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1

Measurement of the inclusive semielectronic D(0) branching fraction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Farlane, P. M. Patel, and B. Spaan McGill University and the Institute of Particle Physics, Montre´al, Que´bec H3A 2T8, Canada A. J. Sadoff Ithaca College, Ithaca, New York 14850 R. Ammar, P. Baringer, A. Bean, D. Besson, D. Coppage, N. Copty, R. Davis, N...PHYSICAL REVIEW D 1 SEPTEMBER 1996VOLUME 54, NUMBER 5ARTICLES Measurement of the inclusive semielectronic D0 branching fraction Y. Kubota, M. Lattery, J. K. Nelson, S. Patton, R. Poling, T. Riehle, V. Savinov, and R. Wang University of Minnesota...

Baringer, Philip S.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Constraints on exclusive branching fractions $BF_i(B^+\\to X_c^il^+?)$ from moment measurements in inclusive $B\\to X_cl?$ decays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

As an alternative to direct measurements, we extract exclusive branching fractions of semileptonic B-meson decays to charmed mesons, $BF_i(B\\to X_c^il\

Florian U. Bernlochner; Dustin Biedermann; Heiko Lacker; Thomas Lück

2014-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

3

Measurement of the Inclusive Branching FractionsB(B^- to D^+ Pi^- Pi^-) and B(B^- to D*^+ Pi^- Pi^-)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The D{sub J}{sup 0} is a family of four orbitally excited mesons: D*{sub 2}(2460){sup 0}, D{sub 1}(2420){sup 0}, D{sub 1}(j = 1/2){sup -}, and D*{sub 0}(j = 1/2){sup 0}. This dissertation presents the measurements of the inclusive branching fractions, {Beta}(B{sup -} {yields} D*{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -}) and {Beta}(B{sup -} {yields} D{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -}). The D{sub J}{sup 0} provides an intermediate resonance for those two modes. The data used for this analysis consists of Runs 1-5 with total integrated luminosity of 343.38 fb{sup -1}, which is corresponding to 383.92 million B{bar B} pairs, provided by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric B Factory. The values presented are: {Beta}(B{sup -} {yields} D{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -}) = (1.12 {+-} 0.02 {+-} 0.08) x 10{sup -3}; {Beta}(B{sup -} {yields} D*{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -}) = (1.67 {+-} 0.03 {+-} 0.13) x 10{sup -3}.

Eschenburg, Vance Onno; /Mississippi U.; ,

2007-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

4

Measurement of the D -> pipi branching fractions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using data from CLEO II at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring we provide a new measurement of the branching fraction for D0 --> pi+pi-, and we present the first measurements of D0 --> pi0pi0 and of D+ --> pi+pi0, which is ...

Ammar, Raymond G.; Ball, S.; Baringer, Philip S.; Coppage, Don; Copty, N.; Davis, Robin E. P.; Hancock, N.; Kelly, M.; Kwak, Nowhan; Lam, H.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Measurement of the D*(2010) branching fractions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report a measurement of the D*+ and D*0 decay branching fractions based on 780 pb-1 of data collected with the CLEO II detector. For radiative D*+ decay, we obtain an upper limit, B(D*+ --> D+ gamma) < 4.2% (90% confidence ...

Ammar, Raymond G.; Ball, S.; Baringer, Philip S.; Coppage, Don; Copty, N.; Davis, Robin E. P.; Hancock, N.; Kelly, M.; Kwak, Nowhan; Lam, H.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

A Measurement of the Semileptonic Branching Fraction of the B_s Meson  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report a measurement of the inclusive semileptonic branching fraction of the B{sub s} meson using data collected with the BABAR detector in the center-of-mass energy region above the {gamma}(4S) resonance. We use the inclusive yield of {phi} mesons and the {phi} yield in association with a high-momentum lepton to perform a simultaneous measurement of the semileptonic branching fraction and the production rate of B{sub s} mesons relative to all B mesons as a function of center-of-mass energy. The inclusive semileptonic branching fraction of the B{sub s} meson is determined to be {Beta}(B{sub s} {yields} {ell}{nu}X) = 9.5{sub -2.0}{sup +2.5}(stat){sub -1.9}{sup +1.1}(syst)%, where {ell} indicates the average of e and {mu}.

Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Milanes, D.A.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D.J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T.S.; McKenna, J.A.; /Imperial Coll., London /Annecy, LAPP /Barcelona U., ECM /INFN, Bari /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /INFN, Bari /Bari U. /Bergen U. /UC, Berkeley /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Harvey Mudd Coll. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Paris U., VI-VII /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U.; /more authors..

2012-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

7

Determination of Charm Hadronic Branching Fractions at CLEO-c  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent results from CLEO-c on measurements of absolute hadronic branching fractions of D0, D+, and Ds+ mesons are presented.

A. Ryd

2007-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

8

Measurement of the Topological Branching Fractions of the ? Lepton  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report new and precise measurements of the decay branching fractions of the ? lepton to one and three charged particles. The data, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 176 pb(?1), were collected by the high ...

Baringer, Philip S.

1985-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

9

Branch length distribution in TREF fractionated polyethylene Ramnath Ramachandran a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Branch length distribution in TREF fractionated polyethylene Ramnath Ramachandran a , Gregory Keywords: Polyethylene Branching Neutron scattering a b s t r a c t Commercial polyethylene is typically and catalyst activity. Further, processing of polyethylene after polymerization may also result in changes

Beaucage, Gregory

10

On fractional differential inclusions with the Jumarie derivative  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the paper, fractional differential inclusions with the Jumarie derivative are studied. We discuss the existence and uniqueness of a solution to such problems. Our study relies on standard variational methods.

Kamocki, Rafa?, E-mail: rafkam@math.uni.lodz.pl [Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science, Chair of Differential Equations and Computer Science, University of Lodz, Banacha 22, 90-238 Lodz (Poland)] [Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science, Chair of Differential Equations and Computer Science, University of Lodz, Banacha 22, 90-238 Lodz (Poland); Obczy?ski, Cezary, E-mail: czacza@math.uni.lodz.pl [Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science, Chair of Nonlinear Analysis, University of Lodz, Banacha 22, 90-238 Lodz (Poland)] [Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science, Chair of Nonlinear Analysis, University of Lodz, Banacha 22, 90-238 Lodz (Poland)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

11

Measurement of the B semileptonic branching fraction with lepton tags  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have used the CLEO II detector and 2.06 fb(-1) of Y(4S) data to measure the B-meson semileptonic branching fraction. The B --> Xe nu momentum spectrum was obtained over nearly the full momentum range by using charge and kinematic correlations...

Ammar, Raymond G.; Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Besson, David Zeke; Coppage, Don; Copty, N.; Davis, Robin E. P.; Hancock, N.; Kotov, S.; Kravchenko, I.; Kwak, Nowhan

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Branching Fraction Measurement of B to omega l nu decays  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a measurement of the B{sup +} {yields} {omega}{ell}{sup +}{nu} branching fraction based on a sample of 467 million B{bar B} pairs recorded by the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} collider. We observe 1041 {+-} 133 signal decays, corresponding to a branching fraction of {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {omega}{ell}{sup +}{nu}) = (1.15 {+-} 0.15 {+-} 0.12) x 10{sup -4}, where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic. The dependence of the decay rate on q{sup 2}, the momentum transfer squared to the lepton system, is compared to QCD predictions of the form factors based on a quark model and light-cone sum rules.

Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Palano, A.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; /Bergen U.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; /Ruhr U., Bochum; Asgeirsson, D.J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T.S.; McKenna, J.A.; So, R.Y.; /British Columbia U.; Khan, A.; /Brunel U.; Blinov, V.E.; /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Harvey Mudd Coll. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U., Comp. Sci. Dept. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U.; /more authors..

2012-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

13

Precision measurement of the $D^{*0}$ decay branching fractions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using 482 pb$^{-1}$ of data taken at $\\sqrt{s}=4.009$ GeV, we measure the branching fractions of the decays of $D^{*0}$ into $D^0\\pi^0$ and $D^0\\gamma$ to be $\\BR(D^{*0} \\to D^0\\pi^0)=(65.5\\pm 0.8\\pm 0.5)%$ and $\\BR(D^{*0} \\to D^0\\gamma)=(34.5\\pm 0.8\\pm 0.5)%$ respectively, by assuming that the $D^{*0}$ decays only into these two modes. The ratio of the two branching fractions is $\\BR(D^{*0} \\to D^0\\pi^0)/\\BR(D^{*0} \\to D^0\\gamma) =1.90\\pm 0.07\\pm 0.05$, which is independent of the assumption made above. The first uncertainties are statistical and the second ones systematic. The precision is improved by a factor of three compared to the present world average values.

M. Ablikim; M. N. Achasov; X. C. Ai; O. Albayrak; M. Albrecht; D. J. Ambrose; A. Amoroso; F. F. An; Q. An; J. Z. Bai; R. Baldini Ferroli; Y. Ban; D. W. Bennett; J. V. Bennett; M. Bertani; D. Bettoni; J. M. Bian; F. Bianchi; E. Boger; O. Bondarenko; I. Boyko; R. A. Briere; H. Cai; X. Cai; O. Cakir; A. Calcaterra; G. F. Cao; S. A. Cetin; J. F. Chang; G. Chelkov; G. Chen; H. S. Chen; H. Y. Chen; J. C. Chen; M. L. Chen; S. J. Chen; X. Chen; X. R. Chen; Y. B. Chen; H. P. Cheng; X. K. Chu; G. Cibinetto; D. Cronin-Hennessy; H. L. Dai; J. P. Dai; A. Dbeyssi; D. Dedovich; Z. Y. Deng; A. Denig; I. Denysenko; M. Destefanis; F. De Mori; Y. Ding; C. Dong; J. Dong; L. Y. Dong; M. Y. Dong; S. X. Du; P. F. Duan; J. Z. Fan; J. Fang; S. S. Fang; X. Fang; Y. Fang; L. Fava; F. Feldbauer; G. Felici; C. Q. Feng; E. Fioravanti; M. Fritsch; C. D. Fu; Q. Gao; Y. Gao; I. Garzia; K. Goetzen; W. X. Gong; W. Gradl; M. Greco; M. H. Gu; Y. T. Gu; Y. H. Guan; A. Q. Guo; L. B. Guo; T. Guo; Y. Guo; Y. P. Guo; Z. Haddadi; A. Hafner; S. Han; Y. L. Han; F. A. Harris; K. L. He; Z. Y. He; T. Held; Y. K. Heng; Z. L. Hou; C. Hu; H. M. Hu; J. F. Hu; T. Hu; Y. Hu; G. M. Huang; G. S. Huang; H. P. Huang; J. S. Huang; X. T. Huang; Y. Huang; T. Hussain; Q. Ji; Q. P. Ji; X. B. Ji; X. L. Ji; L. L. Jiang; L. W. Jiang; X. S. Jiang; J. B. Jiao; Z. Jiao; D. P. Jin; S. Jin; T. Johansson; A. Julin; N. Kalantar-Nayestanaki; X. L. Kang; X. S. Kang; M. Kavatsyuk; B. C. Ke; R. Kliemt; B. Kloss; O. B. Kolcu; B. Kopf; M. Kornicer; W. Kuehn; A. Kupsc; W. Lai; J. S. Lange; M. Lara; P. Larin; C. H. Li; Cheng Li; D. M. Li; F. Li; G. Li; H. B. Li; J. C. Li; Jin Li; K. Li; K. Li; P. R. Li; T. Li; W. D. Li; W. G. Li; X. L. Li; X. M. Li; X. N. Li; X. Q. Li; Z. B. Li; H. Liang; Y. F. Liang; Y. T. Liang; G. R. Liao; D. X. Lin; B. J. Liu; C. L. Liu; C. X. Liu; F. H. Liu; Fang Liu; Feng Liu; H. B. Liu; H. H. Liu; H. H. Liu; H. M. Liu; J. Liu; J. P. Liu; J. Y. Liu; K. Liu; K. Y. Liu; L. D. Liu; P. L. Liu; Q. Liu; S. B. Liu; X. Liu; X. X. Liu; Y. B. Liu; Z. A. Liu; Zhiqiang Liu; Zhiqing Liu; H. Loehner; X. C. Lou; H. J. Lu; J. G. Lu; R. Q. Lu; Y. Lu; Y. P. Lu; C. L. Luo; M. X. Luo; T. Luo; X. L. Luo; M. Lv; X. R. Lyu; F. C. Ma; H. L. Ma; L. L. Ma; Q. M. Ma; S. Ma; T. Ma; X. N. Ma; X. Y. Ma; F. E. Maas; M. Maggiora; Q. A. Malik; Y. J. Mao; Z. P. Mao; S. Marcello; J. G. Messchendorp; J. Min; T. J. Min; R. E. Mitchell; X. H. Mo; Y. J. Mo; C. Morales Morales; K. Moriya; N. Yu. Muchnoi; H. Muramatsu; Y. Nefedov; F. Nerling; I. B. Nikolaev; Z. Ning; S. Nisar; S. L. Niu; X. Y. Niu; S. L. Olsen; Q. Ouyang; S. Pacetti; P. Patteri; M. Pelizaeus; H. P. Peng; K. Peters; J. L. Ping; R. G. Ping; R. Poling; Y. N. Pu; M. Qi; S. Qian; C. F. Qiao; L. Q. Qin; N. Qin; X. S. Qin; Y. Qin; Z. H. Qin; J. F. Qiu; K. H. Rashid; C. F. Redmer; H. L. Ren; M. Ripka; G. Rong; X. D. Ruan; V. Santoro; A. Sarantsev; M. Savrié; K. Schoenning; S. Schumann; W. Shan; M. Shao; C. P. Shen; P. X. Shen; X. Y. Shen; H. Y. Sheng; M. R. Shepherd; W. M. Song; X. Y. Song; S. Sosio; S. Spataro; B. Spruck; G. X. Sun; J. F. Sun; S. S. Sun; Y. J. Sun; Y. Z. Sun; Z. J. Sun; Z. T. Sun; C. J. Tang; X. Tang; I. Tapan; E. H. Thorndike; M. Tiemens; D. Toth; M. Ullrich; I. Uman; G. S. Varner; B. Wang; B. L. Wang; D. Wang; D. Y. Wang; K. Wang; L. L. Wang; L. S. Wang; M. Wang; P. Wang; P. L. Wang; Q. J. Wang; S. G. Wang; W. Wang; X. F. Wang; Y. D. Wang; Y. F. Wang; Y. Q. Wang; Z. Wang; Z. G. Wang; Z. H. Wang; Z. Y. Wang; T. Weber; D. H. Wei; J. B. Wei; P. Weidenkaff; S. P. Wen; U. Wiedner; M. Wolke; L. H. Wu; Z. Wu; L. G. Xia; Y. Xia; D. Xiao; Z. J. Xiao; Y. G. Xie; G. F. Xu; L. Xu; Q. J. Xu; Q. N. Xu; X. P. Xu; L. Yan; W. B. Yan; W. C. Yan; Y. H. Yan; H. X. Yang; L. Yang; Y. Yang; Y. X. Yang; H. Ye; M. Ye; M. H. Ye; J. H. Yin; B. X. Yu; C. X. Yu; H. W. Yu; J. S. Yu; C. Z. Yuan; W. L. Yuan; Y. Yuan; A. Yuncu; A. A. Zafar; A. Zallo; Y. Zeng; B. X. Zhang; B. Y. Zhang; C. Zhang; C. C. Zhang; D. H. Zhang; H. H. Zhang; H. Y. Zhang; J. J. Zhang; J. L. Zhang; J. Q. Zhang; J. W. Zhang; J. Y. Zhang; J. Z. Zhang; K. Zhang; L. Zhang; S. H. Zhang; X. Y. Zhang; Y. Zhang; Y. H. Zhang; Z. H. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; Z. Y. Zhang; G. Zhao; J. W. Zhao; J. Y. Zhao; J. Z. Zhao; Lei Zhao; Ling Zhao; M. G. Zhao; Q. Zhao; Q. W. Zhao; S. J. Zhao; T. C. Zhao; Y. B. Zhao; Z. G. Zhao; A. Zhemchugov; B. Zheng; J. P. Zheng; W. J. Zheng; Y. H. Zheng; B. Zhong; L. Zhou; Li Zhou; X. Zhou; X. K. Zhou; X. R. Zhou; X. Y. Zhou; K. Zhu; K. J. Zhu; S. Zhu; X. L. Zhu; Y. C. Zhu; Y. S. Zhu; Z. A. Zhu; J. Zhuang; B. S. Zou; J. H. Zou; for BESIII Collaboration

2014-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

14

Measurement of the B- -> D0 K*- branching fraction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

From a sample of 232 million Upsilon(4S)--> B B-bar events collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B Factory in 1999--2004, we measure the B- --> D0 K*-(892) decay branching fraction using events where the K*- is reconstructed in the K0_S pi- mode and the D0 in the K- pi+, K- pi+ pi0, and K- pi+ pi+ pi- channels: B(B- --> D0 K*-(892)) = 5.29 +/- 0.30(stat) +/- 0.34 (syst)) X 10-4.

B. Aubert

2006-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

15

The binary fraction of extreme horizontal branch stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(Abbreviated) We have used precise radial velocity measurements of subdwarf-B stars from the Palomar-Green catalogue to look for binary extreme horizontal branch (EHB) stars. We identify 36 EHB stars in our sample and find that at least 21 of these stars are binaries. All but one or two of these are new identifications. The minimum binary fraction for EHB stars implied by our survey is 60+-8%. Our survey is sensitive to binaries with orbital periods P less than about 10d. For reasonable assumptions concerning the period distribution and the mass ratio distribution of the binaries, we find that the mean detection efficiency of our survey over this range of orbital periods is 87%. Allowing for this estimated detection efficiency, the fraction of EHB stars which are short-period binaries ($0.03 < P <10d, approximately) is 69+-9%. The value is not strongly dependent on the period distribution below P=10d or the mean companion mass for these short-period binaries. The orbital separation of the stars in these binaries is much less than the size of the red giant from which the EHB star has formed. This is strong evidence that binary star evolution is fundamental to the formation of the majority of EHB stars. If there are also binary EHB stars whose orbital periods are more than about 10d, the fraction of EHB stars whose evolution has been affected by the presence of a companion may be much higher.

P. F. L. Maxted; U. Heber; T. R. Marsh; R. C. North

2001-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

16

Production cross section and topological decay branching fractions of the ? lepton  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report new measurements of the production cross section for the reaction e(+)e(?)??(+)?(?) at s?=29 GeV, as well as the topological decay branching fractions of the ? lepton. The data were taken with the High Resolution ...

Baringer, Philip S.

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Branching fractions and charge asymmetries in charmless hadronic decays at BABAR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present measurements of branching fraction, polarization and charge asymmetry in charmless hadronic B decays with {eta}, {eta}{prime}, {omega}, and b{sub 1} in the final state. All the results use the final BABAR dataset.

Biassoni, Pietro; /Milan U. /INFN, Milan

2009-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

18

Measurement of the branching fraction for $?(3686)\\to?K^+ K^-$  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

With $1.06\\times 10^8$ $\\psi(3686)$ events collected with the BESIII detector, the branching fraction of $\\psi(3686) \\to \\omega K^+ K^-$ is measured to be $(1.54 \\pm 0.04 \\pm 0.11) \\times 10^{-4}$. This is the most precise result to date, due to the largest $\\psi(3686)$ sample, improved signal reconstruction efficiency, good simulation of the detector performance, and a more accurate knowledge of the continuum contribution. Using the branching fraction of $J/\\psi \\to \\omega K^+ K^-$, the ratio $\\mathcal{B}(\\psi(3868) \\to K^+K^-) / \\mathcal{B}(J/\\psi \\to K^+K^-)$ is determined to be $(18.4 \\pm 3.7)\\,\\%$. This constitutes a significantly improved test of the $12\\,\\%$ rule, with the uncertainty now dominated by the $J/\\psi$ branching fraction.

BESIII Collaboration; M. Ablikim; M. N. Achasov; X. C. Ai; O. Albayrak; M. Albrecht; D. J. Ambrose; F. F. An; Q. An; J. Z. Bai; R. Baldini Ferroli; Y. Ban; D. W. Bennett; J. V. Bennett; M. Bertani; J. M. Bian; E. Boger; O. Bondarenko; I. Boyko; S. Braun; R. A. Briere; H. Cai; X. Cai; O. Cakir; A. Calcaterra; G. F. Cao; S. A. Cetin; J. F. Chang; G. Chelkov; G. Chen; H. S. Chen; J. C. Chen; M. L. Chen; S. J. Chen; X. Chen; X. R. Chen; Y. B. Chen; H. P. Cheng; X. K. Chu; Y. P. Chu; D. Cronin-Hennessy; H. L. Dai; J. P. Dai; D. Dedovich; Z. Y. Deng; A. Denig; I. Denysenko; M. Destefanis; W. M. Ding; Y. Ding; C. Dong; J. Dong; L. Y. Dong; M. Y. Dong; S. X. Du; J. Z. Fan; J. Fang; S. S. Fang; Y. Fang; L. Fava; C. Q. Feng; C. D. Fu; O. Fuks; Q. Gao; Y. Gao; C. Geng; K. Goetzen; W. X. Gong; W. Gradl; M. Greco; M. H. Gu; Y. T. Gu; Y. H. Guan; L. B. Guo; T. Guo; Y. P. Guo; Z. Haddadi; S. Han; Y. L. Han; F. A. Harris; K. L. He; M. He; Z. Y. He; T. Held; Y. K. Heng; Z. L. Hou; C. Hu; H. M. Hu; J. F. Hu; T. Hu; G. M. Huang; G. S. Huang; H. P. Huang; J. S. Huang; L. Huang; X. T. Huang; Y. Huang; T. Hussain; C. S. Ji; Q. Ji; Q. P. Ji; X. B. Ji; X. L. Ji; L. L. Jiang; L. W. Jiang; X. S. Jiang; J. B. Jiao; Z. Jiao; D. P. Jin; S. Jin; T. Johansson; A. Julin; N. Kalantar-Nayestanaki; X. L. Kang; X. S. Kang; M. Kavatsyuk; B. Kloss; B. Kopf; M. Kornicer; W. Kuehn; A. Kupsc; W. Lai; J. S. Lange; M. Lara; P. Larin; M. Leyhe; C. H. Li; Cheng Li; Cui Li; D. Li; D. M. Li; F. Li; G. Li; H. B. Li; J. C. Li; Jin Li; K. Li; K. Li; P. R. Li; Q. J. Li; T. Li; W. D. Li; W. G. Li; X. L. Li; X. N. Li; X. Q. Li; Z. B. Li; H. Liang; Y. F. Liang; Y. T. Liang; D. X. Lin; B. J. Liu; C. L. Liu; C. X. Liu; F. H. Liu; Fang Liu; Feng Liu; H. B. Liu; H. H. Liu; H. M. Liu; J. Liu; J. P. Liu; K. Liu; K. Y. Liu; P. L. Liu; Q. Liu; S. B. Liu; X. Liu; Y. B. Liu; Z. A. Liu; Zhiqiang Liu; Zhiqing Liu; H. Loehner; X. C. Lou; G. R. Lu; H. J. Lu; H. L. Lu; J. G. Lu; Y. Lu; Y. P. Lu; C. L. Luo; M. X. Luo; T. Luo; X. L. Luo; M. Lv; X. R. Lyu; F. C. Ma; H. L. Ma; Q. M. Ma; S. Ma; T. Ma; X. Y. Ma; F. E. Maas; M. Maggiora; Q. A. Malik; Y. J. Mao; Z. P. Mao; J. G. Messchendorp; J. Min; T. J. Min; R. E. Mitchell; X. H. Mo; Y. J. Mo; H. Moeini; C. Morales Morales; K. Moriya; N. Yu. Muchnoi; H. Muramatsu; Y. Nefedov; F. Nerling; I. B. Nikolaev; Z. Ning; S. Nisar; X. Y. Niu; S. L. Olsen; Q. Ouyang; S. Pacetti; M. Pelizaeus; H. P. Peng; K. Peters; J. L. Ping; R. G. Ping; R. Poling; M. Qi; S. Qian; C. F. Qiao; L. Q. Qin; N. Qin; X. S. Qin; Y. Qin; Z. H. Qin; J. F. Qiu; K. H. Rashid; C. F. Redmer; M. Ripka; G. Rong; X. D. Ruan; A. Sarantsev; K. Schoenning; S. Schumann; W. Shan; M. Shao; C. P. Shen; X. Y. Shen; H. Y. Sheng; M. R. Shepherd; W. M. Song; X. Y. Song; S. Spataro; B. Spruck; G. X. Sun; J. F. Sun; S. S. Sun; Y. J. Sun; Y. Z. Sun; Z. J. Sun; Z. T. Sun; C. J. Tang; X. Tang; I. Tapan; E. H. Thorndike; M. Tiemens; D. Toth; M. Ullrich; I. Uman; G. S. Varner; B. Wang; D. Wang; D. Y. Wang; K. Wang; L. L. Wang; L. S. Wang; M. Wang; P. Wang; P. L. Wang; Q. J. Wang; S. G. Wang; W. Wang; X. F. Wang; Y. D. Wang; Y. F. Wang; Y. Q. Wang; Z. Wang; Z. G. Wang; Z. H. Wang; Z. Y. Wang; D. H. Wei; J. B. Wei; P. Weidenkaff; S. P. Wen; M. Werner; U. Wiedner; M. Wolke; L. H. Wu; N. Wu; Z. Wu; L. G. Xia; Y. Xia; D. Xiao; Z. J. Xiao; Y. G. Xie; Q. L. Xiu; G. F. Xu; L. Xu; Q. J. Xu; Q. N. Xu; X. P. Xu; Z. Xue; L. Yan; W. B. Yan; W. C. Yan; Y. H. Yan; H. X. Yang; L. Yang; Y. Yang; Y. X. Yang; H. Ye; M. Ye; M. H. Ye; B. X. Yu; C. X. Yu; H. W. Yu; J. S. Yu; S. P. Yu; C. Z. Yuan; W. L. Yuan; Y. Yuan; A. Yuncu; A. A. Zafar; A. Zallo; S. L. Zang; Y. Zeng; B. X. Zhang; B. Y. Zhang; C. Zhang; C. B. Zhang; C. C. Zhang; D. H. Zhang; H. H. Zhang; H. Y. Zhang; J. J. Zhang; J. Q. Zhang; J. W. Zhang; J. Y. Zhang; J. Z. Zhang; S. H. Zhang; X. J. Zhang; X. Y. Zhang; Y. Zhang; Y. H. Zhang; Z. H. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; Z. Y. Zhang; G. Zhao; J. W. Zhao; Lei Zhao; Ling Zhao; M. G. Zhao; Q. Zhao; Q. W. Zhao; S. J. Zhao; T. C. Zhao; X. H. Zhao; Y. B. Zhao; Z. G. Zhao; A. Zhemchugov; B. Zheng; J. P. Zheng; Y. H. Zheng; B. Zhong; L. Zhou; Li Zhou; X. Zhou; X. K. Zhou; X. R. Zhou; X. Y. Zhou; K. Zhu; K. J. Zhu; X. L. Zhu; Y. C. Zhu; Y. S. Zhu; Z. A. Zhu; J. Zhuang; B. S. Zou; J. H. Zou

2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

19

Measurement of the absolute branching fraction for D(0) -> K- pi+  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using 1.79 fb-1 of data recorded by the CLEO II detector we have measured the absolute branching fraction for D0 --> K-pi+. The angular correlation between the pi+ emitted in the decay D*+ --> D0pi+, and the jet direction in e+e- --> ccBAR events...

Ammar, Raymond G.; Ball, S.; Baringer, Philip S.; Coppage, Don; Copty, N.; Davis, Robin E. P.; Hancock, N.; Kelly, M.; Kwak, Nowhan; Lam, H.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

First Measurement of the Branching Fraction of the Decay $\\psi(2S) \\to \\tau\\tau$  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The branching fraction of the psi(2S) decay into tau pair has been measured for the first time using the BES detector at the Beijing Electron-Positron Collider. The result is $B_{\\tau\\tau}=(2.71\\pm 0.43 \\pm 0.55) \\times 10^{-3}$, where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic. This value, along with those for the branching fractions into e+e- and mu+mu of this resonance, satisfy well the relation predicted by the sequential lepton hypothesis. Combining all these values with the leptonic width of the resonance the total width of the psi(2S) is determined to be $(252 \\pm 37)$ keV.

Bai, J Z; Bian, J G; Blum, I K; Chen, G P; Chen, H F; Chen, J; Chen Jia Chao; Chen, Y; Chen, Y B; Chen, Y Q; Cheng Bao Sen; Cui, X Z; Ding, H L; Dong, L Y; Du, Z Z; Dunwoodie, W M; Gao, C S; Gao, M L; Gao, S Q; Gratton, P; Gu, J H; Gu, S D; Gu, W X; Gu, Y F; Guo, Z J; Guo, Y N; Han, S W; Han, Y; Harris, F A; He, J; He, J T; He, K L; He, M; Heng, Y K; Hitlin, D G; Hu, G Y; Hu, H M; Hu, J L; Hu, Q H; Hu, T; Hu Xiao Qing; Huang, G S; Huang, Y Z; Izen, J M; Jiang, C H; Jin, Y; Jones, B D; Ju, X; Ke, Z J; Kelsey, M H; Kim, B K; Kong, D; Lai, Y F; Lang, P F; Lankford, A J; Li, C G; Li, D; Li, H B; Li, J; Li, J C; Li, P Q; Li, R B; Li, W; Li, W G; Li, X H; Li Xiao Nan; Liu, H M; Liu, J; Liu, R G; Liu, Y; Lou, X C; Lowery, B; Lu, F; Lu, J G; Luo, X L; Ma, E C; Ma, J M; Malchow, R; Mao, H S; Mao, Z P; Meng, X C; Nie, J; Olsen, S L; Oyang, J Y T; Paluselli, D; Pan, L J; Panetta, J; Porter, F; Qi, N D; Qi, X R; Qian, C D; Qiu, J F; Qu, Y H; Que, Y K; Rong, G; Schernau, M; Shao, Y Y; Shen, B W; Shen, D L; Shen, H; Shen, X Y; Sheng, H Y; Shi, H Z; Song, X F; Standifird, J; Sun, F; Sun, H S; Sun, Y; Sun, Y Z; Tang, S Q; Toki, W; Tong, G L; Varner, G S; Wang, F; Wang, L S; Wang, L Z; Wang, M; Wang, P; Wang, P L; Wang, S M; Wang, T J; Wang, Y Y; Weaver, M; Wei, C L; Wu, J M; Wu, N; Wu, Y G; Xi, D M; Xia, X M; Xie, P P; Xie, Y; Xie, Y H; Xu, G F; Xue, S T; Yan, J; Yan, W G; Yang, C M; Yang, C Y; Yang, H X; Yang, J; Yang, W; Yang, X F; Ye, M H; Ye Shu Wei; Ye, Y X; Yu, C S; Yu, C X; Yu, G W; Yu Yu Hei; Yu, Z Q; Yuan, C Z; Yuan, Y; Zhang Bing Yun; Zhang, C; Zhang, C C; Zhang, D H; Zhang, H L; Zhang, J; Zhang, J W; Zhang, L; Zhang, L S; Zhang, P; Zhang, Q J; Zhang, S Q; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y Y; Zhao, D X; Zhao, H W; Zhao Jia Wei; Zhao, M; Zhao Wei Ren; Zhao, Z G; Zheng Jian Ping; Zheng Lin Sheng; Zheng Zhi Peng; Zhou, B Q; Zhou, G P; Zhou, H S; Zhou, L; Zhu, K J; Zhu, Q M; Zhu, Y C; Zhu, Y S; Zhuang, B A

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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21

Measurements of the Branching fractions for $B_(s) -> D_(s)???$ and $?_b^0 -> ?_c^+???$  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Branching fractions of the decays $H_b\\to H_c\\pi^-\\pi^+\\pi^-$ relative to $H_b\\to H_c\\pi^-$ are presented, where $H_b$ ($H_c$) represents B^0-bar($D^+$), $B^-$ ($D^0$), B_s^0-bar ($D_s^+$) and $\\Lambda_b^0$ ($\\Lambda_c^+$). The measurements are performed with the LHCb detector using 35${\\rm pb^{-1}}$ of data collected at $\\sqrt{s}=7$ TeV. The ratios of branching fractions are measured to be B(B^0-bar -> D^+\\pi^-\\pi^+\\pi^-)/ B(B^0-bar -> D^+\\pi^-) = 2.38\\pm0.11\\pm0.21 B(B^- -> D^0\\pi^-\\pi^+\\pi^-) / B(B^- -> D^0\\pi^-) = 1.27\\pm0.06\\pm0.11 B(B_s^0-bar -> D_s^+\\pi^-\\pi^+\\pi^-) / B(B_s^0-bar -> D_s^+\\pi^-) = 2.01\\pm0.37\\pm0.20 B(\\Lambda_b^0->\\Lambda_c^+\\pi^-\\pi^+\\pi^-) / B(\\Lambda_b^0 -> \\Lambda_c^+\\pi^-) = 1.43\\pm0.16\\pm0.13. We also report measurements of partial decay rates of these decays to excited charm hadrons. These results are of comparable or higher precision than existing measurements.

LHCb Collaboration; R. Aaij; B. Adeva; M. Adinolfi; C. Adrover; A. Affolder; Z. Ajaltouni; J. Albrecht; F. Alessio; M. Alexander; G. Alkhazov; P. Alvarez Cartelle; A. A. Alves Jr; S. Amato; Y. Amhis; J. Anderson; R. B. Appleby; O. Aquines Gutierrez; F. Archilli; L. Arrabito; A. Artamonov; M. Artuso; E. Aslanides; G. Auriemma; S. Bachmann; J. J. Back; D. S. Bailey; V. Balagura; W. Baldini; R. J. Barlow; C. Barschel; S. Barsuk; W. Barter; A. Bates; C. Bauer; Th. Bauer; A. Bay; I. Bediaga; K. Belous; I. Belyaev; E. Ben-Haim; M. Benayoun; G. Bencivenni; S. Benson; J. Benton; R. Bernet; M. -O. Bettler; M. van Beuzekom; A. Bien; S. Bifani; A. Bizzeti; P. M. Bjørnstad; T. Blake; F. Blanc; C. Blanks; J. Blouw; S. Blusk; A. Bobrov; V. Bocci; A. Bondar; N. Bondar; W. Bonivento; S. Borghi; A. Borgia; T. J. V. Bowcock; C. Bozzi; T. Brambach; J. van den Brand; J. Bressieux; D. Brett; S. Brisbane; M. Britsch; T. Britton; N. H. Brook; H. Brown; A. Büchler-Germann; I. Burducea; A. Bursche; J. Buytaert; S. Cadeddu; J. M. Caicedo Carvajal; O. Callot; M. Calvi; M. Calvo Gomez; A. Camboni; P. Campana; A. Carbone; G. Carboni; R. Cardinale; A. Cardini; L. Carson; K. Carvalho Akiba; G. Casse; M. Cattaneo; M. Charles; Ph. Charpentier; N. Chiapolini; K. Ciba; X. Cid Vidal; G. Ciezarek; P. E. L. Clarke; M. Clemencic; H. V. Cliff; J. Closier; C. Coca; V. Coco; J. Cogan; P. Collins; F. Constantin; G. Conti; A. Contu; A. Cook; M. Coombes; G. Corti; G. A. Cowan; R. Currie; B. D'Almagne; C. D'Ambrosio; P. David; I. De Bonis; S. De Capua; M. De Cian; F. De Lorenzi; J. M. De Miranda; L. De Paula; P. De Simone; D. Decamp; M. Deckenhoff; H. Degaudenzi; M. Deissenroth; L. Del Buono; C. Deplano; O. Deschamps; F. Dettori; J. Dickens; H. Dijkstra; P. Diniz Batista; S. Donleavy; A. Dosil Suárez; D. Dossett; A. Dovbnya; F. Dupertuis; R. Dzhelyadin; C. Eames; S. Easo; U. Egede; V. Egorychev; S. Eidelman; D. van Eijk; F. Eisele; S. Eisenhardt; R. Ekelhof; L. Eklund; Ch. Elsasser; D. G. d'Enterria; D. Esperante Pereira; L. Estéve; A. Falabella; E. Fanchini; C. Färber; G. Fardell; C. Farinelli; S. Farry; V. Fave; V. Fernandez Albor; M. Ferro-Luzzi; S. Filippov; C. Fitzpatrick; M. Fontana; F. Fontanelli; R. Forty; M. Frank; C. Frei; M. Frosini; S. Furcas; A. Gallas Torreira; D. Galli; M. Gandelman; P. Gandini; Y. Gao; J-C. Garnier; J. Garofoli; J. Garra Tico; L. Garrido; C. Gaspar; N. Gauvin; M. Gersabeck; T. Gershon; Ph. Ghez; V. Gibson; V. V. Gligorov; C. Göbel; D. Golubkov; A. Golutvin; A. Gomes; H. Gordon; M. Grabalosa Gándara; R. Graciani Diaz; L. A. Granado Cardoso; E. Graugés; G. Graziani; A. Grecu; S. Gregson; B. Gui; E. Gushchin; Yu. Guz; T. Gys; G. Haefeli; C. Haen; S. C. Haines; T. Hampson; S. Hansmann-Menzemer; R. Harji; N. Harnew; J. Harrison; P. F. Harrison; J. He; V. Heijne; K. Hennessy; P. Henrard; J. A. Hernando Morata; E. van Herwijnen; E. Hicks; W. Hofmann; K. Holubyev; P. Hopchev; W. Hulsbergen; P. Hunt; T. Huse; R. S. Huston; D. Hutchcroft; D. Hynds; V. Iakovenko; P. Ilten; J. Imong; R. Jacobsson; A. Jaeger; M. Jahjah Hussein; E. Jans; F. Jansen; P. Jaton; B. Jean-Marie; F. Jing; M. John; D. Johnson; C. R. Jones; B. Jost; S. Kandybei; M. Karacson; T. M. Karbach; J. Keaveney; U. Kerzel; T. Ketel; A. Keune; B. Khanji; Y. M. Kim; M. Knecht; S. Koblitz; P. Koppenburg; A. Kozlinskiy; L. Kravchuk; K. Kreplin; M. Kreps; G. Krocker; P. Krokovny; F. Kruse; K. Kruzelecki; M. Kucharczyk; S. Kukulak; R. Kumar; T. Kvaratskheliya; V. N. La Thi; D. Lacarrere; G. Lafferty; A. Lai; D. Lambert; R. W. Lambert; E. Lanciotti; G. Lanfranchi; C. Langenbruch; T. Latham; R. Le Gac; J. van Leerdam; J. -P. Lees; R. Lefévre; A. Leflat; J. Lefrançois; O. Leroy; T. Lesiak; L. Li; L. Li Gioi; M. Lieng; M. Liles; R. Lindner; C. Linn; B. Liu; G. Liu; J. H. Lopes; E. Lopez Asamar; N. Lopez-March; J. Luisier; F. Machefert; I. V. Machikhiliyan; F. Maciuc; O. Maev; J. Magnin; S. Malde; R. M. D. Mamunur; G. Manca; G. Mancinelli; N. Mangiafave; U. Marconi; R. Märki; J. Marks; G. Martellotti; A. Martens; L. Martin; A. Martín Sánchez; D. Martinez Santos; A. Massafferri; Z. Mathe; C. Matteuzzi; M. Matveev; E. Maurice; B. Maynard; A. Mazurov; G. McGregor; R. McNulty; C. Mclean; M. Meissner; M. Merk; J. Merkel; R. Messi; S. Miglioranzi; D. A. Milanes; M. -N. Minard; S. Monteil; D. Moran; P. Morawski; R. Mountain; I. Mous; F. Muheim; K. Müller; R. Muresan; B. Muryn; M. Musy; J. Mylroie-Smith; P. Naik; T. Nakada; R. Nandakumar; J. Nardulli; I. Nasteva; M. Nedos; M. Needham; N. Neufeld; C. Nguyen-Mau; M. Nicol; S. Nies; V. Niess; N. Nikitin; A. Oblakowska-Mucha; V. Obraztsov; S. Oggero; S. Ogilvy; O. Okhrimenko; R. Oldeman; M. Orlandea; J. M. Otalora Goicochea; P. Owen; B. Pal; J. Palacios; M. Palutan; J. Panman; A. Papanestis; M. Pappagallo; C. Parkes; C. J. Parkinson; G. Passaleva; G. D. Patel; M. Patel; S. K. Paterson

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

22

Measurement of Branching Fraction and CP-Violating Asymmetry for B-> omega K0s  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors present a preliminary measurement of the branching fraction and CP-violating parameters S and C for the decay B{sup 0} {yields} {omega}K{sub S}{sup 0}. The data sample corresponds to 232 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs produced from e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance. They measure {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {omega}K{sup 0}) = (5.9 {+-} 1.0 {+-} 0.4) x 10{sup -6}, S = 0.50{sub -0.38}{sup +0.34} {+-} 0.02 and C = -0.56{sub -0.27}{sup +0.29} {+-} 0.03.

Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; /Annecy, LAPP; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona, IFAE; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B. /Bergen U. /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San

2005-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

23

A method to measure the absolute branching fractions of $?_c$ decays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is proposed to exploit the decay of the meson ${B}^+ \\rightarrow p \\pi^+ \\pi^+ \\bar{\\Sigma}_c^{--}$ and of its charge conjugate $B^-$ copiously produced at LHC to obtain a sample of $\\Lambda_c$ baryons through the strong decay $\\Sigma_c \\rightarrow \\Lambda_c \\pi$. The sample thus obtained is not affected by biases typically introduced by selections that depend on specific decay modes. Therefore it allows a measurement of the absolute branching fraction for the decay of the $\\Lambda_c$ baryon into $ p K \\pi$ or into other observable final states to be performed in a model independent manner. The accuracy that can be achieved with this method is discussed and it is shown that it would be either competitive with or an improvement over current measurements.

Andrea Contu; Dorothea Fonnesu; Rudolf Gerhard Christiaan Oldeman; Biagio Saitta; Claudia Vacca

2014-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

24

Measurement of the $\\Xi^0 \\rightarrow \\Lambda\\gamma$ Decay Asymmetry and Branching Fraction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In data taken with the NA48 experiment at the CERN SPS in 1999, 730 candidates of the weak radiative hyperon decay Xi0 -> Lambda gamma have been found with an estimated background of 58 +- 8 events. From these events the Xi0 -> Lambda gamma decay asymmetry has been determined to alpha(Xi0 -> Lambda gamma) = -0.78 +- 0.18_stat +- 0.06_syst, which is the first evidence of a decay asymmetry in Xi0 -> Lambda gamma. The branching fraction of the decay has been measured to be Br(Xi0 -> Lambda gamma) = (1.16 +- 0.05_stat +- 0.06_syst) x 10^-3.

