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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "income gdp population" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

EO 12898: Environmental Justice in Minority Populations and Low-Income Populations  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WASHINGTON WASHINGTON February 11, 1994 MEMORANDUM FOR THE HEADS OF ALL DEPARTMENTS AND AGENCIES SUBJECT: Executive Order on Federal Actions to Address Environmental Justice in Minority Populations and Low- Income Populations Today I have issued an Executive Order on Federal Actions to Address Environmental Justice in Minority Populations and Low-Income Populations. That order is designed to focus Federal attention on the environmental and human health conditions in minority communities and low-income communities with the goal of achieving environmental justice. That order is also intended to promote nondiscrimination in Federal programs substantially affecting human health and the environment, and to provide minority communities and low-income communities access to public

2

EO 12898: Environmental Justice in Minority Populations and Low-Income  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2898: Environmental Justice in Minority Populations and 2898: Environmental Justice in Minority Populations and Low-Income Populations EO 12898: Environmental Justice in Minority Populations and Low-Income Populations To focus Federal attention on the environmental and human health conditions in minority communities and low-income communities with the goal of achieving environmental justice. That order is also intended to promote nondiscrimination in Federal programs substantially affecting human health and the environment, and to provide minority communities and low-income communities access to public information on, and an opportunity for public participation in, matters relating to human health or the environment. EO 12898: Environmental Justice in Minority Populations and Low-Income Populations More Documents & Publications

3

"Projected Real GDP Growth Trend"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

69465655,0.02391459409,0.01807394932 " * These are historical annual growth rates in real GDP (2005 chained dollars). The annual changes are compounded and averaged in the table...

4

Executive Order 12898: Federal Actions to Address Environmental Justice in Minority Populations and Low-Income Populations (1994)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Documents Documents Federal Register Vol. 59, No. 32 Wednesday, February 16, 1994 Title 3- The President Executive Order 12898 of February 11, 1994 Federal Actions To Address Environmental Justice in Minority Populations and Low-Income Populations By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the laws of the United States of America, it is hereby ordered as follows: Section 1-1.Implementation. 1-101. Agency Responsibilities. To the greatest extent practicable and per- mitted by law, and consistent with the principles set forth in the report on the National Performance Review, each Federal agency shall make achiev- ing environmental justice part of its mission by identifying and addressing, as appropriate, disproportionately high and adverse human health or environ-

5

Income and Health Spending: Evidence from Oil Price Shocks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Health expenditures as a share of GDP in the United States have more than tripled over the past half-century. A common conjecture is that this is a consequence of rising income. We investigate this hypothesis by instrumenting ...

Acemoglu, Daron

6

North Dakota sees increases in real GDP per capita following ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

In recent years, North Dakota has seen significant gains in real gross domestic product (GDP) per capita, coinciding with development of the Bakken shale play.

7

New Contract Helps Portsmouth GDP Cleanup | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Contract Helps Portsmouth GDP Cleanup Contract Helps Portsmouth GDP Cleanup New Contract Helps Portsmouth GDP Cleanup August 18, 2010 - 10:47am Addthis Elizabeth Meckes Elizabeth Meckes Director of User Experience & Digital Technologies, Office of Public Affairs Last week, we took a closer look at the dismantling of the final W62 warhead, a major milestone in the nation's efforts to reduce the amount of nuclear weapons in its stockpile. But after five decades of nuclear weapons production, the Cold War didn't just create a stockpile -- it left 1.5 million cubic meters of solid waste and 88 million gallons of liquid waste. This waste requires treatment and permanent safe storage in gaseous diffusion plants, like the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (GDP) in south-central Ohio. This week, the Department of Energy accelerated Portsmouth GDP cleanup

8

GDP Jobs Direct Structure of Australian economy, employment and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% GDP Jobs Direct emissions Inclusive emissions Structure Biomass Solar PV 3020 Abatement below businss as usual Mt CO2e Industry Buildings Forestry Power Transport Employment intensity Jobs / $m valu-add 13 2 10 4 14 10 11 Gross value added ABS Australian Nat'l Accounts

Pezzey, Jack

9

U.S. Primary Energy Use and GDP, 1970-1998 (chart)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Home > Energy Users > Energy Efficiency Page > Figure 2. U.S. primary energy use and GDP [Trends in Building-Related Energy and ...

10

Solar upgrading of low income housing  

SciTech Connect

The design, installation, training and operation experience of retrofitting solar devices (active and passive water heaters, Trombe walls, convective loop window units, etc.) on hundreds of low-income houses along the Southwest Border Region are summarized. The project demonstrates a wide variety of appropriate low-cost solar applications and provides prototypical models for the region's low-income inhabitants. Space heating and cooling systems and water heating systems have been combined with weatherization and conservation techniques. CETA employees, members of various community groups and youth groups, and employees of local non-profit organizations have been trained as installers, and low-income people have been educated in the operation and use of these solar devices. It is anticipated that this transfer of appropriate technology into the region will result in continued retrofitting of solar installations and in the stimulation of local industries, which will create employment opportunities for members of the low-income population.

Lumsdaine, E.; Farrer, R.; Callahan, D.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Smoking, Drinking, and Income  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A growing literature identifies a beneficial effect of moderate and even heavy drinking on wages and a negative effect of smoking on wages. An outstanding issue is whether these results obtain because of a causal effect of substance use on wages or whether the observed correlations reflect the effects of income on consumption or other endogeneity problems. This paper presents full information estimates of the structural parameters of a simultaneous model of drinking and smoking status and income using repeated cross--section data. With all else in the system held constant, both smoking and drinking behaviour still have large effects on income, and the income elasticities of smoking and drinking are shown to be larger in magnitude when controlling for endogeneity. JEL Classification: I12 Keywords: alcohol, tobacco, simultaneous equations, maximum simulated likelihood, multinomial probit, limited dependent variables 1 I thank Cam Donaldson, Herb Emery, David Feeny, Chris Ferrall, Jon ...

Mingshan Lu; James Mackinnon; Ken Mckenzie; Harry Paarsche; Seminar Participants; M. Christopher Auld; M. Christopher Auld

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Entrepreneurship and income inequality in southern Ethiopia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Apr 7, 2009 ... source of cash income for the local population. In ... followed over the years, enforced by tradition, by the socialist administration that was in power until .... index following a uniform percentage change in yk is .... hand, require access to markets and changes in the ..... tion of earnings in the United States.

13

Empirical Analysis on the Cities' GDP and the Main Economic Indicators of High-Tech Industrial Parks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, the national 54 high-tech industrial parks' main economic indicators and their cities' GDP are analyzed respectively with clustering analysis. It is found that there is a certain degree of correlation between them. To reveal the inner ... Keywords: Cities' GDP, High-tech industrial parks' economic, Correlation Analysis, Clustering Analysis

Yu-Chen Song; Sha Zhen

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Earned Income Credit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This management advisory report presents the results of our review of the effectiveness of the Internal Revenue Service’s (IRS) administration of the Earned Income Credit (EIC). 1 The objective of this review was to evaluate the history of the EIC, difficulties the IRS has faced involving the EIC in the past, and the problems the IRS faces in the future. This is the first in a series of audits on the EIC. Currently, the Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration has the following five audits in process involving the EIC: • The EIC Recertification Process. • Duplicate Dependent Claims. • Revenue Protection Strategy on Improving Taxpayer Compliance. • Educating and Assisting Taxpayers on the EIC.

Review Process; Pamela J. Gardiner

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

U.S. Motor Vehicle Output and Other GDP, 1968-2007  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Motor Vehicle Output and Other GDP, 1968-2007 Motor Vehicle Output and Other GDP, 1968-2007 Danilo J. Santini, Ph. D. Senior Economist Center for Transportation Research Argonne National Laboratory 9700 South Cass Avenue Phone: 630 252 3758 Fax: 630 252 3443 E-mail: dsantini@anl.gov David A Poyer, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Economics Morehouse College 830 Westview Dr. SW Atlanta, GA 30314 Phone: 404 681 2800, ext. 2553 E-mail: dpoyer@morehouse.edu THE 66th INTERNATIONAL ATLANTIC ECONOMIC CONFERENCE Montreal, Canada 9-12 October 2008 BUSINESS FLUCTUATIONS AND CYCLES 12 October 2008 Sunday 11:15 AM - 1:15 PM The submitted manuscript has been created by UChicago Argonne, LLC, Operator of Argonne National Laboratory ("Argonne"). Argonne, a U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science laboratory, is operated under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357. . The U.S. Government

16

Low income energy assistance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

States are limited in their ability to manage their heating assistance programs because they normally receive funds from the Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program after the heating season has begun and after they have decided on the benefits to be provided to eligible participants. In addition, the Department of Health and Human Services does not have enough flexibility to respond to unanticipated energy cost increases that can occur as a result of unusually severe weather or fuel price increases. HHS and the states could better manage the program if (1) it were forward funded so the states would know exactly how much federal assistance they would receive before they begin handling applications for heating assistance and (2) HHS had some discretion in how funds are allocated to the states to enable it to react to unanticipated energy-related circumstances.

Not Available

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Income Statement -- A Financial Management Tool  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An income statement measures the success of a business in terms of net income or loss for a period of time. An income statement of a farm business includes items in seven major categories. This publication describes each of these categories and gives a sample income statement.

Klinefelter, Danny A.

2008-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

18

China's Pathways to Achieving 40percent 45percent Reduction in CO2 Emissions per Unit of GDP in 2020: Sectoral Outlook and Assessment of Savings Potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy and Carbon Emission Outlook to 2050. ” Berkeley, CA:of GDP in 2020: Sectoral Outlook and Assessment of Savings2 Sectoral Outlook and

Zheng, Nina

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Environ Resource Econ DOI 10.1007/s10640-008-9226-8 Are There Income Effects on Global Willingness to Pay for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract This paper is concerned with the empirical relationship between biodiversity conservation values and income. We use random effects panel models to examine the effects of income, and then GDP per capita, on willingness to pay for habitat and biodiversity conservation. In a meta-analysis, 145 Willingness To Pay estimates for biodiversity conservation where existence value plays a major role were collected from 46 contingent valuation studies across six continents. Other effects included in the meta-analysis were the study year; habitat type; continent; scope as presented to respondents; whether WTP bids were for preventing a deterioration or gaining an improvement in conservation, whether a specific species or specific habitat was protected; whether the questionnaire used a dichotomous choice or an open-ended format; distribution format; and the choice of payment vehicle. GDP per capita seemed to perform as well as an explanatory variable as respondent’s mean stated income, indicating that it is wealth in society as a whole which determines variations in WTP. Even if large variation, our main conclusion is, that the demand for biodiversity conservation rises with a nation’s wealth, but the income elasticity of willingness to pay is less than one.

Biodiversity Conservation; Jette Bredahl; Jacobsen Nick Hanley; J. B. Jacobsen (b

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Low income home energy assistance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program provides eligible households with assistance for home energy costs. Assistance is available to (1) help families pay heating and cooling costs, (2) prevent energy cutoff in crisis situations, and (3) help families make their homes more energy efficient. This report provides background information on the program in preparation for the program's reauthorization in 1990.

Not Available

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "income gdp population" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Top Incomes in Indonesia, 1920-2004 *  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using taxation and household survey data, this paper estimates top income shares for Indonesia during 1920-2004. Our results suggest that top income shares grew during the 1920s and 1930s, but fell in the post-war era. In more recent decades, we observe a sharp rise in top income shares during the late-1990s, coincident with the economic downturn, and some evidence that top income shares fell in the early-2000s. For prewar Indonesia, we decompose top income shares by income source, and find that for groups below the top 0.5 percent, a majority of income was derived from wages. Throughout the twentieth century, top income shares in Indonesia have been higher than in India, broadly comparable to Japan, and somewhat lower than levels prevailing in the

Andrew Leigh; Pierre Van Der Eng

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

China's Income Distribution, 1985-2001  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

China’s Income Distribution, 1985-2001 Ximing Wu* andBureau of Statistics of China, for explaining many featuresa new method to estimate China’s income distributions using

Wu, Ximing; Perloff, Jeffrey M.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Mutational, Structural, and Kinetic Evidence for a Dissociative Mechanism in the GDP-mannose Mannosyl Hydrolase Reaction  

SciTech Connect

GDP-mannose hydrolase (GDPMH) catalyzes the hydrolysis of GDP-{alpha}-D-sugars by nucleophilic substitution with inversion at the anomeric C1 atom of the sugar, with general base catalysis by H124. Three lines of evidence indicate a mechanism with dissociative character. First, in the 1.3 Angstrom X-ray structure of the GDPMH-Mg{sup 2+}-GDP{center_dot}Tris{sup +} complex, the GDP leaving group interacts with five catalytic components: R37, Y103, R52, R65, and the essential Mg{sup 2+}. As determined by the effects of site-specific mutants on k{sub cat}, these components contribute factors of 24-, 100-, 309-, 24-, and {ge}10{sup 5}-fold, respectively, to catalysis. Both R37 and Y103 bind the {beta}-phosphate of GDP and are only 5.0 Angstroms apart. Accordingly, the R37Q/Y103F double mutant exhibits partially additive effects of the two single mutants on k{sub cat}, indicating cooperativity of R37 and Y103 in promoting catalysis, and antagonistic effects on K{sub m}. Second, the conserved residue, D22, is positioned to accept a hydrogen bond from the C2-OH group of the sugar undergoing substitution at C1, as was shown by modeling an {alpha}-D-mannosyl group into the sugar binding site. The D22A and D22N mutations decreased k{sub cat} by factors of 10{sup 2.1} and 10{sup 2.6}, respectively, for the hydrolysis of GDP-{alpha}-D-mannose, and showed smaller effects on K{sub m}, suggesting that the D22 anion stabilizes a cationic oxocarbenium transition state. Third, the fluorinated substrate, GDP-2F-{alpha}-D-mannose, for which a cationic oxocarbenium transition state would be destabilized by electron withdrawal, exhibited a 16-fold decrease in k{sub cat} and a smaller, 2.5-fold increase in K{sub m}. The D22A and D22N mutations further decreased the k{sub cat} with GDP-2F-{alpha}-D-mannose to values similar to those found with GDP-{alpha}-D-mannose, and decreased the K{sub m} of the fluorinated substrate. The choice of histidine as the general base over glutamate, the preferred base in other Nudix enzymes, is not due to the greater basicity of histidine, since the pK{sub a} of E124 in the active complex (7.7) exceeded that of H124 (6.7), and the H124E mutation showed a 10{sup 2.2}-fold decrease in k{sub cat}and a 4.0-fold increase in K{sub m} at pH 9.3. Similarly, the catalytic triad detected in the X-ray structure (H124---Y127---P120) is unnecessary for orienting H124, since the Y127F mutation had only 2-fold effects on k{sub cat} and K{sub m} with either H124 or E124 as the general base. Hence, a neutral histidine rather than an anionic glutamate may be necessary to preserve electroneutrality in the active complex.

Xia,Z.; Azurmendi, H.; lairson, L.; Withers, S.; Gabelli, S.; Bianchet, M.; Amzel, L.; Mildvan, A.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Population, affluence, and environmental impact across development: Evidence from panel cointegration modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper analyzes urban population's and affluence's (GDP per capita's) influence on environmental impact in developed and developing countries by taking as its starting point the STIRPAT framework. In addition to considering environmental impacts ... Keywords: Environment and development, Environmental/Carbon Kuznets Curve, FMOLS panel cointegration, GHG emissions, IPAT, Population and environment, STIRPAT

Brantley Liddle

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Low Impact, Affordable, Low Income Houses for Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper discusses an effort to develop low impact, affordable, low income houses for Mexico. Low impact houses are defined as houses with energy and water needs that are substantially reduced below levels corresponding to code compliance. This paper includes an analysis of the population and energy consumption of the different climate regions in Mexico (Hot-Dry Deserts, Great Plains, Mediterranean, Semi-Arid, Temperate, Hot-Dry Jungles and Hot-Humid Jungles) versus the USA and concludes with advice on an approach for low impact housing.

Alcocer, J. L. B.; Haberl, J. S.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Indoor environment quality and energy retrofits in low-income...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Indoor environment quality and energy retrofits in low-income apartments: retrofit selection protocol Title Indoor environment quality and energy retrofits in low-income...

27

Revisiting the Income Effect: Gasoline Prices and Grocery Purchases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

or Rent Gasoline and Motor Oil Income after taxes Number ofor Rent Gasoline and Motor Oil Income after taxes Number of

Gicheva, Dora; Hastings, Justine; Villas-Boas, Sofia B

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Integrating Photovoltaic Systems into Low-Income Housing Developments...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Residential Financing Model and Low-Income Resident Job Training Program SEPTEMBER 2011 SOLAR ENERGY TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM II Integrating PV Systems into Low-Income Housing...

29

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Income Tax Credit  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Income Tax Income Tax Credit to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Income Tax Credit on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Income Tax Credit on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Income Tax Credit on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Income Tax Credit on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Income Tax Credit on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Income Tax Credit on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Biodiesel Income Tax Credit A taxpayer that delivers pure, unblended biodiesel (B100) into the tank of a vehicle or uses B100 as an on-road fuel in their trade or business may be

30

Financial Incentives for Increasing Work and Income Among Low-Income Families  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

v j-i_ruCM Earnings + AFDC Earnings + Supplement 1 [ t 1—(—6a: Annual Income Under AFDC and CAP Single Parent With Two+ Food Stamps I Earnings + AFDC + Food Stamps $o I I I i I I

Blank, Rebecca M.; Card, David; Robins, Philip K.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Evidence for the Gompertz Curve in the Income Distribution of Brazil 1978-2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work presents an empirical study of the evolution of the personal income distribution in Brazil. Yearly samples available from 1978 to 2005 were studied and evidence was found that the complementary cumulative distribution of personal income for 99% of the economically less favorable population is well represented by a Gompertz curve of the form $G(x)=\\exp [\\exp (A-Bx)]$, where $x$ is the normalized individual income. The complementary cumulative distribution of the remaining 1% richest part of the population is well represented by a Pareto power law distribution $P(x)= \\beta x^{-\\alpha}$. This result means that similarly to other countries, Brazil's income distribution is characterized by a well defined two class system. The parameters $A$, $B$, $\\alpha$, $\\beta$ were determined by a mixture of boundary conditions, normalization and fitting methods for every year in the time span of this study. Since the Gompertz curve is characteristic of growth models, its presence here suggests that these patterns in...

Moura, Newton J

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Three essays on the impacts of income taxes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation consists of three essays studying the impacts of income and wage taxes. Chapter One examines how income tax changes differentially affect the pre-tax wages of different industries based on the injury and ...

Powell, David Matthew, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP) | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tags Employment, labor force, Demographics, Income, Program Participation, AFDC, Food Stamps, SSI, Energy Assistance, Welfare, General Assistance, School Meals, Health...

34

Empire District Electric - Low Income New Homes Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Empire District Electric - Low Income New Homes Program Empire District Electric - Low Income New Homes Program Empire District Electric - Low Income New Homes Program < Back Eligibility Construction Low-Income Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate Total: $1,100 Program Info State Missouri Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Insulation: full incremental cost above the appropriate baseline Heat Pumps: $400 Central AC: $400 Refrigerator: $200 Lighting: $100 Provider Empire District Electric Empire District Electric offers rebates for the utilization of energy efficient measures and appliances in new, low-income homes. Rebates are

35

Income Tax Capital Credit (Alabama) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Income Tax Capital Credit (Alabama) Income Tax Capital Credit (Alabama) Income Tax Capital Credit (Alabama) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Industrial Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Alabama Program Type Corporate Tax Incentive The purpose of this law is to create jobs and to stimulate business and economic growth in the state by providing an income tax capital credit for approved projects. The Income Tax Capital Credit is a credit of five percent (5%) of the capital costs of a qualifying project offered by the Alabama Department of Revenue. The credits is applied to the Alabama income tax liability or financial institution excise tax generated by the project income, each year for 20 years. This credit cannot be carried forward or

36

GDP-L-fucose: {beta}-D-galactoside 2-{alpha}-Lfucosyltransferases, DNA sequences encoding the same, method for producing the same and a method of genotyping a person  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The gene encoding GDP-L-fucose: {beta}-D-Galactoside 2-{alpha}-Lfucosyltransferase has been cloned, and a mutation in this gene has been found to be responsible for an individual being a non-secretor. 30 figs.

Lowe, J.B.; Lennon, G.; Rouquier, S.; Giorgi, D.; Kelly, R.J.

1998-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

37

Minnesota Energy Resources (Gas) - Low-Income New Construction Rebates |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Minnesota Energy Resources (Gas) - Low-Income New Construction Minnesota Energy Resources (Gas) - Low-Income New Construction Rebates Minnesota Energy Resources (Gas) - Low-Income New Construction Rebates < Back Eligibility Low-Income Residential Nonprofit Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Gas Furnace: 500 Integrated Space and Water Heating System: 900 Electronic Programmable Set-Back Thermostat: 100 Water Heater: 100 Drain Water Heat Recovery Device: 300 Provider Minnesota Energy Resources Minnesota Energy Resources is now offering rebates for non-profits servicing low-income communities. New construction organizations can take advantage of rebates for efficient technologies if the low-income homes are

38

Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AHPwES - Assisted Home Performance with ENERGY STAR AMI - Area Median Income APS - Arizona Public Service ARRA - American Reinvestment and Recovery Act ASEC - Annual Social and...

39

Approaches to Electric Utility Energy Efficiency for Low Income...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

to Electric Utility Energy Efficiency for Low Income Customers in a Changing Regulatory Environment Jump to: navigation, search Name Approaches to Electric Utility Energy...

40

Income Tax Deduction for Energy Efficiency Upgrades (Idaho) ...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Facebook icon Twitter icon Income Tax Deduction for Energy Efficiency Upgrades (Idaho) This is the approved revision of this page, as well as being the most recent. Jump...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "income gdp population" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Low-Income Loan Program for Energy Conservation Improvements...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

energy sources by offering low-interest loans to low- and moderate-income homeowners for repairs to existing homes. All renewable energy technologies are eligible. The...

42

Understanding the world wool market : trade, productivity and grower incomes.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??[Truncated abstract] The core objective of this thesis is summarised by its title: “Understanding the World Wool Market: Trade, Productivity and Grower Incomes”. Thus, we… (more)

Verikios, George

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

California Solar Initiative - Low-Income Solar Water Heating...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) voted in October 2011 to create the California Solar Initiative (CSI) Thermal Low-Income program for single and multifamily residential...

44

Measurement and Verification of Low Income Energy Efficiency...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and Verification of Low Income Energy Efficiency Programs in Brazil: Methodological Challenges Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Measurement and...

45

Income Tax Deduction for Energy Efficiency Upgrades | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1, 2002, qualify for an income tax deduction for 100% of the cost of installing new insulation or other approved energy efficiency improvements in an existing residence. Any...

46

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.9 Low-Income Housing  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

2 2 Energy Burden Definitions Energy burden is an important statistic for policy makers who are considering the need for energy assistance. Energy burden can be defined broadly as the burden placed on household incomes by the cost of energy, or more simply, the ratio of energy expenditures to household income. However, there are different ways to compute energy burden, and different interpretations and uses of the energy burden statistics. DOE Weatherization primarily uses mean individual burden and mean group burden since these statistics provide data on how an "average" individual household fares against an "average" group of households (that is, how burdens are distributed for the population). DOE Weatherization (and HHS) also uses the median individual burden which shows

47

INCOMING DOCUMENT CONTROL FORM DOCUMENT DESCRIPTION ORGANIZATIO  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

INCOMING DOCUMENT CONTROL FORM DOCUMENT DESCRIPTION ORGANIZATIO )ATE COMPLETED: ACTION NUMBER: I ! I I DOCUMENT CONTROL DATE INITIALS DATA BASE: ACTION LOG: FILED: To : Doug Tonkay, OTS Decen From: MIchele Landis, dRW Subject: Draft report ~ Result= of the Radiologic; Former Ore Storage Site, Palmerton, Pennsylvania Attached is one copy of the draft report. PIE provide your comments to me by January 16, 1990. tlichele Landis ,9, 1989 "ey at the review and Results of the Radiological SJrvey at the Former Ore S&age Site, Palmerton, PennsylvLnia (PPOOI) J. L Quikd J. W. Cdchdr W. D. &rei ! I : HEALTH AND t5UEI-Y RESEARCH DMSi Waste Management Research and Development Prc (Activity No. AH 10 05 00 0; NEAHOOl) RESULTS OF 'I-HE RADIOLOGICAL SURV

48

Income Growth, Energy Consumption and Carbon Emissions in China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper examines the long-run relationship between per capita income growth, energy consumption, and pollutant emissions in China during the period 1953–2004. We find that energy consumption, pollutant emissions and income are cointegrated in ... Keywords: Energy consumption, Pollutant emissions, Causality, Multivariate cointegration, China

Zhi Zhao; Jiahai Yuan

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Residential Renewable Energy Income Tax Credit | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Renewable Energy Income Tax Credit Renewable Energy Income Tax Credit Residential Renewable Energy Income Tax Credit < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Water Heating Wind Maximum Rebate 1,000 Program Info Start Date 1979 State Massachusetts Program Type Personal Tax Credit Rebate Amount 15% Provider Massachusetts Department of Revenue Massachusetts allows a 15% credit -- up to $1,000 -- against the state income tax for the net expenditure* of a renewable-energy system (including installation costs) installed on an individual's primary residence. If the credit amount is greater than a resident's income tax liability, the excess credit amount may be carried forward to the next succeeding year for

50

Project #: UM08-Q3Saving among Low-Income Women: Motivation and Obstacles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

How do low-income households think about saving? What motivations do they identify for saving, and what obstacles to meeting their goals? We use data from qualitative interviews with 51 households in Detroit to shed light on these questions. We find that they wish they could save- primarily for protection against the unexpected or to put children through college- but that most of them cannot. Friends and family surface as a major obstacle to saving, since those who have liquid assets are asked for help. When savings is feasible in this population, it occurs

Helen Levy; Kristin Seefeldt; Helen Levy; Kristin Seefeldt; Ann Arbor; Andrea Fischer Newman; Ann Arbor; Andrew C. Richner; Grosse Pointe; Park S. Martin; Helen Levy; Kristin Seefeldt

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Measurement and Verification of Low Income Energy Efficiency Programs in  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Measurement and Verification of Low Income Energy Efficiency Programs in Measurement and Verification of Low Income Energy Efficiency Programs in Brazil: Methodological Challenges Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Measurement and Verification of Low Income Energy Efficiency Programs in Brazil: Methodological Challenges Focus Area: Energy Efficiency Topics: Socio-Economic Website: www.eceee.org/conference_proceedings/eceee/2009/Panel_3/3.049/ Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/measurement-and-verification-low-inco Language: English Policies: "Regulations,Financial Incentives" is not in the list of possible values (Deployment Programs, Financial Incentives, Regulations) for this property. Regulations: Feebates This report presents results from Brazilian electric utilities evaluation

52

Income Tax Credits Program (Arkansas) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Income Tax Credits Program (Arkansas) Income Tax Credits Program (Arkansas) Income Tax Credits Program (Arkansas) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fuel Distributor Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Arkansas Program Type Personal Tax Incentives Corporate Tax Incentive Rebate Program Provider Department of Economic Develoment There are multiple tax credit programs for businesses new to Arkansas. Additionally, there are investment tax credit programs, job creation incentives, discretionary incentives, and targeted business incentives,

53

Domestic Hot Water Consumption in Four Low-Income Apartment Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Domestic Hot Water Consumption in Four Low-Income Apartment Buildings Title Domestic Hot Water Consumption in Four Low-Income Apartment Buildings Publication Type Conference...

54

China's Pathways to Achieving 40% ~ 45% Reduction in CO{sub 2} Emissions per Unit of GDP in 2020: Sectoral Outlook and Assessment of Savings Potential  

SciTech Connect

Achieving China’s goal of reducing its carbon intensity (CO{sub 2} per unit of GDP) by 40% to 45% percent below 2005 levels by 2020 will require the strengthening and expansion of energy efficiency policies across the buildings, industries and transport sectors. This study uses a bottom-up, end-use model and two scenarios -- an enhanced energy efficiency (E3) scenario and an alternative maximum technically feasible energy efficiency improvement (Max Tech) scenario – to evaluate what policies and technical improvements are needed to achieve the 2020 carbon intensity reduction target. The findings from this study show that a determined approach by China can lead to the achievement of its 2020 goal. In particular, with full success in deepening its energy efficiency policies and programs but following the same general approach used during the 11th Five Year Plan, it is possible to achieve 49% reduction in CO{sub 2} emissions per unit of GDP (CO{sub 2} emissions intensity) in 2020 from 2005 levels (E3 case). Under the more optimistic but feasible assumptions of development and penetration of advanced energy efficiency technology (Max Tech case), China could achieve a 56% reduction in CO{sub 2} emissions intensity in 2020 relative to 2005 with cumulative reduction of energy use by 2700 Mtce and of CO{sub 2} emissions of 8107 Mt CO{sub 2} between 2010 and 2020. Energy savings and CO{sub 2} mitigation potential varies by sector but most of the energy savings potential is found in energy-intensive industry. At the same time, electricity savings and the associated emissions reduction are magnified by increasing renewable generation and improving coal generation efficiency, underscoring the dual importance of end-use efficiency improvements and power sector decarbonization.

Zheng, Nina; Fridley, David; Zhou, Nan; Levine, Mark; Price, Lynn; Ke, Jing

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

55

The Farmer's Conundrum: Income from Biofuels or Protect the Soil? |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Farmer's Conundrum: Income from Biofuels or Protect the Soil? The Farmer's Conundrum: Income from Biofuels or Protect the Soil? The Farmer's Conundrum: Income from Biofuels or Protect the Soil? July 1, 2010 - 11:39am Addthis Lindsay Gsell After a harvest is over, crops can be sold, shipped, canned or consumed. But what happens to the parts of the crops that are inedible-the corn stover, stalks or cobs? Selling crop residues for bioenergy could provide farmers with an extra source of income. Yet, leaving some residue on the fields helps reduce soil erosion and maintain healthy levels of soil carbon and other nutrients. So how can land managers find this balance? Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is developing the Residue Removal Tool -- new software designed to simulate sustainability criteria -- to help find this balance of what to remove and what to leave behind. The software will

56

EmPOWER Maryland Low Income Energy Efficiency Program (Maryland) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EmPOWER Maryland Low Income Energy Efficiency Program (Maryland) EmPOWER Maryland Low Income Energy Efficiency Program (Maryland) EmPOWER Maryland Low Income Energy Efficiency Program (Maryland) < Back Eligibility Low-Income Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Other Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Program Info Funding Source EmPOWER Maryland State Maryland Program Type State Rebate Program Rebate Amount Direct installation, no cost to the recipient Provider Maryland Department of Housing and Community Development Note: The eligible technologies listed above are only examples of some improvements that might be supported under this program as detailed on the program web site. Not all potentially eligible improvements will be

57

Weatherization Assistance for Low-Income Persons: Maintaining the Privacy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Weatherization Assistance for Low-Income Persons: Maintaining the Weatherization Assistance for Low-Income Persons: Maintaining the Privacy of Applicants for and Recipients of Services Weatherization Assistance for Low-Income Persons: Maintaining the Privacy of Applicants for and Recipients of Services Amending regulations to require all States and other service providers that participate in the Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP) to treat all requests for information concerning applicants and recipients of WAP funds in a manner consistent with the Federal government's treatment of information requested under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA), 5 U.S.C. 552, including the privacy protections contained in Exemption (b)(6) of the FOIA, 5 U.S.C. 552(b)(6). Weatherization Assistance for Low-Income Persons: Maintaining the Privacy

58

Xcel Energy - Residential and Low Income Home Energy Service | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Xcel Energy - Residential and Low Income Home Energy Service Xcel Energy - Residential and Low Income Home Energy Service Xcel Energy - Residential and Low Income Home Energy Service < Back Eligibility Installer/Contractor Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Other Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Program Info Start Date 1/1/2011 Expiration Date 12/31/2012 State New Mexico Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Evaporative Cooling: $200-$1000/unit Saver's Switch A/C Cycling: $20/ton of enrolled air conditioning Refrigerator Recycling: $75 CFLs: $1/bulb LED's: $10/bulb

59

Figure ES2. Annual Indices of Real Disposable Income, Vehicle...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

ES2 Figure ES2. Annual Indices of Real Disposable Income, Vehicle-Miles Traveled, Consumer Price Index (CPI-U), and Real Average Retail Gasoline Price, 1978-2004, 1985100...

60

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.9 Low-Income Housing  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

4 4 Weatherization Population Facts - Roughly 25% of Federally eligible households move in and out of poverty "classification" each year. - The average income of Federally eligible households in FY 2005 was $16,264, based on RECS and Bureau of the Census' Current Population Survey (CPS) data. - States target the neediest, especially the elderly, persons with disabilities, and families with children. - Since the inception of the Weatherization Assistance Program in 1976, over 6.3 million households have received weatherization services with DOE and leveraged funding. - In FY 2009, the energy burden on Federally eligible households was about four times the burden on Federally ineligible households (14% versus 4%). Source(s): ORNL, Weatherization Works: Final Report on the National Weatherization Evaluation, Sept. 1994, p. 1 for migrating poor; ORNL, 1996 for targeting; HHS,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "income gdp population" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

UNIVERSITE PARIS I PANTHEON -SORBONNE U.F.R. DE SCIENCES ECONOMIQUES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Agreement on Tarrifs and Trade GDP Gross Domesic Product GNI Gross National Income GNP Gross National

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

62

Approaches to Electric Utility Energy Efficiency for Low Income Customers  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Approaches to Electric Utility Energy Efficiency for Low Income Customers Approaches to Electric Utility Energy Efficiency for Low Income Customers in a Changing Regulatory Environment Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Approaches to Electric Utility Energy Efficiency for Low Income Customers in a Changing Regulatory Environment Focus Area: Energy Efficiency Topics: Best Practices Website: www.ornl.gov/~webworks/cppr/y2001/misc/99601.pdf Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/approaches-electric-utility-energy-ef Language: English Policies: "Regulations,Financial Incentives" is not in the list of possible values (Deployment Programs, Financial Incentives, Regulations) for this property. Regulations: Feebates This report, written for members of the Weatherization Assistance Program

63

Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households Title Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2011 Authors Zimring, Mark, Merrian Borgeson, Ian M. Hoffman, Charles A. Goldman, Elizabeth Stuart, Annika Todd, and Megan A. Billingsley Pagination 102 Date Published 12/2011 Publisher LBNL City Berkeley Keywords electricity markets and policy group, energy analysis and environmental impacts department Abstract The question posed in this report is: How can programs motivate these middle income single family households to seek out more comprehensive energy upgrades, and empower them to do so? Research methods included interviews with more than 35 program administrators, policy makers, researchers, and other experts; case studies of programs, based on interviews with staff and a review of program materials and data; and analysis of relevant data sources and existing research on demographics, the financial status of Americans, and the characteristics of middle income American households. While there is no 'silver bullet' to help these households overcome the range of barriers they face, this report describes outreach strategies, innovative program designs, and financing tools that show promise in increasing the attractiveness and accessibility of energy efficiency for this group. These strategies and tools should be seen as models that are currently being honed to build our knowledge and capacity to deliver energy improvements to middle income households. However, the strategies described in this report are probably not sufficient, in the absence of robust policy frameworks, to deliver these improvements at scale. Instead, these strategies must be paired with enabling and complementary policies to reach their full potential.

64

Utility investments in low-income-energy-efficiency programs  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study is to describe the energy-efficiency programs being operated by utilities for low-income customers. The study focuses, in particular, on programs that install major residential weatherization measures free-of-charge to low-income households. A survey was mailed to a targeted list of 600 utility program managers. Follow-up telephone calls were made to key non- respondents, and a random sample of other non-respondents also was contacted. Completed surveys were received from 180 utilities, 95 of which provided information on one or more of their 1992 low-income energy-efficiency programs for a total of 132 individual programs. These 132 utility programs spent a total of $140.6 million in 1992. This represents 27% of the total program resources available to weatherize the dwellings of low-income households in that year. Both the total funding and the number of programs has grown by 29% since 1989. A majority of the 132 programs are concentrated in a few regions of the country (California, the Pacific Northwest, the Upper Midwest, and the Northeast). Although a majority of the programs are funded by electric utilities, gas utilities have a significantly greater average expenditure per participant ($864 vs. $307 per participant). The most common primary goal of low-income energy-efficiency programs operating in 1992 was {open_quotes}to make energy services more affordable to low-income customers{close_quotes}. Only 44% of the programs were operated primarily to provide a cost-effective energy resource. Based on a review of household and measure selection criteria, equity and not the efficiency of resource acquisition appears to dominate the design of these programs.

Brown, M.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Beyer, M.A. [Aspen Systems Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Eisenberg, J.; Power, M. [Economic Opportunity Research Institute, Washington, DC (United States); Lapsa, E.J. [Manhattan Data Systems, Knoxville, TN (United States)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Household Energy Expenditure and Income Groups: Evidence from Great Britain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

  and  0.024  for  district heating However, as income is not observed its effect cannot be analysed.  Wu et al. (2004) examine the demand for space heating in Armenia, Moldova, and  Kyrgyz  Republic  using  household  survey  data.  In  these  countries...  and in some regions incomes are not sufficient to  afford space heating from district heating systems making these systems unviable.  We  analyse  electricity,  gas  and  overall  energy  spending  for  a  large  sample  of  households  in  Great  Britain.  We  discern  inflection  points  and  discuss...

Jamasb, Tooraj; Meier, H

66

Oil Prices, External Income, and Growth: Lessons from Jordan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper extends the long-run growth model of Esfahani et al. (2012a) to a labour exporting country that receives large in‡ows of external income – the sum of remittances, FDI and general government transfers – from major oil exporting economies. The theoretical model predicts real oil prices to be one of the main long-run drivers of real output. Using quarterly data between 1979 and 2009 on core macroeconomic variables for Jordan and a number of key foreign variables, we identify two long-run relationships: an output equation as predicted by theory and an equation linking foreign and domestic in‡ation rates. It is shown that real output in the long run is shaped by (i) oil prices through their impact on external income and in turn on capital accumulation, and (ii) technological transfers through foreign output. The empirical analysis of the paper con…rms the hypothesis that a large share of Jordan’s output volatility can be associated with ‡uctuations in net income received from abroad (arising from oil price shocks). External factors, however, cannot be relied upon to provide similar growth stimuli in the future, and therefore it will be important to diversify the sources of growth in order to achieve a high and sustained level of income.

Kamiar Mohaddes A; Mehdi Raissi B

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Controlling incoming connections using certificates and distributed hash tables  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The current architecture of the Internet where anyone can send anything to anybody presents many problems. The recipient of the connection might be using a mobile access network and thus unwanted incoming connections could produce a high cost to the ... Keywords: DoS countermeasures, certificates, rights delegation, rights management, session management

Dmitrij Lagutin; Hannu H. Kari

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Population analysis relative to geothermal energy development, Imperial County, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The historical and current population characteristics of Imperial County, California, are examined. These include vital rates, urbanization, town sizes, labor force composition, income, utility usage, and ethnic composition. Inferences are drawn on some of the important social and economic processes. Multivariate statistical analysis is used to study present relationships between variables. Population projections for the County were performed under historical, standard, and geothermal projection assumptions. The transferability of methods and results to other geothermal regions anticipating energy development is shown. (MHR)

Pick, J.B.; Jung, T.H.; Butler, E.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Juanita's Money Order: Income Effects on Human Capital Investment in Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Desarrollo Social Juanita’s Money Order: Income Effects onAvellaneda, 2005. Juanita’s Money Order: Income E?ects on13 Vice expenditures include money spent on alcohol and

Suarez, Juan Carlos; Avellaneda, Zenide

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

"Shelter within my reach" : medium rise apartment housing for the middle income group in Karachi, Pakistan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis identifies the project development processes of medium rise (five storied or less) apartment housing built by the private formal sector, catering to the middle income groups in Karachi, Pakistan. Middle income ...

Mahmood, Saman, 1972-

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

55,"Aberdeen City of",5,1,482619,"Taxes Other Than Income Taxes...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Services to Municipality or Other Government Units (line 14, less line 19)" 13523,"Newberry City of",5,1,0,"Taxes Other Than Income Taxes, Operating Income (408.1)"...

72

55,"Aberdeen City of",5,1,479437,"Taxes Other Than Income Taxes...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Services to Municipality or Other Government Units (line 14, less line 19)" 13523,"Newberry City of",5,1,0,"Taxes Other Than Income Taxes, Operating Income (408.1)"...

73

Department of Energy Provides Nearly $88 Million to Low-Income...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

spend 5 percent of their income on paying energy bills, but for lower-income households the costs average 16 percent. These costs can include anything from heating and...

74

Department of Energy Provides Nearly $112 Million to Low-Income...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

spend five percent of their income on paying energy bills, but for lower-income households the costs average 16 percent. These costs can include anything from heating and...

75

Energy Department Provides $140.3 Million to Low-Income Families...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

spend 3.5 percent of their income on paying energy bills, but for lower-income households the costs average 14 percent. These costs can include anything from heating and...

