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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "income excluding unusual" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Countries Diesel Prices Excluding Taxes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

excluding taxes) excluding taxes) Date Belgium France Germany Italy Netherlands UK US 01/13/14 3.56 3.46 3.55 3.80 3.63 3.57 3.40 01/06/14 3.70 3.49 3.62 3.82 3.63 3.55 3.43 12/30/13 NA NA NA NA NA NA 3.42 12/23/13 NA NA NA NA NA NA 3.39 12/16/13 3.63 3.50 3.71 3.85 3.71 3.56 3.38 12/9/13 3.83 3.53 3.77 3.86 3.72 3.57 3.39 12/2/13 3.70 3.46 3.75 3.80 3.67 3.53 3.40 11/25/13 3.60 3.38 3.74 3.75 3.61 3.48 3.36 11/18/13 3.74 3.36 3.67 3.70 3.55 3.45 3.33 11/11/13 3.57 3.34 3.57 3.66 3.51 3.42 3.34 11/4/13 3.60 3.36 3.65 3.69 3.58 3.43 3.37 10/28/13 3.60 3.48 3.71 3.84 3.67 3.53 3.38 10/21/13 3.64 3.50 3.75 3.84 3.70 3.54 3.40 10/14/13 3.70 3.45 3.74 3.82 3.70 3.51 3.40 10/7/13 3.63 3.46 3.75 3.83 3.70 3.52 3.41

2

Low income energy assistance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

States are limited in their ability to manage their heating assistance programs because they normally receive funds from the Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program after the heating season has begun and after they have decided on the benefits to be provided to eligible participants. In addition, the Department of Health and Human Services does not have enough flexibility to respond to unanticipated energy cost increases that can occur as a result of unusually severe weather or fuel price increases. HHS and the states could better manage the program if (1) it were forward funded so the states would know exactly how much federal assistance they would receive before they begin handling applications for heating assistance and (2) HHS had some discretion in how funds are allocated to the states to enable it to react to unanticipated energy-related circumstances.

Not Available

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

BM: excluded-speakers = 3080 3094 3095 3105 3112 3113 ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

BM: excluded-speakers = 3080 3094 3095 3105 3112 3113 3114 3126 3147 3190 3205 3208 3212 3231 3237 3240 3242 3277 3314 3334 3352 ...

2007-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

4

Smoking, Drinking, and Income  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A growing literature identifies a beneficial effect of moderate and even heavy drinking on wages and a negative effect of smoking on wages. An outstanding issue is whether these results obtain because of a causal effect of substance use on wages or whether the observed correlations reflect the effects of income on consumption or other endogeneity problems. This paper presents full information estimates of the structural parameters of a simultaneous model of drinking and smoking status and income using repeated cross--section data. With all else in the system held constant, both smoking and drinking behaviour still have large effects on income, and the income elasticities of smoking and drinking are shown to be larger in magnitude when controlling for endogeneity. JEL Classification: I12 Keywords: alcohol, tobacco, simultaneous equations, maximum simulated likelihood, multinomial probit, limited dependent variables 1 I thank Cam Donaldson, Herb Emery, David Feeny, Chris Ferrall, Jon ...

Mingshan Lu; James Mackinnon; Ken Mckenzie; Harry Paarsche; Seminar Participants; M. Christopher Auld; M. Christopher Auld

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Urine Test Strips to Exclude Cerebral Spinal Fluid Blood  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

two Pearson Chi-Square tests. The first compared samplesO riginal R esearch Urine Test Strips to Exclude CerebralBayer Multistix ® urine test strips are designed to test

Marshall, Robin A; Hejamanowski, Chris

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Earned Income Credit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This management advisory report presents the results of our review of the effectiveness of the Internal Revenue Service’s (IRS) administration of the Earned Income Credit (EIC). 1 The objective of this review was to evaluate the history of the EIC, difficulties the IRS has faced involving the EIC in the past, and the problems the IRS faces in the future. This is the first in a series of audits on the EIC. Currently, the Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration has the following five audits in process involving the EIC: • The EIC Recertification Process. • Duplicate Dependent Claims. • Revenue Protection Strategy on Improving Taxpayer Compliance. • Educating and Assisting Taxpayers on the EIC.

Review Process; Pamela J. Gardiner

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Categorically Excluded Actions |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NEPA » National NEPA » National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Categorically Excluded Actions National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Categorically Excluded Actions Categorical Exclusions (CX) - Categorical exclusions are categories of actions that DOE has determined, by regulation, do not individually or cumulatively have a significant effect on the human environment and for which neither an environmental assessment nor an environmental impact statement is typically required. Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 1021, National Environmental Policy Act Implementing Procedures, Appendices A and B to Subpart D, list DOE's categorical exclusions. Appendix A classes of actions are those actions considered to be general agency actions, such as awarding a contract or hiring personnel. Appendix B classes of actions

8

The Unusually Useful Web Book  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

From the Publisher:June Cohen's Unusually Useful Web Book is just that - full of unusually useful tips and tricks you need to make the best website quickly and without expense. Much in the same engaging and informative style Steve Krug applies ...

June Cohen

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

"ENDING STOCKS OF CRUDE OIL (excluding SPR)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

ENDING STOCKS OF CRUDE OIL (excluding SPR)" ENDING STOCKS OF CRUDE OIL (excluding SPR)" "Sourcekey","WCESTP11","WCESTP11","WCESTP21","WCESTP21","WCESTP31","WCESTP31","WCESTP41","WCESTP41","WCESTP51","WCESTP51","WCESTUS1","WCESTUS1" "Date","Weekly East Coast (PADD 1) Ending Stocks excluding SPR of Crude Oil (Thousand Barrels)","Weekly East Coast (PADD 1) Ending Stocks excluding SPR of Crude Oil (Thousand Barrels)","Weekly Midwest (PADD 2) Ending Stocks excluding SPR of Crude Oil (Thousand Barrels)","Weekly Midwest (PADD 2) Ending Stocks excluding SPR of Crude Oil (Thousand Barrels)","Weekly Gulf Coast (PADD 3) Ending Stocks excluding SPR of Crude Oil (Thousand Barrels)","Weekly Gulf Coast (PADD 3) Ending Stocks excluding SPR of Crude Oil (Thousand Barrels)","Weekly Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) Ending Stocks excluding SPR of Crude Oil (Thousand Barrels)","Weekly Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) Ending Stocks excluding SPR of Crude Oil (Thousand Barrels)","Weekly West Coast (PADD 5) Ending Stocks excluding SPR of Crude Oil (Thousand Barrels)","Weekly West Coast (PADD 5) Ending Stocks excluding SPR of Crude Oil (Thousand Barrels)","Weekly U.S. Ending Stocks excluding SPR of Crude Oil (Thousand Barrels)","Weekly U.S. Ending Stocks excluding SPR of Crude Oil (Thousand Barrels)"

10

Burls and Other Unusual Woods  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation BURLS AND OTHER UNUSUAL WOODS Wood worked by the hands of skilled craftsmen puts a wealth of quiet beauty into our daily...

11

Income Statement -- A Financial Management Tool  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An income statement measures the success of a business in terms of net income or loss for a period of time. An income statement of a farm business includes items in seven major categories. This publication describes each of these categories and gives a sample income statement.

Klinefelter, Danny A.

2008-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

12

Low income home energy assistance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program provides eligible households with assistance for home energy costs. Assistance is available to (1) help families pay heating and cooling costs, (2) prevent energy cutoff in crisis situations, and (3) help families make their homes more energy efficient. This report provides background information on the program in preparation for the program's reauthorization in 1990.

Not Available

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Top Incomes in Indonesia, 1920-2004 *  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using taxation and household survey data, this paper estimates top income shares for Indonesia during 1920-2004. Our results suggest that top income shares grew during the 1920s and 1930s, but fell in the post-war era. In more recent decades, we observe a sharp rise in top income shares during the late-1990s, coincident with the economic downturn, and some evidence that top income shares fell in the early-2000s. For prewar Indonesia, we decompose top income shares by income source, and find that for groups below the top 0.5 percent, a majority of income was derived from wages. Throughout the twentieth century, top income shares in Indonesia have been higher than in India, broadly comparable to Japan, and somewhat lower than levels prevailing in the

Andrew Leigh; Pierre Van Der Eng

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

China's Income Distribution, 1985-2001  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

China’s Income Distribution, 1985-2001 Ximing Wu* andBureau of Statistics of China, for explaining many featuresa new method to estimate China’s income distributions using

Wu, Ximing; Perloff, Jeffrey M.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Mainstreaming the e-excluded in Europe: strategies, good practices and some ethical issues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

E-inclusion is getting a lot of attention in Europe these days. The European Commission and EU Member States have initiated e-inclusion strategies aimed at reaching out to the e-excluded and bringing them into the mainstream of society and the economy. ... Keywords: E-excluded, E-inclusion, E-inclusion strategies, Good practice, Strategies

David Wright; Kush Wadhwa

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Appendix B Major Disturbances and Unusual Occurrences  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

144 U.S. Energy Information Administration/Electric Power Monthly June 2012 Table B.2 Major Disturbances and Unusual Occurrences, Year-to-Date through ...

17

GRR/Elements/18-CA-a.2 - Is the Waste Non-excluded Solid Waste...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2 - Is the Waste Non-excluded Solid Waste < GRR | Elements Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections...

18

GRR/Elements/18-CA-a.4 - Is the Waste a Non-excluded Hazardous...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

4 - Is the Waste a Non-excluded Hazardous Waste < GRR | Elements Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of...

19

Particle number fluctuations in nuclear collisions within excluded volume hadron gas model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The multiplicity fluctuations are studied in the van der Waals excluded volume hadron-resonance gas model. The calculations are done in the grand canonical ensemble within the Boltzmann statistics approximation. The scaled variances for positive, negative and all charged hadrons are calculated along the chemical freeze-out line of nucleus-nucleus collisions at different collision energies. The multiplicity fluctuations are found to be suppressed in the van der Waals gas. The numerical calculations are presented for two values of hard-core hadron radius, $r=0.3$ fm and 0.5 fm, as well as for the upper limit of the excluded volume suppression effects.

M. I. Gorenstein; M. Hauer; D. O. Nikolajenko

2007-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

20

Production of Strange, Non-strange particles and Hypernuclei in an Excluded-Volume Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a systematic study of production of strange and non-strange hadron yields and their ratios obtained in various experiments using our thermodynamically consistent excluded-volume model. We also analyze the production of light nuclei, hypernuclei and their antinuclei in terms of our excluded-volume model over a broad energy range starting from Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) to Large Hadron Collider (LHC) energies. Further, we extend our model for studying rapidity spectra of hadrons produced in heavy-ion collisions.

S. K. Tiwari; C. P. Singh

2013-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "income excluding unusual" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Indoor environment quality and energy retrofits in low-income...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Indoor environment quality and energy retrofits in low-income apartments: retrofit selection protocol Title Indoor environment quality and energy retrofits in low-income...

22

Revisiting the Income Effect: Gasoline Prices and Grocery Purchases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

or Rent Gasoline and Motor Oil Income after taxes Number ofor Rent Gasoline and Motor Oil Income after taxes Number of

Gicheva, Dora; Hastings, Justine; Villas-Boas, Sofia B

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Integrating Photovoltaic Systems into Low-Income Housing Developments...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Residential Financing Model and Low-Income Resident Job Training Program SEPTEMBER 2011 SOLAR ENERGY TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM II Integrating PV Systems into Low-Income Housing...

24

Solar upgrading of low income housing  

SciTech Connect

The design, installation, training and operation experience of retrofitting solar devices (active and passive water heaters, Trombe walls, convective loop window units, etc.) on hundreds of low-income houses along the Southwest Border Region are summarized. The project demonstrates a wide variety of appropriate low-cost solar applications and provides prototypical models for the region's low-income inhabitants. Space heating and cooling systems and water heating systems have been combined with weatherization and conservation techniques. CETA employees, members of various community groups and youth groups, and employees of local non-profit organizations have been trained as installers, and low-income people have been educated in the operation and use of these solar devices. It is anticipated that this transfer of appropriate technology into the region will result in continued retrofitting of solar installations and in the stimulation of local industries, which will create employment opportunities for members of the low-income population.

Lumsdaine, E.; Farrer, R.; Callahan, D.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Activated carbon: Utilization excluding industrial waste treatment. (Latest citations from the Compendex database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the commercial use and theoretical studies of activated carbon. Topics include performance evaluations in water treatment processes, preparation and regeneration techniques, materials recovery, and pore structure studies. Adsorption characteristics for specific materials are discussed. Studies pertaining specifically to industrial waste treatment are excluded. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Clean Water Act (excluding Section 404). Environmental guidance program reference book: Revision 6  

SciTech Connect

This Reference Book contains a current copy of the Clean Water Act (excluding Section 404) and those regulations that implement the statutes and appear to be most relevant to US Department of Energy (DOE) activities. The document is provided to DOE and contractor staff for informational purposes only and should not be interpreted as legal guidance. Updates that include important new requirements will be provided periodically. Questions concerning this Reference Book may be directed to Mark Petts, EH-231 (202/586-2609).

Not Available

1993-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

27

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Income Tax Credit  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Income Tax Income Tax Credit to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Income Tax Credit on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Income Tax Credit on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Income Tax Credit on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Income Tax Credit on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Income Tax Credit on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Income Tax Credit on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Biodiesel Income Tax Credit A taxpayer that delivers pure, unblended biodiesel (B100) into the tank of a vehicle or uses B100 as an on-road fuel in their trade or business may be

28

Entrepreneurship and income inequality in southern Ethiopia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Apr 7, 2009 ... source of cash income for the local population. In ... followed over the years, enforced by tradition, by the socialist administration that was in power until .... index following a uniform percentage change in yk is .... hand, require access to markets and changes in the ..... tion of earnings in the United States.

29

Method for excluding salt and other soluble materials from produced water  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for reducing the salinity, as well as the hydrocarbon concentration of produced water to levels sufficient to meet surface water discharge standards. Pressure vessel and coflow injection technology developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory is used to mix produced water and a gas hydrate forming fluid to form a solid or semi-solid gas hydrate mixture. Salts and solids are excluded from the water that becomes a part of the hydrate cage. A three-step process of dissociation of the hydrate results in purified water suitable for irrigation.

Phelps, Tommy J. (Knoxville, TN); Tsouris, Costas (Oak Ridge, TN); Palumbo, Anthony V. (Oak Ridge, TN); Riestenberg, David E. (Knoxville, TN); McCallum, Scott D. (Knoxville, TN)

2009-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

30

Financial Incentives for Increasing Work and Income Among Low-Income Families  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

v j-i_ruCM Earnings + AFDC Earnings + Supplement 1 [ t 1—(—6a: Annual Income Under AFDC and CAP Single Parent With Two+ Food Stamps I Earnings + AFDC + Food Stamps $o I I I i I I

Blank, Rebecca M.; Card, David; Robins, Philip K.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Three essays on the impacts of income taxes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation consists of three essays studying the impacts of income and wage taxes. Chapter One examines how income tax changes differentially affect the pre-tax wages of different industries based on the injury and ...

Powell, David Matthew, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Unusual Failures of Aero-Derivative Combustion Turbines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2011. Symposium, Failure Analysis and Prevention. Presentation Title, Unusual Failures of ...

33

Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP) | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tags Employment, labor force, Demographics, Income, Program Participation, AFDC, Food Stamps, SSI, Energy Assistance, Welfare, General Assistance, School Meals, Health...

34

Empire District Electric - Low Income New Homes Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Empire District Electric - Low Income New Homes Program Empire District Electric - Low Income New Homes Program Empire District Electric - Low Income New Homes Program < Back Eligibility Construction Low-Income Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate Total: $1,100 Program Info State Missouri Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Insulation: full incremental cost above the appropriate baseline Heat Pumps: $400 Central AC: $400 Refrigerator: $200 Lighting: $100 Provider Empire District Electric Empire District Electric offers rebates for the utilization of energy efficient measures and appliances in new, low-income homes. Rebates are

35

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.9 Low-Income Housing  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

5 5 Weatherization Program Facts - PY 2010 weatherization funding breakdown: DOE 18.3%, LIHEAP 59.6%, others 22.1%.(1) - The Federal Government's outlay for fuel subsidies runs from $4.0 to 4.4 billion per year. The major two agencies dispensing fuel subsidies are HUD and HHS (through LIHEAP). - In 2006, HUD spent over $1.43 billion annually to pay all or part of the total utility bills (including water/sewer) for 1.2 million low-income units. Utilities (including water) made up approximately 23% of public housing authorities' expenditures. In addition, HUD estimates tenant expenditures on utilities (excluding water) at about $421 million in 2007. - LIHEAP spends 85% of its funding on direct fuel subsidies and weatherization. Up to 15% can be spent for weatherization

36

Income Tax Capital Credit (Alabama) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Income Tax Capital Credit (Alabama) Income Tax Capital Credit (Alabama) Income Tax Capital Credit (Alabama) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Industrial Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Alabama Program Type Corporate Tax Incentive The purpose of this law is to create jobs and to stimulate business and economic growth in the state by providing an income tax capital credit for approved projects. The Income Tax Capital Credit is a credit of five percent (5%) of the capital costs of a qualifying project offered by the Alabama Department of Revenue. The credits is applied to the Alabama income tax liability or financial institution excise tax generated by the project income, each year for 20 years. This credit cannot be carried forward or

37

The Simplest Models of Radiative Neutrino Mass: Excluding Simplified Zee Models and Beyond  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The complexity of radiative neutrino-mass models can be judged by: (i) whether they require the imposition of ad hoc symmetries, (ii) the number of new multiplets they introduce, and (iii) the number of arbitrary parameters that appear. Adopting the view that the imposition of arbitrary new symmetries is the least appealing approach, the simplest models have two new multiplets and a minimal number of new parameters. With this in mind, we search for the simplest models of radiative neutrino mass. We are lead to two new models, containing a real scalar triplet and a charged scalar doublet (respectively), in addition to the charged singlet scalar considered by Zee [h^+\\sim(1,1,2)]. The new models are essentially simplified versions of the Zee model and appear to be \\emph{the simplest} models of radiative neutrino mass. However, these models are only of pedagogical interest; despite successfully generating nonzero masses, present-day data is sufficient to rule them out. The lessons learned from these models also enable one to exclude a more general class of radiative models. Moving beyond the minimal cases, we find a new model of two-loop masses that employs the charged doublet \\Phi\\sim(1,2,3) and the doubly-charged scalar k^{++}\\sim(1,1,4).

Sandy S. C. Law; Kristian L. McDonald

2013-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

38

Minnesota Energy Resources (Gas) - Low-Income New Construction Rebates |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Minnesota Energy Resources (Gas) - Low-Income New Construction Minnesota Energy Resources (Gas) - Low-Income New Construction Rebates Minnesota Energy Resources (Gas) - Low-Income New Construction Rebates < Back Eligibility Low-Income Residential Nonprofit Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Gas Furnace: 500 Integrated Space and Water Heating System: 900 Electronic Programmable Set-Back Thermostat: 100 Water Heater: 100 Drain Water Heat Recovery Device: 300 Provider Minnesota Energy Resources Minnesota Energy Resources is now offering rebates for non-profits servicing low-income communities. New construction organizations can take advantage of rebates for efficient technologies if the low-income homes are

39

Performance Profiles Table Browser: T-27. Statement of Income ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1 Represents reported cost of raw materials processed at refineries, ... 2 Excludes costs of nonfuel goods and services and tires, batteries, and ...

40

BSA 11-22: Enhancing Oilseed Germination and Unusual Oil ...  

BSA 11-22: Enhancing Oilseed Germination and Unusual Oil Production. BNL Reference Number: BSA 11-22. Patent Status: Provisional filed on July 14, 2011

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "income excluding unusual" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Structure of an Unusually Small RNA Switch Provides Insight into...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Structure of an Unusually Small RNA Switch Provides Insight into the Minimal Requirements for Microbial Gene Regulation The emergence of drug-resistant microbes represents a major...

42

Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AHPwES - Assisted Home Performance with ENERGY STAR AMI - Area Median Income APS - Arizona Public Service ARRA - American Reinvestment and Recovery Act ASEC - Annual Social and...

43

Approaches to Electric Utility Energy Efficiency for Low Income...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

to Electric Utility Energy Efficiency for Low Income Customers in a Changing Regulatory Environment Jump to: navigation, search Name Approaches to Electric Utility Energy...

44

Income Tax Deduction for Energy Efficiency Upgrades (Idaho) ...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Facebook icon Twitter icon Income Tax Deduction for Energy Efficiency Upgrades (Idaho) This is the approved revision of this page, as well as being the most recent. Jump...

45

Low-Income Loan Program for Energy Conservation Improvements...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

energy sources by offering low-interest loans to low- and moderate-income homeowners for repairs to existing homes. All renewable energy technologies are eligible. The...

46

Understanding the world wool market : trade, productivity and grower incomes.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??[Truncated abstract] The core objective of this thesis is summarised by its title: “Understanding the World Wool Market: Trade, Productivity and Grower Incomes”. Thus, we… (more)

Verikios, George

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

California Solar Initiative - Low-Income Solar Water Heating...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) voted in October 2011 to create the California Solar Initiative (CSI) Thermal Low-Income program for single and multifamily residential...

48

Measurement and Verification of Low Income Energy Efficiency...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and Verification of Low Income Energy Efficiency Programs in Brazil: Methodological Challenges Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Measurement and...

49

Income Tax Deduction for Energy Efficiency Upgrades | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1, 2002, qualify for an income tax deduction for 100% of the cost of installing new insulation or other approved energy efficiency improvements in an existing residence. Any...

50

INCOMING DOCUMENT CONTROL FORM DOCUMENT DESCRIPTION ORGANIZATIO  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

INCOMING DOCUMENT CONTROL FORM DOCUMENT DESCRIPTION ORGANIZATIO )ATE COMPLETED: ACTION NUMBER: I ! I I DOCUMENT CONTROL DATE INITIALS DATA BASE: ACTION LOG: FILED: To : Doug Tonkay, OTS Decen From: MIchele Landis, dRW Subject: Draft report ~ Result= of the Radiologic; Former Ore Storage Site, Palmerton, Pennsylvania Attached is one copy of the draft report. PIE provide your comments to me by January 16, 1990. tlichele Landis ,9, 1989 "ey at the review and Results of the Radiological SJrvey at the Former Ore S&age Site, Palmerton, PennsylvLnia (PPOOI) J. L Quikd J. W. Cdchdr W. D. &rei ! I : HEALTH AND t5UEI-Y RESEARCH DMSi Waste Management Research and Development Prc (Activity No. AH 10 05 00 0; NEAHOOl) RESULTS OF 'I-HE RADIOLOGICAL SURV

51

Income Growth, Energy Consumption and Carbon Emissions in China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper examines the long-run relationship between per capita income growth, energy consumption, and pollutant emissions in China during the period 1953–2004. We find that energy consumption, pollutant emissions and income are cointegrated in ... Keywords: Energy consumption, Pollutant emissions, Causality, Multivariate cointegration, China

Zhi Zhao; Jiahai Yuan

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Activated carbon: Utilization excluding industrial waste treatment. (Latest citations from the EI Compendex*plus database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the commercial use and theoretical studies of activated carbon. Topics include performance evaluations in water treatment processes, preparation and regeneration techniques, materials recovery, and pore structure studies. Adsorption characteristics for specific materials are discussed. Studies pertaining specifically to industrial waste treatment are excluded. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Residential Renewable Energy Income Tax Credit | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Renewable Energy Income Tax Credit Renewable Energy Income Tax Credit Residential Renewable Energy Income Tax Credit < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Water Heating Wind Maximum Rebate 1,000 Program Info Start Date 1979 State Massachusetts Program Type Personal Tax Credit Rebate Amount 15% Provider Massachusetts Department of Revenue Massachusetts allows a 15% credit -- up to $1,000 -- against the state income tax for the net expenditure* of a renewable-energy system (including installation costs) installed on an individual's primary residence. If the credit amount is greater than a resident's income tax liability, the excess credit amount may be carried forward to the next succeeding year for

54

Income Tax Credits Program (Arkansas) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Income Tax Credits Program (Arkansas) Income Tax Credits Program (Arkansas) Income Tax Credits Program (Arkansas) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fuel Distributor Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Arkansas Program Type Personal Tax Incentives Corporate Tax Incentive Rebate Program Provider Department of Economic Develoment There are multiple tax credit programs for businesses new to Arkansas. Additionally, there are investment tax credit programs, job creation incentives, discretionary incentives, and targeted business incentives,

55

Measurement and Verification of Low Income Energy Efficiency Programs in  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Measurement and Verification of Low Income Energy Efficiency Programs in Measurement and Verification of Low Income Energy Efficiency Programs in Brazil: Methodological Challenges Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Measurement and Verification of Low Income Energy Efficiency Programs in Brazil: Methodological Challenges Focus Area: Energy Efficiency Topics: Socio-Economic Website: www.eceee.org/conference_proceedings/eceee/2009/Panel_3/3.049/ Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/measurement-and-verification-low-inco Language: English Policies: "Regulations,Financial Incentives" is not in the list of possible values (Deployment Programs, Financial Incentives, Regulations) for this property. Regulations: Feebates This report presents results from Brazilian electric utilities evaluation

56

Domestic Hot Water Consumption in Four Low-Income Apartment Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Domestic Hot Water Consumption in Four Low-Income Apartment Buildings Title Domestic Hot Water Consumption in Four Low-Income Apartment Buildings Publication Type Conference...

57

The Farmer's Conundrum: Income from Biofuels or Protect the Soil? |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Farmer's Conundrum: Income from Biofuels or Protect the Soil? The Farmer's Conundrum: Income from Biofuels or Protect the Soil? The Farmer's Conundrum: Income from Biofuels or Protect the Soil? July 1, 2010 - 11:39am Addthis Lindsay Gsell After a harvest is over, crops can be sold, shipped, canned or consumed. But what happens to the parts of the crops that are inedible-the corn stover, stalks or cobs? Selling crop residues for bioenergy could provide farmers with an extra source of income. Yet, leaving some residue on the fields helps reduce soil erosion and maintain healthy levels of soil carbon and other nutrients. So how can land managers find this balance? Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is developing the Residue Removal Tool -- new software designed to simulate sustainability criteria -- to help find this balance of what to remove and what to leave behind. The software will

58

Income and Health Spending: Evidence from Oil Price Shocks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Health expenditures as a share of GDP in the United States have more than tripled over the past half-century. A common conjecture is that this is a consequence of rising income. We investigate this hypothesis by instrumenting ...

Acemoglu, Daron

59

EmPOWER Maryland Low Income Energy Efficiency Program (Maryland) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EmPOWER Maryland Low Income Energy Efficiency Program (Maryland) EmPOWER Maryland Low Income Energy Efficiency Program (Maryland) EmPOWER Maryland Low Income Energy Efficiency Program (Maryland) < Back Eligibility Low-Income Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Other Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Program Info Funding Source EmPOWER Maryland State Maryland Program Type State Rebate Program Rebate Amount Direct installation, no cost to the recipient Provider Maryland Department of Housing and Community Development Note: The eligible technologies listed above are only examples of some improvements that might be supported under this program as detailed on the program web site. Not all potentially eligible improvements will be

60

Weatherization Assistance for Low-Income Persons: Maintaining the Privacy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Weatherization Assistance for Low-Income Persons: Maintaining the Weatherization Assistance for Low-Income Persons: Maintaining the Privacy of Applicants for and Recipients of Services Weatherization Assistance for Low-Income Persons: Maintaining the Privacy of Applicants for and Recipients of Services Amending regulations to require all States and other service providers that participate in the Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP) to treat all requests for information concerning applicants and recipients of WAP funds in a manner consistent with the Federal government's treatment of information requested under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA), 5 U.S.C. 552, including the privacy protections contained in Exemption (b)(6) of the FOIA, 5 U.S.C. 552(b)(6). Weatherization Assistance for Low-Income Persons: Maintaining the Privacy

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "income excluding unusual" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Xcel Energy - Residential and Low Income Home Energy Service | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Xcel Energy - Residential and Low Income Home Energy Service Xcel Energy - Residential and Low Income Home Energy Service Xcel Energy - Residential and Low Income Home Energy Service < Back Eligibility Installer/Contractor Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Other Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Program Info Start Date 1/1/2011 Expiration Date 12/31/2012 State New Mexico Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Evaporative Cooling: $200-$1000/unit Saver's Switch A/C Cycling: $20/ton of enrolled air conditioning Refrigerator Recycling: $75 CFLs: $1/bulb LED's: $10/bulb

62

Figure ES2. Annual Indices of Real Disposable Income, Vehicle...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

ES2 Figure ES2. Annual Indices of Real Disposable Income, Vehicle-Miles Traveled, Consumer Price Index (CPI-U), and Real Average Retail Gasoline Price, 1978-2004, 1985100...

63

Sterling science: Strain in silver nanoparticles creates unusual  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sterling science: Strain in silver nanoparticles creates unusual Sterling science: Strain in silver nanoparticles creates unusual "twinning" By Jared Sagoff * August 27, 2012 Tweet EmailPrint When twins are forced to share, it can put a significant strain on their relationship. While this observation is perhaps unsurprising in the behavior of children, it is less obvious when it comes to nanoparticles. After spending close to a decade examining the structure of nanowires made of pure silver, scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory have discovered a set of unusual behaviors in nanocrystals with a strained, five-fold symmetry formed by "twinning" in the crystal structure. The twinned crystals' unusual pentagonal symmetry and complicated structures distinguish them from the cubic

64

Investigation of Unusual Albedos in the SGP Domain  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Investigation of Unusual Albedos in the SGP Domain Investigation of Unusual Albedos in the SGP Domain Groff, David ARM SGP Duchon, Claude University Of Oklahoma Category: Atmospheric State and Surface We investigate the cause of unusually high albedos at an Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) extended facility near Morris, OK. In a previous study, daily albedos were calculated at several SGP extended facilities for 1998 and 1999 using broadband (.28 to 3 microns) pyranometers. The average daily albedo during this period was calculated to be at least about 5% higher at Morris than at any of the other SGP extended facilities. Surface based measurements of daily albedos at Morris and two nearby SGP extended facilities during 2004 and 2005 suggest the unusually high albedo measurements at Morris are real.

65

Neutron scattering investigations on the unusual phase behavior of water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water is the most ubiquitous substance on earth, and is essential to sustain all known forms of life. However, despite centuries of research, a coherent picture of the unusual phase behavior of water is so far lacking. The ...

Zhang, Yang, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Nuclear Science and Engineering

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Unusually Strong Vertical Motions in a Caribbean Hurricane  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Unusually strong updrafts and downdrafts in the eyewall of Hurricane Emily (1987) during its rapidly deepening phase are documented by both in situ aircraft measurements and a vertically pointing Doppler radar. Updrafts and downdrafts as strong ...

Robert A. Black; Howard B. Bluestein; Michael L. Black

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Approaches to Electric Utility Energy Efficiency for Low Income Customers  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Approaches to Electric Utility Energy Efficiency for Low Income Customers Approaches to Electric Utility Energy Efficiency for Low Income Customers in a Changing Regulatory Environment Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Approaches to Electric Utility Energy Efficiency for Low Income Customers in a Changing Regulatory Environment Focus Area: Energy Efficiency Topics: Best Practices Website: www.ornl.gov/~webworks/cppr/y2001/misc/99601.pdf Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/approaches-electric-utility-energy-ef Language: English Policies: "Regulations,Financial Incentives" is not in the list of possible values (Deployment Programs, Financial Incentives, Regulations) for this property. Regulations: Feebates This report, written for members of the Weatherization Assistance Program

68

Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households Title Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2011 Authors Zimring, Mark, Merrian Borgeson, Ian M. Hoffman, Charles A. Goldman, Elizabeth Stuart, Annika Todd, and Megan A. Billingsley Pagination 102 Date Published 12/2011 Publisher LBNL City Berkeley Keywords electricity markets and policy group, energy analysis and environmental impacts department Abstract The question posed in this report is: How can programs motivate these middle income single family households to seek out more comprehensive energy upgrades, and empower them to do so? Research methods included interviews with more than 35 program administrators, policy makers, researchers, and other experts; case studies of programs, based on interviews with staff and a review of program materials and data; and analysis of relevant data sources and existing research on demographics, the financial status of Americans, and the characteristics of middle income American households. While there is no 'silver bullet' to help these households overcome the range of barriers they face, this report describes outreach strategies, innovative program designs, and financing tools that show promise in increasing the attractiveness and accessibility of energy efficiency for this group. These strategies and tools should be seen as models that are currently being honed to build our knowledge and capacity to deliver energy improvements to middle income households. However, the strategies described in this report are probably not sufficient, in the absence of robust policy frameworks, to deliver these improvements at scale. Instead, these strategies must be paired with enabling and complementary policies to reach their full potential.

69

Utility investments in low-income-energy-efficiency programs  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study is to describe the energy-efficiency programs being operated by utilities for low-income customers. The study focuses, in particular, on programs that install major residential weatherization measures free-of-charge to low-income households. A survey was mailed to a targeted list of 600 utility program managers. Follow-up telephone calls were made to key non- respondents, and a random sample of other non-respondents also was contacted. Completed surveys were received from 180 utilities, 95 of which provided information on one or more of their 1992 low-income energy-efficiency programs for a total of 132 individual programs. These 132 utility programs spent a total of $140.6 million in 1992. This represents 27% of the total program resources available to weatherize the dwellings of low-income households in that year. Both the total funding and the number of programs has grown by 29% since 1989. A majority of the 132 programs are concentrated in a few regions of the country (California, the Pacific Northwest, the Upper Midwest, and the Northeast). Although a majority of the programs are funded by electric utilities, gas utilities have a significantly greater average expenditure per participant ($864 vs. $307 per participant). The most common primary goal of low-income energy-efficiency programs operating in 1992 was {open_quotes}to make energy services more affordable to low-income customers{close_quotes}. Only 44% of the programs were operated primarily to provide a cost-effective energy resource. Based on a review of household and measure selection criteria, equity and not the efficiency of resource acquisition appears to dominate the design of these programs.

Brown, M.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Beyer, M.A. [Aspen Systems Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Eisenberg, J.; Power, M. [Economic Opportunity Research Institute, Washington, DC (United States); Lapsa, E.J. [Manhattan Data Systems, Knoxville, TN (United States)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Household Energy Expenditure and Income Groups: Evidence from Great Britain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

  and  0.024  for  district heating However, as income is not observed its effect cannot be analysed.  Wu et al. (2004) examine the demand for space heating in Armenia, Moldova, and  Kyrgyz  Republic  using  household  survey  data.  In  these  countries...  and in some regions incomes are not sufficient to  afford space heating from district heating systems making these systems unviable.  We  analyse  electricity,  gas  and  overall  energy  spending  for  a  large  sample  of  households  in  Great  Britain.  We  discern  inflection  points  and  discuss...

Jamasb, Tooraj; Meier, H

71

Oil Prices, External Income, and Growth: Lessons from Jordan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper extends the long-run growth model of Esfahani et al. (2012a) to a labour exporting country that receives large in‡ows of external income – the sum of remittances, FDI and general government transfers – from major oil exporting economies. The theoretical model predicts real oil prices to be one of the main long-run drivers of real output. Using quarterly data between 1979 and 2009 on core macroeconomic variables for Jordan and a number of key foreign variables, we identify two long-run relationships: an output equation as predicted by theory and an equation linking foreign and domestic in‡ation rates. It is shown that real output in the long run is shaped by (i) oil prices through their impact on external income and in turn on capital accumulation, and (ii) technological transfers through foreign output. The empirical analysis of the paper con…rms the hypothesis that a large share of Jordan’s output volatility can be associated with ‡uctuations in net income received from abroad (arising from oil price shocks). External factors, however, cannot be relied upon to provide similar growth stimuli in the future, and therefore it will be important to diversify the sources of growth in order to achieve a high and sustained level of income.

Kamiar Mohaddes A; Mehdi Raissi B

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Controlling incoming connections using certificates and distributed hash tables  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The current architecture of the Internet where anyone can send anything to anybody presents many problems. The recipient of the connection might be using a mobile access network and thus unwanted incoming connections could produce a high cost to the ... Keywords: DoS countermeasures, certificates, rights delegation, rights management, session management

Dmitrij Lagutin; Hannu H. Kari

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Juanita's Money Order: Income Effects on Human Capital Investment in Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Desarrollo Social Juanita’s Money Order: Income Effects onAvellaneda, 2005. Juanita’s Money Order: Income E?ects on13 Vice expenditures include money spent on alcohol and

Suarez, Juan Carlos; Avellaneda, Zenide

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

"Shelter within my reach" : medium rise apartment housing for the middle income group in Karachi, Pakistan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis identifies the project development processes of medium rise (five storied or less) apartment housing built by the private formal sector, catering to the middle income groups in Karachi, Pakistan. Middle income ...

Mahmood, Saman, 1972-

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

55,"Aberdeen City of",5,1,482619,"Taxes Other Than Income Taxes...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Services to Municipality or Other Government Units (line 14, less line 19)" 13523,"Newberry City of",5,1,0,"Taxes Other Than Income Taxes, Operating Income (408.1)"...

76

55,"Aberdeen City of",5,1,479437,"Taxes Other Than Income Taxes...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Services to Municipality or Other Government Units (line 14, less line 19)" 13523,"Newberry City of",5,1,0,"Taxes Other Than Income Taxes, Operating Income (408.1)"...

77

Department of Energy Provides Nearly $88 Million to Low-Income...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

spend 5 percent of their income on paying energy bills, but for lower-income households the costs average 16 percent. These costs can include anything from heating and...

78

Department of Energy Provides Nearly $112 Million to Low-Income...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

spend five percent of their income on paying energy bills, but for lower-income households the costs average 16 percent. These costs can include anything from heating and...

79

Energy Department Provides $140.3 Million to Low-Income Families...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

spend 3.5 percent of their income on paying energy bills, but for lower-income households the costs average 14 percent. These costs can include anything from heating and...

80

Water an Unusual Liquid; LCLS Provides New Insights | Stanford Synchrotron  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water an Unusual Liquid; LCLS Provides New Insights Water an Unusual Liquid; LCLS Provides New Insights Wednesday, November 13, 2013 - 3:00pm SLAC, Redtail Hawk Conference Room 108A Anders Nilsson, SUNCAT The anomalous physical properties of water are responsible for sustaining much of life on earth; for example, water displays a higher heat capacity than common liquids and expands upon freezing. Some of these anomalous physical properties become dramatically enhanced upon supercooling below the freezing point. In particular, extrapolations of the thermal expansion coefficient, isothermal compressibility, heat capacity and correlation length can all be fitted with a power law divergence with the same apparent singularity temperature of about 228 K. Experiments on pure bulk water below about ~240 K have so far been difficult: water crystallization occurs

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "income excluding unusual" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

An Unusual Mechanism for the Antimicrobial Target Flavine-dependant  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

An Unusual Mechanism for the Antimicrobial An Unusual Mechanism for the Antimicrobial Target Flavine-dependant Thymidylate Synthase (FTDS) Classical thymidylate synthases, encoded by the thyA and TYMS genes, are present in most eukaryotes, including humans, and are frequently targeted by chemotherapeutic and antibiotic drugs. A recently discovered class of thymidylate synthases, the FDTSs encoded by the thyX gene has been found primarily in prokaryotes and viruses including several pathogens and biological warfare agents (see http://www.cdc.gov). Several organisms, including human pathogens, rely solely on thyX for thymidylate synthesis. FDTSs share no structure or sequence homology with classical thymidylate synthases (Fig 1), and thus present a promising new frontier for antibacterial/antiviral drug development.