Lai, A; Bevan, A; Dosanjh, R S; Gershon, T J; Hay, B; Kalmus, George Ernest; Lazzeroni, C; Munday, D J; Olaiya, E; Parker, M A; White, T O; Wotton, S A; Barr, G; Bocquet, G; Ceccucci, Augusto; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Cundy, Donald C; D'Agostini, Giulio; Doble, Niels T; Falaleev, V P; Gatignon, L; Gonidec, A; Gorini, B; Govi, G; Grafström, P; Kubischta, Werner; Lacourt, A; Norton, A; Palestini, S; Panzer-Steindel, B; Taureg, Hans; Velasco, M; Wahl, H; Cheshkov, C; Gaponenko, A N; Khristov, P Z; Kekelidze, V D; Madigozhin, D T; Molokanova, N A; Potrebenikov, Yu K; Tatishvili, G T; Tkachev, A L; Zinchenko, A I; Knowles, I; Martin, V; Sacco, R; Walker, A; Contalbrigo, M; Dalpiaz, Pietro; Duclos, J; Frabetti, P L; Gianoli, A; Martini, M; Petrucci, F; Savrié, M; Bizzeti, A; Calvetti, M; Collazuol, G; Graziani, G; Iacopini, E; Lenti, M; Martelli, F; Veltri, M; Becker, H G; Eppard, K; Eppard, M; Fox, H; Kalter, A; Kleinknecht, K; Koch, U; Köpke, L; Lopes da Silva, P; Marouelli, P; Pellmann, I A; Peters, A; Renk, B; Schmidt, S A; Schönharting, V; Schué, Yu; Wanke, R; Winhart, A; Wittgen, M; Chollet, J C; Fayard, L; Iconomidou-Fayard, L; Ocariz, J; Unal, G; Wingerter-Seez, I; Anzivino, Giuseppina; Cenci, P; Imbergamo, E; Lubrano, P; Mestvirishvili, A; Nappi, A; Pepé, M; Piccini, M; Bertanza, L; Carosi, R; Casali, R; Cerri, C; Cirilli, M; Costantini, F; Fantechi, R; Giudici, Sergio; Mannelli, I; Pierazzini, G M; Sozzi, M; Chèze, J B; Cogan, J; De Beer, M; Debu, P; Formica, A; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Mazzucato, E; Peyaud, B; Turlay, René; Vallage, B; Holder, M; Maier, A; Ziolkowski, M; Arcidiacono, R; Biino, C; Cartiglia, N; Guida, R; Marchetto, F; Menichetti, E; Pastrone, N; Nassalski, J P; Rondio, Ewa; Szleper, M; Wislicki, W; Wronka, S; Dibon, Heinz; Fischer, G; Jeitler, Manfred; Markytan, Manfred; Mikulec, I; Neuhofer, Günther; Pernicka, Manfred; Taurok, Anton; Widhalm, L

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

First Observation of B+ to rho+ K0 and Measurement of its Branching Fraction and Charge Asymmetry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the first observation of the decay B{sup +} {yields} {rho}{sup +}K{sup 0}, using a data sample of 348 fb{sup -1} collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector. The branching fraction and charge asymmetry are measured to be (8.0{sub -1.3}{sup +1.4} {+-} 0.5) x 10{sup -6} and (-12.2 {+-} 16.6 {+-} 2.0)%, respectively, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. The significance of the observed branching fraction, including systematic uncertainties, is 7.9 standard deviations.

Aubert, B.

2007-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

26

Measurement of partial branching fractions of inclusive charmless B meson decays to K  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. R. Wagner,16 R. Ayad,17,* W. H. Toki,17 H. Jasper,18 A. Petzold,18 B. Spaan,18 M. J. Kobel,19 K. R. Adametz,28 J. Marks,28 U. Uwer,28 F. U. Bernlochner,29 M. Ebert,29 H. M. Lacker,29 T. Lueck,29 A. Volk,29

Jensen, Grant J.

27

Measurement of the Branching fraction ratio B ---> D K / B ---> D pi with the CDF II detector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this thesis the author has described the first measurement performed at a hadron collider of the branching fraction of the Cabibbo-suppressed mode B{sup +} {yields} {bar D}{sup 0} K{sup +}. The analysis has been performed with 360 pb{sup -1} of data collected by the CDF II detector.

Squillacioti, Paola; /INFN, Pisa /Siena U.

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

First measurement of the ratio of branching fractions B(?b0??c+?-?¯?)/B(?b0??c+?-)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This article presents the first measurement of the ratio of branching fractions B(?b0??c+?-?¯?)/B(?b0??c+?-). Measurements in two control samples using the same technique B(B¯0?D+?-?¯?)/B(B¯0?D+?-) and B(B¯0?D*(2010)+?-?¯?)/B(B¯0?D*(2010)+?-) are also reported. The analysis uses data from an integrated luminosity of approximately 172??pb-1 of pp¯ collisions at s=1.96??TeV, collected with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. The relative branching fractions are measured to be B(?b0??c+?-?¯?)B(?b0??c+?-)=16.6±3.0(stat)±1.0(syst)+2.6-3.4(PDG)±0.3(EBR), B(B¯0?D+?-?¯?)B(B¯0?D+?-)=9.9±1.0(stat)±0.6(syst)±0.4(PDG)±0.5(EBR), and B(B¯0?D*(2010)+?-?¯?)B(B¯0?D*(2010)+?-)=16.5±2.3(stat)±0.6(syst)±0.5(PDG)±0.8(EBR). The uncertainties are from statistics (stat), internal systematics (syst), world averages of measurements published by the Particle Data Group or subsidiary measurements in this analysis (PDG), and unmeasured branching fractions estimated from theory (EBR), respectively. This article also presents measurements of the branching fractions of four new ?b0 semileptonic decays: ?b0??c(2595)+?-?¯?, ?b0??c(2625)+?-?¯?, ?b0??c(2455)0?+?-?¯?, and ?b0??c(2455)++?-?-?¯?, relative to the branching fraction of the ?b0??c+?-?¯? decay. Finally, the transverse-momentum distribution of ?b0 baryons produced in pp¯ collisions is measured and found to be significantly different from that of B¯0 mesons, which results in a modification in the production cross-section ratio ??b0/?B¯0 with respect to the CDF I measurement.

T. Aaltonen et al. (CDF Collaboration)

2009-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

29

Precision measurements of branching fractions for $ ?'\\to?^0 J?$ and $?J?$  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a precision study of the $\\psip\\to\\pi^0 J/\\psi$ and $\\eta J/\\psi$ decay modes. The measurements are obtained using $106\\times10^6$ $\\psi'$ events accumulated with the BESIII detector at the BEPCII $\\ee$ collider operating at a center-of-mass energy corresponding to the $\\psip$ mass. We obtain $\\mathcal{B}(\\psip\\to\\pi^0 J/\\psi)=(1.26\\pm0.02{\\rm (stat.)}\\pm0.03{\\rm (syst.)})\\times 10^{-3}$ and $\\mathcal{B}(\\psip\\to\\eta J/\\psi)=(33.75\\pm0.17{\\rm (stat.)}\\pm0.86{\\rm (syst.)})\\times 10^{-3}$. The branching fraction ratio $R=\\frac{\\mathcal{B}(\\psip\\to\\pi^0 J/\\psi)}{\\mathcal{B}(\\psip\\to\\eta J/\\psi)}$ is determined to be $(3.74\\pm0.06 {\\rm(stat.)}\\pm0.04 {\\rm(syst.)})\\times 10^{-2}$. The precision of these measurements of $\\mathcal{B}(\\psip\\to\\pi^{0} J/\\psi)$ and $R$ represent a significant improvement over previously published values.

M. Ablikim; M. N. Achasov; O. Albayrak; D. J. Ambrose; F. F. An; Q. An; J. Z. Bai; Y. Ban; J. Becker; J. V. Bennett; M. Bertani; J. M. Bian; E. Boger O. Bondarenko; I. Boyko; R. A. Briere; V. Bytev; X. Cai; O. Cakir; A. Calcaterra; G. F. Cao; S. A. CetinB; J. F. Chang; G. Chelkov G. Chen; H. S. Chen; J. C. Chen; M. L. Chen; S. J. Chen; X. Chen; Y. B. Chen; H. P. Cheng; Y. P. Chu; F. Coccetti; D. Cronin-Hennessy; H. L. Dai; J. P. Dai; D. Dedovich; Z. Y. Deng; A. Denig; I. Denysenko M. Destefanis; W. M. Ding; Y. Ding; L. Y. Dong; M. Y. Dong; S. X. Du; J. Fang; S. S. Fang; L. Fava F. Feldbauer; C. Q. Feng; R. B. Ferroli; C. D. Fu; J. L. Fu; Y. Gao; C. Geng; K. Goetzen; W. X. Gong; W. Gradl; M. Greco; M. H. Gu; Y. T. Gu; Y. H. Guan; A. Q. Guo; L. B. Guo; Y. P. Guo; Y. L. Han; F. A. Harris; K. L. He; M. He; Z. Y. He; T. Held; Y. K. Heng; Z. L. Hou; H. M. Hu; J. F. Hu; T. Hu; G. M. Huang; G. S. Huang; J. S. Huang; X. T. Huang; Y. P. Huang; T. Hussain; C. S. Ji; Q. Ji; Q. P. Ji; X. B. Ji; X. L. Ji; L. L. Jiang; X. S. Jiang; J. B. Jiao; Z. Jiao; D. P. Jin; S. Jin; F. F. Jing; N. Kalantar-Nayestanaki; M. Kavatsyuk; M. Kornicer; W. Kuehn; W. Lai; J. S. Lange; C. H. Li; Cheng Li; Cui Li; D. M. Li; F. Li; G. Li; H. B. Li; J. C. Li; K. Li; Lei Li; Q. J. Li; S. L. Li; W. D. Li; W. G. Li; X. L. Li; X. N. Li; X. Q. Li; X. R. Li; Z. B. Li; H. Liang; Y. F. Liang; Y. T. Liang; G. R. Liao; X. T. Liao; B. J. Liu; C. L. Liu; C. X. Liu; C. Y. Liu; F. H. Liu; Fang Liu; Feng Liu; H. Liu; H. H. Liu; H. M. Liu; H. W. Liu; J. P. Liu; K. Y. Liu; Kai Liu; P. L. Liu; Q. Liu; S. B. Liu; X. Liu; Y. B. Liu; Z. A. Liu; Zhiqiang Liu; Zhiqing Liu; H. Loehner; G. R. Lu; H. J. Lu; J. G. Lu; Q. W. Lu; X. R. Lu; Y. P. Lu; C. L. Luo; M. X. Luo; T. Luo; X. L. Luo; M. Lv; C. L. Ma; F. C. Ma; H. L. Ma; Q. M. Ma; S. Ma; T. Ma; X. Y. Ma; Y. Ma; F. E. Maas; M. MaggioraA; Q. A. Malik; Y. J. Mao; Z. P. Mao; J. G. Messchendorp; J. Min; T. J. Min; R. E. Mitchell; X. H. Mo; C. Morales Morales; C. Motzko; N. Yu. Muchnoi; H. Muramatsu; Y. Nefedov; C. Nicholson; I. B. Nikolaev; Z. Ning; S. L. Olsen; Q. Ouyang; S. PacettiB; J. W. Park; M. Pelizaeus; H. P. Peng; K. Peters; J. L. Ping; R. G. Ping; R. Poling; E. Prencipe; M. Qi; S. Qian; C. F. Qiao; X. S. Qin; Y. Qin; Z. H. Qin; J. F. Qiu; K. H. Rashid; G. Rong; X. D. Ruan; A. Sarantsev; B. D. Schaefer; J. Schulze; M. Shao; C. P. Shen; X. Y. Shen; H. Y. Sheng; M. R. Shepherd; X. Y. Song; S. SpataroA B. Spruck; D. H. Sun; G. X. Sun; J. F. Sun; S. S. Sun; Y. J. Sun; Y. Z. Sun; Z. J. Sun; Z. T. Sun; C. J. Tang; X. Tang; I. TapanC; E. H. Thorndike; D. Toth; M. Ullrich; G. S. Varner; B. Wang; B. Q. Wang; D. Wang; D. Y. Wang; K. Wang; L. L. Wang; L. S. Wang; M. Wang; P. Wang; P. L. Wang; Q. Wang; Q. J. Wang; S. G. Wang; X. L. Wang; Y. D. Wang; Y. F. Wang; Y. Q. Wang; Z. Wang; Z. G. Wang; Z. Y. Wang; D. H. Wei; J. B. Wei; P. Weidenkaff; Q. G. Wen; S. P. Wen; M. Werner; U. Wiedner; L. H. Wu; N. Wu; S. X. Wu; W. Wu; Z. Wu; L. G. Xia; Z. J. Xiao; Y. G. Xie; Q. L. Xiu; G. F. Xu; G. M. Xu; H. Xu; Q. J. Xu; X. P. Xu; Z. R. Xu; F. Xue; Z. Xue; L. Yan; W. B. Yan; Y. H. Yan; H. X. Yang; Y. Yang; Y. X. Yang; H. Ye; M. Ye; M. H. Ye; B. X. Yu; C. X. Yu; H. W. Yu; J. S. Yu; S. P. Yu; C. Z. Yuan; Y. Yuan; A. A. Zafar; A. Zallo; Y. Zeng; B. X. Zhang; B. Y. Zhang; C. Zhang; C. C. Zhang; D. H. Zhang; H. H. Zhang; H. Y. Zhang; J. Q. Zhang; J. W. Zhang; J. Y. Zhang; J. Z. Zhang; S. H. Zhang; X. J. Zhang; X. Y. Zhang; Y. Zhang; Y. H. Zhang; Y. S. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; Z. Y. Zhang; G. Zhao; H. S. Zhao; J. W. Zhao; K. X. Zhao; Lei Zhao; Ling Zhao; M. G. Zhao; Q. Zhao; Q. Z. Zhao; S. J. Zhao; T. C. Zhao; X. H. Zhao; Y. B. Zhao; Z. G. Zhao; A. Zhemchugov B. Zheng; J. P. Zheng; Y. H. Zheng; B. Zhong; J. Zhong; Z. Zhong; L. Zhou; X. K. Zhou; X. R. Zhou; C. Zhu; K. Zhu; K. J. Zhu; S. H. Zhu; X. L. Zhu; Y. C. Zhu; Y. M. Zhu; Y. S. Zhu; Z. A. Zhu; J. Zhuang; B. S. Zou; J. H. Zou

2012-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

30

Measurement of the branching fraction for $\\tau\\to\\eta K\  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors report on analyses of tau lepton decays {tau}{sup -} {yields} {eta}K{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} and {tau}{sup -} {yields} {eta}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}, with {eta} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}, using 470 fb{sup -1} of data from the BABAR experiment at PEP-II, collected at center-of-mass energies at and near the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance. They measure the branching fraction for the {tau}{sup -} {yields} {eta}K{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} decay mode, {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} {eta}K{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}) = (1.42 {+-} 0.11(stat) {+-} 0.07(syst)) x 10{sup -4}, and report a 95% confidence level upper limit for the second-class current process {tau}{sup -} {yields} {eta}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}, {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} {eta}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}) < 9.9 x 10{sup -5}.

del Amo Sanchez, P.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; /INFN, Bari /Bari U.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; /Bergen U.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; Tanabe, T.; /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Paris U., VI-VII /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

2011-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

31

Some chemical kinetics issues in reburning: The branching fraction of the HCCO + NO Reaction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors have determined theoretically some critical kinetic parameters in the mechanism of NOx reburning under flow-reactor conditions. Specifically, using a variety of electronic structure methods to investigate the potential energy surfaces and the maximum free energy method of Quack and Troe to determine the resulting rate coefficients, they have deduced the values of k{sub 2} and k{sub 3} for the reactions, HCNO+O {leftrightarrow} HCO+NO (R2) and HCNO + OH {leftrightarrow} HCOH + NO, (R3) to be k{sub 2} {approx} 7 x 10{sup 13} cm{sup 3}/mole-sec. and k{sub 3} {approx} 2 x 10{sup 13} cm{sup 3}/mole-sec. independent of temperature for 300 K < T < 2,700 K. With such fast reactions converting HCNO to NO, a critical parameter in the reburn mechanism is {alpha}(T) = k{sub 1b}(T)/k{sub 1}(T), the branching fraction of the HCCO + NO reaction, HCCO + NO {leftrightarrow} HCNO+CO (R1a); HCCO + NO {leftrightarrow} HCN + CO{sub 2} (R1b); HCCO + NO {leftrightarrow} HONC + CO (R1c). Again using PES information from a variety of electronic-structure methods, the authors have used the statistical-theoretical methodology of Miller, Parrish, and Brown to determine {alpha} (T) = 0.985 exp({minus}T/1,748), valid for 300 K < T < 2,000 K. Using a value of k{sub 1} = k{sub 1a} + k{sub 1b} + k{sub 1c} = 2.4 x 10{sup 13} cm{sup 3}/mole-sec. independent of temperature (consistent with experiment) they have determined modified Arrhenius expressions for k{sub 1a} and k{sub 1b}, k{sub 1a} = 1.17 x 10{sup 13} T{sup 0.65} cm{sup 3}/mole-sec. and k{sub 1b} = 1.45 x 10{sup 16} T{sup {minus}0.968} exp({minus}648/RT) cm{sup 3}/mole-sec for 300 K < T < 2,000 K. Reaction (R1c) never contributes as much as 1% to the total rate coefficient. The theoretical analyses and the reburn mechanism are discussed in detail.

Miller, J.A.; Durant, J.L. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Combustion Research Facility; Glarborg, P. [Technical Univ. of Denmark, Lyngby (Denmark). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Measurement of the Branching Fraction for D8+ rarr tau+nu_tau and Extraction of the Decay Constant f_D_s  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The branching fraction for the decay D{sub s}{sup +} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}} with {tau}{sup +} {yields} e{sup +}{bar {nu}}{sub {tau}}, is measured using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 427 fb{sup -1} collected at center of mass energies near 10.58 GeV with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at SLAC. In the process e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} c{bar c} {yields} D*{sub s}{sup +} {bar D}{sub TAG}{bar K}X, the D*{sub s}{sup +} meson is reconstructed as a missing particle, and the subsequent decay D*{sub s}{sup +} {yields} D{sub s}{sup +}{gamma} yields an inclusive D{sub s}{sup +} data sample. Here {bar D}{sub TAG} refers to a fully reconstructed hadronic {bar D} decay, {bar K} is a K{sup -} or {bar K}{sup 0}, and X stands for any number of charged or neutral pions. The decay D{sub s}{sup +} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sup +} is isolated also, and from ratio of event yields and known branching fractions, {Beta}(D{sub s}{sup +} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}}) = (4.5 {+-} 0.5 {+-} 0.4 {+-} 0.3)% is determined. The pseudoscalar decay constant is extracted to be f{sub D{sub s}} = (233 {+-} 13 {+-} 10 {+-} 7) MeV, where the first uncertainty is statistical, the second is systematic, and the third results from the uncertainties on the external measurements used as input to the calculation.

Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; /INFN, Bari /Bari U.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; /Bergen U.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; Tanabe, T.; /UC, Berkeley; Hawkes, C.M.; /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

2010-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

33

Measurement of the branching fraction B(tau- --> K0 pi- nu) using the BaBar detector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A preliminary measurement of the branching fraction B(tau- --> K0 pi- nu) is made using 384.6 fb-1 of e+e- collision data provided by the PEP-II collider, operating primarily at sqrt(s)=10.58 GeV, and recorded using the BaBar detector. From this we measure: B(tau- --> K0 pi- nu) = (0.840 +/- 0.004 (stat) +/- 0.023 (syst)) %. This result is the most precise measurement to date and is consistent with the world average.

B. Aubert

2008-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

34

Measurements of Branching Fractions and CP Asymmetries and Studies of Angular Distributions for B to phi phi K Decays  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present branching fraction and CP asymmetry measurements as well as angular studies of B {yields} {phi}{phi}K decays using 464 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} events collected by the BABAR experiment. The branching fractions are measured in the {phi}{phi} invariant mass range below the {eta}{sub c} resonance (m{sub {phi}{phi}} < 2.85 GeV). We find {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {phi}{phi}K{sup +}) = (5.6 {+-} 0.5 {+-} 0.3) x 10{sup -6} and {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {phi}{phi}K{sup 0}) = (4.5 {+-} 0.8 {+-} 0.3) x 10{sup -6}, where the first uncertaintiy is statistical and the second systematic. The measured direct CP asymmetries for the B{sup {+-}} decays are A{sub CP} = -0.10 {+-} 0.08 {+-} 0.02 below the {eta}{sub c} threshold (m{sub {phi}{phi}} < 2.85 GeV) and A{sub CP} = 0.09 {+-} 0.10 {+-} 0.02 in the {eta}{sub c} resonance region (m{sub {phi}{phi}} in [2.94,3.02] GeV). Angular distributions are consistent with J{sub P} = 0{sup -} in the {eta}{sub c} resonance region and favor J{sup P} = 0{sup +} below the {eta}{sub c} resonance.

Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Martinelli, M.; /INFN, Bari /Bari U.; Milanes, D.A.; /INFN, Bari; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; /INFN, Bari /Bari U.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; /Bergen U.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; /UC, Berkeley; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; /Ruhr U., Bochum; Asgeirsson, D.J.; Hearty, C.; /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Harvey Mudd Coll. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Paris U., VI-VII /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas Nuclear Corp., Austin /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

35

Measurement of the B -> Dl nu branching fractions and form factor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

J. Lee, 19 H. Schwarthoff, 19 A. Wolf, 19 M.M. Zoeller, 19 S.J. Richichi, 20 H. Severini, 20 P. Skubic, 20 A. Undrus, 20 M. Bishai, 21 S. Chen, 21 J. Fast, 21 J.W. Hinson, 21 N. Menon, 21 D.H. Miller, 21 E.I. Shibata, 21 I.P.J. Shipsey, 21 S. Glenn... efficiency and the smearing in ?w. The fraction of D 0 , 2 ?n decays in each w bin that is recon- structed is 17% to 21% and the average ?w resolution is 0.026, about one-half the bin width. The small statistical uncertainty in e ij is represented by s 2 e ij...

Ammar, Raymond G.; Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Besson, David Zeke; Coppage, Don; Darling, C.; Davis, Robin E. P.; Kotov, S.; Kravchenko, I.; Kwak, Nowhan; Zhou, L.

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

ds-branching-web.dvi  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

This This note will be revised after the new CLEO measurements of thirteen D + s branching fractions (P.U.E. Onyisi et al., Phys. Rev. D88, 032009 (2013)) are added to the Particle Listings. More than a dozen papers on the D + s , most of them from the CLEO experiment, have been published since the 2008 Review. We now know enough to attempt an overview of the branching fractions. Figure 1 shows a partial breakdown of the fractions. The rest of this note is about how the figure was constructed. The values shown make heavy use of CLEO measurements of inclusive branching fractions [1] For other data and references cited in the following, see the Listings. Modes with leptons: The bottom (20.0 ± 0.9)% of Fig. 1 shows the fractions for the exclusive modes that include leptons. Measured e + ν e fractions have been doubled to get the semileptonic ℓ + ν fractions. The sum of the exclusive e + ν e fractions is (6.9

37

Improved Measurements of the Branching Fractions for B0 into pi+pi- and B0 into K+pi-, and a Search for B0 into K+K-  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors present measurements of the branching fractions for the charmless two-body decays B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} and B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, and a search for the decay B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}. They include the effects of final-state radiation from the daughter mesons for the first time, and quote branching fractions for the inclusive processes B{sup 0} {yields} h{sup +}h'{sup -}n{gamma}, where h and h' are pion or kaons. The maximum value of the sum of the energies of the n undetected photons, E{sub {gamma}}{sup max}, is mode-dependent. Using a data sample of approximately 227 million {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at SLAC.

Aubert, B.

2006-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

38

Measurement of CP Asymmetries and Branching Fractions in Charmless Two-Body B-Meson Decays to Pions and Kaons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present improved measurements of CP-violation parameters in the decays B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, and B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}, and of the branching fractions for B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} and B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}. The results are obtained with the full data set collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance by the BABAR experiment at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B factory at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, corresponding to 467 {+-} 5 million B{bar B} pairs. We find the CP-violation parameter values and branching fractions S{sub {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}} = -0.68 {+-} 0.10 {+-} 0.03, C{sub {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}} = -0.25 {+-} 0.08 {+-} 0.02, {Alpha}{sub K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}} = -0.107 {+-} 0.016{sub -0.004}{sup +0.006}, C{sub {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}} = -0.43 {+-} 0.26 {+-} 0.05, {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}) = (1.83 {+-} 0.21 {+-} 0.13) x 10{sup -6}, {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} K0{pi}{sup 0}) = (10.1 {+-} 0.6 {+-} 0.4) x 10{sup -6}, where in each case, the first uncertainties are statistical and the second are systematic. We observe CP violation with a significance of 6.7 standard deviations for B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} and 6.1 standard deviations for B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, including systematic uncertainties. Constraints on the Unitarity Triangle angle {alpha} are determined from the isospin relations among the B {yields} {pi}{pi} rates and asymmetries. Considering only the solution preferred by the Standard Model, we find {alpha} to be in the range [71{sup o}, 109{sup o}] at the 68% confidence level.

Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Palano, A.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; /Bergen U.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; /Ruhr U., Bochum; Asgeirsson, D.J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T.S.; McKenna, J.A.; So, R.Y.; /British Columbia U.; Khan, A.; /Brunel U.; Blinov, V.E.; /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Harvey Mudd Coll. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U., Comp. Sci. Dept. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

2012-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

39

A measurement of the branching fractions of the f1(1285) and f1(1420) produced in central pp interactions at 450 GeV/c  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A study of the f1(1285) and f1(1420) produced in central pp interactions has been performed. For the first time in a single experiment the branching fractions of both mesons in all major decay modes have been determined. Both the f1(1285) and f1(1420) are consistent with being produced by double Pomeron exchange.

The WA102 Collaboration; D. Barberis et al

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Interdiction Branching  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sep 29, 2011 ... of partitioning the search space, referred to as the branching scheme. .... standard branch-and-bound both in terms of size of the enumeration tree and ...... of the fractional variable to be selected to enter at each iteration of the.

2011-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inclusive branching fractions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Measurement of the $B^+\\rightarrow p \\bar{p} K^{+}$ Branching Fraction and Study of the Decay Dynamics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With a sample of 232 x 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} events collected with the BABAR detector, we study the decay B{sup +} {yields} p{bar p}K{sup +} excluding charmonium decays to p{bar p}. We measure a branching fraction {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} p{bar p}K{sup +}) = (6.7 {+-} 0.5 {+-} 0.4) x 10{sup -6}. An enhancement at low p{bar p} mass is observed and the Dalitz plot asymmetry suggests dominance of the penguin amplitude in this B decay. We search for a pentaquark candidate {Theta}*{sup ++} decaying into pK{sup +} in the mass range 1.43 to 2.00 GeV/c{sup 2} and set limits on {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {Theta}*{sup ++} {bar p}) x {Beta}({Theta}*{sup ++} {yields} pK{sup +}) at the 10{sup -7} level.

Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; /Annecy, LAPP; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona, IFAE; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B. /Bergen U. /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San

2005-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

42

Precision measurement of the branching fractions of J/psi -> pi+pi-pi0 and psi' -> pi+pi-pi0  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the decays of the J/psi and psi' mesons to pi+pi-pi0 using data samples at both resonances collected with the BES III detector in 2009. We measure the corresponding branching fractions with unprecedented precision and provide mass spectra and Dalitz plots. The branching fraction for J/psi -> pi+pi-pi0 is determined to be (2.137 +- 0.004 (stat.) +0.058-0.056 (syst.) +0.027-0.026 (norm.))*10-2, and the branching fraction for psi' -> pi+pi-pi0 is measured as (2.14 +- 0.03 (stat.) +0.08-0.07 (syst.) +0.09-0.08 (norm.))*10-4. The J/psi decay is found to be dominated by an intermediate rho(770) state, whereas the psi' decay is dominated by di-pion masses around 2.2 GeV/c2, leading to strikingly different Dalitz distributions.

BESIII Collaboration; M. Ablikim; M. N. Achasov; D. J. Ambrose; F. F. An; Q. An; Z. H. An; J. Z. Bai; R. B. F. Baldini Ferroli; Y. Ban; J. Becker; N. Berger; M. B. Bertani; J. M. Bian; E. Boger; O. Bondarenko; I. Boyko; R. A. Briere; V. Bytev; X. Cai; A. C. Calcaterra; G. F. Cao; J. F. Chang; G. Chelkov; G. Chen; H. S. Chen; J. C. Chen; M. L. Chen; S. J. Chen; Y. Chen; Y. B. Chen; H. P. Cheng; Y. P. Chu; D. Cronin-Hennessy; H. L. Dai; J. P. Dai; D. Dedovich; Z. Y. Deng; G. Denig; I. Denysenko; M. Destefanis; W. M. Ding Ding; Y. Ding; L. Y. Dong; M. Y. Dong; S. X. Du; J. Fang; S. S. Fang; L. Fava; F. Feldbauer; C. Q. Feng; C. D. Fu; J. L. Fu; Y. Gao; C. Geng; K. Goetzen; W. X. Gong; M. Greco; M. H. Gu; Y. T. Gu; Y. H. Guan; A. Q. Guo; L. B. Guo; Y. P. Guo; Y. L. Han; X. Q. Hao; F. A. Harris; K. L. He; M. He; Z. Y. He; T. Held; Y. K. Heng; Z. L. Hou; H. M. Hu; J. F. Hu; T. Hu; B. Huang; G. M. Huang; J. S. Huang; X. T. Huang; Y. P. Huang; T. Hussain; C. S. Ji; Q. Ji; X. B. Ji; X. L. Ji; L. K. Jia; L. L. Jiang; X. S. Jiang; J. B. Jiao; Z. Jiao; D. P. Jin; S. Jin; F. F. Jing; N. Kalantar-Nayestanaki; M. Kavatsyuk; W. Kuehn; W. Lai; J. S. Lange; J. K. C. Leung; C. H. Li; Cheng Li; Cui Li; D. M. Li; F. Li; G. Li; H. B. Li; J. C. Li; K. Li; Lei Li; N. B. Li; Q. J. Li; S. L. Li; W. D. Li; W. G. Li; X. L. Li; X. N. Li; X. Q. Li; X. R. Li; Z. B. Li; H. Liang; Y. F. Liang; Y. T. Liang; G. R. Liao; X. T. Liao; B. J. Liu; B. J. Liu; C. L. Liu; C. X. Liu; C. Y. Liu; F. H. Liu; Fang Liu; Feng Liu; H. Liu; H. B. Liu; H. H. Liu; H. M. Liu; H. W. Liu; J. P. Liu; K. Liu; K. Liu; K. Y. Liu; S. B. Liu; X. Liu; X. H. Liu; Y. B. Liu; Yong Liu; Z. A. Liu; Zhiqiang Liu; Zhiqing Liu; H. Loehner; G. R. Lu; H. J. Lu; J. G. Lu; Q. W. Lu; X. R. Lu; Y. P. Lu; C. L. Luo; M. X. Luo; T. Luo; X. L. Luo; M. Lv; C. L. Ma; F. C. Ma; H. L. Ma; Q. M. Ma; S. Ma; T. Ma; X. Y. Ma; F. E. Maas; M. Maggiora; Q. A. Malik; H. Mao; Y. J. Mao; Z. P. Mao; J. G. Messchendorp; J. Min; T. J. Min; R. E. Mitchell; X. H. Mo; C. Motzko; N. Yu. Muchnoi; Y. Nefedov; I. B. Nikolaev; Z. Ning; S. L. Olsen; Q. Ouyang; S. P. Pacetti; J. W. Park; M. Pelizaeus; K. Peters; J. L. Ping; R. G. Ping; R. Poling; C. S. J. Pun; M. Qi; S. Qian; C. F. Qiao; X. S. Qin; Y. Qin; Z. H. Qin; J. F. Qiu; K. H. Rashid; G. Rong; X. D. Ruan; A. Sarantsev; J. Schulze; M. Shao; C. P. Shen; X. Y. Shen; H. Y. Sheng; M. R. Shepherd; X. Y. Song; S. Spataro; B. Spruck; D. H. Sun; G. X. Sun; J. F. Sun; S. S. Sun; X. D. Sun; Y. J. Sun; Y. Z. Sun; Z. J. Sun; Z. T. Sun; C. J. Tang; X. Tang; E. H. Thorndike; H. L. Tian; D. Toth; M. U. Ulrich; G. S. Varner; B. Wang; B. Q. Wang; K. Wang; L. L. Wang; L. S. Wang; M. Wang; P. Wang; P. L. Wang; Q. Wang; Q. J. Wang; S. G. Wang; X. F. Wang; X. L. Wang; Y. D. Wang; Y. F. Wang; Y. Q. Wang; Z. Wang; Z. G. Wang; Z. Y. Wang; D. H. Wei; Q. G. Wen; S. P. Wen; M. W. Werner; U. Wiedner; L. H. Wu; N. Wu; S. X. Wu; W. Wu; Z. Wu; L. G. Xia; Z. J. Xiao; Y. G. Xie; Q. L. Xiu; G. F. Xu; G. M. Xu; H. Xu; Q. J. Xu; X. P. Xu; Y. Xu; Z. R. Xu; F. Xue; Z. Xue; L. Yan; W. B. Yan; Y. H. Yan; H. X. Yang; T. Yang; Y. Yang; Y. X. Yang; H. Ye; M. Ye; M. H. Ye; B. X. Yu; C. X. Yu; J. S. Yu; S. P. Yu; C. Z. Yuan; W. L. Yuan; Y. Yuan; A. A. Zafar; A. Z. Zallo; Y. Zeng; B. X. Zhang; B. Y. Zhang; C. C. Zhang; D. H. Zhang; H. H. Zhang; H. Y. Zhang; J. Zhang; J. Q. Zhang; J. W. Zhang; J. Y. Zhang; J. Z. Zhang; L. Zhang; S. H. Zhang; T. R. Zhang; X. J. Zhang; X. Y. Zhang; Y. Zhang; Y. H. Zhang; Y. S. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; Z. Y. Zhang; G. Zhao; H. S. Zhao; Jingwei Zhao; K. X. Zhao; Lei Zhao; Ling Zhao; M. G. Zhao; Q. Zhao; S. J. Zhao; T. C. Zhao; X. H. Zhao; Y. B. Zhao; Z. G. Zhao; A. Zhemchugov; B. Zheng; J. P. Zheng; Y. H. Zheng; Z. P. Zheng; B. Zhong; J. Zhong; L. Zhou; X. K. Zhou; X. R. Zhou; C. Zhu; K. Zhu; K. J. Zhu; S. H. Zhu; X. L. Zhu; X. W. Zhu; Y. M. Zhu; Y. S. Zhu; Z. A. Zhu; J. Zhuang; B. S. Zou; J. H. Zou; J. X. Zuo

2012-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

43

Branching fractions for chi_cJ -> p p-bar pi^0, p p-bar eta, and p p-bar omega  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using a sample of 25.9 million psi(2S) decays acquired with the CLEO-c detector at the CESR e^+e^- collider, we report branching fractions for the decays chi_cJ -> p p-bar pi^0, p p-bar eta, and p p-bar omega, with J=0,1,2. Our results for B(chi_cJ-> p p-bar pi^0) and B(chi_cJ-> p p-bar eta) are consistent with, but more precise than, previous measurements. Furthermore, we include the first measurement of B(chi_cJ-> p p-bar omega).

CLEO Collaboration; P. U. E. Onyisi; J. L. Rosner; J. P. Alexander; D. G. Cassel; S. Das; R. Ehrlich; L. Fields; L. Gibbons; S. W. Gray; D. L. Hartill; B. K. Heltsley; J. M. Hunt; D. L. Kreinick; V. E. Kuznetsov; J. Ledoux; J. R. Patterson; D. Peterson; D. Riley; A. Ryd; A. J. Sadoff; X. Shi; W. M. Sun; J. Yelton; P. Rubin; N. Lowrey; S. Mehrabyan; M. Selen; J. Wiss; S. Adams; M. Kornicer; R. E. Mitchell; M. R. Shepherd; C. M. Tarbert; D. Besson; T. K. Pedlar; J. Xavier; D. Cronin-Hennessy; J. Hietala; P. Zweber; S. Dobbs; Z. Metreveli; K. K. Seth; T. Xiao; A. Tomaradze; S. Brisbane; J. Libby; L. Martin; A. Powell; P. Spradlin; G. Wilkinson; H. Mendez; J. Y. Ge; D. H. Miller; I. P. J. Shipsey; B. Xin; G. S. Adams; D. Hu; B. Moziak; J. Napolitano; K. M. Ecklund; J. Insler; H. Muramatsu; C. S. Park; E. H. Thorndike; F. Yang; S. Ricciardi; C. Thomas; M. Artuso; S. Blusk; R. Mountain; T. Skwarnicki; S. Stone; J. C. Wang; L. M. Zhang; G. Bonvicini; D. Cinabro; A. Lincoln; M. J. Smith; P. Zhou; J. Zhu; P. Naik; J. Rademacker; D. M. Asner; K. W. Edwards; J. Reed; K. Randrianarivony; A. N. Robichaud; G. Tatishvili; E. J. White; R. A. Briere; H. Vogel

2010-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

44

Improved Measurements of Branching Fractions for B0 -> pi+pi-, K+pi-, and Search for B0 -> K+K-  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present preliminary measurements of branching fractions for the charmless two-body decays B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} and K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, and a search for B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -} using a data sample of approximately 227 million B{bar B} decays. Signal yields are extracted with a multi-dimensional maximum likelihood fit, and the efficiency is corrected for the effects of final-state radiation. We find the charge-averaged branching fractions (in units of 10{sup -6}): {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) = 5.5 {+-} 0.4 {+-} 0.3; {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) = 19.2 {+-} 0.6 {+-} 0.6; and {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}) = < 0.40. The errors are statistical followed by systematic, and the upper limit on K{sup +}K{sup -} represents a confidence level of 90%.

Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; /Annecy, LAPP; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona, IFAE; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B. /Bergen U. /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San

2005-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

45

Measurement of the Ratio of Branching Fractions Br(Bs -> Ds- pi+)/Br(B -> D- pi+) at CDF-II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The measurement of B{sub s}{sup 0} mixing is one of the flagship analyses for the Run II B physics program. The sensitivity of the measurement to the frequency of B{sub s}{sup 0} oscillations strongly depends on the number of reconstructed B{sub s}{sup 0} mesons. They present the measurement of the ratio of branching fractions Br(B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup -}{pi}{sup +})/Br(B{sup 0} {yields} D{sup -}{pi}{sup +}), which directly influences the number of B{sub s}{sup 0} events available for the measurement of B{sub s}{sup 0} mixing at CDF-II. They analyze 115 pb{sup -1} of data collected with the CDF-II detector in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV using a novel displaced track trigger. They reconstruct 78 {+-} 11 B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup -}{pi}{sup +} decays at 1153 {+-} 45 B{sup 0} {yields} D{sup -}{pi}{sup +} decays with good signal to background ratio. This is the world's largest sample of fully reconstructed B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup -}{pi}{sup +} decays. They find the ratio of production fractions multiplied by the ratio of branching fractions to be: f{sub s}/f{sub d} {center_dot} Br(B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup -}{pi}{sup +})/Br(B{sup 0} {yields} D{sup -}{pi}{sup +}) = 0.325 {+-} 0.046(stat) {+-} 0.034(syst) {+-} 0.084 (BR). Using the world average value of f{sub s}/f{sub d} = 0.26 {+-} 0.03, we infer that the ratio of branching fractions is: Br(B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup -}{pi}{sup +})/Br(B{sup 0} {yields} D{sup -}{pi}{sup +}) = 1.25 {+-} 0.18(stat) {+-} 0.13(syst) {+-} 0.32(BR) {+-} 0.14(PR) where the last uncertainty is due to the uncertainty on the world average measurement of the ratio of B{sub s}{sup 0} to B{sup 0} production rates, f{sub s}/f{sub d}.

Furic, Ivan Kresimir; /MIT

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

ds_branching_s034dsb-web.dvi  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

More More than a dozen papers on the D + s , most of them from the CLEO experiment, have been published since the 2008 Review. We now know enough to attempt an overview of the branching fractions. Figure 1 shows a partial breakdown of the fractions. The rest of this note is about how the figure was constructed. The values shown make heavy use of CLEO measurements of inclusive branching fractions [1] For other data and references cited in the following, see the Listings. Modes with leptons: The bottom (20.0 ± 0.9)% of Fig. 1 shows the fractions for the exclusive modes that include lep- tons. Measured e + ν e fractions have been doubled to get the semileptonic ℓ + ν fractions. The sum of the exclusive e + ν e frac- tions is (6.9 ± 0.4)%, consistent with an inclusive semileptonic e + ν e measurement of (6.5 ± 0.4)%. There seems to be little missing here. Inclusive hadronic KK fractions: The Cabibbo-favored

47

Measurement of the Branching Fractions of the Rare Decays B0 to Ds(*)+pi-,B0 to Ds(*)+rho-, and B0 to Ds(*)-K(*)+  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors report the measurement of the branching fractions of the rare decays B{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup (*)+} {pi}{sup -}, B{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup (*)+} {rho}{sup -}, and B{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup (*)-} K{sup (*)+} in a sample of 381 x 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(4S) decays into B{bar B} pairs collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} storage ring. They present evidence for the decay B{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup -} K*{sup +} and the vector-vector decays B{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup *+} {rho}{sup -} and B{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup *-} K{sup *+}, as well as the first measurement of the vector meson polarization in these decays. They also determine the ratios of the CM-suppressed to CKM-favored amplitudes r(D{sup (*)}{pi}) and r(D{sup (*)}{rho}) in decays B{sup 0} {yields} D{sup (*)}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}} and B{sup 0} {yields} D{sup (*)}{sup {+-}}{rho}{sup {-+}}, and comment on the prospects for measuring the Cp observable sin(2{beta} + {gamma}).

Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Lopez, L.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; /Bari U.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; /Bergen U.; Abrams, G.S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Button-Shafer, J.; Cahn, R.N.; /Energy Sci. Network /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /Frascati /Genoa U. /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Karlsruhe U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /Pisa U. /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DSM, DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

2008-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

48

Improved Measurements of Neutral B Decay Branching Fractions to K0s pi+ pi- and the Charge Asymmetry of B0 -> K*+ pi-  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors analyze the decay B{sup 0} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} using a sample of 232 million {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} decays collected with the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II asymmetric-energy B factory. A maximum likelihood fit finds the following branching fractions: {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup 0}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) = (43.0 {+-} 2.3 {+-} 2.3) x 10{sup -6}, {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} f{sub 0}({yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})K{sup 0}) = (5.5 {+-} 0.7 {+-} 0.5 {+-} 0.3) x 10{sup -6} and {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} K*{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) = (11.0 {+-} 1.5 {+-} 0.5 {+-} 0.5) x 10{sup -6}. For these results, the first uncertainty is statistical, the second is systematic, and the third (if present) is due to the effect of interference from other resonances. They also measure the CP-violating charge asymmetry in the decay B{sup 0} {yields} K*{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, {Alpha}{sub K*{pi}} = -0.11 {+-} 0.14 {+-} 0.05.

Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; /Annecy, LAPP; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona, IFAE; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B. /Bergen U. /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San

2005-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

49

Inclusive B decays from resummed perturbation theory.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ar X iv :h ep -p h/ 07 03 03 6v 1 4 M ar 2 00 7 Inclusive B decays from resummed perturbation theory Einan Gardi Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, J J Thomson Avenue, Cambridge, CB3 0HE, UK and Department of Applied Mathematics... for the experimentally–relevant branching fractions can be derived from resummed perturbation theory and explain the way in which the resummation further provides guidance in parametrizing non-perturbative Fermi–motion effects. Finally I address the comparison between...

