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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "increase electricity demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Report: Natural Gas Infrastructure Implications of Increased Demand from the Electric Power Sector  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This report examines the potential infrastructure needs of the U.S. interstate natural gas pipeline transmission system across a range of future natural gas demand scenarios that drive increased electric power sector natural gas use.

2

High Temperatures & Electricity Demand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High Temperatures & Electricity Demand An Assessment of Supply Adequacy in California Trends.......................................................................................................1 HIGH TEMPERATURES AND ELECTRICITY DEMAND.....................................................................................................................7 SECTION I: HIGH TEMPERATURES AND ELECTRICITY DEMAND ..........................9 BACKGROUND

3

Sweating it out: the response of summer electricity demand to increases in price.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This study examines the own price elasticity of demand for electricity in the Greater Sacramento Area. Data corresponded to customer billing information from the Sacramento… (more)

Davis, Zephaniah K.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Abstract--Electrical Distribution Systems (EDS) are facing ever-increasing complexity due to fast growing demand and large  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

operation. As such Electrical Distribution Systems will require new planning strategies and tools, new1 Abstract-- Electrical Distribution Systems (EDS) are facing ever-increasing complexity due to fast growing demand and large amount of distributed energy resources integration. The conventional

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

5

electricity demand | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

demand demand Dataset Summary Description The New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development publishes energy data including many datasets related to electricity. Included here are three electricity consumption and demand datasets, specifically: annual observed electricity consumption by sector (1974 to 2009); observed percentage of consumers by sector (2002 - 2009); and regional electricity demand, as a percentage of total demand (2009). Source New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development Date Released Unknown Date Updated July 03rd, 2009 (5 years ago) Keywords Electricity Consumption electricity demand energy use by sector New Zealand Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon Electricity Consumption by Sector (1974 - 2009) (xls, 46.1 KiB) application/vnd.ms-excel icon Percentage of Consumers by Sector (2002 - 2009) (xls, 43.5 KiB)

6

EIA - AEO2010 - Electricity Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Demand Electricity Demand Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projections to 2035 Electricity Demand Figure 69. U.S. electricity demand growth 1950-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 60. Average annual U.S. retail electricity prices in three cases, 1970-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 61. Electricity generation by fuel in three cases, 2008 and 2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 62. Electricity generation capacity additions by fuel type, 2008-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 63. Levelized electricity costs for new power plants, 2020 and 2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 64. Electricity generating capacity at U.S. nuclear power plants in three cases, 2008, 2020, and 2035

7

Electricity Demand and Energy Consumption Management System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This project describes the electricity demand and energy consumption management system and its application to the Smelter Plant of Southern Peru. It is composted of an hourly demand-forecasting module and of a simulation component for a plant electrical system. The first module was done using dynamic neural networks, with backpropagation training algorithm; it is used to predict the electric power demanded every hour, with an error percentage below of 1%. This information allows management the peak demand before this happen, distributing the raise of electric load to other hours or improving those equipments that increase the demand. The simulation module is based in advanced estimation techniques, such as: parametric estimation, neural network modeling, statistic regression and previously developed models, which simulates the electric behavior of the smelter plant. These modules allow the proper planning because it allows knowing the behavior of the hourly demand and the consumption patterns of the plant, in...

Sarmiento, Juan Ojeda

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Electricity Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Demand Electricity Demand Annual Energy Outlook 2008 with Projections to 2030 Electricity Demand Figure 60. Annual electricity sales by sector, 1980-2030 (billion kilowatthours). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 61. Electricity generation by fuel, 2006 and 2030 (billion kilowatthours). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Residential and Commercial Sectors Dominate Electricity Demand Growth Total electricity sales increase by 29 percent in the AEO2008 reference case, from 3,659 billion kilowatthours in 2006 to 4,705 billion in 2030, at an average rate of 1.1 percent per year. The relatively slow growth follows the historical trend, with the growth rate slowing in each succeeding

9

Option Value of Electricity Demand Response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Table 1. “Economic” demand response and real time pricing (Implications of Demand Response Programs in CompetitiveAdvanced Metering, and Demand Response in Electricity

Sezgen, Osman; Goldman, Charles; Krishnarao, P.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Figure 34. Regional electricity cost duration curves in 2010especially focus on electricity costs and grid compositionrelatively higher electricity costs. If electricity demand

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

SUMMER 2007 ELECTRICITY SUPPLY AND DEMAND OUTLOOK  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION SUMMER 2007 ELECTRICITY SUPPLY AND DEMAND OUTLOOK DRAFTSTAFFREPORT May ELECTRICITY ANALYSIS OFFICE Sylvia Bender Acting Deputy Director ELECTRICITY SUPPLY ANALYSIS DIVISION B. B assessment of the capability of the physical electricity system to provide power to meet electricity demand

12

Electricity demand analysis - unconstrained vs constrained scenarios  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In India, the electricity systems are chronically constrained by shortage of both capital and energy resources. These result in rationing and interruptions of supply with a severely disrupted electricity usage pattern. From this background, we try to analyse the demand patterns with and without resource constraints. Accordingly, it is necessary to model appropriately the dynamic nature of electricity demand, which cannot be captured by methods like annual load duration curves. Therefore, we use the concept - Representative Load Curves (RLCs) - to model the temporal and structural variations in demand. As a case study, the electricity system of the state of Karnataka in India is used. Four years demand data, two unconstrained and two constrained, are used and RLCs are developed using multiple discriminant analysis. It is found that these RLCs adequately model the variations in demand and bring out distinctions between unconstrained and constrained demand patterns. The demand analysis attempted here helped to study the differences in demand patterns with and without constraints, and the success of rationing measures in reducing demand levels as well as greatly disrupting the electricity usage patterns. Multifactor ANOVA analyses are performed to find out the statistical significance of the ability of logically obtained factors in explaining overall variations in demand. The results showed that the factors that are taken into consideration accounted for maximum variations in demand at very high significance levels.

P. Balachandra; V. Chandru; M.H. Bala Subrahmanya

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Production Will Meet Demand Increase This Summer  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 Notes: Production must meet increases in demand this year. Last year, increased imports met most of the summer demand increase, and increases in stock draws met almost all of the remainder. Production did not increase much. But this year, inventories will not be available, and increased imports seem unlikely. Thus, increases in production will be needed to meet increased demand. Imports availability is uncertain this summer. Imports in 1999 were high, and with Phase II RFG product requirements, maintaining this level could be challenging since not all refineries exporting to the U.S. will be able to meet the new gasoline specifications. Stocks will also contribute little supply this summer. Last year's high gasoline stocks allowed for a stock draw that was 58 MB/D higher than

14

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Designing Markets for Electricity, Wiley-IEEE Press. CEC (in Major Drivers in U.S. Electricity Markets, NREL/CP-620-and fuel efficiency and electricity demand assumptions used

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Electric Utility Demand-Side Evaluation Methodologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

"::. ELECTRIC UTILITY DEMAND-SIDE EVALUATION METHODOLOGIES* Nat Treadway Public Utility Commission of Texas Austin, Texas ABSTRACT The electric. util ity industry's demand-side management programs can be analyzed ?from various points... of view using a standard benefit-cost methodology. The methodology now in use by several. electric utilities and the Public Utility Commlsslon of Texas includes measures of efficiency and equity. The nonparticipant test as a measure of equity...

Treadway, N.

16

Demand Response and Electric Grid Reliability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Demand Response and Electric Grid Reliability Paul Wattles Senior Analyst, Market Design & Development, ERCOT CATEE Conference, Galveston October 10, 2012 2 North American Bulk Power Grids CATEE Conference October 10, 2012 ? The ERCOT... adequacy ? ?Achieving more DR participation would . . . displace some generation investments, but would achieve the same level of reliability... ? ?Achieving this ideal requires widespread demand response and market structures that enable loads...

Wattles, P.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Utility Sector Impacts of Reduced Electricity Demand  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents a new approach to estimating the marginal utility sector impacts associated with electricity demand reductions. The method uses publicly available data and provides results in the form of time series of impact factors. The input data are taken from the Energy Information Agency's Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) projections of how the electric system might evolve in the reference case, and in a number of side cases that incorporate different effciency and other policy assumptions. The data published with the AEO are used to define quantitative relationships between demand-side electricity reductions by end use and supply-side changes to capacity by plant type, generation by fuel type and emissions of CO2, Hg, NOx and SO2. The impact factors define the change in each of these quantities per unit reduction in site electricity demand. We find that the relative variation in these impacts by end use is small, but the time variation can be significant.

Coughlin, Katie

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Demand Response in U.S. Electricity Markets: Empirical Evidence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reliability Corporation. Demand response data task force:Energy. Benefits of demand response in electricity marketsAssessment of demand response & advanced metering, staff

Cappers, Peter

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Tool Improves Electricity Demand Predictions to Make More Room...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Tool Improves Electricity Demand Predictions to Make More Room for Renewables Tool Improves Electricity Demand Predictions to Make More Room for Renewables October 3, 2011 -...

20

What is a High Electric Demand Day?  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation by T. McNevin of the New Jersey Bureau of Air Quality Planning was part of the July 2008 Webcast sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program Clean Energy and Air Quality Integration Initiative that was titled Role of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy in Improving Air Quality and Addressing Greenhouse Gas Reduction Goals on High Electric Demand Days.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "increase electricity demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Climate, extreme heat, and electricity demand in California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Climate projections from three atmosphere-ocean climate models with a range of low to mid-high temperature sensitivity forced by the Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change SRES higher, middle, and lower emission scenarios indicate that, over the 21st century, extreme heat events for major cities in heavily air-conditioned California will increase rapidly. These increases in temperature extremes are projected to exceed the rate of increase in mean temperature, along with increased variance. Extreme heat is defined here as the 90 percent exceedance probability (T90) of the local warmest summer days under the current climate. The number of extreme heat days in Los Angeles, where T90 is currently 95 F (32 C), may increase from 12 days to as many as 96 days per year by 2100, implying current-day heat wave conditions may last for the entire summer, with earlier onset. Overall, projected increases in extreme heat under the higher A1fi emission scenario by 2070-2099 tend to be 20-30 percent higher than those projected under the lower B1 emission scenario, ranging from approximately double the historical number of days for inland California cities (e.g. Sacramento and Fresno), up to four times for previously temperate coastal cities (e.g. Los Angeles, San Diego). These findings, combined with observed relationships between high temperature and electricity demand for air-conditioned regions, suggest potential shortfalls in transmission and supply during T90 peak electricity demand periods. When the projected extreme heat and peak demand for electricity are mapped onto current availability, maintaining technology and population constant only for demand side calculations, we find the potential for electricity deficits as high as 17 percent. Similar increases in extreme heat days are suggested for other locations across the U.S. southwest, as well as for developing nations with rapidly increasing electricity demands. Electricity response to recent extreme heat events, such as the July 2006 heat wave in California, suggests that peak electricity demand will challenge current supply, as well as future planned supply capacities when population and income growth are taken into account.

Miller, N.L.; Hayhoe, K.; Jin, J.; Auffhammer, M.

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Hawaiian Electric Company Demand Response Roadmap Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of control. Water heater demand response options are notcurrent water heater and air conditioning demand responsecustomer response Demand response water heater participation

Levy, Roger

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Hawaiian Electric Company Demand Response Roadmap Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Like HECO actual utility demand response implementations canindustry-wide utility demand response applications tend toobjective. Figure 4. Demand Response Objectives 17  

Levy, Roger

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Equity Effects of Increasing-Block Electricity Pricing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evidence from Residential Electricity Demand,” Review ofLester D. “The Demand for Electricity: A Survey,” The BellResidential Demand for Electricity under Inverted Block

Borenstein, Severin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Duct Leakage Impacts on Airtightness, Infiltration, and Peak Electrical Demand in Florida Homes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

return leak from the attic can increase cooling electrical demand by 100%. Duct repairs in a typical. electrically heated Florida home reduce winter peak demand by about 1.6 kW per house at about one-sixth the cost of building new electrical generation...

Cummings, J. B.; Tooley, J. J.; Moyer, N.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Hawaiian Electric Company Demand Response Roadmap Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with  residential  electric  resistance  water  heater  solar system backup electric resistance water heaters. Anheaters require electric resistance backup water heaters.

Levy, Roger

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Electricity Markets Meet the Home through Demand Response Lazaros Gkatzikis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electricity Markets Meet the Home through Demand Response Lazaros Gkatzikis CERTH, University Hegde, Laurent Massouli´e Technicolor Paris Research Lab Paris, France Abstract-- Demand response (DR the alternative option of dynamic demand adaptation. In this direction, demand response (DR) programs provide

28

Benefits of Demand Response in Electricity Markets and Recommendations for  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Demand Response in Electricity Markets and Demand Response in Electricity Markets and Recommendations for Achieving Them. A report to the United States Congress Pursuant to Section 1252 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (February 2006) Benefits of Demand Response in Electricity Markets and Recommendations for Achieving Them. A report to the United States Congress Pursuant to Section 1252 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (February 2006) Most electricity customers see electricity rates that are based on average electricity costs and bear little relation to the true production costs of electricity as they vary over time. Demand response is a tariff or program established to motivate changes in electric use by end-use customers in response to changes in the price of electricity over time, or to give

29

Benefits of Demand Response in Electricity Markets and Recommendations...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Benefits of Demand Response in Electricity Markets and Recommendations for Achieving Them. A report to the United States Congress Pursuant to Section 1252 of the Energy Policy Act...

30

Electricity demand as frequency controlled reserves, ENS (Smart...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ENS (Smart Grid Project) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name Electricity demand as frequency controlled reserves, ENS Country Denmark Coordinates 56.26392, 9.501785...

31

Electricity demand as frequency controlled reserves, ForskEL...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ForskEL (Smart Grid Project) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name Electricity demand as frequency controlled reserves, ForskEL Country Denmark Coordinates 56.26392,...

32

Topics in Residential Electric Demand Response.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Demand response and dynamic pricing are touted as ways to empower consumers, save consumers money, and capitalize on the “smart grid” and expensive advanced meter… (more)

Horowitz, Shira R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Price Responsive Demand in New York Wholesale Electricity Market using  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Price Responsive Demand in New York Wholesale Electricity Market using Price Responsive Demand in New York Wholesale Electricity Market using OpenADR Title Price Responsive Demand in New York Wholesale Electricity Market using OpenADR Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-5557E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Kim, Joyce Jihyun, and Sila Kiliccote Date Published 06/2012 Publisher LBNL/NYSERDA Keywords commercial, demand response, dynamic pricing, mandatory hourly pricing, open automated demand response, openadr, pilot studies & implementation, price responsive demand Abstract In New York State, the default electricity pricing for large customers is Mandatory Hourly Pricing (MHP), which is charged based on zonal day-ahead market price for energy. With MHP, retail customers can adjust their building load to an economically optimal level according to hourly electricity prices. Yet, many customers seek alternative pricing options such as fixed rates through retail access for their electricity supply. Open Automated Demand Response (OpenADR) is an XML (eXtensible Markup Language) based information exchange model that communicates price and reliability information. It allows customers to evaluate hourly prices and provide demand response in an automated fashion to minimize electricity costs. This document shows how OpenADR can support MHP and facilitate price responsive demand for large commercial customers in New York City.

34

Electricity Demand Evolution Driven by Storm Motivated Population Movement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Managing the risks posed by climate change to energy production and delivery is a challenge for communities worldwide. Sea Level rise and increased frequency and intensity of natural disasters due to sea surface temperature rise force populations to move locations, resulting in changing patterns of demand for infrastructure services. Thus, Infrastructures will evolve to accommodate new load centers while some parts of the network are underused, and these changes will create emerging vulnerabilities. Combining climate predictions and agent based population movement models shows promise for exploring the universe of these future population distributions and changes in coastal infrastructure configurations. In this work, we created a prototype agent based population distribution model and developed a methodology to establish utility functions that provide insight about new infrastructure vulnerabilities that might result from these patterns. Combining climate and weather data, engineering algorithms and social theory, we use the new Department of Energy (DOE) Connected Infrastructure Dynamics Models (CIDM) to examine electricity demand response to increased temperatures, population relocation in response to extreme cyclonic events, consequent net population changes and new regional patterns in electricity demand. This work suggests that the importance of established evacuation routes that move large populations repeatedly through convergence points as an indicator may be under recognized.

Allen, Melissa R [ORNL; Fernandez, Steven J [ORNL; Fu, Joshua S [ORNL; Walker, Kimberly A [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Introduction Increasing demands on limited water resources have made  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Introduction Increasing demands on limited water resources have made wastewater recycling quality, containing numerous microbiological and chemical contaminants, than recycled wastewater that has such that recycled water is of sufficient quality to satisfy most non-potable demands, and as such, recycled water

Sanderson, Mike

36

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy storage and demand management can complement solarwith energy storage to firm the resource, or solar thermaland solar generation. And demand response or energy storage

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Demand Response in U.S. Electricity Markets: Empirical Evidence |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

in U.S. Electricity Markets: Empirical Evidence in U.S. Electricity Markets: Empirical Evidence Demand Response in U.S. Electricity Markets: Empirical Evidence The work described in this paper was funded by the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, Permitting, Siting and Analysis of the U.S. Department of Energy under contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. The authors are solely responsible for any omissions or errors contained herein. Demand Response in U.S. Electricity Markets: Empirical Evidence More Documents & Publications Demand Response National Trends: Implications for the West? Benefits of Demand Response in Electricity Markets and Recommendations for Achieving Them. A report to the United States Congress Pursuant to Section 1252 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (February 2006)

38

Hawaiian Electric Company Demand Response Roadmap Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

widely differing control technologies, notification options,Electric  Reliability   Technology,  LBNL,  Joseph  Eto  E. Availability F. Technology Proposed Residential Large

Levy, Roger

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Electricity Market Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Market Module (EMM) represents the planning, operations, and pricing of electricity in the United States. It is composed of four primary submodules—electricity capacity planning, electricity fuel dispatching, load and demand-side management, and electricity finance and pricing. In addition, nonutility generation and supply and electricity transmission and trade are represented in the planning and dispatching submodules. Electricity Market Module (EMM) represents the planning, operations, and pricing of electricity in the United States. It is composed of four primary submodules—electricity capacity planning, electricity fuel dispatching, load and demand-side management, and electricity finance and pricing. In addition, nonutility generation and supply and electricity transmission and trade are represented in the planning and dispatching submodules. Based on fuel prices and electricity demands provided by the other modules of the NEMS, the EMM determines the most economical way to supply electricity, within environmental and operational constraints. There are assumptions about the operations of the electricity sector and the costs of various options in each of the EMM submodules. The major assumptions are summarized below.

40

Implications of Low Electricity Demand Growth  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Conference July 14, 2014 | Washington, DC Jim Diefenderfer, Director, Office of Electricity, Coal, Nuclear, & Renewables Analysis U.S. Energy Information Administration...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "increase electricity demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

U.S. electric utility demand-side management 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Electric Utility Demand-Side Management report is prepared by the Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternative Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. The report presents comprehensive information on electric power industry demand-side management (DSM) activities in the US at the national, regional, and utility levels. The objective of the publication is to provide industry decision makers, government policy makers, analysts, and the general public with historical data that may be used in understanding DSM as it relates to the US electric power industry. The first chapter, ``Profile: US Electric Utility Demand-Side Management``, presents a general discussion of DSM, its history, current issues, and a review of key statistics for the year. Subsequent chapters present discussions and more detailed data on energy savings, peak load reductions and costs attributable to DSM. 9 figs., 24 tabs.

NONE

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

The Impact of Climate Change on Electricity Demand in Thailand   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate change is expected to lead to changes in ambient temperature, wind speed, humidity, precipitation and cloud cover. As electricity demand is closely influenced by these climatic variables, there is likely to be ...

Parkpoom, Suchao Jake

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Incentive effects of paying demand response in wholesale electricity markets  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recently issued U.S. Federal Energy Regulatory Commission regulations require comparable treatment of demand reduction and generation in the wholesale electric market so that they are compensated at the same mark...

Hung-po Chao; Mario DePillis

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

The residential demand for electricity in New England,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The residential demand for electricity, studied on the national level for many years, is here investigated on the regional level. A survey of the literature is first presented outlining past econometric work in the field ...

Levy, Paul F.

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Innovative and Progressive Electric Utility Demand-Side Management Strategies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to as Demand-Side Management (DSM) and are extremely rigorous in scope. Electric utilities have pursued many different DSM policies and strategies during the past decade. These programs have addressed various technologies and have included rebates for efficient...

Epstein, G. J.; Fuller, W. H.

46

Electricity demand, GDP and employment: evidence from Italy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper applies time series methodologies to examine the causal relationship among electricity demand, real per capita GDP and total labor force for Italy from 1970 to 2009. After a brief introduction, a su...

Cosimo Magazzino

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

problems, Electric Power Systems Research, 73(2): p. 169-problems, Electric Power Systems Research, 77(3-4): p. 212-decomposition, Electric Power Systems Research, 77(7): p.

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Electricity demand and supply projections for Indian economy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The present paper deals with an econometric model to forecast future electricity requirements for various sectors of Indian economy. Following the analysis of time series of sectoral GDPs, number of consumers in various sectors and price indices of electricity, a logarithmic linear regression model has been developed to forecast long-term demand of electricity up to the year 2045. Using the historical GDP growth in various sectors and the corresponding electricity consumption for the period 1971-2005, it is predicted that the total electricity demand will be 5000 billion kWh, against a supply of 1500 billion kWh in the year 2045. This may lead to a disastrous situation for the country unless drastic policy measures are taken to improve the supply side as well as to reduce demand.

Subhash Mallah; N.K. Bansal

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Turkey opens electricity markets as demand grows  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Turkey's growing power market has attracted investors and project developers for over a decade, yet their plans have been dashed by unexpected political or financial crises or, worse, obstructed by a lengthy bureaucratic approval process. Now, with a more transparent retail electricity market, government regulators and investors are bullish on Turkey. Is Turkey ready to turn the power on? This report closely examine Turkey's plans to create a power infrastructure capable of providing the reliable electricity supplies necessary for sustained economic growth. It was compiled with on-the-ground research and extensive interview with key industrial and political figures. Today, hard coal and lignite account for 21% of Turkey's electricity generation and gas-fired plants account for 50%. The Alfin Elbistan-B lignite-fired plant has attracted criticism for its lack of desulfurization units and ash dam facilities that have tarnished the industry's image. A 1,100 MW hard-coal fired plant using supercritical technology is under construction. 9 figs., 1 tab.

McKeigue, J.; Da Cunha, A.; Severino, D. [Global Business Reports (United States)

2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

50

Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Appendix C: Demand Forecast  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Appendix C: Demand Forecast Energy Demand ........................................................................ 28 Possible Future Trends for Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles .............................................................. 23 Electricity Demand Growth in the West

51

U.S. electric utility demand-side management 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Electric Utility Demand-Side Management report presents comprehensive information on electric power industry demand-side management (DSM) activities in the US at the national, regional, and utility levels. The objective of the publication is to provide industry decision makers, government policy makers, analysts, and the general public with historical data that may be used in understanding DSM as it related to the US electric power industry. The first chapter, ``Profile: U.S. Electric Utility Demand-Side Management,`` presents a general discussion of DSM, its history, current issues, and a review of key statistics for the year. Subsequent chapters present discussions and more detailed data on energy savings, peak load reductions and costs attributable to DSM. 9 figs., 24 tabs.

NONE

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Appendix H: Demand Response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Appendix H: Demand Response Introduction..................................................................................................................................... 1 Demand Response in the Council's Fifth Power Plan......................................................................................................................... 3 Estimate of Potential Demand Response

53

Demand response in wholesale electricity markets: the choice of customer baseline  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Given a hybrid electricity market structure, demand response (DR) in wholesale electricity markets depends ... counterfactual consumption levels that would have prevailed without demand-response programs. However...

Hung-po Chao

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Electrical power distribution control methods, electrical energy demand monitoring methods, and power management devices  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Electrical power distribution control methods, electrical energy demand monitoring methods, and power management devices are described. In one aspect, an electrical power distribution control method includes providing electrical energy from an electrical power distribution system, applying the electrical energy to a load, providing a plurality of different values for a threshold at a plurality of moments in time and corresponding to an electrical characteristic of the electrical energy, and adjusting an amount of the electrical energy applied to the load responsive to an electrical characteristic of the electrical energy triggering one of the values of the threshold at the respective moment in time.

Chassin, David P. (Pasco, WA); Donnelly, Matthew K. (Kennewick, WA); Dagle, Jeffery E. (Richland, WA)

2006-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

55

Statewide Electricity and Demand Capacity Savings from the Implementation of IECC Code in Texas: Analysis for Single-Family Residences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper presents estimates of the statewide electricity and electric demand savings achieved from the adoption of the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) for single-family residences in Texas and includes the corresponding increase...

Kim, H.; Baltazar, J.C.; Haberl, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Demand or No Demand: Electrical Rates for Standard 90.1-2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ASHRAE is developing the 2010 version of Standard 90.1 with the goal of reaching 30% savings beyond the 2004 edition of the standard. Economics are used to inform the process of setting criteria and the assumed electricity rates are crucial to these calculations. Previously the committee used national average electrical rates in the criteria setting but recently a number of voices have been heard in support of using demand rates instead. This article explores the issues surrounding the use of a pure consumption rate vs. the use of demand rates and looks at the implications for HVAC equipment efficiency.

Jarnagin, Ronald E.; McBride, Merle F.; Trueman, Cedric; Liesen, Richard J.

2008-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

57

Electricity demand as frequency controlled reserves, ENS (Smart Grid  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electricity demand as frequency controlled reserves, ENS (Smart Grid Electricity demand as frequency controlled reserves, ENS (Smart Grid Project) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name Electricity demand as frequency controlled reserves, ENS Country Denmark Coordinates 56.26392°, 9.501785° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":56.26392,"lon":9.501785,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

58

Progress towards Managing Residential Electricity Demand: Impacts of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Progress towards Managing Residential Electricity Demand: Impacts of Progress towards Managing Residential Electricity Demand: Impacts of Standards and Labeling for Refrigerators and Air Conditioners in India Title Progress towards Managing Residential Electricity Demand: Impacts of Standards and Labeling for Refrigerators and Air Conditioners in India Publication Type Conference Paper Refereed Designation Unknown LBNL Report Number LBNL-2322E Year of Publication 2009 Authors McNeil, Michael A., and Maithili Iyer Date Published 06/2009 Keywords Air Conditioners, Appliance Efficiency, appliance energy efficiency, energy efficiency, greenhouse gas emissions, india, Labels, MEPS, refrigerators, Standards and labeling URL https://isswprod.lbl.gov/library/view-docs/public/output/rpt77250.PDF Refereed Designation Unknown Attachment Size

59

\\{HEMSs\\} and enabled demand response in electricity market: An overview  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Traditional electricity grid offers demand side management (DSM) programs for industrial plants and commercial buildings; there is no such program for residential consumers because of the lack of effective automation tools and efficient information and communication technologies (ICTs). Smart Grid is, by definition, equipped with modern automation tools such as home energy management system (HEMS), and ICTs. HEMS is an intelligent system that performs planning, monitoring and control functions of the energy utilization within premises. It is intended to offer desirable demand response according to system conditions and price value signaled by the utility. HEMS enables smart appliances to counter demand response programs according to the comfort level and priority set by the consumer. Demand response can play a key role to ensure sustainable and reliable electricity supply by reducing future generation cost, electricity prices, CO2 emission and electricity consumption at peak times. This paper focuses on the review of \\{HEMSs\\} and enabled demand response (DR) programs in various scenarios as well as incorporates various DR architectures and models employed in the smart grid. A comprehensive case study along with simulations and numerical analysis has also been presented.

Aftab Ahmed Khan; Sohail Razzaq; Asadullah Khan; Fatima Khursheed; Owais

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Electric Power Research Institute Cooperation to Increase Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Electric Power Research Institute Cooperation to Increase Energy Electric Power Research Institute Cooperation to Increase Energy Efficiency, March 6, 2008 Electric Power Research Institute Cooperation to Increase Energy Efficiency, March 6, 2008 The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) strengthened cooperation for research, development and deployment of energy technologies aimed at promoting increased energy efficiency. DOE and EPRI yesterday signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) establishing a framework for close coordination to advance the common goal of satisfying the nation's growing electricity needs by improving energy efficiency and promoting the widespread adoption of electric energy demand response programs in an effort to curtail energy use during peak periods.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "increase electricity demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Palm Springs solar insolation, and California electricityConcentrating Solar Power in California, NREL/SR-550-39291,generation from wind and solar in California could be very

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Distributed Load Demand Scheduling in Smart Grid to Minimize Electricity Generation Cost  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is to perform demand side management (DSM) [1], which aims at matching the consum- ers' electricity demand between electricity consumption and generation. On the consumption side, electric demand ramps upDistributed Load Demand Scheduling in Smart Grid to Minimize Electricity Generation Cost Siyu Yue

Pedram, Massoud

63

Electric Power Research Institute Cooperation to Increase Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Research Institute Cooperation to Increase Energy Research Institute Cooperation to Increase Energy Efficiency, March 6, 2008 Electric Power Research Institute Cooperation to Increase Energy Efficiency, March 6, 2008 The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) strengthened cooperation for research, development and deployment of energy technologies aimed at promoting increased energy efficiency. DOE and EPRI yesterday signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) establishing a framework for close coordination to advance the common goal of satisfying the nation's growing electricity needs by improving energy efficiency and promoting the widespread adoption of electric energy demand response programs in an effort to curtail energy use during peak periods. Electric Power Research Institute Cooperation to Increase Energy

64

Industrial-Load-Shaping: The Practice of and Prospects for Utility/Industry Cooperation to Manage Peak Electricity Demand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INDUSTRIAL-LOAD-SHAPI1IG: TIlE PRACTICE OF AND PROSPECTS FOR UTILITY/INDUSTRY COOPERATION TO MAUGE PEAK ELECTRICITY DEMAND Donald J. BuIes and David E. Rubin Consultants, Pacific Gas and Electric Company San Francisco, California Michael F.... Maniates Energy and Resources Group, University of California Berkeley, California ABSTRACT Load-management programs designed to reduce demand for electricity during peak periods are becoming increasingly important to electric utilities. For a gf...

Bules, D. J.; Rubin, D. E.; Maniates, M. F.

65

THE ROLE OF BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES IN REDUCING AND CONTROLLING PEAK ELECTRICITY DEMAND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LBNL-49947 THE ROLE OF BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES IN REDUCING AND CONTROLLING PEAK ELECTRICITY DEMAND? ..................................... 8 What are the seasonal aspects of electric peak demand?............................ 9 What because of the California electricity crisis (Borenstein 2001). Uncertainties surrounding the reliability

66

Table 11.2 Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2010; 2 Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes; Column: Electricity Components; Unit: Million Kilowatthours. Sales and Net Demand Economic Total Onsite Transfers for Characteristic(a) Purchases Transfers In(b) Generation(c) Offsite Electricity(d) Total United States Value of Shipments and Receipts (million dollars) Under 20 91,909 Q 1,406 194 93,319 20-49 86,795 81 2,466 282 89,060 50-99 90,115 215 2,593 1,115 91,808 100-249 124,827 347 11,375 5,225 131,324 250-499 116,631 2,402 24,079 5,595 137,516 500 and Over 225,242 6,485 91,741 20,770 302,699 Total 735,520 9,728 133,661 33,181 845,727 Employment Size Under 50

67

Table 11.1 Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1.1 Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2010; 1.1 Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity Components; Unit: Million Kilowatthours. Total Sales and Net Demand NAICS Transfers Onsite Transfers for Code(a) Subsector and Industry Purchases In(b) Generation(c) Offsite Electricity(d) Total United States 311 Food 75,652 21 5,666 347 80,993 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 16,620 0 3,494 142 19,972 311221 Wet Corn Milling 7,481 0 3,213 14 10,680 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 1,264 0 1,382 109 2,537 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 9,258 0 336 66 9,528 3115 Dairy Products 9,585 2 38 22 9,602 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing 20,121 15 19 0 20,155 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products

68

Electric Power Research Institute Cooperation to Increase Energy...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

energy efficiency and promoting the widespread adoption of electric energy demand response programs in an effort to curtail energy use during peak periods. Electric Power...