82

California Solar Initiative - Low-Income Solar Water Heating Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » California Solar Initiative - Low-Income Solar Water Heating Rebate Program California Solar Initiative - Low-Income Solar Water Heating Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Solar Water Heating Maximum Rebate Single-Family Low-Income: $3,750 Multi-Family Low-Income: $500,000 Program Info Funding Source Ratepayer Funds Start Date 3/29/2012 State California Program Type State Rebate Program Rebate Amount Step 1 Incentive Rates (contact utility to determine current incentive levels): Single-Family Low-Income: $25.64 per therm displaced Multi-Family Low-Income: $19.23 per therm displaced The California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) voted in October 2011 to

83

Income distribution impacts of climate change mitigation policy in the Susquehanna River Basin Economy  

SciTech Connect

We examine the cost-side income distribution impacts of a carbon tax in the Susquehanna River Basin (SRB) Region of the United States utilizing a computable general equilibrium model. We find the aggregate impacts of a $25/ton carbon tax on the SRB economy are likely to be negative but modest-an approximately one-third of 1% reduction in Gross Regional Product (GRP) in the short-run and double that amount in the long-run. However, unlike many previous studies, we find that the carbon tax is mildly progressive as measured by income bracket changes, per capita equivalent variation, and Gini coefficient changes based on expenditure patterns. The dominant factors affecting the distributional impacts are the pattern of output, income and consumption impacts that affect lower income groups relatively less than higher income ones, an increase in transfer payments favoring lower income groups, and decreased corporate profits absorbed primarily by higher income groups.

Oladosu, Gbadebo A [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Evaluating the income and employment impacts of gas cooling technologies  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study is to estimate the potential employment and income benefits of the emerging market for gas cooling products. The emphasis here is on exports because that is the major opportunity for the U.S. heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) industry. But domestic markets are also important and considered here because without a significant domestic market, it is unlikely that the plant investments, jobs, and income associated with gas cooling exports would be retained within the United States. The prospects for significant gas cooling exports appear promising for a variety of reasons. There is an expanding need for cooling in the developing world, natural gas is widely available, electric infrastructures are over-stressed in many areas, and the cost of building new gas infrastructure is modest compared to the cost of new electric infrastructure. Global gas cooling competition is currently limited, with Japanese and U.S. companies, and their foreign business partners, the only product sources. U.S. manufacturers of HVAC products are well positioned to compete globally, and are already one of the faster growing goods-exporting sectors of the U.S. economy. Net HVAC exports grew by over 800 percent from 1987 to 1992 and currently exceed $2.6 billion annually (ARI 1994). Net gas cooling job and income creation are estimated using an economic input-output model to compare a reference case to a gas cooling scenario. The reference case reflects current policies, practices, and trends with respect to conventional electric cooling technologies. The gas cooling scenario examines the impact of accelerated use of natural gas cooling technologies here and abroad.

Hughes, P.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Laitner, S.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Low Impact, Affordable, Low Income Houses for Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper discusses an effort to develop low impact, affordable, low income houses for Mexico. Low impact houses are defined as houses with energy and water needs that are substantially reduced below levels corresponding to code compliance. This paper includes an analysis of the population and energy consumption of the different climate regions in Mexico (Hot-Dry Deserts, Great Plains, Mediterranean, Semi-Arid, Temperate, Hot-Dry Jungles and Hot-Humid Jungles) versus the USA and concludes with advice on an approach for low impact housing.

Alcocer, J. L. B.; Haberl, J. S.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

T.: Numerical sequence extraction in handwritten incoming mail documents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this communication, we propose a method for the automatic extraction of numerical fields in handwritten documents. The approach exploits the known syntactic structure of the numerical field to extract, combined with a set of contextual morphological features to find the best label to each connected component. Applying an HMM based syntactic analyzer on the overall document allows to localize/extract fields of interest. Reported results on the extraction of zip codes, phone numbers and customer codes from handwritten incoming mail documents demonstrate the interest of the proposed approach. 1.

G. Koch; L. Heutte; T. Paquet

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

A structural analysis of natural gas consumption by income class from 1987 to 1993  

SciTech Connect

This study had two major objectives: (1) assess and compare changes in natural gas consumption between 1987 and 1993 by income group and (2) assess the potential influence of energy policy on observed changes in natural gas consumption over time and across income groups. This analysis used U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) data files and involved both the generation of simple descriptive statistics and the use of multivariate regression analysis. The consumption of natural gas by the groups was studied over a six-year period. The results showed that: (1) natural gas use was substantially higher for the highest income group than for the two lower income groups and (2) natural gas consumption declined for the lowest and middle income quintiles and increased for the highest income quintile between 1987 and 1990; between 1990 and 1993, consumption increased for the lowest and middle income quintile, but remained relatively constant for the highest income quintile. The relative importance of the structural and variable factors in explaining consumption changes between survey periods varies by income group. The analysis provides two major energy policy implications: (1) natural gas intensity has been the highest for the lowest income group, indicating that this group is more vulnerable to sudden changes in demand-indicator variables, in particular weather-related variables, than increase natural gas consumption, and (2) the fall in natural gas intensity between 1987 and 1993 may indicate that energy policy has had some impact on reducing natural gas consumption. 11 refs., 4 figs., 16 tabs.

Poyer, D.A.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

City of Tallahassee Utilities - Low-Income Energy Efficiency Grant Programs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tallahassee Utilities - Low-Income Energy Efficiency Grant Tallahassee Utilities - Low-Income Energy Efficiency Grant Programs City of Tallahassee Utilities - Low-Income Energy Efficiency Grant Programs < Back Eligibility Low-Income Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Ventilation Program Info State Florida Program Type Utility Grant Program Rebate Amount Ceiling Insulation Grant: $500 HVAC Repair: $500 Provider City of Tallahassee Utilities City of Tallahassee Utilities offers two different grants that encourage low-income residents to improve the energy efficiency of homes. Both programs require a free home energy audit to be conducted in order to determine the eligibility of the applicant. Applicants must also fit within the qualifying income levels detailed on the web site.

89

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.9 Low-Income Housing  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

Program Definitions DOE Weatherization: Department of Energy's Weatherization Assistance Program DOE Weatherization Eligible Households: Households with incomes at or below 125% of the Federal poverty level, which varies by family size; however, a State may instead elect to use the LIHEAP income standard if its State LIHEAP income standard is at least 125% of the Federal poverty level. Data listed in this chapter include previously weatherized units. DOE Weatherization Eligible Households are a subset of Federally Eligible Households. DOE Weatherization Recipient Households: Households that have received weatherization under DOE Weatherization funding. Federally Eligible Households: Households with incomes below the Federal maximum standard of 150% to 200% of the poverty

90

The Impact of Wind Development on County-Level Income and Employment...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ruth Baranowski, NRELPIX 16410 The Impact of Wind Development on County-Level Income and Employment: A Review of Methods and an Empirical Analysis Introduction The economic...

91

The association between income smoothing and job security concerns in New Zealand.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study tests for a relationship between income smoothing, proxied by discretionary accruals, and job security concerns, proxied by product durability, capital intensity, and leverage,… (more)

Tauch, Sothyda

92

Effect of Income on Appliances in U.S. Households, The  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This web page page entails how people live, the factors that cause the most differences in home lifestyle, including energy use in Geographic Location, Socioeconomics and Household Income.

Michael Laurence

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Tax Man Cometh: Income Taxation as a Measure of State Capacity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dilemma: Building State Capacity in Latin America. Berkeley:2005. Challenges to state policy capacity: Global trends andfor our construct of state capacity because income taxes

Weller, Nick; Ziegler, Melissa

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Agricultural Biomass Income Tax Credit (Personal) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Personal) Personal) Agricultural Biomass Income Tax Credit (Personal) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Savings Category Bioenergy Maximum Rebate Statewide annual limit of 5 million in total credits Program Info Start Date 1/1/2011 State New Mexico Program Type Personal Tax Credit Rebate Amount 5 per wet ton Provider New Mexico Energy, Minerals and Natural Resources Department [http://www.nmlegis.gov/Sessions/10%20Regular/final/HB0171.pdf House Bill 171] of 2010 created a tax credit for agricultural biomass from a dairy or feedlot transported to a facility that uses agricultural biomass to generate electricity or make biocrude or other liquid or gaseous fuel for commercial use. For the purposes of this tax credit, agricultural biomass means wet manure. The Energy, Minerals and Natural Resources Department may

95

Agricultural Biomass Income Tax Credit (Corporate) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Corporate) Corporate) Agricultural Biomass Income Tax Credit (Corporate) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Savings Category Bioenergy Maximum Rebate Statewide annual limit of 5 million in total credits Program Info Start Date 1/1/2011 State New Mexico Program Type Corporate Tax Credit Rebate Amount 5 per wet ton Provider New Mexico Energy, Minerals and Natural Resources Department [http://www.nmlegis.gov/Sessions/10%20Regular/final/HB0171.pdf House Bill 171] of 2010 created a tax credit for agricultural biomass from a dairy or feedlot transported to a facility that uses agricultural biomass to generate electricity or make biocrude or other liquid or gaseous fuel for commercial use. For the purposes of this tax credit, agricultural biomass means wet manure. The Energy, Minerals and Natural Resources Department may

96

Low-income energy assistance: State responses to funding reductions  

SciTech Connect

Appropriations for the Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program have declined each year since FY 1986, from a level of about $2.0 billion to about $1.5 billion in FY 1988. The President's budget for FY 1989 has proposed a further reduction to about $1.2 billion. The reduction was proposed in recognition of the hundreds of millions of dollars in oil overcharge settlements available to states for this and certain other activities. GAO reviewed 13 states for information on the availability and use of oil overcharge funds; federal allotments to LIHEAP, total LIHEAP funding, and a projection of possible FY 1989 funding; the number of LIHEAP households provided heating assistance; heating benefit levels per household; LIHEAP transfers to and from other block grants; and perceptions of interest groups of past and proposed LIHEAP budget cuts.

Not Available

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Low-income communities : technological strategies for nurturing community, empowerment and self-sufficiency at a low-income housing development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There are a number of historically familiar and unfamiliar forces at work in low-income communities in the United States. Recurrent forces include rapidly changing economic and demographic trends, Welfare Reform, and the ...

O'Bryant, Richard Louis, 1964-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Enabling energy efficiency for low-income housing in Developing countries using MIT Design Advisor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There is a great need to improve energy efficiency of low-income housing, since people who can afford it least have to pay a significant portion of their income to make their homes more habitable or else live with greater ...

Ali, Zehra (Zehra Hyder)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

China's Income Distribution, 1985-2001 Ximing Wu* and Jeffrey M. Perloff**  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

China's Income Distribution, 1985-2001 Ximing Wu* and Jeffrey M. Perloff** February, 2005 We Bureau of Statistics of China, for explaining many features of the Chinese urban survey. Ximing Wu@are.berkeley.edu. #12;Abstract We employ a new method to estimate China's income distributions using publicly available

Perloff, Jeffrey M.

100

Nepal-Program for Scaling Up Renewable Energy in Low Income Countries  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nepal-Program for Scaling Up Renewable Energy in Low Income Countries Nepal-Program for Scaling Up Renewable Energy in Low Income Countries (SREP) Jump to: navigation, search Name Nepal-Program for Scaling Up Renewable Energy in Low Income Countries (SREP) Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis Website http://www.climatefundsupdate. Program Start 2009 Country Nepal UN Region Southern Asia References Program for Scaling Up Renewable Energy in Low Income Countries (SREP)[1] Ethiopia Specific Documents[2] Honduras Specific Documents[3] Kenya Specific Documents[4] Maldives Specific Documents[5] Mali Specific Documents[6] Nepal Specific Documents[7] Overview "The Scaling-Up Renewable Energy Program for Low Income Countries (SREP) is

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "income excluding unusual" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Honduras-Program for Scaling Up Renewable Energy in Low Income Countries  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Honduras-Program for Scaling Up Renewable Energy in Low Income Countries Honduras-Program for Scaling Up Renewable Energy in Low Income Countries (SREP) Jump to: navigation, search Name Honduras-Program for Scaling Up Renewable Energy in Low Income Countries (SREP) Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis Website http://www.climatefundsupdate. Program Start 2009 Country Honduras UN Region Southern Asia References Program for Scaling Up Renewable Energy in Low Income Countries (SREP)[1] Ethiopia Specific Documents[2] Honduras Specific Documents[3] Kenya Specific Documents[4] Maldives Specific Documents[5] Mali Specific Documents[6] Nepal Specific Documents[7] Overview "The Scaling-Up Renewable Energy Program for Low Income Countries (SREP) is

102

Mali-Program for Scaling Up Renewable Energy in Low Income Countries (SREP)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mali-Program for Scaling Up Renewable Energy in Low Income Countries (SREP) Mali-Program for Scaling Up Renewable Energy in Low Income Countries (SREP) Jump to: navigation, search Name Mali-Program for Scaling Up Renewable Energy in Low Income Countries (SREP) Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis Website http://www.climatefundsupdate. Program Start 2009 Country Mali UN Region Southern Asia References Program for Scaling Up Renewable Energy in Low Income Countries (SREP)[1] Ethiopia Specific Documents[2] Honduras Specific Documents[3] Kenya Specific Documents[4] Maldives Specific Documents[5] Mali Specific Documents[6] Nepal Specific Documents[7] Overview "The Scaling-Up Renewable Energy Program for Low Income Countries (SREP) is

103

Kenya-Program for Scaling Up Renewable Energy in Low Income Countries  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kenya-Program for Scaling Up Renewable Energy in Low Income Countries Kenya-Program for Scaling Up Renewable Energy in Low Income Countries (SREP) Jump to: navigation, search Name Kenya-Program for Scaling Up Renewable Energy in Low Income Countries (SREP) Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis Website http://www.climatefundsupdate. Program Start 2009 Country Kenya UN Region Southern Asia References Program for Scaling Up Renewable Energy in Low Income Countries (SREP)[1] Ethiopia Specific Documents[2] Honduras Specific Documents[3] Kenya Specific Documents[4] Maldives Specific Documents[5] Mali Specific Documents[6] Nepal Specific Documents[7] Overview "The Scaling-Up Renewable Energy Program for Low Income Countries (SREP) is

104

Ethiopia-Program for Scaling Up Renewable Energy in Low Income Countries  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ethiopia-Program for Scaling Up Renewable Energy in Low Income Countries Ethiopia-Program for Scaling Up Renewable Energy in Low Income Countries (SREP) Jump to: navigation, search Name Ethiopia-Program for Scaling Up Renewable Energy in Low Income Countries (SREP) Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis Website http://www.climatefundsupdate. Program Start 2009 Country Ethiopia UN Region Southern Asia References Program for Scaling Up Renewable Energy in Low Income Countries (SREP)[1] Ethiopia Specific Documents[2] Honduras Specific Documents[3] Kenya Specific Documents[4] Maldives Specific Documents[5] Mali Specific Documents[6] Nepal Specific Documents[7] Overview "The Scaling-Up Renewable Energy Program for Low Income Countries (SREP) is

105

Maldives-Program for Scaling Up Renewable Energy in Low Income Countries  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Maldives-Program for Scaling Up Renewable Energy in Low Income Countries Maldives-Program for Scaling Up Renewable Energy in Low Income Countries (SREP) Jump to: navigation, search Name Maldives-Program for Scaling Up Renewable Energy in Low Income Countries (SREP) Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis Website http://www.climatefundsupdate. Program Start 2009 Country Maldives UN Region Southern Asia References Program for Scaling Up Renewable Energy in Low Income Countries (SREP)[1] Ethiopia Specific Documents[2] Honduras Specific Documents[3] Kenya Specific Documents[4] Maldives Specific Documents[5] Mali Specific Documents[6] Nepal Specific Documents[7] Overview "The Scaling-Up Renewable Energy Program for Low Income Countries (SREP) is

106

Program for Scaling Up Renewable Energy in Low Income Countries (SREP) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Scaling Up Renewable Energy in Low Income Countries (SREP) Scaling Up Renewable Energy in Low Income Countries (SREP) Jump to: navigation, search Name Program for Scaling Up Renewable Energy in Low Income Countries (SREP) Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis Website http://www.climatefundsupdate. Program Start 2009 Country Ethiopia, Honduras, Kenya, Maldives, Mali, Nepal UN Region Southern Asia References Program for Scaling Up Renewable Energy in Low Income Countries (SREP)[1] Ethiopia Specific Documents[2] Honduras Specific Documents[3] Kenya Specific Documents[4] Maldives Specific Documents[5] Mali Specific Documents[6] Nepal Specific Documents[7] Overview "The Scaling-Up Renewable Energy Program for Low Income Countries (SREP) is

107

EO 12898: Environmental Justice in Minority Populations and Low-Income  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2898: Environmental Justice in Minority Populations and 2898: Environmental Justice in Minority Populations and Low-Income Populations EO 12898: Environmental Justice in Minority Populations and Low-Income Populations To focus Federal attention on the environmental and human health conditions in minority communities and low-income communities with the goal of achieving environmental justice. That order is also intended to promote nondiscrimination in Federal programs substantially affecting human health and the environment, and to provide minority communities and low-income communities access to public information on, and an opportunity for public participation in, matters relating to human health or the environment. EO 12898: Environmental Justice in Minority Populations and Low-Income Populations More Documents & Publications

108

Investigating the book-tax income gap : factors which affect the gap and details regarding its most significant component  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(cont.) In total, my thesis suggests that recent changes in the book-tax income gap may be exogenous and transitory, due to changes to the calculation of book income, general business conditions or other factors which ...

Seidman, Jeri

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Heavy Rain in the Middle East Related to Unusual Jet Stream Properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A major and fatal flooding event illustrative of rare similar cases in the Middle East was related to unusual characteristics of the jet stream. Contrary to the usual conditions, the jet stream had anticyclonic curvature and sloped northward with ...

Uri Dayan; Richard Abramski

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Diagnosis of Upper-Level Processes Influencing an Unusually Intense Extratropical Cyclone over Southeast Australia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On 1 December 1987, an unusual midlatitude cyclone affected much of southeastern Australia. The storm was characterized by unforced rapid deepening to a near record low (locally) mean sea-level pressure, high winds, anomalously cold surface ...

Christopher S. Velden; Graham A. Mills

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

2006 Special issue Perceiving the unusual: Temporal properties of hierarchical motor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2006 Special issue Perceiving the unusual: Temporal properties of hierarchical motor of demonstrated actions to the observer robot's equivalent motor representations (Alissandrakis, Nehaniv visual information and retrieving motor representations, differ in the way that the perceptual

Demiris, Yiannis

112

Polarization Lidar and Synoptic Analyses of an Unusual Volcanic Aerosol Cloud  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over an unusually brief three-day period in early August 1989, spectacular twilight effects indicative of a stratospheric volcanic cloud were seen at Salt Lake City, Utah. Concurrent polarization lidar observations detected an aerosol layer at ...

Kenneth Sassen; John D. Horel

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

DOE Provides $96.4 Million to Low-Income Families for Home Weatherization |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

96.4 Million to Low-Income Families for Home 96.4 Million to Low-Income Families for Home Weatherization DOE Provides $96.4 Million to Low-Income Families for Home Weatherization July 6, 2006 - 2:50pm Addthis Funding is Second Installment of $243 Million in Total Weatherization Grants for FY 2006 WASHINGTON, D.C. - U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Secretary Samuel W. Bodman today announced $96.4 million in weatherization program grants to 19 states to make energy efficiency improvements in homes of low-income families. Weatherization can reduce an average home's energy costs by $358 annually. Total Fiscal Year 2006 funding is $243 million and will provide weatherization to approximately 96,560 homes. "Weatherizing your home is a valuable way to save energy and money," Secretary Bodman said. "The Department of Energy's weatherization program

114

Department of Energy Provides Nearly $112 Million to Low-Income Families  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

112 Million to Low-Income 112 Million to Low-Income Families for Home Weatherization Department of Energy Provides Nearly $112 Million to Low-Income Families for Home Weatherization March 29, 2007 - 12:17pm Addthis Funding is First Installment of $204.5 Million in Total Weatherization Grants for FY 2007 WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced $111.6 million in weatherization grants to 30 states and the Navajo Nation to make energy efficiency improvements in homes of low-income families. Weatherization can reduce an average home's energy costs by $358 annually. Total Fiscal Year 2007 funding is $204.5 million and will provide weatherization to approximately 70,000 homes. "Weatherization is a valuable way to help save money and energy," DOE Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Alexander

115

Urban settlement design, Seoul, Korea : a comparative study for low-income housing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The study proposes an alternative design approach for urban dwelling environments of the low-income sectors in Seoul, Korea, based upon a comparative evaluation of the physical and socio-economic performance of the existing ...

Je, Hae-Seong

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

EO 12898: Environmental Justice in Minority Populations and Low-Income Populations  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WASHINGTON WASHINGTON February 11, 1994 MEMORANDUM FOR THE HEADS OF ALL DEPARTMENTS AND AGENCIES SUBJECT: Executive Order on Federal Actions to Address Environmental Justice in Minority Populations and Low- Income Populations Today I have issued an Executive Order on Federal Actions to Address Environmental Justice in Minority Populations and Low-Income Populations. That order is designed to focus Federal attention on the environmental and human health conditions in minority communities and low-income communities with the goal of achieving environmental justice. That order is also intended to promote nondiscrimination in Federal programs substantially affecting human health and the environment, and to provide minority communities and low-income communities access to public

117

Energy Department Provides $140.3 Million to Low-Income Families for Home  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

140.3 Million to Low-Income Families 140.3 Million to Low-Income Families for Home Weatherization Energy Department Provides $140.3 Million to Low-Income Families for Home Weatherization April 3, 2006 - 9:55am Addthis Funding is first installment of $243 million in total weatherization grants for FY 2006 WASHINGTON, D.C. - U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Secretary Samuel W. Bodman today announced $140.3 million in weatherization program grants to 31 states and the Navajo Nation to make energy efficiency improvements in homes of low-income families; weatherization can reduce an average home's energy costs by $358 annually. Total Fiscal Year 2006 funding is $243 million and will provide weatherization to approximately 96,560 homes. "Weatherizing your home is a valuable way to save energy and money,"

118

Department of Energy Provides Nearly $88 Million to Low-Income Families for  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

88 Million to Low-Income 88 Million to Low-Income Families for Home Weatherization Department of Energy Provides Nearly $88 Million to Low-Income Families for Home Weatherization June 29, 2007 - 2:36pm Addthis Funding is Second Installment of $200 Million in Total Weatherization Grants for FY 2007 WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced $88 million in weatherization grants to 20 states to make energy efficiency improvements in homes of low-income families. Weatherization can reduce an average home's energy costs by $358 annually, and this year, DOE expects funding to weatherize approximately 70,000 homes nationwide. For every dollar spent, weatherization returns $1.53 in energy savings over the life of the measures. DOE's weatherization program performs energy

119

The Impact of Wind Development on County-Level Income and Employment...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Impact of Wind Development on County-Level Income and Employment: A Review of Methods and an Empirical Analysis (Fact Sheet) Title The Impact of Wind Development on...

120

The Low-Income Housing Tax Credit : HERA, ARRA and beyond  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Low-Income Housing Tax Credit (LIHTC) has arguably been the most successful government subsidy to finance affordable housing. Since its creation in the Tax Reform Act of 1986 as Internal Revenue Code (IRC) Section 42, ...

Korb, Jason (Jason Bryan Patricof)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "income excluding unusual" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Incoming Shortwave Fluxes at the Surface—A Comparison of GCM Results with Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Evidence is presented that the excess surface net radiation calculated in general circulation models at continental surfaces is mostly due to excess incoming shortwave fluxes. Based on long-term observations from 22 worldwide inland stations and ...

J. R. Garratt

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Equitable economic energy efficiency : creating good jobs in low-income efficiency programming  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy efficiency is an important consideration in energy policy-making. So, a federal program aimed at funding "energy efficiency retrofits" for low-income households could be an important step in increasing the overall ...

Sarin, Amit

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Relating Rainfall Patterns to Agricultural Income: Implications for Rural Development in Mozambique  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rural farmers in Mozambique rely on rainfed agriculture for food and income. Yet they experience high rainfall variability ranging from extreme drought to flooding rainfall from tropical cyclone systems. To explore linkages between rainfall and ...

Julie A. Silva; Corene J. Matyas

124

A Study of the Incoming Longwave Atmospheric Radiation from a Clear Sky  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A band model for atmospheric absorption is used to calculate the incoming longwave atmospheric radiative flux for some typical clear sky conditions. The sky radiation is also measured using a specially-designed calorimetric apparatus over a wide ...

J. W. Ramsey; H. D. Chiang; R. J. Goldstein

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Causes, effects, and implications of subletting : experiences from low-income neighborhoods in Third World cities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In recent years increasing numbers of low-income families in Third World cities have found it necessary to share housing accommodation. Those with access to land may be unable to afford to build their house or to pay the ...

Bailey, Susan Ruth

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Low income housing tax credit properties : non-profit disposition strategies in the Commonwealth  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis examines how non-profit owners in Massachusetts have maintained affordability and ownership of Low-Income Housing Tax Credit (LIHTC) properties after the initial fifteen-year compliance period, at the lowest ...

Lew-Hailer, Lillian

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Community transportation : alternative transportation provision in a low-income neighborhoods in southeast Atlanta  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Regional transit agencies are ineffective at meeting many of the basic transportation needs of a clustered "Study Area" of low-income Atlanta neighborhoods. For transit dependant residents in the Study Area, getting to the ...

Alexander, James W., 1977-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

New Hampshire Electric Co-Op - Low-Income Energy Assistance Grant...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

help NHEC's income-qualified members manage energy use with the goal of lowering total energy costs. Qualified members living in an apartment or house, either rented or owned, can...

129

The forgotten class : reconceptualizing contemporary middle-income housing in New York City  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

New York City's costly real estate poses housing affordability challenges for not only low- or even moderate-income households, but also for the so-called "middle class." Because New York is predominantly a renter's market, ...

Milchman, Karina (Karina Faye)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Low-income communities in World Heritage Cities : revitalizing neighborhoods in Tunis and Quito  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since the 1970s, international preservation and funding agencies have promoted revitalization projects in developing countries aiming to, among other things, benefit low-income communities. For the most part, these projects ...

Young, T. Luke, 1972-

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Key worker housing : a demand analysis of middle-income workforce housing in eastern Massachusetts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Boston Metropolitan Area is one of the most expensive places to live in the United States. In recent years studies have speculated that middle-income workers have had to endure increased commute times as they have moved ...

Sacks, Sean D

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Department of Energy Provides Nearly $88 Million to Low-Income Families for  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Provides Nearly $88 Million to Low-Income Provides Nearly $88 Million to Low-Income Families for Home Weatherization Department of Energy Provides Nearly $88 Million to Low-Income Families for Home Weatherization June 29, 2007 - 2:36pm Addthis Funding is Second Installment of $200 Million in Total Weatherization Grants for FY 2007 WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced $88 million in weatherization grants to 20 states to make energy efficiency improvements in homes of low-income families. Weatherization can reduce an average home's energy costs by $358 annually, and this year, DOE expects funding to weatherize approximately 70,000 homes nationwide. For every dollar spent, weatherization returns $1.53 in energy savings over the life of the measures. DOE's weatherization program performs energy

133

Sensitivity of Computed Incoming Solar Radiation at the Surface to Cloud Analyses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A radiation model was used to simulate daily incoming solar radiation at four ships during Phase III of GATE. The accuracy of the simulations from several different cloud analyses based on ship or satellite data was estimated by comparison with ...

John T. Ball; Marshall A. Atwater; Stephen J. Thoren

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Low-income energy assistance programs: a profile of need and policy options  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This second report of the Fuel Oil Marketing Advisory Committee (FOMAC) of DOE is twofold: to update information on the energy needs of low-income persons and governmental response to such needs; and to emphasize the need for energy-conservation programs that may alleviate the enormous financial burden placed on low-income people by rising energy prices. FOMAC has continued to develop further and refine its initial energy-conservation recommendations. Mainly, the updated assessment document finds that the poor will expend at least 35% of their income directly on energy and will spend at least 21% of their income on household energy. Other economic impacts of rising energy costs on low-income groups are summarized. Appropriations and stipulations by Congress to aid the lo-income people are reviewed. After careful review of various program designs, FOMAC continues to support the income indexing/vendor line of credit approach. This design provides assistance to elgible households based on: energy needed, cost of fuel, and percentage of income. The cost of implementing the FOMAC design nationally would, according to estimates, range from $3.5 to $4.6 billion for the 1980-1981 winter heating season. A figure of $1.6 to $2.2 billion is being discussed in the Congress. Meeting the ongoing energy needs of the poor will require a coherent national policy which consists of aid in paying energy bills and aid in the poor's effort to conserve energy. The report seeks to promote such policies. Needs assessment, government response, FOMAC model, comments on the programs, projected cost of 1980-1981 Energy Assistance Program, need for conservation programs, and program financing are discussed.

Not Available

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

The asymmetric effects of changes in price and income on energy and oil demand.” Energy Journal 23(1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper estimates the effects on energy and oil demand of changes in income and oil prices, for 96 of the world’s largest countries, in per-capita terms. We examine three important issues: the asymmetric effects on demand of increases and decreases in oil prices; the asymmetric effects on demand of increases and decreases in income; and the different speeds of demand adjustment to changes in price and in income. Its main conclusions are the following: (1) OECD demand responds much more to increases in oil prices than to decreases; ignoring this asymmetric price response will bias downward the estimated response to income changes; (2) demand’s response to income decreases in many Non-OECD countries is not necessarily symmetric to its response to income increases; ignoring this asymmetric income response will bias the estimated response to income changes; (3) the speed of demand adjustment is faster to changes in income than to changes in price; ignoring this difference will bias upward the estimated response to income changes. Using correctly specified equations for energy and oil demand, the long-run response in demand for income growth is about 1.0 for Non-OECD Oil Exporters, Income Growers and perhaps all Non-OECD countries, and about 0.55 for OECD countries. These estimates for developing countries are significantly higher than current estimates used by the US Department of Energy. Our estimates for the OECD countries are also higher than those estimated recently by Schmalensee-Stoker-Judson (1998) and Holtz-Eakin and Selden (1995), who ignore the (asymmetric) effects of prices on demand. Higher responses to income changes, of course, will increase projections of energy and oil demand, and of carbon dioxide emissions.

Dermot Gately; Hillard G. Huntington; Dermot Gately; Hillard G. Huntington; Joyce Dargay; Lawrence Goulder; Mary Riddel; Shane Streifel

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Residential energy consumption and expenditure patterns of low-income households in the United States  

SciTech Connect

The principal objective of this study is to compare poor and non-poor households with respect to energy consumption and expenditures, housing characteristics, and energy-related behavior. We based our study on an analysis of a national data base created by the US Department of Energy, the 1982-1983 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS). RECS includes detailed information on individual households: demographic characteristics, energy-related features of the structure, heating equipment and appliances, recent conservation actions taken by the household, and fuel consumption and costs for April 1982-March 1983. We found a number of statistically significant (at the 0.05 level) differences between the two income groups in terms of demographics, heating/cooling/water heating systems, appliance saturation, the thermal integrity of their home, energy conservation behavior, energy consumption, energy expenditures, and the percentage of income spent on energy costs. For example, the non-poor used 22% more energy and paid 25% more money on utilities than the poor; however, the poor spent 20% more energy per square foot than the non-poor and spent about 25% of their income on energy expenditures, compared to 7% for the non-poor. These differences suggest different approaches that might be taken for targeting energy conservation programs to low-income households. Since the poor's ''energy burden'' is large, informational, technical, and financial assistance to low-income households remains an urgent, national priority. 13 refs., 26 tabs.

Vine, E.L.; Reyes, I.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

"Table HC7.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Household Income, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Household Income, 2005" 0 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Household Income, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 or More" "Home Appliances Usage Indicators" "Total",111.1,26.7,28.8,20.6,13.1,22,16.6,38.6 "Cooking Appliances" "Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked" "3 or More Times A Day",8.2,2.9,2.5,1.3,0.5,1,2.4,4.6 "2 Times A Day",24.6,6.5,7,4.3,3.2,3.6,4.8,10.3 "Once a Day",42.3,8.8,9.8,8.7,5.1,10,5,12.9

138

"Table HC7.5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Household Income, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Household Income, 2005" 5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Household Income, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 or More" "Space Heating Usage Indicators" "Total U.S. Housing Units",111.1,26.7,28.8,20.6,13.1,22,16.6,38.6 "Do Not Have Heating Equipment",1.2,0.5,0.3,0.2,"Q",0.2,0.3,0.6 "Have Space Heating Equipment",109.8,26.2,28.5,20.4,13,21.8,16.3,37.9 "Use Space Heating Equipment",109.1,25.9,28.1,20.3,12.9,21.8,16,37.3

139

Income Tax Deduction for Energy-Efficient Products | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Income Tax Deduction for Energy-Efficient Products Income Tax Deduction for Energy-Efficient Products Income Tax Deduction for Energy-Efficient Products < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Cooling Appliances & Electronics Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Maximum Rebate Not to exceed $500 Program Info Start Date 3/23/2007 Expiration Date 07/01/2017 State Virginia Program Type Personal Deduction Rebate Amount 20% of the sales tax paid by an individual Provider Virginia Department of Taxation This incentive is available for dishwashers, clothes washers, air conditioners, ceiling fans, compact fluorescent light bulbs, dehumidifiers, programmable thermostats or refrigerators that meet or exceed federal Energy Star standards. Purchases of fuel cells that generate electricity

140

An Energy Model for a Low Income Rural African Village | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

An Energy Model for a Low Income Rural African Village An Energy Model for a Low Income Rural African Village Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: An Energy Model for a Low Income Rural African Village Agency/Company /Organization: Howells, Alfstad, Victor, Goldstein and Remme Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, People and Policy Phase: Create a Vision Topics: - Energy Access Resource Type: Publications User Interface: Website Website: iea-etsap.org/web/Workshop/worksh_6_2003/2003P_howells.pdf Cost: Free UN Region: Southern Africa Language: English This paper reports on efforts to extend a MARKAL energy model for South Africa to include rural energy choices, allowing for computation of optimal energy systems in a typical (non-electrified) rural village.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "income excluding unusual" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Impact of the FY 2005 Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program on United States Employment and Earned Income  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) is interested in assessing the potential economic impacts of its portfolio of subprograms on national employment and income. A special purpose version of the IMPLAN input-output model called ImBuild II is used in this study of 20 subprograms of the Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program contained in the EERE final FY 2005 budget request to the Office of Management and Budget on February 2, 2004. Energy savings, investments, and impacts on U.S. national employment and earned income are reported by subprogram for selected years to the year 2030. Energy savings and investments from these subprograms have the potential of creating a total of 228,000 jobs and about $3.1 billion in earned income (2003$) by the year 2030.

Scott, Michael J.; Anderson, David M.; Belzer, David B.; Cort, Katherine A.; Dirks, James A.; Elliott, Douglas B.; Hostick, Donna J.

2004-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

142

Impact of 2001 Building Technology, state and community programs on United States employment and wage income  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy Office of Building Technology, State and Community Programs (BTS) is interested in assessing the potential economic impacts of its portfolio of programs on national employment and income. A special purpose version of the IMPLAN input-output model allied In Build is used in this study of all 38 BTS programs included in the FY2001 federal budget. Energy savings, investments, and impacts on U.S. national employment and wage income are reported by program for selected years to the year 2030. Energy savings from these programs have the potential of creating a total of nearly 332,000 jobs and about $5.3 billion in wage income (1995$) by the year 2030. Because the required investments to achieve these savings are capital intensive, the net effect after investment is 304,000 jobs and $5.0 billion.

MJ Scott; DJ Hostick; DB Elliott

2000-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

143

Impact of the FY 2009 Building Technologies Program on United States Employment and Earned Income  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) is interested in assessing the potential economic impacts of its portfolio of subprograms on national employment and income. A special purpose input-output model called ImSET is used in this study of 14 Building Technologies Program subprograms in the EERE final FY 2009 budget request to the Office of Management and Budget in February 2008. Energy savings, investments, and impacts on U.S. national employment and earned income are reported by subprogram for selected years to the year 2025. Energy savings and investments from these subprograms have the potential of creating a total of 258,000 jobs and about $3.7 billion in earned income (2007$) by the year 2025.

Livingston, Olga V.; Scott, Michael J.; Hostick, Donna J.; Dirks, James A.; Cort, Katherine A.

2008-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

144

Impact of the FY 2005 Building Technologies Program on United States Employment and Earned Income  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) is interested in assessing the potential economic impacts of its portfolio of subprograms on national employment and income. A special purpose version of the IMPLAN input-output model called ImBuild II is used in this study of all 21 Building Technologies Program subprograms in the EERE final FY 2005 budget request to the Office of Management and Budget on February 2, 2004. Energy savings, investments, and impacts on U.S. national employment and earned income are reported by subprogram for selected years to the year 2030. Energy savings and investments from these subprograms have the potential of creating a total of 396,000 jobs and about $5.6 billion in earned income (2003$) by the year 2030.

Scott, Michael J.; Anderson, Dave M.; Belzer, David B.; Cort, Katherine A.; Dirks, James A.; Elliott, Douglas B.; Hostick, Donna J.

2004-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

145

Impact of 2001 Building Technology, State and Community Programs on United States Employment and Wage Income  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy Office of Building Technology, State and Community Programs (BTS) is interested in assessing the potential economic impacts of its portfolio of programs on national employment and income. A special purpose version of the IMPLAN input-output model called ImBuild is used in this study of all 38 BTS programs included in the FY2001 federal budget. Energy savings, investments, and impacts on U.S. national employment and wage income are reported by program for selected years to the year 2030. Energy savings from these programs have the potential of creating a total of nearly 332,000 jobs and about $5.3 billion in wage income (1999$) by the year 2030. Because the required investments to achieve these savings are capital intensive, the net effect after investment is 304,000 jobs and $5.0 billion.

Scott, Michael J.; Hostick, Donna J.; Elliott, Douglas B.

2000-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

146

Do homeowners increase consumption after the last mortgage payment? An alternative test of the permanent income hypothesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The maturity date of a mortgage loan marks the end of monthly mortgage payments for homeowners. In the period after the last payment, homeowners experience an increase in their monthly disposable income that is equal to the average monthly mortgage payment. Our study interprets this event as an anticipated increase in income, and analyzes consumption behavior over the transition period. In particular, we test whether households smooth consumption as predicted by the rational expectation Life-Cycle/Permanent Income Hypothesis (Re-LC/PIH). We find that they do. Households do not alter nondurable goods consumption in the period following the last mortgage payment despite the increase in disposable income.

Brahima Coulibaly; Geng Li

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Substance use and intimate partner violence among low income, urban women seeking care in an emergency department.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? This three-paper dissertation aims to examine the relationship between using drugs and alcohol and experiencing intimate partner violence (IPV) among low income urban women… (more)

Gilbert, Louisa

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Low-income energy policy in a restructuring electricity industry: an assessment of federal options  

SciTech Connect

This report identifies both the low-income energy services historically provided in the electricity industry and those services that may be affected by industry restructuring. It identifies policies that are being proposed or could be developed to address low- income electricity services in a restructured industry. It discusses potential federal policy options and identifies key policy and implementation issues that arise when considering these potential federal initiatives. To understand recent policy development at the state level, we reviewed restructuring proposals from eight states and the accompanying testimony and comments filed in restructuring proceedings in these states.

