National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for inclusive branching fractions

  1. Measurement of the inclusive semileptonic branching fraction B(B⁰s→X-l+νl) at Belle

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Oswald, C.; Urquijo, P.; Dingfelder, J.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Arinstein, K.; Asner, D. M.; Aushev, T.; Bakich, A. M.; Belous, K.; et al

    2013-04-30

    We report a measurement of the inclusive semileptonic B0s branching fraction in a 121 fb⁻¹ data sample collected near the Υ(5S) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric energy e⁺e⁻ collider. Events containing B⁰(*)sB¯¯¯⁰(*)s pairs are selected by reconstructing a tag side D⁺s and identifying a signal side lepton l⁺ (l=e, μ) that is required to have the same-sign charge to ensure that both originate from different B⁰s mesons. The B⁰s→X⁻l⁺νl branching fraction is extracted from the ratio of the measured yields of D⁺s mesons and D⁺sl⁺ pairs and the known production and branching fractions. The inclusive semileptonicmore » branching fraction is measured to be [10.6±0.5(stat)±0.7(syst)]%.« less

  2. Measurement of the inclusive semileptonic branching fraction B(B⁰s→X-l+νl) at Belle

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Oswald, C.; Urquijo, P.; Dingfelder, J.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Arinstein, K.; Asner, D. M.; Aushev, T.; Bakich, A. M.; Belous, K.; et al

    2013-04-30

    We report a measurement of the inclusive semileptonic B0s branching fraction in a 121 fb⁻¹ data sample collected near the Υ(5S) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric energy e⁺e⁻ collider. Events containing B⁰(*)sB¯¯¯⁰(*)s pairs are selected by reconstructing a tag side D⁺s and identifying a signal side lepton l⁺ (l=e, μ) that is required to have the same-sign charge to ensure that both originate from different B⁰s mesons. The B⁰s→X⁻l⁺νl branching fraction is extracted from the ratio of the measured yields of D⁺s mesons and D⁺sl⁺ pairs and the known production and branching fractions. The inclusive semileptonicmore »branching fraction is measured to be [10.6±0.5(stat)±0.7(syst)]%.« less

  3. Branching Fraction and CP Asymmetry Measurements in Inclusive B ? Xs ???? and B ? Xs? Decays from BABAR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eigen, G.

    2015-04-29

    We present an update on total and partial branching fractions and on CP asymmetries in the semi-inclusive decay B ? Xs???-. Further, we summarize our results on branching fractions and CP asymmetries for semi-inclusive and fully-inclusive B ? Xs? decays. We present the first result on the CP asymmetry diff erence of charged and neutral B ? Xs? decays yielding the first constraint on the ratio of Wilson coeffi cients Im(C8eff/C7eff).

  4. Measurement of the Inclusive Branching FractionsB(B^- to D^+ Pi^- Pi^-) and B(B^- to D*^+ Pi^- Pi^-)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eschenburg, Vance Onno

    2007-07-17

    The D{sub J}{sup 0} is a family of four orbitally excited mesons: D*{sub 2}(2460){sup 0}, D{sub 1}(2420){sup 0}, D{sub 1}(j = 1/2){sup -}, and D*{sub 0}(j = 1/2){sup 0}. This dissertation presents the measurements of the inclusive branching fractions, {Beta}(B{sup -} {yields} D*{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -}) and {Beta}(B{sup -} {yields} D{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -}). The D{sub J}{sup 0} provides an intermediate resonance for those two modes. The data used for this analysis consists of Runs 1-5 with total integrated luminosity of 343.38 fb{sup -1}, which is corresponding to 383.92 million B{bar B} pairs, provided by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric B Factory. The values presented are: {Beta}(B{sup -} {yields} D{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -}) = (1.12 {+-} 0.02 {+-} 0.08) x 10{sup -3}; {Beta}(B{sup -} {yields} D*{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -}) = (1.67 {+-} 0.03 {+-} 0.13) x 10{sup -3}.

  5. Measurement of the B?Xs? branching fraction with a sum of exclusive decays

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Saito, T.; Ishikawa, A.; Yamamoto, H.; Abdesselam, A.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Al Said, S.; Arinstein, K.; Asner, D.?M.; Aushev, T.; et al

    2015-03-04

    We use 772 106 BB meson pairs collected at the ?(4S) resonance with the Belle detector to measure the branching fraction for B ? Xs?. Our measurement uses a sum-of-exclusives approach in which 38 of the hadronic final states with strangeness equal to +1, denoted by Xs, are reconstructed. The inclusive branching fraction for MXs s?)=(3.510.170.33) 104, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic.

  6. Measurement of the [ital D][r arrow][pi][pi] branching fractions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Selen, M.; Sadoff, A.J.; Ammar, R.; Ball, S.; Baringer, P.; Coppage, D.; Copty, N.; Davis, R.; Hancock, N.; Kelly, M.; Kwak, N.; Lam, H.; Kubota, Y.; Lattery, M.; Nelson, J.K.; Patton, S.; Perticone, D.; Poling, R.; Savinov, V.; Schrenk, S.; Wang, R.; Alam, M.S.; Kim, I.J.; Nemati, B.; O'Neill, J.J.; Severini, H.; Sun, C.R.; Zoeller, M.M.; Crawford, G.; Daubenmeir, C.M.; Fulton, R.; Fujino, D.; Gan, K.K.; Honscheid, K.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Lee, J.; Malchow, R.; Morrow, F.; Skovpen, Y.; Sung, M.; White, C.; Whitmore, J.; Wilson, P.; Butler, F.; Fu, X.; Kalbfleisch, G.; Lambrecht, M.; Ross, W.R.; Skubic, P.; Snow, J.; Wang, P.L.; Wood, M.; Bortoletto, D.; Brown, D.N.; Fast, J.; McIlwain, R.L.; Miao, T.; Miller, D.H.; Modesitt, M.; Schaffner, S.F.; Shibata, E.I.; Shipsey, I.P.J.; Wang, P.N.; Battle, M.; Ernst, J.; Kroha, H.; Roberts, S.; Sparks, K.; Thorndike, E.H.; Wang, C.H.; Dominick, J.; Sanghera, S.; Skwarnicki, T.; Stroynowski, R.; Artuso, M.; He, D.; Goldberg, M.; Horwitz, N.; Ken

    1993-09-27

    Using data from CLEO II at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring we provide a new measurement of the branching fraction for [ital D][sup 0][r arrow][pi][sup +][pi][sup [minus

  7. Search for the decay Bs0 ? ?? and a measurement of the branching fraction for Bs0 ? ??

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dutta, Deepanwita; Bhuyan, Bipul; Abdesselam, A.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Al Said, S.; Arinstein, K.; Asner, David M.; Aulchenko, V.; Aushev, T.; Ayad, R.; Aziz, T.; Bahinipati, S.; Bakich, A. M.; Bansal, Vikas; Bhardwaj, V.; Bobrov, A.; Bonvicini, Giovanni; Bracko, Marko; Browder, Thomas E.; Cervenkov, D.; Chen, A.; Cheon, B. G.; Chilikin, K.; Chistov, R.; Cho, K.; Chobanova, V.; Choi, Y.; Cinabro, David A.; Dalseno, J.; Dolezal, Z.; Drasal, Z.; Drutskoy, A.; Dutta, K.; Eidelman, S.; Farhat, H.; Fast, James E.; Frost, O.; Gaur, Vipin; Ganguly, Sudeshna; Garmash, Alexey; Getzkow, D.; Goh, Y. M.; Golob, B.; Hayashii, H.; He, X. H.; Hou, W. S.; Iijima, T.; Ishikawa, A.; Iwasaki, Y.; Jaegle, Igal; Joffe, D.; Kang, K. H.; Kato, E.; Kiesling, C.; Kim, D. Y.; Kim, J. B.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, K. T.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. J.; Kinoshita, Kay; Ko, Byeong Rok; Kodys, P.; Korpar, S.; Krizan, P.; Krokovny, Pavel; Kuhr, Thomas; Kuzmin, A.; Kwon, Y. J.; Lange, J. S.; Lee, I. S.; Lewis, P.; Li, Y.; Li Gioi, L.; Libby, J.; Liventsev, Dmitri; Matvienko, D.; Miyata, H.; Mizuk, R.; Mohanty, G. B.; Moll, A.; Mori, T.; Mussa, R.; Nakano, E.; Nakao, M.; Nanut, T.; Nayak, Minakshi; Nisar, N. K.; Nishida, S.; Ogawa, S.; Okuno, S.; Pakhlov, P.; Pakhlova, Galina; Pedlar, Todd K.; Pestotnik, Rok; Petric, Marko; Piilonen, Leo E.; Ribezl, Eva; Ritter, M.; Rostomyan, A.; Sakai, Y.; Sandilya, Saurabh; Santelj, Luka; Sanuki, T.; Sato, Y.; Savinov, Vladimir; Schneider, O.; Schnell, G.; Schwanda, C.; Schwartz, A. J.; Semmler, D.; Shebalin, V.; Shibata, T. A.; Shiu, Jing-Ge; Shwartz, B.; Sibidanov, A.; Simon, F.; Sohn, Y. S.; Sokolov, A.; Solovieva, E.; Staric, M.; Sumihama, M.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Teramoto, Y.; Trabelsi, K.; Uchida, M.; Unno, Yuji; Uno, S.; Usov, Y.; Van Hulse, C.; Vanhoefer, P.; Varner, G.; Vinokurova, A.; Vossen, Anslem G.; Wagner, M. N.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, P.; Watanabe, Y.; Wehle, S.; Williams, K. M.; Won, E.; Yamamoto, H.; Yamaoka, J.; Yashchenko, S.; Yusa, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhilich, V.; Zupanc, A.

    2015-01-01

    We search for the decay B0s??? and measure the branching fraction for B0s??? using 121.4~fb-1 of data collected at the ?(5S) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e+e- collider. The B0s??? branching fraction is measured to be (3.60.5(stat.)0.3(syst.)0.6(fs))10-5, where fs is the fraction of Bs(*)Bs(*) in bb events. Our result is in good agreement with the theoretical predictions as well as with a recent measurement from LHCb. We observe no statistically significant signal for the decay B0s??? and set a 90% confidence-level upper limit on its branching fraction at 3.110-6. This constitutes a significant improvement over the previous result.

  8. Measurement of branching fractions and rate asymmetries in the rare decays B→K(*)l⁺l⁻

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; et al

    2012-08-24

    In a sample of 471×10⁶ BB¯¯¯ events collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e⁺e⁻ collider we study the rare decays B→K(*)l⁺l⁻, where l⁺l⁻ is either e⁺e⁻ or μ⁺μ⁻. We report results on partial branching fractions and isospin asymmetries in seven bins of dilepton mass-squared. We further present CP and lepton-flavor asymmetries for dilepton masses below and above the J/ψ resonance. We find no evidence for CP or lepton-flavor violation. The partial branching fractions and isospin asymmetries are consistent with the Standard Model predictions and with results from other experiments.

  9. Measurement of the Branching Fraction of B0 Meson Decay to a_1^+(1260) pi-

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B. /Bergen U. /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Pisa U. /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Prairie View A-M /Princeton U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Vanderbilt U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison /Yale U.

    2005-07-12

    We present a preliminary measurement of the branching fraction of the B meson decay B{sup 0} {yields} a{sub 1}{sup +}(1260){pi}{sup -}with a{sub 1}{sup +}(1260) {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}. The data sample corresponds to 218 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs produced in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation through the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance. We find the branching fraction (40.2 {+-} 3.9 {+-} 3.9) x 10{sup -6}, where the first error quoted is statistical and the second is systematic. The fitted values of the a{sub 1}(1260) parameters are m{sub a{sub 1}} = 1.22 {+-} 0.02 GeV/c{sup 2} and {Lambda}{sub a{sub 1}} = 0.423 {+-} 0.050 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  10. A Measurement of the Exclusive Branching Fraction for B → π K at BaBar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aspinwall, Marie Louise

    2002-02-01

    This thesis presents an exclusive measurement of the branching fraction B for the rare charmless hadronic B decays to πK final states. A sample of 22.57±0.36 million BB pairs was collected with the BaBar detector at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center's PEP-II B Factory, during the Run 1 data taking period (1999-2000).

  11. Measurement of the B+- --> rho+- pi0 Branching Fraction and Direct CP Asymmetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B. /Bergen U. /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Prairie View A-M /Princeton U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Stony Brook /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Vanderbilt U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison /Yale U.

    2005-06-29

    An improved measurement of the process B{sup {+-}} {yields} {rho}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup 0} is presented. The data sample of 211 fb{sup -1} comprises 232 million {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric B Factory at SLAC. The yield and CP asymmetry are calculated using an extended maximum likelihood fitting method. The branching fraction and asymmetry are found to be {Beta}(B{sup {+-}} {yields} {rho}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup 0}) = [10.0 {+-} 1.4 (Stat.) {+-} 0.9 (Syst.)] x 10{sup -6} and {Alpha}{sub CP}(B{sup {+-}} {yields} {rho}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup 0}) = -0.01 {+-} 0.13 (Stat.) {+-} 0.02 (Syst.), superseding previous measurements. The statistical significance of the signal is calculated to be 8.7{sigma}.

  12. Measurement of the Absolute Branching Fraction of D0 to K- pi+

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Boutigny, D.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Lopez, L.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Abrams, G.S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Button-Shafer, J.; /LBL, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Munich, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /Frascati /Genoa U. /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Karlsruhe U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /Maryland U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /Pisa U. /Prairie View A-M /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DSM, DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /Trieste U. /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison /Yale U.

    2007-04-25

    The authors measure the absolute branching fraction for D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup -} {pi}{sup +} using partial reconstruction of {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup +}X{ell}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {ell}} decays, in which only the charged lepton and the pion from the decay D*{sup +} {yields} D{sup 0}{pi}{sup +} are used. Based on a data sample of 230 million B{bar B} pairs collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B Factory at SLAC, they obtain {Beta}(D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}) = (4.007 {+-} 0.037 {+-} 0.070)%, where the first error is statistical and the second error is systematic.

  13. FRACTIONAL CRYSTALLIZATION LABORATORY TESTING FOR INCLUSION & COPRECIPITATION WITH ACTUAL TANK WASTE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WARRANT, R.W.

    2006-12-11

    Fractional crystallization is being considered as a pretreatment method to support supplemental treatment of retrieved single-shell tank (SST) saltcake waste at the Hanford Site. The goal of the fractional crystallization process is to optimize the separation of the radioactivity (radionuclides) from the saltcake waste and send it to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant and send the bulk of the saltcake to the supplemental treatment plant (bulk vitrification). The primary factors that influence the separation efficiency are (1) solid/liquid separation efficiency, (2) contaminant inclusions, and (3) co-precipitation. This is a report of testing for factors (2) and (3) with actual tank waste samples. For the purposes of this report, contaminant inclusions are defined as the inclusion of supernatant, containing contaminating radionuclides, in a pocket within the precipitating saltcake crystals. Co-precipitation is defined as the simultaneous precipitation of a saltcake crystal with a contaminating radionuclide. These two factors were tested for various potential fractional crystallization product salts by spiking the composite tank waste samples (SST Early or SST Late, external letter CH2M-0600248, ''Preparation of Composite Tank Waste Samples for ME-21 Project'') with the desired target salt and then evaporating to precipitate that salt. SST Early represents the typical composition of dissolved saltcake early in the retrieval process, and SST Late represents the typical composition during the later stages of retrieval.

  14. Measurement of Branching Fractions and CP-ViolatingCharge Asymmetries for B Meson Decays to D(*)D(*), and Implications for the CKMAngle gamma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Bona, M.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B.; /Bergen U. /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Karlsruhe U., EKP /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Prairie View A-M /Princeton U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Stony Brook /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison /Yale U.

    2006-07-06

    In summary, the authors have measured branching fractions, upper limits, and charge asymmetries for all B meson decays to D{sup (*)} {bar D}{sup (*)}.

  15. Measurement of the Branching fraction ratio B ---> D K / B ---> D pi with the CDF II detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Squillacioti, Paola; /INFN, Pisa /Siena U.

    2006-11-01

    In this thesis the author has described the first measurement performed at a hadron collider of the branching fraction of the Cabibbo-suppressed mode B{sup +} {yields} {bar D}{sup 0} K{sup +}. The analysis has been performed with 360 pb{sup -1} of data collected by the CDF II detector.

  16. Measurements of the Branching Fractions and CP Asymmetries of B -> D0_CP K Decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B.; Abrams, G.S.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Karlsruhe U., EKP /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Prairie View A-M /Princeton U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Stony Brook /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Vanderbilt U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison /Yale U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Clermont-Ferrand U. /Basilicata U., Potenza

    2006-01-05

    We present a study of the decay B{sup -} {yields} D{sub (CP)}{sup 0} K{sup -} and its charge conjugate, where D{sub (CP)}{sup 0} is reconstructed in CP-even, CP-odd, and non-CP flavor eigenstates, based on a sample of 232 million {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} storage ring. We measure the partial-rate charge asymmetries AC{sub CP{+-}} and the ratios R{sub CP{+-}} of the B {yields} D{sup 0} K decay branching fractions as measured in CP{+-} and non-CP D{sup 0} decays: A{sub CP+} = 0.35 {+-} 0.13(stat) {+-} 0.04(syst), A{sub CP-} = -0.06 {+-} 0.13(stat) {+-} 0.04(syst), R{sub CP+} = 0.90 {+-} 0.12(stat) {+-} 0.04(syst), R{sub CP-} = 0.86 {+-} 0.10(stat) {+-} 0.05(syst).

  17. Measurement of branching fractions and rate asymmetries in the rare decays B→K(*)l⁺l⁻

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D. J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Yushkov, A. N.; Bondioli, M.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; Atmacan, H.; Gary, J. W.; Liu, F.; Long, O.; Vitug, G. M.; Campagnari, C.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; West, C. A.; Eisner, A. M.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Martinez, A. J.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Chao, D. S.; Cheng, C. H.; Echenard, B.; Flood, K. T.; Hitlin, D. G.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Porter, F. C.; Rakitin, A. Y.; Andreassen, R.; Huard, Z.; Meadows, B. T.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Sun, L.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W. H.; Spaan, B.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Clark, P. J.; Playfer, S.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Luppi, E.; Munerato, M.; Negrini, M.; Piemontese, L.; Santoro, V.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Guido, E.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Bhuyan, B.; Prasad, V.; Lee, C. L.; Morii, M.; Edwards, A. J.; Adametz, A.; Uwer, U.; Lacker, H. M.; Lueck, T.; Dauncey, P. D.; Behera, P. K.; Mallik, U.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rubin, A. E.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Derkach, D.; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Chavez, C. A.; Coleman, J. P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Sigamani, M.; Cowan, G.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Griessinger, K.; Hafner, A.; Prencipe, E.; Barlow, R. J.; Jackson, G.; Lafferty, G. D.; Behn, E.; Cenci, R.; Hamilton, B.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Dallapiccola, C.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Sciolla, G.; Cheaib, R.; Lindemann, D.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Biassoni, P.; Neri, N.; Palombo, F.; Stracka, S.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Sonnek, P.; Summers, D. J.; Nguyen, X.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; De Nardo, G.; Monorchio, D.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Martinelli, M.; Raven, G.; Jessop, C. P.; LoSecco, J. M.; Wang, W. F.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Torrence, E.; Feltresi, E.; Gagliardi, N.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simi, G.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Akar, S.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bomben, M.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Hamon, O.; Leruste, Ph.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Sitt, S.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Pacetti, S.; Rossi, A.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Oberhof, B.; Paoloni, E.; Perez, A.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Telnov, A. V.; Anulli, F.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Li Gioi, L.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Piredda, G.; Bünger, C.; Grünberg, O.; Hartmann, T.; Leddig, T.; Schröder, H.; Voss, C.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Vasseur, G.; Yèche, Ch.; Aston, D.; Bard, D. J.; Bartoldus, R.; Benitez, J. F.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M. R.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Ebert, M.; Field, R. C.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gabareen, A. M.; Graham, M. T.; Grenier, P.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Lewis, P.; Lindquist, B.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; MacFarlane, D. B.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Nelson, S.; Perl, M.; Pulliam, T.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Va’vra, J.; Wagner, A. P.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wittgen, M.; Wright, D. H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Young, C. C.; Ziegler, V.; Park, W.; Purohit, M. V.; White, R. M.; Wilson, J. R.; Randle-Conde, A.; Sekula, S. J.; Bellis, M.; Burchat, P. R.; Miyashita, T. S.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Gorodeisky, R.; Guttman, N.; Peimer, D. R.; Soffer, A.; Lund, P.; Spanier, S. M.; Ritchie, J. L.; Ruland, A. M.; Schwitters, R. F.; Wray, B. C.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; Gamba, D.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Oyanguren, A.; Ahmed, H.; Albert, J.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Choi, H. H. F.; King, G. J.; Kowalewski, R.; Lewczuk, M. J.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Tasneem, N.; Gershon, T. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Latham, T. E.; Puccio, E. M. T.; Band, H. R.; Dasu, S.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.; Wu, S. L.

    2012-08-24

    In a sample of 471×10⁶ BB¯¯¯ events collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e⁺e⁻ collider we study the rare decays B→K(*)l⁺l⁻, where l⁺l⁻ is either e⁺e⁻ or μ⁺μ⁻. We report results on partial branching fractions and isospin asymmetries in seven bins of dilepton mass-squared. We further present CP and lepton-flavor asymmetries for dilepton masses below and above the J/ψ resonance. We find no evidence for CP or lepton-flavor violation. The partial branching fractions and isospin asymmetries are consistent with the Standard Model predictions and with results from other experiments.

  18. Measurement of the Branching Fraction for D8+ rarr tau+nu_tau and Extraction of the Decay Constant f_D_s

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; Tanabe, T.; Hawkes, C.M.

    2010-06-04

    The branching fraction for the decay D{sub s}{sup +} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}} with {tau}{sup +} {yields} e{sup +}{bar {nu}}{sub {tau}}, is measured using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 427 fb{sup -1} collected at center of mass energies near 10.58 GeV with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at SLAC. In the process e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} c{bar c} {yields} D*{sub s}{sup +} {bar D}{sub TAG}{bar K}X, the D*{sub s}{sup +} meson is reconstructed as a missing particle, and the subsequent decay D*{sub s}{sup +} {yields} D{sub s}{sup +}{gamma} yields an inclusive D{sub s}{sup +} data sample. Here {bar D}{sub TAG} refers to a fully reconstructed hadronic {bar D} decay, {bar K} is a K{sup -} or {bar K}{sup 0}, and X stands for any number of charged or neutral pions. The decay D{sub s}{sup +} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sup +} is isolated also, and from ratio of event yields and known branching fractions, {Beta}(D{sub s}{sup +} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}}) = (4.5 {+-} 0.5 {+-} 0.4 {+-} 0.3)% is determined. The pseudoscalar decay constant is extracted to be f{sub D{sub s}} = (233 {+-} 13 {+-} 10 {+-} 7) MeV, where the first uncertainty is statistical, the second is systematic, and the third results from the uncertainties on the external measurements used as input to the calculation.

  19. Detector for measuring the π+ → e+v branching fraction

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aguilar-Arevalo, A. A.; Aoki, M.; Blecher, M.; Bruch, D. vom; Bryman, D.; Comfort, J.; Cuen-Rochin, S.; Doria, L.; Gumplinger, P.; Hussein, A.; et al

    2015-04-13

    The PIENU experiment at TRIUMF is aimed at a measurement of the branching ratio Re/u = Γ((π+ → e+ve) + (π+ → e+veγ))/Γ((π+ → μ+vμ) + (π+ → μ+vμγ)) with precision more »This paper provides a description of the PIENU experimental apparatus and its performance in pursuit of Re/u« less

  20. A Measurement of the B ---> Eta/C K Branching Fraction Using the BaBar Detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, Frank; /Manchester U.

    2006-04-26

    The branching fraction is measured for the decay channels B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{sub c}K{sub S}{sup 0} and B{sup +} {yields} {eta}{sub c}K{sup +} where {eta}{sub c} {yields} K{bar K}{pi}, using the BABAR detector. The {eta}{sub c} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sup +}{pi}{sup -} and {eta}{sub c} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} decay channels are used, including non-resonant decays and possibly those through intermediate resonances.

  1. Measurements of Branching Fractions and CP Asymmetries and Studies of Angular Distributions for B to phi phi K Decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Milanes, D.A.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D.J.; Hearty, C.; /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Harvey Mudd Coll. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Paris U., VI-VII /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas Nuclear Corp., Austin /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2011-08-15

    We present branching fraction and CP asymmetry measurements as well as angular studies of B {yields} {phi}{phi}K decays using 464 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} events collected by the BABAR experiment. The branching fractions are measured in the {phi}{phi} invariant mass range below the {eta}{sub c} resonance (m{sub {phi}{phi}} < 2.85 GeV). We find {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {phi}{phi}K{sup +}) = (5.6 {+-} 0.5 {+-} 0.3) x 10{sup -6} and {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {phi}{phi}K{sup 0}) = (4.5 {+-} 0.8 {+-} 0.3) x 10{sup -6}, where the first uncertaintiy is statistical and the second systematic. The measured direct CP asymmetries for the B{sup {+-}} decays are A{sub CP} = -0.10 {+-} 0.08 {+-} 0.02 below the {eta}{sub c} threshold (m{sub {phi}{phi}} < 2.85 GeV) and A{sub CP} = 0.09 {+-} 0.10 {+-} 0.02 in the {eta}{sub c} resonance region (m{sub {phi}{phi}} in [2.94,3.02] GeV). Angular distributions are consistent with J{sub P} = 0{sup -} in the {eta}{sub c} resonance region and favor J{sup P} = 0{sup +} below the {eta}{sub c} resonance.

  2. Measurement of Branching Fractions of B0 Decays to K1(1270)+ pi- and K1(1400)+ pi-

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aubert, Bernard; Bona, M.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Lopez, L.; Palano, Antimo; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, Bjarne; Sun, L.; Abrams, G.S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Cahn, Robert N.; Jacobsen, R.G.; /LBL, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /Consorzio Milano Ricerche /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Napoli Seconda U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /Banca di Roma /Frascati /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2008-08-04

    We present a measurement of the branching fraction of neutral B meson decaying to final states containing a K1 meson, i.e. K{sub 1}(1270) and K{sub 1}(1400), and a charged pion. The data, collected with the BABAR detector at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, represent 454 million B{bar B} pairs produced in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation. We measure the branching fraction {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} K{sub 1}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) = (31.0 {+-} 2.7 {+-} 6.9) x 10{sup -6}, where the first error quoted is statistical and the second is systematic. In the framework of the K-matrix formalism used to describe these decays, we also set limits on the ratio of the production constants for the K{sub 1}(1270){sup +} and K{sub 1}(1400){sup +} mesons in B{sup 0} decays.

  3. Detector for measuring the ?+ ? e+v branching fraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aguilar-Arevalo, A. A.; Aoki, M.; Blecher, M.; Bruch, D. vom; Bryman, D.; Comfort, J.; Cuen-Rochin, S.; Doria, L.; Gumplinger, P.; Hussein, A.; Igarashi, Y.; Ito, N.; Ito, S.; Kettell, S. H.; Kurchaninov, L.; Littenberg, L.; Malbrunot, C.; Mischke, R. E.; Muroi, A.; Numao, T.; Sheffer, G.; Sher, A.; Sullivan, T.; Tauchi, K.; Vavilov, D.; Yamada, K.; Yoshida, M.

    2015-04-13

    The PIENU experiment at TRIUMF is aimed at a measurement of the branching ratio Re/u = ?((?+ ? e+ve) + (?+ ? e+ve?))/?((?+ ? ?+v?) + (?+ ? ?+v??)) with precision < 0.1%. Incident pions, delivered at the rate of 60 kHz with momentum 75 MeV/c, were degraded and stopped in a plastic scintillator target. Pions and their decay product positrons were detected with plastic scintillators and tracked with multiwire proportional chambers and silicon strip detectors. The energies of the positrons were measured in a spectrometer consisting of a large NaI(T?) crystal surrounded by an array of pure CsI crystals. This paper provides a description of the PIENU experimental apparatus and its performance in pursuit of Re/u

  4. Detector for measuring the π+ → e+v branching fraction

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aguilar-Arevalo, A. A.; Aoki, M.; Blecher, M.; Bruch, D. vom; Bryman, D.; Comfort, J.; Cuen-Rochin, S.; Doria, L.; Gumplinger, P.; Hussein, A.; et al

    2015-04-13

    The PIENU experiment at TRIUMF is aimed at a measurement of the branching ratio Re/u = Γ((π+ → e+ve) + (π+ → e+veγ))/Γ((π+ → μ+vμ) + (π+ → μ+vμγ)) with precision < 0.1%. Incident pions, delivered at the rate of 60 kHz with momentum 75 MeV/c, were degraded and stopped in a plastic scintillator target. Pions and their decay product positrons were detected with plastic scintillators and tracked with multiwire proportional chambers and silicon strip detectors. The energies of the positrons were measured in a spectrometer consisting of a large NaI(Tℓ) crystal surrounded by an array of pure CsI crystals.more » This paper provides a description of the PIENU experimental apparatus and its performance in pursuit of Re/u« less

  5. Measurement of the production fraction times branching fraction $\\boldsymbol{ f(b\\to\\Lambda_{b})\\cdot \\mathcal{B}(\\Lambda_{b}\\to J/\\psi \\Lambda)}$

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; Abbott, Braden Keim; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; Adams, Mark Raymond; Adams, Todd; Alexeev, Guennadi D.; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; Alton, Andrew K.; Alverson, George O.; Alves, Gilvan Augusto; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; /Nijmegen U. /Fermilab

    2011-05-01

    The {Lambda}{sub b}(udb) baryon is observed in the decay {Lambda}{sub b} {yields} J/{psi}{Lambda} using 6.1 fb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions collected with the D0 detector at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The production fraction multiplied by the branching fraction for this decay relative to that for the decay B{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi}K{sub s}{sup 0} is measured to be 0.345 {+-} 0.034 (stat.) {+-} 0.033 (syst.) {+-} 0.003 (PDG). Using the world average value of f(b {yields} B{sup 0}) {center_dot} {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi}K{sub s}{sup 0}) = (1.74 {+-} 0.08) x 10{sup -5}, they obtain f(b {yields} {Lambda}{sub b}) {center_dot} {Beta}({Lambda}{sub b} {yields} J/{psi}{Lambda}) = (6.01 {+-} 0.60 (stat.) {+-} 0.58 (syst.) {+-} 0.28 (PDG)) x 10{sup -5}. This measurement represents an improvement in precision by about a factor of three with respect to the current world average.

  6. Measurement of the B -> Omega l Nu and B -> Eta l Nu Branching Fractions Using Neutrino Reconstruction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aubert, Bernard; Bona, M.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, Vincent; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Lopez, L.; Palano, Antimo; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, Bjarne; Sun, L.; Abrams, G.S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Cahn, Robert N.; Jacobsen, R.G.; /LBL, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U., Comp. Sci. Dept. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /Consorzio Milano Ricerche /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Napoli Seconda U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /Banca di Roma /Frascati /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2008-09-09

    The authors present a study of the charmless semileptonic B-meson decays B{sup +} {yields} {omega}{ell}{sup +}{nu} and B{sup +} {yields} {eta}{ell}{sup +}{nu}. The analysis is based on 383 million B{bar B} pairs recorded at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector. The {omega} mesons are reconstructed in the channel {omega} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} and the {eta} mesons in the channels {eta} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} and {eta} {yields} {gamma}{gamma}. They measure the branching fractions {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {omega}{ell}{sup +}{nu}) = (1.14 {+-} 0.16{sub stat} {+-} 0.08{sub syst}) x 10{sup -4} and {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {eta}{ell}{sup +}{nu}) = (0.31 {+-} 0.06{sub stat} {+-} 0.08{sub syst}) x 10{sup -4}.

  7. Measurements of branching fractions, polarizations, and direct CP-violation asymmetries in B -> rho0 K* and B -> f0(980) K* decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    del Amo Sanchez, P.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Milanes, D.A.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Harvey Mudd Coll. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas Nuclear Corp., Austin /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2011-08-12

    We present measurements of the branching fractions, longitudinal polarization, and direct CP-violation asymmetries for the decays B{sup +} {yields} {rho}{sup 0}K*{sup +} and B{sup +} f{sub 0}(980)K*{sup +} with a sample of (467 {+-} 5) x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. We observe B{sup +} {yields} {rho}{sup 0}K*{sup +} with a significance of 5.3{sigma} and measure the branching fraction {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {rho}{sup 0}K*{sup +}) = (4.6 {+-} 1.0 {+-} 0.4) x 10{sup -6}, the longitudinal polarization f{sub L} = 0.78 {+-} 0.12 {+-} 0.03, and the CP-violation asymmetry A{sub CP} = 0.31 {+-} 0.13 {+-} 0.03. We observe B{sup +} {yields} f{sub 0}(980)K*{sup +} and measure the branching fraction {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} f{sub 0}(980)K*{sup +}) x {Beta}(f{sub 0}(980) {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) = (4.2 {+-} 0.6 {+-} 0.3) x 10{sup -6} and the CP-violation asymmetry A{sub CP} = -0.15 {+-} 0.12 {+-} 0.03. The first uncertainty quoted is statistical and the second is systematic.

  8. Measurement of the Ratio of Branching Fractions Br(Bs -> Ds- pi+)/Br(B -> D- pi+) at CDF-II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Furic, Ivan Kresimir; /MIT

    2004-03-01

    The measurement of B{sub s}{sup 0} mixing is one of the flagship analyses for the Run II B physics program. The sensitivity of the measurement to the frequency of B{sub s}{sup 0} oscillations strongly depends on the number of reconstructed B{sub s}{sup 0} mesons. They present the measurement of the ratio of branching fractions Br(B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup -}{pi}{sup +})/Br(B{sup 0} {yields} D{sup -}{pi}{sup +}), which directly influences the number of B{sub s}{sup 0} events available for the measurement of B{sub s}{sup 0} mixing at CDF-II. They analyze 115 pb{sup -1} of data collected with the CDF-II detector in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV using a novel displaced track trigger. They reconstruct 78 {+-} 11 B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup -}{pi}{sup +} decays at 1153 {+-} 45 B{sup 0} {yields} D{sup -}{pi}{sup +} decays with good signal to background ratio. This is the world's largest sample of fully reconstructed B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup -}{pi}{sup +} decays. They find the ratio of production fractions multiplied by the ratio of branching fractions to be: f{sub s}/f{sub d} {center_dot} Br(B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup -}{pi}{sup +})/Br(B{sup 0} {yields} D{sup -}{pi}{sup +}) = 0.325 {+-} 0.046(stat) {+-} 0.034(syst) {+-} 0.084 (BR). Using the world average value of f{sub s}/f{sub d} = 0.26 {+-} 0.03, we infer that the ratio of branching fractions is: Br(B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup -}{pi}{sup +})/Br(B{sup 0} {yields} D{sup -}{pi}{sup +}) = 1.25 {+-} 0.18(stat) {+-} 0.13(syst) {+-} 0.32(BR) {+-} 0.14(PR) where the last uncertainty is due to the uncertainty on the world average measurement of the ratio of B{sub s}{sup 0} to B{sup 0} production rates, f{sub s}/f{sub d}.

  9. Measurement of branching fraction and first evidence of CP violation in B⁰→a₁±(1260)π∓ decays

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dalseno, J.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Asner, D. M.; Aulchenko, V.; Aushev, T.; Bakich, A. M.; Bay, A.; Belous, K.; Bhuyan, B.; et al

    2012-11-26

    We present a measurement of the branching fraction and time-dependent CP violation parameters in B⁰→a±₁(1260)π∓ decays. The results are obtained from the final data sample containing 772×10⁶ BB¯¯¯ pairs collected at the Υ(4S) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e⁺e⁻ collider. We obtain the product branching fraction B(B⁰→a±₁(1260)π∓)×B(a±₁(1260)→π±π∓π±)=(11.1±1.0(stat)±1.4(syst))×10⁻⁶ and an upper limit on the product branching fraction for a possible decay with the same final state B(B⁰→a±₂(1320)π∓)×B(a±₂(1320)→π±π∓π±)<2.2×10⁻⁶at 90% CL. In a time-dependent measurement to extract CP asymmetries, we obtain the CP violation parameters ACP=–0.06±0.05(stat)±0.07(syst), CCP=–0.01±0.11(stat)±0.09(syst), SCP=–0.51±0.14(stat)±0.08(syst), representing time- and flavor-integrated direct, flavor-dependent direct and mixing-induced CP violation,more » respectively. Simultaneously, we also extract the CP-conserving parameters ΔC=+0.54±0.11(stat)±0.07(syst), ΔS=–0.09±0.14(stat)±0.06(syst), which, respectively, describe a rate difference and strong phase difference between the decay channels where the a±₁ does not contain the spectator quark and those where it does. We find first evidence of mixing-induced CP violation in B⁰→a±₁(1260)π∓ decays with 3.1σ significance. The rate where the a±₁ does not contain the spectator quark from the B meson is found to dominate the rate where it does at the 4.1σ level. However, there is no evidence for either time- and flavor-integrated direct CP violation or flavor-dependent direct CP violation.« less

  10. Measurement of the Absolute Branching FractionsB to D\\pi, D^*\\pi, D^{**}\\pi with aMissing Mass Method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B.; Abrams, G.S.; Battaglia, M.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Karlsruhe U., EKP /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Prairie View A-M /Princeton U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Stony Brook /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison /Yale U.

    2006-11-30

    We present branching fraction measurements of charged and neutral B decays to D{pi}{sup -}, D*{pi}{sup -} and D**{pi}{sup -} with a missing mass method, based on a sample of 231 million {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} pairs collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} collider. One of the B mesons is fully reconstructed and the other one decays to a reconstructed charged {pi} and a companion charmed meson identified by its recoil mass, inferred by kinematics. Here D** refers to the sum of all the non-strange charm meson states with masses in the range 2.2-2.8 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  11. Measurement of the ratio of branching fractions b(bs --> ds- ds+) /b (b0 --> d- ds+) with the CDF detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iyutin, Boris; /MIT

    2007-03-01

    In this thesis they report the measurement of ratios of branching fractions: {Beta}(B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})/{Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} D{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}), and {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} D{sup -}D{sub s}{sup +})/{Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} D{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}), using 355 pb{sup -1} of data collected by CDF detector at the Tevatron p{bar p} collider at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV.

  12. Measurement of the ratio of branching fractions B(D0 ---> K+ pi-) / B(D0 ---> K- pi+) using the CDF II Detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abulencia, A.; Acosta, D.; Adelman, Jahred A.; Affolder, T.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Ambrose, D.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Anikeev, K.; /Taiwan, Inst. Phys. /Argonne /Barcelona, Autonoma U. /Baylor U. /INFN, Bologna /Brandeis U. /UC, Davis /UCLA /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.

    2006-05-01

    The authors present a measurement of R{sub B}, the ratio of the branching fraction for the rare decay D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -} to that for the Cabibbo-favored decay D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}. Charge conjugate decays are implicitly included. A signal of 2005 {+-} 104 events for the decay D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -} is obtained using the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The data set corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 0.35 fb{sup -1} produced in {bar p}p collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. Assuming no mixing, they find R{sub B} = [4.05 {+-} 0.21(stat) {+-} 0.11(syst)] x 10{sup -3}. This measurement is consistent with the world average, and comparable in accuracy with the best measurements from other experiments.

  13. Inclusive decays of {ital B} mesons to charmonium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balest, R.; Cho, K.; Ford, W.T.; Johnson, D.R.; Lingel, K.; Lohner, M.; Rankin, P.; Smith, J.G.; Alexander, J.P.; Bebek, C.; Berkelman, K.; Bloom, K.; Browder, T.E.; Cassel, D.G.; Cho, H.A.; Coffman, D.M.; Crowcroft, D.S.; Drell, P.S.; Dumas, D.J.; Ehrlich, R.; Gaidarev, P.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Geiser, B.; Gittelman, B.; Gray, S.W.; Hartill, D.L.; Heltsley, B.K.; Henderson, S.; Jones, C.D.; Jones, S.L.; Kandaswamy, J.; Katayama, N.; Kim, P.C.; Kreinick, D.L.; Ludwig, G.S.; Masui, J.; Mevissen, J.; Mistry, N.B.; Ng, C.R.; Nordberg, E.; Patterson, J.R.; Peterson, D.; Riley, D.; Salman, S.; Sapper, M.; Wuerthwein, F.; Avery, P.; Freyberger, A.; Rodriguez, J.; Yang, S.; Yelton, J.; Cinabro, D.; Liu, T.; Saulnier, M.; Wilson, R.; Yamamoto, H.; Bergfeld, T.; Eisenstein, B.I.; Gollin, G.; Ong, B.; Palmer, M.; Selen, M.; Thaler, J.J.; Edwards, K.W.; Ogg, M.; Bellerive, A.; Britton, D.I.; Hyatt, E.R.F.; MacFarlane, D.B.; Patel, P.M.; Spaan, B.; Sadoff, A.J.; Ammar, R.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Besson, D.; Coppage, D.; Copty, N.; Davis, R.; Hancock, N.; Kelly, M.; Kotov, S.; Kravchenko, I.; Kwak, N.; Lam, H.; Kubota, Y.; Lattery, M.; Momayezi, M.; Nelson, J.K.; Patton, S.; Poling, R.; Savinov, V.; Schrenk, S.; Wang, R.; Alam, M.S.; Kim, I.J.; Ling, Z.; Mahmood, A.H.; O`Neill, J.J.; Severini, H.; Sun, C.R.; Wappler, F.; Crawford, G.; Daubenmier, C.M.; Fulton, R.; Fujino, D.; Gan, K.K.; Honscheid, K.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Lee, J.; Sung, M.; White, C.; Wolf, A.; Zoeller, M.M.; Butler, F.; Fu, X.; Nemati, B.; Ross, W.R.; Skubic, P.; Wood, M.; Bishai, M.; Fast, J.; Gerndt, E.; Hinson, J.W.; McIlwain, R.L.; Miao, T.; Miller, D.H.; Modesitt, M.; Payne, D.; Shibata, E.I.; Shipsey, I.P.J.; Wang, P.N.; Battle, M.; Ernst, J.; Gibbons, L.; Kwon, Y.; Roberts, S.; Thorndike, E.H.; Wang, C.H.; Dominick, J.; Lambrecht, M.; Sanghera, S.; Shelkov, V.; Skwarnicki, T.; Stroynowski, R.; Volobouev, I.; Wei, G.; Artuso, M.; Gao, M.; Goldberg, M.; He, D.; Horwitz, N.; Moneti, G.C.; (CLEO Collabor..

    1995-09-01

    We have used the CLEO-II detector at the Cornell Electron Storage Ringe (CESR) to study the inclusive production of charmonium mesons in a sample of 2.15 million {ital B{bar B}} events. We find inclusive branching fractions of (1.12{plus_minus}0.04{plus_minus}0.06)% for {ital B}{r_arrow}{ital J}/{psi}{ital X}, (0.34{plus_minus}0.04{plus_minus}0.03)% for {ital B}{r_arrow}{psi}{prime}{ital X}, and (0.40{plus_minus}0.06{plus_minus}0.04)% for {ital B}{r_arrow}{chi}{sub {ital c}1}{ital X}. We also find some evidence for the inclusive production of {chi}{sub {ital c}2}, and set an upper limit for the branching fraction of the inclusive decay {ital B}{r_arrow}{eta}{sub {ital c}}{ital X} of 0.9% at 90% confidence level. Momentum spectra for inclusive {ital J}/{psi}, {psi}{prime}, and {chi}{sub {ital c}1} production are presented. These measurements are compared to theoretical calculations.

  14. Measurement of the ratio of the production cross sections times branching fractions of Bc ? J/??and B ? J/? K and B(Bc? J/? ???-/+)/B(Bc ? J/? ?) in pp collisions at ?s = 7 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, V.

    2015-01-13

    The ratio of the production cross sections times branching fractions (?(Bc) B(Bc ? J/??))/(?(B) B(B ? J/?K) is studied in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV with the CMS detector at the LHC. The kinematic region investigated requires Ba,sub>c and Bmesons with transverse momentum p? > 15 GeV and rapidity |y| -1. The ratio is determined to be [0.48 0.05 (stat) 0.03(syst) 0.05 (?Bc)]% The J/????-/+ decay mode is also observed in the same data sample. Using a model-independent method developed tomoremeasure the efficiency given the presence of resonant behaviour in the three-pion system, the ratio of the branching fractions J/? ???-/+)/B(Bc is measured to be 2.55 0.80(stat) 0.33(syst) +0.04-0.01 (?Bc), consistent with the previous LHCb result.less

  15. Measurement of Branching Fractions of B decays to K1(1270)pi and K1(1400)pi and Determination of the CKM angle alpha from B0 --> a1(1260) /- pi-/

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aubert, B.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G. /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2009-10-30

    We report measurements of the branching fractions of neutral and charged B meson decays to final states containing a K{sub 1}(1270) or K{sub 1}(1400) meson and a charged pion. The data, collected with the BABAR detector at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, correspond to 454 million B{bar B} pairs produced in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation. We measure the branching fractions {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} K{sub 1}(1270){sup +}{pi}{sup -} + K{sub 1}(1400){sup +}{pi}{sup -}) = 3.1{sub 0.7}{sup +0.8} x 10{sup -5} and {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} K{sub 1}(1270){sup 0}{pi}{sup +} + K{sub 1}(1400){sup 0}{pi}{sup +}) = 2.9{sub -1.7}{sup +2.9} x 10{sup -5} (< 8.2 x 10{sup -5} at 90% confidence level), where the errors are statistical and systematic combined. The B{sup 0} decay mode is observed with a significance of 7.5{sigma}, while a significance of 3.2{sigma} is obtained for the B{sup +} decay mode. Based on these results, we estimate the weak phase {alpha} = (79 {+-} 7 {+-} 11){sup o} from the time dependent CP asymmetries in B{sup 0} {yields} a{sub 1}(1260){sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}} decays.

  16. Diversity, Inclusion

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Workplace Diversity, Inclusion Diversity, Inclusion Explore the multiple dimensions of a career at Los Alamos Lab: work with the best minds on the planet in an inclusive...

  17. Measurement of the branching fractions of the radiative leptonic τ decays τ → eγνν¯ and τ → μγνν¯ at BaBar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lees, J. P.

    2015-03-25

    We perform a measurement of the τ → lγνν¯ (l = e,μ) branching fractions for a minimum photon energy of 10 MeV in the τ rest frame, using 431 fb–1 of e+e collisions collected at the center-of-mass energy of the Υ(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II storage rings. We find B(τ → μγνν¯) = (3.69±0.03±0.10)×10–3 and B(τ → eγνν¯)=(1.847±0.015±0.052)×10–2, where the first quoted error is statistical and the second is systematic. In addition, these results are substantially more precise than previous measurements.

  18. Measurements of CP asymmetries and branching fractions of two-body charmless decays of B^0 and B^0_s mesons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morello, Michael Joseph; /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore

    2007-12-01

    to statistically determine the composition of the B{sub (s)}{sup 0} {yields} h{sup +}h{prime}{sup -} sample. This kinematics-PID combined fit has been developed and performed for the first time at CDF in the analysis presented in this thesis and this methodology was later inherited by several other analyses. Chapter 7 is devoted to the study of the isolation variable, which is a crucial handle to enhance the signal-to-background ratio in the off-line selection. It exploits the property that the b-hadrons tend to carry a larger fraction of the transverse momentum of the particles produced in the fragmentation, with respect to lighter hadrons. Since the simulators do not accurately reproduce the fragmentation processes, this chapter is devoted to the study of the control data sample of B{sub (s)}{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi}X decays to probe the characteristics of this variable. Chapter 8 describes an innovative procedure used to optimize the selection to minimize the statistical uncertainty on the quantities one wishes to measure. The procedure is based on the fit of composition described in chap. 6. Chapter 9 reports the results of the fit of composition described in chap. 6 and the cross-checks performed to verify the goodness of the fit of composition. In order to translate the parameters returned from the fit into physics measurements the relative efficiency corrections between the various decay modes need to be applied. Chapter 10 is devoted to the description of these corrections. Chapter 11 describes the measurement of the detector-induced charge asymmetry between positively and negatively charged kaons and pions, due to their different probability of strong interaction in the tracker material using the real data. This allows to extract the acceptance correction factor for the CP asymmetries measurement without any external inputs from the simulation, and to perform a powerful check of whole analysis. Chapter 12 describes the main sources of systematic uncertainties

  19. Measurements of branching fraction ratios and CP-asymmetries in suppressed B-→ D(→ K+π-)K- and B-→ D(→ K+π-)π- decays

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T.

    2011-08-01

    We report the first reconstruction in hadron collisions of the suppressed decays B-→ D(→ K+π-)K- and B-→ D(→ K+π-)π- decays, sensitive to the CKM phase {gamma}, using data from 7 fb-1 of integrated luminosity collected by the CDF II detector at the Tevatron collider. We reconstruct a signal for the B-→ D(→ K+π-)K- suppressed mode with a significance of 3.2 standard deviations, and measure the ratios of the suppressed to favored branching fractions R(K) = [22.0 ± 8.6(stat) ± 2.6(syst)] x 10-3, R+(K) = [42.6 ± 13.7(stat) ± 2.8(syst)] x 10-3, R-(K) = [3.8 ± 10.3(stat) ± 2.7(syst)] x 10-3more » as well as the direct CP-violating asymmetry A(K) = -0.82±0.44(stat)±0.09(syst) of this mode. Corresponding quantities for B- → D(→ K+π-)π- decay are also reported.« less

  20. Measurements of branching fraction ratios and CP-asymmetries in suppressed B-→ D(→ K+π-)K- and B-→ D(→ K+π-)π- decays

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T.

    2011-08-01

    We report the first reconstruction in hadron collisions of the suppressed decays B-→ D(→ K+π-)K- and B-→ D(→ K+π-)π- decays, sensitive to the CKM phase {gamma}, using data from 7 fb-1 of integrated luminosity collected by the CDF II detector at the Tevatron collider. We reconstruct a signal for the B-→ D(→ K+π-)K- suppressed mode with a significance of 3.2 standard deviations, and measure the ratios of the suppressed to favored branching fractions R(K) = [22.0 ± 8.6(stat) ± 2.6(syst)] x 10-3, R+(K) = [42.6 ± 13.7(stat) ± 2.8(syst)] x 10-3, R-(K) = [3.8 ± 10.3(stat) ± 2.7(syst)] x 10-3more »as well as the direct CP-violating asymmetry A(K) = -0.82±0.44(stat)±0.09(syst) of this mode. Corresponding quantities for B- → D(→ K+π-)π- decay are also reported.« less

  1. Inclusive radiative J/{psi} decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Besson, D.; Pedlar, T. K.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Gao, K. Y.; Hietala, J.; Kubota, Y.; Klein, T.; Lang, B. W.; Poling, R.; Scott, A. W.; Zweber, P.; Dobbs, S.; Metreveli, Z.; Seth, K. K.; Tomaradze, A.; Libby, J.; Powell, A.; Wilkinson, G.; Ecklund, K. M.; Love, W.

    2008-08-01

    Using data taken with the CLEO-c detector at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring, we have investigated the direct-photon momentum spectrum in the decay J/{psi}(1S){yields}{gamma}gg, via the ''tagged'' process: e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}{psi}(2S); {psi}(2S){yields}J/{psi}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}; J/{psi}{yields}{gamma}+X. Including contributions from two-body radiative decay processes, we find the ratio of the inclusive direct-photon branching fraction to that of the dominant three-gluon branching fraction [R{sub {gamma}}=B(gg{gamma})/B(ggg)] to be R{sub {gamma}}=0.137{+-}0.001{+-}0.016{+-}0.004, where the errors shown are statistical, systematic, and the model-dependent uncertainty related to the extrapolation to zero photon energy. The shape of the scaled photon energy spectrum in J/{psi}{yields}gg{gamma} is observed to be very similar to that of {upsilon}{yields}gg{gamma}. The R{sub {gamma}} value obtained is roughly consistent with that expected by a simple quark-charge scaling [R{sub {gamma}}{approx}(q{sub c}/q{sub b}){sup 2}] of the value determined at the {upsilon}(1S), but somewhat higher than the value expected from the running of the strong coupling constant.

  2. Inclusive radiative {psi}(2S) decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Libby, J.; Martin, L.; Powell, A.; Thomas, C.; Wilkinson, G.; Mendez, H.; Ge, J. Y.; Miller, D. H.; Shipsey, I. P. J.; Xin, B.; Adams, G. S.; Hu, D.; Moziak, B.; Napolitano, J.; Ecklund, K. M.; He, Q.; Insler, J.; Muramatsu, H.; Park, C. S.; Thorndike, E. H.

    2009-10-01

    Using e{sup +}e{sup -} collision data taken with the CLEO-c detector at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring, we have investigated the direct photon spectrum in the decay {psi}(2S){yields}{gamma}gg. We determine the ratio of the inclusive direct photon decay rate to that of the dominant three-gluon decay rate {psi}(2S){yields}ggg (R{sub {gamma}}{identical_to}{gamma}({gamma}gg)/{gamma}(ggg)) to be R{sub {gamma}}(z{sub {gamma}}>0.4)=0.070{+-}0.002{+-}0.019{+-}0.011, with z{sub {gamma}} defined as the scaled photon energy relative to the beam energy. The errors shown are statistical, systematic, and that due to the uncertainty in the input branching fractions used to extract the ratio, respectively.

  3. Solid State Photovoltaic Research Branch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    This report summarizes the progress of the Solid State Photovoltaic Research Branch of the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) from October 1, 1988, through September 30,l 1989. Six technical sections of the report cover these main areas of SERIs in-house research: Semiconductor Crystal Growth, Amorphous Silicon Research, Polycrystalline Thin Films, III-V High-Efficiency Photovoltaic Cells, Solid-State Theory, and Laser Raman and Luminescence Spectroscopy. Sections have been indexed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  4. Measurement of the Ratios of Branching Fractions B(Bs -> Ds pi pi pi) / B(Bd -> Dd pi pi pi) and B(Bs -> Ds pi) / B(Bd -> Dd pi)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abulencia, A.; Adelman, J.; Affolder, T.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Ambrose, D.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Anikeev, K.; Annovi, A.; /Frascati /Taiwan, Inst. Phys.

    2006-10-01

    Using 355 pb{sup -1} of data collected by the CDF II detector in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron, they study the fully reconstructed hadronic decays B{sub (s)}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub (s)}{sup -}{pi}{sup +} and B{sub (s)}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub (s)}{sup -} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}. They present the first measurement of the ratio of branching fractions {Beta}(B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})/{Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} D{sup -} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) = 1.05 {+-} 0.10(stat.) {+-} 0.22(syst.). They also update their measurement of {Beta}(B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup -} {pi}{sup +})/{Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} D{sup -} {pi}{sup +}) to 1.13 {+-} 0.08(stat.) {+-} 0.23(syst.) improving the statistical uncertainty by more than a factor of two. They find {Beta}(B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup -} {pi}{sup +}) = [3.8 {+-} 0.3(stat.) {+-} 1.3(syst.)] x 10{sup -3} and {Beta}(B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup -} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) = [8.4 {+-} 0.8(stat.) {+-} 3.2(syst.)] x 10{sup -3}.