69

Stackelberg Game based Demand Response for At-Home Electric Vehicle Charging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Stackelberg Game based Demand Response for At-Home Electric Vehicle Charging Sung-Guk Yoon Member, which is called demand response. Under demand response, retailers determine their electricity prices cost solution and the result of the equal- charging scheme. Index Terms--demand response, electric

Bahk, Saewoong

70

Exponential smoothing with covariates applied to electricity demand forecast  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Exponential smoothing methods are widely used as forecasting techniques in industry and business. Their usual formulation, however, does not allow covariates to be used for introducing extra information into the forecasting process. In this paper, we analyse an extension of the exponential smoothing formulation that allows the use of covariates and the joint estimation of all the unknowns in the model, which improves the forecasting results. The whole procedure is detailed with a real example on forecasting the daily demand for electricity in Spain. The time series of daily electricity demand contains two seasonal patterns: here the within-week seasonal cycle is modelled as usual in exponential smoothing, while the within-year cycle is modelled using covariates, specifically two harmonic explanatory variables. Calendar effects, such as national and local holidays and vacation periods, are also introduced using covariates. [Received 28 September 2010; Revised 6 March 2011, 2 October 2011; Accepted 16 October 2011

José D. Bermúdez

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Electric Water Heater Modeling and Control Strategies for Demand Response  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Abstract— Demand response (DR) has a great potential to provide balancing services at normal operating conditions and emergency support when a power system is subject to disturbances. Effective control strategies can significantly relieve the balancing burden of conventional generators and reduce investment on generation and transmission expansion. This paper is aimed at modeling electric water heaters (EWH) in households and tests their response to control strategies to implement DR. The open-loop response of EWH to a centralized signal is studied by adjusting temperature settings to provide regulation services; and two types of decentralized controllers are tested to provide frequency support following generator trips. EWH models are included in a simulation platform in DIgSILENT to perform electromechanical simulation, which contains 147 households in a distribution feeder. Simulation results show the dependence of EWH response on water heater usage . These results provide insight suggestions on the need of control strategies to achieve better performance for demand response implementation. Index Terms— Centralized control, decentralized control, demand response, electrical water heater, smart grid

Diao, Ruisheng; Lu, Shuai; Elizondo, Marcelo A.; Mayhorn, Ebony T.; Zhang, Yu; Samaan, Nader A.

2012-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

72

Domestic Demand Response to Increase the Value of Wind Power.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This thesis describes a new method to evaluate the value of wind power combined with domestic demand response. The thesis gives a brief overview of… (more)

Hamidi, Vandad

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Chapter 5: Demand Response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Chapter 5: Demand Response Summary of Key.............................................................................................................. 1 Demand Response in the Fifth Power Plan........................................................................................... 3 Demand Response in the Sixth Power Plan

74

Large Consumer Electricity Acquisition Considering Time-of-Use Rates Demand Response Programs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The consumers try to obtain their electricity demand at minimum cost from different resources in restructured electricity markets. Hence more attention have been made on demand response programs (DRP) which aims ...

Sayyad Nojavan; Hadi Qesmati; Kazem Zare…

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Influence of Air Conditioner Operation on Electricity Use and Peak Demand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electricity demand due to occupant controlled room air conditioners in a large mater-metered apartment building is analyzed. Hourly data on the electric demand of the building and of individual air conditioners are used in analyses of annual...

McGarity, A. E.; Feuermann, D.; Kempton, W.; Norford, L. K.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Demand responsive programs - an emerging resource for competitive electricity markets?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The restructuring of regional electricity markets in the U.S. has been accompanied by numerous problems, including generation capacity shortages, transmission congestion, wholesale price volatility, and reduced system reliability. These problems have created significant new opportunities for technologies and business approaches that allow load serving entities and other aggregators, to control and manage the load patterns of their wholesale or retail end-users. These technologies and business approaches for manipulating end-user load shapes are known as Load Management or, more recently, Demand Responsive programs. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) is conducting case studies on innovative demand responsive programs and presents preliminary results for five case studies in this paper. These case studies illustrate the diversity of market participants and range of technologies and business approaches and focus on key program elements such as target markets, market segmentation and participation results; pricing scheme; dispatch and coordination; measurement, verification, and settlement; and operational results where available.

Heffner, Grayson C. Dr.; Goldman, Charles A.

2001-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

77

An Approach to Demand Response for Alleviating Power System Stress Conditions due to Electric Vehicle Penetration.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Along with the growth of electricity demand and the penetration of intermittent renewable energy sources, electric power distribution networks will face more and more stress… (more)

Shao, Shengnan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Demand for Electric Power in Norway : Estimating price and substitution elasticities.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The main goal of this master thesis is to estimate how the prices of electricity and heating oil affect the aggregate demand for electric power… (more)

Øyan, Ola Hagen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

The potential contribution of small hydroelectric generation to meeting electrical demand on Vancouver Island.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This work focuses on the electrical contribution small hydro generation can make to meeting Vancouver Island's electrical demand, today, and as further development proceeds. A… (more)

Schuett, Matthew T.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

New Zealand Energy Data: Electricity Demand and Consumption | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electricity Demand and Consumption Electricity Demand and Consumption Dataset Summary Description The New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development publishes energy data including many datasets related to electricity. Included here are three electricity consumption and demand datasets, specifically: annual observed electricity consumption by sector (1974 to 2009); observed percentage of consumers by sector (2002 - 2009); and regional electricity demand, as a percentage of total demand (2009). The sectors included are: agriculture, forestry and fishing; industrial (mining, food processing, wood and paper, chemicals, basic metals, other minor sectors); commercial; and residential. Source New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development Date Released Unknown Date Updated July 03rd, 2009 (5 years ago)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "increase electricity demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Integrated electricity and heating demand-side management for wind power integration in China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The wind power generation system will play a crucial role for developing the energy conservative, environmentally friendly, and sustainable electric power system in China. However, the intermittency and unpredictability of wind power has been an obstacle to the deployment of wind power generation, especially in the winter of northern China. In northern China, a combined heat and power (CHP) unit has been widely utilized as a heat and electricity source. Considering the flexible operation of CHP with introduction of electric heat pumps (EHPs), this paper proposes a new method of electricity and heating demand side management to facilitate the wind power integration with the purpose of energy conservation in a unit-commitment problem. The thermal characteristics of demand side such as the thermal inertia of buildings and thermal comfort of end users are taken into consideration. Moreover the distributed electric heat pumps (EHPs) widely used by city dwellers are introduced into the wind-thermal power system as the heating source and spinning reserve so as to increase the flexibility of heating and electricity supply. The simulation results show that the new method can integrate more wind power into power grid for electricity and heating demand to reduce the coal consumption.

Yulong Yang; Kai Wu; Hongyu Long; Jianchao Gao; Xu Yan; Takeyoshi Kato; Yasuo Suzuoki

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Employing demand response in energy procurement plans of electricity retailers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper proposes a new framework in which demand response (DR) is incorporated as an energy resource of electricity retailers in addition to the commonly used forward contracts and pool markets. In this way, a stepwise reward-based DR is proposed as a real-time resource of the retailer. In addition, the unpredictable behavior of customers participating in the proposed reward-based DR is modeled through a scenario-based participation factor. The overall problem is formulated as a stochastic optimization approach in which pool prices and customers’ participation in DR are uncertain variables. The feasibility of the problem is evaluated on a realistic case of the Australian National Electricity Market (NEM) and solved using General Algebraic Modeling System (GAMS) software.

Nadali Mahmoudi; Mehdi Eghbal; Tapan K. Saha

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Demand Response in U.S. Electricity Markets: Empirical Evidence  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

LBNL-2124E LBNL-2124E Demand Response in U.S. Electricity Markets: Empirical Evidence Principal Authors Peter Cappers a , Charles Goldman a , and David Kathan b a Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 b Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, 888 First Street, NE, Washington, DC 20426, Energy Analysis Department Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1 Cyclotron Road, MS 90R4000 Berkeley CA 94720-8136 Environmental Energy Technologies Division June 2009 http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/EMS/EMS_pubs.html Pre-print version of the article to be published in Energy, forthcoming 2009. The work described in this paper was funded by the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, Permitting, Siting and Analysis of the U.S.

84

Univariate forecasting of day-ahead hourly electricity demand in the northern grid of India  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Short-term electricity demand forecasts (minutes to several hours ahead) have become increasingly important since the rise of the competitive energy markets. The issue is particularly important for India as it has recently set up a power exchange (PX), which has been operating on day-ahead hourly basis. In this study, an attempt has been made to forecast day-ahead hourly demand of electricity in the northern grid of India using univariate time-series forecasting techniques namely multiplicative seasonal ARIMA and Holt-Winters multiplicative exponential smoothing (ES). In-sample forecasts reveal that ARIMA models, except in one case, outperform ES models in terms of lower RMSE, MAE and MAPE criteria. We may conclude that linear time-series models works well to explain day-ahead hourly demand forecasts in the northern grid of India. The findings of the study will immensely help the players in the upcoming power market in India.

Sajal Ghosh

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Multicriteria decision making in electricity demand management: the case of Kuwait  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Electricity demand in Kuwait has substantially increased over the years and this increase is attributed to population growth, increase in the number of buildings, and the extensive use of air-conditioning system during the very hot weather in the summer. The amount of electrical energy generated reached 48 444 308 megawatt hour (MWH) in 2007. Such growth calls for extensive investment in the continuous expansion of the existing power plants and constructing new ones. To rationalise the consumption of electricity, several conservation policies have to be implemented. In this work, we have attempted to diagnose such problem and solicit expert opinions in order to provide the proper remedies. Because the problem comprises several criteria that are subjective in nature, multicriteria decision-making approaches were suggested. The Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP) was used as a decision tool to assess the different policies that could be used to bring about electricity conservation.

Mohammed Hajeeh

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Automated Demand Response: The Missing Link in the Electricity Value Chain  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2006, the Public Interest Energy Research Program (PIER) Demand Response Research Center (DRRC) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory initiated research into Automated Demand Response (OpenADR) applications in California industry. The goal is to improve electric grid reliability and lower electricity use during periods of peak demand. The purpose of this research is to begin to define the relationship among a portfolio of actions that industrial facilities can undertake relative to their electricity use. This ?electricity value chain? defines energy management and demand response (DR) at six levels of service, distinguished by the magnitude, type, and rapidity of response. One element in the electricity supply chain is OpenADR, an open-standards based communications system to send signals to customers to allow them to manage their electric demand in response to supply conditions, such as prices or reliability, through a set of standard, open communications. Initial DRRC research suggests that industrial facilities that have undertaken energy efficiency measures are probably more, not less, likely to initiate other actions within this value chain such as daily load management and demand response. Moreover, OpenADR appears to afford some facilities the opportunity to develop the supporting control structure and to"demo" potential reductions in energy use that can later be applied to either more effective load management or a permanent reduction in use via energy efficiency. Under the right conditions, some types of industrial facilities can shift or shed loads, without any, or minimal disruption to operations, to protect their energy supply reliability and to take advantage of financial incentives.1 In 2007 and 2008, 35 industrial facilities agreed to implement OpenADR, representing a total capacity of nearly 40 MW. This paper describes how integrated or centralized demand management and system-level network controls are linked to OpenADR systems. Case studies of refrigerated warehouses and wastewater treatment facilities are used to illustrate OpenADR load reduction potential. Typical shed and shift strategies include: turning off or operating compressors, aerator blowers and pumps at reduced capacity, increasing temperature set-points or pre-cooling cold storage areas and over-oxygenating stored wastewater prior to a DR event. This study concludes that understanding industrial end-use processes and control capabilities is a key to support reduced service during DR events and these capabilities, if DR enabled, hold significant promise in reducing the electricity demand of the industrial sector during utility peak periods.

McKane, Aimee; Rhyne, Ivin; Lekov, Alex; Thompson, Lisa; Piette, MaryAnn

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Customer Load Strategies for Demand Response in Bilateral Contracting of Electricity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Electricity markets are systems for affecting the purchase and sale of electricity using supply and demand to set energy prices. Electricity can be traded in organized markets or by negotiating forward bilateral ...

Fernando Lopes; Hugo Algarvio

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Using Compressed Air Efficiency Projects to Reduce Peak Industrial Electric Demands: Lessons Learned  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

"To help customers respond to the wildly fluctuating energy markets in California, Pacific Gas & Electric (PG&E) initiated an emergency electric demand reduction program in October 2000 to cut electric use during peak periods. One component...

Skelton, J.

89

Renewable Electricity Futures Study. Volume 3: End-Use Electricity Demand  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Renewable Electricity Futures (RE Futures) Study investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. The analysis focused on the sufficiency of the geographically diverse U.S. renewable resources to meet electricity demand over future decades, the hourly operational characteristics of the U.S. grid with high levels of variable wind and solar generation, and the potential implications of deploying high levels of renewables in the future. RE Futures focused on technical aspects of high penetration of renewable electricity; it did not focus on how to achieve such a future through policy or other measures. Given the inherent uncertainties involved with analyzing alternative long-term energy futures as well as the multiple pathways that might be taken to achieve higher levels of renewable electricity supply, RE Futures explored a range of scenarios to investigate and compare the impacts of renewable electricity penetration levels (30%-90%), future technology performance improvements, potential constraints to renewable electricity development, and future electricity demand growth assumptions. RE Futures was led by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

Hostick, D.; Belzer, D.B.; Hadley, S.W.; Markel, T.; Marnay, C.; Kintner-Meyer, M.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Table E13.1. Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 1998  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 1998;" 1. Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Electricity Components;" " Unit: Million Kilowatthours." " ",," "," ",," " ,,,,"Sales and","Net Demand","RSE" "Economic",,,"Total Onsite","Transfers","for","Row" "Characteristic(a)","Purchases","Transfers In(b)","Generation(c)","Offsite","Electricity(d)","Factors" ,"Total United States"

91

On the impact of urban heat island and global warming on the power demand and electricity consumption of buildings—A review  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Urban heat island and global warming increase significantly the ambient temperature. Higher temperatures have a serious impact on the electricity consumption of the building sector increasing considerably the peak and the total electricity demand. The present paper aims to collect, analyze and present in a comparative way existing studies investigating the impact of ambient temperature increase on electricity consumption. Analysis of eleven studies dealing with the impact of the ambient temperature on the peak electricity demand showed that for each degree of temperature increase, the increase of the peak electricity load varies between 0.45% and 4.6%. This corresponds to an additional electricity penalty of about 21 (±10.4) W per degree of temperature increase and per person. In parallel, analysis of fifteen studies examining the impact of ambient temperature on the total electricity consumption, showed that the actual increase of the electricity demand per degree of temperature increase varies between 0.5% and 8.5%.

M. Santamouris; C. Cartalis; A. Synnefa; D. Kolokotsa

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Climate, extreme heat, and electricity demand in California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

demand responses to climate change: Methodology and application to the Commonwealth of Massachusetts.

Miller, N.L.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Marginal Cost Pricing: An Efficient Tool to Ensure Electricity Demand Side Management  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The constant adaptation between electricity supply and demand can be achieved in two ways : On the supply side, through the construction of additional facilities, and on the demand side, by implementing tariffs, ...

B. Lescoeur; J. B. Galland; E. Husson

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

The behavioral response to voluntary provision of an environmental public good: Evidence from residential electricity demand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

residential electricity demand Grant D. Jacobsen a,n , Matthew J. Kotchen b,c , Michael P. Vandenbergh d online 25 February 2012 JEL classification: H41 Q42 G54 Keywords: Green electricity Voluntary environmental protection Carbon offset Renewable energy Moral licensing Residential electricity demand a b s t r

Kotchen, Matthew J.

95

Residential Electricity Demand in China -- Can Efficiency Reverse the Growth?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for 90% of household electricity consumption in China. Usinggives an annual electricity consumption of 12kWh assumingto look at is electricity consumption at the household

Letschert, Virginie

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

"Table A16. Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region, Industry"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6. Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region, Industry" 6. Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region, Industry" " Group, and Selected Industries, 1991" " (Estimates in Million Kilowatthours)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," "," "," "," ","Sales and/or"," ","RSE" "SIC"," "," ","Transfers","Total Onsite","Transfers","Net Demand for","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","Purchases","In(b)","Generation(c)","Offsite","Electricity(d)","Factors"

97

ELECTRICITY DEMAND AND SUPPLY PROJECTIONS IN IEA WORLD ENERGY SCENARIOS: HOW MUCH, HOW CLEAN?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract (40-Word Limit): The presentation will highlight and discuss projections for electricity demand up to 2050 based on the recent publication Energy Technology Perspectives 2012:...

Frankl, Paolo

98

An integrated assessment of global and regional water demands for electricity generation to 2095  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electric power plants currently account for approximately one-half of the global industrial water withdrawal. While continued expansion of the electric sector seems likely into the future, the consequent water demands are quite uncertain, and will depend on highly variable water intensities by electricity technologies, at present and in the future. Using GCAM, an integrated assessment model of energy, agriculture, and climate change, we first establish lower-bound, median, and upper-bound estimates for present-day electric sector water withdrawals and consumption by individual electric generation technologies in each of 14 geopolitical regions, and compare them with available estimates of regional industrial or electric sector water use. We then explore the evolution of global and regional electric sector water use over the next century, focusing on uncertainties related to withdrawal and consumption intensities for a variety of electric generation technologies, rates of change of power plant cooling system types, and rates of adoption of a suite of water-saving technologies. Results reveal that the water withdrawal intensity of electricity generation is likely to decrease in the near term with capital stock turnover, as wet towers replace once-through flow cooling systems and advanced electricity generation technologies replace conventional ones. An increase in consumptive use accompanies the decrease in water withdrawal rates; however, a suite of water conservation technologies currently under development could compensate for this increase in consumption. Finally, at a regional scale, water use characteristics vary significantly based on characteristics of the existing capital stock and the selection of electricity generation technologies into the future.

Davies, Evan; Kyle, G. Page; Edmonds, James A.

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Evaluation of ground energy storage assisted electric vehicle DC fast charger for demand charge reduction and providing demand response  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In 2012 there was approximately 2400 electric vehicle DC Fast Charging stations sold globally. According to Pike Research (Jerram and Gartner, 2012), it is anticipated that by 2020 there will be approximately 460,000 of them installed worldwide. A typical public DC fast charger delivers a maximum power output of 50 kW which allows a typical passenger vehicle to be 80% charged in 10–15 min, compared with 6–8 h for a 6.6 kW AC level 2 charging unit. While DC fast chargers offer users the convenience of being able to rapidly charge their vehicle, the unit's high power demand has the potential to put sudden strain on the electricity network, and incur significant demand charges. Depending on the utility rate structure, a DC fast charger can experience annual demand charges of several thousand dollars. Therefore in these cases there is an opportunity to mitigate or even avoid the demand charges incurred by coupling the unit with an appropriately sized energy storage system and coordinating the way in which it integrates. This paper explores the technical and economical suitability of coupling a ground energy storage system with a DC fast charge unit for mitigation or avoidance of demand charges and lessening the impact on the local electricity network. This paper also discusses the concept of having the system participate in demand response programs in order to provide grid support and to further improve the economic suitability of an energy storage system.

Donald McPhail

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Demand side management of electric car charging: Benefits for consumer and grid  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ireland is currently striving to source 10% of the energy required for its transport fleet from renewable energy sources by 2020. As part of the measures being implemented in order to help realise this ambitious target a number of Government schemes have been introduced to financially subsidise the purchase of alternative energy vehicles in an effort to achieve 10% EV (electric vehicle) penetration in the country's road fleet by 2020. The replacement of ICE (internal combustion engine) vehicles with EV equivalents poses challenges for grid operators while simultaneously offering opportunities in terms of distributed energy storage and flexible load. This paper examines how optimising the charging cycles of an electric car using DSM (Demand Side Management) based on a number of criteria could be used to achieve financial savings, increased demand on renewable energy, reduce demand on thermal generation plant, and reduce peak load demand. The results demonstrate that significant gains can be achieved using currently available market data which highlights the point that DSM can be implemented without any further technological advents.

P. Finn; C. Fitzpatrick; D. Connolly

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "increase electricity demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

The Supply and Demand Models Based on Electricity Consumption  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Analyzing how the supply and demand of a commodity changes as a function of its price is one of the many purposes of the field of economics. The supply and demand model of a commodity is also the most efficient a...

Zhaoguang Hu; Zheng Hu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Table A19. Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region and  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region and" Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region and" " Economic Characteristics of the Establishment, 1991" " (Estimates in Million Kilowatthours)" " "," "," "," ","Sales/"," ","RSE" " "," ","Transfers","Onsite","Transfers"," ","Row" "Economic Characteristics(a)","Purchases","In(b)","Generation(c)","Offsite","Net Demand(d)","Factors" ,"Total United States" "RSE Column Factors:",0.5,1.4,1.3,1.9,0.5 "Value of Shipments and Receipts" "(million dollars)"

103

Table A26. Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region, Census Di  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region, Census Division, and" Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region, Census Division, and" " Economic Characteristics of the Establishment, 1994" " (Estimates in Million Kilowatthours)" " "," "," "," ","Sales/"," ","RSE" " "," ","Transfers","Onsite","Transfers"," ","Row" "Economic Characteristics(a)","Purchases","In(b)","Generation(c)","Offsite","Net Demand(d)","Factors" ,"Total United States" "RSE Column Factors:",0.5,2.1,1.2,2,0.4 "Value of Shipments and Receipts"

104

Trends in electricity demand and supply in the developing countries, 1980--1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides an overview of trends concerning electricity demand and supply in the developing countries in the 1980--1990 period, with special focus on 13 major countries for which we have assembled consistent data series. We describe the linkage between electricity demand and economic growth, the changing sectoral composition of electricity consumption, and changes in the mix of energy sources for electricity generation. We also cover trends in the efficiency of utility electricity supply with respect to power plant efficiency and own-use and delivery losses, and consider the trends in carbon dioxide emissions from electricity supply.

Meyers, S.; Campbell, C.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Demand side management of industrial electricity consumption: Promoting the use of renewable energy through real-time pricing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract As the installed capacity of wind generation in Ireland continues to increase towards an overall goal of 40% of electricity from renewable sources by 2020, it is inevitable that the frequency of wind curtailment occurrences will increase. Using this otherwise discarded energy by strategically increasing demand at times that would otherwise require curtailment has the potential to reduce the installed capacity of wind required to meet the national 2020 target. Considering two industrial electricity consumers, this study analyses the potential for the implementation of price based demand response by an industrial consumer to increase their proportional use of wind generated electricity by shifting their demand towards times of low prices. Results indicate that while curtailing during peak price times has little or no benefit in terms of wind energy consumption, demand shifting towards low price times is likely to increase a consumer’s consumption of wind generation by approximately 5.8% for every 10% saved on the consumer’s average unit price of electricity.

Paddy Finn; Colin Fitzpatrick

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Economy and Electricity Demand Growth Linked but ƒƒƒ.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Economy and Electricity Demand Economy and Electricity Demand Growth Linked but ... for International Utility Conference, Demand Trends Panel March 12, 2013 | London, UK by Adam Sieminski, Administrator U. S. electricity use and economic growth, 1950-2040 Adam Sieminski, EEI Demand Trends, March 12, 2013 2 -2% 0% 2% 4% 6% 8% 10% 12% 14% 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 2020 2030 2040 Percent growth, 3-year rolling average Source: EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Early Release History Projections 2011 Electricity Use GDP 2.4% 0.9% 2011 - 2040 average Annual energy use of a new refrigerator, 1950-2008 Adam Sieminski, EEI Demand Trends, March 12, 2013 3 Kilowatthours per year Source: DOE / EERE - Building Technologies Office 0 200 400 600 800 1,000 1,200 1,400 1,600 1,800

107

THE CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES TO MEET THE WORKFORCE DEMAND IN THE ELECTRIC POWER AND ENERGY PROFESSION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, but also has become the backbone for our economic development. The world has witnessed electric power1 THE CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES TO MEET THE WORKFORCE DEMAND IN THE ELECTRIC POWER AND ENERGY and supply in the world in general, and in the US, in particular. The electric power and energy industry

108

Prices in Wholesale Electricity Markets and Demand Response.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Price determination for a wholesale electricity market has been a long-standing issue in energy systems modeling. From an economic perspective, the complication arises from determining… (more)

Aketi, Venkata Sesha Praneeth

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Ancillary Service Revenue Opportunities from Electric Vehicles via Demand Response.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Driven by a variety of factors including falling costs, environmental impacts, and state mandates, the integration of renewable energy on the U. S. electrical grid… (more)

Moss, Brian

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Effects of the drought on California electricity supply and demand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ELECTRICITY SUPPLY Hydroelectric Energy Supply Thermal-question. Data on PG&E's hydroelectric resources and Pacific27 Table 28 Table 29 Hydroelectric Supply in California Fuel

Benenson, P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Singular value decomposition expansion for electrical demand analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......friction. Reactive power in an electric circuit is analogous to the...eigenvalue decomposition, the elementary factors are invariant under...invariant under three matrix elementary transformations on A, i...often much higher than the resistance in an electrical system......

FAN LI

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Electricity Demand-Side Management for an Energy Efficient Future in China: Technology Options and Policy Priorities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electricity Demand-Side Management for an Energy Efficient Future in China: Technology Options sensitive impacts on electricity demand growth by different demand-side management (DSM) scenarios countries. The research showed that demand side management strategies could result in significant reduction

de Weck, Olivier L.

113

AN ECONOMETRIC ANALYSIS OF ZAMBIAN INDUSTRIAL ELECTRICITY DEMAND.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The purpose of this thesis is twofold: to examine the electricity use in Zambia’s mining industry by focusing on own-price, cross price and index of… (more)

Chama, Yoram Chama

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

ASSESSMENT OF ELECTRICITY DEMAND IN IRAN'S INDUSTRIAL SECTOR USING DIFFERENT INTELLIGENT OPTIMIZATION TECHNIQUES  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study presents application of particle swarm optimization (PSO) and genetic algorithm (GA) methods to estimate electricity demand in Iran's industrial sectors, based on economic indicators. The economic indicators used in this study are number of ...

M. A. Behrang; E. Assareh; M. R. Assari; A. Ghanbarzadeh

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

The Impacts of Utility-Sponsored Demand-Side Management Programs on Industrial Electricity Consumers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

One of the most pressing issues in electric utility regulation today is the extent to which demand-side management (DSM) programs should be promoted by utilities. DSM refers to energy-efficiency or conservation measures, such as insulation, more...

Rosenblum, J. I.

116

Medium-term forecasting of demand prices on example of electricity prices for industry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the paper, a method of forecasting demand prices for electric energy for the industry has been suggested. An algorithm of the forecast for 2006–2010 based on the data for 1997–2005 has been presented.

V. V. Kossov

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Issues Related to the Growth of Electricity in Global Energy Demand  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Since the subject of this international conference is “Global Energy Demand in Transition: The New Role of Electricity ... drive the evolution of the market shares of energy sources and uses (which are different,...

Marcelo Alonso

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Electricity Distribution Networks: Investment and Regulation, and Uncertain Demand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by the Department of Energy and Climate Change (DEEC) on an annual basis.6 5 Engineering Technical Report 115 (1988). 6 DECC Sub-national energy consumption statistics (http://www.decc.gov.uk/en/content... of non-domestic activity, which must be taken into account whilst forecasting non-domestic demand. 8 DECC Sub-national energy consumption statistics (http://www.decc.gov.uk/en/content...

Jamasb, Tooraj; Marantes, Cristiano

2011-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

119

Photo-Ionic Cells: Two Solutions to Store Solar Energy and Generate Electricity on Demand  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Photo-Ionic Cells: Two Solutions to Store Solar Energy and Generate Electricity on Demand ... potential of solar energy all over the world is many times larger than the current total primary energy demanded. ... The magnitudes of the free energies derived from formal potentials are detd. ...

Manuel A. Méndez; Pekka Peljo; Micheál D. Scanlon; Heron Vrubel; Hubert H. Girault

2014-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

120

Electric Demand Cost Versus Labor Cost: A Case Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

steel and glass. Pins, glass beads and headers are assembled manually and are put in a carbon tray. Carbon trays are put in furnaces (ovens) which are maintained at a constant temperature between 160Q-2000F and have an exothermic gas environment.... At this time, company registers its peak demand. Company keeps all furnaces on and keep them available for workers in case they will need it for their products. On average, no more than two furnaces will have same temperature and exothermic gas...

Agrawal, S.; Jensen, R.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "increase electricity demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Imperfect price-reversibility of US gasoline demand: Asymmetric responses to price increases and declines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes a framework for analyzing the imperfect price-reversibility (hysteresis) of oil demand. The oil demand reductions following the oil price increases of the 1970s will not be completely reversed by the price cuts of the 1980s, nor is it necessarily true that these partial demand reversals themselves will be reversed exactly by future price increases. The author decomposes price into three monotonic series: price increases to maximum historic levels, price cuts, and price recoveries (increases below historic highs). He would expect that the response to price cuts would be no greater than to price recoveries, which in turn would be no greater than for increases in maximum historic price. For evidence of imperfect price-reversibility, he tests econometrically the following US data: vehicle miles per driver, the fuel efficiency of the automobile fleet, and gasoline demand per driver. In each case, the econometric results allow him to reject the hypothesis of perfect price-reversibility. The data show smaller response to price cuts than to price increases. This has dramatic implications for projections of gasoline and oil demand, especially under low-price assumptions. 26 refs., 13 figs., 3 tabs.

Gately, D. (New York Univ., NY (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Solutions for Summer Electric Power Shortages: Demand Response andits Applications in Air Conditioning and Refrigerating Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Demand response (DR) is an effective tool which resolves inconsistencies between electric power supply and demand. It further provides a reliable and credible resource that ensures stable and economical operation of the power grid. This paper introduces systematic definitions for DR and demand side management, along with operational differences between these two methods. A classification is provided for DR programs, and various DR strategies are provided for application in air conditioning and refrigerating systems. The reliability of DR is demonstrated through discussion of successful overseas examples. Finally, suggestions as to the implementation of demand response in China are provided.

Han, Junqiao; Piette, Mary Ann

2007-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

123

Univariate time-series forecasting of monthly peak demand of electricity in northern India  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study forecasts the monthly peak demand of electricity in the northern region of India using univariate time-series techniques namely Multiplicative Seasonal Autoregressive Integrated Moving Average (MSARIMA) and Holt-Winters Multiplicative Exponential Smoothing (ES) for seasonally unadjusted monthly data spanning from April 2000 to February 2007. In-sample forecasting reveals that the MSARIMA model outperforms the ES model in terms of lower root mean square error, mean absolute error and mean absolute percent error criteria. It has been found that ARIMA (2, 0, 0) (0, 1, 1)12 is the best fitted model to explain the monthly peak demand of electricity, which has been used to forecast the monthly peak demand of electricity in northern India, 15 months ahead from February 2007. This will help Northern Regional Load Dispatch Centre to make necessary arrangements a priori to meet the future peak demand.

Sajal Ghosh

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Risk-based bidding of large electric utilities using Information Gap Decision Theory considering demand response  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The present study presents a new risk-constrained bidding strategy formulation of large electric utilities in, presence of demand response programs. The considered electric utility consists of generation facilities, along with a retailer part, which is responsible for supplying associated demands. The total profit of utility comes from participating in day-ahead energy markets and selling energy to corresponding consumers via retailer part. Different uncertainties, such as market price, affect the profit of the utility. Therefore, here, attempts are made to make use of Information Gap Decision Theory (IGDT) to obtain a robust scheduling method against the unfavorable deviations of the market prices. Implementing demand response programs sounds attractive for the consumers through providing some incentives in one hand, and it improves the risk hedging capability of the utility on the other hand. The proposed method is applied to a test system and effect of demand response programs is investigated on the total profit of the utility.

M. Kazemi; B. Mohammadi-Ivatloo; M. Ehsan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Climate, Extreme Heat, and Electricity Demand in California  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Over the twenty-first century, the frequency of extreme-heat events for major cities in heavily air conditioned California is projected to increase rapidly. Extreme heat is defined here as the temperature threshold for the 90th-percentile ...

Norman L. Miller; Katharine Hayhoe; Jiming Jin; Maximilian Auffhammer

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Exploring the Effect of Continuing Increases in Water Demands on the Sustainability of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the Rio Grande Compact was approved by Congress, dividing the annual water flow among the three states3 Exploring the Effect of Continuing Increases in Water Demands on the Sustainability of Limited Water Resources byDr.JamesF.Booker NRLCVisitingFellow The Rio Grande originates in the southern Colorado

127

Maximizing the Productive Uses of Electricity to Increase the...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Maximizing the Productive Uses of Electricity to Increase the Impact of Rural Electrification Programs Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Maximizing the...