Baxter, L.W.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Evaluation of DOE's Partnership in Low-Income Residential Retrofit (PILIRR) Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In July 1986, the US Department of Energy (DOE) awarded competitive grants to five states to conduct pilot projects to establish partnerships and use resource leveraging to stimulate support for low-income residential energy retrofits. The projects were conducted under DOE's Partnerships in Low-Income Residential Retrofit (PILIRR) Program. These projects have been monitored and analyzed through a concurrent process evaluation conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). This study reports the findings of that evaluation. The overriding goal of the PILIRR Program was to determine whether the states could stimulate support for low-income residential energy improvements from non-federal sources. The goal for the process evaluation was to conduct an assessment of the processes used by the states and the extent to which they successfully established partnerships and leveraged resources. Five states were selected to participate in the program: Florida, Iowa, Kentucky, Oklahoma and Washington. Each state proposed a different approach to promote non-federal support for low-income residential weatherization. Three of the five states--Florida, Iowa, and Washington--established partnerships that led to retrofits during the monitoring period (October 1986--October 1988). Kentucky established its partnership during the monitoring period, but did not accomplish its retrofits until after monitoring was complete. Oklahoma completed development of its marketing program and had begun marketing efforts by the end of the monitoring period. 16 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

Callaway, J.W.; Lee, A.D.

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Low-Income Renewable Energy Programs: A Survey of State Clean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ABOUT THIS CASE STUDY SERIES A number of U.S. states have recently established clean energy funds Energy States Alliance, and by the U.S. Department of Energy (the Assistant Secretary of EnergyLow-Income Renewable Energy Programs: A Survey of State Clean Energy Funds Garrett Fitzgerald, Mark

151

It's not all about "Green": energy use in low-income communities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Personal energy consumption, specifically home energy consumption such as heating, cooling, and electricity, has been an important environmental and economic topic for decades. Despite the attention paid to this area, few researchers have specifically ... Keywords: domestic computing, low-income, sustainability

Tawanna Dillahunt; Jennifer Mankoff; Eric Paulos; Susan Fussell

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Evidence for the Gompertz Curve in the Income Distribution of Brazil 1978-2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work presents an empirical study of the evolution of the personal income distribution in Brazil. Yearly samples available from 1978 to 2005 were studied and evidence was found that the complementary cumulative distribution of personal income for 99% of the economically less favorable population is well represented by a Gompertz curve of the form $G(x)=\\exp [\\exp (A-Bx)]$, where $x$ is the normalized individual income. The complementary cumulative distribution of the remaining 1% richest part of the population is well represented by a Pareto power law distribution $P(x)= \\beta x^{-\\alpha}$. This result means that similarly to other countries, Brazil's income distribution is characterized by a well defined two class system. The parameters $A$, $B$, $\\alpha$, $\\beta$ were determined by a mixture of boundary conditions, normalization and fitting methods for every year in the time span of this study. Since the Gompertz curve is characteristic of growth models, its presence here suggests that these patterns in...

Moura, Newton J

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

The Myth of Post-Reform Income Stagnation: Evidence from Brazil and Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This Working Paper should not be reported as representing the views of the IMF. The views expressed in this Working Paper are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent those of the IMF or IMF policy. Working Papers describe research in progress by the author(s) and are published to elicit comments and to further debate. Economic policies are often judged by a handful of statistics, some of which may be biased during periods of change. We estimate the income growth implied by the evolution of food demand and durable good ownership in post-reform Brazil and Mexico, and find that changes in consumption patterns are inconsistent with official estimates of near stagnant incomes. That is attributed to biases in the price deflator. The estimated unmeasured income gains are higher for poorer households, implying marked reductions in “real ” inequality. These findings challenge the conventional wisdom that post-reform income growth was low and did not benefit the poor. 25BJEL Classification

Irineu De Carvalho Filho; Prepared Irineu; Carvalho Filho; Marcos Chamon

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.9 Low-Income Housing  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

Level and Weatherization Eligibility (Millions) Single-Family Multi-Family Unit Mobile Home 2005 Household Income Own Rent Own Rent Own Rent Less than 15,000 6.1 2.4 0.3 7.1 1.6...

155

Income distribution and the allocation of public agricultural investment in developing countries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Income distribution and the allocation of public agricultural investment in developing countries responsible for the views expressed and for any limitiations #12;1 Introduction We compare the distributional average distribution costs, encouraging the growth of a distributional network. The creation of an export

Kammen, Daniel M.

156

Recent Heavy Precipitation in the Vicinity of the Great Salt Lake: Just How Unusual?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A long time series (1863–1984) of area)-average precipitation in the vicinity of the Great Salt Lake is shown to be highly correlated with the Great Salt Lake levels. This time series is used to assess the unusualness of the recent episode of ...

Thomas R. Karl; Pamela J. Young

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Recent Heavy Precipitation in the Vicinity of the Great Salt Lake: Just How Unusual?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A long time series (1863–1984) of areal average precipitation in the vicinity of the Great Salt Lake is shown to be highly correlated with the Great Salt Lake levels. This time series is used to assess the unusual recent episode of heavy ...

Thomas R. Karl; Pamela J. Young

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Low-income DSM Programs: Methodological approach to determining the cost-effectiveness of coordinated partnerships  

SciTech Connect

As governments at all levels become increasingly budget-conscious, expenditures on low-income, demand-side management (DSM) programs are being evaluated more on the basis of efficiency at the expense of equity considerations. Budgetary pressures have also caused government agencies to emphasize resource leveraging and coordination with electric and gas utilities as a means of sharing the expenses of low-income programs. The increased involvement of electric and gas utilities in coordinated low-income DSM programs, in turn, has resulted in greater emphasis on estimating program cost-effectiveness. The objective of this study is to develop a methodological approach to estimate the cost- effectiveness of coordinated low-income DSM programs, given the special features that distinguish these programs from other utility-operated DSM programs. The general approach used in this study was to (1) select six coordinated low-income DSM programs from among those currently operating across the United States, (2) examine the main features of these programs, and (3) determine the conceptual and pragmatic problems associated with estimating their cost-effectiveness. Three types of coordination between government and utility cosponsors were identified. At one extreme, local agencies operate {open_quotes}parallel{close_quotes} programs, each of which is fully funded by a single sponsor (e.g., one funded by the U.S. Department of Energy and the other by a utility). At the other extreme are highly {open_quotes}coupled{close_quotes} programs that capitalize on the unique capabilities and resources offered by each cosponsor. In these programs, agencies employ a combination of utility and government funds to deliver weatherization services as part of an integrated effort. In between are {open_quotes}supplemental{close_quotes} programs that utilize resources to supplement the agency`s government-funded weatherization, with no changes to the operation of that program.

Brown, M.A.; Hill, L.J.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Microsoft Word - q302.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Twenty-one major energy companies 1 reported overall net income (excluding unusual items) of $4.0 billion on revenues of $139 billion during the third quarter of 2002 (Q302). The level of net income for Q302 was 54 percent lower than in the third quarter of 2001 (Q301) (Table 1). The overall decline in net income was due primarily to reduced refined petroleum product prices coupled with an increase in crude oil prices. Almost all petroleum lines of business registered declines in net income between Q301 and Q302 (foreign oil and natural gas production was the only exception) while chemicals showed an increase. (Note: corporate net income and the total net income of the lines of business differ because (1) some items in corporate net income are nontraceable, such as interest expense, and

160

Microsoft Word - q202.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Twenty-two major energy companies 1 reported overall net income (excluding unusual items) of $5.5 billion on revenues of $141 billion during the second quarter of 2002 (Q202). The level of net income for Q202 was 55-percent lower than was the case in the second quarter of 2001 (Q201) (Table 1). All lines of business registered declines in net income between Q201 and Q202 with the exception of chemicals. (Note corporate net income and the total net income of the lines of business will differ because (1) some items in corporate net income are nontraceable, such as interest expense, and are not allocated to lines of business and (2) the number of companies reporting line-of-business net income varies.) The majors' domestic upstream oil and natural gas

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "income excluding unusual" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

New York, New York 10003-6687The Asymmetric Effects of Changes in Price and Income on Energy and Oil Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper estimates the effects on energy and oil demand of changes in income and oil prices, for 96 of the world’s largest countries, in per-capita terms. We examine three important issues: the asymmetric effects on demand of increases and decreases in oil prices; the asymmetric effects on demand of increases and decreases in income; and the different speeds of demand adjustment to changes in price and in income. Its main conclusions are the following: (1) OECD demand responds much more to increases in oil prices than to decreases; ignoring this asymmetric price response will bias downward the estimated income elasticity; (2) demand’s response to income decreases in many non-OECD countries is not necessarily symmetric to its response to income increases; ignoring this asymmetric income response will bias the estimated income elasticity; (3) the speed of demand adjustment is faster to changes in income than to changes in price; ignoring this difference will bias upward the estimated response to income changes. Using correctly specified equations for energy and oil demand, the long-run elasticity for increases in income is about 0.55 for OECD energy and oil, and 1.0 or higher for Non-OECD Oil Exporters, Income Growers and perhaps all Non-OECD countries. These income elasticity

Dermot Gately; Hillard G. Huntington; Dermot Gately; Hillard G. Huntington; Dermot Gately; Hillard G. Huntington

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Weatherizing the Homes of Low-Income Home Energy Assistance Program Clients: A Programmatic Assessment  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this project was to assess the relationships between two federal programs that support low income households, the Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP) and the Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP). The specific question addressed by this research is: what impact does weatherizing homes of LIHEAP recipients have on the level of need for LIHEAP assistance? The a priori expectation is that the level of need will decrease. If this is the case, then it can be argued that a non-energy benefit of WAP is the reduction in the level of need for LIHEAP assistance for households receiving weatherization assistance. The study area for this project was Boston, Massachusetts, which is representative of large northern urban areas. Additionally, Boston was chosen because one of its social service agencies, Action for Boston Community Development (ABCD), administers both WAP and LIHEAP programs. ABCD has a substantial client base of low-income households and was willing to cooperate in this study. In the State of Massachusetts, an income test is used to determine whether low-income households qualify for standard LIHEAP benefits. Benefits provided to eligible households are determined by a schedule that gauges benefit levels based on household income and number of members in the household. Additionally, households that consume large amounts of primary heating fuel can also qualify an additional high energy subsidy. It was expected that weatherization's biggest influence on the LIHEAP program would be in reducing the number of households qualifying for high energy subsidies. Data were collected for three groups of households that received both weatherization and LIHEAP assistance and for one control group that only received LIHEAP assistance. Table ES-1 indicates the sample sizes, weatherization dates, and winter time periods when changes in energy consumption and receipt of LIHEAP benefits could be expected to be observed. The reason why there is a lag of one year when weatherization impacts upon LIHEAP benefits might be observed is that LIHEAP benefits--specifically high energy benefits--are based on the previous year's primary heat fuel bills.

Tonn, B.

2002-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

163

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.9 Low-Income Housing  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

2 2 Energy Burden Definitions Energy burden is an important statistic for policy makers who are considering the need for energy assistance. Energy burden can be defined broadly as the burden placed on household incomes by the cost of energy, or more simply, the ratio of energy expenditures to household income. However, there are different ways to compute energy burden, and different interpretations and uses of the energy burden statistics. DOE Weatherization primarily uses mean individual burden and mean group burden since these statistics provide data on how an "average" individual household fares against an "average" group of households (that is, how burdens are distributed for the population). DOE Weatherization (and HHS) also uses the median individual burden which shows

164

Income Tax Evasion Dynamics: Evidence from an Agent-based Econophysics Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze income tax evasion dynamics in a standard model of statistical mechanics, the Ising model of ferromagnetism. However, in contrast to previous research, we use an inhomogeneous multi-dimensional Ising model where the local degrees of freedom (agents) are subject to a specific social temperature and coupled to external fields which govern their social behavior. This new modeling frame allows for analyzing large societies of four different and interacting agent types. As a second novelty, our model may reproduce results from agent-based models that incorporate standard Allingham and Sandmo tax evasion features as well as results from existing two-dimensional Ising based tax evasion models. We then use our model for analyzing income tax evasion dynamics under different enforcement scenarios and point to some policy implications.

Pickhardt, Michael

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Feasibility of an energy-related loan program for low-income homeowners  

SciTech Connect

The study explores the opportunities to create an interest subsidized residential retrofit loan program which would assist low-income homeowners to substantially reduce their utility bills. Energy conservation techniques which would be cost effective in a loan package were identified. The methodology used included a literature search to locate wherever possible actual measurements of energy and cost savings for areas of energy use and supply including furnace retrofits, water heating, appliances, lights, the effects of natural and mechanical ventilation, and the use of renewable energy sources such as solar space and water heating. An engineering/economic analysis of the options available through a 20 year loan program and at interest rates of 1, 3, and 6% was performed. It was found that substantial reductions in utility bills can be obtained with such a loan program. The information in the study would be useful to other income groups besides the poor. References and a list of information sources are included.

Eccli, E.

1977-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

An unusual partnership takes fruit: artists exhibit works from PPPL at PPPL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

An unusual partnership takes fruit: artists exhibit works from PPPL at PPPL An unusual partnership takes fruit: artists exhibit works from PPPL at PPPL By Jeanne Jackson DeVoe June 5, 2013 Tweet Widget Facebook Like Google Plus One Buse Aktas painting the vacuum vessel of QUASAR (formerly the National Compact Stellarator Experiment), which was stored in the MG site basement. (Photo by Elle Starkman/PPPL Office of Communications) Buse Aktas painting the vacuum vessel of QUASAR (formerly the National Compact Stellarator Experiment), which was stored in the MG site basement. Gallery: Josephine Halvorson, an artist whose work the New York Times described as "rugged, deeply gratifying realism," spent several hours outside the class painting a pink-colored I-beam and concrete blocks, seen at right. One of her paintings is included in the exhibit.

167

Upgrade energy building standards and develop rating system for existing low-income housing  

SciTech Connect

The city of Memphis Division of Housing and Community Development (HCD) receives grant funding each year from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) to provide local housing assistance to low-income residents. Through the years, HCD has found that many of the program recipients have had difficulty in managing their households, particularly in meeting monthly financial obligations. One of the major operating costs to low-income households is the utility bill. Furthermore, HCD`s experience has revealed that many low-income residents are simply unaware of ways to reduce their utility bill. Most of the HCD funds are distributed to low-income persons as grants or no/low interest loans for the construction or rehabilitation of single-family dwellings. With these funds, HCD builds 80 to 100 new houses and renovates about 500 homes each year. Houses constructed or renovated by HCD must meet HUD`s minimum energy efficiency standards. While these minimum standards are more than adequate to meet local building codes, they are not as aggressive as the energy efficiency standards being promoted by the national utility organizations and the home building industry. Memphis Light, Gas and Water (MLGW), a city-owned utility, has developed an award-winning program named Comfort Plus which promotes energy efficiency{open_quote} in new residential construction. Under Comfort Plus, MLGW models house plans on computer for a fee and recommends cost-effective alterations which improve the energy efficiency of the house. If the builder agrees to include these recommendations, MLGW will certify the house and guarantee a maximum annual heating/cooling bill for two years. While the Comfort Plus program has received recognition in the new construction market, it does not address the existing housing stock.

Muller, D.; Norville, C. [Memphis and Shelby County Div. of Planning and Development, TN (United States)

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Middle East and Central Asia Department Oil Prices, External Income, and Growth: Lessons from Jordan 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This Working Paper should not be reported as representing the views of the IMF. The views expressed in this Working Paper are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent those of the IMF or IMF policy. Working Papers describe research in progress by the author(s) and are published to elicit comments and to further debate. This paper extends the long-run growth model of Esfahani et al. (2009) to a labor exporting country that receives large inflows of external income—the sum of remittances, FDI and general government transfers—from major oil-exporting economies. The theoretical model predicts real oil prices to be one of the main long-run drivers of real output. Using quarterly data between 1979 and 2009 on core macroeconomic variables for Jordan and a number of key foreign variables, we identify two long-run relationships: an output equation as predicted by theory and an equation linking foreign and domestic inflation rates. It is shown that real output in the long run is shaped by: (i) oil prices through their impact on external income and in turn on capital accumulation, and (ii) technological transfers through foreign output. The empirical analysis of the paper confirms the hypothesis that a large share of Jordan's output volatility can be associated with fluctuations in net income received from abroad. External factors, however, cannot be relied upon to provide similar growth stimuli in the future, and therefore it will be important to diversify the sources of growth in order to achieve a high and sustained level of income.

Prepared Kamiar Mohaddes; Mehdi Raissi

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Energy consumption and expenditure projections by income quintile on the basis of the Annual Energy Outlook 1997 forecast  

SciTech Connect

This report presents an analysis of the relative impacts of the base-case scenario used in the Annual Energy Outlook 1997, published by the US Department of Energy, Energy Information Administration, on income quintile groups. Projected energy consumption and expenditures, and projected energy expenditures as a share of income, for the period 1993 to 2015 are reported. Projected consumption of electricity, natural gas, distillate fuel, and liquefied petroleum gas over this period is also reported for each income group. 33 figs., 11 tabs.

Poyer, D.A.; Allison, T.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

26Al in the Early Solar System: Not so Unusual After All  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recently acquired evidence shows that extrasolar asteroids exhibit over a factor of 100 variation in the iron to aluminum abundance ratio. This large range likely is a consequence of igneous differentiation that resulted from heating produced by radioactive decay of 26Al with an abundance comparable to that in the solar system's protoplanetary disk at birth. If so, the conventional view that our solar system began with an unusually high amount of 26Al should be discarded.

Jura, M; Young, E D

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Table HC1-3a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Household Income,  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Household Income, 3a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Household Income, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Housing Unit Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total 2001 Household Income Below Poverty Line Eli- gible for Fed- eral Assist- ance 1 RSE Row Factors Less than $14,999 $15,000 to $29,999 $30,000 to $49,999 $50,000 or More 0.6 1.3 1.1 1.0 0.9 1.4 1.0 Total ............................................... 107.0 18.7 22.9 27.1 38.3 15.0 33.8 3.3 Census Region and Division Northeast ...................................... 20.3 3.3 4.2 4.9 7.8 2.6 6.8 6.4 New England .............................. 5.4 0.8 1.1 1.3 2.3 0.6 1.6 9.9 Middle Atlantic ............................ 14.8 2.6 3.2 3.5 5.6 2.0 5.2 7.7 Midwest ......................................... 24.5 3.7 5.2 6.8 8.9 2.8 7.4 5.8 East North Central ......................

172

An Unusual Hailstorm on 24 June 2006 in Boulder, Colorado. Part II: Low-Density Growth of Hail  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 24 June 2006 Boulder hailstorm produced very heavy precipitation including disklike hailstones that grew with low density. These disklike hailstones, 4–5 cm in diameter, are unusual, and some of them appear to have accumulated graupel while ...

Charles A. Knight; Paul T. Schlatter; Thomas W. Schlatter

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Estimations of Cloud Optical Thickness from Ground-Based Measurements of Incoming Solar Radiation in the Arctic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A technique for evaluation of cloud optical thickness (plant-parallel, homogeneous layer) from ground-based measurements of incoming solar irradiance using a simple radiation model is introduced. The sensitivities of downward and upward fluxes of ...

E. Leontyeva; K. Stamnes

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Own-price and income elasticities for household electricity demand : a survey of literature using meta-regression analysis.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Maria Wist Langmoen Own-price and income elasticities for household electricity demand -A Literature survey using meta-regression analysis Economists have been modelling the electricity demand for… (more)

Langmoen, Maria Wist

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Portfolio Substitution and the Revenue Cost of the Federal Income Tax Exemption for State and Local Government Bonds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper illustrates how different assumptions about household portfolio behavior influence estimates of the amount of individual income tax revenue that would be collected if the interest tax exemption for state and ...

Poterba, James M.

176

WORKINGPAPER SERIES Number 150CAP AND DIVIDEND: HOW TO CURB GLOBAL WARMING WHILE PROTECTING THE INCOMES OF AMERICAN FAMILIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This essay examines the distributional effects of a “cap-and-dividend ” policy for reducing carbon emission in the United States: a policy that auctions carbon permits and rebates the revenue to the public on an equal per capita basis. The aim of the policy is to reduce U.S. emissions of carbon dioxide, the main pollutant causing global warming, while at the same time protecting the real incomes of middle-income and lower-income American families. The number of permits is set by a statutory cap on carbon emissions that gradually diminishes over time. The sale of carbon permits will generate very large revenues, posing the critical question of who will get the money. The introduction of carbon permits – or, for that matter, any policy to curb emissions – will raise prices of fossil fuels, Key words: Global warming; fossil fuels; climate change; carbon permits; cap-and-dividend; cap-and-auction; cap-and-trade. and have a regressive impact on income distribution, since fuel expenditures represent a larger fraction of income for lower-income households than for upper-income households. The net effect of carbon emission-reduction policies depends on who gets the money that households pay in higher prices. We find that a cap-and-dividend policy would have a strongly progressive net effect. Moreover, the majority of U.S. households would be net winners in purely monetary terms: that is, their real incomes, after paying higher fuel prices and receiving their dividends, would rise. From the standpoints of both distributional equity and political feasibility, a cap-and-dividend policy is therefore an attractive way to curb carbon emissions. s s

James K. Boyce; Matthew Riddle; James K. Boyce; Matthew Riddle

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Guidelines Establishing Criteria for Excluding Buildings from the Energy Performance Requirements of Section 543 of the National Energy Conservation Policy Act as Amended by the Energy Policy Act of 2005  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Guidelines Establishing Criteria for Excluding Buildings Guidelines Establishing Criteria for Excluding Buildings from the Energy Performance Requirements of Section 543 of the National Energy Conservation Policy Act as Amended by the Energy Policy Act of 2005 January 27, 2006 These guidelines and accompanying criteria fulfill the requirement under Section 543(c)(3) of the National Energy Conservation Policy Act (NECPA) as amended by the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPACT). Section 543(c)(3) states that the Secretary of Energy shall issue guidelines that establish criteria for exclusions from the energy performance requirement for a fiscal year, any Federal building or collection of Federal buildings, within the statutory framework provided by the law. The purpose of these guidelines is to clarify and explicate, as necessary, the statutory

178

Guidelines Establishing Criteria for Excluding Buildings from the Energy Performance Requirements of Section 543 of the National Energy Conservation Policy Act as Amended by the Energy Policy Act of 2005  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Guidelines Establishing Criteria for Excluding Buildings Guidelines Establishing Criteria for Excluding Buildings from the Energy Performance Requirements of Section 543 of the National Energy Conservation Policy Act as Amended by the Energy Policy Act of 2005 January 27, 2006 These guidelines and accompanying criteria fulfill the requirement under Section 543(c)(3) of the National Energy Conservation Policy Act (NECPA) as amended by the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPACT). Section 543(c)(3) states that the Secretary of Energy shall issue guidelines that establish criteria for exclusions from the energy performance requirement for a fiscal year, any Federal building or collection of Federal buildings, within the statutory framework provided by the law. The purpose of these guidelines is to clarify and explicate, as necessary, the statutory

179

Financial News for Major Energy Companies, January - March 2004  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Companies Twenty-four major energy companies reported overall net income (excluding unusual items) of $13.9 billion on revenues of $198.3 billion during the first quarter of 2004 (Q104). The level of net income for Q104 was significantly higher than in the first quarter of 2003 (Q103), rising 18 percent (Table 1). The overall increase in net income was due primarily to slightly higher crude oil prices, higher foreign production of crude oil, and higher refinery throughput. Overall, the petroleum line of business (which includes both oil and natural gas production and petroleum refining/marketing) registered an 8-percent increase in net income between Q103 and Q104, as the 3-percent increase in oil and gas production net income was augmented by a 30-percent increase in refining/marketing net income.

180

Microsoft Word - q402.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Twenty major energy companies 1 reported overall net income (excluding unusual items) of $6.6 billion on revenues of $149 billion during the fourth quarter of 2002 (Q402). The level of net income for Q402 was 296 percent higher than in the fourth quarter of 2001 (Q401) (Table 1). The overall increase in net income was due primarily to higher crude oil and natural gas prices. Overall, the petroleum line of business registered a 47-percent increase in net income between Q401 and Q402, as declines in refining/marketing net income were more than offset by increases in oil and gas production net income. Returns to worldwide gas and power operations increased, while losses from chemicals operations declined, but earnings from other businesses declined

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "income excluding unusual" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Project #: UM08-Q3Saving among Low-Income Women: Motivation and Obstacles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

How do low-income households think about saving? What motivations do they identify for saving, and what obstacles to meeting their goals? We use data from qualitative interviews with 51 households in Detroit to shed light on these questions. We find that they wish they could save- primarily for protection against the unexpected or to put children through college- but that most of them cannot. Friends and family surface as a major obstacle to saving, since those who have liquid assets are asked for help. When savings is feasible in this population, it occurs

Helen Levy; Kristin Seefeldt; Helen Levy; Kristin Seefeldt; Ann Arbor; Andrea Fischer Newman; Ann Arbor; Andrew C. Richner; Grosse Pointe; Park S. Martin; Helen Levy; Kristin Seefeldt

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Unusual Capacitance Emission Transients in CIGS Caused by Large Defect Entropy Changes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Capacitance transient data from bias-pulse experiments on CdS/CIGS solar cells show an unusual behavior at high temperatures. Above 350 K, a minority-carrier trap, with a larger activation energy than a majority-carrier trap, emits faster than the lower activation-energy minority trap. A simple enthalpy model for trap emission cannot explain this counterintuitive behavior; but the more complete Gibbs free-energy model that includes entropy can explain it. We show that entropy plays a major role in carrier emission from traps in CIGS.

Young, D. L.; Ramanathan, K.; Crandall, R. S.

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.9 Low-Income Housing  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

7 7 Residential Energy Burdens, by Weatherization Eligibility and Year (1) 1987 Mean Mean Mean Mean Mdn Mean Mean Mdn Mean Group Indvdl Group Indvdl Indvdl Group Indvdl Indvdl Group Total U.S. Households 4.0% 6.8% 3.2% 6.1% 3.5% 2.4% 7.2% 4.4% 3.2% Federally Eligible 13.0% 14.4% 10.1% 12.1% 7.9% 7.7% 13.8% 9.6% 10.0% Federally Ineligible 4.0% 3.5% N.A. 3.0% 2.6% 2.0% 3.6% 3.1% 2.6% Below 125% Poverty Line 13.0% N.A. N.A. N.A. N.A. N.A. N.A. N.A. N.A. Note(s): Source(s): 1990 FY 2000 (2) FY 2009 (3) 1) Energy burden can be defined broadly as the burden placed on household incomes by the cost of energy, or the ratio of energy expenditures to income for a household. DOE Weatherization primarily uses mean individual burden and mean group burden since these statistics provide data on how an "average" individual household fares against an "average" group of households (that is, how burdens are

184

One Hundred Years of Oil Income and the Iranian Economy: A Curse or a Blessing?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper examines the impact of oil revenues on the Iranian economy over the past hundred years, spanning the period 1908–2010. It is shown that although oil has been produced in Iran over a very long period, its importance in the Iranian economy was relatively small up until the early 1960s. It is argued that oil income has been both a blessing and a curse. Oil revenues when managed appropriately are a blessing, but their volatility (which in Iran is much higher than oil price volatility) can have adverse e¤ects on real output, through excessively high and persistent levels of in‡ation. Lack of appropriate institutions and policy mechanisms which act as shock absorbers in the face of high levels of oil revenue volatility have also become a drag on real output. In order to promote growth, policies should be devised to control in‡ation; to serve as shock absorbers negating the adverse e¤ects of oil revenue volatility; to reduce rent seeking activities; and to prevent excessive dependence of government …nances on oil income. We are grateful to Parvin Alizadeh, Hassan Hakimian and conference participants at the University of

Kamiar Mohaddes A; M. Hashem Pesaran B

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

X-ray Scattering Reveals Unusual Growth of Lead on Silicon  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

X-ray Scattering Reveals Unusual Growth of Lead on Silicon X-ray Scattering Reveals Unusual Growth of Lead on Silicon Most thin films grow on substrates in only three ways: layer by layer, formation of atomic islands, or layers followed by islands. The particular growth mode that a given material will follow crucially depends on the relative magnitudes of the surface energy of the film versus the interfacial energy of the film on the substrate. Recently, a team of researchers from the University of Illinois, Academica Sinica in Taiwan, Georgia Tech, and the City University of Hong Kong has discovered a remarkable anomaly. By means of real-time x-ray scattering measurements, the researchers found that lead films grown on silicon adopt a completely novel pattern of growth. X-ray diffraction images taken with a CCD camera during growth of Pb films on Si(111). The interference fringes yield information about island height and layer thickness. Fig. 1. X-ray diffraction images taken with a CCD camera during growth of Pb films on Si(111). The interference fringes yield information about island height and layer thickness.

186

HotPatch Web Gateway: Statistical Analysis of Unusual Patches on Protein Surfaces  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

HotPatch finds unusual patches on the surface of proteins, and computes just how unusual they are (patch rareness), and how likely each patch is to be of functional importance (functional confidence (FC).) The statistical analysis is done by comparing your protein's surface against the surfaces of a large set of proteins whose functional sites are known. Optionally, HotPatch can also write a script that will display the patches on the structure, when the script is loaded into some common molecular visualization programs. HotPatch generates complete statistics (functional confidence and patch rareness) on the most significant patches on your protein. For each property you choose to analyze, you'll receive an email to which will be attached a PDB-format file in which atomic B-factors (temp. factors) are replaced by patch indices; and the PDB file's Header Remarks will give statistical scores and a PDB-format file in which atomic B-factors are replaced by the raw values of the property used for patch analysis (for example, hydrophobicity instead of hydrophobic patches). [Copied with edits from http://hotpatch.mbi.ucla.edu/

Pettit, Frank K.; Bowie, James U.(DOE-Molecular Biology Institute)

187

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.9 Low-Income Housing  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

4 4 Weatherization Population Facts - Roughly 25% of Federally eligible households move in and out of poverty "classification" each year. - The average income of Federally eligible households in FY 2005 was $16,264, based on RECS and Bureau of the Census' Current Population Survey (CPS) data. - States target the neediest, especially the elderly, persons with disabilities, and families with children. - Since the inception of the Weatherization Assistance Program in 1976, over 6.3 million households have received weatherization services with DOE and leveraged funding. - In FY 2009, the energy burden on Federally eligible households was about four times the burden on Federally ineligible households (14% versus 4%). Source(s): ORNL, Weatherization Works: Final Report on the National Weatherization Evaluation, Sept. 1994, p. 1 for migrating poor; ORNL, 1996 for targeting; HHS,

188

Shared savings and low income homeowners: Results of a demonstration project in Hennepin County  

SciTech Connect

In 1984 Hennepin County, with financial support from the US Department of Energy and as part of the Year Five energy program of the Urban Consortium's Energy Task Force, initiated a Residential Shared Savings Demonstration Project (RSSDP) for single family homeowners. Shared savings, or performance contracting, occurs when an energy service company (ESCo) finances and installs energy improvements in a customer's property and receives a share of the savings that result over time as their compensation. Chapter 1 of this report provides general background on the project, including a brief description of Hennepin County, the energy environment within which the project was conducted, and the Residential Shared Savings Demonstration Project. Chapter 2 describes the efforts to market the RSSDP to low income homeowners, the results of those efforts and the findings from an extensive market assessment effort. Chapter 3 summarizes the significant lessons learned during the project. 4 figs., 3 tabs.

Miller, R.D.; Ford, J.M.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Retirement Saving with Contribution Payments and Labor Income as a Benchmark for Investments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we study the retirement saving problem from the point of view of a plan sponsor, who makes contribution payments for the future retirement of an employee. The plan sponsor considers the employee's labor income as investment-benchmark in order to ensure the continuation of consumption habits after retirement. We demonstrate that the demand for risky assets increases at low wealth levels due to the contribution payments. We quantify the demand for hedging against changes in wage growth and nd that it is relatively small. We show that downside-risk measures increase risk-taking at both low and high levels of wealth. Keywords: retirement saving, optimal asset allocation, discrete-time nance, dynamic programming. JEL Classications Codes: G11, G23. We are grateful to Bart Oldenkamp and Ton Vorst for comments on an earlier version of this paper. y Corresponding author: Erasmus University Rotterdam, Econometric Institute, P.O. Box 1738, 3000 DR Rotterdam, The Netherland...

Arjan Berkelaar; Roy Kouwenberg

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Technique for tracking the effect of weatherization retrofits on low-income housing  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a technique for analyzing the effect of energy saving retrofits installed in low-income housing under a nationwide weatherization demonstration program. A tracking technique, based on the calculated balance-point temperature of each home prior to the weatherization, was developed to estimate the would-be fuel consumption over a period of time if the house had not been weatherized. The savings in fuel consumption for a home can be determined from the difference between the actual usage after retrofit and the calculated usage if it were not retrofitted. Besides the overall reduction, the saving in energy usage during different time periods while the house is being weatherized can be visualized from the graphical representation of the tracking technique.

Chang, Y.L.; Grot, R.A.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

WEATHERIZING THE HOMES OF LOW-INCOME HOME ENERGY ASSISTANCE PROGRAM CLIENTS: A PROGRAMMATIC ASSESSMENT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CON-486 CON-486 WEATHERIZING THE HOMES OF LOW-INCOME HOME ENERGY ASSISTANCE PROGRAM CLIENTS: A PROGRAMMATIC ASSESSMENT Bruce Tonn Richard Schmoyer Sarah Wagner OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY DOCUMENT AVAILABILITY Reports produced after January 1, 1996, are generally available free via the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Information Bridge. Web site http://www.osti.gov/bridge Reports produced before January 1, 1996, may be purchased by members of the public from the following source. National Technical Information Service 5285 Port Royal Road Springfield, VA 22161 Telephone 703-605-6000 (1-800-553-6847) TDD 703-487-4639 Fax 703-605-6900 E-mail info@ntis.fedworld.gov Web site http://www.ntis.gov/support/ordernowabout.htm Reports are available to DOE employees, DOE contractors, Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDE) representatives,

192

The Impact of Carbon Control on Low-Income Household Electricity and Gasoline Expenditures  

SciTech Connect

In July of 2007 The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Energy Information Administration (EIA) released its impact analysis of 'The Climate Stewardship And Innovation Act of 2007,' known as S.280. This legislation, cosponsored by Senators Joseph Lieberman and John McCain, was designed to significantly cut U.S. greenhouse gas emissions over time through a 'cap-and-trade' system, briefly described below, that would gradually but extensively reduce such emissions over many decades. S.280 is one of several proposals that have emerged in recent years to come to grips with the nation's role in causing human-induced global climate change. EIA produced an analysis of this proposal using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) to generate price projections for electricity and gasoline under the proposed cap-and-trade system. Oak Ridge National Laboratory integrated those price projections into a data base derived from the EIA Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) for 2001 and the EIA public use files from the National Household Transportation Survey (NHTS) for 2001 to develop a preliminary assessment of impact of these types of policies on low-income consumers. ORNL will analyze the impacts of other specific proposals as EIA makes its projections for them available. The EIA price projections for electricity and gasoline under the S.280 climate change proposal, integrated with RECS and NHTS for 2001, help identify the potential effects on household electric bills and gasoline expenditures, which represent S.280's two largest direct impacts on low-income household budgets in the proposed legislation. The analysis may prove useful in understanding the needs and remedies for the distributive impacts of such policies and how these may vary based on patterns of location, housing and vehicle stock, and energy usage.

Eisenberg, Joel Fred [ORNL

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

The Impact of Carbon Control on Low-Income Household Electricity and Gasoline Expenditures  

SciTech Connect

In July of 2007 The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Energy Information Administration (EIA) released its impact analysis of 'The Climate Stewardship And Innovation Act of 2007,' known as S.280. This legislation, cosponsored by Senators Joseph Lieberman and John McCain, was designed to significantly cut U.S. greenhouse gas emissions over time through a 'cap-and-trade' system, briefly described below, that would gradually but extensively reduce such emissions over many decades. S.280 is one of several proposals that have emerged in recent years to come to grips with the nation's role in causing human-induced global climate change. EIA produced an analysis of this proposal using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) to generate price projections for electricity and gasoline under the proposed cap-and-trade system. Oak Ridge National Laboratory integrated those price projections into a data base derived from the EIA Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) for 2001 and the EIA public use files from the National Household Transportation Survey (NHTS) for 2001 to develop a preliminary assessment of impact of these types of policies on low-income consumers. ORNL will analyze the impacts of other specific proposals as EIA makes its projections for them available. The EIA price projections for electricity and gasoline under the S.280 climate change proposal, integrated with RECS and NHTS for 2001, help identify the potential effects on household electric bills and gasoline expenditures, which represent S.280's two largest direct impacts on low-income household budgets in the proposed legislation. The analysis may prove useful in understanding the needs and remedies for the distributive impacts of such policies and how these may vary based on patterns of location, housing and vehicle stock, and energy usage.