76

California Solar Initiative - Low-Income Solar Water Heating Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » California Solar Initiative - Low-Income Solar Water Heating Rebate Program California Solar Initiative - Low-Income Solar Water Heating Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Solar Water Heating Maximum Rebate Single-Family Low-Income: $3,750 Multi-Family Low-Income: $500,000 Program Info Funding Source Ratepayer Funds Start Date 3/29/2012 State California Program Type State Rebate Program Rebate Amount Step 1 Incentive Rates (contact utility to determine current incentive levels): Single-Family Low-Income: $25.64 per therm displaced Multi-Family Low-Income: $19.23 per therm displaced The California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) voted in October 2011 to

77

Income distribution impacts of climate change mitigation policy in the Susquehanna River Basin Economy  

SciTech Connect

We examine the cost-side income distribution impacts of a carbon tax in the Susquehanna River Basin (SRB) Region of the United States utilizing a computable general equilibrium model. We find the aggregate impacts of a $25/ton carbon tax on the SRB economy are likely to be negative but modest-an approximately one-third of 1% reduction in Gross Regional Product (GRP) in the short-run and double that amount in the long-run. However, unlike many previous studies, we find that the carbon tax is mildly progressive as measured by income bracket changes, per capita equivalent variation, and Gini coefficient changes based on expenditure patterns. The dominant factors affecting the distributional impacts are the pattern of output, income and consumption impacts that affect lower income groups relatively less than higher income ones, an increase in transfer payments favoring lower income groups, and decreased corporate profits absorbed primarily by higher income groups.

Oladosu, Gbadebo A [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Evaluating the income and employment impacts of gas cooling technologies  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study is to estimate the potential employment and income benefits of the emerging market for gas cooling products. The emphasis here is on exports because that is the major opportunity for the U.S. heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) industry. But domestic markets are also important and considered here because without a significant domestic market, it is unlikely that the plant investments, jobs, and income associated with gas cooling exports would be retained within the United States. The prospects for significant gas cooling exports appear promising for a variety of reasons. There is an expanding need for cooling in the developing world, natural gas is widely available, electric infrastructures are over-stressed in many areas, and the cost of building new gas infrastructure is modest compared to the cost of new electric infrastructure. Global gas cooling competition is currently limited, with Japanese and U.S. companies, and their foreign business partners, the only product sources. U.S. manufacturers of HVAC products are well positioned to compete globally, and are already one of the faster growing goods-exporting sectors of the U.S. economy. Net HVAC exports grew by over 800 percent from 1987 to 1992 and currently exceed $2.6 billion annually (ARI 1994). Net gas cooling job and income creation are estimated using an economic input-output model to compare a reference case to a gas cooling scenario. The reference case reflects current policies, practices, and trends with respect to conventional electric cooling technologies. The gas cooling scenario examines the impact of accelerated use of natural gas cooling technologies here and abroad.

Hughes, P.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Laitner, S.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

T.: Numerical sequence extraction in handwritten incoming mail documents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this communication, we propose a method for the automatic extraction of numerical fields in handwritten documents. The approach exploits the known syntactic structure of the numerical field to extract, combined with a set of contextual morphological features to find the best label to each connected component. Applying an HMM based syntactic analyzer on the overall document allows to localize/extract fields of interest. Reported results on the extraction of zip codes, phone numbers and customer codes from handwritten incoming mail documents demonstrate the interest of the proposed approach. 1.

G. Koch; L. Heutte; T. Paquet

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

A structural analysis of natural gas consumption by income class from 1987 to 1993  

SciTech Connect

This study had two major objectives: (1) assess and compare changes in natural gas consumption between 1987 and 1993 by income group and (2) assess the potential influence of energy policy on observed changes in natural gas consumption over time and across income groups. This analysis used U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) data files and involved both the generation of simple descriptive statistics and the use of multivariate regression analysis. The consumption of natural gas by the groups was studied over a six-year period. The results showed that: (1) natural gas use was substantially higher for the highest income group than for the two lower income groups and (2) natural gas consumption declined for the lowest and middle income quintiles and increased for the highest income quintile between 1987 and 1990; between 1990 and 1993, consumption increased for the lowest and middle income quintile, but remained relatively constant for the highest income quintile. The relative importance of the structural and variable factors in explaining consumption changes between survey periods varies by income group. The analysis provides two major energy policy implications: (1) natural gas intensity has been the highest for the lowest income group, indicating that this group is more vulnerable to sudden changes in demand-indicator variables, in particular weather-related variables, than increase natural gas consumption, and (2) the fall in natural gas intensity between 1987 and 1993 may indicate that energy policy has had some impact on reducing natural gas consumption. 11 refs., 4 figs., 16 tabs.

Poyer, D.A.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "income gdp population" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

City of Tallahassee Utilities - Low-Income Energy Efficiency Grant Programs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tallahassee Utilities - Low-Income Energy Efficiency Grant Tallahassee Utilities - Low-Income Energy Efficiency Grant Programs City of Tallahassee Utilities - Low-Income Energy Efficiency Grant Programs < Back Eligibility Low-Income Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Ventilation Program Info State Florida Program Type Utility Grant Program Rebate Amount Ceiling Insulation Grant: $500 HVAC Repair: $500 Provider City of Tallahassee Utilities City of Tallahassee Utilities offers two different grants that encourage low-income residents to improve the energy efficiency of homes. Both programs require a free home energy audit to be conducted in order to determine the eligibility of the applicant. Applicants must also fit within the qualifying income levels detailed on the web site.

82

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.9 Low-Income Housing  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

Program Definitions DOE Weatherization: Department of Energy's Weatherization Assistance Program DOE Weatherization Eligible Households: Households with incomes at or below 125% of the Federal poverty level, which varies by family size; however, a State may instead elect to use the LIHEAP income standard if its State LIHEAP income standard is at least 125% of the Federal poverty level. Data listed in this chapter include previously weatherized units. DOE Weatherization Eligible Households are a subset of Federally Eligible Households. DOE Weatherization Recipient Households: Households that have received weatherization under DOE Weatherization funding. Federally Eligible Households: Households with incomes below the Federal maximum standard of 150% to 200% of the poverty

83

The Impact of Wind Development on County-Level Income and Employment...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ruth Baranowski, NRELPIX 16410 The Impact of Wind Development on County-Level Income and Employment: A Review of Methods and an Empirical Analysis Introduction The economic...

84

The association between income smoothing and job security concerns in New Zealand.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study tests for a relationship between income smoothing, proxied by discretionary accruals, and job security concerns, proxied by product durability, capital intensity, and leverage,… (more)

Tauch, Sothyda

85

Effect of Income on Appliances in U.S. Households, The  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This web page page entails how people live, the factors that cause the most differences in home lifestyle, including energy use in Geographic Location, Socioeconomics and Household Income.

Michael Laurence

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Tax Man Cometh: Income Taxation as a Measure of State Capacity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dilemma: Building State Capacity in Latin America. Berkeley:2005. Challenges to state policy capacity: Global trends andfor our construct of state capacity because income taxes

Weller, Nick; Ziegler, Melissa

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Agricultural Biomass Income Tax Credit (Personal) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Personal) Personal) Agricultural Biomass Income Tax Credit (Personal) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Savings Category Bioenergy Maximum Rebate Statewide annual limit of 5 million in total credits Program Info Start Date 1/1/2011 State New Mexico Program Type Personal Tax Credit Rebate Amount 5 per wet ton Provider New Mexico Energy, Minerals and Natural Resources Department [http://www.nmlegis.gov/Sessions/10%20Regular/final/HB0171.pdf House Bill 171] of 2010 created a tax credit for agricultural biomass from a dairy or feedlot transported to a facility that uses agricultural biomass to generate electricity or make biocrude or other liquid or gaseous fuel for commercial use. For the purposes of this tax credit, agricultural biomass means wet manure. The Energy, Minerals and Natural Resources Department may

88

Agricultural Biomass Income Tax Credit (Corporate) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Corporate) Corporate) Agricultural Biomass Income Tax Credit (Corporate) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Savings Category Bioenergy Maximum Rebate Statewide annual limit of 5 million in total credits Program Info Start Date 1/1/2011 State New Mexico Program Type Corporate Tax Credit Rebate Amount 5 per wet ton Provider New Mexico Energy, Minerals and Natural Resources Department [http://www.nmlegis.gov/Sessions/10%20Regular/final/HB0171.pdf House Bill 171] of 2010 created a tax credit for agricultural biomass from a dairy or feedlot transported to a facility that uses agricultural biomass to generate electricity or make biocrude or other liquid or gaseous fuel for commercial use. For the purposes of this tax credit, agricultural biomass means wet manure. The Energy, Minerals and Natural Resources Department may

89

Low-income energy assistance: State responses to funding reductions  

SciTech Connect

Appropriations for the Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program have declined each year since FY 1986, from a level of about $2.0 billion to about $1.5 billion in FY 1988. The President's budget for FY 1989 has proposed a further reduction to about $1.2 billion. The reduction was proposed in recognition of the hundreds of millions of dollars in oil overcharge settlements available to states for this and certain other activities. GAO reviewed 13 states for information on the availability and use of oil overcharge funds; federal allotments to LIHEAP, total LIHEAP funding, and a projection of possible FY 1989 funding; the number of LIHEAP households provided heating assistance; heating benefit levels per household; LIHEAP transfers to and from other block grants; and perceptions of interest groups of past and proposed LIHEAP budget cuts.

Not Available

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Low-income communities : technological strategies for nurturing community, empowerment and self-sufficiency at a low-income housing development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There are a number of historically familiar and unfamiliar forces at work in low-income communities in the United States. Recurrent forces include rapidly changing economic and demographic trends, Welfare Reform, and the ...

O'Bryant, Richard Louis, 1964-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Enabling energy efficiency for low-income housing in Developing countries using MIT Design Advisor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There is a great need to improve energy efficiency of low-income housing, since people who can afford it least have to pay a significant portion of their income to make their homes more habitable or else live with greater ...

Ali, Zehra (Zehra Hyder)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

China's Income Distribution, 1985-2001 Ximing Wu* and Jeffrey M. Perloff**  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

China's Income Distribution, 1985-2001 Ximing Wu* and Jeffrey M. Perloff** February, 2005 We Bureau of Statistics of China, for explaining many features of the Chinese urban survey. Ximing Wu@are.berkeley.edu. #12;Abstract We employ a new method to estimate China's income distributions using publicly available

Perloff, Jeffrey M.

93

Nepal-Program for Scaling Up Renewable Energy in Low Income Countries  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nepal-Program for Scaling Up Renewable Energy in Low Income Countries Nepal-Program for Scaling Up Renewable Energy in Low Income Countries (SREP) Jump to: navigation, search Name Nepal-Program for Scaling Up Renewable Energy in Low Income Countries (SREP) Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis Website http://www.climatefundsupdate. Program Start 2009 Country Nepal UN Region Southern Asia References Program for Scaling Up Renewable Energy in Low Income Countries (SREP)[1] Ethiopia Specific Documents[2] Honduras Specific Documents[3] Kenya Specific Documents[4] Maldives Specific Documents[5] Mali Specific Documents[6] Nepal Specific Documents[7] Overview "The Scaling-Up Renewable Energy Program for Low Income Countries (SREP) is

94

Honduras-Program for Scaling Up Renewable Energy in Low Income Countries  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Honduras-Program for Scaling Up Renewable Energy in Low Income Countries Honduras-Program for Scaling Up Renewable Energy in Low Income Countries (SREP) Jump to: navigation, search Name Honduras-Program for Scaling Up Renewable Energy in Low Income Countries (SREP) Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis Website http://www.climatefundsupdate. Program Start 2009 Country Honduras UN Region Southern Asia References Program for Scaling Up Renewable Energy in Low Income Countries (SREP)[1] Ethiopia Specific Documents[2] Honduras Specific Documents[3] Kenya Specific Documents[4] Maldives Specific Documents[5] Mali Specific Documents[6] Nepal Specific Documents[7] Overview "The Scaling-Up Renewable Energy Program for Low Income Countries (SREP) is

95

Mali-Program for Scaling Up Renewable Energy in Low Income Countries (SREP)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mali-Program for Scaling Up Renewable Energy in Low Income Countries (SREP) Mali-Program for Scaling Up Renewable Energy in Low Income Countries (SREP) Jump to: navigation, search Name Mali-Program for Scaling Up Renewable Energy in Low Income Countries (SREP) Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis Website http://www.climatefundsupdate. Program Start 2009 Country Mali UN Region Southern Asia References Program for Scaling Up Renewable Energy in Low Income Countries (SREP)[1] Ethiopia Specific Documents[2] Honduras Specific Documents[3] Kenya Specific Documents[4] Maldives Specific Documents[5] Mali Specific Documents[6] Nepal Specific Documents[7] Overview "The Scaling-Up Renewable Energy Program for Low Income Countries (SREP) is

96

Kenya-Program for Scaling Up Renewable Energy in Low Income Countries  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kenya-Program for Scaling Up Renewable Energy in Low Income Countries Kenya-Program for Scaling Up Renewable Energy in Low Income Countries (SREP) Jump to: navigation, search Name Kenya-Program for Scaling Up Renewable Energy in Low Income Countries (SREP) Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis Website http://www.climatefundsupdate. Program Start 2009 Country Kenya UN Region Southern Asia References Program for Scaling Up Renewable Energy in Low Income Countries (SREP)[1] Ethiopia Specific Documents[2] Honduras Specific Documents[3] Kenya Specific Documents[4] Maldives Specific Documents[5] Mali Specific Documents[6] Nepal Specific Documents[7] Overview "The Scaling-Up Renewable Energy Program for Low Income Countries (SREP) is

97

Ethiopia-Program for Scaling Up Renewable Energy in Low Income Countries  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ethiopia-Program for Scaling Up Renewable Energy in Low Income Countries Ethiopia-Program for Scaling Up Renewable Energy in Low Income Countries (SREP) Jump to: navigation, search Name Ethiopia-Program for Scaling Up Renewable Energy in Low Income Countries (SREP) Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis Website http://www.climatefundsupdate. Program Start 2009 Country Ethiopia UN Region Southern Asia References Program for Scaling Up Renewable Energy in Low Income Countries (SREP)[1] Ethiopia Specific Documents[2] Honduras Specific Documents[3] Kenya Specific Documents[4] Maldives Specific Documents[5] Mali Specific Documents[6] Nepal Specific Documents[7] Overview "The Scaling-Up Renewable Energy Program for Low Income Countries (SREP) is

98

Maldives-Program for Scaling Up Renewable Energy in Low Income Countries  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Maldives-Program for Scaling Up Renewable Energy in Low Income Countries Maldives-Program for Scaling Up Renewable Energy in Low Income Countries (SREP) Jump to: navigation, search Name Maldives-Program for Scaling Up Renewable Energy in Low Income Countries (SREP) Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis Website http://www.climatefundsupdate. Program Start 2009 Country Maldives UN Region Southern Asia References Program for Scaling Up Renewable Energy in Low Income Countries (SREP)[1] Ethiopia Specific Documents[2] Honduras Specific Documents[3] Kenya Specific Documents[4] Maldives Specific Documents[5] Mali Specific Documents[6] Nepal Specific Documents[7] Overview "The Scaling-Up Renewable Energy Program for Low Income Countries (SREP) is

99

Program for Scaling Up Renewable Energy in Low Income Countries (SREP) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Scaling Up Renewable Energy in Low Income Countries (SREP) Scaling Up Renewable Energy in Low Income Countries (SREP) Jump to: navigation, search Name Program for Scaling Up Renewable Energy in Low Income Countries (SREP) Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis Website http://www.climatefundsupdate. Program Start 2009 Country Ethiopia, Honduras, Kenya, Maldives, Mali, Nepal UN Region Southern Asia References Program for Scaling Up Renewable Energy in Low Income Countries (SREP)[1] Ethiopia Specific Documents[2] Honduras Specific Documents[3] Kenya Specific Documents[4] Maldives Specific Documents[5] Mali Specific Documents[6] Nepal Specific Documents[7] Overview "The Scaling-Up Renewable Energy Program for Low Income Countries (SREP) is

100

Investigating the book-tax income gap : factors which affect the gap and details regarding its most significant component  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(cont.) In total, my thesis suggests that recent changes in the book-tax income gap may be exogenous and transitory, due to changes to the calculation of book income, general business conditions or other factors which ...

Seidman, Jeri

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "income gdp population" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

DOE Provides $96.4 Million to Low-Income Families for Home Weatherization |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

96.4 Million to Low-Income Families for Home 96.4 Million to Low-Income Families for Home Weatherization DOE Provides $96.4 Million to Low-Income Families for Home Weatherization July 6, 2006 - 2:50pm Addthis Funding is Second Installment of $243 Million in Total Weatherization Grants for FY 2006 WASHINGTON, D.C. - U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Secretary Samuel W. Bodman today announced $96.4 million in weatherization program grants to 19 states to make energy efficiency improvements in homes of low-income families. Weatherization can reduce an average home's energy costs by $358 annually. Total Fiscal Year 2006 funding is $243 million and will provide weatherization to approximately 96,560 homes. "Weatherizing your home is a valuable way to save energy and money," Secretary Bodman said. "The Department of Energy's weatherization program

102

Department of Energy Provides Nearly $112 Million to Low-Income Families  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

112 Million to Low-Income 112 Million to Low-Income Families for Home Weatherization Department of Energy Provides Nearly $112 Million to Low-Income Families for Home Weatherization March 29, 2007 - 12:17pm Addthis Funding is First Installment of $204.5 Million in Total Weatherization Grants for FY 2007 WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced $111.6 million in weatherization grants to 30 states and the Navajo Nation to make energy efficiency improvements in homes of low-income families. Weatherization can reduce an average home's energy costs by $358 annually. Total Fiscal Year 2007 funding is $204.5 million and will provide weatherization to approximately 70,000 homes. "Weatherization is a valuable way to help save money and energy," DOE Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Alexander

103

Urban settlement design, Seoul, Korea : a comparative study for low-income housing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The study proposes an alternative design approach for urban dwelling environments of the low-income sectors in Seoul, Korea, based upon a comparative evaluation of the physical and socio-economic performance of the existing ...

Je, Hae-Seong

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Department of Energy Provides Nearly $88 Million to Low-Income Families for  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Provides Nearly $88 Million to Low-Income Provides Nearly $88 Million to Low-Income Families for Home Weatherization Department of Energy Provides Nearly $88 Million to Low-Income Families for Home Weatherization June 29, 2007 - 2:36pm Addthis Funding is Second Installment of $200 Million in Total Weatherization Grants for FY 2007 WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced $88 million in weatherization grants to 20 states to make energy efficiency improvements in homes of low-income families. Weatherization can reduce an average home's energy costs by $358 annually, and this year, DOE expects funding to weatherize approximately 70,000 homes nationwide. For every dollar spent, weatherization returns $1.53 in energy savings over the life of the measures. DOE's weatherization program performs energy

105

Energy Department Provides $140.3 Million to Low-Income Families for Home  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

140.3 Million to Low-Income Families 140.3 Million to Low-Income Families for Home Weatherization Energy Department Provides $140.3 Million to Low-Income Families for Home Weatherization April 3, 2006 - 9:55am Addthis Funding is first installment of $243 million in total weatherization grants for FY 2006 WASHINGTON, D.C. - U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Secretary Samuel W. Bodman today announced $140.3 million in weatherization program grants to 31 states and the Navajo Nation to make energy efficiency improvements in homes of low-income families; weatherization can reduce an average home's energy costs by $358 annually. Total Fiscal Year 2006 funding is $243 million and will provide weatherization to approximately 96,560 homes. "Weatherizing your home is a valuable way to save energy and money,"

106

Department of Energy Provides Nearly $88 Million to Low-Income Families for  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

88 Million to Low-Income 88 Million to Low-Income Families for Home Weatherization Department of Energy Provides Nearly $88 Million to Low-Income Families for Home Weatherization June 29, 2007 - 2:36pm Addthis Funding is Second Installment of $200 Million in Total Weatherization Grants for FY 2007 WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced $88 million in weatherization grants to 20 states to make energy efficiency improvements in homes of low-income families. Weatherization can reduce an average home's energy costs by $358 annually, and this year, DOE expects funding to weatherize approximately 70,000 homes nationwide. For every dollar spent, weatherization returns $1.53 in energy savings over the life of the measures. DOE's weatherization program performs energy

107

The Impact of Wind Development on County-Level Income and Employment...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Impact of Wind Development on County-Level Income and Employment: A Review of Methods and an Empirical Analysis (Fact Sheet) Title The Impact of Wind Development on...

108

The Low-Income Housing Tax Credit : HERA, ARRA and beyond  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Low-Income Housing Tax Credit (LIHTC) has arguably been the most successful government subsidy to finance affordable housing. Since its creation in the Tax Reform Act of 1986 as Internal Revenue Code (IRC) Section 42, ...

Korb, Jason (Jason Bryan Patricof)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Incoming Shortwave Fluxes at the Surface—A Comparison of GCM Results with Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Evidence is presented that the excess surface net radiation calculated in general circulation models at continental surfaces is mostly due to excess incoming shortwave fluxes. Based on long-term observations from 22 worldwide inland stations and ...

J. R. Garratt

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Equitable economic energy efficiency : creating good jobs in low-income efficiency programming  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy efficiency is an important consideration in energy policy-making. So, a federal program aimed at funding "energy efficiency retrofits" for low-income households could be an important step in increasing the overall ...

Sarin, Amit

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Relating Rainfall Patterns to Agricultural Income: Implications for Rural Development in Mozambique  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rural farmers in Mozambique rely on rainfed agriculture for food and income. Yet they experience high rainfall variability ranging from extreme drought to flooding rainfall from tropical cyclone systems. To explore linkages between rainfall and ...

Julie A. Silva; Corene J. Matyas

112

A Study of the Incoming Longwave Atmospheric Radiation from a Clear Sky  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A band model for atmospheric absorption is used to calculate the incoming longwave atmospheric radiative flux for some typical clear sky conditions. The sky radiation is also measured using a specially-designed calorimetric apparatus over a wide ...

J. W. Ramsey; H. D. Chiang; R. J. Goldstein

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Causes, effects, and implications of subletting : experiences from low-income neighborhoods in Third World cities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In recent years increasing numbers of low-income families in Third World cities have found it necessary to share housing accommodation. Those with access to land may be unable to afford to build their house or to pay the ...

Bailey, Susan Ruth

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Low income housing tax credit properties : non-profit disposition strategies in the Commonwealth  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis examines how non-profit owners in Massachusetts have maintained affordability and ownership of Low-Income Housing Tax Credit (LIHTC) properties after the initial fifteen-year compliance period, at the lowest ...

Lew-Hailer, Lillian

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Community transportation : alternative transportation provision in a low-income neighborhoods in southeast Atlanta  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Regional transit agencies are ineffective at meeting many of the basic transportation needs of a clustered "Study Area" of low-income Atlanta neighborhoods. For transit dependant residents in the Study Area, getting to the ...

Alexander, James W., 1977-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

New Hampshire Electric Co-Op - Low-Income Energy Assistance Grant...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

help NHEC's income-qualified members manage energy use with the goal of lowering total energy costs. Qualified members living in an apartment or house, either rented or owned, can...

117

The forgotten class : reconceptualizing contemporary middle-income housing in New York City  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

New York City's costly real estate poses housing affordability challenges for not only low- or even moderate-income households, but also for the so-called "middle class." Because New York is predominantly a renter's market, ...

Milchman, Karina (Karina Faye)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Low-income communities in World Heritage Cities : revitalizing neighborhoods in Tunis and Quito  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since the 1970s, international preservation and funding agencies have promoted revitalization projects in developing countries aiming to, among other things, benefit low-income communities. For the most part, these projects ...

Young, T. Luke, 1972-

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Key worker housing : a demand analysis of middle-income workforce housing in eastern Massachusetts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Boston Metropolitan Area is one of the most expensive places to live in the United States. In recent years studies have speculated that middle-income workers have had to endure increased commute times as they have moved ...

Sacks, Sean D

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Sensitivity of Computed Incoming Solar Radiation at the Surface to Cloud Analyses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A radiation model was used to simulate daily incoming solar radiation at four ships during Phase III of GATE. The accuracy of the simulations from several different cloud analyses based on ship or satellite data was estimated by comparison with ...

John T. Ball; Marshall A. Atwater; Stephen J. Thoren

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "income gdp population" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Low-income energy assistance programs: a profile of need and policy options  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This second report of the Fuel Oil Marketing Advisory Committee (FOMAC) of DOE is twofold: to update information on the energy needs of low-income persons and governmental response to such needs; and to emphasize the need for energy-conservation programs that may alleviate the enormous financial burden placed on low-income people by rising energy prices. FOMAC has continued to develop further and refine its initial energy-conservation recommendations. Mainly, the updated assessment document finds that the poor will expend at least 35% of their income directly on energy and will spend at least 21% of their income on household energy. Other economic impacts of rising energy costs on low-income groups are summarized. Appropriations and stipulations by Congress to aid the lo-income people are reviewed. After careful review of various program designs, FOMAC continues to support the income indexing/vendor line of credit approach. This design provides assistance to elgible households based on: energy needed, cost of fuel, and percentage of income. The cost of implementing the FOMAC design nationally would, according to estimates, range from $3.5 to $4.6 billion for the 1980-1981 winter heating season. A figure of $1.6 to $2.2 billion is being discussed in the Congress. Meeting the ongoing energy needs of the poor will require a coherent national policy which consists of aid in paying energy bills and aid in the poor's effort to conserve energy. The report seeks to promote such policies. Needs assessment, government response, FOMAC model, comments on the programs, projected cost of 1980-1981 Energy Assistance Program, need for conservation programs, and program financing are discussed.

Not Available

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Executive Summary Harrison County posted job, population, and per capita personal income gains during the past five  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and perhaps even a downturn. Further, skyrocketing oil prices have the potential to adversely impact=1.000) Oil - West Texas Intermediate 72.18 105.13 96.65 92.00 90.01 88.00 ($ per barrel) Key Prices Percent become relatively expensive to our major trading partners, while foreign imports become relatively

Mohaghegh, Shahab

123

The asymmetric effects of changes in price and income on energy and oil demand.” Energy Journal 23(1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper estimates the effects on energy and oil demand of changes in income and oil prices, for 96 of the world’s largest countries, in per-capita terms. We examine three important issues: the asymmetric effects on demand of increases and decreases in oil prices; the asymmetric effects on demand of increases and decreases in income; and the different speeds of demand adjustment to changes in price and in income. Its main conclusions are the following: (1) OECD demand responds much more to increases in oil prices than to decreases; ignoring this asymmetric price response will bias downward the estimated response to income changes; (2) demand’s response to income decreases in many Non-OECD countries is not necessarily symmetric to its response to income increases; ignoring this asymmetric income response will bias the estimated response to income changes; (3) the speed of demand adjustment is faster to changes in income than to changes in price; ignoring this difference will bias upward the estimated response to income changes. Using correctly specified equations for energy and oil demand, the long-run response in demand for income growth is about 1.0 for Non-OECD Oil Exporters, Income Growers and perhaps all Non-OECD countries, and about 0.55 for OECD countries. These estimates for developing countries are significantly higher than current estimates used by the US Department of Energy. Our estimates for the OECD countries are also higher than those estimated recently by Schmalensee-Stoker-Judson (1998) and Holtz-Eakin and Selden (1995), who ignore the (asymmetric) effects of prices on demand. Higher responses to income changes, of course, will increase projections of energy and oil demand, and of carbon dioxide emissions.

Dermot Gately; Hillard G. Huntington; Dermot Gately; Hillard G. Huntington; Joyce Dargay; Lawrence Goulder; Mary Riddel; Shane Streifel

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Residential energy consumption and expenditure patterns of low-income households in the United States  

SciTech Connect

The principal objective of this study is to compare poor and non-poor households with respect to energy consumption and expenditures, housing characteristics, and energy-related behavior. We based our study on an analysis of a national data base created by the US Department of Energy, the 1982-1983 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS). RECS includes detailed information on individual households: demographic characteristics, energy-related features of the structure, heating equipment and appliances, recent conservation actions taken by the household, and fuel consumption and costs for April 1982-March 1983. We found a number of statistically significant (at the 0.05 level) differences between the two income groups in terms of demographics, heating/cooling/water heating systems, appliance saturation, the thermal integrity of their home, energy conservation behavior, energy consumption, energy expenditures, and the percentage of income spent on energy costs. For example, the non-poor used 22% more energy and paid 25% more money on utilities than the poor; however, the poor spent 20% more energy per square foot than the non-poor and spent about 25% of their income on energy expenditures, compared to 7% for the non-poor. These differences suggest different approaches that might be taken for targeting energy conservation programs to low-income households. Since the poor's ''energy burden'' is large, informational, technical, and financial assistance to low-income households remains an urgent, national priority. 13 refs., 26 tabs.

Vine, E.L.; Reyes, I.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

"Table HC7.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Household Income, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Household Income, 2005" 0 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Household Income, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 or More" "Home Appliances Usage Indicators" "Total",111.1,26.7,28.8,20.6,13.1,22,16.6,38.6 "Cooking Appliances" "Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked" "3 or More Times A Day",8.2,2.9,2.5,1.3,0.5,1,2.4,4.6 "2 Times A Day",24.6,6.5,7,4.3,3.2,3.6,4.8,10.3 "Once a Day",42.3,8.8,9.8,8.7,5.1,10,5,12.9

126

"Table HC7.5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Household Income, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Household Income, 2005" 5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Household Income, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 or More" "Space Heating Usage Indicators" "Total U.S. Housing Units",111.1,26.7,28.8,20.6,13.1,22,16.6,38.6 "Do Not Have Heating Equipment",1.2,0.5,0.3,0.2,"Q",0.2,0.3,0.6 "Have Space Heating Equipment",109.8,26.2,28.5,20.4,13,21.8,16.3,37.9 "Use Space Heating Equipment",109.1,25.9,28.1,20.3,12.9,21.8,16,37.3

127

Income Tax Deduction for Energy-Efficient Products | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Income Tax Deduction for Energy-Efficient Products Income Tax Deduction for Energy-Efficient Products Income Tax Deduction for Energy-Efficient Products < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Cooling Appliances & Electronics Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Maximum Rebate Not to exceed $500 Program Info Start Date 3/23/2007 Expiration Date 07/01/2017 State Virginia Program Type Personal Deduction Rebate Amount 20% of the sales tax paid by an individual Provider Virginia Department of Taxation This incentive is available for dishwashers, clothes washers, air conditioners, ceiling fans, compact fluorescent light bulbs, dehumidifiers, programmable thermostats or refrigerators that meet or exceed federal Energy Star standards. Purchases of fuel cells that generate electricity

128

An Energy Model for a Low Income Rural African Village | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

An Energy Model for a Low Income Rural African Village An Energy Model for a Low Income Rural African Village Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: An Energy Model for a Low Income Rural African Village Agency/Company /Organization: Howells, Alfstad, Victor, Goldstein and Remme Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, People and Policy Phase: Create a Vision Topics: - Energy Access Resource Type: Publications User Interface: Website Website: iea-etsap.org/web/Workshop/worksh_6_2003/2003P_howells.pdf Cost: Free UN Region: Southern Africa Language: English This paper reports on efforts to extend a MARKAL energy model for South Africa to include rural energy choices, allowing for computation of optimal energy systems in a typical (non-electrified) rural village.

129

Impact of the FY 2005 Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program on United States Employment and Earned Income  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) is interested in assessing the potential economic impacts of its portfolio of subprograms on national employment and income. A special purpose version of the IMPLAN input-output model called ImBuild II is used in this study of 20 subprograms of the Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program contained in the EERE final FY 2005 budget request to the Office of Management and Budget on February 2, 2004. Energy savings, investments, and impacts on U.S. national employment and earned income are reported by subprogram for selected years to the year 2030. Energy savings and investments from these subprograms have the potential of creating a total of 228,000 jobs and about $3.1 billion in earned income (2003$) by the year 2030.

Scott, Michael J.; Anderson, David M.; Belzer, David B.; Cort, Katherine A.; Dirks, James A.; Elliott, Douglas B.; Hostick, Donna J.

2004-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

130

Impact of 2001 Building Technology, state and community programs on United States employment and wage income  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy Office of Building Technology, State and Community Programs (BTS) is interested in assessing the potential economic impacts of its portfolio of programs on national employment and income. A special purpose version of the IMPLAN input-output model allied In Build is used in this study of all 38 BTS programs included in the FY2001 federal budget. Energy savings, investments, and impacts on U.S. national employment and wage income are reported by program for selected years to the year 2030. Energy savings from these programs have the potential of creating a total of nearly 332,000 jobs and about $5.3 billion in wage income (1995$) by the year 2030. Because the required investments to achieve these savings are capital intensive, the net effect after investment is 304,000 jobs and $5.0 billion.

MJ Scott; DJ Hostick; DB Elliott

2000-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

131

Impact of the FY 2009 Building Technologies Program on United States Employment and Earned Income  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) is interested in assessing the potential economic impacts of its portfolio of subprograms on national employment and income. A special purpose input-output model called ImSET is used in this study of 14 Building Technologies Program subprograms in the EERE final FY 2009 budget request to the Office of Management and Budget in February 2008. Energy savings, investments, and impacts on U.S. national employment and earned income are reported by subprogram for selected years to the year 2025. Energy savings and investments from these subprograms have the potential of creating a total of 258,000 jobs and about $3.7 billion in earned income (2007$) by the year 2025.

Livingston, Olga V.; Scott, Michael J.; Hostick, Donna J.; Dirks, James A.; Cort, Katherine A.

2008-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

132

Impact of the FY 2005 Building Technologies Program on United States Employment and Earned Income  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) is interested in assessing the potential economic impacts of its portfolio of subprograms on national employment and income. A special purpose version of the IMPLAN input-output model called ImBuild II is used in this study of all 21 Building Technologies Program subprograms in the EERE final FY 2005 budget request to the Office of Management and Budget on February 2, 2004. Energy savings, investments, and impacts on U.S. national employment and earned income are reported by subprogram for selected years to the year 2030. Energy savings and investments from these subprograms have the potential of creating a total of 396,000 jobs and about $5.6 billion in earned income (2003$) by the year 2030.

Scott, Michael J.; Anderson, Dave M.; Belzer, David B.; Cort, Katherine A.; Dirks, James A.; Elliott, Douglas B.; Hostick, Donna J.

2004-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

133

Impact of 2001 Building Technology, State and Community Programs on United States Employment and Wage Income  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy Office of Building Technology, State and Community Programs (BTS) is interested in assessing the potential economic impacts of its portfolio of programs on national employment and income. A special purpose version of the IMPLAN input-output model called ImBuild is used in this study of all 38 BTS programs included in the FY2001 federal budget. Energy savings, investments, and impacts on U.S. national employment and wage income are reported by program for selected years to the year 2030. Energy savings from these programs have the potential of creating a total of nearly 332,000 jobs and about $5.3 billion in wage income (1999$) by the year 2030. Because the required investments to achieve these savings are capital intensive, the net effect after investment is 304,000 jobs and $5.0 billion.

Scott, Michael J.; Hostick, Donna J.; Elliott, Douglas B.

2000-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

134

Do homeowners increase consumption after the last mortgage payment? An alternative test of the permanent income hypothesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The maturity date of a mortgage loan marks the end of monthly mortgage payments for homeowners. In the period after the last payment, homeowners experience an increase in their monthly disposable income that is equal to the average monthly mortgage payment. Our study interprets this event as an anticipated increase in income, and analyzes consumption behavior over the transition period. In particular, we test whether households smooth consumption as predicted by the rational expectation Life-Cycle/Permanent Income Hypothesis (Re-LC/PIH). We find that they do. Households do not alter nondurable goods consumption in the period following the last mortgage payment despite the increase in disposable income.

Brahima Coulibaly; Geng Li

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Substance use and intimate partner violence among low income, urban women seeking care in an emergency department.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? This three-paper dissertation aims to examine the relationship between using drugs and alcohol and experiencing intimate partner violence (IPV) among low income urban women… (more)

Gilbert, Louisa

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Low-income energy policy in a restructuring electricity industry: an assessment of federal options  

SciTech Connect

This report identifies both the low-income energy services historically provided in the electricity industry and those services that may be affected by industry restructuring. It identifies policies that are being proposed or could be developed to address low- income electricity services in a restructured industry. It discusses potential federal policy options and identifies key policy and implementation issues that arise when considering these potential federal initiatives. To understand recent policy development at the state level, we reviewed restructuring proposals from eight states and the accompanying testimony and comments filed in restructuring proceedings in these states.

Baxter, L.W.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Blue Chip Consensus US GDP Forecast  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and metro area from Moody’s Economy.com Equivalent to US-level Gross Domestic Product ? The GMP forecasts have a large impact on the peak load forecasts Rule of thumb: 1 % growth in RTO GMP ? approx. 1,000 MW growth in forecast RTO peak load

James F. Wilson

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Energy Systems and Population Health  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is well-documented that energy and energy systems have a central role in social and economic development and human welfare at all scales, from household and community to regional and national (41). Among its various welfare effects, energy is closely linked with people s health. Some of the effects of energy on health and welfare are direct. With abundant energy, more food or more frequent meals can be prepared; food can be refrigerated, increasing the types of food items that are consumed and reducing food contamination; water pumps can provide more water and eliminate the need for water storage leading to contamination or increased exposure to disease vectors such as mosquitoes or snails; water can be disinfected by boiling or using other technologies such as radiation. Other effects of energy on public health are mediated through more proximal determinants of health and disease. Abundant energy can lead to increased irrigation, agricultural productivity, and access to food and nutrition; access to energy can also increase small-scale income generation such as processing of agricultural commodities (e.g., producing refined oil from oil seeds, roasting coffee, drying and preserving fruits and meats) and production of crafts; ability to control lighting and heating allows education or economic activities to be shielded from daily or seasonal environmental constraints such as light, temperature, rainfall, or wind; time and other economic resources spent on collecting and/or transporting fuels can be used for other household needs if access to energy is facilitated; energy availability for transportation increases access to health and education facilities and allow increased economic activity by facilitating the transportation of goods and services to and from markets; energy for telecommunication technology (radio, television, telephone, or internet) provides increased access to information useful for health, education, or economic purposes; provision of energy to rural and urban health facilities allows increased delivery and coverage of 3 various health services and interventions such as tests and treatments, better storage of medicine and vaccines, disinfection of medical equipment by boiling or radiation, and more frequent and efficient health system encounters through mobile clinics or longer working hours; and so on. In fact, while the dominant view of development-energy-health linkages has been that improvements in energy and health are outcomes of the socioeconomic development process (e.g., the ''energy ladder'' framework discussed below), it has even been argued that access to higher quality energy sources and technologies can initiate a chain of demographic, health, and development outcomes by changing the household structure and socioeconomic relationships. For example, in addition to increased opportunities for food and income production, reduced infant mortality as a result of transition to cleaner fuels or increased coverage of vaccination with availability of refrigerators in rural clinics may initiate a process of ''demographic transition'' to low-mortality and low-fertility populations (14). Such a transition has historically been followed with further improvements in maternal and child health and increased female participation in the labor markets and other economic activities.

Ezzati, Majid; Bailis, Rob; Kammen, Daniel M.; Holloway, Tracey; Price, Lynn; Cifuentes, Luis A.; Barnes, Brendon; Chaurey, Akanksha; Dhanapala, Kiran N.

2004-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

139

Evaluation of DOE's Partnership in Low-Income Residential Retrofit (PILIRR) Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In July 1986, the US Department of Energy (DOE) awarded competitive grants to five states to conduct pilot projects to establish partnerships and use resource leveraging to stimulate support for low-income residential energy retrofits. The projects were conducted under DOE's Partnerships in Low-Income Residential Retrofit (PILIRR) Program. These projects have been monitored and analyzed through a concurrent process evaluation conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). This study reports the findings of that evaluation. The overriding goal of the PILIRR Program was to determine whether the states could stimulate support for low-income residential energy improvements from non-federal sources. The goal for the process evaluation was to conduct an assessment of the processes used by the states and the extent to which they successfully established partnerships and leveraged resources. Five states were selected to participate in the program: Florida, Iowa, Kentucky, Oklahoma and Washington. Each state proposed a different approach to promote non-federal support for low-income residential weatherization. Three of the five states--Florida, Iowa, and Washington--established partnerships that led to retrofits during the monitoring period (October 1986--October 1988). Kentucky established its partnership during the monitoring period, but did not accomplish its retrofits until after monitoring was complete. Oklahoma completed development of its marketing program and had begun marketing efforts by the end of the monitoring period. 16 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

Callaway, J.W.; Lee, A.D.