128

A demand responsive bidding mechanism with price elasticity matrix in wholesale electricity pools ; A demand responsive bidding mechanism with price elasticity matrix .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??In the past several decades, many demand-side participation features have been applied in the electricity power systems. These features, such as distributed generation, on-site storage… (more)

Wang, Jiankang, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

"Table A25. Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region, Census Division, Industry"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region, Census Division, Industry" Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region, Census Division, Industry" " Group, and Selected Industries, 1994" " (Estimates in Million Kilowatthours)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," "," "," "," ","Sales and/or"," ","RSE" "SIC"," "," ","Transfers","Total Onsite","Transfers","Net Demand for","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","Purchases","In(b)","Generation(c)","Offsite","Electricity(d)","Factors"

130

Statewide Electricity and Demand Capacity Savings from the Implementation of IECC Code in Texas: Analysis for Single-Family Residences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STATEWIDE ELECTRICITY AND DEMAND CAPACITY SAVINGS FROM THE IMPLEMENTATION OF IECC CODE IN TEXAS: ANALYSIS FOR SINGLE?FAMILY RESIDENCES 11th International Conference for Enhanced Building Operations New York City, October 18 ? 20, 2011 Hyojin...&M University System Statewide Electricity and Demand Savings from the IECC Code in TX 11th ICEBO Conference Oct. 18 ? 20, 2011 2 Outline Introduction Methodology Base?Case Building Results Summary Statewide Electricity and Demand Savings from the IECC...

Kim, H.; Baltazar, J.C.; Haberl, J.; Lewis, C.; Yazdani, B.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Coordinating Regulation and Demand Response in Electric Power Grids: Direct and Price-Based Tracking Using Multirate Economic Model Predictive Control  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

?Based on “Coordinating regulation and demand response in electric power grids using multirate model...

Haitham Hindi; Daniel Greene…

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Further exploring the potential of residential demand response programs in electricity distribution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Smart grids play a key role in realizing climate ambitions. Boosting consumption flexibility is an essential measure in bringing the potential gains of smart grids to fruition. The collective scientific understanding of demand response programs argues that time-of-use tariffs have proven its merits. The findings upon which this conclusion rests are, however, primarily derived from studies covering energy-based time-of-use rates over fairly short periods of time. Hence, this empirical study set out with the intention of estimating the extent of response to a demand-based time-of-use electricity distribution tariff among Swedish single-family homes in the long term. The results show that six years after the implementation households still respond to the price signals of the tariff by cutting demand in peak hours and shifting electricity consumption from peak to off-peak hours. Studies conducted in the Nordic countries commonly include only homeowners and so another aim of the study was to explore the potential of demand response programs among households living in apartment buildings. The demand-based tariff proved to bring about similar, but not as marked, effects in rental apartments, whereas there are virtually no corresponding evidences of demand response in condominium apartments.

Cajsa Bartusch; Karin Alvehag

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Long-term electricity demand forecasting for power system planning using economic, demographic and climatic variables  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The stochastic planning of power production overcomes the drawback of deterministic models by accounting for uncertainties in the parameters. Such planning accounts for demand uncertainties by using scenario sets and probability distributions. However, in previous literature, different scenarios were developed by either assigning arbitrary values or assuming certain percentages above or below a deterministic demand. Using forecasting techniques, reliable demand data can be obtained and inputted to the scenario set. This article focuses on the long-term forecasting of electricity demand using autoregressive, simple linear and multiple linear regression models. The resulting models using different forecasting techniques are compared through a number of statistical measures and the most accurate model was selected. Using Ontario's electricity demand as a case study, the annual energy, peak load and base load demand were forecasted up to the year 2025. In order to generate different scenarios, different ranges in the economic, demographic and climatic variables were used. [Received 16 October 2007; Revised 31 May 2008; Revised 25 October 2008; Accepted 1 November 2008

F. Chui; A. Elkamel; R. Surit; E. Croiset; P.L. Douglas

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Demand Reduction  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Grantees may use funds to coordinate with electricity supply companies and utilities to reduce energy demands on their power systems. These demand reduction programs are usually coordinated through...

135

Economic Benefits of Increasing Electric Grid Resilience to Weather Outages  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Economic Benefits of Increasing Electric Grid Resilience to Weather Economic Benefits of Increasing Electric Grid Resilience to Weather Outages Economic Benefits of Increasing Electric Grid Resilience to Weather Outages In June 2011, President Obama released A Policy Framework for the 21st Century Grid which set out a four-pillared strategy for modernizing the electric grid. The initiative directed billions of dollars toward investments in 21st century smart grid technologies focused at increasing the grid's efficiency, reliability, and resilience, and making it less vulnerable to weather-related outages and reducing the time it takes to restore power after an outage occurs. Grid resilience is increasingly important as climate change increases the frequency and intensity of severe weather. Greenhouse gas emissions are elevating air and water temperatures around the world. Scientific research

136

Abstract--Electrical Distribution Systems (EDS) are facing ever-increased complexity due, in part, to fast growing consumer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. As such Electrical Distribution Systems will require new planning strategies and tools, new design methodologies1 Abstract-- Electrical Distribution Systems (EDS) are facing ever-increased complexity due, in part, to fast growing consumer demands and the integration of large amounts of distributed energy

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

137

What explains the increased utilization of Powder River Basin coal in electric power generation?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article examines possible explanations for increased utilization of Powder River Basin (PRB) coal in electric power generation that occurred over the last two decades. Did more stringent environmental policy motivate electric power plants to switch to less polluting fuels? Or, did greater use of PRB coal occur because relative price changes altered input markets in favor of this fuel. A key finding is that factors other than environmental policy such as the decline in railroad freight rates together with elastic demand by power plants were major contributors to the increased utilization of this fuel.

Gerking, S.; Hamilton, S.F. [University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL (United States)

2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

138

Texas Uses Phasors to Increase Electricity Reliability | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Uses Phasors to Increase Electricity Reliability Uses Phasors to Increase Electricity Reliability Texas Uses Phasors to Increase Electricity Reliability March 31, 2011 - 12:57pm Addthis Merrill Smith Program Manager, Office of Electricity Delivery & Energy Reliability What does this mean for me? Phasor measurement units are part of a comprehensive approach to managing the variability from renewable sources, particularly wind. This project will enable more effective use of renewable energy sources by helping to illustrate solutions for managing unpredictability and promote reliability on the grid. As any businessperson will tell you, a key to long-term success is the ability to foresee potential problems and limit risk. In the electricity industry this ability can prevent grid events, like unexpected

139

The Impact of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response Programs on the U.S. Electricity Market  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study analyzes the impact of the energy efficiency (EE) and demand response (DR) programs on the grid and the consequent level of production. Changes in demand caused by EE and DR programs affect not only the dispatch of existing plants and new generation technologies, the retirements of old plants, and the finances of the market. To find the new equilibrium in the market, we use the Oak Ridge Competitive Electricity Dispatch Model (ORCED) developed to simulate the operations and costs of regional power markets depending on various factors including fuel prices, initial mix of generation capacity, and customer response to electricity prices. In ORCED, over 19,000 plant units in the nation are aggregated into up to 200 plant groups per region. Then, ORCED dispatches the power plant groups in each region to meet the electricity demands for a given year up to 2035. In our analysis, we show various demand, supply, and dispatch patterns affected by EE and DR programs across regions.

Baek, Young Sun [ORNL; Hadley, Stanton W [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Demand-response (DR) programs, in which facilities reduce their electric loads in response to a utility signal, represent a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Issue Demand-response (DR) programs, in which facilities reduce their electric loads (Figure 1). The testing covered four Lighting the Way to Demand ResponseLighting the Way to Demand Response California Energy Commission's Public Interest Energy Research Program Technical Brief PIER

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "increase electricity demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Integrating Demand into the U.S. Electric Power System: Technical, Economic, and Regulatory Frameworks for Responsive Load  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for Responsive/Adaptive Load by Jason W. Black Massachusetts Institute of Technology Submitted to the Engineering integration of demand response. Integrating demand into the US electricity system will allow the development, and market issues to determine a system structure that provides incentives for demand response. An integrated

de Weck, Olivier L.

142

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Table 5.8 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal Net Demand Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal End Use for Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) Natural Gas(c) NGL(d) Coke and Breeze) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 3,335 251 129 5,512 79 1,016 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 84 133 23 2,119 8 547 Conventional Boiler Use 84 71 17 1,281 8 129 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process 0 62 6 838 1 417 Direct Uses-Total Process 2,639 62 52 2,788 39 412 Process Heating 379 59 19 2,487 32 345 Process Cooling and Refrigeration

143

A Preliminary Examination of the Supply and Demand Balance for Renewable Electricity  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

A Preliminary Examination A Preliminary Examination of the Supply and Demand Balance for Renewable Electricity Blair Swezey, Jørn Aabakken, and Lori Bird Technical Report NREL/TP-670-42266 October 2007 NREL is operated by Midwest Research Institute ● Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 A Preliminary Examination of the Supply and Demand Balance for Renewable Electricity Blair Swezey, Jørn Aabakken, and Lori Bird Prepared under Task No. WF6N.1015 Technical Report NREL/TP-670-42266 October 2007 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Operated for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy by Midwest Research Institute * Battelle

144

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Demand Residual and Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coke and Breeze) for Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) (billion NGL(d) (million End Use (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 977,338 40 22 5,357 21 46 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 24,584 21 4 2,059 2 25 Conventional Boiler Use 24,584 11 3 1,245 2 6 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process 0 10 1 814 * 19 Direct Uses-Total Process 773,574 10 9 2,709 10 19 Process Heating

145

Protecting the Electric Grid from Increasingly Severe Weather Due to  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Protecting the Electric Grid from Increasingly Severe Weather Due Protecting the Electric Grid from Increasingly Severe Weather Due to Climate Change Protecting the Electric Grid from Increasingly Severe Weather Due to Climate Change August 12, 2013 - 5:25pm Addthis Transmission lines along Highway 15 outside Victorville, California. | Photo courtesy of Abby Rowling. Transmission lines along Highway 15 outside Victorville, California. | Photo courtesy of Abby Rowling. Patricia A. Hoffman Patricia A. Hoffman Assistant Secretary, Office of Electricity Delivery & Energy Reliability Jim Stock Member - White House Council of Economic Advisers EDITOR'S NOTE: This article originally appeared on WhiteHouse.gov. This week marks the tenth anniversary of one of the worst power outages in the United States, during which tens of millions of Americans were affected

146

Protecting the Electric Grid from Increasingly Severe Weather Due to  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Protecting the Electric Grid from Increasingly Severe Weather Due Protecting the Electric Grid from Increasingly Severe Weather Due to Climate Change Protecting the Electric Grid from Increasingly Severe Weather Due to Climate Change August 12, 2013 - 5:25pm Addthis Transmission lines along Highway 15 outside Victorville, California. | Photo courtesy of Abby Rowling. Transmission lines along Highway 15 outside Victorville, California. | Photo courtesy of Abby Rowling. Patricia A. Hoffman Patricia A. Hoffman Assistant Secretary, Office of Electricity Delivery & Energy Reliability Jim Stock Member - White House Council of Economic Advisers EDITOR'S NOTE: This article originally appeared on WhiteHouse.gov. This week marks the tenth anniversary of one of the worst power outages in the United States, during which tens of millions of Americans were affected

147

High Electric Demand Days: Clean Energy Strategies for Improving Air Quality  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation by Art Diem of the State and Local Capacity Building Branch in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency was part of the July 2008 Webcast sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program Clean Energy and Air Quality Integration Initiative that was titled Role of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy in Improving Air Quality and Addressing Greenhouse Gas Reduction Goals on High Electric Demand Days.

148

NREL Works to Increase Electric Vehicle Efficiency Through Enhanced Thermal Management (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Researchers at NREL are providing new insight into how heating and cooling systems affect the distance that electric vehicles can travel on a single charge. Electric vehicle range can be reduced by as much as 68% per charge because of climate-control demands. NREL engineers are investigating opportunities to change this dynamic and increase driving range by improving vehicle thermal management. NREL experts are collaborating with automotive industry partners to investigate promising thermal management technologies and strategies, including zone-based cabin temperature controls, advanced heating and air conditioning controls, seat-based climate controls, vehicle thermal preconditioning, and thermal load reduction technologies.

Not Available

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

A Fresh Look at Weather Impact on Peak Electricity Demand and Energy Use of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fresh Look at Weather Impact on Peak Electricity Demand and Energy Use of Fresh Look at Weather Impact on Peak Electricity Demand and Energy Use of Buildings Using 30-Year ActualWeather Data Title A Fresh Look at Weather Impact on Peak Electricity Demand and Energy Use of Buildings Using 30-Year ActualWeather Data Publication Type Journal Year of Publication 2013 Authors Hong, Tianzhen, Wen-Kuei Chang, and Hung-Wen Lin Keywords Actual meteorological year, Building simulation, Energy use, Peak electricity demand, Typical meteorological year, Weather data Abstract Buildings consume more than one third of the world's total primary energy. Weather plays a unique and significant role as it directly affects the thermal loads and thus energy performance of buildings. The traditional simulated energy performance using Typical Meteorological Year (TMY) weather data represents the building performance for a typical year, but not necessarily the average or typical long-term performance as buildings with different energy systems and designs respond differently to weather changes. Furthermore, the single-year TMY simulations do not provide a range of results that capture yearly variations due to changing weather, which is important for building energy management, and for performing risk assessments of energy efficiency investments. This paper employs large-scale building simulation (a total of 3162 runs) to study the weather impact on peak electricity demand and energy use with the 30-year (1980 to 2009) Actual Meteorological Year (AMY) weather data for three types of office buildings at two design efficiency levels, across all 17 ASHRAE climate zones. The simulated results using the AMY data are compared to those from the TMY3 data to determine and analyze the differences. Besides further demonstration, as done by other studies, that actual weather has a significant impact on both the peak electricity demand and energy use of buildings, the main findings from the current study include: 1) annual weather variation has a greater impact on the peak electricity demand than it does on energy use in buildings; 2) the simulated energy use using the TMY3 weather data is not necessarily representative of the average energy use over a long period, and the TMY3 results can be significantly higher or lower than those from the AMY data; 3) the weather impact is greater for buildings in colder climates than warmer climates; 4) the weather impact on the medium-sized office building was the greatest, followed by the large office and then the small office; and 5) simulated energy savings and peak demand reduction by energy conservation measures using the TMY3 weather data can be significantly underestimated or overestimated. It is crucial to run multi-decade simulations with AMY weather data to fully assess the impact of weather on the long-term performance of buildings, and to evaluate the energy savings potential of energy conservation measures for new and existing buildings from a life cycle perspective.

150

The business value of demand response for balance responsible parties.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? By using IT-solutions, the flexibility on the demand side in the electrical systems could be increased. This is called demand response and is part… (more)

Jonsson, Mattias

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Chapter 3: Electricity Demand Forecast  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at a relatively slow pace, custom data centers (Google, etc.) are a relatively new end-use that has been seeing................................................................................................................... 7 Alternative Load Forecast Concepts been influenced by expected higher electricity prices that reflect a rapid rise in fuel prices

152

Statewide Emissions Reduction, Electricity and Demand Savings from the Implementation of Building-Energy-Codes in Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the calculations. To estimate electric demand savings, the calculated statewide electric demand savings (MW) were then multiplied by the average capital cost of a natural gas combined cycle power plant, $1,165 per kW (Kaplan, 2008) using a 15% reserve margin... (Simulation adjustment3: Heating 72F, Cooling 75F) (b) Heat Pump House: 0.904 360 0.88 kW (Simulation adjustment3: 1.095 kW) HVAC System Type (a) Electric/Gas House: 0.594 (a) Electric/Gas House: 0.544 SLA= 0.00036 (a) Electric/Gas House: SEER 13...

Yazdani, B.; Haberl, J.; Kim, H.; Baltazar, J.C.; Zilbershtein, G.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Dynamic Control of Electricity Cost with Power Demand Smoothing and Peak Shaving for Distributed Internet Data Centers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dynamic Control of Electricity Cost with Power Demand Smoothing and Peak Shaving for Distributed a major part of their running costs. Modern electric power grid provides a feasible way to dynamically and efficiently manage the electricity cost of distributed IDCs based on the Locational Marginal Pricing (LMP

Rahman, A.K.M. Ashikur

154

Summary We examined the effects of increased transpira-tion demand on xylem hydraulic conductivity and vulnerabil-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in response to high evaporative demand and prevent xylem tensions from reaching values that cause catastrophicSummary We examined the effects of increased transpira- tion demand on xylem hydraulic conductivity potential and water potential differences between the soil and the shoot were similar for desert and montane

Maherali, Hafiz

155

Integrating demand into the U.S. electric power system : technical, economic, and regulatory frameworks for responsive load  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The electric power system in the US developed with the assumption of exogenous, inelastic demand. The resulting evolution of the power system reinforced this assumption as nearly all controls, monitors, and feedbacks were ...

Black, Jason W. (Jason Wayne)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Electricity demand-side management for an energy efficient future in China : technology options and policy priorities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The main objective of this research is to identify robust technology and policy options which achieve substantial reductions in electricity demand in China's Shandong Province. This research utilizes a scenario-based ...

Cheng, Chia-Chin

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Automated Demand Response: The Missing Link in the Electricity Value Chain  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Laboratory. Berkeley. Demand Response Research Center,and Automated Demand Response in Wastewater TreatmentLaboratory. Berkeley. Demand Response Research Center,

McKane, Aimee

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Automated Demand Response: The Missing Link in the Electricity Value Chain  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Open Automated Demand Response. In Grid Interop Forum.Berkeley National Laboratory. Demand Response ResearchCenter, Demand Response Research Center PIER Team Briefing,

McKane, Aimee

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Quantifying Changes in Building Electricity Use, with Application to Demand Response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and techniques for demand response,” Lawrence BerkeleyNational action plan on demand response,” Prepared with the3] G. He?ner, “Demand response valuation frameworks paper,”

Mathieu, Johanna L.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Load-side Demand Management in Buildings using Controlled Electric Springs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The concept of demand-side management for electricand simulation of demand-side management potential in urbanin smart grids, demand side management has been a keen topic

Soni, Jayantika; Krishnanand, KR; Panda, Sanjib

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "increase electricity demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

LBNL-6280E A Fresh Look at Weather Impact on Peak Electricity Demand and  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

280E 280E A Fresh Look at Weather Impact on Peak Electricity Demand and Energy Use of Buildings Using 30- Year Actual Weather Data Tianzhen Hong 1 , Wen-kuei Chang 2 , Hung-Wen Lin 2 1 Environmental Energy Technologies Division 2 Green Energy and Environment Laboratories, Industrial Technology Research Institute, Taiwan, ROC May 2013 This work was supported by the Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, the U.S.-China Clean Energy Research Center for Building Energy Efficiency, of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-

162

The Important Participants in Demand-Side Management: Power Consumers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Electric power consumers are the basis for demand-side management (DSM) practice. Increased power consumption efficiency...

Zhaoguang Hu; Xinyang Han; Quan Wen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

SmartCap: Flattening Peak Electricity Demand in Smart Homes Sean Barker, Aditya Mishra, David Irwin, Prashant Shenoy, and Jeannie Albrecht  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SmartCap: Flattening Peak Electricity Demand in Smart Homes Sean Barker, Aditya Mishra, David Irwin--Flattening household electricity demand reduces generation costs, since costs are disproportionately affected by peak demands. While the vast majority of household electrical loads are interactive and have little scheduling

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

164

Chapter 21 - Case Study: Demand-Response and Alternative Technologies in Electricity Markets  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The PJM wholesale electricity market has evolved to promote open competition between existing generation resources, new generation resources, demand-response, and alternative technologies to supply services to support reliable power grid operations. PJM has adapted market rules and procedures to accommodate smaller alternative resources while maintaining and enhancing stringent reliability standards for grid operation. Although the supply resource mix has tended to be less operationally flexible, the development of smart grid technologies, breakthroughs in storage technologies, microgrid applications, distributed supply resources, and smart metering infrastructure have the potential to make power transmission, distribution, and consumption more flexible than in the past. Competitive market signals in forward capacity markets and grid service markets have resulted in substantial investment in demand-response and alternative technologies to provide reliability services to the grid operator. This chapter discusses these trends and the market mechanisms by which both system and market operators can manage and leverage these changes to maintain the reliability of the bulk electric power system.

Andrew Ott

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Modeling of Electric Water Heaters for Demand Response: A Baseline PDE Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Demand response (DR)control can effectively relieve balancing and frequency regulation burdens on conventional generators, facilitate integrating more renewable energy, and reduce generation and transmission investments needed to meet peak demands. Electric water heaters (EWHs) have a great potential in implementing DR control strategies because: (a) the EWH power consumption has a high correlation with daily load patterns; (b) they constitute a significant percentage of domestic electrical load; (c) the heating element is a resistor, without reactive power consumption; and (d) they can be used as energy storage devices when needed. Accurately modeling the dynamic behavior of EWHs is essential for designing DR controls. Various water heater models, simplified to different extents, were published in the literature; however, few of them were validated against field measurements, which may result in inaccuracy when implementing DR controls. In this paper, a partial differential equation physics-based model, developed to capture detailed temperature profiles at different tank locations, is validated against field test data for more than 10 days. The developed model shows very good performance in capturing water thermal dynamics for benchmark testing purposes

Xu, Zhijie; Diao, Ruisheng; Lu, Shuai; Lian, Jianming; Zhang, Yu

2014-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

166

Managing Variable Energy Resources to Increase Renewable Electricity's  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Are There Challenges in Integrating Wind and Solar Power into the Power Grid? 10 What National and State PoliciesManaging Variable Energy Resources to Increase Renewable Electricity's Contribution to the Grid P oG MEllon founDatIon, thE u.s. DEpaRtMEnt of EnERGy's natIonal EnERGy tEChnoloGy laboRatoRy, thE El

167

Managing Variable Energy Resources to Increase Renewable Electricity's  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Are There Challenges in Integrating Wind and Solar Power into the Power Grid? 10 What National and State PoliciesManaging Variable Energy Resources to Increase Renewable Electricity's Contribution to the Grid P oG MEllon founD atIon, thE u.s. DEpaRtMEnt of EnERGy 's natIonal E nERGy t EChnolo Gy laboRatoRy, thE El

168

Optimal Tariff Period Determination Cost of electricity generation is closely related to system demand. In general, the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optimal Tariff Period Determination Cost of electricity generation is closely related to system setting is giving signal to customers the time variant cost of supplying electricity. Since the costs demand. In general, the generation cost is higher during system peak period, and vice versa. In Hong Kong

169

Statewide Electricity and Demand Capacity Savings from the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) Adoption for Single-Family Residences in Texas (2002-2011)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This report is the continuation of the previous 2011 Statewide Electricity Savings report from code-compliant, single-family residences built between 2002 and 2009. Statewide electricity and electric demand savings achieved from the adoption...

Kim, H.; Baltazar, J. C.; Haberl, J. S.; Yazdani, B.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

ECONOMIC BENEFITS OF INCREASING ELECTRIC GRID RESILIENCE TO  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

ECONOMIC BENEFITS OF ECONOMIC BENEFITS OF INCREASING ELECTRIC GRID RESILIENCE TO WEATHER OUTAGES Executive Office of the President August 2013 2 This report was prepared by the President's Council of Economic Advisers and the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, with assistance from the White House Office of Science and Technology 3 Executive Summary Severe weather is the leading cause of power outages in the United States. Between 2003 and 2012, an estimated 679 widespread power outages occurred due to severe weather. Power outages close schools, shut down businesses and impede emergency services, costing the economy billions of dollars and disrupting the lives of millions of Americans. The resilience of

171

Electricity demand as frequency controlled reserves, ForskEL (Smart Grid  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ForskEL (Smart Grid ForskEL (Smart Grid Project) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name Electricity demand as frequency controlled reserves, ForskEL Country Denmark Coordinates 56.26392°, 9.501785° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":56.26392,"lon":9.501785,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

172

A fuzzy chance-constrained program for unit commitment problem considering demand response, electric vehicle and wind power  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract As a form of renewable and low-carbon energy resource, wind power is anticipated to play an essential role in the future energy structure. Whereas, its features of time mismatch with power demand and uncertainty pose barriers for the power system to utilize it effectively. Hence, a novel unit commitment model is proposed in this paper considering demand response and electric vehicles, which can promote the exploitation of wind power. On the one hand, demand response and electric vehicles have the feasibility to change the load demand curve to solve the mismatch problem. On the other hand, they can serve as reserve for wind power. To deal with the unit commitment problem, authors use a fuzzy chance-constrained program that takes into account the wind power forecasting errors. The numerical study shows that the model can promote the utilization of wind power evidently, making the power system operation more eco-friendly and economical.

Ning Zhang; Zhaoguang Hu; Xue Han; Jian Zhang; Yuhui Zhou

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Secure Demand Shaping for Smart Grid On constructing probabilistic demand response schemes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Secure Demand Shaping for Smart Grid On constructing probabilistic demand response schemes. Developing novel schemes for demand response in smart electric gird is an increasingly active research area/SCADA for demand response in smart infrastructures face the following dilemma: On one hand, in order to increase

Sastry, S. Shankar

174

Review of real-time electricity markets for integrating Distributed Energy Resources and Demand Response  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The high penetration of both Distributed Energy Resources (DER) and Demand Response (DR) in modern power systems requires a sequence of advanced strategies and technologies for maintaining system reliability and flexibility. Real-time electricity markets (RTM) are the non-discriminatory transaction platforms for providing necessary balancing services, where the market clearing (nodal or zonal prices depending on markets) is very close to real time operations of power systems. One of the primary functions of \\{RTMs\\} in modern power systems is establishing an efficient and effective mechanism for small DER and DR to participate in balancing market transactions, while handling their meteorological or intermittent characteristics, facilitating asset utilization, and stimulating their active responses. Consequently, \\{RTMs\\} are dedicated to maintaining the flexibility and reliability of power systems. This paper reviews advanced typical \\{RTMs\\} respectively in the North America, Australia and Europe, focusing on their market architectures and incentive policies for integrating DER and DR in electricity markets. In this paper, \\{RTMs\\} are classified into three groups: Group I applies nodal prices implemented by optimal power flow, which clears energy prices every 5 min. Group II applies zonal prices, with the time resolution of 5-min. Group III is a general balancing market, which clears zonal prices intro-hourly. The various successful advanced RTM experiences have been summarized and discussed, which provides a technical overview of the present \\{RTMs\\} integrating DER and DR.

Qi Wang; Chunyu Zhang; Yi Ding; George Xydis; Jianhui Wang; Jacob Østergaard

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Demand-side management in smart grid operation considering electric vehicles load shifting and vehicle-to-grid support  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Demand fluctuation in electric power systems is undesirable from many points of view; this has sparked an interest in demand-side strategies that try to establish mechanisms that allow for a flatter demand curve. Particularly interesting is load shifting, a strategy that considers the shifting of certain amounts of energy demand from some time periods to other time periods with lower expected demand, typically in response to price signals. In this paper, an optimization-based model is proposed to perform load shifting in the context of smart grids. In our model, we define agents that are responsible for load, generation and storage management; in particular, some of them are electric vehicle aggregators. An important feature of the proposed approach is the inclusion of electric vehicles with vehicle-to-grid capabilities; with this possibility, electric vehicles can provide certain services to the power grid, including load shifting and congestion management. Results are reported for a test system based on the IEEE 37-bus distribution grid; the effectiveness of the approach and the effect of the hourly energy prices on flattening the load curve are shown.

M.A. López; S. de la Torre; S. Martín; J.A. Aguado

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Response Options Aimed at Increasing the ContributionResponse Options Aimed at Increasing the Contribution of Variable Energy Resources in the Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Contribution of Variable Energy Resources in the Electricity Supply Workshop Roskilde June 10 Measures in the electricity tigeneration Henrik Klinge Jacobsen and Erika Zvingilaite, Risø DTUg g , #12;Contents · Impacts of electricity or heat 4 ­ Storage of electricity or heat ­ New demand technologies (heat pumps, hybrid electric

177

Categorization of residential electricity consumption as a basis for the assessment of the impacts of demand response actions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In a smart(er) grid context, the existence of dynamic tariffs and bidirectional communications will simultaneously allow and require an active role from the end-user concerning electricity management. However, the residential end-user will not be always available to manage energy resources and decide, based on price signals and preferences/needs, the best response actions to implement or the best usage of the electricity produced locally. Therefore, energy management systems are required to monitor consumption/generation/storage and to make the best decisions according to input signals and the user's needs and preferences. The design of adequate algorithms to be implemented in those systems require the prior characterization of domestic electricity demand and categorization of loads, according to availability, typical usage patterns, working cycles and technical constraints. Automated demand response actions must be tailored and chosen according to this previous analysis of load characteristics. In this paper, a characterization of household electricity consumption is presented and an operational categorization of end-use loads is proposed. The existing potential for demand response to a diversified set of management actions is described and a tool to assess the impact of implementing several actions with different rates of penetration of energy management systems is presented. The results obtained show the potential savings for the end-user and expected changes in the load diagram with a decrease of the aggregated peak electricity demand and a smoothed valley.

Ana Soares; Álvaro Gomes; Carlos Henggeler Antunes

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

The demand for high performance computing research has been significantly increasing over the past few years. Various  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The demand for high performance computing research has been significantly increasing over the past to promote the effective use of High Performance Computing in the research environment. In addition facility has enabled cutting-edge computations material research, "Having a high-performance computing

Akhmedov, Azer

179

Beyond kWh and kW demand: Understanding the new real-time electric power  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Beyond kWh and kW demand: Understanding the new real-time electric power Beyond kWh and kW demand: Understanding the new real-time electric power measurement system in LBNL Building 90 Speaker(s): Alex McEachern Date: January 14, 2010 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 In the Summer of 2009, LBNL researchers installed end-use sub-metering equipment and associated Energy Information System (EIS) tools to characterize energy use and comfort in Building 90. Seven of 40 key electric loads were measured using advanced meters that make sophisticated real-time measurements of dozens of power flow parameters, power disturbances, and harmonics. The talk will review some electrical engineering fundamentals, how use and interpret data measured in building 90 in real-time. The real-time data available includes power, volt-amps, VAR's, unbalance voltage and current, voltage and current distortion,

180

Fast Reactor Subassembly Design Modifications for Increasing Electricity Generation Efficiency  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Suggested for Track 7: Advances in Reactor Core Design and In-Core Management _____________________________________________________________________________________ Fast Reactor Subassembly Design Modifications for Increasing Electricity Generation Efficiency R. Wigeland and K. Hamman Idaho National Laboratory Given the ability of fast reactors to effectively transmute the transuranic elements as are present in spent nuclear fuel, fast reactors are being considered as one element of future nuclear power systems to enable continued use and growth of nuclear power by limiting high-level waste generation. However, a key issue for fast reactors is higher electricity cost relative to other forms of nuclear energy generation. The economics of the fast reactor are affected by the amount of electric power that can be produced from a reactor, i.e., the thermal efficiency for electricity generation. The present study is examining the potential for fast reactor subassembly design changes to improve the thermal efficiency by increasing the average coolant outlet temperature without increasing peak temperatures within the subassembly, i.e., to make better use of current technology. Sodium-cooled fast reactors operate at temperatures far below the coolant boiling point, so that the maximum coolant outlet temperature is limited by the acceptable peak temperatures for the reactor fuel and cladding. Fast reactor fuel subassemblies have historically been constructed using a large number of small diameter fuel pins contained within a tube of hexagonal cross-section, or hexcan. Due to this design, there is a larger coolant flow area next to the hexcan wall as compared to flow area in the interior of the subassembly. This results in a higher flow rate near the hexcan wall, overcooling the fuel pins next to the wall, and a non-uniform coolant temperature distribution. It has been recognized for many years that this difference in sodium coolant temperature was detrimental to achieving greater thermal efficiency, since it causes the fuel pins in the center of the subassembly to operate at higher temperatures than those near the hexcan walls, and it is the temperature limit(s) for those fuel pins that limits the average coolant outlet temperature. Fuel subassembly design changes are being investigated using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to quantify the effect that the design changes have on reducing the intra-subassembly coolant flow and temperature distribution. Simulations have been performed for a 19-pin test subassembly geometry using typical fuel pin diameters and wire wrap spacers. The results have shown that it may be possible to increase the average coolant outlet temperature by 20 C or more without changing the peak temperatures within the subassembly. These design changes should also be effective for reactor designs using subassemblies with larger numbers of fuel pins. R. Wigeland, Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Mail Stop 3860, Idaho Falls, ID, U.S.A., 83415-3860 email – roald.wigeland@inl.gov fax (U.S.) – 208-526-2930

R. Wigeland; K. Hamman

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "increase electricity demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Report: Impacts of Demand-Side Resources on Electric Transmission Planning  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Demand for new transmission can be driven by different factors, including connection of new generation, reliability, economics, environmental policy compliance and replacement of retiring infrastructure. This report assesses the relationship between high levels of demand-side resources (including end-use efficiency, demand response, and distributed generation) and investment in new transmission or utilization of existing transmission.