Eisenberg, Joel Fred [ORNL

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Overview  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Companies, First Quarter 2007 Companies, First Quarter 2007 Overview First Quarter 2007 Key Findings Net Income $23.9 billion Revenues $261.2 billion Trends Unchanged net income relative to first quarter of 2006 Lower oil and gas prices, higher oil and gas production Twenty major energy companies reported overall net income (excluding unusual items) of $23.9 billion on revenues of $261.2 billion during the first quarter of 2007 (Q107). The level of net income for Q107 was essentially unchanged relative to the first quarter of 2006 (Q106) (Table 1). Net income for Q107 was unchanged as the effects of lower prices were offset by the effects of higher worldwide production of crude oil and natural gas liquids, and increased domestic production of natural gas. Overall, the petroleum line of business (which includes both oil and natural gas production and

195

Overview  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2007 Overview Second Quarter 2007 Key Findings Net Income $30.7 billion Revenues $301.7 billion Trends 4-percent increase in net income relative to second quarter of 2006 Lower oil prices, and lower oil and gas production Twenty-two major energy companies a reported overall net income (excluding unusual items) of $30.7 billion on revenues of $301.7 billion during the second quarter of 2007 (Q207). The level of net income for Q207 was 4-percent higher than in the second quarter of 2006 (Q206) (Table 1). Net income for Q207 increased as the effects of higher natural gas prices and much higher refining margins offset the effects of lower oil prices, lower worldwide production of oil and natural gas, and lower refinery throughput. Overall, the petroleum line of business (which includes both oil and natural gas production and

196

Overview  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Fourth Quarter 2007 Key Findings Net Income $28.3 billion Revenues $329.6 billion Highlights 24-percent increase in net income relative to fourth quarter of 2006 (31-percent increase relative to the fourth-quarter average for 2003-2006) effects of higher oil and natural gas prices overwhelm lower worldwide oil production and U.S. refining margins Overview Sixteen major energy companies [1] reported overall net income (excluding unusual items) of $28.3 billion on revenues of $329.6 billion during the fourth quarter of 2007 (Q407). The level of net income for Q407 was 24- percent higher than in the fourth quarter of 2006 (Q406) (Table 1), and was 31-percent higher than the fourth- quarter average for 2003-2006 after adjusting for inflation. Net income for Q407 increased as the effects of lower

197

Microsoft Word - q408.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Fourth Quarter 2008 Key Findings Net Income $5.8 billion Revenues $236.1 billion Highlights Major energy companies reported a 78-percent decrease in net income relative to fourth quarter of 2007. Further, this represents a 73-percent decrease relative to the fourth-quarter average for 2003-2007. Return on sales (net income ÷ revenue) decreased from 8.3 percent in the fourth quarter of 2007 to 2.5 percent in the fourth quarter of 2008 due to the 78 percent decrease in net income. The effects of higher U.S. refining margins and foreign oil production were overwhelmed by lower oil and natural gas prices, lower U.S. oil production, and lower worldwide natural gas production. Overview Twelve major energy companies [1] reported overall net income (excluding unusual items) of $5.8 billion on

198

Overview  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 First Quarter 2008 Key Findings Net Income $28.3 billion Revenues $343.4 billion Highlights Major energy companies reported an 18-percent increase in net income relative to first quarter of 2007 (42-percent increase relative to the first-quarter average for 2003- 2007). Return on sales (net income ÷ revenue) fell from 9.5 percent in the first quarter of 2007 to 8.2 percent in the first quarter of 2008 due to the 37 percent increase in revenue. The effects of higher oil and natural gas prices overwhelm lower worldwide oil production and U.S. refining margins. Overview Nineteen major energy companies [1] reported overall net income (excluding unusual items) of $28.3 billion on revenues of $343.4 billion during the first quarter of 2008 (Q108). The level of net income for Q108 was 18-

199

Microsoft Word - q308.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Third Quarter 2008 Key Findings Net Income $48.0 billion Revenues $428.8 billion Highlights Major energy companies reported an 82-percent increase in net income relative to third quarter of 2007. Further, this represents a 102-percent increase relative to the third-quarter average for 2003-2007. Return on sales (net income ÷ revenue) increased from 8.8 percent in the third quarter of 2007 to 11.2 percent in the third quarter of 2008 due to the 82 percent increase in net income. The effects of higher refining margins, oil and natural gas prices, and worldwide natural gas production overwhelmed lower worldwide oil production and refining throughput. Overview Nineteen major energy companies [1] reported overall net income (excluding unusual items) of $48.0 billion on

200

Overview  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Third Quarter 2007 Key Findings Net Income $26.5 billion Revenues $301.8 billion Highlights 11-percent decrease in net income relative to third quarter of 2006 (25-percent increase relative to the third-quarter average for 2003-2006) effects of higher oil prices overwhelmed by lower worldwide oil production and U.S. refining margins Overview Twenty-two major energy companies 1 reported overall net income (excluding unusual items) of $26.5 billion on revenues of $301.8 billion during the third quarter of 2007 (Q307). The level of net income for Q307 was 11- percent lower than in the third quarter of 2006 (Q306) (Table 1), but was 25-percent higher than the third-quarter average for 2003-2006 after adjusting for price changes. Net income for Q307 decreased as the effects of lower

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "income excluding unusual" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Overview  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Second Quarter 2008 Key Findings Net Income $30.4 billion Revenues $423.4 billion Highlights Major energy companies reported a 1-percent decline in net income relative to second quarter of 2007. However, this also represents a 31-percent increase relative to the second-quarter average for 2003-2007. Return on sales (net income ÷ revenue) fell from 10.5 percent in the second quarter of 2007 to 7.2 percent in the second quarter of 2008 due to the 44 percent increase in revenue. The effects of higher oil and natural gas prices overwhelm lower worldwide oil production and world-wide refining margins. Overview Nineteen major energy companies [1] reported overall net income (excluding unusual items) of $30.4 billion on revenues of $423.4 billion during the second quarter of 2008 (Q208). The level of net income for Q208 was 1-

202

Evaluation Ratings Definitions (Excluding Utilization of Small...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(WOSB), HUBZone small business, veteran-owned small business (VOSB) and service disabled veteran owned small business (SDVOSB). Complied with FAR 52.219-8, Utilization of...

203

working lunch menus prices excludes VAT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cheese and biscuits with dried apricot and a fresh grape garnish » stuffed organic peppers with cream

204

National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Categorically Excluded...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Used to Access Groundwater Monitoring Wells South of the Tuba City, Arizona, Uranium Mill Tailing Remedial Action (UMTRA) Title I Ste 05282013 B1.3 LM-01-13 Current and Future...

205

Effects on minority and low-income households of the EPA proposal to reduce leaded gasoline use  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To reduce the potentially harmful environmental effects of lead in the environment, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has proposed a reduction in the amount of lead used in leaded gasoline. This report examines the potential impacts of such action on minority and low-income households in the US. The benefits of the EPA's proposal would presumably accrue primarily to households that contain small children and that are located in the central cities of metropolitan areas. This is because small children (under age seven) are particularly susceptible to the effects of lead and also because the automobile traffic density in central cities is higher than in any other area. Potential costs are examined in terms of households that own vehicles requiring leaded gasoline. Costs could accrue either because of higher gasoline prices due to reduced lead content or because of higher vehicle repair costs for engines that must use leaded gasoline to prevent excessive wear. Because of their location and number, minority and low-income households with small children would benefit more than the average US household. No costs would be incurred by the relatively large segment of minority and low-income households that own no vehicles. However, the Hispanic and other minority (except black) and low-income households that do own vehicles have a greater than average share of vehicles that require leaded gasoline; costs to these households because of the EPA's proposed action would be comparatively high.

Rose, K.; LaBelle, S.; Winter, R.; Klein, Y.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

An Unusual Hailstorm on 24 June 2006 in Boulder, Colorado. Part I: Mesoscale Setting and Radar Features  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An unusual, isolated hailstorm descended on Boulder, Colorado, on the evening of 24 June 2006. Starting with scattered large, flattened, disk-shaped hailstones and ending with a deluge of slushy hail that was over 4 cm deep on the ground, the ...

Paul T. Schlatter; Thomas W. Schlatter; Charles A. Knight

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Roundtable on prevention of fraud and abuse in low income weatherization programs, March 23--24, 1987, Highland Hotel, Washington, DC  

SciTech Connect

This report contains: Identification of Issues and Preventive Measures Associated with Fraud and Abuse in Low Income Conservation Programs; Working Papers Prepared by Roundtable Discussants; Annotated Bibliography of Publications Related to Prevention/Detection of Fraud and Abuse in DOE and LIHEAP Conservation Programs; and List of Members on Task Force for Prevention of Fraud and Abuse in Low Income Weatherization Programs.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Economic Impacts of Marcellus Shale in Pennsylvania: Employment and Income in 2009 2011 Penn State Extension and Penn College www.msetc.org 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Economic Impacts of Marcellus Shale in Pennsylvania: Employment and Income in 2009 ©2011 Penn State Extension and Penn College www.msetc.org 1 Economic Impacts of Marcellus Shale in Pennsylvania: Employment and Income in 2009 August 2011 www.msetc.org The Marcellus Shale Education & Training Center (MSETC

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

209

The Role of Acculturation in Nutrition Behaviors among Low Income Hispanic Women Living in Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to determine the role of acculturation in the food consumption patterns of low income Hispanic women living in Texas and enrolled in the Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) Program by testing the following hypotheses: a) There are significant differences in consumption of fruit and vegetables by selected socio-demographic variables; and, b) less healthy food consumption patterns are associated with higher levels of acculturation in health-related research involving low-income Hispanic women living in Texas. A secondary-data analysis of the responses to the Texas Food & Nutrition (TEXFAN) questionnaire was performed. TEXFAN is a 122-item survey designed to measure WIC participants' consumption behaviors and to assess the impact of new food packages in Texas' WIC program. A total of 3,336 adult, non-pregnant women self-identified as having Hispanic ethnic background of all races were considered for this study. Analysis of Variance and Kruskal-Wallis tests showed significant differences in nutritional practices among Hispanic women for age, educational attainment, employment status, race, area of residence, and acculturation. Logistic Regression analysis confirmed the hypothesis that lower levels of acculturation are associated with healthier food consumption patterns. The majority of respondents (70.7%, N=2,358) did not consume the recommended five servings of fruits and vegetables a day; therefore, do not have healthy patterns of food consumption. Consequently, the majority of respondents (70.0%, N= 1,709) has a weight statuses above normal and at a higher proportion than women in the State of Texas and the nation. Acculturation continues to interest social and behavioral researchers but variations on conceptualization, definition, operationalization, and measurement negatively impact generalizability and applicability of results. Interventions not considering acculturation are not likely to be successful. Research has to include community, ecological, cultural and contextual factors (e.g., machismo, accessibility to sidewalks, availability of fresh healthy foods, etc.). Development of effective intervention programs should be aimed to increase consumption of healthy food and an adherence to the recommendations of the "Healthy Plate" and the "Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2010" among Hispanics. Also, interventions should generate necessary skills among Hispanics for empowering them to sustain proper nutritional behaviors and overcome barriers.

Atehortua, Nelson

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

States fund an expanded range of activities under low-income home energy assistance block grant  

SciTech Connect

The low-income home energy assistance (LIHEA) block grant expanded states' flexibility and authority and permitted funds to be used for a broader range of activities not previously permitted. Unlike other block grants created under the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1981, LIHEA received increased appropriations over the level established for the prior program to assist eligible households in meeting the costs of home energy. While heating assistance continued to account for the bulk of expenditures in most states, the majority of the 13 states GAO visited used their new authority to provide weatherization, transfer energy assistance funds to other block grants, and carry over funds to the following year. In addition, states gave increased emphasis to energy crisis assistance. Few changes were made to program management procedures. Overall, state executive and legislative branch officials found the block grant less burdensome and more desirable than the prior program. However, about half the interest groups viewed the block grant as a less desirable method of funding energy assistance programs.

Not Available

1984-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

211

Making It Happen: Achieving Energy Efficiency in Multi-Family Buildings Housing Low-Income Tenants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Saving energy in multi-family buildings is a comparatively easy task to accomplish in theory: engineering science has shown us how to reduce heatloss and air infiltration, how to balance systems and improve heating plant efficiency, and how to capture warmth from the air, the earth and the sea. But getting this knowledge into multi-family buildings and making them energy efficient in fact is very difficult, especially if those buildings house low-income and elderly tenants, the people for whom saving energy is most urgent. Energy practitioners have found that multifamily building owners are not buying energy efficiency because it is not being marketed intelligently; affordable financing is very difficult to obtain, and energy education tailored to the needs of owners, occupants and maintenance crews is practically unknown. This paper discusses how four non-profit energy companies, located in major cities, overcame these obstacles. It explains how they market energy conservation improvements, how they finance them, and how they involve tenants in energy education; i.e., how they make energy efficiency happen in multifamily buildings.

Haun, C. R.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Integrating Photovoltaic Systems into Low-Income Housing Developments: A Case Study on the Creation of a New Residential Financing Model and Low-Income Resident Job Training Program, September 2011 (Brochure)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This case study covers the process of successfully integrating photovoltaic (PV) systems into a low-income housing development in northeast Denver, Colorado, focusing specifically on a new financing model and job training. The Northeast Denver Housing Center (NDHC), working in cooperation with Del Norte Neighborhood Development Corporation, Groundwork Denver, and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), was able to finance the PV system installations by blending private equity funding with utility rebates, federal tax credits, and public sector funding. A grant provided by the Governor's Energy Office allowed for the creation of the new financing model. In addition, the program incorporated an innovative low-income job training program and an energy conservation incentive program.

Dean, J.; Smith-Dreier, C.; Mekonnen, G.; Hawthorne, W.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Integrating Photovoltaic Systems into Low-Income Housing Developments: A Case Study on the Creation of a New Residential Financing Model and Low-Income Resident Job Training Program, September 2011 (Brochure)  

SciTech Connect

This case study covers the process of successfully integrating photovoltaic (PV) systems into a low-income housing development in northeast Denver, Colorado, focusing specifically on a new financing model and job training. The Northeast Denver Housing Center (NDHC), working in cooperation with Del Norte Neighborhood Development Corporation, Groundwork Denver, and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), was able to finance the PV system installations by blending private equity funding with utility rebates, federal tax credits, and public sector funding. A grant provided by the Governor's Energy Office allowed for the creation of the new financing model. In addition, the program incorporated an innovative low-income job training program and an energy conservation incentive program.

Dean, J.; Smith-Dreier, C.; Mekonnen, G.; Hawthorne, W.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Liquid-gas and other unusual thermal phase transitions in some large-N magnets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Much insight into the low temperature properties of quantum magnets has been gained by generalizing them to symmetry groups of order N, and then studying the large N limit. In this paper we consider an unusual aspect of their finite temperature behavior--their exhibiting a phase transition between a perfectly paramagetic state and a paramagnetic state with a finite correlation length at N = \\infty. We analyze this phenomenon in some detail in the large ``spin'' (classical) limit of the SU(N) ferromagnet which is also a lattice discretization of the CP^{N-1} model. We show that at N = \\infty the order of the transition is governed by lattice connectivity. At finite values of N, the transition goes away in one or less dimension but survives on many lattices in two dimensions and higher, for sufficiently large N. The latter conclusion contradicts a recent conjecture of Sokal and Starinets, yet is consistent with the known finite temperature behavior of the SU(2) case. We also report closely related first order paramagnet-ferromagnet transitions at large N and shed light on a violation of Elitzur's theorem at infinite N via the large q limit of the q-state Potts model, reformulated as an Ising gauge theory.

O. Tchernyshyov; S. L. Sondhi

2002-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

215

Unusually high (oxidizer/Pu) ratios in the macro-residues from plutonium-droplet combustion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Individual submillimeter-diameter droplets of /sup 239/Pu-0.6w/o Ga alloy were laser ignited and burned during free fall through air. As with a number of other active metals, plutonium droplets burn as coherent, intensely incandescent bodies that explode near the end of combustion. Compared to many other metals, however, the explosive event with plutonium droplets is relatively mild, and, in most experiments, an essentially intact spherule of oxidized material can be retrieved afterward from the combustion chamber. The oxidizer-to-plutonium atomic ratios (O/Pu) of the exploded spherules retrieved in the experiments seem unusually high - from 3- to 5-fold greater than the pre-explosion ratios. Some possible explanations of the high apparent O/Pu ratios are: (1) the particles may have become contaminated after the explosion but before the microweighing; (2) the analyses may have been performed with only partially dissolved specimens; (3) one or more elements heavier than the oxidizer elements (i.e. Ga) may have concentrated in the post explosion residue, giving a false indication of the O/Pu ratio; (4) the specimens may be supersaturated or otherwise metastable solutions of oxygen or other oxidizers quenched in at combustion temperatures; or (5) there might be hitherto unknown hyperstoichiometric oxygen and/or nitrogen compounds of plutonium which form at high temperatures. (JMT)

Nelson, L.S.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

An unusual carbon?carbon bond cleavage reaction during phosphinothricin biosynthesis  

SciTech Connect

Natural products containing phosphorus-carbon bonds have found widespread use in medicine and agriculture. One such compound, phosphinothricin tripeptide, contains the unusual amino acid phosphinothricin attached to two alanine residues. Synthetic phosphinothricin (glufosinate) is a component of two top-selling herbicides (Basta and Liberty), and is widely used with resistant transgenic crops including corn, cotton and canola. Recent genetic and biochemical studies showed that during phosphinothricin tripeptide biosynthesis 2-hydroxyethylphosphonate (HEP) is converted to hydroxymethylphosphonate (HMP). Here we report the in vitro reconstitution of this unprecedented C(sp{sup 3})-C(sp{sup 3}) bond cleavage reaction and X-ray crystal structures of the enzyme. The protein is a mononuclear non-haem iron(II)-dependent dioxygenase that converts HEP to HMP and formate. In contrast to most other members of this family, the oxidative consumption of HEP does not require additional cofactors or the input of exogenous electrons. The current study expands the scope of reactions catalysed by the 2-His-1-carboxylate mononuclear non-haem iron family of enzymes.

Cicchillo, Robert M.; Zhang, Houjin; Blodgett, Joshua A.V.; Whitteck, John T.; Li, Gongyong; Nair, Satish K.; van derDonk, Wilfred A.; Metcalf, William W.; (UIUC)

2010-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

217

An Analysis of Low Cost, Energy Efficient, Housing for Low-income Residents of How and Humid Climates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this research is to develop methods that will enable the reduction of owning and operating costs of low-income housing in the hot-humid climates of the U. S. The objectives include investigating various scenarios that will enable the implementation of cost-effective construction of low-income housing using volunteer labor. The research uses a case study approach where a base-line energy use is established using a comparative Princeton Score Keeping Method (PRISM) analysis and measurements from a case study house. A prototype house is then simulated with the DOE-2 building simulation program, and the energy savings calculated by comparing simulated energy and water conservation design measures (E&WCDMs) with the calibrated baseline energy simulation. The cost and maintenance of the house are analyzed with the real cost of construction of a case study house in Bryan/College Station, Texas.

Kootin-Sanwu, Victor

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Design and Evaluation of a Net Zero Energy Low-Income Residential Housing Development in Lafayette, Colorado  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Design and Evaluation of a Design and Evaluation of a Net Zero Energy Low-Income Residential Housing Development in Lafayette, Colorado Jesse Dean and Otto VanGeet National Renewable Energy Laboratory Scott Simkus Boulder County Housing Authority Mark Eastment Mountain Energy Partnership Technical Report NREL/TP-7A40-51450 March 2012 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Design and Evaluation of a Net Zero Energy Low-Income Residential Housing Development in Lafayette,

219

Patterns of residential energy demand by type of household: white, black, Hispanic, and low- and nonlow-income  

SciTech Connect

This report compares patterns of residential energy use by white, black, Hispanic, low-income, and nonlow-income households. The observed downward trend in residential energy demand over the period of this study can be attributed primarily to changes in space-heating energy demand. Demand for space-heating energy has experienced a greater decline than energy demand for other end uses for two reasons: (1) it is the largest end use of residential energy, causing public attention to focus on it and on strategies for conserving it; and (2) space-heating expenditures are large relative to other residential energy expenditures. The price elasticity of demand is thus greater, due to the income effect. The relative demand for space-heating energy, when controlled for the effect of climate, declined significantly over the 1978-1982 period for all fuels studied. Income classes do not differ significantly. In contrast, black households were found to use more energy for space heating than white households were found to use, although those observed differences are statistically significant only for houses heated with natural gas. As expected, the average expenditure for space-heating energy increased significantly for dwellings heated by natural gas and fuel oil. No statistically significant increases were found in electricity expenditures for space heating. Electric space heat is, in general, confined to milder regions of the country, where space heating is relatively less essential. As a consequence, we would expect the electricity demand for space heating to be more price-elastic than the demand for other fuels.

Klein, Y.; Anderson, J.; Kaganove, J.; Throgmorton, J.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

The Unusual Infrared Object HDF-N J123656.3+621322  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe an object in the Hubble Deep Field North with very unusual near-infrared properties. It is readily visible in Hubble Space Telescope NICMOS images at 1.6um and from the ground at 2.2um, but is undetected (with signal-to-noise ~ 8.3 (97.7% confidence) from 1.6 to 1.1um. The object is compact but may be slightly resolved in the NICMOS 1.6um image. In a low-resolution, near-infrared spectrogram, we find a possible emission line at 1.643um, but a reobservation at higher spectral resolution failed to confirm the line, leaving its reality in doubt. We consider various hypotheses for the nature of this object. Its colors are unlike those of known galactic stars, except perhaps the most extreme carbon stars or Mira variables with thick circumstellar dust shells. It does not appear to be possible to explain its spectral energy distribution as that of a normal galaxy at any redshift without additional opacity from either dust or intergalactic neutral hydrogen. The colors can be matched by those of a dusty galaxy at z >~ 2, by a maximally old elliptical galaxy at z >~ 3 (perhaps with some additional reddening), or by an object at z >~ 10 whose optical and 1.1um light have been suppressed by the intergalactic medium. Under the latter hypothesis, if the luminosity results from stars and not an AGN, the object would resemble a classical, unobscured protogalaxy, with a star formation rate >~ 100 M_sun/yr. Such UV-bright objects are evidently rare at 2 < z < 12.5, however, with a space density several hundred times lower than that of present-day L* galaxies.

Mark Dickinson; Christopher Hanley; Richard Elston; Peter R. Eisenhardt; S. A. Stanford; Kurt L. Adelberger; Alice Shapley; Charles C. Steidel; Casey Papovich; Alexander S. Szalay; Matthew A. Bershady; Christopher J. Conselice; Henry C. Ferguson; Andrew S. Fruchter

1999-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "income excluding unusual" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Biodiversity Monitoring Using NGS Approaches on Unusual Substrates (2013 DOE JGI Genomics of Energy and Environment 8th Annual User Meeting)  

SciTech Connect

Tom Gilbert of the Natural History Museum of Denmark on "Biodiversity monitoring using NGS approaches on unusual substrates" at the 8th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting in Walnut Creek, Calif.

Gilbert, Tom [National History Museum of Denmark

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Bringing good things to life : New Markets Tax Credits and the opening of low-income communities to investment, including a case study of Pittsfield, Massachusetts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The New Markets Tax Credit (NMTC) Program is designed to promote investment and economic growth in urban and rural low-income communities across the country. Created in 2000 as one of the last acts of the Clinton Administration, ...

McGrath, Daniel J., S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Projecting net incomes for Texas crop producers: an application of probabilistic forecasting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Agricultural policy changes directly affect the economic viability of Texas crop producers because government payments make up a significant portion of their net farm income (NFI). NFI projections benefit producers, agribusinesses and policy makers, but an economic model making these projections for Texas did not previously exist. The objective of this study was to develop a model to project annual NFI for producers of major crops in Texas. The Texas crop model was developed to achieve this objective, estimating state prices, yields and production costs as a function of their national counterparts. Five hundred iterations of national price and yield projections from the Food and Agricultural Policy Research Institute (FAPRI), along with FAPRI�s average production cost projections, were used as input to the Texas crop model. The stochastic FAPRI Baseline and residuals for Ordinary Least Squares (OLS) equations relating Texas variables to national variables were used to incorporate the risk left unexplained by OLS equations between Texas and U.S. variables. Deterministic and probabilistic NFI projections for Texas crops were compared under the January 2005 and January 2006 FAPRI Baseline projections. With production costs increasing considerably and prices rising moderately in the January 2006 Baseline, deterministic projections of 2006-2014 Texas NFI decreased by an average of 26 percent for corn, 3 percent for cotton, 15 percent for peanuts, and 12 percent for rice, and were negative for sorghum and wheat. Probability distributions of projected NFI fell for all program crops, especially sorghum and wheat. Higher hay price projections caused deterministic projections of NFI for hay to rise roughly 13 percent, and increased the probability distributions of projected hay NFI. Deterministic and probabilistic projections of total NFI decreased for each year, especially for 2006-2008 when fuel price projections were the highest. The Texas crop model can be used to simulate NFI for Texas crop producers under alternative FAPRI baselines. The model shows the impact of baseline changes on probability distributions of NFI for each crop and for Texas as a whole. It can also be useful as a policy analysis tool to compare impacts of alternative farm and macroeconomic policies on NFI.

Eggerman, Christopher Ryan

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Microsoft Word - q109.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 First Quarter 2009 Key Findings Net Income $-7.0 billion Revenues $191.5 billion Highlights Major energy companies reported a 126-percent decrease in net income relative to first quarter of 2008. Further, this represents a 131-percent decrease relative to the first- quarter average for 2004-2008. Return on sales (net income ÷ revenue) decreased from 8.0 percent in the first quarter of 2008 to -3.7 percent in the first quarter of 2009 due to the 126 percent decrease in net income. The effects of higher worldwide refining margins and worldwide oil and natural gas production were overwhelmed by lower oil and natural gas prices and lower worldwide refinery throughput. Overview Nineteen major energy companies [1] reported an overall net loss (excluding unusual items) of $7.0 billion on

225

Financial News for Major Energy Companies, Fourth Quarter 2005  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Fourth Quarter 2005 Fourth Quarter 2005 Overview The "Financial News for Major Energy Companies" is issued quarterly to report recent trends in the financial performance of the major energy companies. These include the respondents to Form EIA-28 (Financial Reporting System (FRS)), with the exception of the FRS companies that do not issue quarterly earnings releases or fail to provide separate information for the company's U.S. operations. Twenty-one major energy companies 1 reported overall net income (excluding unusual items) of $28.7 billion on revenues of $298.4 billion (i.e., 9.6 cents of net income per dollar of revenue) during the fourth quarter of 2005 (Q405). The level of net income for Q405 was 43 percent higher than in the fourth quarter of 2004 (Q404) (Table 1). Net income for Q405

226

An unusual mono-substituted Keggin anion-chain based 3D framework with 24-membered macrocycles as linker units  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new compound, [Cu{sup I}(H{sub 2}O)(Hbpp){sub 2}] Subset-Of {l_brace}[Cu{sup I}(bpp)]{sub 2}[PW{sub 11}Cu{sup II}O{sub 39}]{r_brace} (1) (bpp=1,3-bis(4-pyridyl)propane), has been hydrothermally synthesized and structurally characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction. In compound 1, the unusual -A-B-A-B- array mono-substituted Keggin anion-chains and 24-membered (Cubpp){sub 2} cation-macrocycles are linked together to form a (2, 4) connected 3D framework with channels of ca. 9.784 Multiplication-Sign 7.771 A{sup 2} along two directions, in which the [Cu(H{sub 2}O)(Hbpp){sub 2}] coordination fragments as guest components are trapped. The photocatalytic experiments of compound 1 were performed, which show a good catalytic activity of compound 1 for photodegradation of RhB. Furthermore, the IR, TGA and electrochemical properties of compound 1 were investigated. - Graphical abstract: An unusual example of mono-substituted Keggin anion-chain based hybrid compound that possesses a 3D structure has been synthesized, which offers a feasible route for synthesis of such compounds. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The first example of -A-B-A-B- array mono-substituted Keggin chain is observed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An unusual three dimensional structure based mono-substituted Keggin anion-chains. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The photocatalysis and electrochemical properties of the title compound were studied.

Pang Haijun [Key Laboratory of Green Chemical Engineering and Technology College of Heilongjiang Province, College of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Harbin University of Science and Technology, Harbin 150040 (China); Ma Huiyuan, E-mail: mahy017@163.com [Key Laboratory of Green Chemical Engineering and Technology College of Heilongjiang Province, College of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Harbin University of Science and Technology, Harbin 150040 (China); Yu Yan; Yang Ming; Xun Ye [Key Laboratory of Green Chemical Engineering and Technology College of Heilongjiang Province, College of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Harbin University of Science and Technology, Harbin 150040 (China); Liu Bo, E-mail: liubo200400@vip.sina.com [Key Laboratory of Green Chemical Engineering and Technology College of Heilongjiang Province, College of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Harbin University of Science and Technology, Harbin 150040 (China)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

227

Very preliminary draft. Please do not quote without permission of authors. Repo Market Microstructure in Unusual Monetary Policy Conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. The financial turmoil that began in mid?2007 produced severe stress in interbank markets and prompted significant changes in central bank’s funding operations. This paper examines how official interventions affected the efficiency and reliability of the secondary repo market as a mechanism for the distribution of interbank funding during this unusual period. The limit orderbook from the BrokerTec electronic repo trading platform is reconstructed to provide an accurate measure of available liquidity and funding opportunities at high frequency throughout the crisis. This provides insights about the effectiveness of ‘liquidity provider of last resort ’ efforts by the ECB in reponse to the crisis.

Peter G. Dunne; Michael Fleming; Andrey Zholos

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

" Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Living Space Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" 2 Living Space Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 or More" "Living Space Characteristics" "Total",111.1,26.7,28.8,20.6,13.1,22,16.6,38.6 "Floorspace (Square Feet)" "Total Floorspace1" "Fewer than 500",3.2,1.9,0.9,"Q","Q","Q",1.3,2.3 "500 to 999",23.8,10.5,7.3,3.3,1.4,1.2,6.6,12.9 "1,000 to 1,499",20.8,5.8,7,3.8,2.2,2,3.9,8.9

229

" Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Lighting Usage Indicators by Household Income, 2005" 3 Lighting Usage Indicators by Household Income, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 or More" "Lighting Usage Indicators" "Total U.S. Housing Units",111.1,26.7,28.8,20.6,13.1,22,16.6,38.6 "Indoor Lights Turned On During Summer" "Number of Lights Turned On" "Between 1 and 4 Hours per Day",91.8,20.8,23.6,17,11.3,19.1,13,30.7 "1.",28.6,9.4,9.1,4.5,2.4,3.2,5.7,12.6 "2.",29.5,6.8,8,5.8,3.7,5.2,4.2,10.2

230

" Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Household Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" 3 Household Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 or More" "Household Characteristics" "Total",111.1,26.7,28.8,20.6,13.1,22,16.6,38.6 "Household Size" "1 Person",30,13.5,8.5,4.3,2,1.8,5.9,13.1 "2 Persons",34.8,6,8.8,7.3,4.4,8.4,3.5,8.4 "3 Persons",18.4,3.1,4.7,3.4,2.5,4.6,2,5.8 "4 Persons",15.9,2.2,3.5,3.3,2.7,4.3,2.2,5.1

231

" Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Water Heating Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" 8 Water Heating Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 or More" "Water Heating Characteristics" "Total",111.1,26.7,28.8,20.6,13.1,22,16.6,38.6 "Number of Water Heaters" "1.",106.3,25.8,28,19.6,12.7,20.2,16,37.3 "2 or More",3.7,0.3,0.5,0.9,0.4,1.7,"Q",0.5 "Do Not Use Hot Water",1.1,0.6,0.3,"Q","N","Q",0.5,0.8

232

" Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Housing Unit Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" Housing Unit Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 or More" "Housing Unit Characteristics" "Total",111.1,26.7,28.8,20.6,13.1,22,16.6,38.6 "Census Region and Division" "Northeast",20.6,4.9,5.4,3.5,2.4,4.3,3.2,8.1 "New England",5.5,1.3,1.3,1,0.6,1.2,0.7,2.3 "Middle Atlantic",15.1,3.7,4.1,2.5,1.8,3.1,2.5,5.8 "Midwest",25.6,6.5,6.6,4.7,3,4.8,3.5,9.4

233

" Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Space Heating Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" 4 Space Heating Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 or More" "Space Heating Characteristics" "Total",111.1,26.7,28.8,20.6,13.1,22,16.6,38.6 "Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment",1.2,0.5,0.3,0.2,"Q",0.2,0.3,0.6 "Have Main Space Heating Equipment",109.8,26.2,28.5,20.4,13,21.8,16.3,37.9 "Use Main Space Heating Equipment",109.1,25.9,28.1,20.3,12.9,21.8,16,37.3

234

" Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

HC7.9 Home Appliances Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" HC7.9 Home Appliances Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 or More" "Home Appliances Characteristics" "Total U.S.",111.1,26.7,28.8,20.6,13.1,22,16.6,38.6 "Cooking Appliances" "Conventional Ovens" "Use an Oven",109.6,26.1,28.5,20.2,12.9,21.8,16.3,37.8 "1.",103.3,25.1,27.1,19.2,12.3,19.6,15.8,36.3 "2 or More",6.2,0.9,1.4,1,0.6,2.2,0.5,1.5

235

" Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Home Electronics Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" 1 Home Electronics Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 or More" "Home Electronics Characteristics" "Total",111.1,26.7,28.8,20.6,13.1,22,16.6,38.6 "Personal Computers" "Do Not Use a Personal Computer ",35.5,17.1,10.8,4.2,1.8,1.6,10.3,20.6 "Use a Personal Computer",75.6,9.6,18,16.4,11.3,20.3,6.4,17.9 "Number of Desktop PCs" "1.",50.3,8.3,14.2,11.4,7.2,9.2,5.3,14.2

236

Short and Long-Term Perspectives: The Impact on Low-Income Consumers of Forecasted Energy Price Increases in 2008 and A Cap & Trade Carbon Policy in 2030  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy's Energy Information Administration (EIA) recently released its short-term forecast for residential energy prices for the winter of 2007-2008. The forecast indicates increases in costs for low-income consumers in the year ahead, particularly for those using fuel oil to heat their homes. In the following analysis, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory has integrated the EIA price projections with the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) for 2001 in order to project the impact of these price increases on the nation's low-income households by primary heating fuel type, nationally and by Census Region. The report provides an update of bill estimates provided in a previous study, "The Impact Of Forecasted Energy Price Increases On Low-Income Consumers" (Eisenberg, 2005). The statistics are intended for use by policymakers in the Department of Energy's Weatherization Assistance Program and elsewhere who are trying to gauge the nature and severity of the problems that will be faced by eligible low-income households during the 2008 fiscal year. In addition to providing expenditure forecasts for the year immediately ahead, this analysis uses a similar methodology to give policy makers some insight into one of the major policy debates that will impact low-income energy expenditures well into the middle decades of this century and beyond. There is now considerable discussion of employing a cap-and-trade mechanism to first limit and then reduce U.S. emissions of carbon into the atmosphere in order to combat the long-range threat of human-induced climate change. The Energy Information Administration has provided an analysis of projected energy prices in the years 2020 and 2030 for one such cap-and-trade carbon reduction proposal that, when integrated with the RECS 2001 database, provides estimates of how low-income households will be impacted over the long term by such a carbon reduction policy.

Eisenberg, Joel Fred [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Executive Order 12898: Federal Actions to Address Environmental Justice in Minority Populations and Low-Income Populations (1994)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Documents Documents Federal Register Vol. 59, No. 32 Wednesday, February 16, 1994 Title 3- The President Executive Order 12898 of February 11, 1994 Federal Actions To Address Environmental Justice in Minority Populations and Low-Income Populations By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the laws of the United States of America, it is hereby ordered as follows: Section 1-1.Implementation. 1-101. Agency Responsibilities. To the greatest extent practicable and per- mitted by law, and consistent with the principles set forth in the report on the National Performance Review, each Federal agency shall make achiev- ing environmental justice part of its mission by identifying and addressing, as appropriate, disproportionately high and adverse human health or environ-

238

Lifeline electric rates and alternative approaches to the problems of low-income ratepayers: ten case studies of rejected programs  

SciTech Connect

This volume, Volume 3, contains ten case studies of non-implemented programs. It is noted that in Volume 2, the implemented lifeline programs, evolved as policy closely after the 1973 oil embargo; in contrast, the rejected programs were initiated about 4 years later and considered in a more-complex policy environment - after which time alternate methods of assisting low-income people had been developed. Specifically presented here are program summary, issue development, governmental process, and impact for the following: (a) Delaware Senate Bill 202; (b) Illinois House Bill 83; (c) Maine Legislative Document No. 1043; (d) Minnesota House File 1243; (e) New York Assembly Bill 12214; (f) New York Senate Bill 7013-A; (g) Rhode Island Resolution 79-H 5770-A; (h) South Dakota Senate Joint Resolution 9; (i) West Virginia House Bill 943; and (j) Wisconsin Assembly Bill 1250. 4 figures, 24 tables.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Measured Energy Savings from Retrofits Installed in Low-Income Housing in a Hot and Humid Climate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) is metering energy use in a Habitat for Humanity housing development. The objective is to understand the way in which energy is used in low income housing and how it can be effectively reduced. The ten homes come from a conventional housing project built by in 1993 Habitat for Humanity in Homestead, Florida. The instrumentation was installed in the homes in July of 1994 with over three years of 15-minute data collected on all sites. Data were obtained on seven electrical end-uses (air conditioning, heating, hot water, dryer, range, refrigerator, washer/freezer) as well as total. Weather conditions were also monitored as well as interior comfort conditions (temperature and humidity) and hot water consumption and window ventilation status. Baseline field data from a year of monitoring from the ten homes allowed unique insight into how energy is used in low income housing and suggested where consumption might be reduced. In April of 1997, a series of detailed retrofits were applied to eight of the ten Habitat homes. These included solar water heaters installed in seven homes. In eight homes we retrofit light features to compact fluorescent types, repaired and sealed duct air distribution systems, cleaned refrigerator coils and installed low-flow showerheads. Since each of he associated energy end-uses (including hot water consumption) is metered, we are able to assess the relative performance of each of the retrofits. We also measured of air conditioner performance and house tightness. These audits revealed numerous problems, but low-evaporator coil air flow was discovered in all homes. The paper describes the retrofit installation, audit data collected and the impact on measured energy consumption. Preliminary economics are explored.

Parker, D. S.; Sherwin, J. R.; Floyd, D. B.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

The Impact of DOE Building Technology Energy Efficiency Programs on U.S. Employment, Income, and Investment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To more fully evaluate its programs to increase the energy efficiency of the U.S. residential and commercial building stock, the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) assesses the macroeconomic impacts of those programs, specifically on national employment, wage income, and (most recently) investment. The analysis is conducted using the Impact of Sector Energy Technologies (ImSET) model, a special-purpose 188-sector input-output model of the U.S. economy designed specifically to evaluate the impacts of energy efficiency investments and saving. For the analysis described in the paper, ImSET was amended to provide estimates of sector-by-sector capital requirements and investment. In the scenario of the Fiscal Year (FY) 2005 Buildings Technology (BT) program, the technologies and building practices being developed and promoted by the BT program have the prospect of saving about 2.9×1015 Btu in buildings by the year 2030, about 27% of the expected growth in buildings energy consumption by the year 2030. The analysis reported in the paper finds that, by the year 2030, these savings have the potential to increase employment by up to 446,000 jobs, increase wage income by $7.8 billion, reduce needs for capital stock in the energy sector and closely related supporting industries by about $207 billion (and the corresponding annual level of investment by $13 billion), and create net capital savings that are available to grow the nation’s future economy.

Scott, Michael J.; Roop, Joseph M.; Schultz, Robert W.; Anderson, Dave M.; Cort, Katherine A.

2008-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "income excluding unusual" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

The Birth of a Relativistic Outflow in the Unusual {\\gamma}-ray Transient Swift J164449.3+573451  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Active galactic nuclei (AGN), powered by long-term accretion onto central supermassive black holes, produce relativistic jets with lifetimes of greater than one million yr that preclude observations at birth. Transient accretion onto a supermassive black hole, for example through the tidal disruption of a stray star, may therefore offer a unique opportunity to observe and study the birth of a relativistic jet. On 2011 March 25, the Swift {\\gamma}-ray satellite discovered an unusual transient source (Swift J164449.3+573451) potentially representing such an event. Here we present the discovery of a luminous radio transient associated with Swift J164449.3+573451, and an extensive set of observations spanning centimeter to millimeter wavelengths and covering the first month of evolution. These observations lead to a positional coincidence with the nucleus of an inactive galaxy, and provide direct evidence for a newly-formed relativistic outflow, launched by transient accretion onto a million solar mass black hole...