Gardi, Einan

50

Measurement of the Relative Branching Fraction of \\boldmath $B_{s}^{0} \\rightarrow J/?f_{0}(980), f_{0}(980) \\rightarrow \\p i^{+}?^{-}$ to $B_{s}^{0} \\rightarrow J/??, ?\\rightarrow K^{+}K^{-}$  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A measurement of the relative branching fraction of $B_{s}^{0} \\rightarrow J/\\ps i f_{0}(980), f_{0}(980) \\rightarrow \\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}$ to $B_{s}^{0} \\rightarrow J/\\psi \\phi, \\p hi \\rightarrow K^{+}K^{-}$ is presented. The decay mode $B_{s}^{0} \\rightarrow J/\\psi f_{0}(980)$ is an interesting mode since it is a CP-odd eigenstate which could be used in CP-violating studies. Using approximat ely 8 $\\rm{fb}^{-1}$ of data recorded with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider, a relative branching fraction of 0.210 $\\pm$ 0.032\\thinspace(stat) $\\pm$ 0.036\\thi nspace(syst) is found.

B. Abbott

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

51

Branching Fraction and P-violation Charge Asymmetry Measurements for B-meson Decays to eta K+-, eta pi+-, eta'K, eta' pi+-, omega K, and omega pi+-  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors present measurements of the branching fractions for B{sup 0} meson decays to {eta}{prime}K{sup 0} and {omega}K{sup 0}, and of the branching fractions and CP-violation charge asymmetries for B{sup +} meson decays to {eta}{pi}{sup +}, {eta}K{sup +}, {eta}{prime}{pi}{sup +}, {eta}{prime}K{sup +}, {omega}{pi}{sup +}, and {omega}K{sup +}. The data, collected with the BABAR detector at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, represent 383 million B{bar B} pairs produced in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation. The measurements agree with previous results; they find no evidence for direct CP violation.

Aubert, B.

2007-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

52

Measurement of Branching Fractions and CP-Violating Asymmetries in B0 to K0K0bar and B+ to K0barK+ Decays at the BaBar Experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the last few years, the B factories have established the Cabbibo-Kobayashi-Maskawa mechanism of CP violation in the Standard Model through the study of the decays of B mesons. The focus of Belle and BaBar has now expanded to the search for signatures of new physics beyond the Standard Model, particularly through examination of flavor-changing neutral-current transitions, which proceed through diagrams involving virtual loops. These decays are suppressed in the Standard Model, increasing sensitivity to new-physics effects but decreasing branching fractions. Exploiting large and growing datasets, BaBar and Belle have made many measurements in loop decays where a b quark transitions to an s quark, observing hints of possible deviations from Standard Model expectations in CP-violating measurements.

Biesiada, Jedrzej; /Princeton U.; ,

2007-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

53

Measurements of the branching fractions for B{sub (s)}{yields}D{sub (s)}{pi}{pi}{pi} and {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0}{yields}{Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{pi}{pi}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Branching fractions of the decays H{sub b}{yields}H{sub c}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} relative to H{sub b}{yields}H{sub c}{pi}{sup -} are presented, where H{sub b} (H{sub c}) represents B{sup 0} (D{sup +}), B{sup -} (D{sup 0}), B{sub s}{sup 0} (D{sub s}{sup +}), and {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} ({Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}). The measurements are performed with the LHCb detector using 35 pb{sup -1} of data collected at {radical}(s)=7 TeV. The ratios of branching fractions are measured to be [B(B{sup 0}{yields}D{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})]/[B(B{sup 0}{yields}D{sup +}{pi}{sup -})]=2.38{+-}0.11{+-}0.21, [B(B{sup -}{yields}D{sup 0}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})]/[B(B{sup -}{yields}D{sup 0}{pi}{sup -})]= 1.27{+-}0.06{+-}0.11, [B(B{sub s}{sup 0}{yields}D{sub s}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})]/[B(B{sub s}{sup 0}{yields}D{sub s}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})]=2.01{+-}0.37{+-}0.20, [B({Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0}{yields}{Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})]/[B({Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0}{yields}{Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})]=1.43{+-}0.16{+-}0.13 We also report measurements of partial decay rates of these decays to excited charm hadrons. These results are of comparable or higher precision than existing measurements.

Aaij, R.; Bauer, Th.; Beuzekom, M. van; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Coco, V.; van Eijk, D.; Farinelli, C.; Heijne, V.; Hulsbergen, W.; Jans, E.; Jansen, F.; Koppenburg, P.; Kozlinskiy, A.; van Leerdam, J.; Merk, M.; Mous, I.; Oggero, S.; Pellegrino, A.; du Pree, T.; Storaci, B. [Nikhef National Institute for Subatomic Physics, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Measurements of CP asymmetries and branching fractions of two-body charmless decays of B^0 and B^0_s mesons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The thesis is organized as follows: Chapter 1 describes the theoretical framework of non-leptonic B{sub (s)}{sup 0} {yields} H{sup +}h{prime}{sup -} decays, with a simple overview of the CP violation mechanism within the Standard Model and of the most used phenomenological approaches in the evaluation of strong interaction contributions. The chapter contains also a review of the theoretical expectations and the current experimental measurements along with a discussion about the importance of studying such decays. Chapter 2 contains a general description of the Tevatron collider and of the CDF II detector. Chapter 3 is devoted to the description of the data sample used for the measurement and the method used in extracting the signal from the background. Particular attention is dedicated to the on-line trigger selection, which is crucial to collect a sample enriched in B{sub (s)}{sup 0} {yields} h{sup +}h{prime}{sup -} decays. Chapter 4 shows how the information from kinematics and particle identification was used to achieve a statistical discrimination amongst modes to extract individual measurements. The available resolutions in mass or in particle identification are separately insufficient for an event-by-event separation of B{sub (s)}{sup 0} {yields} h{sup +}h{prime}{sup -} modes. The choice of observables and the technique used to combine them is an important and innovative aspect of the analysis described in this thesis. Chapter 5 is devoted to the accurate determination of the invariant mass lineshape. This is a crucial ingredient for resolving overlapping mass peaks. This chapter details all resolution effects with particular attention at the tails due to the emission of low-energy photons from charged kaons and pions in the final state (FSR). For the first time the effect of FSR has been accurately accounted for in a CDF analysis. Chapter 6 describes how kinematic and PID information, discussed in chap. 4 and chap. 5 were combined in a maximum Likelihood fit to statistically determine the composition of the B{sub (s)}{sup 0} {yields} h{sup +}h{prime}{sup -} sample. This kinematics-PID combined fit has been developed and performed for the first time at CDF in the analysis presented in this thesis and this methodology was later inherited by several other analyses. Chapter 7 is devoted to the study of the isolation variable, which is a crucial handle to enhance the signal-to-background ratio in the off-line selection. It exploits the property that the b-hadrons tend to carry a larger fraction of the transverse momentum of the particles produced in the fragmentation, with respect to lighter hadrons. Since the simulators do not accurately reproduce the fragmentation processes, this chapter is devoted to the study of the control data sample of B{sub (s)}{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi}X decays to probe the characteristics of this variable. Chapter 8 describes an innovative procedure used to optimize the selection to minimize the statistical uncertainty on the quantities one wishes to measure. The procedure is based on the fit of composition described in chap. 6. Chapter 9 reports the results of the fit of composition described in chap. 6 and the cross-checks performed to verify the goodness of the fit of composition. In order to translate the parameters returned from the fit into physics measurements the relative efficiency corrections between the various decay modes need to be applied. Chapter 10 is devoted to the description of these corrections. Chapter 11 describes the measurement of the detector-induced charge asymmetry between positively and negatively charged kaons and pions, due to their different probability of strong interaction in the tracker material using the real data. This allows to extract the acceptance correction factor for the CP asymmetries measurement without any external inputs from the simulation, and to perform a powerful check of whole analysis. Chapter 12 describes the main sources of systematic uncertainties and the method used to evaluate the significance of the results on rare modes. The final resul

Morello, Michael Joseph; /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Measurements of branching fraction ratios and CP-asymmetries in suppressed B-? D(? K+?-)K- and B-? D(? K+?-)?- decays  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report the first reconstruction in hadron collisions of the suppressed decays B-? D(? K+?-)K- and B-? D(? K+?-)?- decays, sensitive to the CKM phase {gamma}, using data from 7 fb-1 of integrated luminosity collected by the CDF II detector at the Tevatron collider. We reconstruct a signal for the B-? D(? K+?-)K- suppressed mode with a significance of 3.2 standard deviations, and measure the ratios of the suppressed to favored branching fractions R(K) = [22.0 ± 8.6(stat) ± 2.6(syst)] x 10-3, R+(K) = [42.6 ± 13.7(stat) ± 2.8(syst)] x 10-3, R-(K) = [3.8 ± 10.3(stat) ± 2.7(syst)] x 10-3 as well as the direct CP-violating asymmetry A(K) = -0.82±0.44(stat)±0.09(syst) of this mode. Corresponding quantities for B- ? D(? K+?-)?- decay are also reported.

Aaltonen, T. [Helsinki Inst. of Physics; Gonzalez, Alvarez B. [Oviedo U., Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S. [INFN, Padua; Amidei, D. [Michigan U.; Anastassov, A. [Northwestern U.; Annovi, A. [Frascati; Antos, J [Comenius U.; Apollinari, G. [Fermilab; Appel, J. A [Fermilab; Apresyan, A. [Purdue; Arisawa, T. [Waseda U., Dubna, JINR

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Branch content of metallocene polyethylene Ramnath Ramachandran, Gregory Beaucage*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Branch content of metallocene polyethylene Ramnath Ramachandran, Gregory Beaucage* and Amit catalyzed polyethylene (PE). A novel scaling approach is applied to determine the mole fraction branch solutions of metallocene polyethylene samples, to quantify the LCB content in polymers previously studied

Beaucage, Gregory

57

Solid State Photovoltaic Research Branch  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the progress of the Solid State Photovoltaic Research Branch of the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) from October 1, 1988, through September 30,l 1989. Six technical sections of the report cover these main areas of SERIs in-house research: Semiconductor Crystal Growth, Amorphous Silicon Research, Polycrystalline Thin Films, III-V High-Efficiency Photovoltaic Cells, Solid-State Theory, and Laser Raman and Luminescence Spectroscopy. Sections have been indexed separately for inclusion on the data base.

Not Available

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Measurement of the Electron Energy Spectrum and its Moments in Inclusive B->X e nu Decays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report a measurement of the inclusive electron energy spectrum for semileptonic decays of B mesons in a data sample of 52 million Y4S -> BBar decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B-meson factory at SLAC. We determine the branching fraction, first, second, and third moments of the spectrum for lower cut-offs on the electron energy between 0.6 and 1.5 GeV. We measure the partial branching fraction to be Br(B -> X e nu, E_e>0.6 GeV) = (10.36 +-0.06(stat.) +-0.23(sys))%.

B. Aubert

2004-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

59

Inclusive and Exclusive |Vub|  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The current status of the determinations of CKM matrix element |V{sub ub}| via exclusive and inclusive charmless semileptonic B decays is reviewed. The large datasets collected at the B-Factories, and the increased precision of theoretical calculations have allowed an improvement in the determination of |V{sub ub}|. However, there are still significant uncertainties. In the exclusive approach, the most precise measurement of the pion channel branching ratio is obtained by an untagged analysis. This very good precision can be reached by tagged analyses with more data. The problem with exclusive decays is that the strong hadron dynamics can not be calculated from first principles and the determination of the form factor has to rely on light-cone sum rules or lattice QCD calculations. The current data samples allow a comparison of different FF models with data distributions. With further developments on lattice calculations, the theoretical error should shrink to reach the experimental one. The inclusive approach still provides the most precise |V{sub ub}| determinations. With new theoretical calculations, the mild (2.5{sigma}) discrepancy with respect to the |V{sub ub}| value determined from the global UT fit has been reduced. As in the exclusive approach, theoretical uncertainties represent the limiting factor to the precision of the measurement. Reducing the theoretical uncertainties to a level comparable with the statistical error is challenging. New measurements in semileptonic decays of charm mesons could increase the confidence in theoretical calculations and related uncertainties.

Petrella, Antonio; /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara

2011-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

60

Measurement of the B0 ->π−ℓνand B ->η(′)ℓνBranching Fractions, the B0 ->π−ℓνand B ->ηℓνForm-Factor Shapes, and Determination of |Vub|  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report the results of a study of the exclusive charmless semileptonic decays, B{sup +} {yields} {eta}{sup {prime}}{ell}{sup +}{nu} and B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{ell}{sup +}{nu}, undertaken with approximately 464 million B{bar B} pairs collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector. The analysis uses events in which the signal B decays are reconstructed with a loose neutrino reconstruction technique. We obtain partial branching fractions for B{sup +} {yields} {eta}{ell}{sup +}{nu} and B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{ell}{sup +}{nu} decays in three and 12 bins of q{sup 2}, respectively, from which we extract the f{sub +}(q{sup 2}) form-factor shapes and the total branching fractions {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {eta}{ell}{sup +}{nu}) = (0.36 {+-} 0.05{sub stat} {+-} 0.04{sub syst}) x 10{sup -4} and {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{ell}{sup +}{nu}) = (1.42 {+-} 0.05{sub stat} {+-} 0.07{sub syst}) x 10{sup -4}. We also measure {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {eta}{sup {prime}}{ell}{sup +}{nu}) = (0.24 {+-} 0.08{sub stat} {+-} 0.03{sub syst}) x 10{sup -4}. We obtain values for the magnitude of the CKM matrix element |V{sub ub}| using three different QCD calculations.

del Amo Sanchez, P.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Martinelli, M.; Milanes, D.A.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; /INFN, Bari /Bari U.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; /Bergen U.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; /UC, Berkeley; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Paris U., VI-VII /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas Nuclear Corp., Austin /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

2011-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

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61

Measurement of the Inclusive Electron Spectrum in Charmless Semileptonic B Decays Near the Kinematic Endpoint and Determination of |Vub|  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a measurement of the inclusive electron spectrum in B {yields} X{sub u}e{nu} decays near the kinematic limit for B {yields} X{sub c}e{nu} transitions, using a sample of 88 million B{bar B} pairs recorded by the BABAR detector at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance. Partial branching fraction measurements are performed in five overlapping intervals of the electron momentum; for the interval of 2.0-2.6 GeV/c we obtain {Delta}{Beta}(B {yields} X{sub u}e{nu}) = (0.572 {+-} 0.041{sub stat} {+-} 0.065{sub syst}) x 10{sup -3}. Combining this result with shape function parameters extracted from BABAR measurements of moments of the inclusive photon spectrum in B {yields} X{sub s}{gamma} decays and moments of the hadron mass and lepton energy spectra in B {yields} X{sub c}l{nu} decays we determine |V{sub ub}| = 4.44 {+-} 0.25{sub exp{sub -0.38}{sup +0.42}SF} {+-} 0.22{sub theory} x 10{sup -3}. Here the first error represents the combined statistical and systematic experimental uncertainties of the partial branching fraction measurement, the second error refers to the uncertainty of the determination of the shape function parameters, and the third error is due to theoretical uncertainties in the QCD calculations.

Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; /Annecy, LAPP; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona, IFAE; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B. /Bergen U. /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

62

Fluid Inclusion Gas Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fluid inclusion gas analysis for wells in various geothermal areas. Analyses used in developing fluid inclusion stratigraphy for wells and defining fluids across the geothermal fields. Each sample has mass spectrum counts for 180 chemical species.

Dilley, Lorie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Nonspectator contributions to inclusive charmless B decays  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The light quarks inside B mesons are usually treated as spectators and do not affect the decay rates which are assumed to be purely due to b quark decays. In this paper we calculate the nonspectator contributions to inclusive charmless B decays due to the spectator effects. We find that the nonspectator contributions to the branching ratio for B0 are small (<2×10-4), but the contributions to ?S=0 and ?S=-1, B- decay branching ratios can be as large as -7.5×10-4 and 2×10-3, and can modify the main three-body spectator b decay branching ratios by 10% and 20%, respectively. These contributions may play an important role in rare charmless B decays.

Wu-Sheng Dai; Xiao-Gang He; Xue-Qian Li; Gang Zhao

1999-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

64

Measurement of the ratio of branching fractions {ital B}({ital D}{sup 0}{r_arrow}{pi}{sup {minus}}{ital e}{sup +}{nu}{sub {ital e}})/{ital B}({ital D}{sup 0}{r_arrow}{ital K}{sup {minus}}{ital e}{sup +}{nu}{sub {ital e}})  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using 3.0 fb{sup {minus}1} of data collected with the CLEO-II detector, we study the Cabibbo-suppressed decay {ital D}{sup 0}{r_arrow}{pi}{sup {minus}}{ital e}{sup +}{nu}{sub {ital e}}. The ratio of the branching fractions {ital B}({ital D}{sup 0}{r_arrow}{pi}{sup {minus}}{ital e}{sup +}{nu}{sub {ital e}})/{ital B}({ital D}{sup 0}{r_arrow}{ital K}{sup {minus}}{ital e}{sup +}{nu}{sub {ital e}}) is measured to be (10.3{plus_minus}3.9{plus_minus}1.3)%, corresponding to an upper limit of 15.6% at the 90% confidence level.

Butler, F.; Fu, X.; Nemati, B.; Ross, W.R.; Skubic, P.; Wood, M.; Bishai, M.; Fast, J.; Gerndt, E.; Hinson, J.W.; McIlwain, R.L.; Miao, T.; Miller, D.H.; Modesitt, M.; Payne, D.; Shibata, E.I.; Shipsey, I.P.J.; Wang, P.N.; Gibbons, L.; Kwon, Y.; Roberts, S.; Thorndike, E.H.; Coan, T.E.; Dominick, J.; Fadeyev, V.; Korolkov, I.; Lambrecht, M.; Sanghera, S.; Shelkov, V.; Skwarnicki, T.; Stroynowski, R.; Volobouev, I.; Wei, G.; Artuso, M.; Gao, M.; Goldberg, M.; He, D.; Horwitz, N.; Moneti, G.C.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Mukhin, Y.; Playfer, S.; Rozen, Y.; Stone, S.; Xing, X.; Zhu, G.; Bartelt, J.; Csorna, S.E.; Egyed, Z.; Jain, V.; Gibaut, D.; Kinoshita, K.; Pomianowski, P.; Barish, B.; Chadha, M.; Chan, S.; Cowen, D.F.; Eigen, G.; Miller, J.S.; O`Grady, C.; Urheim, J.; Weinstein, A.J.; Wuerthwein, F.; Asner, D.M.; Athanas, M.; Bliss, D.W.; Brower, W.S.; Masek, G.; Paar, H.P.; Gronberg, J.; Korte, C.M.; Kutschke, R.; Menary, S.; Morrison, R.J.; Nakanishi, S.; Nelson, H.N.; Nelson, T.K.; Qiao, C.; Richman, J.D.; Roberts, D.; Ryd, A.; Tajima, H.; Witherell, M.S.; Balest, R.; Cho, K.; Ford, W.T.; Lohner, M.; Park, H.; Rankin, P.; Smith, J.G.; Alexander, J.P.; Bebek, C.; Berger, B.E.; Berkelman, K.; Bloom, K.; Browder, T.E.; Cassel, D.G.; Cho, H.A.; Coffman, D.M.; Crowcroft, D.S.; Dickson, M.; Drell, P.S.; Dumas, D.J.; Ehrlich, R.; Elia, R.; Gaidarev, P.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Gittelman, B.; Gray, S.W.; Hartill, D.L.; Heltsley, B.K.; Henderson, S.; Jones, C.D.; Jones, S.L.; Kandaswamy, J.; Katayama, N.; Kim, P.C.; Kreinick, D.L.; Liu, Y.; Ludwig, G.S.; Masui, J.; Mevissen, J.; Mistry, N.B.; Ng, C.R.; Nordberg, E.; Patterson, J.R.; Peterson, D.; Riley, D.; Soffer, A.; Avery, P.; Freyberger, A.; Lingel, K.; Rodriguez, J.; Yang, S.; Yelton, J.; Brandenburg, G.; Cinabro, D.; Liu, T.; Saulnier, M.; Wilson, R.; Yamamoto, H.; Bergfeld, T.; Eisenstein, B.I.; Ernst, J.; Gladding, G.E.; Gollin, G.D.; Palmer, M.; Selen, M.; Thaler, J.J.; Edwards, K.W.; McLean, K.W.; (CLEO Collabor..

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Inclusive Teaching "Invisible" Diversity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DIVERSITY · Inclusive Teaching · "Invisible" Diversity · Teaching Adult Learners Inclusive Teaching and sample answers that spell out your expectations. #12;"Invisible" Diversity Diversity is more than race ideas or behaviors as normative. 3. Make the invisible visible. Acknowledge difference and incorporate

Champagne, Frances A.

66

New measurement of B -> D*pi branching fractions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(+)e(-) luminosity of 3.1 fb(-1) accumulated at the Y(4S) by the CLEO-II Il detector, we report measurements of B((B) over bar(0) --> D*(+)pi(-)) = (2.81 +/- 0.11 +/- 0.21 +/- 0.05) x 10(-3) and B(B- --> D*(0) pi(-)) = (4.34 +/- 0.33 +/- 0.34 +/- 0.18) x 10(-3)....

Ammar, Raymond G.; Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Besson, David Zeke; Coppage, Don; Darling, C.; Davis, Robin E. P.; Hancock, N.; Kotov, S.; Kravchenko, I.; Kwak, Nowhan

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Branching fraction and photon energy spectrum for b -> s gamma  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

theory corrections. We obtain first and second moments of the photon energy spectrum above 2.0 GeV, (E gamma) = 2.346 +/- 0.032 +/- 0.011 GeV, and (E-gamma(2)) - (E-gamma)(2) = 0.0226 +/- 0.0066 +/- 0.0020 GeV2, where the errors are statistical...

Ammar, Raymond G.; Bean, Alice; Besson, David Zeke; Zhao, X.

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Radioiodinated branched carbohydrates  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A radioiodinated branched carbohydrate for tissue imaging. Iodine-123 is stabilized in the compound by attaching it to a vinyl functional group that is on the carbohydrate. The compound exhibits good uptake and retention and is promising in the development of radiopharmaceuticals for brain, heart and tumor imaging.

Goodman, Mark M. (Knoxville, TN); Knapp, Jr., Furn F. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Executive Branch Management Scorecard | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Executive Branch Management Scorecard Executive Branch Management Scorecard More Documents & Publications Executive Branch Management Scorecard Slide 1 Three Year Rolling Timeline...

70

Inclusive Jets in PHP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Differential inclusive-jet cross sections have been measured in photoproduction for boson virtualities Q^2 < 1 GeV^2 with the ZEUS detector at HERA using an integrated luminosity of 300 pb^-1. Jets were identified in the laboratory frame using the k_T, anti-k_T or SIScone jet algorithms. Cross sections are presented as functions of the jet pseudorapidity, eta(jet), and the jet transverse energy, E_T(jet). Next-to-leading-order QCD calculations give a good description of the measurements, except for jets with low E_T(jet) and high eta(jet). The cross sections have the potential to improve the determination of the PDFs in future QCD fits. Values of alpha_s(M_Z) have been extracted from the measurements based on different jet algorithms. In addition, the energy-scale dependence of the strong coupling was determined.

Roloff, Philipp

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Inclusive Jets in PHP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Differential inclusive-jet cross sections have been measured in photoproduction for boson virtualities Q^2 < 1 GeV^2 with the ZEUS detector at HERA using an integrated luminosity of 300 pb^-1. Jets were identified in the laboratory frame using the k_T, anti-k_T or SIScone jet algorithms. Cross sections are presented as functions of the jet pseudorapidity, eta(jet), and the jet transverse energy, E_T(jet). Next-to-leading-order QCD calculations give a good description of the measurements, except for jets with low E_T(jet) and high eta(jet). The cross sections have the potential to improve the determination of the PDFs in future QCD fits. Values of alpha_s(M_Z) have been extracted from the measurements based on different jet algorithms. In addition, the energy-scale dependence of the strong coupling was determined.

Philipp Roloff

2013-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

72

Protein Phosphorylation in Amyloplasts Regulates Starch Branching Enzyme Activity and Proteinâ??Protein Interactions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...example, the amylose extender...in beta-amylase (EC 3...in beta-amylase migration...formation of alpha-(16)-branches in amylopectin, are regulated...Total Starch Amylose Fraction...mg of the alpha-amylase inhibitor...1948). Amylose and amylopectin fractionated...

Ian J. Tetlow; Robin Wait; Zhenxiao Lu; Rut Akkasaeng; Caroline G. Bowsher; Sergio Esposito; Behjat Kosar-Hashemi; Matthew K. Morell; Michael J. Emes

2004-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

73

Reading Comprehension - The Three Branches of Government  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The Three Branches of Government The Three Branches of Government The three branches of the federal government are the _________ local state executive , _________ legislative mayor city , and the _________ judge judicial jury branches. The executive branch is responsible for _________ enforcing making interpreting laws. The head of the executive branch is _________ The President The Congress The Supreme Court . The President is the chief _________ law enforcer judge jury of the United States. The President is also the head of the _________ armed forces Supreme Court Congress . The legislative branch _________ enforces makes interprets laws. The legislative branch is known as _________ The President Congress The Supreme Court . Congress consists of two houses, known as the _________ Senate

74

Minimal energy for elastic inclusions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...articles 1008 4 120 Minimal energy for elastic inclusions Hans...Courant Institute, New York University, , Mercer Street 251, New York, NY 10012, USA We...term representing elastic energy. More precisely, our aim...

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Stiffening solids with liquid inclusions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

From bone and wood to concrete and carbon fibre, composites are ubiquitous natural and engineering materials. Eshelby's inclusion theory describes how macroscopic stress fields couple to isolated microscopic inclusions, allowing prediction of a composite's bulk mechanical properties from a knowledge of its microstructure. It has been extended to describe a wide variety of phenomena from solid fracture to cell adhesion. Here, we show experimentally and theoretically that Eshelby's theory breaks down for small liquid inclusions in a soft solid. In this limit, an isolated droplet's deformation is strongly size-dependent with the smallest droplets mimicking the behaviour of solid inclusions. Furthermore, in opposition to the predictions of conventional composite theory, we find that finite concentrations of small liquid inclusions enhance the stiffness of soft solids. A straight-forward extension of Eshelby's theory, accounting for the surface tension of the solid-liquid interface, explains our experimental observations. The counterintuitive effect of liquid-stiffening of solids is expected whenever droplet radii are smaller than an elastocapillary length, given by the ratio of the surface tension to Young's modulus of the solid matrix.

Robert W. Style; Rostislav Boltyanskiy; Benjamin Allen; Katharine E. Jensen; Henry P. Foote; John S. Wettlaufer; Eric R. Dufresne

2014-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

76

Optimization Online - Branch-and-cut and Branch-and-cut-and-price ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Jan 27, 2014 ... Branch-and-cut and Branch-and-cut-and-price Algorithms for the Adjacent Only Quadratic Minimum Spanning Tree Problem. Dilson Lucas ...

Dilson Lucas Pereira

2014-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

77

ARM - Measurement - Cloud fraction  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Cloud fraction Fraction of sky covered by clouds, observed directly or derived from SW...

78

Hawaii Wastewater Branch Webpage | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Hawaii Wastewater Branch Webpage Abstract This is the webpage of the Wastewater Branch of the...

79

Molecular Genetic Analysis of Maize Starch Branching Isoforms: Modulation of Starch Branching Enzyme Isoform Activities in Maize to Produce Starch with Novel Branching Architecture and Properties  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Modulation of Starch Branching enzyme Isoform Activities in Maize to Produce Starch with Novel Branching Architecture and Properties.

Guiltinan, Mark J.; Thompson, Donald

2009-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

80

Fractional Electromagnetic Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the present work we consider the electromagnetic wave equation in terms of the fractional derivative of the Caputo type. The order of the derivative being considered is 0 <\\gamma<1. A new parameter \\sigma, is introduced which characterizes the existence of the fractional components in the system. We analyze the fractional derivative with respect to time and space, for \\gamma = 1 and \\gamma = 1/2 cases.

J. F. Gómez; J. J. Rosales; J. J. Bernal; V. I. Tkach; M. Guía

2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inclusive branching fractions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Government-Wide Diversity and Inclusion Strategic Plan (2011...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

diversity and inclusion efforts: workforce diversity, workplace inclusion, and sustainability. The Department of Energy's Diversity and Inclusion Strategic Plan was based off...

82

Fractions continues Michel Waldschmidt  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

´erentes oeuvres d'art, 2 appara^it aussi dans des oeuvres artistiques persanes. 2 #12;Figure 1. Fraction continue

Waldschmidt, Michel

83

Vegetation survey of PEN Branch wetlands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A survey was conducted of vegetation along Pen Branch Creek at Savannah River Site (SRS) in support of K-Reactor restart. Plants were identified to species by overstory, understory, shrub, and groundcover strata. Abundance was also characterized and richness and diversity calculated. Based on woody species basal area, the Pen Branch delta was the most impacted, followed by the sections between the reactor and the delta. Species richness for shrub and groundcover strata were also lowest in the delta. No endangered plant species were found. Three upland pine areas were also sampled. In support of K Reactor restart, this report summarizes a study of the wetland vegetation along Pen Branch. Reactor effluent enters Indian Grove Branch and then flows into Pen Branch and the Pen Branch Delta.

Not Available

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

MD Simulation Study of the Influence of Branch Content on Relaxation and Crystallization of Branched Polyethylene Chains with Uniform Branch Distribution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Branched Polyethylene Chains with Uniform Branch Distribution I. A. HUSSEIN, B. F. ABU-SHARKH* Department-density polyethylene (LLDPE) chains with different levels of branch content (BC), ranging from 10 to 80 branches/1000 C words: MD simulation, Polyethylene, branch content, chain conformation, radius of gyration

Hussein, Ibnelwaleed A.

85

Branching Brownian Motion with branching at the origin Sergey Bocharov, Simon C. Harris  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Branching Brownian Motion with branching at the origin Sergey Bocharov, Simon C. Harris University. Dawson and K. Fleischmann [4], K. Fleischmann and J.F. Le Gall [9] or J. Engl¨ander and D. Turaev [7 result is the Strong Law of Large Numbers for the branching system. Theorem 1.7 (SLLN). Let f : R R

Harris, Simon Colin

86

Inclusive central region in perturbative Reggeon calculus  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The single-particle inclusive cross section and the correlation function are studied in the perturbative approach to Gribov's Reggeon calculus, evaluating the leading contributions to both functions. The large energy rise of the inclusive cross section appears as a consequence of the Pomeron having an intercept larger than 1. The same set of parameters which describes correctly the cross-section data and the triple-Regge region also describes the inclusive data in the central region.

C. Pajares and R. Pascual

1976-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

A discrete fractional random transform  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a discrete fractional random transform based on a generalization of the discrete fractional Fourier transform with an intrinsic randomness. Such discrete fractional random transform inheres excellent mathematical properties of the fractional Fourier transform along with some fantastic features of its own. As a primary application, the discrete fractional random transform has been used for image encryption and decryption.

Zhengjun Liu; Haifa Zhao; Shutian Liu

2006-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

88

Diversity & Inclusion FAQs | Argonne National Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

FAQs Q. How does diversity and inclusion fit with Argonne's values? A. Argonne values excellence in science and engineering, and it values the contributions that individuals make....

89

Improved Measurement of |Vub| with Inclusive Semileptonic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(CLEO) 2002 Lake Louise Winter Institute Inclusive Vub 7 CESR & CLEO II Dataset · CESR a Symmetric e- likelihood; fake rate nuclear interaction lengths; fake rate 0

90

DISPLAYING AND INTERPRETING FLUID INCLUSION STRATIGRAPHY ANALYSES...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

This is the fourth paper in a series on developing fluid inclusion stratigraphy (FIS) as a logging tool for geothermal bore holes. Here we address methods of displaying...

91

Fractional vortices and lumps  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study what might be called fractional vortices, vortex configurations with the minimum winding from the viewpoint of their topological stability, but which are characterized by various notable substructures in the transverse energy distribution. The fractional vortices occur in diverse Abelian or non-Abelian generalizations of the Higgs model. The global and local features characterizing these are studied, and we identify the two crucial ingredients for their occurrence--the vacuum degeneracy leading to nontrivial vacuum moduli M, and the BPS nature of the vortices. Fractional vortices are further classified into two kinds. The first type of such vortices appear when M has orbifold Z{sub n} singularities; the second type occurs in systems in which the vacuum moduli space M possesses either a deformed geometry or some singularity. These general features are illustrated with several concrete models.

Eto, Minoru; Gudnason, Sven Bjarke; Konishi, Kenichi [Department of Physics, University of Pisa, Largo Pontecorvo, 3, Building C, 56127 Pisa (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Pisa, Largo Pontecorvo, 3, Ed. C, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Fujimori, Toshiaki; Nagashima, Takayuki [Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Nitta, Muneto [Department of Physics, Keio University, Hiyoshi, Yokohama, Kanagawa 223-8521 (Japan); Ohashi, Keisuke [Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, CB3 0WA (United Kingdom); Vinci, Walter [Department of Physics, University of Pisa, Largo Pontecorvo, 3, Building C, 56127 Pisa (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Pisa, Largo Pontecorvo, 3, Ed. C, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, CB3 0WA (United Kingdom)

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

92

Fractional Standard Map  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Properties of the phase space of the standard map with memory are investigated. This map was obtained from a kicked fractional differential equation. Depending on the value of the parameter of the map and the fractional order of the derivative in the original differential equation this nonlinear dynamical system demonstrates attractors (fixed points, stables periodic trajectories, slow converging and slow diverging trajectories, ballistic trajectories, and fractal-like structures) and/or chaotic trajectories. At least one type of fractal-like sticky attractors in the chaotic sea was observed.

Mark Edelman; Vasily E. Tarasov

2009-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

93

Streamer branching rationalized by conformal mapping techniques  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Spontaneous branching of discharge channels is frequently observed, but not well understood. We recently proposed a new branching mechanism based on simulations of a simple continuous discharge model in high fields. We here present analytical results for such streamers in the Lozansky-Firsov limit where they can be modeled as moving equipotential ionization fronts. This model can be analyzed by conformal mapping techniques which allow the reduction of the dynamical problem to finite sets of nonlinear ordinary differential equations. Our solutions illustrate that branching is generic for the intricate head dynamics of streamers in the Lozansky-Firsov limit.

Bernard Meulenbroek, Andrea Rocco, and Ute Ebert

2004-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

94

Branching of negative streamers in free flight  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have recently shown that a negative streamer in a sufficiently high homogeneous field can branch spontaneously due to a Laplacian instability, rather than approach a stationary mode of propagation with fixed radius. In our previous simulations, the streamer started from a wide initial ionization seed on the cathode. We here demonstrate, in improved simulations, that a streamer emerging from a single electron branches in the same way. In fact, though the evolving streamer is much more narrow, it branches after an even shorter propagation distance.

Andrea Rocco, Ute Ebert, and Willem Hundsdorfer

2002-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

95

The Intermediate Scale Branch of the Landscape  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Three branches of the string theory landscape have plausibly been identified. One of these branches is expected to exhibit a roughly logarithmic distribution of supersymmetry breaking scales. The original KKLT models are in this class. We argue that certain features of the KKLT model are generic to this branch, and that the resulting phenomenology depends on a small set of discrete choices. As in the MSSM, the weak scale in these theories is tuned; a possible explanation is selection for the dark matter density.

Michael Dine

2005-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

96

Long Branch Capital | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Branch Capital Branch Capital Jump to: navigation, search Name Long Branch Capital Place Austin, Texas Zip 78744 Sector Efficiency, Renewable Energy Product Long Branch Capital makes minority investments in private companies focused on renewable energy, clean technology, and efficiency Coordinates 30.267605°, -97.742984° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":30.267605,"lon":-97.742984,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

97

Regulation of Branching by Phytochrome and Phytohormones  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Light is the fundamental source of energy and information throughout the plant life cycle. Light signals regulate plant architecture and branching, key processes that determine biomass production and grain yield. Low red (R) to far-red (FR) light...

Krishnareddy, Srirama R.

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

98

Electrochemical Branched-DNA Assay for Polymerase Chain Reaction...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Branched-DNA Assay for Polymerase Chain Reaction-Free Detection and Quantification of Oncogenes in Messenger RNA Electrochemical Branched-DNA Assay for Polymerase Chain...

99

Magnify Credit Union- South Lakeland Branch  

High Performance Buildings Database

Lakeland, FL The new branch credit union is located on a previously developed site and was designed to wrap around an existing building that is the home of a "neighborhood favorite" ice cream shop. The design of this flagship branch aligns with the client's mission of financial education and environmental awareness. Programmatic flexibility of both private and public spaces weaves the project into the community fabric by providing a place for events that can develop the credit union's identity over time.

100

Branching fractions for psi(2S)-to-J/psi transitions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.0129.0129 s p .01360:95?1:05, jjp J= j.0255jp X jj= .0129.0129.0129 s p <0:07.For.0017 and single-.0025 0 transitions, in which the J= is monochro- matic, p.0133J= .0134 must lie within 500?570MeV=c (.0025 0 )or 150?250MeV=c (.0017). Charged dipion transition... J= 22.2 13399 67 115 16:52.00060:14.00060:58 27:76.00060:25.00060:43 49:24.00060:47.00060:86 .0017J= 22.6 2793 17 116 3:25.00060:06.00060:11 5:46.00060:10.00060:07 9:68.00060:19.00060:13 .0017.0133! .0013.0013.0134J= 16.9 2065 14 103 3...

Besson, David Zeke

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inclusive branching fractions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Measurements of semileptonic branching fractions of B mesons at the ?(4S) resonance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Hadrons misidentified as leptons are called "fake" lep- tons. For electron sample A, the probability of misiden- tifying a. hadron as an electron (fake probability) was determined using T(1S) events. For sample B, the fake probability was determined using... lepton yield above 1.4 GeV/c. As described below, models that differ greatly in the way they treat quark hadronization are all successful in predicting the b ~ c/v lepton spectrum. (ii) Secondary leptons The .second component is lep- tons from...

Baringer, Philip S.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Measurement of semileptonic branching fractions of B mesons to narrow D-** states  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

O.V. Eroshin, 38 J. Estrada, 49 H. Evans, 67 A. Evdokimov, 36 V.N. Evdokimov, 38 J. Fast, 49 S.N. Fatakia, 60 L. Feligioni, 60 A.V. Ferapontov, 38 T. Ferbel, 68 F. Fiedler, 25 F. Filthaut, 34 W. Fisher, 49 H.E. Fisk, 49 I. Fleck, 23 M. Fortner, 51 H.... Rev. D 59, 034018 (1999). [3] A.K. Leibovich, Z. Ligeti, I.W. Stewart, and M.B. Wise, Phys. Rev. Lett. 78, 3995 (1997); Phys. Rev. D 57, 308 (1998). [4] D. Ebert, R.N. Faustov, and V.O. Galkin, Phys. Rev. D 62, 014032 (2000). [5] K. Abe et al. (Belle...

Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Christofek, L.; Coppage, Don; Gardner, J.; Hensel, Carsten; Jabeen, S.; Moulik, Tania; Wilson, Graham Wallace

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Diversity and Inclusion Guidance | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Diversity and Inclusion Guidance Diversity and Inclusion Guidance Diversity and Inclusion Guidance All DOE diversity and inclusion policies, practices and programs must comply with Federal Equal Employment Opportunity laws, Merit Systems Principles, the foundation of the Civil Service, and not constitute a Prohibited Personnel Practice. Federal Laws That Prohibit Workplace Discrimination The following laws are enforced by Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC): The VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (Title VII), which makes it illegal to discriminate against a person on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, or national origin. The law also protects individuals from retaliation if they complain about discrimination or participate in the EEO process. http://www.eeoc.gov./laws/statutes/titlevii.cfm

104

Fluid Inclusion Analysis | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fluid Inclusion Analysis Fluid Inclusion Analysis Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Fluid Inclusion Analysis Details Activities (20) Areas (11) Regions (1) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Lab Analysis Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Fluid Lab Analysis Parent Exploration Technique: Fluid Lab Analysis Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Fluid composition at a point in time and space Thermal: The minimum temperature of fluid inclusion formation Cost Information Low-End Estimate (USD): 17.571,757 centUSD 0.0176 kUSD 1.757e-5 MUSD 1.757e-8 TUSD / sample Median Estimate (USD): 17.571,757 centUSD 0.0176 kUSD 1.757e-5 MUSD 1.757e-8 TUSD / sample High-End Estimate (USD): 26.782,678 centUSD

105

Analysis of fluid inclusions in halite  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A technique has been developed to drill into fluid inclusions in halite, to extract the inclusions fluids, and to determine the concentration of all of the major and some of the minor constituents in these fluids. The minimum diameter of usable fluid inclusions is ca. 250 ..mu..m. After dilution, the fluids are analyzed by ion chromatography and coulometry. Uncertainties in the concentration of the major cations and anions is on the order of 4%. The analytical scheme provides much more precise analyses of inclusion fluids than have been available to date. The analyses are a useful starting point for reconstructing the composition of the sea water from which the evaporite brines evolved.

Lazar, B.; Holland, H.D.

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Fraction of stopped K- mesons which interact with free hydrogen in propane  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In a sample of film containing 13 400 stopped K- mesons in a liquid-propane bubble chamber, 98 examples of the reaction K-p??- ?+ were found. Using the known branching ratio for this channel, we find the fraction of K- which interact at rest with free protons to be (3.2 ± 0.4)%. The result is compared with measurements of the same fraction for ?- mesons and anti-protons.

C. T. Murphy; G. Keyes; M. Saha; M. Tanaka

1974-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Numerical convergence of the branching time of negative streamers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Discharge streamers in experiments branch frequently. Arrayás et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 174502 (2002)] presented simulations of branching streamers and interpreted them as physical branching events. The numerical results were criticized by Kulikovsky [Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 229401 (2002)]. Using an adaptive grid algorithm, we here present numerical experiments on the effect of grid resolution on streamer branching. The convergence of branching time with stepwise finer grid sizes provides a quantitative correction on the earlier, low-resolution results in overvolted gaps. Furthermore, streamers can branch even in undervolted, but sufficiently long gaps, but fewer branching modes are accessible than in higher fields.

Carolynne Montijn, Ute Ebert, and Willem Hundsdorfer

2006-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

108

Solvent Fractionation of Lignin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lignin is a highly abundant source of renewable carbon that can be considered as a valuable sustainable source of biobased materials. The major issues for the commercial production of value added high performance lignin products are lignin s physical and chemical heterogenities. To overcome these problems, a variety of procedures have been developed to produce pure lignin suitable for high performace applications such as lignin-derived carbon materials. However, most of the isolation procedures affect lignin s properties and structure. In this chapter, a short review of the effect of solvent fractionation on lignin s properties and structure is presented.