  5. Measurement of branching fractions and rate asymmetries in the rare decays BK(*)+-

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D. J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Yushkov, A. N.; Bondioli, M.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; Atmacan, H.; Gary, J. W.; Liu, F.; Long, O.; Vitug, G. M.; Campagnari, C.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; West, C. A.; Eisner, A. M.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Martinez, A. J.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Chao, D. S.; Cheng, C. H.; Echenard, B.; Flood, K. T.; Hitlin, D. G.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Porter, F. C.; Rakitin, A. Y.; Andreassen, R.; Huard, Z.; Meadows, B. T.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Sun, L.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W. H.; Spaan, B.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Clark, P. J.; Playfer, S.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Luppi, E.; Munerato, M.; Negrini, M.; Piemontese, L.; Santoro, V.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Guido, E.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Bhuyan, B.; Prasad, V.; Lee, C. L.; Morii, M.; Edwards, A. J.; Adametz, A.; Uwer, U.; Lacker, H. M.; Lueck, T.; Dauncey, P. D.; Behera, P. K.; Mallik, U.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rubin, A. E.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Derkach, D.; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Chavez, C. A.; Coleman, J. P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Sigamani, M.; Cowan, G.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Griessinger, K.; Hafner, A.; Prencipe, E.; Barlow, R. J.; Jackson, G.; Lafferty, G. D.; Behn, E.; Cenci, R.; Hamilton, B.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Dallapiccola, C.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Sciolla, G.; Cheaib, R.; Lindemann, D.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Biassoni, P.; Neri, N.; Palombo, F.; Stracka, S.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Sonnek, P.; Summers, D. J.; Nguyen, X.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; De Nardo, G.; Monorchio, D.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Martinelli, M.; Raven, G.; Jessop, C. P.; LoSecco, J. M.; Wang, W. F.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Torrence, E.; Feltresi, E.; Gagliardi, N.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simi, G.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Akar, S.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bomben, M.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Hamon, O.; Leruste, Ph.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Sitt, S.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Pacetti, S.; Rossi, A.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Oberhof, B.; Paoloni, E.; Perez, A.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Telnov, A. V.; Anulli, F.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Li Gioi, L.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Piredda, G.; Bünger, C.; Grünberg, O.; Hartmann, T.; Leddig, T.; Schröder, H.; Voss, C.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Vasseur, G.; Yèche, Ch.; Aston, D.; Bard, D. J.; Bartoldus, R.; Benitez, J. F.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M. R.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Ebert, M.; Field, R. C.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gabareen, A. M.; Graham, M. T.; Grenier, P.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Lewis, P.; Lindquist, B.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; MacFarlane, D. B.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Nelson, S.; Perl, M.; Pulliam, T.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Va’vra, J.; Wagner, A. P.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wittgen, M.; Wright, D. H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Young, C. C.; Ziegler, V.; Park, W.; Purohit, M. V.; White, R. M.; Wilson, J. R.; Randle-Conde, A.; Sekula, S. J.; Bellis, M.; Burchat, P. R.; Miyashita, T. S.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Gorodeisky, R.; Guttman, N.; Peimer, D. R.; Soffer, A.; Lund, P.; Spanier, S. M.; Ritchie, J. L.; Ruland, A. M.; Schwitters, R. F.; Wray, B. C.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; Gamba, D.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Oyanguren, A.; Ahmed, H.; Albert, J.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Choi, H. H. F.; King, G. J.; Kowalewski, R.; Lewczuk, M. J.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Tasneem, N.; Gershon, T. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Latham, T. E.; Puccio, E. M. T.; Band, H. R.; Dasu, S.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.; Wu, S. L.

    2012-08-01

    In a sample of 471×106 BB¯ events collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e+e- collider we study the rare decays B→K(*)ℓ+-, where ℓ+- is either e+e- or μ+μ-. We report results on partial branching fractions and isospin asymmetries in seven bins of dilepton mass-squared. We further present CP and lepton-flavor asymmetries for dilepton masses below and above the J/ψ resonance. We find no evidence for CP or lepton-flavor violation. The partial branching fractions and isospin asymmetries are consistent with the Standard Model predictions and with results from other experiments.

  6. Measurements of Time-Dependent CP-Asymmetry Parameters in B Meson Decays to \\eta^{\\prime} K^0 and of Branching Fractions of SU(3) Related Modes with BaBar Experiment at SLAC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biassoni, Pietro; /Milan U.

    2009-01-22

    In this thesis work we have measured the following upper limits at 90% of confidence level, for B meson decays (in units of 10{sup -6}), using a statistics of 465.0 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs: {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}K{sup 0}) < 1.6 {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{eta}) < 1.4 {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{prime}{eta}{prime}) < 2.1 {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{phi}) < 0.52 {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{omega}) < 1.6 {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{prime}{phi}) < 1.2 {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{prime}{omega}) < 1.7 We have no observation of any decay mode, statistical significance for our measurements is in the range 1.3-3.5 standard deviation. We have a 3.5{sigma} evidence for B {yields} {eta}{omega} and a 3.1 {sigma} evidence for B {yields} {eta}{prime}{omega}. The absence of observation of the B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}K{sup 0} open an issue related to the large difference compared to the charged mode B{sup +} {yields} {eta}K{sup +} branching fraction, which is measured to be 3.7 {+-} 0.4 {+-} 0.1 [118]. Our results represent substantial improvements of the previous ones [109, 110, 111] and are consistent with theoretical predictions. All these results were presented at Flavor Physics and CP Violation (FPCP) 2008 Conference, that took place in Taipei, Taiwan. They will be soon included into a paper to be submitted to Physical Review D. For time-dependent analysis, we have reconstructed 1820 {+-} 48 flavor-tagged B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{prime}K{sup 0} events, using the final BABAR statistic of 467.4 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs. We use these events to measure the time-dependent asymmetry parameters S and C. We find S = 0.59 {+-} 0.08 {+-} 0.02, and C = -0.06 {+-} 0.06 {+-} 0.02. A non-zero value of C would represent a directly CP non-conserving component in B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{prime}K{sup 0}, while S would be equal to sin2{beta} measured in B{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi}K{sub s}{sup 0} [108], a mixing-decay interference effect, provided the decay is dominated

  7. Executive Branch Management Scorecard | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Branch Management Scorecard Executive Branch Management Scorecard PDF icon Executive Branch Management Scorecard More Documents & Publications Executive Branch Management Scorecard ...

  8. Measurement of the B⁰→π⁻l⁺ν and B⁺→η(')l⁺ν branching fractions, the B⁰→π⁻l⁺ν and B⁺→ηl⁺ν form-factor shapes, and determination of |Vub|

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    del Amo Sanchez, P.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I. L.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D. J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Khan, A.; Randle-Conde, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Yushkov, A. N.; Bondioli, M.; Curry, S.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; Martin, E. C.; Stoker, D. P.; Atmacan, H.; Gary, J. W.; Liu, F.; Long, O.; Vitug, G. M.; Campagnari, C.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; West, C.; Eisner, A. M.; Heusch, C. A.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Martinez, A. J.; Schalk, T.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Winstrom, L. O.; Cheng, C. H.; Doll, D. A.; Echenard, B.; Hitlin, D. G.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Porter, F. C.; Rakitin, A. Y.; Andreassen, R.; Dubrovin, M. S.; Mancinelli, G.; Meadows, B. T.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Nagel, M.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W. H.; Jasper, H.; Karbach, T. M.; Petzold, A.; Spaan, B.; Kobel, M. J.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Clark, P. J.; Playfer, S.; Watson, J. E.; Andreotti, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cecchi, A.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Franchini, P.; Luppi, E.; Munerato, M.; Negrini, M.; Petrella, A.; Piemontese, L.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Nicolaci, M.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Guido, E.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Tosi, S.; Bhuyan, B.; Prasad, V.; Lee, C. L.; Morii, M.; Adametz, A.; Marks, J.; Uwer, U.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Ebert, M.; Lacker, H. M.; Lueck, T.; Volk, A.; Dauncey, P. D.; Tibbetts, M.; Behera, P. K.; Mallik, U.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Dong, L.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Rubin, A. E.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Derkach, D.; Firmino da Costa, J.; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Perez, A.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Serrano, J.; Sordini, V.; Stocchi, A.; Wang, L.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Bingham, I.; Chavez, C. A.; Coleman, J. P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamet, R.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Sigamani, M.; Cowan, G.; Paramesvaran, S.; Wren, A. C.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Hafner, A.; Alwyn, K. E.; Bailey, D.; Barlow, R. J.; Jackson, G.; Lafferty, G. D.; Anderson, J.; Cenci, R.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Simi, G.; Tuggle, J. M.; Dallapiccola, C.; Salvati, E.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Sciolla, G.; Zhao, M.; Lindemann, D.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Schram, M.; Biassoni, P.; Lazzaro, A.; Lombardo, V.; Palombo, F.; Stracka, S.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Sonnek, P.; Summers, D. J.; Nguyen, X.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; De Nardo, G.; Monorchio, D.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Raven, G.; Snoek, H. L.; Jessop, C. P.; Knoepfel, K. J.; LoSecco, J. M.; Wang, W. F.; Corwin, L. A.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Morris, J. P.; Blount, N. L.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Igonkina, O.; Kolb, J. A.; Rahmat, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Strube, J.; Torrence, E.; Castelli, G.; Feltresi, E.; Gagliardi, N.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Hamon, O.; Leruste, Ph.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Prendki, J.; Sitt, S.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Rossi, A.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Neri, N.; Paoloni, E.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Lu, C.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Telnov, A. V.; Anulli, F.; Baracchini, E.; Cavoto, G.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Li Gioi, L.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Piredda, G.; Renga, F.; Hartmann, T.; Leddig, T.; Schröder, H.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Franek, B.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Vasseur, G.; Yèche, Ch.; Zito, M.; Allen, M. T.; Aston, D.; Bard, D. J.; Bartoldus, R.; Benitez, J. F.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M. R.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Field, R. C.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gabareen, A. M.; Graham, M. T.; Grenier, P.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Li, S.; Lindquist, B.; Luitz, S.; Lynch, H. L.; MacFarlane, D. B.; Marsiske, H.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Nelson, S.; O’Grady, C. P.; Ofte, I.; Perl, M.; Pulliam, T.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Santoro, V.; Schindler, R. H.; Schwiening, J.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Sun, S.; Suzuki, K.; Thompson, J. M.; Va’vra, J.; Wagner, A. P.; Weaver, M.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wittgen, M.; Wright, D. H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Yarritu, A. K.; Young, C. C.; Ziegler, V.; Chen, X. R.; Park, W.; Purohit, M. V.; White, R. M.; Wilson, J. R.; Sekula, S. J.; Bellis, M.; Burchat, P. R.; Edwards, A. J.; Miyashita, T. S.; Ahmed, S.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Pan, B.; Saeed, M. A.; Zain, S. B.; Guttman, N.; Soffer, A.; Lund, P.; Spanier, S. M.; Eckmann, R.; Ritchie, J. L.; Ruland, A. M.; Schilling, C. J.; Schwitters, R. F.; Wray, B. C.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; Gamba, D.; Pelliccioni, M.; Bomben, M.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Lopez-March, N.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Oyanguren, A.; Albert, J.; Banerjee, Sw.; Choi, H. H. F.; Hamano, K.; King, G. J.; Kowalewski, R.; Lewczuk, M. J.; Lindsay, C.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Gershon, T. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Latham, T. E.; Puccio, E. M. T.; Band, H. R.; Dasu, S.; Flood, K. T.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.; Vuosalo, C. O.; Wu, S. L.

    2011-03-24

    We report the results of a study of the exclusive charmless semileptonic decays, B⁺→η(')l⁺ν and B⁰→π⁻l⁺ν, undertaken with approximately 464×10⁶ BB¯¯ pairs collected at the Υ(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector. The analysis uses events in which the signal B decays are reconstructed with a loose neutrino reconstruction technique. We obtain partial branching fractions for B⁺→ηl⁺ν and B⁰→π⁻l⁺ν decays in three and 12 bins of q², respectively, from which we extract the f+(q²) form-factor shapes and the total branching fractions B(B⁺→ηl⁺ν)=(0.36±0.05stat±0.04syst)×10⁻⁴ and B(B⁰→π⁻l⁺ν)=(1.42±0.05stat±0.07syst)×10⁻⁴. We also measure B(B+→η'l⁺ν)=(0.24±0.08stat±0.03syst)×10⁻⁴. We obtain values for the magnitude of the CKM matrix element |Vub| using three different QCD calculations.

  9. Measurement of the B⁰→π⁻l⁺ν and B⁺→η(')l⁺ν branching fractions, the B⁰→π⁻l⁺ν and B⁺→ηl⁺ν form-factor shapes, and determination of |Vub|

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    del Amo Sanchez, P.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Palano, A.; et al

    2011-03-24

    We report the results of a study of the exclusive charmless semileptonic decays, B⁺→η(')l⁺ν and B⁰→π⁻l⁺ν, undertaken with approximately 464×10⁶ BB¯¯ pairs collected at the Υ(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector. The analysis uses events in which the signal B decays are reconstructed with a loose neutrino reconstruction technique. We obtain partial branching fractions for B⁺→ηl⁺ν and B⁰→π⁻l⁺ν decays in three and 12 bins of q², respectively, from which we extract the f+(q²) form-factor shapes and the total branching fractions B(B⁺→ηl⁺ν)=(0.36±0.05stat±0.04syst)×10⁻⁴ and B(B⁰→π⁻l⁺ν)=(1.42±0.05stat±0.07syst)×10⁻⁴. We also measure B(B+→η'l⁺ν)=(0.24±0.08stat±0.03syst)×10⁻⁴. We obtain values for the magnitude of the CKM matrix element |Vub| usingmore » three different QCD calculations.« less

  10. Inclusive and Exclusive |Vub|

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petrella, Antonio; /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara

    2011-11-17

    The current status of the determinations of CKM matrix element |V{sub ub}| via exclusive and inclusive charmless semileptonic B decays is reviewed. The large datasets collected at the B-Factories, and the increased precision of theoretical calculations have allowed an improvement in the determination of |V{sub ub}|. However, there are still significant uncertainties. In the exclusive approach, the most precise measurement of the pion channel branching ratio is obtained by an untagged analysis. This very good precision can be reached by tagged analyses with more data. The problem with exclusive decays is that the strong hadron dynamics can not be calculated from first principles and the determination of the form factor has to rely on light-cone sum rules or lattice QCD calculations. The current data samples allow a comparison of different FF models with data distributions. With further developments on lattice calculations, the theoretical error should shrink to reach the experimental one. The inclusive approach still provides the most precise |V{sub ub}| determinations. With new theoretical calculations, the mild (2.5{sigma}) discrepancy with respect to the |V{sub ub}| value determined from the global UT fit has been reduced. As in the exclusive approach, theoretical uncertainties represent the limiting factor to the precision of the measurement. Reducing the theoretical uncertainties to a level comparable with the statistical error is challenging. New measurements in semileptonic decays of charm mesons could increase the confidence in theoretical calculations and related uncertainties.

  11. Branching Fraction Measurements of the Color-Suppressed Decays B0bar to D(*)0 pi0, D(*)0 eta, D(*)0 omega, and D(*)0 eta_prime and Measurement of the Polarization in the Decay B0bar to D*0 omega

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Milanes, D.A.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D.J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T.S.; McKenna, J.A.; ,

    2012-02-14

    We report updated branching fraction measurements of the color-suppressed decays {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}, D*{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}, D{sup 0}{eta}, D*{sup 0}{eta}, D{sup 0}{omega}, D*{sup 0}{omega}, D{sup 0}{eta}', and D*{sup 0}{eta}'. We measure the branching fractions (x10{sup -4}): {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}) = 2.69 {+-} 0.09 {+-} 0.13, {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}) = 3.05 {+-} 0.14 {+-} 0.28, {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D{sup 0}{eta}) = 2.53 {+-} 0.09 {+-} 0.11, {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup 0}{eta}) = 2.69 {+-} 0.14 {+-} 0.23, {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D{sup 0}{omega}) = 2.57 {+-} 0.11 {+-} 0.14, {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup 0}{omega}) = 4.55 {+-} 0.24 {+-} 0.39, {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D{sup 0}{eta}') = 1.48 {+-} 0.13 {+-} 0.07, and {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup 0}{eta}') = 1.49 {+-} 0.22 {+-} 0.15. We also present the first measurement of the longitudinal polarization fraction of the decay channel D*{sup 0}{omega}, f{sub L} = (66.5 {+-} 4.7 {+-} 1.5)%. In the above, the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. The results are based on a sample of (454 {+-} 5) x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance, with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II storage rings at SLAC. The measurements are the most precise determinations of these quantities from a single experiment. They are compared to theoretical predictions obtained by factorization, Soft Collinear Effective Theory (SCET) and perturbative QCD (pQCD). We find that the presence of final state interactions is favored and the measurements are in better agreement with SCET than with pQCD.

  12. Diversity and Inclusion

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Diversity and Inclusion fosters a diverse and inclusive work environment that ensures equality of opportunity for applicants and employees through Departmental diversity policy...

  13. Electronic branching ratio of the. tau. lepton

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ammar, R.; Baringer, P.; Coppage, D.; Davis, R.; Kelly, M.; Kwak, N.; Lam, H.; Ro, S.; Kubota, Y.; Lattery, M.; Nelson, J.K.; Perticone, D.; Poling, R.; Schrenk, S.; Wang, R.; Alam, M.S.; Kim, I.J.; Nemati, B.; Romero, V.; Sun, C.R.; Wang, P.; Zoeller, M.M.; Crawford, G.; Fulton, R.; Gan, K.K.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Lee, J.; Malchow, R.; Morrow, F.; Sung, M.K.; Whitmore, J.; Wilson, P.; Butler, F.; Fu, X.; Kalbfleisch, G.; Lambrecht, M.; Skubic, P.; Snow, J.; Wang, P.; Bortoletto, D.; Brown, D.N.; Dominick, J.; McIlwain, R.L.; Miller, D.H.; Modesitt, M.; Shibata, E.I.; Schaffner, S.F.; Shipsey, I.P.J.; Battle, M.; Ernst, J.; Kroha, H.; Roberts, S.; Sparks, K.; Thorndike, E.H.; Wang, C.; Stroynowski, R.; Artuso, M.; Goldberg, M.; Haupt, T.; Horwitz, N.; Kennett, R.; Moneti, G.C.; Playfer, S.; Rozen, Y.; Rubin, P.; Skwarnicki, T.; Stone, S.; Thulasidas, M.; Yao, W.; Zhu, G.; Barnes, A.V.; Bartelt, J.; Csorna, S.E.; Jain, V.; Letson, T.; Mestayer, M.D.; Akerib, D.S.; Barish, B.; Chadha, M.

    1992-06-01

    Using data accumulated by the CLEO I detector operating at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring, we have measured the ratio {ital R}={Gamma}({tau}{r arrow}{ital e}{bar {nu}}{sub {ital e}}{nu}{sub {tau}})/{Gamma}{sub 1}, where {Gamma}{sub 1} is the {tau} decay rate to final states with one charged particle. We find {ital R}=0.2231{plus minus}0.0044{plus minus}0.0073 where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic. Together with the measured topological one-charged-particle branching fraction, this yields the branching fraction of the {tau} lepton to electrons, {ital B}{sub {ital e}}=0.192{plus minus}0.004{plus minus}0.006.

  14. Radioiodinated branched carbohydrates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goodman, Mark M.; Knapp, Jr., Furn F.

    1989-01-01

    A radioiodinated branched carbohydrate for tissue imaging. Iodine-123 is stabilized in the compound by attaching it to a vinyl functional group that is on the carbohydrate. The compound exhibits good uptake and retention and is promising in the development of radiopharmaceuticals for brain, heart and tumor imaging.

  15. Measurement of the branching fraction for ?(3770)???c0 ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    0370-2693 Publisher: Elsevier Sponsoring Org: USDOE Country of Publication: Netherlands Language: English Word Cloud More Like This Free Publicly Accessible Full Text Publisher's...

  16. Measurement of the branching fraction for ?(3770)???c0 ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    FG02-04ER41291; DESC0010118 Type: Published Article Journal Name: Physics Letters. Section B Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 753; Journal Issue: C;...

  17. Fluid Inclusion Gas Analysis

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Dilley, Lorie

    Fluid inclusion gas analysis for wells in various geothermal areas. Analyses used in developing fluid inclusion stratigraphy for wells and defining fluids across the geothermal fields. Each sample has mass spectrum counts for 180 chemical species.

  18. Fluid Inclusion Gas Analysis

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Dilley, Lorie

    2013-01-01

    Fluid inclusion gas analysis for wells in various geothermal areas. Analyses used in developing fluid inclusion stratigraphy for wells and defining fluids across the geothermal fields. Each sample has mass spectrum counts for 180 chemical species.

  19. Measurement of the ratio of the production cross sections times branching fractions of Bc ? J/??and B ? J/? K and B(Bc? J/? ???-/+)/B(Bc ? J/? ?) in pp collisions at ?s = 7 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, V.

    2015-01-13

    The ratio of the production cross sections times branching fractions (?(Bc) B(Bc ? J/??))/(?(B) B(B ? J/?K) is studied in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV with the CMS detector at the LHC. The kinematic region investigated requires Ba,sub>c and Bmesons with transverse momentum p? > 15 GeV and rapidity |y| < 1.6. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 5.1 fb-1. The ratio is determined to be [0.48 0.05 (stat) 0.03(syst) 0.05 (?Bc)]% The J/????-/+ decay mode is also observed in the same data sample. Using a model-independent method developed to measure the efficiency given the presence of resonant behaviour in the three-pion system, the ratio of the branching fractions J/? ???-/+)/B(Bc is measured to be 2.55 0.80(stat) 0.33(syst) +0.04-0.01 (?Bc), consistent with the previous LHCb result.

  20. Measurement of the ratio of the production cross sections times branching fractions of $$B_{c}^{\\pm} \\to J/\\psi \\pi^{\\pm}$$ and $$B^{\\pm} \\to J/\\psi K^{\\pm}$$ and $$\\mathcal{B}(B_{c}^{\\pm} \\to J/\\psi \\pi^{\\pm}\\pi^{\\pm}\\pi^{\\mp})/\\mathcal{B}(B_{c}^{\\pm} \\to J/\\psi \\pi^{\\pm})$$ in pp collisions at $$\\sqrt{s} =$$ 7 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-01-13

    The ratio of the production cross sections times branching fractions (σ(B±c)B(B±c→J/ψπ±))/(σ(B±)B(B±→J/ψK±)) is studied in proton-proton collisions at a center of-mass energy of 7 TeV with the CMS detector at the LHC. The kinematic region investigated requires B c ± and B± mesons with transverse momentum p T > 15 GeV and rapidity |y|< 1.6. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 5.1 fb-1. The ratio is determined to be [0.48±0.05(stat)± 0.03(syst)±0.05 (τBc)]%. The B c ± → J/ψπ ± π ± π ∓ decay is also observed in the same data sample. Using a model-independent method developed tomore » measure the efficiency given the presence of resonant behaviour in the three-pion system, the ratio of the branching fractions B(B±c→J/ψπ±π±π∓)/B(B±c→J/ψπ±) is measured to be 2.55±0.80(stat)±0.33(syst)+0.04-0.01(τBc), consistent with the previous LHCb result.« less

  1. Measurement of the branching ratio of B¯→D(*)τ−ν¯τ relative to (B)over bar to B¯→D(*)ℓ−ν¯ℓ decays with hadronic tagging at Belle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huschle, Matthias J.; Kuhr, Thomas; Heck, M.; Goldenzweig, P.; Abdesselam, A.; Adachi, I.; Adamczyk, K.; Aihara, H.; Al Said, S.; Arinstein, K.; Asner, David M.; Aushev, T.; Ayad, R.; Aziz, T.; Badhrees, I.; Bakich, A. M.; Bansal, Vikas; Barberio, E.; Bhardwaj, V.; Bhuyan, Bipul; Biswal, J.; Bobrov, A.; Bozek, A.; Bracko, Marko; Browder, Thomas E.; Cervenkov, D.; Chang, P.; Chekelian, V.; Chen, A.; Cheon, B. G.; Chilikin, Kirill; Chistov, R.; Cho, K.; Chobanova, V.; Choi, Y.; Cinabro, David A.; Dalseno, J.; Danilov, M.; Dolezal, Z.; Drasal, Z.; Dutta, D.; Eidelman, S.; Epifanov, D.; Farhat, H.; Fast, James E.; Ferber, T.; Frey, A.; Fulsom, Bryan G.; Gaur, Vipin; Gabyshev, N.; Garmash, Alexey; Gillard, R.; Glattaur, R.; Goh, Y. M.; Golob, B.; Grygier, J.; Hamer, P.; Hara, K.; Hara, Takanori; Hasenbusch, J.; Hayasaka, K.; Hayashii, H.; He, X. H.; Heider, M.; Heller, A.; Horiguchi, T.; Hou, W. S.; Hsu, C. L.; Iijima, T.; Inami, K.; Inguglia, G.; Ishikawa, A.; Itoh, R.; Iwasaki, Y.; Jaegle, Igal; Joffe, D.; Joo, K. K.; Julius, T.; Kang, K. H.; Kato, E.; Katrenko, P.; Kawasaki, T.; Keck, T.; Kiesling, C.; Kim, D. Y.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, J. B.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, K. T.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. J.; Kinoshita, Kay; Ko, Byeong Rok; Kobayashi, Nakako; Kodys, P.; Korpar, S.; Krizan, P.; Krokovny, Pavel; Kumita, T.; Kuzmin, A.; Kwon, Y. J.; Lee, I. S.; Li, C.; Li, Y.; Li Gioi, L.; Libby, J.; Liventsev, Dmitri; Lukin, P.; Masuda, M.; Matvienko, D.; Miyabayashi, K.; Miyake, Hideki; Miyata, H.; Mizuk, R.; Mohanty, G. B.; Mohanty, Subhashree; Moll, A.; Moon, H K.; Mussa, R.; Nakamura, KR; Nakano, E.; Nakao, Mikihiko; Nanut, T.; Nayak, Minakshi; Nisar, N. K.; Nishida, Shohei; Ogawa, S.; Okuno, S.; Oswald, Christian; Pakhlova, Galina; Pal, Bilas K.; Park, C. W.; Park, H.; Pedlar, Todd K.; Pesantez, L.; Pestotnik, Rok; Petric, Marko; Piilonen, Leo E.; Pulvermacher, C.; Ribezl, Eva; Ritter, M.; Rostomyan, A.; Sakai, Y.; Sandilya, Saurabh; Santelj, Luka; Sanuki, T.; Sato, Y.; Savinov, Vladimir; Schneider, O.; Schnell, G.; Schwanda, C.; Schwartz, Alan J.; Semmler, D.; Senyo, K.; Seon, O.; Sevior, Martin E.; Shebalin, V.; Shen, C. P.; Shibata, TA; Shiu, Jing-Ge; Simon, F.; Sohn, Young-Soo; Sokolov, A.; Solovyeva, Elena; Stanic, S.; Staric, M.; Steder, M.; Stypula, J.; Sumihama, M.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Tamponi, Umberto; Teramoto, Y.; Trabelsi, K.; Trusov, V.; Uchida, M.; Uglov, T.; Uno, S.; Usov, Y.; Van Hulse, C.; Vanhoefer, P.; Varner, Gary; Vinokurova, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Wagner, M. N.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, M. Z.; Wang, P.; Wang, X. L.; Watanabe, M.; Watanabe, Y.; Won, Eun Il; Yamamoto, H.; Yamaoka, Jared AK; Yashchenko, S.; Ye, H.; Yook, Youngmin; Yuan, C. Z.; Yusa, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhilich, V.; Zhulanov, V.; Zupanc, A.

    2015-10-26

    Belle II paper 450 We report a measurement of the branching fraction ratios R(D)(()*)) of (B) over bar

  2. Long Branch Capital | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Branch Capital Jump to: navigation, search Name: Long Branch Capital Place: Austin, Texas Zip: 78744 Sector: Efficiency, Renewable Energy Product: Long Branch Capital makes...

  3. Diversity and Inclusion

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Inclusion Diversity and Inclusion At Los Alamos, you will work with the best minds on the planet in an inclusive environment rich in intellectual vitality and opportunity for growth. Lab named a Top 50 Best Workplace for Latinas Lab named a Top 50 Best Workplace for Latinas Highlighting, promoting, bringing recognition to Hispanic women READ MORE Michael Torrez Employee Spotlight: Michael Torrez Research technologist enjoys spending his free time tracing family lineages to colonial New Mexico.

  4. Diversity and Inclusion Guidance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    All DOE diversity and inclusion policies, practices and programs must comply with Federal Equal Employment Opportunity laws, Merit Systems Principles, the foundation of the Civil Service, and not...

  5. Measurement of the ratio of the production cross sections times branching fractions of $B_{c}^{\\pm} \\to J/\\psi \\pi^{\\pm}$ and $B^{\\pm} \\to J/\\psi K^{\\pm}$ and $\\mathcal{B}(B_{c}^{\\pm} \\to J/\\psi \\pi^{\\pm}\\pi^{\\pm}\\pi^{\\mp})/\\mathcal{B}(B_{c}^{\\pm} \\to J/\\psi \\pi^{\\pm})$ in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s} =$ 7 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-01-13

    The ratio of the production cross sections times branching fractions (σ(B±c)B(B±c→J/ψπ±))/(σ(B±)B(B±→J/ψK±)) is studied in proton-proton collisions at a center of-mass energy of 7 TeV with the CMS detector at the LHC. The kinematic region investigated requires B c ± and B± mesons with transverse momentum p T > 15 GeV and rapidity |y|< 1.6. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 5.1 fb-1. The ratio is determined to be [0.48±0.05(stat)± 0.03(syst)±0.05 (τBc)]%. The B c ± → J/ψπ ± π ± π decay is also observed in the same data sample. Using a model-independent method developed to measure the efficiency given the presence of resonant behaviour in the three-pion system, the ratio of the branching fractions B(B±c→J/ψπ±π±π)/B(B±c→J/ψπ±) is measured to be 2.55±0.80(stat)±0.33(syst)+0.04-0.01Bc), consistent with the previous LHCb result.

  6. Diversity and Inclusion Related Documents

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Diversity and Inclusion fosters a diverse and inclusive work environment that ensures equality of opportunity for applicants and employees through Departmental diversity policy...

  7. Inclusive charm production in {upsilon}(nS) decay (Journal Article...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    annihilation of the color-singlet bb pair into gamma*yieldscc. Most of the remaining branching fraction is from annihilation of the color-singlet bb pair decaying into ccgg. ...

  8. Walker Branch Watershed Ecosystems Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Walker Branch Watershed is located on the U. S. Department of Energy's Oak Ridge Reservation near Oak Ridge, in Anderson County, Tennessee. The Walker Branch Watershed Project began in 1967 under sponsorship of the U. S. Atomic Energy Commission (now the U. S. Department of Energy). Initially, the project centered primarily on the geologic and hydrologic processes that control the amounts and chemistry of water moving through the watershed. Past projects have included: • U. S. Department of Energy funded studies of watershed hydrology and forest nutrient dynamics • National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration funded studies of forest micrometeorology • Studies of atmospheric deposition under the National Atmospheric Deposition Program • The International Biological Program Eastern Deciduous Forest Biome Project • National Science Foundation sponsored studies of trace element cycling and stream nutrient spiraling • Electric Power Research Institute funded studies of the effects of acidic deposition on canopy processes and soil chemistry. These projects have all contributed to a more complete understanding of how forest watersheds function and have provided insights into the solution of energy-related problems associated with air pollution, contaminant transport, and forest nutrient dynamics. This is one of a few sites in the world characterized by long-term, intensive environmental studies. The Walker Branch Watershed website at http://walkerbranch.ornl.gov/ provides maps, photographs, and data on climate, precipitation, atmospheric deposition, stream discharge and runoff, stream chemistry, and vegetation. [Taken from http://walkerbranch.ornl.gov/ABOUTAAA.HTM

  9. Hawaii Wastewater Branch Webpage | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Hawaii Wastewater Branch Webpage Abstract This is the webpage of the Wastewater Branch of the...

  10. Tempered fractional calculus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sabzikar, Farzad; Meerschaert, Mark M.; Chen, Jinghua

    2015-07-15

    Fractional derivatives and integrals are convolutions with a power law. Multiplying by an exponential factor leads to tempered fractional derivatives and integrals. Tempered fractional diffusion equations, where the usual second derivative in space is replaced by a tempered fractional derivative, govern the limits of random walk models with an exponentially tempered power law jump distribution. The limiting tempered stable probability densities exhibit semi-heavy tails, which are commonly observed in finance. Tempered power law waiting times lead to tempered fractional time derivatives, which have proven useful in geophysics. The tempered fractional derivative or integral of a Brownian motion, called a tempered fractional Brownian motion, can exhibit semi-long range dependence. The increments of this process, called tempered fractional Gaussian noise, provide a useful new stochastic model for wind speed data. A tempered fractional difference forms the basis for numerical methods to solve tempered fractional diffusion equations, and it also provides a useful new correlation model in time series.

  11. Methodologies for Reservoir Characterization Using Fluid Inclusion...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Methodologies for Reservoir Characterization Using Fluid Inclusion Gas Chemistry Methodologies for Reservoir Characterization Using Fluid Inclusion Gas Chemistry Methodologies for ...

  12. Walker Branch Watershed Ecosystems Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    These projects have all contributed to a more complete understanding of how forest watersheds function and have provided insights into the solution of energy-related problems associated with air pollution, contaminant transport, and forest nutrient dynamics. This is one of a few sites in the world characterized by long-term, intensive environmental studies. The Walker Branch Watershed website at http://walkerbranch.ornl.gov/ provides maps, photographs, and data on climate, precipitation, atmospheric deposition, stream discharge and runoff, stream chemistry, and vegetation. [Taken from http://walkerbranch.ornl.gov/ABOUTAAA.HTM

  13. Semi-inclusive studies of semileptonic B-s decays at Belle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oswald, Christian; Urquijo, P.; Dingfelder, J.; Abdesselam, A.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Al Said, S.; Asner, David M.; Aushev, T.; Ayad, R.; Babu, V.; Badhrees, I.; Bakich, A. M.; Bhardwaj, V.; Bobrov, A.; Bonvicini, Giovanni; Bozek, A.; Bracko, Marko; Browder, Thomas E.; Cervenkov, D.; Chang, M-C; Chekelian, V.; Chen, A.; Cheon, B. G.; Chilikin, K.; Cho, K.; Chobanova, V.; Choi, Y.; Cinabro, David A.; Dalseno, J.; Dolezal, Z.; Drasal, Z.; Drutskoy, A.; Dutta, D.; Eidelman, S.; Farhat, H.; Fast, James E.; Ferber, T.; Frost, O.; Fulsom, Bryan G.; Gaur, Vipin; Gabyshev, N.; Ganguly, Sudeshna; Garmash, A.; Getzkow, D.; Gillard, R.; Glattaur, R.; Goh, Y. M.; Goldenzweig, P.; Golob, B.; Grzymkowska, O.; Hara, Takanori; Hasenbusch, J.; Hayasaka, K.; Hayashii, H.; He, X. H.; Hou, W. S.; Huschle, Matthias J.; Hyun, H. J.; Iijima, T.; Ishikawa, A.; Itoh, R.; Iwasaki, Y.; Jaegle, Igal; Julius, T.; Kang, K. H.; Kapusta, P.; Kato, E.; Kawasaki, T.; Kiesling, C.; Kim, D. Y.; Kim, J. B.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, K. T.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. J.; Kinoshita, Kay; Ko, Byeong Rok; Kodys, P.; Korpar, S.; Krizan, P.; Krokovny, Pavel; Kuhr, T.; Kumita, T.; Kwon, Y. J.; Lange, J. S.; Lee, D. H.; Lee, I. S.; Li, Y.; Gioi, LL; Libby, J.; Liventsev, D.; Lukin, P.; Matvienko, D.; Miyata, H.; Mizuk, R.; Mohanty, G. B.; Moll, A.; Moon, H K.; Nakano, E.; Nakao, M.; Nakazawa, H.; Nanut, T.; Natkaniec, Z.; Nayak, Minakshi; Nishida, S.; Nozaki, T.; Okuno, S.; Pakhlov, P.; Pakhlova, G.; Park, C. W.; Park, H.; Pedlar, Todd; Pesantez, L.; Pestotnik, R.; Petric, M.; Piilonen, Leo E.; Pulvermacher, C.; Ribezl, Eva; Ritter, M.; Rostomyan, A.; Rozanska, M.; Ryu, S.; Sakai, Y.; Sandilya, Saurabh; Santelj, L.; Sanuki, T.; Sato, Y.; Savinov, Vladimir; Schneider, O.; Schnell, G.; Schwanda, C.; Semmler, D.; Senyo, K.; Seon, O.; Sevior, ME; Shapkin, M.; Shebalin, V.; Shen, CP; Shibata, TA; Shiu, Jing-Ge; Sibidanov, A.; Simon, F.; Sohn, Y. S.; Solovieva, E.; Stanic, S.; Staric, M.; Stypula, J.; Sumihama, M.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Tamponi, Umberto; Teramoto, Y.; Trabelsi, K.; Uchida, M.; Unno, Y.; Uno, S.; Usov, Y.; Van Hulse, C.; Vanhoefer, P.; Varner, G.; Vinokurova, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Vossen, Anslem G.; Wagner, M. N.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, M. Z.; Wang, P.; Wang, Xiaolong; Watanabe, Y.; Williams, K. M.; Won, E.; Yamamoto, H.; Yashchenko, S.; Yook, Youngmin; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhilich, V.; Zhulanov, V.; Zupanc, A.

    2015-10-22

    We present an analysis of the semi-inclusive decays B-s -> D(s)(-)Xl(+)nu and B-s -> D-s*(-)Xl(+)nu, where X denotes a final state that may consist of additional hadrons or photons and l is an electron or muon. The studied Bs decays are contained in the 121.4 fb(-1) Upsilon(5S) data sample collected by the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e(+)e(-) collider. The branching fractions of the decays are measured to be B(B-s -> D(s)(-)Xl(+)nu) = [8.2 +/- 0.2(stat) +/- 0.6(syst) +/- 1.4(ext)] % and B(B-s -> D-s*(-)Xl(+)nu) = [5.4 +/- 0.4(stat) +/- 0.4(syst) +/- 0.9(ext)] %, where the first two uncertainties are statistical and systematic and the last is due to external parameters. The measurement also provides an estimate of the B-s(()*())(B) over bar (()(s)*()) production cross section, sigma(e(+)e(-) -> B-s(()*())(B) over bar (()(s)*())) = 53.8 +/- 1.4(stat) +/- 4.0(syst) +/- 3.4(ext)] pb, at the center-of-mass energy root s = 10.86 GeV.

  14. Inclusive J/{psi} production in {Upsilon} decay via color-singlet mechanism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He Zhiguo; Wang Jianxiong

    2010-03-01

    In this work, we have calculated the tree level color-singlet contribution to the inclusive J/{psi} production in {Upsilon} decay of the {alpha}{sub s}{sup 5} order QCD process {Upsilon}{yields}J/{psi}+ccg and {alpha}{sup 2{alpha}}{sub s}{sup 2} order QED processes {Upsilon}{yields}{gamma}*{yields}J/{psi}+cc and {Upsilon}{yields}J/{psi}+gg. It is found that the contribution of the QED processes is comparable with that of the QCD process and the numerical results of the QCD process alone are about an order of magnitude smaller than the previous theoretical predictions. Our prediction in total is 4.2x10{sup -5} which is about an order of magnitude smaller than the recent CLEO measurement on the branching fraction B({Upsilon}{yields}J/{psi}+X). It indicates that the J/{psi} production mechanism in {Upsilon} decay is not well understood and further theoretical work and experimental analysis are still necessary.

  15. Diversity and Inclusion | Careers | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Diversity and Inclusion NREL's world-class staff bring knowledge and expertise from across the globe. Our diverse backgrounds enable the laboratory to create clean energy solutions ...

  16. QER- Comment of Rachel Branch

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    April 20, 2014 I hereby respectfully request that the Department of Energy Quadrennial Energy Review Task Force on the Infrastructure Constraints in New England oppose any new development or building of any more fossil fuel infrastructure and only allow the repair of existing infrastructure that is absolutely necessary as we transition to sustainable, renewable sources. Further, I respectfully request that any and all subsidies, tax incentives and/or tax exemptions hereinafter be appropriated and/or directed only to sustainable, renewable sources, i. e., solar, wind, and hydro energy, and development of electrical storage capacities for those sustainable and renewable sources. I further request that any funds spent to push for fossil fuel infrastructure be transparent to the general public. As you are holding meetings in Providence and Hartford, when will your meeting in Massachusetts be scheduled so that Commonwealth of Massachusetts residents can participate? Respectfully submitted, Rachel I. Branch

  17. Vegetation survey of PEN Branch wetlands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    A survey was conducted of vegetation along Pen Branch Creek at Savannah River Site (SRS) in support of K-Reactor restart. Plants were identified to species by overstory, understory, shrub, and groundcover strata. Abundance was also characterized and richness and diversity calculated. Based on woody species basal area, the Pen Branch delta was the most impacted, followed by the sections between the reactor and the delta. Species richness for shrub and groundcover strata were also lowest in the delta. No endangered plant species were found. Three upland pine areas were also sampled. In support of K Reactor restart, this report summarizes a study of the wetland vegetation along Pen Branch. Reactor effluent enters Indian Grove Branch and then flows into Pen Branch and the Pen Branch Delta.

  18. Construction Branch Electrician & Lead Electrician | Princeton...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Construction Branch Electrician & Lead Electrician Department: Engineering Supervisor(s): ... devices, and assist with the construction and repair of facilities on the PPPL campus. ...

  19. Observation of B0 (s) ---> K+ K- and Measurements of Branching Fractions of Charmless Two-body Decays of B0 and B0(s) Mesons in anti-p p Collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abulencia, A.; Acosta, D.; Adelman, Jahred A.; Affolder, T.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Ambrose, D.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Anikeev, K.; /Taiwan, Inst. Phys. /Argonne /Barcelona, IFAE /Baylor U. /INFN, Bologna /Bologna U. /Brandeis U. /UC, Davis /UCLA /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara

    2006-07-01

    The authors search for decays of the type B{sub (s)}{sup 0} {yields} h{sup +}h'{sup -} (where h,h' = K or {pi}) in 180 pb{sup -1} of data collected by the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. They observe the new mode B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -} with a yield of 236 {+-} 32 events, corresponding to (f{sub s}/f{sub d}) x {Beta}(B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -})/{Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) = 0.46 {+-} 0.08(stat.) {+-} 0.07(syst.), where f{sub s}/f{sub d} is the ratio of production fractions of B{sub s}{sup 0} and B{sup 0}. They find results in agreement with world averages for the modes B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} and B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, and set the following upper limits at 90% CL: {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}) < 1.8 x 10{sup -6}, {Beta}(B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}) < 5.6 x 10{sup -6}, and {Beta}(B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) < 1.7 x 10{sup -6}.

  20. Diversity & Inclusion at Argonne | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Diversity & Inclusion at Argonne Share Duration 2:50 Topic Operations Human Resources Diversity Argonne Diversity & Inclusion Advisory Council members discuss the value and...

  1. Production of branched-chain alcohols by recombinant Ralstonia eutropha in fed-batch cultivation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fei, Q; Brigham, CJ; Lu, JN; Fu, RZ; Sinskey, AJ

    2013-09-01

    Branched-chain alcohols are considered promising green energy sources due to their compatibility with existing infrastructure and their high energy density. We utilized a strain of Ralstonia eutropha capable of producing branched-chain alcohols and examined its production in flask cultures. In order to increase isobutanol and 3-methyl-1-butanol (isoamyl alcohol) productivity in the engineered strain, batch, fed-batch, and two-stage fed-batch cultures were carried out in this work. The effects of nitrogen source concentration on branched-chain alcohol production were investigated under four different initial concentrations in fermenters. A maximum 380 g m(-3) of branched-chain alcohol production was observed with 2 kg m(-3) initial NH4Cl concentration in batch cultures. A pH-stat control strategy was utilized to investigate the optimum carbon source amount fed during fed-batch cultures for higher cell density. In cultures of R. eutropha strains that did not produce polyhydroxyalkanoate or branched-chain alcohols, a maximum cell dry weight of 36 kg m(-3) was observed using a fed-batch strategy, when 10 kg m(-3) carbon source was fed into culture medium. Finally, a total branched-chain alcohol titer of 790 g m(-3), the highest branched-chain alcohol yield of 0.03 g g(-1), and the maximum branched-chain alcohol productivity of 8.23 g m(-3) h(-1) were obtained from the engineered strain Re2410/pJL26 in a two-stage fed-batch culture system with pH-stat control. Isobutanol made up over 95% (mass fraction) of the total branched-chain alcohols titer produced in this study. (C) 2013 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. FY 1990 Applied Sciences Branch annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keyes, B.M.; Dippo, P.C.

    1991-11-01

    The Applied Sciences Branch actively supports the advancement of DOE/SERI goals for the development and implementation of the solar photovoltaic technology. The primary focus of the laboratories is to provide state-of-the-art analytical capabilities for materials and device characterization and fabrication. The branch houses a comprehensive facility which is capable of providing information on the full range of photovoltaic components. A major objective of the branch is to aggressively pursue collaborative research with other government laboratories, universities, and industrial firms for the advancement of photovoltaic technologies. Members of the branch disseminate research findings to the technical community in publications and presentations. This report contains information on surface and interface analysis, materials characterization, development, electro-optical characterization module testing and performance, surface interactions and FTIR spectroscopy.

  3. EA-263 UBS AG, London Branch | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EA-263 UBS AG, London Branch Order authorizing UBS AG, London Branch to export electric energy to Mexico. PDF icon EA-263 UBS AG, London Branch More Documents & Publications EA-232 ...

  4. Cow Branch Wind Energy Center Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Cow Branch Wind Energy Center Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Cow Branch Wind Energy Center Wind Farm Facility Cow Branch Wind Energy Center Sector Wind energy Facility...

  5. Microbial production of wax esters from highly branched alkanes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bogan, William W.; Sullivan, Wendy R.; Paterek, James R.

    2005-02-01

    A microbial culture and method for producing wax esters using highly branched alkanes. In accordance with one embodiment, the highly branched alkane is squalane.

  6. Hawaii Department of Health Solid and Hazardous Waste Branch...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and Hazardous Waste Branch Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hawaii Department of Health Solid and Hazardous Waste Branch Address: 919 Ala Moana Boulevard 212 Place: Honolulu,...

  7. Utah DEQ Air Permitting Branch Webpage | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    link for Utah DEQ Air Permitting Branch Webpage Citation Utah Department of Environmental Quality. Utah DEQ Air Permitting Branch Webpage Internet. State of Utah. cited 201411...

  8. Hawaii Department of Health Indoor and Radiological Health Branch...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Indoor and Radiological Health Branch Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hawaii Department of Health Indoor and Radiological Health Branch From Open Energy Information Address: 591...

  9. FRACTIONAL CRYSTALLIZATION FEED ENVELOPE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HERTING DL

    2008-03-19

    Laboratory work was completed on a set of evaporation tests designed to establish a feed envelope for the fractional crystallization process. The feed envelope defines chemical concentration limits within which the process can be operated successfully. All 38 runs in the half-factorial design matrix were completed successfully, based on the qualitative definition of success. There is no feed composition likely to be derived from saltcake dissolution that would cause the fractional crystallization process to not meet acceptable performance requirements. However, some compositions clearly would provide more successful operation than other compositions.

  10. Jr., Process Development Branch Construction Division SUBJECT:

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    FR?M : Jr., Process Development Branch Construction Division SUBJECT: INING TESTS AT BOWEN ENGINEERING, INC. - M A Y 16 AND 16,!1961 SYMBOL! EPD:ABBrbt I REY~AKC~: &DiVE;G?i&)il [q a 1 $ a, " I On day 16 and 16,,1951 Bowen Engineering, Inc. made test rune on ypray calcining of boiled-down Mallinokrodt pitohblende raffinate. Theqe rune were made in Bowen'e laboratory unit et North Branch, NT Jel;sey. The initial results indicate that raffidate &$be euocessfully epray oalcined to

  11. Isolation and characterization of portal branch ligation-stimulated Hmga2-positive bipotent hepatic progenitor cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sakai, Hiroshi; Graduate School of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 B51, Nagatsuta-cho, Midori-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 226-8503 ; Tagawa, Yoh-ichi; Graduate School of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 B51, Nagatsuta-cho, Midori-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 226-8503; PRESTO, Japan Science and Technology Agency, 4-1-8 Honcho, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 ; Tamai, Miho; Motoyama, Hiroaki; Ogawa, Shinichiro; McEwen Center for Regenerative Medicine, University Health Network, 190 Elizabeth Street, Toronto, Ont., Canada M5G 2C4 ; Soeda, Junpei; Nakata, Takenari; Miyagawa, Shinichi

    2010-12-17

    Research highlights: {yields} Hepatic progenitor cells were isolated from the portal branch-ligated liver of mice. {yields} Portal branch ligation-stimulated hepatic progenitor cells (PBLHCs) express Hmga2. {yields} PBLHCs have bidirectional differentiation capability in vitro. -- Abstract: Hepatic stem/progenitor cells are one of several cell sources that show promise for restoration of liver mass and function. Although hepatic progenitor cells (HPCs), including oval cells, are induced by administration of certain hepatotoxins in experimental animals, such a strategy would be inappropriate in a clinical setting. Here, we investigated the possibility of isolating HPCs in a portal branch-ligated liver model without administration of any chemical agents. A non-parenchymal cell fraction was prepared from the portal branch-ligated or non-ligated lobe, and seeded onto plates coated with laminin. Most of the cells died, but a small number were able to proliferate. These proliferating cells were cloned as portal branch ligation-stimulated hepatic cells (PBLHCs) by the limiting dilution method. The PBLHCs expressed cytokeratin19, albumin, and Hmga2. The PBLHCs exhibited metabolic functions such as detoxification of ammonium ions and synthesis of urea on Matrigel-coated plates in the presence of oncostatin M. In Matrigel mixed with type I collagen, the PBLHCs became rearranged into cystic and tubular structures. Immunohistochemical staining demonstrated the presence of Hmga2-positive cells around the interlobular bile ducts in the portal branch-ligated liver lobes. In conclusion, successful isolation of bipotent hepatic progenitor cell clones, PBLHCs, from the portal branch-ligated liver lobes of mice provides the possibility of future clinical application of portal vein ligation to induce hepatic progenitor cells.

  12. Clean fractionation of biomass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Alternative Feedstocks (AF) program is forging new links between the agricultural community and the chemicals industry through support of research and development (R & D) that uses `green` feedstocks to produce chemicals. The program promotes cost-effective industrial use of renewable biomass as feedstocks to manufacture high-volume chemical building blocks. Industrial commercialization of such processes would stimulate the agricultural sector by increasing the demand of agricultural and forestry commodities. New alternatives for American industry may lie in the nation`s forests and fields. The AF program is conducting ongoing research on a clean fractionation process. This project is designed to convert biomass into materials that can be used for chemical processes and products. Clean fractionation separates a single feedstock into individual components cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin.

  13. Study of thermal-gradient-induced migration of brine inclusions in salt. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olander, D.R.

    1984-08-01

    Natural salt deposits, which are being considered for high-level waste disposal, contain a small volume fraction of water in the form of brine inclusions distributed throughout the salt. Radioactive decay heating of the nuclear wastes will impose a temperature gradient on the surrounding salt which mobilizes the brine inclusions. Inclusions filled completely with brine (the all-liquid inclusions) migrate up the temperature gradient and eventually accumulate brine near the buried waste forms. The brine may slowly corrode or degrade the waste forms, which is undesirable. Therefore it is important to consider the migration of brine inclusions in salt under imposed temperature gradients to properly evaluate the performance of a future salt repository for nuclear wastes. The migration velocities of the inclusions were found to be dependent on temperature, temperature gradient, and inclusion shape and size. The velocities were also dictated by the interfacial mass transfer resistance at brine/solid interface. This interfacial resistance depends on the dislocation density in the crystal, which in turn, depends on the axial compressive loading of the crystal. At low axial loads, the dependence between the velocity and temperature gradient is nonlinear. At high axial loads, the interfacial resistance is reduced and the migration velocity depends linearly on the temperature gradient. All-liquid inclusions filled with mixed brines were also studied. For gas-liquid inclusions, helium, air and argon were compared. Migration studies were also conducted on single crystallites of natural salt as well as in polycrystalline natural salt samples. The behavior of the inclusions at large-ange grain boundaries was observed.

  14. Photovoltaic Program Branch annual report, FY 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Summers, K A

    1990-03-01

    This report summarizes the progress of the Photovoltaic (PV) Program Branch of the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) from October 1, 1988, through September 30, 1989. The branch is responsible for managing the subcontracted portion of SERI's PV Advanced Research and Development Project. In fiscal year (FY) 1989, this included nearly 50 subcontracts, with a total annualized funding of approximately $13.1 million. Approximately two-thirds of the subcontracts were with universities, at a total funding of nearly $4 million. The six technical sections of the report cover the main areas of the subcontracted program: Amorphous Silicon Research, Polycrystalline Thin Films, Crystalline Silicon Materials Research, High-Efficiency Concepts, New Ideas, and University Participation. Technical summaries of each of the subcontracted programs provide a discussion of approaches, major accomplishments in FY 1989, and future research directions. Each report will be cataloged individually.

  15. Fractional channel multichannel analyzer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brackenbush, Larry W.; Anderson, Gordon A.

    1994-01-01

    A multichannel analyzer incorporating the features of the present invention obtains the effect of fractional channels thus greatly reducing the number of actual channels necessary to record complex line spectra. This is accomplished by using an analog-to-digital converter in the asynscronous mode, i.e., the gate pulse from the pulse height-to-pulse width converter is not synchronized with the signal from a clock oscillator. This saves power and reduces the number of components required on the board to achieve the effect of radically expanding the number of channels without changing the circuit board.

  16. Fractional channel multichannel analyzer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brackenbush, L.W.; Anderson, G.A.

    1994-08-23

    A multichannel analyzer incorporating the features of the present invention obtains the effect of fractional channels thus greatly reducing the number of actual channels necessary to record complex line spectra. This is accomplished by using an analog-to-digital converter in the asynchronous mode, i.e., the gate pulse from the pulse height-to-pulse width converter is not synchronized with the signal from a clock oscillator. This saves power and reduces the number of components required on the board to achieve the effect of radically expanding the number of channels without changing the circuit board. 9 figs.

  17. Cold versus hot fusion deuterium branching ratios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fox, H.; Bass, R.

    1995-12-31

    A major source of misunderstanding of the nature of cold nuclear fusion has been the expectation that the deuterium branching ratios occurring within a palladium lattice would be consistent with the gas-plasma branching ratios. This misunderstanding has led to the concept of the dead graduate student, the 1989`s feverish but fruitless search for neutron emissions from cold fusion reactors, and the follow-on condemnation of the new science of cold fusion. The experimental facts are that in a properly loaded palladium lattice, the deuterium fusion produces neutrons at little above background, a greatly less-than-expected production of tritium (the tritium desert), and substantially more helium-4 than is observed in hot plasma physics. The experimental evidence is now compelling (800 reports of success from 30 countries) that cold nuclear fusion is a reality, that the branching ratios are unexpected, and that a new science is struggling to be recognized. Commercialization of some types of cold fusion devices has already begun.

  18. Clean fractionation of biomass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-09-01

    The US DOE Alternative Feedstocks (AF) program is forging new links between the agricultural community and the chemicals industry through support of research and development (R&D) that uses green feedstocks to produce chemicals. The program promotes cost-effective industrial use of renewable biomass as feedstocks to manufacture high-volume chemical building blocks. Industrial commercialization of such processes would stimulate the agricultural sector by increasing the demand of agricultural and forestry commodities. A consortium of five DOE national laboratories has been formed with the objectives of providing industry with a broad range of expertise and helping to lower the risk of new process development through federal cost sharing. The AF program is conducting ongoing research on a clean fractionation process, designed to convert biomass into materials that can be used for chemical processes and products. The focus of the clean fractionation research is to demonstrate to industry that one technology can successfully separate all types of feedstocks into predictable types of chemical intermediates.

  19. Hawaii Department of Health Clean Water Branch | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Clean Water Branch Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hawaii Department of Health Clean Water Branch Address: P.O. Box 3378 Place: Honolulu, Hawaii Zip: 96801 Website: hawaii.gov...

  20. North Branch Water & Light Comm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    North Branch Water & Light Comm Jump to: navigation, search Name: North Branch Water & Light Comm Place: Minnesota Phone Number: 651-674-7100 or 651-674-8113 Website:...

  1. EA-261 UBS AG, London Branch | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1 UBS AG, London Branch EA-261 UBS AG, London Branch Order authorizing UBS AG, London Branch to export electric energy to Mexico. EA-261 UBS AG, London Branch (24.57 KB) More Documents & Publications EA-184 Morgan Stanley Capital Group Inc. EA-166 Duke Energy Trading and Marketing, L.L.C EA-167 PG&E Energy Trading-Power, L.P

  2. Diversity & Inclusion Advisory Council | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... for Science (OTD) Harry Weerts, Associate Laboratory Director (PSE) Emily Zvolanek, GIS Senior Analyst (EVS) Resources Diversity & Inclusion Initiative: At a Glance Diversity & ...

  3. DISPLAYING AND INTERPRETING FLUID INCLUSION STRATIGRAPHY ANALYSES...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    DISPLAYING AND INTERPRETING FLUID INCLUSION STRATIGRAPHY ANALYSES ON MUDLOG GRAPHS Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings:...

  4. NMR Spectroscopic Investigation of Inclusion Complexes between...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    NMR Spectroscopic Investigation of Inclusion Complexes between Cyclodextrins and the Neurotoxin Tetramethylenedisulfotetramine (TETS) Citation Details In-Document Search Title: NMR ...

  5. Dendrimers and methods of preparing same through proportionate branching

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yu, Yihua; Yue, Xuyi

    2015-09-15

    The present invention provides for monodispersed dendrimers having a core, branches and periphery ends, wherein the number of branches increases exponentially from the core to the periphery end and the length of the branches increases exponentially from the periphery end to the core, thereby providing for attachment of chemical species at the periphery ends without exhibiting steric hindrance.