Zauderer, B A; Soderberg, A M; Loeb, A; Narayan, R; Frail, D A; Petitpas, G R; Brunthaler, A; Chornock, R; Carpenter, J M; Pooley, G G; Mooley, K; Kulkarni, S R; Margutti, R; Fox, D B; Nakar, E; Patel, N A; Volgenau, N H; Culverhouse, T L; Bietenholz, M F; Rupen, M P; Max-Moerbeck, W; Readhead, A C S; Richards, J; Shepherd, M; Storm, S; Hull, C L H

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Molecular Gas, AGN Feedback and the Unusual Case of K. A. Alatalo (UC, Berkeley), T. A. Davis (Oxford University, United King-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Molecular Gas, AGN Feedback and the Unusual Case of NGC1266 K. A. Alatalo (UC, Berkeley), T. A effort. It remarkably hosts about 109 M of molecular gas and has a spectrum that exhibits extended wings of an AGN and molecular gas outflowing faster than vesc, this galaxy is an excellent candidate for AGN

Bureau, Martin

243

Environ Resource Econ DOI 10.1007/s10640-008-9226-8 Are There Income Effects on Global Willingness to Pay for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract This paper is concerned with the empirical relationship between biodiversity conservation values and income. We use random effects panel models to examine the effects of income, and then GDP per capita, on willingness to pay for habitat and biodiversity conservation. In a meta-analysis, 145 Willingness To Pay estimates for biodiversity conservation where existence value plays a major role were collected from 46 contingent valuation studies across six continents. Other effects included in the meta-analysis were the study year; habitat type; continent; scope as presented to respondents; whether WTP bids were for preventing a deterioration or gaining an improvement in conservation, whether a specific species or specific habitat was protected; whether the questionnaire used a dichotomous choice or an open-ended format; distribution format; and the choice of payment vehicle. GDP per capita seemed to perform as well as an explanatory variable as respondent’s mean stated income, indicating that it is wealth in society as a whole which determines variations in WTP. Even if large variation, our main conclusion is, that the demand for biodiversity conservation rises with a nation’s wealth, but the income elasticity of willingness to pay is less than one.

Biodiversity Conservation; Jette Bredahl; Jacobsen Nick Hanley; J. B. Jacobsen (b

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

This Policy Brief is an excerpt from the report: "Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households." For the full report and other resources visit: http://middleincome.lbl.gov  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This Policy Brief is an excerpt from the report: "Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income://middleincome.lbl.gov March 6, 2012 Scaling Energy Efficiency in the Heart of the Residential Market: Increasing Middle America's Access to Capital for Energy Improvements Middle income American households ­ broadly defined

245

Financial News for Major Energy Companies  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Third Quarter 2005 Third Quarter 2005 The "Financial News for Major Energy Companies" is issued quarterly to report recent trends in the financial performance of the major energy companies. These include the respondents to Form EIA-28 (Financial Reporting System (FRS)), with the exception of the FRS companies that do not issue quarterly earnings releases or fail to provide separate information for the company's U.S. operations. Twenty-one 1 major energy companies reported overall net income (excluding unusual items) of $26.0 billion on revenues of $295.1 billion during the third quarter of 2005 (Q305). The level of net income for Q305 was 69 percent higher than in the third quarter of 2004 (Q304) (Table 1). Net income for Q305 increased primarily as a result of higher crude oil and

246

Financial News for Major Energy Companies  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

First Quarter 2006 First Quarter 2006 The "Financial News for Major Energy Companies" is issued quarterly to report recent trends in the financial performance of the major energy companies. These include the respondents to Form EIA-28 (Financial Reporting System (FRS)), with the exception of the FRS companies that do not issue quarterly earnings releases or fail to provide separate information for the company's U.S. operations. Twenty-one major energy companies 1 reported overall net income (excluding unusual items) of $24.1 billion on revenues of $276.6 billion during the first quarter of 2006 (Q106). The level of net income for Q106 was 23 percent higher than in the first quarter of 2005 (Q105) (Table 1). Net income for Q106 increased primarily as a result of higher crude oil and

247

Financial News for Major Energy Companies, Second Quarter 2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Second Quarter 2006 Overview The "Financial News for Major Energy Companies" is issued quarterly to report recent trends in the financial performance of the major energy companies. These include the respondents to Form EIA-28 (Financial Reporting System (FRS)), with the exception of the FRS companies that do not issue quarterly earnings releases or do not provide separate information for the company's U.S. operations. Twenty-one major energy companies 1 reported overall net income (excluding unusual items) of $30.1 billion on revenues of $297.1 billion during the second quarter of 2006 (Q206). The level of net income for Q206 was 36 percent higher than in the second quarter of 2005 (Q205) (Table 1). Net income for Q206 increased primarily as a result of higher crude oil

248

Financial News for Major Energy Companies, October - December 2001  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Financial News for Major Energy Companies Financial News for Major Energy Companies Twenty-two major energy companies reported overall net income (excluding unusual items) of $4.6 billion during the fourth quarter of 2001 (Q401). The level of net income represented a 65-percent decline relative to the fourth quarter of 2000 (Q400) (Table 1). The majors' foreign upstream oil and natural gas production operations made the largest contribution to overall net income in Q401 at $2.0 billion (Table 1), with domestic upstream oil and natural gas production operations second at $1.8 billion, and worldwide downstream natural gas (i.e., those natural gas operations that occur between the wellhead and the consumer) and power operations third at $1.5 billion. The mergers of Chevron and Texaco, El Paso and

249

Financial News for Major Energy Companies  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Second Quarter 2005 Second Quarter 2005 The "Financial News for Major Energy Companies" is issued quarterly to report recent trends in the financial performance of the major energy companies. These include the respondents to Form EIA-28 (Financial Reporting System (FRS)), with the exception of the FRS companies that do not issue quarterly earnings releases or fail to provide separate information for the company's U.S. operations. Twenty-five major energy companies reported overall net income (excluding unusual items) of $23.0 billion on revenues of $276.1 billion during the second quarter of 2005 (Q205). The level of net income for Q205 was 38 percent higher than in the second quarter of 2004 (Q204) (Table 1). Net income for Q205 increased primarily as a result of higher crude oil

250

Financial News for Major Energy Companies, October - December 2004  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The "Financial News for Major Energy Companies" is issued quarterly to report recent trends in The "Financial News for Major Energy Companies" is issued quarterly to report recent trends in the financial performance of the major energy companies. These include the respondents to Form EIA-28 (Financial Reporting System (FRS)), with the exception of the FRS companies that do not issue quarterly earnings releases or fail to provide separate information for the company's U.S. operations. Twenty-three major energy companies reported overall net income (excluding unusual items) of $20.2 billion on revenues of $241.9 billion during the fourth quarter of 2004 (Q404). The level of net income for Q404 was 101 percent higher than in the fourth quarter of 2003 (Q403) (Table 1). Similarly, net income for 2004 was 53 percent higher than for 2003 on

251

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Overview The "Financial News for Major Energy Companies" is issued quarterly to report recent trends in the financial performance of the major energy companies. These include the respondents to Form EIA-28 (Financial Reporting System (FRS)), with the exception of the FRS companies that do not issue quarterly earnings releases or do not provide separate information for the company's U.S. operations. Nineteen major energy companies 1 reported overall net income (excluding unusual items) of $23.0 billion on revenues of $258.9 billion during the fourth quarter of 2006 (Q406). The level of net income for Q406 was 18 percent lower than in the fourth quarter of 2005 (Q405) (Table 1). Net income for Q406 decreased primarily as a result of much lower natural gas prices, reduced foreign production of natural gas, and lower U.S. refining margins.

252

The Four Dimensions of Rail Transit Performance: How Administration, Finance, Demographics, and Politics Affect Outcomes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

motor vehicle excise taxes and gross receipts tax, but excludes income, sales, and property or gasoline taxes.

Compin, Nicholas Shawn

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Review of water, lighting, and cooling energy efficiency measures for low-income homes located in warm climates  

SciTech Connect

In support of the U.S. Department of Energy`s Weatherization Assistance Program, Oak Ridge National Laboratory has performed a literature review of weatherization measures applicable for homes located in warm climate regions. Sources for this information included: (1) documented engineering estimates, (2) vendor information, (3) reported performance from research and field tests, and (4) direct discussions with researchers, vendors, and field reporters. Estimated savings are extrapolated from reported energy savings and applied to the end-use energy consumption for low-income homes reported by the Energy Information Administration. Additionally, installation costs, savings-to-investment ratios, and parameters indicating performance sensitivity to issues such as occupancy, construction, client education, and maintenance requirements are presented. The report is comprised of two sections: (1) an overview of measure performance, and (2) an appendix. The overview of measures is in a tabular format, which allows for quick reference. More detailed discussions and references for each measure are presented in the Appendix and it is highly recommended that these be reviewed prior to measure selection.

Martin, M.A.; Gettings, M.B.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Resonant X-Ray Diffraction Study of an Unusually Large Phase Coexistance in Smectic Liquid-Crystal Films  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The recent discovery of the new smectic-C{sub d6}* (SmC{sub d6}*) phase [S. Wang et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 104 027801 (2010)] also revealed the existence of a noisy region in the temperature window between the SmC{sub d6}* phase and the smectic-C{sub d4}* (SmC{sub d4}*) phase. Characterized by multiple resonant peaks spanning a wide region in Q{sub Z}, the corresponding structure of this temperature window has been a mystery. In this Letter, through a careful resonant x-ray diffraction study and simulations of the diffraction spectra, we show that this region is in fact an unusually large coexistence region of the SmC{sub d6}* phase and the SmC{sub d4}* phase. The structure of the noisy region is found to be a heterogeneous mixture of local SmC{sub d6}* and SmC{sub d4}* orders on the sub-{micro}m scale.

Pan L.; Pindak R.; Barois, P.; Liu, Z.Q.; McCoy, B.K. & Hyang, C.C.

2012-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

255

" Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Air Conditioning Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" 6 Air Conditioning Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 or More" "Air Conditioning Characteristics" "Total",111.1,26.7,28.8,20.6,13.1,22,16.6,38.6 "Do Not Have Cooling Equipment",17.8,5.3,4.7,2.8,1.9,3.1,3.6,7.5 "Have Cooling Equipment",93.3,21.5,24.1,17.8,11.2,18.8,13,31.1 "Use Cooling Equipment",91.4,21,23.5,17.4,11,18.6,12.6,30.3 "Have Equipment But Do Not Use it",1.9,0.5,0.6,0.4,"Q","Q",0.5,0.8

256

Design and Evaluation of a Net Zero Energy Low-Income Residential Housing Development in Lafayette, Colorado  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report outlines the lessons learned and sub-metered energy performance of an ultra low energy single family ranch home and duplex unit, called the Paradigm Pilot Project and presents the final design recommendations for a 153-unit net zero energy residential development called the Josephine Commons Project. Affordable housing development authorities throughout the United States continually struggle to find the most cost-effective pathway to provide quality, durable, and sustainable housing. The challenge for these authorities is to achieve the mission of delivering affordable housing at the lowest cost per square foot in environments that may be rural, urban, suburban, or within a designated redevelopment district. With the challenges the U.S. faces regarding energy, the environmental impacts of consumer use of fossil fuels and the increased focus on reducing greenhouse gas emissions, housing authorities are pursuing the goal of constructing affordable, energy efficient and sustainable housing at the lowest life-cycle cost of ownership. This report outlines the lessons learned and sub-metered energy performance of an ultra-low-energy single family ranch home and duplex unit, called the Paradigm Pilot Project and presents the final design recommendations for a 153-unit net zero energy residential development called the Josephine Commons Project. In addition to describing the results of the performance monitoring from the pilot project, this paper describes the recommended design process of (1) setting performance goals for energy efficiency and renewable energy on a life-cycle cost basis, (2) using an integrated, whole building design approach, and (3) incorporating systems-built housing, a green jobs training program, and renewable energy technologies into a replicable high performance, low-income housing project development model.

Dean, J.; VanGeet, O.; Simkus, S.; Eastment, M.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

WELDING UNUSUAL METALS  

SciTech Connect

Methods of welding including electron beam welding, diffusion bonding, motor-arc welding, and combination methods are discussed. The successful welding and soldering of uranium in different shapes are discussed. (C.J.G.)

Grobecker, D.W.

1959-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Sustainable Design Standards in India: The Excluded Issues  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Due to the recent emphasis on “Green Building” in different countries around the world, LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) certification has emerged as one of the major recognized standards for measuring building sustainability. In 2005, the Indian Green Building Council (IGBC) adopted the original US rating system without substantive modifications in response to the significant contextual differences between the United States and India. In 2007, the IGBC published the LEED INDIA NC Version 1.0 with changes to better respond to the Indian context. This version did not address climatic variations, which demand focused attention on particular sections, such as natural ventilation and daylighting. This paper highlights the essential significance of these critical issues in latest LEED Indian Guidelines in the current LEED standards with respect to comparison between performance of green buildings with and without the LEED certification.

Gupta, K.; Haider, J.

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Syntheses, crystal structures and properties of two unusual pillared-layer 3d-4f Ln-Cu heterometallic coordination polymers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two unusual pillared-layer 3d-4f Ln-Cu heterometallic coordination polymers, {l_brace}[Ln{sub 2}Cu{sub 5}Br{sub 4}(IN){sub 7}(H{sub 2}O){sub 6}].H{sub 2}O{r_brace}{sub n} (Ln=Eu (1) and Gd (2), HIN=isonicotinic acid), have been synthesized under hydrothermal conditions, and characterized by elemental analysis, IR, thermal analysis and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The structure determination reveals that 1 and 2 are isostructural and feature a novel three-dimensional pillared-layer hetrometallic structure built upon the linkages of one-dimensional (1D) linear Ln-carboxylate chains, zero-dimensional (0D) Ln-carboxylate Ln{sub 2}(IN){sub 8} dimers, rare 1D zigzag [Cu{sub 5}Br{sub 4}]{sub n} inorganic chains and IN{sup -} pillars. In both 3D structures, there are Ln-carboxylate layers resulted from the connections of 1D Ln-carboxylate chains and 0D Ln{sub 2}(IN){sub 8} dimers through O-H...O hydrogen bondings. The luminescent properties of 1 have been investigated. The magnetic properties of 1 and 2 have also been studied. - Graphical abstract: Two unusual pillared-layer Eu (Gd)-Cu heterometallic coordination polymers have been hydrothermally synthesized. The luminescent properties of Eu-Cu compound and magnetic properties of both compounds are investigated. Highlights: > Two unusual 3D pillared-layer Eu (Gd)-Cu heterometallic coordination polymers have been synthesized. > 1D and 0D Ln-carboxylate motifs construct layers by O-H...O hydrogen bondings. > In both the structures, there are rare 1D zigzag Cu/Br inorganic chains. > Luminescent properties of Eu-Cu compound and magnetic properties of both the compounds are investigated.

Fan Leqing, E-mail: lqfan@hqu.edu.cn [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Key Laboratory for Functional Materials of Fujian Higher Education, Huaqiao University, Xiamen, Fujian 361021 (China); Wu Jihuai, E-mail: jhwu@hqu.edu.cn [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Key Laboratory for Functional Materials of Fujian Higher Education, Huaqiao University, Xiamen, Fujian 361021 (China); Huang Yunfang [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Key Laboratory for Functional Materials of Fujian Higher Education, Huaqiao University, Xiamen, Fujian 361021 (China)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

260

Impact of Wind Development on County-Level Income and Employment: A Review of Methods and an Empirical Analysis (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To gain an understanding of the long-term county-level impacts from a large sample of wind power projects and to understand the potential significance of methodological criticisms, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and NREL recently joined efforts to complete a first-of-its-kind study that quantifies the annual impact on county-level personal income resulting from wind power installations in nearly 130 counties across 12 states. The results of this study, as well as a comparison with the prior county-level estimates generated from input-output models, are summarized here.

Not Available

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "income excluding unusual" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Unusual Decommissioning of Contaminated Facilities at the Savannah River Site - The Demolition of Cooling Towers 285-H and 285-F  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Savannah River Site is an 800-square kilometer (310-square mile) U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) industrial facility located in Aiken, Allendale, and Barnwell Counties in South Carolina. The site is dedicated to environmental cleanup, developing and deploying technologies to support the cleanup mission, processing and storing nuclear materials, and supporting national security missions. The current focus in environmental management is on the cleanup of legacy materials, facilities and wastes left from the Cold War. In 2002 the DOE initiated actions to expedite cleanup focusing on significant risk reduction coupled with reducing costs. SRS published the Savannah River Site Environmental Management Integrated Deactivation and Decommissioning Plan in 2003 which addressed the final disposition and physical end state of all 1,013 Environmental Management facilities on site by the year 2025. Included in this list of facilities are reactors, fabrication facilities, process facilities and the support facilities that were required during the past 50 years. By the end of FY06, over 200 facilities had been decommissioned. This paper describes the demolition of two facilities, cooling towers 285-H and 285-F that were associated with the operation of the process canyons. Because of the circumstances surrounding these decommissions, unique and unusual techniques were safely employed to demolish and remove the cooling towers. Both 285-H and 285-F were safely felled by pulling the columns remotely to weaken the internal portion of the structure so it would collapse inwards into the basin. Cooling tower 285-H fell in less than 1 second after approximately two-thirds of the columns had been broken. See Figure 3 for a photo of 285-H after its collapse. 285-F, which was larger than 285-H, fell in three sections, two cells at a time. Once the towers were felled conventional demolition equipment was used to segregate and remove the debris. All protective measures used to protect surrounding equipment and structures were successful and the basins were cleaned out and returned to service in less than two weeks. The demolition of both cooling towers 285- H and 285-F was completed safely and timely using unconventional means to fell the towers due to structural degradation, height, limited access, radiological and asbestos hazards, and a requirement to protect equipment on all sides of the facility as well as preservation of the basins. During felling operations personnel were required to stay outside the fall zone equivalent to a distance of 150% of the height of the towers. Remote operations outside the fall zone required a tracked vehicle to pull cables attached to the columns in a predetermined sequence so as to fell the tower straight down into the basin. Once the towers fell traditional demolition equipment segregated and removed the waste. Wooden cooling towers of this vintage present a difficult challenge to traditional demolition techniques. Because of the height and potential instability of these types of facilities, considerable effort is placed on reducing the potential energy to a point where heavy equipment can reach safely without endangering the operators. The column-pulling technique chosen for both 285-H and 285-F cooling towers proved to be a safe and efficient method for demolition of these types of facilities.

Austin, William E.; Baldwin, Guy R. [Washington Savannah River Company, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

262

Energy efficient low-income housing demonstration with Houston Habitat for Humanity. Final status report, October 1, 1995--September 30, 1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using DOE grant funds, the Alliance to Save Energy developed and managed an award-winning low-income housing demonstration in cooperation with Houston Habitat for Humanity at the 1996 and 1997 annual NAHB Builders Show in Houston, Texas. Using a unique group of over 30 national, state and local partners, the energy design of Houston Habitat houses was permanently upgraded to the Energy Star Homes Program threshold. Meeting Energy Star Homes Program criteria, the partner design team increased the level of efficiency approximately 30% over the 1992 Model Energy Code. This innovative design using commercially available materials added approximately $1,400 in cost-effective energy upgrades with an estimated payback of less than 8 years. The 30 public-private partners successfully demonstrated energy and resource efficient housing techniques to the 65,000 NAHB home show attendees and the over 3,000 Habitat affiliates. This project resulted in the Houston Habitat affiliate becoming the nation`s first low-income Energy Star Homes Program home builder. By the year 2000, Houston Habitat anticipates building over 500 homes to this new level of efficiency as well as set an example for other Habitat affiliates nationwide to follow. The 1997 demonstration house utilized an all-women volunteer builders team to construct a 3 bedroom home in Houston Habitat`s Woodglen Subdivision. Energy consumption was remotely metered by Texas A and M.

NONE

1997-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

263

Microsoft Word - q102.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Financial News for Major Energy Companies, First Quarter 2002 Financial News for Major Energy Companies, First Quarter 2002 Twenty-two major energy companies 1 reported overall net income (excluding unusual items) of $4.4 billion on revenues of $126 billion during the first quarter of 2002 (Q102), a 68-percent decline relative to the first quarter of 2001 (Q101) (Table 1). The majors' foreign upstream oil and natural gas production operations made the largest contribution to overall net income in Q102 at $2.9 billion (Table 1), with domestic upstream oil and natural gas production operations second at $1.7 billion, and worldwide downstream natural gas (i.e., those natural gas operations that occur between the wellhead and the consumer) and power operations third at $1.6 billion. Energy Price News Oil and natural gas prices much lower than a year earlier. The average natural gas

264

Correlation between Median Household Income and LEED Sustainable Site Criteria for Public Transportation Access and a Regression Model Predicting Appraised Unit Value of Unimproved Parcels in Houston, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Green Building Rating System provides third-party verification for environmentally sustainable construction. LEED certified buildings often provide healthier work and living environments, however, it does not provide any direct economic incentives to the owners and developers. An early research suggested that there was a significant correlation between appraised unit value of a parcel and LEED sustainable site criteria for public transportation access. Moreover, the regression model for predicting appraised unit value of a parcel suggested that the coefficient of Number of Light Rail Stations was positive, while the coefficient of Number of Bus Stops was negative. This result contradicted our original expectation that both number of bus stops and light rail stations could have a positive effect on the appraised unit value. Hence it becomes important to conduct further research to explain this phenomenon. In this research, Pearson correlation was examined to determine whether there is a significant correlation between median household income and the number of bus stops and light rail stations for a given parcel that meet LEED sustainable site criteria for public transportation access. After confirming no significant correlation exists, multiple regression analysis was applied to establish a regression model for predicting unit value of a given parcel using number of bus stops and light rail stations for a given parcel that meet LEED sustainable site criteria for public transportation access, median household income and parcel area as the independent variables. Result of Pearson correlation indicated that there was no significant correlation exists between median household income and the number of bus stops and light rail stations for a given parcel which met LEED sustainable site criteria for public transportation access. Findings of multiple regression analysis suggested that all independent variables were significant predictors for unit value of a parcel. Besides, this regression model had a higher adjusted R- square value than that of the model which was established by Bhagyashri Joshi. It means that this regression model could better predict appraised unit value of an unimproved parcel.

Ji, Qundi

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Enhanced solid waste management by understanding the effects of gender, income, marital status, and religious convictions on attitudes and practices related to street littering in Nablus - Palestinian territory  

SciTech Connect

Litter is recognized as a form of street pollution and a key issue for solid waste managers. Nablus district (West Bank, Palestinian Territory), which has an established network of urban and rural roads, suffers from a wide-spread litter problem that is associated with these roads and is growing steadily with a well-felt negative impact on public health and the environment. The purpose of this research was to study the effects of four socio-economic characteristics (gender, income, marital status, and religious convictions) of district residents on their attitudes, practices, and behavior regarding street litter generation and to suggest possible remedial actions. All four characteristics were found to have strong correlations, not only with littering behavior and practices, but also with potential litter prevention strategies. In particular, the impact of religious convictions of the respondents on their littering habits and attitudes was very clear and interesting to observe.

Al-Khatib, Issam A. [Institute of Environmental and Water Studies (IEWS), Birzeit University, Ramallah (Palestinian Territory, Occupied); Arafat, Hassan A. [Chemical Engineering Department, An-Najah National University, Nablus (Palestinian Territory, Occupied)], E-mail: harafat@najah.edu; Daoud, Raeda; Shwahneh, Hadeel [College of Graduate Studies, An-Najah National University, Nablus (Palestinian Territory, Occupied)

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

266

This Policy Brief is an excerpt from the report: "Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households." For the full report and other resources visit: http://middleincome.lbl.gov  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This Policy Brief is an excerpt from the report: "Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Purcell, Deputy Director at Home This paper is part of the LBNL Clean Energy Financing Policy Brief series://eetd.lbl.gov/EAP/EMP/. The work described in this Policy Brief was funded by the Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency

267

This Policy Brief is an excerpt from the report: "Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households." For the full report and other resources visit: http://middleincome.lbl.gov  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This Policy Brief is an excerpt from the report: "Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income households. This paper is part of the LBNL Clean Energy Financing Policy Brief series. To join the email list in this Policy Brief was funded by the Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

268

This Policy Brief is an excerpt from the report: "Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households." For the full report and other resources visit: http://middleincome.lbl.gov  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This Policy Brief is an excerpt from the report: "Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income of the LBNL Clean Energy Program Policy Brief series. These working papers highlight emerging program models and industry). Energy conservation in new and existing buildings plays a key role in the plan's ambitious goals

269

This Policy Brief is an excerpt from the report: "Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households." For the full report and other resources visit: http://middleincome.lbl.gov  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This Policy Brief is an excerpt from the report: "Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Clean Energy Financing Policy Brief series. To join the email list to receive these policy briefs for Credit: Case Study on Clean Energy Works Oregon Launched as a Portland-based pilot in April 2010, Clean

270

Housing Diversity and Consolidation in Low-Income Colonias: Patterns of House Form and Household Arrangements in Colonias of the US-Mexico Border  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Colonias are low-income settlements on the US-Mexico border characterized by poor infrastructure, minimum services, and an active housing construction with a high self-help and self-management component. Housing in colonias is very diverse showing house forms that include temporary and permanent structures, campers, trailers or manufactured houses and conventional homes. Most of this housing does not meet construction standards and codes and is considered substandard. Colonias households are also of diverse nature and composition including single households, nuclear and extended families, as well as multiple households sharing lots. This wide variety of house forms and households in colonias fits poorly within the nuclear household, single family detached housing idealized by conventional low-income housing projects, programs and policies. As a result, colonias marginally benefit from the resources available to them and continue to depend mostly on the individual efforts of their inhabitants. This research identifies the housing diversity and the process of housing consolidation in colonias of the US-Mexico border by looking at the patterns of house form and household arrangements in colonias of South Texas. Ten colonias located to the east of the city of Laredo along Highway 359 in Webb County, Texas were selected based on their characteristics, data availability and accessibility. Data collected included periodic aerial images of the colonias spanning a period of 28 years, household information from the 2000 census disaggregated at the block level for these colonias, and information from a field survey and a semi structured interview made to a random sample of 123 households between February and June 2007. The survey collected information about house form and household characteristics. The survey also incorporated descriptive accounts on how households completed their house from the initial structure built or set on the lot until the current house form. Data was compiled and analyzed using simple statistical methods looking for identifiable patterns on house form and household characteristics and changes over time. Findings showed that housing in colonias is built and consolidated following identifiable patterns of successive changes to the house form. Findings also showed that households in colonias share characteristics that change over time in similar ways. These results suggest similarities of colonias with extra-legal settlements in other developing areas. Based on these findings, the study reflects on possible considerations that could improve the impact of projects, programs and policies directed to support colonias and improve colonias housing.

Reimers-Arias, Carlos Alberto

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Urgent supplemental appropriation bill, 1980: Low-income energy assistance program. Hearings before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, House of Representatives, Ninety-Sixth Congress, First Session  

SciTech Connect

Two supplemental budget requests are considered, for low-income full assistance programs. One totals $150 million which, if approved would remain in the Community Services Administration (CSA); the second totals $1.2 billion, which would be, if approved, transferred from CSA to HEW. Specific testimony is presented by Thomas P. O'Neill, Jr. House of Representatives; Patrica Roberts Harris, HEW; and Graciela Olivarez, Community Services Administration. Statements by many other interested members of Congress are presented. (MCW)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Energy savings from operation and maintenance training for apartment boiler heating systems. An energy study on ten low-income apartments  

SciTech Connect

The Portland Energy Office provided operation and maintenance (O&M) training to the operators of boiler heating systems for ten low-income apartment complexes in the Fall of 1990. This study tracked energy usage before and after O&M training to see if savings occurred. Training was provided on both weatherized and non-weatherized apartments to find out if weatherization impacted the amount of O&M savings to be obtained. Also, energy savings from the O&M training and building shell weatherization are compared. The O&M training averaged about four hours per building. Content was adjusted at each site to match needs of the boiler and operator. The Energy Office also provided a boiler tune-up by a service technician. The training stressed low-cost and no-cost measures which operators could either do themselves or hire service help to implement. It also emphasized boiler safety. Nine of the ten apartment complexes in the study used less energy per heating degree-day after the O&M help. Average savings were 10%. Four apartments chosen randomly as controls had negative savings; they used slightly more energy during the same post-O&M time frame. Weatherized and unweatherized apartments showed similar savings after the O&M help, 10% and 11% percent respectively. Savings from weatherization of six of the apartments in the winter of 1988--1989 were also measured. A low average of only 4% was observed, reflecting negative savings in two buildings.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Unusual plant features gas turbines  

SciTech Connect

Gas turbines were chosen by Phillips Petroleum Co. to operate the first gas-injection plant in the world to use gas-type turbines to drive reciprocating compressors. The plant is located in Lake Maracaibo, Venezuela. Gas turbines were chosen because of their inherent reliability as prime movers and for their lack of vibration. Reciprocating compressors were decided upon because of their great flexibility. Now, for the first time, the advantages of both gas turbines and reciprocating compressors are coupled on a very large scale. In this installation, the turbines will operate at about 5,000 rpm, while the compressors will run at only 270 rpm. Speed will be reduced through the giant gear boxes. The compressor platform rests on seventy- eight 36-in. piles in 100 ft of water. Piles were driven 180 ft below water level. To dehydrate the gas, Phillips will install a triethylene glycol unit. Two nearby flow stations will gather associated gas produced at the field and will pipe the gas underwater to the gas injection platform. Lamar Field is in the S. central area of Lake Maracaibo. To date, it has produced a 150 million bbl in 10 yr. Studies have indicated that a combination of waterflooding and repressuring by gas injection could double final recovery. Waterflooding began in 1963.

Franco, A.

1967-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Unusual capabilities and new programs  

SciTech Connect

A multipurpose NDE laboratory develops many techniques for special purposes. Without an intentional effort to relate these techniques to problems of the nuclear weapons community we pass by opportunities for valuable interchanges. Several solutions to weapons problems are described. Out of these descriptions better NDE techniques will emerge for use in examination of weapons and weapon components.

Janney, D.H.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Chandra observation of an unusually long and intense X-ray flare from a young solar-like star in M78  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LkHA312 has been observed serendipitously with the ACIS-I detector on board Chandra with 26h continuous exposure. This H_alpha emission line star belongs to the star-forming region M78 (NGC2068). From the optical and NIR data, we show that it is a pre-main sequence (PMS) low-mass star with a weak NIR excess. This genuine T Tauri star displayed an X-ray flare with an unusual long rise phase (~8h). The X-ray emission was nearly constant during the first 18h of the observation, and then increased by a factor of 13 during a fast rise phase (~2h), and reached a factor of 16 above the quiescent X-ray level at the end of a gradual phase (~6h) showing a slower rise. To our knowledge this flare, with \\~0.4-~0.5 cts/s, has the highest count rate observed so far with Chandra from a PMS low-mass star. By chance, the source position, 8.2' off-axis, protected this observation from pile-up. We make a spectral analysis of the X-ray emission versus time, showing that the plasma temperature of the quiescent phase and the flare peak reaches 29MK and 88MK, respectively. The quiescent and flare luminosities in the energy range 0.5--8keV corrected from absorption (N_H~1.7E21 cm^{-2}) are 6E30erg/s and ~1E32erg/s, respectively. The ratio of the quiescent X-ray luminosity on the LkHA312 bolometric luminosity is very high with log(L_X/L_bol)= -2.9, implying that the corona of LkHA312 reached the `saturation' level. The X-ray luminosity of the flare peak reaches ~2% of the stellar bolometric luminosity. The different phases of this flare are finally discussed in the framework of solar flares, which leads to the magnetic loop height from 3.1E10 to 1E11 cm (0.2-0.5 R*, i.e., 0.5-1.3 R_sun).

N. Grosso; T. Montmerle; E. D. Feigelson; T. G. Forbes

2004-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

276

FASB Statement No. 109, Accounting for Income Taxes APB Statement No. 3, Financial Statements Restated for General Price-Level Changes AICPA Statement of Position 93-3, Rescission of Accounting Principles Board Statements ISSUE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Enterprises located in countries with highly inflationary economies may prepare financial statements restated for general price-level changes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles in the United States. The tax bases of assets and liabilities of those enterprises are often restated for the effects of inflation. For those enterprises, the issues are: 1. How temporary differences should be computed under Statement 109 2. How deferred income tax expense or benefit for the year should be determined. EITF DISCUSSION The Task Force reached a consensus that when preparing financial statements restated for general price-level changes using end-of-current-year purchasing power units, temporary differences under Statement 109 are determined based on the difference between the indexed tax basis amount of the asset or liability and the related price-level restated amount reported in the financial statements. Copyright © 1993, Financial Accounting Standards Board Not for redistribution

unknown authors

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

4-Week Avg U.S. Commercial Crude Oil Imports Excluding SPR ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

4,982 : 06/24 : 4,810 : 1988-Jul: 07/01 : 4,939 : 07/08 : 4,880 : 07/15 : 4,911 : 07/22 : 5,172 : 07/29 : 5,060 : 1988-Aug: 08/05 : 5,154 : 08/12 : 5,126 : 08/19 : 4,941

278

Weekly U.S. Commercial Crude Oil Imports Excluding SPR (Thousand ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Year-Month Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5; End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value; 1982-Aug : 08/20 : 3,459 : 08/27

279

Fundamental impossibility theorems on voluntary participation in the provision of non-excludable public goods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

009-0100-0 ORIGINAL PAPER Fundamental impossibility theoremsRather, we propose fundamental impossibility theorems withRather, we propose fundamental impossibility theorems with

Saijo, Tatsuyoshi; Yamato, Takehiko

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Weekly U.S. Ending Stocks excluding SPR of Crude Oil (Thousand ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Year-Month Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5; End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value; 1982-Aug : 08/20 : 361,185 : 08/27

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "income excluding unusual" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Effluent treatment in the textile industry: Excluding dyes. (Latest citations from World Textile abstracts). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the treatment and reuse of textile industry effluents exclusive of dyes. Topics include the recovery of lubricants, lye, sizing agents, polyvinyl alcohol, zinc, dirt, and heat from textile effluents. Air and water pollution control technology that is effective in treating textile effluents is discussed. Effluents from synthetic fiber manufacture and wool scouring processes are emphasized. Effluents that contain dyes are discusssed in a separate bibliography. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Effluent treatment in the textile industry: Excluding dyes. (Latest citations from World Textile abstracts). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the treatment and reuse of textile industry effluents exclusive of dyes. Topics include the recovery of lubricants, lye, sizing agents, polyvinyl alcohol, zinc, dirt, and heat from textile effluents. Air and water pollution control technology that is effective in treating textile effluents is discussed. Effluents from synthetic fiber manufacture and wool scouring processes are emphasized. Effluents that contain dyes are discusssed in a separate bibliography.(Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Effluent treatment in the textile industry: Excluding dyes. (Latest citations from World Textile abstracts). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the treatment and reuse of textile industry effluents exclusive of dyes. Topics include the recovery of lubricants, lye, sizing agents, polyvinyl alcohol, zinc, dirt, and heat from textile effluents. Air and water pollution control technology that is effective in treating textile effluents is discussed. Effluents from synthetic fiber manufacture and wool scouring processes are emphasized. Effluents that contain dyes are discusssed in a separate bibliography. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Exclude and Include for Audio Sources and Sinks: Analogs of Mute & Solo Are Deafen & Attend  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Non-immersive perspectives in virtual environments enable flexible paradigms of perception, especially in the context of frames of reference for conferencing and musical audition. Traditional mixing idioms for enabling and disabling various audio sources ...

Michael Cohen

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

The Simplest Models of Radiative Neutrino Mass: Excluding Simplified Zee Models and Beyond  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The complexity of radiative neutrino-mass models can be judged by: (i) whether they require the imposition of ad hoc symmetries, (ii) the number of new multiplets they introduce, and (iii) the number of arbitrary parameters that appear. Adopting the view that the imposition of arbitrary new symmetries is the least appealing approach, the simplest models have two new multiplets and a minimal number of new parameters. With this in mind, we search for the simplest models of radiative neutrino mass. We are lead to two new models, containing a real scalar triplet and a charged scalar doublet (respectively), in addition to the charged singlet scalar considered by Zee [h^+\\sim(1,1,2)]. The new models are essentially simplified versions of the Zee model and appear to be \\emph{the simplest} models of radiative neutrino mass. However, these models are only of pedagogical interest; despite successfully generating nonzero masses, present-day data is sufficient to rule them out. The lessons learned from these models also ...

Law, Sandy S C

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Individual- and Neighbourhood-Level Indicators of Subjective Well-Being in a Small and Poor Eastern Cape Township: The Effect of Health, Social Capital, Marital Status, and Income  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract Our study used multilevel regression analysis to identify individual- and neighbourhood-level factors that determine individual-level subjective well-being in Rhini, a deprived suburb of Grahamstown in the Eastern Cape province of South Africa. The Townsend index and Gini coefficient were used to investigate whether contextual neighbourhood-level differences in socioeconomic status determined individual-level subjective well-being. Crime experience, health status, social capital, and demographic variables were assessed at the individual level. The indicators of subjective well-being were estimated with a two-level random-intercepts and fixed slopes model. Social capital, health and marital status (all p \\.001), followed by income level (p \\.01) and the Townsend score (p \\.05) were significantly related to individual-level subjective well-being outcomes. Our findings showed that individual-level subjective well-being is influenced by neighbourhood-level socioeconomic status as measured by the Townsend deprivation score. Individuals reported higher levels of subjective well-being in less deprived neighbourhoods. Here we wish to highlight the role of context for subjective well-being, and to suggest that subjective well-being outcomes may also be defined in ecological terms. We hope the findings are useful for implementing programs and interventions designed to achieve greater subjective well-being for people living in deprived areas.

J. M. Cramm; A. P. Nieboer; A. P. Nieboer; V. Møller

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Unusual behavior in the upper critical magnetic fields of the ambient-pressure organic superconductor. kappa. -(BEDT-TTF) sub 2 Cu(N(CN) sub 2 )Br (where BEDT-TTF represents bis(ethylenedithio) tetrathiofulvalene)  

SciTech Connect

We report a determination of the temperature dependence of the upper critical magnetic fields {ital H}{sub {ital c}2} for {kappa}-(BEDT-TTF){sub 2}Cu(N(CN){sub 2})Br, with the use of dc-magnetization measurements that show a well-defined diamagnetic onset. We find large slopes of {minus}20 T/K and {minus}2.2 T/K for {bold H}{parallel}{ital ac} and {bold H}{parallel}{ital b}, respectively, which lead to coherence lengths of 37 and 4 A. There is unusual structure in the critical fields and a possible dimensional crossover at {ital T}/{ital T}{sub {ital c}}{approximately}0.97 for {bold H}{parallel}{ital ac}. Neither the slopes nor the structure are observable in the superconducting transition measured by ac magnetoresistance, which exhibits strong magnetic-field broadening similar to that of the high-{Tc} copper oxide superconductor YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}{delta}}. We find a strong depression of {ital T}{sub {ital c}}, as large as 1.2 K, when the sample is rapidly cooled.

Kwok, W.K.; Welp, U.; Carlson, K.D.; Crabtree, G.W.; Vandervoort, K.G.; Wang, H.H.; Kini, A.M.; Williams, J.M.; Stupka, D.L.; Montgomery, L.K.; Thompson, J.E. (Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (USA) Chemistry Divisions, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (USA))

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

The distributive justice of income inequality  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

the human condition, there is little question of not accepting inequality in practice. ..... approximation of the actual distribution, an error is certainly introduced,.