Chatterjee, Sabornie [ORNL; Saito, Tomonori [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

On cyclic branched coverings of prime knots  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......2-spheres with four points with branching...2-suborbifolds lifts to the JSJ-collection...holes and one cone point; (iv) a disc...holes and one cone point; (v) a disc...There are four possible cases...torus. The knot K lifts to a singular......

Michel Boileau; Luisa Paoluzzi

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Electronic Impact of Inclusions in Diamond  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

X-ray topography data are compared with photodiode responsivity maps to identify potential candidates for electron trapping in high purity, single crystal diamond. X-ray topography data reveal the defects that exist in the diamond material, which are dominated by non-electrically active linear dislocations. However, many diamonds also contain defects configurations (groups of threading dislocations originating from a secondary phase region or inclusion) in the bulk of the wafer which map well to regions of photoconductive gain, indicating that these inclusions are a source of electron trapping which affect the performance of diamond X-ray detectors. It was determined that photoconductive gain is only possible with the combination of an injecting contact and charge trapping in the near surface region. Typical photoconductive gain regions are 0.2 mm across; away from these near-surface inclusions the device yields the expected diode responsivity.

Muller, E.M.; Smedley, J.; Raghothamachar, B.; Gaowei, M.; Keister, J.W.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Dudley, M.; Wu, Q.

2010-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

111

The evolution of a complex type B allende inclusion: An ion microprobe trace element study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

USNM 5241 is a Type B1 refractory inclusion from Allende, first described by El Goresy et al. (1985), that consists of a 1.2 mm-thick melilite-rich and spinel-poor mantle enclosing a 0.6 cm-radius spinel-rich core; the inclusion contains xenoliths of spinel-free fassaite {plus minus} melilite {plus minus} anorthite incorporated within the spinel-rich core. Detailed ion microprobe analyses of individual phases in 5241 show that the rare earth element (REE) concentrations in mantle melilite vary irregularly with increasing distance from the rim of the inclusion, at first decreasing immediately below the rim and then remaining constant between {approximately}0.4 and 1.0 mm. More than 1.0 mm from the rim, the REE concentrations again decrease. Although counterintuitive in the context of traditional fractional crystallization models, these REE variations are in fact broadly consistent with such a model in light of recent experimental measurements of D{sub REE3+ (mel)}, that show a strong inverse correlation of D with the akermanite content of the melilite. Local variations, over distances of <20 {mu}m, in the akermanite content of mantle melilite--as much as 5-10 mol% Ak--with accompanying fluctuations in REE contents, are due to reaction of gehlenitic melilite with tiny inclusions of fassaite, producing narrow zones of more akermanitic melilite surrounding more fassaitic pyroxene. The authors interpret 5241 as having formed largely by fractional crystallization during the first {approximately}40% of its solidification; this was followed by fractional crystallization + xenolith assimilation during the last 60%.

MacPherson, G.J. (Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC (USA)); Crozaz, G.; Lundberg, L.L. (Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (USA))

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Diversity & Inclusion | Argonne National Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Diversity Diversity Message from the Lab Director Diversity & Inclusion Advisory Council Workforce Pipeline Mentoring Leadership Development Policies & Practices Business Diversity Outreach & Education The African American/Black Club promotes the richness and diversity of African American/Black cultures and provides professional networking opportunities for the African American/Black community and all Argonne employees. The Hispanic Latino Club promotes the richness and diversity of Hispanic/Latino cultures and provides professional networking opportunities that benefit the Hispanic/Latino community and all Argonne employees. Women in Science and Technology (WIST) aims to promote the success of women in scientific and technical positions at Argonne. Diversity & Inclusion

113

2.4 I Branches of Functions 79 2.4 BRANCHES OF FUNCTIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

square root function is f1 (z) = |z| 1 2 ei Arg(z) 2 = r 1 2 ei 2 = r 1 2 cos 2 + ir 1 2 sin 2 , (2-28) where r = |z| and = Arg (z) so that - f1 is a branch of f. Using the same notation = r 1 2 ei 2 ei = -r 1 2 ei 2 = -f1 (z) , #12;2.4 I Branches of Functions 81 so f1 and f2 can

California at Santa Cruz, University of

114

Incompressible Stars and Fractional Derivatives  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fractional calculus is an effective tool in incorporating the effects of non-locality and memory into physical models. In this regard, successful applications exist rang- ing from signal processing to anomalous diffusion and quantum mechanics. In this paper we investigate the fractional versions of the stellar structure equations for non radiating spherical objects. Using incompressible fluids as a comparison, we develop models for constant density Newtonian objects with fractional mass distributions or stress conditions. To better understand the fractional effects, we discuss effective values for the density, gravitational field and equation of state. The fractional ob- jects are smaller and less massive than integer models. The fractional parameters are related to a polytropic index for the models considered.

S. S. Bayin; J. P. Krisch

2014-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

115

Paleotemperatures preserved in fluid inclusions in halite  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A variety of paleoclimate proxy records allow determination of relative warming or cooling. However, if we are to understand climate change, quantification of past temperature fluctuations is essential. Our research indicates that fluid inclusions in halite can yield homogenization temperatures that record surface brine temperatures at the time of halite precipitation. To avoid problems with stretching, leaking, and initial trapping of air, samples with primary, single-phase (liquid) fluid inclusions are chilled in a freezer to nucleate vapor bubbles. We tested the reliability of this method of obtaining fluid-inclusion homogenization temperatures using modern salts precipitated at Badwater Basin, Death Valley, California. Homogenization temperatures correlate well with measured brine temperatures. The same method is applied to fluid inclusions in Pleistocene halite from a core taken at the same location in Death Valley. Results are at several scales, recording diurnal temperature variations, seasonal temperature fluctuations, and longer-term warming and cooling events that correlate with major changes in the sedimentary environment related to climate. This technique is uniquely instrumental for paleoclimate studies because it offers actual, not just proxy, paleotemperature data. 27 refs., 17 figs.

Roberts, S.M.; Spencer, R.J. [Univ. of Calgary, Alberta (Canada)] [Univ. of Calgary, Alberta (Canada)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

"BUILDING AN INCLUSIVE WORKFORCE" Ensuring Equal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

"BUILDING AN INCLUSIVE WORKFORCE" Ensuring Equal Opportunities to Employees with Disabilities Administration Building, Rm 114 San José, CA 95129-0168 408-924-6003 (voice) 408-924-5900 (TTY) 408-924-4358 (fax) earc@drc.sjsu.edu #12;Employment Accommodations Resource Center (EARC) w w w. e a r c . s j s u . e d u

Su, Xiao

117

Web Accessibility Office of Diversity and Inclusion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Web Accessibility Office of Diversity and Inclusion Applies to: Any website conducting university of the art digital and web based information delivery of information is increasingly central in carrying out constituencies. This policy establishes minimum standards for the accessibility of web based information

Jones, Michelle

118

Hawaii Clean Water Branch Forms Webpage | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Branch Forms Webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Hawaii Clean Water Branch Forms Webpage Author State of Hawaii Department of...

119

Hawaii Department of Health Clean Air Branch Webpage | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Department of Health Clean Air Branch Webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Hawaii Department of Health Clean Air Branch Webpage...

120

TO :Lyall E. Johnson, Chief Licensing Branch  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Lyall E. Johnson, Chief Lyall E. Johnson, Chief Licensing Branch ,,,_ i-.. FROM :Clifford K. Beck, Chief q q+. ., ,,/,j !i-/ I, v' Hazards Evaluation Branch ,: s~~p:~LLItma0~7c ~HEI-IICAL wows We have reviewed the letter of December 10, 1958, from Mallinckrodt Chemical Works, requesting amendment of License No. SNM-33 to permit pelleting operations on uranium enriched to 5% U-235 in a new facility at Hematite, Missouri. Batch sizes throughout the operations will not exceed limited safe masses as specified in Report K-1019, Part 4 (Deleted). Neither the diameter nor capacity of the storage hopper located above the feed hopper of the pelleting press is given. Either the diameter should be not over the limited safe dimension or positive means should be in effect to insure against more than a limited safe m&s in the

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121

Photovoltaic Program Branch annual report, FY 1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the progress of the Photovoltaic (PV) Program Branch of the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) from October 1, 1988, through September 30, 1989. The branch is responsible for managing the subcontracted portion of SERI's PV Advanced Research and Development Project. In fiscal year (FY) 1989, this included nearly 50 subcontracts, with a total annualized funding of approximately $13.1 million. Approximately two-thirds of the subcontracts were with universities, at a total funding of nearly $4 million. The six technical sections of the report cover the main areas of the subcontracted program: Amorphous Silicon Research, Polycrystalline Thin Films, Crystalline Silicon Materials Research, High-Efficiency Concepts, New Ideas, and University Participation. Technical summaries of each of the subcontracted programs provide a discussion of approaches, major accomplishments in FY 1989, and future research directions. Each report will be cataloged individually.

Summers, K A [ed.

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Nano-pore based characterization of branched polymers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a novel characterization method of randomly branched polymers based on the geometrical property of such objects in confined spaces. The central idea is that randomly branched polymers exhibit passing/clogging transition across the nano-channel as a function of the channel size. This critical channel size depends on the degree of the branching, whereby allowing the extraction of the branching information of the molecule.

Takahiro Sakaue; Françoise Brochard-Wyart

2014-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

123

COMMERCIAL SNF ACCIDENT RELEASE FRACTIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this design analysis is to specify and document the total and respirable fractions for radioactive materials that are released from an accident event at the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) involving commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) in a dry environment. The total and respirable release fractions will be used to support the preclosure licensing basis for the MGR. The total release fraction is defined as the fraction of total CSNF assembly inventory, typically expressed as an activity inventory (e.g., curies), of a given radionuclide that is released to the environment from a waste form. The radionuclides are released from the inside of breached fuel rods (or pins) and from the detachment of radioactive material (crud) from the outside surfaces of fuel rods and other components of fuel assemblies. The total release fraction accounts for several mechanisms that tend to retain, retard, or diminish the amount of radionuclides that are available for transport to dose receptors or otherwise can be shown to reduce exposure of receptors to radiological releases. The total release fraction includes a fraction of airborne material that is respirable and could result in inhalation doses. This subset of the total release fraction is referred to as the respirable release fraction. Potential accidents may involve waste forms that are characterized as either bare (unconfined) fuel assemblies or confined fuel assemblies. The confined CSNF assemblies at the MGR are contained in shipping casks, canisters, or disposal containers (waste packages). In contrast to the bare fuel assemblies, the container that confines the fuel assemblies has the potential of providing an additional barrier for diminishing the total release fraction should the fuel rod cladding breach during an accident. However, this analysis will not take credit for this additional bamer and will establish only the total release fractions for bare unconfined CSNF assemblies, which may however be conservatively applied to confined CSNF assemblies.

S.O. Bader

1999-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

124

Sedimentation Field Flow Fractionation: Applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...FIELD-FLOW FRACTIONATION OF ALKALI-LIBERATED NUCLEAR POLYHEDROSIS-VIRUS FROM GYPSY-MOTH...FRACTIONATION TO RADIOACTIVE-WASTE DISPOSAL, NUCLEAR TECHNOLOGY 51 : 147 ( 1980 ). SOBER...perThe SFFF separation in Fig. 9a was ic dispersant moarbitrarily concluded shortly after...

J. J. Kirkland; W. W. Yau

1982-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

125

E-Print Network 3.0 - alternative energy branch Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

branch Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: alternative energy branch Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Thesis Overview: Reducing Branch...

126

Upgrading petroleum and petroleum fractions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method is described for neutralizing the organic naphthenic acids acidity present in petroleum and petroleum fractions to produce a neutralization number less than 1.0 whereby they are rendered suitable as lube oil feed stocks which consists essentially of treating the petroleum and petroleum fractions with a neutralizing amount of monoethanolamine to form an amine salt with the organic acids and then heating the thus-neutralized petroleum and petroleum fractions at a temperature at least about 25/sup 0/F greater than the boiling point of water and for a time sufficient to convert the amine salts to amides.

Ferguson, S.; Reese, D.D.

1988-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

127

Branching and Momentum Effects in Photochemistry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The decision on the fate of the reaction (branching of the path) is sometimes not only taken at the last conical intersection, but the Franck-Condon region can also contribute. Consideration of simple properties such as the slopes of the potential surfaces can explain effects such as the principle of least motion or the torquoselectivity without invoking ad-hoc electronic effects. The lack of stereospecificity of cyclobutene ring opening and the wavelength dependence of photochemical reactions of alkylated olefins and cyclobutenes can similarly be explained, if one assumes in addition that the momentum is conserved over a certain time.

Fuss, Werner [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

2007-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

128

Annual report, Basic Sciences Branch, FY 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the progress of the Basic Sciences Branch of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) from October 1, 1990, through September 30, 1991. Seven technical sections of the report cover these main areas of NREL's in-house research: Semiconductor Crystal Growth, Amorphous Silicon Research, Polycrystalline Thin Films, III-V High-Efficiency Photovoltaic Cells, Solid-State Theory, Solid-State Spectroscopy, and Superconductivity. Each section explains the purpose and major accomplishments of the work in the context of the US Department of Energy's National Photovoltaic Research Program plans.

Not Available

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Annual report, Basic Sciences Branch, FY 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the progress of the Basic Sciences Branch of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) from October 1, 1990, through September 30, 1991. Seven technical sections of the report cover these main areas of NREL`s in-house research: Semiconductor Crystal Growth, Amorphous Silicon Research, Polycrystalline Thin Films, III-V High-Efficiency Photovoltaic Cells, Solid-State Theory, Solid-State Spectroscopy, and Superconductivity. Each section explains the purpose and major accomplishments of the work in the context of the US Department of Energy`s National Photovoltaic Research Program plans.

Not Available

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Valles Caldera Geothermal Region (1990) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Region (1990) Geothermal Region (1990) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Valles Caldera Geothermal Region (1990) Exploration Activity Details Location Valles Caldera Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Fluid Inclusion Analysis Activity Date 1990 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes A system for analysis of inclusion gas contents based upon quadrupole mass spectrometry has been designed, assembled and tested during the first 7 months of funding. The system is currently being tested and calibrated using inclusions with known gas contents from active geothermal systems. References Mckibben, M. A. (25 April 1990) Volatiles in hydrothermal fluids- A mass spectrometric study of fluid inclusions from active

131

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (1990) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

0) 0) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (1990) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Fluid Inclusion Analysis Activity Date 1990 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes A system for analysis of inclusion gas contents based upon quadrupole mass spectrometry has been designed, assembled and tested during the first seven months of funding. The system is currently being tested and calibrated using inclusions with known gas contents from active geothermal systems. References Mckibben, M. A. (25 April 1990) Volatiles in hydrothermal fluids- A mass spectrometric study of fluid inclusions from active geothermal systems

132

Commercial SNF Accident Release Fractions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this analysis is to specify and document the total and respirable fractions for radioactive materials that could be potentially released from an accident at the repository involving commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in a dry environment. The total and respirable release fractions are used to support the preclosure licensing basis for the repository. The total release fraction is defined as the fraction of total commercial SNF assembly inventory, typically expressed as an activity inventory (e.g., curies), of a given radionuclide that is released to the environment from a waste form. Radionuclides are released from the inside of breached fuel rods (or pins) and from the detachment of radioactive material (crud) from the outside surfaces of fuel rods and other components of fuel assemblies. The total release fraction accounts for several mechanisms that tend to retain, retard, or diminish the amount of radionuclides that are available for transport to dose receptors or otherwise can be shown to reduce exposure of receptors to radiological releases. The total release fraction includes a fraction of airborne material that is respirable and could result in inhalation doses; this subset of the total release fraction is referred to as the respirable release fraction. Accidents may involve waste forms characterized as: (1) bare unconfined intact fuel assemblies, (2) confined intact fuel assemblies, or (3) canistered failed commercial SNF. Confined intact commercial SNF assemblies at the repository are contained in shipping casks, canisters, or waste packages. Four categories of failed commercial SNF are identified: (1) mechanically and cladding-penetration damaged commercial SNF, (2) consolidated/reconstituted assemblies, (3) fuel rods, pieces, and debris, and (4) nonfuel components. It is assumed that failed commercial SNF is placed into waste packages with a mesh screen at each end (CRWMS M&O 1999). In contrast to bare unconfined fuel assemblies, the container that confines the fuel assemblies could provide an additional barrier for diminishing the total release fraction should the fuel rod cladding breach during an accident. This analysis, however, does not take credit for the additional barrier and establishes only the total release fractions for bare unconfined intact commercial SNF assemblies, which may be conservatively applied to confined intact commercial I SNF assemblies.

J. Schulz

2004-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

133

Diversity and Inclusion Town Hall Program Book | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Diversity and Inclusion Town Hall Program Book Diversity and Inclusion Town Hall Program Book Diversity and Inclusion Town Hall Program Book As part of a larger effort to create a culture that values diversity, we have been conducting focus groups to engage in a dialog and hear feedback on how diversity can be improved. At the Town Hall, DOE employees will hear the results of these discussions. View the program booklet from the Diversity and Inclusion Town Hall below. For more information about the Department's diversity and inclusion programs, visit http://energy.gov/diversity/services/diversity-and-inclusion Diversity Town Hall Program Booklet_0.pdf More Documents & Publications Diversity Action Letter from Secretary Chu Secretary Chu's Diversity Action Letter Government-Wide Diversity and Inclusion Strategic Plan (2011), Office of

134

Office of Personnel Management (OPM) Guidance on Diversity and Inclusion |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Office of Personnel Management (OPM) Guidance on Diversity and Office of Personnel Management (OPM) Guidance on Diversity and Inclusion Office of Personnel Management (OPM) Guidance on Diversity and Inclusion The following documents are from the Office of Personnel Management (OMP)'s Office of Diversity and Inclusion, which is responsible for reviewing and evaluating plans, reports, and programs for conformance with various laws, regulations, and directives relating to diversity and inclusion. Governement-Wide Diversity and Inclusion Strategic Plan and Guidance: Executive Order 13583, issued on August 18, 2011, requires OPM to publish a Government-Wide Diversity and Inclusion Strategic Plan, and guidance to agencies. Program Reviews: The Office of Personnel Management (OMP)'s Office of Diversity and Inclusion prepares program reviews and annual accomplishment

135

Office of Personnel Management (OPM) Guidance on Diversity and Inclusion |  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Office of Personnel Management (OPM) Guidance on Diversity and Office of Personnel Management (OPM) Guidance on Diversity and Inclusion Office of Personnel Management (OPM) Guidance on Diversity and Inclusion The following documents are from the Office of Personnel Management (OMP)'s Office of Diversity and Inclusion, which is responsible for reviewing and evaluating plans, reports, and programs for conformance with various laws, regulations, and directives relating to diversity and inclusion. Governement-Wide Diversity and Inclusion Strategic Plan and Guidance: Executive Order 13583, issued on August 18, 2011, requires OPM to publish a Government-Wide Diversity and Inclusion Strategic Plan, and guidance to agencies. Program Reviews: The Office of Personnel Management (OMP)'s Office of Diversity and Inclusion prepares program reviews and annual accomplishment

136

Quantitative analysis of inclusion distributions in hot pressed silicon carbide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ABSTRACT Depth of penetration measurements in hot pressed SiC have exhibited significant variability that may be influenced by microstructural defects. To obtain a better understanding regarding the role of microstructural defects under highly dynamic conditions; fragments of hot pressed SiC plates subjected to impact tests were examined. Two types of inclusion defects were identified, carbonaceous and an aluminum-iron-oxide phase. A disproportionate number of large inclusions were found on the rubble, indicating that the inclusion defects were a part of the fragmentation process. Distribution functions were plotted to compare the inclusion populations. Fragments from the superior performing sample had an inclusion population consisting of more numerous but smaller inclusions. One possible explanation for this result is that the superior sample withstood a greater stress before failure, causing a greater number of smaller inclusions to participate in fragmentation than in the weaker sample.

Michael Paul Bakas

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Geysers Geothermal Area (1990) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Geysers Geothermal Area (1990) Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Geysers Geothermal Area (1990) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Geysers Geothermal Area (1990) Exploration Activity Details Location Geysers Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Fluid Inclusion Analysis Activity Date 1990 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes A system for analysis of inclusion gas contents based upon quadrupole mass spectrometry has been designed, assembled and tested during the first 7 months of funding. The system is currently being tested and calibrated using inclusions with known gas contents from active geothermal systems. References Mckibben, M. A. (25 April 1990) Volatiles in hydrothermal fluids- A mass spectrometric study of fluid inclusions from active

138

One-particle inclusive semileptonic B decays  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We propose a method for a QCD based calculation of one-particle inclusive decays of the form B?D¯X or B?D*X. It is based on the heavy mass limit and a short distance expansion of the amplitudes, which yield a power series in the parameter 1/MX2 for the spectra and in ?QCDmb/(mb-mc)2 for the rates. We study the leading term of this expansion for the case of the semileptonic decays B?D¯Xl+?.

Christopher Balzereit and Thomas Mannel

1998-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

139

Semiconducting glasses with flux pinning inclusions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A series of amorphous superconducting glassy alloys containing 1% to 10% by volume of flux pinning crystalline inclusions have been found to have potentially useful properties as high field superconducting magnet materials. The alloys are prepared by splat cooling by the piston and anvil technique. The alloys have the composition (TM).sub.90-70 (M).sub.10-30 where TM is a transition metal selected from at least one metal of Groups IVB, VB, VIB, VIIB or VIIIB of the Periodic Table such as Nb, Mo, Ru, Zr, Ta, W or Re and M is at least one metalloid such as B, P, C, N, Si, Ge or Al.

Johnson, William L. (Pasadena, CA); Poon, Siu-Joe (Palo Alto, CA); Duwez, Pol E. (Pasadena, CA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Fraction of Stopped Antiprotons which Annihilate on Free Hydrogen in Propane  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Antiprotons were stopped in a liquid-propane bubble chamber. In a sample of film containing 75 000 annihilations at rest, 21 examples of the reactions p¯p??+?- or p¯p?K+K- were identified. This number, together with the previously measured branching ratios of these channels in liquid hydrogen, leads to a determination that (11±3)% of the antiprotons annihilate on free protons. The remaining 89% annihilate on bound nucleons in carbon. This fraction is markedly higher than the fraction of ?- at rest which charge exchange on free protons in similar hydrocarbons. An explanation of the large difference is suggested.

W. T. Pawlewicz; C. T. Murphy; J. G. Fetkovich; T. Dombeck; M. Derrick; T. Wangler

1970-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inclusive branching fractions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

The Branching of Graphs in 2-d Quantum Gravity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The branching ratio is calculated for three different models of 2d gravity, using dynamical planar phi-cubed graphs. These models are pure gravity, the D=-2 Gaussian model coupled to gravity and the single spin Ising model coupled to gravity. The ratio gives a measure of how branched the graphs dominating the partition function are. Hence it can be used to estimate the location of the branched polymer phase for the multiple Ising model coupled to 2d gravity.

M. G. Harris

1996-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

142

Basic Sciences Branch annual report, FY 1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the progress of the Basic Sciences Branch of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) from October 1, 1989, through September 30, 1990. Six technical sections of the report cover these main areas of NREL`s in-house research: Semiconductor Crystal Growth, Amorphous Silicon Research, Polycrystalline Thin Films, III-V High-Efficiency Photovoltaic Cells, Solid-State Theory, and Solid-State Spectroscopy. Each section of the report was written by the group leader principally in charge of the work. The task in each case was to explain the purpose and major accomplishments of the work in the context of the US Department of Energy`s National Photovoltaic Research Program plans.

Not Available

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Resummed hadronic spectra of inclusive B decays  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper we investigate the hadronic mass spectra of inclusive B decays. Specifically, we study how an upper cut on the invariant mass spectrum, which is necessary to extract Vub, results in the breakdown of the standard perturbative expansion due to the existence of large infrared logs. We first show how the decay rate factorizes at the level of the double differential distribution. Then, we present closed form expressions for the resummed cut rate for the inclusive decays B?Xs? and B?Xue? at next-to-leading order in the infrared logs. Using these results, we determine the range of cuts for which resummation is necessary, as well as the range for which the resummed expansion itself breaks down. We also use our results to extract the leading and next to leading infrared log contribution to the two loop differential rate. We find that for the phenomenologically interesting cut values, there is only a small region where the calculation is under control. Furthermore, the size of this region is sensitive to the parameter ?¯. We discuss the viability of extracting Vub from the hadronic mass spectrum.

Adam K. Leibovich; Ian Low; I. Z. Rothstein

2000-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

144

Hawaii Wastewater Branch Online Application Webpage | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Application Webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Hawaii Wastewater Branch Online Application Webpage Author State of Hawaii...

145

Continued Fraction Expansion Approaches to Discretizing Fractional Order Derivatives—an Expository Review  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper attempts to present an expository review of continued fraction expansion (CFE) based discretization schemes for fractional order differentiators...

Yangquan Chen; Blas M. Vinagre; Igor Podlubny

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

System for Detection of Small Inclusions in Large Optics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The presence of defects in optical materials can lead to bulk damage or downstream modulation and subsequent surface damage in high fluence laser systems. An inclusion detection system has been developed by the National Ignition Facility Optics Metrology Group. The system detects small inclusions in optical materials with increased sensitivity and speed over previous methods. The system has detected all known inclusions and defects and has detected previously undetected defects smaller than 5 microns.

Wolfe, J E; Runkel, M J

2008-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

147

Progress in computing inclusive B decay spectra.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ar X iv :h ep -p h/ 06 01 18 1v 1 2 1 Ja n 20 06 Progress in computing inclusive B decay spectra Einan Gardi and Jeppe R. Andersen Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, J J Thomson Avenue, Cambridge, CB3 0HE, UK We review the progress... V, M0E =1.7GeV x =1GeV, M0E =1.7GeV, fully diff. x =1GeV, M0E =0.66GeV max + =1GeV, P0E =0.66GeV, fully diff. max + =1GeV, P0E Figure 4. The P? spectrum in B¯ ?? Xul?¯ as calculated by DGE [17], after integration over P+ and El in four different...

Gardi, Einan; Andersen, Jeppe R

148

Inclusive jet cross section at CDF  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This contribution reports on preliminary measurements of the inclusive jet production cross section in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV using data collected with CDF corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 385 pb{sup -1}. Two analyzes are presented: one uses the longitudinally invariant k{sub T} algorithm to reconstruct the jets, the other uses the midpoint algorithm. Both are limited to jets with rapidity in the range 0.1 < |y{sup jet}| < 0.7. The measured cross sections are in good agreement with next-to-leading order perturbative QCD predictions after including the non-perturbative corrections necessary to account for underlying event and hadronization effects.

Lefevre, R.; Martinez, M.; /Barcelona, IFAE

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Diversity & Inclusion Advisory Council | Argonne National Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Diversity & Inclusion Advisory Council Diversity & Inclusion Advisory Council To achieve the level of collaboration and partnership needed to make substantial scientific advancements, we know that diversity among participants enhances output." - Brian Stephenson, Associate Laboratory Director, Photon Sciences The Council serves as an advisory committee and provides recommendations to the Laboratory Director on diversity and inclusion initiatives and priorities. Council members include committed representatives from across the laboratory to champion efforts and promote best practices. Diversity & Inclusion Advisory Council: Eric Isaacs Laboratory Director Office of the Director Mark Peters Deputy Laboratory Director for Programs Office of the Director Seth Darling Scientist and Fellow,

150

Diversity and Inclusion Strategic Plan 2012 - 2015 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Strategic Plan 2012 - 2015 Strategic Plan 2012 - 2015 Diversity and Inclusion Strategic Plan 2012 - 2015 Our Diversity and Inclusion Strategic Plan is designed to create a culture which values trust and human dignity and provides the opportunity for personal development and self- fulfillment in the attainment of DOE's mission and goals. The 2012- 2015 strategic plan has three essential pillars - mission focus, accountability, and continual learning. It also: Creates a universal definition of diversity and inclusion. Designs strategic outreach and recruitment initiatives to reach all segments of society. Creates an internal DOE-wide Diversity and Inclusion Council to monitor progress and support employee engagement. Promotes effective communication with employees and stakeholders to

151

Mary Ann Fresco receives OPM award for creating, fostering inclusive...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

receives OPM award for creating, fostering inclusive diversity Mary Ann Fresco, Senior Advisor to NNSA's Management and Business Office (NA-MB), was recently recognized by the...

152

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technique Fluid Inclusion Analysis Activity Date - 1988 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Abstract does not describe study in explicit detail, need to...

153

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Geysers Area (Moore, Et Al., 2001...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Moore, Et Al., 2001) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Geysers Area (Moore, Et Al., 2001) Exploration...

154

FLUID INCLUSION STRATIGRAPHY: NEW METHOD FOR GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

RESERVOIR ASSESSMENT PRELIMINARY RESULTS Abstract Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy (FIS) is a new technique developed for the oil industry in order to map borehole fluids....

155

Methodologies for Reservoir Characterization Using Fluid Inclusion Gas Chemistry  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Methodologies for Reservoir Characterization Using Fluid Inclusion Gas Chemistry presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado.

156

Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy: Interpretation of New Wells in...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coso Geothermal Field Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings: Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy: Interpretation of New Wells in the...

157

Strong Corrections to Inclusive B to X tau nu Decays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We calculate the $\\alpha_s$ corrections to the form factors which parameterize the hadronic tensor relevant for inclusive semileptonic $B \\rightarrow X \\tau\\bar\

C. G. Boyd; Z. Guralnik; M. Schmaltz; F. J. Vegas

1994-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

158

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (1996) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

) ) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (1996) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Fluid Inclusion Analysis Activity Date 1996 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Fluid inclusion homogenization temperatures and salinities demonstrate that cool, low salinity ground waters were present when the thermal plume was emplaced. Dilution of the thermal waters occurred above and below the plume producing strong gradients in their compositions. Comparison of mineral and fluid inclusion based temperatures demonstrates that cooling has occurred along the margins of the thermal system but that the interior of the system

159

A liquid of fractional charges  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... understanding. The first, the integral quantum Hall effect, has found practical application as a resistance standard as well as giving an improved value for the fine-structure constant a, ... value for the fine-structure constant a, a fundamental constant that describes the coupling of elementary particles to electromagnetic fields. The second, the fractional quantum Hall effect, manifests itself ...

Gerhard Fasol

1988-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

160

APPLYING CACHING TO TWO-LEVEL ADAPTIVE BRANCH PREDICTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

" of Sibiu Hatfield, Hertfordshire, U.K. Seoul, Korea Sibiu-2400, Romania AL10 9AB 139-743 email: C% [1]. More recently, the advent of superscalar processors has given renewed impetus to branch on a superscalar processor. This renewed interest in branch prediction led to a dramatic breakthrough in the 1990s

Vintan, Lucian N.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inclusive branching fractions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

HIDDEN SYMMETRIES OF CYCLIC BRANCHED COVERINGS OF 2-BRIDGE KNOTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HIDDEN SYMMETRIES OF CYCLIC BRANCHED COVERINGS OF 2-BRIDGE KNOTS MARCO RENI AND ANDREI VESNIN hyperbolic 3-manifolds Mn(K), which are n- fold cyclic branched coverings of 2-bridge knots K. We show the symmetry groups of knots and links (see [BZ], [Ka]). Particularly, the class of 2-bridge knots

162

Surviving particles for subcritical branching processes in random environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Surviving particles for subcritical branching processes in random environment Vincent Bansaye December 9, 2008 Abstract The asymptotic behavior of a subcritical Branching Process in Random Envi- ronment (BPRE) starting with several particles depends on whether the BPRE is strongly subcritical (SS

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

163

BBuulllleettiinnFEBRUARY 2009 HARBOR BRANCH FORMS OCEAN EXPLORATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is interested in mapping large swaths of sea floor in deep water. Harbor Branch will support this mission for the following reasons: · to provide detailed data on the distribu- tion of deep water reefs in order to protect with project management services, and our ship the RV Seward Johnson. At the same time Harbor Branch's Center

Fernandez, Eduardo

164

Radiolabeled dimethyl branched long chain fatty acid for heart imaging  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A radiolabeled long chain fatty acid for heart imaging that has dimethyl branching at one of the carbons of the chain which inhibits the extent to which oxidation can occur. The closer to the carboxyl the branching is positioned, the more limited the oxidation, thereby resulting in prolonged retention of the radiolabeled compound in the heart.

Knapp, Jr., Furn F. (Oak Ridge, TN); Goodman, Mark M. (Knoxville, TN); Kirsch, Gilbert (Woippy, FR)

1988-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

165

Extension Bulletin E-1844 (New) August 1985 Forcing Flowering Branches  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Lee Taylor Department of Horticulture Introduction Cutting branches from your favorite flowering in a dimly lighted location at 60-65°F. Although branches could be brought into full sun and room of Horticulture August 1985 2 pages The PDF file was provided courtesy of the Michigan State University Library

166

Power-Aware Branch Prediction: Characterization and Design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Power-Aware Branch Prediction: Characterization and Design Dharmesh Parikh, Kevin Skadron, Yan-point benchmarks to explore the role of branch predictor organization in power/energy/performance tradeoffs's total power dissipation, prediction accuracy is nevertheless a powerful lever on processor behavior

Skadron, Kevin

167

Quantification of branching in model 3-arm star polyethylene Ramnath Ramachandran, Gregory Beaucage*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Quantification of branching in model 3-arm star polyethylene Ramnath Ramachandran, Gregory-arm star polyethylene molecules is presented. Many commercial polyethylenes have long side branches-density polyethylene (LDPE) is typically a highly branched structure with broad distributions in branch content, branch

Beaucage, Gregory

168

Inclusion of Scatter in HADES: Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Covert nuclear attack is one of the foremost threats facing the United States and is a primary focus of the War on Terror. The Domestic Nuclear Detection Office (DNDO), within the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), is chartered to develop, and improve domestic systems to detect and interdict smuggling for the illicit use of a nuclear explosive device, fissile material or radiologica1 material. The CAARS (Cargo Advanced Automated Radiography System) program is a major part of the DHS effort to enhance US security by harnessing cutting-edge technologies to detect radiological and nuclear threats at points of entry to the United States. DNDO has selected vendors to develop complete radiographic systems. It is crucial that the initial design and testing concepts for the systems be validated and compared prior to the substantial efforts to build and deploy prototypes and subsequent large-scale production. An important aspect of these systems is the scatter which interferes with imaging. Monte Carlo codes, such as MCNP (X-5 Monte Carlo Team, 2005 Revision) allow scatter to be calculatied, but these calculations are very time consuming. It would be useful to have a fast scatter estimation algorithm in a fast ray tracing code. We have been extending the HADES ray-tracing radiographic simulation code to model vendor systems in a flexible and quick fashion and to use this tool to study a variety of questions involving system performance and the comparative value of surrogates. To enable this work, HADES has been linked to the BRL-CAD library (BRL-CAD Open Source Project, 2010), in order to enable the inclusion of complex CAD geometries in simulations, scanner geometries have been implemented in HADES, and the novel detector responses have been included in HADES. A major extension of HADES which has been required by this effort is the inclusion of scatter in these radiographic simulations. Ray tracing codes generally do not easily allow the inclusion of scatter, because these codes define a source and a grid of detector pixels and only compute the attenuation along rays between these points. Scatter is an extremely complex set of processes which can involve rays which change directions many times between the source and detector. Scatter from outside the field of view of the imaging system, as well as within the field of view, can have an important role in image formation. In this report, we will describe how we implemented a treatment of scatter in HADES. We begin with a discussion of how we define scatter in Section 2, followed by a description of how single Compton scatter is now included in HADES in Section 3. In Section 4 we report a set of verification tests against MCNP and tests of how the technique scales with image size, number of scatters allowed and number of processors used in the calculations. In Section 5, we describe how we plan to extend this approach to other forms of scatter and conclude in Section 6. It should be emphasized that the purpose of this report is to show that a form of scatter has been implemented in HADES and has been verified against MCNP. Validation, the process of comparing simulation and experiment, is a future task.

Aufderheide, M B

2010-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

169

Listing Unique Fractional Factorial Designs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fractional factorial design. The defining contrast subgroup is {I, ABE, BCD, ACDE}. Suppose the 25?2 design is constructed by using defining words {BCD, ABE}. This design, shown in Fig. 4, has the runs {1,4,6,7,9,12,14,15} of Fig. 3. Taking the modulo-2 sum... in generating design catalogs . . . . . . . . . . . 5 I.2.1. Computational issues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 I.2.2. Complicated designs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 I.3. Research objectives and contributions . . . . . . . . . . 8 I.4. Organization...

Shrivastava, Abhishek Kumar

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

170

Problem definition Branch-and-Price approach Pricing: knapsack problem with conflicts Results A Branch-and-Price Algorithm for the Bin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Problem definition Branch-and-Price approach Pricing: knapsack problem with conflicts Results A Branch-and-Price Algorithm for the Bin Packing Problem with Conflicts Ruslan Sadykov1 François Vanderbeck Sadykov, François Vanderbeck Branch-and-price for bin packing with conflicts #12;Problem definition Branch-and-Price

Vanderbeck, François

171

FLUID INCLUSION STRATIGRAPHY: NEW METHOD FOR GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FLUID INCLUSION STRATIGRAPHY: NEW METHOD FOR GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR FLUID INCLUSION STRATIGRAPHY: NEW METHOD FOR GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ASSESSMENT PRELIMINARY RESULTS Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: FLUID INCLUSION STRATIGRAPHY: NEW METHOD FOR GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ASSESSMENT PRELIMINARY RESULTS Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy (FIS) is a new technique developed for the oil industry in order to map borehole fluids. This method is being studied for application to geothermal wells and is funded by the California Energy Commission. Fluid inclusion gas geochemistry is analyzed and plotted on well log diagrams. The working hypothesis is that select gaseous species and species ratios indicate areas of groundwater and reservoir fluid flow

172

IDENTIFYING FRACTURES AND FLUID TYPES USING FLUID INCLUSION STRATIGRAPHY |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

IDENTIFYING FRACTURES AND FLUID TYPES USING FLUID INCLUSION STRATIGRAPHY IDENTIFYING FRACTURES AND FLUID TYPES USING FLUID INCLUSION STRATIGRAPHY Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: IDENTIFYING FRACTURES AND FLUID TYPES USING FLUID INCLUSION STRATIGRAPHY Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy (FIS) is a method currently being developed for use in geothermal systems to identify fractures and fluid types. This paper is the third in a series of papers on the development of FIS. Fluid inclusion gas chemistry is analyzed and plotted on well log diagrams. The working hypothesis is that select gaseous species and species ratios indicate areas of groundwater and reservoir fluid flow and reservoir seals. Previously we showed that FIS analyses identify fluid types and

173

Understanding fractional equivalence and the differentiated effects on operations with fractions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study compared two representations for teaching fraction equivalence. It traced the implications of both representations on the student?s comprehension of fractions as well as their ability to perform operations with fractions...

Naiser, Emilie Ann

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

174

Wide Binary Effects on Asymmetries in Asymptotic Giant Branch Circumstellar Envelopes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Observations of increasingly higher spatial resolution reveal the existence of asymmetries in the circumstellar envelopes of a small fraction of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. Although there is no general consensus for their origin, a binary companion star may be responsible. Within this framework, we investigate the gravitational effects associated with a sufficiently wide binary system, where Roche lobe overflow is unimportant, on the outflowing envelopes of AGB stars using three dimensional hydrodynamic simulations. The effects due to individual binary components are separately studied, enabling investigation of the stellar and circumstellar characteristics in detail. The reflex motion of the AGB star alters the wind velocity distribution, thereby, determining the overall shape of the outflowing envelope. On the other hand, the interaction of the companion with the envelope produces a gravitational wake, which exhibits a vertically thinner shape. The two patterns overlap and form clumpy structures. T...

Kim, Hyosun

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Near Critical Catalyst Reactant Branching Processes with Controlled Immigration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Near critical catalyst-reactant branching processes with controlled immigration are studied. The reactant population evolves according to a branching process whose branching rate is proportional to the total mass of the catalyst. The bulk catalyst evolution is that of a classical continuous time branching process; in addition there is a specific form of immigration. Immigration takes place exactly when the catalyst population falls below a certain threshold, in which case the population is instantaneously replenished to the threshold. Such models are motivated by problems in chemical kinetics where one wants to keep the level of a catalyst above a certain threshold in order to maintain a desired level of reaction activity. A diffusion limit theorem for the scaled processes is presented, in which the catalyst limit is described through a reflected diffusion, while the reactant limit is a diffusion with coefficients that are functions of both the reactant and the catalyst. Stochastic averaging principles under ...

Budhiraja, Amarjit

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Establishment report: Reforestation of the Pen Branch corridor and delta  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the role of the USDA Forest Service in the reforestation of the Pen Branch floodplain and delta. The report focuses upon the reforestation activities and monitoring to characterize the sites.

Nelson, E.A.; Dulohery, N.J.; Bunton, C.S.; Trettin, C.C.; McKee, W.H. Jr.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Strong Branching Inequalities for Convex Mixed Integer Nonlinear ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sep 3, 2011 ... the branch-and-bound tree for solving Mixed Integer Nonlinear ..... A complete proof of Lemma 1 can be found in the Ph.D. thesis of K?l?nç [24].

2011-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

178

Electrical resistance of the low dimensional critical branching random walk  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We show that the electrical resistance between the origin and generation n of the incipient infinite oriented branching random walk in dimensions d0. This answers a question of Barlow, J\\'arai, Kumagai and Slade [2].

Antal A. Járai; Asaf Nachmias

2013-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

179

First measurement of the B->pi l nu and B->rho(omega)l nu branching fractions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, we obtain B(B-0 --> pi(-)l(+)nu) = (1.8 +/- 0.4 +/- 0.3 +/- 0.2) x 10(-4) and B(B-0 --> rho(-)l(+)nu) = (2.5 +/- 0.4(0.7)(+0.5) +/- 0.5) x 10(-4), where the errors are statistical, systematic, and the estimated model dependence. We also estimate \\V...

Ammar, Raymond G.; Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Besson, David Zeke; Coppage, Don; Copty, N.; Davis, Robin E. P.; Hancock, N.; Kotov, S.; Kravchenko, I.; Kwak, Nowhan

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced branching control Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

control... caused by hard-to-predict branch mispredictions, by collapsing multiple control flow paths and scheduling... - tion of the branch guarding predicate. Depending on...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inclusive branching fractions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Coal fractionation by density for coking purposes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Scarce coal with good coking properties may be obtained by separating less valuable coal into different density fractions. The use of valuable fractions released in enrichment ensures optimal coking-batch composi...

S. G. Gagarin

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

DOE Research and Development Accomplishments Widget Inclusion Code  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Widget Inclusion Code Widget Inclusion Code You may download and install the DOE R&D Accomplishments widget by copying and pasting its HTML inclusion code on your Web page or by using the Get Widget Options. if (WIDGETBOX) WIDGETBOX.renderWidget('b8ed69ad-e0b6-4b7f-99bb-5fa32036f6fb');Get the DOE R&D Accomplishments widget and many other great free widgets at Widgetbox! Not seeing a widget? (More info)

183

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At International Geothermal Area Mexico (Norman &  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Fluid Inclusion Analysis At International Geothermal Area Mexico (Norman & Moore, 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Fluid Inclusion Analysis At International Geothermal Area Mexico (Norman & Moore, 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location International Geothermal Area Mexico Exploration Technique Fluid Inclusion Analysis Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Our examination of Cerro Prieto gas analyses indicates that the geothermal system structure is changing with time. Gas data routinely measured in most geothermal fields; hence fluid-flow plots as presented here can be accomplished with little cost. Gas analytical data, therefore, are useful

184

Respiration, photosynthesis, and oxygen isotope fractionation in ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Jan 25, 1971 ... Respiration, photosynthesis, and oxygen isotope fractionation in oceanic surface water1. Peter M. Kroopnick. Department of Oceanography,.

