Sample records for increased domestic production

  1. By Patricia A. Plunkert Domestic primary aluminum production increased slightly in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of primary metal produced domestically in 1995 was Voluntary Aluminum Industrial Partnership (VAIP) committed metal came from new (manufacturing) scrap and 47% from old scrap (discarded aluminum products, and Washington conjunction with the domestic primary aluminum industry, accounted for 36% of the production

  2. New Technologies that Enhance Environmental Protection, Increase Domestic Production, Result from DOE-Supported Consortium

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    New technologies that help small, independent oil and natural gas operators contribute to domestic energy production while improving environmental protection have resulted from U.S. Department of Energy support of the Stripper Well Consortium.

  3. 2013 Domestic Uranium Production Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA.S. Energy Information Administration | 2013 Domestic Uranium Production Report iii Preface The U.S. Energy://www.eia.doe.gov/glossary/. #12;U.S. Energy Information Administration | 2013 Domestic Uranium Production Report iv Contents

  4. (Data in thousand metric tons of copper content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Domestic mine production in 2008 increased by about 12% to 1.3 million tons and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    --Arizona, Utah, New Mexico, Nevada, and Montana--accounted for more than 99% of domestic production; copper also, and miscellaneous consumers. Copper and copper alloy products were used in building construction, 49%; electric, mine and mill, thousands 6.4 7.0 8.4 9.7 11.2 Net import reliance4 as a percentage of apparent

  5. Effect of Increased Natural Gas Exports on Domestic Energy Markets

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report responds to an August 2011 request from the Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy (DOE\\/FE) for an analysis of "the impact of increased domestic natural gas demand, as exports." Appendix A provides a copy of the DOE\\/FE request letter. Specifically, DOE\\/FE asked the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) to assess how specified scenarios of increased natural gas exports could affect domestic energy markets, focusing on consumption, production, and prices.

  6. State Support of Domestic Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amy Wright

    2007-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was developed in response to a cooperative agreement offering by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) under the State Support of Domestic Production DE-FC26-04NT15456. The Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC) performed efforts in support of State programs related to the security, reliability and growth if our nation's domestic production of oil and natural gas. The project objectives were to improve the States ability to monitor the security of oil and gas operations; to maximize the production of domestic oil and natural gas thereby minimizing the threat to national security posed by interruptions in energy imports; to assist States in developing and maintaining high standards of environmental protection; to assist in addressing issues that limit the capacity of the industry; to promote the deployment of the appropriate application of technology for regulatory efficiency; and to inform the public about emerging energy issues.

  7. 2014 Domestic Uranium Production Report

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25,9,1996 N Y MDomesticDomestic Uranium

  8. 2014 Domestic Uranium Production Report

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25,9,1996 N Y MDomestic Uranium Production

  9. Domestic Uranium Production Report - Quarterly

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline353/06) 2Yonthly Energy :and1. Total production

  10. Increasing productivity: Another approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norton, F.J.

    1996-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    An engineering information (EI) and information technology (IT) organization that must improve its productivity should work to further its business goals. This paper explores a comprehensive model for increasing EI/IT productivity by supporting organizational objectives.

  11. Productivity increases in science

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danko, J.E. [ed.; Young, J.K.; Molton, P.M.; Dirks, J.A.

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The study quantifies the impact on the cost of experimentation of synergistic advancements in instrumentation, theory, and computation over the last two decades. The study finds that the productivity of experimental investigation (experimental results/$) is increasing as science is transformed from a linear, isolated approach to a hierarchical, multidisciplinary approach. Developments such as massively parallel processors coupled with instrumental systems with multiple probes and diverse data analysis capabilities will further this transformation and increase the productivity of scientific studies. The complexities and scale of today`s scientific challenges are much greater than in the past, however, so that the costs of research are increasing. Even though science is much more productive in terms of the experimental results, the challenges facing scientific investigators are increasing at an even faster pace. New approaches to infrastructure investments must capitalize on the changing dynamics of research and allow the scientific community to maximize gains in productivity so that complex problems can be attacked cost-effectively. Research strategies that include user facilities and coordinated experimental, computational, and theoretical research are needed.

  12. Productivity increases in science

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danko, J.E. (ed.); Young, J.K.; Molton, P.M.; Dirks, J.A.

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The study quantifies the impact on the cost of experimentation of synergistic advancements in instrumentation, theory, and computation over the last two decades. The study finds that the productivity of experimental investigation (experimental results/$) is increasing as science is transformed from a linear, isolated approach to a hierarchical, multidisciplinary approach. Developments such as massively parallel processors coupled with instrumental systems with multiple probes and diverse data analysis capabilities will further this transformation and increase the productivity of scientific studies. The complexities and scale of today's scientific challenges are much greater than in the past, however, so that the costs of research are increasing. Even though science is much more productive in terms of the experimental results, the challenges facing scientific investigators are increasing at an even faster pace. New approaches to infrastructure investments must capitalize on the changing dynamics of research and allow the scientific community to maximize gains in productivity so that complex problems can be attacked cost-effectively. Research strategies that include user facilities and coordinated experimental, computational, and theoretical research are needed.

  13. Domestic Uranium Production Report 2004-13

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688 760,877 951,322 1,381,127by Local(Dollars9.Domestic Thank

  14. Domestic Uranium Production Report - Energy Information Administration

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline353/06) 2Yonthly Energy :and CommercialDomestic

  15. (Data in thousand metric tons of copper content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: U.S. mine production of copper in 2013 increased by 4% to about 1.22 million tons,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and was valued at about $9 billion. Arizona, Utah, New Mexico, Nevada, and Montana--in descending order and miscellaneous consumers. Copper and copper alloys products were used in building construction, 44%; electric 236 270 Employment, mine and mill, thousands 8.3 9.5 10.6 11.5 12.0 Net import reliance 4

  16. (Data in thousand metric tons of copper content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: U.S. mine production of copper in 2011 increased slightly to about 1.1 million tons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and its value rose to about $10 billion. Arizona, Utah, New Mexico, Nevada, and Montana--in descending construction, 45%; electric and electronic products, 23%; transportation equipment, 12%; consumer and general.5 Net import reliance 4 as a percentage of apparent consumption 37 31 21 32 35 Recycling: Old scrap

  17. Domestic production of medical isotope Mo-99 moves a step closer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Domestic production of medical isotope Mo-99 Domestic production of medical isotope Mo-99 moves a step closer Irradiated uranium fuel has been recycled and reused for molybdenum-99...

  18. (Data in thousand metric tons of copper content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: U.S. mine production of copper in 2012 increased by 4% to about 1.15 million tons,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    [(703) 648­4978, dedelste@usgs.gov] #12;49 COPPER 80% year-on-year increase in China's net imports 975 Secondary 54 46 38 37 60 Copper from all old scrap 156 138 143 153 170 Imports for consumption 33% of the U.S. copper supply. Import Sources (2008­11): Unmanufactured: Chile, 43%; Canada, 32

  19. Domestic conventional natural-gas reserves - can they be increased by the year 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahlbrandt, T.S.; Taylor, D.J. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States))

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A review of recent natural-gas studies and supporting data bases suggests that natural-gas reserves and excess productive capacity are declining and remedial action to ensure adequate supplies will require increased drilling of high-quality prospects. Conventional gas resources will remain the dominant source of natural gas through the year 2010, although nonconventional gas sources will increase and competition from coal in the utility sector will remain strong. More than two-thirds of current domestic gas production is coming from wells 11 or fewer years old. There is a need for increased conventional resources to fulfill anticipated increased demand for natural gas, and new concepts, be they new geophysical techniques or looking in lightly explored, deep, or remote areas particularly on Federal lands where most undiscovered conventional gas resources presumably are present, are required to find these resources. Conventional resources discovered during the past decade have initial production rates nearly three times that of unconventional resources developed under tax credit incentives for wells drilled before December 31, 1993. The industry has nearly doubled its efficiency, as measured by reserves found per well, from 1988 to 1991 at a low level of drilling relative to the high level drilling during the early 1980's. Significant reserve growth of old, large gas fields has helped to reduce the rate of decline of gas reserves. However, a developing hypothesis related to the field-growth phenomenon is that younger, smaller fields may grow at a lower rate and for a shorter time span than older, larger fields. This hypothesis may reflect, in part, the important role of new seismic techniques to better define the field size and reserves earlier in the process of gas-field development and thereby result in more accurate estimates of ultimate reserves. 39 refs., 15 figs.

  20. (Data in kilograms of germanium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based upon the 2000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based upon the 2000 producer price. The domestic industry consisted of three germanium refineries, one each in New York, Oklahoma, and Pennsylvania, and Issues: World refinery production of germanium remained steady in 2000. The recycling of scrap continued

  1. (Data in kilograms of germanium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based on the 1999

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based on the 1999 producer price. The domestic industry consisted of three germanium refineries, one each in New York, Oklahoma, and Pennsylvania@usgs.gov, fax: (703) 648-7757] #12;73 GERMANIUM Events, Trends, and Issues: World refinery production

  2. (Data in kilograms of germanium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based on the 1996 producer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based on the 1996 producer price. The domestic industry consisted of three germanium refineries, one each in New York, Oklahoma, and Pennsylvania, and chemotherapy), 5%. Salient Statistics--United States: 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996e Production, refinery 13,000 10

  3. (Data in kilograms of germanium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based upon an estimated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based upon an estimated 2004 producer refinery in Utica, NY, produced germanium tetrachloride for optical fiber production. Another refinery

  4. (Data in thousand metric tons of metal, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2000, 12 companies operated 23 primary aluminum reduction plants. Montana,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and Issues: Domestic primary aluminum production decreased owing in large part to the smelter production cutbacks caused by increased energy costs, particularly in the Pacific Northwest. Domestic smelters aluminum smelter in Hawesville, KY. The acquisition was subject to the completion of a labor agreement

  5. Domestic electricity consumption is con-tinuously increasing and now accounts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Domestic electricity consumption is con- tinuously increasing and now accounts for about one third") enable detailed electricity consumption infor- mation to be captured, processed, and communicated electricity consumption infor- mation in real-time, enabling occupants to better understand their electricity

  6. (Data in kilograms of gallium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: No domestic primary gallium recovery was reported in 2009. One company in Utah

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    58 GALLIUM (Data in kilograms of gallium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production 98% of domestic gallium consumption. About 67% of the gallium consumed was used in integrated and Use: No domestic primary gallium recovery was reported in 2009. One company in Utah recovered

  7. (Data in kilograms of germanium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based on the 1998 producer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based on the 1998 producer price. The domestic industry consisted of three germanium refineries, one each in New York, Oklahoma, and Pennsylvania Production, refinery 10,000 10,000 18,000 20,000 22,000e Total imports 14,700 16,200 27,500 23,700 20

  8. Increasing Scientific Productivity by Tracking Data

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Data Tracking Increases Scientific Productivity Data Tracking Increases Scientific Productivity July 20, 2011 | Tags: HPSS, NERSC Linda Vu, lvu@lbl.gov, +1 510 486 2402 HPSS...

  9. (Data in kilograms of germanium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based upon an estimated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based upon an estimated 2003 producer. A germanium refinery in Utica, NY, produced germanium tetrachloride for optical fiber production. Another refinery in Oklahoma produced refined germanium compounds for the production of fiber optics, infrared

  10. (Data in kilograms of germanium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based upon the 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based upon the 2002 producer price-bearing materials generated from the processing of zinc ores. The germanium refinery in Utica, NY, produced germanium tetrachloride for optical fiber production. The refinery in Oklahoma doubled its production

  11. (Data in kilograms of germanium content, unless noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based on the 1995

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based on the 1995 producer price, was approximately industry consisted of three germanium refineries, one each in New York, Oklahoma, and Pennsylvania. World Refinery Production, Reserves, and Reserve Base: Refinery production Reserves6 Reserve base6 1994

  12. (Data in kilograms of germanium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based upon an estimated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based upon an estimated 2008 producer of 2008. A germanium refinery in Utica, NY, produced germanium tetrachloride for optical fiber production. Another refinery in Oklahoma produced refined germanium compounds for the production of fiber optics

  13. (Data in kilograms of germanium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based upon an estimated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based upon an estimated 2007 producer in the fourth quarter of 2007. A germanium refinery in Utica, NY, produced germanium tetrachloride for optical fiber production. Another refinery in Oklahoma produced refined germanium compounds for the production

  14. Stress and domestication traits increase the relative fitness of cropwild hybrids in sunflower

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ­wild hybrid, domestication, G · E interactions, GM crops, herbicide, introgression, relative fitness

  15. (Data in kilograms of germanium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based on the 1997 producer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based on the 1997 producer price. The domestic industry consisted of three germanium refineries, one each in New York, Oklahoma, and Pennsylvania, refinery 10,000 10,000 10,000 18,000 20,000e Total imports 15,000 15,000 16,000 27,000 17,0001 Exports NA

  16. WA_96_016_AIR_PRODUCTS_AND_CHEMICALS_INC_Waiver_of_Domestic_...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    16AIRPRODUCTSANDCHEMICALSINCWaiverofDomestic.pdf WA96016AIRPRODUCTSANDCHEMICALSINCWaiverofDomestic.pdf WA96016AIRPRODUCTSANDCHEMICALSINCWaiverofDomest...

  17. (Data in thousand metric tons of copper content, unless noted) Domestic Production and Use: Domestic mine production in 1995 continued its upward trend, begun in 1984, rising

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Arizona, Utah, New Mexico, Montana, and Michigan, accounted for 97% of domestic production; copper in building construction, 42%; electric and electronic products, 22%; industrial machinery and equipment, 13, refined5 132 205 153 119 135 Employment, mine and mill, thousands 13.7 13.6 13.3 13.2 13.3 Net import

  18. (Data in metric tons of contained tin, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1998, there was no domestic tin mine production. Production of tin at the only U.S.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    180 TIN (Data in metric tons of contained tin, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1998, there was no domestic tin mine production. Production of tin at the only U.S. tin smelter, at Texas City, TX, stopped in 1989. Twenty-five firms consumed about 85% of the primary tin. The major uses

  19. (Data in metric tons of contained tin, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1997, there was no domestic tin mine production. Production of tin at the only

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    178 TIN (Data in metric tons of contained tin, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1997, there was no domestic tin mine production. Production of tin at the only U.S. tin smelter, at Texas City, TX, stopped in 1989. Twenty-five firms consumed about 85% of the primary tin. The major uses

  20. (Data in metric tons of contained tin, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1999, there was no domestic tin mine production. Production of tin at the only

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    176 TIN (Data in metric tons of contained tin, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1999, there was no domestic tin mine production. Production of tin at the only U.S. tin smelter, at Texas City, TX, stopped in 1989. Twenty-five firms consumed about 97% of the primary tin. The major uses

  1. (Data in metric tons of contained tin, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1996, there was no domestic tin mine production. Production of tin at the only U.S.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    178 TIN (Data in metric tons of contained tin, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1996, there was no domestic tin mine production. Production of tin at the only U.S. tin smelter, at Texas City, TX, stopped in 1989. Twenty-five firms consumed about 85% of the primary tin. The major uses

  2. Salmonella contamination during production of domestic and imported canaloupe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uribe, Imelda Mercado

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , application of improperly composted manure to soil as fertilizer, handling during and after harvest, changes in packaging technology, and distribution and marketing of the final product. The increase of global trade of food commodities has allowed... of improperly composted manure to soil as fertilizer, handling during and after harvest, hansportation, and distribution of fruits and vegetables, increases the spreading of pathogenic microorganisms, including Salmonella (Beuchat 2000). Large outbreaks...

  3. (Data in metric tons of tungsten content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1997, little if any tungsten concentrate was produced from U.S. mines.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    182 TUNGSTEN (Data in metric tons of tungsten content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production in a significant decrease in mine production. The amount of tungsten concentrates remaining in stockpiles in China for the tungsten industry. Once the stockpiles are depleted, world mine production will have to increase to meet

  4. Relaxations for Production Planning Problems with Increasing By-products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    Relaxations for Production Planning Problems with Increasing By-products Srikrishna Sridhar, Jeff, James Leudtke SILO Seminars: Feb 1, 2012 #12;One slide summary Problem Description Production process involves desirable & undesirable products. Srikrishna Sridhar, Jeff Linderoth, James Leudtke SILO Seminars

  5. (Data in kilograms of gallium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: No domestic primary gallium recovery was reported in 2005. One company in Utah

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    66 GALLIUM (Data in kilograms of gallium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production, [(703) 648-7719, dkramer@usgs.gov, fax: (703) 648-7975] #12;67 GALLIUM Consolidation of companies and Use: No domestic primary gallium recovery was reported in 2005. One company in Utah recovered

  6. (Data in kilograms of gallium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: No domestic primary gallium recovery was reported in 1998. Two companies in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    66 GALLIUM (Data in kilograms of gallium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production A. Kramer [(703) 648-7719, dkramer@usgs.gov, fax: (703) 648-7722] #12;67 GALLIUM Events, Trends and Use: No domestic primary gallium recovery was reported in 1998. Two companies in Oklahoma and Utah

  7. (Data in kilograms of germanium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based upon the 2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based upon the 2001 producer price-bearing materials generated from the processing of zinc ores. The germanium refineries in New York and Oklahoma and set up in New York. The refinery in Oklahoma expanded, and a new secondary facility was built in North

  8. Bioenergy Research at BNL: Increasing Productivity Using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Homes, Christopher C.

    Bioenergy Research at BNL: Increasing Productivity Using Biological Interactions Lee Newman With D consequences: ­ Price of corn has doubled ­ Farmers are planting more corn for ethanol · Increase alternative

  9. Table 5. Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14Total DeliveredPrincipal shale gas plays:Domestic Crude

  10. (Data in thousand metric tons of metal unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2006, 5 companies operated 13 primary aluminum smelters; 6 smelters were

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Use: In 2006, 5 companies operated 13 primary aluminum smelters; 6 smelters were temporarily idled. Domestic smelters operated at about 62% of rated or engineered capacity. Imports for consumption increased Smelter Production and Capacity: Production Yearend capacity 2005 2006e 2005 2006e United States 2,481 2

  11. (Data in metric tons of tin content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined domestically since 1993. Production of tin at the only U.S.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    176 TIN (Data in metric tons of tin content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined domestically since 1993. Production of tin at the only U.S. tin smelter, at Texas City, TX, stopped in 1989. Twenty-five firms used about 92% of the primary tin consumed

  12. (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined domestically since 1993. Production of tin at the only U.S.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    174 TIN (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined domestically since 1993. Production of tin at the only U.S. tin smelter, at Texas City, TX, stopped in 1989. Twenty-five firms used about 80% of the primary tin consumed

  13. (Data in metric tons of tin content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined domestically since 1993. Production of tin at the only U.S.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    174 TIN (Data in metric tons of tin content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined domestically since 1993. Production of tin at the only U.S. tin smelter, at Texas City, TX, stopped in 1989. Twenty-five firms used about 77% of the primary tin consumed

  14. Process for Low Cost Domestic Production of LIB Cathode Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    information" 4 Approach BASF has a low cost production process for Li ion battery cathode materials. In this project, the cathode materials developed in the laboratory will be...

  15. (Data in kilograms of gallium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: No domestic primary gallium recovery was reported in 1996. Two companies in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on world production of primary gallium were unavailable because data on the output of the few producers62 GALLIUM (Data in kilograms of gallium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production in optoelectronic devices, which include light-emitting diodes (LED's), laser diodes, photodetectors, and solar

  16. Process for Low Cost Domestic Production of LIB Cathode Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thurston, Anthony

    2012-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the research was to determine the best low cost method for the large scale production of the Nickel-Cobalt-Manganese (NCM) layered cathode materials. The research and development focused on scaling up the licensed technology from Argonne National Laboratory in BASF’s battery material pilot plant in Beachwood Ohio. Since BASF did not have experience with the large scale production of the NCM cathode materials there was a significant amount of development that was needed to support BASF’s already existing research program. During the three year period BASF was able to develop and validate production processes for the NCM 111, 523 and 424 materials as well as begin development of the High Energy NCM. BASF also used this time period to provide free cathode material samples to numerous manufactures, OEM’s and research companies in order to validate the ma-terials. The success of the project can be demonstrated by the construction of the production plant in Elyria Ohio and the successful operation of that facility. The benefit of the project to the public will begin to be apparent as soon as material from the production plant is being used in electric vehicles.

  17. (Data in thousand metric tons of metal unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2007, 6 companies operated 14 primary aluminum smelters; 5 smelters were

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Use: In 2007, 6 companies operated 14 primary aluminum smelters; 5 smelters were temporarily idled primary aluminum production increased substantially owing to smelter restarts after new power contracts were obtained by producers. Domestic smelters operated at about 69% of rated or engineered capacity

  18. (Data in metric tons unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Indium was not recovered from ores in the United States in 2004. Two companies,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    80 INDIUM (Data in metric tons unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Indium-efficiency photovoltaic devices. A major manufacturer is testing indium for a new application as a heat-management material in computers, which could increase consumption by 40 metric tons per year. The estimated

  19. 1st Quarter 2015 Domestic Uranium Production Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi" ,"Plant","Primary1. Total production of uranium

  20. 1st Quarter 2015 Domestic Uranium Production Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi" ,"Plant","Primary1. Total production of uranium2.

  1. 1st Quarter 2015 Domestic Uranium Production Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi" ,"Plant","Primary1. Total production of uranium2.3.

  2. 1st Quarter 2015 Domestic Uranium Production Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi" ,"Plant","Primary1. Total production of uranium2.3.4.

  3. Projections of the impact of expansion of domestic heavy oil production on the U.S. refining industry from 1990 to 2010. Topical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, D.K.; Ramzel, E.B.; Strycker, A.R. [National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research, Bartlesville, OK (United States). ITT Research Institute] [National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research, Bartlesville, OK (United States). ITT Research Institute; Guariguata, G.; Salmen, F.G. [Bonner and Moore Management Science, Houston, TX (United States)] [Bonner and Moore Management Science, Houston, TX (United States)

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is one of a series of publications assessing the feasibility of increasing domestic heavy oil (10{degrees} to 20{degrees} API gravity) production. This report provides a compendium of the United States refining industry and analyzes the industry by Petroleum Administration for Defense District (PADD) and by ten smaller refining areas. The refining capacity, oil source and oil quality are analyzed, and projections are made for the U.S. refining industry for the years 1990 to 2010. The study used publicly available data as background. A linear program model of the U.S. refining industry was constructed and validated using 1990 U.S. refinery performance. Projections of domestic oil production (decline) and import of crude oil (increases) were balanced to meet anticipated demand to establish a base case for years 1990 through 2010. The impact of additional domestic heavy oil production, (300 MB/D to 900 MB/D, originating in select areas of the U.S.) on the U.S. refining complex was evaluated. This heavy oil could reduce the import rate and the balance of payments by displacing some imported, principally Mid-east, medium crude. The construction cost for refining units to accommodate this additional domestic heavy oil production in both the low and high volume scenarios is about 7 billion dollars for bottoms conversion capacity (delayed coking) with about 50% of the cost attributed to compliance with the Clean Air Act Amendment of 1990.

  4. (Data in kilograms of gallium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: No domestic primary gallium recovery was reported in 1997. Two companies in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Use: No domestic primary gallium recovery was reported in 1997. Two companies in Oklahoma and Utah in optoelectronic devices, which include light-emitting diodes (LED's), laser diodes, photodetectors, and solar-than-expected increase in demand. The company planned to operate its refineries in France and Germany using stockpiled

  5. (Data in thousand metric tons of copper content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Domestic mine production of copper in 2010 declined by about 5% to 1.12 million

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    --Arizona, Utah, Nevada, New Mexico, and Montana--accounted for more than 99% of domestic production; copper also, and miscellaneous consumers. Copper and copper alloy products were used in building construction, 49%; electric and mill, thousands 8.4 9.7 11.9 8.3 8.7 Net import reliance 4 as a percentage of apparent consumption 38

  6. (Data in thousand metric tons of copper content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Domestic mine production in 2006 rose to more than 1.2 million tons and was

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mexico, Nevada, and Montana--accounted for 99% of domestic production; copper was also recovered at mines, and miscellaneous consumers. Copper and copper alloy products were used in building construction, 49%; electric, and metal exchanges 1,030 657 134 66 115 Employment, mine and mill, thousandse 7.0 6.8 7.0 7.0 7.2 Net

  7. (Data in thousand metric tons of copper content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Domestic mine production in 1997 was essentially unchanged at 1.9 million metric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mexico, Nevada, and Montana, accounted for 98% of domestic production; copper was also recovered at mines in building construction, 43%; electric and electronic products, 24%; industrial1 machinery and equipment, 12 119 163 146 2505 Employment, mine and mill, thousands 13.3 13.1 13.8 13.2 13.3 Net import reliance

  8. (Data in thousand metric tons of copper content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Domestic mine production in 2005 fell nominally to 1.15 million tons and was

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mexico, Nevada, and Montana, accounted for 99% of domestic production; copper was also recovered at mines, and miscellaneous consumers. Copper and copper alloy products were used in building construction, 49%; electric exchanges 952 1,030 657 134 70 Employment, mine and mill, thousands 8.2 7.0 6.8 7.0 7.0 Net import reliance4

  9. (Data in thousand metric tons of copper content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Domestic mine production in 2007 declined nominally to 1.19 million tons, but its

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    --Arizona, Utah, New Mexico, Nevada, and Montana--accounted for 99% of domestic production; copper was also, and miscellaneous consumers. Copper and copper alloy products were used in building construction, 51%; electric, mine and mill, thousandse 6.8 7.0 7.0 7.2 7.3 Net import reliance4 as a percentage of apparent

  10. (Data in thousand metric tons of copper content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Domestic mine production in 2009 declined by about 9% to 1.2 million tons and its

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    --Arizona, Utah, New Mexico, Nevada, and Montana--accounted for more than 99% of domestic production; copper also, and miscellaneous consumers. Copper and copper alloy products were used in building construction, 50%; electric and mill, thousands 7.0 8.4 9.7 11.9 9.1 Net import reliance4 as a percentage of apparent consumption 42 38

  11. WA_99_022_AIR_PRODUCTS_AND_CHEMICAL_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_F...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    9022AIRPRODUCTSANDCHEMICALWaiverofDomesticandF.pdf WA99022AIRPRODUCTSANDCHEMICALWaiverofDomesticandF.pdf WA99022AIRPRODUCTSANDCHEMICALWaiverofDomestic...

  12. (Data in metric tons of tungsten content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The last recorded production of tungsten concentrates in the United States was in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    182 TUNGSTEN (Data in metric tons of tungsten content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The last recorded production of tungsten concentrates in the United States was in 1994 of ores and concentrates, intermediate and primary products, wrought and unwrought tungsten, and waste

  13. (Data in metric tons of tungsten content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The last recorded production of tungsten concentrates in the United States was in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    178 TUNGSTEN (Data in metric tons of tungsten content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The last recorded production of tungsten concentrates in the United States was in 1994. In 2000, intermediate and primary products, wrought and unwrought tungsten, and waste and scrap: China, 39%; Russia, 21

  14. EA-1929: NorthStar Medical Technologies LLC, Commercial Domestic Production of the Medical Isotope Molybdenum-99

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to use federal funds to support and accelerate Northstar Medical Radioisotopes' project to develop domestic, commercial production capability for the medical isotope Molybdenum-99 without the use of highly enriched uranium.

  15. (Data in thousand metric tons unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2009, clay and shale production was reported in 41 States. About 190 companies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    44 CLAYS (Data in thousand metric tons unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2009, clay and shale production was reported in 41 States. About 190 companies operated approximately 830% drilling mud, 17% foundry sand bond, 14% iron ore pelletizing, and 20% other uses; common clay--57% brick

  16. (Data in thousand metric tons unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2008, clay and shale production was reported in 41 States. About 190 companies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    46 CLAYS (Data in thousand metric tons unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2008, clay and shale production was reported in 41 States. About 190 companies operated approximately 830% drilling mud, 17% foundry sand bond, 14% iron ore pelletizing, and 20% other uses; common clay--57% brick

  17. (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2005, the United States consumed about 11% of world chromite ore production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    48 CHROMIUM (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production. Imported chromite was consumed by one chemical firm to produce chromium chemicals. Consumption of chromium ferroalloys and metal was predominantly for the production of stainless and heat-resisting steel

  18. (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2004, the United States consumed about 10% of world chromite ore production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    46 CHROMIUM (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production. Imported chromite was consumed by one chemical firm to produce chromium chemicals. Consumption of chromium ferroalloys and metal was predominantly for the production of stainless and heat-resisting steel

  19. Maximizing the Productive Uses of Electricity to Increase the...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Maximizing the Productive Uses of Electricity to Increase the Impact of Rural Electrification Programs Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Maximizing the...

  20. President Truman Increases Production of Uranium and Plutonium...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Increases Production of Uranium and Plutonium | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing...

  1. (Data in thousand metric tons, unless noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1995, clays were produced in most States except Alaska, Delaware, Hawaii,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    44 CLAYS (Data in thousand metric tons, unless noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1995, clays, these firms operated about 983 mines. Estimated value of all marketable clay produced was about $1.8 billion. Major domestic uses for specific clays were estimated as follows: kaolin--55% paper, 8% kiln furniture

  2. (Data in thousand metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1998, clays were produced in most States except Alaska, Delaware, Hawaii, Idaho,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    50 CLAYS (Data in thousand metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1998, clays were produced in most States except Alaska, Delaware, Hawaii, Idaho, New Hampshire, Rhode clay produced was about $2.14 billion. Major domestic uses for specific clays were estimated as follows

  3. (Data in thousand metric tons gross weight unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2007, the United States consumed about 11% of world chromite ore production in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    48 CHROMIUM (Data in thousand metric tons gross weight unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production. Stainless- and heat-resisting-steel producers were the leading consumers of ferrochromium. Superalloys require chromium. The value of chromium material consumption was about $408 million as measured

  4. (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2000, the United States consumed about 13% of world chromite ore production in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    44 CHROMIUM (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight, unless otherwise noted) Domestic chromium chemicals and chromite-containing refractories, respectively. Consumption of chromium ferroalloys and metal was predominantly for the production of stainless and heat-resisting steel and superalloys

  5. (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2001, the United States consumed about 14% of world chromite ore production in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    46 CHROMIUM (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight, unless otherwise noted) Domestic chromium chemicals and chromite-containing refractories, respectively. Consumption of chromium ferroalloys and metal was predominantly for the production of stainless and heat-resisting steel and superalloys

  6. (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The United States consumes about 14% of world chromite ore production in various

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    48 CHROMIUM (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight, unless otherwise noted) Domestic and chromite-containing refractories, respectively. Consumption of chromium ferroalloys and metal was predominantly for the production of stainless and heat-resisting steel and superalloys, respectively. The value

  7. (Data in thousand metric tons gross weight unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2008, the United States consumed about 10% of world chromite ore production in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    44 CHROMIUM (Data in thousand metric tons gross weight unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production. Stainless- and heat-resisting-steel producers were the leading consumers of ferrochromium. Superalloys require chromium. The value of chromium material consumption in 2007 was $548 million as measured

  8. Second Forum on Energy & Water Sustainability: Increasing Resource Productivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keller, Arturo A.