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Low-Income Renewable Energy Programs: A Survey of State Clean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ABOUT THIS CASE STUDY SERIES A number of U.S. states have recently established clean energy funds Energy States Alliance, and by the U.S. Department of Energy (the Assistant Secretary of EnergyLow-Income Renewable Energy Programs: A Survey of State Clean Energy Funds Garrett Fitzgerald, Mark

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "income gdp population" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

It's not all about "Green": energy use in low-income communities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Personal energy consumption, specifically home energy consumption such as heating, cooling, and electricity, has been an important environmental and economic topic for decades. Despite the attention paid to this area, few researchers have specifically ... Keywords: domestic computing, low-income, sustainability

Tawanna Dillahunt; Jennifer Mankoff; Eric Paulos; Susan Fussell

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

The Myth of Post-Reform Income Stagnation: Evidence from Brazil and Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This Working Paper should not be reported as representing the views of the IMF. The views expressed in this Working Paper are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent those of the IMF or IMF policy. Working Papers describe research in progress by the author(s) and are published to elicit comments and to further debate. Economic policies are often judged by a handful of statistics, some of which may be biased during periods of change. We estimate the income growth implied by the evolution of food demand and durable good ownership in post-reform Brazil and Mexico, and find that changes in consumption patterns are inconsistent with official estimates of near stagnant incomes. That is attributed to biases in the price deflator. The estimated unmeasured income gains are higher for poorer households, implying marked reductions in “real ” inequality. These findings challenge the conventional wisdom that post-reform income growth was low and did not benefit the poor. 25BJEL Classification

Irineu De Carvalho Filho; Prepared Irineu; Carvalho Filho; Marcos Chamon

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.9 Low-Income Housing  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

Level and Weatherization Eligibility (Millions) Single-Family Multi-Family Unit Mobile Home 2005 Household Income Own Rent Own Rent Own Rent Less than 15,000 6.1 2.4 0.3 7.1 1.6...

144

Income distribution and the allocation of public agricultural investment in developing countries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Income distribution and the allocation of public agricultural investment in developing countries responsible for the views expressed and for any limitiations #12;1 Introduction We compare the distributional average distribution costs, encouraging the growth of a distributional network. The creation of an export

Kammen, Daniel M.

145

Low-income DSM Programs: Methodological approach to determining the cost-effectiveness of coordinated partnerships  

SciTech Connect

As governments at all levels become increasingly budget-conscious, expenditures on low-income, demand-side management (DSM) programs are being evaluated more on the basis of efficiency at the expense of equity considerations. Budgetary pressures have also caused government agencies to emphasize resource leveraging and coordination with electric and gas utilities as a means of sharing the expenses of low-income programs. The increased involvement of electric and gas utilities in coordinated low-income DSM programs, in turn, has resulted in greater emphasis on estimating program cost-effectiveness. The objective of this study is to develop a methodological approach to estimate the cost- effectiveness of coordinated low-income DSM programs, given the special features that distinguish these programs from other utility-operated DSM programs. The general approach used in this study was to (1) select six coordinated low-income DSM programs from among those currently operating across the United States, (2) examine the main features of these programs, and (3) determine the conceptual and pragmatic problems associated with estimating their cost-effectiveness. Three types of coordination between government and utility cosponsors were identified. At one extreme, local agencies operate {open_quotes}parallel{close_quotes} programs, each of which is fully funded by a single sponsor (e.g., one funded by the U.S. Department of Energy and the other by a utility). At the other extreme are highly {open_quotes}coupled{close_quotes} programs that capitalize on the unique capabilities and resources offered by each cosponsor. In these programs, agencies employ a combination of utility and government funds to deliver weatherization services as part of an integrated effort. In between are {open_quotes}supplemental{close_quotes} programs that utilize resources to supplement the agency`s government-funded weatherization, with no changes to the operation of that program.

Brown, M.A.; Hill, L.J.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Population | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Population Population Dataset Summary Description Total population (in millions) by country, 1980 to 2010. Compiled by Energy Information Administration (EIA). Source EIA Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords EIA Population world Data text/csv icon population_by_country_1980_2010millions.csv (csv, 59.1 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period 1980 - 2010 License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote Usefulness of the dataset Average vote Your vote Ease of access Average vote Your vote Overall rating Average vote Your vote Comments Login or register to post comments If you rate this dataset, your published comment will include your rating.

147

New York, New York 10003-6687The Asymmetric Effects of Changes in Price and Income on Energy and Oil Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper estimates the effects on energy and oil demand of changes in income and oil prices, for 96 of the world’s largest countries, in per-capita terms. We examine three important issues: the asymmetric effects on demand of increases and decreases in oil prices; the asymmetric effects on demand of increases and decreases in income; and the different speeds of demand adjustment to changes in price and in income. Its main conclusions are the following: (1) OECD demand responds much more to increases in oil prices than to decreases; ignoring this asymmetric price response will bias downward the estimated income elasticity; (2) demand’s response to income decreases in many non-OECD countries is not necessarily symmetric to its response to income increases; ignoring this asymmetric income response will bias the estimated income elasticity; (3) the speed of demand adjustment is faster to changes in income than to changes in price; ignoring this difference will bias upward the estimated response to income changes. Using correctly specified equations for energy and oil demand, the long-run elasticity for increases in income is about 0.55 for OECD energy and oil, and 1.0 or higher for Non-OECD Oil Exporters, Income Growers and perhaps all Non-OECD countries. These income elasticity

Dermot Gately; Hillard G. Huntington; Dermot Gately; Hillard G. Huntington; Dermot Gately; Hillard G. Huntington

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Weatherizing the Homes of Low-Income Home Energy Assistance Program Clients: A Programmatic Assessment  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this project was to assess the relationships between two federal programs that support low income households, the Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP) and the Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP). The specific question addressed by this research is: what impact does weatherizing homes of LIHEAP recipients have on the level of need for LIHEAP assistance? The a priori expectation is that the level of need will decrease. If this is the case, then it can be argued that a non-energy benefit of WAP is the reduction in the level of need for LIHEAP assistance for households receiving weatherization assistance. The study area for this project was Boston, Massachusetts, which is representative of large northern urban areas. Additionally, Boston was chosen because one of its social service agencies, Action for Boston Community Development (ABCD), administers both WAP and LIHEAP programs. ABCD has a substantial client base of low-income households and was willing to cooperate in this study. In the State of Massachusetts, an income test is used to determine whether low-income households qualify for standard LIHEAP benefits. Benefits provided to eligible households are determined by a schedule that gauges benefit levels based on household income and number of members in the household. Additionally, households that consume large amounts of primary heating fuel can also qualify an additional high energy subsidy. It was expected that weatherization's biggest influence on the LIHEAP program would be in reducing the number of households qualifying for high energy subsidies. Data were collected for three groups of households that received both weatherization and LIHEAP assistance and for one control group that only received LIHEAP assistance. Table ES-1 indicates the sample sizes, weatherization dates, and winter time periods when changes in energy consumption and receipt of LIHEAP benefits could be expected to be observed. The reason why there is a lag of one year when weatherization impacts upon LIHEAP benefits might be observed is that LIHEAP benefits--specifically high energy benefits--are based on the previous year's primary heat fuel bills.

Tonn, B.

2002-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

149

Population and Environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 356 Coastal and Marine Environments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 358 Energy, Air Pollution or growth. Indeed, an overlay of graphs depicting global trends in population, energy consumption, carbon; coastal and marine environments; and energy, air pollu- tion, and climate change. In the concluding

150

Income Tax Evasion Dynamics: Evidence from an Agent-based Econophysics Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze income tax evasion dynamics in a standard model of statistical mechanics, the Ising model of ferromagnetism. However, in contrast to previous research, we use an inhomogeneous multi-dimensional Ising model where the local degrees of freedom (agents) are subject to a specific social temperature and coupled to external fields which govern their social behavior. This new modeling frame allows for analyzing large societies of four different and interacting agent types. As a second novelty, our model may reproduce results from agent-based models that incorporate standard Allingham and Sandmo tax evasion features as well as results from existing two-dimensional Ising based tax evasion models. We then use our model for analyzing income tax evasion dynamics under different enforcement scenarios and point to some policy implications.

Pickhardt, Michael

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Feasibility of an energy-related loan program for low-income homeowners  

SciTech Connect

The study explores the opportunities to create an interest subsidized residential retrofit loan program which would assist low-income homeowners to substantially reduce their utility bills. Energy conservation techniques which would be cost effective in a loan package were identified. The methodology used included a literature search to locate wherever possible actual measurements of energy and cost savings for areas of energy use and supply including furnace retrofits, water heating, appliances, lights, the effects of natural and mechanical ventilation, and the use of renewable energy sources such as solar space and water heating. An engineering/economic analysis of the options available through a 20 year loan program and at interest rates of 1, 3, and 6% was performed. It was found that substantial reductions in utility bills can be obtained with such a loan program. The information in the study would be useful to other income groups besides the poor. References and a list of information sources are included.

Eccli, E.

1977-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Upgrade energy building standards and develop rating system for existing low-income housing  

SciTech Connect

The city of Memphis Division of Housing and Community Development (HCD) receives grant funding each year from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) to provide local housing assistance to low-income residents. Through the years, HCD has found that many of the program recipients have had difficulty in managing their households, particularly in meeting monthly financial obligations. One of the major operating costs to low-income households is the utility bill. Furthermore, HCD`s experience has revealed that many low-income residents are simply unaware of ways to reduce their utility bill. Most of the HCD funds are distributed to low-income persons as grants or no/low interest loans for the construction or rehabilitation of single-family dwellings. With these funds, HCD builds 80 to 100 new houses and renovates about 500 homes each year. Houses constructed or renovated by HCD must meet HUD`s minimum energy efficiency standards. While these minimum standards are more than adequate to meet local building codes, they are not as aggressive as the energy efficiency standards being promoted by the national utility organizations and the home building industry. Memphis Light, Gas and Water (MLGW), a city-owned utility, has developed an award-winning program named Comfort Plus which promotes energy efficiency{open_quote} in new residential construction. Under Comfort Plus, MLGW models house plans on computer for a fee and recommends cost-effective alterations which improve the energy efficiency of the house. If the builder agrees to include these recommendations, MLGW will certify the house and guarantee a maximum annual heating/cooling bill for two years. While the Comfort Plus program has received recognition in the new construction market, it does not address the existing housing stock.

Muller, D.; Norville, C. [Memphis and Shelby County Div. of Planning and Development, TN (United States)

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Middle East and Central Asia Department Oil Prices, External Income, and Growth: Lessons from Jordan 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This Working Paper should not be reported as representing the views of the IMF. The views expressed in this Working Paper are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent those of the IMF or IMF policy. Working Papers describe research in progress by the author(s) and are published to elicit comments and to further debate. This paper extends the long-run growth model of Esfahani et al. (2009) to a labor exporting country that receives large inflows of external income—the sum of remittances, FDI and general government transfers—from major oil-exporting economies. The theoretical model predicts real oil prices to be one of the main long-run drivers of real output. Using quarterly data between 1979 and 2009 on core macroeconomic variables for Jordan and a number of key foreign variables, we identify two long-run relationships: an output equation as predicted by theory and an equation linking foreign and domestic inflation rates. It is shown that real output in the long run is shaped by: (i) oil prices through their impact on external income and in turn on capital accumulation, and (ii) technological transfers through foreign output. The empirical analysis of the paper confirms the hypothesis that a large share of Jordan's output volatility can be associated with fluctuations in net income received from abroad. External factors, however, cannot be relied upon to provide similar growth stimuli in the future, and therefore it will be important to diversify the sources of growth in order to achieve a high and sustained level of income.

Prepared Kamiar Mohaddes; Mehdi Raissi

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Energy consumption and expenditure projections by income quintile on the basis of the Annual Energy Outlook 1997 forecast  

SciTech Connect

This report presents an analysis of the relative impacts of the base-case scenario used in the Annual Energy Outlook 1997, published by the US Department of Energy, Energy Information Administration, on income quintile groups. Projected energy consumption and expenditures, and projected energy expenditures as a share of income, for the period 1993 to 2015 are reported. Projected consumption of electricity, natural gas, distillate fuel, and liquefied petroleum gas over this period is also reported for each income group. 33 figs., 11 tabs.

Poyer, D.A.; Allison, T.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Table HC1-3a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Household Income,  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Household Income, 3a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Household Income, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Housing Unit Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total 2001 Household Income Below Poverty Line Eli- gible for Fed- eral Assist- ance 1 RSE Row Factors Less than $14,999 $15,000 to $29,999 $30,000 to $49,999 $50,000 or More 0.6 1.3 1.1 1.0 0.9 1.4 1.0 Total ............................................... 107.0 18.7 22.9 27.1 38.3 15.0 33.8 3.3 Census Region and Division Northeast ...................................... 20.3 3.3 4.2 4.9 7.8 2.6 6.8 6.4 New England .............................. 5.4 0.8 1.1 1.3 2.3 0.6 1.6 9.9 Middle Atlantic ............................ 14.8 2.6 3.2 3.5 5.6 2.0 5.2 7.7 Midwest ......................................... 24.5 3.7 5.2 6.8 8.9 2.8 7.4 5.8 East North Central ......................

156

Estimations of Cloud Optical Thickness from Ground-Based Measurements of Incoming Solar Radiation in the Arctic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A technique for evaluation of cloud optical thickness (plant-parallel, homogeneous layer) from ground-based measurements of incoming solar irradiance using a simple radiation model is introduced. The sensitivities of downward and upward fluxes of ...

E. Leontyeva; K. Stamnes

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Own-price and income elasticities for household electricity demand : a survey of literature using meta-regression analysis.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Maria Wist Langmoen Own-price and income elasticities for household electricity demand -A Literature survey using meta-regression analysis Economists have been modelling the electricity demand for… (more)

Langmoen, Maria Wist

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Portfolio Substitution and the Revenue Cost of the Federal Income Tax Exemption for State and Local Government Bonds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper illustrates how different assumptions about household portfolio behavior influence estimates of the amount of individual income tax revenue that would be collected if the interest tax exemption for state and ...

Poterba, James M.

159

WORKINGPAPER SERIES Number 150CAP AND DIVIDEND: HOW TO CURB GLOBAL WARMING WHILE PROTECTING THE INCOMES OF AMERICAN FAMILIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This essay examines the distributional effects of a “cap-and-dividend ” policy for reducing carbon emission in the United States: a policy that auctions carbon permits and rebates the revenue to the public on an equal per capita basis. The aim of the policy is to reduce U.S. emissions of carbon dioxide, the main pollutant causing global warming, while at the same time protecting the real incomes of middle-income and lower-income American families. The number of permits is set by a statutory cap on carbon emissions that gradually diminishes over time. The sale of carbon permits will generate very large revenues, posing the critical question of who will get the money. The introduction of carbon permits – or, for that matter, any policy to curb emissions – will raise prices of fossil fuels, Key words: Global warming; fossil fuels; climate change; carbon permits; cap-and-dividend; cap-and-auction; cap-and-trade. and have a regressive impact on income distribution, since fuel expenditures represent a larger fraction of income for lower-income households than for upper-income households. The net effect of carbon emission-reduction policies depends on who gets the money that households pay in higher prices. We find that a cap-and-dividend policy would have a strongly progressive net effect. Moreover, the majority of U.S. households would be net winners in purely monetary terms: that is, their real incomes, after paying higher fuel prices and receiving their dividends, would rise. From the standpoints of both distributional equity and political feasibility, a cap-and-dividend policy is therefore an attractive way to curb carbon emissions. s s

James K. Boyce; Matthew Riddle; James K. Boyce; Matthew Riddle

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.9 Low-Income Housing  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

7 7 Residential Energy Burdens, by Weatherization Eligibility and Year (1) 1987 Mean Mean Mean Mean Mdn Mean Mean Mdn Mean Group Indvdl Group Indvdl Indvdl Group Indvdl Indvdl Group Total U.S. Households 4.0% 6.8% 3.2% 6.1% 3.5% 2.4% 7.2% 4.4% 3.2% Federally Eligible 13.0% 14.4% 10.1% 12.1% 7.9% 7.7% 13.8% 9.6% 10.0% Federally Ineligible 4.0% 3.5% N.A. 3.0% 2.6% 2.0% 3.6% 3.1% 2.6% Below 125% Poverty Line 13.0% N.A. N.A. N.A. N.A. N.A. N.A. N.A. N.A. Note(s): Source(s): 1990 FY 2000 (2) FY 2009 (3) 1) Energy burden can be defined broadly as the burden placed on household incomes by the cost of energy, or the ratio of energy expenditures to income for a household. DOE Weatherization primarily uses mean individual burden and mean group burden since these statistics provide data on how an "average" individual household fares against an "average" group of households (that is, how burdens are

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "income gdp population" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

One Hundred Years of Oil Income and the Iranian Economy: A Curse or a Blessing?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper examines the impact of oil revenues on the Iranian economy over the past hundred years, spanning the period 1908–2010. It is shown that although oil has been produced in Iran over a very long period, its importance in the Iranian economy was relatively small up until the early 1960s. It is argued that oil income has been both a blessing and a curse. Oil revenues when managed appropriately are a blessing, but their volatility (which in Iran is much higher than oil price volatility) can have adverse e¤ects on real output, through excessively high and persistent levels of in‡ation. Lack of appropriate institutions and policy mechanisms which act as shock absorbers in the face of high levels of oil revenue volatility have also become a drag on real output. In order to promote growth, policies should be devised to control in‡ation; to serve as shock absorbers negating the adverse e¤ects of oil revenue volatility; to reduce rent seeking activities; and to prevent excessive dependence of government …nances on oil income. We are grateful to Parvin Alizadeh, Hassan Hakimian and conference participants at the University of

Kamiar Mohaddes A; M. Hashem Pesaran B

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Population Monte Carlo algorithms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We give a cross-disciplinary survey on ``population'' Monte Carlo algorithms. In these algorithms, a set of ``walkers'' or ``particles'' is used as a representation of a high-dimensional vector. The computation is carried out by a random walk and split/deletion of these objects. The algorithms are developed in various fields in physics and statistical sciences and called by lots of different terms -- ``quantum Monte Carlo'', ``transfer-matrix Monte Carlo'', ``Monte Carlo filter (particle filter)'',``sequential Monte Carlo'' and ``PERM'' etc. Here we discuss them in a coherent framework. We also touch on related algorithms -- genetic algorithms and annealed importance sampling.

Yukito IBA

2000-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

163

Food availability in the heartland: effects of neighborhood race and income composition.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Despite ideals of justice and equality, certain segments of the U.S. population are denied the rights and privileges available to the more affluent. This thesis… (more)

Miller, Michael J.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.9 Low-Income Housing  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

5 5 Weatherization Program Facts - PY 2010 weatherization funding breakdown: DOE 18.3%, LIHEAP 59.6%, others 22.1%.(1) - The Federal Government's outlay for fuel subsidies runs from $4.0 to 4.4 billion per year. The major two agencies dispensing fuel subsidies are HUD and HHS (through LIHEAP). - In 2006, HUD spent over $1.43 billion annually to pay all or part of the total utility bills (including water/sewer) for 1.2 million low-income units. Utilities (including water) made up approximately 23% of public housing authorities' expenditures. In addition, HUD estimates tenant expenditures on utilities (excluding water) at about $421 million in 2007. - LIHEAP spends 85% of its funding on direct fuel subsidies and weatherization. Up to 15% can be spent for weatherization

165

WEATHERIZING THE HOMES OF LOW-INCOME HOME ENERGY ASSISTANCE PROGRAM CLIENTS: A PROGRAMMATIC ASSESSMENT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CON-486 CON-486 WEATHERIZING THE HOMES OF LOW-INCOME HOME ENERGY ASSISTANCE PROGRAM CLIENTS: A PROGRAMMATIC ASSESSMENT Bruce Tonn Richard Schmoyer Sarah Wagner OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY DOCUMENT AVAILABILITY Reports produced after January 1, 1996, are generally available free via the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Information Bridge. Web site http://www.osti.gov/bridge Reports produced before January 1, 1996, may be purchased by members of the public from the following source. National Technical Information Service 5285 Port Royal Road Springfield, VA 22161 Telephone 703-605-6000 (1-800-553-6847) TDD 703-487-4639 Fax 703-605-6900 E-mail info@ntis.fedworld.gov Web site http://www.ntis.gov/support/ordernowabout.htm Reports are available to DOE employees, DOE contractors, Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDE) representatives,

166

Shared savings and low income homeowners: Results of a demonstration project in Hennepin County  

SciTech Connect

In 1984 Hennepin County, with financial support from the US Department of Energy and as part of the Year Five energy program of the Urban Consortium's Energy Task Force, initiated a Residential Shared Savings Demonstration Project (RSSDP) for single family homeowners. Shared savings, or performance contracting, occurs when an energy service company (ESCo) finances and installs energy improvements in a customer's property and receives a share of the savings that result over time as their compensation. Chapter 1 of this report provides general background on the project, including a brief description of Hennepin County, the energy environment within which the project was conducted, and the Residential Shared Savings Demonstration Project. Chapter 2 describes the efforts to market the RSSDP to low income homeowners, the results of those efforts and the findings from an extensive market assessment effort. Chapter 3 summarizes the significant lessons learned during the project. 4 figs., 3 tabs.

Miller, R.D.; Ford, J.M.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Retirement Saving with Contribution Payments and Labor Income as a Benchmark for Investments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we study the retirement saving problem from the point of view of a plan sponsor, who makes contribution payments for the future retirement of an employee. The plan sponsor considers the employee's labor income as investment-benchmark in order to ensure the continuation of consumption habits after retirement. We demonstrate that the demand for risky assets increases at low wealth levels due to the contribution payments. We quantify the demand for hedging against changes in wage growth and nd that it is relatively small. We show that downside-risk measures increase risk-taking at both low and high levels of wealth. Keywords: retirement saving, optimal asset allocation, discrete-time nance, dynamic programming. JEL Classications Codes: G11, G23. We are grateful to Bart Oldenkamp and Ton Vorst for comments on an earlier version of this paper. y Corresponding author: Erasmus University Rotterdam, Econometric Institute, P.O. Box 1738, 3000 DR Rotterdam, The Netherland...

Arjan Berkelaar; Roy Kouwenberg

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Technique for tracking the effect of weatherization retrofits on low-income housing  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a technique for analyzing the effect of energy saving retrofits installed in low-income housing under a nationwide weatherization demonstration program. A tracking technique, based on the calculated balance-point temperature of each home prior to the weatherization, was developed to estimate the would-be fuel consumption over a period of time if the house had not been weatherized. The savings in fuel consumption for a home can be determined from the difference between the actual usage after retrofit and the calculated usage if it were not retrofitted. Besides the overall reduction, the saving in energy usage during different time periods while the house is being weatherized can be visualized from the graphical representation of the tracking technique.

Chang, Y.L.; Grot, R.A.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

The Impact of Carbon Control on Low-Income Household Electricity and Gasoline Expenditures  

SciTech Connect

In July of 2007 The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Energy Information Administration (EIA) released its impact analysis of 'The Climate Stewardship And Innovation Act of 2007,' known as S.280. This legislation, cosponsored by Senators Joseph Lieberman and John McCain, was designed to significantly cut U.S. greenhouse gas emissions over time through a 'cap-and-trade' system, briefly described below, that would gradually but extensively reduce such emissions over many decades. S.280 is one of several proposals that have emerged in recent years to come to grips with the nation's role in causing human-induced global climate change. EIA produced an analysis of this proposal using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) to generate price projections for electricity and gasoline under the proposed cap-and-trade system. Oak Ridge National Laboratory integrated those price projections into a data base derived from the EIA Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) for 2001 and the EIA public use files from the National Household Transportation Survey (NHTS) for 2001 to develop a preliminary assessment of impact of these types of policies on low-income consumers. ORNL will analyze the impacts of other specific proposals as EIA makes its projections for them available. The EIA price projections for electricity and gasoline under the S.280 climate change proposal, integrated with RECS and NHTS for 2001, help identify the potential effects on household electric bills and gasoline expenditures, which represent S.280's two largest direct impacts on low-income household budgets in the proposed legislation. The analysis may prove useful in understanding the needs and remedies for the distributive impacts of such policies and how these may vary based on patterns of location, housing and vehicle stock, and energy usage.

Eisenberg, Joel Fred [ORNL

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

The Impact of Carbon Control on Low-Income Household Electricity and Gasoline Expenditures  

SciTech Connect

In July of 2007 The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Energy Information Administration (EIA) released its impact analysis of 'The Climate Stewardship And Innovation Act of 2007,' known as S.280. This legislation, cosponsored by Senators Joseph Lieberman and John McCain, was designed to significantly cut U.S. greenhouse gas emissions over time through a 'cap-and-trade' system, briefly described below, that would gradually but extensively reduce such emissions over many decades. S.280 is one of several proposals that have emerged in recent years to come to grips with the nation's role in causing human-induced global climate change. EIA produced an analysis of this proposal using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) to generate price projections for electricity and gasoline under the proposed cap-and-trade system. Oak Ridge National Laboratory integrated those price projections into a data base derived from the EIA Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) for 2001 and the EIA public use files from the National Household Transportation Survey (NHTS) for 2001 to develop a preliminary assessment of impact of these types of policies on low-income consumers. ORNL will analyze the impacts of other specific proposals as EIA makes its projections for them available. The EIA price projections for electricity and gasoline under the S.280 climate change proposal, integrated with RECS and NHTS for 2001, help identify the potential effects on household electric bills and gasoline expenditures, which represent S.280's two largest direct impacts on low-income household budgets in the proposed legislation. The analysis may prove useful in understanding the needs and remedies for the distributive impacts of such policies and how these may vary based on patterns of location, housing and vehicle stock, and energy usage.

Eisenberg, Joel Fred [ORNL

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Effects on minority and low-income households of the EPA proposal to reduce leaded gasoline use  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To reduce the potentially harmful environmental effects of lead in the environment, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has proposed a reduction in the amount of lead used in leaded gasoline. This report examines the potential impacts of such action on minority and low-income households in the US. The benefits of the EPA's proposal would presumably accrue primarily to households that contain small children and that are located in the central cities of metropolitan areas. This is because small children (under age seven) are particularly susceptible to the effects of lead and also because the automobile traffic density in central cities is higher than in any other area. Potential costs are examined in terms of households that own vehicles requiring leaded gasoline. Costs could accrue either because of higher gasoline prices due to reduced lead content or because of higher vehicle repair costs for engines that must use leaded gasoline to prevent excessive wear. Because of their location and number, minority and low-income households with small children would benefit more than the average US household. No costs would be incurred by the relatively large segment of minority and low-income households that own no vehicles. However, the Hispanic and other minority (except black) and low-income households that do own vehicles have a greater than average share of vehicles that require leaded gasoline; costs to these households because of the EPA's proposed action would be comparatively high.

Rose, K.; LaBelle, S.; Winter, R.; Klein, Y.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Roundtable on prevention of fraud and abuse in low income weatherization programs, March 23--24, 1987, Highland Hotel, Washington, DC  

SciTech Connect

This report contains: Identification of Issues and Preventive Measures Associated with Fraud and Abuse in Low Income Conservation Programs; Working Papers Prepared by Roundtable Discussants; Annotated Bibliography of Publications Related to Prevention/Detection of Fraud and Abuse in DOE and LIHEAP Conservation Programs; and List of Members on Task Force for Prevention of Fraud and Abuse in Low Income Weatherization Programs.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Economic Impacts of Marcellus Shale in Pennsylvania: Employment and Income in 2009 2011 Penn State Extension and Penn College www.msetc.org 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Economic Impacts of Marcellus Shale in Pennsylvania: Employment and Income in 2009 ©2011 Penn State Extension and Penn College www.msetc.org 1 Economic Impacts of Marcellus Shale in Pennsylvania: Employment and Income in 2009 August 2011 www.msetc.org The Marcellus Shale Education & Training Center (MSETC

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

174

The Role of Acculturation in Nutrition Behaviors among Low Income Hispanic Women Living in Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to determine the role of acculturation in the food consumption patterns of low income Hispanic women living in Texas and enrolled in the Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) Program by testing the following hypotheses: a) There are significant differences in consumption of fruit and vegetables by selected socio-demographic variables; and, b) less healthy food consumption patterns are associated with higher levels of acculturation in health-related research involving low-income Hispanic women living in Texas. A secondary-data analysis of the responses to the Texas Food & Nutrition (TEXFAN) questionnaire was performed. TEXFAN is a 122-item survey designed to measure WIC participants' consumption behaviors and to assess the impact of new food packages in Texas' WIC program. A total of 3,336 adult, non-pregnant women self-identified as having Hispanic ethnic background of all races were considered for this study. Analysis of Variance and Kruskal-Wallis tests showed significant differences in nutritional practices among Hispanic women for age, educational attainment, employment status, race, area of residence, and acculturation. Logistic Regression analysis confirmed the hypothesis that lower levels of acculturation are associated with healthier food consumption patterns. The majority of respondents (70.7%, N=2,358) did not consume the recommended five servings of fruits and vegetables a day; therefore, do not have healthy patterns of food consumption. Consequently, the majority of respondents (70.0%, N= 1,709) has a weight statuses above normal and at a higher proportion than women in the State of Texas and the nation. Acculturation continues to interest social and behavioral researchers but variations on conceptualization, definition, operationalization, and measurement negatively impact generalizability and applicability of results. Interventions not considering acculturation are not likely to be successful. Research has to include community, ecological, cultural and contextual factors (e.g., machismo, accessibility to sidewalks, availability of fresh healthy foods, etc.). Development of effective intervention programs should be aimed to increase consumption of healthy food and an adherence to the recommendations of the "Healthy Plate" and the "Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2010" among Hispanics. Also, interventions should generate necessary skills among Hispanics for empowering them to sustain proper nutritional behaviors and overcome barriers.

Atehortua, Nelson

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Estimated population near uranium tailings  

SciTech Connect

Population studies, which took place during the months of April, May, and June 1983, were performed for 27 active and 25 inactive mill sites. For each mill site, a table showing population by radius (1/2, 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 km) in 16 compass directions was generated. 22 references, 6 tables.

Bloomster, C.H.; Brown, D.R.; Bruno, G.A.; Craig, S.N.; Dirks, J.A.; Griffin, E.A.; Reis, J.W.; Young, J.K.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

States fund an expanded range of activities under low-income home energy assistance block grant  

SciTech Connect

The low-income home energy assistance (LIHEA) block grant expanded states' flexibility and authority and permitted funds to be used for a broader range of activities not previously permitted. Unlike other block grants created under the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1981, LIHEA received increased appropriations over the level established for the prior program to assist eligible households in meeting the costs of home energy. While heating assistance continued to account for the bulk of expenditures in most states, the majority of the 13 states GAO visited used their new authority to provide weatherization, transfer energy assistance funds to other block grants, and carry over funds to the following year. In addition, states gave increased emphasis to energy crisis assistance. Few changes were made to program management procedures. Overall, state executive and legislative branch officials found the block grant less burdensome and more desirable than the prior program. However, about half the interest groups viewed the block grant as a less desirable method of funding energy assistance programs.

Not Available

1984-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

177

Making It Happen: Achieving Energy Efficiency in Multi-Family Buildings Housing Low-Income Tenants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Saving energy in multi-family buildings is a comparatively easy task to accomplish in theory: engineering science has shown us how to reduce heatloss and air infiltration, how to balance systems and improve heating plant efficiency, and how to capture warmth from the air, the earth and the sea. But getting this knowledge into multi-family buildings and making them energy efficient in fact is very difficult, especially if those buildings house low-income and elderly tenants, the people for whom saving energy is most urgent. Energy practitioners have found that multifamily building owners are not buying energy efficiency because it is not being marketed intelligently; affordable financing is very difficult to obtain, and energy education tailored to the needs of owners, occupants and maintenance crews is practically unknown. This paper discusses how four non-profit energy companies, located in major cities, overcame these obstacles. It explains how they market energy conservation improvements, how they finance them, and how they involve tenants in energy education; i.e., how they make energy efficiency happen in multifamily buildings.

Haun, C. R.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Integrating Photovoltaic Systems into Low-Income Housing Developments: A Case Study on the Creation of a New Residential Financing Model and Low-Income Resident Job Training Program, September 2011 (Brochure)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This case study covers the process of successfully integrating photovoltaic (PV) systems into a low-income housing development in northeast Denver, Colorado, focusing specifically on a new financing model and job training. The Northeast Denver Housing Center (NDHC), working in cooperation with Del Norte Neighborhood Development Corporation, Groundwork Denver, and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), was able to finance the PV system installations by blending private equity funding with utility rebates, federal tax credits, and public sector funding. A grant provided by the Governor's Energy Office allowed for the creation of the new financing model. In addition, the program incorporated an innovative low-income job training program and an energy conservation incentive program.

Dean, J.; Smith-Dreier, C.; Mekonnen, G.; Hawthorne, W.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Integrating Photovoltaic Systems into Low-Income Housing Developments: A Case Study on the Creation of a New Residential Financing Model and Low-Income Resident Job Training Program, September 2011 (Brochure)  

SciTech Connect

This case study covers the process of successfully integrating photovoltaic (PV) systems into a low-income housing development in northeast Denver, Colorado, focusing specifically on a new financing model and job training. The Northeast Denver Housing Center (NDHC), working in cooperation with Del Norte Neighborhood Development Corporation, Groundwork Denver, and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), was able to finance the PV system installations by blending private equity funding with utility rebates, federal tax credits, and public sector funding. A grant provided by the Governor's Energy Office allowed for the creation of the new financing model. In addition, the program incorporated an innovative low-income job training program and an energy conservation incentive program.

Dean, J.; Smith-Dreier, C.; Mekonnen, G.; Hawthorne, W.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Design and Evaluation of a Net Zero Energy Low-Income Residential Housing Development in Lafayette, Colorado  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Design and Evaluation of a Design and Evaluation of a Net Zero Energy Low-Income Residential Housing Development in Lafayette, Colorado Jesse Dean and Otto VanGeet National Renewable Energy Laboratory Scott Simkus Boulder County Housing Authority Mark Eastment Mountain Energy Partnership Technical Report NREL/TP-7A40-51450 March 2012 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Design and Evaluation of a Net Zero Energy Low-Income Residential Housing Development in Lafayette,

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181

An Analysis of Low Cost, Energy Efficient, Housing for Low-income Residents of How and Humid Climates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this research is to develop methods that will enable the reduction of owning and operating costs of low-income housing in the hot-humid climates of the U. S. The objectives include investigating various scenarios that will enable the implementation of cost-effective construction of low-income housing using volunteer labor. The research uses a case study approach where a base-line energy use is established using a comparative Princeton Score Keeping Method (PRISM) analysis and measurements from a case study house. A prototype house is then simulated with the DOE-2 building simulation program, and the energy savings calculated by comparing simulated energy and water conservation design measures (E&WCDMs) with the calibrated baseline energy simulation. The cost and maintenance of the house are analyzed with the real cost of construction of a case study house in Bryan/College Station, Texas.

Kootin-Sanwu, Victor

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Patterns of residential energy demand by type of household: white, black, Hispanic, and low- and nonlow-income  

SciTech Connect

This report compares patterns of residential energy use by white, black, Hispanic, low-income, and nonlow-income households. The observed downward trend in residential energy demand over the period of this study can be attributed primarily to changes in space-heating energy demand. Demand for space-heating energy has experienced a greater decline than energy demand for other end uses for two reasons: (1) it is the largest end use of residential energy, causing public attention to focus on it and on strategies for conserving it; and (2) space-heating expenditures are large relative to other residential energy expenditures. The price elasticity of demand is thus greater, due to the income effect. The relative demand for space-heating energy, when controlled for the effect of climate, declined significantly over the 1978-1982 period for all fuels studied. Income classes do not differ significantly. In contrast, black households were found to use more energy for space heating than white households were found to use, although those observed differences are statistically significant only for houses heated with natural gas. As expected, the average expenditure for space-heating energy increased significantly for dwellings heated by natural gas and fuel oil. No statistically significant increases were found in electricity expenditures for space heating. Electric space heat is, in general, confined to milder regions of the country, where space heating is relatively less essential. As a consequence, we would expect the electricity demand for space heating to be more price-elastic than the demand for other fuels.

Klein, Y.; Anderson, J.; Kaganove, J.; Throgmorton, J.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

2001 New York State NHTS: Travel Patterns of Special Populations  

SciTech Connect

Policymakers rely on transportation statistics, including data on personal travel behavior, to formulate strategic transportation policies, and to improve the safety and efficiency of the U.S. transportation system. Data on personal travel trends are needed to examine the reliability, efficiency, capacity, and flexibility of the Nation's transportation system to meet current demands and accommodate future demands; to assess the feasibility and efficiency of alternative congestion-alleviating technologies (e.g., high-speed rail, magnetically levitated trains, intelligent vehicle and highway systems); to evaluate the merits of alternative transportation investment programs; and to assess the energy-use and air-quality impacts of various policies. To address these data needs, the U.S. Department of Transportation (USDOT) initiated an effort in 1969 to collect detailed data on personal travel. The 1969 survey was the first Nationwide Personal Transportation Survey (NPTS). The survey was conducted again in 1977, 1983, 1990, 1995, and 2001. Data on daily travel were collected in 1969, 1977, 1983, 1990 and 1995. Longer-distance travel was collected in 1977 and 1995. The 2001 National Household Travel Survey (NHTS) collected both daily and longer-distance trips in one survey. The 2001 survey was sponsored by three USDOT agencies: Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS), and National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA). The primary objective of the survey was to collect trip-based data on the nature and characteristics of personal travel so that the relationships between the characteristics of personal travel and the demographics of the traveler can be established. Commercial and institutional travel was not part of the survey. New York State participated in the 2001 NHTS by procuring additional 12,000 sample households. These additional sample households allowed New York State to address transportation planning issues pertinent to geographic areas that are significantly smaller than what the national NHTS data allowed. The final sample size for New York State was 13,423 usable households. In this report, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) identifies and analyzes differences, if any, in travel patterns that are attributable to demographic characteristics (e.g., gender, age, race and ethnicity), household characteristics (e.g., low income households, zero and one car households), modal characteristics and geographic location. Travel patterns of those who work at home are examined and compared to those of conventional workers, as well as those who do not work. Focus is given to trip frequency, travel by time of day, trip purpose, and mode choice. For example, included in this analysis is the mobility of the elderly population in New York State. The American society is undergoing a major demographic transformation that is resulting in a greater percentage of older individuals in the population. In addition to demographic changes, recent travel surveys show that an increasing number of older individuals are licensed to drive and that they drive more than their same age cohort did a decade ago. Cohort differences in driving are particularly apparent - not only are more of today's elderly population licensed to drive than their age cohort two decades ago, they also drive more. Equally important are the increase in immigration and in racial and cultural diversity. This report also discusses vehicle availability, socioeconomic characteristics, travel trends (e.g., miles travelled, distance driven, commute patterns), and the transportation accessibility of these populations. Specifically, this report addresses in detail the travel behavior of the following special populations: (1) the elderly, defined as those who were 65 years old or older, (2) low-income households, (3) ethnic groups and immigrants, and (4) those who worked at home.

Hu, Patricia S [ORNL; Reuscher, Tim [ORNL

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Population Forecasting for Fiscal Planning: Issues and Innovations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

forecasts of men’s and women’s potential real wages and non- labor income, and of interest rates, and some key prices,

Lee, Ronald D.; Tuljapurkar, Shripad

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Bringing good things to life : New Markets Tax Credits and the opening of low-income communities to investment, including a case study of Pittsfield, Massachusetts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The New Markets Tax Credit (NMTC) Program is designed to promote investment and economic growth in urban and rural low-income communities across the country. Created in 2000 as one of the last acts of the Clinton Administration, ...

McGrath, Daniel J., S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Projecting net incomes for Texas crop producers: an application of probabilistic forecasting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Agricultural policy changes directly affect the economic viability of Texas crop producers because government payments make up a significant portion of their net farm income (NFI). NFI projections benefit producers, agribusinesses and policy makers, but an economic model making these projections for Texas did not previously exist. The objective of this study was to develop a model to project annual NFI for producers of major crops in Texas. The Texas crop model was developed to achieve this objective, estimating state prices, yields and production costs as a function of their national counterparts. Five hundred iterations of national price and yield projections from the Food and Agricultural Policy Research Institute (FAPRI), along with FAPRI�s average production cost projections, were used as input to the Texas crop model. The stochastic FAPRI Baseline and residuals for Ordinary Least Squares (OLS) equations relating Texas variables to national variables were used to incorporate the risk left unexplained by OLS equations between Texas and U.S. variables. Deterministic and probabilistic NFI projections for Texas crops were compared under the January 2005 and January 2006 FAPRI Baseline projections. With production costs increasing considerably and prices rising moderately in the January 2006 Baseline, deterministic projections of 2006-2014 Texas NFI decreased by an average of 26 percent for corn, 3 percent for cotton, 15 percent for peanuts, and 12 percent for rice, and were negative for sorghum and wheat. Probability distributions of projected NFI fell for all program crops, especially sorghum and wheat. Higher hay price projections caused deterministic projections of NFI for hay to rise roughly 13 percent, and increased the probability distributions of projected hay NFI. Deterministic and probabilistic projections of total NFI decreased for each year, especially for 2006-2008 when fuel price projections were the highest. The Texas crop model can be used to simulate NFI for Texas crop producers under alternative FAPRI baselines. The model shows the impact of baseline changes on probability distributions of NFI for each crop and for Texas as a whole. It can also be useful as a policy analysis tool to compare impacts of alternative farm and macroeconomic policies on NFI.

Eggerman, Christopher Ryan

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Monthly GDP Estimates for Inter-War Britain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

nsumption, electricity consumption, merchandise on railways, commercial motors in use, postal receipts, building activity, iron and steel for home consumption, raw cotton delivered to mills, imports of raw materials, exports British manufactures, shipping... and the General tariff in February 1932 6 . However, neither of these policies seems to have generated immediate observable effects on the path of recovery with the economy continuing to slide between February and September 1932. Clearly, Temin’s hypothesis...