182

Impacts of increased bioenergy demand on global food markets: an AgMIP economic model intercomparison  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Integrated Assessment studies have shown that meeting ambitious greenhouse gas mitigation targets will require substantial amounts of bioenergy as part of the future energy mix. In the course of the Agricultural Model Comparison and Improvement Project (AgMIP), five global agro-economic models were used to analyze a future scenario with global demand for ligno-cellulosic bioenergy rising to about 100 ExaJoule in 2050. From this exercise a tentative conclusion can be drawn that ambitious climate change mitigation need not drive up global food prices much, if the extra land required for bioenergy production is accessible or if the feedstock, e.g. from forests, does not directly compete for agricultural land. Agricultural price effects across models by the year 2050 from high bioenergy demand in an RCP2.6-type scenario appear to be much smaller (+5% average across models) than from direct climate impacts on crop yields in an RCP8.5-type scenario (+25% average across models). However, potential future scarcities of water and nutrients, policy-induced restrictions on agricultural land expansion, as well as potential welfare losses have not been specifically looked at in this exercise.

Lotze-Campen, Hermann; von Lampe, Martin; Kyle, G. Page; Fujimori, Shinichiro; Havlik, Petr; van Meijl, Hans; Hasegawa, Tomoko; Popp, Alexander; Schmitz, Christoph; Tabeau, Andrzej; Valin, Hugo; Willenbockel, Dirk; Wise, Marshall A.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Costing for National Electricity Interventions to Increase Access to Energy, Health Services, and Education  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Costing for National Electricity Interventions to Increase Access to Energy, Health Services ..................................................................................................... 6 2 Earth Institute Electricity Planning and Investment Costing Model........................................................................... 21 4.1 Total costs of electricity distribution scale-up............................

Modi, Vijay

184

Progress towards Managing Residential Electricity Demand: Impacts of Standards and Labeling for Refrigerators and Air Conditioners in India  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development of Energy Efficiency Standards and Labeling (EES&L) began in earnest in India in 2001 with the Energy Conservation Act and the establishment of the Indian Bureau of Energy Efficiency (BEE). The first main residential appliance to be targeted was refrigerators, soon to be followed by room air conditioners. Both of these appliances are of critical importance to India's residential electricity demand. About 15percent of Indian households own a refrigerator, and sales total about 4 million per year, but are growing. At the same time, the Indian refrigerator market has seen a strong trend towards larger and more consumptive frost-free units. Room air conditioners in India have traditionally been sold to commercial sector customers, but an increasing number are going to the residential sector. Room air conditioner sales growth in India peaked in the last few years at 20percent per year. In this paper, we perform an engineering-based analysis using data specific to Indian appliances. We evaluate costs and benefits to residential and commercial sector consumers from increased equipment costs and utility bill savings. The analysis finds that, while the BEE scheme presents net benefits to consumers, there remain opportunities for efficiency improvement that would optimize consumer benefits, according to Life Cycle Cost analysis. Due to the large and growing market for refrigerators and air conditioners in India, we forecast large impacts from the standards and labeling program as scheduled. By 2030, this program, if fully implemented would reduce Indian residential electricity consumption by 55 TWh. Overall savings through 2030 totals 385 TWh. Finally, while efficiency levels have been set for several years for refrigerators, labels and MEPS for these products remain voluntary. We therefore consider the negative impact of this delay of implementation to energy and financial savings achievable by 2030.

McNeil, Michael A.; Iyer, Maithili

2009-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

185

Automated Demand Response: The Missing Link in the Electricity Value Chain  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Missing Link in the Electricity Value Chain Aimee McKane,Missing Link in the Electricity Value Chain Aimee McKane,grid reliability and lower electricity use during periods of

McKane, Aimee

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Automated Demand Response: The Missing Link in the Electricity Value Chain  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Missing Link in the Electricity Value Chain Aimee McKane*,Missing Link in the Electricity Value Chain Aimee McKane,grid reliability and lower electricity use during periods of

McKane, Aimee

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

NREL Works to Increase Electric Vehicle Efficiency Through Enhanced...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) are providing new insight into how heating and cooling systems affect the distance that electric vehicles can travel on a single...

188

Analysis of PG&E`s residential end-use metered data to improve electricity demand forecasts -- final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes findings from a unique project to improve the end-use electricity load shape and peak demand forecasts made by the Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) and the California Energy Commission (CEC). First, the direct incorporation of end-use metered data into electricity demand forecasting models is a new approach that has only been made possible by recent end-use metering projects. Second, and perhaps more importantly, the joint-sponsorship of this analysis has led to the development of consistent sets of forecasting model inputs. That is, the ability to use a common data base and similar data treatment conventions for some of the forecasting inputs frees forecasters to concentrate on those differences (between their competing forecasts) that stem from real differences of opinion, rather than differences that can be readily resolved with better data. The focus of the analysis is residential space cooling, which represents a large and growing demand in the PG&E service territory. Using five years of end-use metered, central air conditioner data collected by PG&E from over 300 residences, we developed consistent sets of new inputs for both PG&E`s and CEC`s end-use load shape forecasting models. We compared the performance of the new inputs both to the inputs previously used by PG&E and CEC, and to a second set of new inputs developed to take advantage of a recently added modeling option to the forecasting model. The testing criteria included ability to forecast total daily energy use, daily peak demand, and demand at 4 P.M. (the most frequent hour of PG&E`s system peak demand). We also tested the new inputs with the weather data used by PG&E and CEC in preparing their forecasts.

Eto, J.H.; Moezzi, M.M.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Linking supply and demand: increasing grower participation and customer attendance at local farmers' markets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Farmers' markets in the United States have experienced a dramatic increase since the 1970's. In the past three decades the number of farmers' markets has increased from 340 in 1970 to 3,617 by 2006. This interest in farmers' markets has not been...

Lillard, Patrick Terrell

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

190

Where has Electricity Demand Growth Gon in PJM and What are the...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

economic conditions and environmental rules - New entry of combined cycle gas and demand response resources...will there be incentives for continued new entry? * Impending GHG...

191

E-Print Network 3.0 - aggregate electricity demand Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Distribution and Plants 11 Nordic TSOs' Action Plans in enhancing and monitoring Demand Response Summary: in Norway (draft) Nordel (2003): Statistical analysis of price response...

192

Time-of-use pricing and electricity demand response: evidence from a sample of Italian industrial customers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The introduction of real time pricing in many wholesale market as well as the liberalisation process involving the retail market poses the attention over the measurement of demand response to time differentiated price signals. This paper shows an example of how to estimate elasticities of substitution across time using a sample of Italian industrial customers facing time-of-use (TOU) pricing schemes. The model involves the estimation of a nested constant elasticity of substitution (CES) input demand function, which allows estimating substitutability of electricity usage across hourly intervals within a month and across different months.

Graziano Abrate

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

The Effects of Residential Energy Efficiency on Electric Demand Response Programs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Design and efficiency of houses can affect the amount of peak load reduction available from a residential demand response program. Twenty-four houses were simulated with varying thermal integrity and air conditioner size during the summer cooling season ... Keywords: demand response, efficiency, residential, hvac, conservation

Ward Jewell

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Linkages between demand-side management and congestion in the European electricity transmission system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract We evaluate the possibility to reduce congestion in the transmission grid through large-scale implementation of demand-side management (DSM) in the form of load shifting for the EU-27 countries, Norway, and Switzerland for Year 2020. A linear, cost-minimising, dispatch model that includes a DC load-flow description of the transmission system and a general representation of load shifting is used. It is assumed that the EU Member States fulfil the targets for Year 2020 in their national renewable energy action plans. In the model calculations, a reference case without load shifting is compared with cases in which the load shifting is 5%, 10%, 15% or 20% of the load. The possibility to shift load in time is added exogenously and economic incentives for DSM are not evaluated. Three types of congestion are identified: peak-load-hour congestion, low-load-hour congestion and all-hour congestion. Peak-load-hour congestion is reduced as the DSM share of the load increases, whereas low-load-hour congestion, which is typically associated with a high level of wind generation, persists at all the DSM penetration levels investigated. We show that all-hour congestion occurs between systems that have large differences in supply structure, and that the impact of DSM on all-hour congestion is low.

Lisa Göransson; Joel Goop; Thomas Unger; Mikael Odenberger; Filip Johnsson

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal NAICS Net Demand Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal Code(a) End Use for Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coke and Breeze) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 3,335 251 129 5,512 79 1,016 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 84 133 23 2,119 8 547 Conventional Boiler Use 84 71 17 1,281 8 129 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process 0 62 6 838 1 417 Direct Uses-Total Process 2,639 62 52 2,788 39 412 Process Heating 379 59 19 2,487 32 345 Process Cooling and Refrigeration

196

Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Table 5.3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Demand Residual and Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coke and Breeze) NAICS for Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) (billion NGL(e) (million Code(a) End Use (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 977,338 40 22 5,357 21 46 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 24,584 21 4 2,059 2 25 Conventional Boiler Use 24,584 11 3

197

Modeling demand for electric vehicles: the effect of car users' attitudes and perceptions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

electric cars and petrol-driven ones and in particular which include the respondents' own cars to electric cars on vehicle preferences. Opinion and perception data are also collected to capture the impact) and currently, few charging stations and infrastructures are available. The electric car user is hence compelled

Bierlaire, Michel

198

Controlling market power and price spikes in electricity networks: Demand-side bidding  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...controlled data set with...competition on transmission lines connecting...demand from outages are ignored. Other...losses in transmission and any line constraints...14 days of data by level...when the transmission lines...

Stephen J. Rassenti; Vernon L. Smith; Bart J. Wilson

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Interrelation Between the Accuracy of Prediction and Irregularity of Electric Energy Demand Curves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Results of a study of the dependence of the accuracy of prediction on daily and seasonal irregularity of demand curves are described. It is shown that in power systems characterized by high irregularity of the...

B. I. Makoklyuev; V. F. Ech

200

Electrical Properties of Mineral Surfaces for Increasing Water Sorption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the presence of O2.2,4,5 In addition to controlling Mn concentrations, the nanostructures sequester heavy-metal and the associated toxic metals can be remobilized. N the electrical properties of mineral surfaces and thereby affect reactions with charged species such as metal

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "increase electricity demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Japan's Residential Energy Demand Outlook to 2030 Considering Energy Efficiency Standards "Top-Runner Approach"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Total Energy Source Demand Coal, Oil, Gas, Heat, ElectricityEnergy Source Demand per Household Coal, Oil, Gas, Heat,ton of oil equivalent Considerable increases in demand for

Komiyama, Ryoichi

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Solutions for Summer Electric Power Shortages: Demand Response and its Applications in Air Conditioning and Refrigerating Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for DR and demand side management, along with operationalresponse), DSM (demand side management), DR strategy, air

Han, Junqiao; Piette, Mary Ann

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

The structure of demand for electricity in the Gulf Cooperation Council countries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electricity is a vital ingredient for the economic and social advancement of all developing nations. The members of Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) offer no exception. The quantity of electricity consumed in these countries has grown consistently since the 1970s. If past trends are extrapolated to the year 2000, the electricity consumption at the turn of the century will be at least 10-fold the level prevailing the 1970s.

Eltony, M.N.; Mohammad, Y.H.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

204

Must DSM programs increase rates? (Not all...just some)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Demand side management in the electric power industry is discussed. The effect on price increases to the consumer is evaluated.

Hirst, E.; Hadley, S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1995-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

205

Converting 15-Minute Interval Electricity Load Data into Reduced Demand, Energy Reduction and Cash Flow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, store managers are intimidated. 5 So what are the solutions? • A data acquisition system. • Pro-active with alarming and demand-response. Is there staff to maintain and ensure a response? • Passive. Acquire the data and then evaluate and assess... is not required, this will prevent the requirement for additional costs of installing an OAT sensor at the building and potentially adding costs to the datalogger hardware or configuration. If possible, it is best to use and on-site OAT sensor. If a demand-response...

Herrin, D. G.

206

Energy demand  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The basic forces pushing up energy demand are population increase and economic growth. From ... of these it is possible to estimate future energy requirements.

Geoffrey Greenhalgh

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Electric power is an increasingly important aspect of modern society. We are extremely dependent on electric-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Infrastructure Figure 1. Structure and economic impacts of wood-fueled electric power generation in a local

Florida, University of

208

Multi-objective dynamic economic emission dispatch of electric power generation integrated with game theory based demand response programs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The dynamic economic emission dispatch (DEED) of electric power generation is a multi-objective mathematical optimization problem with two objective functions. The first objective is to minimize all the fuel costs of the generators in the power system, whilst the second objective seeks to minimize the emissions cost. Both objective functions are subject to constraints such as load demand constraint, ramp rate constraint, amongst other constraints. In this work, we integrate a game theory based demand response program into the DEED problem. The game theory based demand response program determines the optimal hourly incentive to be offered to customers who sign up for load curtailment. The game theory model has in built mechanisms to ensure that the incentive offered the customers is greater than the cost of interruption while simultaneously being beneficial to the utility. The combined DEED and game theoretic demand response model presented in this work, minimizes fuel and emissions costs and simultaneously determines the optimal incentive and load curtailment customers have to perform for maximal power system relief. The developed model is tested on two test systems with industrial customers and obtained results indicate the practical benefits of the proposed model.

Nnamdi I. Nwulu; Xiaohua Xia

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Electric Demand Reduction for the U.S. Navy Public Works Center San Diego, California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory investigated the profitability of operating a Navy ship's generators (in San Diego) during high electricity price periods rather than the ships hooking up to the Base electrical system for power. Profitability is predicated on the trade-off between the operating and maintenance cost incurred by the Navy for operating the ship generators and the net profit associated with the sale of the electric power on the spot market. In addition, PNNL assessed the use of the ship's generators as a means to achieve predicted load curtailments, which can then be marketed to the California Independent System Operator.

Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW

2000-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

210

Floating offshore wind farms : demand planning & logistical challenges of electricity generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Floating offshore wind farms are likely to become the next paradigm in electricity generation from wind energy mainly because of the near constant high wind speeds in an offshore environment as opposed to the erratic wind ...

Nnadili, Christopher Dozie, 1978-

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Quantifying Changes in Building Electricity Use, with Application to Demand Response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

electric loads to deliver load following and regu- lation,6], and regulation/load following [7]), and as DR is used toload as a function of time-of-week and outdoor air temperature. Following

Mathieu, Johanna L.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Distributed Solar Photovoltaics for Electric Vehicle Charging...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

DISTRIBUTED SOLAR PHOTOVOLTAICS FOR ELECTRIC VEHICLE CHARGING REGULATORY AND POLICY CONSIDERATIONS ABSTRACT Increasing demand for electric vehicle (EV) charging provides an...

213

Analysis of Michigan's demand-side electricity resources in the residential sector: Volume 3, End-use studies: Revised final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume of the ''Analysis of Michigan's Demand-Side Electricity Resources in the Residential Sector'' contains end-use studies on various household appliances including: refrigerators, freezers, lighting systems, water heaters, air conditioners, space heaters, and heat pumps. (JEF)

Krause, F.; Brown, J.; Connell, D.; DuPont, P.; Greely, K.; Meal, M.; Meier, A.; Mills, E.; Nordman, B.

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

NREL Uses Fuel Cells to Increase the Range of Battery Electric Vehicles (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

NREL analysis identifies potential cost-effective scenarios for using small fuel cell power units to increase the range of medium-duty battery electric vehicles.

Not Available

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Testing Electric Vehicle Demand in "Hybrid Households" Using a Reflexive Survey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EV market studies In the absenceof data on actual sales,EV, then we expect 16 to 18% annual of of light-duty vehicle salesEV experiments indicate there is still more than adequatepotential marketsfor electric vehicles to have , exceededthe former 1998CARB mandatefor sales

Kurani, Kenneth S.; Turrentine, Thomas; Sperling, Daniel

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

ZONAL PRICING AND DEMAND-SIDE BIDDING IN THE NORWEGIAN ELECTRICITY MARKET  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Program on Workable Energy Regulation (POWER). POWER is a program of the University of California Energy. University of California Energy Institute 2539 Channing Way Berkeley, California 94720-5180 www-ahead electricity market in Norway. We consider the hypothesis that generators are better able to exercise market

California at Berkeley. University of

217

California Energy Demand Scenario Projections to 2050  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

annual per-capita electricity consumption by demand15 California electricity consumption projections by demandannual per-capita electricity consumption by demand

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Genetic algorithm-based demand response scheme for electric vehicle charging  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents a design and evaluates the performance of a charging task scheduler for electric vehicles, aiming at reducing the peak load and improving the service ratio in charging stations. Based on a consumption profile and the real-time task model consisting of actuation time, operation length, and deadline, the proposed scheduler fills the time table, by which the power controller turns on or off the electric connection switch to the vehicle on each time slot boundary. Genetic evolutions yield better results by making the initial population include both heuristic-generated schedules for fast convergence and randomly generated schedules for diversity loss compensation. Our heuristic scheme sequentially fills the time slots having lowest load for different orders such as deadline and operation length. The performance measurement result obtained from a prototype implementation reveals that our scheme can reduce the peak load for the given charging task sets by up to 4.9%, compared with conventional schemes.

Junghoon Lee; Gyung-Leen Park

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Modeling, Analysis, and Control of Demand Response Resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

advanced metering and demand response in electricityGoldman, and D. Kathan. “Demand response in U.S. electricity29] DOE. Benefits of demand response in electricity markets

Mathieu, Johanna L.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Wind offering strategy in the Australian National Electricity Market: A two-step plan considering demand response  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper proposes an energy offering strategy for wind power producers. A new trading plan is presented through which a wind power producer can employ demand response (DR) to maximize its profit. To consider DR, a new DR scheme is developed here. The proposed plan includes two steps: The first step takes place on a day-ahead basis. The corresponding decisions involve an initial offering schedule and preliminary DR arrangements for the following day. The second step coincides with the day of the energy delivery. A consecutive approach is proposed in which the wind power producer determines its final energy offer during each trading interval. Simultaneously, the required DR agreements for that interval are also confirmed. This approach is repeated until all periods of the day are covered. The proposed plan is formulated as a stochastic programming approach, where its feasibility is evaluated on a case of the Australian National Electricity Market (NEM).

Nadali Mahmoudi; Tapan K. Saha; Mehdi Eghbal

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "increase electricity demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Impact of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles on power systems with demand response and wind power.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper uses a new unit commitment model which can simulate the interactions among plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs), wind power, and demand response (DR). Four PHEV charging scenarios are simulated for the Illinois power system: (1) unconstrained charging, (2) 3-hour delayed constrained charging, (3) smart charging, and (4) smart charging with DR. The PHEV charging is assumed to be optimally controlled by the system operator in the latter two scenarios, along with load shifting and shaving enabled by DR programs. The simulation results show that optimally dispatching the PHEV charging load can significantly reduce the total operating cost of the system. With DR programs in place, the operating cost can be further reduced.

Wang, J.; Liu, C.; Ton, D.; Zhou, Y.; Kim, J.; Vyas, A. (Decision and Information Sciences); ( ES); (ED); (Kyungwon Univ.)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Energy Department/Electric Power Research Institute Cooperation to Increase Energy Efficiency  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) strengthened cooperation for research, development and deployment of energy technologies aimed at promoting increased energy efficiency.

223

Maximizing the Productive Uses of Electricity to Increase the Impact of  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Maximizing the Productive Uses of Electricity to Increase the Impact of Maximizing the Productive Uses of Electricity to Increase the Impact of Rural Electrification Programs Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Maximizing the Productive Uses of Electricity to Increase the Impact of Rural Electrification Programs Agency/Company /Organization: Christophe de Gouvello and Laurent Durix Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy Phase: Create a Vision Topics: - Energy Access Resource Type: Publications User Interface: Website Website: www.esmap.org/esmap/sites/esmap.org/files/FR_Maximizing%20the%20Produc Cost: Free Language: English This paper argues that to be successful, rural electrification programs should target direct impact on livelihoods and revenue generation beyond the provision of connections and kilowatt-hours by implementing electricity

224

The Boom of Electricity Demand in the Residential Sector in the Developing World and the Potential for Energy Efficiency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

B. Atanasiu (2006). Electricity Consumption and Efficiencywill see their electricity consumption rise significantly.the bulk of household electricity consumption in developing

Letschert, Virginie

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

They must respond to growing demands for good affordable housing, to increasing urbanisation, and to calls for higher  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the built environment and urban areas. It focuses on all phases of real estate ­ initiation, preparation, organisational and computational concerns. Specialisations: · Design & Construction Management · Real Estate growing communities. They confront new challenges as the demand for sustainable building grows, and as new

Langendoen, Koen

226

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and D. Kathan (2009). Demand Response in U.S. ElectricityEnergy Financial Group. Demand Response Research Center [2008). Assessment of Demand Response and Advanced Metering.

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

A Hierarchical Demand Response Framework for Data Center Power Cost Optimization Under Real-World Electricity Pricing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 A Hierarchical Demand Response Framework for Data Center Power Cost Optimization Under Real bills. Our focus is on a subset of this work that carries out demand response (DR) by modulating

Urgaonkar, Bhuvan

228

A Hierarchical Demand Response Framework for Data Center Power Cost Optimization Under Real-World Electricity Pricing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 A Hierarchical Demand Response Framework for Data Center Power Cost Optimization Under Real for optimizing their utility bills. Our focus is on a subset of this work that carries out demand response (DR

Urgaonkar, Bhuvan

229

Composites for Aerospace and Transportation As the fuel costs and environment concerns continue to increase, so does the demand for composite  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Composites for Aerospace and Transportation As the fuel costs and environment concerns continue to increase, so does the demand for composite materials for aerospace and transportation applications. Polymer composites are inherited lighter than their metallic counterparts resulting in significant weight reduction

Li, Mo

230

Towards continuous policy-driven demand response in data centers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Demand response (DR) is a technique for balancing electricity supply and demand by regulating power consumption instead of generation. DR is a key technology for emerging smart electric grids that aim to increase grid efficiency, while incorporating ... Keywords: blink, power, renewable energy, storage

David Irwin; Navin Sharma; Prashant Shenoy

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Novel effects of demand side management data on accuracy of electrical energy consumption modeling and long-term forecasting  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Worldwide implementation of demand side management (DSM) programs has had positive impacts on electrical energy consumption (EEC) and the examination of their effects on long-term forecasting is warranted. The objective of this study is to investigate the effects of historical DSM data on accuracy of EEC modeling and long-term forecasting. To achieve the objective, optimal artificial neural network (ANN) models based on improved particle swarm optimization (IPSO) and shuffled frog-leaping (SFL) algorithms are developed for EEC forecasting. For long-term EEC modeling and forecasting for the U.S. for 2010–2030, two historical data types used in conjunction with developed models include (i) EEC and (ii) socio-economic indicators, namely, gross domestic product, energy imports, energy exports, and population for 1967–2009 period. Simulation results from IPSO-ANN and SFL-ANN models show that using socio-economic indicators as input data achieves lower mean absolute percentage error (MAPE) for long-term EEC forecasting, as compared with EEC data. Based on IPSO-ANN, it is found that, for the U.S. EEC long-term forecasting, the addition of DSM data to socio-economic indicators data reduces MAPE by 36% and results in the estimated difference of 3592.8 MBOE (5849.9 TW h) in EEC for 2010–2030.

F.J. Ardakani; M.M. Ardehali

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

National Action Plan on Demand Response  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

David Kathan, Ph.D David Kathan, Ph.D Federal Energy Regulatory Commission U.S. DOE Electricity Advisory Committee October 29, 2010 Demand Response as Power System Resources The author's views do not necessarily represent the views of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission 2 Demand Response * FERC (Order 719) defines demand response as: - A reduction in the consumption of electric energy by customers from their expected consumption in response to an increase in the price of electric energy or to in incentive payments designed to induce lower consumption of electric energy. * The National Action Plan on Demand Response released by FERC staff broadens this definition to include - Consumer actions that can change any part of the load profile of a utility or region, not just the period of peak usage

233

Increasing throughput of multiplexed electrical bus in pipe-lined architecture  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Techniques are disclosed for increasing the throughput of a multiplexed electrical bus by exploiting available pipeline stages of a computer or other system. For example, a method for increasing a throughput of an electrical bus that connects at least two devices in a system comprises introducing at least one signal hold stage in a signal-receiving one of the two devices, such that a maximum frequency at which the two devices are operated is not limited by a number of cycles of an operating frequency of the electrical bus needed for a signal to propagate from a signal-transmitting one of the two devices to the signal-receiving one of the two devices. Preferably, the signal hold stage introduced in the signal-receiving one of the two devices is a pipeline stage re-allocated from the signal-transmitting one of the two devices.

Asaad, Sameh; Brezzo, Bernard V; Kapur, Mohit

2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

234

Evolution of Wholesale Electricity Market Design with Increasing Levels of Renewable Generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Variable generation such as wind and photovoltaic solar power has increased substantially in recent years. Variable generation has unique characteristics compared to the traditional technologies that supply energy in the wholesale electricity markets. These characteristics create unique challenges in planning and operating the power system, and they can also influence the performance and outcomes from electricity markets. This report focuses on two particular issues related to market design: revenue sufficiency for long-term reliability and incentivizing flexibility in short-term operations. The report provides an overview of current design and some designs that have been proposed by industry or researchers.

Ela, E.; Milligan, M.; Bloom, A.; Botterud, A.; Townsend, A.; Levin, T.

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

20% Wind Energy by 2030: Increasing Wind Energy's Contribution to U.S. Electricity Supply; Executive Summary (Revised)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is a 21-page summary of the 200+ page analysis that explores one clearly defined scenario for providing 20% of our nation's electricity demand with wind energy by 2030 and contrasts it to a scenario of no new U.S. wind power capacity.

Not Available

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

A comparative environmental analysis of fossil fuel electricity generation options for South Africa .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The increased demand for electricity in South Africa is expected to exceed supply between 2004 and 2007. Electricity supply options in the country would be… (more)

Govender, Indran

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

High-Performance with Solar Electric Reduced Peak Demand: Premier Homes Rancho Cordoba, CA- Building America Top Innovation  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Building America Innovations profile describes Building America solar home research that has demonstrated the ability to reduce peak demand by 75%. Numerous field studies have monitored power production and system effectiveness.

238

The use of electrical resistance in the plant stem to measure plant response to soil moisture tension and evaporative demand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. . . . . . , . . . . . . ~. . . . . . . . . 30 10- Diurnal cotton plant stem electrical resistance readings as recorded simultaneously from three soil moisture levels. ~ 36 Flot 1-P (cotton), Diurnal cotton plant stem electrical resistance readings with soil moisture tension equal to 13... atsespheresl ~ ~ a ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ . ~ ~ ~ ~ ta ~ I ~ ~ ~ t ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ae ~ ~ ~ a ~ ~ t ~ ~ ~ ~ 37 13 ' Electrical resistance in the plant stem, and evapotrans- piration in non-irrigated and irrigated cotton plots during one diurnal period. . ~ 39 Plots...

Box, James E.

1956-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Thermal Energy Storage for Electricity Peak-demand Mitigation: A Solution in Developing and Developed World Alike  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

N ATIONAL L ABORATORY Thermal Energy Storage for Electricity20, 2012. I. Dincer, On thermal energy storage systems andin research on cold thermal energy storage, International

DeForest, Nicholas

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Demand Response-Enabled Model Predictive HVAC Load Control in Buildings using Real-Time Electricity Pricing.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??A practical cost and energy efficient model predictive control (MPC) strategy is proposed for HVAC load control under dynamic real-time electricity pricing. The MPC strategy… (more)

Avci, Mesut

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "increase electricity demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Hot Thermal Storage/Selective Energy System Reduces Electric Demand for Space Cooling As Well As Heating in Commercial Application  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy and off-peak electric resistance heating. Estimated energy and first cost savings, as compared with an all-electric VAV HVAC system, are: 30 to 50% in ductwork size and cost; 30% in fan energy; 25% in air handling equipment; 20 to 40% in utility...

Meckler, G.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

The Costs, Air Quality, and Human Health Effects of Meeting Peak Electricity Demand with Installed Backup Generators  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

E.G. thanks John Dawson, Rob Pinder, and Pavan Racherla for assistance with the PMCAMx model, and Janet Joseph, Peter Savio, and Gunnar Walmet from NYSERDA for useful information about backup generators and emergency demand response programs in New York City. ...

Elisabeth A. Gilmore; Lester B. Lave; Peter J. Adams

2006-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

243

Mass Market Demand Response  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mass Market Demand Response Mass Market Demand Response Speaker(s): Karen Herter Date: July 24, 2002 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Demand response programs are often quickly and poorly crafted in reaction to an energy crisis and disappear once the crisis subsides, ensuring that the electricity system will be unprepared when the next crisis hits. In this paper, we propose to eliminate the event-driven nature of demand response programs by considering demand responsiveness a component of the utility obligation to serve. As such, demand response can be required as a condition of service, and the offering of demand response rates becomes a requirement of utilities as an element of customer service. Using this foundation, we explore the costs and benefits of a smart thermostat-based demand response system capable of two types of programs: (1) a mandatory,

244

Measuring the capacity impacts of demand response  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Critical peak pricing and peak time rebate programs offer benefits by increasing system reliability, and therefore, reducing capacity needs of the electric power system. These benefits, however, decrease substantially as the size of the programs grows relative to the system size. More flexible schemes for deployment of demand response can help address the decreasing returns to scale in capacity value, but more flexible demand response has decreasing returns to scale as well. (author)

Earle, Robert; Kahn, Edward P.; Macan, Edo

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

245

As the world economy continues to expand the demand for petroleum based fuel increases and the price of these fuels rises  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

4 4 Structural Studies of Catalytically Stabilized Industrial Hydrotreating Catalysts Myriam Perez De la Rosa 1 , Gilles Berhault 2 , Apurva Mehta 3 , Russell R. Chianelli 1 1 University of Texas at El Paso, Materials Research Technology Institute, El Paso, TX 2 Institut de Recherches sur la Catalyse, CNRS, Villeurbanne cedex, France 3 Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA Figure 1: MoS 2 layered structure. As the world economy continues to expand the demand for petroleum based fuel increases and the price of these fuels rises. The rising price of fuel has another consequence: refiners tend to purchase cheaper fuels of poorer quality. These poor quality fuels contain increasing amounts of sulfur and other pollutants leading to a decline

246

Uranium 2009 resources, production and demand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

With several countries currently building nuclear power plants and planning the construction of more to meet long-term increases in electricity demand, uranium resources, production and demand remain topics of notable interest. In response to the projected growth in demand for uranium and declining inventories, the uranium industry – the first critical link in the fuel supply chain for nuclear reactors – is boosting production and developing plans for further increases in the near future. Strong market conditions will, however, be necessary to trigger the investments required to meet projected demand. The "Red Book", jointly prepared by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency and the International Atomic Energy Agency, is a recognised world reference on uranium. It is based on information compiled in 40 countries, including those that are major producers and consumers of uranium. This 23rd edition provides a comprehensive review of world uranium supply and demand as of 1 January 2009, as well as data on global ur...

Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development. Paris

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Demand-Side Management Expenditures and the Market Value of U.S. Electric Utilities: Strategic Investment or Disinvestment?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

For over eighty years the vertically integrated suppliers of electricity in the United States have been assigned exclusive territorial (consumer) franchises and closely regulated. Both the legal monopolies and th...

Douglas A. Houston

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Market and Policy Barriers for Demand Response Providing Ancillary Services in U.S. Markets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wholesale Electricity Demand Response Program Comparison,J. (2009) Open Automated Demand Response Communicationsin Demand Response for Wholesale Ancillary Services.

Cappers, Peter

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

INCREASE  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The Interdisciplinary Consortium for Research and Educational Access in Science and Engineering (INCREASE), assists minority-serving institutions in gaining access to world-class research facilities.

None

2013-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

250

Statewide Electrical Energy Cost Savings and Peak Demand Reduction from the IECC Code-Compliant, Single-Family Residences in Texas (2002-2009)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

peaking plant (i.e., capacity savings), the calculated demand savings in MW were then multiplied by the average capital cost of natural gas combined cycle power plant, $1,165 per kW (Kaplan, 2008) using a 15% reserve margin (Faruqui et al. 2007... to the 2001 and 2006 IECC codes. 72?F Heating, 75?F CoolingSpace Temperature Set point (Simulation adjustment3: Heating 72F, Cooling 75F) (b) Heat Pump House: 0.904 360 0.88 kW (Simulation adjustment3: 1.095 kW) HVAC System Type (a) Electric/Gas...