    Second Forum on Energy & Water Sustainability: Increasing Resource Productivity April 10, 2009 on Energy & Water Sustainability in 2007 successfully brought together policy-makers, researchers, energy of energy and water sustainability, considering the important linkages between these two resources

  9. Quantifying Energy Savings from Lean Manufacturing Productivity Increases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seryak, J.; Epstein, G.; D'Antonio, M.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    from existing use due to additional equipment or operating hours. Alternately, in the post-event scenario, Lean Manufacturing techniques enable production gains without increasing operating hours or adding manufacturing equipment. Hence.... The Lean Manufacturing techniques listed above improve productivity in several ways, which may or may not have impacts on energy use. Additionally, Lean Manufacturing techniques can also improve energy use in ways that have no relation to productivity...

  10. (Data in thousand metric tons of copper content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Domestic mine production, which had remained unchanged in 1995, resumed the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    States, in descending order, Arizona, Utah, New Mexico, Nevada, and Montana, accounted for 98 alloy products were consumed in1 building construction, 40%; electric and electronic products, 25.3 13.1 13.8 14.0 Net import reliance as a percent of6 apparent consumption 2 7 13 7 13 Recycling: Old

  11. (Data in thousand metric tons of metal unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2005, 6 companies operated 15 primary aluminum smelters; 4 smelters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Use: In 2005, 6 companies operated 15 primary aluminum smelters; 4 smelters continued. Most of the production decreases continued to take place in the Pacific Northwest. Domestic smelters from 693 thousand tons at yearend 2004. World Smelter Production and Capacity: Production Yearend

  12. (Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Limited shipments of tungsten concentrates were made from a California mine in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    178 TUNGSTEN (Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and primary products, wrought and unwrought tungsten, and waste and scrap: China, 43%; Germany, 11%; Canada,630 1,450 Events, Trends, and Issues: World tungsten supply was dominated by Chinese production

  13. (Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: A tungsten mine in California produced concentrates in 2012. Approximately eight

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    176 TUNGSTEN (Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and concentrates, intermediate and primary products, wrought and unwrought tungsten, and waste and scrap: China, 45,200 3,630 1,610 Events, Trends, and Issues: World tungsten supply was dominated by Chinese production

  14. (Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: One mine in California produced tungsten concentrates in 2010. Approximately

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    176 TUNGSTEN (Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production. Import Sources (2006­09): Tungsten contained in ores and concentrates, intermediate and primary products, Trends, and Issues: World tungsten supply is dominated by Chinese production and exports. China

  15. (Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: A mine in California produced tungsten concentrates in 2009. Approximately eight

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    176 TUNGSTEN (Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production. Import Sources (2005-08): Tungsten contained in ores and concentrates, intermediate and primary products, and Issues: World tungsten supply was dominated by Chinese production and exports. China's Government limited

  16. (Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: A mine in California restarted operations and made its first shipment of tungsten

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    182 TUNGSTEN (Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and primary products, wrought and unwrought tungsten, and waste and scrap: China, 43%; Canada, 16%; Germany, 9 by Chinese production and exports. China's Government restricted the amounts of tungsten that could

  17. (Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: A tungsten mine in California produced concentrates in 2013. Approximately eight

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    174 TUNGSTEN (Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and concentrates, intermediate and primary products, wrought and unwrought tungsten, and waste and scrap: China, 45,100 2,300 2,240 Events, Trends, and Issues: World tungsten supply was dominated by Chinese production

  18. (Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: One mine in California produced tungsten concentrates in 2011. Approximately

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    176 TUNGSTEN (Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production (2007­10): Tungsten contained in ores and concentrates, intermediate and primary products, wrought: World tungsten supply is dominated by Chinese production and exports. China's Government regulates its

  19. Reduced Temperature Production of Recombinant Proteins to Increase Productivity in Mammalian Cell Culture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, Steven R.

    The production of recombinant proteins from an industrial perspective has one of its main goals is to increase the product concentration whether in batch, fed-batch or continuous perfusion bioreactor systems. However, a ...

  20. Domestic production of medical isotope Mo-99 moves a step closer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract ManagementDiscovering How MusclesAdministrationDomestic

  1. (Data in kilograms of gallium content, unless noted) Domestic Production and Use: No domestic primary gallium recovery was reported in 1995. Two companies in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : No domestic primary gallium recovery was reported in 1995. Two companies in Oklahoma and Utah recovered devices, which include light-emitting diodes (LED's), laser diodes, photodetectors, and solar cells contract to a consortium of private companies to develop gallium nitride technology. Blue LED's are useful

  2. (Data in kilograms of gallium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: No domestic primary gallium recovery was reported in 1999. Two companies in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Use: No domestic primary gallium recovery was reported in 1999. Two companies in Oklahoma and Utah in optoelectronic devices, which include light-emitting diodes (LED's), laser diodes, photodetectors, and solar in July. The additional facility was expected to double the company's refinery capacity to 100

  3. (Data in kilograms of gallium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: No domestic primary gallium recovery was reported in 2002. Two companies in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Use: No domestic primary gallium recovery was reported in 2002. Two companies in Oklahoma and Utah diodes, photodetectors, and solar cells. Integrated circuits represented 65% of gallium demand forecasts of market growth, several companies were consolidating, reducing, or eliminating their Ga

  4. (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 2006, based on contained zinc recoverable from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    186 ZINC (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production accounted for about 80% of total U.S. production. Two primary and 12 large- and medium-sized secondary, and rubber industries. Major coproducts of zinc mining and smelting, in order of decreasing tonnage, were

  5. (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 2003, based on contained zinc recoverable from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    188 ZINC (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production three-fourths of total U.S. production. Two primary and 12 large- and medium-sized secondary smelters uses. Zinc compounds and dust were used principally by the agriculture, chemical, paint, and rubber

  6. (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 2002, based on contained zinc recoverable from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    190 ZINC (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production% of production. Two primary and 13 large- and medium-sized secondary smelters refined zinc metal of commercial principally by the agriculture, chemical, paint, and rubber industries. Major coproducts of zinc mining

  7. (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 2004, based on contained zinc recoverable from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    188 ZINC (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production% of total U.S. production. Two primary and 12 large- and medium-sized secondary smelters refined zinc metal were used principally by the agriculture, chemical, paint, and rubber industries. Major coproducts

  8. (Data in metric tons of lithium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The only commercially active lithium mine in the United States was a brine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    94 LITHIUM (Data in metric tons of lithium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The only commercially active lithium mine in the United States was a brine operation in Nevada. The mine's production capacity was expanded in 2012, and a new lithium hydroxide plant opened in North

  9. An investigation of productivity increases from hydraulic fracturing treatments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boriskie, Robert Joe

    1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AN INVESTIGATION OF PRODUCTIVITY INCREASES FROM HYDRAULIC FRACTURING TREATMENTS A Thesis b7 Robert Joe Boriskie Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment of the requirements... Head of Department) August, 1963 1. ABSTRACT 2. INTRODUCTION. TABLE OF CONTENTS PRgB 3. THEORY AND PROCEDURE. 4. DISCUSSION OF RESULTS. . 5. CONCLUSIONS. 6. ACKNOWLEDGEMENT. 7. APPENDIX. 8. REFERENCES. 18 19 20 32 LIST OF FIGURES...

  10. ESTABLISHMENT OF AN INDUSTRY-DRIVEN CONSORTIUM FOCUSED ON IMPROVING THE PRODUCTION PERFORMANCE OF DOMESTIC STRIPPER WELLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel L. Morrison

    2004-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory will establish, promote, and manage a national industry-driven Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) that will be focused on improving the production performance of domestic petroleum and/or natural gas stripper wells. The consortium creates a partnership with the U.S. petroleum and natural gas industries and trade associations, state funding agencies, academia, and the National Energy Technology Laboratory. This report serves as the thirteenth quarterly technical progress report for the SWC. Key activities for this reporting period included: (1) hosting three fall technology transfer meetings in Wyoming, Texas, and Pennsylvania, (2) releasing the 2004 SWC request-for-proposal (RFP), and (3) initial planning of the SWC spring meeting in Golden Colorado for selecting the 2004 SWC projects. The Fall technology transfer meetings attracted 100+ attendees between the three workshops. The SWC membership which attended the Casper, Wyoming workshop was able to see several SWC-funded projects operating in the field at the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center. The SWC is nearing the end of its initial funding cycle. The Consortium has a solid membership foundation and a demonstrated ability to review and select projects that have relevancy to meet the needs of domestic stripper well operators.

  11. ESTABLISHMENT OF AN INDUSTRY-DRIVEN CONSORTIUM FOCUSED ON IMPROVING THE PRODUCTION PERFORMANCE OF DOMESTIC STRIPPER WELLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel L. Morrison

    2002-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), will establish, promote, and manage a national industry-driven Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) that will be focused on improving the production performance of domestic petroleum and/or natural gas stripper wells. The consortium creates a partnership with the U.S. petroleum and natural gas industries and trade associations, state funding agencies, academia, and the National Energy Technology Laboratory. This report serves as the eighth quarterly technical progress report for the SWC. Key activities for this reporting period include: (1) issuing subcontracts, (2) SWC membership class expansion, (3) planning SWC technology transfer meetings, and (4) extending selected 2001 project periods of performance. In addition, a literature search that focuses on the use of lasers, microwaves, and acoustics for potential stripper well applications continued.

  12. ESTABLISHMENT OF AN INDUSTRY-DRIVEN CONSORTIUM FOCUSED ON IMPROVING THE PRODUCTION PERFORMANCE OF DOMESTIC STRIPPER WELLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel L. Morrison

    2003-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory will establish, promote, and manage a national industry-driven Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) that will be focused on improving the production performance of domestic petroleum and/or natural gas stripper wells. The consortium creates a partnership with the U.S. petroleum and natural gas industries and trade associations, state funding agencies, academia, and the National Energy Technology Laboratory. This report serves as the ninth quarterly technical progress report for the SWC. Key activities for this reporting period include: (1) organizing and hosting two fall technology transfer meetings, (2) SWC membership class expansion, and (3) planning the SWC 2003 Spring meeting. In addition, a literature search that focuses on the use of lasers, microwaves, and acoustics for potential stripper well applications continued.

  13. Establishment of an Industry-Driven Consortium Focused on Improving the Production Performance of Domestic Stripper Wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel Morrison; Sharon Elder

    2006-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory will establish, promote, and manage a national industry-driven Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) that will be focused on improving the production performance of domestic petroleum and/or natural gas stripper wells. The consortium creates a partnership with the U.S. petroleum and natural gas industries and trade associations, state funding agencies, academia, and the National Energy Technology Laboratory. This report serves as the sixth quarterly technical progress report for the SWC. Key activities for this reporting period included: (1) Organized and hosted two technology transfer meetings; (2) Collaborated with the Pennsylvania Oil and Gas Association (POGAM) to host a Natural Gas Outlook conference in Pittsburgh, PA; (3) Provided a SWC presentation at the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC) meeting in Jackson Hole, WY; and (4) Completed and released a stripper well industry documentary entitled: ''Independent Oil: Rediscovering America's Forgotten Wells''.

  14. ESTABLISHMENT OF AN INDUSTRY-DRIVEN CONSORTIUM FOCUSED ON IMPROVING THE PRODUCTION PERFORMANCE OF DOMESTIC STRIPPER WELLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel L. Morrison

    2001-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the US Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory will establish, promote, and manage a national industry-driven stripper Well Consortium (SWC) that will be focused on improving the production performance of domestic petroleum and/or natural gas stripper wells. The consortium creates a partnership with the US petroleum and natural gas industries and trade associations, state funding agencies, academia, and the National Energy Technology Laboratory. This report serves as the four quarterly technical progress report for the SWC. During this reporting period, Penn State primary focus was on finalizing all subcontracts, planning the SWC technology transfer meeting and two workshops in the southern US, and preparing the next SWC newsletter. Membership in the SWC now stands at 49.

  15. Establishment of an Industry-Driven Consortium Focused on Improving the Production Performance of Domestic Stripper Wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2006-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has established a national industry-driven Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) that is focused on improving the production performance of domestic petroleum and/or natural gas stripper wells. The consortium creates a partnership with the U.S. petroleum and natural gas industries and trade associations, state funding agencies, academia, and the National Energy Technology Laboratory. This report serves as the seventh quarterly technical progress report for the SWC. Key activities for this reporting period include: (1) Nomination and election of the Executive Council members for the 2006-07 term, (2) Finalize and release the 2006 Request for Proposals (RFP), (3) Invoice and recruit members, (4) Plan for the spring meeting, (5) Improving communication efforts, and (6) Continue distribution of the DVD entitled: ''Independent Oil: Rediscovering American's Forgotten Wells''.

  16. ESTABLISHMENT OF AN INDUSTRY-DRIVEN CONSORTIUM FOCUSED ON IMPROVING THE PRODUCTION PERFORMANCE OF DOMESTIC STRIPPER WELLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel L. Morrison

    2005-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory will establish, promote, and manage a national industry-driven Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) that will be focused on improving the production performance of domestic petroleum and/or natural gas stripper wells. The consortium creates a partnership with the U.S. petroleum and natural gas industries and trade associations, state funding agencies, academia, and the National Energy Technology Laboratory. This report serves as the seventeenth quarterly technical progress report for the SWC. Key activities for this reporting period include: (1) organizing and hosting the SWC fall technology transfer meetings in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma and State College, Pennsylvania, (2) planning of the upcoming SWC spring proposal meeting, (3) release of the SWC Request-for-proposals (RFP), (4) revision of the SWC By-Laws, and (5) the SWC Executive Council nomination and election for 2005-2006 term members.

  17. (Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The last reported U.S. production of tungsten concentrates was in 1994. In 2006,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    178 TUNGSTEN (Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The last reported U.S. production of tungsten concentrates was in 1994. In 2006, approximately. Import Sources (2002-05): Tungsten contained in ores and concentrates, intermediate and primary products

  18. (Data in metric tons of tungsten content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The last reported U.S. production of tungsten concentrates was in 1994. In 2003,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    180 TUNGSTEN (Data in metric tons of tungsten content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The last reported U.S. production of tungsten concentrates was in 1994. In 2003, approximately and concentrates, intermediate and primary products, wrought and unwrought tungsten, and waste and scrap: China, 49

  19. (Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The last reported U.S. production of tungsten concentrates was in 1994. In 2005,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    182 TUNGSTEN (Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The last reported U.S. production of tungsten concentrates was in 1994. In 2005, approximately. Import Sources (2001-04): Tungsten contained in ores and concentrates, intermediate and primary products

  20. (Data in metric tons of tungsten content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The last recorded U.S. production of tungsten concentrates was in 1994. In 2001,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    180 TUNGSTEN (Data in metric tons of tungsten content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The last recorded U.S. production of tungsten concentrates was in 1994. In 2001, approximately, intermediate and primary products, wrought and unwrought tungsten, and waste and scrap: China, 41%; Russia, 21

  1. (Data in metric tons of tungsten content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The last reported U.S. production of tungsten concentrates was in 1994. In 2002,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    182 TUNGSTEN (Data in metric tons of tungsten content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The last reported U.S. production of tungsten concentrates was in 1994. In 2002, approximately, intermediate and primary products, wrought and unwrought tungsten, and waste and scrap: China, 48%; Russia, 16

  2. (Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The last reported U.S. production of tungsten concentrates was in 1994. In 2004,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    180 TUNGSTEN (Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The last reported U.S. production of tungsten concentrates was in 1994. In 2004, approximately (2000-03): Tungsten content of ores and concentrates, intermediate and primary products, wrought

  3. (Data in thousand metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1996, clays were produced in most States except Alaska, Delaware, Hawaii, Rhode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    46 CLAYS (Data in thousand metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1996, clays were produced in most States except Alaska, Delaware, Hawaii, Rhode Island, Vermont. Together, these firms operated about 820 mines. Estimated value of all marketable clay produced was about

  4. (Data in thousand metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1999, clays were produced in most States except Alaska, Delaware, Hawaii,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    50 CLAYS (Data in thousand metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1999, clays were produced in most States except Alaska, Delaware, Hawaii, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Wisconsin. A total of 238 companies operated approximately 700 clay pits or quarries. The leading 20 firms

  5. (Data in thousand metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1997, clays were produced in most States except Alaska, Delaware, Hawaii, Rhode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    46 CLAYS (Data in thousand metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1997, clays were produced in most States except Alaska, Delaware, Hawaii, Rhode Island, Vermont, these firms operated approximately 739 mines. The estimated value of all marketable clay produced was about $1

  6. (Data in thousand metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2000, clays were produced in all States except Alaska, Delaware, Hawaii, Idaho,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    46 CLAYS (Data in thousand metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2000, clays were produced in all States except Alaska, Delaware, Hawaii, Idaho, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Wisconsin. A total of 233 companies operated approximately 650 clay pits or quarries

  7. (Data in thousand metric tons of metal, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1996, 13 companies operated 22 primary aluminum reduction plants. Montana,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . 18.5% ad val. Unwrought (other than aluminum alloys) 7601.10.6000 Free 11.0% ad val. Waste and scrap18 ALUMINUM1 (Data in thousand metric tons of metal, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1996, 13 companies operated 22 primary aluminum reduction plants. Montana, Oregon

  8. (Data in thousand metric tons of metal unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2004, 6 companies operated 14 primary aluminum reduction plants; 6 smelters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Unwrought (other than aluminum alloys) 7601.10.6000 Free. Waste and scrap 7602.00.0000 Free. Depletion20 ALUMINUM1 (Data in thousand metric tons of metal unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2004, 6 companies operated 14 primary aluminum reduction plants; 6 smelters continued

  9. (Data in thousand metric tons of metal, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1999, 12 companies operated 23 primary aluminum reduction plants. Montana,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .10.3000 2.6% ad val. Unwrought (other than aluminum alloys) 7601.10.6000 Free. Waste and scrap 760222 ALUMINUM1 (Data in thousand metric tons of metal, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1999, 12 companies operated 23 primary aluminum reduction plants. Montana, Oregon

  10. (Data in thousand metric tons of metal, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2001, 12 companies operated 23 primary aluminum reduction plants. The 11

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    coils) 7601.10.3000 2.6% ad val. Unwrought (other than aluminum alloys) 7601.10.6000 Free. Waste20 ALUMINUM1 (Data in thousand metric tons of metal, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2001, 12 companies operated 23 primary aluminum reduction plants. The 11 smelters east

  11. (Data in thousand metric tons of metal, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2003, 7 companies operated 15 primary aluminum reduction plants; 6 smelters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Unwrought (other than aluminum alloys) 7601.10.6000 Free. Waste and scrap 7602.00.0000 Free. Depletion, prices in the aluminum scrap and secondary aluminum alloy markets fluctuated through September but closed20 ALUMINUM1 (Data in thousand metric tons of metal, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production

  12. (Data in metric tons of lithium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Chile was the largest lithium chemical producer in the world; Argentina, China,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    100 LITHIUM (Data in metric tons of lithium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Chile was the largest lithium chemical producer in the world; Argentina, China, Russia, and the United States were large producers also. Australia, Canada, and Zimbabwe were major producers of lithium

  13. (Data in metric tons of lithium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Chile was the largest lithium chemical producer in the world; Argentina, China,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    98 LITHIUM (Data in metric tons of lithium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Chile was the largest lithium chemical producer in the world; Argentina, China, Russia, and the United States were large producers also. Australia, Canada, and Zimbabwe were major producers of lithium

  14. (Data in metric tons of lithium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Chile was the leading lithium chemical producer in the world; Argentina, China,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    100 LITHIUM (Data in metric tons of lithium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Chile was the leading lithium chemical producer in the world; Argentina, China, Russia, and the United States also were major producers. Australia, Canada, and Zimbabwe were major producers of lithium

  15. (Data in metric tons of lithium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Chile was the largest lithium chemical producer in the world; Argentina, China,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    96 LITHIUM (Data in metric tons of lithium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Chile was the largest lithium chemical producer in the world; Argentina, China, Russia, and the United States were large producers also. Australia, Canada, and Zimbabwe were major producers of lithium

  16. (Data in metric tons of lithium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Chile was the leading lithium chemical producer in the world; Argentina, China,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    98 LITHIUM (Data in metric tons of lithium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Chile was the leading lithium chemical producer in the world; Argentina, China, Russia, and the United States also were major producers. Australia, Canada, and Zimbabwe were major producers of lithium

  17. (Data in metric tons of lithium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The only commercially active lithium mine operating in the United States was a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    94 LITHIUM (Data in metric tons of lithium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The only commercially active lithium mine operating in the United States was a brine operation in Nevada. Two companies produced a large array of downstream lithium compounds in the United States from

  18. (Data in metric tons of contained lithium, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Chile was the largest lithium chemical producer in the world, followed by China,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , but growing through the recycling of lithium batteries. Import Sources (1994-97): Chile, 96%; and other, 4 lithium salts from battery recycling and lithium hydroxide monohydrate from former Department of Energy102 LITHIUM (Data in metric tons of contained lithium, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production

  19. (Data in thousand metric tons of metal unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2010, five companies operated nine primary aluminum smelters; six smelters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Use: In 2010, five companies operated nine primary aluminum smelters; six smelters were closed the entire year. Demolition of two smelters that had been idle for several years was started in 2010. Based: During the first half of 2010, production from domestic primary aluminum smelters had stabilized after

  20. (Data in thousand metric tons gross weight unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2011, the United States was expected to consume about 5% of world chromite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    42 CHROMIUM (Data in thousand metric tons gross weight unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production- and heat-resisting-steel producers were the leading consumers of ferrochromium. Superalloys require chromium. The value of chromium material consumption in 2010 was $883 million as measured by the value

  1. (Data in thousand metric tons gross weight unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2009, the United States was expected to consume about 7% of world chromite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    42 CHROMIUM (Data in thousand metric tons gross weight unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and chromium metal. Stainless- and heat-resisting-steel producers were the leading consumers of ferrochromium. Superalloys require chromium. The value of chromium material consumption in 2008 was $1,283 million

  2. (Data in thousand metric tons gross weight unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2012, the United States was expected to consume about 6% of world chromite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    42 CHROMIUM (Data in thousand metric tons gross weight unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production company produced chromium metal. Stainless- and heat-resisting-steel producers were the leading consumers of ferrochromium. Superalloys require chromium. The value of chromium material consumption in 2011 was $1

  3. (Data in thousand metric tons gross weight unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2010, the United States was expected to consume about 2% of world chromite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    42 CHROMIUM (Data in thousand metric tons gross weight unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production- and heat-resisting-steel producers were the leading consumers of ferrochromium. Superalloys require chromium. The value of chromium material consumption in 2009 was $358 million as measured by the value

  4. (Data in metric tons of tungsten content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1998, little if any tungsten concentrate was produced from U.S. mines.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    184 TUNGSTEN (Data in metric tons of tungsten content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1998, little if any tungsten concentrate was produced from U.S. mines. Approximately 10 companies in the United States processed tungsten concentrates, ammonium paratungstate, tungsten oxide, and

  5. (Data in metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Indium was not recovered from ores in the United States in 2000. Domestically

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Statistics--United States: 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000e Production, refinery -- -- -- -- -- Imports fluctuations. World Refinery Production, Reserves, and Reserve Base: Refinery productione Reserves2 Reserve

  6. (Data in metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Indium was not recovered from ores in the United States in 2002. Domestically

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Statistics--United States: 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002e Production, refinery -- -- -- -- -- Imports. World Refinery Production, Reserves, and Reserve Base: Refinery productione Reserves3 Reserve base3 2001

  7. Methods for increasing the production of ethanol from microbial fermentation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gaddy, James L. (Fayetteville, AR); Arora, Dinesh K. (Fayetteville, AR); Ko, Ching-Whan (Fayetteville, AR); Phillips, John Randall (Fayetteville, AR); Basu, Rahul (Bethlehem, PA); Wikstrom, Carl V. (Fayetteville, AR); Clausen, Edgar C. (Fayetteville, AR)

    2007-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A stable continuous method for producing ethanol from the anaerobic bacterial fermentation of a gaseous substrate containing at least one reducing gas involves culturing a fermentation bioreactor anaerobic, acetogenic bacteria in a liquid nutrient medium; supplying the gaseous substrate to the bioreactor; and manipulating the bacteria in the bioreactor by reducing the redox potential, or increasing the NAD(P)H TO NAD(P) ratio, in the fermentation broth after the bacteria achieves a steady state and stable cell concentration in the bioreactor. The free acetic acid concentration in the bioreactor is maintained at less than 5 g/L free acid. This method allows ethanol to be produced in the fermentation broth in the bioreactor at a productivity greater than 10 g/L per day. Both ethanol and acetate are produced in a ratio of ethanol to acetate ranging from 1:1 to 20:1.

  8. ESTABLISHMENT OF AN INDUSTRY-DRIVEN CONSORTIUM FOCUSED ON IMPROVING THE PRODUCTION PERFORMANCE OF DOMESTIC STRIPPER WELLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel L. Morrison

    2001-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the US Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory will establish, promote, and manage a national industry-driven Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) that will be focused on improving the production performance of domestic petroleum and/or natural gas stripper wells. the consortium creates a partnership with the US petroleum and natural gas industries and trade associations, state funding agencies, academia, and the National Energy Technology Laboratory. This report serves as the third quarterly technical progress report for the SWC. During this reporting period the SWC entered into a co-funding arrangement with the New York State Energy Development Authority (NYSERDA) to provide an additional $100,000 in co-funding for stripper well production-orientated projects.The SWC hosted its first meeting in which members proposed research projects to the SWC membership. The meeting was held on April 9-10, 2001 in State College, Pennsylvania. Twenty three proposals were submitted to the SWC for funding consideration. Investigators of the proposed projects provided the SWC membership with a 20 minute (15 minute technical discussion, 5 minute question and answer session) presentation. Of the 23 proposals, the Executive Council approved $921,000 in funding for 13 projects. Penn State then immediately started the process of issuing subcontracts to the various projects approved for funding.

  9. (Data in metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Indium was not recovered from ores in the United States in 2001. Domestically

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    --United States: 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001e Production, refinery -- -- -- -- -- Imports for consumption 85.5 75 77 fluctuations caused by economic uncertainties. World Refinery Production, Reserves, and Reserve Base: Refinery

  10. (Data in metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: No indium was recovered from ores in the United States in 1997. Domestically

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    --United States: 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997e Production, refinery -- -- -- -- -- Imports for consumption 73.4 70 for the indium market remains promising. World Refinery Production, Reserves, and Reserve Base: Refinery

  11. Increased Oil Production and Reserves Utilizing Secondary/Terriary Recovery Techniques on Small Reservoirs in the Paradox Basin, Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David E. Eby; Thomas C. Chidsey, Jr.

    1998-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of this project is to enhance domestic petroleum production by demonstration and technology transfer of an advanced oil recovery technology in the Paradox basin, southeastern Utah. If this project can demonstrate technical and economic feasibility, the technique can be applied to about 100 additional small fields in the Paradox basin alone, and result in increased recovery of 150 to 200 million barrels of oil. This project is designed to characterize five shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation and choose the best candidate for a pilot demonstration project for either a waterflood or carbon dioxide-(CO -) 2 flood project. The field demonstration, monitoring of field performance, and associated validation activities will take place in the Paradox basin within the Navajo Nation. Two activities continued this quarter as part of the geological and reservoir characterization of productive carbonate buildups in the Paradox basin: (1) diagenetic characterization of project field reservoirs, and (2) technology transfer.

  12. ESTABLISHMENT OF AN INDUSTRY-DRIVEN CONSORTIUM FOCUSED ON IMPROVING THE PRODUCTION PERFORMANCE OF DOMESTIC STRIPPER WELLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel L. Morrison

    2004-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory will establish, promote, and manage a national industry-driven Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) that will be focused on improving the production performance of domestic petroleum and/or natural gas stripper wells. The consortium creates a partnership with the U.S. petroleum and natural gas industries and trade associations, state funding agencies, academia, and the National Energy Technology Laboratory. This report serves as the eleventh quarterly technical progress report for the SWC. Key activities for this reporting period include: (1) organizing and hosting the Spring SWC meeting in Pearl River, New York, (2) working with successful applicants and Penn State's Office of Sponsored Research to get subcontracts in place, and (3) planning three SWC technology transfer meetings to take place in the fall of 2003. During this reporting period, the efforts were focused primarily on the organizing and hosting the SWC Spring proposal meeting and organizing the fall technology transfer meetings.

  13. 16 Heat Transfer and Air Flow in a Domestic Refrigerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    445 16 Heat Transfer and Air Flow in a Domestic Refrigerator Onrawee Laguerre UMR Génie Industriel...............................................447 16.2.1 Studies in Domestic Refrigerators...................................................................................... 451 16.3 Cold Production System in Domestic Refrigerators

  14. Optimizing Production of Hydroquinone Achieves Increased Yield and Energy Efficiency 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gross, S.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2009 production to model of the old production strategy ? Amount of HQ produced in one year ? Year end inventory ? Energy Savings: compared 2009 electricity and steam usage to that of 2008 ? Manufacturing Cost Reporting (SAP) Results ? Energy...