289

DISCUSSION PAPER Income, resources, and electricity mix  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I am grateful for data advice from Ditya Nurdianto and comments from Sambit Bhattacharyya, Raghbendra Jha,

Paul J. Burke

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Income inequality, tax base and sovereign spreads  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SVN NLD HUN CZE ISL DEU RUS ESP ISR PRT GRC POL SVK BRA UKRDEU*), DENMARK(DNK*), SPAIN(ESP*), FRANCE(FRA*), GREECE(Correlation = -.72 DNK RUS PRT ESP POL BGR PER ARG VEN BEL

Aizenman, Joshua; Jinjarak, Yothin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mel Lane Assistant Director Office of the Treasurer Office of Insurance, Loss Control, & Claims Curator Larry Shaver Associate Director Greg Jeffers Fire Pump Inspector Steve Morron Fire Inspector Mark Colglazier Fire Inspector Kevin Wright Fire Inspector Loss Prevention Campus Art Claims & Athletic Program

292

Unusual HVAC challenges require innovative solutions  

SciTech Connect

There were many reasons behind Motorola`s decision to build the first 225,000 sq ft of a planned one million sq ft manufacturing facility in Chihuahua, Mexico. Among these were the availability of skilled labor in the area, lower construction costs, some export tax advantages, and the close proximity to the US border. The new facility is made up of a variety of functional areas that together create an impressively efficient plant. Phase 1 construction included a large manufacturing floor, shipping and receiving areas, a bulk storage facility, and a large office area with a view of the factory floor. The structure also houses a retail store where Motorola consumer products are sold, a conference and banquet center, a commercial kitchen, and dining facilities for 750. The design cooling load is 750 tons; the heating load is 4.5 million Btuh. The paper discusses the challenging location, the HVAC system, and the future expansion planned.

Jardine, G.M.; Gwin, O.D. [Heery International, Inc., Atlanta, GA (United States)

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Unusual routines: Organizational (non)sensemaking  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as officer in the Communication and Technology Division, onOrganizations and communication technology (pp. 95-116).

Rice, Ronald E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Unusually Stable Glasses May Benefit Drugs, Coatings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... glass is more apt to convert to a low-energy crystalline order ... to study how molecules diffuse during subsequent annealing of the two types of glass ...

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Ads by Goooooogle Unique, Unusual Gifts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Internet Marketing Gas prices high? Try an eco-friendly, 3.5 mln dollars Skycar Home > News > World News A Hairstyles Survey! HighPaySurveys.com Birthday Gifts & Ideas Unique gifts for their special day Tailored Posted on 30 Sep 2005 # Reuters Gas prices high? Try an eco- friendly, 3.5 mln dollars Skycar CHICAGO

McGraw, Kevin J.

296

Unusual routines: Organizational (non)sensemaking  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

enigmatic episode" (weak links of life-script, antecedentsand "perfunctory ritual" (weak link to life-script, neutral

Rice, Ronald E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Unusual Iron Redox Systematics of Martian Magmas  

SciTech Connect

Martian magmas are known to be FeO-rich and the dominant FeO-bearing mineral at many sites visited by the Mars Exploration rovers (MER) is magnetite. Morris et al. proposed that the magnetite appears to be igneous in origin, rather than of secondary origin. However, magnetite is not typically found in experimental studies of martian magmatic rocks. Magnetite stability in terrestrial magmas is well understood, as are the stabilities of FeO and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} in terrestrial magmas. In order to better understand the variation of FeO and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and the stability of magnetite (and other FeO-bearing phases) in martian magmas, we have undertaken an experimental study with two emphases. First, we determine the FeO and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} contents of super- and sub-liquidus glasses from a shergottite bulk composition at 1 bar to 4 GPa, and variable fO{sub 2}. Second, we document the stability of magnetite with temperature and fO{sub 2} in a shergottite bulk composition.

Danielson, L.; Righter, K.; Pando, K.; Morris, R.V.; Graff, T.; Agresti, D.; Martin, A.; Sutton, S.; Newville, M.; Lanzirotti, A. (NASA-JSC); (ESCG Jacobs); (UAB); (UC)

2012-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

298

Neighborhood as refuge : environmental justice and community reconstruction in Boston, Barcelona, and Havana  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Environmental Justice (EJ) scholarship has revealed that communities of color and low-income neighborhoods have been disproportionally affected by 'brown' contaminating facilities and excluded from decision-making on their ...

Anguelovski, Isabelle

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

The Modification of Joint Size–Charge Distribution in Rain. Part I: Computations which Exclude Partial Coalescence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of individual charge-modifying processes is tested by following the development joint distributions of raindrop size and charge through a fall depth of 1 km beneath a weakly electrified warm cloud. Evaporation, ion capture and ...

S. G. Bradley; C. D. Stow

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Home Energy Management DIY – Do-It-Yourself HERS – Homeare completed. Do-It-Yourself (DIY) Improvements. About oneand financial incentives for DIY improvements.    Flexible

Zimring, Mark

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "income excluding unusual" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

California Solar Initiative - Low-Income Solar Water Heating...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Clean Energy Analysis Low Emission Development Strategies Oil & Gas Smart Grid Solar U.S. OpenLabs Utilities Water Wind Page Actions View form View source History View New...

302

Revisiting the Income Effect: Gasoline Prices and Grocery Purchases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Formulations Gasoline and Crude Oil Prices, 2000-2006 FigureI: Weekly Gasoline and Crude Oil Prices for2001- 2006 Crude Oil CA Regular Reformulated Figure II:

Gicheva, Dora; Hastings, Justine; Villas-Boas, Sofia B

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Revisiting the Income Effect: Gasoline Prices and Grocery Purchases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hurst, 2007b. “Lifecycle Prices and Production,” forthcomingA. Pakes, 1995. “Automobile Prices in Market Equilibrium,”on the Importance of Sticky Prices," Journal of Political

Gicheva, Dora; Hastings, Justine; Villas-Boas, Sofia B

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HVAC replacement, air sealing, duct sealing, additionaltoday – for example, air sealing and climate-appropriatesome combination of air sealing, insulation, lighting

Zimring, Mark

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

A strategy for low income housing in South Africa  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is the intent of this thesis to investigate an alternative strategy for design and implementation of low cost housing in South Africa. For this purpose a site is chosen and a design strategy is formulated. The core ...

Niazmand, Seyed Safadin

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rentalhousing/Energy_Efficiency_Project/COB_rebates_8.2.11.PDS/rentalhousing/Energy_Efficiency_Project/SmartRegs_Final_s residential energy efficiency loan program November 2010-

Zimring, Mark

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Net income: A company's total earnings, or profit  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Acronyms . API American Petroleum Institute . boe barrels of oil equivalent . Btu British thermal unit . DD&A depreciation, depletion, and amortization

308

Estimating the Impacts of Low-Income Weatherization Assistance...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to estimate the impact of WAP. These approaches compare the consumption of households participating in WAP to the consumption of non-participating households. An...

309

Evaluating New Income Management in the Northern Territory: First Evaluation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

................................................................................................ x Glossary

310

Income Replacement and Reemployment Programs in Michigan and Neighboring States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Governments in every developed industrial economy administer programs that partially replace the earnings of workers who suffer job loss or on-the-job injury. In addition, governments administer programs to help job losers gain reemployment, either through direct job placement (for those who are job-ready) or through retraining (for those who are not). This chapter describes and discusses current policy issues surrounding the main social insurance and reemployment programs in Michigan: Unemployment Insurance (UI), which partially replaces lost earnings following loss of a job; Workers ' Compensation (WC), which pays for medical treatment, vocational rehabilitation, and lost earnings following a work-related injury or illness; and the cluster of reemployment and training programs that, since 1998, has come under the Workforce Investment Act (WIA). In addition to describing these programs, a main goal of the chapter is to offer a critical view of Michigan's programs by comparing them with corresponding programs in neighboring states. Discussion of these three programs could hardly be more timely. UI has come under attack for a range of alleged failings, and the Michigan legislature passed a bill in April 2002 that increased weekly benefits, lengthened benefit durations, and tightened the eligibility requirements

Stephen A. Woodbury; Stephen A. Woodbury

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Oil Prices, External Income, and Growth: Lessons from Jordan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The theoretical model predicts real oil prices to be one of the main long-run drivers of real output. Using quarterly data between 1979 and 2009 on core macroeconomic variables for Jordan and a number of key foreign variables, we identify two long...

Mohaddes, Kamiar; Raissi, Mehdi

2011-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

312

Income Tax Credit for Green Buildings (Corporate) (Maryland)...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Credits apply to three types of alternative energy sources: photovoltaics (PV), wind turbines and fuel cells. Tax credits for alternate energy sources can only be claimed if they...

313

Income Tax Credit for Green Buildings (Personal) (Maryland) ...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Credits apply to three types of alternative energy sources: photovoltaics (PV), wind turbines and fuel cells. Tax credits for alternate energy sources can only be claimed if they...

314

The Choice between Income and Consumption Taxes: A Primer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

which the economy’s capital intensity is held constant buttwo parameters, the capital intensity of production and theproduction function, the capital intensity parameter in the

Auerbach, Alan J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

City of Tallahassee Utilities - Low-Income Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

not exclusively fund energy efficiency, but could contribute to the reduction of energy usage within a home. Measures like changing out inoperable heating systems and water...

316

Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Renewable Energy (DOE EERE), Weatherization andand Roya Stanley (DOE EERE) for their support of thisfor Humanity International DOE EERE – Department of Energy

Zimring, Mark

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Small Area Income and Poverty Estimates (SAIPE) | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

sehsd.saipe@census.gov Unique Identifier DOC-2121 Public Access Level public Data Dictionary http:www.census.govdidwwwsaipedataindex.html Data Download URL http:...

318

Government Policy Effects on Urban and Rural Income Inequality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EITC Phase-out Minimum Wage AFDC/TANF Female-head Post-taxPhase-out Minimum Wage AFDC/TANF Female-head * statisticallyIns. SSI Disability Ins. AFDC/TANF AFDC/TANF Need Std. 0.009

Wu, Ximing; Perloff, Jeffrey M.; Golan, Amos

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Predicting Hunger and Overcrowding: How Much Difference Does Income Make?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from a telephone survey o f AFDC recipients in California,even in California, where the AFDC grant was relatively highat the time o f the survey, AFDC and food stamps are not

Mauldon, Jane

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Effects of Government Policies on Income Distribution and Welfare  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

welfare. Transfer programs (AFDC/TANF and food stamps)to Needy Families (AFDC/TANF), food stamps, disabilityvary over time, and SSI, AFDC/TANF, and food stamps vary

Wu, Ximing; Perloff, Jeffrey M.; Golan, Amos

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "income excluding unusual" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Revisiting the Income Effect: Gasoline Prices and Grocery Purchases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gasoline and Crude Oil Prices, 2000-2006 Figure I:Weekly Gasoline and Crude Oil Prices for 2001- 2006 Crudeargue that increases in oil prices may lead to recessions

Gicheva, Dora; Hastings, Justine; Villas-Boas, Sofia B

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Performance Profiles Table Browser: T-12. Income Taxes  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas. Exploration and reserves, storage, ...

323

Income Tax Deduction for Energy-Efficient Products (Virginia...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

that generate electricity using an electrochemical process, have an electricity-only generation efficiency greater than 35%, and have a generating capacity of at least two...

324

Agricultural Biomass Income Tax Credit (Corporate) (New Mexico...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Incentive Type Corporate Tax Credit Applicable Sector Agricultural Eligible Technologies Biomass Active Incentive Yes Incentive Inactive Date 12312019 Implementing Sector State...

325

Agricultural Biomass Income Tax Credit (Personal) (New Mexico...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Incentive Type Personal Tax Credit Applicable Sector Agricultural Eligible Technologies Biomass Active Incentive Yes Implementing Sector StateTerritory Energy Category Renewable...

326

Revisiting the Income Effect: Gasoline Prices and Grocery Purchases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On Sale Residuals Log Gas Price Residuals Week Log %On Sale Residuals Log Gas Price Residuals Week Log %On Sale Residuals Log Gas Price Residuals Log % Purchased On

Gicheva, Dora; Hastings, Justine; Villas-Boas, Sofia B

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Deleveraging domesticity : incremental design forays on middle income housing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Housing today has little do with architecture. Design is a currency of services, while housing today is intensively packaged as a consumer good. It is packaged with land as speculative real-estate, and bundled abstractly ...

Miller, Christopher M., M. Arch. (Christopher Michael). Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Just Suppose: Housing Subsidies for Low Income Renters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Treasury. 2006. Internal Revenue Service (IRS). Statisticsship by using the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) to

Quigley, John M.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Three: Should California Adopt an Earned Income Tax Credit?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the meaning of the Internal Revenue Code (a legal issue32(c)(2) of the Internal Revenue Code defines “earnedtax credit) of the Internal Revenue Code. This in turn means

Stark, Kirk J

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Duke Energy - Low Income Weatherization Program (Indiana) | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Efficiency Incentive Programs Program Administrator Duke Energy Website http:www.duke-energy.comindianasavingshome-weatherization.asp Date added to DSIRE 2006-09-26 Last...

331

Unusual Deformation Mechanisms in the Prehensile Tails of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Structural Competition and Phase Transformations in Binary Ti-Nb Alloys for Biomedical Applications · Structure and Fracture Resistance of Armored Fish Scales.

332

Unusual 'Collapsing' Iron Superconductor Sets Record for Its ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... superconductor that operates at the highest known temperature for a material in its class.* The discovery inches iron-based superconductors— ...

2012-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

333

Unusual formations of the free electromagnetic field in vacuum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is shown that there are exact solutions of the free Maxwell equations (FME) in vacuum allowing an existence of stable spherical formations of the free magnetic field and ring-like formations of the free electric field. It is detected that a form of these spheres and rings does not change with time in vacuum. It is shown that these convergent solutions are the result of an interference of some divergent solutions of FME. One can surmise that these electromagnetic formations correspond to Kapitsa's hypothesis about interference origin and a structure of fireball.

Andrew E. Chubykalo; Augusto Espinoza

2005-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

334

This year's gasoline price increase not unusual - Today in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... and trends. FAQs ... although in some years, including this year, the price increase ... Over the past 20 years, the average period of rising prices in the ...

335

Enhancing protection for unusually sensitive ecological areas from pipeline releases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ECOLOGICAL AREAS FROM PIPELINE RELEASES Christina Sames;Administration, Office of Pipeline Safety, DPS-10/ 400 7thof a hazardous liquid pipeline accident. Pipeline operators

Sames, Christina; Fink, Dennis

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Search for New and Unusual Stangonia using CLAS  

SciTech Connect

We perform a survey of the proton, K^+, K^- -3 charged track data, taken by the CLAS detector for the HyCLAS experiment during the g12 run-period at Jefferson Lab. We aim to study the strong decay amplitudes, partial widths and production channels of strangeonia from the CLAS g12 dataset. HyCLAS was motivated by the experimental results for gluonic hybrid meson candidates, theoretical Lattice QCD, and Flux-tube Model calculations and predictions. The experiment was designed and conducted to search and observe new forms of hadronic matter through photoproduction.

Saini, Mukesh Satyapraka [Florida State U.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Carcinoma erysipeloides: An unusual presentation mimicking radiation dermatitis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Dermatology, NDMVPS Medical College and Research Centre,Surgery, NDMVPS Medical College and Research, Centre Nashik,

Gugle, Anil; Malpathak, Vijay; Zawar, Vijay; Deshmukh, Milind; Kote, Rahul

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Investigation of Unusual “Sharkskin” Corrosion in Drawn Copper Pipes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Alloy Parts Heat Treatment Temperature Monitoring System · Analysis of ... FEM Analysis of Pipe Reduction Forming Process for Increasing of Wall Thickness.

339

Study of the unusual failure of milliwatt generator strength members  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In order to qualify Milliwatt Generator heat sources for an extended design life, multi-axial mechanical tests were performed on the strength member components. The results of these tests indicated that failure occurred predominantly in the middle of the weld ramp-down (down-slope) zone. Examination of the failure zone by standard metallographic techniques failed to indicate the cause of failure. A modified technique utilizing chemical etching, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive x-ray analysis was employed and dramatically indicated the true cause of failure, viz., inclusions in the parent material which were precipitated along the welds. As a result of the initial investigation, weld parameters for the heat sources were altered and preliminary tests on sample welds suggested that pulse-arc welding eliminate this type of failure.

Zielinski, R.E.; Stacy, E.; Burgan, C.E.

1977-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

340

A Case Study of an Unusually Intense Atmospheric Gravity Wave  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A remarkable long-lived, large-amplitude gravity wave in the Carolinas and Virginia on 27 February 1984 is investigated by means of a subsynoptic-scale case study. The wave was characterized by a minor-wave of elevation followed by a sharp wave ...

Lance F. Bosart; Anton Seimon

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "income excluding unusual" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

An Unusually Strong Gravity Wave over Western Washington  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A mesoscale wave disturbance, observed over western Washington State, is studied through local observations and recognized by comparisons with theory as a large-amplitude gravity wave. It is shown that this gravity wave propagated over 200 km in ...

Bruce H. Bauck

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Overview  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Producers, Third Quarter 2010 Producers, Third Quarter 2010 Third Quarter 2010 Key Findings Net Income $17.4 billion Revenues $285.0 billion Highlights Twenty major energy producers reported a 32-percent increase in third-quarter net income relative to the third quarter of 2009 (Q309). This percentage increase in the third quarter of 2010 (Q310) was primarily because net income in Q309 was unusually low. Q310 income was 41- percent lower than the third-quarter average for 2005- 2009. The effects of higher crude oil and natural gas prices, higher foreign oil and worldwide natural gas production, higher U.S. refining margins, and higher U.S. refinery throughput overwhelmed the effects of lower U.S. crude oil production and lower foreign refinery throughput and led to higher net income.

343

Supercomputers: Super-polluters? Datacenters Journal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

includes: · Free Cooling - Free cooling is the use of outside air- or water-side cooling via cooling towers and $112.7 million. These values are for the IT equipment only, i.e. excluding cooling. 1 Wehner, M, L--would not be unusual for a contemporary supercomputing facility. Meanwhile, rising cooling demand is driving the up

Lee, Jason R.

344

After starting with a 12,000-job bang in 2010-Q2, Connecticut's  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- aged more than 7 degrees above nor- mal. Historically there's little correla- tion between unusual in the number of residents with jobs. Problematically, Connecticut's lower unemployment rate has triggered.5% Freight +6.3% State Tax Receipts Income +16.7% Sales +13.7% Real Estate Conveyance +34.8% Electricity

Holsinger, Kent

345

I. Excluded Volume Effects in Ising Cluster Distributions and Nuclear Multifragmentation II. Multiple-Chance Effects in Alpha-Particle Evaporation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

+ s a ) + y ) . / t ; % Heat capacity f u n c t i o n CV = clattice gas coexistence heat capacity i n the limit of thepared to the exact heat capacity (line). The heat capacity

Breus, Dimitry E.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Asbestos and silicate pollution (excluding workplace pollution). March 1987-December 1989 (Citations from the NTIS data base). Report for March 1987-December 1989  

SciTech Connect

This bibliography contains citations concerning the occurrence and effects of asbestos and silicate pollution outside of the workplace. Topics include increased cancer risk associated with asbestos pollution, and the hazards of silica-dust inhalation and silicate effects on water resources. Included are pollutant sources, and sampling techniques and test results of analyses of indoor air samples, drinking water, and ground water for these pollutants. Asbestos and silicate pollution in the workplace and asbestos-removal technology are considered in other bibliographies. (This updated bibliography contains 78 citations, 11 of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

Not Available

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Rotating electrical machines. Part 2: Methods for determining losses and efficiency of rotating electrical machinery from tests (excluding machines for traction vehicles)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Applies to d.c. machines and to a.c. synchronous and induction machines. The principles can be applied to other types of machines such as rotary converters, a.c. commutator motors and single-phase induction motors for which other methods of determining losses are used.

International Electrotechnical Commission. Geneva

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Observed local and remote influences of vegetation on the atmosphere across North America using a model-validated statistical technique that first excludes oceanic forcings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The observed local and non-local influences of vegetation on the atmosphere across North America are quantified after first removing the ocean’s impact. The interaction between vegetation and the atmosphere is dominated by forcing from the ...

Fuyao Wang; Michael Notaro; Zhengyu Liu; Guangshan Chen

349

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.9 Low-Income Housing  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

1 1 Households Weatherized with ARRA Funds by Grantee (1) Grantee Grantee Alabama Nebraska Alaska Nevada Arizona New Hampshire Arkansas New Jersey California New Mexico Colorado New York Connecticut North Carolina Delaware North Dakota District of Columbia Ohio Florida Oklahoma Georgia Oregon Hawaii Pennsylvania Idaho Rhode Island Illinois South Carolina Indiana South Dakota Iowa Tennessee Kansas Texas Kentucky Utah Louisiana Vermont Maine Virginia Maryland Washington Massachusetts West Virginia Michigan Wisconsin Minnesota Wyoming Mississippi Missouri Territories and Reservations Montana Total Note(s): Source(s): 1) Includes homes weatherized through November 30, 2011. Energy.gov, 2012, ARRA Homes Weatherized by Grantee, retrieved Feb. 13, 2012, from http://energy.gov/downloads/arra-homes-weatherized-grantee

350

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.9 Low-Income Housing  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

3 3 Households Weatherized and Weatherization Eligibility by Year (Million) (1) Federally Federally Below 125% Below 150% Total DOE Eligible (2) Ineligible Poverty Line Poverty Line Households 1977 0.025 - - - - 74.8 1980 0.181 - - - - 79.6 1985 0.125 - - - - 87.9 1987 0.100 - - - - 90.5 1990 0.085 27.9 66.1 18.2 - 94.2 1991 0.105 - - - - 95.3 1992 0.105 - - - - 96.4 1993 0.090 30.7 65.9 19.4 - 97.7 1994 0.101 - - - - 98.7 1995 0.103 - - - - 100.0 1996 0.060 - - - - 101.0 1997 0.067 34.1 67.4 19.7 - 102.2 1998 0.068 - - - - 103.5 1999 0.068 - - - - 104.9 2000 0.077 - - - - 105.7 2001 0.078 33.8 73.2 20.1 26.5 107.0 2002 0.104 - - - - 105.0 2003 0.100 - - - - 105.6 2004 0.100 - - - - 106.6 2005 0.093 29.6 81.5 19.4 26.6 108.8 2006 0.104 - - - - 109.9 2007 0.104 - - - - 110.4 2008 0.098 - - - - 110.6 2009 0.075 - - - - 111.2 2010 0.036 - - - - 111.9 1977-2010 3.42 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A Note(s): Source(s): 1) The number of households weatherized represent the number of units completed during the specified Program Year. 2) Federally eligible

351

Income Tax Deduction for Solar-Powered Roof Vents or Fans (Indiana...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1232012 References DSIRE1 Summary Indiana allows taxpayers to take a deduction on solar-powered roof fans (or vent, also sometimes called an attic fan) installed in a home...

352

Rural Latino families in California are missing earned income tax benefits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Central Cities and Remote- Rural Areas. Research brief.DC. www.urban.org/url.cfm? ID= Rural Families Speak Project.RESEARCH ARTICLE Rural Latino families in California are

Varcoe, Karen P.; Lees, Nancy B.; López, Martha L.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Investigating Possible Links between Incoming Cosmic Ray Fluxes and Lightning Activity over the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the past two decades, particular scientific attention has been drawn to the potential cosmic ray–atmospheric coupling. Galactic cosmic rays reaching the upper troposphere are suggested as the key modulators of the global electric circuit, ...

Themis G. Chronis

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Chinese housing mixology : considerations for the successful development of mixed-income housing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In recent years, the Chinese government transformed their national system of housing provision and introduced market mechanisms. The consequent boom in residential real estate development and the emergence of speculative ...

Chan, Janelle (Janelle Jie-Ying)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

One Hundred Years of Oil Income and the Iranian Economy: A Curse or a Blessing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

 $ Constant 2009 $ Source: British Petroleum Statistical Review of World Energy. conditions and lower oil prices. Such a policy was discussed in a critical meeting of tech- nocrats and policy makers in Gajereh, but was ?atly rejected by the Shah who insisted...  oil prices in logs (left scale) Real exchange rate in logs (right scale) Note: The real exchange rate measure used is the ?free market?rate. Source: British Petroleum Statistical Review of World Energy and IMF International Financial Statistics. expected to last that long. It is less...

Mohaddes, Kamiar; Pesaran, M. Hashem

2012-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

356

Microsoft Word - INCOMING.EM SSAB Chairs to NewEM-1.052109.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

May 21, 2009 May 21, 2009 Inés R. Triay Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management U.S. Department of Energy, EM-1 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585 Dear Assistant Secretary Triay: The eight local boards that make up EM's Site Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB) welcome you to your new position as Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management (EM). We look forward to continuing the positive, collaborative working relationship the EM SSAB, has with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Each local board provides advice or recommendations on policy issues that affect their respective sites. We are committed to providing DOE EM with clear, concise advice that reflects the values of those representatives sitting on the board and to a limited extent a

357

of LaborEstimating the Income Loss of Disabled Individuals: The Case of Spain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Any opinions expressed here are those of the author(s) and not those of IZA. Research published in this series may include views on policy, but the institute itself takes no institutional policy positions. The Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) in Bonn is a local and virtual international research center and a place of communication between science, politics and business. IZA is an independent nonprofit organization supported by Deutsche Post Foundation. The center is associated with the University of Bonn and offers a stimulating research environment through its international network, workshops and conferences, data service, project support, research visits and doctoral program. IZA engages in (i) original and internationally competitive research in all fields of labor economics, (ii) development of policy concepts, and (iii) dissemination of research results and concepts to the interested public. IZA Discussion Papers often represent preliminary work and are circulated to encourage discussion. Citation of such a paper should account for its provisional character. A revised version may be

Maria Cervini-plá; Jose I. Silva; Judit Vall-castello; Maria Cervini-plá; Jose I. Silva; Judit Vall-castello

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Income Tax Deduction for Solar-Powered Roof Vents or Fans  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Indiana allows taxpayers to take a deduction on solar-powered roof fans (or vent, also sometimes called an attic fan) installed in a home that the taxpayer owns or leases. The deduction is for 50%...

359

Carbon Markets: A Potential Source of Income for Farmers and Ranchers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Agricultural producers may be able to increase their earnings by selling carbon credits to large carbon emitters. This publication explains the origins of the carbon market, the types of projects agriculturists can undertake, and the steps and requirements for participating in the carbon credits marketplace. 9 pp., 2 tables, 2 figures

Ribera, Luis; Zenteno, Joaquin; McCarl, Bruce

2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

360

The Effects of Prevaling Wage Requirements on the Cost of Low-Income Housing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Infill Residential Project Cost Site and Structure CostEstimates of increased project costs un- der Davis-BaconWage Differential (%) Project Cost Increase (%) Source:

Dunn, Sarah; Quigley, John M.; Rosenthal, Larry A.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "income excluding unusual" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Food availability in the heartland: effects of neighborhood race and income composition.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Despite ideals of justice and equality, certain segments of the U.S. population are denied the rights and privileges available to the more affluent. This thesis… (more)

Miller, Michael J.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.9 Low-Income Housing  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

8 FY 2009 Residential Energy Burdens, by Region (1) Northeast South Midwest West Mean Mdn Mean Mean Mdn Mean Mean Mdn Mean Mean Mdn Mean Indvdl Indvdl Group Indvdl Indvdl Group...

363

The impact of the Internet on economic growth in upper-middle-income countries.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Internet affects economies by facilitating a faster and wider access to information, promoting competition in the markets, enhancing communication in terms of lower cost… (more)

Hadavand, Aboozar

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Homeward Bound: Food-Related Transportation Strategies in Low Income and Transit Dependent Communities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

s Ad Hoc Food Security ing Home the Broccoli: Innovativeor administrative home for food security planning, includingtheir goods home. broadly, food security approaches. The

Gottlieb, Robert; Fisher, Andrew; Dohan, Marc; O'Connor, Linda; Parks, Virginia

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

FARM NET INCOME IMPACT OF SWITCHGRASS PRODUCTION AND CORN STOVER COLLECTION FOR HEAT AND POWER GENERATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

................................................................................................ 10 1.5b Gasification., 2006). If switchgrass is going to be used for ethanol fermentation or gasification systems modeled. 1.5b Gasification Biomass gasification is the latest generation of biomass energy conversion

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

366

Table 3.11 Major U.S. Energy Companies’ Net Income, 1974-2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Rate Regulated Pipelines Total ... the basis of operating-level utilities. Web Page: ... Reporting System" database, November 1997.

367

A comparative study of income tax legislation for foreign oil and gas companies investing in Africa.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The oil and natural gas industry worldwide has become one of the most important commodities due to its value in use and dependency in our… (more)

Struwig, Sybrand Johannes

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Decomposition of the price and income elasticities of the consumer demand for gasoline  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors specify and estimate a model of the short-run demand for gasoline which allows them to decompose a consumer's gasoline demand elasticities into miles-driven and driving-efficiency components. Their model is estimated using detailed household survey data which allows direct focus on the short run, holding both the household's automobile stock and demographic profile fixed. Among the most interesting results are: (1) The data allow interesting insights to be drawn into the interrelationship between these important variables and household behavior with respect to gasoline consumption, miles driven, and driving efficiency. (2) The gasoline demand behavior of one-car and multi-car households differ significantly from each other. Evaluated at overall sample means, one-car households have higher (in absolute value) price elasticites for gasoline, miles driven and fuel-efficiency demand. Conversely, multi-car households have higher (in absolute value) total expenditure elasticities for each category. (3) For both one-car and multi-car households, roughly 75% of the estimated price elasticity and roughly 80% of the estimated total-expenditure elasticity of gasoline demand stem from the miles-driven component. The estimated fuel-efficiency elasticities, though smaller than their standard errors, indicate that households respond to changes in prices and total-expenditure levels not only by changing the number of miles they drive, but also by changing the efficiency with which they drive them. 23 references, 3 tables.

Archibald, R. (College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA); Gillingham, R.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Knowledge is power: A theory of information, income and welfare spending  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?information South Carolina Louisiana North Dakota Mississippi Arizona Utah Alabama Wyoming Oklahoma New Hampshire Maine Nebraska Kansas Illinois South Dakota North Carolina Virginia Colorado Texas Connecticut Florida Maryland Kentucky Missouri West Virginia Arkansas... information equivalent” outcome through cues, information shortcuts and biases cancelling out in aggregation (McKelvey and Ordeshook, 1985; Wittman, 1989; Lupia, 1992). Also the pivotal voting literature usually predicts that uninformed voters balance...

Lind, Jo Thori; Rohner, Dominic

2011-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

370

New Media, new voices : supporting civic engagement in low-income communities of color  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Within the past few years, large-scale events such as Obama's successful 2008 campaign and democratic mobilizations in the Middle East have increased mainstream buzz about the democratic potential of new media. With the ...

Ritoper, Stefanie (Stefanie Tianne)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.9 Low-Income Housing  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

invested. Source(s): DOE, Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Weatherization Assistance Program, June 2010; EEREOWIP, Weatherization Program Notice 11-1, Dec. 2010, p. 6...

372

Effects of Atmospheric Absorption of Incoming Radiation on the Radiation Limit of the Troposphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The limit of the planetary radiation (longwave radiation) of a planet with oceans on its surface is determined by various mechanisms called “radiation limits,” which can be classified as the Komabayashi–Ingersoll limit and the radiation limit of ...

Hiroyuki Kurokawa; Taishi Nakamoto

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Residential energy consumption of low-income and elderly households: how non-discretionary is it  

SciTech Connect

The energy literature is replete with opinions that the poor and elderly have cut their residential energy consumption to a minimum. This paper challenges such conclusions through an analysis of data on a sample of 319 Decatur, Illinois homeowners. The data include utility bill histories and survey information on housing characteristics, energy-related behaviors, attitudes, and socio-economic and demographic characteristics. It shows that residential energy consumption per square foot of living space is significantly higher for the elderly and poor than for other groups of Decatur homeowners. By breaking energy use into seasonal components, the paper estimates consumption for various household uses. This information, combined with the survey data, suggests that both subgroups heat and cool their homes inefficiently, due in part to the conditions of their homes, but also due to energy-related behaviors. The public policy implications of the findings are discussed.

Brown, M.A.; Rollinson, P.A.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.9 Low-Income Housing  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

0 2005 Average Energy Expenditures per Household Member and per Square Foot, by Weatherization Eligibility (2010) Members Hhold Hhold Total U.S. Households 780 2.6 0.86 Federally...

375

Working but Poor: Mexican Immigrant Workers in a Low-Income Enclave in San Jose  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

formal and informal jobs that havc cspanded in the Siliconimprovement programs that havc bcen dcvcloped to address theo f the economic changes that havc occurred in Santa Clara

Zlolniski, Christian; Palerm, Juan-Vicente

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Unbalanced Economic Growth and Uneven National Income Distribution: Evidence from China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pChina refers to rural and urbanand Economic Growth in China”, The Quarterly Journal ofProfits: the Potential Risks in China’s Reform of Economic

Minghai, Zhou; Wen, Xiao; Xianguo, Yao

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

The Earned Income Tax Credit and the Labor Supply of Married Couples  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Participation Under the AFDC-UP Program", Econometrica 64(with Dependent Children (AFDC), is fixed at about 16 billionthat faced by welfare (AFDC/ TANF) recipients. In addition,

Eissa, Nada; Hoynes, Hilary Williamson

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

More Information and Better Choices: What Low Income Women Seek from Family Planning Services  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

encounters with the AFDC office and hostile feelings withGroup Participants, Compared to All AFDC Recipients Adults=Control by All Adult Women on AFDC Table 5. Table 6. Table

Chetkovich, Carol; Mauldon, Jane; Brindis, Claire; Guendelman, Sylvia

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Country hedging for real income stabilization: a case study of South Korea and Egypt  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A CASE S1UDY OF SOUIH KOREA AND EGYPT by Kathryn M. llirdonA CASE STUDY OF SOUTII KOREA AND EGYPT* By Kathryn M. GordonA CASE STIJDY OF SOlJIH KOREA AND EGYPT The major upheavals

Gordon, Kathryn M.; Rausser, Gordon C.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Error in Measurements of Incoming Shortwave Radiation Made from Ships and Buoys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Errors in shortwave solar radiation measurements resulting from mean tils and rocking motions, as well as from the response time of the sensors, are determined experimentally. The magnitude of the mean tilt error can be large and lead to errors ...

M. A. MacWhorter; R. A. Weller

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "income excluding unusual" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

"Table HC7.5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Household Income...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5,11.2,6.7,13.2,5.8,14.5 "Housing Unit Characteristics Affecting Usage" "Adequacy of Insulation" "Well Insulated",42.8,9,11,8.2,5.1,9.5,4.8,13.1 "Adequately Insulated",46.3,10.4,11...

382

Marketing Compost A Guide for Compost Producers in Low and Middle-Income Countries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Nizarazu, Department of crop and Soil Science, Oregon state university, Corvallis, OR 97331, USA Theor Appl Genet (2001 Chromosome analysis and sorting was performed using a FAC- Vantage flow cytometer and sorter (Becton

Richner, Heinz

383

Microsoft Word - INCOMING.EM SSAB Chairs Recommendation 2010-1.RFP Option Periods.012110.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0-1 0-1 ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SITE-SPECIFIC ADVISORY BOARD ________________________________________________________________________________________________ Hanford Idaho Nevada Northern New Mexico Oak Ridge Paducah Portsmouth Savannah River ________________________________________________________________________________________________ January 21, 2010 Inés R. Triay Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management U.S. Department of Energy, EM-1 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585 Dear Assistant Secretary Triay: The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) has awarded numerous contracts in recent years to manage projects and to perform work in an effort to complete environmental cleanup at Environmental Management sites across the DOE complex. These contracts contain a

384

Juanita's Money Order: Income Effects on Human Capital Investment in Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Workers’ Remittances to Mexico,” Federal Reserve Bank ofEvidence from Rural Mexico,” Submitted to the Americanand Educational Attainment in Mexico,” NBER Working Paper.

Suarez, Juan Carlos; Avellaneda, Zenide

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Master lease & leaseback of government owned real estate : a model for a fixed income investment product  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Throughout the United States, significant taxpayer capital is unnecessarily tied up in the ownership of state and municipal government buildings. Today, multiple state and municipal governments face record budget deficits, ...

Hutchinson, Jeffrey E. (Jeffrey Ernest), 1970-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

THE UNUSUAL VARIABLE HOT B SUBDWARF LS IV-14{sup 0}116  

SciTech Connect

We first present the results of follow-up photometric observations of the He-rich hot B subdwarf LS IV-14{sup 0}116, which confirm the presence of multiperiodic luminosity variations in the light curve of this star. Rather surprisingly, no other follow-up observations of this kind seem to have been published after the initial suggestion in 2005 that LS IV-14{sup 0}116 could be a pulsating star of a new kind. We were able to extract from our data at least six significant periodicities ranging from 1954 s to 5084 s, including the two oscillations uncovered previously. We also present the results of an analysis combining a high signal-to-noise optical spectrum of LS IV-14{sup 0}116 with recently developed non-local thermodynamic equilibrium model atmospheres and synthetic spectra. Our best estimates of the atmospheric parameters of this star are T{sub eff} = 34950 {+-} 250 K, log g = 5.93 {+-} 0.04, and log N(He)/N(H) = -0.62 {+-} 0.03 (formal fitting errors only). These place LS IV-14{sup 0}116 very near the region of maximum instability in the T{sub eff}-log g plane for short-period p-mode pulsators of the hot subdwarf type. If the luminosity variations are indeed due to pulsations, then LS IV-14{sup 0}116 poses a real challenge to current theory: how can such long observed periods (which would have to be associated with medium- to high-order g-modes) be excited at such a high effective temperature and surface gravity, while the short-period p-modes, more typically excited in this domain, are not observed in this particular star?

Green, E. M.; Guvenen, B.; O'Malley, C. J.; O'Connell, C. J.; Baringer, B. P.; Villareal, A. S.; Carleton, T. M. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Fontaine, G.; Brassard, P. [Departement de Physique, Universite de Montreal, Succ. Centre-Ville, C.P. 6128, Montreal, QC H3C 3J7 (Canada); Charpinet, S., E-mail: bgreen@as.arizona.edu [Universite de Toulouse, UPS-OMP, IRAP, Toulouse (France)

2011-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

387

Review of the Unusual Winter of 1982–83 In the Upper Midwest  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Climatologists from the climate centers of 12 states of the upper Midwest contributed temperature, precipitation, and related data for December 1982, January and February 1983. Analyses present the month-to-month spatial anomaly patterns of these ...

W. M. Wendland; L. D. Bark; D. R. Clark; R. B. Curry; J. W. Enz; K. G. Hubbard; V. Jones; E. L. Kuehnast; W. Lytle; J. Newman; F. V. Nurnberger; P. Waite

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

An Unusual Summertime Downslope Wind Event in Fort Collins, Colorado, on 3 July 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An unseasonal, severe downslope windstorm along the eastern foothills of the Colorado Rocky Mountains is described. The storm, which occurred on 3 July 1993, produced wind guts in Fort Collins, Colorado, over 40 m s?1 and resulted in extensive ...

William R. Cotton; John F. Weaver; Brian A. Beitler

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Unusual Room Temperature Ferromagnetism in Bulk Sintered GaP Doped with Copper  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Robust room temperature ferromagnetism is obtained in single phase Gallium Phosphide doped with Cu{sup 2+} prepared by simple solid state reaction route. The saturation magnetization at 300 K is 1.5 times 10{sup -2} emu/g and the coercivity was found to be 125 Oe. A strong ferromagnetic resonance signal confirms the long range magnetic order which persists to temperatures as high as 739 K. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) indicate that Cu is in a +2 state. Ab initio calculations also show that the ferromagnetic ordering is energetically favorable in Cu doped GaP. When the spin-orbit coupling is included we get an enhanced total magnetic moment of 0.31 muB with a local moment on Cu 0.082 and on P 0.204 mu{sub B}. per atom.