2000-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

185

Perceptions Of Texas Agricultural Education Teachers Regarding Diversity Inclusion In Secondary Agricultural Education Programs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

teachers' perceptions of the benefits of diversity inclusion, perceptions of the barriers of diversity inclusion, and perceptions of proposed solutions to increase diversity inclusion in Texas secondary agricultural education programs. The sample consisted...

Lavergne, Douglas D.

2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

186

HLA allele distribution distinguishes sporadic inclusion body myositis from hereditary inclusion body myopathies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We studied the HLA class II associations in patients with sporadic inclusion body myositis (s-IBM) and hereditary inclusion body myopathies (h-IBM) and attempted to distinguish these myopathies on the basis of HLA allele assignments. Forty-five patients, 30 with s-IBM and 15 with h-IBM, underwent HLA class II allele-specific typing using polymerase chain reaction sequence-specific primers for 71 alleles contained in the DR?1, DR?3-5, and DQ?1 loci. In s-IBM, we found a high (up to 77%) frequency of DR?1*0301, DR?3*0101 (or DR?3*0202) and DQ?1*0201 alleles. No significant association with alleles in the DR and DQ haplotypes was found among the 15 h-IBM patients. The strong association of prominent alleles with s-IBM, but not h-IBM, suggests that s-IBM is a distinct disorder with an immunogenetic background that differs from h-IBM.

Boyd M Koffman; Kumaraswamy Sivakumar; Toni Simonis; David Stroncek; Marinos C Dalakas

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Reproductive success and mortality rates of Ceriodaphnia dubia maintained in water from Upper Three Runs, Pen Branch, and Fourmile Branch  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is anticipated that the new SRS NPDES permit will require toxicity testing of at numerous outfalls and receiving streams, using the standard test species, Ceriodaphnia dubia. Because SRS surface waters differ markedly from the standard culture water that is used for Ceriodaphnia, studies were undertaken to determine if unimpacted SRS surface waters will support this species. Three SRS surface waters were evaluated; Upper Three Runs at Road 8-1, Pen Branch at Road B, and Fourmile Branch at Road F. Toxicity tests were performed monthly on each water source for eleven months. All three water sources exhibited varying degrees of toxicity to Ceriodaphnia, with Pen Branch being the least toxic and Fourmile Branch being the most toxic. These results indicate that if in-stream toxicity testing is required, it may not be possible to separate the naturally occurring toxic effects of the receiving water from possible toxic effects of SRS effluents.

Specht, W.L.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

The Unique Branching Patterns of Deinococcus Glycogen Branching Enzymes Are Determined by Their N-Terminal Domains  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...9005-79-2 Glycogen 9005-82-7 Amylose 9037-22-3 Amylopectin EC 2.4.1.18 1,4-alpha-Glucan Branching Enzyme...metabolism Amino Acid Sequence Amylopectin metabolism Amylose Bacterial Proteins genetics...

M. Palomo; S. Kralj; M. J. E. C. van der Maarel; L. Dijkhuizen

2009-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

189

Using EPR To Compare PEG-branch-nitroxide "Bivalent-Brush Polymers" and Traditional PEG Bottle-Brush Polymers: Branching  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using EPR To Compare PEG-branch-nitroxide "Bivalent-Brush Polymers" and Traditional PEG Bottle and a hydrophobic nitroxide domain. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy was used to characterize

Turro, Nicholas J.

190

DISPLAYING AND INTERPRETING FLUID INCLUSION STRATIGRAPHY ANALYSES ON MUDLOG  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

DISPLAYING AND INTERPRETING FLUID INCLUSION STRATIGRAPHY ANALYSES ON MUDLOG DISPLAYING AND INTERPRETING FLUID INCLUSION STRATIGRAPHY ANALYSES ON MUDLOG GRAPHS Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: DISPLAYING AND INTERPRETING FLUID INCLUSION STRATIGRAPHY ANALYSES ON MUDLOG GRAPHS Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: This is the fourth paper in a series on developing fluid inclusion stratigraphy (FIS) as a logging tool for geothermal bore holes. Here we address methods of displaying analyses and plotting gas ratios used for data interpretation on mudlog plots. The goal is to develop a rapid method of data display and interpretation for the up to 10,000 analyses returned by a geothermal well FIS analysis. Author(s): Norman, D.I.; Dilley, L.M.; McCulloch, J. Published: PROCEEDINGS, Thirtieth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir

191

Integrated mineralogical and fluid inclusion study of the Coso geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

mineralogical and fluid inclusion study of the Coso geothermal mineralogical and fluid inclusion study of the Coso geothermal systems, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Integrated mineralogical and fluid inclusion study of the Coso geothermal systems, California Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Coso is one of several high-temperature geothermal systems on the margins of the Basin and Range province that is associated with recent volcanic activity. This system, which is developed entirely in fractured granitic and metamorphic rocks, consists of a well-defined thermal plume that originates in the southern part of the field and then flows upward and laterally to the north. Fluid inclusion homogenization temperatures and salinities demonstrate that cool, low salinity ground waters were present

192

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (2004) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Fluid Inclusion Analysis Activity Date 2004 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis 1) To determine if analyses of fluid propene and propane species in fluid inclusions can be used to interpret fluid type, history, or process. 2) To evaluate the geology and thermal history of the East Flank, in order to better understand how the rocks will behave during hydro-fracturing. Notes 1) Analyses were performed on drill cuttings at 20ft intervals from four Coso geothermal wells. Two wells are good producers, one has cold-water entrants in the production zone, and the fourth is a non-producer. The ratios show distinct differences between producing and the non-producing

193

A Fluid-Inclusion Investigation Of The Tongonan Geothermal Field,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fluid-Inclusion Investigation Of The Tongonan Geothermal Field, Fluid-Inclusion Investigation Of The Tongonan Geothermal Field, Philippines Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Fluid-Inclusion Investigation Of The Tongonan Geothermal Field, Philippines Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: At least 660 fluid-inclusion homogenization temperature (Th) and 44 freezing temperature (Tm) measurements, mainly on anhydrite crystals sampled to 2.5 km depth from 28 wells, record thermal and chemical changes in the Tongonan geothermal field. Interpretations of the Th (175-368°C range). Tm (-0.3 to -12.7°C range) and crushing stage observations indicate that early trapped fluids contained up to (approximate)2 mol% CO2 (now measured at <0.4 mol%). reservoir temperatures have decreased by

194

Gas Analysis Of Geothermal Fluid Inclusions- A New Technology...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

inclusion gas analysis of drill chip cuttings in a similar fashion as used in the petroleum industry. Thus the results of this project may lower exploration costs both in the...

195

Fluid inclusion evidence for Silurian evaporites in southeastern Vermont: Summary  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...evaporites in southeastern Vermont: Summary R. A. RICH 1 1 Yankee Atomic Electric Company...evaporites in southeastern Vermont: Summary R. A. RICH Yankee Atomic Electric Company...inclusion localities in Vermont. X = halite- bearing...

196

Green's kernels for transmission problems in bodies with small inclusions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The uniform asymptotic approximation of Green's kernel for the transmission problem of antiplane shear is obtained for domains with small inclusions. The remainder estimates are provided. Numerical simulations are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the approach.

Vladimir Maz'ya; Alexander Movchan; Michael Nieves

2010-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

197

Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy Interpretation of New Wells in the...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Field Abstract This paper is the fifth in a series about the development of the FIS method. Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy (FIS) is a new technique being developed to map...

198

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (1999) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (1999) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Fluid Inclusion Analysis Activity Date 1999 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Well and steam sample comparison Notes Vein and alteration assemblages from eight Coso wells have been collected and their fluid-inclusion gases analyzed by quadrupole mass spectrometry. Four major types of alteration were sampled: 1) young calcite-hematite-pyrite veins; 2) wairakite or epidote veins and alteration that are spatially associated with deep reservoirs in the main field and eastern wells; 3) older sericite and pyrite wallrock alteration; and 4) stilbite-calcite veins that are common in cooler or marginal portions of

199

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (2003) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coso Geothermal Area Coso Geothermal Area (2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Fluid Inclusion Analysis Activity Date 2003 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis 1) Fracture/stress analysis. 2)To determine the driver of the relationship between hydrogen and organic species. Notes 1) Fluid inclusion analyses of cuttings from well 83-16 were used to determine the temperatures of vein mineralization. 2) Measurement of organic compounds in fluid inclusions shows that there are strong relationships between H2 concentrations and alkane/alkene ratios and benzene concentrations. Inclusion analyses that indicate H2 concentrations > 0.001 mol % typically have ethane > ethylene, propane > propylene, and

200

The tahitites of gran canaria and haüynitization of their inclusions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The petrology and chemistry of these lavas of tahititic character are studied, as well as their genesis. Inclusions in tahitites from Gran Canaria have also taken into consideration, and the...

A. Hernández-Pacheco

1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inclusive branching fractions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

E-Print Network 3.0 - antilambda0 inclusively produced Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

inclusions with a sliding and bonded interfaces are compared. It is shown that the energy... in the inclusion with sliding interface due to uniform eigenstrain is greater...

202

Diffusion coefficients in trimethyleneoxide containing comb branch polymer  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Diffusion coefficients in trimethyleneoxide containing comb branch polymer Diffusion coefficients in trimethyleneoxide containing comb branch polymer electrolytes Title Diffusion coefficients in trimethyleneoxide containing comb branch polymer electrolytes Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2004 Authors Liu, Gao, Craig L. Reeder, Xiaoguang Sun, and John B. Kerr Journal Solid State Ionics Volume 175 Pagination 781-783 Keywords comb branch polyethers, conductivity, lithium battery, polymer electrolytes, salt diffusion coefficient, trimethylene oxide Abstract This paper reports on a new comb branch polymer based on trimethylene oxide (TMO) side chains as a polymer electrolyte for potential application in lithium metal rechargeable batteries. The trimethylene oxide (TMO) units are attached to the side chains of a polyepoxide ether to maximize the segmental motion. Lithium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (LiTFSI) salt was used to formulate the polymer electrolyte with the new TMO containing polymers. The new polymer electrolytes show improved salt diffusion coefficients (Ds) and conductivity at ambient and subambient temperature compare to the ethylene oxide (EO) counterpart, whereas performance at high temperature (85 °C) remains the same or is actually worse for salt diffusivity.

203

Hawaii Department of Health Indoor and Radiological Health Branch | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Indoor and Radiological Health Branch Indoor and Radiological Health Branch Jump to: navigation, search Name Hawaii Department of Health Indoor and Radiological Health Branch From Open Energy Information Address 591 Ala Moana Blvd. Place Honolulu, Hawaii Zip 96813 Website http://hawaii.gov/health/envir Coordinates 21.300314°, -157.864542° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":21.300314,"lon":-157.864542,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

204

Memorandum A. J. Rizzo, Chief TO : Operational Safety Branch  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

j Memorandum A. J. Rizzo, Chief TO / : Operational Safety Branch Harold Glauberman, ?a FROM : Operational Safety Branch ' I DATE: September 30, 1966 REMOVAL OF CONTAMINATED EQUlPMEHT AT THE CANEL FACILITY SUBJECT: MI DDLETOWN, CONNECT I CUT' INTRODUCTION The decision to terminate AEC contract activities at the CANEL facility introduced the need to dispose of radioactively contaminated equipment and materials so as to permit release of the facilities. As a result, -' . the Operational Safety Branch, NY, was requested to perform thenecessary Health Physics surveillance and monitoring functions during the-disassembly, removal and packaging of the contaminated equipment. The actual removal and handling of contaminated equipment was performed by the' AEC.contractor,

205

Hawaii Department of Health Clean Air Branch | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Clean Air Branch Clean Air Branch Jump to: navigation, search Name Hawaii Department of Health Clean Air Branch Address P.O. Box 3378 Place Honolulu, Hawaii Zip 96801 Website http://hawaii.gov/health/envir Coordinates 21.31°, -157.86° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":21.31,"lon":-157.86,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

206

Hawaii Department of Health Clean Water Branch | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hawaii Department of Health Clean Water Branch Hawaii Department of Health Clean Water Branch Jump to: navigation, search Name Hawaii Department of Health Clean Water Branch Address P.O. Box 3378 Place Honolulu, Hawaii Zip 96801 Website http://hawaii.gov/health/envir Coordinates 21.31°, -157.86° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":21.31,"lon":-157.86,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

207

Hawaii Department of Health Safe Drinking Water Branch | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Branch Branch Jump to: navigation, search Name Hawaii Department of Health Safe Drinking Water Branch Address 919 Ala Moana Blvd Room 308 Place Honolulu, Hawaii Zip 96814 Coordinates 21.294755°, -157.858979° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":21.294755,"lon":-157.858979,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

208

North Branch Municipal Water and Light - Residential Energy Efficiency  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

North Branch Municipal Water and Light - Residential Energy North Branch Municipal Water and Light - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program North Branch Municipal Water and Light - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Lighting: See program website Room A/C: $25, plus $25 for recycling an old, working unit Central A/C: $100 - $200, plus additional rebate for efficiency ratings above 14.5 SEER Air Source Heat Pump:$100 - $200, plus additional rebate for efficiency ratings above 14.5 SEER Geothermal Heat Pump:$200/ton, plus $25/ton for every 1 EER above minimum

209

Why is an IEEE Student Branch Beneficial? A Student Branch gives students the opportunity to meet and learn from fellow students, as well as faculty members and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

://www.ieee.org/web/membership/qualifications/qualifications.html. IEEE Student Branches are established at over 1,500 universities and colleges throughout the world rebates and allotments to help Student Branches with operating costs based on their timely submission.00 per member rebate. Upon submission of their Annual Plan, Branches receive $50.00 if they have less

Eckmiller, Rolf

210

Isotope/element fractionation during surface adsorption  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The adsorption of ions onto mineral surfaces accompanies isotope/element fractionation in planets and asteroids. A model based on simple classical physics is presented to predict these fractionations. The agreement between the experimentally observed isotope/element ratios and their predicted values is found to be excellent. This fractionation can be demonstrated experimentally in advanced physics laboratories using macroscopic particles. The success of the model shows students that even a very complex naturally occurring process can be explained quantitatively with simple physics.

Gamini Seneviratne; Asiri Nanayakkara

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Accelerator dynamics of a fractional kicked rotor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is shown that the Weyl fractional derivative can quantize an open system. A fractional kicked rotor is studied in the framework of the fractional Schrodinger equation. The system is described by the non-Hermitian Hamiltonian by virtue of the Weyl fractional derivative. Violation of space symmetry leads to acceleration of the orbital momentum. Quantum localization saturates this acceleration, such that the average value of the orbital momentum can be a direct current and the system behaves like a ratchet. The classical counterpart is a nonlinear kicked rotor with absorbing boundary conditions.

A. Iomin

2006-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

212

Nonlinear time-fractional dispersive equations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we study some cases of time-fractional nonlinear dispersive equations (NDEs) involving Caputo derivatives, by means of the invariant subspace method. This method allows to find exact solutions to nonlinear time-fractional partial differential equations by separating variables. We first consider a third order time-fractional NDE that admits a four-dimensional invariant subspace and we find a similarity solution. We also study a fifth order NDE. In this last case we find a solution involving Mittag-Leffler functions. We finally observe that the invariant subspace method permits to find explicit solutions for a wide class of nonlinear dispersive time-fractional equations.

P. Artale Harris; R. Garra

2014-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

213

Mesoscopic Fractional Quantum in Soft Matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Soft matter (e.g., biomaterials, polymers, sediments, oil, emulsions) has become an important bridge between physics and diverse disciplines. Its fundamental physical mechanism, however, is largely obscure. This study made the first attempt to connect fractional Schrodinger equation and soft matter physics under a consistent framework from empirical power scaling to phenomenological kinetics and macromechanics to mesoscopic quantum mechanics. The original contributions are the fractional quantum relationships, which show Levy statistics and fractional Brownian motion are essentially related to momentum and energy, respectively. The fractional quantum underlies fractal mesostructures and many-body interactions of macromolecules in soft matter and is experimentally testable.

W Chen

2005-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

214

Inclusive lepton production in hadronic events from e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation at 29 GeV  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have measured the production rates of prompt electrons and muons in hadronic events from e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation at 29 GeV. The inclusive rate per hadronic event for leptons with total momenta greater than 2 GeV/c is determined to be (0.033 +- 0.003 +- 0.012) for electrons and (0.037 +- 0.005 +- 0.008) for muons. We measure the longitudinal and transverse momentum spectra of these leptons. The harder transverse momentum spectrum of leptons from bottom and charm quark relative to charm decays allows us to separate the bottom and charm quark contributions to the prompt lepton signal. The longitudinal momentum distributions allow us to study the fragmentation properties of these heavy quarks. For charm quarks we find average semileptonic branching ratios of (6.4 +- 1.3 +- 2.8)% into electrons and (8.1 +- 1.6 +- 1.8)% into muons. For bottom quarks we find average branching ratios of (12.9 +- 2.5 +- 2.0)% into electrons and (12.2 +- 5.0 +- 3.0)% into muons. The fragmentation function for bottom quarks is determined to be peaked at large z with /sub b/ approx. = 0.75. 46 references.

Nelson, M.E.

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

RADIONUCLIDE INVENTORY AND DISTRIBUTION: FOURMILE BRANCH, PEN BRANCH, AND STEEL CREEK IOUS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As a condition to the Department of Energy (DOE) Low Level Waste Disposal Federal Facility Review Group (LFRG) review team approving the Savannah River Site (SRS) Composite Analysis (CA), SRS agreed to follow up on a secondary issue, which consisted of the consolidation of several observations that the team concluded, when evaluated collectively, could potentially impact the integration of the CA results. This report addresses secondary issue observations 4 and 21, which identify the need to improve the CA sensitivity and uncertainty analysis specifically by improving the CA inventory and the estimate of its uncertainty. The purpose of the work described herein was to be responsive to these secondary issue observations by re-examining the radionuclide inventories of the Integrator Operable Units (IOUs), as documented in ERD 2001 and Hiergesell, et. al. 2008. The LFRG concern has been partially addressed already for the Lower Three Runs (LTR) IOU (Hiergesell and Phifer, 2012). The work described in this investigation is a continuation of the effort to address the LFRG concerns by re-examining the radionuclide inventories associated with Fourmile Branch (FMB) IOU, Pen Branch (PB) IOU and Steel Creek (SC) IOU. The overall approach to computing radionuclide inventories for each of the IOUs involved the following components: • Defining contaminated reaches of sediments along the IOU waterways • Identifying separate segments within each IOU waterway to evaluate individually • Computing the volume and mass of contaminated soil associated with each segment, or “compartment” • Obtaining the available and appropriate Sediment and Sediment/Soil analytical results associated with each IOU • Standardizing all radionuclide activity by decay-correcting all sample analytical results from sample date to the current point in time, • Computing representative concentrations for all radionuclides associated with each compartment in each of the IOUs • Computing the radionuclide inventory of each DOE-added radionuclide for the compartments of each IOU by applying the representative, central value concentration to the mass of contaminated soil • Totaling the inventory for all compartments associated with each of the IOUs Using this approach the 2013 radionuclide inventories for each sub-compartment associated with each of the three IOUs were computed, by radionuclide. The inventories from all IOU compartments were then rolled-up into a total inventory for each IOU. To put the computed estimate of radionuclide activities within FMB, PB, and SC IOUs into context, attention was drawn to Cs-137, which was the radionuclide with the largest contributor to the calculated dose to a member of the public at the perimeter of SRS within the 2010 SRS CA (SRNL 2010). The total Cs-137 activity in each of the IOUs was calculated to be 9.13, 1.5, and 17.4 Ci for FMB, PB, and SC IOUs, respectively. Another objective of this investigation was to address the degree of uncertainty associated with the estimated residual radionuclide activity that is calculated for the FMB, PB, and SC IOUs. Two primary contributing factors to overall uncertainty of inventory estimates were identified and evaluated. The first related to the computation of the mass of contaminated material in a particular IOU compartment and the second to the uncertainty associated with analytical counting errors. The error ranges for the mass of contaminated material in each IOU compartment were all calculated to be approximately +/- 9.6%, or a nominal +/-10%. This nominal value was added to the uncertainty associated with the analytical counting errors that were associated with each radionuclide, individually. This total uncertainty was then used to calculate a maximum and minimum estimated radionuclide inventories for each IOU.

Hiergesell, R.; Phifer, M.

2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

216

Diversity and Inclusion Events Calendar | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Diversity and Inclusion Events Calendar Diversity and Inclusion Events Calendar Diversity and Inclusion Events Calendar Training, networking, and career-building conferences like the ones below are valuable ways to engage in diversity issues. Learn about upcoming events on the calendar below, and contact us at diversity@hq.doe.gov to let us know about other upcoming events. To learn more about the Department's diversity initiatives, visit this page. July 2013 Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat 30 1 2 3 4 5 6 Independence Day 3:30PM EDT Filipino-American Friendship Day 3:30PM EDT 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 World Population Day 3:30PM EDT 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 Organization of Chinese Americans Federal Leadership Training 2:15PM to 5:15PM EDT 2013 National Council of La Raza Leadership Development Workshops 4:00PM to 6:00PM EDT

217

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (2002) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

) ) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Fluid Inclusion Analysis Activity Date 2002 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Analyses were averaged and plotted verses depth (Figure 4). Fluid inclusion gas analyses done on vein minerals from drill hole 68-6 that we earlier analyzed (Adams 2000) were plotted for comparison in order to confirm that similar analyses are obtained from chips and vein minerals. This comparison is far from ideal. The drill holes are better than a kilometer apart, samples analyzed in the two bore holes are not from the same depths, and the chip analyses were performed on the new dual quadrupole system that

218

Fluid Inclusion Gas Compositions From An Active Magmatic-Hydrothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fluid Inclusion Gas Compositions From An Active Magmatic-Hydrothermal Fluid Inclusion Gas Compositions From An Active Magmatic-Hydrothermal System- A Case Study Of The Geysers Geothermal Field, Usa Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Fluid Inclusion Gas Compositions From An Active Magmatic-Hydrothermal System- A Case Study Of The Geysers Geothermal Field, Usa Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Hydrothermal alteration and the active vapor-dominated geothermal system at The Geysers, CA are related to a composite hypabyssal granitic pluton emplaced beneath the field 1.1 to 1.2 million years ago. Deep drill holes provide a complete transect across the thermal system and samples of the modern-day steam. The hydrothermal system was liquid-dominated prior to formation of the modern vapor-dominated regime at 0.25 to 0.28 Ma. Maximum

219

Gas Analysis Of Geothermal Fluid Inclusions- A New Technology For  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Gas Analysis Of Geothermal Fluid Inclusions- A New Technology For Geothermal Exploration Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Gas Analysis Of Geothermal Fluid Inclusions- A New Technology For Geothermal Exploration Details Activities (7) Areas (6) Regions (0) Abstract: To increase our knowledge of gaseous species in geothermal systems by fluid inclusion analysis in order to facilitate the use of gas analysis in geothermal exploration. The knowledge of gained by this program can be applied to geothermal exploration, which may expand geothermal

220

Microsoft Word - DOE 2012-2015 Diversityand inclusion Strategic Plan  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2 - 2 0 1 5 2 - 2 0 1 5 D e p a r t me n t o f E n e r g y D i v e r s i t y & I n c l u s i o n S t r a t e g i c P l a n Department of Energy's Diversity and Inclusion Strategic Plan: 2012 -2015 i Message from the March 23, 2012 Secretary of Energy The Department of Energy (DOE) is pleased to provide its 2012-2015 Diversity and Inclusion Strategic Plan. Achieving the Department of Energy's mission and goals will involve creating a culture which values the contributions of all DOE employees and provides equal opportunity for professional development and career advancement. Therefore, as we implement this Diversity and Inclusion Strategic Plan, we must reaffirm DOE's Management principles, and apply three central ideas: Mission Focus,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inclusive branching fractions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Power Grid Verification Using Node and Branch Nahi Abdul Ghani  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Power Grid Verification Using Node and Branch Dominance Nahi Abdul Ghani ECE Department University Toronto, Ontario, Canada f.najm@utoronto.ca ABSTRACT The verification of power grids in modern integrated, Verification Keywords Power grid, voltage drop, dominance 1. INTRODUCTION The rising demand for low

Najm, Farid N.

222

Branching ratios for the beta decay of Na-21  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have measured the beta-decay branching ratio for the transition from Na-21 to the first excited state of Ne-21. A recently published test of the standard model, which was based on a measurement of the beta-nu correlation in the decay of Na-21...

Iacob, V. E.; Hardy, John C.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Goodwin, J.; Nica, N.; Park, H. I.; Tabacaru, G.; Trache, L.; Tribble, Robert E.; Zhai, Y.; Towner, I. S.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

The Polymerase Chain Reaction and Branching Processes Fengzhu Sun  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Polymerase Chain Reaction and Branching Processes Fengzhu Sun Department of Mathematics, DRB is studied. We also study the distribution of the Hamming distance between two randomly chosen sequences long. The double-stranded DNA molecules are heated to near boiling temperature so that the double

Sun, Fengzhu - Sun, Fengzhu

224

,rsity or Calirorn:taBuue: SOUTHERN -BRANCH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Astronomy, 117. Biology, 102. Board,96. Books, 97. Boeaiyl, 102. Calendar, 5. Chemistry, 108. Chemistry BRANCH LOS ANGELES , CALIFORNIA ForSaleattheStudents'BookStores. Berkeley and Los Angeles PRICE , 10 information about the University, its organization , government , requirements for admission to undergraduate

Grether, Gregory

225

Branching Brownian motion with an inhomogeneous breeding potential  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Branching Brownian motion with an inhomogeneous breeding potential J. W. Harris and S. C. Harris 1TW, U.K. email: john.harris@bristol.ac.uk. Supported by the Heilbronn Institute for Mathe- matical.K. email: s.c.harris@bath.ac.uk 1 #12;|y|p for p > 2, the population would almost surely explode

Harris, Simon Colin

226

Measurement of Branching Ratio for K+?e+?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Using a 2?-sr magnetic spectrometer, the branching ratio for K+?e+? relative to that for K+??+? has been measured to be (2.42 ± 0.42) × 10-5, in good agreement with the predictions of the V-A theory.

A. R. Clark, Bruce Cork, T. Elioff, L. T. Kerth, J. F. McReynolds, David Newton, and W. A. Wenzel

1972-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

227

RUSSIAN ACADEMY OF SCIENCE Lenin Order of Siberian Branch  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RUSSIAN ACADEMY OF SCIENCE Lenin Order of Siberian Branch G.I. Budker INSTITUTE OF NUCLEAR PHYSICS.I. Meshkov, V.V. Smaluk, V.N. Zhilich, A.N. Zhuravlev Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics 630090, Novosibirsk at the points with non-zero dispersion function Dx 0. Wiggler field variation enables us to redistribute

Smaluk, Victor

228

Cow Branch Wind Energy Center Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cow Branch Wind Energy Center Wind Farm Cow Branch Wind Energy Center Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Cow Branch Wind Energy Center Wind Farm Facility Cow Branch Wind Energy Center Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Wind Capital Group/John Deere Capital Developer Wind Capital Group/John Deere Capital Energy Purchaser Associated Electric Cooperative Location Atchison County MO Coordinates 40.423897°, -95.477781° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.423897,"lon":-95.477781,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

229

Inverse Problems for Fractional Diffusion Equations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 1.5.3 Derivation of fractional difiusion equations . . . . . . . . . . . 12 1.6 Fractional calculus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 1.7 Mittag-Le?er function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 1... point theory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 1.3 Volterra equation of the second kind . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 1.4 Classical difiusion equations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 1.4.1 Derivation...

Zuo, Lihua

2013-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

230

Airborne release fractions/rates and respirable fractions for nonreactor nuclear facilities. Volume 2, Appendices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document contains compiled data from the DOE Handbook on Airborne Release Fractions/Rates and Respirable Fractions for Nonreactor Nuclear facilities. Source data and example facilities utilized, such as the Plutonium Recovery Facility, are included.

Not Available

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Fractional Zaslavsky and Henon Discrete Maps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper is devoted to the memory of Professor George M. Zaslavsky passed away on November 25, 2008. In the field of discrete maps, George M. Zaslavsky introduced a dissipative standard map which is called now the Zaslavsky map. G. Zaslavsky initialized many fundamental concepts and ideas in the fractional dynamics and kinetics. In this paper, starting from kicked damped equations with derivatives of non-integer orders we derive a fractional generalization of discrete maps. These fractional maps are generalizations of the Zaslavsky map and the Henon map. The main property of the fractional differential equations and the correspondent fractional maps is a long-term memory and dissipation. The memory is realized by the fact that their present state evolution depends on all past states with special forms of weights.

Vasily E. Tarasov

2011-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

232

Airborne release fraction -ARF- and respirable fraction -RF- for foot pack cans in fires  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this analysis is to provide the airborne release fraction (ARF), respirable fraction (RF) and respirable release as a fraction of initial mass for Food Pack Cans (FPCs) containing plutonium powders (e.g., oxide) that become pressurized to the point of bursting in a fire.

CARSON, D.M.

2002-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

233

Inclusion Body Isolation Maxi Kit Product Insert Product # 17700  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. coli. The kit includes reagents specially formulated to achieve rapid and high-quality purification in solid form 2. Solubilization of purified inclusion bodies 3. Purification of the recombinant protein · Vortex · Micropipettors · Sterile, deionized water or Milli-Q® water Procedure This section describes

Lebendiker, Mario

234

Swansea Academy of Inclusivity and Learner Support (SAILS)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Swansea Academy of Inclusivity and Learner Support (SAILS) Contact the College of Science for more information www.swansea.ac.uk/science The College of Science brings together Bioscience, Computer Science - for example, in our new Foundation programme. Widening Access in Science Science at Swansea has always been

Martin, Ralph R.

235

Process Switches and Branch Prediction Accuracy David Chen, Bennett Lau, Jeffrey Shafer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to "repair" the destructive aliasing in the branch history table after a process switch, both combine in modern deeply pipelined superscalar machines. The penalty of a mispredicted branch can be quite high [6

Rixner, Scott

236

E-Print Network 3.0 - arterial branch points Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

branch points Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: arterial branch points Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 CONTRIBUTIONS I<'ROM THE...

237

UBS AG, LONDON BRANCH Order No. EA-263 I. BACKGROUND  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3 3 I. BACKGROUND Exports of electricity from the United States to a foreign country are regulated and require authorization under section 202(e) of the Federal Power Act (FPA) (16 U.S.C. §824a(e)). On April 11, 2002, the Office of Fossil Energy (FE) of the Department of Energy (DOE) received an application from UBS, AG London Branch (UBS) for authorization to transmit electric energy from the Untied States to Mexico and to Canada. UBS, a Swiss corporation formed in 1998 by the merger of Union Bank of Switzerland and Swiss Bank Corporation, is a power marketer that does not own or control any electric generation or transmission facilities nor does it have any franchised service territory in the United States. The designation "London Branch" indicates the principal booking location of the company's energy trading business; UBS

238

North Branch Water & Light Comm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

North Branch Water & Light Comm North Branch Water & Light Comm Place Minnesota Utility Id 13681 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial Commercial Large General Service Industrial Residential Residential Residential- Seasonal Residential Average Rates Residential: $0.1250/kWh Commercial: $0.1140/kWh Industrial: $0.0750/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a"

239

Wells Branch, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Branch, Texas: Energy Resources Branch, Texas: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 30.4460353°, -97.6794507° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":30.4460353,"lon":-97.6794507,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

240

: Hanson Blata, Chief, Radiation Branch Health & Safety Division  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Hanson Blata, Chief, Radiation Branch Hanson Blata, Chief, Radiation Branch Health & Safety Division ,DATTE: July 25, 1952 FROM : Eugene Barry, Radiation Brsnchctr@ Health & Safety Division SL-JEm: VISIT TO CANADIAN RADIUM AND UFLANIUM CO, MT. K&O, N. Y. - MAY 28, 1952 SrnOL: HSR:.WB:md On May 28, a visit was made to the Canadian Radium and Uranium Co. of Mt. Kisco, New York, a manufacturer and distributor of radium and polonium products, for the purpose of assisting the New York State Department of Labor in making a contamination S.U"Jey. The following types of samples were taken: 1 l/811 diameter Whatman #&. filter paper smear samples for measuring removable alpha contamination, general air and locsl'air radon samples, air dust samples utilizing the Hudson air sampler with

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inclusive branching fractions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Agriculture and Food Processes Branch program summary document  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The work of the Agriculture and Food Processes Branch within the US DOE's Office of Industrial Programs is discussed and reviewed. The Branch is responsible for assisting the food and agricultural sectors of the economy in increasing their energy efficiency by cost sharing with industry the development and demonstration of technologies industry by itself would not develop because of a greater than normal risk factor, but have significant energy conservation benefits. This task is made more difficult by the diversity of agriculture and the food industry. The focus of the program is now on the development and demonstration of energy conservation technology in high energy use industry sectors and agricultural functions (e.g., sugar processing, meat processing, irrigation, and crop drying, high energy use functions common to many sectors of the food industry (e.g., refrigeration, drying, and evaporation), and innovative concepts (e.g., energy integrated farm systems. Specific projects within the program are summarized. (LCL)

None

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

The genealogy of branching Brownian motion with absorption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider a system of particles which perform branching Brownian motion with negative drift and are killed upon reaching zero, in the near-critical regime where the total population stays roughly constant with approximately N particles. We show that the characteristic time scale for the evolution of this population is of order $(\\log N)^3$, in the sense that when time is measured in these units, the scaled number of particles converges to a variant of Neveu's continuous-state branching process. Furthermore, the genealogy of the particles is then governed by a coalescent process known as the Bolthausen-Sznitman coalescent. This validates the nonrigorous predictions by Brunet, Derrida, Muller and Munier for a closely related model.

Julien Berestycki; Nathanaël Berestycki; Jason Schweinsberg

2010-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

243

UBS AG, LONDON BRANCH Order No. EA-261 I. BACKGROUND  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1 1 I. BACKGROUND Exports of electricity from the United States to a foreign country are regulated and require authorization under section 202(e) of the Federal Power Act (FPA) (16 U.S.C. §824a(e)). On April 11, 2002, the Office of Fossil Energy (FE) of the Department of Energy (DOE) received an application from UBS AG, London Branch (UBS) for authorization to transmit electric energy from the United States to Mexico. UBS, a Swiss corporation formed in 1998 by the merger of Union Bank of Switzerland and Swiss Bank Corporation, is a power marketer that does not own or control any electric generation or transmission facilities nor does it have any franchised service territory in the United States. The designation "London Branch" indicates the

244

Christian Branches, Maori Roots: The Cult of Rua  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Allan Hanson CHRISTIAN BRANCHES, MAORI ROOTS: THE CULT OF RUA During the first third of the twentieth century a New Zealand Maori named Rua Kenana, proclaiming himself to be a Messiah and the brother of Jesus, or even Jesus himself, headed a... Hanson and Fransje Knops for critical comments. I Rua's cult had received very little scholarly attention prior to the appearance of two books, researched independently but both published in 1979. Judith Binney, Gillian Chaplin, and Craig Wallace...

Hanson, F. Allan

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Fractional and fractal derivatives modeling of turbulence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study makes the first attempt to use the 2/3-order fractional Laplacian modeling of enhanced diffusing movements of random turbulent particle resulting from nonlinear inertial interactions. A combined effect of the inertial interactions and the molecule Brownian diffusivities is found to be the bi-fractal mechanism behind multifractal scaling in the inertial range of scales of moderate Reynolds number turbulence. Accordingly, a stochastic equation is proposed to describe turbulence intermittency. The 2/3-order fractional Laplacian representation is also used to construct a fractional Reynolds equation for nonlinear interactions of fluctuating velocity components, underlying turbulence spacetime fractal structures of Levy 2/3 stable distribution. The new perspective of this study is that the fractional calculus is an effective approach modeling of chaotic fractal phenomena induced by nonlinear interactions.

Wen Chen

2005-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

246

Bio-oil fractionation and condensation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of fractionating bio-oil vapors which involves providing bio-oil vapors comprising bio-oil constituents is described. The bio-oil vapors are cooled in a first stage which comprises a condenser having passages for the bio-oil separated by a heat conducting wall from passages for a coolant. The coolant in the condenser of the first stage is maintained at a substantially constant temperature, set at a temperature in the range of 75 to 100.degree. C., to condense a first liquid fraction of liquefied bio-oil constituents in the condenser of the first stage. The first liquid fraction of liquified bio-oil constituents from the condenser in the first stage is collected. Also described are steps for subsequently recovering further liquid fractions of liquefied bio-oil constituents. Particular compositions of bio-oil condensation products are also described.

Brown, Robert C; Jones, Samuel T; Pollard, Anthony

2013-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

247

Thermodynamic Branch in the Chemical System Response to External Impact  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The paper gives an account of a detailed investigation of the thermodynamic branch as a path of the chemical system deviation from its isolated thermodynamic equilibrium under an external impact. For a combination of direct and reverse reactions in the same chemical system, full thermodynamic branch is presented by an S-shaped curve, whose ends asymptotically achieve appropriate initial states, which, in turn, are logistic ends of the opposite reactions. The slope tangents of the steepest parts of the curves, the areas of the maximum rate of the shift growth vs. the external thermodynamic force, occurred to be directly proportional to the force and, simultaneously, linearly proportional to the thermodynamic equivalent of chemical reaction, which is the ratio between the amount in moles of any reaction participant, transformed in an isolated system, along the reaction way from its initial state to thermodynamic equilibrium, to its stoichiometric coefficient. The found linearity is valid for arbitrary combination of the stoichiometric coefficients in a reaction of compound synthesis from chemical elements like aA+bB=AaBb, and confirms the exclusive role of the thermodynamic equivalent of transformation as the chemical system characteristic of robustness and irreversibility. Results of this work allow for quantitative evaluation of the chemical system shift from thermodynamic equilibrium along thermodynamic branch and its rate vs. the shifting force. Such an investigation became possible due to the development of discrete thermodynamics of chemical equilibria.

B. Zilbergleyt

2012-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

248

Development of plutonium aerosol fractionation system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DEVELOPMENT OF A PLUTONIUM AEROSOL FRACTIONATION SYSTEM A Thesis by MALLA R. MEKALA Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August... 1993 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering DEVELOPMENT OP A PLUTONIUM AEROSOL FRACTIONATION SYSTEM A Thesis by MALLA R. MEKALA Approved as to style and content by: A. R. McFarland (Chair of Committee) N. K. Anand (Mer toer) (', & C. B...

Mekala, Malla R.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Finite-size Domains in a Membrane with Two-state Active Inclusions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a model that leads to the formation of non-equilibrium finite-size domains in a biological membrane. Our model considers the active conformational change of the inclusions and the coupling between inclusion density and membrane curvature. Two special cases with different interactions are studied by Monte Carlo simulations. In case (i) exited state inclusions prefer to aggregate. In case (ii) ground state inclusions prefer to aggregate. When the inclusion density is not coupled to the local membrane curvature, in case (i) the typical length scale ($\\sqrt{M}$) of the inclusion clusters shows weak dependence on the excitation rate ($K_{on}$) of the inclusions for a wide range of $K_{on}$ but increases fast when $K_{on}$ becomes sufficiently large; in case (ii) $\\sqrt{M}\\sim {K_{on}}^{-{1/3}}$ for a wide range of $K_{on}$. When the inclusion density is coupled to the local membrane curvature, the curvature coupling provides the upper limit of the inclusion clusters. In case (i) (case (ii)), the formation of the inclusions is suppressed when $K_{off}$ ($K_{on}$) is sufficiently large such that the ground state (excited state) inclusions do not have sufficient time to aggregate. We also find that the mobility of an inclusion in the membrane depends on inclusion-curvature coupling. Our study suggests possible mechanisms that produce finite-size domains in biological membranes.