Kim, H; Baltazar, J.C.; Haberl, J.

251

Demand Response - Policy | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Demand Response - Policy Demand Response - Policy Since its inception, the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE) has been committed to modernizing the nation's...

252

Demand Response | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Demand Response Demand Response Demand Response Demand Response Demand response provides an opportunity for consumers to play a significant role in the operation of the electric grid by reducing or shifting their electricity usage during peak periods in response to time-based rates or other forms of financial incentives. Demand response programs are being used by electric system planners and operators as resource options for balancing supply and demand. Such programs can lower the cost of electricity in wholesale markets, and in turn, lead to lower retail rates. Methods of engaging customers in demand response efforts include offering time-based rates such as time-of-use pricing, critical peak pricing, variable peak pricing, real time pricing, and critical peak rebates. It also includes direct load control programs which provide the

253

The Role of Demand Response in Default Service Pricing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and coordinated by the Demand Response Research Center onThe Role of Demand Response in Default Service Pricing Galenfor providing much-needed demand response in electricity

Barbose, Galen; Goldman, Charles; Neenan, Bernie

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

NREL: Energy Analysis: Electric System Flexibility and Storage  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Electric System Flexibility and Storage Electric System Flexibility and Storage Options for Increasing Electric System Flexibility to Accommodate Higher Levels of Variable Renewable Electricity Increased electric system flexibility, needed to enable electricity supply-demand balance with high levels of renewable generation, can come from a portfolio of supply- and demand-side options, including flexible conventional generation, grid storage, curtailment of some renewable generation, new transmission, and more responsive loads. NREL's electric system flexibility studies investigate the role of various electric system flexibility options on large-scale deployment of renewable energy. NREL's electric system flexibility analyses show that: Key factors in improving grid flexibility include (1) increasing the

255

Control Strategy for Domestic Water Heaters during Peak Periods and its Impact on the Demand for Electricity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Because they store hot water, water heaters are easily-shifted loads that can be controlled to reduce peak demands. However, load shifting may have some detrimental consequences on the domestic hot water supply temperature if the heating element is deactivated for a long period of time. Furthermore, a new peak may be caused if a significant number of heaters are reactivated at the same time. This study presents a control strategy for water heaters that minimizes the pick-up demand when the heating elements are reactivated at the end of a load shifting period and that ensures, in all cases, the client's hot water supply. The study is based on a simulation model of a water heater that was experimentally validated and takes into account the diversity of the population's hot water withdrawal profile. More specifically, the data of 8,167 real water withdrawal profiles of several clients were input into the simulation model in order to evaluate the performance of water heaters under different operating conditions.

Alain Moreau

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reviews the relationship between energy efficiency and demand response and discusses approaches and barriers to coordinating energy efficiency and demand response. The paper is intended to support the 10 implementation goals of the National Action Plan for Energy Efficiency's Vision to achieve all cost-effective energy efficiency by 2025. Improving energy efficiency in our homes, businesses, schools, governments, and industries - which consume more than 70 percent of the nation's natural gas and electricity - is one of the most constructive, cost-effective ways to address the challenges of high energy prices, energy security and independence, air pollution, and global climate change. While energy efficiency is an increasingly prominent component of efforts to supply affordable, reliable, secure, and clean electric power, demand response is becoming a valuable tool in utility and regional resource plans. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) estimated the contribution from existing U.S. demand response resources at about 41,000 megawatts (MW), about 5.8 percent of 2008 summer peak demand (FERC, 2008). Moreover, FERC recently estimated nationwide achievable demand response potential at 138,000 MW (14 percent of peak demand) by 2019 (FERC, 2009).2 A recent Electric Power Research Institute study estimates that 'the combination of demand response and energy efficiency programs has the potential to reduce non-coincident summer peak demand by 157 GW' by 2030, or 14-20 percent below projected levels (EPRI, 2009a). This paper supports the Action Plan's effort to coordinate energy efficiency and demand response programs to maximize value to customers. For information on the full suite of policy and programmatic options for removing barriers to energy efficiency, see the Vision for 2025 and the various other Action Plan papers and guides available at www.epa.gov/eeactionplan.

Goldman, Charles; Reid, Michael; Levy, Roger; Silverstein, Alison

2010-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

257

Overview of Demand Side Response | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

and Energy Officials Need to Know High Electric Demand Days: Clean Energy Strategies for Improving Air Quality Demand Response in U.S. Electricity Markets: Empirical Evidence...

258

Impact of a solar domestic hot water demand-side management program on an electric utility and its customers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A methodology to assess the economic and environmental impacts of a large scale implementation of solar domestic hot water (SDHW) systems is developed. Energy, emission and demand reductions and their respective savings are quantified. It is shown that, on average, an SDHW system provides an energy reduction of about 3200 kWH, avoided emissions of about 2 tons and a capacity contribution of 0.7 kW to a typical Wisconsin utility that installs 5000 SDHW system. The annual savings from these reductions to utility is {dollar_sign}385,000, providing a return on an investment of over 20{percent}. It is shown that, on average, a consumer will save {dollar_sign}211 annually in hot water heating bills. 8 refs., 7 figs.

Trzeniewski, J.; Mitchell, J.W.; Klein, S.A.; Beckman, W.A.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response Title Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response Publication Type Report Refereed Designation Unknown Year of Publication 2010 Authors Goldman, Charles A., Michael Reid, Roger Levy, and Alison Silverstein Pagination 74 Date Published 01/2010 Publisher LBNL City Berkeley Keywords electricity markets and policy group, energy analysis and environmental impacts department Abstract This paper reviews the relationship between energy efficiency and demand response and discusses approaches and barriers to coordinating energy efficiency and demand response. The paper is intended to support the 10 implementation goals of the National Action Plan for Energy Efficiency's Vision to achieve all cost-effective energy efficiency by 2025.1 Improving energy efficiency in our homes, businesses, schools, governments, and industries-which consume more than 70 percent of the nation's natural gas and electricity-is one of the most constructive, cost-effective ways to address the challenges of high energy prices, energy security and independence, air pollution, and global climate change. While energy efficiency is an increasingly prominent component of efforts to supply affordable, reliable, secure, and clean electric power, demand response is becoming a valuable tool in utility and regional resource plans. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) estimated the contribution from existing U.S. demand response resources at about 41,000 megawatts (MW), about 5.8 percent of 2008 summer peak demand (FERC, 2008). Moreover, FERC recently estimated nationwide achievable demand response potential at 138,000 MW (14 percent of peak demand) by 2019 (FERC, 2009).2 A recent Electric Power Research Institute study estimates that "the combination of demand response and energy efficiency programs has the potential to reduce non-coincident summer peak demand by 157 GW" by 2030, or 14-20 percent below projected levels (EPRI, 2009a). This paper supports the Action Plan's effort to coordinate energy efficiency and demand response programs to maximize value to customers. For information on the full suite of policy and programmatic options for removing barriers to energy efficiency, see the Vision for 2025 and the various other Action Plan papers and guides available at www.epa.gov/eeactionplan.

260

The Potential Impact of Increased Renewable Energy Penetrations on Electricity Bill Savings from Residential Photovoltaic Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of electricity retail rates or on the private economics ofelectricity rates and hence the customer economics of residential, behind-the-meter PV. We calculate the private

Barbose, Galen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "increase electricity demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Best practices and research for handling demand response security issues in the smart grid.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??When electricity demand is peak, utilities and other electric Independent Systems Operators (ISOs) keep electric generators on-line in order to meet the high demand. In… (more)

Asavachivanthornkul, Prakarn

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Construction of a Demand Side Plant with Thermal Energy Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

storage and its potential impact on the electric utilities and introduces the demand side plant concept....

Michel, M.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Opportunities, Barriers and Actions for Industrial Demand Response in California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

industrial demand response (DR) with energy efficiency (EE) to most effectively use electricity and natural gas

McKane, Aimee T.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Fact #717: March 5, 2012 Availability of Electric Charging Stations Has Increased Dramatically in Recent Years  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

At the end of September 2009, there were just 465 electric vehicle charging stations nationwide. By the end of January 2012, the number of charging stations had grown to 6,033. California has...

265

The Potential Impact of Increased Renewable Energy Penetrations on Electricity Bill Savings from Residential Photovoltaic Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

concentrated solar power (CSP), and wind penetrations in theis met by wind, solar PV, concentrating solar power with 6schemes on power prices: The case of wind electricity in

Barbose, Galen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

NREL Uses Fuel Cells to Increase the Range of Battery Electric...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Range Limitation of Medium-Duty Battery Electric Vehicles through the Use of Hydrogen Fuel Cells." SAE Int.; DOI: 10.42712013-01-2471. Extrapolation from parcel delivery vehicle...

267

EV Project Electric Vehicle Charging Infrastructure Summary Report...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Max electricity demand across all days Min electricity demand across all days Electricity demand on single calendar day with highest peak Charging Unit Usage Residential Level 2...

268

Flexible Demand Management under Time-Varying Prices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Day in a Typical Hourly Average Electricity Prices . . . . .on demand response to electricity price are mostly conductedassociated with electricity prices, local generation, and

Liang, Yong

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Fan-shape optimisation using CFD and genetic algorithms for increasing the efficiency of electric motors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The electric motor efficiency represents the effectiveness with which the motor converts electrical energy into mechanical energy. As the energy losses are converted into heat, which is dissipated by the motor frame aided by internal and external fans, a better cooling system adds up to better efficiency. In recent years, improvements in motor efficiency have been achieved but at higher costs. By using Genetic Algorithms (GAs), changes are introduced to the fan shape looking for a better aerodynamic performance. The evaluation of the achieved fan efficiency with the modified shapes is performed with Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation software.

Noel Leon-Rovira; Eduardo Uresti; Waldo Arcos

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Automated Demand Response and Commissioning  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the results from the second season of research to develop and evaluate the performance of new Automated Demand Response (Auto-DR) hardware and software technology in large facilities. Demand Response (DR) is a set of activities to reduce or shift electricity use to improve the electric grid reliability and manage electricity costs. Fully-Automated Demand Response does not involve human intervention, but is initiated at a home, building, or facility through receipt of an external communications signal. We refer to this as Auto-DR. The evaluation of the control and communications must be properly configured and pass through a set of test stages: Readiness, Approval, Price Client/Price Server Communication, Internet Gateway/Internet Relay Communication, Control of Equipment, and DR Shed Effectiveness. New commissioning tests are needed for such systems to improve connecting demand responsive building systems to the electric grid demand response systems.

Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David S.; Motegi, Naoya; Bourassa, Norman

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Demand response: a strategy to address residential air-conditioning peak load in Australia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Rapid growth in electricity network peak demand is increasing pressure for new investment which may be used for only a few hours a year. Residential air-conditioning is widely believed to be the prime cause of...

Robert Smith; Ke Meng; Zhaoyang Dong…

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Demand Response and Variable Generation Integration Scoping Study  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Market and Policy Barriers for Demand Market and Policy Barriers for Demand Response Providing Ancillary Services in U.S. Electricity Markets Peter Cappers, Jason MacDonald, Charles Goldman April 2013 Report Summary 1 Energy Analysis Department  Electricity Markets and Policy Group Presentation Overview  Objectives and Approach  Wholesale and Retail Market Environments  Market and Policy Barrier Typology  Prototypical Regional Barrier Assessment 2 Energy Analysis Department  Electricity Markets and Policy Group A Role for Demand Response to Provide Ancillary Services  Increasing penetration of renewable energy generation in U.S. electricity markets means that bulk power system operators will need to manage the variable and uncertain nature of many renewable resources

273

Use characteristics and mode choice behavior of electric bike users in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

electric bikes will also slightly increase demand for automobileelectric bikes are less of a transitional mode between human-powered bikes and full-blown automobile

Cherry, Christopher; Cervero, Robert

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

In a world where the demand for fresh surface water increases every year, the restoration and protection of the Great Lakes is vital, as the lakes contain 20 percent  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· Identifying Land Use Tipping Points that Threaten Great Lakes Ecosystems Aquatic Invasive Species · Great Lakes Aquatic Nuisance Species Information System Expansion · Regional Ecosystem Prediction- AquaticIn a world where the demand for fresh surface water increases every year, the restoration

275

Q:\asufinal_0107_demand.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

00 00 (AEO2000) Assumptions to the January 2000 With Projections to 2020 DOE/EIA-0554(2000) Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Macroeconomic Activity Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 International Energy Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Household Expenditures Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Residential Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Commercial Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Industrial Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Transportation Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 Electricity Market Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 Oil and Gas Supply Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution

276

Decentralized demand–supply matching using community microgrids and consumer demand response: A scenario analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Developing countries constantly face the challenge of reliably matching electricity supply to increasing consumer demand. The traditional policy decisions of increasing supply and reducing demand centrally, by building new power plants and/or load shedding, have been insufficient. Locally installed microgrids along with consumer demand response can be suitable decentralized options to augment the centralized grid based systems and plug the demand–supply gap. The objectives of this paper are to: (1) develop a framework to identify the appropriate decentralized energy options for demand–supply matching within a community, and, (2) determine which of these options can suitably plug the existing demand–supply gap at varying levels of grid unavailability. A scenario analysis framework is developed to identify and assess the impact of different decentralized energy options at a community level and demonstrated for a typical urban residential community – Vijayanagar, Bangalore in India. A combination of LPG based CHP microgrid and proactive demand response by the community is the appropriate option that enables the Vijayanagar community to meet its energy needs 24/7 in a reliable, cost-effective manner. The paper concludes with an enumeration of the barriers and feasible strategies for the implementation of community microgrids in India based on stakeholder inputs.

Kumudhini Ravindra; Parameshwar P. Iyer

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Modeling Electric Vehicle Benefits Connected to Smart Grids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the commercial building electricity costs distributed energydegradation costs electricity sales fixed electricity costsvariable electricity costs (energy and demand charges) EV

Stadler, Michael

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Late January Cold Impacted Both Supply & Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

A brief cold spell occurred in the second half of January on top of A brief cold spell occurred in the second half of January on top of the low stocks. Cold weather increases demand, but it also can interfere with supply, as happened this past January. During the week ending January 22, temperatures in the New England and the Mid-Atlantic areas shifted from being15 percent and 17 percent warmer than normal, respectively, to 24 percent and 22 percent colder than normal. The weather change increased weekly heating requirements by about 40 percent. Temperature declines during the winter affect heating oil demand in a number of ways: Space heating demand increases; Electricity peaking demand increases and power generators must turn to distillate to meet the new peak needs; Fuel switching from natural gas to distillate occurs among large

279

Aggregator-Assisted Residential Participation in Demand Response Program.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The demand for electricity of a particular location can vary significantly based on season, ambient temperature, time of the day etc. High demand can result… (more)

Hasan, Mehedi

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Modeling, Analysis, and Control of Demand Response Resources.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??While the traditional goal of an electric power system has been to control supply to fulfill demand, the demand-side can plan an active role in… (more)

Mathieu, Johanna L.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "increase electricity demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Modeling, Analysis, and Control of Demand Response Resources.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? While the traditional goal of an electric power system has been to control supply to fulfill demand, the demand-side can plan an active role… (more)

Mathieu, Johanna L.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Industrial Equipment Demand and Duty Factors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Demand and duty factors have been measured for selected equipment (air compressors, electric furnaces, injection molding machines, centrifugal loads, and others) in industrial plants. Demand factors for heavily loaded air compressors were near 100...

Dooley, E. S.; Heffington, W. M.

283

Harnessing the power of demand  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Demand response can provide a series of economic services to the market and also provide ''insurance value'' under low-likelihood, but high-impact circumstances in which grid reliablity is enhanced. Here is how ISOs and RTOs are fostering demand response within wholesale electricity markets. (author)

Sheffrin, Anjali; Yoshimura, Henry; LaPlante, David; Neenan, Bernard

2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

284

The impact of future energy demand on renewable energy production – Case of Norway  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Projections of energy demand are an important part of analyses of policies to promote conservation, efficiency, technology implementation and renewable energy production. The development of energy demand is a key driver of the future energy system. This paper presents long-term projections of the Norwegian energy demand as a two-step methodology of first using activities and intensities to calculate a demand of energy services, and secondly use this as input to the energy system model TIMES-Norway to optimize the Norwegian energy system. Long-term energy demand projections are uncertain and the purpose of this paper is to illustrate the impact of different projections on the energy system. The results of the analyses show that decreased energy demand results in a higher renewable fraction compared to an increased demand, and the renewable energy production increases with increased energy demand. The most profitable solution to cover increased demand is to increase the use of bio energy and to implement energy efficiency measures. To increase the wind power production, an increased renewable target or higher electricity export prices have to be fulfilled, in combination with more electricity export.

Eva Rosenberg; Arne Lind; Kari Aamodt Espegren

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Demand Side Bidding. Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document sets forth the final report for a financial assistance award for the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC) to enhance coordination between the building operators and power system operators in terms of demand-side responses to Location Based Marginal Pricing (LBMP). Potential benefits of this project include improved power system reliability, enhanced environmental quality, mitigation of high locational prices within congested areas, and the reduction of market barriers for demand-side market participants. NARUC, led by its Committee on Energy Resources and the Environment (ERE), actively works to promote the development and use of energy efficiency and clean distributive energy policies within the framework of a dynamic regulatory environment. Electric industry restructuring, energy shortages in California, and energy market transformation intensifies the need for reliable information and strategies regarding electric reliability policy and practice. NARUC promotes clean distributive generation and increased energy efficiency in the context of the energy sector restructuring process. NARUC, through ERE's Subcommittee on Energy Efficiency, strives to improve energy efficiency by creating working markets. Market transformation seeks opportunities where small amounts of investment can create sustainable markets for more efficient products, services, and design practices.

Spahn, Andrew

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

286

Cooperative Demand Response Using Repeated Game for Price-Anticipating Buildings in Smart Grid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

E. El-Saadany, “A summary of demand response in electricityYang, and X. Guan, “Optimal demand response scheduling withwith application to demand response,” IEEE Transactions on

Ma, Kai; Hu, Guoqiang; Spanos, Costas J

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Estimating Demand Response Market Potential Among Large Commercial and Industrial Customers: A Scoping Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2001. “Electricity Demand Side Management Study: Review ofEpping/North Ryde Demand Side Management Scoping Study:Energy Agency Demand Side Management (IEA DSM) Programme:

Goldman, Charles; Hopper, Nicole; Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Neenan, Bernie; Cappers, Peter

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Demand Response This is the first of the Council's power plans to treat demand response as a resource.1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Demand Response This is the first of the Council's power plans to treat demand response the resource and describes some of the potential advantages and problems of the development of demand response. WHAT IS DEMAND RESPONSE? Demand response is a change in customers' demand for electricity corresponding

289

Balancing of Energy Supply and Residential Demand  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Power demand of private households shows daily fluctuations and ... (BEV) and heat pumps. This additional demand, especially when it remains unmanaged, will ... to an increase in fluctuations. To balance demand,

Martin Bock; Grit Walther

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Marketing Demand-Side Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

they the only game in town, enjoying a captive market. Demand-side management (DSM) again surfaced as a method for increasing customer value and meeting these competitive challenges. In designing and implementing demand-side management (DSM) programs we... have learned a great deal about what it takes to market and sell DSM. This paper focuses on how to successfully market demand-side management. KEY STEPS TO MARKETING DEMAND-SIDE MANAGEMENT Management Commitment The first key element in marketing...

O'Neill, M. L.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Japan's Residential Energy Demand Outlook to 2030 Considering Energy Efficiency Standards "Top-Runner Approach"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Source Demand per Household Coal, Oil, Gas, Heat, Electricity Total Energy Source Demand Coal, Oil, Gas, Heat, Electricity Demography Japan’

Komiyama, Ryoichi

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Demand Response (transactional control) - Energy Innovation Portal  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Transmission Electricity Transmission Find More Like This Return to Search Demand Response (transactional control) Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Contact PNNL About...

293

Transportation Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

page intentionally left blank page intentionally left blank 69 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates transportation energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5) and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars and light trucks), commercial light trucks (8,501-10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), buses, freight and passenger aircraft, freight and passenger rail, freight shipping, and miscellaneous

294

EV Project Electric Vehicle Charging Infrastructure Summary Report...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

all days Percentage of charging units connected on single calendar day with peak electricity demand Charging Demand: Range of Aggregate Electricity Demand versus Time of Day...

295

NCEP_Demand_Response_Draft_111208.indd  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

National Council on Electricity Policy: Electric Transmission Series for State Offi National Council on Electricity Policy: Electric Transmission Series for State Offi cials Demand Response and Smart Metering Policy Actions Since the Energy Policy Act of 2005: A Summary for State Offi cials Demand Response and Smart Metering Policy Actions Since the Energy Policy Act of 2005: A Summary for State Offi cials Prepared by the U.S. Demand Response Coordinating Committee for The National Council on Electricity Policy Fall 2008 i National Council on Electricity Policy: Electric Transmission Series for State Offi cials Demand Response and Smart Metering Policy Actions Since the Energy Policy Act of 2005: A Summary for State Offi cials The National Council on Electricity Policy is funded by the U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The views and opinions expressed herein are strictly those of the

296

Security and privacy in demand response systems in smart grid.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Demand response programs are used in smart grid to improve stability of the electric grid and to reduce consumption of electricity and costs during peak… (more)

Paranjpe, Mithila

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Analysis of Residential Demand Response and Double-Auction Markets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Demand response and dynamic pricing programs are expected to play increasing roles in the modern Smart Grid environment. While direct load control of end-use loads has existed for decades, price driven response programs are only beginning to be explored at the distribution level. These programs utilize a price signal as a means to control demand. Active markets allow customers to respond to fluctuations in wholesale electrical costs, but may not allow the utility to control demand. Transactive markets, utilizing distributed controllers and a centralized auction can be used to create an interactive system which can limit demand at key times on a distribution system, decreasing congestion. With the current proliferation of computing and communication resources, the ability now exists to create transactive demand response programs at the residential level. With the combination of automated bidding and response strategies coupled with education programs and customer response, emerging demand response programs have the ability to reduce utility demand and congestion in a more controlled manner. This paper will explore the effects of a residential double-auction market, utilizing transactive controllers, on the operation of an electric power distribution system.

Fuller, Jason C.; Schneider, Kevin P.; Chassin, David P.

2011-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

298

Abstract--The profound change in the electric industry worldwide in the last twenty years assigns an increasing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Value. I. INTRODUCTION He reformed electric industry scheme sets the transmission sector at the center

Catholic University of Chile (Universidad Católica de Chile)

299

Configuring load as a resource for competitive electricity markets--Review of demand response programs in the U.S. and around the world  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

emergencies (see Table 2). Xcel’s Electric Reduction Savingsinstead, operated so that Xcel could avoid exceeding MAPPElectricity Cooperative Xcel Energy Investor-Owned Utility

Heffner, Grayson C.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Building America Top Innovations Hall of Fame Profile … High-Performance with Solar Electric Reduced Peak Demand: Premier Homes Rancho Cordoba, CA  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

95 homes in Premier Gardens are 95 homes in Premier Gardens are equipped with photovoltaic panels that take advantage of solar energy to offset peak power loads during the hottest part of the day. As the housing market continues to evolve toward zero net-energy ready homes, Building America research has provided essential guidance for integrating renewable energy systems with high-performance homes and showing how they align with utility peak-demand reduction interests. Solar photovoltaic technology is an attractive option for utilities because they can reduce reliance on fossil-fuel energy. More significantly, it reduces peak demand because systems produce the most power on sunny summer afternoons coincident with the highest demand for air conditioning. Photovoltaic systems have been a part of several research projects conducted by

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "increase electricity demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Demand Response  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Assessment for Eastern Interconnection Youngsun Baek, Stanton W. Hadley, Rocio Martinez, Gbadebo Oladosu, Alexander M. Smith, Fran Li, Paul Leiby and Russell Lee Prepared for FY12 DOE-CERTS Transmission Reliability R&D Internal Program Review September 20, 2012 2 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy DOE National Laboratory Studies Funded to Support FOA 63 * DOE set aside $20 million from transmission funding for national laboratory studies. * DOE identified four areas of interest: 1. Transmission Reliability 2. Demand Side Issues 3. Water and Energy 4. Other Topics * Argonne, NREL, and ORNL support for EIPC/SSC/EISPC and the EISPC Energy Zone is funded through Area 4. * Area 2 covers LBNL and NREL work in WECC and

302

Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LBNL-3047E Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers G described in this report was coordinated by the Demand Response Research Center and funded by the California. Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers. California Energy

303

20% Wind Energy by 2030: Increasing Wind Energy's Contribution to U.S. Electricity Supply; Executive Summary (Revised)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

0% Wind Energy by 2030 0% Wind Energy by 2030 Increasing Wind Energy's Contribution to U.S. Electricity Supply DOE/GO-102008-2578 * December 2008 More information is available on the web at: www.eere.energy.gov/windandhydro http://www.nrel.gov/docs/fy08osti/41869.pdf December 2008 GRATEFUL APPRECIATION TO PARTNERS The U.S. Department of Energy would like to acknowledge the in-depth analysis and extensive research conducted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and the major contributions and manuscript reviews by the American Wind Energy Association and many wind industry organizations that contributed to the production of this report. The costs curves for energy supply options and the WinDS modeling assumptions were developed in cooperation with Black & Veatch. The preparation of

304

Energy Demand Modeling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

From the end of World War II until the early 1970s there was a strong and steady increase in the demand for energy. The abundant supplies of fossil and other ... an actual fall in the real price of energy of abou...

S. L. Schwartz

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Electricity Monthly Update  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Energy, electric power prices from SNL Energy, electric system demand data from Ventyx Energy Velocity Suite, and weather data and imagery from the National Oceanic and...

306

Electricity Monthly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Update November 28, 2012 Map of Electric System Selected for Daily Peak Demand was replaced with the correct map showing Selected Wholesale Electricity and Natural Gas Locations....

307

ELECTRIC  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

you nay give us will be greatly uppreckted. VPry truly your23, 9. IX. Sin0j3, Mtinager lclectronics and Nuclear Physics Dept. omh , WESTINGHOUSE-THE NAT KING IN ELECTRICITY...

308

Demand Response Spinning Reserve Demonstration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Demand Response Spinning Reserve project is a pioneeringdemonstration of how existing utility load-management assets can providean important electricity system reliability resource known as spinningreserve. Using aggregated demand-side resources to provide spinningreserve will give grid operators at the California Independent SystemOperator (CAISO) and Southern California Edison (SCE) a powerful, newtool to improve system reliability, prevent rolling blackouts, and lowersystem operating costs.

Eto, Joseph H.; Nelson-Hoffman, Janine; Torres, Carlos; Hirth,Scott; Yinger, Bob; Kueck, John; Kirby, Brendan; Bernier, Clark; Wright,Roger; Barat, A.; Watson, David S.

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 The commercial module forecasts consumption by fuel 15 at the Census division level using prices from the NEMS energy supply modules, and macroeconomic variables from the NEMS Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM), as well as external data sources (technology characterizations, for example). Energy demands are forecast for ten end-use services 16 for eleven building categories 17 in each of the nine Census divisions (see Figure 5). The model begins by developing forecasts of floorspace for the 99 building category and Census division combinations. Next, the ten end-use service demands required for the projected floorspace are developed. The electricity generation and water and space heating supplied by distributed generation and combined heat and power technologies are projected. Technologies are then

310

Findings from the 2004 Fully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the 2004 Fully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large the 2004 Fully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilities Title Findings from the 2004 Fully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilities Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-58178 Year of Publication 2005 Authors Piette, Mary Ann, David S. Watson, Naoya Motegi, and Norman Bourassa Date Published 10/18/2005 Keywords market sectors, technologies Abstract This report describes the results of the second season of research to develop and evaluate the performance of new Automated Demand Response (Auto-DR) hardware and software technology in large facilities. Demand Response (DR) is a set of time dependant activities that reduce or shift electricity use to improve electric grid reliability, manage electricity costs, and provide systems that encourage load shifting or shedding during times when the electric grid is near its capacity or electric prices are high. Demand Response is a subset of demand side management, which also includes energy efficiency and conservation. The overall goal of this research project was to support increased penetration of DR in large facilities through the use of automation and better understanding of DR technologies and strategies in large facilities. To achieve this goal, a set of field tests were designed and conducted. These tests examined the performance of Auto-DR systems that covered a diverse set of building systems, ownership and management structures, climate zones, weather patterns, and control and communication configurations.

311

Energy Efficiency Funds and Demand Response Programs - National Overview  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Funds and Demand Funds and Demand Response Programs - National Overview Charles Goldman Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory November 2, 2006 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group San Francisco CA Overview of Talk * National Overview * Energy Efficiency Programs and Funds * Demand Response Programs and Funds * FEMP Resources on Public Benefit Funds *Suggestions for Federal Customers DSM Spending is increasing! * 2006 Utility DSM and Public Benefit spending is ~$2.5B$ - $1B for C&I EE programs * CA utilities account for 35% of total spending 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 1994 2000 2005 2006 Costs (in billion $) DSM Costs Load Management Gas EE Other States Electric EE California Electric EE EE Spending in 2006 (by State) $ Million < 1 (23) 1 - 10 (2) 11 - 50 (13) 51 - 100 (7) > 100 (5) 790 101 257

312

Annual World Oil Demand Growth  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Notes: Following relatively small increases of 1.3 million barrels per day in 1999 and 0.9 million barrels per day in 2000, EIA is estimating world demand may grow by 1.6 million barrels per day in 2001. Of this increase, about 3/5 comes from non-OECD countries, while U.S. oil demand growth represents more than half of the growth projected in OECD countries. Demand in Asia grew steadily during most of the 1990s, with 1991-1997 average growth per year at just above 0.8 million barrels per day. However, in 1998, demand dropped by 0.3 million barrels per day as a result of the Asian economic crisis that year. Since 1998, annual growth in oil demand has rebounded, but has not yet reached the average growth seen during 1991-1997. In the Former Soviet Union, oil demand plummeted during most of the

313

Commercial & Industrial Demand Response  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Resources News & Events Expand News & Events Skip navigation links Smart Grid Demand Response Agricultural Residential Demand Response Commercial & Industrial Demand Response...

314

Demand Response Opportunities and Enabling Technologies for Data Centers:  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Demand Response Opportunities and Enabling Technologies for Data Centers: Demand Response Opportunities and Enabling Technologies for Data Centers: Findings From Field Studies Title Demand Response Opportunities and Enabling Technologies for Data Centers: Findings From Field Studies Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-5763E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Ghatikar, Girish, Venkata Ganti, Nance Matson, and Mary Ann Piette Publisher PG&E/SDG&E/CEC/LBNL Keywords communication and standards, control systems, data centers, demand response, enabling technologies, end-use technologies, load migration, market sectors, technologies Abstract The energy use in data centers is increasing and, in particular, impacting the data center energy cost and electric grid reliability during peak and high price periods. As per the 2007 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in the Pacific Gas and Electric Company territory, data centers are estimated to consume 500 megawatts of annual peak electricity. The 2011 data confirm the increase in data center energy use, although it is slightly lower than the EPA forecast. Previous studies have suggested that data centers have significant potential to integrate with supply-side programs to reduce peak loads. In collaboration with California data centers, utilities, and technology vendors, this study conducted field tests to improve the understanding of the demand response opportunities in data centers. The study evaluated an initial set of control and load migration strategies and economic feasibility for four data centers. The findings show that with minimal or no impact to data center operations a demand savings of 25% at the data center level or 10% to 12% at the whole building level can be achieved with strategies for cooling and IT equipment, and load migration. These findings should accelerate the grid-responsiveness of data centers through technology development, integration with the demand response programs, and provide operational cost savings.

315

Assessment of Demand Response and Advanced Metering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;#12;2008 Assessment of Demand Response and Advanced Metering Staff Report Federal Energy metering penetration and potential peak load reduction from demand response have increased since 2006. Significant activity to promote demand response or to remove barriers to demand response occurred at the state

Tesfatsion, Leigh

316

The alchemy of demand response: turning demand into supply  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Paying customers to refrain from purchasing products they want seems to run counter to the normal operation of markets. Demand response should be interpreted not as a supply-side resource but as a secondary market that attempts to correct the misallocation of electricity among electric users caused by regulated average rate tariffs. In a world with costless metering, the DR solution results in inefficiency as measured by deadweight losses. (author)

Rochlin, Cliff

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

317

Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Building and Operating Electric  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Building and Operating Electric Power Plants in the Upper Colorado-1712 As demand for electricity increases, investments into new generation capacity from renewable,CaliforniaandtherestoftheWestCoastoftheUnited States started to experience severe shortages of electricity. Investments

Kammen, Daniel M.