Owens, F. J.; Gupta, A.; Rao, K. V.; Iqbal, Z.; Osorio Guillen, J. M.; Ahuja, R.; Guo, J.-H.

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

A metastatic cancer to skin in an otherwise asymptomatic young man: an unusual presentation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran. Cutaneous Leishmaniasisof Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran. Cutaneous LeishmaniasisMedical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran. Student research committee,

Salmanpoor, Rahmatollah; Saki, Nasrin; Sepaskhah, Mojdeh; Aslani, Fatemeh Sari; Kardeh, Bahareh

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Unusual Cause of Cardiac Compression in a Trauma Patient: Cystic Thymoma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

University Faculty of Medicine, Izmir Ataturk Researchand Training Hospital, Izmir,Turkey Supervising Section

Bozok, Sahin; Yava??, Özcan; Ilhan, Gokhan; Gurbuz, Ali

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Multidisciplinary Analysis of an Unusual Tornado: Meteorology, Climatology, and the Communication and Interpretation of Warnings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On 22 May 2008, a strong tornado—rated EF3 on the enhanced Fujita scale, with winds estimated between 136 and 165 mi h?1 (61 and 74 m s?1)—caused extensive damage along a 55-km track through northern Colorado. The worst devastation occurred in ...

Russ S. Schumacher; Daniel T. Lindsey; Andrea B. Schumacher; Jeff Braun; Steven D. Miller; Julie L. Demuth

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Mechanistic studies of an unusual epoxide-forming elimination of a b-hydroxyalkyl rhodium porphyrin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

acid-catalysis, and alternative hydrocarbon fuels through Fisher-Tropsch synthesis. The novel catalytic transportation fuels through Fisher-Tropsch synthesis." In a postdoctoral position at the University

Groves, John T.

394

The unusually large population of Blazhko variables in the globular cluster NGC 5024 (M53)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report the discovery of amplitude and phase modulations typical of the Blazhko effect in 22 RRc and 9 RRab type RR Lyrae stars in NGC 5024 (M53). This brings the confirmed Blazhko variables in this cluster to 23 RRc and 11 RRab, that represent 66% and 37% of the total population of RRc and RRab stars in the cluster respectively, making NGC 5024 the globular cluster with the largest presently known population of Blazhko RRc stars. We place a lower limit on the overall incidence rate of the Blazhko effect among the RR Lyrae population in this cluster of 52%. New data have allowed us to refine the pulsation periods. The limitations imposed by the time span and sampling of our data prevents reliable estimations of the modulation periods. The amplitudes of the modulations range between 0.02 and 0.39 mag. The RRab and RRc are neatly separated in the CMD, and the RRc Blazhko variables are on averge redder than their stable couterparts; these two facts may support the hypothesis that the HB evolution in this clust...

Ferro, A Arellano; Jaimes, R Figuera; Giridhar, Sunetra; Kuppuswamy, K

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Unusual decay modes of D sup 0 and D sup + mesons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CLEO has measured decay modes of the {ital D}{sup 0} and {ital D}{sup +} into final states consisting of {ital K}{sup {plus minus}}'s, {pi}{sup {plus minus}}'s, {ital K}{sup 0}'s and {ital {bar K}}{sup 0}'s, using data taken with the CLEO detector at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring. We report new results on the decays of {ital D}{sup 0}'s into 4{pi}{sup {plus minus}},{ital K}{sup {minus}}{ital K+}{pi}{sup {minus}}{pi}{sup +},{ital {bar K}}{sup 0}{ital K+}{ital K{minus}},{ital {bar K}}{sup 0} {ital K+}{pi}{sup {minus}},{ital K}{sup 0}{ital K{minus}}{pi}{sup +},3{ital K}{sub {ital S}}{sup 0} and {ital {bar K}}{sup 0}{phi} together with some of their resonant substructure. We also present the first observation of the decay {ital D}{sup +}{r arrow}{ital {bar K}}{sup 0}{ital {bar K}0}{ital K+} and give limits on the doubly-Cabibbo-suppressed decays of the {ital D}{sup 0} into {ital K}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}} and {ital K}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}}.

Ammar, R.; Baringer, P.; Coppage, D.; Davis, R.; Haas, P.; Kelly, M.; Kwak, N.; Lam, H.; Ro, S.; Kubota, Y.; Nelson, J.K.; Perticone, D.; Poling, R.; Schrenk, S.; Crawford, G.; Fulton, R.; Jensen, T.; Johnson, D.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Malchow, R.; Morrow, F.; Whitmore, J.; Wilson, P.; Bortoletto, D.; Brown, D.N.; Dominick, J.; McIlwain, R.L.; Miller, D.H.; Modesitt, M.; Ng, C.R.; Schaffner, S.F.; Shibata, E.I.; Shipsey, I.P.J.; Battle, M.; Kroha, H.; Sparks, K.; Thorndike, E.H.; Wang, C.; Alam, M.S.; Kim, I.J.; Li, W.C.; Nemati, B.; Romero, V.; Sun, C.R.; Wang, P.; Zoeller, M.M.; Goldberg, M.; Haupt, T.; Horwitz, N.; Jain, V.; Kennett, R.; Mestayer, M.D.; Moneti, G.C.; Rozen, Y.; Rubin, P.; Skwarnicki, T.; Stone, S.; Thusalidas, M.; Yao, W.; Zhu, G.; Barnes, A.V.; Bartelt, J.; Csorna, S.E.; Letson, T.; Alexander, J.; Artuso, M.; Bebek, C.; Berkelman, K.; Besson, D.; Browder, T.E.; Cassel, D.G.; Cheu, E.; Coffman, D.M.; Drell, P.S.; Ehrlich, R.; Galik, R.S.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Geiser,; (CLEO Collaboration)

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Unusual temperature dependence of the London penetration depth in all-organic {beta}  

SciTech Connect

The temperature dependence of the in-plane, {lambda}{sub {parallel}}(T), and interplane, {lambda}{sub {perpendicular}}(T), London penetration depth was measured in the metal-free all-organic superconductor {beta}''-(ET){sub 2}SF{sub 5}CH{sub 2}CF{sub 2}SO{sub 3} (T{sub c}{approx}5.2 K). {Delta}{lambda}{sub ||}(T){proportional_to}T{sup 3} up to 0.5 T{sub c}, a power law previously observed only in materials thought to be p-wave superconductors. {lambda}{sub {perpendicular}} is larger than the sample dimensions down to the lowest temperatures (0.35 K), implying an anisotropy of {lambda}{sub {perpendicular}}/{lambda}{sub {parallel}}{approx}400-800.

Prozorov, R.; Giannetta, R. W.; Schlueter, J.; Kini, A. M.; Mohtasham, J.; Winter, R. W.; Gard, G. L.

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Unusual Central Indian Drought of Summer Monsoon 2008: Role of Southern Tropical Indian Ocean Warming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While many of the previous positive Indian Ocean dipole (IOD) years were associated with above (below)-normal monsoon rainfall over central (southern) India during summer monsoon months [June–September (JJAS)], the IOD event in 2008 is associated ...

Suryachandra A. Rao; Hemantkumar S. Chaudhari; Samir Pokhrel; B. N. Goswami

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Unusual sedimentation of a Galveston Bay wetland at Pine Gully, Seabrook, Texas: implications for beach renourishment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Excess sedimentation began affecting the wetland dynamics of Pine Gully in Seabrook, Texas during the first quarter of 2004. This sedimentation was sudden and became a serious problem for the dynamics of the Pine Gully wetland because the fine, well sorted, quartz rich sediments began plugging the main channel of the previously tidally dominated wetland. Progressive sedimentation has produced overbank deposits in the marine grasses, contributing to the death of wetland grasses by sediment chocking. The main purpose of this study is to determine the new source and mechanism of sedimentation in Pine Gully, document changes from sedimentation, and determine a solution to prevent future sedimentation. Sedimentation in Pine Gully and coastal areas adjacent to Pine Gully has occurred in a region that has experienced subsidence and sea level rise. The sedimentation in Pine Gully is a direct result of new and sustained sediment at the mouth of Pine Gully. These new sediments are transported into Pine Gully by displacement waves from ships moving through the Houston Ship Channel. Beach renourishment at Wright Beach, located a half mile north of Pine Gully, occurred as Pine Gully experienced sedimentation. Construction of a breakwater at the mouth of Pine Gully and subsequent removal of sediment in Pine Gully itself is ultimately the solution to revitalizing the wetland to its pre-sedimentation state. Replanting of native vegetation killed off by sedimentation is recommended and would hasten the recovery of the wetland. Documenting the effects of this unique sedimentation in Pine Gully has implications for the future. Beach renourishment or coastal projects that may contribute excess sediment to the coastline should be concerned with unintended effects they may cause. Although an historically eroding shoreline exists, the effects of excess sedimentation can be severe. A coastal study should be done before sediment is added to the shoreline to identify any areas within the sphere of influence of the project. Ecosystems determined to be within the sphere of influence by a coastal study should implement preventative measures at those locations to avoid an ecological disaster similar to that in Pine Gully.

Culver, Wesley Richard

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Characterization of UNUSUAL LATERAL ORGANS : a miRNA regulated F-Box protein  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

between ULO and the HD-ZIP proteins in planta. Anotherof homodomain-leucine zipper (HD-Zip) proteins. Plant SignalKANADI and class III HD-Zip gene families regulate embryo

Smith, Peter Thomas

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Whole genome sequence of an unusual Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato isolate  

SciTech Connect

Human Lyme disease is caused by a number of related Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato species. We report here the complete genome sequence of Borrelia sp. isolate SV1 from Finland. This isolate is to date the closest known relative of B. burgdorferi sensu stricto, but it is sufficiently genetically distinct from that species that it and its close relatives warrant its candidacy for new-species status. We suggest that this isolate should be named 'Borrelia finlandensis.'

Casjens, S.R.; Dunn, J.; Fraser-Liggett, C. M.; Mongodin, E. F.; Qiu, W. G.; Luft, B. J.; Schutzer, S. E.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "income excluding unusual" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Altered mental status, an unusual manifestation of early disseminated Lyme disease: A case report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Early disseminated Lyme disease can have a myriad of central nervous system manifestations. These run the gamut from meningitis to radiculopathy and cranial neuropathy. Here we present a case that manifested with only acute mental status change in the setting of central nervous system involvement with Lyme disease. A paucity of other central nervous system manifestations is rare, especially with positive serum and cerebrospinal fluid markers. This article underscores the importance of a high index of clinical suspicion in detection of Lyme disease related manifestations in endemic areas. Background Lyme disease is a multisystem inflammatory disease caused by spirochetes, known collectively as Borrelia burgdorferi, which are spread by the bite of infected Ixodes ticks. Lyme disease was first described in studies of an outbreak of "juvenile rheumatoid arthritis " in Connecticut [1]. It is endemic in the states of Massachusetts, Connecticut,

Shiven B Chabria; Jock Lawrason

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Case Study of an Unusual Long-Range Sulfur Transport Episode  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations of extremely high fine particulate sulfur concentrations during early April 1983 in the western United States are linked to a strong cyclone over the midwestern United States. The strong winds around this cyclone circulated polluted ...

James F. Bresch; Elmar R. Reiter

1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Unusually Long Duration, Multiple-Doppler Radar Observations of a Front in a Convective Boundary Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dual-Doppler observations acquired by a network of mobile radars deployed in the Oklahoma panhandle on 3 June 2002 are used to document the kinematic structure and evolution of a front. The data were collected during the International H2O Project ...

John R. Stonitsch; Paul M. Markowski

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

A new modification of an old framework: Hofmann layers with unusual tetracyanidometallate groups  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cyanidometallate complexes are highly versatile building units for the generation of functional porous materials. Here we report five new pillared Hofmann layer compounds incorporating the tetracyanidometallates [MoO(CN){sub 4}]{sup 2-} and [MnN(CN){sub 4}]{sup 2-}. These metalloligands, which are new to this class of materials, have been combined with divalent 1st-row transition metals to produce Hofmann layers that are linked into three-dimensional frameworks by ditopic bridging dipyridyls. We report the structures and anomalous thermal expansion properties of five new materials: [Mn(H{sub 2}O)(bpy){sub 1/2}{l_brace}MoO(CN){sub 4}(bpy){sub 1/2}{r_brace}] {center_dot} 2H{sub 2}O (1), [Mn(H{sub 2}O)(bpy){sub 1/2}{l_brace}MnN(CN){sub 4}(bpy){sub 1/2}{r_brace}] {center_dot} 2H{sub 2}O (2), [Fe(H{sub 2}O)(bpy){sub 1/2}{l_brace}MnN(CN){sub 4}(bpy){sub 1/2}{r_brace}] {center_dot} 2H{sub 2}O (3), [Co(H{sub 2}O)(bpy){sub 1/2}{l_brace}MnN(CN){sub 4}(bpy){sub 1/2}{r_brace}] {center_dot} 2H{sub 2}O (4) and [{l_brace}Mn(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}{r_brace}{sub 1/2}{l_brace}Mn(bpa){sub 2}{r_brace}{sub 1/2}{l_brace}MoO(CN){sub 4}(bpa){sub 1/2}{r_brace}] {center_dot} MeOH (5), (where bpy = 4,4'-bipyridine and bpa = 4,4'-bipyridylacetylene).

Keene, Tony D.; Murphy, Michael J.; Price, Jason R.; Price, David J.; Kepert, Cameron J. (Sydney)

2012-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

405

Allyl m-Trifluoromethyldiazirine Mephobarbital: An Unusually Potent Enantioselective and Photoreactive Barbiturate General Anesthetic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We synthesized 5-allyl-1-methyl-5-(m-trifluoromethyl-diazirynylphenyl)barbituric acid (14), a trifluoromethyldiazirine-containing derivative of general anesthetic mephobarbital, separated the racemic mixture into enantiomers by chiral chromatography, and determined the configuration of the (+)-enantiomer as S by X-ray crystallography. Additionally, we obtained the {sup 3}H-labeled ligand with high specific radioactivity. R-(-)-14 is an order of magnitude more potent than the most potent clinically used barbiturate, thiopental, and its general anesthetic EC{sub 50} approaches those for propofol and etomidate, whereas S-(+)-14 is 10-fold less potent. Furthermore, at concentrations close to its anesthetic potency, R-(-)-14 both potentiated GABA-induced currents and increased the affinity for the agonist muscimol in human {alpha}1{beta}2/3{gamma}2L GABA{sub A} receptors. Finally, R-(-)-14 was found to be an exceptionally efficient photolabeling reagent, incorporating into both {alpha}1 and {beta}3 subunits of human {alpha}1{beta}3 GABAA receptors. These results indicate R-(-)-14 is a functional general anesthetic that is well-suited for identifying barbiturate binding sites on Cys-loop receptors.

Savechenkov, Pavel Y.; Zhang, Xi; Chiara, David C.; Stewart, Deirdre S.; Ge, Rile; Zhou, Xiaojuan; Raines, Douglas E.; Cohen, Jonathan B.; Forman, Stuart A.; Miller, Keith W.; Bruzik, Karol S. (Harvard-Med); (Mass. Gen. Hosp.); (UIC)

2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

406

Radiation Protection at Industrial Radiography in Germany Exposures and Unusual Events  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. In the Federal Republic of Germany safety related events in the use and transportation of radioactive materials as well as in the operation of accelerators are registered. The analysis of these events reveals their causation and allows this conclusions on avoidable errors. In this paper, a special insight is given into events in the field of gamma radiography which is a technical application of ionising radiation for non destructive testing of materials. Conclusions from analysis are drawn. In addition, the occupational radiation exposure of workers is presented taking into account that industrial radiography is performed under particular working conditions with different risks. 1.

Renate Czarwinski; Uwe Häusler; Gerhard Frasch; Bundesamt Für; Strahlenschutz Fachbereich Strahlenschutz Und Gesundheit

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

The Unusual Behavior and Precipitation Pattern Associated with Tropical Storm Ignacio (1997)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A case study of eastern North Pacific Tropical Storm Ignacio (1997), which brought rainfall to the southwestern United States as a tropical cyclone and to the northwestern United States as an extratropical cyclone, is presented. This tropical ...

Kimberly M. Wood; Elizabeth A. Ritchie

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Unusual defects in silicon carbide thin films grown by multiple or interrupted growth technique  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses the growth and characterization of 3C-SiC films on Si (100) and (111) substrates using hexamethyldisilane (HMDS) as the source material in a resistance-heated furnace as well as the formation and microstructure of various types of ... Keywords: 3C-SiC, 3C-SiC nanowires, CVD, Defects, HMDS, Interrupted growth, Voids

A. Gupta; C. Jacob

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

An unusual 3D interdigitated architecture assembled from Keggin polyoxometalates and dinuclear copper(II) complexes  

SciTech Connect

A novel organic-inorganic hybrid compound, [Cu{sub 2}(bipy){sub 3}({mu}{sub 1}-H{sub 2}O){sub 2}({mu}{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O)({mu}{sub 2}-OH)(H{sub 2}BW{sub 12}O{sub 40})]{center_dot}4 H{sub 2}O (1) (bipy=4,4 Prime -bipy), has been synthesized in hydrothermal condition and characterized by elemental analysis, IR spectrum, TG analysis and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Compound 1 possesses poly-pendant layered motifs composed of 12-tungstoborates and dinuclear copper(II) complexes, in which the mono-coordinated bipy molecules are orderly appended to both sides of the layer, respectively. Adjacent layers mutually engage in a zipper-like pattern to result in a novel 3D interdigitated architecture. The variable-temperature magnetic susceptibility of 1 showed that there existed weak antiferromagnetic interaction in 1. Toward the reduction of hydrogen peroxide, 1 has good electrocatalytic activity and remarkable stability. - A new compound has been obtained, which represents the first interdigitated architecture assembled by POMs and dinuclear copper(II) complexes. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The first example of interdigitated architecture assembled by POMs and dinuclear copper(II) complexes is observed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A zipper-like pattern is observed in the structure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The IR, TG, XRPD, magnetism and electrochemical property of the title compound were studied.

Pang, Haijun; Yang, Ming; Kang, Lu [Key Laboratory of Green Chemical Engineering and Technology of College of Heilongjiang Province, College of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Harbin University of Science and Technology, Harbin 150040 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Green Chemical Engineering and Technology of College of Heilongjiang Province, College of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Harbin University of Science and Technology, Harbin 150040 (China); Ma, Huiyuan, E-mail: mahy017@nenu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Green Chemical Engineering and Technology of College of Heilongjiang Province, College of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Harbin University of Science and Technology, Harbin 150040 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Green Chemical Engineering and Technology of College of Heilongjiang Province, College of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Harbin University of Science and Technology, Harbin 150040 (China); Liu, Bo, E-mail: liubo200400@vip.sina.com [Key Laboratory of Green Chemical Engineering and Technology of College of Heilongjiang Province, College of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Harbin University of Science and Technology, Harbin 150040 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Green Chemical Engineering and Technology of College of Heilongjiang Province, College of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Harbin University of Science and Technology, Harbin 150040 (China); Li, Shaobin; Liu, Heng [Key Laboratory of Green Chemical Engineering and Technology of College of Heilongjiang Province, College of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Harbin University of Science and Technology, Harbin 150040 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Green Chemical Engineering and Technology of College of Heilongjiang Province, College of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Harbin University of Science and Technology, Harbin 150040 (China)

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

410

Discovery of an Unusual Dwarf Galaxy in the Outskirts of the Milky Way  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this Letter, we announce the discovery of a new dwarf galaxy, Leo T, in the Local Group. It was found as a stellar overdensity in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 5 (SDSS DR5). The color-magnitude diagram of Leo T shows two well-defined features, which we interpret as a red giant branch and a sequence of young, massive stars. As judged from fits to the color-magnitude diagram, it lies at a distance of about 420 kpc and has an intermediate-age stellar population with a metallicity of [Fe/H]= -1.6, together with a young population of blue stars of age of 200 Myr. There is a compact cloud of neutral hydrogen with mass roughly 10^5 solar masses and radial velocity 35 km/s coincident with the object visible in the HIPASS channel maps. Leo T is the smallest, lowest luminosity galaxy found to date with recent star-formation. It appears to be a transition object similar to, but much lower luminosity than, the Phoenix dwarf.

Irwin, M J; Evans, N W; Ryan-Weber, E V; De Jong, J T A; Koposov, S; Zucker, D B; Hodgkin, S T; Gilmore, G; Prema, P; Hebb, L; Begum, A; Fellhauer, M; Hewett, P C; Kennicutt, R C; Wilkinson, M I; Bramich, D M; Vidrih, S; Rix, H W; Beers, T C; Barentine, J C; Brewington, H; Harvanek, M; Krzesínski, J; Long, D; Nitta, A; Snedden, S A

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Discovery of an Unusual Dwarf Galaxy in the Outskirts of the Milky Way  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this Letter, we announce the discovery of a new dwarf galaxy, Leo T, in the Local Group. It was found as a stellar overdensity in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 5 (SDSS DR5). The color-magnitude diagram of Leo T shows two well-defined features, which we interpret as a red giant branch and a sequence of young, massive stars. As judged from fits to the color-magnitude diagram, it lies at a distance of about 420 kpc and has an intermediate-age stellar population with a metallicity of [Fe/H]= -1.6, together with a young population of blue stars of age of 200 Myr. There is a compact cloud of neutral hydrogen with mass roughly 10^5 solar masses and radial velocity 35 km/s coincident with the object visible in the HIPASS channel maps. Leo T is the smallest, lowest luminosity galaxy found to date with recent star-formation. It appears to be a transition object similar to, but much lower luminosity than, the Phoenix dwarf.

M. J. Irwin; V. Belokurov; N. W. Evans; E. V. Ryan-Weber; J. T. A. de Jong; S. Koposov; D. B. Zucker; S. T. Hodgkin; G. Gilmore; P. Prema; L. Hebb; A. Begum; M. Fellhauer; P. C. Hewett; R. C. Kennicutt, Jr.; M. I. Wilkinson; D. M. Bramich; S. Vidrih; H. -W. Rix; T. C. Beers; J. C. Barentine; H. Brewington; M. Harvanek; J. Krzesinski; D. Long; A. Nitta; S. A. Snedden

2007-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

412

AMBIENT HYDROCARBONS IN THE HOUSTON METROPOLITAN AREA DURING TEXAQS 2000: AN IDENTIFICATION OF UNUSUAL FEATURES.  

SciTech Connect

Houston's ozone problem has been linked to the occurrence of very high light olefin concentrations. We have analyzed the DOE G-1 aircraft hydrocarbon data set to provide additional information on the geographic distribution and prevalence of air samples with high olefin concentration as well as an identification of other compounds which contribute to the high hydrocarbon reactivity in Houston. In order to identify high concentrations we need a definition of normal. For that purpose we use aircraft samples collected during a 1999 aircraft based field campaign in Philadelphia relying on the circumstance that the frequency distributions of NO{sub x} and C{sub 2}H{sub 2} in Philadelphia are nearly the same as in Houston. Comparison is made also with hydrocarbons collected in Phoenix which exhibit nearly the same NO{sub x} and C{sub 2}H{sub 2} frequency distribution as the other 2 cities, but in spite of that similarity have a much lower hydrocarbon reactivity. As in other studies we find that there is a subset of Houston hydrocarbon samples with very high OH-reactivity due to elevated concentrations of ethylene, propylene and less often butenes, including 1,3 butadiene. Although these samples stand out as being qualitatively different we present evidence that ethylene and propylene are significantly elevated in at least half of the Houston samples, covering a wide geographic area apart from the Ship Channel region. Frequency distributions for these compounds are log normal suggesting that Houston's atmosphere is a single entity rather than separate industrial and urban areas. The comparison between Houston and Philadelphia also identifies C{sub 2}-C{sub 5} alkanes, n-hexane, and benzene as having elevated concentrations. Emission reductions of these less reactive compounds sufficient to yield the concentrations observed in Philadelphia would have a minor effect on the most reactive samples, but about a 20% effect on samples with more typical (median) reactivity.

KLEINMAN, L.I.; DAUM P.H.

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Detection of Bipolar Flow toward an Unusual SiO Maser Source IRAS 19312+1950  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report a result of an interferometric observation toward an SiO maser source, IRAS 19312+1950, in the HCO+ J=1-0 line with the Berkeley-Illinois-Maryland-Association (BIMA) Millimeter Array. In the spatially integrated spectrum of HCO+, two kinematic components were seen: a strong line with a narrow width (~2 km/s, narrow component), and a weak symmetric line with a broad width (~60 km/s, broad component). The line profile of HCO+ are reminiscent of that of CO. In the integrated intensity map, we found a pronounced bipolar shape consisting of lower-velocity parts of the broad component. The higher-velocity part of the broad component originated in a relatively small region (component clearly correlated with near-infrared structure. The position-velocity diagrams indicated presence of a bipolar outflow with an expansion velocity of about 10 km/s. On the basis of the present results, we suggest that the nature of the bipolar flow seen in IRAS 19312+1950 is explained by hydrodynamical interaction between an AGB wind and ambient material with axial symmetric structure.

Jun-ichi Nakashima; Shuji Deguchi

2004-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

414

The Unusual Midwinter Warming in the Southern Hemisphere Stratosphere 2002: A Comparison to Northern Hemisphere Phenomena  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A strong midwinter warming occurred in the Southern Hemisphere (SH) stratosphere in September 2002. Based on experiences from the Northern Hemisphere (NH), this event can be defined as a major warming with a breakdown of the polar vortex in ...

Kirstin Krüger; Barbara Naujokat; Karin Labitzke

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Monte Carlo Modelling of the Electron Spectra of 235U- and 239Pu- Films, Irradiated by Thermal Neutrons, Due to All Possible Mechanisms Excluding b-Decay. Comparison With Experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The electron energy spectra, not connected to b-decay, of 235U- and 239Pu-films, irradiated by thermal neutrons, obtained by a Monte Carlo method is presented in the given work. The modelling was performed with the help of a computer code MCNP4C (Monte Carlo Neutron Photon transport code system), allowing to carry out the computer experiments on joint transport of neutrons, photons and electrons. The experiment geometry and the parameters of an irradiation were the same, as in [11] (the thickness of a foil varied only). As a result of computer experiments, the electron spectra was obtained for the samples of 235U, 239Pu and uranium dioxide of 93 % enrichment representing a set of films of 22 mm in diameter and different thickness: 0,001 mm, 0,005 mm, 0,02 mm, 0,01 mm, 0,1 mm, 1,0 mm; and also for the uranium dioxide film of 93 % enrichment (diameter 22 mm and thickness 0,01mm), located between two protective 0,025 mm aluminium disks (the conditions of experiment in [11]) and the electron spectrum was fixed at the output surface of a protective disk. The comparative analysis of the experimental [11] and calculated b--spectra is carried out.

V. D. Rusova; V. N. Pavlovychb; V. A. Tarasova; S. V. Iaroshenkob; D. A. Litvinova

2004-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

416

Monte Carlo Modelling of the Electron Spectra of 235U- and 239Pu- Films, Irradiated by Thermal Neutrons, Due to All Possible Mechanisms Excluding b-Decay. Comparison With Experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The electron energy spectra, not connected to b-decay, of 235U- and 239Pu-films, irradiated by thermal neutrons, obtained by a Monte Carlo method is presented in the given work. The modelling was performed with the help of a computer code MCNP4C (Monte Carlo Neutron Photon transport code system), allowing to carry out the computer experiments on joint transport of neutrons, photons and electrons. The experiment geometry and the parameters of an irradiation were the same, as in [11] (the thickness of a foil varied only). As a result of computer experiments, the electron spectra was obtained for the samples of 235U, 239Pu and uranium dioxide of 93 % enrichment representing a set of films of 22 mm in diameter and different thickness: 0,001 mm, 0,005 mm, 0,02 mm, 0,01 mm, 0,1 mm, 1,0 mm; and also for the uranium dioxide film of 93 % enrichment (diameter 22 mm and thickness 0,01mm), located between two protective 0,025 mm aluminium disks (the conditions of experiment in [11]) and the electron spectrum was fixed at...

Rusova, V D; Tarasova, V A; Iaroshenkob, S V; Litvinova, D A

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Analysis & Projections - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) -  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Not All Subsidies Impacting the Energy Sector Are Included in this Report Not All Subsidies Impacting the Energy Sector Are Included in this Report This report only includes subsidies meeting the following criteria: they are provided by the federal government, they provide a financial benefit with an identifiable FY 2010 federal budget impact, and, they are specifically targeted at energy. These criteria, particularly the energy-specific requirement, exclude some subsidies that benefit the energy sector. Some of the subsidies excluded from this analysis are discussed below. For example, Section 199 of the American Jobs Creation Act of 2004, referred to as the domestic manufacturing deduction, provides reductions in taxable income for American manufacturers, including domestic oil and gas producers and refiners. The value of the Section 199 deduction in FY 2010

418

Building community in low-income areas : designing a new architectural language for community centers in Jordan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The aim of this thesis is to develop a vocabulary of principles to be used in the design of future community centers in Jordan. Community centers provide the stage for bringing members of the community together to meet and ...

Ali, Dalia Osama

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Natural Gas Income: Year-end strategies that can reduce the tax bite. Robin L. Kuleck, MSEd, CFCS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. While most DIY'ers have switched from paper, pencil and calculator to using computer software's) and Certified Financial Planners (CFP's). Regardless of whether you are a tax DIY'er or use a paid preparer

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

420

Microsoft Word - INCOMING.EM SSAB Chairs Letter2010-2.Baseline Budget.September 2010_FINAL_  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SSAB Chairs' Recommendation 2010-2 SSAB Chairs' Recommendation 2010-2 ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SITE-SPECIFIC ADVISORY BOARD ________________________________________________________________________________________________ Hanford Idaho Nevada Northern New Mexico Oak Ridge Paducah Portsmouth Savannah River ________________________________________________________________________________________________ September 2, 2010 Inés R. Triay Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management U.S. Department of Energy, EM-1 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585 Dear Assistant Secretary Triay: The Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB) Chairs are very pleased with the boost in clean-up that each of our respective sites received from the

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421

Development of an income-based hedonic monetization model for the assessment of aviation-related noise impacts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aviation is an industry that has seen tremendous growth in the last several decades. With demand for aviation projected to rise at an annual rate of 5% over the next 20 to 25 years, it is important to consider technological, ...

He, Qinxian, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Cost effective interventions for the prevention of cardiovascular disease in low and middle income countries: a systematic review  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Rexrode KM, Kumanyika SK, Appel LJ, Whelton PK: Long term effects of dietary sodium reduction on cardiovascular disease outcomes: observational follow-up of the trials of hypertension prevention (TOHP). BMJ 2007, 334(7599):885–888. 7. Mendis S, Fukino K... , Rexrode KM, Kumanyika SK, Appel LJ, Whelton PK: Long term effects of dietary sodium reduction on cardiovascular disease outcomes: observational follow-up of the trials of hypertension prevention (TOHP). BMJ 2007, 334(7599):885–888. 7. Mendis S, Fukino K...

Shroufi, Amir; Chowdhury, Rajiv; Anchala, Raghupathy; Stevens, Sarah; Blanco, Patricia; Han, Tha; Niessen, Louis; Franco, Oscar H

2013-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

423

Safe Routes to School Local School Project: A health evaluation at 10 low-income schools  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with Active Commuting to School Among US Adolescents.2004. Safe Routes to School: Practice and Promise. (DOT-HS-Director), Safe Routes to School National Partnership Design

Cooper, Jill F MSW; McMillan, Tracy MPH, PHD

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

The provision of low-income housing within the context of a new town in Lazard Cardenas - Las Truchas, Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis is essentially the description of the shelter components of a World Bank co-financed urban development project in the new town of Lazaro Cardenas and its twin, the poor city of Guacamayas. The document presents ...

Lawrence, Juan Marcos

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Executive Summary Harrison County posted job, population, and per capita personal income gains during the past five  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and perhaps even a downturn. Further, skyrocketing oil prices have the potential to adversely impact=1.000) Oil - West Texas Intermediate 72.18 105.13 96.65 92.00 90.01 88.00 ($ per barrel) Key Prices Percent become relatively expensive to our major trading partners, while foreign imports become relatively

Mohaghegh, Shahab

426

Strategizing for housing : an investigation of the production and regulation of low-income housing in the suburgs of Beirut  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The current consensus in housing policy recognizes the importance of learning from rather than about informal settlements. To serve this end, this dissertation presents a novel methodology for investigating land and housing ...

Fawaz, Mona M., 1972-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Incoming Solar and Infrared Radiation Derived from METEOSAT: Impact on the Modeled Land Water and Energy Budget over France  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Land Surface Analysis Satellite Applications Facility (LSA SAF) project radiation fluxes, derived from the Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) geostationary satellite, were used in the Interactions between Soil, Biosphere, and Atmosphere (ISBA) ...

D. Carrer; S. Lafont; J.-L. Roujean; J.-C. Calvet; C. Meurey; P. Le Moigne; I. F. Trigo

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Short run price elasticity of residential electricity demand within income levels and the implications for CO2 policy.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis investigates the relationship between price and use of electricity in residential homes in order to understand the impact of CO2 policy. A model… (more)

Green, Eric

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Examining the Effect of the Earned Income Tax Credit on the Labor Market Participation of Families on Welfare  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Act (PRWORA) abolished AFDC in 1996. And aggregate GDPScholz (2002), the ratio of AFDC recipients reported in thepercent in 1996. The ratio of AFDC dollars to administrative

Hotz, V. Joseph; Mullin, Charles H.; Scholz, John Karl

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Performance of a silicon photovoltaic module under enhanced illumination and selective filtration of incoming radiation with simultaneous cooling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A promising option to reduce the cost of silicon photovoltaic systems is to concentrate the sunlight incident on the solar cells to increase the output power. However, this leads to higher module temperatures which affects performance adversely and may also cause long term damage. Proper cooling is therefore necessary to operate the system under concentrated radiation. The present work was undertaken to circumvent the problem in practical manner. A suitable liquid, connected to a heat exchanger, was placed in the housing of the photovoltaic module and unwanted wavelengths of solar radiation were filtered out to minimise overheating of the cells. The selection of the liquid was based on factors such as boiling point, transparency towards visible radiation, absorption of infrared and ultraviolet radiation, stability, flow characteristics, heat transfer properties, and electrical nonconductivity. Using a square parabolic type reflector, more than two fold increase in output power was realised on a clear sunny day employing a 0.13 m{sup 2} silicon solar module. Without the cooling arrangement the panel temperature rose uncontrollably. (author)

Maiti, Subarna; Vyas, Kairavi; Ghosh, Pushpito K. [Process Design and Engineering Cell, Central Salt and Marine Chemicals Research Institute (Council of Scientific and Industrial Research), G.B. Marg, Bhavnagar 364002, Gujarat (India)

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

431

Design and Evaluation of a Net Zero Energy Low-Income Residential Housing Development in Lafayette, Colorado  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This abbreviated report outlines the lessons learned and sub-metered energy performance of an ultra low energy single family ranch home and duplex unit, called the Paradigm Pilot Project and presents the final design recommendations for a 153-unit net zero energy residential development called the Josephine Commons Project.

Dean, J.; Van Geet, O.; Simkus, S.; Eastment, M.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Food Security Among California's Low-Income Adults Improves, But Most Severely Affected Do Not Share in Improvement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the WIC Program on Food Security Status of Pregnant First-Insecurity and Very Low Food Security Among Adults Age 18M, Carlson S. Household Food Security in the United States,

Harrison, Gail G.; Sharp, Matthew; Manolo-LeClair, George; al., et

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Final report. [Impact of tropospheric aerosols on the past surface radiation income: Calibration with ARM site data  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This work involved a comparison of surface solar radiation observations from the SOCMET-DATA BASE from 1960-1990 and results from a General Circulation Model to test and evaluate the effects of tropospheric aerosols on clouds.

Kukla, George

2001-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

434

Achieving Six Sigma printed circuit board yields by improving incoming component quality and using a PCBA prioritization algorithm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Printed circuit board assemblies (PCBAs) are the backbone of the electronics industry. PCBA technologies are keeping pace with Moore's Law and will soon enable the convergence of video, voice, data, and mobility onto a ...

Davis, Daniel Jacob

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

EXTREMELY RAPID STAR CLUSTER DISRUPTION IN HIGH-SHEAR CIRCUMNUCLEAR STARBURST RINGS: THE UNUSUAL CASE OF NGC 7742  

SciTech Connect

All known mass distributions of recently formed star cluster populations resemble a 'universal' power-law function. Here we assess the impact of the extremely disruptive environment in NGC 7742's circumnuclear starburst ring on the early evolution of the galaxy's high-mass ({approx}10{sup 5}-10{sup 7} M{sub Sun }) star cluster population. Surprisingly, and contrary to expectations, at all ages-including the youngest, {approx}< 15 Myr-the cluster mass functions are robustly and verifiably represented by lognormal distributions that resemble those commonly found only for old, evolved globular cluster systems in the local universe. This suggests that the high-shear conditions in the NGC 7742 starburst ring may significantly speed up dynamical star cluster destruction. This enhanced mass-dependent disruption rate at very young ages might be caused by a combination of the starburst ring's high density and the shear caused by the counterrotating gas disk.

De Grijs, Richard; Anders, Peter, E-mail: grijs@pku.edu.cn, E-mail: anders@pku.edu.cn [Kavli Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Peking University, Yi He Yuan Lu 5, Hai Dian District, Beijing 100871 (China)

2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

436

Unusual mechanism for the short-range electron transfer within gold-alkanethiol-ionic-liquid films of subnanometer thickness  

SciTech Connect

Exploiting nanoscopically tunable composite gold-alkanethiol-ionic-liquid/ferrocene self-assembled systems with tunable electron transfer distance, we discovered in the case of thinner alkanethiol films a thermally activated electron transfer pattern totally controlled by the viscosity-related slow relaxation mode(s) of the ionic liquid acting as the reactant's fluctuating environment. This pattern manifested through the activation enthalpy and volume parameters that are identical to those for viscous flow was explained in terms of the extreme adiabatic mechanism with a vanishing Marcus barrier (via the exponential Franck-Condon-like term approaching unity).

Khoshtariya, Dimitri E. [Department of Physics and Institute for Biophysics and Bionanosciences, I. Javakhishvili Tbilisi State University, I. Chavchavadze Avenue 3, 0128 Tbilisi, Georgia (United States); Department of Chemistry and Pharmacy, University of Erlangen-Nuernberg, Egerlandstrasse 1, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Institute of Molecular Biology and Biophysics and Institute of Inorganic Chemistry and Electrochemistry, Gotua 12, 0160 Tbilisi, Georgia (United States); Dolidze, Tina D. [Department of Chemistry and Pharmacy, University of Erlangen-Nuernberg, Egerlandstrasse 1, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Institute of Molecular Biology and Biophysics and Institute of Inorganic Chemistry and Electrochemistry, Gotua 12, 0160 Tbilisi, Georgia (United States); Eldik, Rudi van [Department of Chemistry and Pharmacy, University of Erlangen-Nuernberg, Egerlandstrasse 1, 91058 Erlangen (Germany)

2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

437

Unusual nucleotide content of Rubella virus genome as a consequence of biased RNA-editing: comparison with Alphaviruses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The usage of cytosine in third codon positions of 22 complete Rubella virus genomes (52.4%) is significantly higher than the usage of guanine (28.9%), adenine (6.9%) and uracil (11.8%). ...