Mitchell, James; Solomou, Solomos; Weale, Martin

188

Monthly and Quarterly GDP Estimates for Interwar Britain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ended the Great depression we need good quality high frequency data and provided some high frequency analysis of the recovery profiles in the USA and Germany. However, he did not provide the high-frequency data needed to analyse the British case... -values Factor loadings (x100) Autoregressive Coeff t-value Coeff t-value Employment 1.27 12.65 -0.20 -2.62 Coal Consumption 0.96 7.40 0.79 3.96 Electricity Consumption 0.52 0.83 -0.37 -4.86 Railways 0.51 2.28 -0.50 -6.87 Motor 3.00 6.31 -0.39 -5...

Mitchell, James; Solomou, Solomos; Weale, M

189

"Table HC15.3 Household Characteristics by Four Most Populated States, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Household Characteristics by Four Most Populated States, 2005" 3 Household Characteristics by Four Most Populated States, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,"Housing Units (millions)","Four Most Populated States" "Household Characteristics",,"New York","Florida","Texas","California" "Total",111.1,7.1,7,8,12.1 "Household Size" "1 Person",30,1.8,1.9,2,3.2 "2 Persons",34.8,2.2,2.3,2.4,3.2 "3 Persons",18.4,1.1,1.3,1.2,1.8 "4 Persons",15.9,1,0.9,1,2.3 "5 Persons",7.9,0.6,0.6,0.9,0.9 "6 or More Persons",4.1,0.4,"Q",0.5,0.7 "2005 Annual Household Income Category" "Less than $9,999",9.9,0.8,0.7,0.9,1 "$10,000 to $14,999",8.5,0.8,0.4,0.6,0.7

190

" Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Living Space Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" 2 Living Space Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 or More" "Living Space Characteristics" "Total",111.1,26.7,28.8,20.6,13.1,22,16.6,38.6 "Floorspace (Square Feet)" "Total Floorspace1" "Fewer than 500",3.2,1.9,0.9,"Q","Q","Q",1.3,2.3 "500 to 999",23.8,10.5,7.3,3.3,1.4,1.2,6.6,12.9 "1,000 to 1,499",20.8,5.8,7,3.8,2.2,2,3.9,8.9

191

" Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Lighting Usage Indicators by Household Income, 2005" 3 Lighting Usage Indicators by Household Income, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 or More" "Lighting Usage Indicators" "Total U.S. Housing Units",111.1,26.7,28.8,20.6,13.1,22,16.6,38.6 "Indoor Lights Turned On During Summer" "Number of Lights Turned On" "Between 1 and 4 Hours per Day",91.8,20.8,23.6,17,11.3,19.1,13,30.7 "1.",28.6,9.4,9.1,4.5,2.4,3.2,5.7,12.6 "2.",29.5,6.8,8,5.8,3.7,5.2,4.2,10.2

192

" Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Household Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" 3 Household Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 or More" "Household Characteristics" "Total",111.1,26.7,28.8,20.6,13.1,22,16.6,38.6 "Household Size" "1 Person",30,13.5,8.5,4.3,2,1.8,5.9,13.1 "2 Persons",34.8,6,8.8,7.3,4.4,8.4,3.5,8.4 "3 Persons",18.4,3.1,4.7,3.4,2.5,4.6,2,5.8 "4 Persons",15.9,2.2,3.5,3.3,2.7,4.3,2.2,5.1

193

" Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Water Heating Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" 8 Water Heating Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 or More" "Water Heating Characteristics" "Total",111.1,26.7,28.8,20.6,13.1,22,16.6,38.6 "Number of Water Heaters" "1.",106.3,25.8,28,19.6,12.7,20.2,16,37.3 "2 or More",3.7,0.3,0.5,0.9,0.4,1.7,"Q",0.5 "Do Not Use Hot Water",1.1,0.6,0.3,"Q","N","Q",0.5,0.8

194

" Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Housing Unit Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" Housing Unit Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 or More" "Housing Unit Characteristics" "Total",111.1,26.7,28.8,20.6,13.1,22,16.6,38.6 "Census Region and Division" "Northeast",20.6,4.9,5.4,3.5,2.4,4.3,3.2,8.1 "New England",5.5,1.3,1.3,1,0.6,1.2,0.7,2.3 "Middle Atlantic",15.1,3.7,4.1,2.5,1.8,3.1,2.5,5.8 "Midwest",25.6,6.5,6.6,4.7,3,4.8,3.5,9.4

195

" Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Space Heating Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" 4 Space Heating Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 or More" "Space Heating Characteristics" "Total",111.1,26.7,28.8,20.6,13.1,22,16.6,38.6 "Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment",1.2,0.5,0.3,0.2,"Q",0.2,0.3,0.6 "Have Main Space Heating Equipment",109.8,26.2,28.5,20.4,13,21.8,16.3,37.9 "Use Main Space Heating Equipment",109.1,25.9,28.1,20.3,12.9,21.8,16,37.3

196

" Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

HC7.9 Home Appliances Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" HC7.9 Home Appliances Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 or More" "Home Appliances Characteristics" "Total U.S.",111.1,26.7,28.8,20.6,13.1,22,16.6,38.6 "Cooking Appliances" "Conventional Ovens" "Use an Oven",109.6,26.1,28.5,20.2,12.9,21.8,16.3,37.8 "1.",103.3,25.1,27.1,19.2,12.3,19.6,15.8,36.3 "2 or More",6.2,0.9,1.4,1,0.6,2.2,0.5,1.5

197

" Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Home Electronics Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" 1 Home Electronics Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 or More" "Home Electronics Characteristics" "Total",111.1,26.7,28.8,20.6,13.1,22,16.6,38.6 "Personal Computers" "Do Not Use a Personal Computer ",35.5,17.1,10.8,4.2,1.8,1.6,10.3,20.6 "Use a Personal Computer",75.6,9.6,18,16.4,11.3,20.3,6.4,17.9 "Number of Desktop PCs" "1.",50.3,8.3,14.2,11.4,7.2,9.2,5.3,14.2

198

Short and Long-Term Perspectives: The Impact on Low-Income Consumers of Forecasted Energy Price Increases in 2008 and A Cap & Trade Carbon Policy in 2030  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy's Energy Information Administration (EIA) recently released its short-term forecast for residential energy prices for the winter of 2007-2008. The forecast indicates increases in costs for low-income consumers in the year ahead, particularly for those using fuel oil to heat their homes. In the following analysis, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory has integrated the EIA price projections with the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) for 2001 in order to project the impact of these price increases on the nation's low-income households by primary heating fuel type, nationally and by Census Region. The report provides an update of bill estimates provided in a previous study, "The Impact Of Forecasted Energy Price Increases On Low-Income Consumers" (Eisenberg, 2005). The statistics are intended for use by policymakers in the Department of Energy's Weatherization Assistance Program and elsewhere who are trying to gauge the nature and severity of the problems that will be faced by eligible low-income households during the 2008 fiscal year. In addition to providing expenditure forecasts for the year immediately ahead, this analysis uses a similar methodology to give policy makers some insight into one of the major policy debates that will impact low-income energy expenditures well into the middle decades of this century and beyond. There is now considerable discussion of employing a cap-and-trade mechanism to first limit and then reduce U.S. emissions of carbon into the atmosphere in order to combat the long-range threat of human-induced climate change. The Energy Information Administration has provided an analysis of projected energy prices in the years 2020 and 2030 for one such cap-and-trade carbon reduction proposal that, when integrated with the RECS 2001 database, provides estimates of how low-income households will be impacted over the long term by such a carbon reduction policy.

Eisenberg, Joel Fred [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Lifeline electric rates and alternative approaches to the problems of low-income ratepayers: ten case studies of rejected programs  

SciTech Connect

This volume, Volume 3, contains ten case studies of non-implemented programs. It is noted that in Volume 2, the implemented lifeline programs, evolved as policy closely after the 1973 oil embargo; in contrast, the rejected programs were initiated about 4 years later and considered in a more-complex policy environment - after which time alternate methods of assisting low-income people had been developed. Specifically presented here are program summary, issue development, governmental process, and impact for the following: (a) Delaware Senate Bill 202; (b) Illinois House Bill 83; (c) Maine Legislative Document No. 1043; (d) Minnesota House File 1243; (e) New York Assembly Bill 12214; (f) New York Senate Bill 7013-A; (g) Rhode Island Resolution 79-H 5770-A; (h) South Dakota Senate Joint Resolution 9; (i) West Virginia House Bill 943; and (j) Wisconsin Assembly Bill 1250. 4 figures, 24 tables.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Measured Energy Savings from Retrofits Installed in Low-Income Housing in a Hot and Humid Climate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) is metering energy use in a Habitat for Humanity housing development. The objective is to understand the way in which energy is used in low income housing and how it can be effectively reduced. The ten homes come from a conventional housing project built by in 1993 Habitat for Humanity in Homestead, Florida. The instrumentation was installed in the homes in July of 1994 with over three years of 15-minute data collected on all sites. Data were obtained on seven electrical end-uses (air conditioning, heating, hot water, dryer, range, refrigerator, washer/freezer) as well as total. Weather conditions were also monitored as well as interior comfort conditions (temperature and humidity) and hot water consumption and window ventilation status. Baseline field data from a year of monitoring from the ten homes allowed unique insight into how energy is used in low income housing and suggested where consumption might be reduced. In April of 1997, a series of detailed retrofits were applied to eight of the ten Habitat homes. These included solar water heaters installed in seven homes. In eight homes we retrofit light features to compact fluorescent types, repaired and sealed duct air distribution systems, cleaned refrigerator coils and installed low-flow showerheads. Since each of he associated energy end-uses (including hot water consumption) is metered, we are able to assess the relative performance of each of the retrofits. We also measured of air conditioner performance and house tightness. These audits revealed numerous problems, but low-evaporator coil air flow was discovered in all homes. The paper describes the retrofit installation, audit data collected and the impact on measured energy consumption. Preliminary economics are explored.

Parker, D. S.; Sherwin, J. R.; Floyd, D. B.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "income gdp population" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

The Impact of DOE Building Technology Energy Efficiency Programs on U.S. Employment, Income, and Investment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To more fully evaluate its programs to increase the energy efficiency of the U.S. residential and commercial building stock, the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) assesses the macroeconomic impacts of those programs, specifically on national employment, wage income, and (most recently) investment. The analysis is conducted using the Impact of Sector Energy Technologies (ImSET) model, a special-purpose 188-sector input-output model of the U.S. economy designed specifically to evaluate the impacts of energy efficiency investments and saving. For the analysis described in the paper, ImSET was amended to provide estimates of sector-by-sector capital requirements and investment. In the scenario of the Fiscal Year (FY) 2005 Buildings Technology (BT) program, the technologies and building practices being developed and promoted by the BT program have the prospect of saving about 2.9×1015 Btu in buildings by the year 2030, about 27% of the expected growth in buildings energy consumption by the year 2030. The analysis reported in the paper finds that, by the year 2030, these savings have the potential to increase employment by up to 446,000 jobs, increase wage income by $7.8 billion, reduce needs for capital stock in the energy sector and closely related supporting industries by about $207 billion (and the corresponding annual level of investment by $13 billion), and create net capital savings that are available to grow the nation’s future economy.

Scott, Michael J.; Roop, Joseph M.; Schultz, Robert W.; Anderson, Dave M.; Cort, Katherine A.

2008-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

202

Transport Energy Use and Population Density  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transport Energy Use and Population Density Transport Energy Use and Population Density Speaker(s): Masayoshi Tanishita Date: July 1, 2004 - 10:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Jonathan Sinton After Peter Newman and Jeffrey Kenworthy published "Cities and Automobile Dependence" in 1989, population density was brought to public attention as an important factor to explain transport mobility and energy use. However, several related issues still remain open: Is an increase in population density more effective than rising gas prices in reducing transport energy use? How much does per capita transport energy use change as population density in cities changes? And what kind of factors influence changes in population density? In this presentation, using city-level data in the US, Japan and other countries, the population-density elasticity of

203

This Policy Brief is an excerpt from the report: "Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households." For the full report and other resources visit: http://middleincome.lbl.gov  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This Policy Brief is an excerpt from the report: "Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income://middleincome.lbl.gov March 6, 2012 Scaling Energy Efficiency in the Heart of the Residential Market: Increasing Middle America's Access to Capital for Energy Improvements Middle income American households ­ broadly defined

204

Supernova rates and stellar populations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss the results about the nature of type Ia Supernovae that can be derived by studying their rates in different stellar populations. While the evolution of SN photometry and spectra can constrain the explosion mechanism, the SN rate depends on the progenitor system. We review the current available data on rates as a function of parent galaxy color, morphology, star formation rate, radio luminosity and environment. By studying the variation of the rates with the color of the parent galaxy, a strong evidence was established that type Ia SNe come from both young and old stars. The dependence of the rates with the radio power of the parent galaxy is best reproduced by a bimodal distribution of delay time between the formation of the progenitor and its explosion as a SN. Cluster early-type galaxies show higher type Ia SN rate with respect to field galaxies, and this effect can be due either to traces of young stars or to differences in the delay time distribution.

F. Mannucci

2007-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

205

Nuclear Star Clusters - Structure and Stellar Populations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This is an overview of nuclear star cluster observations, covering their structure, stellar populations, kinematics and possible connection to black holes at the centers of galaxies.

Neumayer, Nadine

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Four Most Populous States - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

RESIDENTIAL ENERGY CONSUMPTION SURVEY 1997. OVERVIEW: MOST POPULOUS STATES ... Homes with air-conditioning: 62%... with a central air-conditioning system: 18%

207

Optimal control of leukemic cell population dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sep 5, 2013 ... This issue can be formulated as an optimal control problem. The dynamics of leukemic cell populations in culture is given by age-structured ...

208

Review of water, lighting, and cooling energy efficiency measures for low-income homes located in warm climates  

SciTech Connect

In support of the U.S. Department of Energy`s Weatherization Assistance Program, Oak Ridge National Laboratory has performed a literature review of weatherization measures applicable for homes located in warm climate regions. Sources for this information included: (1) documented engineering estimates, (2) vendor information, (3) reported performance from research and field tests, and (4) direct discussions with researchers, vendors, and field reporters. Estimated savings are extrapolated from reported energy savings and applied to the end-use energy consumption for low-income homes reported by the Energy Information Administration. Additionally, installation costs, savings-to-investment ratios, and parameters indicating performance sensitivity to issues such as occupancy, construction, client education, and maintenance requirements are presented. The report is comprised of two sections: (1) an overview of measure performance, and (2) an appendix. The overview of measures is in a tabular format, which allows for quick reference. More detailed discussions and references for each measure are presented in the Appendix and it is highly recommended that these be reviewed prior to measure selection.

Martin, M.A.; Gettings, M.B.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

" Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Air Conditioning Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" 6 Air Conditioning Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 or More" "Air Conditioning Characteristics" "Total",111.1,26.7,28.8,20.6,13.1,22,16.6,38.6 "Do Not Have Cooling Equipment",17.8,5.3,4.7,2.8,1.9,3.1,3.6,7.5 "Have Cooling Equipment",93.3,21.5,24.1,17.8,11.2,18.8,13,31.1 "Use Cooling Equipment",91.4,21,23.5,17.4,11,18.6,12.6,30.3 "Have Equipment But Do Not Use it",1.9,0.5,0.6,0.4,"Q","Q",0.5,0.8

210

Design and Evaluation of a Net Zero Energy Low-Income Residential Housing Development in Lafayette, Colorado  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report outlines the lessons learned and sub-metered energy performance of an ultra low energy single family ranch home and duplex unit, called the Paradigm Pilot Project and presents the final design recommendations for a 153-unit net zero energy residential development called the Josephine Commons Project. Affordable housing development authorities throughout the United States continually struggle to find the most cost-effective pathway to provide quality, durable, and sustainable housing. The challenge for these authorities is to achieve the mission of delivering affordable housing at the lowest cost per square foot in environments that may be rural, urban, suburban, or within a designated redevelopment district. With the challenges the U.S. faces regarding energy, the environmental impacts of consumer use of fossil fuels and the increased focus on reducing greenhouse gas emissions, housing authorities are pursuing the goal of constructing affordable, energy efficient and sustainable housing at the lowest life-cycle cost of ownership. This report outlines the lessons learned and sub-metered energy performance of an ultra-low-energy single family ranch home and duplex unit, called the Paradigm Pilot Project and presents the final design recommendations for a 153-unit net zero energy residential development called the Josephine Commons Project. In addition to describing the results of the performance monitoring from the pilot project, this paper describes the recommended design process of (1) setting performance goals for energy efficiency and renewable energy on a life-cycle cost basis, (2) using an integrated, whole building design approach, and (3) incorporating systems-built housing, a green jobs training program, and renewable energy technologies into a replicable high performance, low-income housing project development model.

Dean, J.; VanGeet, O.; Simkus, S.; Eastment, M.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Federal Reserve Board  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: We provide a new and superior measure of U.S. GDP, obtained by applying optimal signal-extraction techniques to the (noisy) expenditure-side and income-side estimates. Its properties – particularly as regards serial correlation – differ markedly from those of the standard expenditure-side measure and lead to substantially-revised views regarding the properties of GDP.

Jeremy Nalewaik; Francis X. Diebold; Frank Schorfheide; Dongho Song; Adrian Pagan; John Roberts; Matt Shapiro; Chris Sims; Mark Watson; Justin Wolfers

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Hanford Site Regional Population - 2010 Census  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy conducts radiological operations in south-central Washington State. Population dose estimates must be performed to provide a measure of the impact from site radiological releases. Results of the U.S. 2010 Census were used to determine counts and distributions for the residential population located within 50-miles of several operating areas of the Hanford Site. Year 2010 was the first census year that a 50-mile population of a Hanford Site operational area exceeded the half-million mark.

Hamilton, Erin L.; Snyder, Sandra F.

2011-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

213

Estimating Traveler Populations at Airport and Cruise Terminals for Population Distribution and Dynamics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years, uses of high-resolution population distribution databases are increasing steadily for environmental, socioeconomic, public health, and disaster-related research and operations. With the development of daytime population distribution, temporal resolution of such databases has been improved. However, the lack of incorporation of transitional population, namely business and leisure travelers, leaves a significant population unaccounted for within the critical infrastructure networks, such as at transportation hubs. This paper presents two general methodologies for estimating passenger populations in airport and cruise port terminals at a high temporal resolution which can be incorporated into existing population distribution models. The methodologies are geographically scalable and are based on, and demonstrate how, two different transportation hubs with disparate temporal population dynamics can be modeled utilizing publicly available databases including novel data sources of flight activity from the Internet which are updated in near-real time. The airport population estimation model shows great potential for rapid implementation for a large collection of airports on a national scale, and the results suggest reasonable accuracy in the estimated passenger traffic. By incorporating population dynamics at high temporal resolutions into population distribution models, we hope to improve the estimates of populations exposed to or at risk to disasters, thereby improving emergency planning and response, and leading to more informed policy decisions.

Jochem, Warren C [ORNL; Sims, Kelly M [ORNL; Bright, Eddie A [ORNL; Urban, Marie L [ORNL; Rose, Amy N [ORNL; Coleman, Phil R [ORNL; Bhaduri, Budhendra L [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Method for spatially distributing a population  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for spatially distributing a population count within a geographically defined area can include the steps of logically correlating land usages apparent from a geographically defined area to geospatial features in the geographically defined area and allocating portions of the population count to regions of the geographically defined area having the land usages, according to the logical correlation. The process can also include weighing the logical correlation for determining the allocation of portions of the population count and storing the allocated portions within a searchable data store. The logically correlating step can include the step of logically correlating time-based land usages to geospatial features of the geographically defined area. The process can also include obtaining a population count for the geographically defined area, organizing the geographically defined area into a plurality of sectors, and verifying the allocated portions according to direct observation.

Bright, Edward A [Knoxville, TN; Bhaduri, Budhendra L [Knoxville, TN; Coleman, Phillip R [Knoxville, TN; Dobson, Jerome E [Lawrence, KS

2007-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

215

Planning combat outposts to maximize population security  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Combat outposts (COPs) are small, well-protected bases from which soldiers reside and conduct operations from. Used extensively during the "Surge" in Iraq, COPs are usually established in populated areas and are prevalent ...

Seidel, Scott B

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

HUMAN SUBJECT RESEARCH INVOLVING SPECIAL SUBJECT POPULATIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, April 18, 1979. While there are legitimate ethical concerns whenever vulnerable populations are studied of which are intended to be submitted later to, or held for inspection by, the Food and Drug Administration

Sibille, Etienne

217

United Nations Population Information Network | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

United Nations Population Information Network United Nations Population Information Network Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: United Nations Population Information Network Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Focus Area: People and Policy Resource Type: Dataset Website: www.un.org/popin/ Cost: Free United Nations Population Information Network Screenshot References: United Nations Population Information Network[1] Logo: United Nations Population Information Network The Population Information Network (POPIN) strives to make international, regional and national population information, particularly information available from United Nations sources, easily available to the international community. "The Population Information Network (POPIN) was founded on 9 May 1979, by

218

The Stellar Populations of Seyfert 2 Nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a preliminary analysis of the stellar populations in the central parsecs of a sample of 22 Seyfert 2 galaxies, based on a careful separation of nebular emission and stellar light in high-spatial resolution HST-STIS spectra. 10% of the surveyed nuclei display stellar populations of intermediate age, 1-2 Gyr old, whereas the remaining targets appear to be evenly split between objects showing only very old stellar populations and nuclei requiring also an additional blue featureless component, which we characterise by means of very young, few-Myr-old stars. The small fraction of stellar population of intermediate age seems to argue against the presence of such a young component, however, since the short lifetime of O-stars would imply recurrent star-formation episodes and the build-up over the last 1-2 Gyr of a detectable intermediate-age population. Additionally, a correlation between the luminosity of such a blue component and the emission from highly-ionised species, together with the general absence of Wolf-Rayet features, further suggests that the featureless continuum arises from the central engine rather than from star-forming regions. We discuss our results in the framework of the unification paradigm and of models for star formation close to supermassive black holes.

Marc Sarzi; Joe Shields; Rick Pogge; Paul Martini

2007-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

219

Impact of Wind Development on County-Level Income and Employment: A Review of Methods and an Empirical Analysis (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To gain an understanding of the long-term county-level impacts from a large sample of wind power projects and to understand the potential significance of methodological criticisms, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and NREL recently joined efforts to complete a first-of-its-kind study that quantifies the annual impact on county-level personal income resulting from wind power installations in nearly 130 counties across 12 states. The results of this study, as well as a comparison with the prior county-level estimates generated from input-output models, are summarized here.

Not Available

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Modeling Population Exposures to Pollutants Emitted From Natural...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modeling Population Exposures to Pollutants Emitted From Natural Gas Cooking Burners Title Modeling Population Exposures to Pollutants Emitted From Natural Gas Cooking Burners...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "income gdp population" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Tracer populations in the local group  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, in good agreement with previous work. I go on to develop a set of tracer mass estimators that build on previous work which make use of actual (and not projected) distance and proper motion data, reflecting the amount and quality of data now available to us... ages range from 1-10 Gyr; the scale height of the population increases with age from 200 kpc to around 700 kpc and the metallicity decreases with age to around 20% solar. The typical content of this disk population are A stars, planetary nebulae...

Watkins, Laura Louise

2011-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

222

Energy efficient low-income housing demonstration with Houston Habitat for Humanity. Final status report, October 1, 1995--September 30, 1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using DOE grant funds, the Alliance to Save Energy developed and managed an award-winning low-income housing demonstration in cooperation with Houston Habitat for Humanity at the 1996 and 1997 annual NAHB Builders Show in Houston, Texas. Using a unique group of over 30 national, state and local partners, the energy design of Houston Habitat houses was permanently upgraded to the Energy Star Homes Program threshold. Meeting Energy Star Homes Program criteria, the partner design team increased the level of efficiency approximately 30% over the 1992 Model Energy Code. This innovative design using commercially available materials added approximately $1,400 in cost-effective energy upgrades with an estimated payback of less than 8 years. The 30 public-private partners successfully demonstrated energy and resource efficient housing techniques to the 65,000 NAHB home show attendees and the over 3,000 Habitat affiliates. This project resulted in the Houston Habitat affiliate becoming the nation`s first low-income Energy Star Homes Program home builder. By the year 2000, Houston Habitat anticipates building over 500 homes to this new level of efficiency as well as set an example for other Habitat affiliates nationwide to follow. The 1997 demonstration house utilized an all-women volunteer builders team to construct a 3 bedroom home in Houston Habitat`s Woodglen Subdivision. Energy consumption was remotely metered by Texas A and M.

NONE

1997-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

223

Energy implications of an aging population  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study provides various demographic, medical, and economic information relative to energy usage on a segment of the population, the elderly, which is growing in absolute numbers and relative population percentage. This growth is expected to continue well into the twenty-first century. The US aging population numbered 3.1 million in 1900, and by 1977 it had climbed to 23.5 million. It can be stated with reasonable certainty that this figure will rise to 31 million in the year 2000 and 43 million in the year 2020. These figures, corresponding to more than 10% of our population, are by no means insignificant. As our fossil-fuel reserves are being depleted and the cost of energy mounts, it becomes apparent that the elderly will become increasingly vulnerable to the energy crisis, primarily beause of their physical tendency to infirmity, their economic and social situation, and their susceptibility to psychological depression. This white paper concentrates on those aspects of aging and the nation's energy problem which are not usually related in our everyday consideration of these as separable problems. It seeks to identify the peculiar energy problems of the aged and to consider alternatives in the solution of these problems in light of modern technology.

Not Available

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Atlantic Bluefin Tuna (Thunnus thynnus) Population Dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Atlantic Bluefin Tuna (Thunnus thynnus) Population Dynamics Delineated by Organochlorine Tracers R bluefin tuna (ABFT) are highly valued and heavily exploited, and critical uncertainties regarding. Hereweshowthatorganochlorinepesticidesandpolychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) can be used as tracers of bluefin tuna foraging grounds in the North Atlantic

Hilton, Eric J.

225

Ontology-driven, unsupervised instance population  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Semantic Web's need for machine understandable content has led researchers to attempt to automatically acquire such content from a number of sources, including the web. To date, such research has focused on ''document-driven'' systems that individually ... Keywords: Classification, Confidence assessment, Instance population, Ontology-driven, Semantic Web

Luke K. McDowell; Michael Cafarella

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Behavioral Aspects in Simulating the Future US Building Energy Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

increase to parameter Natural gas price Electricity priceparameter GDP Population Natural gas price Electricity pricethe elasticities of Natural gas price this Electricity price

Stadler, Michael

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

United States: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

state's page. Country Profile Name United States Population Unavailable GDP Unavailable Energy Consumption 99.53 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code US 3-letter ISO code USA...

228

Bacterial Population Genetics in a Forensic Context  

SciTech Connect

This report addresses the recent Department of Homeland Security (DHS) call for a Phase I study to (1) assess gaps in the forensically relevant knowledge about the population genetics of eight bacterial agents of concern, (2) formulate a technical roadmap to address those gaps, and (3) identify new bioinformatics tools that would be necessary to analyze and interpret population genetic data in a forensic context. The eight organisms that were studied are B. anthracis, Y. pestis, F. tularensis, Brucella spp., E. coli O157/H7, Burkholderia mallei, Burkholderia pseudomallei, and C. botulinum. Our study focused on the use of bacterial population genetics by forensic investigators to test hypotheses about the possible provenance of an agent that was used in a crime or act of terrorism. Just as human population genetics underpins the calculations of match probabilities for human DNA evidence, bacterial population genetics determines the level of support that microbial DNA evidence provides for or against certain well-defined hypotheses about the origins of an infecting strain. Our key findings are: (1) Bacterial population genetics is critical for answering certain types of questions in a probabilistic manner, akin (but not identical) to 'match probabilities' in DNA forensics. (2) A basic theoretical framework for calculating likelihood ratios or posterior probabilities for forensic hypotheses based on microbial genetic comparisons has been formulated. This 'inference-on-networks' framework has deep but simple connections to the population genetics of mtDNA and Y-STRs in human DNA forensics. (3) The 'phylogeographic' approach to identifying microbial sources is not an adequate basis for understanding bacterial population genetics in a forensic context, and has limited utility, even for generating 'leads' with respect to strain origin. (4) A collection of genotyped isolates obtained opportunistically from international locations augmented by phylogenetic representations of relatedness will not and enzootic outbreaks noted through international outbreak surveillance systems, and 'representative' genetic sequences from each outbreak. (5) Interpretation of genetic comparisons between an attack strain and reference strains requires a model for the network structure of maintenance foci, enzootic outbreaks, and human outbreaks of that disease, coupled with estimates of mutational rate constants. Validation of the model requires a set of sequences from exemplary outbreaks and laboratory data on mutation rates during animal passage. The necessary number of isolates in each validation set is determined by disease transmission network theory, and is based on the 'network diameter' of the outbreak. (6) The 8 bacteria in this study can be classified into 4 categories based on the complexity of the transmission network structure of their natural maintenance foci and their outbreaks, both enzootic and zoonotic. (7) For B. anthracis, Y. pestis, E. coli O157, and Brucella melitensis, and their primary natural animal hosts, most of the fundamental parameters needed for modeling genetic change within natural host or human transmission networks have been determined or can be estimated from existing field and laboratory studies. (8) For Burkholderia mallei, plausible approaches to transmission network models exist, but much of the fundamental parameterization does not. In addition, a validated high-resolution typing system for characterizing genetic change within outbreaks or foci has not yet been demonstrated, although a candidate system exists. (9) For Francisella tularensis, the increased complexity of the transmission network and unresolved questions about maintenance and transmission suggest that it will be more complex and difficult to develop useful models based on currently available data. (10) For Burkholderia pseudomallei and Clostridium botulinum, the transmission and maintenance networks involve complex soil communities and metapopulations about which very little is known. It is not clear that these pathogens can be brought into the in

Velsko, S P

2009-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

229

Correlation between Median Household Income and LEED Sustainable Site Criteria for Public Transportation Access and a Regression Model Predicting Appraised Unit Value of Unimproved Parcels in Houston, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Green Building Rating System provides third-party verification for environmentally sustainable construction. LEED certified buildings often provide healthier work and living environments, however, it does not provide any direct economic incentives to the owners and developers. An early research suggested that there was a significant correlation between appraised unit value of a parcel and LEED sustainable site criteria for public transportation access. Moreover, the regression model for predicting appraised unit value of a parcel suggested that the coefficient of Number of Light Rail Stations was positive, while the coefficient of Number of Bus Stops was negative. This result contradicted our original expectation that both number of bus stops and light rail stations could have a positive effect on the appraised unit value. Hence it becomes important to conduct further research to explain this phenomenon. In this research, Pearson correlation was examined to determine whether there is a significant correlation between median household income and the number of bus stops and light rail stations for a given parcel that meet LEED sustainable site criteria for public transportation access. After confirming no significant correlation exists, multiple regression analysis was applied to establish a regression model for predicting unit value of a given parcel using number of bus stops and light rail stations for a given parcel that meet LEED sustainable site criteria for public transportation access, median household income and parcel area as the independent variables. Result of Pearson correlation indicated that there was no significant correlation exists between median household income and the number of bus stops and light rail stations for a given parcel which met LEED sustainable site criteria for public transportation access. Findings of multiple regression analysis suggested that all independent variables were significant predictors for unit value of a parcel. Besides, this regression model had a higher adjusted R- square value than that of the model which was established by Bhagyashri Joshi. It means that this regression model could better predict appraised unit value of an unimproved parcel.

Ji, Qundi

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Population Viability Analysis of Riverine Fishes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Many utilities face conflkts between two goals: cost-efficient hydropower generation and protecting riverine fishes. Research to develop ecological simulation tools that can evaluate alternative mitigation strategies in terms of their benefits to fish populations is vital to informed decision-making. In this paper, we describe our approach to population viability analysis of riverine fishes in general and Snake River white sturgeon in particular. We are finding that the individual-based modeling approach used in previous in-stream flow applications is well suited to addressing questions about the viability of species of concern for several reasons. Chief among these are: (1) the abiIity to represent the effects of individual variation in life history characteristics on predicted population viabili~, (2) the flexibili~ needed to quanti~ the ecological benefits of alternative flow management options by representing spatial and temporal variation in flow and temperaturty and (3) the flexibility needed to quantifi the ecological benefits of non-flow related manipulations (i.e., passage, screening and hatchery supplementation).

Bates, P.; Chandler, J.; Jager, H.I.; Lepla, K.; Van Winkle, W.

1999-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

231

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #661: February 7, 2011 Population Density  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1: February 7, 1: February 7, 2011 Population Density to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #661: February 7, 2011 Population Density on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #661: February 7, 2011 Population Density on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #661: February 7, 2011 Population Density on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #661: February 7, 2011 Population Density on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #661: February 7, 2011 Population Density on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #661: February 7, 2011 Population Density on AddThis.com... Fact #661: February 7, 2011 Population Density The density of the population in the U.S., measured as the number of people

232

Enhanced solid waste management by understanding the effects of gender, income, marital status, and religious convictions on attitudes and practices related to street littering in Nablus - Palestinian territory  

SciTech Connect

Litter is recognized as a form of street pollution and a key issue for solid waste managers. Nablus district (West Bank, Palestinian Territory), which has an established network of urban and rural roads, suffers from a wide-spread litter problem that is associated with these roads and is growing steadily with a well-felt negative impact on public health and the environment. The purpose of this research was to study the effects of four socio-economic characteristics (gender, income, marital status, and religious convictions) of district residents on their attitudes, practices, and behavior regarding street litter generation and to suggest possible remedial actions. All four characteristics were found to have strong correlations, not only with littering behavior and practices, but also with potential litter prevention strategies. In particular, the impact of religious convictions of the respondents on their littering habits and attitudes was very clear and interesting to observe.

Al-Khatib, Issam A. [Institute of Environmental and Water Studies (IEWS), Birzeit University, Ramallah (Palestinian Territory, Occupied); Arafat, Hassan A. [Chemical Engineering Department, An-Najah National University, Nablus (Palestinian Territory, Occupied)], E-mail: harafat@najah.edu; Daoud, Raeda; Shwahneh, Hadeel [College of Graduate Studies, An-Najah National University, Nablus (Palestinian Territory, Occupied)

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

233

Genetic Diversity and Population Structure of the Arabian Horse Populations from Syria and other Countries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Humans and horses weaved together wonderful stories of adventure and generosity. As a part of human history and civilization, Arabian horses ignite imagination throughout the world. Populations of this breed exist in many countries. Here I explored different populations of Arabians representing Middle Eastern and Western populations. The main two aims of this study were to provide the genetic diversity description of Arabians from different origins and to examine the traditional classification system of the breed. A third aim was to tackle the distribution pattern of the genetic variability within the genome to show whether there are differences in relative variability of different types of markers. First, I analyzed the genetic structure of 537Arabian horses from seven populations by using microsatellites. The results consistently showed higher levels of diversity within the Middle Eastern populations compared to the Western populations. All American-Arabians showed differentiation from Middle Eastern populations. Second, I sequenced the whole mtDNA D-loop of 251 Arabian horses. The whole D-loop sequence was more informative than using just the HVR1. Native populations from the Middle East, such as Syrian, represented a hot spot of genetic diversity. Most importantly, there was no evidence that the Arabian horse breed has clear subdivisions depending on the traditional maternal based strain classification system. Third, I tested the heterozygosity distribution pattern along the genome of 22 Peruvian Paso horses using 232 microsatellites and Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs). The pattern of genetic diversity was completely different between these two markers where no correlation was found. Runs of homozygosity test of SNPs and associated microsatellites noticeably showed that all of associated microsatellites loci were homozygous in the matched case. The findings of this study will help in understanding the evolutionary history and developing breeding and conservation programs of horses. This study provided databases including parentage testing system and maternal lineages that will help to recover the Syrian Arabian population after the armed conflict started in Syria in 2011. The results here can be applied not only to horses, but also to other animal species with similar criteria.

Khanshour, Anas M

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Variability of Population-Weighted Seasonal Heating Degree Days  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Regional and national heating fuel demand is related to both weather and population density. This study analyzes the variability of population-weighted, seasonal heating degree days for the coterminous 48 states. A risk assessment of unusual ...

Nathaniel B. Guttman

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Ecosystem-specific selection pressures revealed through comparative population genomics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bacterial populations harbor vast genetic diversity that is continually shaped by abiotic and biotic selective pressures, as well as by neutral processes. Individuals coexisting in the same geographically defined population ...

Coleman, Maureen L.

236

Will China's Vehicle Population Grow Even Faster than Forecasted?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Daniel Sperling. 2011. “China’s Soaring Vehicle Population:the longer version, “China’s Soaring Vehicle Population:Vehicle Sales and Stock in China,” Energy Policy, 43: 17–29.

Wang, Yunshi; Teter, Jacob; Sperling, Daniel

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Annual Energy Outlook 2006 with Projections to 2030  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1. 1. Energy use per capita and per dollar of gross domestic product, 1980-2030 (index, 1980 = 1) Population growth is a key determinant of total energy consumption, closely linked to rising demand for housing, services, and travel. Energy consumption per capita, controlling for population growth, shows the combined effect of other factors, such as economic growth and technology improvement. In the AEO- 2006 reference case, energy consumption per capita grows faster than it has in recent history (Figure 31), as a result of continued growth in disposable income. In dollar terms, the economy as a whole is becoming less dependent on energy, the Nation's growing reli- ance on imported fuel notwithstanding. Projected energy intensity, as measured by energy use per 2000 dollar of GDP, declines at an average annual rate of 1.8 percent in the reference case. Efficiency gains and faster growth

238

This Policy Brief is an excerpt from the report: "Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households." For the full report and other resources visit: http://middleincome.lbl.gov  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This Policy Brief is an excerpt from the report: "Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Purcell, Deputy Director at Home This paper is part of the LBNL Clean Energy Financing Policy Brief series://eetd.lbl.gov/EAP/EMP/. The work described in this Policy Brief was funded by the Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency

239

This Policy Brief is an excerpt from the report: "Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households." For the full report and other resources visit: http://middleincome.lbl.gov  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This Policy Brief is an excerpt from the report: "Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income households. This paper is part of the LBNL Clean Energy Financing Policy Brief series. To join the email list in this Policy Brief was funded by the Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

240

This Policy Brief is an excerpt from the report: "Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households." For the full report and other resources visit: http://middleincome.lbl.gov  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This Policy Brief is an excerpt from the report: "Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income of the LBNL Clean Energy Program Policy Brief series. These working papers highlight emerging program models and industry). Energy conservation in new and existing buildings plays a key role in the plan's ambitious goals

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "income gdp population" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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241

This Policy Brief is an excerpt from the report: "Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households." For the full report and other resources visit: http://middleincome.lbl.gov  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This Policy Brief is an excerpt from the report: "Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Clean Energy Financing Policy Brief series. To join the email list to receive these policy briefs for Credit: Case Study on Clean Energy Works Oregon Launched as a Portland-based pilot in April 2010, Clean

242

Predicting Total Ozone Based on GTS Data: Applications for South American High-Latitude Populations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A regular occurrence during the 1990s has been the excursion of the edge of the springtime Antarctic ozone hole over the southernmost region of the South American continent. Given the essential role of atmospheric ozone in absorbing incoming ...

Anna E. Jones; Tanya Bowden; John Turner

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

How Do Recent Population Trends Matter to Climate Change?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. By ensuring couples are able to determine the size of their families, poverty and the depletion of natural change, as one of the root causes of greenhouse gas emissions, how population dynamics affect climate of total population size, research shows that changes in population composition (i.e. age, urban

Colorado at Boulder, University of

244

Identifying phylogeographic patterns and population history in Mediterranean rock ferns  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Q-matrix plots of K=2 through K=5 for 53 sampled populations All populations N>15 -30000 -25000 -20000 -15000 -10000 -5000 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 K L n P ( D ) 0 200 400 600 800 1000 1200 1400 1600 D e l t a K Populations n>15 excluding Valencia -14600...

Hunt, Harriet

2010-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

245

Evaluating the effectiveness of selected residential energy conservation strategies on black, elderly, and poor minority population groups  

SciTech Connect

The effect of high energy costs has been uneven for different population groups. For 1979, households of black, elderly, and poor persons were estimated to spend 8.9%, 8.6%, and 14.3% of their income on residential energy, respectively, compared to 6.2% for the average US household. This gap was highest in the northeastern US. This paper analyzes the potential effect of selected energy conservation strategies on energy consumption and expenditures in minority households. Four strategies that improve the thermal integrity of a structure were selected. The preliminary effects were measured for the targeted categories of black, elderly, and poor households in terms of: (1) the number of households affected, (2) energy savings in Btu, and (3) expenditure savings as a percentage of the household's primary heating fuel bill. The evaluation indicates that the savings potential can be significant in many instances. For example, adding attic insulation where none was present in single-family homes with black, elderly, and poor households could lower space heating fuel bills by 30 to 50%. Savings vary greatly by region and fuel type, and impacts of the other three strategies were somewhat lower.