  6. Fractional diffusion on bounded domains

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Defterli, Ozlem; D'Elia, Marta; Du, Qiang; Gunzburger, Max Donald; Lehoucq, Richard B.; Meerschaert, Mark M.

    2015-03-13

    We found that the mathematically correct specification of a fractional differential equation on a bounded domain requires specification of appropriate boundary conditions, or their fractional analogue. In this paper we discuss the application of nonlocal diffusion theory to specify well-posed fractional diffusion equations on bounded domains.

  7. Diversity & Inclusion | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Diversity & Inclusion Advisory Council Demographics Leadership Institute Workforce Pipeline Mentoring Policies & Practices Business Diversity Educational Programs Directory Argonne National Laboratory About Safety News Careers Education Community Diversity Directory Energy Environment Security User Facilities Science Work with Argonne Diversity Diversity & Inclusion Advisory Council Demographics Leadership Institute Workforce Pipeline Mentoring Policies & Practices Business

  8. Fractionally charged skyrmions in fractional quantum Hall effect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balram, Ajit C.; Wurstbauer, U.; Wójs, A.; Pinczuk, A.; Jain, J. K.

    2015-11-26

    The fractional quantum Hall effect has inspired searches for exotic emergent topological particles, such as fractionally charged excitations, composite fermions, abelian and nonabelian anyons and Majorana fermions. Fractionally charged skyrmions, which support both topological charge and topological vortex-like spin structure, have also been predicted to occur in the vicinity of 1/3 filling of the lowest Landau level. The fractional skyrmions, however, are anticipated to be exceedingly fragile, suppressed by very small Zeeman energies. Here we show that, slightly away from 1/3 filling, the smallest manifestations of the fractional skyrmion exist in the excitation spectrum for a broad range of Zeeman energies, and appear in resonant inelastic light scattering experiments as well-defined resonances slightly below the long wavelength spin wave mode. The spectroscopy of these exotic bound states serves as a sensitive tool for investigating the residual interaction between composite fermions, responsible for delicate new fractional quantum Hall states in this filling factor region.

  9. Additional chain-branching pathways in the low-temperature oxidation of branched alkanes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, Zhandong; Zhang, Lidong; Moshammer, Kai; Popolan-Vaida, Denisia M.; Shankar, Vijai Shankar Bhavani; Lucassen, Arnas; Hemken, Christian; Taatjes, Craig A.; Leone, Stephen R.; Kohse-Hoinghaus, Katharina; et al

    2015-12-31

    Chain-branching reactions represent a general motif in chemistry, encountered in atmospheric chemistry, combustion, polymerization, and photochemistry; the nature and amount of radicals generated by chain-branching are decisive for the reaction progress, its energy signature, and the time towards its completion. In this study, experimental evidence for two new types of chain-branching reactions is presented, based upon detection of highly oxidized multifunctional molecules (HOM) formed during the gas-phase low-temperature oxidation of a branched alkane under conditions relevant to combustion. The oxidation of 2,5-dimethylhexane (DMH) in a jet-stirred reactor (JSR) was studied using synchrotron vacuum ultra-violet photoionization molecular beam mass spectrometry (SVUV-PI-MBMS).more » Specifically, species with four and five oxygen atoms were probed, having molecular formulas of C8H14O4 (e.g., diketo-hydroperoxide/keto-hydroperoxy cyclic ether) and C8H16O5 (e.g., keto-dihydroperoxide/dihydroperoxy cyclic ether), respectively. The formation of C8H16O5 species involves alternative isomerization of OOQOOH radicals via intramolecular H-atom migration, followed by third O2 addition, intramolecular isomerization, and OH release; C8H14O4 species are proposed to result from subsequent reactions of C8H16O5 species. The mechanistic pathways involving these species are related to those proposed as a source of low-volatility highly oxygenated species in Earth's troposphere. At the higher temperatures relevant to auto-ignition, they can result in a net increase of hydroxyl radical production, so these are additional radical chain-branching pathways for ignition. Furthermore, the results presented herein extend the conceptual basis of reaction mechanisms used to predict the reaction behavior of ignition, and have implications on atmospheric gas-phase chemistry and the oxidative stability of organic substances.« less

  10. COMMERCIAL SNF ACCIDENT RELEASE FRACTIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S.O. Bader

    1999-10-18

    The purpose of this design analysis is to specify and document the total and respirable fractions for radioactive materials that are released from an accident event at the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) involving commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) in a dry environment. The total and respirable release fractions will be used to support the preclosure licensing basis for the MGR. The total release fraction is defined as the fraction of total CSNF assembly inventory, typically expressed as an activity inventory (e.g., curies), of a given radionuclide that is released to the environment from a waste form. The radionuclides are released from the inside of breached fuel rods (or pins) and from the detachment of radioactive material (crud) from the outside surfaces of fuel rods and other components of fuel assemblies. The total release fraction accounts for several mechanisms that tend to retain, retard, or diminish the amount of radionuclides that are available for transport to dose receptors or otherwise can be shown to reduce exposure of receptors to radiological releases. The total release fraction includes a fraction of airborne material that is respirable and could result in inhalation doses. This subset of the total release fraction is referred to as the respirable release fraction. Potential accidents may involve waste forms that are characterized as either bare (unconfined) fuel assemblies or confined fuel assemblies. The confined CSNF assemblies at the MGR are contained in shipping casks, canisters, or disposal containers (waste packages). In contrast to the bare fuel assemblies, the container that confines the fuel assemblies has the potential of providing an additional barrier for diminishing the total release fraction should the fuel rod cladding breach during an accident. However, this analysis will not take credit for this additional bamer and will establish only the total release fractions for bare unconfined CSNF assemblies, which may however be

  11. Radiating subdispersive fractional optical solitons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fujioka, J. Espinosa, A.; Rodríguez, R. F.; Malomed, B. A.

    2014-09-01

    It was recently found [Fujioka et al., Phys. Lett. A 374, 1126 (2010)] that the propagation of solitary waves can be described by a fractional extension of the nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation which involves a temporal fractional derivative (TFD) of order α > 2. In the present paper, we show that there is also another fractional extension of the NLS equation which contains a TFD with α < 2, and in this case, the new equation describes the propagation of radiating solitons. We show that the emission of the radiation (when α < 2) is explained by resonances at various frequencies between the pulses and the linear modes of the system. It is found that the new fractional NLS equation can be derived from a suitable Lagrangian density, and a fractional Noether's theorem can be applied to it, thus predicting the conservation of the Hamiltonian, momentum and energy.

  12. Diversity and Inclusion | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Diversity and Inclusion Argonne is home to a vibrant, diverse community. When we bring together groups of people whose cultural and intellectual backgrounds equip them to look at a...

  13. Hawaii Department of Health Safe Drinking Water Branch | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hawaii Department of Health Safe Drinking Water Branch Address: 919 Ala Moana Blvd Room 308 Place: Honolulu, Hawaii Zip: 96814 References: Hawaii Department of Health Safe...

  14. Production of anteiso-branched fatty acids in Escherichia coli...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Production of anteiso-branched fatty acids in Escherichia coli; next generation biofuels with improved cold-flow properties Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Production of ...

  15. Wells Branch, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wells Branch, Texas: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 30.4460353, -97.6794507 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingse...

  16. Branching Mechanisms in Surfactant Micellar Growth (Journal Article...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Branching Mechanisms in Surfactant Micellar Growth Authors: Tang, M ; Carter, W C Publication Date: 2012-08-20 OSTI Identifier: 1169255 ...

  17. Hawaii Department of Health Clean Air Branch | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search Name: Hawaii Department of Health Clean Air Branch Address: P.O. Box 3378 Place: Honolulu, Hawaii Zip: 96801 Website: hawaii.govhealthenvironmenta...

  18. Hawaii Wastewater Branch Online Application Webpage | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Application Webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Hawaii Wastewater Branch Online Application Webpage Author State of Hawaii...

  19. Hawaii Clean Water Branch Forms Webpage | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Not Provided DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Hawaii Clean Water Branch Forms Webpage Citation State of Hawaii Department...

  20. Hawaii Department of Health Clean Air Branch Webpage | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Branch Webpage Internet. cited 20141013. Available from: http:health.hawaii.govcab Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleHawaiiDepartmentofHealthCle...

  1. Mr. John Kinneman, Chief Nuclear Materfals Branch Nuclear Regulatory...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    111989 Mr. John Kinneman, Chief Nuclear Materfals Branch Nuclear Regulatory Commission Region I 475 Allendale Road King of Prussia. Pennsylvania 19406 Dear Mr. Kinneman: -;' .-. 'W ...

  2. Measurements of transverse momentum in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering at CLAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K.A. Griffioen

    2012-12-01

    With mounting experimental evidence that only a small fraction of the proton's spin comes from the spins of its quarks and gluons, the quest for orbital angular momentum has begun. The parton distributions relevant to this depend on transverse quark momenta. Recent CLAS semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering measurements probe these new transverse-momentum-dependent parton distributions using longitudinally polarized beams and targets and detecting {pi}{sup +},{pi}{sup -} and {pi}{sup 0} in the final state.

  3. Diversity and Inclusion | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Diversity and Inclusion Many Voices, One Future is Princeton's institutional movement toward greater diversity and inclusion. We're continually working to make the University a place where everyone's perspectives are welcomed and valued, resulting in a positive and more successful future for the institution and the members of our community. We believe having a diverse community is the only way to maintain our position as a world-class university. This effort is for all members of the campus

  4. Integrated Diversity and Inclusion Management! | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Integrated Diversity and Inclusion Management! Integrated Diversity and Inclusion Management! September 8, 2015 Those of us who are moderately long in the tooth remember the bad old days of (un)safety. One occasion that I recall involved siphoning liquid scintillator with a rubber tube and a mouth, mine. Another was the inappropriate use of magnetic tools in a magnetic field. All that has changed; we are now proud of a safety record and performance, which limits the accidents that do damage to

  5. Government-Wide Diversity and Inclusion Strategic Plan (2011...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Government-Wide Diversity and Inclusion Strategic Plan (2011), Office of Personnel Management Government-Wide Diversity and Inclusion Strategic Plan (2011), Office of Personnel ...

  6. CYANOGEN IN NGC 1851 RED GIANT BRANCH AND ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH STARS: QUADRIMODAL DISTRIBUTIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, S. W.; Stancliffe, R. J.; Lattanzio, J. C.; Angelou, G. C.; D'Orazi, V.; Yong, D.; Wylie-de Boer, E. C.; Martell, S. L.; Grundahl, F.; Sneden, C. E-mail: david.yong@anu.edu.au

    2012-12-10

    The Galactic globular cluster NGC 1851 has raised much interest since Hubble Space Telescope photometry revealed that it hosts a double subgiant branch. Here we report on our homogeneous study into the cyanogen (CN) band strengths in the red giant branch (RGB) population (17 stars) and asymptotic giant branch (AGB) population (21 stars) using AAOmega/2dF spectra with R {approx} 3000. We discover that NGC 1851 hosts a quadrimodal distribution of CN band strengths in its RGB and AGB populations. This result supports the merger formation scenario proposed for this cluster, such that the CN quadrimodality could be explained by the superposition of two 'normal' bimodal populations. A small sample overlap with an abundance catalog allowed us to tentatively explore the relationship between our CN populations and a range of elemental abundances. We found a striking correlation between CN and [O/Na]. We also found that the four CN peaks may be paired-the two CN-weaker populations being associated with low Ba and the two CN-stronger populations with high Ba. If true, then s-process abundances would be a good diagnostic for disentangling the two original clusters in the merger scenario. More observations are needed to confirm the quadrimodality and also the relationship between the subpopulations. We also report CN results for NGC 288 as a comparison. Our relatively large samples of AGB stars show that both clusters have a bias toward CN-weak AGB populations.

  7. Fractionally charged skyrmions in fractional quantum Hall effect

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Balram, Ajit C.; Wurstbauer, U.; Wójs, A.; Pinczuk, A.; Jain, J. K.

    2015-11-26

    The fractional quantum Hall effect has inspired searches for exotic emergent topological particles, such as fractionally charged excitations, composite fermions, abelian and nonabelian anyons and Majorana fermions. Fractionally charged skyrmions, which support both topological charge and topological vortex-like spin structure, have also been predicted to occur in the vicinity of 1/3 filling of the lowest Landau level. The fractional skyrmions, however, are anticipated to be exceedingly fragile, suppressed by very small Zeeman energies. Here we show that, slightly away from 1/3 filling, the smallest manifestations of the fractional skyrmion exist in the excitation spectrum for a broad range of Zeemanmore » energies, and appear in resonant inelastic light scattering experiments as well-defined resonances slightly below the long wavelength spin wave mode. The spectroscopy of these exotic bound states serves as a sensitive tool for investigating the residual interaction between composite fermions, responsible for delicate new fractional quantum Hall states in this filling factor region.« less

  8. Radiolabeled dimethyl branched long chain fatty acid for heart imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Knapp, Jr., Furn F.; Goodman, Mark M.; Kirsch, Gilbert

    1988-08-16

    A radiolabeled long chain fatty acid for heart imaging that has dimethyl branching at one of the carbons of the chain which inhibits the extent to which oxidation can occur. The closer to the carboxyl the branching is positioned, the more limited the oxidation, thereby resulting in prolonged retention of the radiolabeled compound in the heart.

  9. Commercial SNF Accident Release Fractions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Schulz

    2004-11-05

    The purpose of this analysis is to specify and document the total and respirable fractions for radioactive materials that could be potentially released from an accident at the repository involving commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in a dry environment. The total and respirable release fractions are used to support the preclosure licensing basis for the repository. The total release fraction is defined as the fraction of total commercial SNF assembly inventory, typically expressed as an activity inventory (e.g., curies), of a given radionuclide that is released to the environment from a waste form. Radionuclides are released from the inside of breached fuel rods (or pins) and from the detachment of radioactive material (crud) from the outside surfaces of fuel rods and other components of fuel assemblies. The total release fraction accounts for several mechanisms that tend to retain, retard, or diminish the amount of radionuclides that are available for transport to dose receptors or otherwise can be shown to reduce exposure of receptors to radiological releases. The total release fraction includes a fraction of airborne material that is respirable and could result in inhalation doses; this subset of the total release fraction is referred to as the respirable release fraction. Accidents may involve waste forms characterized as: (1) bare unconfined intact fuel assemblies, (2) confined intact fuel assemblies, or (3) canistered failed commercial SNF. Confined intact commercial SNF assemblies at the repository are contained in shipping casks, canisters, or waste packages. Four categories of failed commercial SNF are identified: (1) mechanically and cladding-penetration damaged commercial SNF, (2) consolidated/reconstituted assemblies, (3) fuel rods, pieces, and debris, and (4) nonfuel components. It is assumed that failed commercial SNF is placed into waste packages with a mesh screen at each end (CRWMS M&O 1999). In contrast to bare unconfined fuel assemblies, the

  10. FY 1992 Measurements and Characterization Branch annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dippo, P.C

    1993-03-01

    The Measurements and Characterization Branch actively supports the advancement of DOE/NREL goals for the development and implementation of the solar photovoltaic (PV) technology. The primary focus of the laboratories is to provide state-of-the-art analytical capabilities for materials and device characterization and fabrication. The branch houses a comprehensive facility that Is capable of providing information on the full range of PV components. A major objective of the branch is to aggressively pursue collaborative research with other government laboratories, universities, and industrial firms for the advancement of Pv technologies. Members of the branch disseminate research findings to the technical community in publications and presentations. The Measurements and Characterization Branch encompasses seven coordinated research groups, providing integrated research and development that covers all aspects of photovoltaic materials/devices characterization.

  11. Measurement and Interpretation of Moments of the Combined Hadronic Mass and Energy Spectrum in Inclusive Semileptonic B-Meson Decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klose, Verena; /Dresden, Tech. U.

    2011-08-12

    This thesis presents first measurements of moments of the hadronic n{sub X}{sup 2} distribution measured in inclusive semileptonic decays of B mesons to final states containing a charm quark, B {yields} X{sub c}{ell}{nu}. The variable n{sub X}{sup 2} is a combination of the invariant mass of the charmed meson m{sub X}, its energy in the B-meson rest-frame E{sub X;BRF}, and a constant {tilde {Lambda}} = 0.65 GeV, n{sub X}{sup 2} = m{sub X}{sup 2}c{sup 4}-2{tilde {Lambda}}E{sub X,BRF} + {tilde {Lambda}}{sup 2}. The moments with k = 2,4,6 are measured as proposed by theory to constrain assumptions made in the theoretical description of inclusive observables in semileptonic B-meson decays. This description uses Heavy Quark Expansion (HQE), an effective QCD combined with an Operator Product Expansion. The measurement is based on a sample of 231.6 million e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} events recorded with the BABAR experiment at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -}-storage rings at SLAC. We reconstruct the semileptonic decay by identifying a charged lepton in events tagged by a fully reconstructed hadronic decay of the second B meson. Correction procedures are derived from Monte Carlo simulations to ensure an unbiased measurement of the moments of the n{sub X}{sup 2} distribution. All moments are measured requiring minimum lepton momenta between 0.8 GeV/c and 1.9 GeV/c in the rest frame of the B meson. Performing a simultaneous fit to the measured moments up to order k = 6 combined with other measurements of moments of the lepton-energy spectrum in decays B {yields} X{sub c}{ell}{nu} and moments of the photon-energy spectrum in decays B {yields} X{sub s}{gamma}, we determine the quark-mixing parameter |V{sub cb}|, the bottom and charm quark masses, the semileptonic branching fraction {Beta}(B {yields} X{sub c}{ell}{nu}), and four non-perturbative heavy quark parameters. Using HQE calculations in the kinetic scheme up

  12. Second Generation Fractional Quantum Hall Effect

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Generation Fractional Quantum Hall Effect - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home ... Second Generation Fractional Quantum Hall Effect HomeHighlights - Energy Research...

  13. Branching Mechanisms in Surfactant Micellar Growth (Journal Article...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Branching Mechanisms in Surfactant Micellar Growth Citation ... 1169255 Report Number(s): LLNL-JRNL-575474 DOE Contract Number: DE-AC52-07NA27344 Resource Type: Journal Article ...

  14. Memorandum A. J. Rizzo, Chief TO : Operational Safety Branch

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    j Memorandum A. J. Rizzo, Chief TO / : Operational Safety Branch Harold Glauberman, ?a FROM : Operational Safety Branch ' I DATE: September 30, 1966 REMOVAL OF CONTAMINATED EQUlPMEHT AT THE CANEL FACILITY SUBJECT: MI DDLETOWN, CONNECT I CUT' INTRODUCTION The decision to terminate AEC contract activities at the CANEL facility introduced the need to dispose of radioactively contaminated equipment and materials so as to permit release of the facilities. As a result, -' . the Operational Safety

  15. The Bootstrap Fraction in TFTR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoang, G. T.

    1997-04-15

    The TRANSP plasma analysis code is used to calculate the bootstrap current generated during neutral-beam injection and ion cyclotron resonance frequency heating for a wide variety of TFTR discharges. An empirical scaling relation is given for the bootstrap current fraction using the ratio of the peakedness of the thermal pressure and the total current density.

  16. Measurement of branching fraction ratios and CP asymmetries in B →D0 CPK decays with the BABAR detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marchiori, Giovanni; /Pisa U.

    2010-05-05

    The primary goals of the BABAR experiment are the detection of CP violation (CPV) in the B meson system, the precise measurement of some of the elements of the CKM matrix and the measurement of the rates of rare B meson decays. At present, BABAR has achieved major successes: (1) the discovery, in neutral B decays, of direct and mixing-induced CP violation; (2) accurate measurements of the magnitudes of the CKM matrix elements |V{sub cb}| and |V{sub ub}|; (3) a precise measurement of the CKM parameter {beta} {triple_bond} arg[- V{sub cd}V*{sub cb}/V{sub td}V*{sub tb}]; (4) a first measurement of the CKM parameters {alpha} {triple_bond} arg[- V{sub td}V*{sub tb}/V{sub ud}V*{sub ub}], {gamma} {triple_bond} arg[- V{sub ud}V*{sub ub}/V{sub cd}V*{sub cb}]; and (5) the observation of several rare B decays and the discovery of new particles (in the charmed and charmonium mesons spectroscopy). However, the physics program of BABAR is not yet complete. Two of the key elements of this program that still need to be achieved are: (1) the observation of direct CP violation in charged B decays, which would constitute the first evidence of direct CPV in a charged meson decay; and (2) the precise measurement of {alpha} and {gamma}, which are necessary ingredients for a stringent test of the Standard Model predictions in the quark electroweak sector. A possibility for the discovery of direct CP violation in charged B decays would be the observation of a non-vanishing rate asymmetry in the Cabibbo-suppressed decay B{sup -} {yields} D{sup 0} K{sup -}, with the D{sup 0} decaying to either a CP-even or a CP-odd eigenstate. This class of decays can also provide theoretically-clean information on {gamma}.

  17. BRANCH-BASED MODEL FOR THE DIAMETERS OF THE PULMONARY AIRWAYS...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    BRANCH-BASED MODEL FOR THE DIAMETERS OF THE PULMONARY AIRWAYS: ACCOUNTING FOR DEPARTURES ... Title: BRANCH-BASED MODEL FOR THE DIAMETERS OF THE PULMONARY AIRWAYS: ACCOUNTING FOR ...

  18. Galaxy cluster baryon fractions revisited

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Sivanandam, Suresh; Zabludoff, Ann I.; Zaritsky, Dennis

    2013-11-20

    We measure the baryons contained in both the stellar and hot-gas components for 12 galaxy clusters and groups at z ∼ 0.1 with M = 1-5 × 10{sup 14} M {sub ☉}. This paper improves upon our previous work through the addition of XMM-Newton X-ray data, enabling measurements of the total mass and masses of each major baryonic component—intracluster medium, intracluster stars, and stars in galaxies—for each system. We recover a mean relation for the stellar mass versus halo mass, M{sub ⋆}∝M{sub 500}{sup −0.52±0.04}, that is 1σ shallower than in our previous result. We confirm that the partitioning of baryons between the stellar and hot-gas components is a strong function of M {sub 500}; the fractions of total mass in stars and X-ray gas within a sphere of radius r {sub 500} scale as f{sub ⋆}∝M{sub 500}{sup −0.45±0.04} and f{sub gas}∝M{sub 500}{sup 0.26±0.03}, respectively. We also confirm that the combination of the brightest cluster galaxy and intracluster stars is an increasingly important contributor to the stellar baryon budget in lower halo masses. Studies that fail to fully account for intracluster stars typically underestimate the normalization of the stellar baryon fraction versus M {sub 500} relation by ∼25%. Our derived stellar baryon fractions are also higher, and the trend with halo mass weaker, than those derived from recent halo occupation distribution and abundance matching analyses. One difference from our previous work is the weak, but statistically significant, dependence here of the total baryon fraction upon halo mass: f{sub bary}∝M{sub 500}{sup 0.16±0.04}. For M {sub 500} ≳ 2 × 10{sup 14}, the total baryon fractions within r {sub 500} are on average 18% below the universal value from the seven year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) analysis, or 7% below for the cosmological parameters from the Planck analysis. In the latter case, the difference between the universal value and cluster baryon fractions is

  19. A Study of the Optical Properties of Ice Crystals with Black Carbon Inclusions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arienti, Marco; Yang, Xiaoyuan; Kopacz, Adrian M; Geier, Manfred

    2015-09-01

    The report focu ses on the modification of the optical properties of ice crystals due to atmospheric black car bon (BC) contamination : the objective is to advance the predictive capabilities of climate models through an improved understanding of the radiative properties of compound particles . The shape of the ice crystal (as commonly found in cirrus clouds and cont rails) , the volume fraction of the BC inclusion , and its location inside the crystal are the three factors examined in this study. In the multiscale description of this problem, where a small absorbing inclusion modifies the optical properties of a much la rger non - absorbing particle, state - of - the - art discretization techniques are combined to provide the best compromise of flexibility and accuracy over a broad range of sizes .

  20. Inclusive jet production at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norniella, Olga; /Barcelona, IFAE

    2006-08-01

    Preliminary results on inclusive jet production in proton-antiproton collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV based on 1 fb{sup -1} of CDF Run II data are presented. Measurements are preformed using different jet algorithms in a wide range of jet transverse momentum and jet rapidity. The measured cross sections are compared to next-to-leading order perturbative QCD calculations

  1. A Fluid-Inclusion Investigation Of The Tongonan Geothermal Field...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fluid-Inclusion Investigation Of The Tongonan Geothermal Field, Philippines Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: A Fluid-Inclusion...

  2. Microsoft Word - DOE 2012-2015 Diversityand inclusion Strategic...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... will oversee the implementation of the Diversity & ... Department of Energy's Diversity and Inclusion Strategic ... attitudes, economic status, and knowledge, thought ...

  3. Direct CP Violation, Branching Ratios and Form Factors B --> pi, B --> K in B decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O. Leitner; X.-H. Guo; A.W. Thomas

    2004-11-01

    The B {yields} {pi} and B {yields} K transitions involved in hadronic B decays are investigated in a phenomenological way through the framework of QCD factorization. By comparing our results with experimental branching ratios from the BELLE, BABAR and CLEO collaborations for all the B decays including either a pion or a kaon, we propose boundaries for the transition form factors B {yields} {pi} and B {yields} K depending on the CKM matrix element parameters {rho} and {eta}. From this analysis, the form factors required to reproduce the experimental data for branching ratios are F{sup B {yields} {pi}} = 0.31 {+-} 0.12 and F{sup B {yields} K} = 0.37 {+-} 0.13. We calculate the direct CP violating asymmetry parameter, a{sub CP}, for B {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi} and B {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} K decays, in the case where {rho} - {omega} mixing effects are taken into account. Based on these results, we find that the direct CP asymmetry for B{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -}, {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}, B{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}K{sup -}, and {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} {bar K}{sup 0}, reaches its maximum when the invariant mass {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} is in the vicinity of the {omega} meson mass. The inclusion of {rho} - {omega} mixing provides an opportunity to erase, without ambiguity, the phase uncertainty mod{pi} in the determination of th CKM angles {alpha} in case of b {yields} u and {gamma} in case of b {yields} s.

  4. Subsea pipeline gets welded branch without halting flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    West, A.; Hutt, G.; Starsmore, R.

    1995-12-11

    In October 1994, a 16 in. welded branch was installed without interruption to production onto Wintershall Noordzee BV`s 36-in. gas pipeline from the K13-A platform in the Dutch sector of the North Sea to Den helder, The Netherlands. The procedure is the first successfully to combine hyperbaric welding and subsea hot tapping without interruption to production. Developers of new fields can now consider exporting product without interrupting existing production and through existing infrastructure even if no convenient tie-in locations exist. Unocal evaluated export options and established that the most attractive alternative was to export gas into the Wintershall 36-in. K13-A to Den Helder pipeline. Various options for installing a branch included the following: flooding the pipeline and installing a conventional tee; stopping production and installing a welded branch followed by hot tapping; and continuing production and installing a welded branch followed by hot tapping. The chosen scheme was to retrofit a subsea side-tap assembly. This was achieved by installation of a welded branch followed by hot tapping into the 36-in. pipeline. The paper describes location determination, schedules, onshore preparation, and offshore work.

  5. Exclusive and inclusive decays of B mesons into D sub s mesons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bortoletto, D.; Goldberg, M.; Horwitz, N.; Jain, V.; Mestayer, M.D.; Moneti, G.C.; Sharma, V.; Shipsey, I.P.J.; Skwarnicki, T.; Thulasidas, M.; Csorna, S.E.; Letson, T.; Alexander, J.; Artuso, M.; Bebek, C.; Berkelman, K.; Cassel, D.G.; Cheu, E.; Coffman, D.M.; Crawford, G.; DeWire, J.W.; Drell, P.S.; Ehrlich, R.; Galik, R.S.; Gittelman, B.; Gray, S.W.; Halling, A.M.; Hartill, D.L.; Heltsley, B.K.; Kandaswamy, J.; Katayama, N.; Kreinick, D.L.; Lewis, J.D.; Mistry, N.B.; Mueller, J.; Namjoshi, R.; Nandi, S.; Nordberg, E.; O'Grady, C.; Peterson, D.; Pisharody, M.; Riley, D.; Sapper, M.; Silverman, A.; Stone, S.; Worden, H.; Worris, M.; Sadoff, A.J.; Avery, P.; Besson, D.; Garren, L.; Yelton, J.; Bowcock, T.; Kinoshita, K.; Pipkin, F.M.; Procario, M.; Wilson, R.; Wolinski, J.; Xiao, D.; Ammar, R.; Baringer, P.; Coppage, D.; Haas, P.; Lam, H.; Jawahery, A.; Park, C.H.; Kubota, Y.; Nelson, J.K.; Perticone, D.; Poling, R.; Fulton, R.; Hempstead, M.; Jensen, T.; Johnson, D.R.; Kagan, H.; Kass

    1990-04-30

    We have studied the production of {ital D}{sub {ital s}} mesons in the decays of {ital B} mesons at the {Upsilon}(4{ital S}) resonance. We report on the first observation of exclusive {ital B}-meson decays {ital B}{r arrow}{ital D}{sub {ital s}}{sup {minus}}{ital D*}{sup +}, {ital B}{r arrow}{ital D}{sub {ital s}}{sup {minus}}{ital D}{sup +}, and {ital B}{r arrow}{ital D}{sub {ital s}}{sup {minus}}{ital D}{sup 0}. We also present a new measurement of the branching ratio and the momentum spectrum for the inclusive decay {ital B}{r arrow}{ital D}{sub {ital s}X}.

  6. FRACTIONATING COLUMN PRODUCT COLLECTOR CONTROL

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Paxson, G.D. Jr.

    1964-03-10

    Means for detecting minute fluid products from a chemical separation column and for advancing a collector tube rack in order to automatically separate and collect successive fractionated products are described. A charge is imposed on the forming drops at the column orifice to create an electric field as the drop falls in the vicinity of a sensing plate. The field is detected by an electrometer tube coupled to the plate causing an output signal to actuate rotation of a collector turntable rack, thereby positioning new collectors under the orifice. The invention provides reliable automatic collection independent of drop size, rate of fall, or chemical composition. (AEC)

  7. RADIONUCLIDE INVENTORY AND DISTRIBUTION: FOURMILE BRANCH, PEN BRANCH, AND STEEL CREEK IOUS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hiergesell, R.; Phifer, M.

    2014-04-29

    As a condition to the Department of Energy (DOE) Low Level Waste Disposal Federal Facility Review Group (LFRG) review team approving the Savannah River Site (SRS) Composite Analysis (CA), SRS agreed to follow up on a secondary issue, which consisted of the consolidation of several observations that the team concluded, when evaluated collectively, could potentially impact the integration of the CA results. This report addresses secondary issue observations 4 and 21, which identify the need to improve the CA sensitivity and uncertainty analysis specifically by improving the CA inventory and the estimate of its uncertainty. The purpose of the work described herein was to be responsive to these secondary issue observations by re-examining the radionuclide inventories of the Integrator Operable Units (IOUs), as documented in ERD 2001 and Hiergesell, et. al. 2008. The LFRG concern has been partially addressed already for the Lower Three Runs (LTR) IOU (Hiergesell and Phifer, 2012). The work described in this investigation is a continuation of the effort to address the LFRG concerns by re-examining the radionuclide inventories associated with Fourmile Branch (FMB) IOU, Pen Branch (PB) IOU and Steel Creek (SC) IOU. The overall approach to computing radionuclide inventories for each of the IOUs involved the following components: Defining contaminated reaches of sediments along the IOU waterways Identifying separate segments within each IOU waterway to evaluate individually Computing the volume and mass of contaminated soil associated with each segment, or compartment Obtaining the available and appropriate Sediment and Sediment/Soil analytical results associated with each IOU Standardizing all radionuclide activity by decay-correcting all sample analytical results from sample date to the current point in time, Computing representative concentrations for all radionuclides associated with each compartment in each of the IOUs Computing the radionuclide

  8. MINERνA charged current inclusive analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caicedo, D. A. M.

    2015-05-15

    MINERνA is a few-GeV neutrino scattering experiment that has been taking data in the NuMI beam line at Fermilab since November 2009. The experiment will provide important inputs, both in support of neutrino oscillation searches and as a pure weak probe of the nuclear medium. For this, MINERvA employs a fine-grained detector, with an eight ton active target region composed of plastic scintillator and a suite of nuclear targets composed of helium, carbon, iron, lead and water placed upstream of the active region. We will describe the current status of the charged current inclusive analysis in plastic scintillator.

  9. Semiconducting glasses with flux pinning inclusions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, William L.; Poon, Siu-Joe; Duwez, Pol E.

    1981-01-01

    A series of amorphous superconducting glassy alloys containing 1% to 10% by volume of flux pinning crystalline inclusions have been found to have potentially useful properties as high field superconducting magnet materials. The alloys are prepared by splat cooling by the piston and anvil technique. The alloys have the composition (TM).sub.90-70 (M).sub.10-30 where TM is a transition metal selected from at least one metal of Groups IVB, VB, VIB, VIIB or VIIIB of the Periodic Table such as Nb, Mo, Ru, Zr, Ta, W or Re and M is at least one metalloid such as B, P, C, N, Si, Ge or Al.

  10. PICO: An Object-Oriented Framework for Branch and Bound

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ECKSTEIN,JONATHAN; HART,WILLIAM E.; PHILLIPS,CYNTHIA A.

    2000-12-01

    This report describes the design of PICO, a C++ framework for implementing general parallel branch-and-bound algorithms. The PICO framework provides a mechanism for the efficient implementation of a wide range of branch-and-bound methods on an equally wide range of parallel computing platforms. We first discuss the basic architecture of PICO, including the application class hierarchy and the package's serial and parallel layers. We next describe the design of the serial layer, and its central notion of manipulating subproblem states. Then, we discuss the design of the parallel layer, which includes flexible processor clustering and communication rates, various load balancing mechanisms, and a non-preemptive task scheduler running on each processor. We describe the application of the package to a branch-and-bound method for mixed integer programming, along with computational results on the ASCI Red massively parallel computer. Finally we describe the application of the branch-and-bound mixed-integer programming code to a resource constrained project scheduling problem for Pantex.

  11. Gas compressor with side branch absorber for pulsation control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harris, Ralph E.; Scrivner, Christine M.; Broerman, III, Eugene L.

    2011-05-24

    A method and system for reducing pulsation in lateral piping associated with a gas compressor system. A tunable side branch absorber (TSBA) is installed on the lateral piping. A pulsation sensor is placed in the lateral piping, to measure pulsation within the piping. The sensor output signals are delivered to a controller, which controls actuators that change the acoustic dimensions of the SBA.

  12. Inclusive Inelastic Electron Scattering from Nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fomin, Nadia

    2007-10-26

    Inclusive electron scattering from nuclei at large x and Q{sup 2} is the result of a reaction mechanism that includes both quasi-elastic scattering from nucleons and deep inelastic scattering from the quark consitituents of the nucleons. Data in this regime can be used to study a wide variety of topics, including the extraction of nuclear momentum distributions, the infiuence of final state interactions and the approach to y-scaling, the strength of nucleon-nucleon correlations, and the approach to x-scaling, to name a few. Selected results from the recent experiment E02-019 at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility will be shown and their relevance discussed.

  13. Methodologies for Reservoir Characterization Using Fluid Inclusion Gas

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Chemistry | Department of Energy Methodologies for Reservoir Characterization Using Fluid Inclusion Gas Chemistry Methodologies for Reservoir Characterization Using Fluid Inclusion Gas Chemistry Methodologies for Reservoir Characterization Using Fluid Inclusion Gas Chemistry presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado. dilley_methodologies_peer2013.pdf (2.79 MB) More Documents & Publications Innovative Computational Tools for Reducing Exploration Risk

  14. Enhanced Inclusion Removal from Steel in the Tundish

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. C. Bradt; M.A.R. Sharif

    2009-09-25

    The objective of this project was to develop an effective chemical filtering system for significantly reducing the content of inclusion particles in the steel melts exiting the tundish for continuous casting. This project combined a multi-process approach that aimed to make significant progress towards an "inclusion free" steel by incorporating several interdependent concepts to reduce the content of inclusions in the molten steel exiting the tundish for the caster. The goal is to produce "cleaner" steel.

  15. Diversity and Inclusion Strategic Plan 2012 - 2015 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Strategic Plan 2012 - 2015 Diversity and Inclusion Strategic Plan 2012 - 2015 Our Diversity and Inclusion Strategic Plan is designed to create a culture which values trust and human dignity and provides the opportunity for personal development and self- fulfillment in the attainment of DOE's mission and goals. The 2012- 2015 strategic plan has three essential pillars - mission focus, accountability, and continual learning. It also: Creates a universal definition of diversity and inclusion.

  16. Diversity and Inclusion Town Hall Program Book | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Town Hall Program Book Diversity and Inclusion Town Hall Program Book As part of a larger effort to create a culture that values diversity, we have been conducting focus groups to engage in a dialog and hear feedback on how diversity can be improved. At the Town Hall, DOE employees will hear the results of these discussions. View the program booklet from the Diversity and Inclusion Town Hall below. For more information about the Department's diversity and inclusion programs, visit

  17. Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy Interpretation of New Wells in the...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Stratigraphy Interpretation of New Wells in the Coso Geothermal Field Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Fluid Inclusion...

  18. Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Lightning Dock Area (Norman & Moore...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Lightning Dock Area (Norman & Moore, 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Lightning Dock Area...

  19. Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (1996) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    that the interior of the system is still undergoing heating. References Lutz, S. J.; Moore, J. N.; Copp, J. F. (24 January 1996) Integrated mineralogical and fluid inclusion...

  20. Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Geysers Area (Moore, Et Al., 2001...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Area (Moore, Et Al., 2001) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Geysers Area (Moore, Et Al., 2001)...

  1. Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Geysers Geothermal Area (1990) |...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Area (1990) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Geysers Geothermal Area (1990) Exploration...

  2. Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (2002) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    2) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (2002) Exploration Activity Details Location...

  3. Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Chena Geothermal Area (Kolker, 2008...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Chena Geothermal Area (Kolker, 2008) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Chena Geothermal Area (Kolker,...

  4. 36 CFR 63: Determinations of Eligibility for Inclusion in the...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    63: Determinations of Eligibility for Inclusion in the National Register of Historic Places Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document-...

  5. Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Salton Sea Geothermal Area (1990...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Salton Sea Geothermal Area (1990) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Salton Sea Geothermal Area (1990)...

  6. Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Yellowstone Region (Sturchio, Et...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Yellowstone Region (Sturchio, Et Al., 1990) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Yellowstone Region...

  7. Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (1990) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    0) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (1990) Exploration Activity Details Location...

  8. Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Redondo Geothermal Area (Sasada, 1988) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Valles Caldera - Redondo...

  9. Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Valles Caldera Geothermal Region...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Region (1990) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Valles Caldera Geothermal Region (1990)...

  10. Fluid-inclusion evidence for past temperature fluctuations in...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of the inclusion fluids range from dilute meteoric water to highly modified sea water concentrated by boiling. Comparison of measured drill-hole temperatures with...

  11. A realistic approach to inclusive e-scattering from nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schiavilla, Rocco

    2015-05-01

    We review the current status of calculations, based on realistic nuclear interactions and currents, of the inclusive electromagnetic response of nuclei in the quasi-elastic region.

  12. Mary Ann Fresco receives OPM award for creating, fostering inclusive...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Mary Ann continues to serve as the federal government lead with the University of Southern California to advance the scientific foundation of diversity and inclusion research as it ...

  13. Integrated mineralogical and fluid inclusion study of the Coso...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    inclusion homogenization temperatures and salinities demonstrate that cool, low salinity ground waters were present when the thermal plume was emplaced. Dilution of the thermal...

  14. Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Raft River Geothermal Area (2011...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Raft River Geothermal Area (2011) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Raft River Geothermal Area (2011)...

  15. Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sulphur Springs Geothermal Area (Sasada & Goff, 1995) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Valles Caldera...

  16. WATER FRACTIONS IN EXTRASOLAR PLANETESIMALS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jura, M.; Xu, S., E-mail: jura@astro.ucla.edu, E-mail: sxu@astro.ucla.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1562 (United States)

    2012-01-15

    With the goal of using externally polluted white dwarfs to investigate the water fractions of extrasolar planetesimals, we assemble from the literature a sample that we estimate to be more than 60% complete of DB white dwarfs warmer than 13,000 K, more luminous than 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} L{sub Sun }, and within 80 pc of the Sun. When considering all the stars together, we find that the summed mass accretion rate of heavy atoms exceeds that of hydrogen by over a factor of 1000. If so, this sub-population of extrasolar asteroids treated as an ensemble has little water and is at least a factor of 20 drier than CI chondrites, the most primitive meteorites. Furthermore, while an apparent 'excess' of oxygen in a single DB can be interpreted as evidence that the accreted material originated in a water-rich parent body, we show that at least in some cases, there can be sufficient uncertainties in the time history of the accretion rate that such an argument may be ambiguous. Regardless of the difficulty associated with interpreting the results from an individual object, our analysis of the population of polluted DBs provides indirect observational support for the theoretical view that a snow line is important in disks where rocky planetesimals form.

  17. Relevance of complex branch points for partial wave analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ceci, S.; Svarc, A.; Doering, M.; Hanhart, C.; Krewald, S.; Meissner, U.-G.

    2011-07-15

    A central issue in hadron spectroscopy is to deduce--and interpret--resonance parameters, namely, pole positions and residues, from experimental data, for those are the quantities to be compared to lattice QCD or model calculations. However, not every structure in the observables derives from a resonance pole: the origin might as well be branch points, either located on the real axis (when a new channel composed of stable particles opens) or in the complex plane (when at least one of the intermediate particles is unstable). In this paper we demonstrate first the existence of such branch points in the complex plane and then show on the example of the {pi}N P{sub 11} partial wave that it is not possible to distinguish the structures induced by the latter from a true pole signal based on elastic data alone.

  18. Agriculture and Food Processes Branch program summary document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-06-01

    The work of the Agriculture and Food Processes Branch within the US DOE's Office of Industrial Programs is discussed and reviewed. The Branch is responsible for assisting the food and agricultural sectors of the economy in increasing their energy efficiency by cost sharing with industry the development and demonstration of technologies industry by itself would not develop because of a greater than normal risk factor, but have significant energy conservation benefits. This task is made more difficult by the diversity of agriculture and the food industry. The focus of the program is now on the development and demonstration of energy conservation technology in high energy use industry sectors and agricultural functions (e.g., sugar processing, meat processing, irrigation, and crop drying, high energy use functions common to many sectors of the food industry (e.g., refrigeration, drying, and evaporation), and innovative concepts (e.g., energy integrated farm systems. Specific projects within the program are summarized. (LCL)

  19. Mr. John Kinneman, Chief Nuclear Materfals Branch Nuclear Regulatory Commission

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    111989 Mr. John Kinneman, Chief Nuclear Materfals Branch Nuclear Regulatory Commission Region I 475 Allendale Road King of Prussia. Pennsylvania 19406 Dear Mr. Kinneman: -;' .-. 'W Enclosed are the copfes of the final ORNL survey reports on the radiologlcal Surveys conducted on three Teterboro, New Jersey properties; Metpath Incorporated, Allied Aerospace Corporatio; and Sumftomo Machinery Corporation. Copies of these reports have &en sent directly to the owners by our survey contractor Oak

  20. Measurement of the branching ratio ?(?b0??(2S)?0)/?(?b0?J...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Measurement of the branching ratio (b0(2S)0)(b0J0) with the ATLAS detector Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Measurement of the branching ratio...

  1. Neutron Imaging Calibration to Measure Void Fraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geoghegan, Patrick J; Bilheux, Hassina Z; Sharma, Vishaldeep; Fricke, Brian A

    2015-01-01

    Void fraction is an intuitive parameter that describes the fraction of vapor in a two-phase flow. It appears as a key variable in most heat transfer and pressure drop correlations used to design evaporating and condensing heat exchangers, as well as determining charge inventory in refrigeration systems. Void fraction measurement is not straightforward, however, and assumptions on the invasiveness of the measuring technique must be made. Neutron radiography or neutron imaging has the potential to be a truly non-invasive void fraction measuring technique but has until recently only offered qualitative descriptions of two-phase flow, in terms of flow maldistributions, for example. This paper describes the calibration approach necessary to employ neutron imaging to measure steady-state void fraction. Experiments were conducted at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) Cold Guide 1D neutron imaging facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN, USA.

  2. Airborne release fractions/rates and respirable fractions for nonreactor nuclear facilities. Volume 2, Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-12-01

    This document contains compiled data from the DOE Handbook on Airborne Release Fractions/Rates and Respirable Fractions for Nonreactor Nuclear facilities. Source data and example facilities utilized, such as the Plutonium Recovery Facility, are included.

  3. Measurement of $B_s^0 \\to D_s^{(*)+} D_s^{(*)-}$ Branching Ratios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; /Dubna, JINR /Texas A-M

    2012-04-01

    The decays B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup (*)+}D{sub s}{sup (*)-}s are reconstructed in a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 6.8 fb{sup -1} collected by the CDF II detector at the Tevatron p{bar p} collider. All decay modes are observed with a significance of more than 10 {sigma}, and we measure the B{sub s}{sup 0} production rate times B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup (*)+} D{sub s}{sup (*)-} branching ratios relative to the normalization mode B{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup +}d{sup -} to be 0.183 {+-} 0.021 {+-} 0.017 for B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup +}D{sub s}{sup -}, 0.424 {+-} 0.046 {+-} 0.035 for B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup {+-}} D{sub s}{sup {-+}}, 0.654 {+-} 0.072 {+-} 0.065 for B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup *+} D{sub s}{sup *-}, and 1.261 {+-} 0.095 {+-} 0.112 for the inclusive decay B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup (*)+}D{sub s}{sup (*)-}, where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic. These results are the most precise single measurements to date and provide important constraints for indirect searches for non-standard model physics in B{sub s}{sup 0} mixing.

  4. Constraints on helium enhancement in the globular cluster M4 (NGC 6121): The horizontal branch test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valcarce, A. A. R.; De Medeiros, J. R.; Catelan, M.; Alonso-Garca, J.; Corts, C.

    2014-02-20

    Recent pieces of evidence have revealed that most, and possibly all, globular star clusters are composed of groups of stars that formed in multiple episodes with different chemical compositions. In this sense, it has also been argued that variations in the initial helium abundance (Y) from one population to the next are also the rule, rather than the exception. In the case of the metal-intermediate globular cluster M4 (NGC 6121), recent high-resolution spectroscopic observations of blue horizontal branch (HB) stars (i.e., HB stars hotter than the RR Lyrae instability strip) suggest that a large fraction of blue HB stars are second-generation stars formed with high helium abundances. In this paper, we test this scenario by using recent photometric and spectroscopic data together with theoretical evolutionary computations for different Y values. Comparing the photometric data with the theoretically derived color-magnitude diagrams, we find that the bulk of the blue HB stars in M4 have ?Y ? 0.01 with respect to the cluster's red HB stars (i.e., HB stars cooler than the RR Lyrae strip)a result which is corroborated by comparison with spectroscopically derived gravities and temperatures, which also favor little He enhancement. However, the possible existence of a minority population on the blue HB of the cluster with a significant He enhancement level is also discussed.

  5. FCC LPG olefinicity and branching enhanced by octane catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keyworth, D.A.; Reid, T.A.; Kreider, K.R.; Yatsu, C.A.

    1989-05-29

    Refiners are increasingly recognizing the downstream opportunities for fluid catalytic cracking LPG olefins for the production of methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE), ethyl tertiary butyl ether (ETBE, if the ethanol subsidy is extended to the production of ETBE), and as petrochemical feedstocks. Some of new gasoline FCC octane-enhancing catalysts can support those opportunities because their low non-framework alumina (low NFA) preserve both LPG olefinicity and promote branching of the LPG streams from the FCCU. The combined effect results in more isobutane for alkylate feed, more propylene in the propane/propylene stream, and more isobutene - which makes the addition of an MTBE unit very enticing.

  6. UBS AG, LONDON BRANCH Order No. EA-261 I. BACKGROUND

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1 I. BACKGROUND Exports of electricity from the United States to a foreign country are regulated and require authorization under section 202(e) of the Federal Power Act (FPA) (16 U.S.C. §824a(e)). On April 11, 2002, the Office of Fossil Energy (FE) of the Department of Energy (DOE) received an application from UBS AG, London Branch (UBS) for authorization to transmit electric energy from the United States to Mexico. UBS, a Swiss corporation formed in 1998 by the merger of Union Bank of

  7. UBS AG, LONDON BRANCH Order No. EA-263 I. BACKGROUND

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3 I. BACKGROUND Exports of electricity from the United States to a foreign country are regulated and require authorization under section 202(e) of the Federal Power Act (FPA) (16 U.S.C. §824a(e)). On April 11, 2002, the Office of Fossil Energy (FE) of the Department of Energy (DOE) received an application from UBS, AG London Branch (UBS) for authorization to transmit electric energy from the Untied States to Mexico and to Canada. UBS, a Swiss corporation formed in 1998 by the merger of Union

  8. : Hanson Blata, Chief, Radiation Branch Health & Safety Division

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Hanson Blata, Chief, Radiation Branch Health & Safety Division ,DATTE: July 25, 1952 FROM : Eugene Barry, Radiation Brsnchctr@ Health & Safety Division SL-JEm: VISIT TO CANADIAN RADIUM AND UFLANIUM CO, MT. K&O, N. Y. - MAY 28, 1952 SrnOL: HSR:.WB:md On May 28, a visit was made to the Canadian Radium and Uranium Co. of Mt. Kisco, New York, a manufacturer and distributor of radium and polonium products, for the purpose of assisting the New York State Department of Labor in making a

  9. Theory of generalized branch and combine clock networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El-Amawy, A.; Kulasinghe, P.

    1994-12-31

    In a recent development a new clock distribution scheme, called Branch-and-Combine or BaC, has been introduced. The scheme is the first to guarantee constant skew bound regardless of network size. In this paper we generalize and extend the work on BaC networks. We established some interesting results on clocking paths, node input sequences, node inputs` relative timing, network stability, and skew bound. Furthermore, this study establishes an upper bound on maximum clocking rates for BaC networks which is about double that predicted by earlier studies.

  10. Fractional quantum Hall junctions and two-channel Kondo models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sandler, Nancy P.; Fradkin, Eduardo

    2001-06-15

    A mapping between fractional quantum Hall (FQH) junctions and the two-channel Kondo model is presented. We discuss this relation in detail for the particular case of a junction of a FQH state at {nu}=1/3 and a normal metal. We show that in the strong coupling regime this junction has a non-Fermi-liquid fixed point. At this fixed point the electron Green{close_quote}s function has a branch cut and the impurity entropy is equal to S=1/2ln2. We construct the space of perturbations at the strong coupling fixed point and find that the dimension of the tunneling operator is 1/2. These properties are strongly reminiscent of the non-Fermi-liquid fixed points of a number of quantum impurity models, particularly the two-channel Kondo model. However we have found that, in spite of these similarities, the Hilbert spaces of these two systems are quite different. In particular, although in a special limit the Hamiltonians of both systems are the same, their Hilbert spaces are not since they are determined by physically distinct boundary conditions. As a consequence the spectrum of operators in the two problems is different.

  11. Method for locating metallic nitride inclusions in metallic alloy ingots

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    White, Jack C.; Traut, Davis E.; Oden, Laurance L.; Schmitt, Roman A.

    1992-01-01

    A method of determining the location and history of metallic nitride and/or oxynitride inclusions in metallic melts. The method includes the steps of labeling metallic nitride and/or oxynitride inclusions by making a coreduced metallic-hafnium sponge from a mixture of hafnium chloride and the chloride of a metal, reducing the mixed chlorides with magnesium, nitriding the hafnium-labeled metallic-hafnium sponge, and seeding the sponge to be melted with hafnium-labeled nitride inclusions. The ingots are neutron activated and the hafnium is located by radiometric means. Hafnium possesses exactly the proper metallurgical and radiochemical properties for this use.

  12. Vegetation survey of Pen Branch and Four Mile Creek wetlands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    One hundred-fifty plots were recently sampled (vegetational sampling study) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). An extensive characterization of the vascular flora, in four predetermined strata (overstory, Understory, shrub layer, and ground cover), was undertaken to determine dominance, co-dominance, and the importance value (I.V.) of each species. These results will be used by the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) to evaluate the environmental status of Four Mile Creek, Pen Branch, and two upland pine stands. Objectives of this study were to: Describe in detail the plant communities previously mapped with reference to the topography and drainage, including species of plants present: Examine the successional trends within each sampling area and describe the extent to which current vegetation communities have resulted from specific earlier vegetation disturbances (e.g., logging and grazing); describe in detail the botanical field techniques used to sample the flora; describe the habitat and location of protected and/or rare species of plants; and collect and prepare plant species as herbarium quality specimens. Sampling was conducted at Four Mile Creek and Pen Branch, and in two upland pine plantations of different age growth.

  13. Vegetation survey of Pen Branch and Four Mile Creek wetlands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-10-01

    One hundred-fifty plots were recently sampled (vegetational sampling study) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). An extensive characterization of the vascular flora, in four predetermined strata (overstory, Understory, shrub layer, and ground cover), was undertaken to determine dominance, co-dominance, and the importance value (I.V.) of each species. These results will be used by the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) to evaluate the environmental status of Four Mile Creek, Pen Branch, and two upland pine stands. Objectives of this study were to: Describe in detail the plant communities previously mapped with reference to the topography and drainage, including species of plants present: Examine the successional trends within each sampling area and describe the extent to which current vegetation communities have resulted from specific earlier vegetation disturbances (e.g., logging and grazing); describe in detail the botanical field techniques used to sample the flora; describe the habitat and location of protected and/or rare species of plants; and collect and prepare plant species as herbarium quality specimens. Sampling was conducted at Four Mile Creek and Pen Branch, and in two upland pine plantations of different age growth.

  14. Advanced Branching Control and Characterization of Inorganic Semiconducting Nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, Steven Michael

    2007-12-31

    The ability to finely tune the size and shape of inorganic semiconducting nanocrystals is an area of great interest, as the more control one has, the more applications will be possible for their use. The first two basic shapes develped in nanocrystals were the sphere and the anistropic nanorod. the II_VI materials being used such as Cadmium Selenide (CdSe) and Cadmium Telluride (CdTe), exhibit polytypism, which allows them to form in either the hexagonally packed wurtzite or cubically packed zinc blende crystalline phase. The nanorods are wurtzite with the length of the rod growing along the c-axis. As this grows, stacking faults may form, which are layers of zinc blende in the otherwise wurtzite crystal. Using this polytypism, though, the first generation of branched crystals were developed in the form of the CdTe tetrapod. This is a nanocrystal that nucleates in the zincblend form, creating a tetrahedral core, on which four wurtzite arms are grown. This structure opened up the possibility of even more complex shapes and applications. This disseration investigates the advancement of branching control and further understanding the materials polytypism in the form of the stacking faults in nanorods.

  15. Branch Flow Model: Relaxations and Convexification-Part II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farivar, M; Low, SH

    2013-08-01

    We propose a branch flow model for the analysis and optimization of mesh as well as radial networks. The model leads to a new approach to solving optimal power flow (OPF) that consists of two relaxation steps. The first step eliminates the voltage and current angles and the second step approximates the resulting problem by a conic program that can be solved efficiently. For radial networks, we prove that both relaxation steps are always exact, provided there are no upper bounds on loads. For mesh networks, the conic relaxation is always exact but the angle relaxation may not be exact, and we provide a simple way to determine if a relaxed solution is globally optimal. We propose convexification of mesh networks using phase shifters so that OPF for the convexified network can always be solved efficiently for an optimal solution. We prove that convexification requires phase shifters only outside a spanning tree of the network and their placement depends only on network topology, not on power flows, generation, loads, or operating constraints. Part I introduces our branch flow model, explains the two relaxation steps, and proves the conditions for exact relaxation. Part II describes convexification of mesh networks, and presents simulation results.

  16. Branch Flow Model: Relaxations and Convexification-Part I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farivar, M; Low, SH

    2013-08-01

    We propose a branch flow model for the analysis and optimization of mesh as well as radial networks. The model leads to a new approach to solving optimal power flow (OPF) that consists of two relaxation steps. The first step eliminates the voltage and current angles and the second step approximates the resulting problem by a conic program that can be solved efficiently. For radial networks, we prove that both relaxation steps are always exact, provided there are no upper bounds on loads. For mesh networks, the conic relaxation is always exact but the angle relaxation may not be exact, and we provide a simple way to determine if a relaxed solution is globally optimal. We propose convexification of mesh networks using phase shifters so that OPF for the convexified network can always be solved efficiently for an optimal solution. We prove that convexification requires phase shifters only outside a spanning tree of the network and their placement depends only on network topology, not on power flows, generation, loads, or operating constraints. Part I introduces our branch flow model, explains the two relaxation steps, and proves the conditions for exact relaxation. Part II describes convexification of mesh networks, and presents simulation results.