Chien-Hsun Chen

2005-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

250

A BreakEven Formulation for Evaluating Branch Predictor Energy Efficiency #  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Break­Even Formulation for Evaluating Branch Predictor Energy Efficiency # Michele Co, Dee A demonstrated that a better branch pre­ dictor can increase the energy­efficiency of the system, even if the new a simple, effective metric for eval­ uating the tradeoff between processor energy­efficiency and branch

Co, Michele

251

A new formulation of the spine approach to branching Robert Hardy and Simon C. Harris  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

deviations for a continuous­typed branching di#usion in Git, J.W.Harris and S.C.Harris [8] and HardyA new formulation of the spine approach to branching di#usions Robert Hardy and Simon C. Harris in branching di#usions: see, for example, the L p convergence of additive martingales in Hardy and Harris [12

Harris, Simon Colin

252

A new formulation of the spine approach to branching Robert Hardy and Simon C. Harris  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

deviations for a continuous-typed branching diffusion in Git, J.W.Harris and S.C.Harris [8] and HardyA new formulation of the spine approach to branching diffusions Robert Hardy and Simon C. Harris in branching diffusions: see, for example, the Lp convergence of additive martingales in Hardy and Harris [12

Harris, Simon Colin

253

Market Potential Analysis and Branch Network Planning: Application in a German Retail Bank  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Location problems are an integral part of strategic planning in many kinds of industries. Optimizing an organization's branch network requires considering multiple criteria such as location characteristics, branch performance, and competitors' locations. ... Keywords: Location Analysis, Branch Network Planning, Location Optimization, Maximal Covering Location Problem, MCLP, Retail Banking