  15. ESTABLISHMENT OF AN INDUSTRY-DRIVEN CONSORTIUM FOCUSED ON IMPROVING THE PRODUCTION PERFORMANCE OF DOMESTIC STRIPPER WELLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel L. Morrison

    2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), has established a national industry-driven Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) that is focused on improving the production performance of domestic petroleum and/or natural gas stripper wells. The consortium creates a partnership with the U.S. petroleum and natural gas industries and trade associations, state funding agencies, academia, and the National Energy Technology Laboratory. This report serves as the second topical report. The SWC has grown and diversified its membership during its first 24 months of existence. The Consortium is now focused on building strategic alliances with additional industrial, state, and federal entities to expand further the SWC membership base and transfer technologies as they are developed. In addition, the Consortium has successfully worked to attract state support to co-fund SWC projects. Penn State has entered a co-funding arrangement with the New York State Energy Development Authority (NYSERDA) which has provided $200,000 over the last two years to co-fund stripper well production-orientated projects that have relevance to New York state producers. During this reporting period, the Executive Council approved co-funding for 14 projects that have a total project value of $2,116,897. Since its inception, the SWC has approved cofunding for 27 projects that have a total project value of $3,632,109.84. The SWC has provided $2,242,701 in co-funding for these projects and programmatically maintains a cost share of 39%.

  16. (Data in metric tons of lithium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The only active lithium carbonate plant in the United States was a brine operation in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    94 LITHIUM (Data in metric tons of lithium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The only active lithium carbonate plant in the United States was a brine operation in Nevada. Two companies produced a large array of downstream lithium compounds in the United States from domestic or South

  17. (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    170 TIN (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989, respectively. Twenty-five firms used about 90% of the primary tin consumed domestically in 2012. The major uses were as follows

  18. (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    172 TIN (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989, respectively. Twenty-five firms used about 81% of the primary tin consumed domestically in 2006. The major uses were as follows

  19. (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    172 TIN (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989, respectively. Twenty-five firms used about 86% of the primary tin consumed domestically in 2008. The major uses were as follows

  20. (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    176 TIN (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989, respectively. Twenty-five firms used about 81% of the primary tin consumed domestically in 2005. The major uses were as follows

  1. (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    170 TIN (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989, respectively. Twenty-five firms used about 84% of the primary tin consumed domestically in 2009. The major uses were as follows

  2. (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    168 TIN (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989, respectively. Twenty-five firms accounted for about 90% of the primary tin consumed domestically in 2013. The major uses for tin

  3. (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    170 TIN (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989, respectively. Twenty-five firms used about 91% of the primary tin consumed domestically in 2010. The major uses were as follows

  4. (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    176 TIN (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989, respectively. Twenty-five firms used about 84% of the primary tin consumed domestically in 2007. The major uses were as follows

  5. (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight, unless otherwise specified) Domestic Production and Use: Manganese ore containing 35% or more manganese was not produced domestically

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    of ore were used for such nonmetallurgical purposes as production of dry cell batteries, as an ingredient Recycling: Scrap recovery specifically for manganese was negligible, but a significant amount was recycled inventory inventory for disposal FY 2001 FY 2001 Battery: Natural ore 103 0.2 103 27 1 Synthetic dioxide 3

  6. (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight, unless otherwise specified) Domestic Production and Use: Manganese ore containing 35% or more manganese was not produced domestically

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    of ore were used for such nonmetallurgical purposes as production of dry cell batteries, as an ingredient Recycling: Scrap recovery specifically for manganese was negligible, but a significant amount was recycled, as follows, in tons: natural battery, 16,800, and metallurgical, 331,000. Prepared by Thomas S. Jones [(703

  7. (Data in thousand metric tons gross weight unless otherwise specified) Domestic Production and Use: Manganese ore containing 35% or more manganese was not produced domestically

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    as production of dry cell batteries, plant fertilizers and animal feed, and as a brick colorant. Manganese Recycling: Manganese was recycled incidentally as a minor constituent of ferrous and nonferrous scrap inventory inventory for disposal FY 2006 FY 2006 Manganese ore: Battery grade -- 18 -- 27 -- Chemical grade

  8. (Data in thousand metric tons gross weight unless otherwise specified) Domestic Production and Use: Manganese ore containing 35% or more manganese was not produced domestically

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    as production of dry cell batteries, in plant fertilizers and animal feed, and as a brick colorant. Manganese of apparent consumption 100 100 100 100 100 Recycling: Manganese was recycled incidentally as a minor inventory inventory for disposal FY 2007 FY 2007 Manganese ore: Battery grade 16 2 16 27 2 Chemical grade 0

  9. (Data in thousand metric tons gross weight unless otherwise specified) Domestic Production and Use: Manganese ore containing 35% or more manganese was not produced domestically

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    as production of dry cell batteries, in plant fertilizers and animal feed, and as a brick colorant. Manganese 100 100 100 100 Recycling: Manganese was recycled incidentally as a minor constituent of ferrous FY 2008 FY 2008 Manganese ore: Battery grade -- -- 18 16 Chemical grade -- -- -- -- Metallurgical

  10. (Data in metric tons, unless noted) Domestic Production and Use: No indium was recovered from ores in the United States in 1995. Domestic indium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , refinery NA NA NA NA -- Imports for consumption 36.3 36.3 73.4 70.2 73.0 Exports NA NA NA NA NA marketed through a U.S. company. World Refinery Production, Reserves, and Reserve Base: Refinery

  11. Increased Oil Production and Reserves Utilizing Secondary/Tertiary Recovery Techniques on Small Reservoirs in the Paradox Basin, Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jr., Chidsey, Thomas C.; Allison, M. Lee

    1999-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of this project is to enhance domestic petroleum production by field demonstration and technology transfer of an advanced- oil-recovery technology in the Paradox basin, southeastern Utah. If this project can demonstrate technical and economic feasibility, the technique can be applied to approximately 100 additional small fields in the Paradox basin alone, and result in increased recovery of 150 to 200 million barrels (23,850,000-31,800,000 m3) of oil. This project is designed to characterize five shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation and choose the best candidate for a pilot demonstration project for either a waterflood or carbon-dioxide-(CO2-) miscible flood project. The field demonstration, monitoring of field performance, and associated validation activities will take place within the Navajo Nation, San Juan County, Utah.

  12. Increased Oil Production and Reserves Utilizing Secondary/Tertiary Recovery Techniques on Small Reservoirs in the Paradox Basin, Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chidsey Jr., Thomas C.

    2003-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of this project was to enhance domestic petroleum production by field demonstration and technology transfer of an advanced-oil-recovery technology in the Paradox Basin, southeastern Utah. If this project can demonstrate technical and economic feasibility, the technique can be applied to approximately 100 additional small fields in the Paradox Basin alone, and result in increased recovery of 150 to 200 million barrels (23,850,000-31,800,000 m3) of oil. This project was designed to characterize five shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation and choose the best candidate for a pilot demonstration project for either a waterflood or carbon-dioxide-(CO2-) miscible flood project. The field demonstration, monitoring of field performance, and associated validation activities will take place within the Navajo Nation, San Juan County, Utah.

  13. Domestic Uranium Production Report

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688 760,877 951,322 1,381,127by Local(Dollars per611. U.S.

  14. Domestic Uranium Production Report

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688 760,877 951,322 1,381,127by Local(Dollars per611. U.S.6.

  15. Domestic Uranium Production Report

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688 760,877 951,322 1,381,127by Local(Dollars per611.

  16. Domestic Uranium Production Report

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688 760,877 951,322 1,381,127by Local(Dollars per611.8. U.S.

  17. Domestic Uranium Production Report

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688 760,877 951,322 1,381,127by Local(Dollars per611.8.

  18. Domestic Uranium Production Report

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688 760,877 951,322 1,381,127by Local(Dollars per611.8.4.

  19. Domestic Uranium Production Report

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688 760,877 951,322 1,381,127by Local(Dollars per611.8.4.2.

  20. Domestic Uranium Production Report

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688 760,877 951,322 1,381,127by Local(Dollars per611.8.4.2.3.

  1. Domestic Uranium Production Report

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688 760,877 951,322 1,381,127by Local(Dollars

  2. Domestic Uranium Production Report

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688 760,877 951,322 1,381,127by Local(Dollars9. Summary

  3. Crude Oil Domestic Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline prices4Consumption TheX Imeans

  4. INCREASE

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The Interdisciplinary Consortium for Research and Educational Access in Science and Engineering (INCREASE), assists minority-serving institutions in gaining access to world-class research facilities.

  5. Increased Alberta bitumen production results in prorationing of light oil production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During January to May 1986, shut-in production of light oil in Alberta averaged 109,000 barrels per day. The peak month was April with a shut-in of 164,000 barrels per day. The cause of the shut-in is insufficient pipeline delivery capacity. Both the Interprovincial and TransMountain systems have been operating at full capacity since November 1985. The Rangeland system has also been utilized to its capacity in late spring. This paper discusses the history of the Alberta Proration Plan dating from 1950, the operation of the plan during the recent past years, and the resulting effects of an increase in bitumen production on the transport capacity for light oil.

  6. Golbal Economic and Environmental Impacts of Increased Bioenergy Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wallace Tyner

    2012-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The project had three main objectives: to build and incorporate an explicit biomass energy sector within the GTAP analytical framework and data base; to provide an analysis of the impact of renewable fuel standards and other policies in the U.S. and E.U, as well as alternative biofuel policies in other parts of the world, on changes in production, prices, consumption, trade and poverty; and to evaluate environmental impacts of alternative policies for bioenergy development. Progress and outputs related to each objective are reported.

  7. Mutant E. coli strain with increased succinic acid production

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Donnelly, M.; Millard, C.S.; Stols, L.

    1998-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for isolating succinic acid producing bacteria is provided comprising increasing the biomass of an organism which lacks the ability to catabolize pyruvate, and then subjecting the biomass to glucose-rich medium in an anaerobic environment to enable pyruvate-catabolizing mutants to grow. The invention also provides for a mutant that produces high amounts of succinic acid, which as been derived from a parent which lacked the genes for pyruvate formate lyase and lactate dehydrogenase, and which belongs to the E.coli Group of Bacteria. 2 figs.

  8. Mutant E. coli strain with increased succinic acid production

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Donnelly, Mark; Millard, Cynthia S.; Stols, Lucy

    2001-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for isolating succinic acid producing bacteria is provided comprising increasing the biomass of an organism which lacks the ability to catabolize pyruvate, and then subjecting the biomass to glucose-rich medium in an anaerobic environment to enable pyruvate-catabolizing mutants to grow. The invention also provides for a mutant that produces high amounts of succinic acid, which has been derived from a parent which lacked the genes for pyruvate formate lyase and lactate dehydrogenase, and which belongs to the E.coli Group of Bacteria.

  9. Mutant E. coli strain with increased succinic acid production

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Donnelly, Mark (Warrenville, IL); Millard, Cynthia S. (Plainfield, IL); Stols, Lucy (Woodridge, IL)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for isolating succinic acid producing bacteria is provided comprising increasing the biomass of an organism which lacks the ability to catabolize pyruvate, and then subjecting the biomass to glucose-rich medium in an anaerobic environment to enable pyruvate-catabolizing mutants to grow. The invention also provides for a mutant that produces high amounts of succinic acid, which has been derived from a parent which lacked the genes for pyruvate formate lyase and lactate dehydrogenase, and which belongs to the E.coli Group of Bacteria.

  10. Mutant E. coli strain with increased succinic acid production

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Donnelly, Mark (Warrenville, IL); Millard, Cynthia S. (Plainfield, IL); Stols, Lucy (Woodridge, IL)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for isolating succinic acid producing bacteria is provided comprising increasing the biomass of an organism which lacks the ability to catabolize pyruvate, and then subjecting the biomass to glucose-rich medium in an anaerobic environment to enable pyruvate-catabolizing mutants to grow. The invention also provides for a mutant that produces high amounts of succinic acid, which as been derived from a parent which lacked the genes for pyruvate formate lyase and lactate dehydrogenase, and which belongs to the E.coli Group of Bacteria.

  11. (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 2007, based on zinc contained in concentrate, was about

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    190 ZINC (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production U.S. production. One primary and 12 large- and medium-sized secondary smelters refined zinc metal by the agriculture, chemical, paint, and rubber industries. Major coproducts of zinc mining and smelting, in order

  12. (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content, unless noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 1995 was about $700 million. Essentially all came from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    188 ZINC (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content, unless noted) Domestic Production and Use were used principally by the agricultural, chemical, paint, and rubber industries. Major coproducts--United States: 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995e Production: Mine, recoverable 518 523 488 570 600 Primary slab zinc 253

  13. (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The United States consumes about 13% of world chromite ore production in various

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    48 CHROMIUM (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight, unless otherwise noted) Domestic chromium chemicals, chromium ferroalloys, and chromite-containing refractories, respectively. Consumption of chromium ferroalloys and metal by end use was: stainless and heat-resisting steel, 76%; full-alloy steel, 8

  14. (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The United States consumes about 16% of world chromite ore production in various

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    44 CHROMIUM (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight, unless otherwise noted) Domestic chromium chemicals, chromium ferroalloys, and chromite-containing refractories, respectively. Consumption of chromium ferroalloys and metal by end use was: stainless and heat-resisting steel, 74%; full-alloy steel

  15. (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The United States consumes about 12% of world chromite ore production in various

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    44 CHROMIUM (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight, unless otherwise noted) Domestic chromium chemicals, chromium ferroalloys, and chromite-containing refractories, respectively. Consumption of chromium ferroalloys and metal by end use was: stainless and heat-resisting steel, 68%; full-alloy steel, 8

  16. Influences of Government Interventions on Increasing Value-Added Wood Product Exports from Ghana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Influences of Government Interventions on Increasing Value-Added Wood Product Exports from Ghana exporting raw materials such lumber to exporting processed or value-added wood products. In the mid-1990s on increasing value-added exports. These actions are: 1) the imposition of a levy on air-dried lumber exports, 2

  17. Increased Oil Production and Reserves Utilizing Secondary/Tertiary Recovery Techniques on Small Reservoirs in the Paradox Basin, Utah.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chidsey, T.C. Jr.; Lorenz, D.M.; Culham, W.E.

    1997-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of this project is to enhance domestic petroleum production by demonstration and technology transfer of an advanced oil recovery technology in the Paradox basin, southeastern Utah. If this project can demonstrate technical and economic feasibility, the technique can be applied to approximately 100 additional small fields in the Paradox basin alone, and result in increased recovery of 150 to 200 million barrels of oil. This project is designed to characterize five shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation and choose the best candidate for a pilot demonstration project for either a waterflood or carbon dioxide- (CO{sub 2}-) flood project. The field demonstration, monitoring of field performance, and associated validation activities will take place in the Paradox basin within the Navajo Nation. The results of this project will be transferred to industry and other researchers through a petroleum extension service, creation of digital databases for distribution, technical workshops and seminars, field trips, technical presentations at national and regional professional meetings, and publication in newsletters and various technical or trade journals.

  18. Increased Oil Production and Reserves Utilizing Secondary/Tertiary Recovery Techniques on Small Reservoirs in the Paradox Basin, Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allison, M. Lee; Chidsey, Jr., Thomas

    1999-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of this project is to enhance domestic petroleum production by demonstration and technology transfer of an advanced oil recovery technology in the Paradox basin, southeastern Utah. If this project can demonstrate technical and economic feasibility, the technique can be applied to about 100 additional small fields in the Paradox basin alone, and result in increased recovery of 150 to 200 million bbl of oil. This project is designed to characterize five shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation and choose the best candidate for a pilot demonstration project for either a waterflood or carbon dioxide-(CO-) flood 2 project. The field demonstration, monitoring of field performance, and associated validation activities will take place in the Paradox basin within the Navajo Nation. The results of this project will be transferred to industry and other researchers through a petroleum extension service, creation of digital databases for distribution, technical workshops and seminars, field trips, technical presentations at national and regional professional meetings, and publication in newsletters and various technical or trade journals.

  19. (Data in thousand metric tons of copper content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Domestic mine production in 2003 declined to 1.12 million tons and was valued at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .0 billion. The principal mining States, in descending order, Arizona, Utah, and New Mexico, accounted for 99 alloy products were used in building construction, 46%; electric and electronic products, 23 Employment, mine and mill, thousands 10.3 9.1 8.2 7.0 6.8 Net import reliance4 as a percentage of apparent

  20. (Data in thousand metric tons of copper content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Domestic mine production in 2002 declined to 1.13 million metric tons and was

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    at about $1.9 billion. The principal mining States, in descending order, Arizona, Utah, and New Mexico alloy products consumed1 in building construction totaled 44%; electric and electronic products, 25,020 Employment, mine and mill, thousands 13.0 10.3 9.1 8.2 7 Net import reliance4 as a percentage of apparent

  1. Salmon Carcasses Increase Stream Productivity More than Inorganic Fertilizer Pellets: A Test on Multiple Trophic Levels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagner, Diane

    Salmon Carcasses Increase Stream Productivity More than Inorganic Fertilizer Pellets: A Test experiment, we examined the short-term (6 weeks) comparative effects of artificial nutrient pellets pellet treatment was soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) concentration. Ammonium-nitrogen concentration

  2. Electrolysed palladium has the potential to increase methane production by a mixed rumen population in vitro

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Electrolysed palladium has the potential to increase methane production by a mixed rumen population the proportion of protozoa with attached methanogens decreased, however no estimate of CH4 production under were re-filled with H2:CO2, sealed with butyl rubber stoppers and incubated at 39°C with shaking

  3. A multi-display viewing station that increases productivity and saves space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saskatchewan, University of

    A multi-display viewing station that increases productivity and saves space Conserve desk space) per monitor · Low-profile base saves desk space · Durable aluminum and steel construction creates that are VESA® MIS-D, 100/75, C compliant · Five-year warranty Product Sheet Space-saving desk stands Ergotron

  4. (Data in thousand metric tons of boric oxide (B2O3) unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Two companies in southern California produced boron minerals, mostly sodium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    proprietary data, U.S. boron production and consumption in 2010 were withheld. The leading boron producer standards with respect to heat conservation, which directly correlates to higher consumption of borates32 BORON (Data in thousand metric tons of boric oxide (B2O3) unless otherwise noted) Domestic

  5. Progressive Powder Coating: New Infrared Curing Oven at Metal Finishing Plant Increases Production by 50%

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Progressive Powder Coating in Mentor, Ohio, is a metal finishing plant that uses a convection oven in its manufacturing process. In an effort to save energy and improve production, the company installed an infrared oven in between the powder coating booth and the convection oven on its production line. This installation allowed the plant to increase its conveyor line speed and increase production by 50 percent. In addition, the plant reduced its natural gas consumption, yielding annual energy savings of approximately$54,000. With a total project cost of$136,000, the simple payback is 2.5 years.

  6. Increasing corn for biofuel production reduces biocontrol services in agricultural landscapes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landis, Doug

    November 5, 2008 (received for review May 22, 2008) Increased demand for corn grain as an ethanol feedstock of cellulosic ethanol production processes that use a variety of feedstocks could foster increased diversity has driven a rapid expansion of the corn ethanol industry in the United States. Continuing growth

  7. (Data in thousand metric tons of copper content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Domestic mine production in 2004 rose to 1.16 million tons and was valued at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .4 billion. The principal mining States, in descending order, Arizona, Utah, and New Mexico, accounted for 99 consumers. Copper and copper alloy products were used in building construction, 48%; electric and electronic exchanges 334 952 1,030 657 130 Employment, mine and mill, thousands 9.1 8.2 7.0 6.8 7.0 Net import reliance

  8. (Data in thousand metric tons of copper content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Domestic mine production in 2001 declined to 1.34 million metric tons and was

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    at about $2.2 billion. The principal mining States, in descending order, Arizona, Utah, and New Mexico%; electric and electronic products, 28%; transportation equipment, 11%; industrial machinery and equipment, and metal exchanges 314 532 565 334 800 Employment, mine and mill, thousands 13.2 13.0 11.6 10.2 10 Net

  9. (Data in thousand metric tons of copper content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Domestic mine production in 2000 declined to 1.45 million metric tons and was

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    at about $2.8 billion. The principal mining States, in descending order, Arizona, Utah, New Mexico construction totaled 41%; electric and electronic products, 27%; transportation equipment, 12%; industrial, yearend, refined6 146 314 532 564 280 Employment, mine and mill, thousands 13.3 13.2 13.0 11.6 10 Net

  10. (Data in thousand metric tons of copper content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Domestic mine production in 1998 declined to 1.85 million metric tons and was

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    at about $3.3 billion. The five principal mining States, in descending order, Arizona, Utah, New Mexico in building construction, 42%; electric and electronic products, 25%; industrial machinery and1 equipment, 11, refined 119 163 146 314 4505 Employment, mine and mill, thousands 13.1 13.8 13.3 13.2 13.0 Net import

  11. (Data in thousand metric tons of copper content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Domestic mine production in 1999 declined to 1.66 million metric tons and was

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    at about $2.8 billion. The five principal mining States, in descending order, Arizona, Utah, New Mexico construction, 42%; electric and electronic products, 26%; transportation equipment, 12%; industrial machinery and mill, thousands 13.8 13.3 13.2 13.0 12.0 Net import reliance6 as a percent of apparent consumption 7 14

  12. (Data in thousand metric tons of metal unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2008, 6 companies operated 14 primary aluminum smelters; 4 smelters were

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Use: In 2008, 6 companies operated 14 primary aluminum smelters; 4 smelters were temporarily idled primary aluminum production increased substantially owing to smelter restarts after new power contracts, production was curtailed at two smelters owing to high electricity prices, power supply issues, and a sharp

  13. (Data in metric tons of contained lithium, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Chile was the largest lithium chemical producer in the world, followed by China, the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Use: Chile was the largest lithium chemical producer in the world, followed by China, the United of lower production costs as compared to the costs for hard rock ores. Most of the lithium minerals mined purchased from a producer in Chile. The increased production of low-cost lithium carbonate in South America

  14. (Data in metric tons of contained lithium, unless noted) Domestic Production and Use: The United States was the largest producer and consumer of lithium minerals and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by Joyce A. Ober, (703) 648-7717. #12;97 LITHIUM Events, Trends, and Issues: The Department of Energy (DOE produced lithium compounds for domestic consumption as well as for export to other countries. The use% of estimated domestic consumption. Other major end uses for lithium were in the manufacture of lubricants

  15. Increased oil production and reserves utilizing secondary/tertiary recovery techniques on small reservoirs in the Paradox Basin, Utah, Class II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chidsey, Thomas C.

    2000-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of this project is to enhance domestic petroleum production by field demonstration and technology transfer of an advanced-oil-recovery technology in the Paradox basin, southeastern Utah. If this project can demonstrate technical and economic feasibility, the technique can be applied to approximately 100 additional small fields in the Paradox basin alone, and result in increased recovery of 150 to 200 million barrels (23,850,000-31,800,000 m{sup 3}) of oil. This project is designed to characterize five shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation and choose the best candidate for a pilot demonstration project for either a waterflood or carbon-dioxide-miscible flood project. The field demonstration, monitoring of field performance, and associated validation activities will take place within the Navajo Nation, San Juan County, Utah.

  16. From Domestic vs. International to Domestic and International

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin, S. Massoud

    % 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Domestic International International Domestic 100% 67% 86% 29

  17. Effect of increasing copper and salinity on glycerol production by Dunaliella salina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lustigman, B.; McCormick, J.M.; Dale, G.; McLaughlin, J.J.A.

    1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dunaliella salina is a green marine flagellate whose main storage product is glycerol. Its ability to grow in waters which vary greatly in salinity is due to its ability to form glycerol, the intracellular concentration of which is directly proportional to the extracellular salinity. Copper is an essential trace element needed in small quantities by algae for plastocyanin production. However, at high concentrations it acts as an effective algicide. Dunaliella species have been shown to have an unusual resistance to copper toxicity. The authors examined the effects of lethal and sublethal concentrations of copper on growth and glycerol production in dunaliella saline, in order to determine if adaptation to copper toxicity will result in an increase in production of glycerol.

  18. Opportunities to increase the productivity of spent fuel shipping casks in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winsor, G.H.; Faletti, D.W.; DeSteese, J.G.

    1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Trends indicate that future transportation requirements for spent fuel will be different from those anticipated when the current generation of casks and vehicles was designed. Increased storage capacity at most reactors will increase the average post irradiation age of the spent fuel to be transported. A scenario is presented which shows the 18 casks currently available should be sufficient until approximately 1983. Beyond this time, it appears that an adequate transportation system can be maintained by acquiring, as needed, casks of current designs and new casks currently under development. Spent fuel transportation requirements in the post-1990 period can be met by a new generation of casks specifically designed to transport long-cooled fuel. In terms of the number of casks needed, productivity may be increased by 19% if rail cask turnaround time is reduced to 4 days from the current range of 6.5 to 8.5 days. Productivity defined as payloads per cask year could be increased 62% if the turnaround time for legal weight truck casks were reduced from 12 hours to 4 hours. On a similar basis, overweight truck casks show a 28% increase in productivity.

  19. COST EFFECTIVE REGULATORY APPROACHES TO ENHANCE DOMESTIC OIL & GAS PRODUCTION AND ENSURE THE PROTECTION OF THE ENVIRONMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ben Grunewald; Paul Jehn; Tom Gillespie; Ben Binder

    2004-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The Environmental Information Management Suite/Risk Based Data Management System (EIMS/RBDMS) and Cost Effective Regulatory Approach (CERA) programs continue to be successful. All oil and gas state regulatory programs participate in these efforts. Significant accomplishments include: streamline regulatory approaches, enhancing environmental protection, and making oil and gas data available via the Internet. Oil and gas companies worldwide now have access to data on state web sites. This reduces the cost of exploration and enables companies to develop properties in areas that would have been cost prohibited for exploration. Early in project, GWPC and State Oil and Gas agencies developed the EIMS and CERA strategic plan to prioritize long term development and implementation. The planning process identifies electronic commerce and coal bed methane as high priorities. The group has involved strategic partners in industry and government to develop a common data exchange process. Technical assistance to Alaska continues to improve their program management capabilities. New initiatives in Alaska include the development of an electronic permit tracking system. This system allows managers to expedite the permitting process. Nationwide, the RBDMS system is largely completed with 22 states and one Indian Nation now using this nationally accepted data management system. Additional remaining tasks include routine maintenance and the installation of the program upon request for the remaining oil and gas states. The GWPC in working with the BLM and MMS to develop an XML schema to facilitate electronic permitting and reporting (Appendix A, B, and C). This is a significant effort and, in years to come, will increase access to federal lands by reducing regulatory barriers. The new initiatives are coal bed methane and e-commerce. The e-commerce program will provide industry and BLM/MMS access to the millions of data points housed in the RBDMS system. E-commerce will streamline regulatory approaches and allow small operators to produce energy from areas that have become sub-economic for the major producers. The GWPC is working with states to develop a coal bed methane program, which will both manage the data and develop a public education program on the benefits of produced water. The CERA program benefits all oil and gas states by reducing the cost of regulatory compliance, increasing environmental protection, and providing industry and regulatory agencies a discussion forum. Activities included many small and large group forum settings for discussions of technical and policy issues as well as the ongoing State Class II UIC peer review effort. The accomplishments detailed in this report will be the basis for the next initiative which is RBDMS On-Line. RBDMS On-Line will combine data mining, electronic permitting and electronic reporting with .net technology. Industry, BLM, GWPC and all Oil and Gas states are partnering this effort.

  20. (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2002, the United States consumed about 14% of world chromite ore production in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -2001): Chromium contained in chromite ore and chromium ferroalloys and metal: South Africa, 50%; Kazakhstan, 20, Kazakhstan, and South Africa) accounted for about 76% of world production. South Africa alone accounts States -- -- -- 7,000 India 1,680 1,900 18,000 39,000 Kazakhstan 2,050 2,300 410,000 410,000 South Africa

  1. (Data in thousand metric tons unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2012, clay and shale production was reported in 40 States. About 180 companies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : Insignificant. Import Sources (2008­11): Brazil, 80%; Mexico, 5%; Canada, 4%; United Kingdom, 2%; and other, 9 and pet litter were expected to decline. Fuller's earth could see slight gains as sales increase

  2. 2014 Domestic Uranium Production Report

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25,9,1996 N Y MDomestic Uranium

  3. 2014 Domestic Uranium Production Report

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25,9,1996 N Y MDomestic Uranium9 2014

  4. 2014 Domestic Uranium Production Report

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25,9,1996 N Y MDomestic Uranium9

  5. 2014 Domestic Uranium Production Report

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25,9,1996 N Y MDomestic Uranium911 2014

  6. 2014 Domestic Uranium Production Report

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25,9,1996 N Y MDomestic Uranium911

  7. 2014 Domestic Uranium Production Report

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25,9,1996 N Y MDomestic Uranium9117 2014

  8. 2014 Domestic Uranium Production Report

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25,9,1996 N Y MDomestic Uranium9117 20145

  9. 2014 Domestic Uranium Production Report

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25,9,1996 N Y MDomestic Uranium9117

  10. 2014 Domestic Uranium Production Report

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25,9,1996 N Y MDomestic

  11. Domestic Uranium Production Report - Quarterly

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline353/06) 2Yonthly Energy :and

  12. Domestic Uranium Production Report - Quarterly

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline353/06) 2Yonthly Energy :and1. Total

  13. Domestic Uranium Production Report - Quarterly

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline353/06) 2Yonthly Energy :and1. Total3. U.S.

  14. Domestic Uranium Production Report - Quarterly

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline353/06) 2Yonthly Energy :and1. Total3. U.S.4.

  15. 2014 Domestic Uranium Production Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi" ,"Plant","Primary1. TotalRevenueTotal97. Employment in

  16. 2014 Domestic Uranium Production Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi" ,"Plant","Primary1. TotalRevenueTotal97. Employment

  17. 2014 Domestic Uranium Production Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi" ,"Plant","Primary1. TotalRevenueTotal97. Employment4.

  18. 2014 Domestic Uranium Production Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi" ,"Plant","Primary1. TotalRevenueTotal97. Employment4.2.

  19. 2014 Domestic Uranium Production Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi" ,"Plant","Primary1. TotalRevenueTotal97.