318

Managing Wind-based Electricity Generation and Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Managing Wind-based Electricity Generation and Storage by Yangfang Zhou Submitted to the Tepper, and to meet increasing electricity demand without harming the environment. Two of the most promising solutions for the energy issue are to rely on renewable energy, and to develop efficient electricity storage. Renewable

Sadeh, Norman M.

319

A Dynamic household Alternative-fuel Vehicle Demand Model Using Stated and Revealed Transaction Information  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Potential Demand for Electric Cars”, Journal of Economrtricsand one large car) and one mini electric car. The two modelsscenarios: (i) a subcompact electric car is introduced to

Sheng, Hongyan

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Reliability implications of price responsive demand : a study of New England's power system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

With restructuring of the traditional, vertically integrated electricity industry come new opportunities for electricity demand to actively participate in electricity markets. Traditional definitions of power system ...

Whitaker, Andrew C. (Andrew Craig)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "increase electricity demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Energy technologies and their impact on demand  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Despite the uncertainties, energy demand forecasts must be made to guide government policies and public and private-sector capital investment programs. Three principles can be identified in considering long-term energy prospects. First energy demand will continue to grow, driven by population growth, economic development, and the current low per capita energy consumption in developing countries. Second, energy technology advancements alone will not solve the problem. Energy-efficient technologies, renewable resource technologies, and advanced electric power technologies will all play a major role but will not be able to keep up with the growth in world energy demand. Third, environmental concerns will limit the energy technology choices. Increasing concern for environmental protection around the world will restrict primarily large, centralized energy supply facilities. The conclusion is that energy system diversity is the only solution. The energy system must be planned with consideration of both supply and demand technologies, must not rely on a single source of energy, must take advantage of all available technologies that are specially suited to unique local conditions, must be built with long-term perspectives, and must be able to adapt to change.

Drucker, H.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

20% Wind Energy by 2030: Increasing Wind Energy's Contribution to U.S. Electricity Supply (Executive Summary)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Executive summary of a report on the requirements needed to generate twenty percent of the nation's electricity from wind energy by the year 2030.

323

ELECTRIC  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

ELECTRIC ELECTRIC cdrtrokArJclaeT 3 I+ &i, y$ \I &OF I*- j< t j,fci..- ir )(yiT !E-li, ( \-,v? Cl -p/4.4 RESEARCH LABORATORIES EAST PITTSBURGH, PA. 8ay 22, 1947 Mr. J. Carrel Vrilson General ?!!mager Atomic Qxzgy Commission 1901 Constitution Avenue Kashington, D. C. Dear Sir: In the course of OUT nuclenr research we are planning to study the enc:ri;y threshold anti cross section for fission. For thib program we require a s<>piAroted sample of metallic Uranium 258 of high purity. A quantity of at lezst 5 grams would probably be sufficient for our purpose, and this was included in our 3@icntion for license to the Atonic Energy Coskqission.. This license has been approved, 2nd rre would Llp!Jreciate informztion as to how to ?r*oceed to obtain thit: m2teria.l.

324

Demand side management of a domestic dishwasher: Wind energy gains, financial savings and peak-time load reduction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ireland is currently striving to achieve an ambitious target of supplying 40% of electricity demand with renewable energy by 2020. With the vast majority of this being met by wind energy, an intermittent and non-dispatchable energy source, it is inevitable that frequent substantial curtailment will occur during times of excessive generation. This paper investigates the potential for demand side management to limit the requirement for curtailment and further facilitate the integration of renewable energy by shifting the timing of electrical demand in response to various signals including pricing and wind availability. Using a domestic dishwasher as an example, significant increases in the amount of renewable electricity consumed are demonstrated with simultaneous financial savings for the consumer. Furthermore, secondary benefits such as peak-time demand reductions in excess of 60% are observed. The impact of employing demand side management based on imperfect day-ahead market predictions is also analysed and the resulting deficiencies are quantified.

P. Finn; M. O’Connell; C. Fitzpatrick

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Driving on the Interior of Campus An increased number of vehicles and small electric/gas carts on campus, both State and private,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Driving on the Interior of Campus An increased number of vehicles and small electric/gas carts on campus, both State and private, have created an increased risk to pedestrians and has damaged walkways Director or the designee. · Private and vendor vehicles are restricted at all times. Vehicles requiring

de Lijser, Peter

326

Definition: Demand | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Demand Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Demand The rate at which electric energy is delivered to or by a system or part of a system, generally expressed in kilowatts or megawatts, at a given instant or averaged over any designated interval of time., The rate at which energy is being used by the customer.[1] Related Terms energy, electricity generation References ↑ Glossary of Terms Used in Reliability Standards An i Like Like You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. nline Glossary Definition Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Demand&oldid=480555"

327

Demand Side Management by controlling refrigerators and its effects on consumers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Demand Side Management in power grids has become more and more important in recent years. Continuously growing energy demand both increases the need for distributed generation from renewable energy sources and brings out the topic of Demand Side Management. One of the major application areas of Demand Side Management in smart grids is cooling systems. In this paper, Demand Side Management with control of a refrigerator and its economic effects on consumers are analyzed. With a refrigerator model based on real measurements, several cooling schedules are simulated and annual energy fees for different pricing methods in use in Turkey are calculated and discussed. The results revealed that, 37.9% of refrigerator’s demand in peak period can be shifted to other periods and annual electricity bills for customers can be reduced by 11.4%.

M. Alparslan Zehir; Mustafa Bagriyanik

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Manuscript submitted to Electricity Journal 6/2/2006 Steven Letendre Richard Perez  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Manuscript submitted to Electricity Journal 6/2/2006 Steven Letendre Richard Perez The Prometheus of the U.S. electric grid has become increasingly complex as it has been called upon to accommodate growth in total electricity consumption of 75%, accompanied by an increase in non-coincident peak demand in excess

Perez, Richard R.

329

Electric Power Industry Needs for Grid-Scale Storage Applications |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Industry Needs for Grid-Scale Storage Applications Industry Needs for Grid-Scale Storage Applications Electric Power Industry Needs for Grid-Scale Storage Applications Stationary energy storage technologies will address the growing limitations of the electricity infrastructure and meet the increasing demand for renewable energy use. Widespread integration of energy storage devices offers many benefits, including the following: Alleviating momentary electricity interruptions Meeting peak demand Postponing or avoiding upgrades to grid infrastructure Facilitating the integration of high penetrations of renewable energy Providing other ancillary services that can improve the stability and resiliency of the electric grid Electric Power Industry Needs for Grid-Scale Storage Applications More Documents & Publications

330

Graphical language for identification of control strategies allowing Demand Response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Graphical language for identification of control strategies allowing Demand Response David DA SILVA. This will allow the identification of the electric appliance availability for demand response control strategies to be implemented in terms of demand response for electrical appliances. Introduction An important part

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

331

The Potential Impact of Increased Renewable Energy Penetration Levels on Electricity Bill Savings From Residential Photovoltaic Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

concentrated solar power (CSP), and wind penetrations in theis met by wind, solar PV, concentrating solar power with 6schemes on power prices: The case of wind electricity in

Barbose, Galen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

New coal plant technologies will demand more water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Population shifts, growing electricity demand, and greater competition for water resources have heightened interest in the link between energy and water. The US Energy Information Administration projects a 22% increase in US installed generating capacity by 2030. Of the 259 GE of new capacity expected to have come on-line by then, more than 192 GW will be thermoelectric and thus require some water for cooling. Our challenge will become balancing people's needs for power and for water. 1 ref., 7 figs.

Peltier, R.; Shuster, E.; McNemar, A.; Stiegel, G.J.; Murphy, J.

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

333

D:\assumptions_2001\assumptions2002\currentassump\demand.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Macroeconomic Activity Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 International Energy Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Household Expenditures Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Residential Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Commercial Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Industrial Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Transportation Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Electricity Market Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 Oil and Gas Supply Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89 Petroleum Market Module. . . . . . . . . . . . .

334

Changing the spatial location of electricity generation to increase water availability in areas with drought: a feasibility study and quantification of air quality impacts in Texas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The feasibility, cost, and air quality impacts of using electrical grids to shift water use from drought-stricken regions to areas with more water availability were examined. Power plant cooling represents a large portion of freshwater withdrawals in the United States, and shifting where electricity generation occurs can allow the grid to act as a virtual water pipeline, increasing water availability in regions with drought by reducing water consumption and withdrawals for power generation. During a 2006 drought, shifting electricity generation out of the most impacted areas of South Texas (~10% of base case generation) to other parts of the grid would have been feasible using transmission and power generation available at the time, and some areas would experience changes in air quality. Although expensive, drought-based electricity dispatch is a potential parallel strategy that can be faster to implement than other infrastructure changes, such as air cooling or water pipelines.

Adam P Pacsi; Nawaf S Alhajeri; Mort D Webster; Michael E Webber; David T Allen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Annual Energy Outlook with Projections to 2025 - Market Trends- Electricity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Demand and Supply Electricity Demand and Supply Annual Energy Outlook 2005 Market Trends - Electricity Demand and Supply Continued Growth in Electricity Use Is Expected in All Sectors Figure 66. Annual electricity sales by sector, 1970-2025 (billion kilowatthours). Having problems, call our National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 for help. Figure data Total electricity sales are projected to increase at an average annual rate of 1.9 percent in the AEO2005 reference case, from 3,481 billion kilowatthours in 2003 to 5,220 billion kilowatthours in 2025 (Figure 66). From 2003 to 2025, annual growth in electricity sales is projected to average 1.6 percent in the residential sector, 2.5 percent in the commercial sector, and 1.3 percent in the industrial sector.

336

Home Network Technologies and Automating Demand Response  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the past several years, interest in large-scale control of peak energy demand and total consumption has increased. While motivated by a number of factors, this interest has primarily been spurred on the demand side by the increasing cost of energy and, on the supply side by the limited ability of utilities to build sufficient electricity generation capacity to meet unrestrained future demand. To address peak electricity use Demand Response (DR) systems are being proposed to motivate reductions in electricity use through the use of price incentives. DR systems are also be design to shift or curtail energy demand at critical times when the generation, transmission, and distribution systems (i.e. the 'grid') are threatened with instabilities. To be effectively deployed on a large-scale, these proposed DR systems need to be automated. Automation will require robust and efficient data communications infrastructures across geographically dispersed markets. The present availability of widespread Internet connectivity and inexpensive, reliable computing hardware combined with the growing confidence in the capabilities of distributed, application-level communications protocols suggests that now is the time for designing and deploying practical systems. Centralized computer systems that are capable of providing continuous signals to automate customers reduction of power demand, are known as Demand Response Automation Servers (DRAS). The deployment of prototype DRAS systems has already begun - with most initial deployments targeting large commercial and industrial (C & I) customers. An examination of the current overall energy consumption by economic sector shows that the C & I market is responsible for roughly half of all energy consumption in the US. On a per customer basis, large C & I customers clearly have the most to offer - and to gain - by participating in DR programs to reduce peak demand. And, by concentrating on a small number of relatively sophisticated energy consumers, it has been possible to improve the DR 'state of the art' with a manageable commitment of technical resources on both the utility and consumer side. Although numerous C & I DR applications of a DRAS infrastructure are still in either prototype or early production phases, these early attempts at automating DR have been notably successful for both utilities and C & I customers. Several factors have strongly contributed to this success and will be discussed below. These successes have motivated utilities and regulators to look closely at how DR programs can be expanded to encompass the remaining (roughly) half of the state's energy load - the light commercial and, in numerical terms, the more important residential customer market. This survey examines technical issues facing the implementation of automated DR in the residential environment. In particular, we will look at the potential role of home automation networks in implementing wide-scale DR systems that communicate directly to individual residences.

McParland, Charles

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Demand response in future power systems management – a conceptual framework and simulation tool.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Mestrado em Engenharia Electrotécnica – Sistemas Eléctricos de Energia In competitive electricity markets with deep efficiency concerns, demand response gains significant importance. Moreover, demand response… (more)

Faria, Pedro

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

THE FUTURE DEMAND FOR ALTERNATIVE FUEL PASSENGER VEHICLES: A DIFFUSION OF INNOVATION APPROACH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.......................................................................................................... 5 2.1 AUTOMOBILE DEMAND MODELS.....................................................................................................................20 2.2.4 The Application of Diffusion Models to Automobile Demand.......................................................................................................................................36 3.1.5 Electric Vehicles

Levinson, David M.

339

Coordinating Interstate ElectricTransmission Siting: An Introduction to the  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Coordinating Interstate ElectricTransmission Siting: An Coordinating Interstate ElectricTransmission Siting: An Introduction to the Debate Coordinating Interstate ElectricTransmission Siting: An Introduction to the Debate In recent years, experts have started drawing att ention to the need to improve the system that transmits electricity from power plants to demand centers. Congestion on existing lines, increased energy demand that suggests a need for new electric transmission and the challenge of connecting renewable energy sources to load centers highlight some needs that could be underserved by the existing system in the near future. While improved demand-side management (including energy effi ciency and demand response), bett er utilization of the existing transmission grid, and other strategies (such as distributed

340

Quantifying the Variable Effects of Systems with Demand Response Resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantifying the Variable Effects of Systems with Demand Response Resources Anupama Kowli and George in the electricity industry. In particular, there is a new class of consumers, called demand response resources (DRRs

Gross, George

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "increase electricity demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Research on the Demand Side Management Under Smart Grid  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

From the 1970 of the twentieth century demand side management has gradually become standardized management mode in electric power industry in developed ... coverage, full collection, full prepayment” to demand-side

Litong Dong; Jun Xu; Haibo Liu; Ying Guo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

A Vision of Demand Response - 2016  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Envision a journey about 10 years into a future where demand response is actually integrated into the policies, standards, and operating practices of electric utilities. Here's a bottom-up view of how demand response actually works, as seen through the eyes of typical customers, system operators, utilities, and regulators. (author)

Levy, Roger

2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

343

The Potential Impact of Increased Renewable Energy Penetration Levels on Electricity Bill Savings From Residential Photovoltaic Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Impact of Increased Renewable Energy Penetration Levels onof Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (Solar EnergyImpact of Increased Renewable Energy Penetration Levels on

Darghouth, Naim

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Demand Demand Responsive Lighting Host: Francis Rubinstein Demand Response Research Center Technical Advisory Group Meeting August 31, 2007 10:30 AM - Noon Meeting Agenda * Introductions (10 minutes) * Main Presentation (~ 1 hour) * Questions, comments from panel (15 minutes) Project History * Lighting Scoping Study (completed January 2007) - Identified potential for energy and demand savings using demand responsive lighting systems - Importance of dimming - New wireless controls technologies * Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting (commenced March 2007) Objectives * Provide up-to-date information on the reliability, predictability of dimmable lighting as a demand resource under realistic operating load conditions * Identify potential negative impacts of DR lighting on lighting quality Potential of Demand Responsive Lighting Control

345

ASSESSMENT OF VARIABLE EFFECTS OF SYSTEMS WITH DEMAND RESPONSE RESOURCES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ASSESSMENT OF VARIABLE EFFECTS OF SYSTEMS WITH DEMAND RESPONSE RESOURCES BY ANUPAMA SUNIL KOWLI B of consumers - called demand response resources (DRRs) - whose role has become increasingly important

Gross, George

346

Electricity Markets  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Electricity Markets Electricity Markets Researchers in the electricity markets area conduct technical, economic, and policy analysis of energy topics centered on the U.S. electricity sector. Current research seeks to inform public and private decision-making on public-interest issues related to energy efficiency and demand response, renewable energy, electricity resource and transmission planning, electricity reliability and distributed generation resources. Research is conducted in the following areas: Energy efficiency research focused on portfolio planning and market assessment, design and implementation of a portfolio of energy efficiency programs that achieve various policy objectives, utility sector energy efficiency business models, options for administering energy efficiency

347

Hydrogen Energy Stations: Poly-Production of Electricity, Hydrogen, and Thermal Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrogen and Electricity: Public-Private Partnershipand electricity demands. • Foster Public-Private Partnershipand electricity demands. • Foster Public-Private Partnership

Lipman, Timothy; Brooks, Cameron

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Modeling Energy Demand Aggregators for Residential Consumers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The current world-wide increase of energy demand cannot be matched by energy production and power grid updateModeling Energy Demand Aggregators for Residential Consumers G. Di Bella, L. Giarr`e, M. Ippolito, A. Jean-Marie, G. Neglia and I. Tinnirello § January 2, 2014 Abstract Energy demand aggregators

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

349

What China Can Learn from International Experiences in Developing a Demand  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

What China Can Learn from International Experiences in Developing a Demand What China Can Learn from International Experiences in Developing a Demand Response Program Title What China Can Learn from International Experiences in Developing a Demand Response Program Publication Type Conference Proceedings Year of Publication 2012 Authors Shen, Bo, Chun Chun Ni, Girish Ghatikar, and Lynn K. Price Conference Name ECEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Industry Date Published 06/2012 Conference Location Arnhem, the Netherlands Keywords china, demand response program, electricity, market sectors Abstract China has achieved remarkable economic growth over the last decade. To fuel the growth, China addeda total of 455 gigawatts of new generation capacity between 2006 and 2011, which is an increase of 76%in five years. Even so, this capacity does not meet the growing demand for electricity, and most ofChina's industrial sector is facing the worst power shortages since 2004. The Chinese government hasbeen managing the capacity shortfall through direct load control programs. While such mandatoryprograms have spared China from electricity outages, it does so at a high cost to the industrial sector.The load control program has significantly affected business operations and economic outputs, whilefailing to trigger greater energy efficiency improvement. Instead, it has led to a proliferation of dieselgenerators used by industrial facilities when electricity is not delivered, increasing diesel use andassociated air pollution.

350

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response:both the avoided energy costs (and demand charges) as wellCoordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response,

Shen, Bo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Estimating Large-Customer Demand Response Market Potential: Integrating Price and Customer Behavior  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Estimating Large-Customer Demand Response Market Potential:Syracuse, NY ABSTRACT Demand response (DR) is increasinglyestimated. Introduction Demand response (DR) is increasingly

Goldman, Charles; Hopper, Nicole; Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Neenan, Bernie; Cappers, Peter

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

A Methodology for Estimating Large-Customer Demand Response Market Potential  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Estimating Large-Customer Demand Response Market PotentialEstimating Large-Customer Demand Response Market PotentialSyracuse, NY ABSTRACT Demand response (DR) is increasingly

Goldman, Charles; Hopper, Nicole; Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Neenan, Bernie; Cappers, Peter

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Network-Driven Demand Side Management Website | Open Energy Informatio...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

UtilityElectricity Service Costs) for this property. This task of the International Energy Agency is a broad, systematic examination of the potential for demand-side...

354

Reducing Peak Demand to Defer Power Plant Construction in Oklahoma  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

costs and manage electric reliability under these conditions, OG&E is pursuing demand response strategies made possible by implementation of smart grid technologies, tools, and...

355

Automated demand response applied to a set of commercial facilities.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Commercial facility demand response refers to voluntary actions by customers that change their consumption of electric power in response to price signals, incentives, or… (more)

Lincoln, Donald F.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Demand Response National Trends: Implications for the West? ...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

National Trends: Implications for the West? Demand Response National Trends: Implications for the West? Committee on Regional Electric Power Cooperation. San Francisco, CA. March...

357

Automated demand response applied to a set of commercial buildings.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Commercial facility demand response refers to voluntary actions by customers that change their consumption of electric power in response to price signals, incentives, or directions… (more)

Lincoln, Donald

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

A study of industrial equipment energy use and demand control.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Demand and duty factors were measured for selected equipment [air compressors, electric furnaces, injection-molding machines, a welder, a granulator (plastics grinder), a sheet metal press… (more)

Dooley, Edward Scott

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Demand Response Valuation Frameworks Paper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

benefits of Demand Side Management (DSM) are insufficient toefficiency, demand side management (DSM) cost effectivenessResearch Center Demand Side Management Demand Side Resources

Heffner, Grayson

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Strategies for Demand Response in Commercial Buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes strategies that can be used in commercial buildings to temporarily reduce electric load in response to electric grid emergencies in which supplies are limited or in response to high prices that would be incurred if these strategies were not employed. The demand response strategies discussed herein are based on the results of three years of automated demand response field tests in which 28 commercial facilities with an occupied area totaling over 11 million ft{sup 2} were tested. Although the demand response events in the field tests were initiated remotely and performed automatically, the strategies used could also be initiated by on-site building operators and performed manually, if desired. While energy efficiency measures can be used during normal building operations, demand response measures are transient; they are employed to produce a temporary reduction in demand. Demand response strategies achieve reductions in electric demand by temporarily reducing the level of service in facilities. Heating ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC) and lighting are the systems most commonly adjusted for demand response in commercial buildings. The goal of demand response strategies is to meet the electric shed savings targets while minimizing any negative impacts on the occupants of the buildings or the processes that they perform. Occupant complaints were minimal in the field tests. In some cases, ''reductions'' in service level actually improved occupant comfort or productivity. In other cases, permanent improvements in efficiency were discovered through the planning and implementation of ''temporary'' demand response strategies. The DR strategies that are available to a given facility are based on factors such as the type of HVAC, lighting and energy management and control systems (EMCS) installed at the site.

Watson, David S.; Kiliccote, Sila; Motegi, Naoya; Piette, Mary Ann

2006-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "increase electricity demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Demand Response Research in Spain  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Demand Response Research in Spain Demand Response Research in Spain Speaker(s): Iñigo Cobelo Date: August 22, 2007 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Mary Ann Piette The Spanish power system is becoming increasingly difficult to operate. The peak load grows every year, and the permission to build new transmission and distribution infrastructures is difficult to obtain. In this scenario Demand Response can play an important role, and become a resource that could help network operators. The present deployment of demand response measures is small, but this situation however may change in the short term. The two main Spanish utilities and the transmission network operator are designing research projects in this field. All customer segments are targeted, and the research will lead to pilot installations and tests.

362

Smart (In-home) Power Scheduling for Demand Response on the Smart Grid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Smart (In-home) Power Scheduling for Demand Response on the Smart Grid Gang Xiong, Chen Chen consumption are part of demand response, which relies on varying price of electricity to reduce peak demand

Yener, Aylin

363

The Long View of Demand-Side Management Programs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

One of the primary reasons that the electricity market failed in California during the 2000–2001 period was the lack of dynamic demand response to rising wholesale electricity prices. Had retail customers seen...

Ahmad Faruqui; Greg Wikler; Ingrid Bran

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

A fast chiller power demand response control strategy for buildings connected to smart grid  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract With the increasing integration of renewable energies into electrical grids, power imbalance has become one of the most critical issues in grid operations. The end-users at power demand side can actually make use of their demand reduction potentials to contribute to the grid power balance. Conventional demand responses of end-users can provide considerable power demand reductions, but the demand responses are usually subject to significant delay and cannot fulfill the needs of grid real time operation. In this paper, a fast chiller power demand response control strategy for commercial buildings is therefore proposed which facilitates buildings to act as grid “operating reserves” by providing rapid demand responses to grid request within minutes. However, simply shutting down some essential operating chillers would result in disordered chilled water flow distribution and uneven indoor thermal comfort degradation. This strategy has therefore taken essential measures to solve such problems effectively. Simulation case studies are conducted to investigate the operation dynamics and energy performance of HVAC systems in the demand response events controlled by the strategy. Results show that fast and significant power demand reductions can be achieved without sacrificing the thermal comfort too much.

Xue Xue; Shengwei Wang; Chengchu Yan; Borui Cui

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Modular machinery arrangement and its impact in early-stage naval electric ship design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electrical power demands for naval surface combatants are projected to rise with the development of increasingly complex and power intensive combat systems. This trend also coincides with the need of achieving maximum fuel ...

Jurkiewicz, David J. (David James)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Feasible Café Standard Increases Using Emerging Diesel and Hybrid-Electric Technologies for Light-Duty Vehicles in the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

USING EMERGING DIESEL AND HYBRID-ELECTRIC TECHNOLOGIES FORusing Emerging Diesel and Hybrid- Electric Technologies forusing Emerging Diesel and Hybrid- Electric Technologies for

Burke, Andy; Abeles, Ethan

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Feasible CAFE Standard Increases Using Emerging Diesel and Hybrid-Electric Technologies for Light-Duty Vehicles in the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

USING EMERGING DIESEL AND HYBRID-ELECTRIC TECHNOLOGIES FORusing Emerging Diesel and Hybrid- Electric Technologies forusing Emerging Diesel and Hybrid- Electric Technologies for

Burke, Andy; Abeles, Ethan C.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Definition: Demand Side Management | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Side Management Side Management Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Demand Side Management The term for all activities or programs undertaken by Load-Serving Entity or its customers to influence the amount or timing of electricity they use.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Energy demand management, also known as demand side management (DSM), is the modification of consumer demand for energy through various methods such as financial incentives and education. Usually, the goal of demand side management is to encourage the consumer to use less energy during peak hours, or to move the time of energy use to off-peak times such as nighttime and weekends. Peak demand management does not necessarily decrease total energy consumption, but could be expected to reduce the need

369

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

the country last July, while temperatures in July 2014 were closer to average. This led to a decrease in demand for electricity generation in July 2014, with total...

370

Electric Power Annual 2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

net internal demand, capacity resources, and capacity margins by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Region" "1999 through 2011 actual, 2012-2016 projected"...

371

Automated Demand Response Opportunities in Wastewater Treatment Facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wastewater treatment is an energy intensive process which, together with water treatment, comprises about three percent of U.S. annual energy use. Yet, since wastewater treatment facilities are often peripheral to major electricity-using industries, they are frequently an overlooked area for automated demand response opportunities. Demand response is a set of actions taken to reduce electric loads when contingencies, such as emergencies or congestion, occur that threaten supply-demand balance, and/or market conditions occur that raise electric supply costs. Demand response programs are designed to improve the reliability of the electric grid and to lower the use of electricity during peak times to reduce the total system costs. Open automated demand response is a set of continuous, open communication signals and systems provided over the Internet to allow facilities to automate their demand response activities without the need for manual actions. Automated demand response strategies can be implemented as an enhanced use of upgraded equipment and facility control strategies installed as energy efficiency measures. Conversely, installation of controls to support automated demand response may result in improved energy efficiency through real-time access to operational data. This paper argues that the implementation of energy efficiency opportunities in wastewater treatment facilities creates a base for achieving successful demand reductions. This paper characterizes energy use and the state of demand response readiness in wastewater treatment facilities and outlines automated demand response opportunities.

Thompson, Lisa; Song, Katherine; Lekov, Alex; McKane, Aimee

2008-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

372

Option Value of Electricity Demand Response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Operator (NYISO) and New York State Energy Research andhour National Energy Modeling System New York IndependentNYSERDA), January. New York State Energy Research and

Sezgen, Osman; Goldman, Charles; Krishnarao, P.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Hawaiian Electric Company Demand Response Roadmap Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

implementation of advanced metering and rapidly expanding development of wind, solar, and clean energy

Levy, Roger

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Hawaiian Electric Company Demand Response Roadmap Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Smart Grid implementations may provide current, relevant information for calibrating potential renewable, outage management, and system operational benefits.

Levy, Roger

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Demand Response Assessment INTRODUCTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Demand Response Assessment INTRODUCTION This appendix provides more detail on some of the topics raised in Chapter 4, "Demand Response" of the body of the Plan. These topics include 1. The features, advantages and disadvantages of the main options for stimulating demand response (price mechanisms

376

An Integrated Architecture for Demand Response Communications and Control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An Integrated Architecture for Demand Response Communications and Control Michael LeMay, Rajesh for the MGA and ZigBee wireless communications. Index Terms Demand Response, Advanced Meter Infrastructure. In principle this can be done with demand response techniques in which electricity users take measures

Gross, George

377

A Successful Implementation with the Smart Grid: Demand Response Resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 A Successful Implementation with the Smart Grid: Demand Response Resources Contribution of intelligent line switching, demand response resources (DRRs), FACTS devices and PMUs is key in the smart grid events as a result of voluntary load curtailments. Index Terms--Electricity Markets, Demand Response re

Gross, George

378

Demand Response Providing Ancillary A Comparison of Opportunities and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LBNL-5958E Demand Response Providing Ancillary Services A Comparison of Opportunities Government or any agency thereof or The Regents of the University of California. #12;Demand Response System Reliability, Demand Response (DR), Electricity Markets, Smart Grid Abstract Interest in using

379

Opportunities and Challenges for Data Center Demand Response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Opportunities and Challenges for Data Center Demand Response Adam Wierman Zhenhua Liu Iris Liu of renewable energy into the grid as well as electric power peak-load shaving: data center demand response. Data center demand response sits at the intersection of two growing fields: energy efficient data

Wierman, Adam

380

Towards Continuous Policy-driven Demand Response in Data Centers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Towards Continuous Policy-driven Demand Response in Data Centers David Irwin, Navin Sharma, and Prashant Shenoy University of Massachusetts, Amherst {irwin,nksharma,shenoy}@cs.umass.edu ABSTRACT Demand response (DR) is a technique for balancing electricity sup- ply and demand by regulating power consumption

Shenoy, Prashant

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "increase electricity demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Demand Controlled Ventilation and Classroom Ventilation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

columns indicate the energy and cost savings for  demand class size.   (The energy costs  of classroom ventilation Total Increase in Energy Costs ($) Increased State Revenue

Fisk, William J.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Mass Market Demand Response and Variable Generation Integration Issues: A  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mass Market Demand Response and Variable Generation Integration Issues: A Mass Market Demand Response and Variable Generation Integration Issues: A Scoping Study Title Mass Market Demand Response and Variable Generation Integration Issues: A Scoping Study Publication Type Report Refereed Designation Unknown Year of Publication 2011 Authors Cappers, Peter, Andrew D. Mills, Charles A. Goldman, Ryan H. Wiser, and Joseph H. Eto Pagination 76 Date Published 10/2011 Publisher LBNL City Berkeley Keywords demand response, electricity markets and policy group, energy analysis and environmental impacts department, renewable generation integration, smart grid Abstract The penetration of renewable generation technology (e.g., wind, solar) is expected to dramatically increase in the United States during the coming years as many states are implementing policies to expand this sector through regulation and/or legislation. It is widely understood, though, that large scale deployment of certain renewable energy sources, namely wind and solar, poses system integration challenges because of its variable and often times unpredictable production characteristics (NERC, 2009). Strategies that rely on existing thermal generation resources and improved wind and solar energy production forecasts to manage this variability are currently employed by bulk power system operators, although a host of additional options are envisioned for the near future. Demand response (DR), when properly designed, could be a viable resource for managing many of the system balancing issues associated with integrating large-scale variable generation (VG) resources (NERC, 2009). However, demand-side options would need to compete against strategies already in use or contemplated for the future to integrate larger volumes of wind and solar generation resources. Proponents of smart grid (of which Advanced Metering Infrastructure or AMI is an integral component) assert that the technologies associated with this new investment can facilitate synergies and linkages between demand-side management and bulk power system needs. For example, smart grid proponents assert that system-wide implementation of advanced metering to mass market customers (i.e., residential and small commercial customers) as part of a smart grid deployment enables a significant increase in demand response capability.1 Specifically, the implementation of AMI allows electricity consumption information to be captured, stored and utilized at a highly granular level (e.g., 15-60 minute intervals in most cases) and provides an opportunity for utilities and public policymakers to more fully engage electricity customers in better managing their own usage through time-based rates and near-real time feedback to customers on their usage patterns while also potentially improving the management of the bulk power system. At present, development of time-based rates and demand response programs and the installation of variable generation resources are moving forward largely independent of each other in state and regional regulatory and policy forums and without much regard to the complementary nature of their operational characteristics.2 By 2020, the electric power sector is expected to add ~65 million advanced meters3 (which would reach ~47% of U.S. households) as part of smart grid and AMI4 deployments (IEE, 2010) and add ~40-80 GW of wind and solar capacity (EIA, 2010). Thus, in this scoping study, we focus on a key question posed by policymakers: what role can the smart grid (and its associated enabling technology) play over the next 5-10 years in helping to integrate greater penetration of variable generation resources by providing mass market customers with greater access to demand response opportunities? There is a well-established body of research that examines variable generation integration issues as well as demand response potential, but the nexus between the two has been somewhat neglected by the industry. The studies that have been conducted are informative concerning what could be accomplished with strong broad-based support for the expansion of demand response opportunities, but typically do not discuss the many barriers that stand in the way of reaching this potential. This study examines how demand side resources could be used to integrate wind and solar resources in the bulk power system, identifies barriers that currently limit the use of demand side strategies, and suggests several factors that should be considered in assessing alternative strategies that can be employed to integrate wind and solar resources in the bulk power system. It is difficult to properly gauge the role that DR could play in managing VG integration issues in the near future without acknowledging and understanding the entities and institutions that govern the interactions between variable generation and mass market customers (see Figure ES-1). Retail entities, like load-serving entities (LSE) and aggregators of retail customers (ARC), harness the demand response opportunities of mass market customers through tariffs (and DR programs) that are approved by state regulatory agencies or local governing entities (in the case of public power). The changes in electricity consumption induced by DR as well as the changes in electricity production due to the variable nature of wind and solar generation technologies is jointly managed by bulk power system operators. Bulk power system operators function under tariffs approved by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) and must operate their systems in accordance with rules set by regional reliability councils. These reliability rules are derived from enforceable standards that are set by the North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) and approved by federal regulators. Thus, the role that DR can play in managing VG integration issues is contingent on what opportunities state and local regulators are willing to approve and how customers' response to the DR opportunities can be integrated into the bulk power system both electrically (due to reliability rules) and financially (due to market rules).