Stephan Schneider; Florian Seifert; Ali Sunyaev

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

TO. TO. , W. B; Harris, Chief, Industrial Hygiene'Branch DA , W. B; Harris, Chief, Industrial Hygiene'Branch DA  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

~~~~;.Offi~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~;.Offi~~~~~~~~~~~ ,/-; l UNITED STh , :__ .~. :__ .~. , , TO. TO. , W. B; Harris, Chief, Industrial Hygiene'Branch DA , W. B; Harris, Chief, Industrial Hygiene'Branch DA Health and Safet Division pa& 1 Ps B.- Klevin :mL -y!yG hMBOL: HSH:PBK hMBOL: HSH:PBK : 1. Purpose of Visit >.. a. To study operations planned by~Bu.reau of Ea: factors for Be, II, thorium, zirconium, etc, i b. ,'To explain to Bureauof Mines' personnel tl in handling any of the aforementioned mate] 2. Scope of Work The Bureau of l&s'mill make a'study of the k several materials specified by-the New York 0p1 1 The study mill include the following tests for .a. Ignition~temperature~of a cloud. b. Determine the amount of inert required to L propagation in any of these materials.

255

Correlation of characteristics for steel containing nonmetallic inclusions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The quality of steel is largely determined by nonmetallic inclusions (NI). Improvement of quantitative methods of testing for NI is part of quality evaluation. Metallographic methods of visual evaluation in accordance with GOST 1778-70 are very laborious and are thus being replaced by automatic ones based on computerized image processors (CIP) such as instruments of the Quantimet type and by methods of isolating and analyzing NI. The authors have examined the relationship between counting fields containing NI (method Sh8 in accordance with GOST 1778-70), measurements with the Quantimet-360 and Quantimet-720 CIP, as well as the determination of the concentrations of electrically isolated oxide inclusions. The authors examined hot-rolled 38KhN3MFA steel from seven commercial batches.

Shtremel', M.A.; Fadeev, Yu.I.; Maksimova, O.V.; Chernukha, L.G.; Anisimova, N.I.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

A_N in inclusive lepton-proton collisions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Some estimates for the transverse single spin asymmetry, A_N, in the inclusive processes l p(transv. Pol.) -> h X are compared with new experimental data. The calculations are based on the Sivers and Collins functions as extracted from SIDIS azimuthal asymmetries, within a transverse momentum dependent factorization approach. The values of A_N thus obtained agree in sign and shape with the data. Predictions for future experiments are also given.

Prokudin, Alexey; Anselmino, Mauro; Boglione, Mariaelena; D'Alesio, Umberto; Melis, Stefano; Murgia, Francesco

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Impact of variable RBE on proton fractionation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To explore the impact of variable proton relative biological effectiveness (RBE) on dose fractionation for clinically relevant situations. A generic RBE = 1.1 is generally used for isoeffect calculations, while experimental studies showed that proton RBE varies with tissue type, dose, and linear energy transfer (LET). Methods: An analytical expression for the LET and {alpha}/{beta} dependence of the linear-quadratic (LQ) model has been used for proton simulations in parallel with the assumption of a generic RBE = 1.1. Calculations have been performed for ranges of LET values and fractionation sensitivities to describe clinically relevant cases, such as the treatment of head and neck and prostate tumors. Isoeffect calculations were compared with predictions from a generic RBE value and reported clinical results. Results: The generic RBE = 1.1 appears to be a reasonable estimate for the proton RBE of rapidly growing tissues irradiated with low LET radiation. However, the use of a variable RBE predicts larger differences for tissues with low {alpha}/{beta} (both tumor and normal) and at low doses per fraction. In some situations these differences may appear in contrast to the findings from photon studies highlighting the importance of accurate accounting for the radiobiological effectiveness of protons. Furthermore, the use of variable RBE leads to closer predictions to clinical results. Conclusions: The LET dependence of the RBE has a strong impact on the predicted effectiveness of fractionated proton radiotherapy. The magnitude of the effect is modulated by the fractionation sensitivity and the fractional dose indicating the need for accurate analyses both in the target and around it. Care should therefore be employed for changing clinical fractionation patterns or when analyzing results from clinical studies for this type of radiation.

Dasu, Alexandru; Toma-Dasu, Iuliana [Department of Radiation Physics UHL, County Council of Oestergoetland, 581 85 Linkoeping (Sweden) and Radiation Physics, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linkoeping University, 581 83 Linkoeping (Sweden); Medical Radiation Physics, Stockholm University and Karolinska Institute, 171 76 Stockholm (Sweden)

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

258

Diversity and Inclusion Events Calendar | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Diversity and Inclusion Events Calendar Diversity and Inclusion Events Calendar Diversity and Inclusion Events Calendar Training, networking, and career-building conferences like the ones below are valuable ways to engage in diversity issues. Learn about upcoming events on the calendar below, and contact us at diversity@hq.doe.gov to let us know about other upcoming events. To learn more about the Department's diversity initiatives, visit this page. June 2013 Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat 26 27 28 29 30 31 1 LGBT Pride Month 3:30PM to 5:30PM EDT » National Caribbean American Heritage Month 3:30PM to 5:00PM EDT » Black Music Month 3:30PM to 5:30PM EDT » 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 « LGBT Pride Month 3:30PM to 5:30PM EDT » « National Caribbean American Heritage Month 3:30PM to 5:00PM EDT » « Black Music Month 3:30PM to 5:30PM EDT

259

Diversity and Inclusion Events Calendar | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Diversity and Inclusion Events Calendar Diversity and Inclusion Events Calendar Diversity and Inclusion Events Calendar Training, networking, and career-building conferences like the ones below are valuable ways to engage in diversity issues. Learn about upcoming events on the calendar below, and contact us at diversity@hq.doe.gov to let us know about other upcoming events. To learn more about the Department's diversity initiatives, visit this page. December 2013 Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Universal Human Rights Month 4:15PM to 3:15PM EST » 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 « Universal Human Rights Month 4:15PM to 3:15PM EST » Human Rights Day 4:15PM EST 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 « Universal Human Rights Month 4:15PM to 3:15PM EST » 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 « Universal Human Rights Month 4:15PM to 3:15PM EST

260

Diversity and Inclusion Events Calendar | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Diversity and Inclusion Events Calendar Diversity and Inclusion Events Calendar Diversity and Inclusion Events Calendar Training, networking, and career-building conferences like the ones below are valuable ways to engage in diversity issues. Learn about upcoming events on the calendar below, and contact us at diversity@hq.doe.gov to let us know about other upcoming events. To learn more about the Department's diversity initiatives, visit this page. August 2013 Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 « American Veterans 69th Annual National Convention 3:30PM to 4:30PM EDT » 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 « American Veterans 69th Annual National Convention 3:30PM to 4:30PM EDT 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 International Youth Day 3:30PM EDT 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 Women's Equality Day 3:30PM EDT International Association of Latino Public Administration Executives Executive Leadership Forum 3:30PM to 4:45PM EDT

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inclusive branching fractions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Diversity and Inclusion Events Calendar | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Diversity and Inclusion Events Calendar Diversity and Inclusion Events Calendar Diversity and Inclusion Events Calendar Training, networking, and career-building conferences like the ones below are valuable ways to engage in diversity issues. Learn about upcoming events on the calendar below, and contact us at diversity@hq.doe.gov to let us know about other upcoming events. To learn more about the Department's diversity initiatives, visit this page. December 2012 Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat 25 26 27 28 29 30 1 « Mickey Leland Energy Fellowship 11:45AM to 6:45PM EST » 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 « Mickey Leland Energy Fellowship 11:45AM to 6:45PM EST » 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 « Mickey Leland Energy Fellowship 11:45AM to 6:45PM EST » 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 « Mickey Leland Energy Fellowship 11:45AM to 6:45PM EST » 23 24

262

Generic Wave-Function Description of Fractional Quantum Anomalous Hall States and Fractional Topological Insulators  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We propose a systematical approach to construct generic fractional quantum anomalous Hall states, which are generalizations of the fractional quantum Hall states to lattice models with zero net magnetic field and full lattice translation symmetry. Local and translationally invariant Hamiltonians can also be constructed, for which the proposed states are unique ground states. Our result demonstrates that generic chiral topologically ordered states can be realized in lattice models, without requiring magnetic translation symmetry and Landau level structure. We further generalize our approach to fractional topological insulators, and provide the first explicit wave-function description of fractional topological insulators in the absence of spin conservation.

Xiao-Liang Qi

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

263

Condensation in Totally Asymmetric Inclusion Process Joint work with Paul Chleboun and Stefan Grosskinsky  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Condensation in Totally Asymmetric Inclusion Process Jiarui Cao Joint work with Paul Chleboun and Stefan Grosskinsky January 10, 2013 Jiarui Cao Condensation in Totally Asymmetric Inclusion Process #12;Outline 1. Totally Asymmetric Inclusion Process (TASIP) 2. Condensation in TASIP Model 3. Dynamics

Sengun, Mehmet Haluk

264

On sampling fractions and electron shower shapes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study the usage of various definitions of sampling fractions in understanding electron shower shapes in a sampling multilayer electromagnetic calorimeter. We show that the sampling fractions obtained by the conventional definition (I) of (average observed energy in layer)/(average deposited energy in layer) will not give the best energy resolution for the calorimeter. The reason for this is shown to be the presence of layer by layer correlations in an electromagnetic shower. The best resolution is obtained by minimizing the deviation from the total input energy using a least squares algorithm. The 'sampling fractions' obtained by this method (II) are shown to give the best resolution for overall energy. We further show that the method (II) sampling fractions are obtained by summing the columns of a non-local {lambda} tensor that incorporates the correlations. We establish that the sampling fractions (II) cannot be used to predict the layer by layer energies and that one needs to employ the full {lambda} tensor for this purpose. This effect is again a result of the correlations.

Peryshkin, Alexander; Raja, Rajendran; /Fermilab

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Copper isotope fractionation in acid mine drainage. | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Copper isotope fractionation in acid mine drainage. Copper isotope fractionation in acid mine drainage. Abstract: We surveyed the Cu isotopic composition of primary minerals and...

266

Mr. John Kinneman, Chief Nuclear Materfals Branch Nuclear Regulatory Commission  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

111989 111989 Mr. John Kinneman, Chief Nuclear Materfals Branch Nuclear Regulatory Commission Region I 475 Allendale Road King of Prussia. Pennsylvania 19406 Dear Mr. Kinneman: -;' .-. 'W Enclosed are the copfes of the final ORNL survey reports on the radiologlcal Surveys conducted on three Teterboro, New Jersey properties; Metpath Incorporated, Allied Aerospace Corporatio; and Sumftomo Machinery Corporation. Copies of these reports have &en sent directly to the owners by our survey contractor Oak Ridge National Laboratory. If you have any questions regardfng these reports. please call me at (301) 353-5439. Sfncerely, Enclosure : < I j i Andrew Wallo III, Designation and Certffication Manager Dfvisfon 01 Facility and Site Oeconanlssionfng Projects

267

High-energy nuclear collisions in the geometrical branching model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The geometrical branching model, which has been successful in describing multiparticle production in hadron-hadron and hadron-nucleus collisions, is extended to the case of nucleus-nucleus collisions at high energy. We discuss the issue related to the collision between broken nucleons. The calculated result is in good agreement with the data. We show that the multiplicity and transverse-energy distributions of the produced particles are insensitive to the detail properties of hadronization. Measurable quantities that could reveal relevant information on them are suggested.

Rudolph C. Hwa and Xin-Nian Wang

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Spontaneous-fission branching in the decay of 104259  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The nuclide 104259 has been produced in the Cf249(C13,3n) reaction. Alpha particle groups of 8.77±0.01 MeV and 8.87±0.01 MeV were attributed to the decay of 104159, and the measured half-life was found to be 3.0±1.3 s. The branching ratio for spontaneous fission decay was determined to be 0.063±0.037.RADIOACTIVITY, FISSION 104259(sf and ?), measured T12, E?, I?, Isf, ? for Cf249(C13,3n) and Cf249(C13,?2n) reactions; deduced sf? for 104259; enriched target.

C. E. Bemis; Jr.; P. F. Dittner; R. L. Ferguson; D. C. Hensley; F. Plasil; F. Pleasonton

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Carbon isotope fractionation in protoplanetary disks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the gas-phase and grain-surface chemistry in the inner 30 AU of a typical protoplanetary disk using a new model which calculates the gas temperature by solving the gas heating and cooling balance and which has an improved treatment of the UV radiation field. We discuss inner-disk chemistry in general, obtaining excellent agreement with recent observations which have probed the material in the inner regions of protoplanetary disks. We also apply our model to study the isotopic fractionation of carbon. Results show that the fractionation ratio, 12C/13C, of the system varies with radius and height in the disk. Different behaviour is seen in the fractionation of different species. We compare our results with 12C/13C ratios in the Solar System comets, and find a stark contrast, indicative of reprocessing.

Paul M. Woods; Karen Willacy

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

The Fractional Kinetic Equation and Thermonuclear Functions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The paper discusses the solution of a simple kinetic equation of the type used for the computation of the change of the chemical composition in stars like the Sun. Starting from the standard form of the kinetic equation it is generalized to a fractional kinetic equation and its solutions in terms of H-functions are obtained. The role of thermonuclear functions, which are also represented in terms of G- and H-functions, in such a fractional kinetic equation is emphasized. Results contained in this paper are related to recent investigations of possible astrophysical solutions of the solar neutrino problem.

H. J. Haubold; A. M. Mathai

2000-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

271

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Salton Sea Geothermal Area (1990) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

90) 90) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Salton Sea Geothermal Area (1990) Exploration Activity Details Location Salton Sea Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Fluid Inclusion Analysis Activity Date 1990 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes A system for analysis of inclusion gas contents based upon quadrupole mass spectrometry has been designed, assembled and tested during the first 7 months of funding. The system is currently being tested and calibrated using inclusions with known gas contents from active geothermal systems. References Mckibben, M. A. (25 April 1990) Volatiles in hydrothermal fluids- A mass spectrometric study of fluid inclusions from active geothermal systems

272

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (2004-2005) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (2004-2005) Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (2004-2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (2004-2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Fluid Inclusion Analysis Activity Date 2004 - 2005 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine if fluid inclusion stratigraphy is applicable to geothermal Notes Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy (FIS) is a new technique developed for the oil industry in order to map borehole fluids.Fluid inclusion gas geochemistry is analyzed and plotted on well log diagrams. The working hypothesis is that select gaseous species and species ratios indicate areas of groundwater and reservoir fluid flow and reservoir seals. Analyses from

273

The Effect of Sedimentation on Plutonium Transport in Fourmile Branch  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The major mechanisms of radioactive material transport and fate in surface water are sources, dilution, advection and dispersion of radionuclides by flow and surface waves, radionuclide decay, and interaction between sediment and radionuclides. STREAM II, an aqueous transport module of the Savannah River Site emergency response WIND system, accounts for the source term, and the effects of dilution, advection and dispersion. Although the model has the capability to account for nuclear decay, due to the short time interval of interest for emergency response, the effect of nuclear decay is very small and so it is not employed. The interactions between the sediment and radionuclides are controlled by the flow conditions and physical and chemical characteristics of the radionuclides and the sediment constituents. The STREAM II version used in emergency response must provide results relatively quickly; it therefore does not model the effects of sediment deposition/resuspension. This study estimates the effects of sediment deposition/resuspension on aqueous plutonium transport in Fourmile Branch. There are no measured data on plutonium transport through surface water available for direct model calibration. Therefore, a literature search was conducted to find the range of plutonium partition coefficients based on laboratory experiments and field measurements. A sensitivity study of the calculated plutonium peak concentrations as a function of the input parameter of partition coefficient was then performed. Finally, an estimation of the plutonium partition coefficient was made for the Fourmile Branch.

Chen, K.F.

2002-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

274

Fractionalized exergy for evaluating research performance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The approach based on “thermodynamic” considerations that can quantify research performance using an exergy term defined as X = iC, where i is the impact and C is the number of citations is now extended to cases where fractionalized counting ... Keywords: author productivity, citation analysis, impact factor, scientometrics

Gangan Prathap

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Fractional Quantum Hall Effect and Nonabelian Statistics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Articles Fractional Quantum Hall Effect and Nonabelian Statistics N...rc=1/8-1/8=0; this effect would be due to the Pfaffian...Sloan Foundation Fellow- ship and by NSF PYI DMR-9157484...ed.), The Quantum Hall Effect, 2nd edition (Springer, New......

N. Read; G. Moore

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Fractional Quantization of the Hall Effect  

DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

The Fractional Quantum Hall Effect is caused by the condensation of a two-dimensional electron gas in a strong magnetic field into a new type of macroscopic ground state, the elementary excitations of which are fermions of charge 1/m, where m is an odd integer. A mathematical description is presented.

Laughlin, R. B.

1984-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

277

NASA Policy Statement on Diversity and Inclusion Diversity and inclusion are integral to mission success at NASA. First and foremost, our  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NASA Policy Statement on Diversity and Inclusion Diversity and inclusion are integral to mission success at NASA. First and foremost, our commitment to these principles helps us to enSllfC fairness. the lifeblood of NASA's work. In tum, individuals can reach their potential and maximize their comributions

Christian, Eric

278

Single-spin asymmetries in semi-inclusive pion production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

For the first time single-spin asymmetries in semi-inclusive pion production are measured by the HERMES experiment with a transversely polarised hydrogen target. Two different sine-modulations are extracted which can be related to the transversity \\delta q(x) and Sivers f_{1T}^{\\perp q}(x) quark distribution functions. The extracted sine-moments still contain small sub-leading twist contributions which can be extracted from HERMES data combining the results from the transversely polarised hydrogen target with previously measured results from a longitudinally polarised hydrogen target.

U. Elschenbroich; for the HERMES Collaboration

2005-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

279

Simultaneous QCD analysis of diffractive and inclusive DIS data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a novel analysis of diffractive DIS data, in which the input parton distributions of the Pomeron are parameterised using perturbative QCD expressions. In addition to the usual two-gluon model for the perturbative Pomeron, we allow for the possibility that it may be made from two sea quarks. In particular, we treat individually the components of the Pomeron of different size. This property allows the absorptive corrections to the inclusive DIS structure function F_2 to be calculated using the AGK cutting rules. The absorptive effects are found to enhance the size of the gluon distribution of the proton at small x.

Watt, G; Ryskin, M G

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Simultaneous QCD analysis of diffractive and inclusive DIS data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a novel analysis of diffractive DIS data, in which the input parton distributions of the Pomeron are parameterised using perturbative QCD expressions. In addition to the usual two-gluon model for the perturbative Pomeron, we allow for the possibility that it may be made from two sea quarks. In particular, we treat individually the components of the Pomeron of different size. This property allows the absorptive corrections to the inclusive DIS structure function F_2 to be calculated using the AGK cutting rules. The absorptive effects are found to enhance the size of the gluon distribution of the proton at small x.

G. Watt; A. D. Martin; M. G. Ryskin

2004-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inclusive branching fractions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Isolation of Halobacterium salinarum retrieved directly from halite brine inclusions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Halite crystals were selected from a 186m subsurface core taken from the Badwater salt pan, Death Valley, California to ascertain if halophilic Archaea and their associated 16S rDNA can survive over several tens of thousands of years. Using a combined microscope microdrill/micropipette system, fluids from brine inclusions were aseptically extracted from primary, hopper texture, halite crystals from 8 and 85 metres below the surface (mbls). U-Th disequilibrium dating indicates that these halite layers were deposited at 9600 and 97000 years before present (ybp) respectively.

Mormile, Melanie R.; Biesen, Michelle A.; Gutierrez, M. Carmen; Ventosa, Antonio; Pavlovich, Justin B.; Onstott, T C.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Inclusive-jet photoproduction at HERA and determination of alphas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Inclusive-jet cross sections have been measured in the reaction ep->e+jet+X for photon virtuality Q2 energies in the region 142 energy, ETjet, and pseudorapidity, etajet, for jets with ETjet > 17 GeV and -1 energy-scale dependence of the coupling was determined. The value of alphas(Mz) extracted from the measurements based on the kT jet algorithm is alphas(Mz) = 0.1206 +0.0023 -0.0022 (exp.) +0.0042 -0.0035 (th.); the results from the anti-kT and SIScone algorithms are compatible with this value and have a similar precision.

ZEUS Collaboration; H. Abramowicz; I. Abt; L. Adamczyk; M. Adamus; R. Aggarwal; S. Antonelli; P. Antonioli; A. Antonov; M. Arneodo; V. Aushev; Y. Aushev; O. Bachynska; A. Bamberger; A. N. Barakbaev; G. Barbagli; G. Bari; F. Barreiro; N. Bartosik; D. Bartsch; M. Basile; O. Behnke; J. Behr; U. Behrens; L. Bellagamba; A. Bertolin; S. Bhadra; M. Bindi; C. Blohm; V. Bokhonov; T. Bold; K. Bondarenko; E. G. Boos; K. Borras; D. Boscherini; D. Bot; I. Brock; E. Brownson; R. Brugnera; N. Brummer; A. Bruni; G. Bruni; B. Brzozowska; P. J. Bussey; B. Bylsma; A. Caldwell; M. Capua; R. Carlin; C. D. Catterall; S. Chekanov; J. Chwastowski; J. Ciborowski; R. Ciesielski; L. Cifarelli; F. Cindolo; A. Contin; A. M. Cooper-Sarkar; N. Coppola; M. Corradi; F. Corriveau; M. Costa; G. D'Agostini; F. Dal Corso; J. del Peso; R. K. Dementiev; S. De Pasquale; M. Derrick; R. C. E. Devenish; D. Dobur; B. A. Dolgoshein; G. Dolinska; A. T. Doyle; V. Drugakov; L. S. Durkin; S. Dusini; Y. Eisenberg; P. F. Ermolov; A. Eskreys; S. Fang; S. Fazio; J. Ferrando; M. I. Ferrero; J. Figiel; M. Forrest; B. Foster; G. Gach; A. Galas; E. Gallo; A. Garfagnini; A. Geiser; I. Gialas; A. Gizhko; L. K. Gladilin; D. Gladkov; C. Glasman; O. Gogota; Yu. A. Golubkov; P. Gottlicher; I. Grabowska-Bold; J. Grebenyuk; I. Gregor; G. Grigorescu; G. Grzelak; O. Gueta; M. Guzik; C. Gwenlan; T. Haas; W. Hain; R. Hamatsu; J. C. Hart; H. Hartmann; G. Hartner; E. Hilger; D. Hochman; R. Hori; K. Horton; A. Huttmann; Z. A. Ibrahim; Y. Iga; R. Ingbir; M. Ishitsuka; H. -P. Jakob; F. Januschek; T. W. Jones; M. Jungst; I. Kadenko; B. Kahle; S. Kananov; T. Kanno; U. Karshon; F. Karstens; I. I. Katkov; M. Kaur; P. Kaur; A. Keramidas; L. A. Khein; J. Y. Kim; D. Kisielewska; S. Kitamura; R. Klanner; U. Klein; E. Koffeman; N. Kondrashova; O. Kononeko; P. Kooijman; Ie. Korol; I. A. Korzhavina; A. Kotanski; U. Kotz; H. Kowalski; O. Kuprash; M. Kuze; A. Lee; B. B. Levchenko; A. Levy; V. Libov; S. Limentani; T. Y. Ling; M. Lisovyi; E. Lobodzinska; W. Lohmann; B. Lohr; E. Lohrmann; K. R. Long; A. Longhin; D. Lontkovskyi; O. Yu. Lukina; J. Maeda; S. Magill; I. Makarenko; J. Malka; R. Mankel; A. Margotti; G. Marini; J. F. Martin; A. Mastroberardino; M. C. K. Mattingly; I. -A. Melzer-Pellmann; S. Mergelmeyer; S. Miglioranzi; F. Mohamad Idris; V. Monaco; A. Montanari; J. D. Morris; K. Mujkic; B. Musgrave; K. Nagano; T. Namsoo; R. Nania; A. Nigro; Y. Ning; T. Nobe; U. Noor; D. Notz; R. J. Nowak; A. E. Nuncio-Quiroz; B. Y. Oh; N. Okazaki; K. Oliver; K. Olkiewicz; Yu. Onishchuk; K. Papageorgiu; A. Parenti; E. Paul; J. M. Pawlak; B. Pawlik; P. G. Pelfer; A. Pellegrino; W. Perlanski; H. Perrey; K. Piotrzkowski; P. Plucinski; N. S. Pokrovskiy; A. Polini; A. S. Proskuryakov; M. Przybycien; A. Raval; D. D. Reeder; B. Reisert; Z. Ren; J. Repond; Y. D. Ri; A. Robertson; P. Roloff; I. Rubinsky; M. Ruspa; R. Sacchi; U. Samson; G. Sartorelli; A. A. Savin; D. H. Saxon; M. Schioppa; S. Schlenstedt; P. Schleper; W. B. Schmidke; U. Schneekloth; V. Schonberg; T. Schorner-Sadenius; J. Schwartz; F. Sciulli; L. M. Shcheglova; R. Shehzadi; S. Shimizu; I. Singh; I. O. Skillicorn; W. Slominski; W. H. Smith; V. Sola; A. Solano; D. Son; V. Sosnovtsev; A. Spiridonov; H. Stadie; L. Stanco; N. Stefaniuk; A. Stern; T. P. Stewart; A. Stifutkin; P. Stopa; S. Suchkov; G. Susinno; L. Suszycki; J. Sztuk-Dambietz; D. Szuba; J. Szuba; A. D. Tapper; E. Tassi; J. Terron; T. Theedt; H. Tiecke; K. Tokushuku; J. Tomaszewska; V. Trusov; T. Tsurugai; M. Turcato; O. Turkot; T. Tymieniecka; M. Vazquez; A. Verbytskyi; O. Viazlo; N. N. Vlasov; R. Walczak; W. A. T. Wan Abdullah; J. J. Whitmore; L. Wiggers; M. Wing; M. Wlasenko; G. Wolf; H. Wolfe; K. Wrona; A. G. Yagues-Molina; S. Yamada; Y. Yamazaki; R. Yoshida; C. Youngman; O. Zabiegalov; A. F. Zarnecki; L. Zawiejski; O. Zenaiev; W. Zeuner; B. O. Zhautykov; N. Zhmak; C. Zhou; A. Zichichi; Z. Zolkapli; D. S. Zotkin

2012-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

283

Combined Delta-Nabla Sum Operator in Discrete Fractional Calculus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We introduce a more general discrete fractional operator, given by convex linear combination of the delta and nabla fractional sums. Fundamental properties of the new fractional operator are proved. As particular cases, results on delta and nabla discrete fractional calculus are obtained.

Bastos, Nuno R O

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Progress report for the enhancement of Radcalc: Isotope database, gamma absorption fractions, and G(H{sub 2}) values  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radcalc is a spreadsheet currently used to calculate the generation of hydrogen gas in low-level radioactive waste containers for purposes of transportation and packaging. Radcalc is being enlarged and expanded. It will be offered as a Windows compatible software and will include some of the following enhancements: extended radionuclide library, updated gamma absorption fractions for an increased number of packages, inclusion of a G(H{sub 2}) value data base, updated transportation information, thermal and pressure calculation update, testing and benchmarking. This report discusses the progress made on the new Radcalc program. It presents the new radionuclide library, the results of the gamma absorption fractions for the increased number of packages, and an extensive review of G(H{sub 2}) values.

Green, J.R.

1994-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

285

Mineralogy and petrography of HAL, an isotopicallyunusual Allende inclusion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fractionation effects and small nuclear effects in its Ca isotopic composition, but no 26Mg excesses in samples conclude that each of the layers of the friable rim formed by the accretion of an assemblage of condensate grains rather than by complete reaction of a precursor to HAL with a nebular gas. Thus, the unusual

Grossman, Lawrence

286

Surface tension and the mechanics of liquid inclusions in compliant solids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Eshelby's theory of inclusions has wide-reaching implications across the mechanics of materials and structures including the theories of composites, fracture, and plasticity. However, it does not include the effects of surface stress, which has recently been shown to control many processes in soft materials such as gels, elastomers and biological tissue. To extend Eshelby's theory of inclusions to soft materials, we consider liquid inclusions within an isotropic, compressible, linear-elastic solid. We solve for the displacement and stress fields around individual stretched inclusions, accounting for the bulk elasticity of the solid and the surface tension (\\textit{i.e.} isotropic strain-independent surface stress) of the solid-liquid interface. Surface tension significantly alters the inclusion's shape and stiffness as well as its near- and far-field stress fields. These phenomenon depend strongly on the ratio of inclusion radius, $R$, to an elastocapillary length, $L$. Surface tension is significant whenever inclusions are smaller than $100L$. While Eshelby theory predicts that liquid inclusions generically reduce the stiffness of an elastic solid, our results show that liquid inclusions can actually stiffen a solid when $Rsurface tension cloaks the far-field signature of liquid inclusions when $R=3L/2$. These results are have far-reaching applications from measuring local stresses in biological tissue, to determining the failure strength of soft composites.

Robert W. Style; John S. Wettlaufer; Eric R. Dufresne

2014-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

287

C-O-H ratios of silicate melt inclusions in basalts from the Galapagos spreading center near 95 degree W: A leaser decrepitation mass spectrometry study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volatile ratios (primarily of H{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2}) in individual silicate melt (glass) inclusions in minerals have been analyzed using laser volatilization and mass spectrometry. A Nd-glass laser was used to produce 50-micrometer diameter pits in silicate melt inclusions. Released volatiles were analyzed directly with a computer-controlled quadrupole mass spectrometer. The mean CO{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O from the propagating rift (0.245 {plus minus} 0.068) silicate glass inclusions is significantly lower than that of the actively failing rift (0.641 {plus minus} 0.241); this difference probably reflects different degrees of degassing during contrasting magmatic histories for the two regions. Relatively undifferentiated failing rift magmas must have relatively short crustal residence time prior to eruption and, therefore, have not undergone significant degassing of CO{sub 2}, as would appear to be the case for the more highly fractionated propagating rift magmas. The laser-mass spectrometric system described herein has the ability to act as a point-source probing device that can differentiate between the various volatile sites in minerals and rocks (as well as synthetic materials) on a micrometer scale.

Yonover, R.N.; Sinton, J.M. (Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu (USA)); Gibson, E.K. (NASA/Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX (USA)); Sommer, M.A.

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Mr. Harold Snyder Chief, Discovery and Investigations Branch  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Harold Snyder Harold Snyder Chief, Discovery and Investigations Branch Hazardous Site Control Division Administration for Solid Waste and Emergency Response U. S. Environmental Protection Agency 401 M Street, S. W. Washington, D. C. 70460 Dear Mr. Snyder: The Department of Energy (DDE) has conducted a radiological survey at the Conserv Corporation (The former Virginia-Carolina Chemical Corporation), Nichols, Florida. This survey indicated that levels of residual radioactive material and associated radiation levels at the sfte are in excess c?f those used by DOE to determine if a site requires remedial actfon. The data did not indicate that, under the current use of the site, there was any hazard to the workers or the general public. However, changes fn site use or modifications to the facility could'possibly result

289

Walker Branch Throughfall Displacement Experiment Data Report: Site  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

D: D: LISTING OF THROUGHFALL DISPLACEMENT EXPERIMENT PUBLICATIONS A. INTRODUCTORY PAPERS AND SUMMARIES Hanson, P. J., D. E. Todd, D. W. Johnson, J. D. Joslin, and E. G. O'Neill (in press). Responses of eastern deciduous forests to precipitation change. In J. F. Weltzin and G. R. McPherson (eds.), Precipitation and Terrestrial Ecosystems, John Hopkins University Press, Baltimore. Hanson, P. J. 2000. Large-scale water manipulations. pp. 341-352. In O. E. Sala, R. B. Jackson, H. A. Mooney, and R. W. Howarth (eds.), Methods in Ecosystem Science , Springer- Verlag, New York. Hanson, P. J., D. E. Todd, N. T. Edwards, and M. A. Huston. 1995. Field performance of the Walker Branch Throughfall Displacement Experiment. pp. 307-313. In A. Jenkins, R. C. Ferrier, and C. Kirby (eds.), Ecosystem

290

Mr. Harold Snyder Chief, Discovery and Investigations Branch  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

. 20545 . 20545 FEB 2 7 1985 Mr. Harold Snyder Chief, Discovery and Investigations Branch Hazardous Site Control Division Administration for Solid Waste and Emergency Response U. S. Environmental Protection Agency 401 M Street, S. W. Washington, D. C. 20460 Dear Mr. Snyder: The Department of Olin Corporation, Joliet, Illinois. Energy (DOE) has conducted a radiological survey at the Chemicals Group (The former Blockson Chemical Company), This survey indicated that levels of residual radioactive material and associated radiation levels at the site are in excess of those used by DOE to determine if a site requires remedial action. The data did not indicate that, under the current use of the site, there was any hazard to the workers or the general public. However,

291

Mr. Harold Snyder, Chief Discovery and Investigation Branch  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Ofll s' Ofll s' :y 1: ,' :*,; / c- tii; 1 ;q' (/. 4 L Department of Energy Washington, D .C. 20545 Mr. Harold Snyder, Chief Discovery and Investigation Branch Hazardous Site Control Division Administration for Solid Waste and Emergency Response U.S. Environmental Protection Agency 401 M Street Washington, D.C. 20460 Dear Mr. Snyder: The Department of Energy (DOE) radiological survey at the former Horizons, Inc. facility at 2909 East 79th Street in Cleveland, Ohio, performed in 1977, indicated that levels of residual radioactive materials and associated radiation levels were in excess of those used by DOE to determine if a site requires remedial action. The radioactive contamination and elevated radiation levels on the site were found, for the most part, in storage areas, in drains, and under floors. These data did

292

BRIDGE: Branching Ratio Inquiry/Decay Generated Events  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the manual for the program BRIDGE: Branching Ratio Inquiry/Decay Generated Events. The program is designed to operate with arbitrary models defined within matrix element generators, so that one can simulate events with small final-state multiplicities, decay them with BRIDGE, and then pass them to showering and hadronization programs. BRI can automatically calculate widths of two and three body decays. DGE can decay unstable particles in any Les Houches formatted event file. DGE is useful for the generation of event files with long decay chains, replacing large matrix elements by small matrix elements followed by sequences of decays. BRIDGE is currently designed to work with the MadGraph/MadEvent programs for implementing and simulating new physics models. In particular, it can operate with the MadGraph implementation of the MSSM. In this manual we describe how to use BRIDGE, and present a number of sample results to demonstrate its accuracy.

Patrick Meade; Matthew Reece

2007-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

293

Q-branch Raman scattering and modern kinetic thoery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The program is an extension of previous APL work whose general aim was to calculate line shapes of nearly resonant isolated line transitions with solutions of a popular quantum kinetic equation-the Waldmann-Snider equation-using well known advanced solution techniques developed for the classical Boltzmann equation. The advanced techniques explored have been a BGK type approximation, which is termed the Generalized Hess Method (GHM), and conversion of the collision operator to a block diagonal matrix of symmetric collision kernels which then can be approximated by discrete ordinate methods. The latter method, which is termed the Collision Kernel method (CC), is capable of the highest accuracy and has been used quite successfully for Q-branch Raman scattering. The GHM method, not quite as accurate, is applicable over a wider range of pressures and has proven quite useful.

Monchick, L. [The Johns Hopkins Univ., Laurel, MD (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

E-Print Network 3.0 - avalanches branching ratios Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

20 J.Stat.Mech.(2010)P02015 ournal of Statistical Mechanics Summary: ) and subcritical dynamics: individual avalanches are either subcritical (average branching ratio...

295

Using the primal-dual interior point algorithm within the branch-price ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nov 5, 2012 ... Abstract: Branch-price-and-cut has proven to be a powerful method for solving integer programming problems. It combines decomposition ...

Pedro Munari

2012-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

296

Optimization Online - A branch-cut-and-price algorithm for the ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aug 11, 2014 ... A branch-cut-and-price algorithm for the energy minimization vehicle routing problem. Ricardo Fukasawa (rfukasaw ***at*** math.uwaterloo.ca)

Ricardo Fukasawa

2014-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

297

A branch-and-price algorithm for multi-mode resource leveling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mar 1, 2010 ... We present a branch-and-price approach together with a new heuristic to solve the more general turnaround scheduling problem. Besides ...

Eamonn T. Coughlan

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

E-Print Network 3.0 - aureobasidium-derived soluble branched...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5 Simulation of the effects of chain architecture on the sorption of ethylene in polyethylene Summary: investigated the effect of polyethylene chain length and branching on...

299

E-Print Network 3.0 - applied sciences branch Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

a variable number of cells. The territory and density of axonal... branching are the first determinants of the pattern and strength of neuronal connectivity. A characteristic...

300

E-Print Network 3.0 - africa regional branch Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: africa regional branch Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 REGIONAL SPECIALIZATION COURSES MAY NOT...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inclusive branching fractions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Clean Fractionation: Technology Available for Licensing  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Clean Fractionation Clean Fractionation National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Offi ce of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. NREL/FS-7A1-43959 * October 2008 Printed with a renewable-source ink on paper containing at least 50% wastepaper, including 10% postconsumer waste. You'll find more technologies available for licensing on the NREL Technology Transfer Web site at www.nrel.gov/technologytransfer/. National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future Biorefinery production costs are driven Insolubles Wash Cellulose pulp Lignocellulosic feedstock Solubles

302

Fluid catalytic cracking of heavy petroleum fractions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A process is claimed for fluid catalytic cracking of residuum and other heavy oils comprising of gas oil, petroleum residue, reduced and whole crudes and shale oil to produce gasoline and other liquid products which are separated in various streams in a fractionator and associated vapor recovery equipment. The heat from combustion of coke on the coked catalyst is removed by reacting sulfur-containing coke deposits with steam and oxygen in a separate stripper-gasifier to produce a low btu gas stream comprising of sulfur compounds, methane, carbon monoxide, hydrogen, and carbon dioxide at a temperature of from about 1100/sup 0/F. To about 2200/sup 0/F. The partially regenerated catalyst then undergoes complete carbon removal in a regeneration vessel. The regenerated catalyst is recycled for re-use in the cracking of heavy petroleum fractions. The liquid products are gasoline, distillates, heavy fuel oil, and light hydrocarbons.

McHenry, K.W.

1981-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

303

Fractionation of five technical lignins by selective extraction in green solvents and characterisation of isolated fractions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Lignins from softwood, hardwood, grass and wheat straw were fractionated by selective extraction at ambient temperature using green solvents like acetone/water solutions of 10, 30, 50, 70 and 90% (v/v) acetone and ethyl acetate. A comparison between the isolated fractions and unfractionated lignins was made in terms of extraction yield, lignin solubility factor, molecular weight distribution and functional group composition. Low molecular weight (LMW) lignin fractions with narrow dispersity are obtained by extraction with ethyl acetate and acetone–water solution containing 30% acetone, with yields depending on the type and the functional group content of lignins. A significant amount (56%) of the organosolv hardwood lignin with low molecular weight (Mw = 1868 g/mol) and low dispersity was isolated from ethyl acetate. Insoluble fractions with very high molecular weight (Mw between 10 and 17 kg/mol) are obtained in low yield from acetone–water solutions with 50, 70 and 90% acetone. LMW lignins are in general less condensed and have lower aliphatic hydroxyl content than parent lignins while the HMW fractions have a higher content of condensed hydroxyls. Principal component analysis on the chemical composition of lignins and isolated fractions determined from 31P NMR data showed the high heterogeneity of the technical lignins. Partial least squares models based on FT-IR spectral data were developed to predict the functional group content determined by quantitative 31P NMR analysis of technical lignins and lignin fractions. This approach can be used to develop simple, rapid and accurate analytical tools to monitor and control the selective fractionation of lignin.

Carmen G. Boeriu; Firu?a I. Fi?ig?u; Richard J.A. Gosselink; August E. Frissen; Jan Stoutjesdijk; Francisc Peter

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Fractional Quantum Hall States in Graphene  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We quantum mechanically analyze the fractional quantum Hall effect in graphene. This will be done by building the corresponding states in terms of a potential governing the interactions and discussing other issues. More precisely, we consider a system of particles in the presence of an external magnetic field and take into account of a specific interaction that captures the basic features of the Laughlin series \

Ahmed Jellal; Bellati Malika

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

305

Pyrolysis of shale oil residual fractions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The freezing point of JP-5, the Navy jet fuel, has been related to the n-alkane content, specifically n-hexadecane. In general, jet fuels from shale oil have the highest n-alkanes. The formation of n-alkanes in the jet fuel distillation range can be explained if large n-alkanes are present in the crude oil source. Quantities of large n-alkanes are insufficient, however, to explain the amounts found - up to 37% n-alkanes in the jet fuel range. Other possible precursors to small straight chain molecules are substituted cyclic compounds. Attack in the side chain obviously afford a path to an n-alkane. Aromatic hydrocarbons, esters, acids, amines, and ethers also have the potential to form n-alkanes if an unbranched alkyl chain is present in the molecule. Investigations showed that the best yield of the JP-5 cut comes at different times for the various fractions, but a time in the 60 to 120 min range would appear to be the optimum time for good yield at 450/sup 0/C. The longer time would be preferred with respect to lower potential n-alkane yield. None of the fractions gave n-alkane yields approaching the 37% amount found in the Shale-I JP-5. A temperature different than the 450/sup 0/C used here might affect the conversion percentage. Further the combined saturate, aromatic, and polar fractions may interact under pyrolysis conditions to give higher potential n-alkane yields than the fractions stressed independently.

Hazlett, R.N.; Beal, E.; Vetter, T.; Sonntag, R.; Moniz, W.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Fluid-inclusion evidence for past temperature fluctuations in the Kilauea  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fluid-inclusion evidence for past temperature fluctuations in the Kilauea Fluid-inclusion evidence for past temperature fluctuations in the Kilauea East Rift Zone geothermal area, Hawaii Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Fluid-inclusion evidence for past temperature fluctuations in the Kilauea East Rift Zone geothermal area, Hawaii Abstract Heating and freezing data were obtained for fluid inclusions in hydrothermal quartz, calcite, and anhydrite from several depths in three scientific observation holes drilled along the lower East Rift Zone of Kilauea volcano, Hawaii. Compositions of the inclusion fluids range from dilute meteoric water to highly modified sea water concentrated by boiling. Comparison of measured drill-hole temperatures with fluid-inclusion homogenization-temperature (Th) data indicates that only about 15% of the

307

Numerical simulation of the stochastic dynamics of inclusions in biomembranes in presence of surface tension  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The stochastic dynamics of inclusions in a randomly fluctuating biomembrane is simulated. These inclusions can represent the embedded proteins and the external particles arriving at a cell membrane. The energetics of the biomembrane is modelled via the Canham-Helfrich Hamiltonian. The contributions of both the bending elastic-curvature energy and the surface tension of the biomembrane are taken into account. The biomembrane is treated as a two-dimensional sheet whose height variations from a reference frame is treated as a stochastic Wiener process. The lateral diffusion parameter associated with this Wiener process coupled with the longitudinal diffusion parameter obtained from the standard Einsteinian diffusion theory completely determine the stochastic motion of the inclusions. It is shown that the presence of surface tension significantly affects the overall dynamics of the inclusions, particularly the rate of capture of the external inclusions, such as drug particles, at the site of the embedded inclusions, such as the embedded proteins.

H. Rafii-Tabar; H. R. Sepangi

2005-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

308

Thermal and electronic charge transport in bulk nanostructured Zr{sub 0.25}Hf{sub 0.75}NiSn composites with full-Heusler inclusions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bulk Zr{sub 0.25}Hf{sub 075}NiSn half-Heusler (HH) nanocomposites containing various mole fractions of full-Heusler (FH) inclusions were prepared by solid state reaction of pre-synthesized HH alloy with elemental Ni at 1073 K. The microstructures of spark plasma sintered specimens of the HH/FH nanocomposites were investigated using transmission electron microscopy and their thermoelectric properties were measured from 300 K to 775 K. The formation of coherent FH inclusions into the HH matrix arises from solid-state Ni diffusion into vacant sites of the HH structure. HH(1-y)/FH(y) composites with mole fraction of FH inclusions below the percolation threshold, y{approx}0.2, show increased electrical conductivity, reduced Seebeck coefficient and increased total thermal conductivity arising from gradual increase in the carrier concentration for composites. A drastic reduction ({approx}55%) in {kappa}{sub l} was observed for the composite with y=0.6 and is attributed to enhanced phonon scattering due to mass fluctuations between FH and HH, and high density of HH/FH interfaces. - Graphical abstract: Large reduction in the lattice thermal conductivity of bulk nanostructured half-Heusler/full-Heusler (Zr{sub 0.25}Hf{sub 075}NiSn/ Zr{sub 0.25}Hf{sub 075}Ni{sub 2}Sn) composites, obtained by solid-state diffusion at 1073 K of elemental Ni into vacant sites of the half-Heusler structure, arising from the formation of regions of spinodally decomposed HH and FH phases with a spatial composition modulation of {approx}2 nm. Highlights: > Bulk composites from solid state transformation of half-Heusler matrix through Ni diffusion. > Formation of coherent phase boundaries between half-Heusler matrix and full-Heusler inclusion. > Alteration of thermal and electronic transports with increasing full-Heusler inclusion. > Enhanced phonon scattering at half-Heusler/ full-Heusler phase boundaries.

Makongo, Julien P.A.; Misra, Dinesh K. [Advanced Materials Research Institute, University of New Orleans, New Orleans, LA 70148 (United States); Salvador, James R. [Chemical Sciences and Materials Systems Laboratory, General Motors R and D Center, Warren, MI 48090 (United States); Takas, Nathan J. [Advanced Materials Research Institute, University of New Orleans, New Orleans, LA 70148 (United States); Wang, Guoyu [Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Shabetai, Michael R.; Pant, Aditya; Paudel, Pravin [Advanced Materials Research Institute, University of New Orleans, New Orleans, LA 70148 (United States); Uher, Ctirad [Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Stokes, Kevin L. [Advanced Materials Research Institute, University of New Orleans, New Orleans, LA 70148 (United States); Department of Physics, University of New Orleans, New Orleans, LA 70148 (United States); Poudeu, Pierre F.P., E-mail: ppoudeup@umich.edu [Advanced Materials Research Institute, University of New Orleans, New Orleans, LA 70148 (United States); Department of Chemistry, University of New Orleans, New Orleans, LA 70148 (United States); Laboratory for Emerging Energy and Electronic Materials, Materials Science and Engineering Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

309

Numerical method for shear bands in ductile metal with inclusions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A numerical method for mesoscale simulation of high strain-rate loading of ductile metal containing inclusions is described. Because of small-scale inhomogeneities, such a composite material is prone to localized shear deformation (adiabatic shear bands). The modeling framework is the Generalized Method of Cells of Paley and Aboudi [Mech. Materials, vol. 14, pp. /27-139, 1992], which ensures that the micromechanical response of the material is reflected in the behavior of the composite at the mesoscale. To calculate the effective plastic strain rate when shear bands are present, the analytic and numerical analysis of shear bands by Glimm, Plohr, and Sharp [Mech. Materials, vol. 24, pp. 31-41, 1996] is adapted and extended.

Plohr, Jee Yeon N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Plohr, Bradley J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Inclusive photoproduction of strange baryons at 20 GeV  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cross sections are presented for the inclusive photoproduction of KS0, ?, ?¯, ?-, ?¯ -, ?0, and ?*±(1385) at 20 GeV. An upper limit to ?- production is also given. The data come from 284 000 hadronic events photoproduced in the SLAC 1-m hydrogen-bubble-chamber hybrid facility exposed to a nearly monochromatic, polarized 20-GeV backscattered photon beam. A comparison of the KS0, ?, ?¯, and ?- rates per inelastic event to ?±p data show that ?p rates are consistent with being higher than the ?±p rates, providing evidence of an ss¯ component of the photon. The pair cross sections for KS0KS0, KS0?, KSo?¯, and ??¯ are presented. The xF distributions of the ?, ?¯, and ?- are compared to a quark-diquark fusion model, giving information on strange-baryon photoproduction mechanisms.

K. Abe et al.

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Phenomenology of -factorization for inclusive Higgs boson production at LHC  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract We investigate the inclusive Higgs boson production in proton–proton collisions at high energies in the framework of k T -factorization QCD approach. The attention is focused on the dominant off-shell gluon–gluon fusion subprocess g ? g ? ? H ? ? ? , where the transverse momentum of incoming gluons are taken into account. The transverse momentum dependent (or unintegrated) gluon densities of the proton are determined using the CCFM evolution equation as well as the Kimber–Martin–Ryskin prescription. We study the theoretical uncertainties of our calculations and perform the comparison with the results of traditional pQCD evaluations. Our predictions agree well with the first experimental data taken by the ATLAS Collaboration at the LHC. We argue that further studies of the Higgs boson production are capable of constraining the unintegrated gluon densities of the proton.

A.V. Lipatov; M.A. Malyshev; N.P. Zotov

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Bounding Heavy Meson Form Factors Using Inclusive Sum Rules  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We utilize inclusive sum rules to construct both upper and lower bounds on the form factors for B to D, D*, rho, pi, omega, K and K* semi-leptonic and radiative decays. We include the leading nonperturbative 1/E corrections and point out cases when alpha_s corrections are equally important. We compute the alpha_s correction to the lower bound on the B to D* form factor f(w) at zero recoil, thereby constraining its normalization f(1) to within 6-8% of the upper bound. We show that the B to rho form factor a_+ is suppressed at small momentum transfer by either a factor of 1/E or alpha_s. These bounds can be used to rule out phenomenological models as well as to determine values for the CKM matrix elements once radiative corrections are included.

C. Glenn Boyd; Ira Z. Rothstein

1996-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

313

The Phenomenology of Inclusive Heavy-to-Light Sum Rules  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

By calculating the O(\\alpha_s) corrections to inclusive heavy-to-light sum rules we find model independent upper and lower bounds on form factors for B to pi and B to rho. We use the bounds to rule out model predictions. Some models violate the bounds only for certain ranges of sum rule input parameters \\bar{lambda} \\simeq m_B-m_b and lambda_1, or for certain choices of model parameters, while others obey or violate the bounds irrespective of the inputs. We discuss the reliability and convergence of the bounds, point out their utility for extracting V_{ub}, and derive from them a new form factor scaling relation.

C. Glenn Boyd; I. Z. Rothstein

1997-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

314

Free markets and social inclusion: Toward a common goal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract As part of a cooperative effort between the Journal of Business Research (JBR) and the Business Association of Latin American Studies (BALAS), this special issue brings updated research on the Latin American business environment. Out of 107 papers submitted to the BALAS 2013 Conference, which was hosted by ESAN Graduate School of Business, in Lima, 25 were pre-selected to be reviewed for publication in this special issue — and only nine were accepted after the demanding process of three rounds of double blind review that was run after the conference. This introduction to the special issue of JBR on BALAS 2013 Conference brings an overview of the changes that have taken place in the Latin America, regarding the relationship between free markets and social inclusion. The articles accepted for publication in this special issue address several aspects of the Latin American business environment.

Jorge Carneiro; Nancy Matos; Bryan Husted

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy: Interpretation of New Wells in the Coso  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Stratigraphy: Interpretation of New Wells in the Coso Stratigraphy: Interpretation of New Wells in the Coso Geothermal Field Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy: Interpretation of New Wells in the Coso Geothermal Field Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: This paper focuses on the interpretation of the additional wells (4 bore holes) and comparison to the previous wells. Preliminary correlation between wells is also presented. Analyses from multiple boreholes show fluid stratigraphy that correlates from well to well. The wells include large producers, small to moderate producers, problem producers, injectors, and non producers Author(s): Dilley, L.M.; Newman, D.L. ; McCulloch, J.; Wiggett, G. Published: Geothermal Resource Council Transactions 2005, 1/1/2005

316

An exploration of the influence of specialized recreation program participation on inclusive recreation involvement .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The purpose of this study was to explore the influence participation in specialized recreation programs may have on inclusive recreation involvement. The research questions were… (more)

Mayer, Whitney E.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Template for project inclusion for Remote Sensing Systems' MSU/AMSU brightness temperatures in the C  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Template for project inclusion for Remote Sensing Systems' MSU/AMSU brightness temperatures- Quality control procedures, including ongoing improvements. Brightness temperatures and geolocation data

318

E-Print Network 3.0 - a923 supporting inclusion Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Abstract... Fundamentally-based computational models are developed to quantify the removal of inclusions by bubbles during Source: Thomas, Brian G. - Department of...

319

Government-Wide Diversity and Inclusion Strategic Plan (2011), Office of Personnel Management  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

 This document, required by Executive Order 13583, provides a shared direction, encourages commitment, and creates alignment so agencies can approach their workplace diversity and inclusion efforts...

320

Delamination characterization of composite plates with holes/inclusions under general in-plane loading  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with an epoxy inclusion Interlaminar normal stress along the interfaces for uniform biaxial loading of a. plate with a graphite/epoxy inclusion Interlaminar shea. r stress r, along the interfaces for uniform biaxial loading of a. plate with a graphite.../epoxy inclusion Interlaminar shear stress r, ?i along the interfaces for uniform biaxial loading of a, plate with a graphite/epoxy inclusion Interlaminar stresses through the thickness at the free edge for uniform biaxial loading of a. plate with a graphite...

Bense, Ronald

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inclusive branching fractions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Chemical Signatures of and Precursors to Fractures Using Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The purpose of this research is to develop a method to identify fracture systems in wells using fluid inclusion gas analysis of drill chips.

322

Finite-size domains in membranes with active two-state inclusions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The distribution of inclusion-rich domains in membranes with active two-state inclusions is studied by simulations. Our study shows that typical size of inclusion-rich domains ($L$) can be controlled by inclusion activities in several ways. When there is effective attraction between state-1 inclusions, we find: (i) Small domains with only several inclusions are observed for inclusions with time scales ($\\sim 10^{-3} {\\rm s}$) and interaction energy [$\\sim \\mathcal{O}({\\rm k_BT})$] comparable to motor proteins. (ii) $L$ scales as 1/3 power of the lifetime of state-1 for a wide range of parameters. (iii) $L$ shows a switch-like dependence on state-2 lifetime $k_{12}^{-1}$. That is, $L$ depends weakly on $k_{12}$ when $k_{12} k_{12}^*$, the crossover $k_{12}^*$ occurs when the diffusion length of a typical state-2 inclusion within its lifetime is comparable to $L$. (iv) Inclusion-curvature coupling provides another length scale that competes with the effects of transition rates.

Chien-Hsun Chen; Hsuan-Yi Chen

2006-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

323

Fractionated Grid Therapy in Treating Cervical Cancers: Conventional Fractionation or Hypofractionation?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate the conventionally fractionated and hypofractionated grid therapy in debulking cervical cancers using the linear quadratic (LQ) model. Methods and Materials: A Monte Carlo technique was used to calculate the dose distribution of a commercially available grid in a 6-MV photon beam. The LQ model was used to evaluate the therapeutic outcome of both the conventionally fractionated (2 Gy/fraction) and hypofractionated (15 Gy/fraction) grid therapy regimens to debulk cervical cancers with different LQ parameters. The equivalent open-field dose (EOD) to the cancer cells and therapeutic ratio (TR) were defined by comparing grid therapy with the open debulking field. The clinical outcomes from 114 patients were used to verify our theoretical model. Results: The cervical cancer and normal tissue cell survival statistics for grid therapy in two regimens were calculated. The EODs and TRs were derived. The EOD was only a fraction of the prescribed dose. The TR was dependent on the prescribed dose and the LQ parameters of both the tumor and normal tissue cells. The grid therapy favors the acutely responding tumors inside radiosensitive normal tissues. Theoretical model predictions were consistent with the clinical outcomes. Conclusions: Grid therapy provided a pronounced therapeutic advantage in both the hypofractionated and conventionally fractionated regimens compared with that seen with single fraction, open debulking field regimens, but the true therapeutic advantage exists only in the hypofractionated grid therapy. The clinical outcomes and our study indicated that a course of open-field radiotherapy is necessary to control tumor growth fully after a grid therapy.

Zhang Hualin [Department of Radiation Medicine, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States)], E-mail: zhang.568@osu.edu; Wang, Jian Z.; Mayr, Nina; Kong Xiang; Yuan Jiankui; Gupta, Nilendu; Lo, Simon; Grecula, John; Montebello, Joseph; Martin, Douglas [Department of Radiation Medicine, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Yuh, William [Department of Radiology, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Maples v. University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston Slip Copy, 2013 WL 1777501 (Table)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NACUA Maples v. University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston Slip Copy, 2013 WL 1777501 (Table OF TEXAS MEDICAL BRANCH AT GALVESTON, Defendant­Appellee. No. 12­41226 Summary Calendar. April 26, 2013 disabilities. The United States District Court for the Southern District of Texas, 901 F.Supp.2d 874, 291 Ed

Polly, David

325

A Logistic Branching Process Alternative to the Wright-Fisher Model R. B. Campbell  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Logistic Branching Process Alternative to the Wright-Fisher Model R. B. Campbell Department, Population Regulation Introduction Most of the theoretical work in population genetics is based on the Wright approximation to the Wright-Fisher model. A logistic branching process is introduced in order to limit

Campbell, Russell Bruce

326

Branch structures at the steps of the devil's staircase of the sine circle map  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have discovered substructures consisting of branches at each step of the devil's staircase of the sine circle map. These substructures are found to follow the hierarchy of the Farey tree. We develop a formalism to relate the rational winding number {ital W}={ital p}/{ital q} to the number of branches in these substructures.

Wen, H.C. (Department of Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)); Duong-van, M. (Physics Department, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, University of California, Livermore, California 94550 (United States))

1992-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

327

A Branch and Bound Algorithm for the Protein Folding Problem in the HP Lattice Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Article A Branch and Bound Algorithm for the Protein Folding Problem in the HP Lattice Model Mao tool for the protein folding problem. Key words: protein folding, HP model, branch and bound, lattice Introduction The protein folding problem, or the protein struc- ture prediction problem, is one of the most

Istrail, Sorin

328

Pyrolysis of shale oil vacuum distillate fractions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The freezing point of US Navy jet fuel (JP-5) has been related to the amounts of large n-alkanes present in the fuel. This behavior applies to jet fuels derived from alternate fossil fuel resources, such as shale oil, coal, and tar sands, as well as those derived from petroleum. In general, jet fuels from shale oil have the highest and those from coal the lowest n-alkane content. The origin of these n-alkanes in the amounts observed, especially in shale-derived fuels, is not readily explained on the basis of literature information. Studies of the processes, particularly the ones involving thermal stress, used to produce these fuels are needed to define how the n-alkanes form from larger molecules. The information developed will significantly contribute to the selection of processes and refining techniques for future fuel production from shale oil. Carbon-13 nmr studies indicate that oil shale rock contains many long unbranched straight chain hydrocarbon groups. The shale oil derived from the rock also gives indication of considerable straight chain material with large peaks at 14, 23, 30, and 32 ppM in the C-13 nmr spectrum. Previous pyrolysis studies stressed fractions of shale crude oil residua, measured the yields of JP-5, and determined the content of potential n-alkanes in the JP-5 distillation range (4). In this work, a shale crude oil vacuum distillate (Paraho) was separated into three chemical fractions. The fractions were then subjected to nmr analysis to estimate the potential for n-alkane production and to pyrolysis studies to determine an experimental n-alkane yield.

Hazlett, R.N.; Beal, E.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Pyrolysis of shale oil vacuum distillate fractions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The freezing point of U.S. Navy jet fuel (JP-5) has been related to the amounts of large nalkanes present in the fuel. This behavior applies to jet fuels derived from alternate fossil fuel resources, such as shale oil, coal, and tar sands, as well as those derived from petroleum. In general, jet fuels from shale oil have the highest and those from coal the lowest n-alkane content. The origin of these n-alkanes in the amounts observed, especially in shale-derived fuels, is not readily explained on the basis of literature information. Studies of the processes, particularly the ones involving thermal stress, used to produce these fuels are needed to define how th n-alkanes form from larger molecules. The information developed will significantly contribute to the selection of processes and refining techniques for future fuel production from shale oil. Carbon-13 nmr studies indicate that oil shale rock contains many long unbranched straight chain hydrocarbon groups. The shale oil derived from the rock also gives indication of considerable straight chain material with large peaks at 14, 23, 30 and 32 ppm in the C-13 nmr spectrum. Previous pyrolysis studies stressed fractions of shale crude oil residua, measured the yields of JP-5, and determined the content of potential n-alkanes in the JP-5 distillation range (4). In this work, a shale crude oil vacuum distillate (Paraho) was separated into three chemical fractions. The fractions were then subjected to nmr analysis to estimate the potential for n-alkane production and to pyrolysis studies to determine an experimental n-alkane yield.

Hazlett, R.N.; Beal, E.

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Magnesium-Isotope Fractionation During Plant Growth  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

With three stable isotopes naturally abundant (24Mg, 78.992%; 25Mg, 10.003%; 26Mg, 11.005%), magnesium stable isotope fractionation may provide insights into these cycles. ... Measurements of the magnesium isotopic composition of chlorophylls, seeds, shoots, roots, leaves, exudates, and the limiting nutrient solution over time show that the plant appears to establish an isotopic equilibrium with the nutrient available to it and that the plant (in particular, the seeds and exudates) becomes enriched in the heavy isotopes of magnesium in a mass-dependent relationship as the plant reaches maturity. ...

Jay R. Black; Emanuel Epstein; William D. Rains; Qing-zhu Yin; William H. Casey

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Fractional electric charge and quark confinement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Owing to their fractional electric charges, quarks are blind to transformations that combine a color center phase with an appropriate electromagnetic one. Such transformations are part of a global $Z_6$-like center symmetry of the Standard Model that is lost when quantum chromodynamics (QCD) is treated as an isolated theory. This symmetry and the corresponding topological defects may be relevant to non-perturbative phenomena such as quark confinement, much like center symmetry and ordinary center vortices are in pure SU($N$) gauge theories. Here we report on our investigations of an analogous symmetry in a 2-color model with dynamical Wilson quarks carrying half-integer electric charge.

Sam R. Edwards; André Sternbeck; Lorenz von Smekal

2012-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

332

Hydrolysis and fractionation of lignocellulosic biomass  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A multi-function process is described for the hydrolysis and fractionation of lignocellulosic biomass to separate hemicellulosic sugars from other biomass components such as extractives and proteins; a portion of the solubilized lignin; cellulose; glucose derived from cellulose; and insoluble lignin from said biomass comprising one or more of the following: optionally, as function 1, introducing a dilute acid of pH 1.0-5.0 into a continual shrinking bed reactor containing a lignocellulosic biomass material at a temperature of about 94 to about 160.degree. C. for a period of about 10 to about 120 minutes at a volumetric flow rate of about 1 to about 5 reactor volumes to effect solubilization of extractives, lignin, and protein by keeping the solid to liquid ratio constant throughout the solubilization process; as function 2, introducing a dilute acid of pH 1.0-5.0, either as virgin acid or an acidic stream from another function, into a continual shrinking bed reactor containing either fresh biomass or the partially fractionated lignocellulosic biomass material from function 1 at a temperature of about 94-220.degree. C. for a period of about 10 to about 60 minutes at a volumetric flow rate of about 1 to about 5 reactor volumes to effect solubilization of hemicellulosic sugars, semisoluble sugars and other compounds, and amorphous glucans by keeping the solid to liquid ratio constant throughout the solubilization process; as function 3, optionally, introducing a dilute acid of pH 1.0-5.0 either as virgin acid or an acidic stream from another function, into a continual shrinking bed reactor containing the partially fractionated lignocellulosic biomass material from function 2 at a temperature of about 180-280.degree. C. for a period of about 10 to about 60 minutes at a volumetric flow rate of 1 to about 5 reactor volumes to effect solubilization of cellulosic sugars by keeping the solid to liquid ratio constant throughout the solubilization process; and as function 4, optionally, introducing a dilute acid of pH 1.0-5.0 either as virgin acid or an acidic stream from another function, into a continual shrinking bed reactor containing the partially fractionated lignocellulosic biomass material from function 3 at a temperature of about 180-280.degree. C. for a period of about 10 to about 60 minutes at a volumetric flow rate of about 1 to about 5 reactor volumes to effect solubilization of cellulosic sugars by keeping the solid to liquid ratio constant throughout the solubilization process.

Torget, Robert W. (Littleton, CO); Padukone, Nandan (Denver, CO); Hatzis, Christos (Denver, CO); Wyman, Charles E. (Lakewood, CO)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Polyfunctional catalyst for processiing benzene fractions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A by-product of the coke industry is a raw benzene fraction benzene- 1 which may serve as for catalytic processes. The paper reports a study on the influence of the composition and temperatures on the activity and selectivity of NiO-V{sub 2}O{sub 6}-MoO{sub 3}/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts and the corresponding binary and tertiary subsystems are studied by a pulse method in model reactions; the hydrodealkylating of toluene and the hydrodesulfurizing of thioprhene. The optimal catalyst composition is established. The new catalyst is compared with industrial catalysts.

G. Byakov; B.D. Zubitskii; B.G. Tryasunov; I.Ya. Petrov [Kuznetsk Basin State Technical University, Kemerovo (Russian Federation)

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

334

Branching Ratio and Polarization of B \\to a_1(1260)(b_1(1235))?(?, ?) Decays in the PQCD Approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Within the framework of perturbative QCD approach, we study the charmless two-body decays into final states involving one axial-vector (A), $a_1(1260)$ or $b_1(1235)$, and one vector (V), namely $\\rho(\\omega,\\phi)$. Using the decays constants and the light-cone distribution amplitudes for these mesons derived from the QCD sum rule method, we find the following results: (a) Except the decays $\\bar B^0\\to a^{0}_1\\rho^0(\\omega)$, other tree-dominated decays $B\\to a_1\\rho(\\omega)$ have larger branching ratios, at the order of $10^{-5}$. (b)Except the decays $\\bar B\\to b^+_1\\rho^-$ and $B^-\\to b^0_1\\rho^-$, other $B\\to b_1\\rho(\\omega)$ decays have smaller branching ratios, at the order of $10^{-6}$. (c) The decays $B\\to a_1(b_1) \\phi$ are highly suppressed and have very small branching ratios, at the order of $10^{-9}$. (d) For the decays $\\bar B^0 \\to a_1^0\\rho^0$ and $B^-\\to b_1^-\\rho^0$, their two transverse polarizations are larger than their longitudinal polarizations, which are about 43.3% and 44.9%, respectively. (d) The two transverse polarizations have near values in the decays $B\\to a_1\\rho(\\omega)$, while have large differences in some of $B\\to b_1\\rho(\\omega)$ decays. (e) For the decays $B^-\\to a^{0}_1\\rho^-, b^{0}_1\\rho^-$ and $\\bar B^0\\to b^{0}_1\\rho^0, b^{0}_1\\omega$, where the transverse polarization fractions range from 4.7 to 7.5%, we calculate their direct CP-violating asymmetries with neglecting the transverse polarizations and find that those for two charged decays have smaller values, which are about 11.8% and -3.7%, respectively.