  20. 2014 Domestic Uranium Production Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi" ,"Plant","Primary1. TotalRevenueTotal97.10. Uranium

  1. 2014 Domestic Uranium Production Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi" ,"Plant","Primary1. TotalRevenueTotal97.10. Uranium9.

  2. An analysis of the economic incentives for increased trade in milk and milk products between the United States and Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ernstes, David P

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    continue to increase. Actual analysis of producer and consumer prices for dairy products, processor margins for packaged milk and manufactured products with various component origins, the effects of differing trade scenarios on U.S. federal order...

  3. Ethanol increases matrix metalloproteinase-12 expression via NADPH oxidase-dependent ROS production in macrophages

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Mi Jin; Nepal, Saroj; Lee, Eung-Seok; Jeong, Tae Cheon [College of Pharmacy, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsanbuk-do 712-749 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sang-Hyun [Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 700-422 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Pil-Hoon, E-mail: parkp@yu.ac.kr [College of Pharmacy, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsanbuk-do 712-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Matrix metalloproteinase-12 (MMP-12), an enzyme responsible for degradation of extracellular matrix, plays an important role in the progression of various diseases, including inflammation and fibrosis. Although most of those are pathogenic conditions induced by ethanol ingestion, the effect of ethanol on MMP-12 has not been explored. In the present study, we investigated the effect of ethanol on MMP-12 expression and its potential mechanisms in macrophages. Here, we demonstrated that ethanol treatment increased MMP-12 expression in primary murine peritoneal macrophages and RAW 264.7 macrophages at both mRNA and protein levels. Ethanol treatment also significantly increased the activity of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADPH) oxidase and the expression of NADPH oxidase-2 (Nox2). Pretreatment with an anti-oxidant (N-acetyl cysteine) or a selective inhibitor of NADPH oxidase (diphenyleneiodonium chloride (DPI)) prevented ethanol-induced MMP-12 expression. Furthermore, knockdown of Nox2 by small interfering RNA (siRNA) prevented ethanol-induced ROS production and MMP-12 expression in RAW 264.7 macrophages, indicating a critical role for Nox2 in ethanol-induced intracellular ROS production and MMP-12 expression in macrophages. We also showed that ethanol-induced Nox2 expression was suppressed by transient transfection with dominant negative I?B-? plasmid or pretreatment with Bay 11-7082, a selective inhibitor of NF-?B, in RAW 264.7 macrophages. In addition, ethanol-induced Nox2 expression was also attenuated by treatment with a selective inhibitor of p38 MAPK, suggesting involvement of p38 MAPK/NF-?B pathway in ethanol-induced Nox2 expression. Taken together, these results demonstrate that ethanol treatment elicited increase in MMP-12 expression via increase in ROS production derived from Nox2 in macrophages. - Highlights: • Ethanol increases ROS production through up-regulation of Nox2 in macrophages. • Enhanced oxidative stress contributes to ethanol-induced MMP-12 expression. • p38 MAPK/NF-?B signaling pathway modulates ethanol-induced Nox2 expression.

  4. (Data in thousand metric tons unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2013, clay and shale production was reported in 40 States. About 180 companies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Import Sources (2009­12): Brazil, 83%; Canada, 6%; Mexico, 4%; and other, 7%. Prepared by Robert L. Virta. Bentonite sales declined slightly because sales to most markets, except pet litter, appeared to have declined. Fuller's earth saw slight gains, mainly because of sales increases for pet litters and fluid

  5. Increasing the power density when using inert matrix fuels to reduce production of transuranics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Recktenwald, G.D.; Deinert, M.R. [University of Texas, 1 University Station C2200, Austin TX 78715-0162 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reducing the production of transuranics is a goal of most advanced nuclear fuel cycles. One way to do this is to recycle the transuranics into the same reactors that are currently producing them using an inert matrix fuel. In previous work we have modeled such a reactor where 72%, of the core is comprised of standard enriched uranium fuel pins, with the remaining 28% fuel made from Yttria stabilized zirconium, in which transuranics are loaded. A key feature of this core is that all of the transuranics produced by the uranium fuel assemblies are later burned in inert matrix fuel assemblies. It has been shown that this system can achieve reductions in transuranic waste of more than 86%. The disadvantage of such a system is that the core power rating must be significantly lower than a standard pressurized water reactor. One reason for the lower power is that high burnup of the uranium fuel precludes a critical level of reactivity at the end of the campaign. Increasing the uranium enrichment and changing the pin pitch are two ways to increase burnup while maintaining criticality. In this paper we use MCNPX and a linear reactivity model to quantify the effect of these two parameters on the end of campaign reactivity. Importantly, we show that in the region of our proposed reactor, enrichment increases core reactivity by 0.02 per percent uranium 235 and pin pitch increases reactivity by 0.02 per mm. Reactivity is lost at a rate of 0.005 per MWd/kgIHM uranium burnup. (authors)

  6. An Update on Ethanol Production and Utilization in Thailand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bloyd, Cary N.

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thailand has continued to promote domestic biofuel utilization. Production and consumption of biofuel in Thailand have continued to increase at a fast rate due to aggressive policies of the Thai government in reducing foreign oil import and increasing domestic renewable energy utilization. This paper focuses on ethanol production and consumption, and the use of gasohol in Thailand. The paper is an update on the previous paper--Biofuel Infrastructure Development and Utilization in Thailand--in August 2008.

  7. Increased oil production and reserves utilizing secondary/tertiary recovery techniques on small reservoirs in the Paradox basin, Utah. Technical progress report, January 1, 1995--March 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allison, M.L.

    1995-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of this project is to enhance domestic petroleum production by demonstration and technology transfer of an advanced oil recovery technology in the Paradox basin, southeastern Utah. If this project can demonstrate technical and economic feasibility, the technique can be applied to approximately 100 additional small fields in the Paradox basin alone, and result in increased recovery of 150 to 200 million barrels of oil. This project is designed to characterize five shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian Paradox Formation and choose the best candidate for a pilot demonstration project for either a waterflood or carbon dioxide-flood project. The field demonstration, monitoring of field performance, and associated validation activities will take place in the Paradox basin within the Navajo Nation. The results of this project will be transferred to industry and other researchers through a petroleum extension service, creation of digital databases for distribution, technical workshops and seminars, field trips, technical presentations at national and regional professional meetings, and publication in newsletters and various technical or trade journals.

  8. Comparative Life-Cycle Air Emissions of Coal, Domestic Natural

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaramillo, Paulina

    come domestically from the production of synthetic natural gas (SNG) via coal gasification- methanation gasification technologies that use coal to produce SNG. This National Gasification Strategy callsComparative Life-Cycle Air Emissions of Coal, Domestic Natural Gas, LNG, and SNG for Electricity

  9. Active hypothermic growth : a novel means for increasing total recombinant protein production by CHO cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, Stephen Richard

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recombinant human glycoproteins produced by Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells are an important class of therapeutic molecules and investigating means of improving the production rate and product quality of these glycoproteins ...

  10. Increasing IFN-[gamma] productivity in CHO cells through CDK inhibition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McClain, David Alan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Approximately 60-70% of all recombinant human glycoproteins are produced in Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells. Production in CHO cells, however, is often plagued by low productivity when compared with other host cell lines, ...

  11. Video Mediated Communication for Domestic Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tollmar, Konrad

    ). The core argument is that information and com- munication technologies (ICT) are a prerequisite for the transformation process from a society focused on industrial production to a society dominated by information could change due to new social movements and new use of the domestic environment, we have designed

  12. Benefits of supplementing an industrial waste anaerobic digester with energy crops for increased biogas production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nges, Ivo Achu, E-mail: Nges.Ivo_Achu@biotek.lu.se [Department of Biotechnology, Lund University, P.O. Box 124, SE 221 00 Lund (Sweden); Escobar, Federico; Fu Xinmei; Bjoernsson, Lovisa [Department of Biotechnology, Lund University, P.O. Box 124, SE 221 00 Lund (Sweden)

    2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study demonstrates the feasibility of co-digestion food industrial waste with energy crops. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Laboratory batch co-digestion led to improved methane yield and carbon to nitrogen ratio as compared to mono-digestion of industrial waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Co-digestion was also seen as a means of degrading energy crops with nutrients addition as crops are poor in nutrients. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Batch co-digestion methane yields were used to predict co-digestion methane yield in full scale operation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It was concluded that co-digestion led an over all economically viable process and ensured a constant supply of feedstock. - Abstract: Currently, there is increasing competition for waste as feedstock for the growing number of biogas plants. This has led to fluctuation in feedstock supply and biogas plants being operated below maximum capacity. The feasibility of supplementing a protein/lipid-rich industrial waste (pig manure, slaughterhouse waste, food processing and poultry waste) mesophilic anaerobic digester with carbohydrate-rich energy crops (hemp, maize and triticale) was therefore studied in laboratory scale batch and continuous stirred tank reactors (CSTR) with a view to scale-up to a commercial biogas process. Co-digesting industrial waste and crops led to significant improvement in methane yield per ton of feedstock and carbon-to-nitrogen ratio as compared to digestion of the industrial waste alone. Biogas production from crops in combination with industrial waste also avoids the need for micronutrients normally required in crop digestion. The batch co-digestion methane yields were used to predict co-digestion methane yield in full scale operation. This was done based on the ratio of methane yields observed for laboratory batch and CSTR experiments compared to full scale CSTR digestion of industrial waste. The economy of crop-based biogas production is limited under Swedish conditions; therefore, adding crops to existing industrial waste digestion could be a viable alternative to ensure a constant/reliable supply of feedstock to the anaerobic digester.

  13. Fact #564: March 30, 2009 Transportation and the Gross Domestic...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of the U.S. Gross Domestic Product (GDP) in 2007 is related to transportation. Housing, health care, and food are the only categories with greater shares of the GDP. GDP by...

  14. Domestic medicine in eighteenth centrury Scotland 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hatfield, Vivienne Gabrielle

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    put their services beyond the reach of most people. Even later in the century when roads improved and an increasing number of medical graduates were trained, in rural Scotland domestic medicine was still the only form of treatment available to many...

  15. (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 2000, based on contained zinc recoverable from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    three-fourths of production. Three primary and 12 large- and medium-sized secondary smelters refined 92 Employment: Mine and mill, numbere 2,700 2,500 2,400 2,500 2,600 Smelter primary, numbere 1,000 1 production of zinc concentrate by about 3% in 2000. U.S. mine production greatly exceeded smelter capacity

  16. Additional Steam Traps Increase Production of a Drum Oven at a Petroleum Jelly Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Additional steam traps were installed on the drum oven at a petroleum jelly production facility at an ExxonMobil plant in Nigeria. The installation improved heat transfer and saved energy.

  17. Advancing Commercialization of Algal Biofuels Through Increased Biomass Productivity and Technology Integration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bai, Xuemei [Cellana LLC; Sabarsky, Martin

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Cellana is a leading developer of algae-based bioproducts, and its pre-commercial production of marine microalgae takes place at Cellana?s Kona Demonstration Facility (KDF) in Hawaii. KDF is housing more than 70 high-performing algal strains for different bioproducts, of which over 30 have been grown outside at scale. So far, Cellana has produced more than 10 metric tons of algal biomass for the development of biofuels, animal feed, and high-value nutraceuticals. Cellana?s ALDUO algal cultivation technology allows Cellana to grow non-extremophile algal strains at large scale with no contamination disruptions. Cellana?s research and production at KDF have addressed three major areas that are crucial for the commercialization of algal biofuels: yield improvement, cost reduction, and the overall economics. Commercially acceptable solutions have been developed and tested for major factors limiting areal productivity of algal biomass and lipids based on years of R&D work conducted at KDF. Improved biomass and lipid productivity were achieved through strain improvement, culture management strategies (e.g., alleviation of self-shading, de-oxygenation, and efficient CO2 delivery), and technical advancement in downstream harvesting technology. Cost reduction was achieved through optimized CO2 delivery system, flue gas utilization technology, and energy-efficient harvesting technology. Improved overall economics was achieved through a holistic approach by integration of high-value co-products in the process, in addition to yield improvements and cost reductions.

  18. Increasing Heavy Oil Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Thermal Production Technologies, Class III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    City of Long Beach; Tidelands Oil Production Company; University of Southern California; David K. Davies and Associates

    2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project was to increase the recoverable heavy oil reserves within sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, near Long Beach, California through the testing and application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. It was hoped that the successful application of these technologies would result in their implementation throughout the Wilmington Field and, through technology transfer, will be extended to increase the recoverable oil reserves in other slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs.

  19. (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 2005, based on contained zinc recoverable from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    accounted for 86% of total U.S. production. Two primary and 12 large- and medium-sized secondary smelters Production: Mine, zinc in ore1 842 780 768 739 760 Primary slab zinc 203 182 187 189 250 Secondary slab zinc a major price recovery that started in the third quarter of 2004 and picked up renewed momentum

  20. Increasing Production from Low-Permeability Gas Reservoirs by Optimizing Zone Isolation for Successful Stimulation Treatments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fred Sabins

    2005-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Maximizing production from wells drilled in low-permeability reservoirs, such as the Barnett Shale, is determined by cementing, stimulation, and production techniques employed. Studies show that cementing can be effective in terms of improving fracture effectiveness by 'focusing' the frac in the desired zone and improving penetration. Additionally, a method is presented for determining the required properties of the set cement at various places in the well, with the surprising result that uphole cement properties in wells destined for multiple-zone fracturing is more critical than those applied to downhole zones. Stimulation studies show that measuring pressure profiles and response during Pre-Frac Injection Test procedures prior to the frac job are critical in determining if a frac is indicated at all, as well as the type and size of the frac job. This result is contrary to current industry practice, in which frac jobs are designed well before the execution, and carried out as designed on location. Finally, studies show that most wells in the Barnett Shale are production limited by liquid invasion into the wellbore, and determinants are presented for when rod or downhole pumps are indicated.

  1. Method for construction of bacterial strains with increased succinic acid production

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Donnelly, Mark I. (Warrenville, IL); Sanville-Millard, Cynthia (Plainfield, IL); Chatterjee, Ranjini (Park Ridge, IL)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fermentation process for producing succinic acid is provided comprising selecting a bacterial strain that does not produce succinic acid in high yield, disrupting the normal regulation of sugar metabolism of said bacterial strain, and combining the mutant bacterial strain and selected sugar in anaerobic conditions to facilitate production of succinic acid. Also provided is a method for changing low yield succinic acid producing bacteria to high yield succinic acid producing bacteria comprising selecting a bacterial strain having a phosphotransferase system and altering the phosphotransferase system so as to allow the bacterial strain to simultaneously metabolize different sugars.

  2. International Support for Domestic Climate Policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neuhoff, Karsten

    the CO2 emissions from fossil fuel use. Overall carbon emissions can be further reduced using carbon capture and sequestration for fossil fuel combustion, with substantial reductions occurring if the technology is applied to large installations... from Concentrated Solar Power Plants can encourage domestic and international firms to adopt the technology and stimulate its production in South Africa. Large wind resources require appropriate technology and network design to capture...

  3. U.S. Domestic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 34 44Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun602 1,39720Sales1 Domestic and

  4. U.S. Domestic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 34 44Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun602 1,39720Sales1 Domestic and2

  5. (Data in metric tons of lithium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Chile was the leading lithium chemical producer in the world; Argentina, China, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    States is extremely difficult because of the large number of compounds used in a wide variety of end uses are estimated as follows: ceramics and glass, 31%; batteries, 23%; lubricating greases, 9%; air treatment, 6 conditions improved for lithium-based products in 2010. Sales volumes for the major lithium producers were

  6. (Data in metric tons of lithium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Chile was the leading lithium chemical producer in the world; Argentina, China,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Estimation of value for the lithium mineral compounds produced in the United States is extremely difficult lithium company identified its end-use markets as ceramics and glass, 21%; batteries, 19%; lubricating greases, 16%; pharmaceuticals and polymers, 9%; air conditioning, 8%; primary aluminum production, 6

  7. (Data in metric tons of lithium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Chile was the leading lithium chemical producer in the world; Argentina, China, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    be published. Estimation of value for the lithium mineral compounds produced in the United States is extremely as follows: batteries, 25%; ceramics and glass, 18%; lubricating greases, 12%; pharmaceuticals and polymers, 7%; air conditioning, 6%; primary aluminum production, 4%; continuous casting, 3%; chemical

  8. (Data in thousand metric tons gross weight unless otherwise specified) Domestic Production and Use: Manganese ore containing 35% or more manganese has not been produced

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    purposes as production of dry cell batteries, in plant fertilizers and animal feed, and as a brick colorant of apparent consumption 100 100 100 100 100 Recycling: Manganese was recycled incidentally as a minor inventory for disposal FY 2009 FY 2009 Manganese ore: Battery grade -- -- 18 -- Chemical grade -- -- 23

  9. (Data in thousand metric tons gross weight unless otherwise specified) Domestic Production and Use: Manganese ore containing 35% or more manganese was not produced

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    as production of dry cell batteries, plant fertilizers and animal feed, and as a brick colorant. Manganese Recycling: Manganese was recycled incidentally as a minor constituent of ferrous and nonferrous scrap inventory inventory for disposal FY 2005 FY 2005 Manganese ore: Battery grade -- 18 -- 27 23 Chemical grade

  10. (Data in thousand metric tons of silicon content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Estimated value of silicon alloys and metal (excluding semiconductor-and solar-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Production and Use: Estimated value of silicon alloys and metal (excluding semiconductor- and solar- grade silicon) produced in the United States in 2009 was $470 million. Four companies produced silicon materials in six plants. Of those companies, three produced ferrosilicon in four plants. Metallurgical

  11. (Data in thousand metric tons of metal, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2002, 11 companies operated 16 primary aluminum reduction plants; 6 smelters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Use: In 2002, 11 companies operated 16 primary aluminum reduction plants; 6 smelters were temporarily idled. The 11 smelters east of the Mississippi River accounted for 75% of the production; whereas the remaining 11 smelters, which included the 9 Pacific Northwest smelters, accounted for only 25%. Based upon

  12. (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 2001, based on contained zinc recoverable from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -fourths of production. Three primary and 12 large- and medium-sized secondary smelters refined zinc metal of commercial,500 2,600 2,400 Smelter primary, numbere 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 900 Net import reliance3 greatly exceeded smelter capacity, necessitating exports of concentrate. More than one-third of all

  13. (Data in metric tons unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Indium was not recovered from ores in the United States in 2008. Indium-containing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : Data on the quantity of secondary indium recovered from scrap were not available. Indium is most loop--from collection of scrap to production of secondary materials--now takes less than 30 days. ITO to dissolve the ITO, from which the indium is recovered. Indium recovery from tailings was thought to have

  14. Increasing Heavy Oil Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Thermal Production Technologies, Class III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    City of Long Beach; Tidelands Oil Production Company; University of Southern California; David K. Davies and Associates

    2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project was to increase the recoverable heavy oil reserves within sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, near Long Beach, California through the testing and application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The successful application of these technologies would result in expanding their implementation throughout the Wilmington Field and, through technology transfer, to other slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs.

  15. Energy use of icemaking in domestic refrigerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meier, A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Energy and Environment Div.; Martinez, M.S. [ENVEST-SCE, Irwindale, CA (United States)

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study was designed to develop and test a procedure to measure the electrical consumption of ice making in domestic refrigerators. The Department of Energy (DOE) test procedure was modified to include the energy used for icemaking in conventional refrigerators and those equipped with automatic icemakers. The procedure assumed that 500 grams of ice would be produced daily. Using the new test procedure and the existing DOE test (as a benchmark), four refrigerators equipped with automatic icemakers were tested for ice-making energy use. With the revised test, gross electricity consumption increased about 10% (100 kWh/yr) due to automatic icemaking but about 5% (55 kWh/yr) could be attributed to the special features of the automatic icemaker. The test also confirmed the feasibility of establishing procedures for measuring energy use of specific loads and other activities related to domestic refrigerators. Field testing and subsequent retesting revealed a 14% increase in energy use.

  16. The chitinase-like protein YKL-40 increases mucin5AC production in human bronchial epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Chunyi; Li, Qi [Division of Respiratory Medicine, Second Affiliated Hospital, Chongqing Medical University, No. 74, Linjiang Road, Yuzhong District, Chongqing 400010 (China); Zhou, Xiangdong, E-mail: zxd999@263.net [Division of Respiratory Medicine, Second Affiliated Hospital, Chongqing Medical University, No. 74, Linjiang Road, Yuzhong District, Chongqing 400010 (China); Kolosov, Victor P.; Perelman, Juliy M. [Far Eastern Scientific Center of Physiology and Pathology of Respiration, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Blagoveshchensk (Russian Federation)

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mucus overproduction is an important feature in patients with chronic inflammatory airway diseases. However, the regulatory mechanisms that mediate excessive mucin production remain elusive. Recently, the level of YKL-40, a chitinase-like protein, has been found to be significantly increased in chronic inflammatory airway diseases and has been shown to be associated with the severity of these diseases. In this study, we sought to explore the effect of YKL-40 on mucin5AC (MUC5AC) production in chronic inflammatory airway diseases and the potential signaling pathways involved in this process. We found that elevated YKL-40 levels increased the mRNA and protein expression of MUC5AC in a dose- and time-dependent manner, in association with the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and nuclear factor ?B (NF-?B), reflecting their activation. These responses were significantly suppressed by the knockdown of protease-activating receptor 2 (PAR2) with specific small interfering RNA or the inhibitors of ERK and NF-?B. YKL-40-induced MUC5AC overproduction was also effectively attenuated by the inhibitor of focal adhesion kinase (FAK). Taken together, these results imply that YKL-40 can stimulate excessive MUC5AC production through PAR2- and FAK-mediated mechanisms. - Highlights: • MUC5AC is the major secreted mucin in chronic inflammatory airway diseases. • YKL-40 is a prototype of the chitinase-like protein in mammals. • YKL-40 is an active player in chronic inflammatory airway diseases. • YKL-40 can increase MUC5AC production via PAR2-mediated pathway. • FAK is another candidate to mediate YKL-40-induced MUC5AC overexpression.

  17. AFFIDAVIT OF TERMINATION OF DOMESTIC PARTNERSHIP Declaration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    AFFIDAVIT OF TERMINATION OF DOMESTIC PARTNERSHIP Declaration I of Termination of Domestic Partnership form to my former Domestic Partner on ____________________, 20 or misleading statement made will subject me to disciplinary action up to and including termination

  18. INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unknown

    2001-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to increase the recoverable heavy oil reserves within sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, near Long Beach, California, through the testing and application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The hope is that successful application of these technologies will result in their implementation throughout the Wilmington Field and, through technology transfer, will be extended to increase the recoverable oil reserves in other slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs. The existing steamflood in the Tar zone of Fault Block II-A (Tar II-A) has been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs: inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil and non-uniform distribution of the remaining oil. This has resulted in poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. A suite of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies are being applied during the project to improve oil recovery and reduce operating costs, including: (1) Development of three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic reservoir simulation models--thermal or otherwise--to aid in reservoir management of the steamflood and post-steamflood phases and subsequent development work. (2) Development of computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid reservoir surveillance and operations. (3) Perform detailed studies of the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (4) Testing and proposed application of a novel alkaline-steam well completion technique for the containment of the unconsolidated formation sands and control of fluid entry and injection profiles. (5) Installation of a 2100 ft, 14 inch insulated, steam line beneath a harbor channel to supply steam to an island location. (6) Testing and proposed application of thermal recovery technologies to increase oil production and reserves: (a) Performing pilot tests of cyclic steam injection and production on new horizontal wells. (b) Performing pilot tests of hot water-alternating-steam (WAS) drive in the existing steam drive area to improve thermal efficiency. (7) Perform a pilot steamflood with the four horizontal injectors and producers using a pseudo steam-assisted gravity-drainage (SAGD) process. (8) Advanced reservoir management, through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring and evaluation.

  19. Increasing Productivity of Welding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uhrig, J. J.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is universally recognized that welding is the most economical way to permanently join metals. Recent advances in welding, specifically, the continuous electrode wire processes make welding even more attractive for manufacturing. As welding...

  20. Increasing Productivity of Welding 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uhrig, J. J.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is universally recognized that welding is the most economical way to permanently join metals. Recent advances in welding, specifically, the continuous electrode wire processes make welding even more attractive for manufacturing. As welding...

  1. INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Hara

    2001-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to increase the recoverable heavy oil reserves within sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, near Long Beach, California through the testing and application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The successful application of these technologies will result in expanding their implementation throughout the Wilmington Field and, through technology transfer, to other slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs. The existing steamflood in the Tar zone of Fault Block II-A (Tar II-A) has been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs: inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil and non-uniform distribution of the remaining oil. This has resulted in poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. A suite of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies are being applied during the project to improve oil recovery and reduce operating costs.

  2. High productivity in Australian blast furnaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nightingale, R.J.; Mellor, D.G. [BHP Slab and Plate Products Div., Port Kembla, New South Wales (Australia); Jelenich, L. [BHP Rod and Bar Products Div., Newcastle, New South Wales (Australia); Ward, R.F. [BHP Long Products Div., Whyalla, South Australia (Australia)

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the emergence of the Australian domestic economy from recession in 1992, the productivity of BHP`s blast furnace has increased significantly to meet the demands of both domestic and export markets. BHP Steel operates six blast furnaces at its three Australian integrated plants. These furnaces vary widely in their size, feed, technology and current campaign status. This paper reviews the principal issues associated with productivity improvements over recent years. These gains have been achieved through activities associated with a wide range of process, equipment and human resource based issues.

  3. Increasing Heavy Oil Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field through Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Thermal Production Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    City of Long Beach; David K.Davies and Associates; Tidelands Oil Production Company; University of Southern California

    1999-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to increase the recoverable heavy oil reserves within sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, near Long Beach, California. This is realized through the testing and application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. It is hoped that the successful application of these technologies will result in their implementation throughout the Wilmington Field and through technology transfer, will be extended to increase the recoverable oil reserves in other slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs. The existing steamflood in the Tar zone of Fault Block (FB) II-A has been relatively insufficient because of several producability problems which are common in SBC reservoir; inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil and non-uniform distribution of the remaining oil. This has resulted in poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves.

  4. Development of Production PVD-AIN Buffer Layer System and Processes to Reduce Epitaxy Costs and Increase LED Efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cerio, Frank

    2013-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The DOE has set aggressive goals for solid state lighting (SSL) adoption, which require manufacturing and quality improvements for virtually all process steps leading to an LED luminaire product. The goals pertinent to this proposed project are to reduce the cost and improve the quality of the epitaxial growth processes used to build LED structures. The objectives outlined in this proposal focus on achieving cost reduction and performance improvements over state-of-the-art, using technologies that are low in cost and amenable to high efficiency manufacturing. The objectives of the outlined proposal focus on cost reductions in epitaxial growth by reducing epitaxy layer thickness and hetero-epitaxial strain, and by enabling the use of larger, less expensive silicon substrates and would be accomplished through the introduction of a high productivity reactive sputtering system and an effective sputtered aluminum-nitride (AlN) buffer/nucleation layer process. Success of the proposed project could enable efficient adoption of GaN on-silicon (GaN/Si) epitaxial technology on 150mm silicon substrates. The reduction in epitaxy cost per cm{sup 2} using 150mm GaN-on-Si technology derives from (1) a reduction in cost of ownership and increase in throughput for the buffer deposition process via the elimination of MOCVD buffer layers and other throughput and CoO enhancements, (2) improvement in brightness through reductions in defect density, (3) reduction in substrate cost through the replacement of sapphire with silicon, and (4) reduction in non-ESD yield loss through reductions in wafer bow and temperature variation. The adoption of 150mm GaN/Si processing will also facilitate significant cost reductions in subsequent wafer fabrication manufacturing costs. There were three phases to this project. These three phases overlap in order to aggressively facilitate a commercially available production GaN/Si capability. In Phase I of the project, the repeatability of the performance was analyzed and improvements implemented to the Veeco PVD-AlN prototype system to establish a specification and baseline PVD-AlN films on sapphire and in parallel the evaluation of PVD AlN on silicon substrates began. In Phase II of the project a Beta tool based on a scaled-up process module capable of depositing uniform films on batches of 4”or 6” diameter substrates in a production worthy operation was developed and qualified. In Phase III, the means to increase the throughput of the PVD-AlN system was evaluated and focused primarily on minimizing the impact of the substrate heating and cooling times that dominated the overall cycle time.

  5. Domestic Uranium Production Report - Quarterly - Energy Information

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 3400, U.S. DEPARTMENTshort05) EnergyAdministration All Nuclear

  6. INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Hara

    2004-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of this project is to increase heavy oil reserves in slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs through the application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The project involves improving thermal recovery techniques in the Tar Zone of Fault Blocks II-A and V (Tar II-A and Tar V) of the Wilmington Field in Los Angeles County, near Long Beach, California. A primary objective is to transfer technology which can be applied in other heavy oil formations of the Wilmington Field and other SBC reservoirs, including those under waterflood. The thermal recovery operations in the Tar II-A and Tar V have been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs. Inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil, and nonuniform distribution of remaining oil have all contributed to poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated formation sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. The advanced technologies to be applied include: (1) Develop three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic geologic models. (2) Develop 3-D deterministic and stochastic thermal reservoir simulation models to aid in reservoir management and subsequent development work. (3) Develop computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid in analysis. (4) Perform detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (5) Pilot steam injection and production via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors). (6) Hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the existing steam drive area to improve thermal efficiency. (7) Installing an 2400 foot insulated, subsurface harbor channel crossing to supply steam to an island location. (8) Test a novel alkaline steam completion technique to control well sanding problems and fluid entry profiles. (9) Advanced reservoir management through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring, and evaluation.