  17. Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (2004) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis 1) To determine if analyses of fluid propene and propane species in fluid inclusions can be used to interpret fluid type, history, or process....

  18. Office of Personnel Management (OPM) Guidance on Diversity and Inclusion

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The following documents are from the Office of Personnel Management (OMP)'s Office of Diversity and Inclusion, which is responsible for reviewing and evaluating plans, reports, and programs for...

  19. Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (2004-2005)...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and much fine scale detail when the logs are analyzed in detail. References Dilley, L. M.; Norman, D.I.; Berard, B. (1 January 2004) FLUID INCLUSION STRATIGRAPHY: NEW METHOD...

  20. Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (Norman & Moore...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    done by our CFS (crushfast-scan) method (Norman 1996) show that chips have a high density of homogeneous fluid inclusions. Analyses were averaged and plotted verses depth, and...

  1. Bio-oil fractionation and condensation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Robert C; Jones, Samuel T; Pollard, Anthony

    2013-07-02

    A method of fractionating bio-oil vapors which involves providing bio-oil vapors comprising bio-oil constituents is described. The bio-oil vapors are cooled in a first stage which comprises a condenser having passages for the bio-oil separated by a heat conducting wall from passages for a coolant. The coolant in the condenser of the first stage is maintained at a substantially constant temperature, set at a temperature in the range of 75 to 100.degree. C., to condense a first liquid fraction of liquefied bio-oil constituents in the condenser of the first stage. The first liquid fraction of liquified bio-oil constituents from the condenser in the first stage is collected. Also described are steps for subsequently recovering further liquid fractions of liquefied bio-oil constituents. Particular compositions of bio-oil condensation products are also described.

  2. Casimir Energy Associated With Fractional Derivative Field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lim, S. C.

    2007-04-28

    Casimir energy associated with fractional derivative scalar massless field at zero and positive temperature can be obtained using the regularization based on generalized Riemann zeta function of Epstein-Hurwitz type.

  3. Methodologies for Reservoir Characterization Using Fluid Inclusion Gas Chemistry

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Methodologies for Reservoir Characterization Using Fluid Inclusion Gas Chemistry Lorie M. Dilley Hattenburg Dilley & Linnell Track Name: Geochemistry Project Officer: Ava Coy Total Project Funding: $414,000 April 25, 2013 This presentation does not contain any proprietary confidential, or otherwise restricted information. Insert photo of your choice Fluid types interpreted from fluid inclusion gas chemistry across Coso geothermal system 2 | US DOE Geothermal Office eere.energy.gov

  4. Bibliographic survey of medium energy inclusive reaction data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arthur, E.D.; Madland, D.G.; McClellan, D.M.

    1986-04-01

    A bibliographic survey of inclusive reaction data (experimental and theoretical) for several projectile types having energies between 50 and 1000 MeV has been completed. Approximately one thousand references selected from this survey describe the current state of knowledge for particle-induced inclusive reaction data. The search covered data for the following projectiles: p, d, t, /sup 3/He, /sup 4/He, and lithium ions.

  5. Oscillating side-branch enhancements of thermoacoustic heat exchangers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Swift, Gregory W.

    2003-05-13

    A regenerator-based engine or refrigerator has a regenerator with two ends at two different temperatures, through which a gas oscillates at a first oscillating volumetric flow rate in the direction between the two ends and in which the pressure of the gas oscillates, and first and second heat exchangers, each of which is at one of the two different temperatures. A dead-end side branch into which the gas oscillates has compliance and is connected adjacent to one of the ends of the regenerator to form a second oscillating gas flow rate additive with the first oscillating volumetric flow rate, the compliance having a volume effective to provide a selected total oscillating gas volumetric flow rate through the first heat exchanger. This configuration enables the first heat exchanger to be configured and located to better enhance the performance of the heat exchanger rather than being confined to the location and configuration of the regenerator.

  6. Q-branch Raman scattering and modern kinetic thoery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monchick, L.

    1993-12-01

    The program is an extension of previous APL work whose general aim was to calculate line shapes of nearly resonant isolated line transitions with solutions of a popular quantum kinetic equation-the Waldmann-Snider equation-using well known advanced solution techniques developed for the classical Boltzmann equation. The advanced techniques explored have been a BGK type approximation, which is termed the Generalized Hess Method (GHM), and conversion of the collision operator to a block diagonal matrix of symmetric collision kernels which then can be approximated by discrete ordinate methods. The latter method, which is termed the Collision Kernel method (CC), is capable of the highest accuracy and has been used quite successfully for Q-branch Raman scattering. The GHM method, not quite as accurate, is applicable over a wider range of pressures and has proven quite useful.

  7. Electrostatically Tuned Self-Assembly of Branched Amphiphilic Peptides

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ting, Christina L.; Frischknecht, Amalie L.; Stevens, Mark J.; Spoerke, Erik D.

    2014-06-19

    Electrostatics plays an important role in the self-assembly of amphiphilic peptides. To develop a molecular understanding of the role of the electrostatic interactions, we develop a coarse-grained model peptide and apply self-consistent field theory to investigate the peptide assembly into a variety of aggregate nanostructures. We find that the presence and distribution of charged groups on the hydrophilic branches of the peptide can modify the molecular configuration from extended to collapsed. This change in molecular configuration influences the packing into spherical micelles, cylindrical micelles (nanofibers), or planar bilayers. The effects of charge distribution therefore has important implications for the designmore » and utility of functional materials based on peptides.« less

  8. IDENTIFYING BLUE HORIZONTAL BRANCH STARS USING THE z FILTER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vickers, John J.; Grebel, Eva K.; Huxor, Avon P.

    2012-04-15

    In this paper we present a new method for selecting blue horizontal branch (BHB) candidates based on color-color photometry. We make use of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey z band as a surface gravity indicator and show its value for selecting BHB stars from quasars, white dwarfs, and main-sequence A-type stars. Using the g, r, i, and z bands, we demonstrate that extraction accuracies on a par with more traditional u, g, and r photometric selection methods may be achieved. We also show that the completeness necessary to probe major Galactic structure may be maintained. Our new method allows us to efficiently select BHB stars from photometric sky surveys that do not include a u-band filter such as the Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid Response System.

  9. North Branch Municipal Water & Light- Commercial & Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    North Branch Municipal Water & Light provides incentives for its commercial and industrial customers to improve the energy efficiency of facilities. Rebates are available for a variety of...

  10. Electrodeposition of InSb branched nanowires: Controlled growth with structurally tailored properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Das, Suprem R.; Mohammad, Asaduzzaman; Janes, David B.; Akatay, Cem; Khan, Mohammad Ryyan; Alam, Muhammad A.; Maeda, Kosuke; Deacon, Russell S.; Ishibashi, Koji; Chen, Yong P.; Sands, Timothy D.

    2014-08-28

    In this article, electrodeposition method is used to demonstrate growth of InSb nanowire (NW) arrays with hierarchical branched structures and complex morphology at room temperature using an all-solution, catalyst-free technique. A gold coated, porous anodic alumina membrane provided the template for the branched NWs. The NWs have a hierarchical branched structure, with three nominal regions: a “trunk” (average diameter of 150 nm), large branches (average diameter of 100 nm), and small branches (average diameter of sub-10 nm to sub-20 nm). The structural properties of the branched NWs were studied using scanning transmission electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. In the as-grown state, the small branches of InSb NWs were crystalline, but the trunk regions were mostly nanocrystalline with an amorphous boundary. Post-annealing of NWs at 420 °C in argon produced single crystalline structures along 〈311〉 directions for the branches and along 〈111〉 for the trunks. Based on the high crystallinity and tailored structure in this branched NW array, the effective refractive index allows us to achieve excellent antireflection properties signifying its technological usefulness for photon management and energy harvesting.

  11. Local volume fraction fluctuations in random media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quintanilla, J.; Torquato, S.

    1997-02-01

    Although the volume fraction is a constant for a statistically homogeneous random medium, on a spatially local level it fluctuates. We study the full distribution of volume fraction within an observation window of finite size for models of random media. A formula due to Lu and Torquato for the standard deviation or {open_quotes}coarseness{close_quotes} associated with the {ital local} volume fraction {xi} is extended for the nth moment of {xi} for any n. The distribution function F{sub L} of the local volume fraction of five different model microstructures is evaluated using analytical and computer-simulation methods for a wide range of window sizes and overall volume fractions. On the line, we examine a system of fully penetrable rods and a system of totally impenetrable rods formed by random sequential addition (RSA). In the plane, we study RSA totally impenetrable disks and fully penetrable aligned squares. In three dimensions, we study fully penetrable aligned cubes. In the case of fully penetrable rods, we will also simplify and numerically invert a prior analytical result for the Laplace transform of F{sub L}. In all of these models, we show that, for sufficiently large window sizes, F{sub L} can be reasonably approximated by the normal distribution. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  12. Measurement of branching ratio and B0s lifetime in the decay B0s → J/ψ f0(980) at CDF

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T.

    2011-09-30

    We present a study of Bs0 decays to the CP-odd final state J/ψ f0(980) with J/ψ → µ+µ- and f0(980) → π+π-. Using pp̄ collision data with an integrated luminosity of 3.8 fb-1 collected by the CDF II detector at the Tevatron we measure a Bs0 lifetime of τ(B0s → J/ψ f0(980)) = 1.70-0.11+0.12(stat) ± 0.03(syst) ps. This is the first measurement of the Bs0} lifetime in a decay to a CP eigenstate and corresponds in the standard model to the lifetime of the heavy Bs0 eigenstate. We also measure the product of branching fractions of B0s → J/ψ f0(980)more » and f0(980) → π+π- relative to the product of branching fractions of B0s → J/ψφ and φ→K+K- to be Rf0/ψ = 0.257 ± 0.020(stat) ± 0.014(syst), which is the most precise determination of this quantity to date.« less

  13. Thermopower Enhancement by Fractional Layer Control in 2D Oxide...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Thermopower Enhancement by Fractional Layer Control in 2D Oxide Superlattices Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Thermopower Enhancement by Fractional Layer Control in 2D ...

  14. Inverted fractionation apparatus and use in a heavy oil catalytic...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    cycle oil boiling range hydrocarbons and mixtures thereof into liquid product fractions, ... Subject: 02 PETROLEUM; PETROLEUM; CATALYTIC CRACKING; PETROLEUM FRACTIONS; VISCOSITY; ...

  15. Fractional Topological Phases and Broken Time-Reversal Symmetry...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Fractional Topological Phases and Broken Time-Reversal Symmetry in Strained Graphene Title: Fractional Topological Phases and Broken Time-Reversal Symmetry in Strained Graphene ...

  16. Fraction of Theoretical Specific Energy Achieved at Battery Pack...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fraction of Theoretical Specific Energy Achieved at Battery Pack Level Is Very Sensitive ... factors in determining the fraction of battery material specific energy captured at pack ...

  17. Skyrmion fractionalization and merons in chiral magnets with...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Skyrmion fractionalization and merons in chiral magnets with easy-plane anisotropy Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Skyrmion fractionalization and merons in chiral ...

  18. Time-reversal symmetric hierarchy of fractional incompressible...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Time-reversal symmetric hierarchy of fractional incompressible liquids Title: Time-reversal symmetric hierarchy of fractional incompressible liquids Authors: Santos, Luiz ; ...

  19. Method for voltage-gated protein fractionation (Patent) | DOEPatents

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Method for voltage-gated protein fractionation Title: Method for voltage-gated protein fractionation We report unique findings on the voltage dependence of protein exclusion from ...

  20. Finite temperature Casimir effect for a massless fractional Klein-Gordon field with fractional Neumann conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eab, C. H.; Lim, S. C.; Teo, L. P.

    2007-08-15

    This paper studies the Casimir effect due to fractional massless Klein-Gordon field confined to parallel plates. A new kind of boundary condition called fractional Neumann condition which involves vanishing fractional derivatives of the field is introduced. The fractional Neumann condition allows the interpolation of Dirichlet and Neumann conditions imposed on the two plates. There exists a transition value in the difference between the orders of the fractional Neumann conditions for which the Casimir force changes from attractive to repulsive. Low and high temperature limits of Casimir energy and pressure are obtained. For sufficiently high temperature, these quantities are dominated by terms independent of the boundary conditions. Finally, validity of the temperature inversion symmetry for various boundary conditions is discussed.

  1. K{sub s} -BAND LUMINOSITY EVOLUTION OF THE ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH POPULATION BASED ON STAR CLUSTERS IN THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ko, Youkyung; Lee, Myung Gyoon; Lim, Sungsoon E-mail: mglee@astro.snu.ac.kr

    2013-11-10

    We present a study of K{sub s} -band luminosity evolution of the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) population in simple stellar systems using star clusters in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). We determine physical parameters of LMC star clusters including center coordinates, radii, and foreground reddenings. Ages of 83 star clusters are derived from isochrone fitting with the Padova models, and those of 19 star clusters are taken from the literature. The AGB stars in 102 star clusters with log(age) = 7.3-9.5 are selected using near-infrared color-magnitude diagrams based on Two Micron All Sky Survey photometry. Then we obtain the K{sub s} -band luminosity fraction of AGB stars in these star clusters as a function of ages. The K{sub s} -band luminosity fraction of AGB stars increases, on average, as age increases from log(age) ? 8.0, reaching a maximum at log(age) ? 8.5, and it decreases thereafter. There is a large scatter in the AGB luminosity fraction for given ages, which is mainly due to stochastic effects. We discuss this result in comparison with five simple stellar population models. The maximum K{sub s} -band AGB luminosity fraction for bright clusters is reproduced by the models that expect the value of 0.7-0.8 at log(age) = 8.5-8.7. We discuss the implication of our results with regard to the study of size and mass evolution of galaxies.

  2. Structure and Hydration of Highly-Branched, Monodisperse Phytoglycogen Nanoparticles

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Nickels, Jonathan D.; Atkinson, John; Papp-Szabo, Erzsebet; Stanley, Christopher; Diallo, Souleymane O.; Perticaroli, Stefania; Baylis, Benjamin; Mahon, Perry; Ehlers, Georg; Katsaras, John; et al

    2016-01-30

    Phytoglycogen is a naturally occurring polysaccharide nanoparticle made up of extensively branched glucose monomers. It has a number of unusual and advantageous properties, such as high water retention, low viscosity, and high stability in water, which make this biomaterial a promising candidate for a wide variety of applications. For this paper, we have characterized the structure and hydration of aqueous dispersions of phytoglycogen nanoparticles using neutron scattering. Small angle neutron scattering results suggest that the phytoglycogen nanoparticles behave similar to hard sphere colloids and are hydrated by a large number of water molecules (each nanoparticle contains between 250% and 285%more » of its mass in water). This suggests that phytoglycogen is an ideal sample in which to study the dynamics of hydration water. To this end, we used quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) to provide an independent and consistent measure of the hydration number, and to estimate the retardation factor (or degree of water slow-down) for hydration water translational motions. These data demonstrate a length-scale dependence in the measured retardation factors that clarifies the origin of discrepancies between retardation factor values reported for hydration water using different experimental techniques. Finally, the present approach can be generalized to other systems containing nanoconfined water.« less

  3. Diversity and Inclusion Events Calendar | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Diversity and Inclusion Events Calendar Diversity and Inclusion Events Calendar Training, networking, and career-building conferences like the ones below are valuable ways to engage in diversity issues. Learn about upcoming events on the calendar below, and contact us at diversity@hq.doe.gov to let us know about other upcoming events. To learn more about the Department's diversity initiatives, visit this page. August 2016 < prev next > Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat 31 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

  4. Inclusion in the Workplace - Text Version | Careers | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Inclusion in the Workplace - Text Version This is the text version for the Inclusion in the Workplace video. Manajit Sengupta: I work at NREL because of primarily the challenges, the excitement of the work, and the people I work with. Suzy Belmont: When people feel safe and they feel accepted, they're able to bring the best parts of themselves forward, and they're able to bring exciting new ideas forward because they feel like they can fail, they feel like they can try out new things. Bobi

  5. Methodologies for Reservoir Characterization Using Fluid Inclusion Gas Chemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dilley, Lorie M.

    2015-04-13

    The purpose of this project was to: 1) evaluate the relationship between geothermal fluid processes and the compositions of the fluid inclusion gases trapped in the reservoir rocks; and 2) develop methodologies for interpreting fluid inclusion gas data in terms of the chemical, thermal and hydrological properties of geothermal reservoirs. Phase 1 of this project was designed to conduct the following: 1) model the effects of boiling, condensation, conductive cooling and mixing on selected gaseous species; using fluid compositions obtained from geothermal wells, 2) evaluate, using quantitative analyses provided by New Mexico Tech (NMT), how these processes are recorded by fluid inclusions trapped in individual crystals; and 3) determine if the results obtained on individual crystals can be applied to the bulk fluid inclusion analyses determined by Fluid Inclusion Technology (FIT). Our initial studies however, suggested that numerical modeling of the data would be premature. We observed that the gas compositions, determined on bulk and individual samples were not the same as those discharged by the geothermal wells. Gases discharged from geothermal wells are CO2-rich and contain low concentrations of light gases (i.e. H2, He, N, Ar, CH4). In contrast many of our samples displayed enrichments in these light gases. Efforts were initiated to evaluate the reasons for the observed gas distributions. As a first step, we examined the potential importance of different reservoir processes using a variety of commonly employed gas ratios (e.g. Giggenbach plots). The second technical target was the development of interpretational methodologies. We have develop methodologies for the interpretation of fluid inclusion gas data, based on the results of Phase 1, geologic interpretation of fluid inclusion data, and integration of the data. These methodologies can be used in conjunction with the relevant geological and hydrological information on the system to

  6. Escape fraction of ionizing photons during reionization: Effects due to supernova feedback and runaway ob stars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kimm, Taysun; Cen, Renyue

    2014-06-20

    The fraction of hydrogen ionizing photons escaping from galaxies into the intergalactic medium is a critical ingredient in the theory of reionization. We use two zoomed-in, high-resolution (4 pc), cosmological radiation hydrodynamic simulations with adaptive mesh refinement to investigate the impact of two physical mechanisms (supernova, SN, feedback, and runaway OB stars) on the escape fraction (f {sub esc}) at the epoch of reionization (z ? 7). We implement a new, physically motivated SN feedback model that can approximate the Sedov solutions at all (from the free expansion to snowplow) stages. We find that there is a significant time delay of about ten million years between the peak of star formation and that of escape fraction, due to the time required for the build-up and subsequent destruction of the star-forming cloud by SN feedback. Consequently, the photon number-weighted mean escape fraction for dwarf galaxies in halos of mass 10{sup 8}-10{sup 10.5} M {sub ?} is found to be ?f{sub esc}??11%, although instantaneous values of f {sub esc} > 20% are common when star formation is strongly modulated by the SN explosions. We find that the inclusion of runaway OB stars increases the mean escape fraction by 22% to ?f{sub esc}??14%. As SNe resulting from runaway OB stars tend to occur in less dense environments, the feedback effect is enhanced and star formation is further suppressed in halos with M{sub vir}?10{sup 9} M{sub ?} in the simulation with runaway OB stars compared with the model without them. While both our models produce enough ionizing photons to maintain a fully ionized universe at z ? 7 as observed, a still higher amount of ionizing photons at z ? 9 appears necessary to accommodate the high observed electron optical depth inferred from cosmic microwave background observations.

  7. Fractional corresponding operator in quantum mechanics and applications: A uniform fractional Schrödinger equation in form and fractional quantization methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Xiao; Wei, Chaozhen; Liu, Yingming; Luo, Maokang

    2014-11-15

    In this paper we use Dirac function to construct a fractional operator called fractional corresponding operator, which is the general form of momentum corresponding operator. Then we give a judging theorem for this operator and with this judging theorem we prove that R–L, G–L, Caputo, Riesz fractional derivative operator and fractional derivative operator based on generalized functions, which are the most popular ones, coincide with the fractional corresponding operator. As a typical application, we use the fractional corresponding operator to construct a new fractional quantization scheme and then derive a uniform fractional Schrödinger equation in form. Additionally, we find that the five forms of fractional Schrödinger equation belong to the particular cases. As another main result of this paper, we use fractional corresponding operator to generalize fractional quantization scheme by using Lévy path integral and use it to derive the corresponding general form of fractional Schrödinger equation, which consequently proves that these two quantization schemes are equivalent. Meanwhile, relations between the theory in fractional quantum mechanics and that in classic quantum mechanics are also discussed. As a physical example, we consider a particle in an infinite potential well. We give its wave functions and energy spectrums in two ways and find that both results are the same.

  8. Molecular Design of Branched and Binary Molecules at Ordered Interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirsten Larson Genson

    2005-12-27

    This study examined five different branched molecular architectures to discern the effect of design on the ability of molecules to form ordered structures at interfaces. Photochromic monodendrons formed kinked packing structures at the air-water interface due to the cross-sectional area mismatch created by varying number of alkyl tails and the hydrophilic polar head group. The lower generations formed orthorhombic unit cell with long range ordering despite the alkyl tails tilted to a large degree. Favorable interactions between liquid crystalline terminal groups and the underlying substrate were observed to compel a flexible carbosilane dendrimer core to form a compressed elliptical conformation which packed stagger within lamellae domains with limited short range ordering. A twelve arm binary star polymer was observed to form two dimensional micelles at the air-water interface attributed to the higher polystyrene block composition. Linear rod-coil molecules formed a multitude of packing structures at the air-water interface due to the varying composition. Tree-like rod-coil molecules demonstrated the ability to form one-dimensional structures at the air-water interface and at the air-solvent interface caused by the preferential ordering of the rigid rod cores. The role of molecular architecture and composition was examined and the influence chemically competing fragments was shown to exert on the packing structure. The amphiphilic balance of the different molecular series exhibited control on the ordering behavior at the air-water interface and within bulk structures. The shell nature and tail type was determined to dictate the preferential ordering structure and molecular reorganization at interfaces with the core nature effect secondary.

  9. Fractional Hamiltonian analysis of higher order derivatives systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baleanu, Dumitru; Muslih, Sami I.; Tas, Kenan

    2006-10-15

    The fractional Hamiltonian analysis of 1+1 dimensional field theory is investigated and the fractional Ostrogradski's formulation is obtained. The fractional path integral of both simple harmonic oscillator with an acceleration-squares part and a damped oscillator are analyzed. The classical results are obtained when fractional derivatives are replaced with the integer order derivatives.

  10. Fractionated total body irradiation for metastatic neuroblastoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kun, L.E.; Casper, J.T.; Kline, R.W.; Piaskowski, V.D.

    1981-11-01

    Twelve patients over one year old with neuroblastoma (NBL) metastatic to bone and bone marrow entered a study of adjuvant low-dose, fractionated total body irradiation (TBI). Six children who achieved a ''complete clinical response'' following chemotherapy (cyclophosphamide and adriamycin) and surgical resection of the abdominal primary received TBI (10 rad/fraction to totals of 100-120 rad/10-12 fx/12-25 days). Two children received concurrent local irradiation for residual abdominal tumor. The intervals from cessation of chemotherapy to documented progression ranged from 2-16 months, not substatially different from patients receiving similar chemotherapy and surgery without TBI. Three additional children with progressive NBL received similar TBI (80-120 rad/8-12 fx) without objective response.

  11. Radiotherapy Dose Fractionation under Parameter Uncertainty

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davison, Matt; Kim, Daero; Keller, Harald

    2011-11-30

    In radiotherapy, radiation is directed to damage a tumor while avoiding surrounding healthy tissue. Tradeoffs ensue because dose cannot be exactly shaped to the tumor. It is particularly important to ensure that sensitive biological structures near the tumor are not damaged more than a certain amount. Biological tissue is known to have a nonlinear response to incident radiation. The linear quadratic dose response model, which requires the specification of two clinically and experimentally observed response coefficients, is commonly used to model this effect. This model yields an optimization problem giving two different types of optimal dose sequences (fractionation schedules). Which fractionation schedule is preferred depends on the response coefficients. These coefficients are uncertainly known and may differ from patient to patient. Because of this not only the expected outcomes but also the uncertainty around these outcomes are important, and it might not be prudent to select the strategy with the best expected outcome.

  12. Methods And Apparatus For Acoustic Fiber Fractionation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brodeur, Pierre

    1999-11-09

    Methods and apparatus for acoustic fiber fractionation using a plane ultrasonic wave field interacting with water suspended fibers circulating in a channel flow using acoustic radiation forces to separate fibers into two or more fractions based on fiber radius, with applications of the separation concept in the pulp and paper industry. The continuous process relies on the use of a wall-mounted, rectangular cross-section piezoelectric ceramic transducer to selectively deflect flowing fibers as they penetrate the ultrasonic field. The described embodiment uses a transducer frequency of approximately 150 kHz. Depending upon the amount of dissolved gas in water, separation is obtained using a standing or a traveling wave field.

  13. Ecological effects of contaminants in McCoy Branch, 1991--1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryon, M.G.

    1996-09-01

    The 1984 Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) required assessment of all current and former solid waste management units. Following guidelines under RCRA and the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), a remedial investigation (RI) was required of the Y-12 Plant for their filled coal ash pond (FCAP) and associated areas on McCoy Branch. The RI process was initiated and assessments were presented. Because the disposal of coal ash in the ash pond, McCoy Branch, and Rogers Quarry was not consistent with the Tennessee Water Quality Act, several remediation steps were implemented between 1986 and 1994 for McCoy Branch to address disposal problems. The required ecological risk assessments of McCoy Branch watershed included provisions for biological monitoring of the watershed. The objectives of the biological monitoring were to (1) document changes in biological quality of McCoy Branch after completion of a pipeline bypassing upper McCoy Branch and further, after termination of all discharges to Rogers Quarry, (2) provide guidance on the need for additional remediation, and (3) evaluate the effectiveness of implemented remedial actions. The data from the biological monitoring program may also determine whether the goals of protection of human health and the environment of McCoy Branch are being accomplished.

  14. Inclusive. chi. (2 P ) production in. Upsilon. (3 S ) decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morrison, R.; Schmidt, D.; Procario, M.; Johnson, D.R.; Lingel, K.; Rankin, P.; Smith, J.G.; Alexander, J.; Artuso, M.; Bebek, C.; Berkelman, K.; Besson, D.; Browder, T.E.; Cassel, D.G.; Cheu, E.; Coffman, D.M.; Drell, P.S.; Ehrlich, R.; Galik, R.S.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Geiser, B.; Gittelman, B.; Gray, S.W.; Hartill, D.L.; Heltsley, B.K.; Honscheid, K.; Kandaswamy, J.; Katayama, N.; Kreinick, D.L.; Lewis, J.D.; Ludwig, G.S.; Masui, J.; Mevissen, J.; Mistry, N.B.; Nandi, S.; Ng, C.R.; Nordberg, E.; O'Grady, C.; Patterson, J.R.; Peterson, D.; Pisharody, M.; Riley, D.; Sapper, M.; Selen, M.; Worden, H.; Worris, M.; Avery, P.; Freyberger, A.; Rodriguez, J.; Yelton, J.; Kinoshita, K.; Pipkin, F.; Wilson, R.; Wolinski, J.; Xiao, D.; Sadoff, A.J.; Ammar, R.; Baringer, P.; Coppage, D.; Davis, R.; Haas, P.; Kelly, M.; Kwak, N.; Lam, H.; Ro, S.; Kubota, Y.; Nelson, J.K.; Perticone, D.; Poling, R.; Schrenk, S.; Alam, M.S.; Kim, I.J.; Nemati, B.; Romero, V.; Sun, C.R.; Wang, P.; Zoeller, M.M.; Cr

    1991-09-23

    Using the CsI calorimeter of the CLEO II detector, the spin triplet {chi}{sub {ital b}}(2{ital P}) states are observed in {Upsilon}(3{ital S}) radiative decays with much higher statistics than seen in previous experiments. The observed mass splittings are not described well by theoretical models, while the relative branching ratios agree with predictions that include relativistic corrections to the radiative transition rates.

  15. Microsoft Word - DOE 2012-2015 Diversityand inclusion Strategic Plan

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2 - 2 0 1 5 D e p a r t me n t o f E n e r g y D i v e r s i t y & I n c l u s i o n S t r a t e g i c P l a n Department of Energy's Diversity and Inclusion Strategic Plan: 2012 -2015 i Message from the March 23, 2012 Secretary of Energy The Department of Energy (DOE) is pleased to provide its 2012-2015 Diversity and Inclusion Strategic Plan. Achieving the Department of Energy's mission and goals will involve creating a culture which values the contributions of all DOE employees and

  16. Chemical Signatures of and Precursors to Fractures Using Fluid Inclusion

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Stratigraphy; 2010 Geothermal Technology Program Peer Review Report | Department of Energy Stratigraphy; 2010 Geothermal Technology Program Peer Review Report Chemical Signatures of and Precursors to Fractures Using Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy; 2010 Geothermal Technology Program Peer Review Report DOE 2010 Geothermal Technologies Program Peer Review reservoir_035_dilley.pdf (217.42 KB) More Documents & Publications The Role of Geochemistry and Stress on Fracture Development and Proppant

  17. Elimination of platinum inclusions in phosphate laser glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, J.H.; Wallerstein, E.P. ); Hayden, J.S.; Sapak, D.L.; Warrington, D.E.; Marker, A.J. III ); Toratani, H.; Meissner, H.; Nakajima, S.; Izumitani, T. )

    1989-05-26

    Results from small-scale glass melting experiments aimed at reducing the density of platinum particles in phosphate laser glasses are discussed. The platinum particles originate from the crucibles used to melt the laser glass and can cause optical damage in glasses used in high-peak-power lasers; this problem was particularly acute in the LLNL 120 kJ, 100 TW Nova laser. The melting experiments examine the effects of (i) N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, and Cl{sub 2} gas atmospheres; (ii) temperature and temperature gradients; (iii) processing time; and (iv) platinum alloys on the formation and dissolution of platinum inclusions in LHG-8 and LG-750 phosphate laser glasses. Results show that most platinum inclusions originate early in the melt cycle, with thermal gradients within the melter being one of the major causes. By using oxidizing gas conditions (O{sub 2}, Cl{sub 2}, or O{sub 2} + Cl{sub 2}), the platinum inclusions can be dissolved into the glass during the course of the melt cycle. The dissolution rate of platinum under oxidizing conditions has been measured, and a model is used to quantify the description of the dissolution process. The effect of ionic platinum on the transmission spectra of the laser glasses produced under various oxidizing conditions has also been measured. Results from the above laboratory-scale melting experiments have been incorporated into proprietary laser-glass melting processes. The laser glasses prepared under these conditions have an average of less than 0.1 platinum inclusions/liter, which represents a 1000-fold reduction over the previously available phosphate laser glasses. 52 refs., 56 figs., 15 tabs.

  18. A_N in inclusive lepton-proton collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prokudin, Alexey; Anselmino, Mauro; Boglione, Mariaelena; D'Alesio, Umberto; Melis, Stefano; Murgia, Francesco

    2014-11-01

    Some estimates for the transverse single spin asymmetry, A_N, in the inclusive processes l p(transv. Pol.) -> h X are compared with new experimental data. The calculations are based on the Sivers and Collins functions as extracted from SIDIS azimuthal asymmetries, within a transverse momentum dependent factorization approach. The values of A_N thus obtained agree in sign and shape with the data. Predictions for future experiments are also given.

  19. Inclusive jet cross-section measurement at CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norniella, Olga; /Barcelona, IFAE

    2007-05-01

    The CDF Collaboration has measured the inclusive jet cross section using 1992-93 collider data at 1.8 TeV. The CDF measurement is in very good agreement with NLO QCD predictions for transverse energies (E{sub T}) below 200 GeV. However, it is systematically higher than NLO QCD predictions for E{sub T} above 200 GeV.

  20. Branched peptide amphiphiles, related epitope compounds and self assembled structures thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stupp, Samuel I.; Guler, Mustafa O.

    2008-11-18

    Branched peptide amphiphilic compounds incorporating one or residues providing a pendant amino group for coupling one or more epitope sequences thereto, such compounds and related compositions for enhanced epitope presentation.

  1. Polyfunctional catalyst for processiing benzene fractions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. Byakov; B.D. Zubitskii; B.G. Tryasunov; I.Ya. Petrov

    2009-05-15

    A by-product of the coke industry is a raw benzene fraction benzene- 1 which may serve as for catalytic processes. The paper reports a study on the influence of the composition and temperatures on the activity and selectivity of NiO-V{sub 2}O{sub 6}-MoO{sub 3}/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts and the corresponding binary and tertiary subsystems are studied by a pulse method in model reactions; the hydrodealkylating of toluene and the hydrodesulfurizing of thioprhene. The optimal catalyst composition is established. The new catalyst is compared with industrial catalysts.

  2. Hydrolysis and fractionation of lignocellulosic biomass

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Torget, Robert W.; Padukone, Nandan; Hatzis, Christos; Wyman, Charles E.

    2000-01-01

    A multi-function process is described for the hydrolysis and fractionation of lignocellulosic biomass to separate hemicellulosic sugars from other biomass components such as extractives and proteins; a portion of the solubilized lignin; cellulose; glucose derived from cellulose; and insoluble lignin from said biomass comprising one or more of the following: optionally, as function 1, introducing a dilute acid of pH 1.0-5.0 into a continual shrinking bed reactor containing a lignocellulosic biomass material at a temperature of about 94 to about 160.degree. C. for a period of about 10 to about 120 minutes at a volumetric flow rate of about 1 to about 5 reactor volumes to effect solubilization of extractives, lignin, and protein by keeping the solid to liquid ratio constant throughout the solubilization process; as function 2, introducing a dilute acid of pH 1.0-5.0, either as virgin acid or an acidic stream from another function, into a continual shrinking bed reactor containing either fresh biomass or the partially fractionated lignocellulosic biomass material from function 1 at a temperature of about 94-220.degree. C. for a period of about 10 to about 60 minutes at a volumetric flow rate of about 1 to about 5 reactor volumes to effect solubilization of hemicellulosic sugars, semisoluble sugars and other compounds, and amorphous glucans by keeping the solid to liquid ratio constant throughout the solubilization process; as function 3, optionally, introducing a dilute acid of pH 1.0-5.0 either as virgin acid or an acidic stream from another function, into a continual shrinking bed reactor containing the partially fractionated lignocellulosic biomass material from function 2 at a temperature of about 180-280.degree. C. for a period of about 10 to about 60 minutes at a volumetric flow rate of 1 to about 5 reactor volumes to effect solubilization of cellulosic sugars by keeping the solid to liquid ratio constant throughout the solubilization process; and as function 4

  3. Momentum space dipole amplitude for DIS and inclusive hadron production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basso, E. A.; Gay Ducati, M. B.; De Oliveira, E. G.

    2013-03-25

    We show how the AGBS model, originally developed for deep inelastic scattering applied to HERA data on the proton structure function, can also describe the RHIC data on single inclusive hadron yield for d+Au and p+p collisions through a new simultaneous fit. The single inclusive hadron production is modeled through the color glass condensate, which uses the quark(and gluon) condensate amplitudes in momentum space. The AGBS model is also a momentum space model based on the asymptotic solutions of the BK equation, although a different definition of the Fourier transform is used. This description entirely in transverse momentum of both processes arises for the first time. The small difference between the simultaneous fit and the one for HERA data alone suggests that the AGBS model describes very well both kind of processes and thus emerges as a good tool to investigate the inclusive hadron production data. We use this model for predictions at LHC energies, which agree quite well with available experimental data.

  4. Progress report for the enhancement of Radcalc: Isotope database, gamma absorption fractions, and G(H{sub 2}) values

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, J.R.

    1994-09-28

    Radcalc is a spreadsheet currently used to calculate the generation of hydrogen gas in low-level radioactive waste containers for purposes of transportation and packaging. Radcalc is being enlarged and expanded. It will be offered as a Windows compatible software and will include some of the following enhancements: extended radionuclide library, updated gamma absorption fractions for an increased number of packages, inclusion of a G(H{sub 2}) value data base, updated transportation information, thermal and pressure calculation update, testing and benchmarking. This report discusses the progress made on the new Radcalc program. It presents the new radionuclide library, the results of the gamma absorption fractions for the increased number of packages, and an extensive review of G(H{sub 2}) values.

  5. Advanced Nuclear Technology: Advanced Light Water Reactors Utility Requirements Document Small Modular Reactors Inclusion Summary

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Advanced Nuclear Technology: Advanced Light Water Reactors Utility Requirements Document Small Modular Reactors Inclusion Summary November 2014

  6. Controlled synthesis of hyper-branched inorganic nanocrystals withrich three-dimensional structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kanaras, Antonios G.; Sonnichsen, Carsten; Liu, Haitao; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2005-07-27

    Studies of crystal growth kinetics are tightly integrated with advances in the creation of new nanoscale inorganic building blocks and their functional assemblies 1-11. Recent examples include the development of semiconductor nanorods which have potential uses in solar cells 12-17, and the discovery of a light driven process to create noble metal particles with sharp corners that can be used in plasmonics 18,19. In the course of studying basic crystal growth kinetics we developed a process for preparing branched semiconductor nanocrystals such as tetrapods and inorganic dendrimers of precisely controlled generation 20,21. Here we report the discovery of a crystal growth kinetics regime in which a new class of hyper-branched nanocrystals are formed. The shapes range from 'thorny balls', to tree-like ramified structures, to delicate 'spider net'-like particles. These intricate shapes depend crucially on a delicate balance of branching and extension. The multitudes of resulting shapes recall the diverse shapes of snowflakes 22.The three dimensional nature of the branch points here, however, lead to even more complex arrangements than the two dimensionally branched structures observed in ice. These hyper-branched particles not only extend the available three-dimensional shapes in nanoparticle synthesis ,but also provide a tool to study growth kinetics by carefully observing and modeling particle morphology.

  7. Field-flow fractionation of chromosomes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giddings, J.C.

    1991-09-01

    The work done on this project is divided into two principal areas. The first involves the application of sedimentation/steric FFF to metaphase chromosomes in an attempt to fractionate the chromosomes according to their size. The preparation of chromosomes from a number of organisms was attempted; procedures were finally worked out in collaboration with Los Alamos National Laboratory for the preparation of metaphase chromosomes from Chinese hamster cells. After extensive experimental work was done to identify suitable operating conditions, the partial fractionation of the Chinese hamster chromosomes was achieved. In the second component of the project, flow FFF was applied to the separation of DNA fragments. Figures are provided that show considerable success in the separation of plasmid digests and in the separation of single from double stranded DNA under 10{sup 4} base pairs. Preliminary work was done on DNA fragments having a size greater than 10{sup 4} base pairs. This work has served to establish the inversion point for DNA.

  8. Process for stabilization of coal liquid fractions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Davies, Geoffrey; El-Toukhy, Ahmed

    1987-01-01

    Coal liquid fractions to be used as fuels are stabilized against gum formation and viscosity increases during storage, permitting the fuel to be burned as is, without further expensive treatments to remove gums or gum-forming materials. Stabilization is accomplished by addition of cyclohexanol or other simple inexpensive secondary and tertiary alcohols, secondary and tertiary amines, and ketones to such coal liquids at levels of 5-25% by weight with respect to the coal liquid being treated. Cyclohexanol is a particularly effective and cost-efficient stabilizer. Other stabilizers are isopropanol, diphenylmethanol, tertiary butanol, dipropylamine, triethylamine, diphenylamine, ethylmethylketone, cyclohexanone, methylphenylketone, and benzophenone. Experimental data indicate that stabilization is achieved by breaking hydrogen bonds between phenols in the coal liquid, thereby preventing or retarding oxidative coupling. In addition, it has been found that coal liquid fractions stabilized according to the invention can be mixed with petroleum-derived liquid fuels to produce mixtures in which gum deposition is prevented or reduced relative to similar mixtures not containing stabilizer.

  9. Corrosion of Metal Inclusions In Bulk Vitrification Waste Packages

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bacon, Diana H.; Pierce, Eric M.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Strachan, Denis M.; Josephson, Gary B.

    2006-07-31

    The primary purpose of the work reported here is to analyze the potential effect of the release of technetium (Tc) from metal inclusions in bulk vitrification waste packages once they are placed in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). As part of the strategy for immobilizing waste from the underground tanks at Hanford, selected wastes will be immobilized using bulk vitrification. During analyses of the glass produced in engineering-scale tests, metal inclusions were found in the glass product. This report contains the results from experiments designed to quantify the corrosion rates of metal inclusions found in the glass product from AMEC Test ES-32B and simulations designed to compare the rate of Tc release from the metal inclusions to the release of Tc from glass produced with the bulk vitrification process. In the simulations, the Tc in the metal inclusions was assumed to be released congruently during metal corrosion as soluble TcO4-. The experimental results and modeling calculations show that the metal corrosion rate will, under all conceivable conditions at the IDF, be dominated by the presence of the passivating layer and corrosion products on the metal particles. As a result, the release of Tc from the metal particles at the surfaces of fractures in the glass releases at a rate similar to the Tc present as a soluble salt. The release of the remaining Tc in the metal is controlled by the dissolution of the glass matrix. To summarize, the release of 99Tc from the BV glass within precipitated Fe is directly proportional to the diameter of the Fe particles and to the amount of precipitated Fe. However, the main contribution to the Tc release from the iron particles is over the same time period as the release of the soluble Tc salt. For the base case used in this study (0.48 mass% of 0.5 mm diameter metal particles homogeneously distributed in the BV glass), the release of 99Tc from the metal is approximately the same as the release from 0.3 mass% soluble Tc

  10. Inclusive Production of the $X(4140)$ State in $p \\overline p $ Collisions at D0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich

    2015-12-02

    We present a study of the inclusive production of the X(4140) state with the decay to the J/ψΦ final state in hadronic collisions. Based on 10.4 fb-1 of pp¯ collision data collected by the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron collider, we report the first evidence for the prompt production of an X(4140)state and find the fraction of X(4140) events originating from b hadrons to be fb=0.39±0.07(stat)±0.10(syst). The ratio of the nonprompt X(4140) production rate to the B0syield in the same channel is R=0.19±0.05(stat)±0.07(syst). Furthermore, the values of the mass M=4152.5±1.7(stat)+6.2-5.4(syst) MeV and width Γ=16.3±5.6(stat)±11.4(syst) MeV are consistent with previous measurements.

  11. Fractional vortices in the XY model with {pi} bonds (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Fractional vortices in the XY model with pi bonds Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Fractional vortices in the XY model with pi bonds We define a new set of excitations ...

  12. Effective Field Theory of Fractional Quantized Hall Nematics (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | SciTech Connect Effective Field Theory of Fractional Quantized Hall Nematics Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Effective Field Theory of Fractional Quantized Hall Nematics We present a Landau-Ginzburg theory for a fractional quantized Hall nematic state and the transition to it from an isotropic fractional quantum Hall state. This justifies Lifshitz-Chern-Simons theory - which is shown to be its dual - on a more microscopic basis and enables us to compute a ground state

  13. Measurement of the relative branching ratio of B-s(0) -> J/psi f(0)(980) to B-s(0) -> J/psi phi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; Aoki, M.; Askew, A.; Asman, B.; Atkins, S.; Atramentov, O.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; BackusMayes, J.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besancon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burnett, T. H.; Buszello, C. P.; Calpas, B.; Camacho-Perez, E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M. A.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Thery, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M. -C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; De, K.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Deliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dorland, T.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Garcia-Guerra, G. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J. -F.; Grohsjean, A.; Gruenendahl, S.; Gruenewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffre, M.; Jamin, D.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurca, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Kvita, J.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lietti, S. M.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; de Sa, R. Lopes; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Mackin, D.; Madar, R.; Magana-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martinez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; et al.

    2012-01-20

    We present a measurement of the relative branching fraction, R{sub f{sub 0}/{phi}}, of B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi}f{sub 0}(980), with f{sub 0}(980) {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, to the process B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi}{phi}, with {phi} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}. The J/{psi}f{sub 0}(980) final state corresponds to a CP-odd eigenstate of B{sub s}{sup 0} that could be of interest in future studies of CP violation. Using 8 fb{sup -1} of data recorded with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider, we find R{sub f{sub 0}/{phi}} = 0.275 {+-} 0.041(stat) {+-} 0.061(syst).

  14. Release fractions for Rocky Flats specific accidents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiss, R.C.

    1992-09-01

    As Rocky Flats and other DOE facilities begin the transition process towards decommissioning, the nature of the scenarios to be studied in safety analysis will change. Whereas the previous emphasis in safety accidents related to production, now the emphasis is shifting to accidents related tc decommissioning and waste management. Accident scenarios of concern at Rocky Flats now include situations of a different nature and different scale than are represented by most of the existing experimental accident data. This presentation will discuss approaches@to use for applying the existing body of release fraction data to this new emphasis. Mention will also be made of ongoing efforts to produce new data and improve the understanding of physical mechanisms involved.

  15. Dark photons as fractional cosmic neutrino masquerader

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ng, Kin-Wang; Tu, Huitzu; Yuan, Tzu-Chiang E-mail: huitzu@phys.sinica.edu.tw

    2014-09-01

    Recently, Weinberg proposed a Higgs portal model with a spontaneously broken global U(1) symmetry in which Goldstone bosons may be masquerading as fractional cosmic neutrinos. We extend the model by gauging the U(1) symmetry. This gives rise to the so-called dark photon and dark Higgs. The dark photons can constitute about 0.912 (0.167) to the effective number of light neutrino species if they decouple from the thermal bath before the pions become non-relativistic and after (before) the QCD transition. Restriction on the parameter space of the portal coupling and the dark Higgs mass is obtained from the freeze-out condition of the dark photons. Combining with the collider data constraints on the invisible width of the standard model Higgs requires the dark Higgs mass to be less than a few GeV.

  16. Measurement of Nuclear Dependence in Inclusive Charged Current Neutrino Scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tice, Brian George

    2014-01-01

    Neutrino experiments use heavy nuclei (C, Fe, Pb) to achieve necessary statistics. However, the use of heavy nuclei exposes these experiments to the nuclear dependence of neutrino-nucleus cross sections, which are poorly known and difficult to model. This dissertation presents an analysis of the nuclear dependence of inclusive chargedcurrent neutrino scattering using events in carbon, iron, lead, and scintillator targets of the MINERvA detector. MINERvA (Main INjector ExpeRiment for -A) is a few-GeV neutrinonucleus scattering experiment at Fermilab.

  17. Organic waste amendments effect on zinc fraction of two soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shuman, L.M.

    1999-10-01

    Organic soil amendments can ameliorate metal toxicity to plants by redistributing metals to less available fractions. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of organic amendments on Zn distribution among soil fractions. Two soils were amended with five organic waste materials (some of which contained Zn) or commercial humic acid with and without 400 mg kg{sup {minus}1} Zn, incubated, and fractionated using a sequential extraction technique. Where no Zn was added most of the metals were in the residual fraction. Commercial compost, poultry litter, and industrial sewage sludge increased Zn in the exchangeable (EXC), organic (OM), and manganese oxide (MnOx) fractions due to Zn in the materials. Spent mushroom compost (SMC) redistributed Zn from the EXC fraction to the MnOx fraction for the coarse-textured soil. Where Zn was added, most of the metal was in the EXC and OM fractions. The SMC and humic acid lowered Zn in the EXC fraction and increased Zn in the other fractions. Effects of the organic materials on Zn in soil fractions were more evident for the sandy soil dominated by quartz in the clay than for the finer-textured soil dominated by kaolinite in the clay-size fraction. It was concluded that organic materials high in Zn can increase Zn in the EXC, OM, and MnOx fractions where the soil is not contaminated and others such as SMC and HA can lower the potential availability of Zn in contaminated soils by redistributing it from the EXC to less soluble fractions.

  18. Conceptual Assessment Framework for Forested Wetland Restoration: The Pen Branch Experience. Restoration of a Severely Impacted Riparian Wetland System - The Pen Branch Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kolka, R.; Nelson, E.A.; Trettin, C.C.

    2000-10-01

    Development of an assessment framework and indicators can be used to evaluate effectiveness of wetland restoration. Example of these include index of biotic integrity and the hydrogeomorphic method. Both approaches provide qualitative ranks. We propose a new method based on the EPA wetland research program. Similar to other methods, indexes are compared to reference communities; however, the comparisons are quantitative. In this paper we discuss the results of our framework using the Pen Branch riparian wetland system as an example.

  19. High resolution, shallow seismic reflection survey of the Pen Branch fault

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stieve, A.

    1991-05-15

    The purpose of this project, at the Savannah River River Site (SRS) was to acquire, process, and interpret 28 km (17.4 miles) of high resolution seismic reflection data taken across the trace of the Pen Branch fault and other suspected, intersecting north-south trending faults. The survey was optimized for the upper 300 ft of geologic strata in order to demonstrate the existence of very shallow, flat lying horizons, and to determine the depth of the fault or to sediments deformed by the fault. Field acquisition and processing parameters were selected to define small scale spatial variability and structural features in the vicinity of the Pen Branch fault leading to the definition and the location of the Pen Branch fault, the shallowest extent of the fault, and the quantification of the sense and magnitude of motion. Associated geophysical, borehole, and geologic data were incorporated into the investigation to assist in the determination of optimal parameters and aid in the interpretation.

  20. Asymmetric branching of dissociated photofragments of HD{sup +} in an intense femtosecond laser field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatterjee, Souvik; Bhattacharyya, S. S.; Dutta, Bibhas

    2011-06-15

    We have numerically explored the asymmetry in the branching ratio of the photofragments in the photodissociation of HD{sup +} (neutral D and neutral H), leading to the possibility of localization of the electron on a chosen nucleus by careful tuning of the laser parameters. For two different frequencies we show that, starting from an initial stationary wave function, proper tuning of the pulse duration (2{sigma}) and peak intensities (I{sup 0}) of the laser pulses can lead to very different branching ratios of the two reaction channels. The results are interpreted in terms of the propagation of the nonstationary wave packet through regions having dominant radiative or nonradiative interactions at different times. We also investigate what effect the choice of initial vibrational state has on the overall asymmetry in the branching ratio of the dissociation products.

  1. Study of fractionation of refrigerant blends in contact with lubricants and measurement of the solubility, density, and viscosity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cavestri, R.C.; Falconi, E.A.

    1999-07-01

    The fractionation of two refrigerant blends was studied using the gas equilibrium method. The amount of fractionation was measured by maintaining a constant composition of the refrigerant gas vapor over the lubricant, which was equal in composition to the liquid refrigerant gas blend introduced into the viscometer. Specifically, the concentration of the dissolved refrigerant gas in the lubricant ranges from 0.6% to 78% by weight in the specified temperature range of {minus}25 C to 125 C and within the highest test pressure of 500 psia (3.45 MPa). The polyolester chosen for this study was a 32 ISO VG complex branched acid pentaerythritol product. Smoothed graphical data presented were obtained from individual isothermal measurements. These individual isothermal measurement temperatures detail the composition of the equilibrium gas fractionation of R-32 and R-134a in the lubricant, mixed vapor pressure, concentration of the total mixed blend as percent by weight in the lubricant and viscosity in centipoise (cP) and centistokes (cSt). The raw data are presented in a smoothed graphical form based on a fixed vapor composition.

  2. Executive Order 13583, Establishing a Coordinated Government-Wide Initiative to Promote Diversity and Inclusion in the Federal Workforce

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Establishes a "coordinated government-wide initiative to promote diversity and inclusion in the federal workforce".

  3. Devices, systems, and methods for microscale isoelectric fractionation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sommer, Gregory J; Hatch, Anson V; Wang, Ying-Chih; Singh, Anup K

    2015-04-14

    Embodiments of the present invention provide devices, systems, and methods for microscale isoelectric fractionation. Analytes in a sample may be isolated according to their isoelectric point within a fractionation microchannel. A microfluidic device according to an embodiment of the invention includes a substrate at least partially defining a fractionation microchannel. The fractionation microchannel has at least one cross-sectional dimension equal to or less than 1 mm. A plurality of membranes of different pHs are disposed in the microchannel. Analytes having an isoelectric point between the pH of the membranes may be collected in a region of the fractionation channel between the first and second membranes through isoelectric fractionation.

  4. Request for approval, vented container annual release fraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HILL, J.S.

    1999-10-12

    In accordance with the approval conditions for Modification to the Central Waste Complex (CWC) Radioactive Air Emissions Notice of Construction (NOC). dated August 24,1998, a new release fraction has been developed for submittal to the Washington State Department of Health (WDOH). The proposed annual release fraction of 2.50 E-14 is proposed for use in future NOCs involving the storage and handling operations associated with vented containers on the Hanford Site. The proposed annual release fraction was the largest release fraction calculated from alpha measurements of the NucFil filters from 10 vented containers consisting of nine 55-gallon drums and one burial box with dimensions of 9.3 x 5.7 x 6.4 feet. An annual release fraction of 2.0 E-09 was used in the modification to the CWC radioactive air emissions NOC. This study confirmed that the release fraction used in the CWC radioactive air emissions NOC was conservative.

  5. Revision of the Branch Technical Position on Concentration Averaging and Encapsulation - 12510

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heath, Maurice; Kennedy, James E.; Ridge, Christianne; Lowman, Donald [U.S. NRC, Washington, DC, 20555-0001 (United States); Cochran, John [Sandia National Laboratory (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulation governing low-level waste (LLW) disposal, 'Licensing Requirements for Land Disposal of Radioactive Waste', 10 CFR Part 61, establishes a waste classification system based on the concentration of specific radionuclides contained in the waste. The regulation also states, at 10 CFR 61.55(a)(8), that, 'the concentration of a radionuclide (in waste) may be averaged over the volume of the waste, or weight of the waste if the units are expressed as nanocuries per gram'. The NRC's Branch Technical Position on Concentration Averaging and Encapsulation provides guidance on averaging radionuclide concentrations in waste under 10 CFR 61.55(a)(8) when classifying waste for disposal. In 2007, the NRC staff proposed to revise the Branch Technical Position on Concentration Averaging and Encapsulation. The Branch Technical Position on Concentration Averaging and Encapsulation is an NRC guidance document for averaging and classifying wastes under 10 CFR 61. The Branch Technical Position on Concentration Averaging and Encapsulation is used by nuclear power plants (NPPs) licensees and sealed source users, among others. In addition, three of the four U.S. LLW disposal facility operators are required to honor the Branch Technical Position on Concentration Averaging and Encapsulation as a licensing condition. In 2010, the Commission directed the staff to develop guidance regarding large scale blending of similar homogenous waste types, as described in SECY-10-0043 as part of its Branch Technical Position on Concentration Averaging and Encapsulation revision. The Commission is improving the regulatory approach used in the Branch Technical Position on Concentration Averaging and Encapsulation by moving towards a making it more risk-informed and performance-based approach, which is more consistent with the agency's regulatory policies. Among the improvements to the Branch Technical Position on Concentration Averaging and Encapsulation

  6. Power-law spatial dispersion from fractional Liouville equation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tarasov, Vasily E.

    2013-10-15

    A microscopic model in the framework of fractional kinetics to describe spatial dispersion of power-law type is suggested. The Liouville equation with the Caputo fractional derivatives is used to obtain the power-law dependence of the absolute permittivity on the wave vector. The fractional differential equations for electrostatic potential in the media with power-law spatial dispersion are derived. The particular solutions of these equations for the electric potential of point charge in this media are considered.

  7. Numerical method for shear bands in ductile metal with inclusions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plohr, Jee Yeon N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Plohr, Bradley J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    A numerical method for mesoscale simulation of high strain-rate loading of ductile metal containing inclusions is described. Because of small-scale inhomogeneities, such a composite material is prone to localized shear deformation (adiabatic shear bands). The modeling framework is the Generalized Method of Cells of Paley and Aboudi [Mech. Materials, vol. 14, pp. /27-139, 1992], which ensures that the micromechanical response of the material is reflected in the behavior of the composite at the mesoscale. To calculate the effective plastic strain rate when shear bands are present, the analytic and numerical analysis of shear bands by Glimm, Plohr, and Sharp [Mech. Materials, vol. 24, pp. 31-41, 1996] is adapted and extended.

  8. Semi-inclusive charged-current neutrino-nucleus reactions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Moreno, O.; Donnelly, T. W.; Van Orden, J. W.; Ford, W. P.