Teotia, A.; Levine, E.; South, D.; Anderson, J.; Conley, L.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Housing Diversity and Consolidation in Low-Income Colonias: Patterns of House Form and Household Arrangements in Colonias of the US-Mexico Border  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Colonias are low-income settlements on the US-Mexico border characterized by poor infrastructure, minimum services, and an active housing construction with a high self-help and self-management component. Housing in colonias is very diverse showing house forms that include temporary and permanent structures, campers, trailers or manufactured houses and conventional homes. Most of this housing does not meet construction standards and codes and is considered substandard. Colonias households are also of diverse nature and composition including single households, nuclear and extended families, as well as multiple households sharing lots. This wide variety of house forms and households in colonias fits poorly within the nuclear household, single family detached housing idealized by conventional low-income housing projects, programs and policies. As a result, colonias marginally benefit from the resources available to them and continue to depend mostly on the individual efforts of their inhabitants. This research identifies the housing diversity and the process of housing consolidation in colonias of the US-Mexico border by looking at the patterns of house form and household arrangements in colonias of South Texas. Ten colonias located to the east of the city of Laredo along Highway 359 in Webb County, Texas were selected based on their characteristics, data availability and accessibility. Data collected included periodic aerial images of the colonias spanning a period of 28 years, household information from the 2000 census disaggregated at the block level for these colonias, and information from a field survey and a semi structured interview made to a random sample of 123 households between February and June 2007. The survey collected information about house form and household characteristics. The survey also incorporated descriptive accounts on how households completed their house from the initial structure built or set on the lot until the current house form. Data was compiled and analyzed using simple statistical methods looking for identifiable patterns on house form and household characteristics and changes over time. Findings showed that housing in colonias is built and consolidated following identifiable patterns of successive changes to the house form. Findings also showed that households in colonias share characteristics that change over time in similar ways. These results suggest similarities of colonias with extra-legal settlements in other developing areas. Based on these findings, the study reflects on possible considerations that could improve the impact of projects, programs and policies directed to support colonias and improve colonias housing.

Reimers-Arias, Carlos Alberto

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

The distribution of stellar population age in galactic bars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent analysis of stellar populations in barred galaxies have focused on the spatial distribution of stellar population ages and metallicities. However, barred galaxies are complex objects where dynamical instabilities play a leading role in shaping any spatial distribution. The age distribution of stellar populations should thus be analyzed from the two points of view of stellar population evolution and dynamical secular evolution. Chemodynamical simulations of single barred galaxies with simple but realistic star formation and feedback recipes are used to produce face-on mass-weighted maps of stellar population ages. Luminosity-weighted maps in V-band are also displayed after calibrating the simulation with mass-to-light ratios provided by a synthesis population model. It is shown that inside a stellar bar two persistent diametrically opposed regions display a mean age lower than the surrounding average. These two low-age regions are due to the accumulation of young stellar populations trapped on elliptica...

Wozniak, H

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Special population planner, version 4.0.  

SciTech Connect

Emergencies happen every day. Many are caused by storms or auto accidents and can be planned for, if not predicted. Emergencies resulting from natural hazards often affect a large number of people, and planning for them can be difficult, since knowledge of the needs of the people involved is generally unavailable. Emergencies resulting from accidents at industrial and military facilities can also be large scale in nature if people must be evacuated or sheltered in place. Federal planning for large scale emergencies is the responsibility of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), which provides assistance to various emergency management agencies at the national, state and local level. More information about FEMA is available at http://www.fema.gov/. The purpose of the Special Population Planner (SPP) is to help emergency planners address the needs of persons with special needs. The exact definition of 'special population' is a policy decision. Policymakers have included a variety of groups in this term, such as persons with disabilities, those who do not have vehicles with which to evacuate, children who are unattended at times (latchkey children), and many others. The SPP was developed initially for the Alabama Emergency Management Agency as part of its Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program (CSEPP), which aids emergency planning and preparedness in communities surrounding military installations across the United States where chemical weapons are stored pending their destruction under federal law. Like that specialized application, this open-source version contains a set of specialized Geographic Information System (GIS) tools to facilitate emergency planning on behalf of persons with special needs, regardless of how the term is defined. While the original SPP system was developed for emergency planning relating to chemical hazards, it can be applied to other threats as well. It is apparent from Hurricane Katrina and other natural and man-made disasters that many of the problems posed by emergency planning for a chemical weapons agent release are shared by other hazards as well. The notion that emergency planning shares common functions underlies the decision by FEMA to include the Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program (CSEPP) in its 'all-hazards' planning approach. The CSEPP's official planning guidance operationalizes this approach by suggesting that state and local CSEPP emergency plans 'should be appended to the existing all-hazards emergency plan.' The SPP is programmed as a set of tools within an ESRI ArcMap 9.1 project. ArcMap is a component of both ESRI ArcGIS 9.1 and ESRI ArcView 9.1, and it provides a rich GIS user interface for viewing spatial and tabular data, analyzing it, and producing output reports and maps. This GIS interface has been augmented with the SPP tools for a user interface that provides custom functionality for emergency planning. The system as released also includes some hypothetical example records for special needs populations, facilities, resources, control points and sirens sufficient for showing how the system would work with real information. A GIS database is included with some publicly available example layers. The SPP is designed to support emergency planners as they address emergency management issues, and includes capabilities that support the collection and importing of data, the review of data in a spatial context, and GIS tools for emergency planning. The SPP system allows for the identification and categorization of response zones to allow for multiple levels of preparedness. An Immediate Response Zone (IRZ) might be designated as the area 0 to 10 miles from a facility where the response would be the most urgent. SPP can support more than one set of planning zones to accommodate different types of emergencies or the different jurisdictions of emergency response organizations. These areas can be delineated by any number of criteria that make sense for the area. An area like New Orleans might designate response zones based on the depth above/below s

Kuiper, J.; Tanzman, E.; Metz, W.

2007-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

249

The elusive minimum viable population size for white sturgeon  

SciTech Connect

Biological conservation of sturgeon populations is a concern for many species. Those responsible for managing the white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) and similar species are interested in identifying extinction thresholds to avoid. Two thresholds that exist in theory are the minimum viable population size (MVP) and minimum amount of suitable habitat. In this paper, we present both model and empirical estimates of these thresholds. We modified a population viability analysis (PVA) model for white sturgeon to include two new Allee mechanisms. Despite this, PVA-based MVP estimates were unrealistically low compared with empirical estimates unless opportunities for spawning were assumed to be less frequent. PVA results revealed a trade-off between MVP and habitat thresholds; smaller populations persisted in longer river segments and vice versa. Our empirical analyses suggested (1) a MVP range based on population trends from 1,194 to 27,700 individuals, and (2) a MVP estimate of 4,000 individuals based on recruitment. Long-term historical population surveys are needed for more populations to pinpoint an MVP based on trends, whereas the available data were sufficient to estimate MVP based on recruitment. Beyond the MVP, we developed a hierarchical model for population status based on empirical data. Metapopulation support was the most important predictor of population health, followed by the length of free-flowing habitat, with habitat thresholds at 26 and 150 km. Together, these results suggest that habitat and connectivity are important determinants of population status that likely influence the site-specific MVP thresholds.

Jager, Yetta [ORNL; Lepla, Ken B. [Idaho Power Company; Van Winkle, Webb [Van Windle Environmental Consulting; James, Mr Brad [Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife; McAdam, Dr Steve [University of British Columbia, Vancouver

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Magnetic Fields in Population III Star Formation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We study the buildup of magnetic fields during the formation of Population III star-forming regions, by conducting cosmological simulations from realistic initial conditions and varying the Jeans resolution. To investigate this in detail, we start simulations from identical initial conditions, mandating 16, 32 and 64 zones per Jeans length, and studied the variation in their magnetic field amplification. We find that, while compression results in some amplification, turbulent velocity fluctuations driven by the collapse can further amplify an initially weak seed field via dynamo action, provided there is sufficient numerical resolution to capture vortical motions (we find this requirement to be 64 zones per Jeans length, slightly larger than, but consistent with previous work run with more idealized collapse scenarios). We explore saturation of amplification of the magnetic field, which could potentially become dynamically important in subsequent, fully-resolved calculations. We have also identified a relatively surprising phenomena that is purely hydrodynamic: the higher-resolved simulations possess substantially different characteristics, including higher infall-velocity, increased temperatures inside 1000 AU, and decreased molecular hydrogen content in the innermost region. Furthermore, we find that disk formation is suppressed in higher-resolution calculations, at least at the times that we can follow the calculation. We discuss the effect this may have on the buildup of disks over the accretion history of the first clump to form as well as the potential for gravitational instabilities to develop and induce fragmentation.

Turk, Matthew J.; Oishi, Jeffrey S.; Abel, Tom; Bryan, Greg

2012-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

251

Cooperative spin decoherence and population transfer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An ensemble of multilevel atoms is a good candidate for a quantum information storage device. The information is encrypted in the collective ground state atomic coherence, which, in the absence of external excitation, is decoupled from the vacuum and therefore decoherence free. However, in the process of manipulation of atoms with light pulses (writing, reading), one inadvertently introduces a coupling to the environment, i.e. a source of decoherence. The dissipation process is often treated as an independent process for each atom in the ensemble, an approach which fails at large atomic optical depths where cooperative effects must be taken into account. In this paper, the cooperative behavior of spin decoherence and population transfer for a system of two, driven multilevel-atoms is studied. Not surprisingly, an enhancement in the decoherence rate is found, when the atoms are separated by a distance that is small compared to an optical wavelength; however, it is found that this rate increases even further for somewhat larger separations for atoms aligned along the direction of the driving field's propagation vector. A treatment of the cooperative modification of optical pumping rates and an effect of polarization swapping between atoms is also discussed, lending additional insight into the origin of the collective decay.

C. Genes; P. R. Berman

2006-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

252

The Chemical Enrichment History of the Magellanic Clouds Field Populations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report the results of our project devoted to study the chemical enrichment history of the field population in the Magellanic Clouds using Ca II triplet spectroscopy.

R. Carrera; C. Gallart; A. Aparicio; E. Costa; E. Hardy; R. A. Mendez; N. E. D. Noel; R. Zinn

2008-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

253

Connectivity mechanisms in a population complex of coastal cod.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In this thesis I have studied connectivity processes affecting the population structure of coastal cod on the Norwegian Skagerrak coast. I have focused on three… (more)

Espeland, Sigurd Heiberg

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Population shifts across U.S. regions affect overall heating ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy use in homes, commercial buildings, manufacturing, and transportation. Coal. ... The share of the U.S. population living in the coldest regions, ...

255

Urban aerosols harbor diverse and dynamic bacterial populations  

Urban aerosols harbor diverse and dynamic bacterial populations Eoin L. Brodie, Todd Z. DeSantis, Jordan P. Moberg Parker, Ingrid X. Zubietta, Yvette M. Piceno, and ...

256

Independent Scientific Advisory Board Human Population Impacts on  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

..................................................................................................................................................23 Chemical Effects ......................................................................................................................................52 Acquisition and Conversion of Water Rights that is expected to continue. Population growth is a primary reason for the conversion through increases in demand

257

Selective population of spin--orbit levels in the autoionization ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Selective population of spin-orbit levels in the autoionization of a polyatomic ... individual spin-orbit components of the X 2111, ionic ground state fol ...

2010-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

258

Visualizing Diurnal Population Change in Urban Areas for Emergency Management  

SciTech Connect

There is an increasing need for a quick, simple method to represent diurnal population change in metropolitan areas for effective emergency management and risk analysis. Many geographic studies rely on decennial U.S. Census data that assume that urban populations are static in space and time. This has obvious limitations in the context of dynamic geographic problems. The U.S. Department of Transportation publishes population data at the transportation analysis zone level in fifteen-minute increments. This level of spatial and temporal detail allows for improved dynamic population modeling. This article presents a methodology for visualizing and analyzing diurnal population change for metropolitan areas based on this readily available data. Areal interpolation within a geographic information system is used to create twenty-four (one per hour) population surfaces for the larger metropolitan area of Salt Lake County, Utah. The resulting surfaces represent diurnal population change for an average workday and are easily combined to produce an animation that illustrates population dynamics throughout the day. A case study of using the method to visualize population distributions in an emergency management context is provided using two scenarios: a chemical release and a dirty bomb in Salt Lake County. This methodology can be used to address a wide variety of problems in emergency management.

Kobayashi, Tetsuo [University of Utah; Medina, Richard M [ORNL; Cova, Thomas [University of Utah

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Urgent supplemental appropriation bill, 1980: Low-income energy assistance program. Hearings before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, House of Representatives, Ninety-Sixth Congress, First Session  

SciTech Connect

Two supplemental budget requests are considered, for low-income full assistance programs. One totals $150 million which, if approved would remain in the Community Services Administration (CSA); the second totals $1.2 billion, which would be, if approved, transferred from CSA to HEW. Specific testimony is presented by Thomas P. O'Neill, Jr. House of Representatives; Patrica Roberts Harris, HEW; and Graciela Olivarez, Community Services Administration. Statements by many other interested members of Congress are presented. (MCW)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Energy savings from operation and maintenance training for apartment boiler heating systems. An energy study on ten low-income apartments  

SciTech Connect

The Portland Energy Office provided operation and maintenance (O&M) training to the operators of boiler heating systems for ten low-income apartment complexes in the Fall of 1990. This study tracked energy usage before and after O&M training to see if savings occurred. Training was provided on both weatherized and non-weatherized apartments to find out if weatherization impacted the amount of O&M savings to be obtained. Also, energy savings from the O&M training and building shell weatherization are compared. The O&M training averaged about four hours per building. Content was adjusted at each site to match needs of the boiler and operator. The Energy Office also provided a boiler tune-up by a service technician. The training stressed low-cost and no-cost measures which operators could either do themselves or hire service help to implement. It also emphasized boiler safety. Nine of the ten apartment complexes in the study used less energy per heating degree-day after the O&M help. Average savings were 10%. Four apartments chosen randomly as controls had negative savings; they used slightly more energy during the same post-O&M time frame. Weatherized and unweatherized apartments showed similar savings after the O&M help, 10% and 11% percent respectively. Savings from weatherization of six of the apartments in the winter of 1988--1989 were also measured. A low average of only 4% was observed, reflecting negative savings in two buildings.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "income gdp population" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Computer Aided Composition System with Interactive Selective Population Climbing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work, we are developing the computer aided composition system. This system aids a person, which knows cellphone or background music of home page or software. This system is implemented with the interactive selective population climbing. We suppose ... Keywords: computer aided composition system, interactive selective population climbing, composing model

Hiroshi Hasui

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Optimizing Epochal Evolutionary Search: Population-Size Dependent Theory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Epochal dynamics, in which long periods of stasis in an evolving population are punctuated by a sudden burst of change, is a common behavior in both natural and artificial evolutionary processes. We analyze the population dynamics for a class of fitness ... Keywords: error threshold, evolutionary search, genetic algorithm, marginal stability, optimization, statistical dynamics

Erik Van Nimwegen; James P. Crutchfield

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Ectropy of diversity measures for populations in Euclidean space  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measures to evaluate the diversity of a set of points (population) in Euclidean space play an important role in a variety of areas of science and engineering. Well-known measures are often used without a clear insight into their quality and many of them ... Keywords: Discrepancy, Ectropy, Klee's measure, Minimum spanning tree, Population diversity measure, Singular values

Bakir Lacevic; Edoardo Amaldi

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Quasi-random initial population for genetic algorithms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The selection of the initial population in a population-based heuristic optimizationmethod is important, since it affects the search for several iterations and often has an influence on the final solution. If no a priori information about the optima ... Keywords: Genetic algorithms, Global continuous optimization, Quasi-random sequences, Random numbers

H. Maaranen; K. Miettinen; M. M. Mäkelä

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Numerical calculation of the moments of the population balance equation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The combined CFD-PBM (population balance models) are computationally intensive, so a possibility is to calculate only a few moments of the probability density function (PDF) of the PBM minimizing the computational costs. However, this formulation results ... Keywords: least squares method, population balance equation, quadrature approximation

C. A. Dorao; H. A. Jakobsen

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Removal of GDP Mandrels From Sputter-Coated Beryllium Capsules for NIF Targets (A25711)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proc. Of 17th Target Fabrication Specialists Meeting, San Diego, California, 2006; To Be Published In Fusion Science And Technology17th Target Fabrication Specialists Meeting San Diego California, US, 2006999613405

Youngblood, K.P.

2006-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

267

The effects of energy policies in China on energy consumption and GDP1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of biogas, stalks and firewood by rural residents by region, and fossil fuel energy consumption refers variable is: Biogas consumption per capita Stalks consumption per capita Firewood consumption per capita FE

Lin, C.-Y. Cynthia

268

Energy-GDP decoupling in a second best world -A case study on India Cline Guivarcha,*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analysis and Forecasting, U.S. Department of Energy, Washington, DC. 274pp. EIA (2008) International Energy Outlook 2008. Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting, U.S. Department of Energy, Washington, DC.S. Department of Energy, Washington, DC. 220pp. EIA (2006) International Energy Outlook 2006. Office

269

Real values derived using the GDP Chain-type Price Index, 2005 = 100.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 8. Estimated average rail transportation rates for coal originating in the Uinta Basin Transportation cost per short ton (nominal) Transportation

270

Some State | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Some State Some State Jump to: navigation, search Some State Governor John Doe (D) Population 10,000,000 (rank: 10) GDP $258.3 billion (rank: 14) Household Income $49,000 (rank: 13) OpenEI Resources Energy Maps 18 (rank: 13) Energy Datasets 15 (rank: 12) Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum. Natural Resources Renewable Energy Value Rank Period Source Wind Potential TBD TBD TBD NREL (via WindPoweringAmerica.gov)

271

SECPOP90: Sector population, land fraction, and economic estimation program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1973 Mr. W. Athey of the Environmental Protection Agency wrote a computer program called SECPOP which calculated population estimates. Since that time, two things have changed which suggested the need for updating the original program - more recent population censuses and the widespread use of personal computers (PCs). The revised computer program uses the 1990 and 1992 Population Census information and runs on current PCs as {open_quotes}SECPOP90.{close_quotes} SECPOP90 consists of two parts: site and regional. The site provides population and economic data estimates for any location within the continental United States. Siting analysis is relatively fast running. The regional portion assesses site availability for different siting policy decisions; i.e., the impact of available sites given specific population density criteria within the continental United States. Regional analysis is slow. This report compares the SECPOP90 population estimates and the nuclear power reactor licensee-provided information. Although the source, and therefore the accuracy, of the licensee information is unknown, this comparison suggests SECPOP90 makes reasonable estimates. Given the total uncertainty in any current calculation of severe accidents, including the potential offsite consequences, the uncertainty within SECPOP90 population estimates is expected to be insignificant. 12 refs., 55 figs., 7 tabs.

Humphreys, S.L.; Rollstin, J.A.; Ridgely, J.N.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Optimal control of population transfer in Markovian open quantum systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There has long been interest to control the transfer of population between specified quantum states. Recent work has optimized the control law for closed system population transfer by using a gradient ascent pulse engineer- ing algorithm [1]. Here, a spin-boson model consisting of two-level atoms which interact with the dissipative environment, is investigated. With opti- mal control, the quantum system can invert the populations of the quantum logic states. The temperature plays an important role in controlling popula- tion transfer. At low temperatures the control has active performance, while at high temperatures it has less erect. We also analyze the decoherence be- havior of open quantum systems with optimal population transfer control, and we find that these controls can prolong the coherence time. We hope that active optimal control can help quantum solid-state-based engineering.

Cuia, Wei; Pan, Yu

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Natural balance of graminicolous aphids in Pakistan. Survey of populations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural balance of graminicolous aphids in Pakistan. Survey of populations Sulaiman HAMID Sind Sugar Industry Research Institute, 14-A, Latifabad III, Hyderabad Sind, Pakistan SUMMARY Aphids attacking gramineous crops were studied in seven climatically and ecologically different regions of Pakistan

Recanati, Catherine

274

Optimal control of population transfer in Markovian open quantum systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There has long been interest to control the transfer of population between specified quantum states. Recent work has optimized the control law for closed system population transfer by using a gradient ascent pulse engineer- ing algorithm [1]. Here, a spin-boson model consisting of two-level atoms which interact with the dissipative environment, is investigated. With opti- mal control, the quantum system can invert the populations of the quantum logic states. The temperature plays an important role in controlling popula- tion transfer. At low temperatures the control has active performance, while at high temperatures it has less erect. We also analyze the decoherence be- havior of open quantum systems with optimal population transfer control, and we find that these controls can prolong the coherence time. We hope that active optimal control can help quantum solid-state-based engineering.

Wei Cui; Zairong Xi; Yu Pan

2010-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

275

Observation of inverted population levels in the FM-1 Spherator  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Inversions in the populations of excited levels in hydrogen and HeII were observed in the FM-1 Spherator. The inversion increases strongly as the ratio of the decay time of the electron temperature to the decay time of the electron density was decreased. Time dependent numerical calculations of the populations were in good agreement with the experimental measurements. More general calculations for high Z hydrogen-like ions are discussed.

Suckewer, S.; Hawryluk, R. J.; Okabayashi, M.; Schmidt, J. A.

1976-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Genetic analysis in the Collaborative Cross breeding population  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Genetic reference populations in model organisms are critical resources for systems genetic analysis of disease related phenotypes. The breeding history of these inbred panels may influence detectable allelic and phenotypic diversity. The existing panel of common inbred strains reflects historical selection biases, and existing recombinant inbred panels have low allelic diversity. All such populations may be subject to consequences of inbreeding depression. The Collaborative Cross (CC) is a mouse reference population with high allelic diversity that is being constructed using a randomized breeding design that systematically outcrosses eight founder strains, followed by inbreeding to obtain new recombinant inbred strains. Five of the eight founders are common laboratory strains, and three are wild-derived. Since its inception, the partially inbred CC has been characterized for physiological, morphological, and behavioral traits. The construction of this population provided a unique opportunity to observe phenotypic variation as new allelic combinations arose through intercrossing and inbreeding to create new stable genetic combinations. Processes including inbreeding depression and its impact on allelic and phenotypic diversity were assessed. Phenotypic variation in the CC breeding population exceeds that of existing mouse genetic reference populations due to both high founder genetic diversity and novel epistatic combinations. However, some focal evidence of allele purging was detected including a suggestive QTL for litter size in a location of changing allele frequency. Despite these inescapable pressures, high diversity and precision for genetic mapping remain. These results demonstrate the potential of the CC population once completed and highlight implications for development of related populations. Supplementary material consists of Supplementary Table 1 Phenotypic means, variances, ranges and heritabilities for all traits and generations, Supplementary Table 2, all phenotypic values, Supplementary Table 3, multiple QTL mapping.

Philip, Vivek [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Sokoloff, Greta [ORNL; Ackert-Bicknell, Cheryl [Jackson Laboratory, The, Bar Harbor, ME; Striz, Martin [University of Kentucky, Lexington; Branstetter, Lisa R [ORNL; Beckmann, Melissa [ORNL; Spence, Jason S [ORNL; Jackson, Barbara L [ORNL; Galloway, Leslie D [ORNL; Barker, Gene [ORNL; Wymore, Ann M [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Hunsicker, Patricia R [ORNL; Durtschi, David W [University of Kentucky, Lexington; Shaw, Ginger S [University of Kentucky, Lexington; Shinpock, Sarah G [ORNL; Manly, Kenneth F [University of Kentucky, Lexington; Miller, Darla R [ORNL; Donahue, Kevin [University at Buffalo, NY; Culiat, Cymbeline T [ORNL; Churchill, Gary A [Jackson Laboratory, The, Bar Harbor, ME; Lariviere, William R [University of Pittsburgh; Palmer, Abraham [University of Chicago; O'Hara, Bruce [University of Kentucky; Voy, Brynn H [ORNL; Chesler, Elissa J [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Global Energy Demand, Supply, Consequences, Opportunities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/Joule Population-Energy Equation Power = N x (GDP/N) x (Watts/GDP) C Emission Rate = Power x (Carbon/J) #12;d HVAC Onsite Power & Heat Natural Ventilation, Indoor Environment Building Materials Appliances Thermal · Building Materials Tenants · Lease space from Developer or Property Manager · Professional firms, retailers

Knowles, David William

278

CA manager framework: creating customised workflows for ontology population and semantic annotation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present the Content Augmentation Manager Framework for creating various adapted workflows for ontology population and semantic annotation based on Semantic Web recommendations and UIMA precepts. This framework supports ontology population from text ... Keywords: ontology population, semantic annotation

Danica Damljanovic; Florence Amardeilh; Kalina Bontcheva

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Population genomics: Whole-genome analysis of polymorphism and divergence in Drosophila simulans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PLoS BIOLOGY Population Genomics: Whole-Genome Analysis ofwww.plosbiology.org Population Genomics of D. simulans Table11 | e310 Population Genomics of D. simulans Table S15. GO

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Population Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling for the Human  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Population Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling for the Human Population Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling for the Human Lactational Transfer of PCB 153 with Consideration of Worldwide Human Biomonitoring Results Title Population Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling for the Human Lactational Transfer of PCB 153 with Consideration of Worldwide Human Biomonitoring Results Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2008 Authors Redding, Laurel E., Michael D. Sohn, Thomas E. McKone, Shu-Li Wang, Dennis P. H. Hsieh, and Raymond S. H. Yang Journal Environmental Health Perspectives Volume 116 Issue 12 Pagination 1629-1634 Keywords bayesian inference, body burden, environmental chemistry, exposure & risk group, human milk biomonitoring, indoor environment department, lactational transfer, pcb 153, physiologically-based pharmacokinetic modeling, pollutant fate and transport modeling, poly-chlorinated biphenyls, reverse dosimetry

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "income gdp population" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Session: What do we know about cumulative or population impacts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This session at the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats workshop consisted of a panel discussion followed by a discussion/question and answer period. The panelists were Paul Kerlinger, Curry and Kerlinger, LLC, Al Manville, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and Bill Kendall, US Geological Service. The panel addressed the potential cumulative impacts of wind turbines on bird and bat populations over time. Panel members gave brief presentations that touched on what is currently known, what laws apply, and the usefulness of population modeling. Topics addressed included which sources of modeling should be included in cumulative impacts, comparison of impacts from different modes of energy generation, as well as what research is still needed regarding cumulative impacts of wind energy development on bird and bat populations.

Kerlinger, Paul; Manville, Al; Kendall, Bill

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

All-optical reversible logic gate via adiabatic population transfer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Toffoli gate is an essential logic element, which permits implementation of a reversible processor. It is of relevance both for classical as well as quantum logics. We propose and theoretically study all-optical implementations of three-bit and four-bit Toffoli gates by application of adiabatic population transfer techniques. For a three-bit Toffoli gate we use variants of stimulated Raman adiabatic passage (STIRAP) processes in a $\\Lambda$-type level scheme, driven by two laser pulses at sufficiently large detunings. For the implementation of a four-bit Toffoli gate, we apply reversible adiabatic population transfer in five-level quantum systems, interacting with three laser pulses. We demonstrate correct all-optical implementation of the truth table of three-bit and four-bit Toffoli gates. Moreover, we derive conditions for adiabatic evolution of the population dynamics and robust operation of the gates.

G. Grigoryan; V. Chaltykyan; E. Gazazyan; O. Tikhova; T. Halfmann

2013-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

283

"Table HC15.13 Lighting Usage Indicators by Four Most Populated...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Lighting Usage Indicators by Four Most Populated States, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,"Housing Units (millions)","Four Most Populated States" "Lighting Usage...

284

Population shifts across U.S. regions affect overall heating and ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Since the nation's founding, the population of the United States has migrated westward. The advent of air conditioning nearly a century ago contributed to population ...

285

Table D1. Population, U.S. Gross Domestic Product, and ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table D1. Population, U.S. Gross Domestic Product, and Implicit Price Deflator, 1949-2011: Year: Population: U.S. Gross Domestic Product: United States 1

286

Population and conservation genomics of forest trees: seeing the forest for the trees  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DB, Kremer A: Forest tree genomics: Growing resources andPopulation and conservation genomics of forest trees: seeingPopulation and conservation genomics of forest trees: seeing

Eckert, Andrew

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Diechmann U: Methodologies to Improve Global Population Estimates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper discusses some of the technical issues involved in the development of a georeferenced population database, including urban extents, currently being developed by CIESIN and partner organizations, using ArcGIS. The database will be made available as three separate data products: i) human settlements database (points), ii) urban extents (polygons) derived from satellite imagery and additional geographic data sources (such as DCW), and iii) urban-rural surface (grid). To produce the urban-rural surfaces, we developed a mass-conserving algorithm that reallocates people into urban areas, within each administrative unit, providing a more accurate representation of the distribution of human population. 1.

Francesca Pozzi; Deborah Balk; Gregory Yetman; Andy Nelson; Uwe Deichmann

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Food web complexity and chaotic population Gregor F. Fussmann1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

REPORT Food web complexity and chaotic population dynamics Gregor F. Fussmann1 * and Gerd Heber2 1 their complexity increases. We determined the dynamical stability of a universe of mathematical, nonlinear food web, chaotic dynamics increases with the number of trophic levels in a food web but decreases with the degree

Fussman, Gregor

289

Distribution et association des inversions chromosomiques dans trois populations naturelles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, one on each of the major autosome arms, are cosmopolitan. The Tunisian popu- lation shows the greatest distribution of cosmopolitan inversions between individuals of the French population is observed in the Tunisian lines. Linkage disequilibrium exists between pair of cosmopolitan inversions of the #12;second

Recanati, Catherine

290

SOME EFFECTS OF DREDGING ON POPULATIONS OF MACROBENTHIC ORGANISMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

populations were reduced, but there was no evidence of mass mortality. Recovery of biomass in the channel) and Reish (1959) established that 1.5 mm and 1.4 mm mesh sieves recovered 90% of the biomass from. The data were expressed as number of organ- isms/wet weight/dry weight (biomass) per m2 of substratum

291

Population Files for use with CAP88 at Los Alamos  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CAP88 (Clean Air Act Assessment Package 1988) is a computer model developed for the US Environmental Protection Agency to assess the potential dose from radionuclide emissions to air and to demonstrate compliance with the Clean Air Act. It has options to calculate either individual doses, in units of mrem, or a collective dose, also called population dose, in units of person-rem. To calculate the collective dose, CAP88 uses a population file such as LANL.pop, that lists the number of people in each sector (N, NNE, NE, etc.) as a function of distance (1 to 2 km, etc.) out to a maximum radius of 80 km. Early population files are described in the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Environmental Reports for 1985 (page 14) and subsequent years. LA-13469-MS describes a population file based on the 1990 census. These files have been updated several times, most recently in 2006 for CAP88 version 3. The 2006 version used the US census for 2000. The present paper describes the 2012 updates, using the 2010 census.

McNaughton, Michael W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Brock, Burgandy R [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

292

Electron Subband Population and Mobility in Asymmetric Coupled Quantum Wells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The electron subband energy and population engineering by inserting a thin AlGaAs barrier inside a GaAs quantum well (QW) is considered. The specific voltage across the coupled QW's which arises due to the asymmetric deformation of electron wave function ... Keywords: electron-phonon scattering in a quantum well, photovoltaic effect

Juras Pozela; Karolis Pozela; Vida Juciene And Audrius Namajunas

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Molecular pulses: Population inversion with positively chirped short pulses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Molecular pulses: Population inversion with positively chirped short pulses Jianshu Cao of molecular systems can be achieved with intense positively chirped broadband laser pulses. To provide and a four-level model is designed to demonstrate for molecular systems the correlation between the sign

Cao, Jianshu

294

Periodic solution of single population models on time scales  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By using the calculus on time scales, we study and establish criterion for the existence of periodic solutions of some scalar dynamical equations on time scales. The existence of periodic solutions for some concrete well-known single population models ... Keywords: Coincidence degree theory, Logistic equations, Periodic solutions, Time scales

Jimin Zhang; Meng Fan; Huaiping Zhu

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

RESEARCH ARTICLE Modeling population connectivity by ocean currents,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

this connectivity between distant populations is key to their effective conservation and management. For many marine between distant patches of suitable habitat. Recent work has focused on the biophysics of marine larval illustrate how this connectivity can be analyzed using graph theory--an effective approach for exploring

Queensland, University of

296

Aeration Due to Breaking Waves. Part I: Bubble Populations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The population of bubbles produced by breaking waves in (10 m) winds of up to 12 m s?1 is analyzed using calibrated images from a vertical pencil-beam sonar system placed on the seabed near the Dutch coast. The structure in the images is ...

A. Graham; D. K. Woolf; A. J. Hall

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Binary populations and stellar dynamics in young clusters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We first summarize work that has been done on the effects of binaries on theoretical population synthesis of stars and stellar phenomena. Next, we highlight the influence of stellar dynamics in young clusters by discussing a few candidate UFOs (unconventionally formed objects) like intermediate mass black holes, Eta Carinae, Zeta Puppis, Gamma Velorum and WR 140.

D. Vanbeveren; H. Belkus; J. Van Bever; N. Mennekens

2008-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

298

Binary populations and stellar dynamics in young clusters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We first summarize work that has been done on the effects of binaries on theoretical population synthesis of stars and stellar phenomena. Next, we highlight the influence of stellar dynamics in young clusters by discussing a few candidate UFOs (unconventionally formed objects) like intermediate mass black holes, Eta Carinae, Zeta Puppis, Gamma Velorum and WR 140.

Vanbeveren, D; Van Bever, J; Mennekens, N

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Modelling life cycle and population dynamics of Nostocales (cyanobacteria)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cyanobacteria of the order Nostocales found in lakes in temperate regions are generally assumed to benefit from climate change. To predict their future development under varying environmental conditions, we developed a mathematical model that simulates ... Keywords: Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii, Hasse diagram, Life cycle, Nostocales, Population dynamics, Shallow lake

K. D. Jöhnk; R. Brüggemann; J. Rücker; B. Luther; U. Simon; B. Nixdorf; C. Wiedner

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Analyses of Lettuce Drop Incidence and Population Structure of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum and S. minor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sclerotinia sclerotiorum on canola. Phytopathology 82:875-sclerotiorum populations from canola (17), cabbage (7), and

Subbarao, K V

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "income gdp population" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Analyses of lettuce drop incidence and population structure of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum and S-minor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sclerotinia sclerotiorum on canola. Phytopathology 82:875-sclerotiorum populations from canola (17), cabbage (7), and

Wu, B M; Subbarao, Krishna V

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

FASB Statement No. 109, Accounting for Income Taxes APB Statement No. 3, Financial Statements Restated for General Price-Level Changes AICPA Statement of Position 93-3, Rescission of Accounting Principles Board Statements ISSUE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Enterprises located in countries with highly inflationary economies may prepare financial statements restated for general price-level changes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles in the United States. The tax bases of assets and liabilities of those enterprises are often restated for the effects of inflation. For those enterprises, the issues are: 1. How temporary differences should be computed under Statement 109 2. How deferred income tax expense or benefit for the year should be determined. EITF DISCUSSION The Task Force reached a consensus that when preparing financial statements restated for general price-level changes using end-of-current-year purchasing power units, temporary differences under Statement 109 are determined based on the difference between the indexed tax basis amount of the asset or liability and the related price-level restated amount reported in the financial statements. Copyright © 1993, Financial Accounting Standards Board Not for redistribution

unknown authors

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Waveform correlation methods for identifying populations of calibration events  

SciTech Connect

An approach for systematically screening large volumes of continuous data for repetitive events identified as mining explosions on basis of temporal and amplitude population characteristics. The method extends event clustering through waveform correlation with a new source-region-specific detector. The new signal subspace detector generalizes the matched filter and can be used to increase the number of events associated with a given cluster, thereby increasing the reliability of diagnostic cluster population characteristics. The method can be applied to obtain bootstrap ground truth explosion waveforms for testing discriminants, where actual ground truth is absent. The same events, if associated with to a particular mine, may help calibrate velocity models. The method may also assist earthquake hazard risk assessment by providing what amounts to blasting logs for identified mines. The cluster event lists can be reconciled against earthquake catalogs to screen explosions, otherwise hard to identify from the catalogs.

Harris, D.B.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Military use of depleted uranium assessment of prolonged population exposure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work is an exposure assessment for a population living in an area contaminated by use of depleted uranium (DU) weapons. RESRAD 5.91 code is used to evaluate the average effective dose delivered from 1, 10, 20 cm depths of contaminated soil, in a residential farmer scenario. Critical pathway and group are identified in soil inhalation or ingestion and children playing with the soil, respectively. From available information on DU released on targeted sites, both critical and average exposure can leave to toxicological hazards; annual dose limit for population can be exceeded on short-term period (years) for soil inhalation. As a consequence, in targeted sites cleaning up must be planned on the basis of measured concentration, when available, while special cautions have to be adopted altogether to reduce unaware exposures, taking into account the amount of the avertable dose.

Giannardi, C

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Dental radiography exposure of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki populations  

SciTech Connect

Dental radiography doses in Hiroshima and Nagasaki were estimated on the basis of survey data from dental hospitals and clinics in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, and doses were measured by thermoluminescent dosimeters and a phantom. Doses to organs, including the lens, pituitary fossa, thyroid gland, and skin were calculated from data obtained during a 2-week survey in both cities. The mean caput doses were calculated from the data indicating frequency per year and were tabulated by organs, age, teeth examined, type of examination, population, sex, and city. No significant difference was observed by age, population, sex, or city. Currently the doses incurred during dental radiography may not be sufficiently high to cause bias in the assessments for late radiation effects among atomic-bomb survivors. However, the mean caput thyroid doses of 62 mrad and 67 mrad in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, respectively, cannot be ignored from the standpoint of their potential in contributing to radiation-induced carcinogenesis.

Antoku, S.; Hoshi, M.; Russell, W.J.; Kihara, T.; Sawada, S.; Takeshita, K.; Otake, M.; Yoshinaga, H.; Beach, D.R.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Developing a Modeling Framework for Assessing Population Impacts of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Developing a Modeling Framework for Assessing Population Impacts of Developing a Modeling Framework for Assessing Population Impacts of Residential Air Quality Policies Speaker(s): Jennifer Logue Date: November 13, 2012 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Brett Singer People spend the majority of their time in residences and the health burden of indoor air is significant. However, the definitions of "acceptable" and "good" indoor air quality (IAQ), and the most effective, energy efficient methods for achieving various levels of IAQ are still matters of research and debate. Current ventilation standards focus on minimum requirements for overall and mechanically provided ventilation rates, and vented combustion equipment, and require only the installation of kitchen and bath exhaust fans for source control. These standards generally are

307

Hierarchical population model with a carrying capacity distribution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A time- and space-discrete model for the growth of a rapidly saturating local biological population $N(x,t)$ is derived from a hierarchical random deposition process previously studied in statistical physics. Two biologically relevant parameters, the probabilities of birth, $B$, and of death, $D$, determine the carrying capacity $K$. Due to the randomness the population depends strongly on position, $x$, and there is a distribution of carrying capacities, $\\Pi (K)$. This distribution has self-similar character owing to the imposed hierarchy. The most probable carrying capacity and its probability are studied as a function of $B$ and $D$. The effective growth rate decreases with time, roughly as in a Verhulst process. The model is possibly applicable, for example, to bacteria forming a "towering pillar" biofilm. The bacteria divide on randomly distributed nutrient-rich regions and are exposed to random local bactericidal agent (antibiotic spray). A gradual overall temperature change away from optimal growth co...

Indekeu, J O

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Population exposure from the fuel cycle: Review and future direction  

SciTech Connect

The legacy of radiation exposures confronting man arises from two historical sources of energy, the sun and radioactive decay. Contemporary man continues to be dependent on these two energy sources, which include the nuclear fuel cycle. Radiation exposures from all energy sources should be examined, with particular emphasis on the nuclear fuel cycle, incidents such as Chernobyl and Three Mile Island. In addition to risk estimation, concepts such as de minimis, life shortening as a measure of risk, and competing risks as projected into the future must be considered in placing radiation exposures in perspective. The utility of these concepts is in characterizing population exposures for decision makers in a manner that the public may judge acceptable. All these viewpoints are essential in the evaluation of population exposure from the nuclear fuel cycle.

Richmond, C.R.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Can Population III Stars at High Redshifts produce GRB's?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gamma ray bursts are the most luminous physical phenomena in the universe, consisting of flashes of gamma rays that last from seconds to hours. There have been attempts to observe gamma ray bursts, for example, from population III stars of about 500 solar mass at high redshifts. Here we argue that collapse of such high mass stars does not lead to gamma ray burst as their core collapse temperatures are not sufficient to produce gamma rays, leading to GRBs.

C. Sivaram; Kenath Arun

2010-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

310

Improving the assessment of instream flow needs for fish populations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Instream flow requirements are one of the most frequent and most costly environmental issues that must be addressed in developing hydroelectric projects. Existing assessment methods for determining instream flow requirements have been criticized for not including all the biological response mechanisms that regulate fishery resources. A new project has been initiated to study the biological responses of fish populations to altered stream flows and to develop improved ways of managing instream flows. 21 refs., 3 figs.