  7. INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Hara

    2002-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The project involves using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies to improve thermal recovery techniques and lower operating and capital costs in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., CA. Through June 2002, project work has been completed on the following activities: data preparation; basic reservoir engineering; developing a deterministic three dimensional (3-D) geologic model, a 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model and a rock-log model; well drilling and completions; and surface facilities on the Fault Block II-A Tar Zone (Tar II-A). Work is continuing on research to understand the geochemistry and process regarding the sand consolidation well completion technique, final reservoir tracer work, operational work and research studies to prevent thermal-related formation compaction in the Tar II-A steamflood area, and operational work on the Tar V post-steamflood pilot and Tar II-A post-steamflood projects. During the Third Quarter 2002, the project team essentially completed implementing the accelerated oil recovery and reservoir cooling plan for the Tar II-A post-steamflood project developed in March 2002 and is proceeding with additional related work. The project team has completed developing laboratory research procedures to analyze the sand consolidation well completion technique and will initiate work in the fourth quarter. The Tar V pilot steamflood project terminated hot water injection and converted to post-steamflood cold water injection on April 19, 2002. Proposals have been approved to repair two sand consolidated horizontal wells that sanded up, Tar II-A well UP-955 and Tar V well J-205, with gravel-packed inner liner jobs to be performed next quarter. Other well work to be performed next quarter is to convert well L-337 to a Tar V water injector and to recomplete vertical well A-194 as a Tar V interior steamflood pattern producer. Plans have been approved to drill and complete well A-605 in Tar V in the first quarter 2003. Plans have been approved to update the Tar II-A 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model and run sensitivity cases to evaluate the accelerated oil recovery and reservoir cooling plan. The Tar II-A post-steamflood operation started in February 1999 and steam chest fillup occurred in September-October 1999. The targeted reservoir pressures in the ''T'' and ''D'' sands are maintained at 90 {+-} 5% hydrostatic levels by controlling water injection and gross fluid production and through the bimonthly pressure monitoring program enacted at the start of the post-steamflood phase. Well work related to the Tar II-A accelerated oil recovery and reservoir cooling plan began in March 2002 with oil production increasing from 1009 BOPD in the first quarter to 1145 BOPD in the third quarter. Reservoir pressures have been increased during the quarter from 88% to 91% hydrostatic levels in the ''T'' sands and from 91% to 94% hydrostatic levels in the ''D'' sands. Well work during the quarter is described in the Reservoir Management section. The post-steamflood production performance in the Tar V pilot project has been below projections because of wellbore mechanical limitations and the loss of a horizontal producer a second time to sand inflow that are being addressed in the fourth quarter. As the fluid production temperatures exceeded 350 F, our self-imposed temperature limit, the pilot steamflood was converted to a hot waterflood project in June 2001 and converted to cold water injection on April 19, 2002.

  8. INCREASED OIL PRODUCTION AND RESERVES UTILIZING SECONDARY/TERTIARY RECOVERY TECHNIQUES ON SMALL RESERVOIRS IN THE PARADOX BASIN, UTAH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas C. Chidsey, Jr.

    2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Paradox Basin of Utah, Colorado, and Arizona contains nearly 100 small oil fields producing from shallow-shelf carbonate buildups or mounds within the Desert Creek zone of the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation. These fields typically have one to four wells with primary production ranging from 700,000 to 2,000,000 barrels (111,300-318,000 m{sup 3}) of oil per field at a 15 to 20 percent recovery rate. Five fields in southeastern Utah were evaluated for waterflood or carbon-dioxide (CO{sub 2})-miscible flood projects based upon geological characterization and reservoir modeling. Geological characterization on a local scale focused on reservoir heterogeneity, quality, and lateral continuity as well as possible compartmentalization within each of the five project fields. The Desert Creek zone includes three generalized facies belts: (1) open-marine, (2) shallow-shelf and shelf-margin, and (3) intra-shelf, salinity-restricted facies. These deposits have modern analogs near the coasts of the Bahamas, Florida, and Australia, respectively, and outcrop analogs along the San Juan River of southeastern Utah. The analogs display reservoir heterogeneity, flow barriers and baffles, and lithofacies geometry observed in the fields; thus, these properties were incorporated in the reservoir simulation models. Productive carbonate buildups consist of three types: (1) phylloid algal, (2) coralline algal, and (3) bryozoan. Phylloid-algal buildups have a mound-core interval and a supra-mound interval. Hydrocarbons are stratigraphically trapped in porous and permeable lithotypes within the mound-core intervals of the lower part of the buildups and the more heterogeneous supramound intervals. To adequately represent the observed spatial heterogeneities in reservoir properties, the phylloid-algal bafflestones of the mound-core interval and the dolomites of the overlying supra-mound interval were subdivided into ten architecturally distinct lithotypes, each of which exhibits a characteristic set of reservoir properties obtained from outcrop analogs, cores, and geophysical logs. The Anasazi and Runway fields were selected for geostatistical modeling and reservoir compositional simulations. Models and simulations incorporated variations in carbonate lithotypes, porosity, and permeability to accurately predict reservoir responses. History matches tied previous production and reservoir pressure histories so that future reservoir performances could be confidently predicted. The simulation studies showed that despite most of the production being from the mound-core intervals, there were no corresponding decreases in the oil in place in these intervals. This behavior indicates gravity drainage of oil from the supra-mound intervals into the lower mound-core intervals from which the producing wells' major share of production arises. The key to increasing ultimate recovery from these fields (and similar fields in the basin) is to design either waterflood or CO{sub 2}-miscible flood projects capable of forcing oil from high-storage-capacity but low-recovery supra-mound units into the high-recovery mound-core units. Simulation of Anasazi field shows that a CO{sub 2} flood is technically superior to a waterflood and economically feasible. For Anasazi field, an optimized CO{sub 2} flood is predicted to recover a total 4.21 million barrels (0.67 million m3) of oil representing in excess of 89 percent of the original oil in place. For Runway field, the best CO{sub 2} flood is predicted to recover a total of 2.4 million barrels (0.38 million m3) of oil representing 71 percent of the original oil in place. If the CO{sub 2} flood performed as predicted, it is a financially robust process for increasing the reserves in the many small fields in the Paradox Basin. The results can be applied to other fields in the Rocky Mountain region, the Michigan and Illinois Basins, and the Midcontinent.

  9. Freeze concentration of dairy products Phase 2. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Best, D.E.; Vasavada, K.C.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An efficient, electrically driven freeze concentration system offers potential for substantially increasing electricity demand while providing the mature dairy industry with new products for domestic and export markets together with enhanced production efficiencies. Consumer tests indicate that dairy products manufactured from freeze-concentrated ingredients are either preferred or considered equivalent in quality to fresh milk-based products. Economic analyses indicate that this technology should be competitive with thermal evaporation processes on a commercial basis.

  10. An Intensified Reaction/Product Recovery Process for the Continuous Production of Biodiesel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Biodiesel Cooperative Research into Biobased Fuels between ORNL and Nu-Energie Biodiesel: This project years. Increased use of domestic biofuels will provide a clean and secure source of energy. Biodiesel. Project Background: Conventional reaction and separations used in biodiesel production are done in time

  11. Effect of Increased Natural Gas Exports on Domestic Energy Markets

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently20,000 Russian NuclearandJunetrack graphics4DimitriJune 30,NEW! Energy LiteracyEffect of

  12. Fact #828: July 7, 2014 Japanese Auto Manufacturers Increase Domestic

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport in RepresentativeDepartment ofDepartmentLast Ten Years |Energy 4:

  13. addressing domestic violence: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    domestic violence and abuse. There is help available. Understanding domestic violence and abuse Men can be victims, too Women Leistikow, Bruce N. 9 Domestic violence is a health...

  14. Barriers to the increased utilization of coal combustion/desulfurization by-products by government and commercial sectors - Update 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pflughoeft-Hassett, D.F.; Sondreal, E.A.; Steadman, E.N.; Eylands, K.E.; Dockter, B.A.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The following conclusions are drawn from the information presented in this report: (1) Joint efforts by industry and government focused on meeting RTC recommendations for reduction/removal of barriers have met with some success. The most notable of these are the changes in regulations related to CCB utilization by individual states. Regionally or nationally consistent state regulation of CCB utilization would further reduce regulatory barriers. (2) Technology changes will continue to be driven by the CAAA, and emission control technologies are expected to continue to impact the type and properties of CCBs generated. As a result, continued RD and D will be needed to learn how to utilize new and changing CCBs in environmentally safe, technically sound, and economically advantageous ways. Clean coal technology CCBs offer a new challenge because of the high volumes expected to be generated and the different characteristics of these CCBs compared to those of conventional CCBs. (3) Industry and government have developed the RD and D infrastructure to address the technical aspects of developing and testing new CCB utilization applications, but this work as well as constant quality control/quality assurance testing needs to be continued to address both industry wide issues and issues related to specific materials, regions, or users. (4) Concerns raised by environmental groups and the public will continue to provide environmental and technical challenges to the CCB industry. It is anticipated that the use of CCBs in mining applications, agriculture, structural fills, and other land applications will continue to be controversial and will require case-by-case technical and environmental information to be developed. The best use of this information will be in the development of generic regulations specifically addressing the use of CCBs in these different types of CCB applications. (5) The development of federal procurement guidelines under Executive Order 12873 titled ''Federal Acquisition, Recycling and Waste Prevention,'' in October 1993 was a positive step toward getting CCBs accepted in the marketplace. Industry needs to continue to work with EPA to develop additional procurement guidelines for products containing CCBs--and to take advantage of existing guidelines to encourage the use of CCBs in high-profile projects. (6) Accelerated progress toward increased utilization of CCBs can be made only if there is an increased financial commitment and technical effort by industry and government. The framework for this has been set by the successful cooperation of industry and government under DOE leadership. Cooperation should continue, with DOE fulfilling its lead role established in the RTC. It is clear that the RTC recommendations continue to have validity with respect to increasing CCB utilization and continue to provide guidance to industry and government agencies.

  15. The domestic travel sector in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anders, Jeff, M.B.A. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    China is already the largest domestic tourism market in the world. Chinese citizens made as many as 800 million overnight domestic trips in 2005. While travel is not a new concept in China, the disposable income they wield, ...

  16. The structural preconditions for maximizing FDI spillovers in Colombia : a sectoral impact analysis of Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) on Industry output, labor payments, firm productivity, and the productive structure (1995-2009)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hyman, Benjamin G. (Benjamin Gabriel)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Do multinational corporations (MNCs) crowd out domestic firms in developing countries, or is foreign direct investment (FDI) complementary to domestic firm profitability, productivity, and employment? Empirical literature ...

  17. Comparative life-cycle air emissions of coal, domestic natural gas, LNG, and SNG for electricity generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paulina Jaramillo; W. Michael Griffin; H. Scott Matthews [Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Civil and Environmental Engineering Department

    2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) estimates that in the coming decades the United States' natural gas (NG) demand for electricity generation will increase. Estimates also suggest that NG supply will increasingly come from imported liquefied natural gas (LNG). Additional supplies of NG could come domestically from the production of synthetic natural gas (SNG) via coal gasification-methanation. The objective of this study is to compare greenhouse gas (GHG), SOx, and NOx life-cycle emissions of electricity generated with NG/LNG/SNG and coal. This life-cycle comparison of air emissions from different fuels can help us better understand the advantages and disadvantages of using coal versus globally sourced NG for electricity generation. Our estimates suggest that with the current fleet of power plants, a mix of domestic NG, LNG, and SNG would have lower GHG emissions than coal. If advanced technologies with carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) are used, however, coal and a mix of domestic NG, LNG, and SNG would have very similar life-cycle GHG emissions. For SOx and NOx we find there are significant emissions in the upstream stages of the NG/LNG life-cycles, which contribute to a larger range in SOx and NOx emissions for NG/LNG than for coal and SNG. 38 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Co-culture of mechanically injured cartilage with joint capsule tissue alters chondrocyte expression patterns and increases ADAMTS5 production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grodzinsky, Alan J.

    We studied changes in chondrocyte gene expression, aggrecan degradation, and aggrecanase production and activity in normal and mechanically injured cartilage co-cultured with joint capsule tissue. Chondrocyte expression ...

  19. Using similar tasks to increase negotiation of meaning and language production in an online second language learning environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arslanyilmaz, Abdurrahman

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This study investigates the use of authentic subtitled similar task videos (ASSTVs) and their relationship to second language negotiation of meaning and language production among non-native speakers of English in an online task-based language...

  20. Future U.S. water consumption : The role of energy production.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elcock, D.; Environmental Science Division

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study investigates how meeting domestic energy production targets for both fossil and renewable fuels may affect future water demand. It combines projections of energy production developed by the U.S. Department of Energy with estimates of water consumption on a per-unit basis (water-consumption coefficients) for coal, oil, gas, and biofuels production, to estimate and compare the domestic freshwater consumed. Although total domestic freshwater consumption is expected to increase by nearly 7% between 2005 and 2030, water consumed for energy production is expected to increase by nearly 70%, and water consumed for biofuels (biodiesel and ethanol) production is expected to increase by almost 250%. By 2030, water consumed in the production of biofuels is projected to account for nearly half of the total amount of water consumed in the production of all energy fuels. Most of this is for irrigation, and the West North Central Region is projected to consume most of this water in 2030. These findings identify an important potential future conflict between renewable energy production and water availability that warrants further investigation and action to ensure that future domestic energy demand can be met in an economically efficient and environmentally sustainable manner.

  1. The interrelationship between environmental goals, productivity improvement, and increased energy efficiency in integrated paper and steel plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of an investigation into the interrelationships between plant-level productivity, energy efficiency, and environmental improvements for integrated pulp and paper mills and integrated steel mills in the US. Integrated paper and steel plants are defined as those facilities that use some form of onsite raw material to produce final products (for example, paper and paperboard or finished steel). Fully integrated pulp and paper mills produce onsite the pulp used to manufacture paper from virgin wood fiber, secondary fiber, or nonwood fiber. Fully integrated steel mills process steel from coal, iron ore, and scrap inputs and have onsite coke oven facilities.

  2. Combined heat and power has the potential to significantly increase energy production efficiency and thus reduce greenhouse gas emissions, however current market penetration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    1 Combined heat and power has the potential to significantly increase energy production efficiency and thus reduce greenhouse gas emissions, however current market penetration analyses suggest that California will not reach the targets for combined heat and power set for it by the Air Resources Board (ARB

  3. Increase in ethanol yield via elimination of lactate production in an ethanol-tolerant mutant of Clostridium thermocellum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biswas, Ranjita [ORNL] [ORNL; Prabhu, Sandeep [ORNL] [ORNL; Lynd, Lee R [Thayer School of Engineering at Dartmouth] [Thayer School of Engineering at Dartmouth; Guss, Adam M [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Large-scale production of lignocellulosic biofuel is a potential solution to sustainably meet global energy needs. One-step consolidated bioprocessing (CBP) is a potentially advantageous approach for the production of biofuels, but requires an organism capable of hydrolyzing biomass to sugars and fermenting the sugars to ethanol at commercially viable titers and yields. Clostridium thermocellum, a thermophilic anaerobe, can ferment cellulosic biomass to ethanol and organic acids, but low yield, low titer, and ethanol sensitivity remain barriers to industrial production. Here, we deleted the hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase gene in ethanol tolerant strain of C. thermocellum adhE*(EA) in order to allow use of previously developed gene deletion tools, then deleted lactate dehydrogenase (ldh) to redirect carbon flux towards ethanol. Upon deletion of ldh, the adhE*(EA) ldh strain produced 30% more ethanol than wild type on minimal medium. The adhE*(EA) ldh strain retained tolerance to 5% v/v ethanol, resulting in an ethanol tolerant platform strain of C. thermocellum for future metabolic engineering efforts.

  4. Sandia National Laboratories: domestic reuse of wastewater

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    domestic reuse of wastewater Sandia, the Atlantic Council, and NM Water Resource Research Institute Sponsor Roundtable on Western Water Scarcity On October 4, 2013, in Climate,...

  5. Seeking New Approaches to Investigate Domestication Events |...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Department of Anthropology and Zooarcheology Laboratory The domestication of wild animal species has underpinned some of the most fundamental developments in human...

  6. The importance of domestic law to international arms control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lehman, R.F. II

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies of arms control and disarmament tend to focus on political, military, and diplomatic processes. Recently, in the context of the conversion of defense activities to civilian use, the economic aspects of arms control have also received renewed interest. The legal dimension, however, is in need of fresh examination. Both international and domestic law are sailing increasingly in uncharted waters. Recent arms control agreements and related developments in international peacekeeping have expanded the scope of international law and altered how one perceives certain fundamentals, including the principle of national sovereignty. Still, the nation state is largely unchallenged as the primary actor in international affairs. National governments retain near absolute sovereign rights and responsibilities even in an age of trans-national economic integration and codified international norms for human rights, freedom of the press, and the peaceful resolution of disputes. Indeed, the role of domestic law in arms control and disarmament may be more significant now than ever before. A brief review of relationships between arms control and domestic law should illustrate ways in which ones thinking has been underestimating the importance of domestic law. Hopefully, this survey will set the stage properly for the excellent, more detailed case studies by Elinor Hammarskjold and Alan Crawford. Toward that end, this paper will highlight a number of more general, and sometimes provocative, themes. These themes should be kept in mind when those two complementary presentations are considered.

  7. Research needs to maximize economic producibility of the domestic oil resource

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tham, M.K.; Burchfield, T.; Chung, Ting-Horng; Lorenz, P.; Bryant, R.; Sarathi, P.; Chang, Ming Ming; Jackson, S.; Tomutsa, L. (National Inst. for Petroleum and Energy Research, Bartlesville, OK (United States)); Dauben, D.L. (K and A Energy Consultants, Inc., Tulsa, OK (United States))

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NIPER was contracted by the US Department of Energy Bartlesville (Okla.) Project Office (DOE/BPO) to identify research needs to increase production of the domestic oil resource, and K A Energy Consultants, Inc. was subcontracted to review EOR field projects. This report summarizes the findings of that investigation. Professional society and trade journals, DOE reports, dissertations, and patent literature were reviewed to determine the state-of-the-art of enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and drilling technologies and the constraints to wider application of these technologies. The impacts of EOR on the environment and the constraints to the application of EOR due to environmental regulations were also reviewed. A review of well documented EOR field projects showed that in addition to the technical constraints, management factors also contributed to the lower-than-predicted oil recovery in some of the projects reviewed. DOE-sponsored projects were reviewed, and the achievements by these projects and the constraints which these projects were designed to overcome were also identified. Methods of technology transfer utilized by the DOE were reviewed, and several recommendations for future technology transfer were made. Finally, several research areas were identified and recommended to maximize economic producibility of the domestic oil resource. 14 figs., 41 tabs.

  8. Domestic Audiences, Policy Feedback, and Sequential Decisions During Military Interventions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuberski, Douglas Walter

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Committee Members, Michael Koch Guy Whitten Charles Hermann Head of Department, James Rogers December 2009 Major Subject: Political Science iii ABSTRACT Domestic Audiences, Policy Feedback, and Sequential Decisions During Military... how an individual citizen?s preference over commitment is impacted by policy feedback. The results of the experimental analyses suggest that citizens act as investors: they favor increasing commitment to military interventions when viewing negative...

  9. GNEP Element:Expand Domestic Use of Nuclear Power | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Expand Domestic Use of Nuclear Power GNEP Element:Expand Domestic Use of Nuclear Power A report discussing the intentions of the GNEP. GNEP Element:Expand Domestic Use of Nuclear...

  10. american turkey domestication: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to precontact Native the region, butrules out the South Mexican domestic turkey(Melea- gris gallopavo gallopavo) as a progenitor Kemp, Brian M. 4 The Paradox of Domesticity:...

  11. Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Expand Domestic...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Expand Domestic Use of Nuclear Power Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Expand Domestic Use of Nuclear Power GNEP will build on the recent advances made by the...

  12. Table 22. Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Prices for Selected...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Form EIA-182, "Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Report." 22. Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Prices for Selected Crude Streams 44 Energy Information Administration...

  13. Model Simulating Real Domestic Hot Water Use - Building America...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Model Simulating Real Domestic Hot Water Use - Building America Top Innovation Model Simulating Real Domestic Hot Water Use - Building America Top Innovation Image of a pipe...

  14. The domestic natural gas and oil initiative. Energy leadership in the world economy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two key overarching goals of this Initiative are enhancing the efficiency and competitiveness of U.S. industry and reducing the trends toward higher imports. These goals take into account new Federal policies that reflect economic needs, including economic growth, deficit reduction, job creation and security, and global competitiveness, as well as the need to preserve the environment, improve energy efficiency, and provide for national security. The success of this Initiative clearly requires coordinated strategies that range far beyond policies primarily directed at natural gas and oil supplies. Therefore, this Initiative proposes three major strategic activities: Strategic Activity 1 -- increase domestic natural gas and oil production and environmental protection by advancing and disseminating new exploration, production, and refining technologies; Strategic Activity 2 -- stimulate markets for natural gas and natural-gas-derived products, including their use as substitutes for imported oil where feasible; and Strategic Activity 3 -- ensure cost-effective environmental protection by streamlining and improving government communication, decision making, and regulation. Finally, the Initiative will reexamine the costs and benefits of increase oil imports through a broad new Department of Energy study. This study will form the basis for additional actions found to be warranted under the study.

  15. Construction of a Li Ion Battery (LIB) Cathode Production Plant...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of LIB Cathode Materials Process for Low Cost Domestic Production of LIB Cathode Materials Construction of a Li Ion Battery (LIB) Cathode Production Plant in Elyria, Ohio...

  16. STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY AIR PRODUCTS AND CHEMICALS...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    in the attached waiver petition and in subsequent discussions with DOE Patent Counsel, Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. (Air Products) has requested an advance waiver of domestic...

  17. Sun, Jan 09, 2005 Domestic Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gosselin, Frédéric

    Sun, Jan 09, 2005 Front Page National Domestic Economy Science Panorama Economic Focus Dot Coms on which SM was focusing, the team used a 'bubble test' in which only part of the face is revealed

  18. (Data in thousand metric tons of boric oxide (B O ), unless otherwise noted)2 3 Domestic Production and Use: The estimated value of boric oxide contained in minerals and compounds produced in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    was centered in southern California. The largest producer operated an open pit tincal and kernite mine in the world. Importation of borates from northern Chile continued. Ulexite is mined in Chile production during the year. Neodymium-iron-boron alloys are used to produce the strongest magnetic material

  19. (Data in thousand metric tons of silicon content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Estimated value of silicon alloys and metal produced in the United States in 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .19 billion. Three companies produced silicon materials in seven plants, all east of the Mississippi River company produced both products at two plants. Most ferrosilicon was consumed in the ferrous foundry producers of aluminum and aluminum alloys and the chemical industry. The semiconductor and solar industries

  20. (Data in metric tons of yttrium oxide (Y2O3) content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The rare-earth element yttrium was not mined in the United States in 2008. All

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    12-31-08 Thorium ores and concentrates (monazite) 2612.20.0000 Free. Rare-earth metals, scandium Production and Use: The rare-earth element yttrium was not mined in the United States in 2008. All yttrium and compounds containing by weight >19% to rare-earth compounds, including

  1. (Data in thousand metric tons of boric oxide (B2O3) unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The estimated value of boric oxide contained in minerals and compounds produced

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Salta Mining and Energy Resources, located in Salta Province in northern Argentina, increased exports,000 9,000 Bolivia 68 60 NA NA Chile 590 460 NA NA Chin

  2. Class III Mid-Term Project, "Increasing Heavy Oil Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Thermal Production Technologies"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Hara

    2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of this project was to increase heavy oil reserves in slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs through the application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The project involved improving thermal recovery techniques in the Tar Zone of Fault Blocks II-A and V (Tar II-A and Tar V) of the Wilmington Field in Los Angeles County, near Long Beach, California. A primary objective has been to transfer technology that can be applied in other heavy oil formations of the Wilmington Field and other SBC reservoirs, including those under waterflood. The first budget period addressed several producibility problems in the Tar II-A and Tar V thermal recovery operations that are common in SBC reservoirs. A few of the advanced technologies developed include a three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic geologic model, a 3-D deterministic thermal reservoir simulation model to aid in reservoir management and subsequent post-steamflood development work, and a detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rocks and fluids. State of the art operational work included drilling and performing a pilot steam injection and production project via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors), implementing a hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the existing steamflood area to improve thermal efficiency, installing a 2400-foot insulated, subsurface harbor channel crossing to supply steam to an island location, testing a novel alkaline steam completion technique to control well sanding problems, and starting on an advanced reservoir management system through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring, and evaluation. The second budget period phase (BP2) continued to implement state-of-the-art operational work to optimize thermal recovery processes, improve well drilling and completion practices, and evaluate the geomechanical characteristics of the producing formations. The objectives were to further improve reservoir characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, test the proficiency of the three-dimensional geologic and thermal reservoir simulation models, identify the high permeability thief zones to reduce water breakthrough and cycling, and analyze the nonuniform distribution of the remaining oil in place. This work resulted in the redevelopment of the Tar II-A and Tar V post-steamflood projects by drilling several new wells and converting idle wells to improve injection sweep efficiency and more effectively drain the remaining oil reserves. Reservoir management work included reducing water cuts, maintaining or increasing oil production, and evaluating and minimizing further thermal-related formation compaction. The BP2 project utilized all the tools and knowledge gained throughout the DOE project to maximize recovery of the oil in place.

  3. (Data in metric tons of silver content, unless otherwise noted)1 Domestic Production and Use: Silver, produced by about 76 mines in 16 States, had an estimated value of $338

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,8002 Shipments from Government stockpile excesses 186 220 232 109 250 Consumption, apparent NA NA NA 4,980 5 and technical uses. Industrial and technical uses include photographic materials, electrical products, catalysts NA 1,360 1,700 Imports for consumption 2,600 3,250 3,010 2,540 2,6002 Exports 967 2,890 2,950 3,080 3

  4. Increasing heavy oil reservers in the Wilmington oil Field through advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies, technical progress report, October 1, 1996--December 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hara, S. [Tidelands Oil Production Co., Long Beach, CA (United States)], Casteel, J. [USDOE Bartlesville Project Office, OK (United States)

    1997-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The project involves improving thermal recovery techniques in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., Calif. using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The existing steamflood in the Tar zone of Fault Block (FB) 11-A has been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs. Inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil, and nonuniform distribution of remaining oil have all contributed to poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated formation sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. The advanced technologies to be applied include: (1) Develop three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic geologic models. (2) Develop 3-D deterministic and stochastic thermal reservoir simulation models to aid in reservoir management and subsequent development work. (3) Develop computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid in analysis. (4) Perform detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (5) Pilot steam injection and production via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors). (6) Hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the existing steam drive area to improve thermal efficiency. (7) Installing a 2100 foot insulated, subsurface harbor channel crossing to supply steam to an island location. (8) Test a novel alkaline steam completion technique to control well sanding problems and fluid entry profiles. (9) Advanced reservoir management through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring, and evaluation.

  5. USING CABLE SUSPENDED SUBMERSIBLE PUMPS TO REDUCE PRODUCTION COSTS TO INCREASE ULTIMATE RECOVERY IN THE RED MOUNTAIN FIELD OF THE SAN JUAN BASIN REGION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Don L. Hanosh

    2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses: (1) being able to resume marginal oil production operations in the Red Mountain Oil Field, located in McKinley County, New Mexico by installing a cable suspended electric submersible pumping system (HDESP); (2) determining if this system can reduce life costs making it a more cost effective production system for similar oil fields within the region, and if warranted, drill additional wells to improve the economics. In April 2003, a cooperative 50% cost share agreement between Enerdyne and the DOE was executed to investigate the feasibility of using cable suspended electric submersible pumps to reduce the life costs and increase the ultimate oil recovery of the Red Mountain Oil Field, located on the Chaco Slope of the San Juan Basin, New Mexico. The field was discovered in 1934 and has produced approximately 55,650 cubic meters (m{sup 3}), (350,000 barrels, 42 gallons) of oil. Prior to April 2003, the field was producing only a few cubic meters of oil each month; however, the reservoir characteristics suggest that the field retains ample oil to be economic. This field is unique, in that, the oil accumulations, above fresh water, occur at depths from 88-305 meters, (290 feet to 1000 feet), and serves as a relatively good test area for this experiment.

  6. The directory of United States coal & technology export resources. Profiles of domestic US corporations, associations and public entities, nationwide, which offer products or services suitable for export, relating to coal and its utilization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this directory is to provide a listing of available U.S. coal and coal related resources to potential purchasers of those resources abroad. The directory lists business entities within the US which offer coal related resources, products and services for sale on the international market. Each listing is intended to describe the particular business niche or range of product and/or services offered by a particular company. The listing provides addresses, telephones, and telex/fax for key staff in each company committed to the facilitation of international trade. The content of each listing has been formulated especially for this directory and reflects data current as of the date of this edition. The directory listings are divided into four primary classifications: coal resources; technology resources; support services; and financing and resource packaging. The first three of which are subdivided as follows: Coal Resources -- coal derivatives, coal exporters, and coal mining; Technology Resources -- advanced utilization, architects and engineers, boiler equipment, emissions control and waste disposal systems, facility construction, mining equipment, power generation systems, technical publications, and transport equipment; Support Services -- coal transport, facility operations, freight forwarders, sampling services and equipment, and technical consultants. Listings for the directory were solicited on the basis of this industry breakdown. Each of the four sections of this directory begins with a matrix illustrating which companies fall within the particular subclassifications specific to that main classification. A general alphabetical index of companies and an index by product/service classification are provided following the last section of the directory.

  7. Technology for Increasing Geothermal Energy Productivity. Computer Models to Characterize the Chemical Interactions of Goethermal Fluids and Injectates with Reservoir Rocks, Wells, Surface Equiptment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nancy Moller Weare

    2006-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This final report describes the results of a research program we carried out over a five-year (3/1999-9/2004) period with funding from a Department of Energy geothermal FDP grant (DE-FG07-99ID13745) and from other agencies. The goal of research projects in this program were to develop modeling technologies that can increase the understanding of geothermal reservoir chemistry and chemistry-related energy production processes. The ability of computer models to handle many chemical variables and complex interactions makes them an essential tool for building a fundamental understanding of a wide variety of complex geothermal resource and production chemistry. With careful choice of methodology and parameterization, research objectives were to show that chemical models can correctly simulate behavior for the ranges of fluid compositions, formation minerals, temperature and pressure associated with present and near future geothermal systems as well as for the very high PT chemistry of deep resources that is intractable with traditional experimental methods. Our research results successfully met these objectives. We demonstrated that advances in physical chemistry theory can be used to accurately describe the thermodynamics of solid-liquid-gas systems via their free energies for wide ranges of composition (X), temperature and pressure. Eight articles on this work were published in peer-reviewed journals and in conference proceedings. Four are in preparation. Our work has been presented at many workshops and conferences. We also considerably improved our interactive web site (geotherm.ucsd.edu), which was in preliminary form prior to the grant. This site, which includes several model codes treating different XPT conditions, is an effective means to transfer our technologies and is used by the geothermal community and other researchers worldwide. Our models have wide application to many energy related and other important problems (e.g., scaling prediction in petroleum production systems, stripping towers for mineral production processes, nuclear waste storage, CO2 sequestration strategies, global warming). Although funding decreases cut short completion of several research activities, we made significant progress on these abbreviated projects.