    2014-07-17

    The general, universal formalism for semi-inclusive charged-current (anti)neutrino-nucleus reactions is given for studies of any hadronic system, namely, either nuclei or the nucleon itself. The detailed developments are presented with the former in mind and are further specialized to cases where the final-state charged lepton and an ejected nucleon are presumed to be detected. General kinematics for such processes are summarized and then explicit expressions are developed for the leptonic and hadronic tensors involved and for the corresponding responses according to the usual charge, longitudinal and transverse projections, keeping finite the masses of all particles involved. In the case ofmore » the hadronic responses, general symmetry principles are invoked to determine which contributions can occur. As a result, the general leptonic-hadronic tensor contraction is given as well as the cross section for the process.« less

  9. Semi-inclusive charged-current neutrino-nucleus reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moreno, O.; Donnelly, T. W.; Van Orden, J. W.; Ford, W. P.

    2014-07-17

    The general, universal formalism for semi-inclusive charged-current (anti)neutrino-nucleus reactions is given for studies of any hadronic system, namely, either nuclei or the nucleon itself. The detailed developments are presented with the former in mind and are further specialized to cases where the final-state charged lepton and an ejected nucleon are presumed to be detected. General kinematics for such processes are summarized and then explicit expressions are developed for the leptonic and hadronic tensors involved and for the corresponding responses according to the usual charge, longitudinal and transverse projections, keeping finite the masses of all particles involved. In the case of the hadronic responses, general symmetry principles are invoked to determine which contributions can occur. As a result, the general leptonic-hadronic tensor contraction is given as well as the cross section for the process.

  10. Method Development: Identification of the Soluble Organic Fraction...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Method Development: Identification of the Soluble Organic Fraction of Particulate Matter on DPF Soot Poster presentation at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research ...

  11. Recoil-free fractions of iron in aluminous bridgmanite fromtemperatur...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    from temperature-dependent Mssbauer spectra Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Recoil-free fractions of iron in aluminous bridgmanite from temperature-dependent ...

  12. Devices, systems, and methods for microscale isoelectric fractionation...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Devices, systems, and methods for microscale isoelectric fractionation Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Devices, systems, and methods for microscale isoelectric...

  13. Fractionation and Removal of Solutes from Ionic Liquids - Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LBL About This Technology Technology Marketing SummaryResearchers at the Joint BioEnergy Institute (JBEI) have developed a technology to fractionate and recover biomaterials...

  14. Fractionated Radiation Exposure of Rat Spinal Cords Leads to...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Fractionated Radiation Exposure of Rat Spinal Cords Leads to Latent Neuro-Inflammation in ... of Rat Spinal Cords Leads to Latent Neuro-Inflammation in Brain, Cognitive Deficits, ...

  15. Robert B. Laughlin and the Fractional Quantum Hall Effect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Robert B. Laughlin and the Fractional Quantum Hall Effect Resources with Additional Information Robert B. Laughlin Photo Courtesy of LLNL Robert B. Laughlin shared the 1998 Nobel...

  16. Microscale isoelectric fractionation using immobilized pH-specific...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    We report on advancements of our microscale isoelectric fractionation (muIEFr) methodology for fast on-chip separation and concentration of proteins based on their isoelectric ...

  17. Government-Wide Diversity and Inclusion Strategic Plan (2011), Office of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Personnel Management | Department of Energy Government-Wide Diversity and Inclusion Strategic Plan (2011), Office of Personnel Management Government-Wide Diversity and Inclusion Strategic Plan (2011), Office of Personnel Management This document, required by Executive Order 13583, provides a shared direction, encourages commitment, and creates alignment so agencies can approach their workplace diversity and inclusion efforts in a coordinated, collaborative, and integrated manner. Three key

  18. One-pot refolding of core histones from bacterial inclusion bodies...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Search Results Journal Article: One-pot refolding of core histones from bacterial inclusion bodies allows rapid reconstitution of histone octamer Citation Details ...

  19. On the Inclusion of Energy-Shifting Demand Response in Production...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    On the Inclusion of Energy- Shifting Demand Response in Production Cost Models: Methodology and a Case Study Niamh O'Connell Technical University of Denmark Elaine Hale, Ian ...

  20. Inclusive w and z cross section measurements at the Fermilab Tevatron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, Victoria; /Northwestern U.

    2004-12-01

    The present recent measurements of the inclusive cross section of W and Z bosons from Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron collider.

  1. Chemical Signatures of and Precursors to Fractures Using Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of this research is to develop a method to identify fracture systems in wells using fluid inclusion gas analysis of drill chips.

  2. A Case Study: Using Integrated Approach to Design a Net-Zero Bank Branch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Athalye, Rahul A.; Xie, YuLong; Liu, Bing; Baechler, Michael C.

    2012-10-26

    This paper describes a real life project conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and PNC Financial Services Group's design team. This is a demonstration project supported by the U.S. Department of Energy's Commercial Partnerships Program, the goal of which is to design and construct a new-zero energy bank branch in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

  3. Side branch absorber for exhaust manifold of two-stroke internal combustion engine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harris, Ralph E.; Broerman, III, Eugene L.; Bourn, Gary D.

    2011-01-11

    A method of improving scavenging operation of a two-stroke internal combustion engine. The exhaust pressure of the engine is analyzed to determine if there is a pulsation frequency. Acoustic modeling is used to design an absorber. An appropriately designed side branch absorber may be attached to the exhaust manifold.

  4. Phenolic compounds containing/neutral fractions extract and products derived therefrom from fractionated fast-pyrolysis oils

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chum, H.L.; Black, S.K.; Diebold, J.P.; Kreibich, R.E.

    1993-06-29

    A process is described for preparing phenol-formaldehyde novolak resins and molding compositions in which portions of the phenol normally contained in said resins are replaced by a phenol/neutral fractions extract obtained from fractionating fast-pyrolysis oils. The fractionation consists of a neutralization stage which can be carried out with aqueous solutions of bases or appropriate bases in the dry state, followed by solvent extraction with an organic solvent having at least a moderate solubility parameter and good hydrogen bonding capacity. Phenolic compounds-containing/neutral fractions extracts obtained by fractionating fast-pyrolysis oils from a lignocellulosic material, is such that the oil is initially in the pH range of 2-4, being neutralized with an aqueous bicarbonate base, and extracted into a solvent having a solubility parameter of approximately 8.4-9.11 [cal/cm[sup 3

  5. Long-Term Outcomes of Vestibular Schwannomas Treated With Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy: An Institutional Experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kapoor, Sumit; Batra, Sachin; Carson, Kathryn; Shuck, John; Kharkar, Siddharth; Gandhi, Rahul; Jackson, Juan; Wemmer, Jan; Terezakis, Stephanie; Shokek, Ori; Kleinberg, Lawrence; Rigamonti, Daniele

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: We assessed clinical outcome and long-term tumor control after fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) for unilateral schwannoma. Methods and Materials: Between 1995 and 2007, 496 patients were treated with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy at Johns Hopkins Hospital (Baltimore, MD); 385 patients had radiologic follow-up that met the inclusion criteria. The primary endpoint was treatment failure. Secondary endpoints were radiologic progression and clinical outcome. Logistic regression analysis assessed the association of age, race, tumor side, sex, and pretreatment symptoms. Results: In 11 patients (3%) treatment failed, and they required salvage (microsurgical) treatment. Radiologic progression was observed in 116 patients (30.0%), including 35 patients (9%) in whom the treatment volume more than doubled during the follow-up period, although none required surgical resection. Tumors with baseline volumes of less than 1 cm{sup 3} were 18.02 times more likely to progress than those with tumor volumes of 1 cm{sup 3} or greater (odds ratio, 18.02; 95% confidence interval, 4.25-76.32). Treatment-induced neurologic morbidity included 8 patients (1.6%) with new facial weakness, 12 patients (2.8%) with new trigeminal paresthesias, 4 patients (0.9%) with hydrocephalus (1 communicating and 3 obstructive), and 2 patients (0.5%) with possibly radiation-induced neoplasia. Conclusions: Although the rate of treatment failure is low (3%), careful follow-up shows that radiologic progression occurs frequently. When reporting outcome, the 'no salvage surgery needed' and 'no additional treatment needed' criteria for treatment success need to be complemented by the radiologic data.

  6. Dartmouth Stellar Evolution Database and the ACS Survey of Galactic Globular Clusters II. Stellar Evolution Tracks, Isochrones, Luminosity Functions, and Synthetic Horizontal-Branch Models

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Dotter, A; Chaboyer, B; Jevremovic, D; Kostov, V; Baron, E; Ferguson, J; Sarajedini, A; Anderson, J

    The Dartmouth Stellar Evolution Database is a collection of stellar evolution tracks and isochrones that spans a range of [Fe/H] from -2.5 to +0.5, [a/Fe] from -0.2 to +0.8 (for [Fe/H]<=0) or +0.2 (for [Fe/H]>0), and initial He mass fractions from Y=0.245 to 0.40. Stellar evolution tracks were computed for masses between 0.1 and 4 Msolar, allowing isochrones to be generated for ages as young as 250 Myr. For the range in masses where the core He flash occurs, separate He-burning tracks were computed starting from the zero age horizontal branch. The tracks and isochrones have been transformed to the observational plane in a variety of photometric systems including standard UBV(RI)C, Stromgren uvby, SDSS ugriz, 2MASS JHKs, and HST ACS/WFC and WFPC2. The Dartmouth Stellar Evolution Database is accessible through a Web site at http://stellar.dartmouth.edu/~models/ where all tracks, isochrones, and additional files can be downloaded. [Copied from online abstract of paper titled "Darmouth Stellar Evolution Database" authored by Dotter, Chaboyer, Jevremovic, Kostov, Baron, Ferguson, and Jason. Abstract is located at http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008ApJS..178...89D] Web tools are also available at the home page (http://stellar.dartmouth.edu/~models/index.html). These tools allow users to create isochrones and convert them to luminosity functions or create synthetic horizontal branch models.

  7. Expansion fractionation capacity of the LPG-ULE plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morin, L.M.C.

    1999-07-01

    The Western Division of PDVSA has among other facilities a NGL Fractionation Complex located onshore in Ul'e. The complex consists of three plants, the first and second older plants, LPG-1 and LPG-2, which fractionate the NGL to produce propane, a butane mix and natural gasoline. The third plant, LPG-3, fractionates the butane mix from the LPG-1 and 2 plants to produce iso and normal butane. Several optimization projects already in progress will increase the NGL production to 12,200 b/d. For this reason it was decided to conduct a study of the existing fractionation facilities and utilities systems to determine their capacities. This evaluation revealed that some of the fractionation towers would have some limitations in the processing of the expected additional production. The study recommended an option to increase the capacity of the fractionation towers by lowering their operating pressure, in order to take advantage of relative volatility increase between the key components, which allows easier separation, as well as reducing the heat duty required. The completed study also determined that this option is more economically convenient than the replacement of the existing fractionation towers.

  8. Statistical mechanics based on fractional classical and quantum mechanics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korichi, Z.; Meftah, M. T.

    2014-03-15

    The purpose of this work is to study some problems in statistical mechanics based on the fractional classical and quantum mechanics. At first stage we have presented the thermodynamical properties of the classical ideal gas and the system of N classical oscillators. In both cases, the Hamiltonian contains fractional exponents of the phase space (position and momentum). At the second stage, in the context of the fractional quantum mechanics, we have calculated the thermodynamical properties for the black body radiation, studied the Bose-Einstein statistics with the related problem of the condensation and the Fermi-Dirac statistics.

  9. Condensate fraction of cold gases in a nonuniform external potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Astrakharchik, G. E.; Krutitsky, K. V.

    2011-09-15

    Exact calculation of the condensate fraction in multidimensional inhomogeneous interacting Bose systems in a confining potential of arbitrary shape is a difficult computational problem. We have developed an iterative procedure which allows us to calculate the condensate fraction as well as the corresponding eigenfunction of the one-body density matrix. We successfully validate this procedure in diffusion Monte Carlo simulations of a Bose gas in an optical lattice at zero temperature. We also discuss the relation between different criteria used for testing coherence in cold Bose systems, such as the fraction of particles that are superfluid, condensed, or in the zero-momentum state.

  10. A fractional Fokker-Planck model for anomalous diffusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, Johan; Kim, Eun-jin; Moradi, Sara

    2014-12-15

    In this paper, we present a study of anomalous diffusion using a Fokker-Planck description with fractional velocity derivatives. The distribution functions are found using numerical means for varying degree of fractionality of the stable Lévy distribution. The statistical properties of the distribution functions are assessed by a generalized normalized expectation measure and entropy in terms of Tsallis statistical mechanics. We find that the ratio of the generalized entropy and expectation is increasing with decreasing fractionality towards the well known so-called sub-diffusive domain, indicating a self-organising behavior.

  11. Measurement of the Inclusive Upsilon production cross section in pp collisions at sqrt(s)=7 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan; et al.

    2011-06-01

    The Upsilon production cross section in proton-proton collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV is measured using a data sample collected with the CMS detector at the LHC, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.1 +/- 0.3 inverse picobarns. Integrated over the rapidity range |y|<2, we find the product of the Upsilon(1S) production cross section and branching fraction to dimuons to be sigma(pp to Upsilon(1S) X) B(Upsilon(1S) to mu+ mu-) = 7.37 +/- 0.13^{+0.61}_{-0.42}\\pm 0.81 nb, where the first uncertainty is statistical, the second is systematic, and the third is associated with the estimation of the integrated luminosity of the data sample. This cross section is obtained assuming unpolarized Upsilon(1S) production. If the Upsilon(1S) production polarization is fully transverse or fully longitudinal the cross section changes by about 20%. We also report the measurement of the Upsilon(1S), Upsilon(2S), and Upsilon(3S) differential cross sections as a function of transverse momentum and rapidity.

  12. Improved Measurement of the π→eν Branching Ratio

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aguilar-Arevalo, A.; Aoki, M.; Blecher, M.; Britton, D. I.; Bryman, D. A.; vom Bruch, D.; Chen, S.; Comfort, J.; Ding, M.; Doria, L.; et al

    2015-08-01

    A new measurement of the branching ratio Re/μ=Γ(π+ → e+ν + π+ → e+νγ)/Γ(π+ → μ+ν + π+→μ+νγ) resulted in Rexpe/μ=[1.2344±0.0023(stat)±0.0019(syst)] x 10-4. This is in agreement with the standard model prediction and improves the test of electron-muon universality to the level of 0.1%.

  13. Some problems in sequencing and scheduling utilizing branch and bound algorithms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gim, B.

    1988-01-01

    This dissertation deals with branch and bound algorithms which are applied to the two-machine flow-shop problem with sparse precedence constraints and the optimal sequencing and scheduling of multiple feedstocks in a batch-type digester problem. The problem studied here is to find a schedule which minimizes the maximum flow time with the requirement that the schedule does not violate a set of sparse precedence constraints. This research provides a branch and bound algorithm which employs a lower bounding rule and is based on an adjustment of the sequence obtained by applying Johnson's algorithm. It is demonstrated that this lower bounding procedure in conjunction with Kurisu's branching rule is effective for the sparse precedence constraints problem case. Biomass to methane production systems have the potential of supplying 25% of the national gas demand. The optimal operation of a batch digester system requires the sequencing and scheduling of all batches from multiple feedstocks during a fixed time horizon. A significant characteristic of these systems is that the feedstock decays in storage before use in the digester system. The operational problem is to determine the time to allocate to each batch of several feedstocks and then sequence the individual batches so as to maximize biogas production for a single batch type digester over a fixed planning horizon. This research provides a branch and bound algorithm for sequencing and a two-step hierarchical dynamic programming procedure for time allocation scheduling. An efficient heuristic algorithm is developed for large problems and demonstrated to yield excellent results.

  14. Pen Branch fault program: Consolidated report on the seismic reflection surveys and the shallow drilling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stieve, A.L.; Stephenson, D.E.; Aadland, R.K.

    1991-03-23

    The Pen Branch fault was identified in the subsurface at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in 1989 based upon interpretation of earlier seismic reflection surveys and other geologic investigations (Seismorgraph Services Incorp., 1973; Chapman and DiStefano, 1989; Snipes, Fallaw and Price, 1989). A program was initiated at that time to determine the capability of the fault to release seismic energy (Price and others, 1989) as defined in the Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulatory guidelines, 10 CFR 100 Appendix A. This report presents the results of the Pen Branch fault investigation based on data acquired from seismic reflection surveys and shallow drilling across the fault completed at this time. The Earth Science Advisory Committee (ESAC) has reviewed the results of these investigations and unanimously agrees with the conclusion of Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) that the Pen Branch fault is a non-capable fault. ESAC is a committee of 12 earth science professionals from academia and industry with the charter of providing outside peer review of SRS geotechnical, seismic, and ground water modeling programs.

  15. Probing the molecular design of hyper-branched aryl polyesters towards lubricant applications

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Robinson, Joshua W.; Zhou, Yan; Bhattacharya, Priyanka; Erck, Robert; Qu, Jun; Bays, J. Timothy; Cosimbescu, Lelia

    2016-01-05

    We report novel polymeric materials that may be used as viscosity index improvers (VII) for lubricant applications. Our efforts included probing the comb-burst hyper-branched aryl polyester architecture for beneficial viscosity and friction behavior when utilized as an additive in a group I oil. The monomer was designed as to undergo polymerization via polycondensation within the architectural construct (AB2), typical of hyperbranched polymers. The monomer design was comprised of aliphatic arms (12 or 16 methylenes) to provide the necessary lipophilicity to achieve solubility in a non-polar medium. Once polymerized, via catalyst and heat, the surface alcohols were functionalized with fatty acidsmore » (lauric and palmitic). Controlling the aliphatic nature of the internal arms and peripheral end-groups provided four unique flexible polymer designs. Changing the reaction time and concentration provided opportunities to investigate the influence of molecular weight and branching density on oil-solubility, viscosity, and friction. Oil-solubility was found to decrease with fewer internal carbons, but the number of internal carbons appears to have little influence on the bulk solution viscosity. Increased branching and degree of polymerization, and thus molecular weight, were found to reduce the solubility of these systems in the base oil. At concentrations of 2 wt % in a group I base oil, these polymer additives demonstrated improved viscosity index and reduced friction coefficient, validating the basic approach.« less

  16. Fractionation and Catalytic Upgrading of Bio-Oil Presentation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Office (BETO) 2015 Project Peer Review Fractionation and Catalytic Upgrading of Bio-Oil ... Deconstruction of Biomass to Form Bio-Oil Intermediates Tt-I. Catalytic Upgrading of ...

  17. Thomson scattering diagnostic for the measurement of ion species fraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ross, J S; Park, H S; Amendt, A; Divol, L; Kugland, N L; Rozmus, W; Glenzer, S H

    2012-05-01

    Simultaneous Thomson scattering measurements of collective electron-plasma and ion-acoustic fluctuations have been utilized to determine ion species fraction from laser produced CH plasmas. The CH{sub 2} foil is heated with 10 laser beams, 500 J per beam, at the Omega Laser facility. Thomson scattering measurements are made 4 mm from the foil surface using a 30 J 2{omega} probe laser with a 1 ns pulse length. Using a series of target shots the plasma evolution is measured from 2.5 ns to 9 ns after the rise of the heater beams. Measuring the electron density and temperature from the electron-plasma fluctuations constrains the fit of the two-ion species theoretical form factor for the ion feature such that the ion temperature, plasma flow velocity and ion species fraction are determined. The ion species fraction is determined to an accuracy of {+-}0.06 in species fraction.

  18. Comparison of Cloud Fraction and Liquid Water Path between ECMWF...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Comparison of Cloud Fraction and Liquid Water Path between ECMWF Simulations and ARM Long-term Observations at the NSA Site Ming Zhao (mzhao@uwyo.edu) and Zhien Wang ...

  19. Quantifying intra- and inter-fractional motion in breast radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Scott; Fitzgerald, Rhys; Owen, Rebecca; Ramsay, Jonathan

    2015-03-15

    The magnitude of intra- and inter-fractional variation in the set up of breast cancer patients treated with tangential megavoltage photon beams was investigated using an electronic portal imaging device (EPID). Daily cine-EPID images were captured during delivery of the tangential fields for ten breast cancer patients treated in the supine position. Measurements collected from each image included the central lung distance (CLD), central flash distance (CFD), superior axial measurement (SAM) and the inferior axial measurement (IAM). The variation of motion within a fraction (intra-fraction) and the variation between fractions (inter-fraction) was analysed to quantify set up variation and motion due to respiration. Altogether 3775 EPID images were collected from 10 patients. The effect of respiratory motion during treatment was <0.1 cm standard deviation (SD) in the anterior–posterior (AP) direction. The inter-fraction movement caused by variations in daily set up was larger at 0.28 cm SD in the AP direction. Superior–inferior (SI) variation was more difficult to summarise and proved unreliable as the measurements were taken to an ambiguous point on the images. It was difficult to discern true SI movement from that implicated by AP movement. There is minimal intra-fractional chest wall motion due to respiration during treatment. Inter-fractional variation was larger, however, on average it remained within departmental tolerance (0.5 cm) for set up variations. This review of our current breast technique provides confidence in the feasibility of utilising advanced treatment techniques (field-in-field, intensity modulated radiotherapy or volumetric modulated arc therapy) following a review of the current imaging protocol.

  20. Searches for Fractionally Charged Particles: What Should Be Done Next?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perl, Martin L.; /SLAC

    2009-01-15

    Since the initial measurements of the electron charge a century ago, experimenters have faced the persistent question as to whether elementary particles exist that have charges that are fractional multiples of the electron charge. I concisely review the results of the last 50 years of searching for fractional charge particles with no confirmed positive results. I discuss the question of whether more searching is worthwhile?

  1. Microsoft Word - Group2 CloudBirthFraction(RS).docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Birth and Fraction Report Participants: Jingyi Chen, Stony Brook University George Duffy, Vanderbilt University Elizabeth Smith, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Wei Zhao, University of Washington Instructors: Allison McComiskey, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Dave Turner, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration July 2015 Group 2, July 2015, ARM Summer Training and Science Applications 1 1.0 Cloud Birth and Fraction A case of low-level cumulus was observed over the

  2. The biological effect of inhomogeneous dose distributions in fractionated radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yaes, R.J. )

    1990-07-01

    The linear quadratic (LQ) model is applied to an organ receiving a fractionated course of radiotherapy with an inhomogeneous dose distribution. It is shown that the gradient in the extrapolated response dose (ERD) will be steeper than the gradient in the physical dose. This effect will be greatest for an organ with a small alpha/beta ratio treated with large dose fractions. Clinical implications are discussed with an emphasis on radiation myelitis.

  3. An FTIR Study of Hydrogen in Anorthosite and Associated Melt Inclusions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seaman,S.; Dyar, M.; Marinkovic, N.; Dunbar, N.

    2006-01-01

    High-resolution Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy has been used to document the presence of hydrogen, to estimate its concentration, and to document its oxygen speciation in anorthoclase crystals and associated melt inclusions from Mount Erebus, Antarctica. Synchrotron-generated infrared radiation, 100 to 1000 times brighter than globar-generated infrared radiation, permits rapid collection of maps that depict relative intensities of a chosen FTIR band across the mapped area. Spectra and/or compositional maps showing variations in water concentration were collected from anorthoclase megacrysts and melt inclusions in the megacrysts. Studies of anorthoclase megacrysts involved collection of spectra from three mutually perpendicular sections cut from the crystals. FTIR spectra of anorthoclase crystals are characterized by a broad absorption band at approximately 3200 cm{sup -1} in the mid-IR range. The universal mass absorption coefficient for mid-IR range feldspar spectra, established by Johnson and Rossman (2003), was used for quantitative estimates of water concentrations in the feldspar crystals based on integrated area under the 3200 cm{sup -1} band. Water concentration in the anorthoclase sample was approximately 126 ppm, with an overall error of approximately {+-}30%. FTIR spectra of melt inclusions are characterized by a broad asymmetric absorption band at {approx}3550 cm{sup -1} that was used to calculate total water concentration. The absence of a band at 1630 cm{sup -1} suggests that water in the melt inclusions occurs as OH{sup -} rather than as molecular H{sub 2}O. Absorption coefficients established by Mandeville et al. (2002) for H species in glass were used to calculate water concentrations in the melt inclusions. Melt inclusions in the Mt. Erebus anorthoclase have water concentrations ranging from 0.12 to 0.39 wt%, with an overall error of approximately {+-}15%. The ratio of water in anorthoclase crystals to water in the melt from which

  4. Development and application of a mass spectrometric system to study volatile components of fluid inclusions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sloan, R.C. Jr.

    1992-06-01

    A quadrupole mass spectrometric system coupled with mechanical decrepitation was constructed and calibrated to study fluid inclusions from an active geothermal system. Fluid inclusions in Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Project well cores and ejects from flow tests were analyzed. Ion currents from selected mass/charge ratio numbers were measured for gases from ruptured inclusions in epidote, calcite, and hematite vein minerals from different depths. Water, carbon dioxide, hydrogen sulfide, sulfur dioxide, and C1{minus}C4+ hydrocarbons and free nitrogen were analyzed.

  5. Inclusive hadron distributions in p+p collisions from saturation models of HERA DIS data.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tribedy, P.; Venugopalan, R.

    2010-12-06

    Dipole models based on various saturation scenarios provide reasonable fits to small-x DIS inclusive, diffractive and exclusive data from HERA. Proton un-integrated gluon distributions extracted from such fits are employed in a k{sub {perpendicular}}-factorization framework to calculate inclusive gluon distributions at various energies. The n-particle multiplicity distribution predicted in the Glasma flux tube approach shows good agreement with data over a wide range of energies. Hadron inclusive transverse momentum distributions expressed in terms of the saturation scale demonstrate universal behavior over a wider kinematic range systematically with increasing center of mass energies.

  6. DOE Ups the Ante for Diversity and Inclusion at the Department of Energy |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Ups the Ante for Diversity and Inclusion at the Department of Energy DOE Ups the Ante for Diversity and Inclusion at the Department of Energy April 17, 2012 - 8:25am Addthis DOE Ups the Ante for Diversity and Inclusion at the Department of Energy Bill Valdez Bill Valdez Director of Workforce Management "We will treat our people as our greatest asset." This phrase is not only one of DOE's management principles, but it is also the rock behind our new Diversity

  7. Catalytic hydroprocessing of SRC-II heavy distillate fractions. 4. Hydrodeoxygenation of phenolic compounds in the acidic fractions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, C.L.

    1985-01-01

    Heavy distillate obtained by hydroliquefaction of Powhatan No.5 coal was separated into 9 fractions by liquid chromatography. The very-weak-acid and weak-acid fractions were used as feeds in hydroprocessing experiments with sulphided Ni-Mo/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ catalyst at 350 C and 120 atm. The hydrodeoxygenation of the acidic compounds was shown to be rapid in comparison with other hydroprocessing reactions of coal liquids, including hydrogenation of aromatics, hydrodesulphurisation and hydrodenitrogenation.

  8. Measurement of b-jet Shapes in Inclusive Jet Production in p anti-p Collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.

    2008-06-01

    We present a measurement of the shapes of b-jets using 300 pb{sup -1} of data obtained with the upgraded Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF II) in p{bar p} collisions at center of mass energy {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. This measurement covers a wide transverse momentum range, from 52 to 300 GeV/c. Samples of heavy-flavor enhanced jets together with inclusive jets are used to extract the average shapes of b-jets. The b-jets are expected to be broader than inclusive jets. Moreover, b-jets containing a single b-quark are expected to be narrower than those containing a b{bar b} pair from gluon splitting. The measured b-jet shapes are found to be significantly broader than expected from the pythia and HERWIG Monte Carlo simulations. This effect may arise from an underestimation of the fraction of b-jets originating from gluon splitting in these simulations.

  9. Black Warrior: Sub-soil gas and fluid inclusion exploration and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and isotope data to define possible upflow areas; Calibrate the sub-soil chemistry with down-hole fluid inclusion stratigraphy and fluid analyses to define a follow-up ...

  10. Application Of Fluid Inclusion And Rock-Gas Analysis In Mineral...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to analyze these gases in fluid inclusions in jasperoid around the Pueblo Viejo gold-silver deposit, in vein minerals from the Creede silver-lead-zinc deposit, and from...

  11. U.S. Office of Personnel Management, Office of Diversity and Inclusion

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Government-Wide Diversity and Inclusion Strategic Plan 2011 Our Nation derives strength from the diversity of its population and from its commitment to equal opportunity for all. We are at our best when we draw on the talents of all parts of our society, and our greatest accomplishments are achieved when diverse perspectives are brought to bear to overcome our greatest challenges. - President Obama, Executive Order 13583 U.S. Office of Personnel Management Office of Diversity and Inclusion 2

  12. U.S. Virgin Islands Leadership Embraces Inclusiveness to Ensure Community

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ownership of Clean Energy Vision | Department of Energy Leadership Embraces Inclusiveness to Ensure Community Ownership of Clean Energy Vision U.S. Virgin Islands Leadership Embraces Inclusiveness to Ensure Community Ownership of Clean Energy Vision More than 25 government leaders, energy office officials, and utility company executives from the USVI attended a workshop at NREL in Golden, Colorado, in February 2010. <em>Photo by Adam Warren, NREL</em> More than 25 government

  13. Process for the conversion of lower alcohols to higher branched oxygenates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barger, P.T.

    1996-09-24

    A process is provided for the production of branched C{sub x} oxygenates from lower alcohols such as methanol, ethanol, propanol and mixtures thereof. The process comprises contacting the lower alcohols with a solid catalyst comprising a mixed metal oxide support having components selected from the group consisting of oxides of zinc, magnesium, zirconia, titanium, manganese, chromium, and lanthanides, and an activation metal selected from the group consisting of Group VIII metal, Group IB metals, and mixtures thereof. The advantage of the process is improved yields and selectivity to isobutanol which can subsequently be employed in the production of high octane motor gasoline.

  14. The transport of contaminants during storms in the White Oak Creek and Melton Branch Watersheds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solomon, D.K.; Marsh, J.D.; Wickliff, D.S.; Larsen, I.L.; Clapp, R.B.

    1989-03-01

    This report documents are transport of contaminants from SWSA 5 along two principle pathways: the saturated groundwater system and the intermittently saturated stormflow system. The results of a baseflow sampling effort and a dye tracer study, indicated that much of the transport through the saturated groundwater system occurs along discrete geologic features. These features appear to be related to the contact between the Maryville and Nolichucky members of the Conasauga shale. Three discrete sources of tritium to Melton Branch Stream (MBS) were identified and traced to SWSA 5 by measuring soil moisture and evapotranspiration along transects between MBS and SWSA 5.

  15. D-T gamma-to-neutron branching ratio determined from inertial confinement fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Y.; Mack, J. M.; Herrmann, H. W.; Young, C. S.; Hale, G. M.; Caldwell, S.; Hoffman, N. M.; Evans, S. C.; Sedillo, T. J.; McEvoy, A.; Langenbrunner, J.; Hsu, H. H.; Huff, M. A.; Batha, S.; Horsfield, C. J.; Rubery, M. S.; Garbett, W. J.; Stoeffl, W.; Grafil, E.; Bernstein, L.; and others

    2012-05-15

    A new deuterium-tritium (D-T) fusion gamma-to-neutron branching ratio [{sup 3}H(d,{gamma}){sup 5}He/{sup 3}H(d,n){sup 4}He] value of (4.2 {+-} 2.0) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} was recently reported by this group [Y. Kim et al. Phys. Rev. C (submitted)]. This measurement, conducted at the OMEGA laser facility located at the University of Rochester, was made for the first time using inertial confinement fusion (ICF) plasmas. Neutron-induced backgrounds are significantly reduced in these experiments as compared to traditional beam-target accelerator-based experiments due to the short pulse nature of ICF implosions and the use of gas Cherenkov {gamma}-ray detectors with fast temporal responses and inherent energy thresholds. It is expected that this ICF-based measurement will help resolve the large and long-standing inconsistencies in previously reported accelerator-based values, which vary by a factor of approximately 30. The reported value at ICF conditions was determined by averaging the results of two methods: (1) a direct measurement of ICF D-T {gamma}-ray and neutron emissions using absolutely calibrated detectors and (2) a separate cross-calibration against the better known D-{sup 3}He gamma-to-proton branching ratio [{sup 3}He(d, {gamma}){sup 5}Li/{sup 3}He(d,p){sup 4}He]. Here we include a detailed explanation of these results, and introduce as a corroborative method an in-situ{gamma}-ray detector calibration using neutron-induced {gamma}-rays. Also, by extending the established techniques to two additional series of implosions with significantly different ion temperatures, we test the branching ratio dependence on ion temperature. The data show a D-T branching ratio is nearly constant over the temperature range 2-9 keV. These studies motivate further investigation into the {sup 5}He and {sup 5}Li systems resulting from D-T and D-{sup 3}He fusion, respectively, and result in improved ICF {gamma}-ray reaction history diagnosis at the National Ignition

  16. Effects of inelastic electron-electron scattering on branch imbalance relaxation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Entin-Wohlman, O.; Orbach, R.

    1981-08-01

    The rate for branch-imbalance relaxation in a superconductor associated with inelastic electron-electron (Coulomb) scattering is derived, valid at arbitrary temperatures. The calculation is performed for clean superconductors, and shown to extend to cases where impurity scattering is important, using a technique of Schmid. As expected, for temperatures in the vicinity of T/sub c/ the form for the relaxation rate is identical with that arising from inelastic electron-phonon processes, if one replaces the inelastic electron-phonon scattering time with the inelastic electron-electron scattering time.

  17. Evaluation of partial widths and branching ratios from resonance wave functions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldzak, Tamar; Gilary, Ido; Moiseyev, Nimrod

    2010-11-15

    A quantum system in a given resonance state has different open channels for decay. Partial widths are the decay rates of the resonance (metastable) state into the different open channels. Here we present a rigorous derivation of the partial widths from the solution of a time-dependent Schroedinger equation with outgoing boundary conditions. We show that the sum of the partial widths obtained from the resonance wave function is equal to the total width. The difference with respect to previous studies on partial widths and branching ratios is discussed.

  18. Process for the conversion of lower alcohols to higher branched oxygenates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barger, Paul T. (Arlington Heights, IL)

    1996-01-01

    A process is provided for the production of branched C.sub.4+ oxygenates from lower alcohols such as methanol, ethanol, propanol and mixtures thereof. The process comprises contacting the lower alcohols with a solid catalyst comprising a mixed metal oxide support having components selected from the group consisting of oxides of zinc, magnesium, zirconia, titanium, manganese, chromium, and lanthanides, and an activation metal selected from the group consisting of Group VIII metal, Group IB metals, and mixtures thereof. The advantage of the process is improved yields and selectivity to isobutanol which can subsequently be employed in the production of high octane motor gasoline.

  19. Comparison of a radial fractional transport model with tokamak experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kullberg, A. Morales, G. J.; Maggs, J. E.

    2014-03-15

    A radial fractional transport model [Kullberg et al., Phys. Rev. E 87, 052115 (2013)], that correctly incorporates the geometric effects of the domain near the origin and removes the singular behavior at the outer boundary, is compared to results of off-axis heating experiments performed in the Rijnhuizen Tokamak Project (RTP), ASDEX Upgrade, JET, and DIII-D tokamak devices. This comparative study provides an initial assessment of the presence of fractional transport phenomena in magnetic confinement experiments. It is found that the nonlocal radial model is robust in describing the steady-state temperature profiles from RTP, but for the propagation of heat waves in ASDEX Upgrade, JET, and DIII-D the model is not clearly superior to predictions based on Fick's law. However, this comparative study does indicate that the order of the fractional derivative, ?, is likely a function of radial position in the devices surveyed.

  20. Fractionation of Boron Isotopes in Icelandic Hydrothermal Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aggarwal, J.K.; Palmer, M.R.

    1995-01-01

    Boron isotope ratios have been determined in a variety of different geothermal waters from hydrothermal systems across Iceland. Isotope ratios from the high temperature meteoric water recharged systems reflect the isotope ratio of the host rocks without any apparent fractionation. Seawater recharged geothermal systems exhibit more positive {delta}{sup 11}B values than the meteoric water recharged geothermal systems. Water/rock ratios can be assessed from boron isotope ratios in the saline hydrothermal systems. Low temperature hydrothermal systems also exhibit more positive {delta}{sup 11}B than the high temperature systems, indicating fractionation of boron due to adsorption of the lighter isotope onto secondary minerals. Fractionation of boron in carbonate deposits may indicate the level of equilibrium attained within the systems.

  1. Fractional power-law spatial dispersion in electrodynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tarasov, Vasily E.; Trujillo, Juan J.

    2013-07-15

    Electric fields in non-local media with power-law spatial dispersion are discussed. Equations involving a fractional Laplacian in the Riesz form that describe the electric fields in such non-local media are studied. The generalizations of Coulomb’s law and Debye’s screening for power-law non-local media are characterized. We consider simple models with anomalous behavior of plasma-like media with power-law spatial dispersions. The suggested fractional differential models for these plasma-like media are discussed to describe non-local properties of power-law type. -- Highlights: •Plasma-like non-local media with power-law spatial dispersion. •Fractional differential equations for electric fields in the media. •The generalizations of Coulomb’s law and Debye’s screening for the media.

  2. Distinct magnetic signatures of fractional vortex configurations in multiband superconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silva, R. M. da; Domnguez, D.; Aguiar, J. Albino

    2014-12-08

    Vortices carrying fractions of a flux quantum are predicted to exist in multiband superconductors, where vortex core can split between multiple band-specific components of the superconducting condensate. Using the two-component Ginzburg-Landau model, we examine such vortex configurations in a two-band superconducting slab in parallel magnetic field. The fractional vortices appear due to the band-selective vortex penetration caused by different thresholds for vortex entry within each band-condensate, and stabilize near the edges of the sample. We show that the resulting fractional vortex configurations leave distinct fingerprints in the static measurements of the magnetization, as well as in ac dynamic measurements of the magnetic susceptibility, both of which can be readily used for the detection of these fascinating vortex states in several existing multiband superconductors.

  3. Phenolic compounds containing/neutral fractions extract and products derived therefrom from fractionated fast-pyrolysis oils

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chum, Helena L.; Black, Stuart K.; Diebold, James P.; Kreibich, Roland E.

    1993-01-01

    A process for preparing phenol-formaldehyde novolak resins and molding compositions in which portions of the phenol normally contained in said resins are replaced by a phenol/neutral fractions extract obtained from fractionating fast-pyrolysis oils. The fractionation consists of a neutralization stage which can be carried out with aqueous solutions of bases or appropriate bases in the dry state, followed by solvent extraction with an organic solvent having at least a moderate solubility parameter and good hydrogen bonding capacity. Phenolic compounds-containing/neutral fractions extracts obtained by fractionating fast-pyrolysis oils from a lignocellulosic material, is such that the oil is initially in the pH range of 2-4, being neutralized with an aqueous bicarbonate base, and extracted into a solvent having a solubility parameter of approximately 8.4-9.11 [cal/cm.sup.3 ].sup.1/2 with polar components in the 1.8-3.0 range and hydrogen bonding components in the 2-4.8 range and the recovery of the product extract from the solvent with no further purification being needed for use in adhesives and molding compounds. The product extract is characterized as being a mixture of very different compounds having a wide variety of chemical functionalities, including phenolic, carbonyl, aldehyde, methoxyl, vinyl and hydroxyl. The use of the product extract on phenol-formaldehyde thermosetting resins is shown to have advantages over the conventional phenol-formaldehyde resins.

  4. Kinetic Isotopic Fractionation During Diffusion of Ionic Speciesin Water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richter, Frank M.; Mendybaev, Ruslan A.; Christensen, John; Hutcheon, Ian D.; Williams, Ross W.; Sturchio, Neil C.; Beloso Jr.,Abelardo D.

    2005-06-09

    Experiments specifically designed to measure the ratio of the diffusivities of ions dissolved in water were used to determine D{sub Li}/D{sub K}, D{sub 7{sub Li}}/D{sub 6{sub Li}}, D{sub 25{sub Mg}}/D{sub 24{sub Mg}}, D{sub 26{sub Mg}}/D{sub 25{sub Mg}}, and D{sub 37{sub Cl}}/D{sub 35{sub Cl}}. The measured ratio of the diffusion coefficients for Li and K in water (D{sub Li}/D{sub K} = 0.6) is in good agreement with published data, providing evidence that the experimental design being used resolves the relative mobility of ions with adequate precision to also be used for determining the fractionation of isotopes by diffusion in water. In the case of Li we found measurable isotopic fractionation associated with the diffusion of dissolved LiCl (D{sub 7{sub Li}}/D{sub 6{sub Li}} = 0.99772 {+-} 0.00026). This difference in the diffusion coefficient of {sup 7}Li compared to {sup 6}Li is significantly less than reported in an earlier study, a difference we attribute to the fact that in the earlier study Li diffused through a membrane separating the water reservoirs. Our experiments involving Mg diffusing in water found no measurable isotopic fractionation (D{sub 25{sub Mg}}/D{sub 24{sub Mg}} = 1.00003 {+-} 0.00006). Cl isotopes were fractionated during diffusion in water (D{sub 37{sub Cl}}/D{sub 35{sub Cl}} = 0.99857 {+-} 0.00080) whether or not the co-diffuser (Li or Mg) was isotopically fractionated. The isotopic fractionation associated with the diffusion of ions in water is much smaller than values we found previously for the isotopic fractionation of Li and Ca isotopes by diffusion in molten silicate liquids. A major distinction between water and silicate liquids is that water, being a polar liquid, surrounds dissolved ions with hydration shells, which very likely play an important but still poorly understood role in reducing isotopic fractionation associated with diffusion.

  5. Separation of carbon nanotubes into chirally enriched fractions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doorn, Stephen K.; Niyogi, Sandip

    2012-04-10

    A mixture of single-walled carbon nanotubes ("SWNTs") is separated into fractions of enriched chirality by preparing an aqueous suspension of a mixture of SWNTs and a surfactant, injecting a portion of the suspension on a column of separation medium having a density gradient, and centrifuging the column. In some embodiments, salt is added prior to centrifugation. In other embodiments, the centrifugation is performed at a temperature below room temperature. Fractions separate as colored bands in the column. The diameter of the separated SWNTs decreases with increasing density along the gradient of the column. The colored bands can be withdrawn separately from the column.

  6. Fractional noise destroys or induces a stochastic bifurcation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Qigui; Zeng, Caibin; Wang, Cong

    2013-12-15

    Little seems to be known about the stochastic bifurcation phenomena of non-Markovian systems. Our intention in this paper is to understand such complex dynamics by a simple system, namely, the Black-Scholes model driven by a mixed fractional Brownian motion. The most interesting finding is that the multiplicative fractional noise not only destroys but also induces a stochastic bifurcation under some suitable conditions. So it opens a possible way to explore the theory of stochastic bifurcation in the non-Markovian framework.

  7. The quantum chaos conjecture and generalized continued fractions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pustyl'nikov, L D [M.V. Keldysh Institute for Applied Mathematics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2003-04-30

    The proof of the quantum chaos conjecture is given for a class of systems including as a special case the model of a rotating particle under the action of periodic impulse perturbations. (The distribution of the distances between adjacent energy levels is close to the Poisson distribution and differs from it by terms of the third order of smallness.) The proof reduces to a result in number theory on the distribution of the distances between adjacent fractional parts of values of a polynomial, while the estimate of the remainder term is based on the new theory of generalized continued fractions for vectors.

  8. A Branch and Bound Approach for Truss Topology Design Problems with Valid Inequalities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cerveira, Adelaide; Agra, Agostinho; Bastos, Fernando; Varum, Humberto

    2010-09-30

    One of the classical problems in the structural optimization field is the Truss Topology Design Problem (TTDP) which deals with the selection of optimal configuration for structural systems for applications in mechanical, civil, aerospace engineering, among others. In this paper we consider a TTDP where the goal is to find the stiffest truss, under a given load and with a bound on the total volume. The design variables are the cross-section areas of the truss bars that must be chosen from a given finite set. This results in a large-scale non-convex problem with discrete variables. This problem can be formulated as a Semidefinite Programming Problem (SDP problem) with binary variables. We propose a branch and bound algorithm to solve this problem. In this paper it is considered a binary formulation of the problem, to take advantage of its structure, which admits a Knapsack problem as subproblem. Thus, trying to improve the performance of the Branch and Bound, at each step, some valid inequalities for the Knapsack problem are included.

  9. DUST IS FORMING ALONG THE RED GIANT BRANCH OF 47 Tuc

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Origlia, Livia; Fusi Pecci, Flavio; Rood, Robert T.; Fabbri, Sara; Ferraro, Francesco R.; Dalessandro, Emanuele; Rich, R. Michael E-mail: flavio.fusipecci@oabo.inaf.i E-mail: sara.fabbri@studio.unibo.i E-mail: emanuele.dalessandr2@unibo.i

    2010-07-20

    We present additional evidence that dust is really forming along the red giant branch (RGB) of 47 Tuc at luminosities ranging from above the horizontal branch to the RGB tip. The presence of dust had been inferred from an infrared excess in the (K - 8) color, with K measured from high spatial resolution ground-based near-IR photometry and '8' referring to Spitzer-Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) 8 {mu}m photometry. We show how (K - 8) is a far more sensitive diagnostic for detecting tiny circumstellar envelopes around warm giants than colors using only the Spitzer-IRAC bands, for example, the (3.6 - 8) color used by Boyer et al. In addition, we also show high-resolution Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys I-band images of the giant stars that have (K - 8) color excess. These images clearly demonstrate that the Boyer et al. statement that our detections of color excess associated with stars below the RGB tip arise from blends and artifacts is simply not valid.

  10. Assessment of approximate computational methods for conical intersections and branching plane vectors in organic molecules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nikiforov, Alexander; Gamez, Jose A.; Thiel, Walter; Huix-Rotllant, Miquel; Filatov, Michael

    2014-09-28

    Quantum-chemical computational methods are benchmarked for their ability to describe conical intersections in a series of organic molecules and models of biological chromophores. Reference results for the geometries, relative energies, and branching planes of conical intersections are obtained using ab initio multireference configuration interaction with single and double excitations (MRCISD). They are compared with the results from more approximate methods, namely, the state-interaction state-averaged restricted ensemble-referenced Kohn-Sham method, spin-flip time-dependent density functional theory, and a semiempirical MRCISD approach using an orthogonalization-corrected model. It is demonstrated that these approximate methods reproduce the ab initio reference data very well, with root-mean-square deviations in the optimized geometries of the order of 0.1 or less and with reasonable agreement in the computed relative energies. A detailed analysis of the branching plane vectors shows that all currently applied methods yield similar nuclear displacements for escaping the strong non-adiabatic coupling region near the conical intersections. Our comparisons support the use of the tested quantum-chemical methods for modeling the photochemistry of large organic and biological systems.

  11. Non-abelian fractional quantum hall effect for fault-resistant...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Non-abelian fractional quantum hall effect for fault-resistant topological quantum computation. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Non-abelian fractional quantum hall...

  12. Isotopic fractionation associated with [NiFe]- and [FeFe]-hydrogenases...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Isotopic fractionation associated with NiFe- and FeFe-hydrogenases Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Isotopic fractionation associated with NiFe- and ...

  13. Fractional Quantum Hall Effect at Landau Level Filling v=4/11...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Fractional Quantum Hall Effect at Landau Level Filling v411. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Fractional Quantum Hall Effect at Landau Level Filling v411. Abstract...

  14. Airborne release fractions/rates and respirable fractions for nonreactor nuclear facilities. Volume 1, Analysis of experimental data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-12-01

    This handbook contains (1) a systematic compilation of airborne release and respirable fraction experimental data for nonreactor nuclear facilities, (2) assessments of the data, and (3) values derived from assessing the data that may be used in safety analyses when the data are applicable. To assist in consistent and effective use of this information, the handbook provides: identification of a consequence determination methodology in which the information can be used; discussion of the applicability of the information and its general technical limits; identification of specific accident phenomena of interest for which the information is applicable; and examples of use of the consequence determination methodology and airborne release and respirable fraction information.

  15. Process for removing polymer-forming impurities from naphtha fraction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kowalczyk, Dennis C.; Bricklemyer, Bruce A.; Svoboda, Joseph J.

    1983-01-01

    Polymer precursor materials are vaporized without polymerization or are removed from a raw naphtha fraction by passing the raw naphtha to a vaporization zone (24) and vaporizing the naphtha in the presence of a wash oil while stripping with hot hydrogen to prevent polymer deposits in the equipment.

  16. Decay heat fractions for DFA 8213 and 4192

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kessler, S.F., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-02-06

    Decay heat fractions for FFTF driver fuel assemblies 8213 and 4192 were calculated to allow the assembly nozzles to be cut. Cutting the nozzles is required to allow the assemblies to fit in the center location of a core component container in an Interim Storage Cask.

  17. Water holding capacities of fly ashes: Effect of size fractionation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarkar, A.; Rano, R.

    2007-07-01

    Water holding capacities of fly ashes from different thermal power plants in Eastern India have been compared. Moreover, the effect of size fractionation (sieving) on the water holding capacities has also been determined. The desorption rate of water held by the fly ash fractions at ambient temperature (25-30{sup o}C) has been investigated. The effect of mixing various size fractions of fly ash in increasing the water holding capacities of fly ash has been studied. It is observed that the fly ash obtained from a thermal power plant working on stoker-fired combustor has the highest water holding capacity, followed by the one that works on pulverized fuel combustor. Fly ash collected from super thermal power plant has the least water holding capacity (40.7%). The coarser size fractions of fly ashes in general have higher water holding capacities than the finer ones. An attempt has been made to correlate the results obtained, with the potential use in agriculture.

  18. Anaerobic digestion of the liquid fraction of dairy manure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haugen, V.; Dahlberg, S.; Lindley, J.A.

    1983-06-01

    The authors tested several solid liquid separation systems suitable for processing dairy manure prior to anaerobic digestion. None of the systems tried have completely satisfied the requirements. Evaluated effects of separation on biogas production. Unseparated dairy manure produced more biogas than the liquid fraction.

  19. Process for removing polymer-forming impurities from naphtha fraction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kowalczyk, D.C.; Bricklemyer, B.A.; Svoboda, J.J.

    1983-12-27

    Polymer precursor materials are vaporized without polymerization or are removed from a raw naphtha fraction by passing the raw naphtha to a vaporization zone and vaporizing the naphtha in the presence of a wash oil while stripping with hot hydrogen to prevent polymer deposits in the equipment. 2 figs.

  20. A model experiment to assess the effects of inclusions on wave propagation in soil media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Houston, Thomas W; Ray, Richard P

    2009-01-01

    A data acquisition system has been assembled using Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) technology which provides a flexible data gathering capability to support recording accelerations at various locations within a sand filled 5 meter square test pit that has a depth extending into underlying gravelly soils. Dual-axis accelerometers weighing less than 1 gram each, made possible by advances in MEMS technology, are connected to up to 5 data acquisition (PXI modules) boards, each capable of controlling and recording data from 16 separate dual axis accelerometers. This data acquisition system is used to measure and record acceleration data from wave propagations that are generated by the impact of a hammer on a striker plate and are modified by an inclusion or occlusion buried in the soil media. Thirty-four two-axis accelerometers were placed at surface and embedded locations on either side of various inclusions buried in the test pit. This large number of accelerometers permits experimentally obtaining high quality spatial and temporal data that can describe the character of the generated wave-forms and the modification of those wave-forms caused by the inclusion. A number of differing materials and geometric forms are used to create inclusions in order to provide sufficient data to permit ascertaining the ability of the measurements to describe the character of the inclusion. Continuous Wavelet Transforms are used to remove background noise and to aid interpretation of the character of the generated wave-form.

  1. Measurement of the Branching Ratio Lambda_c+ -> p pi+ pi-

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopez-Hinojosa, Guillermo; /San Luis Potosi U.

    2008-03-01

    The confirmation of the Cabibbo-suppressed charm baryon decay mode {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} p{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} is reported. All data analyzed are from SELEX, a fixed target experiment at Fermilab that took data during 1996 and 1997, mainly with a 600 GeV/c {Sigma}{sup -} beam. The branching ratio of the Cabibbo-suppressed decay mode {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} p{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} relative to the Cabibbo-favored mode {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} pK{sup -}{pi}{sup +} is measured to be: {Gamma}({Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} p{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})/{Gamma}({Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} pK{sup -}{pi}{sup +}) = 0.103 {+-} 0.022.

  2. IS DUST FORMING ON THE RED GIANT BRANCH IN 47 Tuc?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyer, Martha L.; Gordon, Karl D.; Meixner, Margaret; Sewilo, Marta; Shiao, Bernie; Van Loon, Jacco Th.; McDonald, Iain; Babler, Brian; Bracker, Steve; Meade, Marilyn; Block, Miwa; Engelbracht, Charles; Misselt, Karl; Hora, Joe; Indebetouw, Remy; Whitney, Barbara

    2010-03-10

    Using Spitzer Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) observations from the SAGE-SMC Legacy program and archived Spitzer IRAC data, we investigate dust production in 47 Tuc, a nearby massive Galactic globular cluster. A previous study detected infrared excess, indicative of circumstellar dust, in a large population of stars in 47 Tuc, spanning the entire red giant branch (RGB). We show that those results suffered from effects caused by stellar blending and imaging artifacts and that it is likely that no stars below {approx}1 mag from the tip of the RGB are producing dust. The only stars that appear to harbor dust are variable stars, which are also the coolest and most luminous stars in the cluster.

  3. Enhancements of branch and bound methods for the maximal constraint satisfaction problem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wallace, R.J.

    1996-12-31

    Two methods are described for enhancing performance of branch and bound methods for overconstrained CSPs. These methods improve either the upper or lower bound, respectively, during search, so the two can be combined. Upper bounds are improved by using heuristic repair methods before search to find a good solution quickly, whose cost is used as the initial upper bound. The method for improving lower bounds is an extension of directed arc consistency preprocessing, used in conjunction with forward checking. After computing directed arc consistency counts, inferred counts are computed for all values based on minimum counts for values of adjacent variables that are later in the search order. This inference process can be iterated, so that counts are cascaded from the end to the beginning of the search order, to augment the initial counts. Improvements in time and effort are demonstrated for both techniques using random problems.

  4. FRACTIONATION OF LIGNOCELLULOSIC BIOMASS FOR FUEL-GRADE ETHANOL PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    F.D. Guffey; R.C. Wingerson

    2002-10-01

    PureVision Technology, Inc. (PureVision) of Fort Lupton, Colorado is developing a process for the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass into fuel-grade ethanol and specialty chemicals in order to enhance national energy security, rural economies, and environmental quality. Lignocellulosic-containing plants are those types of biomass that include wood, agricultural residues, and paper wastes. Lignocellulose is composed of the biopolymers cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. Cellulose, a polymer of glucose, is the component in lignocellulose that has potential for the production of fuel-grade ethanol by direct fermentation of the glucose. However, enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulose and raw cellulose into glucose is hindered by the presence of lignin. The cellulase enzyme, which hydrolyzes cellulose to glucose, becomes irreversibly bound to lignin. This requires using the enzyme in reagent quantities rather than in catalytic concentration. The extensive use of this enzyme is expensive and adversely affects the economics of ethanol production. PureVision has approached this problem by developing a biomass fractionator to pretreat the lignocellulose to yield a highly pure cellulose fraction. The biomass fractionator is based on sequentially treating the biomass with hot water, hot alkaline solutions, and polishing the cellulose fraction with a wet alkaline oxidation step. In September 2001 PureVision and Western Research Institute (WRI) initiated a jointly sponsored research project with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to evaluate their pretreatment technology, develop an understanding of the chemistry, and provide the data required to design and fabricate a one- to two-ton/day pilot-scale unit. The efforts during the first year of this program completed the design, fabrication, and shakedown of a bench-scale reactor system and evaluated the fractionation of corn stover. The results from the evaluation of corn stover have shown that water hydrolysis prior to

  5. Global and nonglobal parameters of horizontal-branch morphology of globular clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milone, A. P.; Marino, A. F.; Dotter, A.; Norris, J. E.; Jerjen, H.; Asplund, M. E-mail: amarino@mso.anu.edu.au E-mail: jerjen@mso.anu.edu.au; and others

    2014-04-10

    The horizontal-branch (HB) morphology of globular clusters (GCs) is mainly determined by metallicity. However, the fact that GCs with almost the same metallicity exhibit different HB morphologies demonstrates that at least one more parameter is needed to explain the HB morphology. It has been suggested that one of these should be a global parameter that varies from GC to GC and the other a nonglobal parameter that varies within the GC. In this study we provide empirical evidence corroborating this idea. We used the photometric catalogs obtained with the Advanced Camera for Surveys of the Hubble Space Telescope and analyze the color-magnitude diagrams of 74 GCs. The HB morphology of our sample of GCs has been investigated on the basis of the two new parameters L1 and L2 that measure the distance between the red giant branch and the coolest part of the HB and the color extension of the HB, respectively. We find that L1 correlates with both metallicity and age, whereas L2 most strongly correlates with the mass of the hosting GC. The range of helium abundance among the stars in a GC, characterized by ΔY and associated with the presence of multiple stellar populations, has been estimated in a few GCs to date. In these GCs we find a close relationship among ΔY, GC mass, and L2. We conclude that age and metallicity are the main global parameters, while the range of helium abundance within a GC is the main nonglobal parameter defining the HB morphology of Galactic GCs.