383

Advanced Materials and Devices for Stationary Electrical Energy Storage  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Materials and Devices for Stationary Electrical Energy Materials and Devices for Stationary Electrical Energy Storage Applications Advanced Materials and Devices for Stationary Electrical Energy Storage Applications Reliable access to cost-effective electricity is the backbone of the U.S. economy, and electrical energy storage is an integral element in this system. Without significant investments in stationary electrical energy storage, the current electric grid infrastructure will increasingly struggle to provide reliable, affordable electricity, jeopardizing the transformational changes envisioned for a modernized grid. Investment in energy storage is essential for keeping pace with the increasing demands for electricity arising from continued growth in U.S. productivity, shifts in and continued expansion of national cultural imperatives (e.g., the distributed

384

Turkey's energy demand and supply  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The aim of the present article is to investigate Turkey's energy demand and the contribution of domestic energy sources to energy consumption. Turkey, the 17th largest economy in the world, is an emerging country with a buoyant economy challenged by a growing demand for energy. Turkey's energy consumption has grown and will continue to grow along with its economy. Turkey's energy consumption is high, but its domestic primary energy sources are oil and natural gas reserves and their production is low. Total primary energy production met about 27% of the total primary energy demand in 2005. Oil has the biggest share in total primary energy consumption. Lignite has the biggest share in Turkey's primary energy production at 45%. Domestic production should be to be nearly doubled by 2010, mainly in coal (lignite), which, at present, accounts for almost half of the total energy production. The hydropower should also increase two-fold over the same period.

Balat, M. [Sila Science, Trabzon (Turkey)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Northwest Open Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) Demand Response Research Center (DRRC) demonstrated and evaluated open automated demand response (OpenADR) communication infrastructure to reduce winter morning and summer afternoon peak electricity demand in commercial buildings the Seattle area. LBNL performed this demonstration for the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) in the Seattle City Light (SCL) service territory at five sites: Seattle Municipal Tower, Seattle University, McKinstry, and two Target stores. This report describes the process and results of the demonstration. OpenADR is an information exchange model that uses a client-server architecture to automate demand-response (DR) programs. These field tests evaluated the feasibility of deploying fully automated DR during both winter and summer peak periods. DR savings were evaluated for several building systems and control strategies. This project studied DR during hot summer afternoons and cold winter mornings, both periods when electricity demand is typically high. This is the DRRC project team's first experience using automation for year-round DR resources and evaluating the flexibility of commercial buildings end-use loads to participate in DR in dual-peaking climates. The lessons learned contribute to understanding end-use loads that are suitable for dispatch at different times of the year. The project was funded by BPA and SCL. BPA is a U.S. Department of Energy agency headquartered in Portland, Oregon and serving the Pacific Northwest. BPA operates an electricity transmission system and markets wholesale electrical power at cost from federal dams, one non-federal nuclear plant, and other non-federal hydroelectric and wind energy generation facilities. Created by the citizens of Seattle in 1902, SCL is the second-largest municipal utility in America. SCL purchases approximately 40% of its electricity and the majority of its transmission from BPA through a preference contract. SCL also provides ancillary services within its own balancing authority. The relationship between BPA and SCL creates a unique opportunity to create DR programs that address both BPA's and SCL's markets simultaneously. Although simultaneously addressing both market could significantly increase the value of DR programs for BPA, SCL, and the end user, establishing program parameters that maximize this value is challenging because of complex contractual arrangements and the absence of a central Independent System Operator or Regional Transmission Organization in the northwest.

Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann; Dudley, Junqiao

2010-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

386

Demand Response- Policy  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Since its inception, the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE) has been committed to modernizing the nation's electricity delivery infrastructure to assure consumers a robust,...

387

Demand response enabling technology development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Demand Response Enabling Technology Development Phase IEfficiency and Demand Response Programs for 2005/2006,Application to Demand Response Energy Pricing” SenSys 2003,

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Demand Response Spinning Reserve Demonstration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

F) Enhanced ACP Date RAA ACP Demand Response – SpinningReserve Demonstration Demand Response – Spinning Reservesupply spinning reserve. Demand Response – Spinning Reserve

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Cross-sector Demand Response  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Resources News & Events Expand News & Events Skip navigation links Smart Grid Demand Response Agricultural Residential Demand Response Commercial & Industrial Demand Response...

390

Demand Response Programs for Oregon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Demand Response Programs for Oregon Utilities Public Utility Commission May 2003 Public Utility ....................................................................................................................... 1 Types of Demand Response Programs............................................................................ 3 Demand Response Programs in Oregon

391

Demand response enabling technology development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

behavior in developing a demand response future. Phase_II_Demand Response Enabling Technology Development Phase IIYi Yuan The goal of the Demand Response Enabling Technology

Arens, Edward; Auslander, David; Huizenga, Charlie

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Automated Demand Response and Commissioning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fully-Automated Demand Response Test in Large Facilities14in DR systems. Demand Response using HVAC in Commercialof Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities”

Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David S.; Motegi, Naoya; Bourassa, Norman

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Energy Conversion to Electricity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

30 May 1974 research-article Energy Conversion to Electricity D. Clark...continuing growth in the demand for energy, and of electricity as the route...the electricity share of the total energy market and of the substitution of electricity...

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Renewable Electricity Futures Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Renewable Electricity Futures Study End-use Electricity Demand Volume 3 of 4 Volume 2 PDF Volume 3;Renewable Electricity Futures Study Edited By Hand, M.M. National Renewable Energy Laboratory Baldwin, S. U Sandor, D. National Renewable Energy Laboratory Suggested Citations Renewable Electricity Futures Study

395

A Simulation Study of Demand Responsive Transit System Design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Simulation Study of Demand Responsive Transit System Design Luca Quadrifoglio, Maged M. Dessouky changed the landscape for demand responsive transit systems. First, the demand for this type of transit experiencing increased usage for demand responsive transit systems. The National Transit Summaries and Trends

Dessouky, Maged

396

Japan's Residential Energy Demand Outlook to 2030 Considering Energy Efficiency Standards"Top-Runner Approach"  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As one of the measures to achieve the reduction in greenhouse gas emissions agreed to in the"Kyoto Protocol," an institutional scheme for determining energy efficiency standards for energy-consuming appliances, called the"Top-Runner Approach," was developed by the Japanese government. Its goal is to strengthen the legal underpinnings of various energy conservation measures. Particularly in Japan's residential sector, where energy demand has grown vigorously so far, this efficiency standard is expected to play a key role in mitigating both energy demand growth and the associated CO2 emissions. This paper presents an outlook of Japan's residential energy demand, developed by a stochastic econometric model for the purpose of analyzing the impacts of the Japan's energy efficiency standards, as well as the future stochastic behavior of income growth, demography, energy prices, and climate on the future energy demand growth to 2030. In this analysis, we attempt to explicitly take into consideration more than 30 kinds of electricity uses, heating, cooling and hot water appliances in order to comprehensively capture the progress of energy efficiency in residential energy end-use equipment. Since electricity demand, is projected to exhibit astonishing growth in Japan's residential sector due to universal increasing ownership of electric and other appliances, it is important to implement an elaborate efficiency standards policy for these appliances.

Lacommare, Kristina S H; Komiyama, Ryoichi; Marnay, Chris

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

397

Demand Response In California  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation covers the demand response in California and is given at the FUPWG 2006 Fall meeting, held on November 1-2, 2006 in San Francisco, California.

398

Energy Demand Forecasting  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This chapter presents alternative approaches used in forecasting energy demand and discusses their pros and cons. It... Chaps. 3 and 4 ...

S. C. Bhattacharyya

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 1997 Review  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Western Western Interior Appalachian Energy Information Administration/ U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 1997 Review 1 Figure 1. Coal-Producing Regions Source: Energy Information Administration, Coal Industry Annual 1996, DOE/EIA-0584(96) (Washington, DC, November 1997). U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 1997 Review by B.D. Hong Energy Information Administration U.S. Department of Energy Overview U.S. coal production totaled a record high of 1,088.6 million short tons in 1997, up by 2.3 percent over the 1996 production level, according to preliminary data from the Energy Information Administration (Table 1). The electric power industry (utilities and independent power producers)-the dominant coal consumer-used a record 922.0 million short tons, up by 2.8 percent over 1996. The increase in coal use for

400

Global energy demand to 2060  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The projection of global energy demand to the year 2060 is of particular interest because of its relevance to the current greenhouse concerns. The long-term growth of global energy demand in the time scale of climatic change has received relatively little attention in the public discussion of national policy alternatives. The sociological, political, and economic issues have rarely been mentioned in this context. This study emphasizes that the two major driving forces are global population growth and economic growth (gross national product per capita), as would be expected. The modest annual increases assumed in this study result in a year 2060 annual energy use of >4 times the total global current use (year 1986) if present trends continue, and >2 times with extreme efficiency improvements in energy use. Even assuming a zero per capita growth for energy and economics, the population increase by the year 2060 results in a 1.5 times increase in total annual energy use.

Starr, C. (Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA (USA))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "increase electricity demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Hydrogen and electricity: Parallels, interactions,and convergence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

impacts of marginal electricity demand for CA hydrogenUS DOE, 2007. EIA. Electricity data. [cited 2007 March 2,F. Decarbonized hydrogen and electricity from natural gas.

Yang, Christopher

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Modeling Framework and Validation of a Smart Grid and Demand Response System for Wind Power Integration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electricity generation from wind power and other renewable energy sources is increasing, and their variability introduces new challenges to the power system. The emergence of smart grid technologies in recent years has seen a paradigm shift in redefining the electrical system of the future, in which controlled response of the demand side is used to balance fluctuations and intermittencies from the generation side. This paper presents a modeling framework for an integrated electricity system where loads become an additional resource. The agent-based model represents a smart grid power system integrating generators, transmission, distribution, loads and market. The model incorporates generator and load controllers, allowing suppliers and demanders to bid into a Real-Time Pricing (RTP) electricity market. The modeling framework is applied to represent a physical demonstration project conducted on the Olympic Peninsula, Washington, USA, and validation simulations are performed using actual dynamic data. Wind power is then introduced into the power generation mix illustrating the potential of demand response to mitigate the impact of wind power variability, primarily through thermostatically controlled loads. The results also indicate that effective implementation of Demand Response (DR) to assist integration of variable renewable energy resources requires a diversity of loads to ensure functionality of the overall system.

Broeer, Torsten; Fuller, Jason C.; Tuffner, Francis K.; Chassin, David P.; Djilali, Ned

2014-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

403

Demand Response - Policy: More Information | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Demand Response - Policy: More Information Demand Response - Policy: More Information Demand Response - Policy: More Information OE's commitment to ensuring non-wires options to modernize the nation's electricity delivery system includes ongoing support of a number of national and regional activities in support of demand response. The New England Demand Response Initiative (NEDRI), OE's initial endeavor to assist states with non-wire solutions, was created to develop a comprehensive, coordinated set of demand response programs for the New England regional power markets. NEDRI's goal was to outline workable market rules, public policies, and regulatory criteria to incorporate customer-based demand response resources into New England's electricity markets and power systems. NEDRI promoted best practices and coordinated

404

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Highlights: August 2011 Highlights: August 2011 Extreme heat in Texas, New Mexico, Colorado and Arizona drove significant increases in the retail sales of electricity in the Southwest. Wind generation increased in much of the United States, except the middle of the country where total generation declined. Bituminous coal stocks dropped 14% from August 2010. Key indicators Same Month 2010 Year to date Total Net Generation -1% 11% Residential Retail Price -6% 11% Cooling Degree-Days -3% 2% Natural Gas Price, Henry Hub -6% -9% Bituminous Coal Stocks -14% -14% Subbituminous Coal Stocks -10% -17% Heat wave drives record demand and wholesale prices in Texas A prolonged August heat wave in Texas stressed available generating capacity and produced very high wholesale prices in the Electric

405

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

turbine NGST Natural gas steam turbine NWPP Northwest Powerfrom natural gas steam turbine (NGST) and natural gasNGST = Natural gas steam turbine; NWPP = Northwest Power

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

121]. Like other renewable resources and nuclear power, inhydro, nuclear, or renewable resources, and average GHGsupplied by each renewable resource and the capacity of

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

wind turbines, biomass, or geothermal power. By 2050, thebiomass, geothermal, and nuclear power plants arebiomass Nuclear, geothermal, and biomass power plants are

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

10 regions Illinois Colorado, Xcel Energy service area LADWPVehicle Charging in the Xcel Energy Colorado Servicecomprised 30% of LDVs in Xcel Energy’s Colorado service

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2. Well-to-wheel vehicle GHG emissions rates as a functionplant type and average GHG emissions rates by scenario (Generation and average GHG emissions in 2050 for scenarios

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Generation from wind and solar power plants can be highlygrid. When wind stops blowing, another power plant must bethan intermittent wind availability or uncertain power plant

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Implementation Analysis (Preliminary Results), California Public Utilities Commission. NREL (2008) 20% Wind Energy

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

natural gas-fired power plant heat rates and generation,natural gas-fired power plant heat rates and generation,natural gas-fired power plants Total incremental generation

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

109 Figure 57. Assumed natural gas and coal prices in LEDGE-in Figure 57. The coal price stays relatively constantAssumed natural gas and coal prices in LEDGE-CA [152]. It

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biomass Geothermal Small Hydro Solar Wind Statewide CA-N CA-with a relatively small hydro resource require additionaldairy Photovoltaic Parabolic Small hydro Wind Hydro 1 Steam

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IGCC Integrated gasification combined cycle IID ImperialCorporation NGCC Natural gas combined-cycle NGCT Natural gas79% from natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) power plants, and

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

near term. Local distribution infrastructure and reliabilityand distribution constraints, Reliability constraints,It does not depict reliability and distribution constraints,

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Energy and Demand Savings from Implementation Costs in Industrial Facilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, electrical consumption, demand and fees were tracked separately. The remaining data include only one energy stream (e.g., natural gas) in each code [6]. Table 1. Energy Streams STREAM CODE Electrical Consumption EC Electrical Demand ED Other... Electrical Fees EF Electricity E1 Natural Gas E2 L.P.G. E3 #1 Fuel Oil E4 #2 Fuel Oil E5 #4 Fuel Oil E6 #6 Fuel Oil E7 Coal E8 Wood E9 Paper E10 Other Gas E11 Other Energy E12 ESL-IE-00-04-17 Proceedings from the Twenty-second National...

Razinha, J. A.; Heffington, W. M.

418

Puget Sound Area Electric Reliability Plan : Draft Environmental Impact State.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Puget Sound Area Electric Reliability Plan Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) identifies the alternatives for solving a power system problem in the Puget Sound area. This Plan is undertaken by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), Puget Sound Power Light, Seattle City Light, Snohomish Public Utility District No. 1 (PUD), and Tacoma Public Utilities. The Plan consists of potential actions in Puget Sound and other areas in the State of Washington. A specific need exists in the Puget Sound area for balance between east-west transmission capacity and the increasing demand to import power generated east of the Cascades. At certain times of the year, there is more demand for power than the electric system can supply in the Puget Sound area. This high demand, called peak demand, occurs during the winter months when unusually cold weather increases electricity use for heating. The existing power system can supply enough power if no emergencies occur. However, during emergencies, the system will not operate properly. As demand grows, the system becomes more strained. To meet demand, the rate of growth of demand must be reduced or the ability to serve the demand must be increased, or both. The plan to balance Puget Sound's power demand and supply has these purposes: The plan should define a set of actions that would accommodate ten years of load growth (1994--2003). Federal and State environmental quality requirements should be met. The plan should be consistent with the plans of the Northwest Power Planning Council. The plan should serve as a consensus guideline for coordinated utility action. The plan should be flexible to accommodate uncertainties and differing utility needs. The plan should balance environmental impacts and economic costs. The plan should provide electric system reliability consistent with customer expectations. 29 figs., 24 tabs.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Puget Sound area electric reliability plan. Draft environmental impact statement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Puget Sound Area Electric Reliability Plan Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) identifies the alternatives for solving a power system problem in the Puget Sound area. This Plan is undertaken by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), Puget Sound Power & Light, Seattle City Light, Snohomish Public Utility District No. 1 (PUD), and Tacoma Public Utilities. The Plan consists of potential actions in Puget Sound and other areas in the State of Washington. A specific need exists in the Puget Sound area for balance between east-west transmission capacity and the increasing demand to import power generated east of the Cascades. At certain times of the year, there is more demand for power than the electric system can supply in the Puget Sound area. This high demand, called peak demand, occurs during the winter months when unusually cold weather increases electricity use for heating. The existing power system can supply enough power if no emergencies occur. However, during emergencies, the system will not operate properly. As demand grows, the system becomes more strained. To meet demand, the rate of growth of demand must be reduced or the ability to serve the demand must be increased, or both. The plan to balance Puget Sound`s power demand and supply has these purposes: The plan should define a set of actions that would accommodate ten years of load growth (1994--2003). Federal and State environmental quality requirements should be met. The plan should be consistent with the plans of the Northwest Power Planning Council. The plan should serve as a consensus guideline for coordinated utility action. The plan should be flexible to accommodate uncertainties and differing utility needs. The plan should balance environmental impacts and economic costs. The plan should provide electric system reliability consistent with customer expectations. 29 figs., 24 tabs.

Not Available

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Electricity Transmission System Workshop: EERE Issues and Opportunities  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Electricity Transmission System Electricity Transmission System Workshop: EERE Issues and Opportunities November 1, 2012 Dr. David Danielson Assistant Secretary for the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy eere.energy.gov "If you can't solve a problem, expand it." - Dwight D. Eisenhower eere.energy.gov eere.energy.gov Stationary Energy Demand Transport Energy Supply Deploy Clean Electricity Deploy Alternative Hydrocarbon Fuels Modernize the Grid Electrify the Fleet Increase Building and Industrial Efficiency Increase Vehicle Efficiency Source: DOE ,Quadrennial Technology Review, September 2011 eere.energy.gov Rapid Growth in Renewable Electricity Since 2008, the U.S. has doubled renewable energy generation from wind, solar, and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "increase electricity demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Energy Demand | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Demand Energy Demand Jump to: navigation, search Click to return to AEO2011 page AEO2011 Data Figure 55 From AEO2011 report . Market Trends Growth in energy use is linked to population growth through increases in housing, commercial floorspace, transportation, and goods and services. These changes affect not only the level of energy use, but also the mix of fuels used. Energy consumption per capita declined from 337 million Btu in 2007 to 308 million Btu in 2009, the lowest level since 1967. In the AEO2011 Reference case, energy use per capita increases slightly through 2013, as the economy recovers from the 2008-2009 economic downturn. After 2013, energy use per capita declines by 0.3 percent per year on average, to 293 million Btu in 2035, as higher efficiency standards for vehicles and

422

Market and Policy Barriers for Demand Response Providing Ancillary Services  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Market and Policy Barriers for Demand Response Providing Ancillary Services Market and Policy Barriers for Demand Response Providing Ancillary Services in U.S. Markets Title Market and Policy Barriers for Demand Response Providing Ancillary Services in U.S. Markets Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-6155E Year of Publication 2013 Authors Cappers, Peter, Jason MacDonald, and Charles A. Goldman Date Published 03/2013 Keywords advanced metering infrastructure, aggregators of retail customers, ancillary services, demand response, electric utility regulation, electricity market rules, electricity markets and policy group, energy analysis and environmental impacts department, institutional barriers, market and value, operating reserves, retail electricity providers, retail electricity tariffs, smart grid Attachment Size

423

Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Automated Demand Response in Industrial Refrigerated Warehouses in California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's research to date in characterizing energy efficiency and open automated demand response opportunities for industrial refrigerated warehouses in California. The report describes refrigerated warehouses characteristics, energy use and demand, and control systems. It also discusses energy efficiency and open automated demand response opportunities and provides analysis results from three demand response studies. In addition, several energy efficiency, load management, and demand response case studies are provided for refrigerated warehouses. This study shows that refrigerated warehouses can be excellent candidates for open automated demand response and that facilities which have implemented energy efficiency measures and have centralized control systems are well-suited to shift or shed electrical loads in response to financial incentives, utility bill savings, and/or opportunities to enhance reliability of service. Control technologies installed for energy efficiency and load management purposes can often be adapted for open automated demand response (OpenADR) at little additional cost. These improved controls may prepare facilities to be more receptive to OpenADR due to both increased confidence in the opportunities for controlling energy cost/use and access to the real-time data.

Lekov, Alex; Thompson, Lisa; McKane, Aimee; Rockoff, Alexandra; Piette, Mary Ann

2009-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

424

Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates projections of commercial sector energy demand through 2035. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA's State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA

425

Residential Demand Response  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

that can store underutilized renewable or off peak electric energy for space and water heating. ETS systems store electric energy as heat in a well insulated brick core. Built-in...

426

Electricity Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

This page inTenTionally lefT blank 91 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Electricity Market Module The NEMS Electricity Market Module (EMM) represents the capacity planning, dispatching, and pricing of electricity. It is composed of four submodules-electricity capacity planning, electricity fuel dispatching, electricity load and demand, and electricity finance and pricing. It includes nonutility capacity and generation, and electricity transmission and trade. A detailed description of the EMM is provided in the EIA publication, Electricity Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2012, DOE/EIA-M068(2012). Based on fuel prices and electricity demands provided by the other modules of the NEMS, the EMM determines the most

427

Electricity Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

This page intentionally left blank This page intentionally left blank 95 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Electricity Market Module The NEMS Electricity Market Module (EMM) represents the capacity planning, dispatching, and pricing of electricity. It is composed of four submodules-electricity capacity planning, electricity fuel dispatching, electricity load and demand, and electricity finance and pricing. It includes nonutility capacity and generation, and electricity transmission and trade. A detailed description of the EMM is provided in the EIA publication, Electricity Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2011, DOE/EIA-M068(2011). Based on fuel prices and electricity demands provided by the other modules of the NEMS, the EMM determines the most

428

Electricity Market Module  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Market Module Market Module This page inTenTionally lefT blank 101 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Electricity Market Module The NEMS Electricity Market Module (EMM) represents the capacity planning, dispatching, and pricing of electricity. It is composed of four submodules-electricity capacity planning, electricity fuel dispatching, electricity load and demand, and electricity finance and pricing. It includes nonutility capacity and generation, and electricity transmission and trade. A detailed description of the EMM is provided in the EIA publication, Electricity Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2013, DOE/EIA-M068(2013). Based on fuel prices and electricity demands provided by the other modules of the NEMS, the EMM determines the most

429

Demand Response in the U.S. - Key trends and federal facility participation  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

in the U.S. in the U.S. Key trends and federal facility participation Phil Coleman Lawrence Berkeley National Lab FUPWG Williamsburg Meeting November 19, 2008 OUTLINE * Demand response defined * Current status in U.S. * Key trends - Increasing opportunities in "economic" DR - Rise of DR in "capacity" markets - Rise of dynamic pricing - Rise of automated DR ("auto-DR") * Federal participation is small - why? * Ramping up federal participation Demand Response * Def.: A short-term decrease in electrical consumption by end-use customers due to either a) increased electricity prices, or b) incentive payments (triggered by high wholesale market prices or compromised grid reliability). * DR participation can be either through load curtailment (short-term

430

Industrial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Industrial Demand Module The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 15 manufacturing and 6 non-manufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy- intensive manufacturing industries and non-energy-intensive manufacturing industries (Table 6.1). The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process-flow or end-use accounting procedure, whereas the non- manufacturing industries are modeled with substantially less detail. The petroleum refining industry is not included in the Industrial Demand Module, as it is simulated separately in the Petroleum Market Module of NEMS. The Industrial Demand Module calculates energy consumption for the four Census Regions (see Figure 5) and disaggregates the energy consumption

431

demand | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

demand demand Dataset Summary Description This dataset contains hourly load profile data for 16 commercial building types (based off the DOE commercial reference building models) and residential buildings (based off the Building America House Simulation Protocols). This dataset also includes the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) for statistical references of building types by location. Source Commercial and Residential Reference Building Models Date Released April 18th, 2013 (9 months ago) Date Updated July 02nd, 2013 (7 months ago) Keywords building building demand building load Commercial data demand Energy Consumption energy data hourly kWh load profiles Residential Data Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

432

RTP Customer Demand Response  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper provides new evidence on customer demand response to hourly pricing from the largest and...real-time pricing...(RTP) program in the United States. RTP creates value by inducing load reductions at times...

Steven Braithwait; Michael O’Sheasy

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

World Energy Demand  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A reliable forecast of energy resources, energy consumption, and population in the future is a ... So, instead of absolute figures about future energy demand and sources worldwide, which would become...3.1 correl...

Giovanni Petrecca

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Transportation Demand This  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Transportation Demand Transportation Demand This page inTenTionally lefT blank 75 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates transportation energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5) and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific and associated technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars and light trucks), commercial light trucks (8,501-10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), buses, freight and passenger aircraft, freight

435

The role of regulatory reforms, market changes, and technology development to make demand response a viable resource in meeting energy challenges  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In recent years, demand response and load control automation has gained increased attention from regulators, system operators, utilities, market aggregators, and product vendors. It has become a cost-effective demand-side alternative to traditional supply-side generation technologies to balance the power grid, enable grid integration of renewable energy, and meet growing demands for electricity. There are several factors that have played a role in the development of demand response programs. Existing research are however limited on reviewing in a systematic approach how these factors work together to drive this development. This paper makes an attempt to fill this gap. It provides a comprehensive overview on how policy and regulations, electricity market reform, and technological advancement in the US and other countries have worked for demand response to become a viable demand-side resource to address the energy and environmental challenges. The paper also offers specific recommendations on actions needed to capture untapped demand response potentials in countries that have developed active demand response programs as well as countries that plan to pursue demand response.

Bo Shen; Girish Ghatikar; Zeng Lei; Jinkai Li; Greg Wikler; Phil Martin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Supplementary Information Potential for Electricity Generation from Renewable Resources and Levelized Cost of Electricity (LCOE)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Supplementary Information Potential for Electricity Generation from Renewable Resources and Levelized Cost of Electricity (LCOE) Electrical energy can be generated from renewable resources the potential to meet the worldwide demand of electricity and they contribute to the total generation

Suo, Zhigang

437

U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 2010 Year in Review - Energy Information  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 2010 Year in Review U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 2010 Year in Review Release Date: June 1, 2011 | Next Release Date: Periodically | full report Introduction Coal production in the United States in 2010 increased to a level of 1,085.3 million short tons according to preliminary data from the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), an increase of 1.0 percent, or 10.4 million short tons above the 2009 level of 1,074.9 million short tons (Table 1). In 2010 U.S. coal consumption increased in all sectors except commercial and institutional while total coal stocks fell slightly for the year. Coal consumption in the electric power sector in 2010 was higher by 4.5 percent, while coking coal consumption increased by 37.9 percent and the other industrial sector increased by 7.1 percent. The commercial and

438

Software components for demand side integration at a container terminal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Local energy management and demand response are established methods to raise energy ... in industrial enterprises the intelligent use of power demand draws significantly increased importance. Due to the ... energ...

Norman Ihle; Serge Runge; Claas Meyer-Barlag…

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Patterns of residential energy demand by type of household: white, black, Hispanic, and low- and nonlow-income  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report compares patterns of residential energy use by white, black, Hispanic, low-income, and nonlow-income households. The observed downward trend in residential energy demand over the period of this study can be attributed primarily to changes in space-heating energy demand. Demand for space-heating energy has experienced a greater decline than energy demand for other end uses for two reasons: (1) it is the largest end use of residential energy, causing public attention to focus on it and on strategies for conserving it; and (2) space-heating expenditures are large relative to other residential energy expenditures. The price elasticity of demand is thus greater, due to the income effect. The relative demand for space-heating energy, when controlled for the effect of climate, declined significantly over the 1978-1982 period for all fuels studied. Income classes do not differ significantly. In contrast, black households were found to use more energy for space heating than white households were found to use, although those observed differences are statistically significant only for houses heated with natural gas. As expected, the average expenditure for space-heating energy increased significantly for dwellings heated by natural gas and fuel oil. No statistically significant increases were found in electricity expenditures for space heating. Electric space heat is, in general, confined to milder regions of the country, where space heating is relatively less essential. As a consequence, we would expect the electricity demand for space heating to be more price-elastic than the demand for other fuels.

Klein, Y.; Anderson, J.; Kaganove, J.; Throgmorton, J.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Assessment of the theoretical demand response potential in Europe  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract DR (Demand response) measures typically aim at an improved utilization of power plant and grid capacities. In energy systems mainly relying on photovoltaic and wind power, DR may furthermore contribute to system stability and increase the renewable energy share. In this paper, an assessment of the theoretical DR potential in Europe is presented. Special attention is given to temporal availability and geographic distribution of flexible loads. Based on industrial production and electricity consumption statistics, as well as periodic and temperature-dependent load profiles, possible load reduction and increase is estimated for each hour of the year. The analysis identifies substantial DR potentials in all consumer sectors. They add up to a minimum load reduction of 61 GW and a minimum load increase of 68 GW, available in every hour of the year. The overall potential features significant variations during the year, which are characteristic for specific consumers and countries.

Hans Christian Gils

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "increase electricity demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

POWERTECH 2009, JUNE 28 -JULY 2, 2009, BUCHAREST, ROMANIA 1 Incorporation of Demand Response Resources in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

POWERTECH 2009, JUNE 28 - JULY 2, 2009, BUCHAREST, ROMANIA 1 Incorporation of Demand Response, IEEE, Abstract--The use of demand-side resources, in general, and demand response resources (DRRs concerns. Integration of demand response resources in the competitive electricity markets impacts resource

Gross, George

442

Demand and Price Volatility: Rational Habits in International Gasoline Demand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

shift in the short-run price elasticity of gasoline demand.A meta-analysis of the price elasticity of gasoline demand.2007. Consumer demand un- der price uncertainty: Empirical

Scott, K. Rebecca

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Demand and Price Volatility: Rational Habits in International Gasoline Demand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

analysis of the demand for oil in the Middle East. EnergyEstimates elasticity of demand for crude oil, not gasoline.World crude oil and natural gas: a demand and supply model.

Scott, K. Rebecca

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Demand and Price Uncertainty: Rational Habits in International Gasoline Demand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

analysis of the demand for oil in the Middle East. EnergyEstimates elasticity of demand for crude oil, not gasoline.World crude oil and natural gas: a demand and supply model.

Scott, K. Rebecca

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Electric Drive Vehicle Infrastructure Deployment  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

encourages off-peak energy * Smart Grid Integration o Charging stations with Demand Response, Time-of-Use Pricing, and AMI compatible with the modern electric grid * Help...

446

Changing Energy Demand Behavior: Potential of Demand-Side Management  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

There is a great theoretical potential to save resources by managing our demand for energy. However, demand-side management (DSM) programs targeting behavioral patterns of...