Sale, M.J. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Otto, R.G. (Otto (R.G.) and Associates, Arlington, VA (USA))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Stellar Population in LLAGN.I: Ground-based observations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(Abridge): We present a spectroscopic study of the stellar populations of Low Luminosity AGN (LLAGN). Our main goal is to determine whether the stars who live in the innermost (100 pc-scale) regions of these galaxies are in some way related to the emission line properties, which would imply a link between the stellar population and the ionization mechanism. High signal to noise, ground based long-slit spectra in the 3500--5500 A interval were collected for 60 galaxies.Our main findings are: (1) Few LLAGN have a detectable young (weak [OI] emission, but rare (10 %) in LLAGN with stronger [OI]. This is intriguing since LLAGN with weak [OI] have been previously hypothesized to be ``transition objects'' in which both an AGN and young stars contribute to the emission-line excitation. Massive stars, if present, are completely outshone by intermediate age and old stars in the optical. This happens in at least a couple of objects where independent UV spectroscopy detects young starbursts not seen in the optical. (4) Objects with predominantly old stars span the whole range of [OI]/Halpha values, but (5) sources with significant young and/or intermediate age populations are nearly all (90%) weak [OI] emitters.

Roberto Cid Fernandes; Rosa M. Gonzalez Delgado; Henrique Schmitt; Thaisa Storchi-Bergmann; Lucimara P. Martins; Enrique Perez; Timothy Heckman; Claus Leitherer; Daniel Schaerer

2004-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

312

Policy-relevant science to help solve the carbon-climate problem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

but use 1/10th the energy Happiness and GDP #12;Myers, 2004 American income (and energy use) increasesPolicy-relevant science to help solve the carbon-climate problem Ken Caldeira Carnegie Institution to climate stabilization Stabilize climate Remove radiatively active gases from atmosphere Produce energy

313

The development of the contested city form of Shenzhen, China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The population of Shenzhen Special Economic Zone has exploded, within twenty-three years, from thirty thousand to 4.7 million with average 28 percent annual per capita GDP increase. What city forms have been sustaining ...

Tian, Hao, 1978-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Energy policy: Comparative effects on minority population groups  

SciTech Connect

For a number of years, analyses of minority household energy demand have been supported by the United States Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Economic Impact and Diversity (formerly the Office of Minority Economic Impact). The intention of these analyses has been to characterize patterns of energy demand by various demographic, regional and socioeconomic groups and to develop analytical tools to assess the distributive impact of energy prices and policy on these groups. The model supports strategic objectives outlined by the Department of Energy to explicitly recognize and promote equity in state public utility commission decisions and to assess the potential impact of federal and state energy policy on demographically diverse groups as reported in the Department`s Annual Energy Outlook and the upcoming National Energy Policy Plan. The legislation mandating the Office of Economic Impact and Diversity had been premised on the assumption that patterns of energy demand for minority households are different from the population as a whole. Determining the validity of this premise and its potential economic impact on different population groups has been a major objective of these analyses. Consequently, the recripriocal impacts of energy policy on demographic groups and energy consumption and expenditure dynamics on policy formulation and strategy is a central objective of these studies. Residential energy demand research has been substantial in the past twenty years. Insightful and useful research has been done in this area. However, none of this research has addressed the potential differences in the residential energy demand structure among various population groups. Recent work does compare energy and electricity demand elasticities for non-Latino Whites, with the demand elasticities for Latinos and Blacks. This research is particularly important for examination of questions related to the economic welfare implications of national energy policy.

Poyer, D.A.; Henderson, L.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Energy Distributions and the Formation Times of Spheroidal Populations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I review recent progress in exploring the formation times of spheroidal stellar populations (elliptical galaxies and large spiral bulges) using spectrophotometric techniques. A quickly growing body of evidence shows that although massive spheroids can form at early times, there are strong environmental dependencies, and major transitions in star formation histories and even morphologies are detectable to surprisingly small redshifts (z ~ 0.2). These features are consistent with neither the strict monolithic collapse nor hierarchical merging scenarios. Restframe UV observations are a promising means of improving our understanding of spheroid evolution.

Robert W. O'Connell

1999-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

316

Population viability analysis of the Endangered shortnose sturgeon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study used population viability analysis (PVA) to partition the influences of potential threats to the endangered shortnose sturgeon (Acipenser brevirostrum). A workshop brought together experts to help identify potential threats including groundwater withdrawal, poor water quality, saltwater intrusion, mercury effects, harvest as by-catch, and sedimentation of spawning habitat. During the course of the project, we eliminated some threats and added new ones. Groundwater withdrawal was dismissed after a study failed to identify connection with groundwater and the majority of pumping is from a confined aquifer. We also eliminated activities on Fort Stewart as influences on spawning habitat because any successful spawning must occur upstream of Fort Stewart. We added climate change to the list of threats based on our assessment of temperature effects and expectations of sea-level rise. Our study highlighted the role of populations in nearby rivers in providing metapopulation support, raising the concern that the population in the Ogeechee River acts as a demographic sink. As part of this study, we carried out a field sampling study to analyze effects of training activities on headwater streams. We developed a new methodology for sampling design as part of this effort and used a mixed-modeling approach to identify relationships between land cover-land use, including those associated with military training activity and water quality. We found that tank training was associated with higher suspended sediment and equipment training was associated with higher organic carbon) and water quality. We detected effects of training on suspended sediment and organic carbon. We also carried out a field sampling effort in the Canoochee and Ogeechee Rivers. In the Ogeechee River, we found that dissolved oxygen in 40% of measurements during summer were below 4 mg L-1. To evaluate mercury as a potential threat, we developed a mercury uptake model and analyzed mercury levels in amphipod prey and sturgeon eggs. These did not exceed EPA guidelines. Finally, we developed a PVA model that including linkages between shortnose sturgeon growth, reproduction, and survival and each remaining threat; All three had significant influences. Preliminary simulations suggest that elevated temperatures under future climate will extirpate this population and add support to the hypothesis that this species requires access to spawning habitat far upstream to persist.

Jager, Yetta [ORNL; Bevelhimer, Mark S [ORNL; Peterson, Douglas L. [University of Georgia, Athens, GA

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

On the Absence of Population Bias in the Tornado Climatology of Southwestern Ontario  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rural population densities and tornado incidence (confirmed and probable categories) are compared for noncoastal regions in the southwestern Ontario peninsula. No apparent relationship is found between rural population density and F0–F4 ...

Patrick King

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

A HMM-based hierarchical framework for long-term population projection of small areas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Population Projection is the numerical outcome of a specific set of assumptions about future population changes. It is indispensable to the planning of sites as almost all successive planning activities such as the identification of land and housing ...

Bin Jiang; Huidong Jin; Nianjun Liu; Mike Quirk; Ben Searle

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Homogeneity of Powassan virus populations in naturally infected Ixodes scapularis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Powassan virus (POWV, Flaviviridae: Flavivirus) is the sole North American member of the tick-borne encephalitis complex and consists of two distinct lineages that are maintained in ecologically discrete enzootic transmission cycles. The underlying genetic mechanisms that lead to niche partitioning in arboviruses are poorly understood. Therefore, intra- and interhost genetic diversity was analyzed to determine if POWV exists as a quasispecies in nature and quantify selective pressures within and between hosts. In contrast to previous reports for West Nile virus (WNV), significant intrahost genetic diversity was not observed. However, pN (0.238) and d{sub N}/d{sub S} ratios (0.092) for interhost diversity were similar to those of WNV. Combined, these data suggest that purifying selection and/or population bottlenecks constrain quasispecies diversity within ticks. These same selective and stochastic mechanisms appear to drive minor sequence changes between ticks. Moreover, Powassan virus populations seem not to be structured as quasispecies in naturally infected adult deer ticks.

Brackney, Doug E.; Brown, Ivy K.; Nofchissey, Robert A.; Fitzpatrick, Kelly A. [University of New Mexico School of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Albuquerque, New Mexico (United States); Ebel, Gregory D., E-mail: gebel@salud.unm.ed [University of New Mexico School of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Albuquerque, New Mexico (United States)

2010-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

320

GIS and plume dispersion modeling for population exposure assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The use of Pollutant Plume Dispersion Models is widespread in the evaluation of point sources of air pollution. These models provide valuable insight into the concentration and dispersion of hazardous materials throughout the atmosphere. Traditional methods of dispersion modeling for the permitting of new sources and the monitoring of existing sources have allowed much room for error in terms of the effect of the pollutants on nearby populations (Hardikar, 1995). The capabilities of GIS technology offer an improved method of conducting air quality modeling for permitting, remediation studies, and environmental monitoring. GIS has the ability to develop and manage a comprehensive database of model output, map layers, and demographic data that can prove extremely valuable in the modeling process. This data can serve to extend the capabilities of air pollution dispersion modeling from mere estimation of concentrations to comprehensive exposure assessment of neighboring populations (Lowry, et al. 1995, Maslia, et al. 1994). A study of the Monticello power plant in northeast Texas was conducted using the SCREEN3 mathematical plume dispersion model, US Census Bureau demographic data, and a GIS to examine the effects of the plant output on the people living in the seven county area surrounding the plant.

Archer, Jeffrey Keith

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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321

Radiation protection training for diverse general employee populations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiation protection training for the general employee at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory has undergone a great deal of restructuring in the last two years. The number of personnel totally dedicated to nuclear facilities is less than a fifth of our employees and the percentage of contracted employees who are dedicated radiation workers is much smaller. However, the aging of our facilities and increasing emphasis on environmental control means that everyone needs to understand the basics of radiation protection. In accordance with changing DOE guidelines and internal ORNL policies, greater emphasis has been placed on keeping training focused on current issues, training the total workforce, and requiring some type of testing or feedback mechanism. This report describes efforts to instill respect, but not fear, of radiation in the work environment. Flexible tools are being developed to meet this objective for several diverse general employee populations. Continuing efforts include consideration of computer-based training for retraining, developing additional modules for specialized groups and jobs, and testing/documentation appropriate to each population segment. 6 refs.

Copenhaver, E.D.; Houser, B.S.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Yunnan-III models for Evolutionary population synthesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We build the Yunnan-III evolutionary population synthesis (EPS) models by using the MESA stellar evolution code, BaSeL stellar spectra library and the initial mass functions (IMFs) of Kroupa and Salpeter, and present colours and integrated spectral energy distributions (ISEDs) of solar-metallicity stellar populations (SPs) in the range of 1Myr-15 Gyr. The main characteristic of the Yunnan-III EPS models is the usage of a set of self-consistent solar-metallicity stellar evolutionary tracks (the masses of stars are from 0.1 to 100Msun). This set of tracks is obtained by using the state-of-the-art MESA code. MESA code can evolve stellar models through thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB) phase for low- and intermediate-mass stars. By comparisons, we confirm that the inclusion of TP-AGB stars make the V-K, V-J and V-R colours of SPs redder and the infrared flux larger at ages log(t/yr)>7.6 (the differences reach the maximum at log(t/yr)~8.6, ~0.5-0.2mag for colours, ~2 times for K-band flux). The st...

Zhang, F; Han, Z; Zhuang, Y; Kang, X

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Genetic variants associated with fasting glucose and insulin concentrations in an ethnically diverse population: results from the Population Architecture using Genomics and Epidemiology (PAGE) study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

USA. 19 Office of Population Genomics, National Human GenomeArchitecture using Genomics and Epidemiology (PAGE) Study.Architecture using Genomics and Epidemiology (PAGE) study.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

The impacts of population change on carbon emissions in China during 1978-2008  

SciTech Connect

This study examines the impacts of population size, population structure, and consumption level on carbon emissions in China from 1978 to 2008. To this end, we expanded the stochastic impacts by regression on population, affluence, and technology model and used the ridge regression method, which overcomes the negative influences of multicollinearity among independent variables under acceptable bias. Results reveal that changes in consumption level and population structure were the major impact factors, not changes in population size. Consumption level and carbon emissions were highly correlated. In terms of population structure, urbanization, population age, and household size had distinct effects on carbon emissions. Urbanization increased carbon emissions, while the effect of age acted primarily through the expansion of the labor force and consequent overall economic growth. Shrinking household size increased residential consumption, resulting in higher carbon emissions. Households, rather than individuals, are a more reasonable explanation for the demographic impact on carbon emissions. Potential social policies for low carbon development are also discussed. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examine the impacts of population change on carbon emissions in China. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We expand the STIRPAT model by containing population structure factors in the model. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The population structure includes age structure, urbanization level, and household size. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The ridge regression method is used to estimate the model with multicollinearity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The population structure plays a more important role compared with the population size.

Zhu Qin, E-mail: zhuqin@fudan.edu.cn; Peng Xizhe, E-mail: xzpeng@fudan.edu.cn

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

325

Statistical Journal of the United Nations ECE 23 (2006) 110 1 New forecast: Population decline postponed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Statistical Journal of the United Nations ECE 23 (2006) 1­10 1 IOS Press New forecast: Population, Finland fStatistics Norway, Oslo, Norway Abstract. We present results of a probabilistic forecast for the population in 18 European countries, to 2050. Other forecasts have recently predicted a falling population

Løw, Erik

326

A Population Study of Golden Eagles in the Altamont Pass Wind Resource Area: Population Trend Analysis, 1994-1997  

SciTech Connect

The wind industry has annually reported 28-43 turbine blade strike casualties of golden eagles in the Altamont Pass Wind Resource Area, and many more carcasses have doubtless gone unnoticed. Because this species is especially sensitive to adult survival rate changes, we focused upon estimating the demographic trend of the population. In aerial surveys, we monitored survival within a sample of 179 radio-tagged eagles over a four-year period. We also obtained data on territory occupancy and reproduction of about 65 eagle pairs residing in the area. Of 61 recorded deaths of radio-tagged eagles during the four-year investigation, 23 (38%) were caused by wind turbine blade strikes. Additional fatalities were unrecorded because blade strikes sometimes destroy radio transmitters. Annual survival was estimated at 0.7867 (SE=0.0263) for non-territorial eagles and 0.8964 (SE=0.0371) for territorial ones. Annual reproduction was 0.64 (SE=0.08) young per territorial pair (0.25 per female). These parameters were used to estimate population growth rates under different modeling frameworks. At present, there are indications that a reserve of non-breeding adults still exists, i.e., there is an annual territorial reoccupancy rate of 100% and a low incidence (3%) of subadults as members of breeding pairs.

Predatory Bird Research Group, Long Marine Laboratory

1999-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

327

Individual- and Neighbourhood-Level Indicators of Subjective Well-Being in a Small and Poor Eastern Cape Township: The Effect of Health, Social Capital, Marital Status, and Income  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract Our study used multilevel regression analysis to identify individual- and neighbourhood-level factors that determine individual-level subjective well-being in Rhini, a deprived suburb of Grahamstown in the Eastern Cape province of South Africa. The Townsend index and Gini coefficient were used to investigate whether contextual neighbourhood-level differences in socioeconomic status determined individual-level subjective well-being. Crime experience, health status, social capital, and demographic variables were assessed at the individual level. The indicators of subjective well-being were estimated with a two-level random-intercepts and fixed slopes model. Social capital, health and marital status (all p \\.001), followed by income level (p \\.01) and the Townsend score (p \\.05) were significantly related to individual-level subjective well-being outcomes. Our findings showed that individual-level subjective well-being is influenced by neighbourhood-level socioeconomic status as measured by the Townsend deprivation score. Individuals reported higher levels of subjective well-being in less deprived neighbourhoods. Here we wish to highlight the role of context for subjective well-being, and to suggest that subjective well-being outcomes may also be defined in ecological terms. We hope the findings are useful for implementing programs and interventions designed to achieve greater subjective well-being for people living in deprived areas.

J. M. Cramm; A. P. Nieboer; A. P. Nieboer; V. Møller

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

ORISE: Worker Health Studies - Testing Beryllium Vendor Populations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oak Ridge Institute for Science Education Oak Ridge Institute for Science Education Beryllium Testing Vendor Populations When former employees at 25 closed U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) beryllium vendor companies needed an entity to provide medical screening and tests related to their beryllium exposure, the agency chose the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) to manage the program. ORISE administers a brief health questionnaire and a blood test known as the beryllium lymphocyte proliferation test (BeLPT) to determine if a worker has been sensitized to the light metal or if he or she needs to be evaluated further for chronic beryllium disease (CBD). If a worker has at least one abnormal BeLPT, he or she is referred for further evaluation through the Energy Employees Occupational Illness

329

Nevada Test Site tortoise population monitoring study. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Tortoise Population Monitoring Study was initiated to determine and monitor the density of desert tortoises (Gopherus agassizii) on the Nevada Test Site. Quadrat sampling was conducted following methodology described in the Draft Desert Tortoise Recovery Plan (FWS, 1993). So few tortoises were found that densities could not be calculated. Based on estimates of capture probabilities and densities from other studies, it was determined that 1-km{sup 2} (0.4 mi{sup 2}) plots did not contain enough tortoises for estimating densities with the Recovery Plan methods. It was recommended that additional surveys on the Nevada Test Site using those methods not be conducted. Any future efforts to monitor desert tortoise densities should start by identifying other possible methods, determining their relative power to detect changes, and estimating their cost.

Mueller, J.M.; Zander, K.K.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Practical Methods for Locating Abandoned Wells in Populated Areas  

SciTech Connect

An estimated 12 million wells have been drilled during the 150 years of oil and gas production in the United States. Many old oil and gas fields are now populated areas where the presence of improperly plugged wells may constitute a hazard to residents. Natural gas emissions from wells have forced people from their houses and businesses and have caused explosions that injured or killed people and destroyed property. To mitigate this hazard, wells must be located and properly plugged, a task made more difficult by the presence of houses, businesses, and associated utilities. This paper describes well finding methods conducted by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) that were effective at two small towns in Wyoming and in a suburb of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

Veloski, G.A.; Hammack, R.W.; Lynn, R.J.

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Effects of alpha populations on tokamak ballooning stability  

SciTech Connect

Fusion product alpha populations can significantly influence tokamak stability due to coupling between the trapped alpha precessional drift and the kinetic ballooning mode frequency. This effect is of particular importance in parameter regimes where the alpha pressure gradient begins to constitute a sizable fraction of the thermal plasma pressure gradient. Careful, quantitative evaluations of these effects are necessary in burning plasma devices such as the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor and the Joint European Torus, and we have continued systematic development of such a kinetic stability model. In this model we have considered a range of different forms for the alpha distribution function and the tokamak equilibrium. Both Maxwellian and slowing-down models have been used for the alpha energy dependence while deeply trapped and, more recently, isotropic pitch angle dependence have been examined.

Spong, D.A.; Sigmar, D.J.; Tsang, K.T.; Ramos, J.J.; Hastings, D.E.; Cooper, W.A.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Over-populated gauge fields on the lattice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study nonequilibrium dynamics of SU(2) pure gauge theory starting from initial over-population, where intense classical gauge fields are characterized by a single momentum scale Q_s. Classical-statistical lattice simulations indicate a quick evolution towards an approximate scaling behavior with exponent 3/2 at intermediate times. Remarkably, the value for the scaling exponent may be understood as arising from the leading O(g^2) contribution in the presence of a time-dependent background field. The phenomenon is associated to weak wave turbulence describing an energy cascade towards higher momenta. This particular aspect is very similar to what is observed for scalar theories, where an effective cubic interaction arises because of the presence of a time-dependent Bose condensate.

J. Berges; S. Schlichting; D. Sexty

2012-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

333

Bayesian Modeling of Population Variability -- Practical Guidance and Pitfalls  

SciTech Connect

With the advent of easy-to-use open-source software for Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) simulation, hierarchical Bayesian analysis is gaining in popularity. This paper presents practical guidance for hierarchical Bayes analysis of typical problems in probabilistic safety assessment (PSA). The guidance is related to choosing parameterizations that accelerate convergence of the MCMC sampling and to illustrating the potential sensitivity of the results to the functional form chosen for the first-stage prior. This latter issue has significant ramifications because the mean of the average population variability curve (PVC) from hierarchical Bayes (or the mean of the point estimate distribution from empirical Bayes) can be very sensitive to this choice in cases where variability is large. Numerical examples are provided to illustrate the issues discussed.

Dana L. Kelly; Corwin L. Atwood

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

TWO POPULATIONS OF MOLECULAR CLOUDS IN THE ANTENNAE GALAXIES  

SciTech Connect

Super star clusters-extremely massive clusters found predominately in starburst environments-are essential building blocks in the formation of galaxies and thought to dominate star formation in the high-redshift universe. However, the transformation from molecular gas into these ultracompact star clusters is not well understood. To study this process, we used the Submillimeter Array and the Plateau de Bure Interferometer to obtain high angular resolution ({approx}1.''5 or 160 pc) images of the Antennae overlap region in CO(2-1) to search for the molecular progenitors of the super star clusters. We resolve the molecular gas distribution into a large number of clouds, extending the differential cloud mass function down to a 5{sigma} completeness limit of 3.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} M{sub Sun }. We identify a distinct break in the mass function around log M{sub mol}/M{sub Sun} Almost-Equal-To 6.5, which separates the molecular clouds into two distinct populations. The smaller, less massive clouds reside in more quiescent areas in the region, while the larger, more massive clouds cluster around regions of intense star formation. A broken power-law fit to the mass function yields slopes of {alpha} = -1.39 {+-} 0.10 and {alpha} = -1.44 {+-} 0.14 for the low- and high-mass cloud population, well matched to the mass function found for super star clusters in the Antennae galaxies. We find large velocity gradients and velocity dispersions at the locations of intense star formation, suggestive of compressive shocks. It is likely that these environmental factors contribute to the formation of the observed massive molecular clouds and super star clusters in the Antennae galaxies.

Wei, Lisa H.; Keto, Eric [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Ho, Luis C. [The Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States)

2012-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

335

362 “Oil price shocks and real GDP growth: empirical evidence for some OECD countries” by R. Jiménez-Rodríguez and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 2004 all publications will carry a motif taken from the €100 banknote. This paper can be downloaded without charge from

Rebeca Jiménez-rodríguez; Marcelo Sánchez; Rebeca Jiménez-rodríguez; Marcelo Sánchez

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Uncloaking a cryptic, threatened rail with molecular markers: origins, connectivity and demography of a recently-discovered population  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

composition of Black Rails from the East Coast wasStrong isolation among rail populations was apparent fromof endangered clapper rail (Rallus longirostris) populations

Girard, Philippe; Takekawa, John Y.; Beissinger, Steven R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

EIA-Revisions to Gross Domestic product and Implications for the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Revisions to Gross Domestic Product and Implications for the Comparisons Revisions to Gross Domestic Product and Implications for the Comparisons Annual Energy Outlook Retrospective Review: Evaluation of Projections in Past Editions (1982-2008) Revisions to Gross Domestic Product and Implications for the Comparisons The concept of GDP is a commonly used measure of economic activity. It can be expressed in nominal dollars or, with the use of a matched price index to remove inflation, in "real" terms. Movements in nominal GDP show how the value of goods and services produced by the United States changes over time, while real GDP is a measure of how the physical production of the economy has grown. While simple in concept, the projecting of nominal and real GDP and the interpretation of these projected measures relative to "history" is not simple or straightforward. The Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) within the U.S. Department of Commerce continually adjusts the National Income and Product Accounts data, with comprehensive revisions completed every 4 or 5 years. The last four major revisions (1985, 1991, 1995, and 1999) incorporated definitional and statistical changes, as well as emphasizing new ways of presenting the data. Also, prior to AEO1993 aggregate economic activity was measured and projected on the basis of Gross National Product (GNP) as opposed to Gross Domestic Product (GDP). For the period from 1984 through 2004, nominal GNP is on average approximately 0.45 percent above nominal GDP.

338

EIA-Annual Energy Outlook Retrospective Review-Revisions to Gross Domestic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Revisions to Gross Domestic Product and Implications for the Comparisons The concept of GDP is a commonly used measure of economic activity. It can be expressed in nominal dollars or, with the use of a matched price index to remove inflation, in "real" terms. Movements in nominal GDP show how the value of goods and services produced by the United States changes over time, while real GDP is a measure of how the physical production of the economy has grown. While simple in concept, the projecting of nominal and real GDP and the interpretation of these projected measures relative to "history" is not simple or straightforward. The Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) within the U.S. Department of Commerce continually adjusts the National Income and Product Accounts data, with comprehensive revisions completed every 4 or 5 years. The last four major revisions (1985, 1991, 1995, and 1999) incorporated definitional and statistical changes, as well as emphasizing new ways of presenting the data. Also, prior to AEO1993 aggregate economic activity was measured and projected on the basis of Gross National Product (GNP) as opposed to Gross Domestic Product (GDP). For the period from 1984 through 2004, nominal GNP is on average approximately 0.45 percent above nominal GDP.

339

Distributional and socioeconomic impacts of electricity price increases on the Puerto Rican population. Volume 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to analyze the socio-economic impacts of changes in energy prices and availability upon the low income minorities in Puerto Rico. This volume presents both the theoretical and empirical aspect of this research. Chapter two includes a review of the literature on the demand for electricity. Chapter three analyzes the present electricity rate structure and its implications on equity and energy conservation. In chapter four data available from the Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority is used to analyze the concentration of electricity consumption and, to estimate several models of demand functions fitted to be estimated with time-series data. Chapter five describes the household survey undertaken to get information on residential electricity consumption in Puerto Rico. The information obtained was used in chapter six to analyze several aspects of electric energy consumption in Puerto Rico. Among these: the price-consumption relationship, the income-consumption relationship, energy conservation patterns, subsidy impact on conservation, and equity considerations on the electricity consumption subsidy. These issues were examined using cross tabulation and regression analysis techniques. Finally, chapter nine (9) develops a simulation model to analyze the impact of different policy alternatives on electricity rate structures. 7 figures, 43 tables.

Rodriguez, E.; Ocasio, W.; Torres, S.; Zalacain, F.; Lugo, S.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Nuisance Source Population Modeling for Radiation Detection System Analysis  

SciTech Connect

A major challenge facing the prospective deployment of radiation detection systems for homeland security applications is the discrimination of radiological or nuclear 'threat sources' from radioactive, but benign, 'nuisance sources'. Common examples of such nuisance sources include naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM), medical patients who have received radioactive drugs for either diagnostics or treatment, and industrial sources. A sensitive detector that cannot distinguish between 'threat' and 'benign' classes will generate false positives which, if sufficiently frequent, will preclude it from being operationally deployed. In this report, we describe a first-principles physics-based modeling approach that is used to approximate the physical properties and corresponding gamma ray spectral signatures of real nuisance sources. Specific models are proposed for the three nuisance source classes - NORM, medical and industrial. The models can be validated against measured data - that is, energy spectra generated with the model can be compared to actual nuisance source data. We show by example how this is done for NORM and medical sources, using data sets obtained from spectroscopic detector deployments for cargo container screening and urban area traffic screening, respectively. In addition to capturing the range of radioactive signatures of individual nuisance sources, a nuisance source population model must generate sources with a frequency of occurrence consistent with that found in actual movement of goods and people. Measured radiation detection data can indicate these frequencies, but, at present, such data are available only for a very limited set of locations and time periods. In this report, we make more general estimates of frequencies for NORM and medical sources using a range of data sources such as shipping manifests and medical treatment statistics. We also identify potential data sources for industrial source frequencies, but leave the task of estimating these frequencies for future work. Modeling of nuisance source populations is only useful if it helps in understanding detector system performance in real operational environments. Examples of previous studies in which nuisance source models played a key role are briefly discussed. These include screening of in-bound urban traffic and monitoring of shipping containers in transit to U.S. ports.

Sokkappa, P; Lange, D; Nelson, K; Wheeler, R

2009-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "income gdp population" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Dworshak Reservoir Kokanee Population Monitoring, Annual Report 2001.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Onsite testing of strobe lights was conducted to determine if they repelled kokanee Oncorhynchus nerka away from the turbine intakes at Dworshak Dam. We tested a set of nine strobe lights flashing at a rate of 360 flashes/min placed near the intake of a 90 mW turbine. A split-beam echo sounder was used to determine the effect of strobe light operation on fish density (thought to be mostly kokanee) in front of the turbine intakes. On five nights between December 2001 and January 2002, fish density averaged 110 fish/ha when no lights were flashing. Mean density dropped to 13 fish/ha when the strobe lights were turned on during five additional nights of sampling. This 88% decline in density was significant at the P = 0.009 level of significance based on a paired Student's t test. There appeared to be no tendency for fish to habituate to the lights during the night. Test results indicate that a single set of nine lights may be sufficient to repel kokanee from a turbine intake during the night. We also used split-beam hydroacoustics to monitor the kokanee population in Dworshak Reservoir during 2001. Estimated abundance of kokanee has continued to increase since the spring of 1996 when high entrainment losses occurred. Based on hydroacoustic surveys, we estimated 3,276,000 kokanee in Dworshak Reservoir in early July 2001. This included 2,069,000 age-0 kokanee (90% CI {+-} 16.4%), 801,000 age-1 kokanee (90% CI {+-} 17.8%), and 406,000 age-2 kokanee (90% CI {+-} 20.5%). Entrainment sampling was also conducted with split-beam hydroacoustics a minimum of one continuous 24 h period per month. The highest entrainment rates occurred at night with lower discharges and shallower intake depths. Fish movement patterns suggested that they swam 'at will' in front of the intakes and may have chosen to move into the turbine intakes. Based on monthly hydroacoustic sampling in the forebay, we found that kokanee density was low in July and August during a period of high discharge. However, kokanee density was high in late winter when discharge was also high, thus increasing the likelihood of entrainment. Counts of spawning kokanee in four tributary streams used as an index reached 6,079 fish. This spawner count appeared unusually low considering the high population estimate of kokanee in the reservoir and data collected in previous years.

Maiolie, Melo; Stark, Eric

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Adaptive Evolution and Effective Population Size in Wild House Mice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Estimates of the proportion of amino acid substitutions that have been fixed by selection (a) vary widely among taxa, ranging from zero in humans to over 50 % in Drosophila. This wide range may reflect differences in the efficacy of selection due to differences in the effective population size (Ne). However, most comparisons have been made among distantly related organisms that differ not only in Ne but also in many other aspects of their biology. Here, we estimate a in three closely related lineages of house mice that have a similar ecology but differ widely in Ne: Mus musculus musculus (Ne; 25,000–120,000), M. m. domesticus (Ne; 58,000–200,000), and M. m. castaneus (Ne; 200,000–733,000). Mice were genotyped using a high-density single nucleotide polymorphism array, and the proportions of replacement and silent mutations within subspecies were compared with those fixed between each subspecies and an outgroup, Mus spretus. There was significant evidence of positive selection in M. m. castaneus, the lineage with the largest Ne, with a estimated to be approximately 40%. In contrast, estimates of a for M. m. domesticus (a 5 13%) and for M. m. musculus (a 5 12 %) were much smaller. Interestingly, the higher estimate of a for M. m. castaneus appears to reflect not only more adaptive fixations but also more effective purifying selection. These results support the hypothesis that differences in Ne contribute to differences among species in the efficacy of selection.

Megan Phifer-rixey; Francxois Bonhomme; Pierre Boursot; Gary A. Churchill; Jaroslav Piálek; Priscilla K. Tucker; Michael W. Nachman

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Study of atomic physics and population inversions with plasma focus  

SciTech Connect

The plasma focus can be used to generate high temperature and high density plasmas. Neon-like plasmas have previously been studied in Z-pinches and laser produced plasmas as sources for XUV and x-ray lasers. The plasma focus provides a simple and inexpensive source for studying atomic physics of highly ionized atoms. A detailed understanding of atomic physics at high temperatures, densities, and megagauss magnetic fields is necessary for possible x-ray laser designs. Methods that are generally used for obtaining population inversions include collisional ionization of the inner shells of multi-electron atoms and ions, photoexcitation, and electron collisional excitation of ions, collisional combination of ions, and atom-ion resonant charge exchange. We will discuss some possible experiments to help understand the atomic physics under the above condition. Some ideas and calculations will be given to show the feasibility of doing atomic physics relating to x-ray lasers with a plasma focus. 13 refs., 2 figs.

Oona, H.; Hodgdon, M.L.; Rickel, D.G.; Freeman, B.L.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Experimental Designs for Testing Differences in Survival Among Salmonid Populations.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Yakima Fisheries Project (YFP) is a supplementation plan for enhancing salmon runs in the Yakima River basin. It is presumed that inadequate spawning and rearing habitat are limiting factors to population abundance of spring chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawyacha). Therefore, the supplementation effort for spring chinook salmon is focused on introducing hatchery-raised smolts into the basin to compensate for the lack of spawning habitat. However, based on empirical evidence in the Yakima basin, hatchery-reared salmon have survived poorly compared to wild salmon. Therefore, the YFP has proposed to alter the optimal conventional treatment (OCT), which is the state-of-the-art hatchery rearing method, to a new innovative treatment (NIT). The NIT is intended to produce hatchery fish that mimic wild fish and thereby to enhance their survival over that of OCT fish. A limited application of the NIT (LNIT) has also been proposed to reduce the cost of applying the new treatment, yet retain the benefits of increased survival. This research was conducted to test whether the uncertainty using the experimental design was within the limits specified by the Planning Status Report (PSR).

Hoffman, Annette; Busack, Craig; Knudsen, Craig

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Hantavirus testing in small mammal populations of northcentral New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

In 1993, an outbreak of a new strain of hantavirus in the southwestern US indicated that deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) was the primary carrier of the virus. In 1993 and 1994, the Ecological Studies Team (EST) at Los Alamos National Laboratory surveyed small mammal populations in Los Alamos County, New Mexico, primarily for ecological risk assessment (ecorisk) studies. At the request of the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and the School of Medicine at the University of New Mexico, EST also collected blood samples from captured animals for use in determining seroprevalence of hantavirus in this region due to the recent outbreak of this virus in the four-comers region of the Southwest. The deer mouse was the most commonly captured species during the tripping sessions. Other species sampled included harvest mice (Reithrodontomys megalotis), least chipmunk (Eutamias minimus), long-tailed vole (Microtus longicaudus), Mexican woodrat (Neotoma mexicana), and brush mouse (Peromyscus boylii). The team collected blood samples from tripped animals following CDC`s suggested guidelines. Results of the 1993 and 1994 hantavirus testing identified a total overall seroprevalence of approximately 5.5% and 4.2%, respectively. The highest seroprevalence rates were found in deer mice seri (3--6%), but results on several species were inconclusive; further studies will be necessary, to quantify seroprevalence rates in those species. Seroprevalence rates for Los Alamos County were much lower than elsewhere in the region.

Biggs, J.; Bennett, K.; Foxx, T. [and others

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #445: November 27, 2006 U.S. Population  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5: November 27, 5: November 27, 2006 U.S. Population Growth and Light Vehicle Sales to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #445: November 27, 2006 U.S. Population Growth and Light Vehicle Sales on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #445: November 27, 2006 U.S. Population Growth and Light Vehicle Sales on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #445: November 27, 2006 U.S. Population Growth and Light Vehicle Sales on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #445: November 27, 2006 U.S. Population Growth and Light Vehicle Sales on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #445: November 27, 2006 U.S. Population Growth and Light Vehicle Sales on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #445:

347

The distributive justice of income inequality  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

the human condition, there is little question of not accepting inequality in practice. ..... approximation of the actual distribution, an error is certainly introduced,.

348

DISCUSSION PAPER Income, resources, and electricity mix  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I am grateful for data advice from Ditya Nurdianto and comments from Sambit Bhattacharyya, Raghbendra Jha,

Paul J. Burke

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Income inequality, tax base and sovereign spreads  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SVN NLD HUN CZE ISL DEU RUS ESP ISR PRT GRC POL SVK BRA UKRDEU*), DENMARK(DNK*), SPAIN(ESP*), FRANCE(FRA*), GREECE(Correlation = -.72 DNK RUS PRT ESP POL BGR PER ARG VEN BEL

Aizenman, Joshua; Jinjarak, Yothin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mel Lane Assistant Director Office of the Treasurer Office of Insurance, Loss Control, & Claims Curator Larry Shaver Associate Director Greg Jeffers Fire Pump Inspector Steve Morron Fire Inspector Mark Colglazier Fire Inspector Kevin Wright Fire Inspector Loss Prevention Campus Art Claims & Athletic Program

351

Global Population Genetics and Evolution of Invasive Biotypes in the Whitefly Complex Bemisia tabaci  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

population history with DIY ABC: a user-friendly approach topopulation history with DIY ABC: a user-friendly approach to

Hadjistylli, Margarita

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Testing the Behavioral Model of Health Services Use for a Disabled Population.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This research examines the factors that determine physician use in a physically disabled and the mentally disabled population using Andersen's Behavioral Model of Utilization. It… (more)

Greene, Angela Marie

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Dynamic energy budgets and bioaccumulation : a model for marine mammals and marine mammal populations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy intake of individuals affects growth of organisms and, therefore, populations. Persistent lipophilic toxicants acquired with the energy can bioaccumulate and harm individuals. Marine mammals are particularly vulnerable ...

Klanjš?ek, Tin

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

The Threatened Atlantic Elkhorn Coral, Acropora palmata: Population Dynamics and Their Policy Implications.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the years 2030 and 2100. 125! ixthe foreseeable future (until 2030) and beyond (until 2100),in population size by 2030. The most striking difference we

Vardi, Tali

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

The threatened Atlantic elkhorn coral, Acropora palmata : population dynamics and their policy implications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the years 2030 and 2100. 125! ixthe foreseeable future (until 2030) and beyond (until 2100),in population size by 2030. The most striking difference we

Vardi, Tali

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

POPDOSE-SR: A Routine Release Atmospheric Population Dose Model Used at SRS  

SciTech Connect

POPDOSE-SR is used to calculate dose to the surrounding Savannah River Site (SRS) population following routine releases of atmospheric radioactivity.

Simpkins, A.A.

2001-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

357

GENII dose calculations for offsite maximum individual and populations from Plutonium Finishing Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Document describes the potential dose consequences to the offsite maximum individual and population for ground and stack level releases at the offsite receptors from the Plutonium Finishing Plant.

Nguyen, L.V.

1995-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

358

Table HC5-7a. Appliances by Four Most Populated States, Million U ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table HC5-7a. Appliances by Four Most Populated States, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Appliance Types and Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total

359

BARS REJUVENATING BULGES? EVIDENCE FROM STELLAR POPULATION ANALYSIS  

SciTech Connect

We obtained stellar ages and metallicities via spectrum fitting for a sample of 575 bulges with spectra available from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The structural properties of the galaxies have been studied in detail in 2009 by Gadotti and the sample contains 251 bulges in galaxies with bars. Using the whole sample, where galaxy stellar mass distributions for barred and unbarred galaxies are similar, we find that bulges in barred and unbarred galaxies occupy similar loci in the age versus metallicity plane. However, the distribution of bulge ages in barred galaxies shows an excess of populations younger than {approx}4 Gyr, when compared to bulges in unbarred galaxies. Kolmogorov-Smirnov statistics confirm that the age distributions are different with a significance of 99.94%. If we select sub-samples for which the bulge stellar mass distributions are similar for barred and unbarred galaxies, this excess vanishes for galaxies with bulge mass log M < 10.1 M{sub Sun }, while for more massive galaxies we find a bimodal bulge age distribution for barred galaxies only, corresponding to two normal distributions with mean ages of 10.4 and 4.7 Gyr. We also find twice as much active galactic nuclei among barred galaxies, as compared to unbarred galaxies, for low-mass bulges. By combining a large sample of high-quality data with sophisticated image and spectral analysis, we are able to find evidence that the presence of bars affects the mean stellar ages of bulges. This lends strong support to models in which bars trigger star formation activity in the centers of galaxies.

Coelho, P. [Nucleo de Astrofisica Teorica, Universidade Cruzeiro do Sul, R. Galvao Bueno 868, Liberdade 01506-000, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Gadotti, D. A., E-mail: paula.coelho@cruzeirodosul.edu.br, E-mail: dgadotti@eso.org [European Southern Observatory, Casilla 19001, Santiago 19 (Chile)

2011-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

360

Hanford Area 1990 population and 50-year projections. [Appendix contains computer programming for population projections and graphs showing them by grid areas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The complex and comprehensive safety analysis activities carried out at Hanford for nonreactor nuclear facilities require data from a number of scientific and engineering disciplines. The types of data that are required include data pertaining to current population and population projections. The types of data found in this document include 1990 census totals for residential population within a 50-mile radius of the 100-N, 200, 300, and 400 Area meteorological towers. This document also contains 50-year projections for residential populations within a 50-mile radius of these four meteorological towers. The analysis of population projections indicates that residential population within a 50-mile radius of the four meteorological towers in question will continue to grow through 2040, although at a slower rate each decade. In all cases, the highest growth is projected for the decade ending in the year 2000. The annual growth rate for this period is projected to be 0.646, 0.633, 0.543, and 0.570 in the 100-N, 200, 300, and 400 Areas, respectively. By 2040, these growth rates are projected to drop to 0.082, 0.068, 0.078, 0.078, respectively. 4 refs., 1 figs., 4 tabs.