  6. Noncentrosymmetric salt inclusion oxides: Role of salt lattices and counter ions in bulk polarity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    West, J. Palmer; Hwu, Shiou-Jyh

    2012-11-15

    The synthesis and structural features of a newly emerged class of salt-inclusion solids (SISs) are reviewed. The descriptive chemistry with respect to the role of ionic salt and its correlation with bulk noncentrosymmetricity and polarity of the covalent oxide lattice in question is discussed by means of structure analysis. These unprecedented discoveries have opened doors to novel materials synthesis via the utilities of salt-inclusion chemistry (SIC) that are otherwise known as the molten-salt approach. The result of these investigations prove that the bulk acentricity, or cancellation of which, can be accounted for from the perspective of ionic and/or salt lattices. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Synthesis and structure of newly emerged salt-inclusion solids are reviewed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Salt lattice and its symmetry correlation with polar framework are discussed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Preservation of acentricity is accounted for from the perspective of ionic and salt lattices.

  7. Structure of FabH and factors affecting the distribution of branched fatty acids in Micrococcus luteus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pereira, Jose H.; Goh, Ee-Been; Keasling, Jay D.; Beller, Harry R.; Adams, Paul D.

    2012-10-01

    In an effort to better understand the control of the formation of branched fatty acids in Micrococcus luteus, the structure of ?-ketoacyl-ACP synthase III, which catalyzes the initial step of fatty-acid biosynthesis, has been determined. Micrococcus luteus is a Gram-positive bacterium that produces iso- and anteiso-branched alkenes by the head-to-head condensation of fatty-acid thioesters [coenzyme A (CoA) or acyl carrier protein (ACP)]; this activity is of interest for the production of advanced biofuels. In an effort to better understand the control of the formation of branched fatty acids in M. luteus, the structure of FabH (MlFabH) was determined. FabH, or ?-ketoacyl-ACP synthase III, catalyzes the initial step of fatty-acid biosynthesis: the condensation of malonyl-ACP with an acyl-CoA. Analysis of the MlFabH structure provides insights into its substrate selectivity with regard to length and branching of the acyl-CoA. The most structurally divergent region of FabH is the L9 loop region located at the dimer interface, which is involved in the formation of the acyl-binding channel and thus limits the substrate-channel size. The residue Phe336, which is positioned near the catalytic triad, appears to play a major role in branched-substrate selectivity. In addition to structural studies of MlFabH, transcriptional studies of M. luteus were also performed, focusing on the increase in the ratio of anteiso:iso-branched alkenes that was observed during the transition from early to late stationary phase. Gene-expression microarray analysis identified two genes involved in leucine and isoleucine metabolism that may explain this transition.

  8. ARM - Field Campaign - Whole Sky Imager Cloud Fraction Data

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govCampaignsWhole Sky Imager Cloud Fraction Data ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Whole Sky Imager Cloud Fraction Data 1994.01.01 - 1994.12.31 Lead Scientist : Tim Tooman Data Availability sgpwsicldcoverC1.c1.19931230.144000.asc POR028T.CCV 30 Dec 93 - 06 Jan 94 sgpwsicldcoverC1.c1.19940107.151000.asc POR029T.CCV 07 Jan 94 - 14 Jan 94 sgpwsicldcoverC1.c1.19940114.144000.asc POR030T.CCV 14

  9. The fraction of muon tracks in cosmic neutrinos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vissani, Francesco; Pagliaroli, Giulia; Villante, Francesco L. E-mail: giulia.pagliaroli@lngs.infn.it

    2013-09-01

    The study of the distintive signatures of the ultra high energy events recently seen by IceCube [1-4] can allow to single the neutrino origin out. The detection of tau neutrinos would be a clear way to prove that they come from cosmic distances, but at the highest energies currently seen, about 1 PeV, an experimental characterization of tau events is difficult. The study of the fraction of the muon tracks seems more promising. In fact, for any initial composition, because of the occurrence of flavor oscillations and despite their uncertainties, the fraction of muon tracks in the cosmic neutrinos is smaller than the one of atmospheric neutrinos, even hypothesizing an arbitrarily large contribution from charmed mesons. A good understanding of the detection efficiencies and the optimization of the analysis cuts, along with a reasonable increase in the statistics, should provide us with a significant test of the cosmic origin of these events.

  10. What could we learn from a sharply falling positron fraction?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delahaye, Timur; Kotera, Kumiko; Silk, Joseph

    2014-10-20

    Recent results from the AMS-02 data have confirmed that the cosmic-ray positron fraction increases with energy between 10 and 200 GeV. This quantity should not exceed 50%, and it is hence expected that it will either converge toward 50% or fall. We study the possibility that future data may show the positron fraction dropping down abruptly to the level expected with only secondary production, and forecast the implications of such a feature in term of possible injection mechanisms that include both dark matter and pulsars. Were a sharp steepening to be found, rather surprisingly, we conclude that pulsar models would do at least as well as dark matter scenarios in terms of accounting for any spectral cut-off.

  11. Method and apparatus for probing relative volume fractions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jandrasits, Walter G.; Kikta, Thomas J.

    1998-01-01

    A relative volume fraction probe particularly for use in a multiphase fluid system includes two parallel conductive paths defining therebetween a sample zone within the system. A generating unit generates time varying electrical signals which are inserted into one of the two parallel conductive paths. A time domain reflectometer receives the time varying electrical signals returned by the second of the two parallel conductive paths and, responsive thereto, outputs a curve of impedance versus distance. An analysis unit then calculates the area under the curve, subtracts the calculated area from an area produced when the sample zone consists entirely of material of a first fluid phase, and divides this calculated difference by the difference between an area produced when the sample zone consists entirely of material of the first fluid phase and an area produced when the sample zone consists entirely of material of a second fluid phase. The result is the volume fraction.

  12. Method and apparatus for probing relative volume fractions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jandrasits, W.G.; Kikta, T.J.

    1998-03-17

    A relative volume fraction probe particularly for use in a multiphase fluid system includes two parallel conductive paths defining therebetween a sample zone within the system. A generating unit generates time varying electrical signals which are inserted into one of the two parallel conductive paths. A time domain reflectometer receives the time varying electrical signals returned by the second of the two parallel conductive paths and, responsive thereto, outputs a curve of impedance versus distance. An analysis unit then calculates the area under the curve, subtracts the calculated area from an area produced when the sample zone consists entirely of material of a first fluid phase, and divides this calculated difference by the difference between an area produced when the sample zone consists entirely of material of the first fluid phase and an area produced when the sample zone consists entirely of material of a second fluid phase. The result is the volume fraction. 9 figs.

  13. Hadron mass corrections in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Guerrero Teran, Juan Vicente; Ethier, James J.; Accardi, Alberto; Casper, Steven W.; Melnitchouk, Wally

    2015-09-24

    We found that the spin-dependent cross sections for semi-inclusive lepton-nucleon scattering are derived in the framework of collinear factorization, including the effects of masses of the target and produced hadron at finite Q2. At leading order the cross sections factorize into products of parton distribution and fragmentation functions evaluated in terms of new, mass-dependent scaling variables. Furthermore, the size of the hadron mass corrections is estimated at kinematics relevant for current and future experiments, and the implications for the extraction of parton distributions from semi-inclusive measurements are discussed.

  14. Inclusive electron scattering at high Q/sup 2/ in the region 1 < x < 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Day, D.

    1987-01-01

    New inclusive electron scattering data at high Q/sup 2/ from nuclei taken in the x range unavailable to the free nucleon are presented. The ratios of cross section per nucleon, (4/56)d sigma/sup Fe//d sigma/sup He/, show a plateau for 1.3 < x < 2.0 which has been suggested as a signature of quark clusters in nuclei. The subtraction of the quasielastic cross section from the inclusive spectra reveals that the data scale in x at low momentum transfer. A proposal for a new experiment is discussed. 16 refs., 6 figs.

  15. Gas phase fractionation method using porous ceramic membrane

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peterson, Reid A. (Madison, WI); Hill, Jr., Charles G. (Madison, WI); Anderson, Marc A. (Madison, WI)

    1996-01-01

    Flaw-free porous ceramic membranes fabricated from metal sols and coated onto a porous support are advantageously used in gas phase fractionation methods. Mean pore diameters of less than 40 .ANG., preferably 5-20 .ANG. and most preferably about 15 .ANG., are permeable at lower pressures than existing membranes. Condensation of gases in small pores and non-Knudsen membrane transport mechanisms are employed to facilitate and increase membrane permeability and permselectivity.

  16. FRACTIONAL CRYSTALLIZATION FLOWSHEET TESTS WITH ACTUAL TANK WASTE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HERTING, D.L.

    2007-04-13

    Laboratory-scale flowsheet tests of the fractional crystallization process were conducted with actual tank waste samples in a hot cell at the 2224 Laboratory. The process is designed to separate medium-curie liquid waste into a low-curie stream for feeding to supplemental treatment and a high-curie stream for double-shell tank storage. Separations criteria (for Cesium-137 sulfate and sodium) were exceeded in all three of the flowsheet tests that were performed.

  17. FRACTIONAL CRYSTALLIZATION LABORATORY TESTING WITH INTERIM PRETREATMENT SYSTEM FEEDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HERTING DL

    2008-09-17

    The fractional crystallization process was developed as a pretreatment method for saltcake waste retrieved from Hanford single-shell tanks (SST). The process separates the retrieved SST waste into a high-level waste stream containing the bulk of the radionuclides and a low-activity waste stream containing the bulk of the nonradioactive sodium salts. The Interim Pretreatment System project shifted the focus on pretreatment planning from SST waste to double-shell tank waste.

  18. FRACTIONAL CRYSTALLIZATION FLOWSHEET TESTS WITH ACTUAL TANK WASTE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HERTING, D.L.

    2006-10-18

    Laboratory-scale flowsheet tests of the fractional crystallization process were conducted with actual tank waste samples in a hot cell at the 222-S Laboratory. The process is designed to separate medium-curie liquid waste into a low-curie stream for feeding to supplemental treatment and a high-curie stream for double-shell tank storage. Separations criteria (for Cs-137 sulfate, and sodium) were exceeded in all three of the flowsheet tests that were performed.

  19. FRACTIONAL CRYSALLIZATION LABORATORY TESTS WITH SIMULATED TANK WASTE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HERTING DL

    2007-11-29

    Results are presented for several simulated waste tests related to development of the fractional crystallization process. Product salt dissolution rates were measured to support pilot plant equipment design. Evaporation tests were performed to evaluate the effects of organics on slurry behavior and to determine optimum antifoam addition levels. A loss-of-power test was performed to support pilot plant accident scenario analysis. Envelope limit tests were done to address variations in feed composition.

  20. RECOVERY OF Pu VALUES BY FLUORINATION AND FRACTIONATION

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, H.S.; Webster, D.S.

    1959-01-20

    A method is presented for the concentration and recovery of plutonium by fluorination and fractionation. A metallic mass containing uranium and plutonium is heated to 250 C and contacted with a stream of elemental fluorine. After fluorination of the metallic mass, the rcaction products are withdrawn and subjected to a distillation treatment to separate the fluorination products of uranium and to obtain a residue containing the fluorination products of plutonium.

  1. Office of Legal Counsel U.S. Department of Justice *1 EFFECT OF APPROPRIATIONS FOR OTHER AGENCIES AND BRANCHES ON THE AUTHORITY TO

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    337, 1995 WL 917146 (O.L.C.) Office of Legal Counsel U.S. Department of Justice *1 EFFECT OF APPROPRIATIONS FOR OTHER AGENCIES AND BRANCHES ON THE AUTHORITY TO CONTINUE DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FUNCTIONS DURING THE LAPSE IN THE DEPARTMENT'S APPROPRIATIONS December 13, 1995 Where Congress has provided appropriations for the legislative branch, the Department of Justice may continue to provide testimony at hearings and perform other services related to funded functions of the legislative branch

  2. RESOLVING THE BARYON-FRACTION PROFILE IN LENSING GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leier, Dominik; Ferreras, Ignacio; Saha, Prasenjit; Falco, Emilio E.

    2011-10-20

    The study of the distribution of baryonic matter within dark halos enriches our understanding of galaxy formation. We show the radial dependence of stellar baryon-fraction curves derived for 21 lensing galaxies from the CfA-Arizona Space Telescope LEns Survey (CASTLES) by means of stellar population synthesis and pixel-based mass reconstruction. The sample covers a stellar mass range of M{sub s} {approx_equal} 2 x 10{sup 9}-3 x 10{sup 11} M{sub sun} (solar masses) which corresponds to a total enclosed mass range of M{sub L} {approx_equal} 7 x 10{sup 9}-3 x 10{sup 12} M{sub sun} on radial scales from 0.25R{sub e} to 5R{sub e} (effective radii). By examining the M{sub s} and M{sub L} dependence on radial distance to the center of each galaxy, we find that there are pairs of lenses on small to intermediate mass scales which approach at large radii the same values for their enclosed total mass but exhibit very different stellar masses and stellar baryon fractions. This peculiar behavior subsides for the most massive lensing galaxies. All the baryon-fraction profiles show that the dark matter halo overtakes the stellar content between 1.5 and 2.5R{sub e}. At 3R{sub e} most of the stellar component is enclosed. We find evidence for a stellar baryon fraction steadily declining over the full mass range. Furthermore, we shed light on the Fundamental Plane puzzle by showing that the slope of the M{sub L} (< R)-to-M{sub s} (< R) relation approaches the mass-to-light relation of recent Fundamental Plane studies at large radii. We also introduce novel concentration indices c = R90/R50 for stellar and total mass profiles (i.e., the ratio of radii enclosing 90% and 50% of the stellar or total mass). We show that the value c = 2.6 originally determined by light profiles which separates early-type galaxies from late-type galaxies also holds for stellar mass. In particular, less massive dark matter halos turn out to be influenced by the distribution of stellar matter on resolved

  3. The Carina project. VII. Toward the breaking of the age-metallicity degeneracy of red giant branch stars using the C {sub U,} {sub B,} {sub I} index

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monelli, M.; Milone, A. P.; Gallart, C.; Aparicio, A. [Instituto de Astrofsica de Canarias, Calle Via Lactea s/n, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Fabrizio, M.; Cassisi, S.; Buonanno, R. [Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica-Osservatorio Astronomico Collurania, Via M. Maggini, I-64100 Teramo (Italy); Bono, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universit di Roma Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, I-00133 Rome (Italy); Stetson, P. B. [Dominion Astrophysical Observatory, NRC-Herzberg, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC, V9E 2E7 (Canada); Walker, A. R. [Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, National Optical Astronomy Observatory, Casilla 603, La Serena (Chile); Nonino, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica-Osservatorio Astronomico di Trieste, Via G. B. Tiepolo 11, I-40131 Trieste (Italy); Dall'Ora, M. [INAFOsservatorio Astronomico di Capodimonte, Salita Moiariello 16, I-80131 Napoli (Italy); Ferraro, I.; Iannicola, G.; Pulone, L. [Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica-Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, Via Frascati 33, Monte Porzio Catone, I-00044 Rome (Italy); Thvenin, F., E-mail: monelli@iac.es [Universit de Nice Sophia-antipolis, CNRS, Observatoire de la Cte d'Azur, Laboratoire Lagrange, BP 4229, F-06304 Nice (France)

    2014-12-01

    We present an analysis of photometric and spectroscopic data of the Carina dSph galaxy, testing a new approach similar to that used to disentangle multiple populations in Galactic globular clusters (GCs). We show that a proper color combination is able to separate a significant fraction of the red giant branch (RGB) of the two main Carina populations (the old one, ?12 Gyr, and the intermediate-age one, 4-8 Gyr). In particular, the c {sub U,} {sub B,} {sub I} = (U B) (B I) pseudo-color allows us to follow the RGB of both populations along a relevant portion of the RGB. We find that the oldest stars have a more negative c {sub U,} {sub B,} {sub I} pseudo-color than intermediate-age ones. We correlate the pseudo-color of RGB stars with their chemical properties, finding a significant trend between the iron content and the c {sub U,} {sub B,} {sub I}. Stars belonging to the old population are systematically more metal-poor ([Fe/H] =2.32 0.08 dex) than the intermediate-age ones ([Fe/H] =1.82 0.03 dex). This gives solid evidence of the chemical evolution history of this galaxy, and we have a new diagnostic that can allow us to break the age-metallicity degeneracy of H-burning advanced evolutionary phases. We compared the distribution of stars in the c {sub U,} {sub B,} {sub I} plane with theoretical isochrones, finding that no satisfactory agreement can be reached with models developed in a theoretical framework based on standard heavy element distributions. Finally, we discuss possible systematic differences when compared with multiple populations in GCs.

  4. The identification of extreme asymptotic giant branch stars and red supergiants in M33 with 24 μm variability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montiel, Edward J.; Clayton, Geoffrey C.; Johnson, Christopher B.; Srinivasan, Sundar; Engelbracht, Charles W.

    2015-02-01

    We present the first detection of 24 μm variability in 24 sources in the Local Group galaxy M33. These results are based on 4 epochs of Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer observations, which are irregularly spaced over ∼750 days. We find that these sources are constrained exclusively to the Holmberg radius of the galaxy, which increases their chances of being members of M33. We have constructed spectral energy distributions (SEDs) ranging from the optical to the submillimeter to investigate the nature of these objects. We find that 23 of our objects are most likely heavily self-obscured, evolved stars, while the remaining source is the Giant H ii region, NGC 604. We believe that the observed variability is the intrinsic variability of the central star reprocessed through their circumstellar dust shells. Radiative transfer modeling was carried out to determine their likely chemical composition, luminosity, and dust production rate (DPR). As a sample, our modeling has determined an average luminosity of (3.8±0.9)×10{sup 4} L{sub ⊙} and a total DPR of (2.3±0.1)×10{sup −5} M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1}. Most of the sources, given the high DPRs and short wavelength obscuration, are likely extreme asymptotic giant branch (XAGB) stars. Five of the sources are found to have luminosities above the classical AGB limit (M{sub bol} <−7.1 mag, L > 54,000 L{sub ⊙}), which classifies them as probable red supergiants (RSGs). Almost all of the sources are classified as oxygen-rich. As also seen in the LMC, a significant fraction of the dust in M33 is produced by a handful of XAGB and RSG stars.

  5. Evolution of the Geysers (US) - Data From Fluid-Inclusion Microthermometry and Gas Geochemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, J.N.; Hulen, J.B.; Norman, D.I.

    1995-01-01

    The Geysers, California, is the site of an active hydrothermal system that initially developed between about 1.5 and 2 Ma in response to intrusion of a hypabyssal granitic pluton. Mineralogic and fluid-inclusion data demonstrate that the present vapor-dominated regime evolved from an earlier and more extensive, liquid-dominated hydrothermal system. Circulation of these early fluids produced veins characterized by tourmaline and/or biotite {+-} actinolite {+-} clinopyroxene within the pluton and adjacent biotite-rich hornfels, actinolite {+-} ferroaxinite {+-} epidote, and epidote {+-} chlorite {+-} wairakite within the intermediate parts of the thermal system, and calcite in the outer parts. Potassium feldspar and quartz are present in all assemblages. Maximum pressure-corrected homogenization temperatures and apparent salinities of fluid-inclusions in these veins range from 440 C and 44 weight percent NaCl equivalent within the hornfels (<600 m from the pluton) to 325 C and 5 weight percent NaCl equivalent at approximately 1500 m from the intrusion. We suggest that the shallow, moderate-salinity fluids are crustal waters modified by water-rock interactions and that the high-salinity fluids are magmatic brines. The formation of vapor-dominated conditions is reflected in the abrupt appearance of low salinity (0.0 to 0.4 weight percent NaCl equivalent) fluid inclusions with homogenization temperatures near 265 C. These inclusion fluids are thought to represent steam condensate formed as the liquid-dominated system boiled off.

  6. Field-Flow Fractionation of Carbon Nanotubes and Related Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John P. Selegue

    2011-11-17

    During the grant period, we carried out FFF studies of carbonaceous soot, single-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotubes, carbon nano-onions and polyoxometallates. FFF alone does not provide enough information to fully characterize samples, so our suite of characterization techniques grew to include light scattering (especially Photon Correlation Spectroscopy), scanning and transmission electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis and spectroscopic methods. We developed convenient techniques to deposit and examine minute FFF fractions by electron microscopy. In collaboration with Arthur Cammers (University of Kentucky), we used Flow Field-Flow Fractionation (Fl-FFF) to monitor the solution-phase growth of keplerates, a class of polyoxometallate (POM) nanoparticles. We monitored the evolution of Mo-POM nanostructures over the course of weeks by by using flow field-flow fractionation and corroborated the nanoparticle structures by using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Total molybdenum in the solution and precipitate phases was monitored by using inductively coupled plasma analyses, and total Mo-POM concentration by following the UV-visible spectra of the solution phase. We observe crystallization-driven formation of (Mo132) keplerate and solution phase-driven evolution of structurally related nanoscopic species (3-60 nm). FFF analyses of other classes of materials were less successful. Attempts to analyze platelets of layered materials, including exfoliated graphite (graphene) and TaS2 and MoS2, were disappointing. We were not able to optimize flow conditions for the layered materials. The metal sulfides react with the aqueous carrier liquid and settle out of suspension quickly because of their high density.

  7. The sixteen channel CAMAC constant fraction discriminator for APEX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maier, M.R. ); Robertson, M. ); Wolfs, F.L.H.; Perera, P.A.A. . Nuclear Structure Research Lab.)

    1991-11-01

    We report on the construction and the performance of a sixteen channel constant fraction discriminator (CFD) for the Atlas Positron Experiment (APEX). We have used an integrated circuit (IC), recently introduced commercially, which contains all the electronic building blocks needed to construct a CFD. We have placed 16 channels of CFD into a CAMAC module. An important feature is the time to charge converter (TQC) that we have included for every CFD channel. Its calibration constant is controlled via CAMAC. The TQC allows the use charge sensitive analog to digital converters (QDC) for timing measurements. Results for CFD walk, resolution and crosstalk as well as for TQC linearity will be presented.

  8. PREPRINT QUASIPARTICLE AGGREGATION I N THE FRACTIONAL QUANTUM HALL EFFECT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    91618 PREPRINT QUASIPARTICLE AGGREGATION I N THE FRACTIONAL QUANTUM HALL EFFECT R. B. Laughlin This paper was prepared for submittal to the Proceedings of the 17th International Conference on the Physics of Semi conductors San Francisco, California August 6-10, 1984 October 10, 1984 This is a preprint of a paper intended for publication in a journal or proceedings. Since changes may be made before publication, this preprint is made available with the un- derstanding that it will not be cited or

  9. Vortex equations governing the fractional quantum Hall effect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Medina, Luciano

    2015-09-15

    An existence theory is established for a coupled non-linear elliptic system, known as “vortex equations,” describing the fractional quantum Hall effect in 2-dimensional double-layered electron systems. Via variational methods, we prove the existence and uniqueness of multiple vortices over a doubly periodic domain and the full plane. In the doubly periodic situation, explicit sufficient and necessary conditions are obtained that relate the size of the domain and the vortex numbers. For the full plane case, existence is established for all finite-energy solutions and exponential decay estimates are proved. Quantization phenomena of the magnetic flux are found in both cases.

  10. HORIZONTAL BRANCH MORPHOLOGY AND MULTIPLE STELLAR POPULATIONS IN THE ANOMALOUS GLOBULAR CLUSTER M 22

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marino, A. F.; Milone, A. P.; Lind, K. E-mail: milone@iac.es

    2013-05-01

    M 22 is an anomalous globular cluster that hosts two groups of stars with different metallicity and s-element abundance. The star-to-star light-element variations in both groups, with the presence of individual Na-O and C-N anticorrelations, demonstrates that this Milky Way satellite has experienced a complex star formation history. We have analyzed FLAMES/UVES spectra for seven stars covering a small color interval on the reddest horizontal branch (HB) portion of this cluster and investigated possible relations between the chemical composition of a star and its location along the HB. Our chemical abundance analysis takes into account effects introduced by deviations from the local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE effects), which are significant for the measured spectral lines in the atmospheric parameters range spanned by our stars. We find that all the analyzed stars are barium-poor and sodium-poor, thus supporting the idea that the position of a star along the HB is strictly related to the chemical composition, and that the HB morphology is influenced by the presence of different stellar populations.

  11. METALLICITY AND KINEMATIC DISTRIBUTIONS OF RED HORIZONTAL-BRANCH STARS FROM THE SDSS SURVEY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Y. Q.; Zhao, G.; Zhao, J. K.; Xue, X. X.; Schuster, W. J. E-mail: schuster@astrosen.unam.m

    2010-08-15

    On the basis of a recently derived color-metallicity relation and stellar parameters from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 spectroscopic survey, a large sample of red horizontal-branch (RHB) candidates have been selected to serve as standard candles. The metallicity and kinematic distributions of these stars indicate that they mainly originate from the thick-disk and the halo populations. The typical thick disk is characterized by the first group peaking at [Fe/H] {approx} -0.6, V{sub rot} {approx} 170 km s{sup -1} with a vertical scale height around |Z| {approx} 1.2 kpc, while stars with [Fe/H] < -0.9 are dominated by the halo population. Two sub-populations of the halo are suggested by the RHB stars peaking at [Fe/H] {approx} -1.3: one component with V{sub rot} > 0 km s{sup -1} (Halo I) shows a sign of metallicity gradient in the [Fe/H] versus |Z| diagram, while the other with V{sub rot} < 0 km s{sup -1} (Halo II) does not. The Halo I mainly clumps at the inner halo with R < 10 kpc and the Halo II comes both from the inner halo with R < 10 kpc and the outer halo with R > 10 kpc based on the star distribution in the R versus |Z| diagram.

  12. FLUORINE IN THE SOLAR NEIGHBORHOOD: IS IT ALL PRODUCED IN ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH STARS?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jnsson, H.; Ryde, N. [Lund Observatory, Department of Astronomy and Theoretical Physics, Lund University, Box 43, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Harper, G. M. [School of Physics, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Richter, M. J. [Physics Department, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Hinkle, K. H., E-mail: henrikj@astro.lu.se [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box 26732, Tucson, AZ 85726 (United States)

    2014-07-10

    The origin of ''cosmic'' fluorine is uncertain, but there are three proposed production sites/mechanisms for the origin: asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, ? nucleosynthesis in Type II supernovae, and/or the winds of Wolf-Rayet stars. The relative importance of these production sites has not been established even for the solar neighborhood, leading to uncertainties in stellar evolution models of these stars as well as uncertainties in the chemical evolution models of stellar populations. We determine the fluorine and oxygen abundances in seven bright, nearby giants with well determined stellar parameters. We use the 2.3 ?m vibrational-rotational HF line and explore a pure rotational HF line at 12.2 ?m. The latter has never been used before for an abundance analysis. To be able to do this, we have calculated a line list for pure rotational HF lines. We find that the abundances derived from the two diagnostics agree. Our derived abundances are well reproduced by chemical evolution models including only fluorine production in AGB stars and, therefore, we draw the conclusion that this might be the main production site of fluorine in the solar neighborhood. Furthermore, we highlight the advantages of using the 12 ?m HF lines to determine the possible contribution of the ? process to the fluorine budget at low metallicities where the difference between models including and excluding this process is dramatic.

  13. Field studies of streamflow generation using natural and injected tracers on Bickford and Walker Branch Watersheds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Genereux, D.; Hemond, H. . Dept. of Civil Engineering); Mulholland, P. )

    1992-05-01

    Field studies of streamflow generation were undertaken on two forested watersheds, the West Road subcatchment of Bickford Watershed in central Massachusetts and the West Fork of Walker Branch Watershed in eastern Tennessee. A major component of the research was development of a two-stage methodology for the use of naturally-occurring {sup 222}Rn as a tracer. The first of the two stages was solving a mass-balance equation for {sup 222}Rn around a stream reach of interest in order to calculate Rn{sub q}, the {sup 222}Rn content of the lateral inflow to the reach; a conservative tracer (chloride) and a volatile tracer (propane) were injected into the study stream to account for lateral inflow to, and volatilization from, the study reach. The second stage involved quantitative comparison of Rn{sub q} to the measured {sup 222}Rn concentrations of different subsurface waters in order to assess how important these waters were in contributing lateral inflow to the stream reach.

  14. Infrared tip of the red giant branch and distances to the MAFFEI/IC 342 group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Po-Feng; Tully, R. Brent; Jacobs, Bradley A.; Rizzi, Luca; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Karachentsev, Igor D.

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, we extend the use of the tip of the red giant branch (TRGB) method to near-infrared wavelengths from the previously used I-band, using the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3). Upon calibration of a color dependency of the TRGB magnitude, the IR TRGB yields a random uncertainty of ∼5% in relative distance. The IR TRGB methodology has an advantage over the previously used Advance Camera for Surveys F606W and F814W filter set for galaxies that suffer from severe extinction. Using the IR TRGB methodology, we obtain distances toward three principal galaxies in the Maffei/IC 342 complex, which are located at low Galactic latitudes. New distance estimates using the TRGB method are 3.45{sub −0.13}{sup +0.13} Mpc for IC 342, 3.37{sub −0.23}{sup +0.32} Mpc for Maffei 1, and 3.52{sub −0.30}{sup +0.32} Mpc for Maffei 2. The uncertainties are dominated by uncertain extinction, especially for Maffei 1 and Maffei 2. Our IR calibration demonstrates the viability of the TRGB methodology for observations with the James Webb Space Telescope.

  15. DOUBLE HORIZONTAL BRANCHES IN NGC 6440 AND NGC 6569 UNVEILED BY THE VVV SURVEY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mauro, Francesco; Bidin, Christian Moni; Cohen, Roger; Geisler, Doug; Chene, Andre-Nicolas; Villanova, Sandro; Minniti, Dante; Catelan, Marcio

    2012-12-20

    We report the discovery of a peculiar horizontal branch (HB) in NGC 6440 and NGC 6569, two massive and metal-rich Galactic globular clusters (GGCs) located in the Galactic bulge, within 4 kpc from the Galactic center. In both clusters, two distinct clumps are detected at the level of the cluster HB, separated by only {approx}0.1 mag in the K{sub s} band. They were detected with IR photometric data collected with the 'VISTA Variables in the Via Lactea' Survey, and confirmed in independent IR catalogs available in the literature and Hubble Space Telescope optical photometry. Our analysis demonstrates that these clumps are real cluster features, not a product of field contamination or interstellar reddening. The observed split HBs could be a signature of two stellar sub-populations with different chemical composition and/or age, as recently found in Terzan 5, but it cannot be excluded that they are caused by evolutionary effects, in particular for NGC 6440. This interpretation, however, requires an anomalously high helium content (Y > 0.30). Our discovery suggests that such a peculiar HB morphology could be a common feature of massive, metal-rich bulge GGCs.

  16. A massively parallel fractional step solver for incompressible flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Houzeaux, G. Vazquez, M. Aubry, R. Cela, J.M.

    2009-09-20

    This paper presents a parallel implementation of fractional solvers for the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations using an algebraic approach. Under this framework, predictor-corrector and incremental projection schemes are seen as sub-classes of the same class, making apparent its differences and similarities. An additional advantage of this approach is to set a common basis for a parallelization strategy, which can be extended to other split techniques or to compressible flows. The predictor-corrector scheme consists in solving the momentum equation and a modified 'continuity' equation (namely a simple iteration for the pressure Schur complement) consecutively in order to converge to the monolithic solution, thus avoiding fractional errors. On the other hand, the incremental projection scheme solves only one iteration of the predictor-corrector per time step and adds a correction equation to fulfill the mass conservation. As shown in the paper, these two schemes are very well suited for massively parallel implementation. In fact, when compared with monolithic schemes, simpler solvers and preconditioners can be used to solve the non-symmetric momentum equations (GMRES, Bi-CGSTAB) and to solve the symmetric continuity equation (CG, Deflated CG). This gives good speedup properties of the algorithm. The implementation of the mesh partitioning technique is presented, as well as the parallel performances and speedups for thousands of processors.

  17. Exposure to motor vehicle emissions: An intake fraction approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marshall, Julian D.

    2002-05-01

    Motor vehicles are a significant source of population exposure to air pollution. Focusing on California's South Coast Air Basin as a case study, the author combines ambient monitoring station data with hourly time-activity patterns to determine the population intake of motor vehicle emissions during 1996-1999. Three microenvironments are considered wherein the exposure to motor vehicle emissions is higher than in ambient air: in and near vehicles, inside a building that is near a freeway, and inside a residence with an attached garage. Total motor vehicle emissions are taken from the EMFAC model. The 15 million people in the South Coast inhale 0.0048% of primary, nonreactive compounds emitted into the basin by motor vehicles. Intake of motor vehicle emissions is 46% higher than the average ambient concentration times the average breathing rate, because of microenvironments and because of temporal and spatial correlation among breathing rates, concentrations, and population densities. Intake fraction (iF) summarizes the emissions-to-intake relationship as the ratio of population intake to total emissions. iF is a population level exposure metric that incorporates spatial, temporal, and interindividual variability in exposures. iFs can facilitate the calculation of population exposures by distilling complex emissions-transport-receptor relationships. The author demonstrates this point by predicting the population intake of various primary gaseous emissions from motor vehicles, based on the intake fraction for benzene and carbon monoxide.

  18. Aqueous fractionation of biomass based on novel carbohydrate hydrolysis kinetics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Torget, Robert W.

    2001-01-01

    A multi-function process for hydrolysis and fractionation of lignocellulosic biomass to separate hemicellulosic sugars from other biomass components comprising extractives and proteins; a portion of a solubilized lignin; cellulose; glucose derived from cellulose; and insoluble lignin from said biomass comprising: a) introducing either solid fresh biomass or partially fractioned lignocellulosic biomass material with entrained acid or water into a reactor and heating to a temperature of up to about 185.degree. C.-205.degree. C. b) allowing the reaction to proceed to a point where about 60% of the hemicellulose has been hydrolyzed in the case of water or complete dissolution in case of acid; c) adding a dilute acid liquid at a pH below about 5 at a temperature of up to about 205.degree. C. for a period ranging from about 5 to about 10 minutes; to hydrolyze the remaining 40% of hemicellulose if water is used. d) quenching the reaction at a temperature of up to about 140.degree. C. to quench all degradation and hydrolysis reactions; and e) introducing into said reaction chamber and simultaneously removing from said reaction chamber, a volumetric flow rate of dilute acid at a temperature of up to about 140.degree. C. to wash out the majority of the solubilized biomass components, to obtain improved hemicellosic sugar yields.

  19. A Refractory Inclusion Returned by Stardust from Comet 81P/Wild 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simon, S B; Joswiak, D J; Ishii, H A; Bradley, J P; Chi, M; Grossman, L; Al?on, J; Brownlee, D E; Fallon, S; Hutcheon, I D; Matrajt, G; McKeegan, K D

    2008-05-20

    Among the samples returned from comet 81P/Wild 2 by the Stardust spacecraft is a suite of particles from one impact track (Track 25) that are Ca-, Al-rich and FeO-free. We studied three particles from this track that range in size from 5.3 x 3.2 {micro}m to 15 x 10 {micro}m. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy show that they consist of very fine-grained (from {approx}0.5 to {approx}2 {micro}m) Al-rich, Ti-bearing and Ti-free clinopyroxene, Mg-Al spinel, anorthite, perovskite, and osbornite (TiN). In addition to these phases, the terminal particle, named 'Inti', also contains melilite. All of these phases, with the exception of osbornite, are common in refractory inclusions and are predicted to condense at high temperature from a gas of solar composition. Osbornite, though very rare, has also been found in meteoritic refractory inclusions, and could have formed in a region of the nebula where carbon became enriched relative to oxygen compared to solar composition. Compositions of Ti-pyroxene in Inti are similar, but not identical, to those of fassaite from Allende inclusions. Electron energy loss spectroscopy shows that Ti-rich pyroxene in Inti has Ti{sup 3+}/Ti{sup 4+} within the range of typical meteoritic fassaite, consistent with formation under reducing conditions comparable to those of a system of solar composition. Inti is {sup 16}O-rich, with {delta}{sup 18}O {approx} {delta}{sup 17}O {approx} 40{per_thousand}, like unaltered phases in refractory inclusions and refractory IDPs. With grain sizes, mineralogy, mineral chemistry, and an oxygen isotopic composition like those of refractory inclusions, we conclude that Inti is a refractory inclusion that formed in the inner solar nebula. Identification of a particle that formed in the inner Solar System among the comet samples demonstrates that there was transport of materials from the inner to the outer nebula, probably either in a bipolar outflow or by turbulence.

  20. Inclusive search for a vector-like T quark with charge $$\\frac{2}{3}$$ in pp collisions at $$\\sqrt{s}$$ = 8 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2014-01-08

    A search is performed for a massive new vector-like quark T, with charge 2/3, that is pair produced together with its antiparticle in proton-proton collisions. The data were collected by the CMS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider in 2012 at sqrt(s) = 8 TeV and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 19.5 inverse femtobarns. The T quark is assumed to decay into three different final states, bW, tZ, and tH. The search is carried out using events with at least one isolated lepton. No deviations from standard model expectations are observed, and lower limits are set on the Tmore » quark mass at 95% confidence level. The lower limit lies between 687 and 782 GeV for all possible values of the branching fractions into the three different final states assuming strong production. These limits are the most stringent constraints to date on the existence of such a quark.« less

  1. Process for preparing phenolic formaldehyde resole resin products derived from fractionated fast-pyrolysis oils

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chum, Helena L.; Kreibich, Roland E.

    1992-01-01

    A process for preparing phenol-formaldehyde resole resins and adhesive compositions in which portions of the phenol normally contained in said resins are replaced by a phenol/neutral fractions extract obtained from fractionating fast-pyrolysis oils.

  2. The core mass growth and stellar lifetime of thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch stars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalirai, Jason S.; Tremblay, Pier-Emmanuel; Marigo, Paola E-mail: paola.marigo@unipd.it

    2014-02-10

    We establish new constraints on the intermediate-mass range of the initial-final mass relation, and apply the results to study the evolution of stars on the thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB). These constraints derive from newly discovered (bright) white dwarfs in the nearby Hyades and Praesepe star clusters, including a total of 18 high signal-to-noise ratio measurements with progenitor masses of M {sub initial} = 2.8-3.8 M {sub ?}. We also include a new analysis of existing white dwarfs in the older NGC 6819 and NGC 7789 star clusters, M {sub initial} = 1.6 and 2.0 M {sub ?}. Over this range of initial masses, stellar evolutionary models for metallicity Z {sub initial} = 0.02 predict the maximum growth of the core of TP-AGB stars. By comparing the newly measured remnant masses to the robust prediction of the core mass at the first thermal pulse on the AGB (i.e., from stellar interior models), we establish several findings. First, we show that the stellar core mass on the AGB grows rapidly from 10% to 30% for stars with M {sub initial} = 1.6 to 2.0 M {sub ?}. At larger masses, the core-mass growth decreases steadily to ?10% at M {sub initial} = 3.4 M {sub ?}, after which there is a small hint of a upturn out to M {sub initial} = 3.8 M {sub ?}. These observations are in excellent agreement with predictions from the latest TP-AGB evolutionary models in Marigo et al. We also compare to models with varying efficiencies of the third dredge-up and mass loss, and demonstrate that the process governing the growth of the core is largely the stellar wind, while the third dredge-up plays a secondary, but non-negligible role. Based on the new white dwarf measurements, we perform an exploratory calibration of the most popular mass-loss prescriptions in the literature, as well as of the third dredge-up efficiency as a function of the stellar mass. Finally, we estimate the lifetime and the integrated luminosity of stars on the TP-AGB to peak at t ? 3 Myr and E

  3. Variation of the Side Chain Branch Position Leads to Vastly Improved Molecular Weight and OPV Performance in 4,8-dialkoxybenzo[1,2-b:4,5-b′]dithiophene/2,1,3-benzothiadiazole Copolymers

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Coffin, Robert C.; MacNeill, Christopher M.; Peterson, Eric D.; Ward, Jeremy W.; Owen, Jack W.; McLellan, Claire A.; Smith, Gregory M.; Noftle, Ronald E.; Jurchescu, Oana D.; Carroll, David L.

    2011-01-01

    Tmore » hrough manipulation of the solubilizing side chains, we were able to dramatically improve the molecular weight ( M w ) of 4,8-dialkoxybenzo[1,2- b :4,5- b ′ ]dithiophene (BDT)/2,1,3-benzothiadiazole (BT) copolymers. When dodecyl side chains ( P1 ) are employed at the 4- and 8-positions of the BDT unit, we obtain a chloroform-soluble copolymer fraction with M w of 6.3 kg/mol. Surprisingly, by moving to the commonly employed 2-ethylhexyl branch ( P2 ), M w decreases to 3.4 kg/mol.his is despite numerous reports that this side chain increases solubility and M w . By moving the ethyl branch in one position relative to the polymer backbone (1-ethylhexyl, P3 ), M w is dramatically increased to 68.8 kg/mol. As a result of this M w increase, the shape of the absorption profile is dramatically altered, with λ max = 637 nm compared with 598 nm for P1 and 579 nm for P2 .he hole mobility as determined by thin film transistor (TFT) measurements is improved from ~ 1 × 10 − 6  cm 2 /Vs for P1 and P2 to 7 × 10 − 4  cm 2 /Vs for P3 , while solar cell power conversion efficiency in increased to 2.91 % for P3 relative to 0.31 % and 0.19 % for P1 and P2 , respectively.« less

  4. Duodenal Toxicity After Fractionated Chemoradiation for Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelly, Patrick; Das, Prajnan; Pinnix, Chelsea C.; Beddar, Sam; Briere, Tina; Pham, Mary; Krishnan, Sunil; Delclos, Marc E.; Crane, Christopher H.

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: Improving local control is critical to improving survival and quality of life for patients with locally advanced unresectable pancreatic cancer (LAPC). However, previous attempts at radiation dose escalation have been limited by duodenal toxicity. In order to guide future studies, we analyzed the clinical and dosimetric factors associated with duodenal toxicity in patients undergoing fractionated chemoradiation for LAPC. Methods and Materials: Medical records and treatment plans of 106 patients with LAPC who were treated with chemoradiation between July 2005 and June 2010 at our institution were reviewed. All patients received neoadjuvant and concurrent chemotherapy. Seventy-eight patients were treated with conventional radiation to 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions; 28 patients received dose-escalated radiation therapy (range, 57.5-75.4 Gy in 28-39 fractions). Treatment-related toxicity was graded according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.0. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to assess prognostic influence of clinical, pathologic, and treatment-related factors by using Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression methods. Results: Twenty patients had treatment-related duodenal toxicity events, such as duodenal inflammation, ulceration, and bleeding. Four patients had grade 1 events, 8 had grade 2, 6 had grade 3, 1 had grade 4, and 1 had grade 5. On univariate analysis, a toxicity grade ≥2 was associated with tumor location, low platelet count, an absolute volume (cm{sup 3}) receiving a dose of at least 55 Gy (V{sub 55} {sub Gy} > 1 cm{sup 3}), and a maximum point dose >60 Gy. Of these factors, only V{sub 55} {sub Gy} ≥1 cm{sup 3} was associated with duodenal toxicity on multivariate analysis (hazard ratio, 6.7; range, 2.0-18.8; P=.002). Conclusions: This study demonstrates that a duodenal V{sub 55} {sub Gy} >1 cm{sup 3} is an important dosimetric predictor of grade 2 or greater duodenal toxicity and establishes it as a

  5. Do Coupled Climate Models Correctly SImulate the Upward Branch of the Deept Ocean Global Conveyor?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarmiento, Jorge L; Downes, Stephanie; Bianchi, Daniele

    2013-01-17

    The large-scale meridional overturning circulation (MOC) connects the deep ocean, a major reservoir of carbon, to the other components of the climate system and must therefore be accurately represented in Earth System Models. Our project aims to address the specific question of the pathways and mechanisms controlling the upwelling branch of the MOC, a subject of significant disagreement between models and observational syntheses, and among general circulation models. Observations of these pathways are limited, particularly in regions of complex hydrography such as the Southern Ocean. As such, we rely on models to examine theories of the overturning circulation, both physically and biogeochemically. This grant focused on a particular aspect of the meridional overturning circulation (MOC) where there is currently significant disagreement between models and observationally based analyses of the MOC, and amongst general circulation models. In particular, the research focused on addressing the following questions: 1. Where does the deep water that sinks in the polar regions rise to the surface? 2. What processes are responsible for this rise? 3. Do state-of-the-art coupled GCMs capture these processes? Our research had three key components: observational synthesis, model development and model analysis. In this final report we outline the key results from these areas of research for the 2007 to 2012 grant period. The research described here was carried out primarily by graduate student, Daniele Bianchi (now a Postdoc at McGill University, Canada), and Postdoc Stephanie Downes (now a Research Fellow at The Australian national University, Australia). Additional support was provided for programmers Jennifer Simeon as well as Rick Slater.

  6. Structural- and optical-property characterization of three-dimensional branched ZnO nanospikes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chia, M.Y.; Chiu, W.S.; Daud, S.N.H.; Khiew, P.S.; Radiman, S.; Abd-Shukor, R.; Hamid, M.A.A.

    2015-08-15

    Current study reports the synthesis of three-dimensional (3-D) ZnO nanospikes with anomalous optical property, where zinc stearate is adopted as a safe, common and low-cost precursor that undergoes thermal pyrolysis under non-hydrolytic approach. High resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) result show that the as-synthesized 3-D ZnO nanospikes are constructed by bundle of nanorods that sprout radially outwards in random orientation. The possible growth mechanism is discussed by referring to the microscopy results. X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern confirms that the nanospikes are highly crystalline, which existed in hexagonal wurtzite crystal structure. Optical absorption characterization shows that the onset absorption for the nanospikes is slightly red-shifted if compared to commercial ZnO and the corresponding bandgap energy is estimated to be 3.1 eV. The photoluminescene (PL) result of ZnO nanospikes indicate that its optical emission exhibits weak UV emission but very intense visible-light emission that ranged from green- up to red-region. The factors that contributed to the intriguing PL characteristic are discussed. Current finding would offer a versatile synthesis scheme in engineering advanced nanostructures with new design that exhibit congruent optical property. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Pyrolysis of zinc stearate in synthesizing 3-D ZnO nanospikes • ZnO nanospikes possess bundle of nanorods that sprout out from the hexagonal stump • Growth mechanism is deduced to elucidate the morphological evolution from nanobullet to nanospike with branching topology • PL spectrum indicate that the nanospike exhibit prominent visible-light emission that ranged from green- to red-region.

  7. Electron-capture supernovae of super-asymptotic giant branch stars and the Crab supernova 1054

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nomoto, Ken'ichi [Kavli Institute for Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Tominaga, Nozomu [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Konan University, 8-9-1 Okamoto, Kobe, Hyogo 658-8501, Japan and Kavli Institute for Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Blinnikov, Sergei I. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics (ITEP), Moscow 117218, Russia and Kavli Institute for Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan)

    2014-05-02

    An electron-capture supernova (ECSN) is a core-collapse supernova explosion of a super-asymptotic giant branch (SAGB) star with a main-sequence mass M{sub Ms} ? 7 - 9.5M{sub ?}. The explosion takes place in accordance with core bounce and subsequent neutrino heating and is a unique example successfully produced by first-principle simulations. This allows us to derive a first self-consistent multicolor light curves of a core-collapse supernova. Adopting the explosion properties derived by the first-principle simulation, i.e., the low explosion energy of 1.5 10{sup 50} erg and the small {sup 56}Ni mass of 2.5 10{sup ?3} M{sub ?}, we perform a multigroup radiation hydrodynamics calculation of ECSNe and present multicolor light curves of ECSNe of SAGB stars with various envelope mass and hydrogen abundance. We demonstrate that a shock breakout has peak luminosity of L ? 2 10{sup 44} erg s{sup ?1} and can evaporate circumstellar dust up to R ? 10{sup 17} cm for a case of carbon dust, that plateau luminosity and plateau duration of ECSNe are L ? 10{sup 42} erg s{sup ?1} and {sup t} ? 60 - 100 days, respectively, and that a plateau is followed by a tail with a luminosity drop by ? 4 mag. The ECSN shows a bright and short plateau that is as bright as typical Type II plateau supernovae, and a faint tail that might be influenced by spin-down luminosity of a newborn pulsar. Furthermore, the theoretical models are compared with ECSN candidates: SN 1054 and SN 2008S. We find that SN 1054 shares the characteristics of the ECSNe. For SN 2008S, we find that its faint plateau requires a ECSN model with a significantly low explosion energy of E ? 10{sup 48} erg.

  8. HANFORD MEDIUM-LOW CURIE WASTE PRETREATMENT ALTERNATIVES PROJECT FRACTIONAL CRYSTALLIZATION PILOT SCALE TESTING FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HERTING DL

    2008-09-16

    The Fractional Crystallization Pilot Plant was designed and constructed to demonstrate that fractional crystallization is a viable way to separate the high-level and low-activity radioactive waste streams from retrieved Hanford single-shell tank saltcake. The focus of this report is to review the design, construction, and testing details of the fractional crystallization pilot plant not previously disseminated.

  9. CC-inclusive cross section measured with the T2K near detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weber, Alfons

    2015-05-15

    T2K has performed the first measurement of muon neutrino inclusive charged current interactions on carbon at neutrino energies of ?1 GeV where the measurement is reported as a flux-averaged double differential cross section in muon momentum and angle. The flux is predicted by the beam Monte Carlo and external data, including the results from the NA61/SHINE experiment. The data used for this measurement were taken in 2010 and 2011, with a total of 1.08*10{sup 20} protons-on-target. The analysis is performed on 4485 inclusive charged current interaction candidates selected in the most upstream fine-grained scintillator detector of the near detector. The flux-averaged total cross section is = (6.910.13(stat)0.84(syst)) 10{sup ?39} cm{sup 2}/nucleon for a mean neutrino energy of 0.85 GeV.

  10. Cupric oxide inclusions in cuprous oxide crystals grown by the floating zone method

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Frazer, Laszlo; Chang, Kelvin B.; Poeppelmeier, Kenneth R.; Ketterson, John B.

    2015-05-08

    Phase-pure cuprous oxide (Cu2O) crystals are difficult to grow since cupric oxide can form within the crystal as the crystal is cooled to ambient conditions. Vacancies are the solute which causes precipitation of macroscopic defects. Therefore, even when a mostly phase-pure single crystal is used as a feed rod, cupric oxide inclusions persist in the recrystallized solid. Control of the thermal profile during crystal growth, however, can improve phase-purity; a slow counter-rotation rate of the feed and seed rods results in fewer inclusions. Cupric oxide can be removed by annealing, which produces a factor of 540 ± 70 increase inmore » phase-purity.« less

  11. Cupric oxide inclusions in cuprous oxide crystals grown by the floating zone method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frazer, Laszlo; Chang, Kelvin B.; Poeppelmeier, Kenneth R.; Ketterson, John B.

    2015-05-08

    Phase-pure cuprous oxide (Cu2O) crystals are difficult to grow since cupric oxide can form within the crystal as the crystal is cooled to ambient conditions. Vacancies are the solute which causes precipitation of macroscopic defects. Therefore, even when a mostly phase-pure single crystal is used as a feed rod, cupric oxide inclusions persist in the recrystallized solid. Control of the thermal profile during crystal growth, however, can improve phase-purity; a slow counter-rotation rate of the feed and seed rods results in fewer inclusions. Cupric oxide can be removed by annealing, which produces a factor of 540 ± 70 increase in phase-purity.

  12. Double spin asymmetries of inclusive hadron electroproductions from a transversely polarized ³He target

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhao, Yuxiang X.

    2015-07-14

    We report the measurement of beam-target double-spin asymmetries ALT in the inclusive production of identified hadrons, e +³He↑ → h + X, using a longitudinally polarized 5.9 GeV electron beam and a transversely polarized ³He target. Hadrons (π±, K± and proton) were detected at 16° with an average momentum h>=2.35 GeV/c and a transverse momentum (pT) coverage from 0.60 to 0.68 GeV/c. Asymmetries from the ³He target were observed to be non-zero for π± production when the target was polarized transversely in the horizontal plane. The π⁺ and π⁻ asymmetries have opposite signs, analogous to the behavior of ALT inmore » semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering.« less

  13. Dramatic changes in electronic structure revealed by fractionally charged nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cohen, Aron J.; Mori-Snchez, Paula

    2014-01-28

    Discontinuous changes in the electronic structure upon infinitesimal changes to the Hamiltonian are demonstrated. These are revealed in one and two electron molecular systems by full configuration interaction (FCI) calculations when the realm of the nuclear charge is extended to be fractional. FCI electron densities in these systems show dramatic changes in real space and illustrate the transfer, hopping, and removal of electrons. This is due to the particle nature of electrons seen in stretched systems and is a manifestation of an energy derivative discontinuity at constant number of electrons. Dramatic errors of density functional theory densities are seen in real space as this physics is missing from currently used approximations. The movements of electrons in these simple systems encapsulate those in real physical processes, from chemical reactions to electron transport and pose a great challenge for the development of new electronic structure methods.

  14. Inclusive Production of {rho}{+-}(770) Meson in Hadronic Decays of Z0 Boson

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beddall, A.; Beddall, A.; Binguel, A.

    2007-04-23

    The inclusive production of the charged vector meson {rho}{+-}(770) in hadronic Z decays is measured with the ALEPH detector at the LEP collider. Decays of {rho}{+-} {yields} {pi}0 + {pi}{+-} are reconstructed for x > 0.05 where x = E{rho}/Ebeam. The results are compared with Monte Carlo model predictions and OPAL measurements. Bose-Einstein effects are found to be important in extracting {rho}{+-}(770) from two pion invariant mass spectra.

  15. Single spin asymmetries in inclusive hadron production from semiinclusive DIS to hadronic collisions: Universality and phenomenology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boglione, M.; D'Alesio, U.; Murgia, F.

    2008-03-01

    In a perturbative QCD approach, with inclusion of spin and transverse momentum effects, experimental data on azimuthal asymmetries observed in polarized semiinclusive deeply inelastic scattering and e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilations can be used to determine the Sivers, transversity, and Collins soft functions. By using these functions, within the same scheme, we predict p{sup {up_arrow}}p{yields}h+X single spin asymmetries in remarkable agreement with high energy experimental data.

  16. U.S. Virgin Islands Leadership Embraces Inclusiveness to Ensure Community Ownership of Clean Energy Vision

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    0: Committing to an Energy Transition U.S. Virgin Islands Leadership Embraces Inclusiveness to Ensure Community Ownership of Clean Energy Vision Getting the Right People in the Room at the Outset Getting the right people in the room is critical to ensuring buy-in from key stakeholders when setting the vision for an energy project or initiative. Like many island communities, the U.S. Virgin Islands (USVI) was almost 100% depen- dent on imported oil for electricity, water desalinization, and

  17. HEALTH AND SAFETY RESEARCH DIVISION REPORT OF INCLUSION SURVEY AT LOCATION CA00401

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Location mbe: (- Location Number: (CA00401) HEALTH AND SAFETY RESEARCH DIVISION REPORT OF INCLUSION SURVEY AT LOCATION CA00401 MAYER STREET BRIDGEVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA 15017 Investigation Team B. A. Berven - RASA Program Manager C. A. Little - RASA/UMTRA Project Director C. Clark, Jr. - Survey Team Leader John K. Williams December 1985 WORK PERFORMED AS PART OF THE RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY ACTIVITIES PROGRAM Prepared by the OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado

  18. Crystal structure of high-Zr inclusions in an alloy containing U, Pu, Np, Am, Zr and rare-earth elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dawn E. Janney; James W. Madden; J. Rory Kennedy; Thomas P. O'Holleran

    2014-05-01

    Researchers commonly observe high-Zr inclusions in actinide-Zr alloys. As there is very little published data on the crystal structures of these inclusions, it has generally been assumed that the inclusions were impurity-stabilized a-Zr. However, new electron-diffraction data from two high-Zr inclusions in an alloy containing U, Pu, Np, Am, Zr, and rare-earth elements show that these inclusions are not a-Zr (which has a hexagonal structure) but instead have a face-centered cubic structure. This data is unique in that it combines single-crystal diffraction patterns and microchemical analyses from individual inclusions. More data on other high-Zr inclusions is clearly required. However, the present results suggest that caution is needed in assuming that all high-Zr inclusions in actinide-Zr alloys are a-Zr.