Dr. Sylvia Breukers; Dr. Ruth Mourik…

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

DemandDirect | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

DemandDirect DemandDirect Jump to: navigation, search Name DemandDirect Place Woodbury, Connecticut Zip 6798 Sector Efficiency, Renewable Energy, Services Product DemandDirect provides demand response, energy efficiency, load management, and distributed generation services to end-use electricity customers in order to reduce electricity consumption, improve grid reliability, and promote renewable energy. Coordinates 44.440496°, -72.414991° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.440496,"lon":-72.414991,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

448

Role of Context-Awareness for Demand Response Mechanisms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recently due to major changes in the structure of electricity industry and the rising costs of power generation, many countries have realized the potential and benefits of smart metering systems and demand response

Pari Delir Haghighi; Shonali Krishnaswamy

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Aviation fuel demand development in China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper analyzes the core factors and the impact path of aviation fuel demand in China and conducts a structural decomposition analysis of the aviation fuel cost changes and increase of the main aviation enterprises’ business profits. Through the establishment of an integrated forecast model for China’s aviation fuel demand, this paper confirms that the significant rise in China’s aviation fuel demand because of increasing air services demand is more than offset by higher aviation fuel efficiency. There are few studies which use a predictive method to decompose, estimate and analyze future aviation fuel demand. Based on a structural decomposition with indirect prediction, aviation fuel demand is decomposed into efficiency and total amount (aviation fuel efficiency and air transport total turnover). The core influencing factors for these two indexes are selected using path analysis. Then, univariate and multivariate models (ETS/ARIMA model and Bayesian multivariate regression) are used to analyze and predict both aviation fuel efficiency and air transport total turnover. At last, by integrating results, future aviation fuel demand is forecast. The results show that the aviation fuel efficiency goes up by 0.8% as the passenger load factor increases 1%; the air transport total turnover goes up by 3.8% and 0.4% as the urbanization rate and the per capita GDP increase 1%, respectively. By the end of 2015, China’s aviation fuel demand will have increased to 28 million tonnes, and is expected to be 50 million tonnes by 2020. With this in mind, increases in the main aviation enterprises’ business profits must be achieved through the further promotion of air transport.

Jian Chai; Zhong-Yu Zhang; Shou-Yang Wang; Kin Keung Lai; John Liu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Demand Response Valuation Frameworks Paper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

No. ER06-615-000 CAISO Demand Response Resource User Guide -8 2.1. Demand Response Provides a Range of Benefits to8 2.2. Demand Response Benefits can be Quantified in Several

Heffner, Grayson

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Utility rebates for efficient motors -- The outlook for demand-side management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since 1987, many electric utilities throughout North America have been actively promoting DSM--demand-side management, the attempt to conserve fuels and postpone costly generating capacity increases by encouraging customers to use more efficient electrical equipment, including motors. One popular DSM program has been utility payment of cash rebates to purchasers of more efficient motors. Today, such payments face extinction in a rapidly changing utility economic climate based on deregulation. How rebates originated, the basis for such payments, how successful rebate programs have been, and what the future holds for them--these are the subjects of this paper.

Nailen, R.L. [Wisconsin Electric Power Co., Milwaukee, WI (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

452

Utility rebates for efficient motors -- The outlook for demand-side management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since 1987, many electric utilities throughout North America have been actively promoting demand-side management (DSM), the attempt to conserve fuels and postpone costly generating capacity increases by encouraging customers to use more efficient electrical equipment, including motors. One popular DSM program has been utility payment of cash rebates to purchasers of more efficient motors. Today, such payments face extinction in a rapidly changing utility economic climate based on deregulation. How rebates originated, the basis for such payments, how successful rebate programs have been, and what the future holds for them are the subjects of this paper.

Nailen, R.L. [Wisconsin Electric Power Co., Milwaukee, WI (United States)] [Wisconsin Electric Power Co., Milwaukee, WI (United States)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Highlights: February 2012 Highlights: February 2012 Warm temperatures across much of the U.S. led to lower retail sales of electricity during February 2012. Natural gas-fired generation increased in every region of the United States when compared to February 2011. Wholesale electricity prices remained in the low end of the annual range for most wholesale markets due to low demand and depressed natural gas prices Key Indicators Feb 2012 % Change from Feb. 2011 Total Net Generation (Thousand MWh) 310,298 -1.0% Residential Retail Price (cents/kWh) 11.55 3.9% Retail Sales (Thousand MWh) 285,684 -3.5% Heating Degree-Days 654 -12.0% Natural Gas Price, Henry Hub ($/MMBtu) 2.60 -38.1% Coal Stocks (Thousand Tons) 186,958 -13.6% Coal Consumption (Thousand Tons) 62,802 -14.6% Natural Gas Consumption

454

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

February 2012 | Release Date: Apr. 30, February 2012 | Release Date: Apr. 30, 2012 | Next Release Date: May 25, 2012 | Re-Release Date: November 28, 2012 (correction) Previous Issues Issue: November 2013 October 2013 September 2013 August 2013 July 2013 June 2013 May 2013 April 2013 March 2013 February 2013 January 2013 December 2012 November 2012 Previous issues Format: html xls Go Highlights: February 2012 Warm temperatures across much of the U.S. led to lower retail sales of electricity during February 2012. Natural gas-fired generation increased in every region of the United States when compared to February 2011. Wholesale electricity prices remained in the low end of the annual range for most wholesale markets due to low demand and depressed natural gas prices Key Indicators Feb 2012 % Change from Feb. 2011

455

Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

This page intentionally left blank This page intentionally left blank 39 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates projections of commercial sector energy demand through 2035. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA's State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial.

456

Industrial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 12 manufacturing and 6 nonmanufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy-intensive manufacturing industries and nonenergy-intensive manufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process flow or end use accounting procedure, whereas the nonmanufacturing industries are modeled with substantially less detail (Table 17). The Industrial Demand Module forecasts energy consumption at the four Census region level (see Figure 5); energy consumption at the Census Division level is estimated by allocating the Census region forecast using the SEDS 27 data.

457

Residential Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Residential Demand Module The NEMS Residential Demand Module projects future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimate of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the "unit energy consumption" (UEC) by appliance (in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new units, retires existing housing units, and retires and replaces appliances. The primary exogenous drivers for the module are housing starts by type

458

Demand Response Opportunities in Industrial Refrigerated Warehouses in California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Industrial refrigerated warehouses that implemented energy efficiency measures and have centralized control systems can be excellent candidates for Automated Demand Response (Auto-DR) due to equipment synergies, and receptivity of facility managers to strategies that control energy costs without disrupting facility operations. Auto-DR utilizes OpenADR protocol for continuous and open communication signals over internet, allowing facilities to automate their Demand Response (DR). Refrigerated warehouses were selected for research because: They have significant power demand especially during utility peak periods; most processes are not sensitive to short-term (2-4 hours) lower power and DR activities are often not disruptive to facility operations; the number of processes is limited and well understood; and past experience with some DR strategies successful in commercial buildings may apply to refrigerated warehouses. This paper presents an overview of the potential for load sheds and shifts from baseline electricity use in response to DR events, along with physical configurations and operating characteristics of refrigerated warehouses. Analysis of data from two case studies and nine facilities in Pacific Gas and Electric territory, confirmed the DR abilities inherent to refrigerated warehouses but showed significant variation across facilities. Further, while load from California's refrigerated warehouses in 2008 was 360 MW with estimated DR potential of 45-90 MW, actual achieved was much less due to low participation. Efforts to overcome barriers to increased participation may include, improved marketing and recruitment of potential DR sites, better alignment and emphasis on financial benefits of participation, and use of Auto-DR to increase consistency of participation.

Goli, Sasank; McKane, Aimee; Olsen, Daniel

2011-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

459

Interoperability of Demand Response Resources Demonstration in NY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Interoperability of Demand Response Resources Demonstration in NY (Interoperability Project) was awarded to Con Edison in 2009. The objective of the project was to develop and demonstrate methodologies to enhance the ability of customer sited Demand Response resources to integrate more effectively with electric delivery companies and regional transmission organizations.

Wellington, Andre

2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

460

THE ROLE OFLOAD DEMAND ELASTICITY IN CONGESTION MANAGEMENTAND PRICING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE ROLE OFLOAD DEMAND ELASTICITY IN CONGESTION MANAGEMENTAND PRICING EttoreBompard, Enrico that demand responsiveness can play in competitive electricity markets. Typically, the task of congestion and to determine transmission system usage charges. The actions of price responsive loads may be represented

Gross, George

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "increase electricity demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Demand Response In California  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Energy Efficiency & Energy Efficiency & Demand Response Programs Dian M. Grueneich, Commissioner Dian M. Grueneich, Commissioner California Public Utilities Commission California Public Utilities Commission FUPWG 2006 Fall Meeting November 2, 2006 Commissioner Dian M. Grueneich November 2, 2006 1 Highest Priority Resource Energy Efficiency is California's highest priority resource to: Meet energy needs in a low cost manner Aggressively reduce GHG emissions November 2, 2006 2 Commissioner Dian M. Grueneich November 2, 2006 3 http://www.cpuc.ca.gov/PUBLISHED/REPORT/51604.htm Commissioner Dian M. Grueneich November 2, 2006 4 Energy Action Plan II Loading order continued "Pursue all cost-effective energy efficiency, first." Strong demand response and advanced metering

462

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity Components;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 1998;" 1. Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity Components;" " Unit: Million Kilowatthours." " "," ",,,,,," " " "," ",,,,"Sales and","Net Demand","RSE" "NAICS"," ",,,"Total Onsite","Transfers","for","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Purchases","Transfers In(b)","Generation(c)","Offsite","Electricity(d)","Factors" ,,"Total United States"

463

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity Components;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2002;" 1 Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity Components;" " Unit: Million Kilowatthours." " "," ",,,,,," " " "," ",,,"Total ","Sales and","Net Demand","RSE" "NAICS"," ",,"Transfers ","Onsite","Transfers","for","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Purchases"," In(b)","Generation(c)","Offsite","Electricity(d)","Factors" ,,"Total United States"

464

On Demand Guarantees in Iran.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??On Demand Guarantees in Iran This thesis examines on demand guarantees in Iran concentrating on bid bonds and performance guarantees. The main guarantee types and… (more)

Ahvenainen, Laura

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Energy Department - Electric Power Research Institute Cooperation to  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

- Electric Power Research Institute Cooperation - Electric Power Research Institute Cooperation to Increase Energy Efficiency Energy Department - Electric Power Research Institute Cooperation to Increase Energy Efficiency March 6, 2008 - 10:52am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) strengthened cooperation for research, development and deployment of energy technologies aimed at promoting increased energy efficiency. DOE and EPRI yesterday signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) establishing a framework for close coordination to advance the common goal of satisfying the nation's growing electricity needs by improving energy efficiency and promoting the widespread adoption of electric energy demand response programs in an effort to curtail energy

466

Energy Department - Electric Power Research Institute Cooperation to  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Energy Department - Electric Power Research Institute Cooperation Energy Department - Electric Power Research Institute Cooperation to Increase Energy Efficiency Energy Department - Electric Power Research Institute Cooperation to Increase Energy Efficiency March 6, 2008 - 11:52am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) strengthened cooperation for research, development and deployment of energy technologies aimed at promoting increased energy efficiency. DOE and EPRI yesterday signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) establishing a framework for close coordination to advance the common goal of satisfying the nation's growing electricity needs by improving energy efficiency and promoting the widespread adoption of electric energy demand response programs in an effort to curtail energy

467

Energy Department - Electric Power Research Institute Cooperation to  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Energy Department - Electric Power Research Institute Cooperation Energy Department - Electric Power Research Institute Cooperation to Increase Energy Efficiency Energy Department - Electric Power Research Institute Cooperation to Increase Energy Efficiency March 6, 2008 - 10:52am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) strengthened cooperation for research, development and deployment of energy technologies aimed at promoting increased energy efficiency. DOE and EPRI yesterday signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) establishing a framework for close coordination to advance the common goal of satisfying the nation's growing electricity needs by improving energy efficiency and promoting the widespread adoption of electric energy demand response programs in an effort to curtail energy

468

Environmental Implication of Electric Vehicles in China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Today, electric vehicles (EVs) are being proposed in China as one of the potential options to address the dramatically increasing energy demand from on-road transport. ... The annual increase rate of electricity consumption in the U.S. was 0.5% during 2000 and 2009 and is projected by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) to be 0.8% during 2005 and 2035 (11). ... Vehicle use could be reduced in the future, because China is in a period of rapid growth in vehicle stock, and when people own more cars, each individual car would be used less intensively. ...

Hong Huo; Qiang Zhang; Michael Q. Wang; David G. Streets; Kebin He

2010-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

469

FERC Presendation: Demand Response as Power System Resources, October 29,  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

FERC Presendation: Demand Response as Power System Resources, FERC Presendation: Demand Response as Power System Resources, October 29, 2010 FERC Presendation: Demand Response as Power System Resources, October 29, 2010 Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) presentation on demand response as power system resources before the Electicity Advisory Committee, October 29, 2010 Demand Response as Power System Resources More Documents & Publications A National Forum on Demand Response: Results on What Remains to Be Done to Achieve Its Potential - Cost-Effectiveness Working Group Loads Providing Ancillary Services: Review of International Experience Benefits of Demand Response in Electricity Markets and Recommendations for Achieving Them. A report to the United States Congress Pursuant to Section 1252 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (February 2006)

470

Demand-side management and European environmental and energy goals: An optimal complementary approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Demand side management (DSM) in electricity markets could improve energy efficiency and achieve environmental targets through controlled consumption. For the past 10 years or so DSM programmes have registered significant results. However, detailed analysis of its real impact as observed by a large number of pilot studies suggests that such programmes need to be fine-tuned to suit clearly identified conditions. This study aims to provide recommendations for the instruments to be used to prompt demand response with a view to maximizing energy and environmental efficiencies of various countries. The present study suggests that different DSM models should be deployed depending on the specific generation mix in any given country. Beside the natural benefits from cross-borders infrastructures, DSM improves the flexibility and reliability of the energy system, absorbing some shock on generation mix. We show efficiency increases with demand response but at a decreasing rate. So, according to rebound and report effects, simple DSM tools could be preferred.

Claire Bergaentzlé; Cédric Clastres; Haikel Khalfallah

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Energy Demand Staff Scientist  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Demand in China Lynn Price Staff Scientist February 2, 2010 #12;Founded in 1988 Focused on End-Use Energy Efficiency ~ 40 Current Projects in China Collaborations with ~50 Institutions in China Researcher #12;Talk OutlineTalk Outline · Overview · China's energy use and CO2 emission trends · Energy

Eisen, Michael

472

U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 2003 Review  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 Review 3 Review 1 U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 2003 Review by Fred Freme U.S. Energy Information Administration Overview U.S. coal production fell for the second year in a row in 2003, declining by 24.8 million short tons to end the year at 1,069.5 million short tons according to preliminary data from the Energy Information Administration (Table 1), down 2.3 percent from the 2002 level of 1,094.3 million short tons. (Note: All percentage change calculations are done at the short ton level.) Total U.S. coal consumption rose in 2003, with all coal-consuming sectors increasing or remaining stable for the year. Coal consumption in the electric power sector increased by 2.4 percent. However, there were only slight gains in consumption by the other sectors. U.S. coal exports rose in 2003 for the first time in

473

ACCURATE ESTIMATION OF TARGET AMOUNTS USING EXPANDED BASS MODEL FOR DEMAND?SIDE MANAGEMENT  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The electricity demand in Korea has rapidly increased along with a steady economic growth since 1970s. Therefore Korea has positively propelled not only SSM (Supply?Side Management) but also DSM (Demand?Side Management) activities to reduce investment cost of generating units and to save supply costs of electricity through the enhancement of whole national energy utilization efficiency. However study for rebate which have influence on success or failure on DSM program is not sufficient. This paper executed to modeling mathematically expanded Bass model considering rebates which have influence on penetration amounts for DSM program. To reflect rebate effect more preciously the pricing function using in expanded Bass model directly reflects response of potential participants for rebate level.

Hyun?Woong Kim; Jong?Jin Park; Jin?O. Kim

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Real-Time Demand Side Energy Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Real-Time Demand Side Energy Management Annelize Victor Michael Brodkorb Sr. Business Consultant Business Development Manager Aspen Technology, Inc. Aspen Technology España, S.A. Houston, TX Barcelona, Spain ABSTRACT To remain... competitive, manufacturers must capture opportunities to increase bottom-line profitability. The goal of this paper is to present a new methodology for reducing energy costs – “Demand-Side Energy Management.” Learn how process manufacturers assess energy...

Victor, A.; Brodkorb, M.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

EIA - AEO2010 - Natural Gas Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas Demand Gas Demand Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projections to 2035 Natural Gas Demand Figure 68. Regional growth in nonhydroelectric renewable electricity capacity including end-use capacity, 2008-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 69. Annual average lower 48 wellhead and Henry Hub spot market prices for natural gas, 1990-2035. Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 70. Ratio of low-sulfur light crude oil price to Henry Hub natural gas price on an energy equivalent basis, 1990-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 71. Annual average lower 48 wellhead prices for natural gas in three technology cases, 1990-2035. Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 72. Annual average lower 48 wellhead prices for natural gas in three oil price cases, 1990-2035

476

Energy demand simulation for East European countries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The analysis and created statistical models of energy consumption tendencies in the European Union (EU25), including new countries in transition, are presented. The EU15 market economy countries and countries in transition are classified into six clusters by relative indicators of Gross Domestic Product (GDP/P) and energy demand (W/P) per capita. The specified statistical models of energy intensity W/GDP non-linear stochastic tendencies have been discovered with respect to the clusters of classified countries. The new energy demand simulation models have been developed for the demand management in timeâ??territory hierarchy in various scenarios of short-term and long-term perspective on the basis of comparative analysis methodology. The non-linear statistical models were modified to GDP, W/P and electricity (E/P) final consumption long-term forecasts for new associated East European countries and, as an example, for the Baltic Countries, including Lithuania.

Jonas Algirdas Kugelevicius; Algirdas Kuprys; Jonas Kugelevicius

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Demand response compensation, net Benefits and cost allocation: comments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

FERC's Supplemental Notice of Public Rulemaking addresses the question of proper compensation for demand response in organized wholesale electricity markets. Assuming that the Commission would proceed with the proposal ''to require tariff provisions allowing demand response resources to participate in wholesale energy markets by reducing consumption of electricity from expected levels in response to price signals, to pay those demand response resources, in all hours, the market price of energy for such reductions,'' the Commission posed questions about applying a net benefits test and rules for cost allocation. This article summarizes critical points and poses implications for the issues of net benefit tests and cost allocation. (author)

Hogan, William W.

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

478

Energy bidding strategies for restructured electricity market  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Many countries around the world have changed the economics of their electricity markets from monopolies to oligopolies in an effort to increase competition. The restructured electricity markets have introduced risk and uncertainty into a sector of the economy that was traditionally state-owned. Suppliers and customers use financial methods to manage the risk from market prices. The maximization of profit for power companies is highly associated with the bidding strategies. In order to maximize the profit, participants need suitable bidding models. In an open access electricity market, the bidding problem is a complicated task because of producer’s uncertain behaviors and demand fluctuation. Therefore, developing bidding strategy is extremely important for electricity market participants to achieve the maximum profit. This paper analyses a comprehensive literature on the state of the art research of bidding strategies in restructured electric power market.

M. Prabavathi; R. Gnanadass

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Managing Energy Demand With Standards and Information  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Managing Energy Demand With Standards and Information Managing Energy Demand With Standards and Information Speaker(s): Sebastien Houde Date: September 13, 2012 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Christopher Payne The goal of this talk is to discuss two interrelated research projects that aim to assess the welfare effects of energy policies that rely on standards and information. The first project focuses on the Energy Star certification program. Using unique micro-data on the US refrigerator market, I first show that consumers respond to certification in different ways. Some consumers appear to rely heavily on Energy Star and pay little attention to electricity costs, others are the reverse, and still others appear to be insensitive to both electricity costs and Energy Star. I then develop a

480

More efficient household electricity use  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The energy efficiency of electric appliances has increased markedly in OECD countries, according to data provided by utilities, appliance associations, appliance manufacturers, and independent analyses of each country we reviewed (US, Sweden, Norway, Holland, Japan, Germany, UK). These improvements have, in part, offset increases in electricity demand due to increasing saturation of appliances. However, we see evidence that the efficiency of new devices has hit a temporary plateau: Appliances sold in 1988, while far more efficient than similar ones sold in the early 1970s, may not be significantly more efficient than those sold in 1987. The reason for this plateau, according to manufacturers we interviewed, is that the simple energy-saving features have been incorporated; more sophisticated efficiency improvements are economically justified by five to ten year paybacks, but unattractive to consumers in most countries who appear to demand paybacks of less than three years. Manufacturers see features other than efficiency --- such as number of storage compartments and automatic ice-makers --- as more likely to boost sales, market share, or profits. If this efficiency plateau'' proves lasting, then electricity use for appliance could begin to grow again as larger and more fancy models appear in households. 38 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

Schipper, L.; Hawk, D.V.

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "increase electricity demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Modeling demand response and economic impact of advanced and smart metering  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Advanced metering constitutes an essential component of communications between electricity suppliers and consumers. It may be possible to augment demand response by coupling Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI)...

Praneeth Aketi; Suvrajeet Sen

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Unexpected consequences of demand response : implications for energy and capacity price level and volatility .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Historically, electricity consumption has been largely insensitive to short term spot market conditions, requiring the equating of supply and demand to occur almost exclusively through… (more)

Levy, Tal Z. (Tal Ze'ev)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Power system balancing with high renewable penetration : the potential of demand response .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This study investigated the ability of responsive demand to stabilize the electrical grid when intermittent renewable resources are present. The WILMAR stochastic unit commitment model… (more)

Critz, David Karl

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

The Impact on Consumer Behavior of Energy Demand Side Management Programs Measurement Techniques and Methods.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Much effort has gone into measuring the impact of Demand Side Management (DSM) programs on energy usage, particularly in regards to electric usage. However, there… (more)

Pursley, Jeffrey L

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Evaluation of Conservation Voltage Reduction as a tool for demand side management.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??To ensure stability of the power grid, electricity supply and demand must remain in balance in real time. Traditionally utilities, call upon peaking power plants… (more)

Dorrody, Ali

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Data centres’ power profile selecting policies for Demand Response: Insights of Green Supply Demand Agreement  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Demand Response mechanisms serve to preserve the stability of the power grid by shedding the electricity load of the consumers during power shortage situations in order to match power generation to demand. Data centres have been identified as excellent candidates to participate in such mechanisms. Recently a novel supply demand agreement have been proposed to foster power adaptation collaboration between energy provider and data centres. In this paper, we analyse the contractual terms of this agreement by proposing and studying different data centres’ power profile selecting policies. To this end, we setup a discrete event simulation and analysed the power grid’s state of a German energy provider. We believe that our analysis provides insight and knowledge for any energy utility in setting up the corresponding demand supply agreements.

Robert Basmadjian; Lukas Müller; Hermann De Meer

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Only tough choices in Meeting growing demand  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

U.S. electricity demand is not growing very fast by international or historical standards. Yet meeting this relatively modest growth is proving difficult because investment in new capacity is expected to grow at an even slower pace. What is more worrisome is that a confluence of factors has added considerable uncertainties, making the investment community less willing to make the long-term commitments that will be needed during the coming decade.

NONE

2007-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

488

Open Automated Demand Response for Small Commerical Buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report characterizes small commercial buildings by market segments, systems and end-uses; develops a framework for identifying demand response (DR) enabling technologies and communication means; and reports on the design and development of a low-cost OpenADR enabling technology that delivers demand reductions as a percentage of the total predicted building peak electric demand. The results show that small offices, restaurants and retail buildings are the major contributors making up over one third of the small commercial peak demand. The majority of the small commercial buildings in California are located in southern inland areas and the central valley. Single-zone packaged units with manual and programmable thermostat controls make up the majority of heating ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems for small commercial buildings with less than 200 kW peak electric demand. Fluorescent tubes with magnetic ballast and manual controls dominate this customer group's lighting systems. There are various ways, each with its pros and cons for a particular application, to communicate with these systems and three methods to enable automated DR in small commercial buildings using the Open Automated Demand Response (or OpenADR) communications infrastructure. Development of DR strategies must consider building characteristics, such as weather sensitivity and load variability, as well as system design (i.e. under-sizing, under-lighting, over-sizing, etc). Finally, field tests show that requesting demand reductions as a percentage of the total building predicted peak electric demand is feasible using the OpenADR infrastructure.

Dudley, June Han; Piette, Mary Ann; Koch, Ed; Hennage, Dan

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Industrial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

This page intentionally left blank This page intentionally left blank 51 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Industrial Demand Module The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 15 manufacturing and 6 non-manufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy- intensive manufacturing industries and nonenergy-intensive manufacturing industries (Table 6.1). The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process-flow or end-use accounting procedure, whereas the non- manufacturing industries are modeled with substantially less detail. The petroleum refining industry is not included in the Industrial Module, as it is simulated separately in the Petroleum Market Module of NEMS. The Industrial Module calculates

490

Opportunities, Barriers and Actions for Industrial Demand Response in California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

begun to require energy auditors to include recommendationsenergy efficiency (EE) measures, but increasing interest in demand response has led the IOUs to ask auditors

McKane, Aimee T.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Reducing Peak Demand to Defer Power Plant Construction in Oklahoma  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Reducing Peak Demand to Defer Power Plant Construction in Oklahoma Reducing Peak Demand to Defer Power Plant Construction in Oklahoma Located in the heart of "Tornado Alley," Oklahoma Gas & Electric Company's (OG&E) electric grid faces significant challenges from severe weather, hot summers, and about 2% annual load growth. To better control costs and manage electric reliability under these conditions, OG&E is pursuing demand response strategies made possible by implementation of smart grid technologies, tools, and techniques from 2010-2012. The objective is to engage customers in lowering peak demand using smart technologies in homes and businesses and to achieve greater efficiencies on the distribution system. The immediate goal: To defer two 165 MW power plants currently planned for

492

Changing the spatial location of electricity generation to increase water availability in areas with drought: a feasibility study and quantification of air quality impacts in Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The feasibility, cost, and air quality impacts of using electrical grids to shift water use from drought-stricken regions to areas with more water availability were examined. Power plant cooling represents a large portion ...

Pacsi, Adam P

493

Unlocking the potential for efficiency and demand response through advanced  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Unlocking the potential for efficiency and demand response through advanced Unlocking the potential for efficiency and demand response through advanced metering Title Unlocking the potential for efficiency and demand response through advanced metering Publication Type Conference Paper LBNL Report Number LBNL-55673 Year of Publication 2004 Authors Levy, Roger, Karen Herter, and John Wilson Conference Name 2004 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings Date Published 06/2004 Publisher ACEEE Conference Location Pacific Grove, CA Call Number California Energy Commission Keywords demand response, demand response and distributed energy resources center, demand response research center, energy efficiency demand response advanced metering, rate programs & tariffs Abstract Reliance on the standard cumulative kilowatt-hour meter substantially compromises energy efficiency and demand response programs. Without advanced metering, utilities cannot support time-differentiated rates or collect the detailed customer usage information necessary to (1) educate the customer to the economic value of efficiency and demand response options, or (2) distribute load management incentives proportional to customer contribution. These deficiencies prevent the customer feedback mechanisms that would otherwise encourage economically sound demand-side investments and behaviors. Thus, the inability to collect or properly price electricity usage handicaps the success of almost all efficiency and demand response options.

494

U.S. Coal Supply and Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Coal Supply and Demand > U.S. Coal Supply and Demand U.S. Coal Supply and Demand > U.S. Coal Supply and Demand U.S. Coal Supply and Demand 2010 Review (entire report also available in printer-friendly format ) Previous Editions 2009 Review 2008 Review 2007 Review 2006 Review 2005 Review 2004 Review 2003 Review 2002 Review 2001 Review 2000 Review 1999 Review Data for: 2010 Released: May 2011 Next Release Date: April 2012 Table 3. Electric Power Sector Net Generation, 2009-2010 (Million Kilowatthours) New England Coal 14,378 14,244 -0.9 Hydroelectric 7,759 6,861 -11.6 Natural Gas 48,007 54,680 13.9 Nuclear 36,231 38,361 5.9 Other (1) 9,186 9,063 -1.3 Total 115,559 123,210 6.6 Middle Atlantic Coal 121,873 129,935 6.6 Hydroelectric 28,793 26,463 -8.1 Natural Gas 89,808 104,341 16.2 Nuclear 155,140 152,469 -1.7

495

Scenario Analysis of Peak Demand Savings for Commercial Buildings with  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Scenario Analysis of Peak Demand Savings for Commercial Buildings with Scenario Analysis of Peak Demand Savings for Commercial Buildings with Thermal Mass in California Title Scenario Analysis of Peak Demand Savings for Commercial Buildings with Thermal Mass in California Publication Type Conference Paper LBNL Report Number LBNL-3636e Year of Publication 2010 Authors Yin, Rongxin, Sila Kiliccote, Mary Ann Piette, and Kristen Parrish Conference Name 2010 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings Conference Location Pacific Grove, CA Keywords demand response and distributed energy resources center, demand response research center, demand shifting (pre-cooling), DRQAT Abstract This paper reports on the potential impact of demand response (DR) strategies in commercial buildings in California based on the Demand Response Quick Assessment Tool (DRQAT), which uses EnergyPlus simulation prototypes for office and retail buildings. The study describes the potential impact of building size, thermal mass, climate, and DR strategies on demand savings in commercial buildings. Sensitivity analyses are performed to evaluate how these factors influence the demand shift and shed during the peak period. The whole-building peak demand of a commercial building with high thermal mass in a hot climate zone can be reduced by 30% using an optimized demand response strategy. Results are summarized for various simulation scenarios designed to help owners and managers understand the potential savings for demand response deployment. Simulated demand savings under various scenarios were compared to field-measured data in numerous climate zones, allowing calibration of the prototype models. The simulation results are compared to the peak demand data from the Commercial End-Use Survey for commercial buildings in California. On the economic side, a set of electricity rates are used to evaluate the impact of the DR strategies on economic savings for different thermal mass and climate conditions. Our comparison of recent simulation to field test results provides an understanding of the DR potential in commercial buildings.

496

Ethanol Demand in United States Gasoline Production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (OWL) Refinery Yield Model (RYM) has been used to estimate the demand for ethanol in U.S. gasoline production in year 2010. Study cases examine ethanol demand with variations in world oil price, cost of competing oxygenate, ethanol value, and gasoline specifications. For combined-regions outside California summer ethanol demand is dominated by conventional gasoline (CG) because the premised share of reformulated gasoline (RFG) production is relatively low and because CG offers greater flexibility for blending high vapor pressure components like ethanol. Vapor pressure advantages disappear for winter CG, but total ethanol used in winter RFG remains low because of the low RFG production share. In California, relatively less ethanol is used in CG because the RFG production share is very high. During the winter in California, there is a significant increase in use of ethanol in RFG, as ethanol displaces lower-vapor-pressure ethers. Estimated U.S. ethanol demand is a function of the refiner value of ethanol. For example, ethanol demand for reference conditions in year 2010 is 2 billion gallons per year (BGY) at a refiner value of $1.00 per gallon (1996 dollars), and 9 BGY at a refiner value of $0.60 per gallon. Ethanol demand could be increased with higher oil prices, or by changes in gasoline specifications for oxygen content, sulfur content, emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCS), and octane numbers.

Hadder, G.R.

1998-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

497

Optimal Planning and Operation of Smart Grids with Electric Vehicle Interconnection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

index (1,2,… 24) fixed electricity costs, $ macrogrid CO 2the commercial building, $ electricity costs, $ distributedcosts, $ variable electricity costs (energy and demand

Stadler, Michael

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

DSM Electricity Savings Potential in the Buildings Sector in APP Countries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

owned integrated hydro electricity utilities prevail,s Loading Order for Electricity Resources”, Staff Report,International Developments in Electricity Demand Management

McNeil, MIchael

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

China End-Use Energy Demand Modeling  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

China End-Use Energy Demand Modeling China End-Use Energy Demand Modeling Speaker(s): Nan Zhou Date: October 8, 2009 (All day) Location: 90-3122 As a consequence of soaring energy demand due to the staggering pace of its economic growth, China overtook the United States in 2007 to become the world's biggest contributor to CO2 emissions (IEA, 2007). Since China is still in an early stage of industrialization and urbanization, economic development promises to keep China's energy demand growing strongly. Furthermore, China's reliance on fossil fuel is unlikely to change in the long term, and increased needs will only heighten concerns about energy security and climate change. In response, the Chinese government has developed a series of policies and targets aimed at improving energy efficiency, including both short-term targets and long-term strategic

500

Energy demand and population changes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since World War II, US energy demand has grown more rapidly than population, so that per capita consumption of energy was about 60% higher in 1978 than in 1947. Population growth and the expansion of per capita real incomes have led to a greater use of energy. The aging of the US population is expected to increase per capita energy consumption, despite the increase in the proportion of persons over 65, who consume less energy than employed persons. The sharp decline in the population under 18 has led to an expansion in the relative proportion of population in the prime-labor-force age groups. Employed persons are heavy users of energy. The growth of the work force and GNP is largely attributable to the growing participation of females. Another important consequence of female employment is the growth in ownership of personal automobiles. A third factor pushing up labor-force growth is the steady influx of illegal aliens.

Allen, E.L.; Edmonds, J.A.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z