  8. The Challenge Domestic solar panels produce electricity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crowther, Paul

    Sheffield Science Gateway. The Challenge Domestic solar panels produce electricity for homes materials to a wide range of optoelectronic devices, including solar panels. This project was one of 10 of renewable energy generated by solar panels. As a country with ambitious targets for renewable energy at both

  9. Office of Domestic and International Health Studies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Domestic and International Health Studies engages in the conduct of international scientific studies that may provide new knowledge and information about the human response to ionizing radiation in the workplace or people exposed in communities as a result of nuclear accidents, including providing health and environmental monitoring services to populations specified by law.

  10. Domestic smoke pollution and acute respiratory infections in a rural community of the hill region of Nepal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pandey, M.R.; Neupane, R.P.; Gautam, A.; Shrestha, I.B. (Mrigendra Medical Trust, Kathmandu (Nepal))

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Acute respiratory infections (ARI) are the cause of death for at least five million children per year under five years of age. Most of these deaths occur in developing countries. Domestic smoke pollution is very common in many parts of the developing world, and appropriate technology, such as smokeless stoves, is available to reduce this type of pollution. The present study has been undertaken in a rural community of the hill region of Nepal to find out if there is any association between domestic smoke pollution and ARI in infants and children younger than two years of age. This preliminary study showed that episodes of moderate and severe ARI increased with increases in the level of exposure to domestic smoke pollution, thus suggesting domestic smoke pollution to be an important, preventable risk factor of ARI.

  11. Home, Habits, and Energy: Examining Domestic Interactions and Energy Consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paulos, Eric

    , habitual, and irrational. Implications for the design of energy-conserving interactions with technology investigate the relationships among "normal" domestic interactions with technology, energy consumptionHome, Habits, and Energy: Examining Domestic Interactions and Energy Consumption James Pierce1

  12. Hydrogen from Diverse Domestic ResourcesHydrogen from Diverse Domestic Resources Distributed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sequestration Biomass Hydro Wind Solar Biomass Hydro Wind Solar Coal Nuclear Natural Gas Oil Sequestration #12 on foreign oil. · Promote the use of diverse, domestic, and sustainable energy sources. · Reduce carbon

  13. Increasing heavy oil reserves in the Wilmington oil field through advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. Quarterly technical progress report, March 30, 1995--June 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clarke, D. [Long Beach City Dept. of Oil Properties, CA (United States); Ershaghi, I. [Southern California, CA (United States); Davies, D. [Davies (David K.) and Associates, Kingwood, TX (United States); Phillips, C.; Mondragon, J. [Tidelands Oil Production Company (United States)

    1995-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the first quarterly technical progress report for the project. Although the contract was awarded on March 30, 1995 and Pre-Award Approval was given on January 26, 1995, the partners of this project initiated work on October 1, 1994. As such, this progress report summarizes the work performed from project inception. The production and injection data, reservoir engineering data, and digitized and normalized log data were all completed sufficiently by the end of the quarter to start work on the basic reservoir engineering and geologic stochastic models. Basic reservoir engineering analysis began June 1 and will continue to March, 1996. Design work for the 5 observation/core holes, oil finger printing of the cored oil sands, and tracers surveys began in January, 1995. The wells will be drilled from July--August, 1995 and tracer injection work is projected to start in October, 1995. A preliminary deterministic 3-D geologic model was completed in June which is sufficient to start work on the stochastic 3-D geologic model. The four proposed horizontal wells (two injectors and two producers) have been designed, equipment has been ordered, and the wells will be drilled from mid-August through September. Four existing steam injection wells were converted to hot water injection in March, 1995. Initial rates were kept low to minimize operational problems. Injection rates will be increased significantly in July.

  14. Production

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Algae production R&D focuses on exploring resource use and availability, algal biomass development and improvements, characterizing algal biomass components, and the ecology and engineering of...

  15. Q&A About Media Coverage of Domestic Violence New York State Office for the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiu, Weigang

    Q&A About Media Coverage of Domestic Violence New York State Office for the Prevention of Domestic..............................................................................................Cover Media Coverage of Domestic Violence...................................................................................... Page 2 Q&A About Media Coverage of Domestic Violence

  16. Production

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Algae production R&D focuses on exploring resource use and availability, algal biomass development and improvements, characterizing algal biomass components, and the ecology and engineering of cultivation systems.

  17. Domestic institutions, strategic interests, and international conflict

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clare, Joseph Daniel

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    (Huth and Russett 1984, 1988; Fearon 1994a, 1995; Zagare and Kilgour 2000; Schultz 2001; Danilovic 2002). Two recent theoretical angles are most relevant for the approach I take here. Though both attempt to explain the same phenomena?strategic bargaining... of resolve are more credible when leaders face domestic punishment for failing to carry out their threats. Most notably advanced in the audience costs approach (Fearon 1994; Smith 1998; Schultz 2001), this premise leads to an expectation for democratic states...

  18. Expansion of Domestic Production of Lithium Carbonate and Lithium...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    2010 End Date: February, 2013 Partners Engineering: BE&K (a KBR company) Environmental Assessment: Nevada BLM Budget DOE Share - 28.4 million Rockwood Share - 34.5 million...

  19. Expansion of Domestic Production of Lithium Carbonate and Lithium...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    2010 End Date: February, 2013 Partners Engineering: BE&K (a KBR company) Environmental Assessment: Nevada Bureau of Land Mgmt Budget DOE Share - 28.4 million Rockwood Share -...

  20. Expansion of Domestic Production of Lithium Carbonate and Lithium...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    2010 End Date: December, 2013 Partners Engineering: BE&K (a KBR company) Environmental Assessment: Nevada Bureau Land Mgmt Budget DOE Share - 28.4 million Rockwood Share -...

  1. Expansion of Domestic Production of Lithium Carbonate and Lithium...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    June, 2014 Partners Engineering: BE&K (a KBR company), Jacobs Engineering Environmental Assessment: Nevada Bureau Land Mgmt Forecast Spending DOE Share - 28.4 million Rockwood...

  2. Expansion of Domestic Production of Lithium Carbonate and Lithium...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting arravt010esgroves2012...

  3. Expansion of Domestic Production of Lithium Carbonate and Lithium...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation arravt010esgroves2011...

  4. Expansion of Domestic Production of Lithium Carbonate and Lithium...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    0 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C. esarravt010groves2010...

  5. 1st Quarter 2015 Domestic Uranium Production Report

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline prices4 Oil demand8) JunePercent ofFigure 1.

  6. 1st Quarter 2015 Domestic Uranium Production Report

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline prices4 Oil demand8) JunePercent ofFigure 1.

  7. 1st Quarter 2015 Domestic Uranium Production Report

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline prices4 Oil demand8) JunePercent ofFigure

  8. 1st Quarter 2015 Domestic Uranium Production Report

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline prices4 Oil demand8) JunePercent

  9. 1st Quarter 2015 Domestic Uranium Production Report

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline prices4 Oil demand8) JunePercent2014 1st

  10. Domestic Uranium Production Report 1st Quarter 2015

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline353/06) 2Yonthly Energy :and1. Total3.

  11. Table 5. Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14Total DeliveredPrincipal shale gas plays:

  12. Process for Low Cost Domestic Production of LIB Cathode Materials |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of ContaminationHubs+ Report Presentation:in the U.S. by Consider theDepartmentDepartment

  13. Process for Low Cost Domestic Production of LIB Cathode Materials |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of ContaminationHubs+ Report Presentation:in the U.S. by Consider

  14. 1st Quarter 2015 Domestic Uranium Production Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi" ,"Plant","Primary

  15. Expansion of Domestic Production of Lithium Carbonate and Lithium Hydroxide

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:RevisedAdvisoryStandardGenerationEducationalChemistryEnergyto Supply US Battery

  16. Expansion of Domestic Production of Lithium Carbonate and Lithium Hydroxide

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:RevisedAdvisoryStandardGenerationEducationalChemistryEnergyto Supply US

  17. Expansion of Domestic Production of Lithium Carbonate and Lithium Hydroxide

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:RevisedAdvisoryStandardGenerationEducationalChemistryEnergyto Supply USto

  18. Fridge of the future: Designing a one-kilowatt-hour/day domestic refrigerator-freezer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vineyard, E.A.; Sand, J.R.

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An industry/government Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) was established to evaluate and test design concepts for a domestic refrigerator-freezer unit that represents approximately 60% of the US market. The goal of the CRADA was to demonstrate advanced technologies which reduce, by 50 percent, the 1993 NAECA standard energy consumption for a 20 ft{sup 3} (570 I) top-mount, automatic-defrost, refrigerator-freezer. For a unit this size, the goal translated to an energy consumption of 1.003 kWh/d. The general objective of the research was to facilitate the introduction of cost-efficient technologies by demonstrating design changes that can be effectively incorporated into new products. A 1996 model refrigerator-freezer was selected as the baseline unit for testing. Since the unit was required to meet the 1993 NAECA standards, the energy consumption was quite low (1.676 kWh/d), thus making further reductions in energy consumption very challenging. Among the energy saving features incorporated into the original design of the baseline unit were a low-wattage evaporator fan, increased insulation thicknesses, and liquid line flange heaters.

  19. Experimental and cost analyses of a one kilowatt-hour/day domestic refrigerator-freezer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vineyard, E.A.; Sand, J.R.

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past ten years, government regulations for energy standards, coupled with the utility industry`s promotion of energy-efficient appliances, have prompted appliance manufacturers to reduce energy consumption in refrigerator-freezers by approximately 40%. Global concerns over ozone depletion have also required the appliance industry to eliminate CFC-12 and CFC-11 while concurrently improving energy efficiency to reduce greenhouse emissions. In response to expected future regulations that will be more stringent, several design options were investigated for improving the energy efficiency of a conventionally designed, domestic refrigerator-freezer. The options, such as cabinet and door insulation improvements and a high-efficiency compressor were incorporated into a prototype refrigerator-freezer cabinet and refrigeration system. Baseline energy consumption of the original 1996 production refrigerator-freezer, along with cabinet heat load and compressor calorimeter test results, were extensively documented to provide a firm basis for experimentally measured energy savings. The goal for the project was to achieve an energy consumption that is 50% below in 1993 National Appliance Energy Conservation Act (NAECA) standard for 20 ft{sup 3} (570 l) units. Based on discussions with manufacturers to determine the most promising energy-saving options, a laboratory prototype was fabricated and tested to experimentally verify the energy consumption of a unit with vacuum insulation around the freezer, increased door thicknesses, a high-efficiency compressor, a low wattage condenser fan, a larger counterflow evaporator, and adaptive defrost control.

  20. Using Flue Gas Huff 'n Puff Technology and Surfactants to Increase Oil Production from the Antelope Shale Formation of the Railroad Gap Oil Field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McWilliams, Michael

    2001-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was designed to test cyclic injection of exhaust flue gas from compressors located in the field to stimulate production from Antelope Shale zone producers. Approximately 17,000 m{sup 3} ({+-}600 MCF) of flue gas was to be injected into each of three wells over a three-week period, followed by close monitoring of production for response. Flue gas injection on one of the wells would be supplemented with a surfactant.

  1. Fossil fuel potential of Turkey: A statistical evaluation of reserves, production, and consumption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korkmaz, S.; Kara-Gulbay, R.; Turan, M. [Karadeniz Technical University, Trabzon (Turkey)

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since Turkey is a developing country with tremendous economic growth, its energy demand is also getting increased. Of this energy, about 70% is supplied from fossil fuels and the remaining 30% is from renewable sources. Among the fossil fuels, 90% of oil, natural gas, and coal are imported, and only 10% is from domestic sources. All the lignite is supplied from domestic sources. The total share of renewable sources and lignite in the total energy production is 45%. In order for Turkey to have sufficient and reliable energy sources, first the renewable energy sources must be developed, and energy production from fossil fuels, except for lignite, must be minimized. Particularly, scarcity of fossil fuels and increasing oil prices have a strong effect on economic growth of the country.

  2. The nutritional impact of domestic food programs in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keplinger, Keith Oswald

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    event in U. S. legislative history. Even more recent is the evolution of domestic food programs from the status of being primarily vents for surplus agricultural production to their present form where they exist as welfare programs in their own right... of the Food Stamp Program on food consumption in the Southern U. S. Many of the same variables are included in the analysis athough the specification is different. In particular, the food stamp variable, interacting with other independent variables...

  3. The potential use of domestic safeguards interior monitors in International Safeguards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, J.D.; Dupree, S.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sonnier, C.S. [Jupiter Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An important future element of International Safeguards instrumentation is expected to be the merging of containment/surveillance and nondestructive assay equipment with domestic physical protection equipment into integrated systems, coupled with remote monitoring. Instrumentation would include interior monitoring and assessment and entry/exit monitoring. Of particular importance is the application of interior monitors in spaces of declared inactivity; for example, in nuclear material storage locations that are entered infrequently. The use of modern interior monitors in International Safeguards offers potential for improving effectiveness and efficiency. Within the context of increased cooperation, one can readily envision increased interaction between International Safeguards and Domestic Safeguards, including increased joint use of State System of Accounting and Control data.

  4. Help for declining natural gas production seen in the unconventional sources of natural gas. [Eastern shales, tight sands, coal beds, geopressured zones

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Staats, E.B.

    1980-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Oil imports could be reduced and domestic gas production increased if additional gas production is obtained from four unconventional resources-eastern Devonian shales, tight sands, coal beds, and geopressured zones. Gas produced from these resources can help maintain overall production levels as supplies from conventional gas sources gradually decline. The eastern shales and western sands are the chief potential contributors in the near term. Further demonstrations of coal bed methane's recovery feasibility could improve the prospects for its production while future geopressured methane production remains speculative at this time.

  5. Table 21. Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1998 41 Table 21. Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Prices (Dollars per Barrel) - Continued Year Month PAD District II...

  6. Table 22. Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Prices for Selected...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    company data. Source: Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-182, "Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Report." 44 Energy Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual...

  7. Table 21. Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Information Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual 1995 41 Table 21. Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Prices (Dollars per Barrel) - Continued Year Month PAD District II...

  8. Table 22. Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Prices for Selected...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    company data. Source: Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-182, "Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Report." 44 Energy Information Administration Petroleum Marketing...

  9. ORISE: Securing the Golden State from threats foreign and domestic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Securing the Golden State from threats foreign and domestic ORISE helps California emergency planners with innovative training on state and local levels To protect the state of...

  10. NREL Improves System Efficiency and Increases Energy Transfer with Wind2H2 Project, Enabling Reduced Cost Electrolysis Production (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet describes NREL's accomplishments in improving energy transfer within a wind turbine-based hydrogen production system. Work was performed by the Wind2H2 Project team at the National Wind Technology Center in partnership with Xcel Energy.

  11. Tappable Pine Trees: Commercial Production of Terpene Biofuels in Pine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PETRO Project: The University of Florida is working to increase the amount of turpentine in harvested pine from 4% to 20% of its dry weight. While enhanced feedstocks for biofuels have generally focused on fuel production from leafy plants and grasses, the University of Florida is experimenting with enhancing fuel production in a species of pine that is currently used in the paper pulping industry. Pine trees naturally produce around 3-5% terpene content in the wood—terpenes are the energy-dense fuel molecules that are the predominant components of turpentine. The team aims to increase the terpene storage potential and production capacity while improving the terpene composition to a point at which the trees could be tapped while alive, like sugar maples. Growth and production from these trees will take years, but this pioneering technology could have significant impact in making available an economical and domestic source of aviation and diesel biofuels.

  12. USING CABLE SUSPENDED SUBMERSIBLE PUMPS TO REDUCE PRODUCTION COSTS TO INCREASE ULTIMATE RECOVERY IN THE RED MOUNTAIN FIELD IN SAM JUAN BASIN REGION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Don L. Hanosh

    2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A joint venture between Enerdyne LLC, a small independent oil and gas producer, and Pumping Solutions Inc., developer of a low volume electric submersible pump, suspended from a cable, both based in Albuquerque, New Mexico, has re-established marginal oil production from the Red Mountain Oil Field, located in the San Juan Basin, New Mexico by working over 17 existing wells and installing submersible pumps.

  13. USING CABLE SUSPENDED SUBMERSIBLE PUMPS TO REDUCE PRODUCTION COSTS TO INCREASE ULTIMATE RECOVERY IN THE RED MOUNTAIN FIELD IN SAN JUAN BASIN REGION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pat Fort; Don L. Hanosh

    2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A joint venture between Enerdyne LLC, a small independent oil and gas producer, and Pumping Solutions Inc., developer of a low volume electric submersible pump, suspended from a cable, both based in Albuquerque, New Mexico, has re-established marginal oil production from the Red Mountain Oil Field, located in the San Juan Basin, New Mexico by working over 17 existing wells and installing submersible pumps. Resume marginal oil production operations in the Red Mountain oil fields located in McKinley County, New Mexico by installing a cable suspended electric submersible pumping system (HDESP), determine if this system can reduce lift costs making it a more cost effective production system for similar oil fields within the region, and if warranted, drill additional wells to improved the economics. Three Phases of work have been defined in the DOE Form 4600.1 Notice of Financial Assistance Award for this project, in which the project objectives are to be attained through a joint venture between Enerdyne LLC (Enerdyne), owner and operator of the fields and Pumping Solutions Inc. (PSI), developer of the submersible pumping system. Upon analysis of the results of each Phase, the DOE will determine if the results justify the continuation of the project and approve the next Phase to proceed or terminate the project and request that the wells be plugged. This topical report shall provide the DOE with Phase I results and conclusions reached by Enerdyne and PSI.

  14. Increased oil production and reserves utilizing secondary/tertiary recovery techniques on small reservoirs in the Paradox basin, Utah. Annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chidsey, T.C. Jr.

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Paradox basin of Utah, Colorado, and Arizona contains nearly 100 small oil fields producing from carbonate buildups or mounds within the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation. These fields typically have one to four wells with primary production ranging from 700,000 to 2,000,000 barrels of oil per field at a 15 to 20% recovery rate. At least 200 million barrels of oil is at risk of being unrecovered in these small fields because of inefficient recovery practices and undrained heterogeneous reservoirs. Five fields (Anasazi, mule, Blue Hogan, heron North, and Runway) within the Navajo Nation of southeastern utah are being evaluated for waterflood or carbon-dioxide-miscible flood projects based upon geological characterization and reservoir modeling. The results can be applied to other fields in the Paradox basin and the Rocky Mountain region, the Michigan and Illinois basins, and the Midcontinent. The reservoir engineering component of the work completed to date included analysis of production data and well tests, comprehensive laboratory programs, and preliminary mechanistic reservoir simulation studies. A comprehensive fluid property characterization program was completed. Mechanistic reservoir production performance simulation studies were also completed.

  15. Domestic animals in a changing world

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of high quality feed Management systems Higher total production Environmental impact Diseases (infectious material Production of high quality feed Management systems Higher total production Environmental impact with high production in the feeding and management systems that we provide, without compromising animal

  16. Interaction between domestic and international students: a case study on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin, S. Massoud

    Interaction between domestic and international students: a case study on the perspective of CIDE of domestic students is limited. Case study conducted in Fall 2009 Purpose to explore current level integration ·Case studies "We cannot simply assume that interaction between local and international students

  17. Heterogeneous Shallow-Shelf Carbonate Buildups in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado: Targets for Increased Oil Production and Reserves Using Horizontal Drilling Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas C. Chidsey; Kevin McClure; Craig D. Morgan

    2003-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The Paradox Basin of Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico contains nearly 100 small oil fields producing from carbonate buildups within the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation. These fields typically have one to 10 wells with primary production ranging from 700,000 to 2,000,000 barrels (111,300-318,000 m{sup 3}) of oil per field and a 15 to 20 percent recovery rate. At least 200 million barrels (31.8 million m{sup 3}) of oil will not be recovered from these small fields because of inefficient recovery practices and undrained heterogeneous reservoirs. Several fields in southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado are being evaluated as candidates for horizontal drilling and enhanced oil recovery from existing vertical wells based upon geological characterization and reservoir modeling case studies. Geological characterization on a local scale is focused on reservoir heterogeneity, quality, and lateral continuity, as well as possible reservoir compartmentalization, within these fields. This study utilizes representative cores, geophysical logs, and thin sections to characterize and grade each field's potential for drilling horizontal laterals from existing development wells. The results of these studies can be applied to similar fields elsewhere in the Paradox Basin and the Rocky Mountain region, the Michigan and Illinois Basins, and the Midcontinent region. This report covers research activities for the first half of the fourth project year (April 6 through October 5, 2003). The work included (1) analysis of well-test data and oil production from Cherokee and Bug fields, San Juan County, Utah, and (2) diagenetic evaluation of stable isotopes from the upper Ismay and lower Desert Creek zones of the Paradox Formation in the Blanding sub-basin, Utah. Production ''sweet spots'' and potential horizontal drilling candidates were identified for Cherokee and Bug fields. In Cherokee field, the most productive wells are located in the thickest part of the mound facies of the upper Ismay zone, where microporosity is well developed. In Bug field, the most productive wells are located structurally downdip from the updip porosity pinch out in the dolomitized lower Desert Creek zone, where micro-box-work porosity is well developed. Microporosity and micro-box-work porosity have the greatest hydrocarbon storage and flow capacity, and potential horizontal drilling target in these fields. Diagenesis is the main control on the quality of Ismay and Desert Creek reservoirs. Most of the carbonates present within the lower Desert Creek and Ismay have retained a marine-influenced carbon isotope geochemistry throughout marine cementation as well as through post-burial recycling of marine carbonate components during dolomitization, stylolitization, dissolution, and late cementation. Meteoric waters do not appear to have had any effect on the composition of the dolomites in these zones. Light oxygen values obtained from reservoir samples for wells located along the margins or flanks of Bug field may be indicative of exposure to higher temperatures, to fluids depleted in {sup 18}O relative to sea water, or to hypersaline waters during burial diagenesis. The samples from Bug field with the lightest oxygen isotope compositions are from wells that have produced significantly greater amounts of hydrocarbons. There is no significant difference between the oxygen isotope compositions from lower Desert Creek dolomite samples in Bug field and the upper Ismay limestones and dolomites from Cherokee field. Carbon isotopic compositions for samples from Patterson Canyon field can be divided into two populations: isotopically heavier mound cement and isotopically lighter oolite and banded cement. Technology transfer activities consisted of exhibiting a booth display of project materials at the annual national convention of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists, a technical presentation, a core workshop, and publications. The project home page was updated on the Utah Geological Survey Internet web site.

  18. USING CABLE SUSPENDED SUBMERSIBLE PUMPS TO REDUCE PRODUCTION COSTS TO INCREASE ULTIMATE RECOVERY IN THE RED MOUNTAIN FIELD IN SAN JUAN BASIN REGION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Don L. Hanosh

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A joint venture between Enerdyne LLC, a small independent oil and gas producer, and Pumping Solutions Inc., developer of a low volume electric submersible pump, suspended from a cable, both based in Albuquerque, New Mexico, has re-established marginal oil production from the Red Mountain Oil Field, located in the San Juan Basin, New Mexico by working over 17 existing wells and installing submersible pumps. The project was funded through a cooperative 50% cost sharing agreement between Enerdyne LLC and the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), United States Department of Energy, executed on April 16, 2003. The total estimated cost for this first phase of the agreement was $386,385.00 as detailed in Phase I Authorization For Expenditure (AFE). This report describes the tasks performed, the results, and conclusions for the first phase (Phase I) of the cooperative agreement.

  19. Electrocatalytic H2 production with a turnover frequency >107 s?1: The medium provides an increase in rate but not overpotential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hou, Jianbo; Fang, Ming; Cardenas, Allan J.; Shaw, Wendy J.; Helm, Monte L.; Bullock, R. Morris; Roberts, John A.; O'Hagan, Molly J.

    2014-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Exceptionally fast electrocatalytic H2 production (up to 3 x 107 s -1) at overpotentials of ~400 mV are catalysed by [Ni(PPh2NC6H4X2)2]2+ complexes in an acidic ionic liquid - water medium ([(DMF)H]NTf2-H2O, ?H2O = 0.71). This research was supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences and the Office of Science Early Career Research Program through the US DOE, BES (W.J.S.). Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

  20. a-si alloy production: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for silicon metal comes primarily from the aluminum and chemical industries. Domestic secondary aluminum production--the primary materials source for aluminum-silicon alloys--was...

  1. HETEROGENEOUS SHALLOW-SHELF CARBONATE BUILDUPS IN THE PARADOX BASIN, UTAH AND COLORADO: TARGETS FOR INCREASED OIL PRODUCTION AND RESERVES USING HORIZONTAL DRILLING TECHNIQUES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David E. Eby; Thomas C. Chidsey, Jr.; Kevin McClure; Craig D. Morgan

    2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Paradox Basin of Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico contains nearly 100 small oil fields producing from carbonate buildups within the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation. These fields typically have one to 10 wells with primary production ranging from 700,000 to 2,000,000 barrels (111,300-318,000 m{sup 3}) of oil per field and a 15 to 20 percent recovery rate. At least 200 million barrels (31.8 million m{sup 3}) of oil will not be recovered from these small fields because of inefficient recovery practices and undrained heterogeneous reservoirs. Several fields in southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado are being evaluated as candidates for horizontal drilling and enhanced oil recovery from existing vertical wells based upon geological characterization and reservoir modeling case studies. Geological characterization on a local scale is focused on reservoir heterogeneity, quality, and lateral continuity, as well as possible reservoir compartmentalization, within these fields. This study utilizes representative cores, geophysical logs, and thin sections to characterize and grade each field's potential for drilling horizontal laterals from existing development wells. The results of these studies can be applied to similar fields elsewhere in the Paradox Basin and the Rocky Mountain region, the Michigan and Illinois Basins, and the Midcontinent region. This report covers research activities for the second half of the third project year (October 6, 2002, through April 5, 2003). The primary work included describing and mapping regional facies of the upper Ismay and lower Desert Creek zones of the Paradox Formation in the Blanding sub-basin, Utah. Regional cross sections show the development of ''clean carbonate'' packages that contain all of the productive reservoir facies. These clean carbonates abruptly change laterally into thick anhydrite packages that filled several small intra-shelf basins in the upper Ismay zone. Examination of upper Ismay cores identified seven depositional facies: open marine, middle shelf, inner shelf/tidal flat, bryozoan mounds, phylloid-algal mounds, quartz sand dunes, and anhydritic salinas. Lower Desert Creek facies include open marine, middle shelf, protomounds/collapse breccia, and phylloid-algal mounds. Mapping the upper Ismay zone facies delineates very prospective reservoir trends that contain porous, productive buildups around the anhydrite-filled intra-shelf basins. Facies and reservoir controls imposed by the anhydritic intra-shelf basins should be considered when selecting the optimal location and orientation of any horizontal drilling from known phylloidalgal reservoirs to undrained reserves, as well as identifying new exploration trends. Although intra-shelf basins are not present in the lower Desert Creek zone of the Blanding sub-basin, drilling horizontally along linear shoreline trends could also encounter previously undrilled, porous intervals and buildups. Technology transfer activities consisted of a technical presentation at a Class II Review conference sponsored by the National Energy Technology Laboratory at the Center for Energy and Economic Diversification in Odessa, Texas. The project home page was updated on the Utah Geological Survey Internet web site.

  2. Table 23. Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Prices by API Gravity

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Form EIA-182, "Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Report." 23. Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Prices by API Gravity Energy Information Administration Petroleum...

  3. COMBINING DIVERSE DATA SOURCES FOR CEDSS, AN AGENT-BASED MODEL OF DOMESTIC ENERGY DEMAND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gotts, Nicholas Mark; Polhill, Gary; Craig, Tony; Galan-Diaz, Carlos

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Model CEDSS (Community Energy Demand Social Simulator) wasthe determinants of domestic energy demand and covering fivescenarios of domestic energy demand to 2050, and for its

  4. Spotless Italy: Hygiene, Domesticity, and the Ubiquity of Whiteness in Fascist and Postwar Consumer Culture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lombardi-Diop, Cristina

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spotless Italy: Hygiene, Domesticity, and the Ubiquity ofa certain obsession with hygiene seems to signal a desireculture, domesticity, hygiene, and whiteness begins. This

  5. Using Cable Suspended Submersible Pumps to Reduce Production Costs to Increase Ultimate Recovery in the Red Mountain Field of the San Juan Basin Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Don L. Hanosh

    2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A joint venture between Enerdyne LLC, a small independent oil and gas producer, and Pumping Solutions Inc., developer of a low volume electric submersible pump, suspended from a cable, both based in Albuquerque, New Mexico, has re-established marginal oil production from Red Mountain Oil Field, located in the San Juan Basin, New Mexico by working over 17 existing wells, installing cable suspended submersible pumps ( Phase I ) and operating the oil field for approximately one year ( Phase II ). Upon the completion of Phases I and II ( Budget Period I ), Enerdyne LLC commenced work on Phase III which required additional drilling in an attempt to improve field economics ( Budget Period II ). The project was funded through a cooperative 50% cost sharing agreement between Enerdyne LLC and the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), United States Department of Energy, executed on April 16, 2003. The total estimated cost for the two Budget Periods, of the Agreement, was $1,205,008.00 as detailed in Phase I, II & III Authorization for Expenditures (AFE). This report describes tasks performed and results experienced by Enerdyne LLC during the three phases of the cooperative agreement.

  6. Increased oil production and reserves utilizing secondary/tertiary recovery techniques on small reservoirs in the Paradox basin, Utah. Annual report, February 9, 1996--February 8, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chidsey, T.C. Jr.