  19. Finite range and upper branch effects on itinerant ferromagnetism in repulsive Fermi gases: Bethe–Goldstone ladder resummation approach

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    He, Lianyi

    2014-09-19

    In this study, we investigate the ferromagnetic transition in repulsive Fermi gases at zero temperature with upper branch and effective range effects. Based on a general effective Lagrangian that reproduces precisely the two-body ss-wave scattering phase shift, we obtain a nonperturbative expression of the energy density as a function of the polarization by using the Bethe–Goldstone ladder resummation. For hard sphere potential, the predicted critical gas parameter kFa = 0.816 and the spin susceptibility agree well with the results from fixed-node diffusion Monte Carlo calculations. In general, positive and negative effective ranges have opposite effects on the critical gas parametermore » kFa: While a positive effective range reduces the critical gas parameter, a negative effective range increases it. For attractive potential or Feshbach resonance model, the many-body upper branch exhibits an energy maximum at kFa = α with α = 1.34 from the Bethe–Goldstone ladder resummation, which is qualitatively consistent with experimental results. The many-body T-matrix has a positive-energy pole for kFa > α and it becomes impossible to distinguish the bound state and the scattering state. These positive-energy bound states become occupied and therefore the upper branch reaches an energy maximum at kFa = α. In the zero range limit, there exists a narrow window (0.86< kFa < 1.56) for the ferromagnetic phase. At sufficiently large negative effective range, the ferromagnetic phase disappears. On the other hand, the appearance of positive-energy bound state resonantly enhances the two-body decay rate around kFa = α and may prevent the study of equilibrium phases and ferromagnetism of the upper branch Fermi gas.« less

  20. Third report on the Oak Ridge K-25 Site Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program for Mitchell Branch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinzman, R.L.; Adams, S.M.; Ashwood, T.L.

    1995-08-01

    As a condition of the modified National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit issued to the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP; now referred to as the Oak Ridge K-25 Site) on September 11, 1986, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed for the receiving stream (Mitchell Branch or K-1700 stream). On October 1, 1992, a renewed NPDES permit was issued for the K-25 Site. A biological monitoring plan was submitted for Mitchell Branch, Poplar Creek, Poplar Creek Embayment of the Clinch River and any unnamed tributaries of these streams. The objectives of BMAP are to (1) demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for the Oak Ridge K-25 Site protect and maintain the use of Mitchell Branch for growth and propagation of fish and other aquatic life and (2) document the effects on stream biota resulting from operation of major new pollution abatement facilities, including the Central Neutralization Facility (CNF) and the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) incinerator. The BMAP consists of four tasks: (1) toxicity monitoring; (2) bioaccumulation monitoring; (3) assessment of fish health; and (4) instream monitoring of biological communities, including benthic macroinvertebrates and fish. This document, the third in a series, reports on the results of the Oak Ridge K-25 Site BMAP; it describes studies that were conducted over various periods of time between June 1990 and December 1993, although monitoring conducted outside this time period is included, as appropriate.

  1. Polarization of Lambda0 and anti-Lambda0 inclusively produced by 610-GeV/c Sigma- and 525-GeV/c proton beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanchez-Lopez, J.L.; Nelson, K.D.; Engelfried, J.; Akgun, U.; Alkhazov, G.; Amaro-Reyes, J.; Atamantchouk, A.G.; Ayan, A.S.; Balatz, M.Y.; Blanco-Covarrubias, A.; Bondar, N.F.; /Ball State U. /Bogazici U. /Carnegie Mellon U. /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Fermilab /Serpukhov, IHEP /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys. /Moscow, ITEP /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst. /Moscow State U. /St. Petersburg, INP

    2007-06-01

    We have measured the polarization of {Lambda}{sup 0} and {bar {Lambda}{sup 0}} inclusively produced by 610 GeV/c {Sigma}{sup -} and 525 GeV/c proton beams in the experiment SELEX during the 1996/7 fixed target run at Fermilab. The polarization was measured as a function of the {Lambda} longitudinal momentum fraction x{sub F} and transverse momentum p{sub t}. For the {Lambda}{sup 0} produced by {Sigma}{sup -} the polarization is increasing with x{sub F} , from slightly negative at x{sub F} {approx} 0 to about 15% at large x{sub F} ; it shows a non-monotonic behavior as a function of p{sub t}. For the proton beam, the {Lambda}{sup 0} polarization is negative and decreasing as a function of x{sub F} and p{sub t}. The {bar {Lambda}{sup 0}} polarization is compatible with 0 for both beam particles over the full kinematic range. The target dependence was examined but no statistically significant difference was found.

  2. Inclusive cross section and double-helicity asymmetry for $$\\pi^{0}$$ production at midrapidity in $p$$+$$p$ collisions at $$\\sqrt{s}=510$$ GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adare, A.

    2016-01-07

    PHENIX measurements are presented for the cross section and double-helicity asymmetry (ALL) in inclusive π⁰ production at midrapidity from p+p collisions at √s = 510 GeV from data taken in 2012 and 2013 at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. The next-to-leading-order perturbativequantum- chromodynamics theory calculation is in excellent agreement with the presented cross section results. The calculation utilized parton-to-pion fragmentation functions from the recent DSS14 global analysis, which prefer a smaller gluon-to-pion fragmentation function. The π⁰ALL results follow an increasingly positive asymmetry trend with pT and √s with respect to the predictions and are in excellent agreement with the latestmore » global analysis results. This analysis incorporated earlier results on π0 and jet ALL, and suggested a positive contribution of gluon polarization to the spin of the proton ΔG for the gluon momentum fraction range x > 0.05. The data presented here extend to a currently unexplored region, down to x 0.01, and thus provide additional constraints on the value of ΔG.« less

  3. Chemical Signatures of and Precursors to Fractures Using Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lorie M. Dilley

    2011-03-30

    Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) are designed to recover heat from the subsurface by mechanically creating fractures in subsurface rocks. Open or recently closed fractures would be more susceptible to enhancing the permeability of the system. Identifying dense fracture areas as well as large open fractures from small fracture systems will assist in fracture stimulation site selection. Geothermal systems are constantly generating fractures (Moore, Morrow et al. 1987), and fluids and gases passing through rocks in these systems leave small fluid and gas samples trapped in healed microfractures. These fluid inclusions are faithful records of pore fluid chemistry. Fluid inclusions trapped in minerals as the fractures heal are characteristic of the fluids that formed them, and this signature can be seen in fluid inclusion gas analysis. This report presents the results of the project to determine fracture locations by the chemical signatures from gas analysis of fluid inclusions. With this project we hope to test our assumptions that gas chemistry can distinguish if the fractures are open and bearing production fluids or represent prior active fractures and whether there are chemical signs of open fracture systems in the wall rock above the fracture. Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy (FIS) is a method developed for the geothermal industry which applies the mass quantification of fluid inclusion gas data from drill cuttings and applying known gas ratios and compositions to determine depth profiles of fluid barriers in a modern geothermal system (Dilley, 2009; Dilley et al., 2005; Norman et al., 2005). Identifying key gas signatures associated with fractures for isolating geothermal fluid production is the latest advancement in the application of FIS to geothermal systems (Dilley and Norman, 2005; Dilley and Norman, 2007). Our hypothesis is that peaks in FIS data are related to location of fractures. Previous work (DOE Grant DE-FG36-06GO16057) has indicated differences in the

  4. ABUNDANCES OF C, N, Sr, AND Ba ON THE RED GIANT BRANCH OF {omega} CENTAURI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stanford, Laura M.; Da Costa, G. S.; Norris, John E. E-mail: gdc@mso.anu.edu.a

    2010-05-10

    Abundances relative to iron for carbon, nitrogen, strontium, and barium are presented for 33 stars on the red giant branch (RGB) of the globular cluster {omega} Centauri. They are based on intermediate-resolution spectroscopic data covering the blue spectral region analyzed using spectrum synthesis techniques. The data reveal the existence of a broad range in the abundances of these elements, and a comparison with similar data for main-sequence stars enables insight into the evolutionary history of the cluster. The majority of the RGB stars were found to be depleted in carbon, i.e., [C/Fe] < 0, while [N/Fe] for the same stars shows a range of {approx}1 dex, from [N/Fe] {approx} 0.7 to 1.7 dex. The strontium-to-iron abundance ratios varied from solar to mildly enhanced (0.0 {<=} [Sr/Fe] {<=} 0.8), with [Ba/Fe] generally equal to or greater than [Sr/Fe]. The carbon and nitrogen abundance ratios for the one known CH star in the sample, ROA 279, are [C/Fe] = 0.6 and [N/Fe] = 0.5 dex. Evidence for evolutionary mixing on the RGB is found from the fact that the relative carbon abundances on the main sequence are generally higher than those on the RGB. However, comparison of the RGB and main-sequence samples shows that the upper level of nitrogen enhancement is similar in both sets at [N/Fe] {approx} 2.0 dex. This is most likely the result of primordial rather than evolutionary mixing processes. One RGB star, ROA 276, was found to have Sr and Ba abundance ratios similar to the anomalous Sr-rich main-sequence star S2015448. High-resolution spectra of ROA 276 were obtained with the Magellan Telescope/MIKE spectrograph combination to confirm this result, revealing that ROA 276 is indeed an unusual star. For this star, calculations of the depletion effect, the potential change in surface abundance that results from the increased depth of the convective envelope as a star moves from the main sequence to the RGB, strongly suggest that the observed Sr enhancement in ROA 276 is of

  5. Finite range and upper branch effects on itinerant ferromagnetism in repulsive Fermi gases: BetheGoldstone ladder resummation approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He, Lianyi

    2014-12-15

    We investigate the ferromagnetic transition in repulsive Fermi gases at zero temperature with upper branch and effective range effects. Based on a general effective Lagrangian that reproduces precisely the two-body s-wave scattering phase shift, we obtain a nonperturbative expression of the energy density as a function of the polarization by using the BetheGoldstone ladder resummation. For hard sphere potential, the predicted critical gas parameter k{sub F}a=0.816 and the spin susceptibility agree well with the results from fixed-node diffusion Monte Carlo calculations. In general, positive and negative effective ranges have opposite effects on the critical gas parameter k{sub F}a: While a positive effective range reduces the critical gas parameter, a negative effective range increases it. For attractive potential or Feshbach resonance model, the many-body upper branch exhibits an energy maximum at k{sub F}a=? with ?=1.34 from the BetheGoldstone ladder resummation, which is qualitatively consistent with experimental results. The many-body T-matrix has a positive-energy pole for k{sub F}a>? and it becomes impossible to distinguish the bound state and the scattering state. These positive-energy bound states become occupied and therefore the upper branch reaches an energy maximum at k{sub F}a=?. In the zero range limit, there exists a narrow window (0.86branch Fermi gas. - Highlights: Nonperturbative interaction energy is obtained within the BetheGoldstone ladder resummation approach. Positive and negative effective ranges have opposite effects on the critical gas parameter. The upper branch Fermi gas exhibits an energy maximum

  6. On the role of the Sivers effect in A{sub N} for inclusive particle production in pp collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anselmino, Mauro; Boglione, Mariaelena; D'Alesio, Umberto; Melis, Stefano; Murgia, Francesco; Prokudin, Alexei

    2014-01-01

    Single spin asymmetries, A{sub N} , for inclusive particle production in pp collisions are considered within a generalized parton model with inclusion of spin and tranverse momentum effects. We consider the potential role of the Sivers effect in A{sub N} , as extracted from a careful analysis of azimuthal asymmetries in SIDIS, and discuss its phenomenological consequences in connection with a recently updated study of the Collins effect.

  7. Short Narrative About Promising Practices The National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) Diversity and Inclusion Implementation Plan was

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    2 Short Narrative About Promising Practices The National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) Diversity and Inclusion Implementation Plan was approved and submitted to the Department on April 13, 2013. NNSA's Office of Human Capital Management participated on a regular basis with the Department of Energy's (DOE) Diversity and Inclusion (D&I) Council in FY 2013. NNSA continues to establish a partnership with the DOE Office of Diversity Programs (ODP) to share information, collaborate and

  8. Process of electrolysis and fractional crystallization for aluminum purification

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dawless, Robert K.; Bowman, Kenneth A.; Mazgaj, Robert M.; Cochran, C. Norman

    1983-10-25

    A method for purifying aluminum that contains impurities, the method including the step of introducing such aluminum containing impurities to a charging and melting chamber located in an electrolytic cell of the type having a porous diaphragm permeable by the electrolyte of the cell and impermeable to molten aluminum. The method includes further the steps of supplying impure aluminum from the chamber to the anode area of the cell and electrolytically transferring aluminum from the anode area to the cathode through the diaphragm while leaving impurities in the anode area, thereby purifying the aluminum introduced into the chamber. The method includes the further steps of collecting the purified aluminum at the cathode, and lowering the level of impurities concentrated in the anode area by subjecting molten aluminum and impurities in said chamber to a fractional crystallization treatment wherein eutectic-type impurities crystallize and precipitate out of the aluminum. The eutectic impurities that have crystallized are physically removed from the chamber. The aluminum in the chamber is now suited for further purification as provided in the above step of electrolytically transferring aluminum through the diaphragm.

  9. Process of electrolysis and fractional crystallization for aluminum purification

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dawless, R.K.; Bowman, K.A.; Mazgaj, R.M.; Cochran, C.N.

    1983-10-25

    A method is described for purifying aluminum that contains impurities, the method including the step of introducing such aluminum containing impurities to a charging and melting chamber located in an electrolytic cell of the type having a porous diaphragm permeable by the electrolyte of the cell and impermeable to molten aluminum. The method includes further the steps of supplying impure aluminum from the chamber to the anode area of the cell and electrolytically transferring aluminum from the anode area to the cathode through the diaphragm while leaving impurities in the anode area, thereby purifying the aluminum introduced into the chamber. The method includes the further steps of collecting the purified aluminum at the cathode, and lowering the level of impurities concentrated in the anode area by subjecting molten aluminum and impurities in said chamber to a fractional crystallization treatment wherein eutectic-type impurities crystallize and precipitate out of the aluminum. The eutectic impurities that have crystallized are physically removed from the chamber. The aluminum in the chamber is now suited for further purification as provided in the above step of electrolytically transferring aluminum through the diaphragm. 2 figs.

  10. Retraying and revamp double big LPG fractionators's capacity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sasson, R. , Friendswood, TX ); Pate, R. )

    1993-08-02

    Enterprise operates two LPG fractionation units at Mont Belvieu: the Seminole unit and the West Texas unit. In 1985, Nye Engineering Inc., Friendswood, Texas, designed improvements to expand the Seminole plant from 60,000 b/d of C[sub 2] + feed to 90,000 b/d. The primary modifications made to increase the West Texas plant's capacity and reduce fuel consumption were the following: retraying the deethanizer and depropanizer columns with new High Capacity Nye Trays. Lowering the pressure in the de-ethanizer and depropanizer to improve the separating efficiency of the columns. Replacing the debutanizer with a high-pressure column that rejects its condensing heat as reboil for the de-ethanizer. Adjusting the feed temperature to balance the load in the top and bottom of the depropanizer column to prevent premature flooding in one section of the tower. Installing convection heaters to recover existing stack gas heat into the process. In conjunction with the capacity expansion, there was a strong incentive to improve the fuel efficiency of the unit. The modifications are described.

  11. FRACTIONAL DISTILLATION SEPARATION OF PLUTONIUM VALUES FROM LIGHT ELEMENT VALUES

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cunningham, B.B.

    1957-12-17

    A process is described for removing light element impurities from plutonium. It has been found that plutonium contaminated with impurities may be purified by converting the plutonium to a halide and purifying the halide by a fractional distillation whereby impurities may be distilled from the plutonium halide. A particularly effective method includes the step of forming a lower halide such as the trior tetrahalide and distilling the halide under conditions such that no decomposition of the halide occurs. Molecular distillation methods are particularly suitable for this process. The apparatus may comprise an evaporation plate with means for heating it and a condenser surface with means for cooling it. The condenser surface is placed at a distance from the evaporating surface less than the mean free path of molecular travel of the material being distilled at the pressure and temperature used. The entire evaporating system is evacuated until the pressure is about 10/sup -4/ millimeters of mercury. A high temperuture method is presented for sealing porous materials such as carbon or graphite that may be used as a support or a moderator in a nuclear reactor. The carbon body is subjected to two surface heats simultaneously in an inert atmosphere; the surface to be sealed is heated to 1500 degrees centigrade; and another surface is heated to 300 degrees centigrade, whereupon the carbon vaporizes and flows to the cooler surface where it is deposited to seal that surface. This method may be used to seal a nuclear fuel in the carbon structure.

  12. Dartmouth Stellar Evolution Database and the ACS Survey of Galactic Globular Clusters II. Stellar Evolution Tracks, Isochrones, Luminosity Functions, and Synthetic Horizontal-Branch Models

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Dotter, A; Chaboyer, B; Jevremovic, D; Kostov, V; Baron, E; Ferguson, J; Sarajedini, A; Anderson, J

    Web tools are also available at the home page (http://stellar.dartmouth.edu/~models/index.html). These tools allow users to create isochrones and convert them to luminosity functions or create synthetic horizontal branch models.

  13. Single-Fraction Versus 5-Fraction Radiation Therapy for Metastatic Epidural Spinal Cord Compression in Patients With Limited Survival Prognoses: Results of a Matched-Pair Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rades, Dirk; Huttenlocher, Stefan; Šegedin, Barbara; Perpar, Ana; Conde, Antonio J.; Garcia, Raquel; Veninga, Theo; Stalpers, Lukas J.A.; Cacicedo, Jon; Rudat, Volker; Schild, Steven E.

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: This study compared single-fraction to multi-fraction short-course radiation therapy (RT) for symptomatic metastatic epidural spinal cord compression (MESCC) in patients with limited survival prognosis. Methods and Materials: A total of 121 patients who received 8 Gy × 1 fraction were matched (1:1) to 121 patients treated with 4 Gy × 5 fractions for 10 factors including age, sex, performance status, primary tumor type, number of involved vertebrae, other bone metastases, visceral metastases, interval between tumor diagnosis and MESCC, pre-RT ambulatory status, and time developing motor deficits prior to RT. Endpoints included in-field repeated RT (reRT) for MESCC, overall survival (OS), and impact of RT on motor function. Univariate analyses were performed with the Kaplan-Meier method and log-rank test for in-field reRT for MESCC and OS and with the ordered-logit model for effect of RT on motor function. Results: Doses of 8 Gy × 1 fraction and 4 Gy × 5 fractions were not significantly different with respect to the need for in-field reRT for MESCC (P=.11) at 6 months (18% vs 9%, respectively) and 12 months (30% vs 22%, respectively). The RT regimen also had no significant impact on OS (P=.65) and post-RT motor function (P=.21). OS rates at 6 and 12 months were 24% and 9%, respectively, after 8 Gy × 1 fraction versus 25% and 13%, respectively, after 4 Gy × 5 fractions. Improvement of motor function was observed in 17% of patients after 8 Gy × 1 fraction and 23% after 4 Gy × 5 fractions, respectively. Conclusions: There were no significant differences with respect to need for in-field reRT for MESCC, OS, and motor function by dose fractionation regimen. Thus, 8 Gy × 1 fraction may be a reasonable option for patients with survival prognosis of a few months.

  14. Precise Measurements of Beam Spin Asymmetries in Semi-Inclusive π0 production

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aghasyan, M.; Avakian, H.; Rossi, P.; De Sanctis, E.; Hasch, D.; Mirazita, M.; Adikaram, D.; Amaryan, M. J.; Anghinolfi, M.; Baghdasaryan, H.; et al

    2011-10-01

    We present studies of single-spin asymmetries for neutral pion electroproduction in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering of 5.776 GeV polarized electrons from an unpolarized hydrogen target, using the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. A substantial sin Φh amplitude has been measured in the distribution of the cross section asymmetry as a function of the azimuthal angle Φh of the produced neutral pion. The dependence of this amplitude on Bjorken x and on the pion transverse momentum is extracted with significantly higher precision than previous data and is compared to model calculations.

  15. Black Warrior: Sub-soil gas and fluid inclusion exploration and slim well drilling

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. Project Objectives: Discover a blind, low-moderate temperature resource: Apply a combination of detailed sub-soil gas, hydrocarbon, and isotope data to define possible upflow areas; Calibrate the sub-soil chemistry with down-hole fluid inclusion stratigraphy and fluid analyses to define a follow-up exploration drilling target; Create short term jobs and long term employment through resource exploration, development and power plant operation; Extend and adapt the DOE sub-soil 2 meter probe technology to gas sampling.

  16. Partonic Transverse Motion in Unpolarized Semi-Inclusive Deep Inelastic Scattering Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. Boglione, S. Melis, A. Prokudin

    2011-08-01

    We analyse the role of partonic transverse motion in unpolarized Semi-Inclusive Deep Inelastic Scattering (SIDIS) processes. Imposing appropriate kinematical conditions, we find some constraints which fix an upper limit to the range of allowed k_perp values. We show that, applying these additional requirements on the partonic kinematics, we obtain different results with respect to the usual phenomenological approach based on the Gaussian smearing with analytical integration over an unlimited range of k_perp values. These variations are particularly interesting for some observables, like the < cos phi_h > azimuthal modulation of the unpolarized SIDIS cross section or the average transverse momentum of the final, detected hadron.

  17. Measurement of the inclusive B sup * cross section above the. Upsilon. (4 S )

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akerib, D.S.; Barish, B.; Cowen, D.F.; Eigen, G.; Stroynowski, R.; Urheim, J.; Weinstein, A.J.; Morrison, R.; Schmidt, D.; Procario, M.; Johnson, D.R.; Lingel, K.; Rankin, P.; Smith, J.G.; Alexander, J.; Bebek, C.; Berkelman, K.; Besson, D.; Browder, T.E.; Cassel, D.G.; Cheu, E.; Coffman, D.M.; Drell, P.S.; Ehrlich, R.; Galik, R.S.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Geiser, B.; Gittelman, B.; Gray, S.W.; Hartill, D.L.; Heltsley, B.K.; Honscheid, K.; Kandaswamy, J.; Katayama, N.; Kreinick, D.L.; Lewis, J.D.; Ludwig, G.S.; Masui, J.; Mevissen, J.; Mistry, N.B.; Nandi, S.; Ng, C.R.; Nordberg, E.; O'Grady, C.; Patterson, J.R.; Peterson, D.; Pisharody, M.; Riley, D.; Sapper, M.; Selen, M.; Worden, H.; Worris, M.; Avery, P.; Freyberger, A.; Rodriguez, J.; Yelton, J.; Kinoshita, K.; Pipkin, F.; Wilson, R.; Wolinski, J.; Xiao, D.; Sadoff, A.J.; Ammar, R.; Baringer, P.; Coppage, D.; Davis, R.; Haas, P.; Kelly, M.; Kwak, N.; Lam, H.; Ro, S.; Kubota, Y.; Nelson, J.K.; Perticone, D.; Poling, R.; Schrenk, S.; A

    1991-09-23

    Using the CLEO II detector at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring, we have determined the inclusive {ital B}{sup *} cross section above the {Upsilon}(4{ital S}) resonance in the energy range from 10.61 to 10.70 GeV. We also report a new measurement of the energy of the {ital B}{sup *}{r arrow}{ital B}{gamma} transition photon of 46.2{plus minus}0.3{plus minus}0.8 MeV.

  18. AN in inclusive lepton-proton collisions: TMD and twist-3 approaches

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Prokudin, Alexei

    2015-01-23

    We consider the inclusive production of hadrons in lepton-nucleon scattering. For a transversely polarized nucleon this reaction shows a left-right azimuthal asymmetry, which we compute this asymmetry in both TMD and in twist-3 collinear factorization formalisms. All non-perturbative parton correlators of the calculation are fixed through information from other hard processes. Our results for the left-right asymmetry agree in sign with recent data for charged pion production from the HERMES Collaboration and from Jefferson Lab. As a result, we discuss similarities and differences of two formalisms.

  19. Measurement of Branching Ratios for Non-leptonic Cabibbo-suppressed Decays of the Charmed-Strange Baryon Xic+

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vazquez Jauregui, Eric; /San Luis Potosi U.

    2008-08-01

    We studied several {Xi}{sub c}{sup +} decay modes, most of them with a hyperon in the final state, and determined their branching ratios. The data used in this analysis come from the fixed target experiment SELEX, a multi-stage spectrometer with high acceptance for forward interactions, that took data during 1996 and 1997 at Fermilab with 600 GeV=c (mainly {Sigma}{sup -}, {pi}{sup -}) and 540 GeV/c (mainly p) beams incident on copper and carbon targets. The thesis mainly details the first observation of two Cabibbo-suppressed decay modes, {Xi}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Sigma}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +} and {Xi}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Sigma}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}. The branching ratios of the decays relative to the Cabibbo-favored {Xi}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Xi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +} are measured to be: {Lambda}({Xi}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Sigma}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +})/{Lambda}({Xi}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Xi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}) = 0.184 {+-} 0.086. Systematic studies have been performed in order to check the stability of the measurements varying all cuts used in the selection of events over a wide interval and we do not observe evidence of any trend, so the systematic error is negligible in the final results because the quadrature sum of the total error is not affected. The branching ratios for the same decay modes of the {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} are measured to check the methodology of the analysis. The branching ratio of the decay mode {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Sigma}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +} is measured relative to {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} pK{sup -} {pi}{sup +}, while the one of the decay mode {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Sigma}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +} is relative to {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Sigma}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}, as they have been reported earlier. The results for the control modes are: {Gamma}({Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Sigma}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +})/{Gamma

  20. The role of cellular structure on increasing the detonability limits of three-step chain-branching detonations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Short, Mark; Kiyanda, Charles B; Quirk, James J; Sharpe, Gary J

    2011-01-27

    In [1], the dynamics of a pulsating three-step chain-branching detonation were studied. The reaction model consists of, sequentially, chain-initiation, chain-branching and chain-termination steps. The chain-initiation and chain-branching steps are taken to be thermally neutral, with chemical energy release occuring in the chain-termination stage. The purpose of the present study is to examine whether cellular detonation structure can increase the value of the chain-branching cross-over temperature T{sub b} at which fully coupled detonation solutions are observed over those in 1 D. The basic concept is straightforward and has been discussed in [1] and [3]; if T{sub s} drops below T{sub b} at the lead shock, the passage of a transverse shock can increase both the lead shock temperature and the temperature behind the transverse wave back above T{sub b}, thus sustaining an unstable cellular detonation for values of T{sub b} for which a one-dimensional pulsating detonation will fail. Experiments potentially supporting this hypothesis with irregular detonations have been shown in [3] in a shock tube with acoustically absorbing walls. Removal of the transverse waves results in detonation failure, giving way to a decoupled shock-flame complex. A number of questions remain to be addressed regarding the possibility of such a mechanism, and, if so, about the precise mechanisms driving the cellular structure for large T{sub b}. For instance, one might ask what sets the cell size in a chain-branching detonation, particularly could the characteristic cell size be set by the chain-branching cross-over temperature T{sub b}: after a transverse wave shock collision, the strength of the transverse wave weakens as it propagates along the front. If the spacing between shock collisions is too large (cell size), then the transverse shocks may weaken to the extent that the lead shock temperature or that behind the transverse waves is not raised above T{sub b}, losing chemical energy to

  1. The ACP (Advanced Computer Program) Branch bus and real-time applications of the ACP multiprocessor system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hance, R.; Areti, H.; Atac, R.; Biel, J.; Cook, A.; Fischler, M.; Gaines, I.; Husby, D.; Nash, T.; Zmuda, T.

    1987-05-08

    The ACP Branchbus, a high speed differential bus for data movement in multiprocessing and data acquisition environments, is described. This bus was designed as the central bus in the ACP multiprocessing system. In its full implementation with 16 branches and a bus switch, it will handle data rates of 160 MByte/sec and allow reliable data transmission over inter rack distances. We also summarize applications of the ACP system in experimental data acquisition, triggering and monitoring, with special attention paid to FASTBUS environments.

  2. DOE-HDBK-3010-94; DOE Handbook Airborne Release Fractions/Rates...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    10-94 December 1994 CHANGE NOTICE NO. 1 March 2000 DOE HANDBOOK AIRBORNE RELEASE FRACTIONSRATES AND RESPIRABLE FRACTIONS FOR NONREACTOR NUCLEAR FACILITIES Volume I - Analysis of ...

  3. Isotope fractionation in surface ionization ion source of alkaline-earth iodides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suzuki, T.; Kanzaki, C.; Nomura, M.; Fujii, Y.

    2012-02-15

    The relationship between the isotope fractionation of alkaline-earth elements in the surface ionization ion source and the evaporation filament current, i.e., filament temperature, was studied. It was confirmed that the isotope fractionation depends on the evaporation filament temperature; the isotope fractionation in the case of higher temperature of filament becomes larger. The ionization and evaporation process in the surface ionization ion source was discussed, and it was concluded that the isotope fractionation is suppressed by setting at the lower temperature of evaporation filament because the dissociations are inhibited on the evaporation filament.

  4. Synchronization and an application of a novel fractional order King Cobra chaotic system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muthukumar, P. Balasubramaniam, P.; Ratnavelu, K.

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we design a new three dimensional King Cobra face shaped fractional order chaotic system. The multi-scale synchronization scheme of two fractional order chaotic systems is described. The necessary conditions for the multi-scale synchronization of two identical fractional order King Cobra chaotic systems are derived through feedback control. A new cryptosystem is proposed for an image encryption and decryption by using synchronized fractional order King Cobra chaotic systems with the supports of multiple cryptographic assumptions. The security of the proposed cryptosystem is analyzed by the well known algebraic attacks. Numerical simulations are given to show the effectiveness of the proposed theoretical results.

  5. Measurement of the inclusive jet cross section in proton-antiproton collisions at the center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voutilainen, Mikko Antero; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys. /Helsinki U. of Tech. /Nebraska U. /Saclay

    2008-07-01

    This thesis studies the high-energy collisions of protons and antiprotons. The data used in the measurement were collected during 2004-2005 with the D0 detector at the Tevatron Collider of the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory and correspond to 0.7 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity. High energy hadron collisions usually produce collimated sprays of particles called jets. The energy of the jets is measured using a liquid Argon-Uranium calorimeter and the production angle is determined with the help of silicon microstrip and scintillating fiber trackers. The inclusive jet cross section in proton-antiproton collisions is measured as a function of jet transverse momentum p{sub T} in six bins of jet rapidity at the center-of-mass energy {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The measurement covers jet transerve momenta from 50 GeV up to 600 GeV and jet rapidities up to |y| = 2.4. The data are collected using a set of seven single jet triggers. Event and jet cuts are applied to remove non-physical backgrounds and cosmic-ray interactions. The data are corrected for jet energy calibration, cut and trigger efficiencies and finite jet p{sub T} resolution. The corrections are determined from data and the methods are tested with Monte Carlo simulation. The main experimental challenges in the measurement are the calibration of jet energies and the determination of the jet p{sub T} resolution. New methods are developed for the jet energy calibration that take into account physical differences between the {gamma}+jet and dijet calibration samples arising from quark and gluon jet differences. The uncertainty correlations are studied and provided as a set of uncertainty sources. The production of particle jets in hadron collisions is described by the theory of quantum chromodynamics (QCD). When the transverse jet momentum is large, the contributions from long-distance physics processes are small and the production rates of jets can be predicted by perturbative QCD. The inclusive jet cross

  6. Final-state interactions in inclusive deep-inelastic scattering from the deuteron

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cosyn, Wim; Melnitchouk, Wally; Sargsian, Misak M.

    2014-01-16

    We explore the role of final-state interactions (FSI) in inclusive deep-inelastic scattering from the deuteron. Relating the inclusive cross section to the deuteron forward virtual Compton scattering amplitude, a general formula for the FSI contribution is derived in the generalized eikonal approximation, utilizing the diffractive nature of the effective hadron-nucleon interaction. The calculation uses a factorized model with a basis of three resonances with mass W~<2 GeV and a continuum contribution for larger W as the relevant set of effective hadron states entering the final-state interaction amplitude. The results show sizeable on-shell FSI contributions for Bjorken x ~> 0.6 andmore » Q2 < 10 GeV2 increasing in magnitude for lower Q2, but vanishing in the high-Q2 limit due to phase space constraints. The off-shell rescattering contributes at x ~> 0.8 and is taken as an uncertainty on the on-shell result.« less

  7. Double spin asymmetries of inclusive hadron electroproductions from a transversely polarized ³He target

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Yuxiang X.

    2015-07-14

    We report the measurement of beam-target double-spin asymmetries ALT in the inclusive production of identified hadrons, e +³He → h + X, using a longitudinally polarized 5.9 GeV electron beam and a transversely polarized ³He target. Hadrons (π±, K± and proton) were detected at 16° with an average momentum h>=2.35 GeV/c and a transverse momentum (pT) coverage from 0.60 to 0.68 GeV/c. Asymmetries from the ³He target were observed to be non-zero for π± production when the target was polarized transversely in the horizontal plane. The π⁺ and π⁻ asymmetries have opposite signs, analogous to the behavior of ALT in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering.

  8. Investigation of platinum alloys for melting of inclusion free laser glass: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Izumitani, T.; Toratani, H.; Meissner, H.E.

    1986-02-28

    The objective of this work is to evaluate the suitability of Pt alloys as crucible materials for melting LHG-8 phosphate laser glass. The tendency of forming metallic inclusions and ionic dissolution of alloy components in the glass is to be compared with that of pure Pt. Ionic Pt is introduced into the glass melt by direct dissolution of Pt at the crucible-melt interface and by vapor phase transport. It was felt that a Pt-alloy may behave sufficiently differently from Pt that a number of alloys should be studied. Pt inclusions may originate from Pt which reprecipitates from the glass melt on cooling or change in redox-conditions; from volatilized Pt which deposits in colder zones of the melting environment as crystallites which may drop back into the glass melt; and/or from Pt particles which are mechanically removed from the crucible and drop into the glass melt. Besides pure Pt, the following alloys have been tested: Pt//sup 10/Ir, Pt//sup 10/Rh, Pt//sup 5/Au, Pt-ZGS, Pt//sup 5/Au-ZGS, Pt//sup 10/Rh-ZGS.

  9. Inclusive b-jet production in pp collisions at sqrt(s)=7 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; et al.

    2012-04-01

    The inclusive b-jet production cross section in pp collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV is measured using data collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC. The cross section is presented as a function of the jet transverse momentum in the range 18 < pT < 200 GeV for several rapidity intervals. The results are also given as the ratio of the b-jet production cross section to the inclusive jet production cross section. The measurement is performed with two different analyses, which differ in their trigger selection and b-jet identification: a jet analysis that selects events with a b jet using a sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 34 inverse picobarns, and a muon analysis requiring a b jet with a muon based on an integrated luminosity of 3 inverse picobarns. In both approaches the b jets are identified by requiring a secondary vertex. The results from the two methods are in agreement with each other and with next-to-leading order calculations, as well as with predictions based on the PYTHIA event generator.

  10. Influence of germanium nano-inclusions on the thermoelectric power factor of bulk bismuth telluride alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Satyala, Nikhil; Zamanipour, Zahra; Norouzzadeh, Payam; Krasinski, Jerzy S.; Vashaee, Daryoosh; Tahmasbi Rad, Armin; Tayebi, Lobat

    2014-05-28

    Nanocomposite thermoelectric compound of bismuth telluride (Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3}) with 5 at. % germanium nano-inclusions was prepared via mechanically alloying and sintering techniques. The influence of Ge nano-inclusions and long duration annealing on the thermoelectric properties of nanostructured Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} were investigated. It was found that annealing has significant effect on the carrier concentration, Seebeck coefficient, and the power factor of the thermoelectric compound. The systematic heat treatment also reduced the density of donor type defects thereby decreasing the electron concentration. While the as-pressed nanocomposite materials showed n-type properties, it was observed that with the increase of annealing time, the nanocomposite gradually transformed to an abundantly hole-dominated (p-type) sample. The long duration annealing (∼500 h) resulted in a significantly enhanced electrical conductivity pertaining to the augmentation in the density and the structural properties of the sample. Therefore, a simultaneous enhancement in both electrical and Seebeck coefficient characteristics resulted in a remarkable increase in the thermoelectric power factor.

  11. First report on the Oak Ridge K-25 Site Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program for Mitchell Branch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, J.G.; Adams, S.M.; Kszos, L.A.; Ryon, M.G.; Southworth, G.R.; Loar, J.M.

    1993-08-01

    A modified National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit was issued to the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (now referred to as the Oak Ridge K-25 Site) on September 11, 1986. The Oak Ridge K-25 Site is a former uranium-enrichment production facility, which is currently managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. for the US Department of Energy. As required in Part III (L) of that permit, a plan for the biological monitoring of Mitchell Branch (K-1700 stream) was prepared and submitted for approval to the US Environmental Protection Agency and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation [formerly the Tennessee Department of Health and Environment (Loar et al. 1992b)]. The K-25 Site Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) described biomonitoring activities that would be conducted over the duration of the permit. Because it was anticipated that the composition of existing effluent streams entering Mitchell Branch would be altered shortly after the modified permit was issued, sampling of the benthic invertebrate and fish communities (Task 4 of BMAP) was initiated in August and September 1986 respectively.

  12. Second report on the Oak Ridge K-25 Site Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program for Mitchell Branch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, J.G.; Adams, S.M.; Hinzman, R.L.; Kszos, L.A.; Loar, J.M.; Peterson, M.J.; Ryon, M.G.; Southworth, G.R.; Crumby, W.D.

    1994-03-01

    On September 11, 1986, a modified National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit was issued for the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP; now referred to as the Oak Ridge K-25 Site), a former uranium-enrichment production facility. As required in Part III of the permit, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed for the biological monitoring of Mitchell Branch (K-1700 stream) and submitted for approval to the US EPA and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation. The plan described biomonitoring activities that would be conducted over the duration of the permit. The objectives of the BMAP are to demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for the Oak Ridge K-25 Site protect and maintain the use of Mitchell Branch for growth and propagation of fish and other aquatic life, and to document the effects on stream biota resulting from operation of major new pollution abatement facilities. The BMAP consists of four tasks: ambient toxicity testing; bioaccumulation studies; biological indicator studies; and ecological surveys of stream communities, including benthic macroinvertebrates and fish. This document is the second in a series of reports presenting the results of the studies that were conducted over various periods of time between August 1987 and June 1990.

  13. NON-LOCAL THERMODYNAMICAL EQUILIBRIUM EFFECTS ON THE IRON ABUNDANCE OF ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH STARS IN 47 TUCANAE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lapenna, E.; Mucciarelli, A.; Lanzoni, B.; Ferraro, F. R.; Dalessandro, E.; Massari, D.

    2014-12-20

    We present the iron abundance of 24 asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, members of the globular cluster 47 Tucanae, obtained with high-resolution spectra collected with the FEROS spectrograph at the MPG/ESO 2.2 m Telescope. We find that the iron abundances derived from neutral lines (with a mean value [Fe I/H]=0.94 0.01, ? = 0.08 dex) are systematically lower than those derived from single ionized lines ([Fe II/H] =0.83 0.01, ? = 0.05 dex). Only the latter are in agreement with those obtained for a sample of red giant branch (RGB) cluster stars, for which the Fe I and Fe II lines provide the same iron abundance. This finding suggests that non-local thermodynamical equilibrium (NLTE) effects driven by overionization mechanisms are present in the atmosphere of AGB stars and significantly affect the Fe I lines while leaving Fe II features unaltered. On the other hand, the very good ionization equilibrium found for RGB stars indicates that these NLTE effects may depend on the evolutionary stage. We discuss the impact of this finding on both the chemical analysis of AGB stars and on the search for evolved blue stragglers.

  14. High- and low-Am RE inclusion phases in a U-Np-Pu-Am-Zr alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janney, Dawn E.; Madden, James W.; O'Holleran, Thomas P.; Kennedy, J. Rory

    2015-03-01

    Structural, microstructural, and microchemical data were collected from rare-earth inclusions in an as-cast U-Pu-Zr alloy with ~3 at% Am, 2% Np, and 9% rare-earth elements (La, Ce, Pr, and Nd). Two RE phases with different concentrations of Am were identified. The composition of high-Am RE inclusions is ~2-5 at% La, 15-20 % Ce, 5-10% Pr, 25-45% Nd, 1% Np, 5-10% Pu, and 10-20% Am. Some areas also have O, although this does not appear to be an essential part of the high-Am RE phase. The inclusions have a face-centered cubic structure with a lattice parameter a ~ 0.54 nm. The composition of the only low-Am RE inclusion studied in detail is ~~35-40 at% O, 40-45 % Nd, 1-2% Zr, 4-5% La, 9-10% Ce, and 6-7% Pr. This inclusion is an oxide with a crystal structure similar to the room-temperature structure of Nd2O3. Microstructural features suggest that oxidation occurred during casting, and that early crystallization of high-temperature oxides led to formation of two distinct RE phases.

  15. A Population-Based Study of the Fractionation of Postlumpectomy Breast Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashworth, Allison; Cancer Center of Southeastern Ontario, Kingston, Ontario ; Kong, Weidong; Whelan, Timothy; Mackillop, William J.

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: The optimal fractionation schedule of post lumpectomy radiation therapy remains controversial. The objective of this study was to describe the fractionation of post-lumpectomy radiation therapy (RT) in Ontario, before and after the seminal Ontario Clinical Oncology Group (OCOG) trial, which showed the equivalence of 16- and 25-fraction schedules. Methods and Materials: This was a retrospective cohort study conducted by linking electronic treatment records to a population-based cancer registry. The study population included all patients who underwent lumpectomy for invasive breast cancer in Ontario, Canada, between 1984 and 2008. Results: Over the study period, 41,747 breast cancer patients received post lumpectomy radiation therapy to the breast only. Both 16- and 25-fraction schedules were commonly used throughout the study period. In the early 1980s, shorter fractionation schedules were used in >80% of cases. Between 1985 and 1995, the proportion of patients treated with shorter fractionation decreased to 48%. After completion of the OCOG trial, shorter fractionation schemes were once again widely adopted across Ontario, and are currently used in about 71% of cases; however, large intercenter variations in fractionation persisted. Conclusions: The use of shorter schedules of post lumpectomy RT in Ontario increased after completion of the OCOG trial, but the trial had a less normative effect on practice than expected.

  16. An interpolation between the wave and diffusion equations through the fractional evolution equations Dirac like

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pierantozzi, T.; Vazquez, L.

    2005-11-01

    Through fractional calculus and following the method used by Dirac to obtain his well-known equation from the Klein-Gordon equation, we analyze a possible interpolation between the Dirac and the diffusion equations in one space dimension. We study the transition between the hyperbolic and parabolic behaviors by means of the generalization of the D'Alembert formula for the classical wave equation and the invariance under space and time inversions of the interpolating fractional evolution equations Dirac like. Such invariance depends on the values of the fractional index and is related to the nonlocal property of the time fractional differential operator. For this system of fractional evolution equations, we also find an associated conserved quantity analogous to the Hamiltonian for the classical Dirac case.

  17. THE CLUSTER AND FIELD GALAXY ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS FRACTION AT z = 1-1.5: EVIDENCE FOR A REVERSAL OF THE LOCAL ANTICORRELATION BETWEEN ENVIRONMENT AND AGN FRACTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martini, Paul; Miller, E. D.; Bautz, M.; Brodwin, M.; Stanford, S. A.; Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Hickox, R. C.; Stern, D.; Eisenhardt, P. R.; Galametz, A.; Norman, D.; Dey, A.; Jannuzi, B. T.; Murray, S.; Jones, C.; Brown, M. J. I.

    2013-05-01

    The fraction of cluster galaxies that host luminous active galactic nuclei (AGNs) is an important probe of AGN fueling processes, the cold interstellar medium at the centers of galaxies, and how tightly black holes and galaxies co-evolve. We present a new measurement of the AGN fraction in a sample of 13 clusters of galaxies (M {>=} 10{sup 14} M{sub Sun }) at 1 < z < 1.5 selected from the Spitzer/IRAC Shallow Cluster Survey, as well as the field fraction in the immediate vicinity of these clusters, and combine these data with measurements from the literature to quantify the relative evolution of cluster and field AGN from the present to z {approx} 3. We estimate that the cluster AGN fraction at 1 < z < 1.5 is f{sub A} = 3.0{sup +2.4}{sub -1.4}% for AGNs with a rest-frame, hard X-ray luminosity greater than L{sub X,{sub H}} {>=} 10{sup 44} erg s{sup -1}. This fraction is measured relative to all cluster galaxies more luminous than M{sup *}{sub 3.6}(z) + 1, where M{sup *}{sub 3.6}(z) is the absolute magnitude of the break in the galaxy luminosity function at the cluster redshift in the IRAC 3.6 {mu}m bandpass. The cluster AGN fraction is 30 times greater than the 3{sigma} upper limit on the value for AGNs of similar luminosity at z {approx} 0.25, as well as more than an order of magnitude greater than the AGN fraction at z {approx} 0.75. AGNs with L{sub X,{sub H}} {>=} 10{sup 43} erg s{sup -1} exhibit similarly pronounced evolution with redshift. In contrast to the local universe, where the luminous AGN fraction is higher in the field than in clusters, the X-ray and MIR-selected AGN fractions in the field and clusters are consistent at 1 < z < 1.5. This is evidence that the cluster AGN population has evolved more rapidly than the field population from z {approx} 1.5 to the present. This environment-dependent AGN evolution mimics the more rapid evolution of star-forming galaxies in clusters relative to the field.

  18. Measurement of the inclusive isolated prompt photon production cross section at the Tevatron using the CDF detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deluca Silberberg, Carolina; /Barcelona, IFAE

    2009-04-01

    In this thesis we present the measurement of the inclusive isolated prompt photon cross section with a total integrated luminosity of 2.5 fb{sup -1} of data collected with the CDF Run II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The prompt photon cross section is a classic measurement to test perturbative QCD (pQCD) with potential to provide information on the parton distribution function (PDF), and sensitive to the presence of new physics at large photon transverse momentum. Prompt photons also constitute an irreducible background for important searches such as H {yields} {gamma}{gamma}, or SUSY and extra-dimensions with energetic photons in the final state. The Tevatron at Fermilab (Batavia, U.S.A.) is currently the hadron collider that operates at the highest energies in the world. It collides protons and antiprotons with a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The CDF and the D0 experiments are located in two of its four interaction regions. In Run I at the Tevatron, the direct photon production cross section was measured by both CDF and DO, and first results in Run II have been presented by the DO Collaboration based on 380 pb{sup -1}. Both Run I and Run II results show agreement with the theoretical predictions except for the low p{sub T}{sup {gamma}} region, where the observed and predicted shapes are different. Prompt photon production has been also extensively measured at fixed-target experiments in lower p{sub T}{sup {gamma}} ranges, showing excess of data compared to the theory, particularly at high x{sub T}. From an experimental point of view, the study of the direct photon production has several advantages compared to QCD studies using jets. Electromagnetic calorimeters have better energy resolution than hadronic calorimeters, and the systematic uncertainty on the photon absolute energy scale is smaller. Furthermore, the determination of the photon kinematics does not require the use of jet algorithms. However, the measurements using photons require a

  19. Evaluating the biogas potential of the dry fraction from pretreatment of food waste from households

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murto, Marika; Björnsson, Lovisa; Rosqvist, Håkan; Bohn, Irene

    2013-05-15

    Highlights: ► A novel approach for biogas production from a waste fraction that today is incinerated. ► Biogas production is possible in spite of the impurities of the waste. ► Tracer studies are applied in a novel way. ► Structural material is needed to improve the flow pattern of the waste. ► We provide a solution to biological treatment for the complex waste fraction. - Abstract: At the waste handling company NSR, Helsingborg, Sweden, the food waste fraction of source separated municipal solid waste is pretreated to obtain a liquid fraction, which is used for biogas production, and a dry fraction, which is at present incinerated. This pretreatment and separation is performed to remove impurities, however also some of the organic material is removed. The possibility of realising the methane potential of the dry fraction through batch-wise dry anaerobic digestion was investigated. The anaerobic digestion technique used was a two-stage process consisting of a static leach bed reactor and a methane reactor. Treatment of the dry fraction alone and in a mixture with structural material was tested to investigate the effect on the porosity of the leach bed. A tracer experiment was carried out to investigate the liquid flow through the leach beds, and this method proved useful in demonstrating a more homogenous flow through the leach bed when structural material was added. Addition of structural material to the dry fraction was needed to achieve a functional digestion process. A methane yield of 98 m{sup 3}/ton was obtained from the dry fraction mixed with structural material after 76 days of digestion. This was in the same range as obtained in the laboratory scale biochemical methane potential test, showing that it was possible to extract the organic content in the dry fraction in this type of dry digestion system for the production of methane.

  20. Recent Results of Semi-inclusive DIS Experiments at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allada, Kalyan

    2015-09-01

    Semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering (SIDIS) is a powerful tool to explore the 3-d structure of nucleon in momentum space. Through a combination of polarized or unpolarized lepton beam and nucleon target one can study various transverse-momentum dependent parton distribution functions (TMDs) that appear in the SIDIS cross-section. TMDs provide a description of nucleon structure in terms of parton’s transverse momentum and its transverse spin, which enables us to study the quark orbital angular momentum effects in the nucleon. Several SIDIS experiments were performed in three experimental halls at JLab with 6 GeV electron beam using both polarized or upolarized beam and target combinations. The kinematic range was mainly focued on valence quark region. In this proceeding we will discuss some of the recent results from JLab 6 GeV run.

  1. Inclusion free cadmium zinc tellurium and cadmium tellurium crystals and associated growth method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bolotnikov, Aleskey E.; James, Ralph B.

    2010-07-20

    The present disclosure provides systems and methods for crystal growth of cadmium zinc tellurium (CZT) and cadmium tellurium (CdTe) crystals with an inverted growth reactor chamber. The inverted growth reactor chamber enables growth of single, large, high purity CZT and CdTe crystals that can be used, for example, in X-ray and gamma detection, substrates for infrared detectors, or the like. The inverted growth reactor chamber enables reductions in the presence of Te inclusions, which are recognized as an important limiting factor in using CZT or CdTe as radiation detectors. The inverted growth reactor chamber can be utilized with existing crystal growth techniques such as the Bridgman crystal growth mechanism and the like. In an exemplary embodiment, the inverted growth reactor chamber is a U-shaped ampoule.

  2. Empirical Fit to Precision Inclusive Electron-Proton Cross Sections in the Resonance Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M.E. Christy; Peter Bosted

    2010-05-01

    An empirical fit is described to measurements of inclusive inelastic electron-proton cross sections in the kinematic range of four-momentum transfer $0 \\le Q^2<8$ GeV$^2$ and final state invariant mass $1.1<3.1$ GeV. The fit is constrained by the recent high precision longitudinal and transverse (L/T) separated cross section measurements from Jefferson Lab Hall C, un-separated Hall C measurements up to $Q^2$ $\\approx 7.5$ ${\\rm GeV}^2$, and photoproduction data at $Q^2 = 0$. Compared to previous fits, the present fit covers a wider kinematic range, fits both transverse and longitudinal cross sections, and features smooth transitions to the photoproduction data at $Q^2=0$ and DIS data at high $Q^2$ and $W$.

  3. Inclusive J/{psi} Production in {Upsilon} Decay Via Color-Singlet Mechanism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He Zhiguo; Wang Jianxiong

    2011-05-23

    We report the recent works about the inclusive J/{psi} production in {Upsilon} decay. Our results show that until now the color-singlet (CS) contribution which includes leading order ({alpha}{sub s}{sup 5}){Upsilon}{yields}J/{psi}+cc-barg process and {alpha}{sub s}{sup 6} order {Upsilon}{yields}J/{psi}+gg(4g) process as well as {alpha}{sub s}{sup 2{alpha}2} order {Upsilon}{yields}J/{psi}+cc-bar and {Upsilon}{yields}J/{psi}+gg processes can not explain the experimental data yet. A preliminary CS prediction of R{sub cc} (B({Upsilon}{yields}J/{psi}+cc-bar+X)/B({Upsilon}{yields}J/{psi}+X)) 0.39{sub -0.20}{sup +0.21}, which is much larger than color-octet (CO) prediction, is also given as a good quantity to discriminate the CS and color-octet mechanism.

  4. Semi-inclusive charged-pion electroproduction off protons and deuterons: Cross sections, ratios, and access to the quark-parton model at low energies

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Asaturyan, R.; Ent, R.; Mkrtchyan, H.; Navasardyan, T.; Tadevosyan, V.; Adams, G. S.; Ahmidouch, A.; Angelescu, T.; Arrington, J.; Asaturyan, A.; et al

    2012-01-01

    A large set of cross sections for semi-inclusive electroproduction of charged pions (π±) from both proton and deuteron targets was measured. The data are in the deep-inelastic scattering region with invariant mass squared W2 > 4 GeV2 and range in four-momentum transfer squared 2 < Q2 < 4 (GeV/c)2, and cover a range in the Bjorken scaling variable 0.2 < x < 0.6. The fractional energy of the pions spans a range 0.3 < z < 1, with small transverse momenta with respect to the virtual-photon direction, Pt2 < 0.2 (GeV/c)2. The invariant mass that goes undetected, Mx or W',more » is in the nucleon resonance region, W' < 2 GeV. The new data conclusively show the onset of quark-hadron duality in this process, and the relation of this phenomenon to the high-energy factorization ansatz of electron-quark scattering and subsequent quark → pion production mechanisms. The x, z and Pt2 dependences of several ratios (the ratios of favored-unfavored fragmentation functions, charged pion ratios, deuteron-hydrogen and aluminum-deuteron ratios for π+ and π-) have been studied. The ratios are found to be in good agreement with expectations based upon a high-energy quark-parton model description. We find the azimuthal dependences to be small, as compared to exclusive pion electroproduction, and consistent with theoretical expectations based on tree-level factorization in terms of transverse-momentum-dependent parton distribution and fragmentation functions. In the context of a simple model, the initial transverse momenta of d quarks are found to be slightly smaller than for u quarks, while the transverse momentum width of the favored fragmentation function is about the same as for the unfavored one, and both fragmentation widths are larger than the quark widths.« less

  5. ..&rrbt, Chief, Industrial Hy&na Branch, HerlthbrSas8byLaboratoly

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    tf..@ ..&rrbt, Chief, Industrial Hy&na Branch, HerlthbrSas8byLaboratoly ;,.; , ' 1 ' @@w-w 3, 1954 P. B. Klevin, Indurtrial Hygiexn J5rantah, Barrlei &'afelky Lab0raM~ : . .A , 3 t :;p,: . NATIONAL LEiD OF OHIO ROLLINO OFERATIONS AT SIHONr>s SAW 6 STEEL- Amm', +I& y9, <: '.. SmBoLt HSHtPBK ' -: - St. Louis Area Office at the Simnds Saw and Steel Co., k&port, NJ., on tha &boVe clrtm, I oblruloed tb Mat;Lonal Uad umu&m and thorium roll- ing operations which were

  6. Fractional charge and spin errors in self-consistent Greens function theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, Jordan J. Kananenka, Alexei A.; Zgid, Dominika

    2015-05-21

    We examine fractional charge and spin errors in self-consistent Greens function theory within a second-order approximation (GF2). For GF2, it is known that the summation of diagrams resulting from the self-consistent solution of the Dyson equation removes the divergences pathological to second-order Mller-Plesset (MP2) theory for strong correlations. In the language often used in density functional theory contexts, this means GF2 has a greatly reduced fractional spin error relative to MP2. The natural question then is what effect, if any, does the Dyson summation have on the fractional charge error in GF2? To this end, we generalize our previous implementation of GF2 to open-shell systems and analyze its fractional spin and charge errors. We find that like MP2, GF2 possesses only a very small fractional charge error, and consequently minimal many electron self-interaction error. This shows that GF2 improves on the critical failings of MP2, but without altering the positive features that make it desirable. Furthermore, we find that GF2 has both less fractional charge and fractional spin errors than typical hybrid density functionals as well as random phase approximation with exchange.

  7. Remedial investigation report on Chestnut Ridge Operable Unit 2 (filled coal ash pond/Upper McCoy Branch) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 2: Appendixes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    This report comprises appendices A--J which support the Y-12 Plant`s remedial action report involving Chestnut Ridge Operable Unit 2 (filled coal ash pond/Upper McCoy Branch). The appendices cover the following: Sampling fish from McCoy Branch; well and piezometer logs; ecological effects of contaminants in McCoy Branch 1989-1990; heavy metal bioaccumulation data; microbes in polluted sediments; and baseline human health risk assessment data.

  8. Unpolarised TMD Distribution and Fragmentation Functions from recent HERMES and COMPASS Semi-inclusive Deep Inelastic Scattering Multiplicities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prokudin, Alexey; Anselmino, Mauro; Boglione, Mariaelena; Melis, Stefano; Gonzalez, J. O.

    2014-10-01

    The unpolarised transverse momentum dependent distribution and fragmentation functions (TMDs) are extracted from HERMES and COMPASS experimental measurements of semi- inclusive deep inelastic scattering multiplicities for charged hadron production. A simple factorised functional form of the TMDs is adopted, with a Gaussian dependence on the intrinsic transverse momentum, which turns out to be quite adequate in shape.