Vladislav Victorovich Khrustalev; Eugene Victorovich Barkovsky

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Unusually effective microRNA targeting within repeat-rich coding regions of mammalian mRNAs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate numerous biological processes by base-pairing with target messenger RNAs (mRNAs), primarily through sites in 3? untranslated regions (UTRs), to direct the repression of these targets. Although ...

Schnall-Levin, Michael

439

The Crystal Structure and Mechanism of an Unusual Oxidoreductase, GilR, Involved in Gilvocarcin V Biosynthesis  

SciTech Connect

GilR is a recently identified oxidoreductase that catalyzes the terminal step of gilvocarcin V biosynthesis and is a unique enzyme that establishes the lactone core of the polyketide-derived gilvocarcin chromophore. Gilvocarcin-type compounds form a small distinct family of anticancer agents that are involved in both photo-activated DNA-alkylation and histone H3 cross-linking. High resolution crystal structures of apoGilR and GilR in complex with its substrate pregilvocarcin V reveals that GilR belongs to the small group of a relatively new type of the vanillyl-alcohol oxidase flavoprotein family characterized by bicovalently tethered cofactors. GilR was found as a dimer, with the bicovalently attached FAD cofactor mediated through His-65 and Cys-125. Subsequent mutagenesis and functional assays indicate that Tyr-445 may be involved in reaction catalysis and in mediating the covalent attachment of FAD, whereas Tyr-448 serves as an essential residue initiating the catalysis by swinging away from the active site to accommodate binding of the 6R-configured substrate and consequently abstracting the proton of the hydroxyl residue of the substrate hemiacetal 6-OH group. These studies lay the groundwork for future enzyme engineering to broaden the substrate specificity of this bottleneck enzyme of the gilvocarcin biosynthetic pathway for the development of novel anti-cancer therapeutics.

Noinaj, Nicholas; Bosserman, Mary A.; Schickli, M. Alexandra; Piszczek, Grzegorz; Kharel, Madan K.; Pahari, Pallab; Buchanan, Susan K.; Rohr, Jürgen (NIH); (Kentucky)

2012-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

440

Ullrich-Turner phenotype with unusual manifestation in a patient with mosaicism 45,X/47,XX,+18  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report on a girl with Ullrich-Turner phenotype and 45,X/47,XX,+18 chromosomal mosaicism. Only two other patients with similar mosaicism have been reported, both girls with XY sex chromosome constitution. The face of the patient was highly asymmetric, the right side being almost normal, the left showing a typical Ullrich-Turner syndrome appearance. This clinical impression was strengthened by photographic doubling of both hemifaces. The patient had normal intelligence and did not show any stigmata of trisomy 18. 13 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

Franceschini, P.; Guala, A.; Camerano, P.; Franceschini, D.; Vardeu, M.P.; Signorile, F. [Universita di Torino (Italy)

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "income excluding unusual" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Reissner-Nordstrom Expansion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a classical mechanism for the cosmic expansion during the radiation-dominated era. This mechanism assumes that the Universe is a two-component gas. The first component is a gas of ultra-relativistic "normal" particles described by an equation of state of an ideal quantum gas of massless particles. The second component consist of "unusual" charged particles (namely, either with ultra-high charge or with ultra-high mass) that provide the important mechanism of expansion due to their interaction with the "normal" component of the gas. This interaction is described by the Reissner--Nordstr\\"om metric purely geometrically -- the ``unusual'' particles are modeled as zero-dimensional naked singularities inside spheres of gravitational repulsion. The radius of a repulsive sphere is inversely proportional to the energy of an incoming particle or the temperature. The expansion mechanism is based on the inflating of the "unusual" particles (of charge $Q$) with the drop of the temperature -- this drives apart all neutral particles and particles of specific charge $q/m$ such that ${sign}(Q) q/m \\ge - 1$. The Reissner--Nordstr\\"om expansion naturally ends at recombination. We discuss the range of model parameters within which the proposed expansion mechanism is consistent with the restrictions regarding quantum effects.

Emil M. Prodanov; Rossen I. Ivanov; V. G. Gueorguiev

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Engineering study of the potential uses of salts from selective crystallization of Hanford tank wastes  

SciTech Connect

The Clean Salt Process (CSP) is the fractional crystallization of nitrate salts from tank waste stored on the Hanford Site. This study reviews disposition options for a CSP product made from Hanford Site tank waste. These options range from public release to onsite low-level waste disposal to no action. Process, production, safety, environment, cost, schedule, and the amount of CSP material which may be used are factors considered in each option. The preferred alternative is offsite release of clean salt. Savings all be generated by excluding the material from low-level waste stabilization. Income would be received from sales of salt products. Savings and income from this alternative amount to $1,027 million, excluding the cost of CSP operations. Unless public sale of CSP products is approved, the material should be calcined. The carbonate form of the CSP could then be used as ballast in tank closure and stabilization efforts. Not including the cost of CSP operations, savings of $632 million would be realized. These savings would result from excluding the material from low-level waste stabilization and reducing purchases of chemicals for caustic recycle and stabilization and closure. Dose considerations for either alternative are favorable. No other cost-effective alternatives that were considered had the capacity to handle significant quantities of the CSP products. If CSP occurs, full-scale tank-waste stabilization could be done without building additional treatment facilities after Phase 1 (DOE 1996). Savings in capital and operating cost from this reduction in waste stabilization would be in addition to the other gains described.

Hendrickson, D.W.

1996-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

443

Structural basis of error-prone replication and stalling at a thymine base by human DNA polymerase  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Human DNA polymerase iota (pol iota) is a unique member of Y-family polymerases, which preferentially misincorporates nucleotides opposite thymines (T) and halts replication at T bases. The structural basis of the high error rates remains elusive. We present three crystal structures of pol complexed with DNA containing a thymine base, paired with correct or incorrect incoming nucleotides. A narrowed active site supports a pyrimidine to pyrimidine mismatch and excludes Watson-Crick base pairing by pol. The template thymine remains in an anti conformation irrespective of incoming nucleotides. Incoming ddATP adopts a syn conformation with reduced base stacking, whereas incorrect dGTP and dTTP maintain anti conformations with normal base stacking. Further stabilization of dGTP by H-bonding with Gln59 of the finger domain explains the preferential T to G mismatch. A template 'U-turn' is stabilized by pol and the methyl group of the thymine template, revealing the structural basis of T stalling. Our structural and domain-swapping experiments indicate that the finger domain is responsible for pol's high error rates on pyrimidines and determines the incorporation specificity.

Kirouac, Kevin N.; Ling, Hong; (UWO)

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

444

The Determinants of Homeonwership in Presence of Shocks Experienced by Mexican Households  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Homeownership is both an individual and society objective, because of the positive neighborhood effects associated with areas of higher homeownership. To help realize these positive effects, the Mexican government has several programs directed to increasing homeownership. Many factors, however, may influence homeownership including shocks experienced by households. Shocks such as death in family, illness or accidents, unemployment, and business, crop, or livestock loss affect homeownership if households are unable to cushion the impact of the shock. Government income support programs, however, may help cushion the effect of a shock. The main objective is to determine how shocks that households’ experience and government income support programs influence homeownership in Mexico. A secondary objective is to determine how socio-demographic variables influence homeownership in Mexico. Based on the Random Utility Model, logit models of homeownership are estimated using data are from the 2002 Mexican National Survey on Living Levels of Households. Two models are estimated; with and without income. Income is excluded because of a large number of households that did not report income. Generally, inferences from the two models are similar. Homeownership appears to not be affected by shocks experienced by households. It appears households are able to cushion the impact of shocks. The two income support programs, the Program of Direct Rural Support of Mexico (PROGRESA) and the Program of Direct Rural Support of Mexico (PROCAMPO), appear to be increasing homeownership. These social welfare programs provide cash transfers to households. For whatever reason, PROGRESA has a larger effect on homeownership than PROCAMPO. Households with older heads have a larger probability of being a homeowner than households with younger heads. No statistically significance relationship exists between education and homeownership. Regional differences are seen in homeownership, with households located in the northwest region having a higher probability of homeownership than other regions. Differences in the significance of variable representing the household head’s gender, marital status, and occupation on homeownership exist between logit models that include and do not include current income. The most likely reason for these differences is interactions between the variables and a wealth effect.

Lopez Cabrera, Jesus 1977-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

A.12a (Pre-SAS 115) Letter to communicate significant deficiencies and/or material weaknesses in internal control over financial reporting noted in an audit of financial statements of a nonpublic entity, excluding FDICIA engagements (Rev. 1/08)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

I325 8 I325 8 (8-89) EFG (07-90) United States Government Department of Energy Memorandum DATE: December 22,2009 REPLY TO A I T N OF: IG-322 (A09FN006) SUBJECT: Management Letter on the Audit of the Department of Energy's Consolidated Financial Statements for Fiscal Year 2009 TO: Chief Financial Officer, CF- 1 Attached is the subject letter prepared by KPMG LLP, our contract auditors. The letter contains 21 new findings (see letter, Exhibit A) and 5 repeat findings (see letter, Exhibit B) that were issued during the course of the Fiscal Year 2009 audit of the Department of Energy's (Department) Consolidated Financial Statements. Management generally concurred with and provided planned corrective actions for most of the recommendations listed in the Management Letter and management's comments are

446

Number Description Administrative  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Public Warehousing --Including Farm ProductsSUITE HOTELS), Refrigerated Goods, Household Goods Exclude 4900 Utilities --Electric, Gas, Water, Sanitary Wholesale Trade - Durable Goods Exclude Exclude

447

file://C:\Documents%20and%20Settings\VM3\My%20Documents\hc6-3a_  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3a. Usage Indicators by Household Income, 3a. Usage Indicators by Household Income, Million U.S. Households, 2001 ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________ | | | | | | | 2001 Household Income | | Eli- | | | | | gible | | |___________________________________| | for | | | | | | | | Fed- |

448

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

T-1 T-1. Selected Financial Items (Billion 2009 Dollars) Income Statement Operating Revenues Operating Expenses Operating Income Interest Expense Other Income1

449

The impact of trade liberalisation on growth, poverty and income distribution: a dynamic computable general equilibrium analysis with an application to Vietnam.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In recent decades, there have been an increasingly large number of developing countries that have embraced external economic liberalisation policies. Following trade theory, trade liberalisation… (more)

Wong, Melissa Oi Ming

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Investigating the impacts of time-of-use electricity rates on lower-income and senior-headed households: A case study of Milton, Ontario (Canada).  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Through the Smart Metering Initiative in the Canadian province of Ontario, all residential electricity customers will be converted from a tiered rate regime to a… (more)

Simmons, Sarah Ivy

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Assessment of the Stage of Change for Increasing Fruit and Vegetable Availability and Accessibility in Low-income Families with Preschool Age Children.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The study utilized the Transtheoretical Model of Behavior Change to assess the psychosocial factors of decisional balance, self-efficacy and processes influencing availability and accessibility of… (more)

Hildebrand, Deana A.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Settings for collective control : design and programmatic propositions for the reinforcement of resident serive capacity in low-income housing developments/  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Major "redevelopment" projects are being planned and undertaken by the Boston Housing Authority to reverse the "cycle of deterioration" threatening the existence of most of Boston's largest and oldest public housing ...

Acton, Rad Collier

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Settlement patterns in the eastern coast of Maracaibo Lake, Venezuela : evaluation of existing settlements and model for a low income sector of El Menito new town  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis is divided in two parts; The First part is the physical analysis of residential settlements in the Eastern Coast of Maracaibo Lake, Venezuela. The work is based on surveys, evaluations and comparisons of four ...

Rodriguez Navas, Humberto José

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

What are the economic development impacts on U.S. counties of wind power projects, as defined by growth in per capita income  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of all new electric power capacity. ·Wind power plants are often developed in rural areas where local payments and employment growth during plant construction and operation. ·Wind energy represented 2What are the economic development impacts on U.S. counties of wind power projects, as defined

455

Energy-efficiency and environmental policies & income supplements in the UK: Their evolution and distributional impact in relation to domestic energy bills  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The paper examines the financial costs of energy-efficiency and environmental policies that directly affect domestic electricity and gas bills in the UK over time. It also attempts for the first time to work out the current distributional impacts...

Chawla, Mallika; Pollitt, Michael G.

2012-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

456

Low-income housing in Kampala, Uganda : a strategy package to overcome barriers for delivering housing opportunities affordable to the urban poor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The city of Kampala, Uganda, is struggling with a housing deficit that is compounding each year and creating market distortions that threaten to derail recent economic success and destabilize the social fabric of the ...

Mayer, Richard Campbell

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Collective economics : leveraging purchasing power of low-income communities for collective gain : Lawrence Community Works and the Network Advantage Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis focuses on the concept of Collective Economics and develops a set of recommendations by which groups with common interests can effectively utilize their purchasing power for collective benefits. Working with ...

Espino, Eric V

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Examining the Impact of Welfare Reform, Labor Market Conditions, and the Earned Income Tax Credit on the Employment of Black and White Single Mothers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Pre-PRWORA Waivers on AFDC Caseloads and Female Earnings,Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) with the purpose oflaw PRWORA, which dismantled AFDC and replaced it with TANF.

Noonan, Mary C.; Smith, Sandra S.; Corcoran, Mary E.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Outcomes for Low-Income Families under the Wisconsin AFDC Program: Understanding the Baseline So That We Can Estimate the Effects of Welfare Reform  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Poverty. Opinions expressed are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the sponsoring organization. The authors thank Hwanjoon Kim and Catherine O’Neill for their assistance with this project.

Maria Cancian; Thomas Kaplan; Daniel R. Meyer

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Build it-Will They Come?: A Study of the Adoption of Mobile Financial Services by Low Income Clients in South Africa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Globally, only a sixth of the approximately 3 billion impoverished people of working age currently have access to formal financial services, which translates to 17% coverage of the market, leaving 83% under-served. The growth of mobile telephony has ... Keywords: Customer Attitudes, Developing Countries, Financial Institutions, Mobile Financial Services, Mobile Phones

Prateek Shrivastava

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "income excluding unusual" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Field Test Evaluation of Conservation Retrofits of Low-Income, Single-Family Buildings in Wisconsin: Audit Field Test Implementation and Results  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the field test of a retrofit audit. The field test was performed during the winter of 1985-86 in four South Central Wisconsin counties. The purpose of the field test was to measure the energy savings and cost effectiveness of the audit-directed retrofit program for optimizing the programs benefit-to-cost ratio. The audit-directed retrofit program is described briefly in this report and in more detail by another report in this series (ORNL/CON-228/P3). The purpose of this report is to describe the methods and results of the field test. Average energy savings of the 20 retrofitted houses are likely (0.90 probability) to lie between 152 and 262 therms/year/house. The most likely value of the average savings is 207 therms/year/house. These savings are significantly (p < .05) smaller than the audit-predicted savings (286 therms/year/house). Measured savings of individual houses were significantly different than predicted savings for half of the houses. Each house received at least one retrofit. Thirteen of the 20 retrofitted houses received a new condensing furnace or blown-in wall insulation; all but two of the houses received one or more minor retrofits. The seven houses which received condensing furnaces saved, on average, about as much as predicted, but three of the seven houses had significantly more or less savings than predicted. The six houses which received wall insulation saved, on average, about half as much as predicted. The remaining houses which received only minor retrofits saved, on average, less than predicted, but the difference was not significant. Actual retrofit costs were close to expected costs. Overall measured energy savings averaged 15 therms/year per hundred retrofit dollars invested. Houses which received wall insulation or a condensing furnace did slightly better, and the houses which received only minor retrofits did poorly. When estimated program costs were included, average savings dropped to about 13 therms/year/per hundred dollars. The uncertainty associated with the energy savings means that these comparisons of savings and costs also have large uncertainties.

McCold, L.N.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Validation of the National Energy Audit (NEAT) with data from a gas utility low-income residential weatherization program in New York State  

SciTech Connect

This study uses two approaches to the validation of the National Energy Audit (NEAT). The first consists of comparisons of audit-predicted savings to savings observed in a pre- and post-retrofit analysis of metered gas consumption. Here, realization rates, which are the ratio of measured savings to audit-predicted savings, are examined for 49 houses to determine how accurately NEAT predicts savings in a field setting. The second approach involves assessing the accuracy of NEAT`s internal algorithms by comparing its results to those obtained with another engineering model, DOE-2.1E, which is an industry standard. In this analysis, both engineering models are applied to two houses, using the same building description data, and measure-specific estimates of savings are compared. 12 figs., 11 tabs.

Gettings, M.B.; Berry, L.G. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Beyer, M.A.; Maxwell, J.B. [Aspen Systems Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

The unusual stability of TATB (1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene): A review of the scientific literature  

SciTech Connect

This review is intended as an up-to-date review of the scientific literature on TATB since its discovery as a high explosive. In particular, it focuses on clarifying our current understanding of the relationship between the structure of TATB and its unique thermal stability. We review a large number of different publications by many authors. A small portion of the work on TATB'' presented actually consists of experimental studies on TATB formulated as PBX-9502 or as LX-17. Where relevant, this distinction is indicated. However, inasmuch as this review focuses on thermal response and the relationship of chemical reactivity to the molecular and lattice structure of TATB as a pure material, results from these other formulations may not be directly applicable, and in general we have omitted them. 4 refs.

Rice, S.F.; Simpson, R.L.

1990-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

464

A Challenging Solar Eruptive Event of 18 November 2003 and the Causes of the 20 November Geomagnetic Superstorm. I. Unusual History of an Eruptive Filament  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This is the first of four companion papers, which analyze a complex eruptive event of 18 November 2003 in AR 10501 and the causes of the largest Solar Cycle 23 geomagnetic storm on 20 November 2003. Analysis of a complete data set, not considered before, reveals a chain of eruptions to which hard X-ray and microwave bursts responded. A filament in AR 10501 was not a passive part of a larger flux rope, as usually considered. The filament erupted and gave origin to a CME. The chain of events was as follows: i) an eruption at 07:29 accompanied by a not reported M1.2 class flare associated with the onset of a first southeastern CME1, which is not responsible for the superstorm; ii) a confined eruption at 07:41 (M3.2 flare) that destabilized the filament; iii) the filament acceleration (07:56); iv) the bifurcation of the eruptive filament that transformed into a large cloud; v) an M3.9 flare in AR 10501 associated to this transformation. The transformation of the filament could be due to its interaction with the m...

Grechnev, V V; Slemzin, V A; Chertok, I M; Filippov, B P; Rudenko, G V; Temmer, M

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

The unusual stability of TATB (1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene): A review of the scientific literature  

SciTech Connect

This review is intended as an up-to-date review of the scientific literature on TATB since its discovery as a high explosive. In particular, it focuses on clarifying our current understanding of the relationship between the structure of TATB and its unique thermal stability. We review a large number of different publications by many authors. A small portion of the work on TATB'' presented actually consists of experimental studies on TATB formulated as PBX-9502 or as LX-17. Where relevant, this distinction is indicated. However, inasmuch as this review focuses on thermal response and the relationship of chemical reactivity to the molecular and lattice structure of TATB as a pure material, results from these other formulations may not be directly applicable, and in general we have omitted them. 4 refs.

Rice, S.F.; Simpson, R.L.

1990-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

466

A complex de novo translocation of chromosomes 4, 6 and 21 in a child with dysmorphic features and unusual hematological findings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 5 1/2-year-old white male was referred to our institution for evaluation of easy bruising confined to lower extremities since infancy. His family history is not significant with healthy parents and six normal siblings. Physical examination revealed weight and height both in 50th and 75th percentile, respectively. Major findings included macrocephaly with prominent forehead, hypertelorism with inner and outer canthus distances both above 97th percentile, epicanthus folds, normal ears with prominent upper pinnae, thin, sharp nose with pointed tip, neck with pterygium coli appearance and shortened clavicles, short thumbs with hyperconvex nails that curved around tip of fingers, abnormally bowed elbows and knee joints, prominent abdomen with omphalocele and flat feet with hypoplastic nails. He has a speech articulation problem which may be due to high arched palate. Hematological evaluation revealed PT/PTT values in normal range with prolonged bleeding time > 15 minutes. Because of abnormal elbow and knee joints, Mitromycin C Stress test was performed to rule out Fanconi`s anemia (FA). The chromosome breakage frequency was found to be within the normal range for both the patient and the control. Thus, the diagnosis of FA was ruled out. However, cytogenetic analysis revealed a three-way complex translocation between chromosomes 4, 6 and 21 with an apparent balanced carrier male karyotype: 46,XY,t(4;6;21)(4qter{r_arrow}4p16::21q21{r_arrow} 21qter;6qter{r_arrow}6p21.1::4p16{r_arrow}4pter;21pter{r_arrow} 21q21::6p21.1{r_arrow}6pter). Both parents have normal chromosomes.

Muneer, R.S.; Hopcus, D.J.; Sarale, C. [Univ. of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States)] [and others

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Unusually High Differential Attenuation at C Band: Results from a Two-Year Analysis of the French Trappes Polarimetric Radar Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The differential phase (?DP) measured by polarimetric radars is recognized to be a very good indicator of the path integrated by rain. Moreover, if a linear relationship is assumed between the specific differential phase (KDP) and the specific ...

Pierre Tabary; Gianfranco Vulpiani; Jonathan J. Gourley; Anthony J. Illingworth; Robert J. Thompson; Olivier Bousquet

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

A multisite photometric study of two unusual Beta Cep stars: the magnetic V2052 Oph and the massive rapid rotator V986 Oph  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report a multisite photometric campaign for the Beta Cep stars V2052 Oph and V986 Oph. 670 hours of high-quality differential photoelectric Stromgren, Johnson and Geneva time-series photometry were obtained with eight telescopes on five continents during 182 nights. Frequency analyses of the V2052 Oph data enabled the detection of three pulsation frequencies, the first harmonic of the strongest signal, and the rotation frequency with its first harmonic. Pulsational mode identification from analysing the colour amplitude ratios confirms the dominant mode as being radial, whereas the other two oscillations are most likely l=4. Combining seismic constraints on the inclination of the rotation axis with published magnetic field analyses we conclude that the radial mode must be the fundamental. The rotational light modulation is in phase with published spectroscopic variability, and consistent with an oblique rotator for which both magnetic poles pass through the line of sight. The inclination of the rotation ax...

Handler, G; Uytterhoeven, K; Briquet, M; Neiner, C; Tshenye, T; Ngwato, B; van Winckel, H; Guggenberger, E; Raskin, G; Rodriguez, E; Mazumdar, A; Barban, C; Lorenz, D; Vandenbussche, B; Sahin, T; Medupe, R; Aerts, C

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Bacterial and Archaea Community Present in the Pine Barrens Forest of Long Island, NY: Unusually High Percentage of Ammonia Oxidizing Bacteria  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Of the few preserved areas in the northeast of United States, the soil in the Pine Barrens Forests presents a harsh environment for the microorganisms to grow and survive. In the current study we report the use of clustering methods to scientifically select the sampling locations that would represent the entire forest and also report the microbial diversity present in various horizons of the soil. Sixty six sampling locations were selected across the forest and soils were collected from three horizons (sampling depths). The three horizons were 0-10 cm (Horizon O); 11-25 cm (Horizon A) and 26-40 cm (Horizon B). Based on the total microbial substrate utilization pattern and K-means clustering analysis, the soil in the Pine Barrens Forest can be classified into four distinct clusters at each of the three horizons. One soil sample from each of the four clusters were selected and archaeal and bacterial populations within the soil studied using pyrosequencing method. The results show the microbial communities present in each of these clusters are different. Within the microbial communities present, microorganisms involved in nitrogen cycle occupy a major fraction of microbial community in the soil. High level of diversity was observed for nitrogen fixing bacteria. In contrast, Nitrosovibrio and Nitrosocaldus spp are the single bacterial and archaeal population respectively carrying out ammonia oxidation in the soil.

Shah, V.; Green, T.; Shah, V.; Shah, S.; Kambhampati, M.; Ambrose, J.; Smith, N.; Dowd, S.; McDonnell, K.; Panigrahi, B.

2011-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

470

Unusual Layer-Dependent Charge Distribution, Collective Mode Coupling, and Superconductivity in Multilayer Cuprate Ba2Ca3Cu4O8F2  

SciTech Connect

Low energy ultrahigh momentum resolution angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy study on four-layer self-doped high T{sub c} superconductor Ba{sub 2}Ca{sub 3}Cu{sub 4}O{sub 8}F{sub 2} (F0234) revealed fine structure in the band dispersion, identifying the unconventional association of hole and electron doping with the inner and outer CuO{sub 2} layers, respectively. For the states originating from two inequivalent CuO{sub 2} layers, different energy scales are observed in dispersion kinks associated with the collective mode coupling, with the larger energy scale found in the electron (n-) doped state which also has stronger coupling strength. Given the earlier finding that the superconducting gap is substantially larger along the n-type Fermi surface, our observations connect the mode coupling energy and strength with magnitude of the pairing gap.

Chen, Yulin; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /LBL, Berkeley; Iyo, Akira; /JRCAT, Tsukuba /Tsukuba Coll. Tech.; Yang, Wanli; /LBL, Berkeley; Ino, Akihiro; /Hiroshima U.; Arita, M.; /Hiroshima U.; Johnston, Steve; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Eisaki, Hiroshi; /JRCAT, Tsukuba /Tsukuba Coll. Tech.; Namatame, H.; /Hiroshima U.; Taniguchi, M.; /Hiroshima U.; Devereaux, Thomas P.; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Hussain, Zahid; /LBL, Berkeley; Shen, Z.-X.; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

2011-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

471

Two Homologous Intermetallic Phases in the Na-Au-Zn System with Sodium Bound in Unusual Paired Sites within 1D Tunnels  

SciTech Connect

The Na-Au-Zn system contains the two intermetallic phases Na(0.97(4))Au(2)Zn(4)(I) and Na(0.72(4))Au(2)Zn(2)(II) that are commensurately and incommensurately modulated derivatives of K(0.37)Cd(2), respectively. Compound I crystallizes in tetragonal space group P4/mbm (No. 127), a = 7.986(1) Å, c = 7.971(1) Å, Z = 4, as a 1 × 1 × 3 superstructure derivative of K(0.37)Cd(2)(I4/mcm). Compound II is a weakly incommensurate derivative of K(0.37)Cd(2) with a modulation vector q = 0.189(1) along c. Its structure was solved in superspace group P4/mbm(00g)00ss, a = 7.8799(6) Å, c = 2.7326(4) Å, Z = 2, as well as its average structure in P4/mbm with the same lattice parameters.. The Au-Zn networks in both consist of layers of gold or zinc squares that are condensed antiprismatically along c ([Au(4/2)Zn(4)Zn(4)Au(4/2)] for I and [Au(4/2)Zn(4)Au(4/2)] for II) to define fairly uniform tunnels. The long-range cation dispositions in the tunnels are all clearly and rationally defined by electron density (Fourier) mapping. These show only close, somewhat diffuse, pairs of opposed, ?50% occupied Na sites that are centered on (I)(shown) or between (II) the gold squares. Tight-binding electronic structure calculations via linear muffin-tin-orbital (LMTO) methods, assuming random occupancy of ? ?100% of nonpaired Na sites, again show that the major Hamilton bonding populations in both compounds arise from the polar heteroatomic Au-Zn interactions. Clear Na-Au (and lesser Na-Zn) bonding is also evident in the COHP functions. These two compounds are the only stable ternary phases in the (Cs,Rb,K,Na)-Au-Zn systems, emphasizing the special bonding and packing requirements in these sodium structures

Samal, Saroj L.; Lin, Qisheng; Corbett, John D.

2012-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

472

 

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Imperfect Dark Energy of Kinetic Gravity Braiding Imperfect Dark Energy of Kinetic Gravity Braiding Alex Vikman CERN ABSTRACT In this talk I will discuss a new class of cosmological scalar fields. Similarly to gravity, these theories are described by actions linearly depending on second derivatives. The latter can not be excluded without breaking the generally covariant formulation of the action principle. Despite the presence of these second derivatives the equations of motion are of the second order. Hence there are no new pathological degrees of freedom. Because of this structure of the theory the scalar field kinetically mixes with the metric- the phenomenon we have called Kinetic Gravity Braiding. These theories have rather unusual cosmological dynamics which may be useful to model Dark Energy and Inflation. I will discuss an

473

Live Imaging Study on Cytokinin Function and Regulation in Stem-cell Homeostasis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UNUSUAL FLOWER ORGAN [UFO] (Figure 0-1B). The homeodomainmarked by UNUSUAL FLORAL ORGANS (UFO) promoter (B), the Rib-

Xie, Mingtang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Markets & Finance - Analysis - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Refining and Marketing Refining and Marketing U.S. Refining/Marketing The average profitability (contribution to net income divided by net investment in place or return on investment (ROI)) of U.S. refining/marketing operations of the respondents to the Financial Reporting System (FRS) survey was negative 7 percent in 2009 (Figure 18), the lowest in the 33-year history of the FRS. figure data Further, because the loss of 2009 almost immediately followed an unusually profitable 5-year period (2004 through 2008) that included the 4 highest returns in the history of the FRS, the perception of the loss may be magnified. figure data Changes in the profitability of the FRS companies generally happen for two reasons: differences in the rate of change of FRS 21 product prices relative to the rate of change of the crude oil price; and

475

Oil and Gas Exploration (Connecticut) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exploration (Connecticut) Exploration (Connecticut) Oil and Gas Exploration (Connecticut) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State Connecticut Program Type Siting and Permitting These regulations apply to activities conducted for the purpose of obtaining geological, geophysical, or geochemical information about oil or gas including seismic activities but excluding exploratory well drilling or aerial surveys. Such exploration for oil or gas must be registered with the

476

Table 2.9 Commercial Buildings Consumption by Energy Source ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

4 Beginning in 1995, excludes commercial buildings at multi-building manufacturing facilities, and parking garages. ... excludes electricity system ...

477

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Income Statement Items Consolidated Petroleum Other Energy Downstream Natural Gas Electric Power ... Interest Expenses & Financial Charges Minority Interest in Income

478

Evapotranspiration along an elevation gradient in California's Sierra Nevada  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

periods with incoming solar radiation (K) less than 200 Wmduring sunny (incoming solar radiation greater than 200 W m

Goulden, M. L.; Anderson, R. G.; Bales, R. C.; Kelly, A. E.; Meadows, M.; Winston, G. C.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Misaligned spin-orbit in the XO-3 planetary system?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The transiting extrasolar planet XO-3b is remarkable, with a high mass and eccentric orbit. The unusual characteristics make it interesting to test whether its orbital plane is parallel to the equator of its host star, as it is observed for other transiting planets. We performed radial velocity measurements of XO-3 with the SOPHIE spectrograph at the 1.93-m telescope of Haute-Provence Observatory during a planetary transit, and at other orbital phases. This allowed us to observe the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect and, together with a new analysis of the transit light curve, to refine the parameters of the planet. The unusual shape of the radial velocity anomaly during the transit provides a hint for a nearly transverse Rossiter-McLaughlin effect. The sky-projected angle between the planetary orbital axis and the stellar rotation axis should be lambda = 70 +/- 15 degrees to be compatible with our observations. This suggests that some close-in planets might result from gravitational interaction between planets and/or stars rather than migration due to interaction with the accretion disk. This surprising result requires confirmation by additional observations, especially at lower airmass, to fully exclude the possibility that the signal is due to systematic effects.

G. Hebrard; F. Bouchy; F. Pont; B. Loeillet; M. Rabus; X. Bonfils; C. Moutou; I. Boisse; X. Delfosse; M. Desort; A. Eggenberger; D. Ehrenreich; T. Forveille; A. M. Lagrange; C. Lovis; M. Mayor; F. Pepe; C. Perrier; D. Queloz; N. C. Santos; D. Segransan; S. Udry; A. Vidal-Madjar

2008-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

480

Neighborhood socio-economic disadvantage and race/ethnicity as predictors of breast cancer stage at diagnosis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

income and education by zip code) characteristics. Community2000 was observed even among zip codes with low income andvaried by race/ethnicity and zip code levels of income and

Flores, Yvonne N; Davidson, Pamela L; Nakazono, Terry T; Carreon, Daisy C; Mojica, Cynthia M; Bastani, Roshan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "income excluding unusual" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Post-fire changes in net shortwave radiation along a latitudinal gradient in boreal North America  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

contrast, winter incoming solar radiation and summer albedoDa) and incoming solar radiation (S in ), both of which varymean all-sky incoming solar radiation at the surface (S in )

Y, Jin; Randerson, J T; Goulden, M L; Goetz, S J

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Is the gasoline tax regressive?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Claims of the regressivity of gasoline taxes typically rely on annual surveys of consumer income and expenditures which show that gasoline expenditures are a larger fraction of income for very low income households than ...

Poterba, James M.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Weekly Petroleum Status Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Figure D3. Residential Propane Prices by PAD District (Dollars per Gallon , Excluding Taxes) Figure D4. Wholesale Propane Prices by PAD District (Dollars per Gallon , Excluding...

484

Actor implies Person Adult implies Person Airplane_Flying ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... implies Sports Beach implies Outdoor Beards ... implies Male_Person Glasses implies Person ... Black_Frame excludes Glass Black_Frame excludes ...

2012-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

485

Large Value Qtr YTD 1 Yr 3 Yrs 5 Yrs 10 Yrs Expense Fidelity Equity-Income (1.68) 8.41 (1.37) 13.83 (3.41) 3.99 0.68  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.37) 13.83 (3.41) 3.99 0.68 TIAA-CREF Large-Cap Value Premier (3.14) 9.49 (0.82) 14.03 (2.74) - 0.46) 6.08 0.90 Fidelity International Small Cap (8.96) 4.97 (15.78) 10.05 (3.74) - 1.26 TIAA provided by Morningstar, Fidelity and TIAA-CREF and deemed reliable. Performance as of June 30, 2012* #12

486

Large Value Qtr YTD 1 Yr 3 Yrs 5 Yrs 10 Yrs Expense Fidelity Equity-Income 10.26 10.26 (1.25) 21.84 (1.70) 3.10 0.68  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.25) 21.84 (1.70) 3.10 0.68 TIAA-CREF Large-Cap Value Premier 13.11 13.11 0.83 23.53 (0.74) - 0.62 Russell International Small Cap 15.30 15.30 (4.98) 25.54 0.29 - 1.26 TIAA-CREF International Eq Premier 18.71 18.71 (9 University's ORP & Cash Match Fund Performance *Return information provided by Morningstar, Fidelity and TIAA

487

Differential impact of immediate total deregulation of wellhead prices of natural gas on minority and low-income homeowners: a general review and a case study in the Washington, DC area  

SciTech Connect

In this study, the authors evaluate the impact of total deregulation of wellhead prices of natural gas on various strata of the residential consuming population, and compare it to the baseline impact of a continuation of the Natural Gas Policy Act of 1978. They found that minority and poverty homeowners will suffer greater relative welfare losses than their white and non-poverty counterparts. They developed quantitative estimates of the extent of these differentials, and offered some policy proposals suggested by these findings. 54 refs., 8 figs., 68 tabs.

Green, R.D.; Gilbert, H.R.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Incorporating environmental justice into environmental decision making  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Executive Order 12898, signed on February 11, 1994, broadly states that federal activities, programs, and policies should not produce disproportionately high and adverse impacts on minority and low-income populations. Moreover, the Order indicates that these populations should not be denied the benefits of, or excluded from participation in, these activities, programs, and policies. Because a presidential memorandum accompanying the order said that National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documents should begin to address environmental justice immediately, much attention has been paid to assessment-related issues. Also important, a topic that appears to have received relatively little attention, is how decision makers should be expected to use information about environmental justice in their decision making. This paper discusses issues surrounding the use of environmental justice information in the decision-making process by focusing on the following five main topics: (1) the importance, or weight, attached to environmental justice within larger decision-making contexts; (2) the potential tension between localized environmental justice issues and regional or national issues and needs; (3) the use of environmental justice information to develop (perhaps in concert with affected minority and low-income communities) appropriate mitigation strategies, or to establish conditions under which activities, programs, and policies may be accepted locally; (4) the general implications of shifting the distribution of broadly defined risks, costs, and benefits among different population groups; and (5) the implications of implementing environmental justice on an individual, ad hoc basis rather than within a larger environmental justice framework. This paper raises the issues and discusses the implications of alternative approaches to them.

Wolfe, A.K.; Vogt, D.P.; Hwang, Ho-Ling [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Performance Testing Residential Heat Pump Water Heaters under South- and Central-Florida Climate Conditions: Hot, Humid Climate and Warm Ground Water Pose Unusual Operating Environment for Heat Pump Water Heaters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heat pump water heaters (HPWHs) are known to provide considerable energy savings compared with electric resistance devices in many applications. However, as their performance is climate-dependent, it is important to understand their operation in extreme climates. Southern and Central Florida presents an extreme climate for HPWHs, as the air temperature, humidity, and entering water temperatures are all high nearly year-round. This report examines HPWH performance in the Florida Power & Light ...

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

490

Austin Energy - Free Home Energy Improvements Program (Texas...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

measures at no cost to its low-income and disabled residents through its Free Home Energy Improvements Program. Certain income levels must be met for residents to...

491

Table CE3-3e. Electric Air-Conditioning Energy Expenditures in U.S ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Electric Air-Conditioning Energy Expenditures in U.S. Households by Household Income, 2001 RSE Column Factor: Total 2001 Household Income Below Poverty Line Eli-

492

China Energy Databook - Rev. 4  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

National Income (billion 1980 yuan) Energy Consumption (Primary Energy Consumption per Unit of National Income IV-24National Total Balance^ Total Primary Energy Consumption * (

Sinton Editor, J.E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Energy Savers Loan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Community Development Authority (WCDA) offers low-interest loans to income qualified homeowners for energy efficient home retrofits. Homeowners who have an income of less than 80%...

494

Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers - Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Research and Development Expenditures: Table 12. Income Taxes: Table 13. U.S. Taxes Other Than Income Taxes: Table 14. U.S. Energy Operating Statistics: Table 15.

495

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

T-12 T-12. Income Taxes (Million 2009 Dollars) Income Taxes (as per Financial Statements) Current Paid or Accrued: U.S. Federal, before Investment Tax Credit &

496

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

T-2. Consolidated Statement of Income by Line of Business for 2009 (Million 2009 Dollars) Income Statement Items: ... Interest Expenses & Financial Charges

497

Guide to Business Financing 2005/2006  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... ongoing project of the North Carolina Solar Center and ... IC-DISC from its ordinary income taxed at 35 ... the shareholders pay income tax on dividends ...

2011-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

498

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... afdc88 'income from afdc in last 12 mon--fsa' refers to 1988 fsa low income follow up survey imputed for nonresponse ' yes' = 1 ...

499

Home Energy Saver  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Product recycling Weatherization Assistance Program for Low-Income Persons Low-Income Home EnergyAssistance Program Searchable databases of incentives Database of State...

500

Federal Estate Tax Disadvantages for Same-Sex Couples  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Income Bulletin 26(1). Internal Revenue Service. 2007a. ?Size of Gross Estate. ? Internal Revenue Service, Statisticsof Income Division. Internal Revenue Service. 2007b. ?Estate

Steinberger, Michael D

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z