Beck, D.M.; Scott, M.J.; Shindle, S.F.; Napier, B.A.; Thurman, A.G.; Batishko, N.C. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Davis, M.D. (Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)); Pittenger, D.B. (Demographics Lab., Olympia, WA (United States))

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "income gdp population" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2. Average annual changes in Kaya factors by region and country in the Reference case, 2010-2040 2. Average annual changes in Kaya factors by region and country in the Reference case, 2010-2040 percent per year Region/Country Carbon intensity of energy supply (CO2/E) Energy intensity of economic activity (E/GDP) Income per person (GDP/POP) Population (POP) Carbon dioxide emissions OECD OECD Americas -0.3 -2.1 -1.9 0.8 0.3 United States -0.3 -2.3 -1.8 0.9 0.0 Canada -0.4 -1.1 1.2 1.0 0.6 Mexico/Chile -0.4 -1.1 2.9 0.7 2.1 OECD Europe -0.4 -1.3 1.6 0.3 0.0 OECD Asia -0.3 -1.0 1.7 -0.1 0.2 Japan -0.1 -0.6 1.0 -0.4 -0.1 South Korea -0.5 -1.9 3.2 0.1 0.8 Australia/New Zealand -0.4 -1.5 1.3 0.9 0.3 Total OECD -0.3 -1.6 1.8 0.4 0.2 Non-OECD Non-OECD Europe and Eurasia -0.2 -2.5 3.8 0.0 1.0

362

Cultural Dasymetric Population Mapping with Historical GIS: A Case Study from the Southern Appalachians  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There has been a recent flurry of interest in dasymetric population mapping. However, the ancillary coverages that underlie current dasymetric methods are unconnected to cultural context. The resulting regions may indicate density patterns, but not necessarily ... Keywords: Agricultural Geography, Appalachia, Dasymetric, Historical GIS, Population Mapping, Rural Geography, West Virginia

George Towers

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

How do Recent Population Trends Matter to Climate Leiwen Jiang Karen Hardee  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

). For instance, a study of the energy consumption from 1970 to 1990 in developed countries shows that, using that population growth parallels increases in economic growth, energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions change and population growth jointly determine energy consumption and carbon emissions (Ehrlich

364

Expressing effects-based outcomes from patterns of emergent population behaviors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are basic social and cultural structures and processes that influence effects-based outcomes. When populations experience a miss-match of sociocultural factors that influence expectations and intentions, this can trigger an affective reaction – ... Keywords: group dynamics, population modeling, sociocultural factors, stratagemical behavior patterns

Colleen L. Phillips; Norman D. Geddes

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Estimating future global per capita water availability based on changes in climate and population  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Human populations are profoundly affected by water stress, or the lack of sufficient per capita available freshwater. Water stress can result from overuse of available freshwater resources or from a reduction in the amount of available water due to decreases ... Keywords: Climate change impacts, Population growth, Resource scarcity, Water availability

Esther S. Parish; Evan Kodra; Karsten Steinhaeuser; Auroop R. Ganguly

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Asymptotic distribution of Wishart matrix for block-wise dispersion of population eigenvalues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper deals with the asymptotic distribution of Wishart matrix and its application to the estimation of the population matrix parameter when the population eigenvalues are block-wise infinitely dispersed. We show that the appropriately normalized ... Keywords: Stein's loss, 62C20, 62H10, Asymptotic risk, Covariance matrix, Quadratic loss, Wishart distribution

Yo Sheena; Akimichi Takemura

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

AN ENERGETICS MODEL FOR THE EXPLOITED YELLOWFIN TUNA, THUNNUS ALBACARES, POPULATION IN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AN ENERGETICS MODEL FOR THE EXPLOITED YELLOWFIN TUNA, THUNNUS ALBACARES, POPULATION IN THE EASTERN yellowfin tuna, Thunnus albacares, population in the eastern Pacific Ocean is developed. Hydrodynamic to swimming as a function oflength for tunas. Growth and maintenance energetics are estimated and incorporated

368

The Ramsey model with logistic population growth and Benthamite felicity function  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper evaluates the effects of a Benthamite formulation for the utility function into the Ramsey model with logistic population growth, introduced by Brida and Accinelli (2007). Within this framework, we demonstrate the economy to be described by ... Keywords: Benthamite, Ramsey, logistic population

Massimiliano Ferrara; Luca Guerrini

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Review: Multi-agent modeling and simulation of an Aedes aegypti mosquito population  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present work deals with the simulation of a mosquito Aedes aegypti population. The mosquito population was modeled using an individual-based approach. The model consists of agents representing A. aegypti mosquitoes, human beings, some mammals and ... Keywords: Aedes aegypti mosquito, Agent-based model, BG-Sentinel, Ecological model, Individual-based model, Multi-agent simulation

Sandro Jerônimo de Almeida; Ricardo Poley Martins Ferreira; Álvaro E. Eiras; Robin P. Obermayr; Martin Geier

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Population Structure and Gene Flow of the Yellow Anaconda (Eunectes notaeus) in Northern Argentina  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Population Structure and Gene Flow of the Yellow Anaconda (Eunectes notaeus) in Northern Argentina States of America Abstract Yellow anacondas (Eunectes notaeus) are large, semiaquatic boid snakes found anaconda population structure (IBD), and important for gene flow, although genetic distances were

Shaffer, H. Bradley

371

"The Map of the Mexican's Genome": overlapping national identity, and population genomics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper explores the intersections between national identity and the production of medical/population genomics in Mexico. The ongoing efforts to construct a Haplotype Map of Mexican genetic diversity offers a unique opportunity to illustrate and analyze ... Keywords: Ethnography, Haplotypes, Mestizo identity, Nationalism, Population genomics

Ernesto Schwartz-Marín; Irma Silva-Zolezzi

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Estimates of Duck Breeding Populations in the Nebraska Sandhills Using Double Observer Methodology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of breeding duck populations in the Nebraska Sandhills. Aerial transect surveys were conducted using be considered for adjusting duck counts that cannot be corrected using additional aerial or ground surveys. Key words.--Aerial survey, Anas, detection probabilities, double observer, Nebraska, population

Powell, Larkin A.

373

Dedicated breast CT: Fibroglandular volume measurements in a diagnostic population  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To determine the mean and range of volumetric glandular fraction (VGF) of the breast in a diagnostic population using a high-resolution flat-panel cone-beam dedicated breast CT system. This information is important for Monte Carlo-based estimation of normalized glandular dose coefficients and for investigating the dependence of VGF on breast dimensions, race, and pathology. Methods: Image data from a clinical trial investigating the role of dedicated breast CT that enrolled 150 women were retrospectively analyzed to determine the VGF. The study was conducted in adherence to a protocol approved by the institutional human subjects review boards and written informed consent was obtained from all study participants. All participants in the study were assigned BI-RADS{sup Registered-Sign} 4 or 5 as per the American College of Radiology assessment categories after standard diagnostic work-up and underwent dedicated breast CT exam prior to biopsy. A Gaussian-kernel based fuzzy c-means algorithm was used to partition the breast CT images into adipose and fibroglandular tissue after segmenting the skin. Upon determination of the accuracy of the algorithm with a phantom, it was applied to 137 breast CT volumes from 136 women. VGF was determined for each breast and the mean and range were determined. Pathology results with classification as benign, malignant, and hyperplasia were available for 132 women, and were used to investigate if the distributions of VGF varied with pathology. Results: The algorithm was accurate to within {+-}1.9% in determining the volume of an irregular shaped phantom. The study mean ({+-} inter-breast SD) for the VGF was 0.172 {+-} 0.142 (range: 0.012-0.719). VGF was found to be negatively correlated with age, breast dimensions (chest-wall to nipple length, pectoralis to nipple length, and effective diameter at chest-wall), and total breast volume, and positively correlated with fibroglandular volume. Based on pathology, pairwise statistical analysis (Mann-Whitney test) indicated that at the 0.05 significance level, there was no significant difference in distributions of VGF without adjustment for age between malignant and nonmalignant breasts (p= 0.41). Pairwise comparisons of the distributions of VGF in increasing order of mammographic breast density indicated all comparisons were statistically significant (p < 0.002). Conclusions: This study used a different clinical prototype breast CT system than that in previous studies to image subjects from a different geographical region, and used a different algorithm for analysis of image data. The mean VGF estimated from this study is within the range reported in previous studies, indicating that the choice of 50% glandular weight fraction to represent an average breast for Monte Carlo-based estimation of normalized glandular dose coefficients in mammography needs revising. In the study, the distributions of VGF did not differ significantly with pathology.

Vedantham, Srinivasan; Shi Linxi; Karellas, Andrew; O'Connell, Avice M. [Department of Radiology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts 01655 (United States); Department of Imaging Sciences, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York 14642 (United States)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

374

Differential impact of immediate total deregulation of wellhead prices of natural gas on minority and low-income homeowners: a general review and a case study in the Washington, DC area  

SciTech Connect

In this study, the authors evaluate the impact of total deregulation of wellhead prices of natural gas on various strata of the residential consuming population, and compare it to the baseline impact of a continuation of the Natural Gas Policy Act of 1978. They found that minority and poverty homeowners will suffer greater relative welfare losses than their white and non-poverty counterparts. They developed quantitative estimates of the extent of these differentials, and offered some policy proposals suggested by these findings. 54 refs., 8 figs., 68 tabs.

Green, R.D.; Gilbert, H.R.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Spatial Estimation of Populations at Risk from Radiological Dispersion Device Terrorism Incidents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Delineation of the location and size of the population potentially at risk of exposure to ionizing radiation is one of the key analytical challenges in estimating accurately the severity of the potential health effects associated with a radiological terrorism incident. Regardless of spatial scale, the geographical units for which population data commonly are collected rarely coincide with the geographical scale necessary for effective incident management and medical response. This paper identifies major government and commercial open sources of U.S. population data and presents a GIS-based approach for allocating publicly available population data, including age distributions, to geographical units appropriate for planning and implementing incident management and medical response strategies. In summary: The gravity model offers a straight-forward, empirical tool for estimating population flows, especially when geographical areas are relatively well-defined in terms of accessibility and spatial separation. This is particularly important for several reasons. First, the spatial scale for the area impacted by a RDD terrorism event is unlikely to match fully the spatial scale of available population data. That is, the plume spread typically will not uniformly overlay the impacted area. Second, the number of people within the impacted area varies as a function whether an attack occurs during the day or night. For example, the population of a central business district or industrial area typically is larger during the day while predominately residential areas have larger night time populations. As a result, interpolation techniques that link population data to geographical units and allocate those data based on time-frame at a spatial scale that is relevant to enhancing preparedness and response. The gravity model's main advantage is that it efficiently allocates readily available, open source population data to geographical units appropriate for planning and implementing incident management and medical monitoring strategies. The importance of being able to link population estimates to geographic areas during the course of an RDD incident can be understood intuitively: - The spatial distribution of actual total dose equivalents of ionizing radiation is likely to vary due to changes in meteorological parameters as an event evolves over time; - The size of the geographical area affected also is likely to vary as a function of the actual release scenario; - The ability to identify the location and size of the populations that may be exposed to doses of ionizing radiation is critical to carrying out appropriate treatment and post-event medical monitoring; - Once a spatial interaction model has been validated for a city or a region, it can then be used for simulation and prediction purposes to assess the possible human health consequences of different release scenarios. (authors)

Regens, J.L.; Gunter, J.T. [Center for Biosecurity Research, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Empower Women, Save the Planet? Science, Strategy, and Population-Environment Advocacy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by a stronger donor-led emphasis on funding demographic andSilicon Valley led to reductions in funding for integratedgenerally reduced funding for population work have led many

Sasser, Jade

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Precipitation Trends and Water Consumption Related to Population in the Southwestern United States, 1930–83  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The possible effects of climatic fluctuations on renewable water supplies in the western United States was examined, especially as it is impacted by the growth of population and water consumption in recent decades.

Henry F. Diaz; Ronald L. Holle; Joe W. Thorn Jr.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

The Large-Scale Environments of the Global Populations of Mesoscale Convective Complexes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mean genesis environment was constructed for each of five mesoscale convective complex (MCC) population centers around the world: Africa, Australia, China, South America, and the United States. It is found that the environments are very ...

Arlene G. Laing; J. Michael Fritsch

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Aggregation of U.S. Population Centers Using Climate Parameters Related to Building Energy Use  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A technique for aggregating population centers into groups based on selected climate parameters is presented. Climate information on the 125 largest Standard Metropolitan Statistical Areas (SMSAs) in the United States is used to assign each SMSA ...

Brandt Andersson; William L. Carroll; Marlo R. Martin

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Fish population and behavior revealed by instantaneous continental-shelf scale imaging  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The application of a technique to instantaneously image and continuously monitor the abundance, spatial distribution, and behavior of fish populations over thousands of square kilometers using Ocean Acoustic Waveguide ...

Symonds, Deanelle T

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "income gdp population" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Population Characteristics, Development Processes and Structure of Radar Echoes in South Florida  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radar data from the Florida Area Cumulus Experiment were used to study the ensemble characteristics of echo populations and also the structure of echo systems and their phenomenological growth and development process. The diurnal development of ...

Raúl E. López; David O. Blanchard; Daniel Rosenfeld; William L. Hiscox; Marjorie J. Casey

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Modeling and responding to pandemic influenza : importance of population distributional attributes and non-pharmaceutical interventions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

After reviewing prevalent approaches to the modeling pandemic influenza transmission, we present a simple distributional model that captures the most significant population attributes that alter the dynamics of the outbreak. ...

Nigmatulina, Karima Robert

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Properties of Tropical Cloud Ensembles Estimated Using a Cloud Model and an Observed Updraft Population  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple cloud model is developed which is designed for both diagnostic studies and mesoscale cumulus parameterization experiments. The cloud model is combined with an observed population of tropical convective updrafts and used to examine the ...

William M. Frank; Charles Cohen

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Natural balance of graminicolous aphids in Pakistan II. — Aphids populations on maize  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural balance of graminicolous aphids in Pakistan II. — Aphids populations on maize Sulaiman HAMID Sind Sugar Industry Research Institute, 14/A, Latifabad III, Hyderabad Sind, Pakistan SUMMARY Maize in Pakistan is attacked by Myzus obtusirostris David, Narayanan & Rajasingh, Rhopalosiphum

Recanati, Catherine

385

Global Population Distribution and Urban Land Use in Geophysical Parameter Space  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The spatial distribution of human population on the land surface is a fundamental determinant of land-use impacts on Earth's ecosystems. Census enumerations and satellite-detected night lights provide two complementary, but distinct, ...

Christopher Small

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Efficacy, national/international practices and motivational factors of lifelong driver education for the aging population  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In a society facing a significant increase in its aging population, older driver education/training is emerging as a potential solution to help seniors drive more safely, thus maintaining their mobility and quality of life. ...

Israels, Richard (Richard Steven)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Perceiving Ethnic Differences: Consensus Analysis and Personhood in Welsh-American Populations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Iowa and the other on the Vermont/New York border, variedValley on the New York/Vermont border, and the other thein Iowa. The New York/Vermont populations came from North

Caulkins, D. Douglas; Offer-Westort, Molly; Trosset, Carol

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Applying the multivariate time-rescaling theorem to neural population models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Statistical models of neural activity are integral to modern neuroscience. Recently interest has grown in modeling the spiking activity of populations of simultaneously recorded neurons to study the effects of correlations ...

Gerhard, Felipe

389

The Decreasing Population Bias in Tornado Reports across the Central Plains  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tornado–hazard assessment is hampered by a population bias in the available data. Here, the authors demonstrate a way to statistically quantify this bias using the ratio of city to country report densities. The expected report densities come from ...

James B. Elsner; Laura E. Michaels; Kelsey N. Scheitlin; Ian J. Elsner

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Black Carbon Aerosol Concentration in Five Cities and Its Scaling with City Population  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A question of importance for urban planning and attainment of air quality standards is how pollutant concentrations scale with city population. This study uses measurements of light absorption and light scattering coefficients as proxies for primary (i.e.,...

G. Paredes-Miranda; W. P. Arnott; H. Moosmüller; M. C. Green; M. Gyawali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Population- and genome-specific patterns of linkage disequilibrium and SNP variation in spring and winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with the lines from the CIM- MYT population and nearly allpopulations except for the CIM- MYT population, which hadthe sample of U.S. and CIM- MYT wheat cultivars. Therefore,

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Population Size Does Not Predict Artifact Complexity: Analysis of Data from Tasmania, Arctic Hunter-Gatherers, and Oceania Fishing Groups  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A, Wachtmeister C-A (2008) Why does human culture increasePOPULATION SIZE DOES NOT PREDICT ARTIFACT COMPLEXITY:interac- tion population and does a task requiring his or

Read, Dwight

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Intergenerational Transmission of Women’s Educational Attainment in South Korea: An Application of Multi-group Population Projection Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Park Sangtae, and Eun Ki-Soo. eds. Population in Korea.Korea National Statistical Office. (in Korean) Keyfitz,Ki-Soo. eds. Population in Korea. Korea National Statistical

Kye, Bongoh

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

A multi-region nonlinear age-size structured fish population model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The goal of this paper is to present a generic multi-region nonlinear age-size structured fish population model, and to assess its mathematical well-posedness. An initial-boundary-value problem is formulated. Existence and uniqueness of a positive weak solution is proved. Eventually, a comparison result is derived: the population of all regions decreases as the mortality rate increases in at least one region.

Faugeras, Blaise

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Disaggregating measurement uncertainty from population variability and Bayesian treatment of uncensored results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In making low-level radioactivity measurements of populations, it is commonly observed that a substantial portion of net results are negative. Furthermore, the observed variance of the measurement results arises from a combination of measurement uncertainty and population variability. This paper presents a method for disaggregating measurement uncertainty from population variability to produce a probability density function (PDF) of possibly true results. To do this, simple, justifiable, and reasonable assumptions are made about the relationship of the measurements to the measurands (the 'true values'). The measurements are assumed to be unbiased, that is, that their average value is the average of the measurands. Using traditional estimates of each measurement's uncertainty to disaggregate population variability from measurement uncertainty, a PDF of measurands for the population is produced. Then, using Bayes's theorem, the same assumptions, and all the data from the population of individuals, a prior PDF is computed for each individual's measurand. These PDFs are non-negative, and their average is equal to the average of the measurement results for the population. The uncertainty in these Bayesian posterior PDFs is all Berkson with no remaining classical component. The methods are applied to baseline bioassay data from the Hanford site. The data include 90Sr urinalysis measurements on 128 people, 137Cs in vivo measurements on 5,337 people, and 239Pu urinalysis measurements on 3,270 people. The method produces excellent results for the 90Sr and 137Cs measurements, since there are nonzero concentrations of these global fallout radionuclides in people who have not been occupationally exposed. The method does not work for the 239Pu measurements in non-occupationally exposed people because the population average is essentially zero.

Strom, Daniel J.; Joyce, Kevin E.; Maclellan, Jay A.; Watson, David J.; Lynch, Timothy P.; Antonio, Cheryl L.; Birchall, Alan; Anderson, Kevin K.; Zharov, Peter

2012-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

396

Effects of hunting and season of fire on wild turkey populations in South Carolina.  

SciTech Connect

This report assesses impacts to wild turkey populations from hunting and prescribed fire. The objectives of the study were as follows: (1) To compare survival rates and causes of mortality of wild turkey gobblers between hunted and unhunted populations; (2) To determine the effects of dormant versus growing season prescribed burns on nesting success, survival and habitat use of wild turkey hens; (3) To determine the effects of dormant versus growing season prescribed burns on the availability of wild turkey plant foods.

Moore, William, F.; Kilgo, John, C.; Guynn, David, C.; Davis, James, R.

2002-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

397

Location of odor sources and the affected population in Imperial County, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is divided into four sections. The first two sections contain general background information on Imperial County. The third section is a general discussion of odor sources in Imperial County, and the fourth maps the specific odor sources, the expected areas of perception, and the affected populations. this mapping is done for the Imperial Valley and each of the four Imperial County KGRA's (Known Geothermal Resource Areas) where odor from the development of the geothermal energy may affect population.

Hahn, J.L.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Oxygen Effects on Thermophilic Microbial Populations in Biofilters Treating Nitric Oxide Containing Off-Gas Streams  

SciTech Connect

Electricity generation from coal has increased by an average of 51 billion kWh per year over the past 3 years. For this reason cost-effective strategies to control nitrogen oxides (NOx) from coal-fired power plant combustion gases must be developed. Compost biofilters operated at 55°C at an empty bed contact time (EBCT) of 13 seconds were shown to be feasible for removal of nitric oxide (NO) from synthetic flue gas. Denitrifying microbial populations in these biofilters were shown to reduce influent NO feeds by 90 to 95% at inlet NO concentrations of 500 ppmv. Oxygen was shown to have a significant effect on the NO removal efficiency demonstrated by these biofilters. Two biofilters were set up under identical conditions for the purpose of monitoring NO removal as well as changes in the microbial population in the bed medium under anaerobic and aerobic conditions. Changes in the microbial population were monitored to determine the maximum oxygen tolerance of a denitrifying biofilter as well as methods of optimizing microbial populations capable of denitrification in the presence of low oxygen concentrations. Nitric oxide removal dropped to between 10 and 20% when oxygen was present in the influent stream. The inactive compost used to pack the biofilters may have also caused the decreased NO removal efficiency compared to previous biofiltration experiments. Analysis of the bed medium microbial population using environmental scanning electron microscopy indicated significant increases in biomass populating the surface of the compost when compared to unacclimated compost.

Lee, Brady Douglas; Apel, William Arnold; Smith, William Aaron

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Energy Audit Practices in China: National and Local Experiences and Issues  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evaluation of Energy Intensity per GDP Indicators (??? GDP ?and energy indicators, including economic energy intensity,

Shen, Bo

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Estimating future global per capita water availability based on changes in climate and population  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Human populations are profoundly affected by water stress, or the lack of sufficient per capita available freshwater. Water stress can result from overuse of available freshwater resources or from a reduction in the amount of available water due to decreases in rainfall and stored water supplies. Analyzing the interrelationship between human populations and water availability is complicated by the uncertainties associated with climate change projections and population projections. We present a simple methodology developed to integrate disparate climate and population data sources and develop first-order per capita water availability projections at the global scale. Simulations from the coupled land-ocean-atmosphere Community Climate System Model version 3 (CCSM3) forced with a range of hypothetical greenhouse gas emissions scenarios are used to project grid-based changes in precipitation minus evapotranspiration as proxies for changes in runoff, or fresh water supply. Population growth changes according to several Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) storylines are used as proxies for changes in fresh water demand by 2025, 2050 and 2100. These freshwater supply and demand projections are then combined to yield estimates of per capita water availability aggregated by watershed and political unit. Results suggest that important insights might be extracted from the use of the process developed here, notably including the identification of the globe s most vulnerable regions in need of more detailed analysis and the relative importance of population growth versus climate change in in altering future freshwater supplies. However, these are only exemplary insights and, as such, could be considered hypotheses that should be rigorously tested with multiple climate models, multiple observational climate datasets, and more comprehensive population change storylines.

Parish, Esther S [ORNL; Kodra, Evan [Northeastern University; Ganguly, Auroop R [Northeastern University; Steinhaeuser, Karsten [University of Minnesota

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "income gdp population" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Population Status and Evaluation of Landscape Change for the Lower Keys Marsh Rabbit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wildlife biologists and land managers tasked with the recovery of the endangered Lower Keys marsh rabbit (LKMR; Sylvilagus palustris hefneri) were in need of a current population estimate as well as a method to estimate the LKMR population annually. Habitat loss and fragmentation from population growth and development have threatened the existence of the LKMR. Establishing and understanding long-term habitat availability for the LKMR is important for determining causes of historical population declines as well as designing and implementing successful recovery plans. I conducted a range-wide pellet survey and a mark-recapture study to estimate the LKMR population. I evaluated the fit of 5 models and considered the variation in behavioral response model the best model. I correlated (r2 = 0.913) this model's rabbit abundance estimates to pellet density in 11 patches and generated a range-wide population estimate of 317, a western clade population of 257, an eastern clade population of 25, and translocated LKMR populations of 35 and 0 on Little Pine and Water keys, respectively. This prediction equation provides managers a quick, efficient, and non-invasive method to estimate LKMR abundance from pellet counts. To quantify the amount of habitat loss and fragmentation that occurred over the last 50 years, I systematically delineated and compared potential LKMR habitat using 1959 and 2006 aerial photographs. Additionally, I investigated if other factors could have reduced the amount of suitable habitat available for the LKMR with a comparison of habitat loss and fragmentation on a developed island and an undeveloped island. Range-wide, I found that number of habitat patches increased by 38, total class area decreased by 49.0%, and mean patch size decreased by 44.3%. Mean shape index increased by 4.2% and mean proximity index decreased by 13%. Both the 1959 and 2006 connectance indices were low while the 2006 set decreased 12.1%. I observed the same patterns of habitat loss and fragmentation on both the developed and undeveloped islands as I did in the range-wide landscape analysis. I found that LKMR habitat has declined in area and become more fragmented over the last 50 years. Habitat loss and fragmentation by development have directly endangered the LKMR; however, sea level rise and woody encroachment also could have historically caused habitat loss and fragmentation. Although development in LKMR habitat was halted, sea-level rise and woody encroachment could continue to alter LKMR habitat.

Schmidt, Jason Alan

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Local population impacts of geothermal energy development in the Geysers: Calistoga region  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The country-level population increase implications of two long-term geothermal development scenarios for the Geysers region in California are addressed. This region is defined to include the counties of Lake, Sonoma, Mendocino and Napa, all four in northern California. The development scenarios include two components: development for electrical energy production and direct use applications. Electrical production scenarios are derived by incorporating current development patterns into previous development scenarios by both industry and research organizations. The scenarios are made county-specific, specific to the type of geothermal system constructed, and are projected through the year 2000. Separate high growth rate and low growth rate scenarios are developed, based on a set of specified assumptions. Direct use scenarios are estimated from the nature of the available resource, existing local economic and demographic patterns, and available experience with various separate direct use options. From the composite development scenarios, required numbers of direct and indirect employees and the resultant in-migration patterns are estimated. In-migration patterns are compared to current county level population and ongoing trends in the county population change for each of the four counties. From this comparison, conclusions are drawn concerning the contributions of geothermal resource development to future population levels and the significance of geothermally induced population increase from a county planning perspective.

Haven, K.F.; Berg, V.; Ladson, Y.W.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Managing Natural and Reintroduced Rare Plant Populations within a Large Government Reservation  

SciTech Connect

California is home to many large government reservations that have been in existence for decades. Many of these reservations were formed to support various Department of Defense and Department of Energy national defense activities. Often, only a very small percentage of the reservation is actively used for programmatic activities, resulting in large areas of intact habitat. In some cases, this has benefited rare plant populations, as surrounding lands have been developed for residential or industrial use. However, land management activities such as the suppression or active use of fire and other disturbance (such as fire trail grading) can also work to either the detriment or benefit of rare plant populations at these sites. A management regime that is beneficial to the rare plant populations of interest and is at best consistent with existing site programmatic activities, and at a minimum does not impact such activities, has the best potential for a positive outcome. As a result, some species may be 'difficult' while others may be 'easy' to manage in this context, depending on how closely the species biological requirements match the programmatic activities on the reservation. To illustrate, we compare and contrast two rare annual plant species found at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Site 300. Although several populations of Amsinckia grandiflora have been restored on the site, and all populations are intensively managed, this species continues to decline. In contrast, Blepharizonia plumosa appears to take advantage of the annual controlled burns conducted on the site, and is thriving.

Carlsen, T M; Paterson, L E; Alfaro, T M

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

404

Presented at the Annual Meeting of the Population Association of America  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Puerto Rican population in the United States reached 4.2 million according to the 2008 American Community Survey, surpassing the 3.8 million in Puerto Rico. Despite the fact they represent the second largest Hispanic population in the U.S., recent literature lacks a comprehensive picture of characteristics of this population compared to other Hispanic groups. The main objective of this paper is to present an up-to-date profile of the Puerto Ricans living in the U.S. and in the island of Puerto Rico. We will use the 2008 American Community Survey and the Puerto Rico Community Survey. The paper will address three main issues. What are the basic characteristics of the populations such as educational attainment, language and other characteristics over time? How do the two populations compare with other groups like Hispanic groups, Blacks and Whites? What geographic and migration factors influence the difference between Puerto Ricans compared to other groups? This report is released to inform interested parties of research and to encourage discussion. The views expressed on statistical and technical issues are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the U.S. Census Bureau. Collazo, Ryan and Bauman- Page 2

Sonia G. Collazo; Camille L. Ryan; Kurt J. Bauman

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Local Bird Populations and "The Birds of Fermilab"  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Local Bird Populations and "The Birds of Fermilab" Local Bird Populations and "The Birds of Fermilab" If you are a birder yourself, or if your students study birds you may want to keep up to date on the local bird populations. If you're new to birding this may be of even more interest. This article discusses some local resources and includes some tips from a Fermilab expert birder on how to begin. Peter Kasper, birding expert at Fermilab, and our featured physicist in this newsletter has an outstanding resource on the Internet, the Birds of Fermilab. If you have WWW access connect at: http://fnnews.fnal.gov/ecology/wildlife/list.html . Here Peter has reports of sightings of 252 species. The basis of the information on this site are two research periods during which Peter and Vicki Byre (while with the

406

Evaluate Habitat Use and Population Dynamics of Lampreys in Cedar Creek, 2001 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pacific lamprey (Lampetra tridentata) in the Columbia River Basin have declined to a remnant of their pre-1940s populations and the status of the western brook lamprey (L. richardsoni) is unknown. Identifying the biological and ecological factors limiting lamprey populations is critical to their recovery, but little research has been conducted on these species within the Columbia River Basin. This ongoing, multi-year study examines lamprey populations in Cedar Creek, Washington, a third-order tributary to the Lewis River. This annual report describes the activities and results of the second year of this project. Adult (n = 24), metamorphosed (n = 247), transforming (n = 4), and ammocoete (n = 387) stages from both species were examined in 2001. Lamprey were captured using adult fish ladders, lamprey pots, rotary screw traps, and lamprey electrofishers. Twenty-nine spawning ground surveys were conducted. Nine strategic point-specific habitat surveys were performed to assess habitat requirements of juvenile lamprey.

Stone, Jennifer; Pirtle, Jody; Barndt, Scott A.

2002-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

407

Development of a practical modeling framework for estimating the impact of wind technology on bird populations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

One of the most pressing environmental concerns related to wind project development is the potential for avian fatalities caused by the turbines. The goal of this project is to develop a useful, practical modeling framework for evaluating potential wind power plant impacts that can be generalized to most bird species. This modeling framework could be used to get a preliminary understanding of the likelihood of significant impacts to birds, in a cost-effective way. The authors accomplish this by (1) reviewing the major factors that can influence the persistence of a wild population; (2) briefly reviewing various models that can aid in estimating population status and trend, including methods of evaluating model structure and performance; (3) reviewing survivorship and population projections; and (4) developing a framework for using models to evaluate the potential impacts of wind development on birds.

Morrison, M.L. [California State Univ., Sacramento, CA (United States); Pollock, K.H. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Long-term variation of fiddler crab populations in North Carolina salt marshes  

SciTech Connect

As part of the environmental monitoring of possible effects of the Brunswick nuclear power plant fiddle crab populations were sampled in several salt marshes in the lower Cape Fear River estuary, North Carolina for five years. Total biomass of the fiddler crabs Uca Pugnax and U. minax in four Spartina marshes declined by 65 to 70% between the summers of 1974-1975 and 1976-1977 with no significant decrease in population density; there was evidence of a recovery in summer of 1978 to the 1974-1975 levels. The cause of these fluctuations is unknown, but such a degree of variability in intertidal populations emphasizes the need for caution in using one or two-year baseline studies to evalute potential environmental impacts. 1 figure, 2 table.

Cammen, L.M.; Seneca, E.D.; Stroud, L.M.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Binaries, cluster dynamics and population studies of stars and stellar phenomena  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effects of binaries on population studies of stars and stellar phenomena have been investigated over the past 3 decades by many research groups. Here we will focus mainly on the work that has been done recently in Brussels and we will consider the following topics: the effect of binaries on overall galactic chemical evolutionary models and on the rates of different types of supernova, the population of point-like X-ray sources where we distinguish the standard high mass X-ray binaries and the ULXs, a UFO-scenario for the formation of WR+OB binaries in dense star systems. Finally we critically discuss the possible effect of rotation on population studies.

Vanbeveren, D

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Binaries, cluster dynamics and population studies of stars and stellar phenomena  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effects of binaries on population studies of stars and stellar phenomena have been investigated over the past 3 decades by many research groups. Here we will focus mainly on the work that has been done recently in Brussels and we will consider the following topics: the effect of binaries on overall galactic chemical evolutionary models and on the rates of different types of supernova, the population of point-like X-ray sources where we distinguish the standard high mass X-ray binaries and the ULXs, a UFO-scenario for the formation of WR+OB binaries in dense star systems. Finally we critically discuss the possible effect of rotation on population studies.

D. Vanbeveren

2004-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

411

Heavy-duty truck population, activity and usage patterns. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the study was to update the heavy-duty truck (HDT) population, activity (e.g., vehicle miles traveled (VMT), numbers of starts and trips, trip duration, etc.), and usage patterns type of service/business (e.g., delivery, construction, etc.), area of operation (i.e., local, short-haul, long-haul) for HDT`s registered and/or operated in California. The population and activity estimates were done on a weight-class-specific basis light-heavy-duty, medium-heavy-duty and heavy-heavy-duty. Population, activity and usage estimates were based primarily on Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) registration data and Truck Inventory and Usage Survey (TIUS) data. In addition to the analysis of existing data (i.e., DMV and TIUS), 42 HDTs were fitted with on-board data loggers that recorded numbers of trips and starts, daily VMT and travel by time-of-day.

Fischer, M.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Molecular analysis of the metabolic rates of discrete subsurface populations of sulfate reducers  

SciTech Connect

Elucidating the in situ metabolic activity of phylogenetically diverse populations of sulfate-reducing microorganisms that populate anoxic sedimentary environments is key to understanding subsurface ecology. Previous pure culture studies have demonstrated that transcript abundance of dissimilatory (bi)sulfite reductase genes is correlated with the sulfate reducing activity of individual cells. To evaluate whether expression of these genes was diagnostic for subsurface communities, dissimilatory (bi)sulfite reductase gene transcript abundance in phylogenetically distinct sulfate-reducing populations was quantified during a field experiment in which acetate was added to uranium-contaminated groundwater. Analysis of dsrAB sequences prior to the addition of acetate indicated that Desulfobacteraceae, Desulfobulbaceae, and Syntrophaceae-related sulfate reducers were the most abundant. Quantifying dsrB transcripts of the individual populations suggested that Desulfobacteraceae initially had higher dsrB transcripts per cell than Desulfobulbaceae or Syntrophaceae populations, and that the activity of Desulfobacteraceae increased further when the metabolism of dissimilatory metal reducers competing for the added acetate declined. In contrast, dsrB transcript abundance in Desulfobulbaceae and Syntrophaceae remained relatively constant, suggesting a lack of stimulation by added acetate. The indication of higher sulfate-reducing activity in the Desulfobacteraceae was consistent with the finding that Desulfobacteraceae became the predominant component of the sulfate-reducing community. Discontinuing acetate additions resulted in a decline in dsrB transcript abundance in the Desulfobacteraceae. These results suggest that monitoring transcripts of dissimilatory (bi)sulfite reductase genes in distinct populations of sulfate reducers can provide insight into the relative rates of metabolism of different components of the sulfate-reducing community and their ability to respond to environmental perturbations.

Miletto, M.; Williams, K.H.; N'Guessan, A.L.; Lovley, D.R.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

On the mechanism of populating 3p levels of neon under pumping by a hard ioniser  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of quenching additives on the luminescence properties of helium - neon mixtures under pumping by {alpha} particles emitted from {sup 210}Po atoms is considered. It is concluded that, under excitation by a heavy charged particle, the population of the 3p'[1/2]{sub 0} level of neon is not related to the dissociative recombination of molecular ions. It is suggested that the most likely channels for populating the 3p level are the excitation transfer from metastable helium atoms to neon atoms and direct excitation of neon by nuclear particles and secondary electrons. (lasers and active media)

Khasenov, M U [Fotonika LLC, ul. Utegen batyra 112, 050062 Almaty (Kazakhstan)

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

414

Whooping crane (Grus americana) demography and environmental factors in a population growth simulation model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Whooping Crane (Grus americana) is among North AmericaÂ?s most charismatic species. Between 1938 and 2004, the population that migrates between Aransas National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) and Wood Buffalo National Park (WBNP), grew from 18 to 217 individuals. The recovery plan objective for this endangered species is to downlist the population in 2035, but this requires interpretive assessment of population responses to environmental factors over the long term. I analyzed 27 years of banding data, 37 years of nest monitoring data, and 20 years of winter reports to estimate age-specific mortality and fecundity rates. The resulting life table yielded an intrinsic rate of increase (r) of 0.14/y, a net reproductive rate (Ro) of 6.4/y, and a mean length of a generation (G) of 13y. Path analysis of environmental factors, demographic variables (natality and mortality), and the finite rate of population increase (lambda) showed that annual mortality, temperatures from the ANWR, WBNP and at a migration stop-over in Nebraska, and pond water depth were good predictors of lambda variability. However, other environmental factors were significantly correlated: at ANWR, October- March temperature (extreme minimum and maximum), December temperature (mean and extreme minimum), November-January precipitation, and September-March freshwater inflow; at WBNP, March-September precipitation, March-May temperature, and temperatures during the September - October fall migration. The Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) affected lambda indirectly through environmental factors in Nebraska and ANWR. I graphically analyzed relevant data trends from 1967 to 2004 to identify the relation between phases of PDO and environmental and demographic variables. During PDO cold phases, a synchronization of Â?extremeÂ? environmental values was observed from the different regions; during warm phases extreme environmental values were scattered. Most periods of Whooping Crane population decline happened during cold phases. I developed a compartment model to represent Whooping Crane population dynamics utilizing the new data on survivorship and fecundity from banded birds. The model was capable of simulating historical population trends with adjustments in brood success and egg mortality. The model will allow future studies to test population responses to various environmental scenarios at the WBNP, during fall and spring migrations, and at the ANWR.

Gil de Weir, Karine

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Population Evacuations  

SciTech Connect

Emergency evacuation is one of the most important protective action alternatives when facing a natural or a man-made disaster. The planning and implementation of a large-scale emergency evacuation is a difficult and complex problem that requires the interactions of many agencies and involves a large amount of information. This article focuses on the latter and discusses the models that are normally used in the planning phase to evaluate this type of protective action alternatives and the information requirements for their implementation. Although many advances have been achieved in this area, especially during the last few years, a considerable amount of work still remains incomplete. Some of the important areas that need attention, such as improvements in the demographic models, integration of traffic simulation and threat evolution models, and real-time information for the deployment phase, are also discussed in this paper.

Franzese, Oscar [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Target Population  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This guideline is subdivided into selected medication options, such that the following will be addressed: • recommended care prior to treatment • induction and maintenance with the following medications • 6-mercaptopurine (6-MP) or azathioprine (AZA) (Imuran®/Azasan®) with or without prednisone OR • methotrexate (MTX) OR • infliximab (Remicade®) • other treatment related interventions • patient / family education.

unknown authors

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Population Survey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Philippines. 49. Polynesia. 143(x2). Southeast Asian. 143. 74. Syria. 172. Thailand. 45. Turkey. 81. 146,148, 169(x2). 7. 198. 111. United Arab Emirates ...

2007-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

418

Population dose commitments due to radioactive releases from nuclear power plant sites in 1986  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Population radiation dose commitments have been estimated from reported radionuclide releases from commercial power reactors operating during 1986. Fifty-year dose commitments for a one-year exposure from both liquid and atmospheric releases were calculated for four population groups (infant, child, teen-ager and adult) residing between 2 and 80 km from each of 66 reactor sites. This report tabulates the results of these calculations, showing the dose commitments for both water and airborne pathways for each age group and organ. Also included for each of the sites is a histogram showing the fraction of the total population within 2 to 80 km around each site receiving various average dose commitments from the airborne pathways. The total dose commitments (from both liquid and airborne pathways) for each site ranged from a high of 31 person-rem to a low of 0.0007 person-rem for the sites with plants operating throughout the year with an arithmetic mean of 1.7 person-rem. The total population dose for all sites was estimated at 110 person-rem for the 140 million people considered at risk. The site average individual dose commitment from all pathways ranged from a low of 2 {times} 10{sup -6} mrem to a high of 0.02 mrem. No attempt was made in this study to determine the maximum dose commitment received by any one individual from the radionuclides released at any of the sites. 12 refs.

Baker, D.A. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA))

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Population dose commitments due to radioactive releases from nuclear power plant sites in 1985  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Population radiation dose commitments have been estimated from reported radionuclide releases from commericial power reactors operating during 1985. Fifty-year dose commitments from a one-year exposure were calculated from both liquid and atmospheric releases for four population groups (infant, child, teen-ager and adult) residing between 2 and 80 km from each of 61 sites. This report tabulates the results of these calculations, showing the dose commitments for both liquid and airborne pathways for each age group and organ. Also included for each of the sites is a histogram showing the fraction of the total population within 2 to 80 km around each site receiving various average dose commitments from the airborne pathways. The total dose commitments (from both liquid and airborne pathways) for each site ranged from a high of 73 person-rem to a low of 0.011 person-rem for the sites with plants operating throughout the year with an arithmetic mean of 3 person-rem. The total population dose for all sites was estimated at 200 person-rem for the 110 million people considered at risk. The site average individual dose commitment from all pathways ranged from a low of 5 /times/ 10/sup /minus/6/ mrem to a high of 0.02 mrem. No attempt was made in this study to determine the maximum dose commitment received by any one individual from the radionuclides released at any of the sites.