  9. Parton intrinsic motion in inclusive particle production: unpolarized cross sections, single spin asymmetries, and the Sivers effect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D'Alesio, Umberto; Murgia, Francesco

    2004-10-01

    The relevance of intrinsic (or primordial) transverse momentum of partons in the inclusive production of particles at high energy and moderately large p{sub T} has been known for a long time, beginning with Drell-Yan and diphoton processes, and continuing with photon and meson production in hadronic collisions. In view of its renewed interest in the context of polarized processes and single spin asymmetries we perform, in the framework of perturbative QCD with the inclusion of spin and k{sub perpendicular} effects, a detailed analysis of several such processes in different kinematical situations. We show that the inclusion of these effects leads, at the level of accuracy reachable in this approach, to an overall satisfactory agreement between theoretical predictions and experimental unpolarized data, thus giving support to the study of spin effects and single spin asymmetries within the same scheme. We present results for transverse single spin asymmetries, generated by the so-called Sivers effect, in inclusive pion and photon production in proton-proton collisions. We compare our results with the available experimental data and with previous results obtained using simplified versions of this approach.

  10. Measurement of pretzelosity asymmetry of charged pion production in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering on a polarized He target

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, Y.; Qian, X.; Allada, K.; Dutta, C.

    2014-11-01

    An experiment to measure single-spin asymmetries in semi-inclusive production of charged pions in deep-inelastic scattering on a transversely polarized He target was performed at Jefferson Lab in the kinematic region of 0.16 on He3 and on neutron pretzelosity asymmetries are consistent with zero within experimental uncertainties.

  11. Structure of classical affine and classical affine fractional W-algebras

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suh, Uhi Rinn

    2015-01-15

    We introduce a classical BRST complex (See Definition 3.2.) and show that one can construct a classical affine W-algebra via the complex. This definition clarifies that classical affine W-algebras can be considered as quasi-classical limits of quantum affine W-algebras. We also give a definition of a classical affine fractional W-algebra as a Poisson vertex algebra. As in the classical affine case, a classical affine fractional W-algebra has two compatible λ-brackets and is isomorphic to an algebra of differential polynomials as a differential algebra. When a classical affine fractional W-algebra is associated to a minimal nilpotent, we describe explicit forms of free generators and compute λ-brackets between them. Provided some assumptions on a classical affine fractional W-algebra, we find an infinite sequence of integrable systems related to the algebra, using the generalized Drinfel’d and Sokolov reduction.

  12. A Comparison of Multiscale Variations of Decade-long Cloud Fractions...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    A Comparison of Multiscale Variations of Decade-long Cloud Fractions from Six Different Platforms over the Southern Great Plains in the United States Citation Details In-Document ...

  13. Apparatus and method for rapid separation and detection of hydrocarbon fractions in a fluid stream

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sluder, Charles S.; Storey, John M.; Lewis, Sr., Samuel A.

    2013-01-22

    An apparatus and method for rapid fractionation of hydrocarbon phases in a sample fluid stream are disclosed. Examples of the disclosed apparatus and method include an assembly of elements in fluid communication with one another including one or more valves and at least one sorbent chamber for removing certain classifications of hydrocarbons and detecting the remaining fractions using a detector. The respective ratios of hydrocarbons are determined by comparison with a non separated fluid stream.

  14. SU-E-J-105: Stromal-Epithelial Responses to Fractionated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qayyum, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The stromal-epithelial-cell interactions that are responsible for directing normal breast-tissue development and maintenance play a central role in the progression of breast cancer. In the present study, we developed three-dimensional (3-D) cell co-cultures used to study cancerous mammary cell responses to fractionated radiotherapy. In particular, we focused on the role of the reactive stroma in determining the therapeutic ratio for postsurgical treatment. Methods: Cancerous human mammary epithelial cells were cultured in a 3-D collagen matrix with human fibroblasts stimulated by various concentrations of transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-?1). These culture samples were designed to model the post-lumpectomy mammary stroma in the presence of residual cancer cells. We tracked over time the changes in medium stiffness, fibroblast-cell activation (conversion to cancer activated fibroblasts (CAF)), and proliferation of both cell types under a variety of fractionated radiotherapy protocols. Samples were exposed to 6 MV X-rays from a linear accelerator in daily fraction sizes of 90, 180 and 360 cGy over five days in a manner consistent with irradiation exposure during radiotherapy. Results: We found in fractionation studies with fibroblasts and CAF that higher doses per fraction may be more effective early on in deactivating cancer-harboring cellular environments. Higher-dose fraction schemes inhibit contractility in CAF and prevent differentiation of fibroblasts, thereby metabolically uncoupling tumor cells from their surrounding stroma. Yet, over a longer time period, the higher dose fractions may slow wound healing and increase ECM stiffening that could stimulate proliferation of surviving cancer cells. Conclusion: The findings suggest that dose escalation to the region with residual disease can deactivate the reactive stroma, thus minimizing the cancer promoting features of the cellular environment. Large-fraction irradiation may be used to sterilize

  15. STELLAR POPULATIONS OF Ly{alpha} EMITTERS AT z {approx} 6-7: CONSTRAINTS ON THE ESCAPE FRACTION OF IONIZING PHOTONS FROM GALAXY BUILDING BLOCKS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ono, Yoshiaki; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro; Okamura, Sadanori; Masami Ouchi; Dunlop, James; Farrah, Duncan; McLure, Ross

    2010-12-01

    We investigate the stellar populations of Ly{alpha} emitters (LAEs) at z = 5.7 and 6.6 in a 0.65 deg{sup 2} sky of the Subaru/XMM-Newton Deep Survey (SXDS) Field, using deep images taken with the Subaru/Suprime-Cam, United Kingdom Infrared Telescope/Wide Field Infrared Camera, and Spitzer/Infrared Array Camera (IRAC). We produce stacked multiband images at each redshift from 165 (z = 5.7) and 91 (z = 6.6) IRAC-undetected objects to derive typical spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of z {approx} 6-7 LAEs for the first time. The stacked LAEs have as blue UV continua as the Hubble Space Telescope (HST)/Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) z-dropout galaxies of similar M{sub UV}, with a spectral slope {beta} {approx} -3, but at the same time they have red UV-to-optical colors with detection in the 3.6 {mu}m band. Using SED fitting we find that the stacked LAEs have low stellar masses of {approx}(3-10) x 10{sup 7} M{sub sun}, very young ages of {approx}1-3 Myr, negligible dust extinction, and strong nebular emission from the ionized interstellar medium, although the z = 6.6 object is fitted similarly well with high-mass models without nebular emission; inclusion of nebular emission reproduces the red UV-to-optical colors while keeping the UV colors sufficiently blue. We infer that typical LAEs at z {approx} 6-7 are building blocks of galaxies seen at lower redshifts. We find a tentative decrease in the Ly{alpha} escape fraction from z = 5.7 to 6.6, which may imply an increase in the intergalactic medium neutral fraction. From the minimum contribution of nebular emission required to fit the observed SEDs, we place an upper limit on the escape fraction of ionizing photons of f {sup ion}{sub esc} {approx} 0.6 at z = 5.7 and {approx}0.9 at z = 6.6. We also compare the stellar populations of our LAEs with those of stacked HST/WFC3 z-dropout galaxies.

  16. X-RAY CONSTRAINTS ON THE LOCAL SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLE OCCUPATION FRACTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Brendan P.; Gallo, Elena; Baldassare, Vivienne; Greene, Jenny E.; Kelly, Brandon C.; Treu, Tommaso; Woo, Jong-Hak

    2015-01-20

    Distinct seed formation mechanisms are imprinted upon the fraction of dwarf galaxies currently containing a central supermassive black hole. Seeding by Population III remnants is expected to produce a higher occupation fraction than is generated with direct gas collapse precursors. Chandra observations of nearby early-type galaxies can directly detect even low-level supermassive black hole activity, and the active fraction immediately provides a firm lower limit to the occupation fraction. Here, we use the volume-limited AMUSE surveys of ?200 optically selected early-type galaxies to characterize simultaneously, for the first time, the occupation fraction and the scaling of L {sub X} with M {sub star}, accounting for intrinsic scatter, measurement uncertainties, and X-ray limits. For early-type galaxies with M {sub star} < 10{sup 10} M {sub ?}, we obtain a lower limit to the occupation fraction of >20% (at 95% confidence), but full occupation cannot be excluded. The preferred dependence of log L {sub X} upon log M {sub star} has a slope of ?0.7-0.8, consistent with the ''downsizing'' trend previously identified from the AMUSE data set, and a uniform Eddington efficiency is disfavored at ?2?. We provide guidelines for the future precision with which these parameters may be refined with larger or more sensitive samples.

  17. New developments in the processing of the non ferrous metal fraction of car scrap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dalmijn, W.L.; Houwelingen, J.A. van

    1995-12-31

    The processing of scrap and scrap cars starts with size reduction by a hammermill, or shredder. After the liberation the magnetic fraction is removed. The remaining nonmagnetic fraction mixed with other materials is screened and each fraction is processed separately. The increased use of plastic has a negative effect on the recovery of metals and waste production. At Huron Valley, Belleville Michigan, USA, the non-ferrous fraction from 5 million obsolete cars per year, containing 200,000 tons of non-ferrous metal, is processed. Aluminium is recovered with a heavy medium separation process and concentrated with eddy current separators. The remaining heavy non-ferrous fraction is concentrated by a new combination of eddy current separation and image processing. After this separation process the zinc fraction is melted and refined and the copper, brass, stainless steel and other high-quality concentrates are sold to the secondary industries. The recycling of car scrap has become an important source of metals and materials for the secondary materials processing industry.

  18. Noniterative Inclusion of the Triply and Quadruply Excited Clusters: The Locally Renormalized Perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kowalski, Karol; De Jong, Wibe A.

    2006-08-31

    Noniterative inclusion of the higher=order clusters has been a subject of intensive studies aimed at developing a well balanced description of individual many-body contributions for entire ground-state potential energy surfaces. In traditional approaches, the connected quadruples are estimated directly based on perturbative arguments, which leads to excellent agreement with full CI results near the equilibrium geometry and increasingly worse energies for larger internuclear stretches. As a possible improvement to this situation, two techniques are considered as especially promising: perturbative approaches based on the similarity transformed Hamiltonians and renormalization schemes both in global and local formulation. Following the latter strategy we adopted the recently introduced Numerator-Denominator Connected expansion (NDC) [ K. Kowalski, P. Piecuch, J. Chem. Phys. 122 (2005) [074107] as an effective tool for designing new forms of noniterative corrections accounting for the joint effect of triples and quadruples. The performance of the ensuing locally renormalized CCSD(TQ) approaches (LR-CCSD(TQ) is illustrated on several examples that require either going beyond the triples approximation or describing very subtle effects encountered in Van der Waals complexes. Comparisons with other noniterative approaches are also made and some issues regarding the size-extensivity of the locally renormalized methods are addressed.

  19. ARM: Fractional cloud cover, clear-sky and all-sky shortwave flux for each of 25 individual SGP facilities.

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Krista Gaustad; Laura Riihimaki

    Fractional cloud cover, clear-sky and all-sky shortwave flux for each of 25 individual SGP facilities.

  20. ARM: Fractional cloud cover, clear-sky and all-sky shortwave flux for each of 25 individual SGP facilities.

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Krista Gaustad; Laura Riihimaki

    1997-01-01

    Fractional cloud cover, clear-sky and all-sky shortwave flux for each of 25 individual SGP facilities.

  1. A BAYESIAN APPROACH TO LOCATING THE RED GIANT BRANCH TIP MAGNITUDE. II. DISTANCES TO THE SATELLITES OF M31

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conn, A. R.; Parker, Q. A.; Zucker, D. B.; Ibata, R. A.; Martin, N. F.; Lewis, G. F.; McConnachie, A. W.; Irwin, M. J.; Chapman, S. C.; Tanvir, N.; Fardal, M. A.; Ferguson, A. M. N.; Valls-Gabaud, D.

    2012-10-10

    In 'A Bayesian Approach to Locating the Red Giant Branch Tip Magnitude (Part I)', a new technique was introduced for obtaining distances using the tip of the red giant branch (TRGB) standard candle. Here we describe a useful complement to the technique with the potential to further reduce the uncertainty in our distance measurements by incorporating a matched-filter weighting scheme into the model likelihood calculations. In this scheme, stars are weighted according to their probability of being true object members. We then re-test our modified algorithm using random-realization artificial data to verify the validity of the generated posterior probability distributions (PPDs) and proceed to apply the algorithm to the satellite system of M31, culminating in a three-dimensional view of the system. Further to the distributions thus obtained, we apply a satellite-specific prior on the satellite distances to weight the resulting distance posterior distributions, based on the halo density profile. Thus in a single publication, using a single method, a comprehensive coverage of the distances to the companion galaxies of M31 is presented, encompassing the dwarf spheroidals Andromedas I-III, V, IX-XXVII, and XXX along with NGC 147, NGC 185, M33, and M31 itself. Of these, the distances to Andromedas XXIV-XXVII and Andromeda XXX have never before been derived using the TRGB. Object distances are determined from high-resolution tip magnitude posterior distributions generated using the Markov Chain Monte Carlo technique and associated sampling of these distributions to take into account uncertainties in foreground extinction and the absolute magnitude of the TRGB as well as photometric errors. The distance PPDs obtained for each object both with and without the aforementioned prior are made available to the reader in tabular form. The large object coverage takes advantage of the unprecedented size and photometric depth of the Pan-Andromeda Archaeological Survey. Finally, a

  2. A two transition state model for radical-molecule reactions : applications to isomeric branching in the OH-isoprene reaction.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenwald, E. E.; North, S. W.; Georgievskii, Y.; Klippenstein, S. J.; Chemistry; Texas A&M Univ.; SNL

    2007-06-28

    A two transition state model is applied to the prediction of the isomeric branching in the addition of hydroxyl radical to isoprene. The outer transition state is treated with phase space theory fitted to long-range transition state theory calculations on an electrostatic potential energy surface. High-level quantum chemical estimates are applied to the treatment of the inner transition state. A one-dimensional master equation based on an analytic reduction from two-dimensions for a particular statistical assumption about the rotational part of the energy transfer kernel is employed in the calculation of the pressure dependence of the addition process. We find that an accurate treatment of the two separate transition state regions, at the energy and angular momentum resolved level, is essential to the prediction of the temperature dependence of the addition rate. The transition from a dominant outer transition state to a dominant inner transition state is shown to occur at about 275 K, with significant effects from both transition states over the 30-500 K temperature range. Modest adjustments in the ab initio predicted inner saddle point energies yield predictions that are in quantitative agreement with the available high-pressure limit experimental observations and qualitative agreement with those in the falloff regime. The theoretically predicted capture rate is reproduced to within 10% by the expression [1.71 x 10-10(T/298)-2.58 exp(-608.6/RT) + 5.47 x 10-11(T/298)-1.78 exp(-97.3/RT); with R = 1.987 and T in K] cm3 molecule-1 s-1 over the 30-500 K range. A 300 K branching ratio of 0.67:0.02:0.02:0.29 was determined for formation of the four possible OH-isoprene adduct isomers 1, 2, 3, and 4, respectively, and was found to be relatively insensitive to temperature. An Arrhenius activation energy of -0.77 kcal/mol was determined for the high-pressure addition rate constants around 300 K.

  3. Resole resin products derived from fractionated organic and aqueous condensates made by fast-pyrolysis of biomass materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chum, H.L.; Black, S.K.; Diebold, J.P.; Kreibich, R.E.

    1993-08-10

    A process for preparing phenol-formaldehyde resole resins by fractionating organic and aqueous condensates made by fast-pyrolysis of biomass materials while using a carrier gas to move feed into a reactor to produce phenolic-containing/neutrals in which portions of the phenol normally contained in said resins are replaced by a phenolic/neutral fractions extract obtained by fractionation.

  4. Resole resin products derived from fractionated organic and aqueous condensates made by fast-pyrolysis of biomass materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chum, Helena L.; Black, Stuart K.; Diebold, James P.; Kreibich, Roland E.

    1993-01-01

    A process for preparing phenol-formaldehyde resole resins by fractionating organic and aqueous condensates made by fast-pyrolysis of biomass materials while using a carrier gas to move feed into a reactor to produce phenolic-containing/neutrals in which portions of the phenol normally contained in said resins are replaced by a phenolic/neutral fractions extract obtained by fractionation.

  5. Ash reduction strategies in corn stover facilitated by anatomical and size fractionation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lacey, Jeffrey A.; Emerson, Rachel M.; Thompson, David N.; Westover, Tyler L.

    2016-04-22

    There is growing interest internationally to produce fuels from renewable biomass resources. Inorganic components of biomass feedstocks, referred to collectively as ash, damage equipment and decrease yields in thermal conversion processes, and decrease feedstock value for biochemical conversion processes. Decreasing the ash content of feedstocks improves conversion efficiency and lowers process costs. Because physiological ash is unevenly distributed in the plant, mechanical processes can be used to separate fractions of the plant based on ash content. This study focuses on the ash separation that can be achieved by separating corn stover by particle size and anatomical fraction. Baled corn stovermore » was hand-separated into anatomical fractions, ground to <19.1 mm, and size separated using six sieves ranging from 9.5 to 0.150 mm. Size fractions were analyzed for total ash content and ash composition. Particle size distributions observed for the anatomical fractions varied considerably. Cob particles were primarily 2.0 mm or greater, while most of the sheath and husk particles were 2.0 mm and smaller. Particles of leaves greater than 0.6 mm contained the greatest amount of total ash, ranging from approximately 8 to 13% dry weight of the total original material, while the fractions with particles smaller than 0.6 mm contained less than 2% of the total ash of the original material. As a result, based on the overall ash content and the elemental ash, specific anatomical and size fractions can be separated to optimize the feedstocks being delivered to biofuels conversion processes and minimize the need for more expensive ash reduction treatments.« less

  6. Escalation of radiation dose beyond 30 Gy in 10 fractions for metastatic spinal cord compression

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rades, Dirk . E-mail: Rades.Dirk@gmx.net; Karstens, Johann H.; Hoskin, Peter J.; Rudat, Volker; Veninga, Theo; Schild, Steven E.; Dunst, Juergen

    2007-02-01

    Purpose: In many centers worldwide, radiotherapy for metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC) is performed with 30 Gy in 10 fractions. This study investigated the potential benefit of dose escalation. Methods and Materials: Data from 922 patients with carcinomas causing MSCC were retrospectively evaluated. The outcome of 345 patients treated with 10 fractions of 3 Gy in 2 weeks was compared with the outcomes of 577 patients treated with 37.5 Gy in 15 fractions within 3 weeks or 40 Gy in 20 fractions within 4 weeks. Additionally, 10 potential prognostic factors were investigated: age, gender, performance status, tumor type, interval between cancer diagnosis and MSCC, number of involved vertebrae, other bone and visceral metastases, ambulatory status, and the interval to the development of motor deficits before radiotherapy. Results: Motor function improved in 19% of patients after 30 Gy in 10 fractions and in 22% after greater doses (p = 0.31). The local control (p = 0.28) and survival (p = 0.85) rates were not significantly different with doses >30 Gy. Better functional outcome was associated with the absence of visceral metastases, an interval between tumor diagnosis and MSCC of >12 months, ambulatory status, and an interval to the development of motor deficits of >7 days. Improved local control was significantly associated with no visceral metastases, improved survival with favorable histologic features (breast or prostate cancer), no visceral metastases, ambulatory status, an interval between cancer diagnosis and MSCC of >12 months, and an interval to the development of motor deficits of >7days. Conclusion: Escalation of the radiation dose to >30 Gy in 10 fractions did not improve the outcomes in terms of motor function, local control, or survival but did increase the treatment time for these frequently debilitated patients. Therefore, doses >30 Gy in 10 fractions are not recommended.

  7. STRONG VARIABLE ULTRAVIOLET EMISSION FROM Y GEM: ACCRETION ACTIVITY IN AN ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH STAR WITH A BINARY COMPANION?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sahai, Raghvendra; Neill, James D.; Gil de Paz, Armando; Sanchez Contreras, Carmen

    2011-10-20

    Binarity is believed to dramatically affect the history and geometry of mass loss in asymptotic giant branch (AGB) and post-AGB stars, but observational evidence of binarity is sorely lacking. As part of a project to look for hot binary companions to cool AGB stars using the Galaxy Evolution Explorer archive, we have discovered a late-M star, Y Gem, to be a source of strong and variable UV emission. Y Gem is a prime example of the success of our technique of UV imaging of AGB stars in order to search for binary companions. Y Gem's large and variable UV flux makes it one of the most prominent examples of a late-AGB star with a mass accreting binary companion. The UV emission is most likely due to emission associated with accretion activity and a disk around a main-sequence companion star. The physical mechanism generating the UV emission is extremely energetic, with an integrated luminosity of a few x L{sub sun} at its peak. We also find weak CO J = 2-1 emission from Y Gem with a very narrow line profile (FWHM of 3.4 km s{sup -1}). Such a narrow line is unlikely to arise in an outflow and is consistent with emission from an orbiting, molecular reservoir of radius 300 AU. Y Gem may be the progenitor of the class of post-AGB stars which are binaries and possess disks but no outflows.

  8. Environmental geophysics of the Pilot Plant on the west branch of Canal Creek, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGinnis, L.D.; Miller, S.F.; Daudt, C.R.; Thompson, M.D.; Borden, H.; Benson, M.; Wrobel, J.

    1994-05-01

    Plans to demolish and remediate the Pilot Plant complex in the Edgewood Area of Aberdeen Proving Ground have served to initiate a series of nonintrusive, environmental-geophysical studies. The studies are assisting in the location and identification of pipes, tanks, trenches, and liquid waste in the subsurface. Multiple databases have been integrated to provide support for detection of underground utilities and to determine the stratigraphy and lithology of the subsurface. The studies were conducted within the double security fence and exterior to the double fence, down gradient toward the west branch of Canal Creek. To determine if contaminants found in the creek were associated with the Pilot Plant, both the east and west banks were included in the study area. Magnetic, conductivity, inductive emf, and ground-penetrating-radar anomalies outline buried pipes, trenches, and various pieces of hardware associated with building activities. Ground-penetrating-radar imagery also defines a paleovalley cut 30 ft into Potomac Group sediments of Cretaceous age. The paleovalley crosses the site between Building E5654 and the Pilot Plant fence. The valley is environmentally significant because it may control the pathways of contaminants. The Pilot Plant complex was used to manufacture CC2 Impregnite and incapacitating agents; it also served as a production facility for nerve agents.

  9. Magnetohydrodynamics and deep mixing in evolved stars. I. Two- and three-dimensional analytical models for the asymptotic giant branch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nucci, M. C.; Busso, M. E-mail: busso@fisica.unipg.it

    2014-06-01

    The advection of thermonuclear ashes by magnetized domains emerging near the H shell was suggested to explain asymptotic giant branch (AGB) star abundances. Here we verify this idea quantitatively through exact MHD models. Starting with a simple two-dimensional (2D) geometry and in an inertia frame, we study plasma equilibria avoiding the complications of numerical simulations. We show that below the convective envelope of an AGB star, variable magnetic fields induce a natural expansion, permitted by the almost ideal MHD conditions, in which the radial velocity grows as the second power of the radius. We then study the convective envelope, where the complexity of macroturbulence allows only for a schematic analytical treatment. Here the radial velocity depends on the square root of the radius. We then verify the robustness of our results with 3D calculations for the velocity, showing that for both studied regions the solution previously found can be seen as a planar section of a more complex behavior, in which the average radial velocity retains the same dependency on the radius found in 2D. As a final check, we compare our results to approximate descriptions of buoyant magnetic structures. For realistic boundary conditions, the envelope crossing times are sufficient to disperse in the huge convective zone any material transported, suggesting magnetic advection as a promising mechanism for deep mixing. The mixing velocities are smaller than for convection but larger than for diffusion and adequate for extra mixing in red giants.

  10. Analysis of Oxygenated Compounds in Hydrotreated Biomass Fast Pyrolysis Oil Distillate Fractions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christensen, Earl D.; Chupka, Gina; Luecke, Jon; Smurthwaite, Tricia D.; Alleman, Teresa L.; Iisa, Kristiina; Franz, James A.; Elliott, Douglas C.; McCormick, Robert L.

    2011-10-06

    Three hydrotreated bio-oils with different oxygen contents (8.2, 4.9, and 0.4 w/w) were distilled to produce Light, Naphtha, Jet, Diesel, and Gasoil boiling range fractions that were characterized for oxygen containing species by a variety of analytical methods. The bio-oils were originally generated from lignocellulosic biomass in an entrained-flow fast pyrolysis reactor. Analyses included elemental composition, carbon type distribution by {sup 13}C NMR, acid number, GC-MS, volatile organic acids by LC, and carbonyl compounds by DNPH derivatization and LC. Acid number titrations employed an improved titrant-electrode combination with faster response that allowed detection of multiple endpoints in many samples and for acid values attributable to carboxylic acids and to phenols to be distinguished. Results of these analyses showed that the highest oxygen content bio-oil fractions contained oxygen as carboxylic acids, carbonyls, aryl ethers, phenols, and alcohols. Carboxylic acids and carbonyl compounds detected in this sample were concentrated in the Light, Naphtha, and Jet fractions (<260 C boiling point). Carboxylic acid content of all of the high oxygen content fractions was likely too high for these materials to be considered as fuel blendstocks although potential for blending with crude oil or refinery intermediate streams may exist for the Diesel and Gasoil fractions. The 4.9 % oxygen sample contained almost exclusively phenolic compounds found to be present throughout the boiling range of this sample, but imparting measurable acidity primarily in the Light, Naphtha and Jet fractions. Additional study is required to understand what levels of the weakly acidic phenols could be tolerated in a refinery feedstock. The Diesel and Gasoil fractions from this upgraded oil had low acidity but still contained 3 to 4 wt% oxygen present as phenols that could not be specifically identified. These materials appear to have excellent potential as refinery feedstocks and some

  11. Microbial Enhanced Oil Recovery in Fractional-Wet Systems: A Pore-Scale Investigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Armstrong, Ryan T.; Wildenschild, Dorthe

    2012-10-24

    Microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) is a technology that could potentially increase the tertiary recovery of oil from mature oil formations. However, the efficacy of this technology in fractional-wet systems is unknown, and the mechanisms involved in oil mobilization therefore need further investigation. Our MEOR strategy consists of the injection of ex situ produced metabolic byproducts produced by Bacillus mojavensis JF-2 (which lower interfacial tension (IFT) via biosurfactant production) into fractional-wet cores containing residual oil. Two different MEOR flooding solutions were tested; one solution contained both microbes and metabolic byproducts while the other contained only the metabolic byproducts. The columns were imaged with X-ray computed microtomography (CMT) after water flooding, and after MEOR, which allowed for the evaluation of the pore-scale processes taking place during MEOR. Results indicate that the larger residual oil blobs and residual oil held under relatively low capillary pressures were the main fractions recovered during MEOR. Residual oil saturation, interfacial curvatures, and oil blob sizes were measured from the CMT images and used to develop a conceptual model for MEOR in fractional-wet systems. Overall, results indicate that MEOR was effective at recovering oil from fractional-wet systems with reported additional oil recovered (AOR) values between 44 and 80%; the highest AOR values were observed in the most oil-wet system.

  12. Brain necrosis after fractionated radiation therapy: Is the halftime for repair longer than we thought?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bender, Edward T.

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To derive a radiobiological model that enables the estimation of brain necrosis and spinal cord myelopathy rates for a variety of fractionation schemes, and to compare repair effects between brain and spinal cord. Methods: Sigmoidal dose response relationships for brain radiation necrosis and spinal cord myelopathy are derived from clinical data using nonlinear regression. Three different repair models are considered and the repair halftimes are included as regression parameters. Results: For radiation necrosis, a repair halftime of 38.1 (range 6.9-76) h is found with monoexponential repair, while for spinal cord myelopathy, a repair halftime of 4.1 (range 0-8) h is found. The best-fit alpha beta ratio is 0.96 (range 0.24-1.73)Conclusions: A radiobiological model that includes repair corrections can describe the clinical data for a variety of fraction sizes, fractionation schedules, and total doses. Modeling suggests a relatively long repair halftime for brain necrosis. This study suggests that the repair halftime for late radiation effects in the brain may be longer than is currently thought. If confirmed in future studies, this may lead to a re-evaluation of radiation fractionation schedules for some CNS diseases, particularly for those diseases where fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy is used.

  13. Mathematical treatment of isotopologue and isotopomer speciation and fractionation in biochemical kinetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maggi, F.M.; Riley, W.J.

    2009-11-01

    We present a mathematical treatment of the kinetic equations that describe isotopologue and isotopomer speciation and fractionation during enzyme-catalyzed biochemical reactions. These equations, presented here with the name GEBIK (general equations for biochemical isotope kinetics) and GEBIF (general equations for biochemical isotope fractionation), take into account microbial biomass and enzyme dynamics, reaction stoichiometry, isotope substitution number, and isotope location within each isotopologue and isotopomer. In addition to solving the complete GEBIK and GEBIF, we also present and discuss two approximations to the full solutions under the assumption of biomass-free and enzyme steady-state, and under the quasi-steady-state assumption as applied to the complexation rate. The complete and approximate approaches are applied to observations of biological denitrification in soils. Our analysis highlights that the full GEBIK and GEBIF provide a more accurate description of concentrations and isotopic compositions of substrates and products throughout the reaction than do the approximate forms. We demonstrate that the isotopic effects of a biochemical reaction depend, in the most general case, on substrate and complex concentrations and, therefore, the fractionation factor is a function of time. We also demonstrate that inverse isotopic effects can occur for values of the fractionation factor smaller than 1, and that reactions that do not discriminate isotopes do not necessarily imply a fractionation factor equal to 1.

  14. Chromium Isotope Fractionation During Reduction of Cr(VI) Under Saturated Flow Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jamieson-Hanes, Julia H.; Gibson, Blair D.; Lindsay, Matthew B.J.; Kim, Yeongkyoo; Ptacek, Carol J.; Blowes, David W.

    2012-10-25

    Chromium isotopes are potentially useful indicators of Cr(VI) reduction reactions in groundwater flow systems; however, the influence of transport on Cr isotope fractionation has not been fully examined. Laboratory batch and column experiments were conducted to evaluate isotopic fractionation of Cr during Cr(VI) reduction under both static and controlled flow conditions. Organic carbon was used to reduce Cr(VI) in simulated groundwater containing 20 mg L{sup -1} Cr(VI) in both batch and column experiments. Isotope measurements were performed on dissolved Cr on samples from the batch experiments, and on effluent and profile samples from the column experiment. Analysis of the residual solid-phase materials by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and by X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy confirmed association of Cr(III) with organic carbon in the column solids. Decreases in dissolved Cr(VI) concentrations were coupled with increases in {delta}{sup 53}Cr, indicating that Cr isotope enrichment occurred during reduction of Cr(VI). The {delta}{sup 53}Cr data from the column experiment was fit by linear regression yielding a fractionation factor ({alpha}) of 0.9979, whereas the batch experiments exhibited Rayleigh-type isotope fractionation ({alpha} = 0.9965). The linear characteristic of the column {delta}{sup 53}Cr data may reflect the contribution of transport on Cr isotope fractionation.

  15. Measurement of pretzelosity asymmetry of charged pion production in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering on a polarized He target

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Y.; Qian, X.; Allada, K.; Dutta, C.

    2014-11-01

    An experiment to measure single-spin asymmetries in semi-inclusive production of charged pions in deep-inelastic scattering on a transversely polarized He target was performed at Jefferson Lab in the kinematic region of 0.16 < x < 0.35 and 1.4 < Q < 2.7 GeV. Our results show that both ? on He3 and on neutron pretzelosity asymmetries are consistent with zero within experimental uncertainties.

  16. Magnetic properties of MnSb inclusions formed in GaSb matrix directly during molecular beam epitaxial growth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawniczak-Jablonska, Krystyna; Wolska, Anna; Klepka, Marcin T.; Kret, Slawomir; Kurowska, Boguslawa; Kowalski, Bogdan J.; Twardowski, Andrzej; Wasik, Dariusz; Kwiatkowski, Adam; Sadowski, Janusz

    2011-04-01

    Despite of intensive search for the proper semiconductor base materials for spintronic devices working at room temperature no appropriate material based on ferromagnetic semiconductors has been found so far. We demonstrate that the phase segregated system with MnSb hexagonal inclusions inside the GaSb matrix, formed directly during the molecular beam epitaxial growth reveals the ferromagnetic properties at room temperature and is a good candidate for exploitation in spintronics. Furthermore, the MnSb inclusions with only one crystalline structure were identified in this GaMn:MnSb granular material. The SQUID magnetometry confirmed that this material exhibits ferromagnetic like behavior starting from helium up to room temperature. Moreover, the magnetic anisotropy was found which was present also at room temperature, and it was proved that by choosing a proper substrate it is possible to control the direction of easy axis of inclusions' magnetization moment between in-plane and out-of-plane; the latter is important in view of potential applications in spintronic devices.

  17. Diamonds in the rough: a strong case for the inclusion of weak-intensity X-ray diffraction data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Jimin; Wing, Richard A.

    2014-05-01

    Here, new evidence is provided to show that the inclusion of weak-intensity, high-resolution X-ray diffraction data helps to improve the quality of experimental phases by imposing proper constraints on electron-density models during noncrystallographic symmetry averaging. Overwhelming evidence exists to show that the inclusion of weak-intensity, high-resolution X-ray diffraction data helps improve the refinement of atomic models by imposing strong constraints on individual and overall temperature B factors and thus the quality of crystal structures. Some researchers consider these data to be of little value and opt to discard them during data processing, particularly at medium and low resolution, at which individual B factors of atomic models cannot be refined. Here, new evidence is provided to show that the inclusion of these data helps to improve the quality of experimental phases by imposing proper constraints on electron-density models during noncrystallographic symmetry (NCS) averaging. Using electron-density correlation coefficients as criteria, the resolution of data has successfully been extended from 3.1 to 2.5 Å resolution with redundancy-independent merging R factors from below 100% to about 310%. It is further demonstrated that phase information can be fully extracted from observed amplitudes through de novo NCS averaging. Averaging starts with uniform density inside double-shelled spherical masks and NCS matrices that are derived from bound heavy-atom clusters at the vertices of cuboctahedrally symmetric protein particles.

  18. Fractional order PID controller for improvement of PMSM speed control in aerospace applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saraji, Ali Motalebi; Ghanbari, Mahmood

    2014-12-10

    Because of the benefits reduced size, cost and maintenance, noise, CO2 emissions and increased control flexibility and precision, to meet these expectations, electrical equipment increasingly utilize in modern aircraft systems and aerospace industry rather than conventional mechanic, hydraulic, and pneumatic power systems. Electric motor drives are capable of converting electrical power to drive actuators, pumps, compressors, and other subsystems at variable speeds. In the past decades, permanent magnet synchronous motor (PMSM) and brushless dc (BLDC) motor were investigated for aerospace applications such as aircraft actuators. In this paper, the fractional-order PID controller is used in the design of speed loop of PMSM speed control system. Having more parameters for tuning fractional order PID controller lead to good performance ratio to integer order. This good performance is shown by comparison fractional order PID controller with the conventional PI and tuned PID controller by Genetic algorithm in MATLAB soft wear.

  19. Enzymatic Digestibility of Corn Stover Fractions in Response to Fungal Pretreatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cui, Z. F.; Wan, C. X.; Shi, J.; Sykes, R. W.; Li, Y. B.

    2012-05-30

    Corn stover fractions (leaves, cobs, and stalks) were studied for enzymatic digestibility after pretreatment with a white rot fungus, Ceriporiopsis subvermispora. Among the three fractions, leaves had the least recalcitrance to fungal pretreatment and the lignin degradation reached 45% after 30 days of pretreatment. The lignin degradation of stalks and cobs was similar but was significantly lower than that of leaves (p < 0.05). For all fractions, xylan and glucan degradation followed a pattern similar to lignin degradation, with leaves having a significantly higher percentage of degradation (p < 0.05). Hydrolytic enzyme activity also revealed that the fungus was more active in the degradation of carbohydrates in leaves. As a result of fungal pretreatment, the highest sugar yield, however, was obtained with corn cobs.

  20. Power flow controller with a fractionally rated back-to-back converter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Divan, Deepakraj M.; Kandula, Rajendra Prasad; Prasai, Anish

    2016-03-08

    A power flow controller with a fractionally rated back-to-back (BTB) converter is provided. The power flow controller provide dynamic control of both active and reactive power of a power system. The power flow controller inserts a voltage with controllable magnitude and phase between two AC sources at the same frequency; thereby effecting control of active and reactive power flows between the two AC sources. A transformer may be augmented with a fractionally rated bi-directional Back to Back (BTB) converter. The fractionally rated BTB converter comprises a transformer side converter (TSC), a direct-current (DC) link, and a line side converter (LSC). By controlling the switches of the BTB converter, the effective phase angle between the two AC source voltages may be regulated, and the amplitude of the voltage inserted by the power flow controller may be adjusted with respect to the AC source voltages.

  1. Semi-inclusive charged-pion electroproduction off protons and deuterons: Cross sections, ratios, and access to the quark-parton model at low energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asaturyan, R.; Ent, R.; Mkrtchyan, H.; Navasardyan, T.; Tadevosyan, V.; Adams, G. S.; Ahmidouch, A.; Angelescu, T.; Arrington, J.; Asaturyan, A.; Baker, O. K.; Benmouna, N.; Bertoncini, C.; Blok, H. P.; Boeglin, W. U.; Bosted, P. E.; Breuer, H.; Christy, M. E.; Connell, S. H.; Cui, Y.; Dalton, M. M.; Danagoulian, S.; Day, D.; Dunne, J. A.; Dutta, D.; El Khayari, N.; Fenker, H. C.; Frolov, V. V.; Gan, L.; Gaskell, D.; Hafidi, K.; Hinton, W.; Holt, R. J.; Horn, T.; Huber, G. M.; Hungerford, E.; Jiang, X.; Jones, M.; Joo, K.; Kalantarians, N.; Kelly, J. J.; Keppel, C. E.; Kubarovsky, V.; Li, Y.; Liang, Y.; Mack, D.; Malace, S. P.; Markowitz, P.; McGrath, E.; McKee, P.; Meekins, D. G.; Mkrtchyan, A.; Moziak, B.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, I.; Opper, A. K.; Ostapenko, T.; Reimer, P. E.; Reinhold, J.; Roche, J.; Rock, S. E.; Schulte, E.; Segbefia, E.; Smith, C.; Smith, G. R.; Stoler, P.; Tang, L.; Ungaro, M.; Uzzle, A.; Vidakovic, S.; Villano, A.; Vulcan, W. F.; Wang, M.; Warren, G.; Wesselmann, F. R.; Wojtsekhowski, B.; Wood, S. A.; Xu, C.; Yuan, L.; Zheng, X.

    2012-01-01

    A large set of cross sections for semi-inclusive electroproduction of charged pions (π±) from both proton and deuteron targets was measured. The data are in the deep-inelastic scattering region with invariant mass squared W2 > 4 GeV2 and range in four-momentum transfer squared 2 < Q2 < 4 (GeV/c)2, and cover a range in the Bjorken scaling variable 0.2 < x < 0.6. The fractional energy of the pions spans a range 0.3 < z < 1, with small transverse momenta with respect to the virtual-photon direction, Pt2 < 0.2 (GeV/c)2. The invariant mass that goes undetected, Mx or W', is in the nucleon resonance region, W' < 2 GeV. The new data conclusively show the onset of quark-hadron duality in this process, and the relation of this phenomenon to the high-energy factorization ansatz of electron-quark scattering and subsequent quark → pion production mechanisms. The x, z and Pt2 dependences of several ratios (the ratios of favored-unfavored fragmentation functions, charged pion ratios, deuteron-hydrogen and aluminum-deuteron ratios for π+ and π-) have been studied. The ratios are found to be in good agreement with expectations based upon a high-energy quark-parton model description. We find the azimuthal dependences to be small, as compared to exclusive pion electroproduction, and consistent with theoretical expectations based on tree-level factorization in terms of transverse-momentum-dependent parton distribution and fragmentation functions. In the context of a simple model, the initial transverse momenta of d quarks are found to be slightly smaller than for u quarks, while the transverse momentum width of the favored fragmentation function is about the same as for the unfavored one, and both fragmentation widths are larger than the quark widths.

  2. Volumetric Image Guidance Using Carina vs Spine as Registration Landmarks for Conventionally Fractionated Lung Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lavoie, Caroline; Higgins, Jane; Bissonnette, Jean-Pierre; Le, Lisa W.; Sun, Alexander; Brade, Anthony; Hope, Andrew; Cho, John; Bezjak, Andrea

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: To compare the relative accuracy of 2 image guided radiation therapy methods using carina vs spine as landmarks and then to identify which landmark is superior relative to tumor coverage. Methods and Materials: For 98 lung patients, 2596 daily image-guidance cone-beam computed tomography scans were analyzed. Tattoos were used for initial patient alignment; then, spine and carina registrations were performed independently. A separate analysis assessed the adequacy of gross tumor volume, internal target volume, and planning target volume coverage on cone-beam computed tomography using the initial, middle, and final fractions of radiation therapy. Coverage was recorded for primary tumor (T), nodes (N), and combined target (T+N). Three scenarios were compared: tattoos alignment, spine registration, and carina registration. Results: Spine and carina registrations identified setup errors {>=}5 mm in 35% and 46% of fractions, respectively. The mean vector difference between spine and carina matching had a magnitude of 3.3 mm. Spine and carina improved combined target coverage, compared with tattoos, in 50% and 34% (spine) to 54% and 46% (carina) of the first and final fractions, respectively. Carina matching showed greater combined target coverage in 17% and 23% of fractions for the first and final fractions, respectively; with spine matching, this was only observed in 4% (first) and 6% (final) of fractions. Carina matching provided superior nodes coverage at the end of radiation compared with spine matching (P=.0006), without compromising primary tumor coverage. Conclusion: Frequent patient setup errors occur in locally advanced lung cancer patients. Spine and carina registrations improved combined target coverage throughout the treatment course, but carina matching provided superior combined target coverage.

  3. Precision Measurement of the Longitudinal Double-Spin Asymmetry for Inclusive Jet Production in Polarized Proton Collisions at ?s=200GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adamczyk, L.

    2015-08-26

    We report a new measurement of the midrapidity inclusive jet longitudinal double-spin asymmetry, A LL , in polarized pp collisions at center-of-mass energy ?s =200 GeV . The STAR data place stringent constraints on polarized parton distribution functions extracted at next-to-leading order from global analyses of inclusive deep-inelastic scattering (DIS), semi-inclusive DIS, and RHIC pp data. The measured asymmetries provide evidence at the 3? level for positive gluon polarization in the Bjorken-x region x>0.05 .

  4. Precision measurement of the longitudinal double-spin asymmetry for inclusive jet production in polarized proton collisions at √s = 200 GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adamczyk, L.

    2015-08-26

    We report a new measurement of the midrapidity inclusive jet longitudinal double-spin asymmetry, ALL, in polarized pp collisions at center-of-mass energy √s = 200 GeV. The STAR data place stringent constraints on polarized parton distribution functions extracted at next-to-leading order from global analyses of inclusive deep-inelastic scattering (DIS), semi-inclusive DIS, and RHIC pp data. Lastly, the measured asymmetries provide evidence at the 3σ level for positive gluon polarization in the Bjorken-x region x > 0.05 .

  5. Precision measurement of the longitudinal double-spin asymmetry for inclusive jet production in polarized proton collisions at √s = 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adamczyk, L.

    2015-08-26

    We report a new measurement of the midrapidity inclusive jet longitudinal double-spin asymmetry, ALL, in polarized pp collisions at center-of-mass energy √s = 200 GeV. The STAR data place stringent constraints on polarized parton distribution functions extracted at next-to-leading order from global analyses of inclusive deep-inelastic scattering (DIS), semi-inclusive DIS, and RHIC pp data. Lastly, the measured asymmetries provide evidence at the 3σ level for positive gluon polarization in the Bjorken-x region x > 0.05 .

  6. Identifying Wave-Packet Fractional Revivals by Means of Information Entropy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Romera, Elvira; Santos, Francisco de los

    2007-12-31

    Wave-packet fractional revivals is a relevant feature in the long time-scale evolution of a wide range of physical systems, including atoms, molecules, and nonlinear systems. We show that the sum of information entropies in both position and momentum conjugate spaces is an indicator of fractional revivals by analyzing three different model systems: (i) the infinite square well, (ii) a particle bouncing vertically against a wall in a gravitational field, and (iii) the vibrational dynamics of hydrogen iodide molecules. This description in terms of information entropies complements the usual one in terms of the autocorrelation function.

  7. Effects of bounded space in the solutions of time-space fractional diffusion equation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allami, M. H. [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shokri, B. [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Physics Department, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-12-15

    By using a recently proposed numerical method, the fractional diffusion equation with memory in a finite domain is solved for different asymmetry parameters and fractional orders. Some scaling laws are revisited in this condition, such as growth rate in a distance from pulse perturbation, the time when the perturbative peak reaches the other points, and advectionlike behavior as a result of asymmetry and memory. Conditions for negativity and instability of solutions are shown. Also up-hill transport and its time-space region are studied.

  8. Apparatus for measuring the local void fraction in a flowing liquid containing a gas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunn, P.F.

    1979-07-17

    The local void fraction in liquid containing a gas is measured by placing an impedance-variation probe in the liquid, applying a controlled voltage or current to the probe, and measuring the probe current or voltage. A circuit for applying the one electrical parameter and measuring the other includes a feedback amplifier that minimizes the effect of probe capacitance and a digitizer to provide a clean signal. Time integration of the signal provides a measure of the void fraction, and an oscilloscope display also shows bubble size and distribution.

  9. Apparatus for measuring the local void fraction in a flowing liquid containing a gas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunn, Patrick F.

    1981-01-01

    The local void fraction in liquid containing a gas is measured by placing an impedance-variation probe in the liquid, applying a controlled voltage or current to the probe, and measuring the probe current or voltage. A circuit for applying the one electrical parameter and measuring the other includes a feedback amplifier that minimizes the effect of probe capacitance and a digitizer to provide a clean signal. Time integration of the signal provides a measure of the void fraction, and an oscilloscope display also shows bubble size and distribution.

  10. Nucleosynthesis in helium-enriched asymptotic giant branch models: Implications for heavy element enrichment in ω Centauri

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karakas, Amanda I.; Marino, Anna F.; Nataf, David M.

    2014-03-20

    We investigate the effect of helium enrichment on the evolution and nucleosynthesis of low-mass asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars of 1.7 M {sub ☉} and 2.36 M {sub ☉} with a metallicity of Z = 0.0006 ([Fe/H] ≈–1.4). We calculate evolutionary sequences with the primordial helium abundance (Y = 0.24) and with helium-enriched compositions (Y = 0.30, 0.35, 0.40). For comparison, we calculate models of the same mass but at a lower metallicity Z = 0.0003 ([Fe/H] ≈–1.8) with Y = 0.24. Post-processing nucleosynthesis calculations are performed on each of the evolutionary sequences to determine the production of elements from hydrogen to bismuth. Elemental surface abundance predictions and stellar yields are presented for each model. The models with enriched helium have shorter main sequence and AGB lifetimes, and they enter the AGB with a more massive hydrogen-exhausted core than the primordial helium model. The main consequences are as follows: (1) low-mass AGB models with enhanced helium will evolve more than twice as fast, giving them the chance to contribute sooner to the chemical evolution of the forming globular clusters, and (2) the stellar yields will be strongly reduced relative to their primordial helium counterparts. An increase of ΔY = 0.10 at a given mass decreases the yields of carbon by up to ≈60% and of fluorine by up to 80%; it also decreases the yields of the s-process elements barium and lanthanum by ≈45%. While the yields of first s-process peak elements strontium, yttrium, and zirconium decrease by up to 50%, the yields of rubidium either do not change or increase.

  11. Constraints on parton distribution functions and extraction of the strong coupling constant from the inclusive jet cross section in pp collisions at $$\\sqrt{s} = 7$$ $$\\,\\text {TeV}$$

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-06-26

    The inclusive jet cross section for proton–proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 7TeVwas measured by the CMS Collaboration at the LHC with data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.0fb-1. The measurement covers a phase space up to 2TeV in jet transverse momentum and 2.5 in absolute jet rapidity. The statistical precision of these data leads to stringent constraints on the parton distribution functions of the proton. The data provide important input for the gluon density at high fractions of the proton momentum and for the strong coupling constant at large energy scales. Using predictions from perturbative quantum chromodynamicsmore » at next-to-leading order, complemented with electroweak corrections, the constraining power of these data is investigated and the strong coupling constant at the Z boson mass MZ is determined to be αS(MZ)=0.1185±0.0019(exp)+0.0060-0.0037(theo), which is in agreement with the world average.« less

  12. Constraints on parton distribution functions and extraction of the strong coupling constant from the inclusive jet cross section in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2014-10-27

    The inclusive jet cross section for proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 7$~\\mathrm{TeV}$ was measured by the CMS Collaboration at the LHC with data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.0$~\\mathrm{fb}^{-1}$. The measurement covers a phase space up to 2$~\\mathrm{TeV}$ in jet transverse momentum and 2.5 in absolute jet rapidity. The statistical precision of these data leads to stringent constraints on the parton distribution functions of the proton. The data provide important input for the gluon density at high fractions of the proton momentum and for the strong coupling constant at large energy scales. Using predictions from perturbative quantummorechromodynamics at next-to-leading order, complemented with electroweak corrections, the constraining power of these data is investigated and the strong coupling constant at the Z boson mass $M_{\\mathrm{Z}}$ is determined to be $\\alpha_S(M_{\\mathrm{Z}}) = 0.1185 \\pm 0.0019\\,(\\mathrm{exp})\\,^{+0.0060}_{-0.0037}\\,(\\mathrm{theo})$, which is in agreement with the world average.less

  13. Constraints on parton distribution functions and extraction of the strong coupling constant from the inclusive jet cross section in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 7$ $\\,\\text {TeV}$

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-06-26

    The inclusive jet cross section for proton–proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 7TeVwas measured by the CMS Collaboration at the LHC with data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.0fb-1. The measurement covers a phase space up to 2TeV in jet transverse momentum and 2.5 in absolute jet rapidity. The statistical precision of these data leads to stringent constraints on the parton distribution functions of the proton. The data provide important input for the gluon density at high fractions of the proton momentum and for the strong coupling constant at large energy scales. Using predictions from perturbative quantum chromodynamics at next-to-leading order, complemented with electroweak corrections, the constraining power of these data is investigated and the strong coupling constant at the Z boson mass MZ is determined to be αS(MZ)=0.1185±0.0019(exp)+0.0060-0.0037(theo), which is in agreement with the world average.

  14. Constraints on parton distribution functions and extraction of the strong coupling constant from the inclusive jet cross section in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2014-10-27

    The inclusive jet cross section for proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 7$~\\mathrm{TeV}$ was measured by the CMS Collaboration at the LHC with data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.0$~\\mathrm{fb}^{-1}$. The measurement covers a phase space up to 2$~\\mathrm{TeV}$ in jet transverse momentum and 2.5 in absolute jet rapidity. The statistical precision of these data leads to stringent constraints on the parton distribution functions of the proton. The data provide important input for the gluon density at high fractions of the proton momentum and for the strong coupling constant at large energy scales. Using predictions from perturbative quantum chromodynamics at next-to-leading order, complemented with electroweak corrections, the constraining power of these data is investigated and the strong coupling constant at the Z boson mass $M_{\\mathrm{Z}}$ is determined to be $\\alpha_S(M_{\\mathrm{Z}}) = 0.1185 \\pm 0.0019\\,(\\mathrm{exp})\\,^{+0.0060}_{-0.0037}\\,(\\mathrm{theo})$, which is in agreement with the world average.

  15. Improved Measurement of the ??e? Branching Ratio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aguilar-Arevalo, A.; Aoki, M.; Blecher, M.; Britton, D. I.; Bryman, D. A.; vom Bruch, D.; Chen, S.; Comfort, J.; Ding, M.; Doria, L.; Cuen-Rochin, S.; Gumplinger, P.; Hussein, A.; Igarashi, Y.; Ito, S.; Kettell, S. H.; Kurchaninov, L.; Littenberg, L. S.; Malbrunot, C.; Mischke, R. E.; Numao, T.; Protopopescu, D.; Sher, A.; Sullivan, T.; Vavilov, D.; Yamada, K.

    2015-08-01

    A new measurement of the branching ratio Re/?=?(?+ ? e+? + ?+ ? e+??)/?(?+ ? ?+? + ?+??+??) resulted in Rexpe/?=[1.23440.0023(stat)0.0019(syst)] x 10-4. This is in agreement with the standard model prediction and improves the test of electron-muon universality to the level of 0.1%.

  16. THE GENESIS SOLAR WIND CONCENTRATOR TARGET: MASS FRACTIONATION CHARACTERISED BY NE ISOTOPES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WIENS, ROGER C.; OLINGER, C.; HEBER, V.S.; REISENFELD, D.B.; BURNETT, D.S.; ALLTON, J.H.; BAUR, H.; WIECHERT, U.; WIELER, R.

    2007-01-02

    The concentrator on Genesis provides samples of increased fluences of solar wind ions for precise determination of the oxygen isotopic composition of the solar wind. The concentration process caused mass fractionation as function of the radial target position. They measured the fractionation using Ne released by UV laser ablation along two arms of the gold cross from the concentrator target to compare measured Ne with modeled Ne. The latter is based on simulations using actual conditions of the solar wind during Genesis operation. Measured Ne abundances and isotopic composition of both arms agree within uncertainties indicating a radial symmetric concentration process. Ne data reveal a maximum concentration factor of {approx} 30% at the target center and a target-wide fractionation of Ne isotopes of 3.8%/amu with monotonously decreasing {sup 20}Ne/{sup 22}Ne ratios towards the center. The experimentally determined data, in particular the isotopic fractionation, differ from the modeled data. They discuss potential reasons and propose future attempts to overcome these disagreements.

  17. Determination of volume fractions in two-phase flows from sound speed measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaudhuri, Anirban; Sinha, Dipen N.; Osterhoudt, Curtis F.

    2012-08-15

    Accurate measurement of the composition of oil-water emulsions within the process environment is a challenging problem in the oil industry. Ultrasonic techniques are promising because they are non-invasive and can penetrate optically opaque mixtures. This paper presents a method of determining the volume fractions of two immiscible fluids in a homogenized two-phase flow by measuring the speed of sound through the composite fluid along with the instantaneous temperature. Two separate algorithms are developed by representing the composite density as (i) a linear combination of the two densities, and (ii) a non-linear fractional formulation. Both methods lead to a quadratic equation with temperature dependent coefficients, the root of which yields the volume fraction. The densities and sound speeds are calibrated at various temperatures for each fluid component, and the fitted polynomial is used in the final algorithm. We present results when the new algorithm is applied to mixtures of crude oil and process water from two different oil fields, and a comparison of our results with a Coriolis meter; the difference between mean values is less than 1%. Analytical and numerical studies of sensitivity of the calculated volume fraction to temperature changes and calibration errors are also presented.

  18. Disorder Matters in the 5/2 Fractional Quantum Hall Effect (invited...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    National Laboratories contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. Outline: * Introduction * Spin ... VxyI More fractions n 1.55 x 10 cm T 50 mK 13 25 35 37 23 47 10 15 RXy(h...

  19. Gas-chromatographic determination of the main components of hard-coal tar and its fractions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nabivach, V.M.

    1983-01-01

    An investigation was carried out into the composition of bituminous coal tars from several coking plants in the Ukraine using gas-liquid chromatography. It was shown that analytical data can be used for operational quality control of the fractions produced.

  20. Properties of the Katugampola fractional derivative with potential application in quantum mechanics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, Douglas R.; Ulness, Darin J.

    2015-06-15

    Katugampola [e-print http://arxiv.org/abs/1410.6535 ] recently introduced a limit based fractional derivative, D{sup α} (referred to in this work as the Katugampola fractional derivative) that maintains many of the familiar properties of standard derivatives such as the product, quotient, and chain rules. Typically, fractional derivatives are handled using an integral representation and, as such, are non-local in character. The current work starts with a key property of the Katugampola fractional derivative, D{sup α}[y]=t{sup 1−α}(dy)/(dt) , and the associated differential operator, D{sup α} = t{sup 1−α}D{sup 1}. These operators, their inverses, commutators, anti-commutators, and several important differential equations are studied. The anti-commutator serves as a basis for the development of a self-adjoint operator which could potentially be useful in quantum mechanics. A Hamiltonian is constructed from this operator and applied to the particle in a box model.