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Paradox basin of Utah, Colorado, and Arizona contains nearly 100 small oil fields producing from carbonate buildups or mounds within the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation. These fields typically have one to four wells with primary production ranging from 700,000 to 2,000,000 barrels of oil per field at a 15 to 20% recovery rate. At least 200 million barrels of oil is at risk of being unrecovered in these small fields because of inefficient recovery practices and undrained heterogeneous reservoirs. Five fields (Anasazi, Mule, Blue Hogan, Heron North, and Runway) within the Navajo Nation of southeastern Utah are being evaluated for waterflood or carbon-dioxide-miscible flood projects based upon geological characterization and reservoir modeling. The results can be applied to other fields in the Paradox basin and the Rocky Mountain region, the Michigan and Illinois basins, and the Midcontinent. The Anasazi field was selected for the initial geostatistical modeling and reservoir simulation. A compositional simulation approach is being used to model primary depletion, waterflood, and CO{sub 2}-flood processes. During this second year of the project, team members performed the following reservoir-engineering analysis of Anasazi field: (1) relative permeability measurements of the supra-mound and mound-core intervals, (2) completion of geologic model development of the Anasazi reservoir units for use in reservoir simulation studies including completion of a series of one-dimensional, carbon dioxide-displacement simulations to analyze the carbon dioxide-displacement mechanism that could operate in the Paradox basin system of reservoirs, and (3) completion of the first phase of the full-field, three-dimensional Anasazi reservoir simulation model, and the start of the history matching and reservoir performance prediction phase of the simulation study.

  7. DOE Selects Projects Totaling $12.4 Million Aimed at Increasing Domestic

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof"WaveInteractions andDefinition of ShowerheadandFederalHawaii'sEnergy

  8. DOE Selects Projects Totaling $12.4 Million Aimed at Increasing Domestic

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China U.S. DepartmentEnergyBoilersPlant | Department ofPower| DepartmentEnergy

  9. Applications Received by DOE/FE to Export Domestically Produced...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Applications Received by DOEFE to Export Domestically Produced LNG from the Lower-48 States (as of March 5, 2014) All Changes Since February 11, 2014 Update Are In Red 1 Company...

  10. Domestic Institutions and the Supply and Demand of Remittances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hicks, Brian N.

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    routinely desire to control international immigration and capital movement. Consequently they adopt domestic policies which create and enforce institutions that manage both capital and labor mobility across borders. Additionally, researchers commonly neglect...

  11. Table 21. Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    19.11 18.73 18.63 17.97 18.75 18.10 See footnotes at end of table. 21. Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Prices Energy Information Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual...

  12. Toxicity studies with Sesbania spp. in domestic and laboratory animals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whall, Jeffrey DePass

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    May 1982 Major Subject: Veterinary Toxicology TOXICITY STUDIES WITH SESBANIA SPP. IN DOMESTIC AND LABORATORY ANIMALS A Thesis by JEFFREY DEPASS WHALL Approved as to style and content by: (- ~ -) Chy an of Comm ttee) Head f Depar t) (Member...

  13. Changes in the U.S. Domestic Group Tour Market 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Purifoy, Melanie

    2011-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    of the requirements for the designation as UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH SCHOLAR A Senior Scholars Thesis by MELANIE L. PURIFOY CHAglyph1197GES Iglyph1197 THE U.S. DOMESTIC GROUP TOUR MARKET Approved by: Research Advisor: Ulrike Gretzel Associate... as UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH SCHOLAR A Senior Scholars Thesis by MELANIE L. PURIFOY iii ABSTRACT Changes in the U.S. Domestic Group Tour Market (April 2008) Melanie L. Purifoy Department of Recreation, Parks and Tourism Sciences Texas A&M University...

  14. Visual discrimination at varying distances in domestic goats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blakeman, Nancy Elizabeth

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    VISUAL DISCRIMINATION AT VARYINS DISTANCES IN DOMESTIC BOATS A Theaia by NANCY ELIZABETH SLAKEMAN Submitted ta the Sraduate Cel lege ef Taxaa ACcH Univaraity in partial fulfil leant of the requireeents far the degree ef MASTER OF 'SCIENCE... ) J. W. Bassett (Member ) S. C. Bait (Head' o+ Dept-tment) December 1983 Visual Discrimination at Varying Distances in Domestic Boats (December 1983) Nancy Elizabeth Blakeman, B. S. ~ Texas A S N University Chairman of Advisory Coemittee. Dr...

  15. Impact of an Export Subsidy on the Domestic Cotton Industry.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wohlgenant, Michael K.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Elasticities 9 Export Demand Elasticity 10 Elasticity of the Price Transmission of 12 Imported Textiles with Respect to Domestic Cotton Simulation Results for the Effects of Alternative 13 Export Subsidies Estimated Effects on U.S. Price and Quantities... for the three alternative subsidy amounts are presented in Tables 6 through 8. ESTIMATED EFFECTS ON U.s. PRICES AND QUANTITIES The effects of alternative export subsidies on the domestic [14] cotton price, mill consumption of cotton, and cotton exports...

  16. Substitution for petroleum products in Brasil: Urgent issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    de Araujo, J.L.; Ghirardi, A.

    1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Brazililan energy policy during the last decade has focused on the replacement of imported petroleum with domestic energy sources, combined with efforts at conservation. The substitution results, however, have been more spectacular by far. The strategy of replacement is based on two elements. first, to increase domestic petroleum exploration and production. Second, to promote non-petroleum fuels as alternatives to the industrial and transportation sectors, for the substitution of fuel oil and gasoline, respectively. A combination of the substitution strategy, the country's petroleum refining structure, and the composition of the substitution strategy, the country's petroleum refining structure, and the composition of demand, has resulted in large surpluses of both gasoline and fuel oil, while diesel has become the most used among petroleum products. The surpluses are not easily exportable because there is ample availability of fuel oil in the world market, and because the low octane number of the gasoline produced in Brasil is not compatible with the engines of cars elsewhere in the region and in the world. Furthermore, although gasoline might be upgraded, the question remains that prospects for the world market are not encouraging, and an export-based strategy does not seem justified in view of the growing surpluses. The objective of this analysis is to review the mechanisms of themajor petroleum-substitution programs currently in existence, identifying their past impact on the energy market and the possible consequences of changes in the goals and operating conditions of these programs, in the light of the new prospects for increased domestic oil production and self-sufficiency. 23 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Compositions and methods for increasing cellulose production

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yang, Zhenbiao (Riverside, CA); Karr, Stephen (Camarillo, CA)

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This disclosure relates to methods and compositions for genetically altering cellulose biosynthesis.

  18. Sandia National Laboratories: increase annual electricity production

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    & Events, Partnership, Renewable Energy, Solar, Solar Newsletter SolarReserve is testing engineering units at the National Solar Thermal Test Facility (NSTTF) operated by Sandia....

  19. Increasing Scientific Productivity by Tracking Data

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm)HydrogenRFP » ImportantOfficeofof

  20. U.S. monthly coal production increases

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline prices continueshort

  1. STEO January 2013 - oil production increase

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand Requirements RecentlyElectronicResourcesjobsJuly throughR E Q U ESTEM SubscribeRiseoil

  2. Effective Fouling Minimization Increases the Efficiency and Productivi...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Effective Fouling Minimization Increases the Efficiency and Productivity of Refineries Effective Fouling Minimization Increases the Efficiency and Productivity of Refineries This...

  3. Imports and Exports of Fishery Products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Imports and Exports of Fishery Products Annual Summary, 2001 IMPORTS. U.S. imports of edible of fishery products were imported. EXPORTS. U.S. exports of edible fishery products of domestic origin were 1,139,744 tons valued at $3.1 billion, compared with 948,025 tons at $2.8 billion exported in 2000

  4. Imports and Exports of Fishery Products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Imports and Exports of Fishery Products Annual Summary, 2000 IMPORTS. U.S. imports of edible.0 billion of fishery products were imported. EXPORTS. U.S. exports of edible fishery products of domestic origin were 948,025 tons valued at $2.8 billion, compared with 864,166 tons at $2.7 billion exported

  5. Promising freeze protection alternatives in solar domestic hot water systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradley, D.E.

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the gains associated with solar thermal energy technologies are comparatively small in relation to the required capital investment, it is vital to maximize conversion efficiency. While providing the necessary function of freeze protection, the heat exchanger commonly included in solar domestic water heating systems represents a system inefficiency. This thesis explores two alternate methods of providing freeze protection without resorting to a heat exchanger. Commonly, collectors are made of rigid copper tubes separated by copper or aluminum fins. Cracking damage can occur when water is allowed to freeze and expand inside the non compliant tubes. The possibility of making collectors out of an elastic material was investigated and shown to be effective. Since unlike copper, elastomers typically have low thermal conductivities, the standard collector performance prediction equations do not apply. Modified thermal performance prediction equations were developed which can be used for both low and high thermal conductivity materials to provide accurate predictions within a limited range of plate geometries. An elastomeric collector plate was then designed and shown to have comparable performance to a copper plate collector whose aperture area is approximately 33% smaller. Another options for providing freeze protection to an SDHW system is to turn it off during the winter. Choosing a three-season operating period means two things. First, the system will have different optimums such as slope and collector area. Second, the wintertime solar energy incident on the collector is unavailable for meeting a heating load. However, the system`s heat exchanger becomes unnecessary and removing it increases the amount of energy that arrives at the storage tank during those periods in which the system is operating.

  6. (Data in metric tons of tin content, unless noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1995, there was no domestic tin mine production. Production of tin at the only

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,600 2,560 2,000 Shipments from Government stockpile excesses 6,195 6,310 6,022 5,620 5,000 Consumption and containers, 32%; electrical, 23%; construction, 9%; transportation, 11%; and other, 25%. The estimated value of primary metal consumption in 1995, based on the New York composite price, was $300 million. Salient

  7. Domestic Water Conservation Technologies: Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) Federal Technology Alert (Booklet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Executive Order 13123 calls for the Federal government to conserve water as well as energy in its 500,000 facilities. To help set priorities among water-saving measures, the Federal Energy Management Program conducted a study of Federal water use in 1997. The study indicated that the government consumes more than 50% of its water in just three types of Federal facilities: housing, hospitals, and office buildings. These facilities have enough kitchens, rest rooms, and laundry areas to provide facility managers with many opportunities to begin reducing their water use (and utility costs) with appropriate water-saving fixtures and products. Therefore, this Federal Technology Alert focuses on domestic technologies, products, and appliances such as water-efficient faucets, showerheads, toilets, urinals, washing machines, and dishwashers. Conserving water also saves the energy needed to treat, pump, and heat that water in homes, businesses, and other buildings.

  8. A Numerical Investigation into the Anomalous Slight NOx Increase when Burning Biodiesel: A New (Old) Theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ban-Weiss, G A; Chen, J Y; Buchholz, B A; Dibble, R W

    2007-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Biodiesel is a notable alternative to petroleum derived diesel fuel because it comes from natural domestic sources and thus reduces dependence on diminishing petroleum fuel from foreign sources, it likely lowers lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions, and it lowers an engine's emission of most pollutants as compared to petroleum derived diesel. However, the use of biodiesel often slightly increases a diesel engine's emission of smog forming nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) relative to petroleum diesel. In this paper, previously proposed theories for this slight NOx increase are reviewed, including theories based on biodiesel's cetane number, which leads to differing amounts of charge preheating, and theories based on the fuel's bulk modulus, which affects injection timing. This paper proposes an additional theory for the slight NO{sub x} increase of biodiesel. Biodiesel typically contains more double bonded molecules than petroleum derived diesel. These double bonded molecules have a slightly higher adiabatic flame temperature, which leads to the increase in NOx production for biodiesel. Our theory was verified using numerical simulations to show a NOx increase, due to the double bonded molecules, that is consistent with observation. Further, the details of these numerical simulations show that NOx is predominantly due to the Zeldovich mechanism.

  9. STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY THE JOHN DEERE PRODUCT...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    JOHN DEERE PRODUCT ENGINEERING CENTER FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN INVENTION RIGHTS UNDER DOE CONTRACT NO. DE-FC26-05NT42416; W(A)-05-050, CH-1335 The Petitioner,...

  10. STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY AIR PRODUCTS AND CHEMICALS...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AIR PRODUCTS AND CHEMICALS, INC. FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN PATENT RIGHTS UNDER DOE COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT NO. DE-FC36-95GO10059; W(A)-96-016; CH-0908 The...

  11. Smart Meter Aware Domestic Energy Trading Agents Nicola Capodieci

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aiello, Marco

    Smart Meter Aware Domestic Energy Trading Agents Nicola Capodieci University of Modena and RE illustrate an implementation includ- ing the interfacing with a physical Smart Meter and provide initial--Intelligent agents, Multiagent systems General Terms Design, Economy Keywords Energy trade, agents, smart meter 1

  12. New York State Office for the Prevention of Domestic Violence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiu, Weigang

    serve as a vital tool for responders in domestic violence cases. They are used by prosecutors to build this spring, the NYS Division of Criminal Justice Services (DCJS) is making it possible for DIRs to be shared of strangulation was added to the NYS Penal Law, and 2/22/11, a total of 2,003 people were charged with felony and

  13. Analysis Model for Domestic Hot Water Distribution Systems: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maguire, J.; Krarti, M.; Fang, X.

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermal model was developed to estimate the energy losses from prototypical domestic hot water (DHW) distribution systems for homes. The developed model, using the TRNSYS simulation software, allows researchers and designers to better evaluate the performance of hot water distribution systems in homes. Modeling results were compared with past experimental study results and showed good agreement.

  14. A Gameroom of Our Own: Exploring The Domestic Gaming Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenberg, Saul

    A Gameroom of Our Own: Exploring The Domestic Gaming Environment A. VOIDA Donald Bren School ________________________________________________________________________ Digital gaming plays out within different environments--from arcades to virtual worlds to the family living room. Each of these gaming environments offer different constraints and affordances for gaming

  15. STATE OF CALIFORNIA SOLAR DOMESTIC HOT WATER SYSTEMS (SDHW)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    attached CEC F-Chart) # of Collectors in System Collector Size Solar Tank Volume (gallons) §150(j)1B piping shall be insulated. §150(j)4: Solar water-heating system and/or/collectors are certifiedSTATE OF CALIFORNIA SOLAR DOMESTIC HOT WATER SYSTEMS (SDHW) CEC- CF-6R-MECH-02 (Revised 08

  16. Role of CCTs in the evolving domestic electricity market

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grahame, T.J. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Coal and Power Systems

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper summarizes the key points and issues in the role of clean coal technologies in the domestic marketplace. Then suggested solutions to bringing precommercial CCTs to the market are presented. Finally, the outlook for possible actions by government and the private sector are briefly discussed.

  17. Tyrosinase and Tyrosinase Related Protein 1 Alleles Specify Domestic Cat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eizirik, Eduardo

    Tyrosinase and Tyrosinase Related Protein 1 Alleles Specify Domestic Cat Coat Color Phenotypes address above, or e-mail: aschmidt@ncifcrf.gov. Abstract The genes encoding enzymes of the tyrosinase tyrosinase (TYR)--a plausible candidate gene for the albino (C) locus, and tyrosinase related protein 1 (TYRP

  18. Uranium in US surface, ground, and domestic waters. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drury, J.S.; Reynolds, S.; Owen, P.T.; Ross, R.H.; Ensminger, J.T.

    1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report Uranium in US Surface, Ground, and Domestic Waters comprises four volumes. Volumes 2, 3, and 4 contain data characterizing the location, sampling date, type, use, and uranium conentrations of 89,994 individual samples presented in tabular form. The tabular data in volumes 2, 3, and 4 are summarized in volume 1 in narrative form and with maps and histograms.

  19. Laying Claim to the Home: Homesteads and National Domesticity in Antebellum America 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wyckoff, Robert Thomas

    2013-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    his dissertation examines the rhetoric of the homestead movement in antebellum America as a particular instance of domesticity. Homestead rhetoric alters the modes of identity and subjectivity usually found in domesticity, and alters the home...

  20. The evolution of U.S. commercial domestic aircraft operations from 1991 to 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wulz, Alexander Andrew

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The main objective of this thesis is to explore the evolution of U.S. commercial domestic aircraft operations from 1991 to 2010 and describe the implications for future U.S. commercial domestic fleets. Using data collected ...

  1. The Lessons of Practice: Domestic Policy Reform as a Way to Address...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Practice: Domestic Policy Reform as a Way to Address Climate Change Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: The Lessons of Practice: Domestic Policy Reform as a...

  2. Author's personal copy Effectiveness of domestic wastewater treatment using microbial fuel cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction Conventional biological wastewater treatmentAuthor's personal copy Effectiveness of domestic wastewater treatment using microbial fuel cells 2009 Available online 5 September 2009 Keywords: Domestic wastewater treatment Energy recovery

  3. WA_01_022_PRAXAIR_INC_AND_BP_AMOCO_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Fo...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    1022PRAXAIRINCANDBPAMOCOWaiverofDomesticandFo.pdf WA01022PRAXAIRINCANDBPAMOCOWaiverofDomesticandFo.pdf WA01022PRAXAIRINCANDBPAMOCOWaiverofDomestic...

  4. Estimates of future regional heavy oil production at three production rates--background information for assessing effects in the US refining industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, D.K.

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is one of a series of publications from a project considering the feasibility of increasing domestic heavy oil (10{degree} to 20{degree} API gravity inclusive) production being conducted for the US Department of Energy. The report includes projections of future heavy oil production at three production levels: 900,000; 500,000; and 300,000 BOPD above the current 1992 heavy oil production level of 750,000 BOPD. These free market scenario projections include time frames and locations. Production projections through a second scenario were developed to examine which heavy oil areas would be developed if significant changes in the US petroleum industry occurred. The production data helps to define the possible constraints (impact) of increased heavy oil production on the US refining industry (the subject of a future report). Constraints include a low oil price and low rate of return. Heavy oil has high production, transportation, and refining cost per barrel as compared to light oil. The resource is known, but the right mix of technology and investment is required to bring about significant expansion of heavy oil production in the US.

  5. Rabbit mitochondrial DNA : preliminary comparison between some domestic and wild animals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Rabbit mitochondrial DNA : preliminary comparison between some domestic and wild animals Hajer of 6 wild and 5 domestic rabbits belonging respectively to the subspecies Oryctolagus cuniculus algirus, endonucléase de restriction. #12;I. Introduction Living wild and domestic rabbits belong to a unique species

  6. Imports and Exports of Fishery Products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Imports and Exports of Fishery Products Annual Summary, 2002 IMPORTS. U.S. imports of edible. EXPORTS. U.S. exports of edible fishery products of domestic origin were 1,056,306 tons valued at $3.0 billion, compared with 1,139,744 tons at $3.1 billion exported in 2001. Fresh and frozen items were 883

  7. Imports and Exports of Fishery Products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Imports and Exports of Fishery Products Annual Summary, 2003 IMPORTS. U.S. imports of edible imported. EXPORTS. U.S. exports of edible fishery products of domestic origin were 1,047,706 tons valued at $3.1 billion, compared with 1,056,303 tons at $3.0 billion exported in 2002. Fresh and frozen items

  8. Nigerian refineries strive for product balance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Obuasi, P.A.

    1985-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This article discusses the growth patterns of the Nigerian refining industry. Production and consumption are expected to follow the pattern of consumption of fuel products by the domestic market, Presently, however, production and consumption are not evenly balanced for most fuel products, and non-fuel products are domestically consumed but not produced. Some progress has been made in the effort to match production and consumption of fuel products. But the progress that would have been made to balance non-fuel products has been nullified by 50% of the Daduna refinery being idle. This is due to problems associated with importation of heavy crude oil into Nigeria and also a weak market for asphalt in Nigeria.

  9. Evaluation of design options for improving the energy efficiency of an environmentally safe domestic refrigerator-freezer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vineyard, E.A.; Sand, J.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Bohman, R.H.

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to reduce greenhouse emissions from power plants and respond to regulatory actions arising from the National Appliance Energy Conservation Act (NAECA), several design options were investigated for improving the energy efficiency of a conventionally designed, domestic refrigerator-freezer. The options, such as improved cabinet insulation and high-efficiency compressor and fans, were incorporated into a prototype refrigerator-freezer cabinet and refrigeration system to produce a unit that is superior from an environmental viewpoint due to its lower energy consumption and the use of refrigerant HFC-134a as a replacement for CFC-12. Baseline energy performance of the original 1993 production refrigerator-freezer, along with cabinet heat load and compressor calorimeter test results, were extensively documented to provide a firm basis for experimentally measured energy savings. A detailed refrigerator system computer model was used to evaluate the energy savings for several design modifications that, collectively, could achieve a targeted energy consumption of 1.00 kWh/d for a 20 ft{sup 3} (570 l) top-mount, automatic-defrost, refrigerator-freezer. The energy consumption goal represents a 50% reduction in the 1993 NAECA standard for units of this size. Following the modeling simulation, laboratory prototypes were fabricated and tested to experimentally verify the analytical results and aid in improving the model in those areas where discrepancies occurred. While the 1.00 kWh/d goal was not achieved with the modifications, a substantial energy efficiency improvement of 22% (1.41 kWh/d) was demonstrated using near-term technologies. It is noted that each improvement exacts a penalty in terms of increased cost or system complexity/reliability. Further work on this project will analyze cost-effectiveness of the design changes and investigate alternative, more-elaborate, refrigeration system changes to further reduce energy consumption.

  10. Trends in heavy oil production and refining in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, D.K.; Ramzel, E.B.; Pendergrass, R.A. II.

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is one of a series of publications assessing the feasibility of increasing domestic heavy oil production and is part of a study being conducted for the US Department of Energy. This report summarizes trends in oil production and refining in Canada. Heavy oil (10{degrees} to 20{degrees} API gravity) production in California has increased from 20% of the state's total oil production in the early 1940s to 70% in the late 1980s. In each of the three principal petroleum producing districts (Los Angeles Basin, Coastal Basin, and San Joaquin Valley) oil production has peaked then declined at different times throughout the past 30 years. Thermal production of heavy oil has contributed to making California the largest producer of oil by enhanced oil recovery processes in spite of low oil prices for heavy oil and stringent environmental regulation. Opening of Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, Elk Hills (CA) field in 1976, brought about a major new source of light oil at a time when light oil production had greatly declined. Although California is a major petroleum-consuming state, in 1989 the state used 13.3 billion gallons of gasoline or 11.5% of US demand but it contributed substantially to the Nation's energy production and refining capability. California is the recipient and refines most of Alaska's 1.7 million barrel per day oil production. With California production, Alaskan oil, and imports brought into California for refining, California has an excess of oil and refined products and is a net exporter to other states. The local surplus of oil inhibits exploitation of California heavy oil resources even though the heavy oil resources exist. Transportation, refining, and competition in the market limit full development of California heavy oil resources.

  11. Trends in heavy oil production and refining in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, D.K.; Ramzel, E.B.; Pendergrass, R.A. II

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is one of a series of publications assessing the feasibility of increasing domestic heavy oil production and is part of a study being conducted for the US Department of Energy. This report summarizes trends in oil production and refining in Canada. Heavy oil (10{degrees} to 20{degrees} API gravity) production in California has increased from 20% of the state`s total oil production in the early 1940s to 70% in the late 1980s. In each of the three principal petroleum producing districts (Los Angeles Basin, Coastal Basin, and San Joaquin Valley) oil production has peaked then declined at different times throughout the past 30 years. Thermal production of heavy oil has contributed to making California the largest producer of oil by enhanced oil recovery processes in spite of low oil prices for heavy oil and stringent environmental regulation. Opening of Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, Elk Hills (CA) field in 1976, brought about a major new source of light oil at a time when light oil production had greatly declined. Although California is a major petroleum-consuming state, in 1989 the state used 13.3 billion gallons of gasoline or 11.5% of US demand but it contributed substantially to the Nation`s energy production and refining capability. California is the recipient and refines most of Alaska`s 1.7 million barrel per day oil production. With California production, Alaskan oil, and imports brought into California for refining, California has an excess of oil and refined products and is a net exporter to other states. The local surplus of oil inhibits exploitation of California heavy oil resources even though the heavy oil resources exist. Transportation, refining, and competition in the market limit full development of California heavy oil resources.

  12. United States Domestic Research Reactor Infrastrucutre TRIGA Reactor Fuel Support

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas Morrell

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United State Domestic Research Reactor Infrastructure Program at the Idaho National Laboratory manages and provides project management, technical, quality engineering, quality inspection and nuclear material support for the United States Department of Energy sponsored University Reactor Fuels Program. This program provides fresh, unirradiated nuclear fuel to Domestic University Research Reactor Facilities and is responsible for the return of the DOE-owned, irradiated nuclear fuel over the life of the program. This presentation will introduce the program management team, the universities supported by the program, the status of the program and focus on the return process of irradiated nuclear fuel for long term storage at DOE managed receipt facilities. It will include lessons learned from research reactor facilities that have successfully shipped spent fuel elements to DOE receipt facilities.

  13. Methane production from ozonated pulp mill effluent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bremmon, C.E.; Jurgensen, M.F.; Patton, J.T.

    1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A study was made of the production of methane from desugared spent sulfite liquor (SSL) reacted with ozone. The ozonated SSL was fed continuously to three anaerobic fermenters for three months as the sole source of carbon and energy. The fermenters were inoculated with anaerobic bacteria obtained from sewage sludge and acclimated for 1 month in ozonated SSL prior to continuous fermentation. Chemical and biological parameters such as COD, BOD, total sulfur content, redox potential, pH, fatty acid composition, and methane bacteria populations were monitored to determine changes in the SSL during fermentation. Methane production from ozone-treated SSL averaged 1.7 liters/ liter or 17 ml of CH/sub 4/ produced/gram of volatile solids fed. Fatty acis analysis of fermenter effluent indicated a net production of 58 mM/ liter of acetate during ozonated SSL fermentation. This acetic acid production shows future potential for further fermentation by protein-producing yeast. Although the rate of conversion of volatile solids to CH/sub 4/ in this process was not competitive with domestic or agricultural waste digesters, this study did indicate the potential benefits of ozonating organic wastes for increased methane fermentation yields.

  14. Design package for solar domestic hot water system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Information used to evaluate the initial design of the Elcam, Inc., Solar Domestic Hot Water System is presented. Included are such items as the system performance specification, detailed design drawings and other information. Elcam, Inc., has developed two solar heated prototype hot water systems and two heat exchangers. The hot water systems consist of the following subsystems: collector, storage, control, transport, auxiliary energy, and government-furnished Site Data Acquisition. The two systems are installed at Tempe, Arizona, and San Diego, California.

  15. PRODUCTION OF CARBON PRODUCTS USING A COAL EXTRACTION PROCESS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dady Dadyburjor; Philip R. Biedler; Chong Chen; L. Mitchell Clendenin; Manoj Katakdaunde; Elliot B. Kennel; Nathan D. King; Liviu Magean; Peter G. Stansberry; Alfred H. Stiller; John W. Zondlo

    2004-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory sponsored project developed carbon products, using mildly hydrogenated solvents to extract the organic portion of coal to create synthetic pitches, cokes, carbon foam and carbon fibers. The focus of this effort was on development of lower cost solvents, milder hydrogenation conditions and improved yield in order to enable practical production of these products. This technology is needed because of the long-term decline in production of domestic feedstocks such as petroleum pitch and coal tar pitch. Currently, carbon products represents a market of roughly 5 million tons domestically, and 19 million tons worldwide. Carbon products are mainly derived from feedstocks such as petroleum pitch and coal tar pitch. The domestic supply of petroleum pitch is declining because of the rising price of liquid fuels, which has caused US refineries to maximize liquid fuel production. As a consequence, the long term trend has a decline in production of petroleum pitch over the past 20 years. The production of coal tar pitch, as in the case of petroleum pitch, has likewise declined significantly over the past two decades. Coal tar pitch is a byproduct of metallurgical grade coke (metcoke) production. In this industry, modern metcoke facilities are recycling coal tar as fuel in order to enhance energy efficiency and minimize environmental emissions. Metcoke production itself is dependent upon the production requirements for domestic steel. Hence, several metcoke ovens have been decommissioned over the past two decades and have not been replaced. As a consequence sources of coal tar are being taken off line and are not being replaced. The long-term trend is a reduction in coal tar pitch production. Thus import of feedstocks, mainly from Eastern Europe and China, is on the rise despite the relatively large transportation cost. To reverse this trend, a new process for producing carbon products is needed. The process must be economically competitive with current processes, and yet be environmentally friendly as well. The solvent extraction process developed uses mild hydrogenation of low cost oils to create powerful solvents that can dissolve the organic portion of coal. The insoluble portion, consisting mainly of mineral matter and fixed carbon, is removed via centrifugation or filtration, leaving a liquid solution of coal chemicals and solvent. This solution can be further refined via distillation to meet specifications for products such as synthetic pitches, cokes, carbon foam and fibers. The most economical process recycles 85% of the solvent, which itself is obtained as a low-cost byproduct from industrial processes such as coal tar or petroleum refining. Alternatively, processes have been developed that can recycle 100% of the solvent, avoiding any need for products derived from petroleum or coal tar.

  16. Swedish industry is exposed to increasingly fierce competition. We need improved condi-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Yuxiao

    for robust domestic production. Effec- tive use of resources is necessary for sustain- able development. Li, project control and human resource manage- ment. Ultimately, it addresses the relation- ship between as a key field of study for the university. ManageMent tools for the future Swedish industry needs

  17. Development of an advanced continuous mild gasification process for the production of coproducts: Task 4. 6, Technical and economic evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hogsett, R.F.; Jha, M.C.

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) of DOE has sponsored, and continues to sponsor, programs for the development of technology and market strategies which will lead to the commercialization of processes for the production of coproducts from mild gasification of coal. It has been recognized by DOE and industry that mild gasification is a promising technology with potential to economically convert coal into marketable products, thereby increasing domestic coal utilization. In this process, coal is devolatilized under non- oxidizing conditions at mild temperature (900--1100{degrees}F) and pressure (1--15psig). Condensation of the vapor will yield a liquid product that can be upgraded to a petroleum substitute, and the remaining gas can provide the fuel for the process. The residual char can be burned in a power plant. Thus, in a long-term national scenario, implementation of this process will result in significant decrease of imported oil and increase in coal utilization.