Baker, D.A.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Population dose commitments due to radioactive releases from nuclear power plant sites in 1983  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Population radiation dose commitments have been estimated from reported radionuclide releases from commercial power reactors operating during 1983. Fifty-year dose commitments from a one-year exposure were calculated from both liquid and atmospheric releases for four population groups (infant, child, teen-ager and adult) residing between 2 and 80 km from each of 52 sites. This report tabulates the results of these calculations, showing the dose commitments for both liquid and airborne pathways for each age group and organ. Also included for each of the sites is a histogram showing the fraction of the total population within 2 to 80 km around each site receiving various average dose commitments from the airborne pathways. The total dose commitments (from both liquid and airborne pathways) for each site ranged from a high of 45 person-rem to a low of 0.002 person-rem for the sites with plants operating throughout the year with an arithmetic mean of 3 person-rem. The total population dose for all sites was estimated at 170 person-rem for the 100 million people considered at risk.

Baker, D.A.; Peloquin, R.A.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "income gdp population" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Population dose commitments due to radioactive releases from nuclear power plant sites in 1984  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Population radiation dose commitments have been estimated from reported radionuclide releases from commercial power reactors operating during 1984. Fifty-year dose commitments from a one-year exposure were calculated from both liquid and atmospheric releases for four population groups (infant, child, teen-ager and adult) residing between 2 and 80 km from each of 56 sites. This report tabulates the results of these calculations, showing the dose commitments for both liquid and airborne pathways for each age group and organ. Also included for each of the sites is a histogram showing the fraction of the total population within 2 to 80 km around each site receiving various average dose commitments from the airborne pathways. The total dose commitments (from both liquid and airborne pathways) for each site ranged from a high of 110 person-rem to a low of 0.002 person-rem for the sites with plants operating throughout the year with an arithmetic mean of 5 person-rem. The total population dose for all sites was estimated at 280 person-rem for the 100 million people considered at risk. The site average individual dose commitment from all pathways ranged from a low of 6 x 10/sup -6/ mrem to a high of 0.04 mrem. No attempt was made in this study to determine the maximum dose commitment received by any one individual from the radionuclides released at any of the sites.

Baker, D.A.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Population dose commitments due to radioactive releases from nuclear power plant sites in 1980  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Population radiation dose commitments have been estimated from reported radionuclide releases from commercial power reactors operating during 1980. In addition doses derived from the shutdown reactors at the Three Mile Island site were included. Fifty-year dose commitments from a one-year exposure were calculated from both liquid and atmospheric releases for four population groups (infant, child, teen-ager and adult) residing between 2 and 80 km from each site. This report tabulates the results of these calculations, showing the dose commitments for both liquid and airborne pathways for each age group and organ. Also included for each site is a histogram showing the fraction of the total population within 2 to 80 km around each site receiving various average dose commitments from the airborne pathways. The total dose commitment from both liquid and airborne pathways ranged from a high of 40 person-rem to a low of 0.02 person-rem with an arithmetic mean of 4 person-rem. The total population dose for all sites was estimated at 180 person-rem for the 96 million people considered at risk.

Baker, D.A.; Peloquin, R.A.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Population dose commitments due to radioactive releases from nuclear power plant sites in 1982. Volume 4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Population radiation dose commitments have been estimated from reported radionuclide releases from commercial power reactors operating during 1982. Fifty-year dose commitments from a one-year exposure were calculated from both liquid and atmospheric releases for four population groups (infant, child, teen-ager and adult) residing between 2 and 80 km from each of 51 sites. This report tabulates the results of these calculations, showing the dose commitments for both liquid and airborne pathways for each age group and organ. Also included for each site is a histogram showing the fraction of the total population within 2 to 80 km around each site receiving various average dose commitments from the airborne pathways. The total dose commitments from both liquid and airborne pathways ranged from a high of 30 person-rem to a low of 0.007 person-rem for the sites with plants operating throughout the year with an arithmetic mean of 3 person-rem. The total population dose for all sites was estimated at 130 person-rem for the 100 million people considered at risk. The average individual dose commitment from all pathways on a site basis ranged from a low of 6 x 10/sup -7/ mrem to a high of 0.06 mrem. No attempt was made in this study to determine the maximum dose commitment received by any one individual from the radionuclides released at any of the sites.

Baker, D.A.; Peloquin, R.A.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Population-split genetic algorithm for retrieval of ultrafast laser parameters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Authors modify the traditional or standard genetic algorithm by splitting the initial population. This crucial step is an imitation of sexual and asexual reproduction mechanism in the life cycle of many plants or animals. Asexual reproduction shall happen ... Keywords: frequency resolved optical gating, genetic algorithm, pulse retrieving, ultrafast lasers

S. F. Shu; C. L. Pan; C. T. Sun

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Radiative Impacts on the Growth of a Population of Drops within Simulated Summertime Arctic Stratus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impact of solar heating and infrared cooling on the growth of a population of drops is studied with two numerical modeling frameworks. An eddy-resolving model (ERM) simulation of Arctic stratus clouds is used to generate a dataset of 500 ...

Jerry Y. Harrington; Graham Feingold; William R. Cotton

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Nuclear Stellar Populations in the Infrared Space Observatory Atlas of Bright Spiral Galaxies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To understand the nuclear stellar populations and star formation histories of the nuclei of spiral galaxies, we have obtained K-band nuclear spectra for 41 galaxies and H-band spectra for 20 galaxies in the ISO Atlas of Bright Spiral Galaxies. In the vast majority of the subsample (80%), the near-infrared spectra suggest that evolved red stars completely dominate the nuclear stellar populations and that hot young stars are virtually non-existent. The signatures of recent star formation activity are only found in 20% of the subsample, even though older red stars still dominate the stellar populations in these galaxies. Given the dominance of evolved stars in most galaxy nuclei and the nature of the emission lines in the galaxies where they were detected, we suggest that nuclear star formation proceeds in the form of instantaneous bursts. The stars produced by these bursts comprise only ~2% of the total nuclear stellar mass in these galaxies, but we demonstrate how the nuclear stellar populations of normal spiral galaxies can be built up through a series of these bursts. The bursts were detected only in Sbc galaxies and later, and both bars and interactions appeared to be sufficient but not necessary triggers for the nuclear star formation activity. The vast majority of galaxies with nuclear star formation were classified as HII galaxies. With one exception, LINERs and transition objects were dominated by older red stars, which suggested that star formation was not responsible for generating these galaxies' optical line emission.

George J. Bendo; Robert D. Joseph

2004-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

427

Pre-Pleistocene Refugia and Differentiation between Populations of the Caucasian Salamander (Mertensiella caucasica)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the northwestern Caucasus Minor in Turkey and Georgia (Fig. 1). The larger, western part of the range belongs, distributed in the Borjomi area in central Georgia and in southwestern Georgia and northeastern Turkey neighbor- ing populations. 2000 Academic Press Key Words: amphibians; Caucasus; cytochrome-b gene

Thorpe, Roger Stephen

428

The Asian contribution to the Turkish population with respect to the Balkans: Y-chromosome perspective  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Admixture analysis is one of the methods that can be used to calculate the contribution of migrations. There are several admixture estimation methods. In the present study, Chikhi et al.'s admixture method, which considers the effect of genetic drift, ... Keywords: Admixture, Central Asia, Genetic drift, Turkish population, Y-chromosome

Ceren Caner Berkman; ?nci Togan

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

commercial and recreational fisheries are com-posed of both populations of bluefin tuna (Fig.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

commercial and recreational fisheries are com- posed of both populations of bluefin tuna (Fig. 2). A large fraction of the school (57.4%) and medium (44.3%) category bluefin tuna present in the U.S. waters bluefin tuna in the Mid Atlantic Bight decreased with increasing size (age) (Fig. 3). Our estimates

Shaham, Shai

430

An e-health platform for the elderly population: The butler system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Butler system is an e-health platform designed to improve the elderly population's quality of life. The Butler system has three applications diagnostic, therapeutic and playful. The objective of this work is to present the influence of the use of ... Keywords: Elderly, Interactive technologies, Telepsychology, Virtual reality, e-Health system

E. Etchemendy; R. M. Baños; C. Botella; D. Castilla; M. Alcañiz; P. Rasal; L. Farfallini

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

ECOLOGY AND BEHAVIOR Population Dynamics and Within-Plant Distribution of the Mite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pests in agricultural systems (Jeppson et al. 1975, Lindquistetal.1996).Theminutesizeofthesesucking on the leaf (Jeppson et al. 1975). High populations of this mite can cause papaya leaf margins to roll. Proc. Hawaii Entomol. Soc. 31: 30. Jeppson, L. R., H. H. Keifer, and E. W. Baker. 1975. Mites injurious

Rosenheim, Jay A.

432

Long-term underwater camera surveillance for monitoring and analysis of fish populations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Long-term underwater camera surveillance for monitoring and analysis of fish populations Bastiaan J Laboratories, Taiwan Abstract Long-term monitoring of the underwater environ- ment is still labour intensive work. Using underwater surveillance cameras to monitor this environment has the potential advantage

Fisher, Bob

433

213 WILDLIFE BIOLOGY 9:3 (2003) The population dynamics of mountain goats Oreamnos  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-2 adult males per year. Key words: aerial surveys, Alberta, censusing, hunting, mountain goat, pop hunting on population dynam- ics, we analysed long-term data obtained from aerial counts of 12 nativeAlberta were managed by harvesting up to 5% of the number seen during aer- ial surveys (Hall 1977, Hall

Festa-Bianchet, Marco

434

Bayesian population analysis of a washin-washout physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for acetone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The aim of this study was to derive improved estimates of population variability and uncertainty of physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model parameters, especially of those related to the washin-washout behavior of polar volatile substances. This was done by optimizing a previously published washin-washout PBPK model for acetone in a Bayesian framework using Markov chain Monte Carlo simulation. The sensitivity of the model parameters was investigated by creating four different prior sets, where the uncertainty surrounding the population variability of the physiological model parameters was given values corresponding to coefficients of variation of 1%, 25%, 50%, and 100%, respectively. The PBPK model was calibrated to toxicokinetic data from 2 previous studies where 18 volunteers were exposed to 250-550 ppm of acetone at various levels of workload. The updated PBPK model provided a good description of the concentrations in arterial, venous, and exhaled air. The precision of most of the model parameter estimates was improved. New information was particularly gained on the population distribution of the parameters governing the washin-washout effect. The results presented herein provide a good starting point to estimate the target dose of acetone in the working and general populations for risk assessment purposes.

Moerk, Anna-Karin, E-mail: anna-karin.mork@ki.s [Work Environment Toxicology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, SE-171 77 Stockholm (Sweden); Jonsson, Fredrik [Work Environment Toxicology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, SE-171 77 Stockholm (Sweden); Pharsight, a Certara company, St. Louis, MO (United States); Johanson, Gunnar [Work Environment Toxicology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, SE-171 77 Stockholm (Sweden)

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Genomics assisted design of training populations of perennial forage and biofuel crops for predicting breeding value  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and biofuel crops for predicting breeding value Supervisors: Leif Skøt (IBERS), Gancho improvement of crops for food, feedstock and biofuel is an urgent priority to meet with respect to training populations in perennial forage and biofuel crops, specifically

Millar, Andrew J.

436

Model for estimating Venezuelan population with working age using artificial neural networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work presents the development of an Artificial Neural Networks model for estimating the female and male population with working age in Venezuela. For the creation of the model it is used the previous year values related to the employed, unemployed ... Keywords: artificial neural networks, labor force, regression analysis

Samaria Muñoz-Bravo; Anna Pérez-Méndez; Francklin Rivas-Echeverría

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Impacts of Volumetric Flow Rate of Water Intakes on Fish Populations and Communities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report addresses issues related to causes and effects of fish impingement and entrainment at cooling water intake structures (CWISs). It analyzes the possible relationship between the volume of water withdrawn by a water intake and the status of fish populations and aquatic communities in the source water body.

2003-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

438

A population-based local search for solving a bi-objective vehicle routing problem  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we present a population-based local search for solving a bi-objective vehicle routing problem. The objectives of the problem are minimization of the tour length and balancing the routes. The algorithm repeatedly generates a pool of good ...

Joseph M. Pasia; Karl F. Doerner; Richard F. Hartl; Marc Reimann

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Computational Bayesian inference for estimating the size of a finite population  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We develop computationally intensive Bayesian methods to estimate the size of a closed population and apply these methods to estimate the number of children born in upstate New York with spina bifida from 1969 to 1974. The names of these children may ... Keywords: Iterative proportional fitting, Log-linear model, Odds ratio, Prior specification, Sample-resample

Balgobin Nandram; Daniel Zelterman

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

A Multi-Resolution Large Population Game Framework for Smart Grid Demand Response Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Multi-Resolution Large Population Game Framework for Smart Grid Demand Response Management part of power system and market opera- tional practice. Motivated by the smart grid DR management) equation. Finally, we apply the framework to the smart grid DR management problem and illustrate

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "income gdp population" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

From empirical data to mathematical model: using population dynamics to characterize insurgencies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Understanding the nature of insurgencies is critical to determining strategies for mitigating their effects. Modeling insurgencies is one method to provide a structured methodology to gain insight into the various characteristics of insurgencies. This ... Keywords: homeland security, insurgency modeling, population dynamics, system dynamics

John A. Sokolowski; Catherine M. Banks

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Reduced Spill at Hydropower Dams: Opportunities for More Generation and Increased Fish Population  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report indicates that reduction of managed spill at hydropower dams can speed implementation of technologies for fish protection and achieve economic goals. Spill of water over spillways is managed in the Columbia River basin to assist downstream-migrating juvenile salmon, and is generally believed to be the most similar to natural migration, benign and effective passage route; other routes include turbines, intake screens with bypasses, and surface bypasses. However, this belief may be misguided, because spill is becoming recognized as less than natural, with deep intakes below normal migration depths, and likely causing physical damages from severe shear on spillways, high turbulence in tail waters, and collisions with baffle blocks that lead to disorientation and predation. Some spillways induce mortalities comparable to turbines. Spill is expensive in lost generation, and controversial. Fish-passage research is leading to more fish-friendly turbines, screens and bypasses that are more effective and less damaging, and surface bypasses that offer passage of more fish per unit water volume than does spill (leaving more water for generation). Analyses by independent economists demonstrated that goals of increased fish survival over the long term and net gain to the economy can be obtained by selectively reducing spill and diverting some of the income from added power generation to research, development, and installation of fish-passage technologies. Such a plan would selectively reduce spill when and where least damaging to fish, increase electricity generation using the water not spilled and use innovative financing to direct monetary gains to improving fish passage.

Coutant, Charles C [ORNL; Mann, Roger [RMecon, Davis, California; Sale, Michael J [ORNL

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

The marine and terrestrial ecology of a northern population of the Little Penguin, Eudyptula minor, from Bowen Island, Jervis Bay.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The breeding success of the Little Penguin was significantly higher in northern populations compared with documented southern colonies. Several southern colonies including Phillip Island in Victoria and… (more)

Fortescue, Martin

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Forecasting the Population of Census Tracts by Age and Sex: An Example of the Hamilton–Perry Method in Action  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

approach to economic forecasting and policy analysis.for K-12 enrollment forecasting. Educational Research65 and 69 85 and over Forecasting the Population of Census

Swanson, David A.; Schlottmann, Alan; Schmidt, Bob

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

The utilization of genetic markers to resolve modern management issues in historic bison populations: implications for species conservation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The saga of the American bison (Bison bison) is a well-known story of death, destruction, and greed circumvented by early conservationists. The foresight of 5 cattlemen and the Canadian and U.S. governments at the apex of the population bottleneck in the 1880s led to the eventual establishment of several federal bison populations, from which virtually all of the 300,000 extant bison are descended. A survey of 54 microsatellite loci spanning each autosomal and both sex chromosomes was used to compare levels of genetic variation among 10 of the 11 federal bison populations in the U.S. Although most populations contain moderate levels of genetic variation, the majority of genetic variation is contained within only 4 of the federal populations surveyed. The distribution and partitioning of genetic variation confirm historical records of founding lineages and transfers among populations. Previously published mitochondrial and nuclear markers were used to survey federal bison populations for evidence of domestic cattle introgression. While only 1 population was found to contain low levels of domestic cattle mitochondrial DNA, 7 of the 10 surveyed populations had detectable introgression of nuclear genes from domestic cattle. From this, 2 federal bison populations were identified that have both high levels of genetic variation and no evidence of introgression of domestic cattle genes. The data obtained from this study were used to examine consequences of past and present management practices in closed bison populations. In the case of the Texas State Bison Herd, observed chronic small population size, low levels of genetic variation, low natality rates, and high juvenile mortality rates combined with the results of population modeling indicate a high risk of extinction within the next 50 years unless new genetic variation is introduced into the herd. Alternatively, analysis of population substructure and nonrandom culling reveal the necessity for further investigation into the long-term effects of current management practices in the Yellowstone National Park bison population. This study illustrates that while bison may be considered a conservation success story, long-term survival of protected federal populations requires the development of effective genetic management strategies.

Halbert, Natalie Dierschke

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Peak Population: Timing and Influences of Peak Energy on the World and the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Peak energy is the notion that the world’s total production of usable energy will reach a maximum value and then begin an inexorable decline. Ninety-two percent of the world’s energy is currently derived from the non-renewable sources (oil, coal, natural gas and nuclear). As each of these non-renewable sources individually peaks in production, we can see total energy production peak. The human population is tightly correlated with global energy production, as agriculture and material possessions are energy intensive. It follows that peak energy should have a significant effect on world population. Using a set of mathematical models, including M King Hubbert’s oil peak mathematics, we prepared three models. The first approached the peak energy and population problem from the point of view of a “black-box” homogeneous world. The second model divides the world into ten major regions to study the global heterogeneity of the peak energy and population question. Both of these models include various scenarios for how the world population will develop based on available energy and per capita consumption of that energy. The third model examines energy and climate change within the forty-eight contiguous American states in order to identify some of the “best” and some of the “worst” states in which to live in the year 2050. The black box model indicates that peak energy will occur in 2026 at a maximum production of 104.1 billion barrels of oil equivalent (BBOE). Total energy production in 2011 was 92.78 BBOE. Three scenarios of different energy consumption rates suggest a peak world population occurring between 2026 and 2036, at 7.6-8.3 billion. The regional model indicates that even as each region protects its own energy resources, most of the world will reach peak energy by 2030, and world populations peak between 7.5 and 9 billion. A certain robustness in our conclusion is warranted as similar numbers were obtained via two separate approaches. The third model used several different parameters in order to ascertain that, in general, states that are projected to slow towards flat-line population growth and to become milder due to climate change such as Rhode Island, New York and Ohio are far more suitable with regard to an energy limited world than states that are projected to grow in population as well as become less mild due to climate change such as Texas, Arizona and Nevada. Each of these models in its own way foreshadows necessary changes that the world will experience as the 21st century progresses. The economies of the world have been, and continue to be, built on energy. When energy production is unable to continue growing it must follow that economies will be unable to grow. As the world approaches and passes peak energy, the standard of living in the less developed areas of the world cannot improve without sacrifices being made in the developed world.

Warner, Kevin 1987-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

The Effect of Environmental Contaminants on Mating Dynamics and Population Viability in a Sex-Role-Reversed Pipefish  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Understanding how anthropogenic activity impacts the health and viability of wildlife populations is one of the most important tasks of environmental biology. A key concern related to bi-products of human activity is the accumulation of environmental pollutants within aquatic environments. Pollutants such as endocrine disruptors and heavy metals have the potential to impact both human and wildlife populations in contaminated areas. While much research has focused on how these compounds impact natural selection processes, such as viability and reproduction, their effect on sexual selection processes is not as clear. The goal of this dissertation was to address how environmental contaminants impact sexual selection processes in a sex-role reversed pipefish and evaluate how these effects may impact long-term population viability. Here we show that short periods of exposure to environmentally relevant concentrations of a synthetic estrogen result in male pipefish with female-like secondary sexual traits. While these males are capable of reproduction, exposed males are discriminated against by females in mate choice tests. In natural populations, this type of discrimination could reduce male mating opportunities, potentially reducing their reproductive success. In an additional component of this dissertation, it was discovered that pipefish populations around Mobile Bay, specifically Weeks Bay, are currently being exposed to significantly elevated levels of mercury. These populations are genetically distinct from coastal populations but moderate levels of gene flow occur among sites, and gene flow between contaminated and non-contaminated population may be influencing how environmental contaminants are impacting genetic diversity and population viability. In the case of endocrine disruptors, migration between contaminated and non-contaminated sites may negatively impact population viability. Morphological traits induced with exposure to contaminants may be maintained for extended periods of time, therefore, the effect the exposed phenotype has on mating dynamics and sexual selection could be carried to non-contaminated sites if exposed individuals move to new populations. On the other hand, immigration of individuals from non-contaminated sites into contaminated areas may help maintain genetic diversity within exposed populations. In conclusion, the work presented in this dissertation shows that the presence of environmental toxins can significantly impact sexual selection processes, which in turn can have profound effects on the viability and future evolutionary trajectory of populations. Future work in this area should not only address how these toxins impact individual fitness, but should also address how population structure may be influencing the severity of these compounds on natural populations.

Partridge, Charlyn G.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Late Pleistocene Neandertal-Early Modern Human Population Dynamics: The Dental Evidence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent genetic studies have confirmed that there was admixture between African early modern humans and archaic populations throughout the Old World. In this dissertation, I examine European early modern human dental morphology to assess the evidence for Neandertal-human admixture. The focus of this study is not on the question of taxonomic designations of Late Pleistocene Homo, but rather on the interactions of these populations in Europe. This focus on gene flow itself redefines the Neandertal question. Rather than asking if Neandertals are a different species from H. sapiens, I focus on the nature of the interactions between archaic and modern populations, which is essential to understanding the history of modern H. sapiens regardless of species definitions. I recorded dental metric measurements and morphology observations on 85 fossil Neandertals and early modern humans and a recent modern human comparative sample of 330 Native Americans and Spaniards. I examined each trait distribution individually and through the use of Mahalanobis D2, mean measure of divergence, principle components analysis, discriminant function analysis, k-means cluster analysis, and a population genetics program, structure. Through these methods, I found evidence of admixture in the dental trait distributions of European early modern humans. However, it is not evident in traditional distance measures or cluster analyses. The earliest European modern humans do not follow the trend of dental reduction found throughout the Pleistocene and into the Holocene and do not uniformly classify with any fossil population in discriminant function analysis of metric traits. The non-metric trait sample size is too small to make any definitive conclusions, but a mosaic pattern of trait frequencies also suggests admixture. The recent modern human sample shows that while increased variation and a mosaic of non-metric traits persist through many generations after admixture has ceased, traditional methods of distance analysis cannot detect low levels of admixture within 200 years. The program structure is effective in finding patterns of variation within and among populations using morphological data. It will be useful for future analyses of dental traits and other fossil data, given the ability to use it with an incomplete data set.

Springer, Victoria Suzanne

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Population enumeration and the effects of oil and gas development on dune-dwelling lizards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Habitat loss is one of the leading causes of species decline across all taxa and conservation practices require information on population trends. The Mescalero Sands ecosystem, New Mexico, USA, is experiencing landscape changes associated with oil and gas development. The dune-dwelling lizard community contains a habitat specialist, Sceloporus arenicolus, that is of particular interest because it has a very limited geographic distribution that is entirely subject to oil and gas development. Distance sampling is widely used to estimate population densities of many vertebrate taxa however assumptions can be difficult to satisfy with certain species or in certain habitats. Researchers must investigate the likelihood that assumptions can be satisfied before implementing any population sampling method. I had two objectives. First to investigate the precision of population densities of dune-dwelling lizards estimated via distance sampling that was coupled with double-observer surveys. Second to compare abundances of dune-dwelling lizards among sites that varied in oil and gas development. I conducted distance line transects and compared those density estimates to densities obtained from total removal plots. I quantified the amount of oil and gas development, habitat quantity and quality and correlated those to lizard abundances to investigate the effects of oil and gas development on lizard populations. I found large differences in density estimates from distance sampling and total removal plots that resulted from violation of distance sampling assumptions. Although distance sampling is a low cost method, it does not produce reliable density estimates for dune-dwelling lizards and is not an appropriate sampling method in this system. I did not find oil and gas development effects on the habitat quantity, quality or on the abundances of lizards. Lizard abundances were most strongly correlated to habitat quantity. Lizard abundances may be influenced by complex interactions between oil and gas development and habitat quantity and quality but controlling for those interactions was beyond the scope of my study. Before and after experiments and long-term studies at multiple sites would be required to more fully address the effects of oil and gas development on lizard populations in the Mescalero Sands.

Smolensky, Nicole Limunga

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Choose the most appropriate answer 1. A The predicted increase in global population will be particularly harmful in Africa where  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the forecast Aids should been a huge problem, but thanks to the new drugs, millions of people have survived. A China's population will probably go below one billion because of policies that allow families to have only very few children. B China's population will not increase because of enforced restrictive

Romeo, Alessandro

451

Population estimates for the areas within a 50-mile radius of four reference points on the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

This report presents population distributions within a 50-mile radius of four locations on the Hanford Site. The results are based on the US Bureau of Census 1980 population counts for Washington and Oregon. These results are documented in Tables 2 to 13 and 15 to 18 of this report.

Sommer, D.J.; Rau, R.G.; Robinson, D.C.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Table HC15.7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by Four Most Populated States, 2005  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by Four Most Populated States, 2005 7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by Four Most Populated States, 2005 Total.................................................................................. 111.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment.................................... 17.8 1.8 Q Q 4.9 Have Cooling Equipment................................................. 93.3 5.3 7.0 7.8 7.2 Use Cooling Equipment.................................................. 91.4 5.3 7.0 7.7 6.6 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it................................ 1.9 Q N Q 0.6 Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System............................................................. 65.9 1.1 6.4 6.4 5.4 Without a Heat Pump................................................. 53.5 1.1 3.5 5.7 4.9 With a Heat Pump......................................................

453

Table HC15.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Four Most Populated States, 2005  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Four Most Populated States, 2005 0 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Four Most Populated States, 2005 Total.................................................................................... 111.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day................................................. 8.2 0.6 0.5 0.8 1.4 2 Times A Day.............................................................. 24.6 1.4 1.5 2.0 3.1 Once a Day................................................................... 42.3 2.4 3.0 2.7 4.1 A Few Times Each Week.............................................. 27.2 2.1 1.7 1.7 2.5 About Once a Week...................................................... 3.9 0.3 Q 0.4 0.6 Less Than Once a Week............................................... 4.1 Q Q 0.3 0.4 No Hot Meals Cooked...................................................

454

Analyses of reliability characteristics of emergency diesel generator population using empirical Bayes methods  

SciTech Connect

Emergency Diesel Generators (EDGs) provide backup power to nuclear power plants in case of failure of AC buses. The reliability of EDGs is important to assure response to loss-of-offsite power accident scenarios, a dominant contributor to the plant risk. The reliable performance of EDGs has been of concern both for regulators and plant operators. In this paper the authors present an approach and results from the analysis of failure data from a large population of EDGs. They used empirical Bayes approach to obtain both the population distribution and the individual failure probabilities from EDGs failure to start and load-run data over 4 years for 194 EDGs at 63 plant units.

Vesely, W.E. [Science Applications International Corp., Dublin, OH (United States)]|[Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Uryas`ev, S.P.; Samanta, P.K. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Population Synthesis of Radio and Gamma-ray Pulsars in the Fermi Era  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present results of our pulsar population synthesis of normal pulsars from the Galactic disk using our previously developed computer code. On the same footing, we use slot gap and outer gap models for gamma-ray emission from normal pulsars to obtain statistics of radio-loud and radio-quiet gamma-ray pulsars. From recently improved understanding of HII and star forming regions in the Galaxy, we develop a new surface density model of the birth location of neutron stars. We explore models of neutron star evolution with magnetic field-decay, and with different initial period and magnetic field distributions. We present preliminary results including simulated population statistics that are compared with recent detections by Fermi of normal, isolated pulsars.

Gonthier, Peter L; Harding, Alice K; Grenier, Isabelle A; Pierbattista, Marco

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

The ArcSDE GIS Dynamic Population Model Tool for Savannah River Site Emergency Response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site (SRS) is a 310-square-mile Department of Energy site located near Aiken, South Carolina. With a workforce of over 10,000 employees and subcontractors, SRS emergency personnel must be able to respond to an emergency event in a timely and effective manner, in order to ensure the safety and security of the Site. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) provides the technology needed to give managers and emergency personnel the information they need to make quick and effective decisions. In the event of a site evacuation, knowing the number of on-site personnel to evacuate from a given area is an essential piece of information for emergency staff. SRS has developed a GIS Dynamic Population Model Tool to quickly communicate real-time information that summarizes employee populations by facility area and building and then generates dynamic maps that illustrate output statistics.

MCLANE, TRACY; JONES, DWIGHT

2005-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

457

Original article Ethanol and acetic-acid tolerance in Indian geographical populations of Drosophila immigrans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Summary- Indian geographical populations of Drosophila immigrans revealed a lack of allozymic variation at the alcohol dehydrogenase locus. Latitudinal clines of ethanol tolerance (1.5-4.2%) and acetic-acid tolerance (2.9-4.9%) were observed in adult individuals of 4 geographical populations of Drosophila immigrans. Thus, both ethanol and acetic-acid tolerance decreased towards the equator. The parallel patterns of utilisation of ethanol and acetic acid seem to be correlated with the concentrations of these 2 metabolites in natural food resources. Thus, intra-specific differences for ethanol and acetic-acid tolerance could be adaptively maintained by spatially varying fermenting habitats along the north-south axis of the Indian sub-continent.

R Parkash Neena

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Population dose commitments due to radioactive releases from nuclear power plant sites in 1988. Volume 10  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Population radiation dose commitments have been estimated from reported radionuclide releases from commercial power reactors operating during 1988. Fifty-year commitments for a one-year exposure from both liquid and atmospheric releases were calculated for four population groups (infant, child, teen-ager and adult) residing between 2 and 80 km from each of 71 reactor sites. This report tabulates the results of these calculations, showing the dose commitments for both water and airborne pathways for each age group and organ. Also included for each of the sites is a histogram showing the fraction of the total population within 2 to 80 km around each site receiving various average dose commitments from the airborne pathways. The total collective dose commitments (from both liquid and airborne pathways) for each site ranged from a high of 16 person-rem to a low of 0.0011 person-rem for the sites with plants operating throughout the year with an arithmetic mean of 1.1 person-rem. The total population dose for all sites was estimated at 75 person-rem for the 150 million people considered at risk. The site average individual dose commitment from all pathways ranged from a low of 3 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} mrem to a high of 0.02 mrem. No attempt was made in this study to determine the maximum dose commitment received by any one individual from the radionuclides released at any of the sites. However, licensee calculation of doses to the maximally exposed individual at some sites indicated values of up to approximately 100 times average individual doses (on the order of a few millirem per year).

Baker, D.A. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Population dose commitments due to radioactive releases from nuclear power plant sites in 1988  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Population radiation dose commitments have been estimated from reported radionuclide releases from commercial power reactors operating during 1988. Fifty-year commitments for a one-year exposure from both liquid and atmospheric releases were calculated for four population groups (infant, child, teen-ager and adult) residing between 2 and 80 km from each of 71 reactor sites. This report tabulates the results of these calculations, showing the dose commitments for both water and airborne pathways for each age group and organ. Also included for each of the sites is a histogram showing the fraction of the total population within 2 to 80 km around each site receiving various average dose commitments from the airborne pathways. The total collective dose commitments (from both liquid and airborne pathways) for each site ranged from a high of 16 person-rem to a low of 0.0011 person-rem for the sites with plants operating throughout the year with an arithmetic mean of 1.1 person-rem. The total population dose for all sites was estimated at 75 person-rem for the 150 million people considered at risk. The site average individual dose commitment from all pathways ranged from a low of 3 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} mrem to a high of 0.02 mrem. No attempt was made in this study to determine the maximum dose commitment received by any one individual from the radionuclides released at any of the sites. However, licensee calculation of doses to the maximally exposed individual at some sites indicated values of up to approximately 100 times average individual doses (on the order of a few millirem per year).

Baker, D.A. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Evaluation of a Cooling Lake Fishery, Volume 3: Fish Population Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surveys were conducted in Lake Sangchris, a cooling lake, and Lake Shelbyville, a nearby flood control reservoir, to compare the size and composition of the fish populations and to determine the effects, if any, of the thermal discharge from the power plant on the fish community. Quantitative samples of fishes were collected (by electrofishing, gillnetting, and seining) bimonthly from Lake Sangchris and quarterly from Lake Shelbyville. Preferred temperatures and movements of fishes were studied by radiot...

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

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461

Relationship between blood manganese and blood pressure in the Korean general population according to KNHANES 2008  

SciTech Connect

Introduction: We present data on the association of manganese (Mn) level with hypertension in a representative sample of the adult Korean population who participated in the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES) 2008. Methods: This study was based on the data obtained by KNHANES 2008, which was conducted for three years (2007-2009) using a rolling sampling design involving a complex, stratified, multistage, probability-cluster survey of a representative sample of the noninstitutionalized civilian population of South Korea. Results: Multiple regression analysis after controlling for covariates, including gender, age, regional area, education level, smoking, drinking status, hemoglobin, and serum creatinine, showed that the beta coefficients of log blood Mn were 3.514, 1.878, and 2.517 for diastolic blood pressure, and 3.593, 2.449, and 2.440 for systolic blood pressure in female, male, and all participants, respectively. Multiple regression analysis including three other blood metals, lead, mercury, and cadmium, revealed no significant effects of the three metals on blood pressure and showed no effect on the association between blood Mn and blood pressure. In addition, doubling the blood Mn increased the risk of hypertension 1.828, 1.573, and 1.567 fold in women, men, and all participants, respectively, after adjustment for covariates. The addition of blood lead, mercury, and cadmium as covariates did not affect the association between blood Mn and the prevalence of hypertension. Conclusion: Blood Mn level was associated with an increased risk of hypertension in a representative sample of the Korean adult population. - Highlights: {yields} We showed the association of manganese with hypertension in Korean population. {yields} This study was based on the data obtained by KNHANES 2008. {yields} Blood manganese level was associated with an increased risk of hypertension.

Lee, Byung-Kook [Institute of Environmental and Occupational Medicine, Soonchunhyang University 646 Eupnae-ri, Shinchang-myun, Asan-si, Choongnam 336-745 (Korea, Republic of)] [Institute of Environmental and Occupational Medicine, Soonchunhyang University 646 Eupnae-ri, Shinchang-myun, Asan-si, Choongnam 336-745 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yangho, E-mail: yanghokm@nuri.net [Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Ulsan University Hospital, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, 290-3 Cheonha-Dong, Dong-Gu, Ulsan 682-060 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Ulsan University Hospital, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, 290-3 Cheonha-Dong, Dong-Gu, Ulsan 682-060 (Korea, Republic of)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

462

Assessing Population-level Risks of Wind Power Development for the Indiana Bat (Myotis sodalis)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Continued development of wind energy must confront the challenge of managing risks to wildlife populations. Presently, construction of new wind facilities in much of the eastern United States is being hindered by concerns over possible impacts to the threatened Indiana bat (Myotis sodalis). These concerns are heightened by the emergence of a virulent fungal pathogen, white-nose syndrome, affecting hibernating colonies. While migratory tree bat fatalities at wind facilities are common, ...

2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

463

A Risk Analysis Framework for Golden Eagle Population Responses to Wind Power  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of quick “snapshot” metrics that can serve as reliable diagnostic tools for assessing avian population status has great appeal. In this study, stochastic simulation modeling and tree-structured regression analyses were used to evaluate the reliability of two proposed snapshot metrics in territorial birds: the floater/breeder ratio and the rate of nest occupancy by immature subadults. The demographic model, parameterized with field data from an intensively studied ...

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

464

Population genetic structure of Conophthorus ponderosae Hopkins (Coleoptera: Scolytidae) inferred from mitochondrial DNA haplotypes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pine cone beetles (Conophthorus sp.) are serious pests of many forest ecosystems since they burrow into pine cone tissues for egg deposition, causing the death of the seeds. Management of these beetles in natural and commercial stands of pines has been problematic due to lack of understanding about species limits and distribution. This study was conducted to investigate the phylogeography and phylogenetics of the genus. Several species represented by disjunct populations appear to be monophyletic including Conophthorus edulis, C. mexicanus, C. coniperda, and C. conicollens, whereas C. ponderosae is polyphyletic with many distinct clades isolated by geography. This study explored whether host use or geography has played a greater role in the diversification of this genus, focusing on the polyphyletic C. ponderosae and the monophyletic C. edulis. In the first study, 751bp of the mtDNA CO1 gene were sequenced to reconstruct a phylogeny of the genus, and the distribution and host use were compared to investigate whether these factors were significantly associated. The second study addressed population structure and possible historical influences on the C. edulis and C. ponderosae populations using a nested clade analysis of the mtDNA haplotypes. Despite potential limitations due to sampling, several conclusions could be drawn. Three separate haplotype networks were found for the C. ponderosae haplotypes, indicating that there have been at least three lineages that have associated with P. ponderosa. Geography was significantly associated with the phylogeny at greater distances (>900km), but host use was not significant. At the species level, association with geography is variable. Population structure for C. ponderosae at the species level is minimal, and suggests that there has not been much time for lineage sorting of the haplotypes based on the nested clade analysis as compared to C. edulis.

Menard, Katrina Louise

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Automated Population of Cyc: Extracting Information about Named-entities from the Web  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Populating the Cyc Knowledge Base (KB) has been a manual process until very recently. However, there is currently enough knowledge in Cyc for it to be feasible to attempt to acquire additional knowledge autonomously. This paper describes a system that can collect and validate formally represented, fully-integrated knowledge from the Web or any other electronically available text corpus, about various entities of interest (e.g. famous people, organizations, etc.). Experimental results and lessons learned from their analysis are presented.

Purvesh Shah; David Schneider; Cynthia Matuszek; Robert C. Kahlert; Bjørn Aldag; David Baxter; John Cabral; Michael Witbrock; Jon Curtis

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

CONFINED POPULATION III ENRICHMENT AND THE PROSPECTS FOR PROMPT SECOND-GENERATION STAR FORMATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is widely recognized that nucleosynthetic output of the first Population III supernovae was a catalyst defining the character of subsequent stellar generations. Most of the work on the earliest enrichment was carried out assuming that the first stars were extremely massive and that the associated supernovae were unusually energetic, enough to completely unbind the baryons in the host cosmic minihalo and disperse the synthesized metals into the intergalactic medium. Recent work, however, suggests that the first stars may in fact have been somewhat less massive, with a characteristic mass scale of a few tens of solar masses. We present a cosmological simulation following the transport of the metals synthesized in a Population III supernova assuming that it had an energy of 10{sup 51} erg, compatible with standard Type II supernovae. A young supernova remnant is inserted in the first star's relic H II region in the free expansion phase and is followed for 40 Myr employing adaptive mesh refinement and Lagrangian tracer particle techniques. The supernova remnant remains partially trapped within the minihalo, and the thin snowplow shell develops pronounced instability and fingering. Roughly half of the ejecta turn around and fall back toward the center of the halo, with 1% of the ejecta reaching the center in {approx}30 kyr and 10% in {approx}10 Myr. The average metallicity of the combined returning ejecta and the pristine filaments feeding into the halo center from the cosmic web is {approx}0.001-0.01 Z{sub Sun }, but the two remain unmixed until accreting onto the central hydrostatic core that is unresolved at the end of the simulation. We conclude that if Population III stars had less extreme masses, they promptly enriched the host minihalos with metals and triggered Population II star formation.

Ritter, Jeremy S.; Safranek-Shrader, Chalence; Milosavljevic, Milos; Bromm, Volker [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas, 1 University Station C1400, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Gnat, Orly [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, 91904 (Israel)

2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

467

Uncertainty Quantification Techniques for Population Density Estimates Derived from Sparse Open Source Data  

SciTech Connect

The Population Density Tables (PDT) project at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (www.ornl.gov) is developing population density estimates for specific human activities under normal patterns of life based largely on information available in open source. Currently, activity based density estimates are based on simple summary data statistics such as range and mean. Researchers are interested in improving activity estimation and uncertainty quantification by adopting a Bayesian framework that considers both data and sociocultural knowledge. Under a Bayesian approach knowledge about population density may be encoded through the process of expert elicitation. Due to the scale of the PDT effort which considers over 250 countries, spans 40 human activity categories, and includes numerous contributors, an elicitation tool is required that can be operationalized within an enterprise data collection and reporting system. Such a method would ideally require that the contributor have minimal statistical knowledge, require minimal input by a statistician or facilitator, consider human difficulties in expressing qu