  18. EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Early Release

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    reflects increased domestic petroleum and natural gas production, increased use of biofuels (much of which are produced domestically), and demand reductions resulting from...

  19. EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Early Release

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    reflects increased domestic crude oil and natural gas production, increased use of biofuels (much of which are produced domestically), and demand reductions resulting from the...

  20. Polymers with increased order

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sawan, Samuel P. (Tyngsborough, MA); Talhi, Abdelhafid (Rochester, MI); Taylor, Craig M. (Jemez Springs, NM)

    1998-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention features polymers with increased order, and methods of making them featuring a dense gas.

  1. Coal liquefaction process with increased naphtha yields

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ryan, Daniel F. (Friendswood, TX)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved process for liquefying solid carbonaceous materials wherein the solid carbonaceous material is slurried with a suitable solvent and then subjected to liquefaction at elevated temperature and pressure to produce a normally gaseous product, a normally liquid product and a normally solid product. The normally liquid product is further separated into a naphtha boiling range product, a solvent boiling range product and a vacuum gas-oil boiling range product. At least a portion of the solvent boiling-range product and the vacuum gas-oil boiling range product are then combined and passed to a hydrotreater where the mixture is hydrotreated at relatively severe hydrotreating conditions and the liquid product from the hydrotreater then passed to a catalytic cracker. In the catalytic cracker, the hydrotreater effluent is converted partially to a naphtha boiling range product and to a solvent boiling range product. The naphtha boiling range product is added to the naphtha boiling range product from coal liquefaction to thereby significantly increase the production of naphtha boiling range materials. At least a portion of the solvent boiling range product, on the other hand, is separately hydrogenated and used as solvent for the liquefaction. Use of this material as at least a portion of the solvent significantly reduces the amount of saturated materials in said solvent.

  2. (Data in kilograms of germanium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based upon an estimated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,800 10,100 7,100 Shipments from Government stockpile excesses 681 1,760 7,190 4,510 4,000 Consumption.S. germanium consumption. The major end uses for germanium, worldwide, were estimated to be polymerization catalysts, 31%; fiber-optic systems, 24%; infrared optics, 23%; electronics/solar electric applications, 12

  3. (Data in kilograms of germanium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based upon an estimated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,200 13,800 26,500 Shipments from Government stockpile excesses 5,730 681 1,760 7,190 5,000 Consumption.S. germanium consumption. The major end uses for germanium, worldwide, were estimated to be polymerization catalysts, 31%; fiber-optic systems, 24%; infrared optics, 23%; electronics/solar electric applications, 12

  4. Domestic Coal Distribution 2009 Q2 by Destination State: Alabama

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688 760,877 951,322 1,381,127by Local(Dollars per61 Domestic

  5. Sources of Corn for Ethanol Production in the United States: A Review and Decomposition Analysis of the Empirical Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oladosu, Gbadebo A [ORNL; Kline, Keith L [ORNL; Uria Martinez, Rocio [ORNL; Eaton, Laurence M [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of corn for ethanol production in the United States quintupled between 2001 and 2009, generating concerns that this could lead to the conversion of forests and grasslands around the globe, known as indirect land-use change (iLUC). Estimates of iLUC and related food versus fuel concerns rest on the assumption that the corn used for ethanol production in the United States would come primarily from displacing corn exports and land previously used for other crops. A number of modeling efforts based on these assumptions have projected significant iLUC from the increases in the use of corn for ethanol production. The current study tests the veracity of these assumptions through a systematic decomposition analysis of the empirical data from 2001 to 2009. The logarithmic mean divisia index decomposition method (Type I) was used to estimate contributions of different factors to meeting the corn demand for ethanol production. Results show that about 79% of the change in corn used for ethanol production can be attributed to changes in the distribution of domestic corn consumption among different uses. Increases in the domestic consumption share of corn supply contributed only about 5%. The remaining contributions were 19% from added corn production, and 2% from stock changes. Yield change accounted for about two-thirds of the contributions from production changes. Thus, the results of this study provide little support for large land-use changes or diversion of corn exports because of ethanol production in the United States during the past decade.

  6. Leading without Followers: How Politics and Market Dynamics Trapped Innovations in Japan's Domestic Galapagos Telecommunications Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kushida, Kenji E

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Japan leading without followers in telecommunications by presenting the four technologyJapan’s domestic telecommunications market from global markets despite leading in particular technologies

  7. Table 23. Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Prices by API Gravity

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    data reported. Source: Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-182, "Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Report." Energy Information Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual...

  8. Table 23. Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Prices by API Gravity

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    12.17 12.80 Source: Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-182, "Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Report." Energy Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual...

  9. Table 23. Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Prices by API Gravity

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    17.18 17.64 Source: Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-182, "Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Report." Energy Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual...

  10. WA_1994_017_GOLDEN_TECHNOLOGIES_COMPANY_Waiver_of_Domestic_a...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    for An Advance Waiver of Domestic and Foreign Rights. January 10, 1995 WA1994011EATONCORPORATIONWaiverofDomesticandForeign.pdf WA1994014GOLDENTECHNOLOGIESCOMPA...

  11. WA_1993_022_NORTON_COMPANY_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Foreign_Ri...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Golden Technologies Company, Inc. Request for An Advance Waiver of Domestic and Foreign Rights. January 10, 1995 WA1994011EATONCORPORATIONWaiverofDomesticandForeign...

  12. Dispersion modeling of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from combustion of biomass and fossil fuels and production of coke in Tianjin, China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shu Tao; Xinrong Li; Yu Yang; Raymond M. Coveney, Jr.; Xiaoxia Lu; Haitao Chen; Weiran Shen [Peking University, Beijing (China). Laboratory for Earth Surface Processes, College of Environmental Sciences

    2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A USEPA procedure, ISCLT3 (Industrial Source Complex Long-Term), was applied to model the spatial distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) emitted from various sources including coal, petroleum, natural gas, and biomass into the atmosphere of Tianjin, China. Benzo(a)pyrene equivalent concentrations (BaPeq) were calculated for risk assessment. Model results were provisionally validated for concentrations and profiles based on the observed data at two monitoring stations. The dominant emission sources in the area were domestic coal combustion, coke production, and biomass burning. Mainly because of the difference in the emission heights, the contributions of various sources to the average concentrations at receptors differ from proportions emitted. The shares of domestic coal increased from {approximately} 43% at the sources to 56% at the receptors, while the contributions of coking industry decreased from {approximately} 23% at the sources to 7% at the receptors. The spatial distributions of gaseous and particulate PAHs were similar, with higher concentrations occurring within urban districts because of domestic coal combustion. With relatively smaller contributions, the other minor sources had limited influences on the overall spatial distribution. The calculated average BaPeq value in air was 2.54 {+-} 2.87 ng/m{sup 3} on an annual basis. Although only 2.3% of the area in Tianjin exceeded the national standard of 10 ng/m{sup 3}, 41% of the entire population lives within this area. 37 refs., 9 figs.

  13. Development of an advanced continuous mild gasification process for the production of coproducts: Task 4.6, Technical and economic evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hogsett, R.F.; Jha, M.C.

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) of DOE has sponsored, and continues to sponsor, programs for the development of technology and market strategies which will lead to the commercialization of processes for the production of coproducts from mild gasification of coal. It has been recognized by DOE and industry that mild gasification is a promising technology with potential to economically convert coal into marketable products, thereby increasing domestic coal utilization. In this process, coal is devolatilized under non- oxidizing conditions at mild temperature (900--1100{degrees}F) and pressure (1--15psig). Condensation of the vapor will yield a liquid product that can be upgraded to a petroleum substitute, and the remaining gas can provide the fuel for the process. The residual char can be burned in a power plant. Thus, in a long-term national scenario, implementation of this process will result in significant decrease of imported oil and increase in coal utilization.

  14. Trinity College Green Week 2012 Energy Competition Win a Domestic Energy Meter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Mahony, Donal E.

    Trinity College Green Week 2012 Energy Competition ­ Win a Domestic Energy Meter As part of College Green Week the "e3" programme and Director of Buildings Office is promoting an energy related would you like to win a domestic whole house energy meter as part of Trinity College Green Week 2012

  15. Comparison Between TRNSYS Software Simulation and F-Chart Program on Solar Domestic Hot Water System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haberl, J. S.; Baltazar, J. C.; Mao, C.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study presents the accuracy test of a TRNSYS Solar Domestic Hot Water (SDHW) System simulation. The testing is based on comparing the results with the F-Chart software. The selected system to carry out the tests was the Active Solar Domestic...

  16. Modeling and experimental studies on a domestic solar dryer A. Saleh a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Natural circulation solar dryer Sun tracking Thin-layer drying models Drying characteristics a b s t r a cModeling and experimental studies on a domestic solar dryer A. Saleh a, *, I. Badran b Q1 t A domestic solar dryer with transparent external surfaces was designed, built and tested. Thin-layer drying

  17. IMPROVING THE ENERGY EFFECTIVENESS OF DOMESTIC REFRIGERATORS BY THE APPLICATION OF REFRIGERANT MIXTURES*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    #12;IMPROVING THE ENERGY EFFECTIVENESS OF DOMESTIC REFRIGERATORS BY THE APPLICATION OF REFRIGERANT.S. and foreign literature on the use of a mixture of refrigerants rather than a single one in a refrigeration-evaporator refrigerator typical of domestic refrigerators showed an energy savings of 12 percent. By acceptance

  18. Comparison Between TRNSYS Software Simulation and F-Chart Program on Solar Domestic Hot Water System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haberl, J. S.; Baltazar, J. C.; Mao, C.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study presents the accuracy test of a TRNSYS Solar Domestic Hot Water (SDHW) System simulation. The testing is based on comparing the results with the F-Chart software. The selected system to carry out the tests was the Active Solar Domestic...

  19. Rev. 9-29-08 Certification of Tax-Qualified Dependents / Domestic Partner Health & Dental Benefits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rev. 9-29-08 Certification of Tax-Qualified Dependents / Domestic Partner Health & Dental Benefits of the employee with respect to health and dental plan coverage. This form is to enable the employee the domestic partnership. Prior to completing this form, carefully read the handout entitled "Important Tax

  20. Domestic reformulation of the moral issues at stake in the drive against

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    about the laundering of dirty money is formulated. This article does not, how- ever, set out to study domestic debates on the definition of dirty money emerge and how they modify the objectives of the driveDomestic reformulation of the moral issues at stake in the drive against money laundering: the case

  1. Examination of microbial fuel cell start-up times with domestic wastewater and additional amendments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    biological process used for wastewater treatment is desirable to avoid discharge of untreated wastewaterExamination of microbial fuel cell start-up times with domestic wastewater and additional Available online 30 April 2011 Keywords: Microbial fuel cell Domestic wastewater Startup time Substrate a b

  2. Energy Department Takes Major Steps to Increase U.S. Energy Productivi...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Takes Major Steps to Increase U.S. Energy Productivity and Manufacturing Energy Department Takes Major Steps to Increase U.S. Energy Productivity and Manufacturing September 17,...

  3. Among the abiotic stresses that limit plant growth, drought is the most complex and devastating on a global scale. Drought is an increasingly important constraint of crop productivity and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and stability worldwide due to climate change. With continuing yield losses due to an expected water scarcity, crops with greater ability to adapt to reduced water use are needed to cope with increasingly severe drought conditions. Drought, due to insufficient or unpredictable rainfall, has been identified as a bean

  4. Creating a Consortium to Increase minority and Low-Income Community Participation in Alternative Energy Development, Production and Management Melinda Downing, United States Department of Energy Geraldine Herring, United States Department of Agriculture John Rosenthall, Environmental Justice Conference, Inc

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Downing, M. [Company United States Department of Energy (United States)

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    America's desire for energy independence places a new demand on alternative fuel production. Additional interest and emphasis are being placed on alternatives such as solar, wind, biofuels and nuclear energy. The nuclear fuel production option brings a new look at risk and residual waste management for a number of communities that have traditionally remained outside the energy debate. With the Federal requirements for environmental justice and public participation in energy and environmental decision-making, proponents of alternative energy production facilities will find themselves participating in discussions of risk, production, storage and disposal of hazardous materials and waste matters with low income and minority members in communities where these facilities are located or wish to locate. The fundamental principal of environmental justice is that all residents should have meaningful and intelligent participation in all aspects of environmental decision-making that could affect their community. Impacted communities must have the resources and ability to effectively marshall data and other information in order to make informed and intelligent decisions. Traditionally, many low-income and minority communities have lacked access to the required information, decision-makers and technical advisers to make informed decisions with respect to various risks that accompany alternative energy production, hazardous materials storage and nuclear waste management. In order to provide the necessary assistance to these communities, the Departments of Energy and Agriculture have teamed with others to cerate the Alternative Energy Consortium. The Alternative Energy Consortium is a collaboration of non-profit organizations, Federal agencies, Historically Black Colleges and Universities and Minority Serving Institutions (HBCU/MSIs), and private sector corporations (energy industry specialists) designed to explore and develop opportunities that empower minorities to own and work in all aspects of the field of alternative energy. The Consortium's primary objectives are to find ways to: - Include minorities in the development and ownership of infrastructure in the alternative energy industry; - Promote research and education programs to inform the public about risks and benefits of various forms of alternative energy; - Build a Mentor/Protege Program between HBCU/MSIs and industry leaders to enhance minority participation in ownership and career success in alternative energy production and distribution. The Consortium will work together to create a process whereby minorities and low income individuals will be recruited, educated, and mentored to maximize alternative energy ownership and job opportunities. Industry specialists and government representatives will work with academicians and others to: 1. research areas and methods where minorities and rural communities can engage in the industry; 2. invest in minorities by serving as mentors to minority serving institutions by offering hands-on experience through apprenticeships; 3. work to identify ownership opportunities for minorities; and 4. work to develop legislation that supports economic development and participation for minorities and rural communities in the industry. To accomplish this goal, the Consortium has set out a three-phase plan. Phase I organized a meeting of professionals to discuss the concept, explore the fundamentals, identify key players, and draft next steps. The group took a critical look at the energy industry: 1) trends, 2) economics, 3) limited number of minorities; and 4) infrastructure. Through that process the group identified four areas that would greatly impact economic development for minorities and rural communities: I Energy; II Broadband Communications; III Education; IV Labor Resources. Phase II presented a roundtable panel discussion that continued to refine the Consortium. The goal of these discussions is to produce a well-balanced Consortium committed to working together to produce effective solutions that bridge the gap between alternative energy

  5. Comparative evaluation of the impacts of domestic gas and electric heat pump heating on air pollution in California. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ganji, A. [San Francisco State Univ., CA (United States). Div. of Engineering

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Residential space and water heating accounts for approximately 12% of California`s and 15% of the United States, energy consumption. most Of the residential heating is by direct use of natural gas. combustion of natural gas is a contributor to the overall air pollution,, especially CO and NO{sub x} in the urban areas. Another efficient method for domestic water and space heating is use of electric heat pumps, the most popular category of which uses air as its heat source. Electric heat pumps do not emit air pollutants at the point of use, but use electric power, which is a major contributor to air pollution at its point of generation from fossil fuels. It is the specific objective of this report to evaluate and compare the energy efficiency and source air pollutants of natural gas heaters and electric heat pumps used for domestic heating. Effect of replacing natural gas heaters with electric heat pumps on air pollutant emissions due to domestic heating in two urban areas and in California as a whole has also been evaluated. The analysis shows that with the present state of technology, electric heat pumps have higher heating efficiencies than natural gas heaters. Considering the current electricity generation mix in the US, electric heat pumps produce two to four times more NO{sub x}, much less CO, and comparable amount of CO{sub 2} per unit of useful heating energy compared to natural gas heaters. With California mix, electric heat pumps produce comparable NO{sub x} and much less CO and approximately 30% less CO{sub 2} per unit heat output. Replacement of natural gas heaters with electric heat pumps will slightly increase the overall NO{sub x}, and reduce CO and CO{sub 2} emissions in California. The effect of advanced technology power generation and heat pump heating has also been analyzed.

  6. Comparative evaluation of the impacts of domestic gas and electric heat pump heating on air pollution in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ganji, A. (San Francisco State Univ., CA (United States). Div. of Engineering)

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Residential space and water heating accounts for approximately 12% of California's and 15% of the United States, energy consumption. most Of the residential heating is by direct use of natural gas. combustion of natural gas is a contributor to the overall air pollution,, especially CO and NO{sub x} in the urban areas. Another efficient method for domestic water and space heating is use of electric heat pumps, the most popular category of which uses air as its heat source. Electric heat pumps do not emit air pollutants at the point of use, but use electric power, which is a major contributor to air pollution at its point of generation from fossil fuels. It is the specific objective of this report to evaluate and compare the energy efficiency and source air pollutants of natural gas heaters and electric heat pumps used for domestic heating. Effect of replacing natural gas heaters with electric heat pumps on air pollutant emissions due to domestic heating in two urban areas and in California as a whole has also been evaluated. The analysis shows that with the present state of technology, electric heat pumps have higher heating efficiencies than natural gas heaters. Considering the current electricity generation mix in the US, electric heat pumps produce two to four times more NO{sub x}, much less CO, and comparable amount of CO{sub 2} per unit of useful heating energy compared to natural gas heaters. With California mix, electric heat pumps produce comparable NO{sub x} and much less CO and approximately 30% less CO{sub 2} per unit heat output. Replacement of natural gas heaters with electric heat pumps will slightly increase the overall NO{sub x}, and reduce CO and CO{sub 2} emissions in California. The effect of advanced technology power generation and heat pump heating has also been analyzed.

  7. From Space to Smart Homes: Constraint-Based Planning for Domestic Assistance From Space to Smart Homes: Constraint-Based

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flener, Pierre

    From Space to Smart Homes: Constraint-Based Planning for Domestic Assistance From Space to Smart 2009 1 / 43 #12;From Space to Smart Homes: Constraint-Based Planning for Domestic Assistance Outline 1 to Smart Homes: Constraint-Based Planning for Domestic Assistance Motivation: Contextualized Proactive

  8. An Update on Ethanol Production and Utilization in Thailand—2014

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bloyd, Cary N.; Foster, Nikolas AF

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In spite of the recent political turmoil, Thailand has continued to develop its ethanol based alternative fuel supply and demand infrastructure. Its support of production and sales of ethanol contributed to more than doubling the production over the past five years alone. In April 2014, average consumption stood at 3.18 million liter per day- more than a third on its way to its domestic consumption goal of 9 million liters per day by 2021. Strong government incentives and the phasing out of non-blended gasoline contributed substantially. Concurrently, exports dropped significantly to their lowest level since 2011, increasing the pressure on Thai policy makers to best balance energy independency goals with other priorities, such as Thailand’s trade balance and environmental aspirations. Utilization of second generation biofuels might have the potential to further expand Thailand’s growing ethanol market. Thailand has also dramatically increased its higher ethanol blend vehicle fleet, with all new vehicles sold in the Thai market now being E20 capable and the number of E85 vehicles increasing three fold in the last year from 100,000 in 2013 to 300,000 in 2014.

  9. Expansion of Domestic Production of Lithium Carbonate and Lithium Hydroxide to Supply US Battery Industry

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  10. WA_99_017_AIR_PRODUCTS_AND_CHEMICALS_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    9017AIRPRODUCTSANDCHEMICALSWaiverofDomesticand.pdf WA99017AIRPRODUCTSANDCHEMICALSWaiverofDomesticand.pdf WA99017AIRPRODUCTSANDCHEMICALSWaiverofDomesti...

  11. U.S. Domestic Oil Production Exceeds Imports for First Time in 18 Years |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov. Are you sure you wantJoin us for|Idahothe New FundingTravel Travel

  12. Table 2. Real Gross Domestic Product Growth Trends, Projected vs. Actual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14Total Delivered Residential EnergyTotal

  13. Fact #564: March 30, 2009 Transportation and the Gross Domestic Product,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport in RepresentativeDepartment of Energy Score MaturityofDepartment of1:

  14. U.S. Domestic Oil Production Exceeds Imports for First Time in 18 Years |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreakingMayDepartmentTestFeed Families" |ParticleResearchDepartment of

  15. "Table 2. Real Gross Domestic Product Growth Trends, Projected vs. Actual"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1 U.S. Department of Energygasoline4 Space Heating8Total DeliveredReal

  16. Price controls and international petroleum product prices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deacon, R.T.; Mead, W.J.; Agarwal, V.B.

    1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of Federal refined-product price controls upon the price of motor gasoline in the United States through 1977 are examined. A comparison of domestic and foreign gasoline prices is made, based on the prices of products actually moving in international trade. There is also an effort to ascribe US/foreign market price differentials to identifiable cost factors. Primary emphasis is on price comparisons at the wholesale level, although some retail comparisons are presented. The study also examines the extent to which product price controls are binding, and attempts to estimate what the price of motor gasoline would have been in the absence of controls. The time period under consideration is from 1969 through 1977, with primary focus on price relationships in 1970-1971 (just before US controls) and 1976-1977. The foreign-domestic comparisons are made with respect to four major US cities, namely, Boston, New York, New Orleans, and Los Angeles. 20 figures, 14 tables.

  17. Department of Energy to Invest $50 Million to Advance Domestic...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    that have sustainable, competitive cost and performance advantages. SUNPATH will help companies with pilot-scale commercial production scale up their manufacturing...

  18. Disk Quota Increase Request

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract ManagementDiscovering How Muscles Really Work Disk Quota Increase

  19. Residential propane prices increase

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001) -heating oil pricepropanepropane prices increase The

  20. Residential propane prices increase

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001) -heating oil pricepropanepropane prices increase

  1. Managing Increased Charging Demand

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment ofLetterEconomyDr.Energy University Managing Increased Charging

  2. Increasing Employee PEV Awareness

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(Fact Sheet),EnergyImprovement of theResponses to Public Increasing Employee

  3. Comparison of domestic olivine and European magnesite for electrically charged thermal energy storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laster, W.R.; Gay, B.M.; Palmour, H.; Schoenhals, R.J.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrically charged thermal energy storage (TES) heaters employing high heat capacity ceramic refractories for sensible heat storage have been in use in Europe for several years. With these devices, low cost off-peak electrical energy is stored by heating a storage core composed of ceramic material to approximately 800/sup 0/C. During the peak period, no electrical energy is used as the building heating needs are supplied by extracting the stored energy from the core by forced air circulation. The recent increase in use of off-peak TES units in the U.S. has led to the search for a domestic supply of high heat capacity ceramic refractory material. North Carolina's extensive but underutilized supply of refractory grade olivine has been proposed as a source of storage material for these units. In this paper the suitability of North Carolina olivine for heat storage applications is assessed by comparing its thermal performance with that of European materials. Using the method of ASHRAE Standard 94.2, the thermal performance of two commercially available room-size TES units was determined experimentally with two different storage materials, North Carolina olivine and German magnesite. Comparisons are made and conclusions are drawn.

  4. Evaluating Domestic Hot Water Distribution System Options With Validated Analysis Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weitzel, E.; Hoeschele, M.

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A developing body of work is forming that collects data on domestic hot water consumption, water use behaviors, and energy efficiency of various distribution systems. A full distribution system developed in TRNSYS has been validated using field monitoring data and then exercised in a number of climates to understand climate impact on performance. This study builds upon previous analysis modelling work to evaluate differing distribution systems and the sensitivities of water heating energy and water use efficiency to variations of climate, load, distribution type, insulation and compact plumbing practices. Overall 124 different TRNSYS models were simulated. Of the configurations evaluated, distribution losses account for 13-29% of the total water heating energy use and water use efficiency ranges from 11-22%. The base case, an uninsulated trunk and branch system sees the most improvement in energy consumption by insulating and locating the water heater central to all fixtures. Demand recirculation systems are not projected to provide significant energy savings and in some cases increase energy consumption. Water use is most efficient with demand recirculation systems, followed by the insulated trunk and branch system with a central water heater. Compact plumbing practices and insulation have the most impact on energy consumption (2-6% for insulation and 3-4% per 10 gallons of enclosed volume reduced). The results of this work are useful in informing future development of water heating best practices guides as well as more accurate (and simulation time efficient) distribution models for annual whole house simulation programs.

  5. A Comparison of Domestic Water Heating Options in the Austin Electric Service Area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vliet, G. C.; Hood, D. B.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , M., and F. C. Fontana, "Heat-Pump Desuperheaters for Supplying Domestic Not Water - Estimation of Energy Savings and Economic Viability For Residential Applications," ORNLICON-114. Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, May 1983. 11...

  6. Scotland’s rubbish: domestic recycling, policy and practice in everyday life 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, Fraser Andrew

    2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis examines the relationships people have with rubbish in everyday life. Focusing on domestic recycling policy and practice, environmental concern and action is explored as a sociological problem in a way that ...

  7. Spatial empowerment : the appropriation of public spaces by Filipina domestic workers in Hong Kong

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tillu, Jasmine Susanna

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On a typical Sunday afternoon, hundreds of Filipina domestic workers (FDW) gather on the floor of public spaces in prime real estate areas of downtown Hong Kong. Over the last few decades, Hong Kong experienced rapid ...

  8. Evolution of domestic traffic and fares at the top 200 US airports between 1990 and 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ben Abda, Mehdi

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The main objective of this thesis is to analyze the evolution of domestic Origin- Destination (O-D) traffic and fares at the Top 200 airports in the United States between 1990 and 2008. The impetus behind this research is ...

  9. Thermodynamic analysis of the reverse Joule–Brayton cycle heat pump for domestic heating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Alexander

    2009-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper presents an analysis of the effects of irreversibility on the performance of a reverse Joule–Brayton cycle heat pump for domestic heating applications. Both the simple and recuperated (regenerative) cycle are considered at a variety...

  10. Leading without Followers: How Politics and Market Dynamics Trapped Innovations in Japan's Domestic Galapagos Telecommunications Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kushida, Kenji E

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    excluding the joint venture Sony Ericsson—but that 5% wasmostly Japan’s domestic market. Sony Ericsson, for its part,other international markets. Sony Ericsson held just under

  11. Transitions in domestic architecture and home culture in twentieth century Iran

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karimi, Z. Pamela (Zahra Pamela)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation explores the transformation of the Iranian home in twentieth century Iran. While surveying the socio political underpinnings and aesthetic ends of domesticity in Iranian culture from the early twentieth ...

  12. REQUEST BY PRAXAIR, INC.(PRAXAIR) FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    PRAXAIR, INC.(PRAXAIR) FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN PATENT RIGHTS TO INVENTIONS MADE UNDER CONTRACT NO. DE-FC26-00NT41027 ENTITLED "NOVEL REACTOR FOR THE...

  13. The Impact on the New Mexico Budget of Offering Domestic Partnerships to Same-Sex Couples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sears, Brad

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    same-sex couples in New Mexico who choose to celebrate theirThe Impact on the New Mexico Budget of Offering DomesticCommittee of the New Mexico Senate Presented by Professor

  14. Haitian women and domestic violence: an assessment of the influnce of the mother-daughter relationship

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lamothe-Francois, Marie B.

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    (Gelles, 1997). However, for purposes of the current paper, which will analyze married, single, and cohabitating couples, we will refer to this behavior as ?domestic violence? Studies investigating domestic violence with non-immigrant groups... to control their partner (Gelles, 1995). Although the motivations may be quite different, the impact of partner abuse is detrimental to both partners and to the well-being of the community as a whole. Purpose of the Study The purpose of this study...

  15. Profitable Biodiesel Potential from Increased Agricultural Yields Country Name

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    Profitable Biodiesel Potential from Increased Agricultural Yields Country Name Production Cost ($/liter) Potential Biodiesel Volume (liters) Total Export Profits ($) HDI Rank GDP/ cap Corrupt Rank FDI

  16. Applications of shape analysis to domestic and international security.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prasad, Lakshman; Skourikhine, A. N. (Alexei N.); Doak, J. E. (Justin E.)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The rapidly growing area of cooperative international security calls for pervasive deployment of smart sensors that render valuable information and reduce operational costs and errors. Among the sensors used, vision sensors are by far the most versatile, tangible, and rich in the information they provide about their environment. On the flip side, they are also the most complex to analyze automatically for the extraction of high-level information. The ability to process imagery in a useful manner requires at least partial functional emulation of human capabilities of visual understanding. Of all visual cues available in image data, shape is perhaps the most important for understanding the content of an image. In this paper we present an overview of ongoing research at LANL on geometric shape analysis. The objective of our research is to develop a computational framework for multiscale characterization, analysis, and recognition of shapes. This framework will enable the development of a comprehensive and connected body of mathematical methods and algorithms, based on the topological, metrical, and morphological properties of shapes. We discuss its potential applications to automated surveillance, monitoring, container tracking and inspection, weapons dismantlement, and treaty verification. The framework will develop a geometric filtering scheme for extracting semantically salient shape features. This effort creates a paradigm for solving shape-related problems in Pattern Recognition, Computer Vision, and Image Understanding in a conceptually cohesive and algorithmically amenable manner. The research aims to develop an advanced image analysis capability at LANL for solving a wide range of problems in automated facility surveillance, nuclear materials monitoring, treaty verification, and container inspection and tracking. The research provides the scientific underpinnings that will enable us to build smart surveillance cameras, with a direct practical impact on LANL's capabilities in domestic and international safeguards and security.

  17. (Data in kilograms of gallium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: No domestic primary gallium recovery was reported in 2011. One company in Utah

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    % was used in research and development, specialty alloys, and other applications. Optoelectronic devices were used in areas such as aerospace, consumer goods, industrial equipment, medical equipment

  18. (Data in kilograms of gallium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: No domestic primary gallium recovery was reported in 2001. Two companies in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , specialty alloys, and other applications. Optoelectronic devices were used in areas such as consumer goods, medical equipment, industrial components, telecommunications, and aerospace applications. Integrated

  19. (Data in kilograms of gallium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: No domestic primary gallium recovery was reported in 2000. Two companies in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and development, specialty alloys, and other applications. Optoelectronic devices were used in areas such as consumer goods, medical equipment, industrial components, telecommunications, and aerospace applications

  20. (Data in kilograms of gallium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: No domestic primary gallium recovery was reported in 2003. One company in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , specialty alloys, and other applications. Optoelectronic devices were used in areas such as aerospace