Zhi-Qing Zhang

2012-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

335

U-Th-Ra Fractionation During Weathering and River Transport  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...aquatic environment of a phosphogypsum disposal area. J Environ...fractionation of the rare earth elements in a boreal...aquatic environment of a phosphogypsum disposal area. J Environ...fractionation of the rare earth elements in a boreal...

F. Chabaux; J. Riotte; O. Dequincey

336

Assessing the impacts of fractionation on pointing-intensive spacecraft  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fractionated spacecraft consist of physically independent, "free-flying" modules composed of various subsystems. Thus, a fractionated spacecraft might consist of one-module responsible for the power generation and storage, ...

O'Neill, Michael Gregory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Hydrogen isotope fractionation during lipid biosynthesis by Haloarcula marismortui  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrogen isotope fractionation during lipid biosynthesis by Haloarcula marismortui Sitindra S studied the controls on the fractionation of hydrogen isotopes during lipid biosynthesis by Haloarcula marismortui, a halophilic archaea, in pure culture experiments by varying organic substrate, the hydrogen

338

Third annual Walker Branch Watershed research symposium. Program and abstracts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The methods and concepts of watershed research, originally applied in an experimental or monitoring mode to relatively small catchments, are increasingly being used at larger scales and for specific applied problems. Research at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the Tennessee Valley Authority, the US Forest Service, and other agencies and institutions participating in this symposium reflects research over a broad range of spatial scales that is being integrated through large-scale experiments along with computer modeling and graphical interfaces. These research projects address the basic atmospheric, geophysical, biogeochemical, and biological processes that regulate the responses of forested ecosystems to natural environmental variation and anthropogenic stresses. Regional and global issues addressed by presentations include emissions of carbon dioxide, methane, and other hydrocarbons; deposition of sulfate, nitrate, and mercury; land-use changes; biological diversity; droughts; and water quality. The reports presented in this symposium illustrate a wide range of methods and approaches and focus more on concepts and techniques than on a specific physical site. Sites and projects that have contributed research results to this symposium include Walker Branch Watershed (DOE), the Coweeta Hydrologic Laboratory and LTER site (USFS and NSF), Great Smoky Mountains National Park (research funded by NPS, TVA, and EPRI), Imnavait Creek, Alaska (DOE), the TVA-Norris Whole-tree Facility (TVA and EPRI), and DOE`s Biomass Program.

Not Available

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Fiber fractionation as a method of improving handsheet properties  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to copyright. Vol. 78, No. 5 Tappi Journal 123 #12;Recycling used. Following fractionation, the tionation can

Abubakr, Said

340

Catalytic isomerization of the overhead fractions of straight run gasoline  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The isomerization of the pentane and hexane fractions of gasoline on a platinum catalyst was studied, as...

N. R. Bursian; G. N. Maslyanskii…

1965-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inclusive branching fractions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Cryogenic search for fractionally charged particles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An experiment was performed to test the hypothesis of cryogenic trapping of fractionally charged particles, suggested as a possible explanation for the results of LaRue, Fairbank, Hebard, and Phillips at Stanford. A Nb-filament source was built, which could be cooled to 4.2°K and rapidly heated to several hundred °K. The source was operated in the terminal of a 700-kV Cockcroft-Walton accelerator and energy spectra of positively charged particles emerging from the filament were measured under a variety of operating conditions. No events above a background of 10-2 counts/sec were found in the energy regions where one might have expected several hundred particles of charge +13e or +23e as the source was heated. A mass range from 10 MeV/c2 to 100 GeV/c2 was covered in the experiment. Although negative results are rarely unambiguous, our findings exclude one class of hypotheses which might have explained the apparent fractional charges of the Stanford experiments.

W. Kutschera; J. P. Schiffer; D. Frekers; W. Henning; M. Paul; K. W. Shepard; C. D. Curtis; C. W. Schmidt

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Process for stabilization of coal liquid fractions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Coal liquid fractions to be used as fuels are stabilized against gum formation and viscosity increases during storage, permitting the fuel to be burned as is, without further expensive treatments to remove gums or gum-forming materials. Stabilization is accomplished by addition of cyclohexanol or other simple inexpensive secondary and tertiary alcohols, secondary and tertiary amines, and ketones to such coal liquids at levels of 5-25% by weight with respect to the coal liquid being treated. Cyclohexanol is a particularly effective and cost-efficient stabilizer. Other stabilizers are isopropanol, diphenylmethanol, tertiary butanol, dipropylamine, triethylamine, diphenylamine, ethylmethylketone, cyclohexanone, methylphenylketone, and benzophenone. Experimental data indicate that stabilization is achieved by breaking hydrogen bonds between phenols in the coal liquid, thereby preventing or retarding oxidative coupling. In addition, it has been found that coal liquid fractions stabilized according to the invention can be mixed with petroleum-derived liquid fuels to produce mixtures in which gum deposition is prevented or reduced relative to similar mixtures not containing stabilizer.

Davies, Geoffrey (Boston, MA); El-Toukhy, Ahmed (Alexandria, EG)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Electron Spin Precession for the Time Fractional Pauli Equation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this work, we aim to extend the application of the fractional calculus in the realm of quantum mechanics. We present a time fractional Pauli equation containing Caputo fractional derivative. By use of the new equation we study the electron spin precession problem in a homogeneous constant magnetic field.

Hosein Nasrolahpour

2011-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

344

Hamilton-Jacobi formulation of systems within Caputo's fractional derivative  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we develop a fractional Hamilton-Jacobi formulation for discrete systems in terms of fractional Caputo derivatives. The fractional action function is obtained and the solutions of the equations of motion are recovered. An example is studied in details.

Eqab M. Rabei; Ibtesam Almayteh; Sami I. Muslih; Dumitru Baleanu

2007-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

345

QCD analysis of inclusive B decay into charmonium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We compute the decay rates and H-energy distributions of B mesons into the final state H+X, where H can be any one of the S-wave or P-wave charmonia, at next-to-leading order in the strong coupling. We find that a significant fraction of the observed J/?,?? and ?c must be produced through cc¯ pairs in a color octet state and should therefore be accompanied by more than one light hadron. At the same time we obtain stringent constraints on some of the long-distance parameters for color octet production.

M. Beneke; F. Maltoni; I. Z. Rothstein

1999-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

346

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Raft River Geothermal Area (2011) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Raft River Geothermal Area (2011) Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Raft River Geothermal Area (2011) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Raft River Geothermal Area (2011) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Fluid Inclusion Analysis Activity Date 2011 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Hydrogen isotope values of muscovite (δDMs ∼-100‰) and fluid inclusions in quartz (δDFluid ∼-85‰) indicate the presence of meteoric fluids during detachment dynamics. Recrystallized grain-shape fabrics and quartz c-axis fabric patterns reveal a large component of coaxial strain (pure shear), consistent with thinning of the detachment section. Therefore, the high thermal gradient preserved in the Raft River

347

ORGANIC SPECIES IN GEOTHERMAL WATERS IN LIGHT OF FLUID INCLUSION GAS  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ORGANIC SPECIES IN GEOTHERMAL WATERS IN LIGHT OF FLUID INCLUSION GAS ORGANIC SPECIES IN GEOTHERMAL WATERS IN LIGHT OF FLUID INCLUSION GAS ANALYSES Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: ORGANIC SPECIES IN GEOTHERMAL WATERS IN LIGHT OF FLUID INCLUSION GAS ANALYSES Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Measurement of organic compounds in Karaha- Telaga Bodas and Coso fluid inclusions shows there are strong relationships between H2 concentrations and alkane/alkene ratios and benzene concentrations. Inclusion analyses that indicate H2 concentrations > 0.001 mol % typically have ethane > ethylene, propane > propylene, and butane > butylene. There are three end member fluid compositions: type 1 fluids in which alkane compounds predominate, type 2 fluids that have ethane and propylene and no

348

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (Norman & Moore, 2004) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (Norman & Moore, 2004) Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (Norman & Moore, 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (Norman & Moore, 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Fluid Inclusion Analysis Activity Date 2004 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis To determine effectiveness of FIS for geothermal exploration Notes In order to test FIS for geothermal exploration, drill chips were analyzed from Coso well 83-16, which were selected at 1000 ft intervals by Joseph Moore. Sequential crushes done by our CFS (crushfast-scan) method (Norman 1996) show that chips have a high density of homogeneous fluid inclusions.

349

DOE Ups the Ante for Diversity and Inclusion at the Department of Energy |  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

DOE Ups the Ante for Diversity and Inclusion at the Department of DOE Ups the Ante for Diversity and Inclusion at the Department of Energy DOE Ups the Ante for Diversity and Inclusion at the Department of Energy April 17, 2012 - 8:25am Addthis DOE Ups the Ante for Diversity and Inclusion at the Department of Energy Bill Valdez Bill Valdez Principal Deputy Director "We will treat our people as our greatest asset." This phrase is not only one of DOE's management principles, but it is also the rock behind our new Diversity and Inclusion Strategic Plan. In March, we released our plan as reinforcement to employees of their value and provided strategies to ensure equitable opportunities for all employees to fulfill their goals while carrying out DOE's mission. Secretary Chu ignited DOE's diversity initiatives in March 2011 by

350

Ecological effects of contaminants in McCoy Branch, 1989-1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 1984 Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) required assessment of all current and former solid waste management units. Such a RCRA Facility Investigation (RFI) was required of the Y-12 Plant for their Filled Coal Ash Pond on McCoy Branch. Because the disposal of coal ash in the ash pond, McCoy Branch, and Rogers Quarry was not consistent with the Tennessee Water Quality Act, several remediation steps were implemented or planned for McCoy Branch to address disposal problems. The McCoy Branch RFI plan included provisions for biological monitoring of the McCoy Branch watershed. The objectives of the biological monitoring were to: (1) document changes in biological quality of McCoy Branch after completion of a pipeline and after termination of all discharges to Rogers Quarry, (2) provide guidance on the need for additional remediation, and (3) evaluate the effectiveness of implemented remedial actions. The data from the biological monitoring program will also determine if the classified uses, as identified by the State of Tennessee, of McCoy Branch are being protected and maintained. This report discusses results from toxicity monitoring of snails fish community assessment, and a Benthic macroinvertebrate community assessment.

Ryon, M.G. [ed.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

A type of hyperelliptic continued fraction. Based on hints of Tschebychev, a continued fraction is described  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to this as the classical CFE. See [1], Tschebychev (loc. cit.), [12], and for more recent accounts [2, 3, 4, 18 CFE. The fraction detects the torsion, when finite, of D - D- and D - W, where W is any divisor, because of symmetries analogous to those of the classical CFE, it can be expected to run about twice

Berry, Thomas

352

Measurement of the eta_b(1S) mass and the branching fraction for Upsilon(3S) --> gamma eta_b(1S)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report evidence for the ground state of bottomonium, eta_b(1S), in the radiative decay Upsilon(3S) --> gamma eta_b in e^+e^- annihilation data taken with the CLEO III detector. Using 6 million Upsilon(3S) decays, and assuming Gamma(eta_b) = 10 MeV/c^2, we obtain B(Upsilon(3S) --> gamma eta_b) = (7.1 +- 1.8 +- 1.1) X 10^{-4}, where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic. The statistical significance is about 4 sigma. The mass is determined to be M(eta_b) = 9391.8 +- 6.6 +- 2.0 MeV/c^2, which corresponds to the hyperfine splitting Delta M_{hf}(1S)_b = 68.5 +- 6.6 +- 2.0 MeV/c^2. Using 9 million Upsilon(2S) decays, we place an upper limit on the corresponding Y(2S) decay, B(Y(2S) --> gamma eta_b) < 8.4 X 10^{-4} at 90 % confidence level.

The CLEO Collaboration; G. Bonvicini; D. Cinabro; A. Lincoln; M. J. Smith; P. Zhou; J. Zhu; P. Naik; J. Rademacker; D. M. Asner; K. W. Edwards; J. Reed; A. N. Robichaud; G. Tatishvili; E. J. White; R. A. Briere; H. Vogel; P. U. E. Onyisi; J. L. Rosner; J. P. Alexander; D. G. Cassel; R. Ehrlich; L. Fields; R. S. Galik; L. Gibbons; S. W. Gray; D. L. Hartill; B. K. Heltsley; J. M. Hunt; D. L. Kreinick; V. E. Kuznetsov; J. Ledoux; H. Mahlke-Krüger; J. R. Patterson; D. Peterson; D. Riley; A. Ryd; A. J. Sadoff; X. Shi; S. Stroiney; W. M. Sun; J. Yelton; P. Rubin; N. Lowrey; S. Mehrabyan; M. Selen; J. Wiss; M. Kornicer; R. E. Mitchell; M. R. Shepherd; C. M. Tarbert; D. Besson; T. K. Pedlar; J. Xavier; D. Cronin-Hennessy; K. Y. Gao; J. Hietala; R. Poling; P. Zweber; S. Dobbs; Z. Metreveli; K. K. Seth; B. J. Y. Tan; A. Tomaradze; S. Brisbane; J. Libby; L. Martin; A. Powell; P. Spradlin; C. Thomas; G. Wilkinson; H. Mendez; J. Y. Ge; D. H. Miller; I. P. J. Shipsey; B. Xin; G. S. Adams; D. Hu; B. Moziak; J. Napolitano; K. M. Ecklund; J. Insler; H. Muramatsu; C. S. Park; E. H. Thorndike; F. Yang; M. Artuso; S. Blusk; S. Khalil; R. Mountain; K. Randrianarivony; T. Skwarnicki; J. C. Wang; L. M. Zhang

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

353

Measurement of the Ratio of B[+ over c] Branching Fractions to J/??[superscript +] and J??[superscript +]?[subscript ?] Final States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The first measurement that relates semileptonic and hadronic decay rates of the B[+ over c] meson is performed using proton-proton collision data corresponding to 1.0??fb[superscript ?1] of integrated luminosity collected ...

Counts, Ian Thomas Hunt

354

Measurement of the B[0 over s]??[superscript +]?[superscript -] Branching Fraction and Search for B[superscript 0]??[superscript +]?[superscript -] Decays at the LHCb Experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A search for the rare decays B[0 over s]??[superscript +]?[superscript -] and B[superscript 0]??[superscript +]?[superscript -] is performed at the LHCb experiment. The data analyzed correspond to an integrated luminosity ...

Williams, Michael

355

Amplitude analysis and branching fraction measurement of B[overbar] s[superscript 0]-->J/?K[superscript +]K[superscript -  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An amplitude analysis of the final state structure in the B? s0?J/?K+K- decay mode is performed using 1.0??fb-1 of data collected by the LHCb experiment in 7 TeV center-of-mass energy pp collisions produced by the LHC. A ...

Williams, M.

356

Measurement of the branching fraction B(?[subscript b][superscript 0]??[subscript c][superscript +]?[superscript -]?[superscript +]?[superscript -]) at CDF  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report an analysis of the ?[subscript b][superscript 0]??[subscript c][superscript +]?[superscript -]?[superscript +]?[superscript -] decay in a data sample collected by the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron ...

Gomez-Ceballos, Guillelmo

357

Inclusive Jet Spectra in p-Pb Collisions at ALICE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Jet suppression has been observed in central heavy ion collisions. This suppression is attributed to partonic energy loss in the Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP) formed in such collisions. However, this measurement is influenced by all stages of the collision. It is expected that in p-Pb collisions similar initial conditions occur as in Pb-Pb collisions without creating a QGP, allowing modification to the jet spectra due to cold nuclear matter effects to be quantified. Inclusive jet spectra in p-Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}} = 5.02$ TeV measured by ALICE are presented. Jets are reconstructed via the anti-k$_{\\rm T}$ algorithm with different resolution parameters by combining charged tracks measured in the ALICE tracking system with the neutral energy deposited in the electromagnetic calorimeter. The jet spectra can be used to determine a nuclear modification factor $R_{\\rm pPb}$ while the jet profile in p-Pb is studied by dividing spectra measured with different resolution parameters and comparing to the same ratio measured in pp collisions.

Megan Connors; for the ALICE Collaboration

2014-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

358

Fundamentals of Biomass Pretreatment by Fractionation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fundamentals of Biomass Pretreatment by Fractionation Poulomi Sannigrahi 1,2 and Arthur J. Ragauskas 1,2,3 1 BioEnergy Science Center, Oak Ridge, USA 2 Institute of Paper Science and Technology, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, USA 3 School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, USA 10.1 Introduction With the rise in global energy demand and environmental concerns about the use of fossil fuels, the need for rapid development of alternative fuels from sustainable, non-food sources is now well acknowledged. The effective utilization of low-cost high-volume agricultural and forest biomass for the production of transporta- tion fuels and bio-based materials will play a vital role in addressing this concern [1]. The processing of lignocellulosic biomass, especially from mixed agricultural and forest sources with varying composition,

359

Release fractions for Rocky Flats specific accidents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As Rocky Flats and other DOE facilities begin the transition process towards decommissioning, the nature of the scenarios to be studied in safety analysis will change. Whereas the previous emphasis in safety accidents related to production, now the emphasis is shifting to accidents related tc decommissioning and waste management. Accident scenarios of concern at Rocky Flats now include situations of a different nature and different scale than are represented by most of the existing experimental accident data. This presentation will discuss approaches@to use for applying the existing body of release fraction data to this new emphasis. Mention will also be made of ongoing efforts to produce new data and improve the understanding of physical mechanisms involved.

Weiss, R.C.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Release fractions for Rocky Flats specific accidents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As Rocky Flats and other DOE facilities begin the transition process towards decommissioning, the nature of the scenarios to be studied in safety analysis will change. Whereas the previous emphasis in safety accidents related to production, now the emphasis is shifting to accidents related tc decommissioning and waste management. Accident scenarios of concern at Rocky Flats now include situations of a different nature and different scale than are represented by most of the existing experimental accident data. This presentation will discuss approaches to use for applying the existing body of release fraction data to this new emphasis. Mention will also be made of ongoing efforts to produce new data and improve the understanding of physical mechanisms involved.

Weiss, R.C.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inclusive branching fractions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Multidimensional optical fractionation with holographic verification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The trajectories of colloidal particles driven through a periodic potential energy landscape can become kinetically locked in to directions dictated by the landscape's symmetries. When the landscape is realized with forces exerted by a structured light field, the path a given particle follows has been predicted to depend exquisitely sensitively on such properties as the particle's size and refractive index These predictions, however, have not been tested experimentally. Here, we describe measurements of colloidal silica spheres' transport through arrays of holographic optical traps that use holographic video microscopy to track individual spheres' motions in three dimensions and simultaneously to measure each sphere's radius and refractive index with part-per-thousand resolution. These measurements confirm previously untested predictions for the threshold of kinetically locked-in transport, and demonstrate the ability of optical fractionation to sort colloidal spheres with part-per-thousand resolution on multiple characteristics simultaneously.

Ke Xiao; David G. Grier

2009-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

362

Anomalous Topological Pumps and Fractional Josephson Effects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discover novel topological pumps in the Josephson effects for superconductors. The phase difference, which is odd under the chiral symmetry defined by the product of time-reversal and particle-hole symmetries, acts as an anomalous adiabatic parameter. These pumping cycles are different from those in the "periodic table", and are characterized by $Z\\times Z$ or $Z_2\\times Z_2$ strong invariants. We determine the general classifications in class AIII, and those in class DIII with a single anomalous parameter. For the $Z_2\\times Z_2$ topological pump in class DIII, one $Z_2$ invariant describes the coincidence of fermion parity and spin pumps whereas the other one reflects the non-Abelian statistics of Majorana Kramers pairs, leading to three distinct fractional Josephson effects.

Fan Zhang; C. L. Kane

2013-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

363

Regulation of branching by phytochrome B and PPFD in Arabidopsis thaliana  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

…………………...................…….............................. 10 Interval between anthesis and the onset of elongation of the topmost three rosette buds of WT, phyA, phyB, and phyAphyB under low light……........ 11 The lengths of the main inflorescence (M), the topmost rosette branch R(n), the next topmost... rosette branch R(n-1), and the third topmost rosette branch R(n-2) of WT, phyA, phyB, and phyAphyB from the day of the onset of elongation of bud R(n) to the 10 th day after anthesis under low light..….......... 33 35 36 36 38 39 40 41 44 45 46...

Chou, Nan-yen

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

364

Use of Coupled Rate Equations To Describe Nucleation-and-Branching Rate-Limited Solid-State Processes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Use of Coupled Rate Equations To Describe Nucleation-and-Branching Rate-Limited Solid-State Processes ... Coincident with nuclei growth may be the process of nuclei multiplication or “branching”. ... We consider that nucleation and branching may be considered as two interrelated yet distinct steps (often rate determining) in a series of steps required to achieve a conversion. ...

Peter J. Skrdla

2004-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

365

EBSD analysis of magnesium addition on inclusion formation in SS400 structural steel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study, the effect of magnesium addition on the inclusion formation in SS400 steel was investigated. The experimental specimens with and without Mg addition treatment were compared. The microstructure was observed using optical microscopy after etching with 3% nital. The morphology and chemical composition of the inclusions were analyzed via scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectrometry. The lattice structure and orientation of the inclusions were identified by electron backscattering diffraction. The average size of inclusions in SS400 was between 0.67 and 0.75 ?m, and between 0.65 and 0.68 ?m in SS400 + Mg. The 2 ppm Mg addition resulted in the oxide formation change from Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} to MgO·Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and in the inclusion formation change from Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}–MnS to MgO·Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}–MnS. Moreover, a simple-phase MnS with an average grain size of 1 ?m to 2 ?m was observed in rod-like, globular, and polyhedron forms. - Highlights: • The effect of magnesium addition was investigated for SS400 steel. • 2 ppm Mg addition changes the inclusion formation from Al2O3-MnS to MgO·Al2O3-MnS. • MnS observed in inclusions exhibits rod-like, globular, and polyhedron forms.

Luo, Sin-Jie [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng-Kung University, No. 1, University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Su, Yen-Hao Frank; Lu, Muh-Jung [China Steel Corporation, Kaohsiung 81233, Taiwan (China); Kuo, Jui-Chao, E-mail: jckuo@mail.ncku.edu.tw [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng-Kung University, No. 1, University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China)

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

366

Evidence from fluid inclusions for two generations of apatite at the Duluth Complex, Minnesota  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fluid inclusion studies of hydrously altered gabbroic and troctolitic rocks from the SW footwall of the Duluth Complex, Minnesota, indicate two distinct environments of apatite formation. Type 1 apatites are associated with sericitized plagioclase, amphibole and chlorite. They contain few one-phase inclusions and abundant 2- and 3-phase aqueous inclusions. Fluid inclusion analysis by microthermometry indicates a highly saline, CaCl[sub 2] solution. Many contain unidentified daughter minerals with very high birefringence, halite daughters are absent, and clathrate is often present. The aqueous inclusions homogenize to liquid at temperatures ranging from 320[degree] to over 400[degree], and homogenization to vapor occurs at 320[degree]. Type 2 apatites are much smaller and occur only within interstitial quartz. Some have dark cores of undetermined composition, while others display lower interference colors in the central, thicker portion of the grain, indicating isotropic or hollow interiors. They contain no fluid inclusions of workable size, but the host quartz is rich in one-phase gas inclusions of CH[sub 4]+N[sub 2][+-]CO[sub 2]. Fluid inclusion analysis by microthermometry and Raman microsampling spectroscopy indicate a wide range of compositions and salinities. Daughters include halite and calcite; clathrate is sometimes present. The aqueous inclusions homogenize to liquid at temperatures ranging from 100[degree] to over 400[degree], and homogenization to vapor occurs above 430[degree]. These observations suggest: (1) crystallization and fluid trapping of Type 1 apatites occurred at high temperatures, with very saline, high-calcic and low-sodic aqueous fluids; (2) crystallization of Type 2 apatites occurred in conjunction with interstitial quartz which is related to a wide range of temperatures and fluid compositions.

Harris, T.N. (Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States). Dept. of Earth and Planetary Sciences)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Surface water paleotemperatures and chemical compositions from fluid inclusions in Permian Nippewalla Group halite  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Quantitative climatic data for the Permian have been determined from Nippewalla Group halite. The middle Permian Nippewalla Group of Kansas and Oklahoma consists of several hundred feet of bedded halite, anhydrite, and red beds. Study of core and surface samples suggest that this halite was deposited by ephemeral lakes. Fluid inclusions provide evidence for the geochemistry of these Permian saline lake waters, including temperatures, salinities, and chemical compositions. Primary fluid inclusions are well-preserved in the Nippewalla halite. They are 5 - 30 [mu]m cubic inclusions situated along chevron and cornet growth bands. Most are one phase aqueous inclusions, but some also contain anhydride [open quote]accidental[close quotes] crystals. Rare two phase liquid-vapor inclusions may have formed by subaqueous outgassing or trapping of air at the water surface. Fluid inclusion freezing-melting behavior and leachate analyses suggest that Nippewalla halite precipitated from Na-Cl-rich waters with lesser quantities of SO[sub 4], Mg, K, Al, and Si. This composition may be a product of long-term weathering. Surface water paleotemperatures were determined from one phase aqueous fluid inclusions. Homogenization temperatures range from 32 to 46[degrees]C in primary fluid inclusions and are consistent (within 3[degrees]C) along individual chevrons and cornets. These homogenization temperatures are interpreted to represent maximum surface water temperatures. These fluid inclusion data are significant in addressing global change problems. Temperatures and chemistries in these Permian lake waters agree with some modern shallow saline lake waters and with Permian climate models. This study suggests that this Permian environment was relatively similar to its modern counterparts.

Benison, K.C. (Univ. of Kansas, Lawrence, KS (United States))

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Surface water paleotemperatures and chemical compositions from fluid inclusions in Permian Nippewalla Group halite  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Quantitative climatic data for the Permian have been determined from Nippewalla Group halite. The middle Permian Nippewalla Group of Kansas and Oklahoma consists of several hundred feet of bedded halite, anhydrite, and red beds. Study of core and surface samples suggest that this halite was deposited by ephemeral lakes. Fluid inclusions provide evidence for the geochemistry of these Permian saline lake waters, including temperatures, salinities, and chemical compositions. Primary fluid inclusions are well-preserved in the Nippewalla halite. They are 5 - 30 {mu}m cubic inclusions situated along chevron and cornet growth bands. Most are one phase aqueous inclusions, but some also contain anhydride {open_quote}accidental{close_quotes} crystals. Rare two phase liquid-vapor inclusions may have formed by subaqueous outgassing or trapping of air at the water surface. Fluid inclusion freezing-melting behavior and leachate analyses suggest that Nippewalla halite precipitated from Na-Cl-rich waters with lesser quantities of SO{sub 4}, Mg, K, Al, and Si. This composition may be a product of long-term weathering. Surface water paleotemperatures were determined from one phase aqueous fluid inclusions. Homogenization temperatures range from 32 to 46{degrees}C in primary fluid inclusions and are consistent (within 3{degrees}C) along individual chevrons and cornets. These homogenization temperatures are interpreted to represent maximum surface water temperatures. These fluid inclusion data are significant in addressing global change problems. Temperatures and chemistries in these Permian lake waters agree with some modern shallow saline lake waters and with Permian climate models. This study suggests that this Permian environment was relatively similar to its modern counterparts.

Benison, K.C. [Univ. of Kansas, Lawrence, KS (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

369

E-Print Network 3.0 - asymptotic giant branch Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

modelling of COROT data. Summary: for this is due to the red giant branch in the HR diagram being nearly vertical, meaning that even a small... AMBER+FINITO+UT Science...

370

Emulsion polymerization of ethylene-vinyl acetate-branched vinyl ester using a pressure reactor system.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??A new pressure reactor system was designed to synthesize a novel branched ester-ethylene-vinyl acetate (BEEVA) emulsion polymer. The reactor system was capable of handling pressure… (more)

Tan, Chee Boon

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Analysis of the HVAC System at the Willow Branch Intermediate School  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This report presents an analysis of the HVAC system at the Willow Branch Intermediate School for the MEEN 685 class project. The school is located at College Station, Texas. A portion of the school belonged to Oakwood Intermediate School which...

Wei, G.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Spring Break Course in Florida! Forensic entomology is a branch of forensic sci-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spring Break Course in Florida! Forensic entomology is a branch of forensic sci- ence utilizing the science of forensic en- tomology through daily laboratory and field ac- tivities. We also interact

373

Airborne Release Fractions/Rates and Respirable Fractions for Nonreactor Nuclear Facilities, Volume II  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

TS NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-HDBK-3010-94 December 1994 Reaffirmed 2013 DOE HANDBOOK AIRBORNE RELEASE FRACTIONS/RATES AND RESPIRABLE FRACTIONS FOR NONREACTOR NUCLEAR FACILITIES Volume II - Appendices U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information, P.O. Box 62, Oak Ridge, TN 37831; (615) 576-8401. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 487-4650. Order No. DE95004711 DOE-HDBK-3010-94

374

Airborne Release Fractions/Rates and Respirable Fractions for Nonreactor Nuclear Facilities, Volume 1  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

TS NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-HDBK-3010-94 December 1994 Reaffirmed 2013 DOE HANDBOOK AIRBORNE RELEASE FRACTIONS/RATES AND RESPIRABLE FRACTIONS FOR NONREACTOR NUCLEAR FACILITIES Volume I - Analysis of Experimental Data U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information, P.O. Box 62, Oak Ridge, TN 37831; (615) 576-8401. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 487-4650.

375

A branch-and-bound project assignment methodology with generalized network strategies for updating bounds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Diaz, Sastri, and Paz 1995). Additionally, an efficient branch-and- bound procedure is highly desirable to solve integer programming models, such as the one being considered in this thesis. In summary the following are the significant contributions... heuristically to obtain near-optimal solutions. Gavish and Pirkul (1991) employed heuristic procedures and a branch-and-bound procedure to develop algorithms for solving the multi-resource generalized assignment problem. Garcia- Diaz, Sastri and Paz (1995...

Jittamai, Phongchai

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

376

J. Am. Chem. Soc. Supporting Information page S1 Deoxyribozymes that Synthesize Branched and Lariat RNA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a branch at the boldface A, while 9F13 and 9F18 create a branch at the boldface U. This L substrate has a 5 nucleotides, which are found in 9F7, 9F13, and 9F18 but not 9F21. Note that the 9F13 enzyme region is only 38'-CCGTCGCCATCTCAGGATGTGGGGTTTTGCCCGAGGGTATGGCAGT--GGGGAGaGAGTCGTATTATCC-3' 9F18: 5'-CCGTCGCCATCTCGGGATGTGGGGCGCCACCAAGTTAATGTTTGGTTTGGGGAGa

Silverman, Scott K.

377

Controlled synthesis of hyper-branched inorganic nanocrystals withrich three-dimensional structures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Studies of crystal growth kinetics are tightly integrated with advances in the creation of new nanoscale inorganic building blocks and their functional assemblies 1-11. Recent examples include the development of semiconductor nanorods which have potential uses in solar cells 12-17, and the discovery of a light driven process to create noble metal particles with sharp corners that can be used in plasmonics 18,19. In the course of studying basic crystal growth kinetics we developed a process for preparing branched semiconductor nanocrystals such as tetrapods and inorganic dendrimers of precisely controlled generation 20,21. Here we report the discovery of a crystal growth kinetics regime in which a new class of hyper-branched nanocrystals are formed. The shapes range from 'thorny balls', to tree-like ramified structures, to delicate 'spider net'-like particles. These intricate shapes depend crucially on a delicate balance of branching and extension. The multitudes of resulting shapes recall the diverse shapes of snowflakes 22.The three dimensional nature of the branch points here, however, lead to even more complex arrangements than the two dimensionally branched structures observed in ice. These hyper-branched particles not only extend the available three-dimensional shapes in nanoparticle synthesis ,but also provide a tool to study growth kinetics by carefully observing and modeling particle morphology.

Kanaras, Antonios G.; Sonnichsen, Carsten; Liu, Haitao; Alivisatos, A. Paul

2005-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

378

Polarization of Lambda0 and antiLambda0 inclusively produced by 610GeV/c Sigma- and 525GeV/c proton beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have measured the polarization of Lambda0 and antiLambda0 inclusively produced by 610GeV/c Sigma- and 525GeV/c proton beams in the experiment SELEX during the 1996/7 fixed target run at Fermilab. The polarization was measured as a function of the Lambda longitudinal momentum fraction xF and transverse momentum pt. For the Lambda0 produced by Sigma- the polarization is increasing with xF, from slightly negative at x_F~0 to about 15% at large xF; it shows a non-monotonic behavior as a function of pt. For the proton beam, the Lambda0 polarization is negative and decreasing as a function of xF and pt. The antiLambda0 polarization is compatible with 0 for both beam particles over the full kinematic range. The target dependence was examined but no statistically significant difference was found.

SELEX Collaboration; J. L. Sanchez-Lopez; K. D. Nelson; J. Engelfried

2007-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

379

Fractional Equations of Kicked Systems and Discrete Maps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Starting from kicked equations of motion with derivatives of non-integer orders, we obtain "fractional" discrete maps. These maps are generalizations of well-known universal, standard, dissipative, kicked damped rotator maps. The main property of the suggested fractional maps is a long-term memory. The memory effects in the fractional discrete maps mean that their present state evolution depends on all past states with special forms of weights. These forms are represented by combinations of power-law functions.

Vasily E. Tarasov; George M. Zaslavsky

2011-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

380

Projective synchronization in fractional order chaotic systems and its control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The chaotic dynamics of fractional (non-integer) order systems have begun to attract much attention in recent years. In this paper, we study the projective synchronization in two coupled fractional order chaotic oscillators. It is shown that projective synchronization can also exist in coupled fractional order chaotic systems. A simple feedback control method for controlling the scaling factor onto a desired value is also presented.

Chunguang Li

2006-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inclusive branching fractions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Fractional entropy decay and the third law of thermodynamics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report in this paper a theoretical study on the quantum thermodynamic properties of a fractional damping system. Through the analysis, few nontrivial characteristics are revealed, which include (1) a fractional power-law decay entropy function, which provides an evidence for the validity of the third law of thermodynamics in the quantum dissipative region and (2) the varying of the entropy from a nonlinear divergent function to a semilinear decay function with a fractional exponent as the temperature approaches absolute zero.

Chun-Yang Wang; Xue-Mei Zong; Hong Zhang; Ming Yi

2014-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

382

Renewed Search for FUN (Fractionated and Unidentified Nuclear Effects) in Primitive Chondrites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ca-Al-rich inclusions (CAIs) found in primitive chondrites record processes and conditions of the earliest solar system as they are the oldest known solid objects formed in the solar system [1,2]. CAIs with fractionation and unidentified nuclear anomalies (FUN CAIs; [3]) are very rare and thusfar found exclusively in CV carbonaceous chondrites (e.g., Allende and Vigarano)[4]. FUN CAIs are characterized by large nucleosynthetic anomalies in several elements (Ca, Ti, Si, Sr, Ba, Nd, and Sm), large mass-dependant isotope fractionation (Mg, Si, and O), and very little initial {sup 26}Al [4,5 and reference therein]. Formation of FUN CAIs by thermal processing of presolar dust aggregates prior to the injection of {sup 26}Al into the protoplanetary disk has been proposed. More recently [5] proposed that FUN CAIs formed from a protosolar molecular cloud after injection of {sup 26}Al but before {sup 26}Al and {sup 27}Al were completely homogenized. Therefore discovering more FUN CAIs to perform U-Pb and other short-lived chronometric dating will provide key constraints on the age of the solar system, the isotopic composition of the protosolar molecular cloud, the earliest stages of the thermal processing in the solar system and the timing of {sup 26}Al and other short-lived radionuclide injection into the nascent solar system. Most known FUN CAIs were discovered and studied > 30 yr ago, and their isotope ratios determined using thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS). Most of these FUN CAIs were almost or entirely consumed during their respective analyses. [5] recently identified a new FUN CAI (NWA 779 KS-1) based on O and Mg isotope ratios determined by SIMS and MCICPMS, respectively. We have initiated a systematic search for FUN CAIs in primitive chondrites, taking advantage of the large mass-dependant Mg isotope effects known for FUN inclusions with little or no inferred {sup 26}Al. Our strategy is to use newly developed sample cells capable of holding very large slabs of meteorites for laser ablation interfaced with a multicollector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-MC-ICPMS) at UC Davis. Here report the initial findings of our search and describe the instrument setup we use that provides rapid throughput and accurate results.

Tollstrup, D L; Wimpenny, J B; Yin, Q -; Ebel, D S; Jacobsen, B; Hutcheon, I D

2011-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

383

Fractional Order Transmission Line Modeling and Parameter Identification.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Fractional order calculus (FOC) has wide applications in modeling natural behavior of systems related to different areas of engineering including bioengineering, viscoelasticity, electronics, robotics, control… (more)

Razib, Mohammad Yeasin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Tunable fractional quantum Hall phases in bilayer graphene  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Coulomb interactions drive the existence of a correlated many-body state. Bilayer graphene represents a particularly interesting material in which to study the fractional...

385

Linear Stochastic Fractional Programming with Sum-of-Probabilistic ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fractional Programming Problem with Mixed Constraints”, Acta Ciencia Indica,. Vol. XXX M, No. 3, pp 497-506. 11. Charles, V., and Dutta, D., “Extremization of ...

2005-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

386

The Origin of Chondrules and Refractory Inclusions in Chondritic  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Examples of calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs) surrounded by thick chondrule mantles have been found in chondritic meteorites and cast doubt on the conventional belief that CAIs and chondrules possessed different spacetime origins in the primitive solar nebula. We study specific processes by which such objects, and the more common ordinary CAIs and chondrules, might have formed by flare heating of primitive rocks interior to the inner edge of a gaseous accretion disk that has been truncated by magnetized funnel flow onto the central proto-Sun. Motivated by the appearance of the chains of Herbig-Haro knots that define collimated optical jets from many young stellar objects (YSOs), we adopt the model of a fluctuating X-wind, where the inner edge of the solar nebula undergoes periodic radial excursions on a timescale of ~30 yr, perhaps in response to protosolar magnetic cycles. Flares induced by the stressing of magnetic fields threading both the star and the inner edge of the fluctuating disk melt or partially melt solids in the transition zone between the base of the funnel flow and the reconnection ring, and in the reconnection ring itself. The rock melts stick when they collide at low velocities. Surface tension pulls the melt aggregate into a quasi-spherical core/mantle structure, where the core consists mainly of refractories and the mantle mainly of moderate volatiles. Orbital drift of rocks past the inner edge of the disk or infall of large objects from the funnel flow replaces the steady loss of material by the plasma drag of the coronal gas that corotates with the stellar magnetosphere. In quasi-steady state, agglomeration of molten or heat-softened rocks leads to a differential size-distribution in radius R proportional to R-3e, where tL ~ 20 yr is the drift time of an object of fiducial radius L ? 1 cm and t is the time since the last inward excursion of the base of the funnel flow and X-wind. Thus, during the ~30 yr interval between successive flushing of the reconnection ring, flash-heated and irradiated rocks have a chance to grow to millimeter and centimeter sizes. The evaporation of the moderately volatile mantles above large refractory cores, or the dissolving of small refractory cores inside thick ferromagnesian mantles before launch, plus extended heating in the X-wind produce the CAIs or chondrules that end up at planetary distances in the parent bodies of chondritic meteorites.

Frank H. Shu; Hsien Shang; Matthieu Gounelle; Alfred E. Glassgold; Typhoon Lee

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

TRACING FLUID SOURCES IN THE COSO GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM USING FLUID-INCLUSION  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

TRACING FLUID SOURCES IN THE COSO GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM USING FLUID-INCLUSION TRACING FLUID SOURCES IN THE COSO GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM USING FLUID-INCLUSION GAS CHEMISTRY Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: TRACING FLUID SOURCES IN THE COSO GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM USING FLUID-INCLUSION GAS CHEMISTRY Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Vein and alteration assemblages from eight Coso wells have been collected and their fluid-inclusion gases analyzed by quadrupole mass spectrometry. Four major types of alteration were sampled: 1) young calcite-hematite-pyrite veins; 2) wairakite or epidote veins and alteration that are spatially associated with deep reservoirs in the main field and eastern wells; 3) older sericite and pyrite wallrock alteration; and 4) stilbite-calcite veins that are common in cooler or marginal portions of

388

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (Norman & Moore, 2004) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (Norman & Moore, 2004) Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (Norman & Moore, 2004) (Redirected from Water-Gas Samples At Coso Geothermal Area (2004)) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (Norman & Moore, 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Fluid Inclusion Analysis Activity Date 2004 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis To determine effectiveness of FIS for geothermal exploration Notes In order to test FIS for geothermal exploration, drill chips were analyzed from Coso well 83-16, which were selected at 1000 ft intervals by Joseph Moore. Sequential crushes done by our CFS (crushfast-scan) method (Norman

389

U-155: WebCalendar Access Control and File Inclusion Bugs Let Remote Users  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

5: WebCalendar Access Control and File Inclusion Bugs Let 5: WebCalendar Access Control and File Inclusion Bugs Let Remote Users Potentially Execute Arbitrary Code U-155: WebCalendar Access Control and File Inclusion Bugs Let Remote Users Potentially Execute Arbitrary Code April 25, 2012 - 7:00am Addthis PROBLEM: WebCalendar Access Control and File Inclusion Bugs Let Remote Users Potentially Execute Arbitrary Code PLATFORM: 1.2.4 and prior versions ABSTRACT: Two vulnerabilities were reported in WebCalendar. A remote user may be able to execute arbitrary PHP code on the target system. reference links: SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1026966 CVE-2012-1495 CVE-2012-1496 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium Discussion: A remote user can access '/install/index.php' to potentially modify '/includes/settings/' with arbitrary values or PHP code. A remote

390

Not just in it to win it : inclusive game play in an MIT dorm  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The recent increase in digital gaming players and platforms does not imply that digital gaming is as inclusive as it could be. There are still gaps in participation that, if left unaddressed, will exclude groups who have ...

Kolos, Hillary (Hillary Anne)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Seismic velocity anisotropy in mica-rich rocks: an inclusion model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......also calculated Thomsen's anisotropic parameters, , gamma and delta...Hudson J.A.,1994. Anisotropic effective-medium modelling of the elastic properties of shales, Geophysics, 59, 1570-1583...Elastic field of inclusions in anisotropic media, Phys. Status Solidi......

O. Nishizawa; T. Yoshino

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Thermodynamic modelling of Cr-bearing garnets with implications for diamond inclusions and peridotite xenoliths  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Zürich, Switzerland e Geological Survey of Western Australia, Mineral House, 100 Plain Street, East Perth zonations result from metasomatic processes. This sheds further light on peridotitic diamond inclusions

393

Co-production and Co-creation: Creative practice in Social Inclusion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to leverage methods from digital media art practice in contexts that result in social innovation. Keywords: interactive music, social inclusion, social innovation, co-production of knowledge, triangulation 1

Boyer, Edmond

394

Microstructural characterization of halite inclusions in a surrogate glass bonded ceramic waste form  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A glass-bonded ceramic waste form is being developed to immobilize high-level chloride waste salts generated during the conditioning of spent sodium-bonded nuclear fuel for disposal. The waste salt is loaded into zeolite cavities, mixed with a borosilicate glass, and consolidated at 800--900 C by hot isostatic pressing. During this process, small amounts of halite are generated, whereas the zeolite converts to the mineral sodalite, which retains most of the waste salt. In this work, optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy2048e used to characterize the halite inclusions in the final waste form. The halite inclusions were detected within micron- to submicron-sized pores that form within the glass phase in the vicinity of the sodalite/glass interface. The chemical nature and distribution of the halite inclusions were determined. The particular microstructure of the halite inclusions has been related to the corrosion of the ceramic waste form.

Luo, J. S.; Zyryanov, V. N.; Ebert, W. L.

2000-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

395

Inclusive Single- and Dijet Rates in Next-to-Leading Order QCD for ?*p and ?*? Collisions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present one- and two-jet inclusive cross sections for ?*? scattering and virtual photoproduction in ep collisions. The hard cross sections are calculated in next-to-leading order QCD. Soft and collinear singul...

B. Pötter

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

A Qualitative Study of the Initiation and Continuation of Preschool Inclusion Programs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Initiation and continuation of preschool inclusion is a challenging task. Through interviews and focus groups of school district and special education personnel, researchers in this study examined how 5 programs in 1 ...

Purcell, Megan L.; Horn, Eva; Palmer, Susan B.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Thermomigration of Tellurium Inclusions in CZT Brian Faulkner, Dr. Kelvin Lynn and Kelly Jones  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thermomigration of Tellurium Inclusions in CZT Brian Faulkner, Dr. Kelvin Lynn and Kelly Jones Datta, Kelly Jones, Chandrasekar Minnal Santosh Swain, Gitau Munge, Raji Soundararajan To make a good

Collins, Gary S.

398

The Inclusive Semileptonic Decay Lepton Spectrum from $B \\to X e \\overline?$  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this talk, we review the QCD calculation of the lepton spectrum from inclusive semileptonic $B$ decay. We compare this prediction to that of the ACCMM model. This latter work was done in collaboration with Csaba Csaki.

Lisa Randall

1994-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

399

Measurement of inclusive charged current interactions on carbon in a few-GeV neutrino beam  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report a measurement of inclusive charged current interactions of muon neutrinos on carbon with an average energy of 0.8 GeV using the Fermilab Booster Neutrino Beam. We compare our measurement with two neutrino interaction ...

Conrad, Janet

400

Econogenomics 2007: When Does the Inclusion of Biomarkers in Oncology Drug Development Make Economic Sense?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Atlanta, GA Econogenomics 2007: When Does the Inclusion of Biomarkers in Oncology...fill up with approved agents. [ ] Two fundamental problems appear to dominate modern cancer...molecular basis of the stratification does not generalize to other cancer types...

Thomas Roberts

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inclusive branching fractions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Preferential water leakage from fluid inclusions by means of mobile dislocations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... Group 10.1038/345058a0 Preferential water leakage from fluid inclusions by means of mobile dislocationsRonald J. Bakker R. J. J. Ben H. Jansen J. B. H. ...

Ronald J. Bakker; J. Ben H. Jansen

1990-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

402

Black Warrior: Sub-soil gas and fluid inclusion exploration and...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

hydrocarbon, and isotope data to define possible upflow areas; Calibrate the sub-soil chemistry with down-hole fluid inclusion stratigraphy and fluid analyses to define a follow-up...

403

Petrology of clinopyroxene-amphibole inclusions from the roque nublo volcanics, gran canaria, canary islands  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Inclusions consisting of clinopyroxene, amphibole, Fe-Ti oxides and apatitc are abundant in the Roque Nublo volcanics, a unit of Late Tertiary age that is widespread on Gran Canaria Island. The unit includes alka...

T. Frisch; H. U. Schmincke

1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Ultrasonic wave propagation through a layer of spherical inclusions with random of periodic arrangements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ULTRASONIC %'AVE PROPAGATION THROUGH A LAYER OF SPHERICAL INCLUSIONS %ITH RANDOM OR PERIODIC ARRANGEMENTS A Thesis by NATHAN ALLAN DAY Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas AEcM University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1994 Major Subject: Aerospace Engineering ULTRASONIC WAVE PROPAGATION THROUGH A LAYER OF SPHERICAL INCLUSIONS WITH RANDOM OR PERIODIC ARRANGEMENTS A Thesis by NATHAN ALLAN DAY Submitted...

Day, Nathan Allan

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

405

Territoire, bien-tre et inclusion sociale, Confrences cadres LE SYSTEME REGIONAL D'INNOVATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Territoire, bien-être et inclusion sociale, Conférences cadres 26 LE SYSTEME REGIONAL D'INNOVATION la période fordiste, l'innovation y est analysée comme le résultat d'un produit social et)" #12;Territoire, bien-être et inclusion sociale, Conférences cadres 27 Le système régional d'innovation

Boyer, Edmond

406

Isotope Fractionation of Water during Evaporation without Condensation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Specifially, isotope fractionation factors associated with free evaporation (?evap) have been measured as a function of the isotopic composition and temperature of the liquid. ... Liquid-vapor fractionation of oxygen and hydrogen isotopes of water from the freezing to the critical temperature ...

Christopher D. Cappa; Walter S. Drisdell; Jared D. Smith; Richard J. Saykally; Ronald C. Cohen

2005-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

407

Explicit and implicit finite difference schemes for fractional Cattaneo equation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, the numerical solution of fractional (non-integer)-order Cattaneo equation for describing anomalous diffusion has been investigated. Two finite difference schemes namely an explicit predictor-corrector and totally implicit schemes have ... Keywords: Convergence rate, Finite difference schemes, Fractional Cattaneo equation, Stability

H. R. Ghazizadeh; M. Maerefat; A. Azimi

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

SVC Voltage Regulator Based on Fractional Order PID  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Contradiction exist between rapid and smooth in the dynamic adjustment process of SVC, however, Fractional order PID controller has two degrees of freedom more than the integer order PID controller, and it has better control performance. This article ... Keywords: SVC, Fractional order PID, Voltage regulator, Oustaloup

Manyu Liu; Huaying Dong; Guishu Liang

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Robert B. Laughlin and the Fractional Quantum Hall Effect  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Robert B. Laughlin and the Fractional Quantum Hall Effect Robert B. Laughlin and the Fractional Quantum Hall Effect Resources with Additional Information Robert B. Laughlin Photo Courtesy of LLNL Robert B. Laughlin shared the 1998 Nobel Prize in Physics with Horst L. Störmer and Daniel C. Tsui for 'their discovery of a new form of quantum fluid with fractionally charged excitations'. ' ... [I]n 1982 ... Störmer and Tsui discovered the effect. In 1983, Laughlin, then at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, provided the theoretical explanation of the effect in terms of fractionally charged particles. It was a "confluence of things from engineering that prepared me for understanding the fractional quantum Hall effect and coming up with an explanation," Laughlin said during a television interview at Stanford. ...

410

A Matlab toolbox for fractional relaxation-oscillation equations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stress relaxation and oscillation damping of complex viscoelastic media often manifest history- and path-dependent physical behaviors and cannot accurately be described by the classical models. Recent research found that fractional derivative models can characterize such complex relaxation and damping. However, to our best knowledge, easy-to-use numerical software is not available for fractional relaxation-oscillation (FRO) equations. This paper is to introduce an open source free Matlab toolbox which we developed in recent years for numerical solution of the FRO equations. This FRO toolbox uses the predictor-corrector approach for the discretization of time fractional derivative, and non-expert users can accurately solve fractional relaxation-oscillation equations via a friendly graphical user interface. Compared with experimental data, our numerical experiments show that the FRO toolbox is highly efficient and accurate to simulate viscoelastic stress relaxation and damped vibration. This free toolbox will help promote the research and practical use of fractional relaxation-oscillation equations.

Song Wei; Wen Chen

2013-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

411

Modeling branching effects on source-sink relationships of the cotton plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Compared with classical process-based models, the functional-structural plant models provide more efficient tools to explore the impact of changes in plant structures on plant functioning. In this paper we investigated the effects of branches on the sourcesink interaction for the cotton plant (Gossypium hirsutum L.) based on a two-treatment experiment conducted on cotton grown in the field: the singlestem plants and the plants with only two vegetative branches. It was observed that the branched cotton had more organs for the whole plant but the organs on the trunk were smaller than those on the single-stem cotton. The phytomer production of the branches was four or five growth cycles delayed compared with the main stem. The organs on the trunk had similar dynamics of expansion for both treatments. Effects of branches were evaluated by using the functionalstructural model GREENLAB. It allowed estimating the coefficients of sink strength to differentiate the biomass acquisition abilities of organs between diffe...

Li, Dong; Guo, Yan; De Reffye, P; Zhan, Zhigang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Hawaii Department of Health Solid and Hazardous Waste Branch | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and Hazardous Waste Branch and Hazardous Waste Branch Jump to: navigation, search Name Hawaii Department of Health Solid and Hazardous Waste Branch Address 919 Ala Moana Boulevard #212 Place Honolulu, Hawaii Zip 96814 Website http://hawaii.gov/health/envir Coordinates 21.294755°, -157.858979° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":21.294755,"lon":-157.858979,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

413

Effect of magnetic field on quasiparticle branches of intrinsic Josephson junctions with ferromagnetic layer.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The interlayer tunneling spectroscopy has been performed on micron-sized mesa arrays of HgBr{sub 2} intercalated superconducting Bi2212 single crystals. A ferromagnetic multilayer (Au/Co/Au) is deposited on top of the mesas. The spin-polarized current is driven along the c-axis of the mesas through a ferromagnetic Co layer and the hysteretic quasiparticle branches are observed at 4.2 K. Magnetic field evolution of hysteretic quasiparticle branches is obtained to examine the effect of injected spin-polarized current on intrinsic Josephson junction characteristics. It is observed that there is a gradual distribution in quasiparticle branches with the application of magnetic field and increasing field reduces the switching current progressively.

Ozyuzer, L.; Ozdemir, M.; Kurter, C.; Hinks, D. G.; Gray, K. E. (Materials Science Division); (Izmir Inst. of Tech.)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Measurement of the branching ratios for the decays of D(+)(s) to ??(+), ???(+), ??(+), and ???(+)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PHYSICAL REVIEW D, VOLUME 58, 052002Measurement of the branching ratios for the decays of Ds1 to hp1, h8p1, hr1, and h8r1 C. P. Jessop, K. Lingel, H. Marsiske, M. L. Perl, S. F. Schaffner, D. Ugolini, R. Wang, and X. Zhou Stanford Linear Accelerator...-II detector at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring, we have measured the branching ratios for the decay modes Ds 1!(h ,h 8 )p1 and Ds1!(h ,h8)r1 relative to Ds1!fp1. These decay modes are among the most common hadronic decays of the Ds 1 , and can be related...

Baringer, Philip S.

1998-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

415

A Conceptual Restoration Plan and Tidal Hydrology Assessment for Reconnecting Spring Branch Creek to Suisun Marsh, Solano County, California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EDAW 2007. Potrero Hills Landfill FEIR Volume 1. Solanothe headwaters at Potrero Hills Landfill is the headwatersBranch Creek, Potrero Hills Landfill and a private rancher

Olson, Jessica J.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Micro-Raman spectroscopy of fluid inclusions in a hopper crystal in halite  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Raman microscopy has been used successfully to analyze for dissolved sulfate in fluid inclusions in naturally occurring halite. Hopper crystals are crystals of halite (NaCl) whose structure is produced by crystal growth at the surface of a brine reservoir. Brine is trapped by defects in the growing crystal faces as microscopic fluid inclusions. In this study the hopper crystal was characterized by obtaining a profile of the sulfate (SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/) concentrations in brine inclusions in the bands formed in the hopper crystal structure. In addition, the same sample contained large areas of clear recrystallized halite in which fluid inclusions are not as abundant as those in hopper crystals but are several orders of magnitude larger (frequently several mm on an edge). These larger inclusions were also analyzed for their sulfate content. The sample for this study came from a thick halite unit in the Salado Formation (Permian age) in the Delaware Basin, southeastern New Mexico. The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is located at a depth of approximately 2150 feet from the surface.

Higgins, K.L.; Stein, C.L.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (2005-2006) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (2005-2006) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (2005-2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Fluid Inclusion Analysis Activity Date 2005 - 2006 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Include more wells from previous analysis Notes This paper focuses on the interpretation of the additional wells (4 bore holes) and comparison to the previous wells. Preliminary correlation

418

Exclusive channels in semi-inclusive production of pions and kaons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate the role of exclusive channels in semi-inclusive electroproduction of pions and kaons. Using the QCD factorization theorem for hard exclusive processes we evaluate the cross sections for exclusive pseudoscalar and vector meson production in terms of generalized parton distributions and meson distribution amplitudes. We investigate the uncertainties arising from the modeling of the nonperturbative input quantities. Combining these results with available experimental data, we compare the cross sections for exclusive channels to that obtained from quark fragmentation in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering. We find that {rho}{sup 0} production is the only exclusive channel with significant contributions to semi-inclusive pion production at large z and moderate Q{sup 2}. The corresponding contribution to kaon production from the decay of exclusively produced {phi} and K* is rather small.

Diehl, M.; Kugler, W.; Schaefer, A.; Weiss, C. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchroton DESY, 22603 Hamburg (Germany); Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Regensburg, 93040 Regensburg (Germany); Theory Group, Jefferson Lab, Newport News, Virginia 23606 (United States)

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Interactions between colloidal inclusions in two-dimensional smectic-C* films  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report an experimental study of colloidal inclusions in free-standing films of smectic-C* liquid crystal. The inclusions are cholesteric droplets that form above the bulk smectic-C*-7cholesteric transition temperature. Each droplet confined in a two-dimensional (2D) system, is accompanied by a topological defect. The distortions of the in-plane orientational order of the smectic-C* film induce elastic interactions between the droplets. As in 3D water nematic emulsions, a short-range repulsion and a long-range dipolar attraction govern the stability of the inclusions and lead to their organization in chainlike structures. Our results are in agreement with recent theoretical predictions.

P. Cluzeau; P. Poulin; G. Joly; H. T. Nguyen

2001-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

420

Measurement of inclusive charged current interactions on carbon in a few-GeV neutrino beam  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The SciBooNE Collaboration reports a measurement of inclusive charged current interactions of muon neutrinos on carbon with an average energy of 0.8~GeV using the Fermilab Booster Neutrino Beam. We compare our measurement with two neutrino interaction simulations: NEUT and NUANCE. The charged current interaction rates (product of flux and cross section) are extracted by fitting the muon kinematics, with a precision of 6-15% for the energy dependent and 3% for the energy integrated analyses. We also extract CC inclusive interaction cross sections from the observed rates, with a precision of 10-30% for the energy dependent and 8% for the energy integrated analyses. This is the first measurement of the CC inclusive cross section on carbon around 1 GeV. These results can be used to convert previous SciBooNE cross section ratio measurements to absolute cross section values.

jima, Y Naka; Brice, S J; Bugel, L; Catala-Perez, J; Cheng, G; Conrad, J M; Djurcic, Z; Dore, U; Finley, D A; Franke, A J; Giganti, C; Gomez-Cadenas, J J; Guzowski, P; Hanson, A; Hayato, Y; Hiraide, K; Jover-Manas, G; Karagiorgi, G; Katori, T; Kobayashi, Y K; Kobilarcik, T; Kubo, H; Kurimoto, Y; Louis, W C; Loverre, P F; Ludovici, L; Mahn, K B M; Mariani, C; Masuike, S; Matsuoka, K; McGary, V T; Metcalf, W; Mills, G B; Mitsuka, G; Miyachi, Y; Mizugashira, S; Moore, C D; Nakaya, T; Napora, R; Nienaber, P; Orme, D; Otani, M; Russell, A D; Sanchez, F; Shaevitz, M H; Shibata, T -A; Sorel, M; Stefanski, R J; Takei, H; Tanaka, H -K; Tanaka, M; Tayloe, R; Taylor, I J; Tesarek, R J; Uchida, Y; Van de Water, R; Walding, J J; Wascko, M O; White, H B; Yokoyama, M; Zeller, G P; Zimmerman, E D

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inclusive branching fractions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

A BIFURCATION RESULT FOR NON-LOCAL FRACTIONAL EQUATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, minimal surfaces, materials science and water waves. This is one of the reason why, recently, non studied non-local fractional Laplacian equations with superlinear and subcritical or critical

422

Deriving emissions time series from sparse atmospheric mole fractions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A growth-based Bayesian inverse method is presented for deriving emissions of atmospheric trace species from temporally sparse measurements of their mole fractions. This work is motivated by many recent studies that have ...

Rigby, Matthew

423

Energy Efficiency in Cryogenic Fractionation Through Distributive Distillation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-down and cryogenic fractionation steps, the technology can significantly reduce refrigeration power requirements. ARS technology can be applied to revamps of existing plants as well as new plant designs. Additional applications are now being considered...

Carradine, C. R.; McCue, R. H.

424

On the Functional Relation Between Quality Factor and Fractional Bandwidth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The functional relation between the fractional band-width and the quality factor of a radiating system is investigated in this note. Several widely used definitions of the quality factor are compared on two examples of RLC circuits that serve as a simplified model of a single resonant antenna tuned to its resonance. It is demonstrated that for a first-order system, only the quality factor based on differentiation of input impedance has unique proportionality to the fractional bandwidth, whereas e.g. the classical definition of the quality factor, i. e. the ratio of the stored energy to the lost energy per one cycle, is not uniquely proportional to the fractional bandwidth. In addition, it is shown that for higher-order systems the quality factor based on differentiation of the input impedance ceases to be uniquely related to the fractional bandwidth.

Capek, Miloslav; Hazdra, Pavel

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Gravity duals of fractional branes in various dimensions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We derive type II supergravity solutions corresponding to space-filling regular and fractional D branes on (9{minus}p)-dimensional conical transverse spaces. Fractional Dp-branes are wrapped D(p+2)-branes; therefore, our solutions exist only if the base of the cone has a non-vanishing Betti number b{sub 2}. We also consider 11-dimensional SUGRA solutions corresponding to regular and fractional M2 branes on 8-dimensional cones whose base has a non-vanishing b{sub 3}. In this case a fractional M2-brane is an M5-brane wrapped over a 3-cycle. We discuss the gauge theory intepretation of these solutions, as well as of the solutions constructed by Cvetic and co-workers.

Herzog, Christopher P.; Klebanov, Igor R.

2001-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

426

NGL fractionators planned for Corpus Christi olefins plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

TexStar MidStream Services LP is to install two natural gas liquids (NGL) fractionation units adjacent to LyondellBasell affiliate Equistar Chemicals LP's plant in Corpus Christi, Texas, USA.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

RESEARCH Open Access Gene expression and fractionation resistance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Paramecium, Gout et al. [10] identify a clear relationship between high WGD duplicate gene retention rates for explaining variable resistance to fractionation. The Gout et al. paper [10] is the primary inspiration

Sankoff, David

428

Sunlight creates oxygenated species in water-soluble fractions...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

a t Sunlight creates oxygenated species in water-soluble fractions of Deepwater horizon oil Phoebe Z. Ray a , Huan Chen b , David C. Podgorski b,c , Amy M. McKenna b , Matthew A....

429

Fluid inclusion geochemistry of halite from the Silurian A-1 Evaporite, Michigan Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fluids trapped in primary, inclusion-rich halite from the Silurian A-1 Evaporite of the Michigan Basin were analyzed to determine their elemental and isotopic composition and so constrain the fluid chemistry and regional variability of parent brines. The samples were collected from stratigraphically more complete basin center and basin margin cores than hitherto have been available. These include both inclusion-rich whole rock chips and fluids leached with isopropanol from crushed, inclusion-rich halite. Elemental ratios were determined relative to Mg, which is present only in the fluid phase of monomineralic halite samples and acts as a normalizing parameter against which to quantify fluid inclusion chemistry. Stable isotope ratios were determined on fluids collected from inclusion-rich halite by vacuum-thermal decrepitation. Inclusion fluids define a geochemical trend characterized by a Ca:Mg ratio of 1.4 [+-] 0.47, an Sr:Mg ratio of 0.015 [+-] 0.004 and a K:Mg ratio of 0.5 [+-] 0.17. Fluids are also depleted in SO[sub 4]. Importantly, these values are significantly different from any Michigan Basin formation brines and also cannot be derived from evaporation of modern seawater without extensive diagenetic modification. Two explanations of the data are possible. Pervasive syndepositional dolomitization and anhydrite precipitation may have altered Silurian brines of initial modern seawater composition, as has been suggested for similar data. However, consistently high cation ratios in the A-1 Evaporite on a regional scale demand striking uniformity in the timing and location of such reactions. Alternatively, Silurian seawater may have had elevated Ca:Mg, Sr:Mg and possibly K:Mg ratios relative to modern seawater.

Leibold, A.W.; Walter, L.M.; Huston, T.J.; O'Neil, J.R. (Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Lattice construction of pseudopotential Hamiltonians for fractional Chern insulators  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fractional Chern insulators are novel realizations of fractional quantum Hall states in lattice systems without orbital magnetic field. These states can be mapped onto conventional fractional quantum Hall states through the Wannier state representation [Qi, Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 126803 (2011)]. In this paper, we use the Wannier state representation to construct the pseudopotential Hamiltonians for fractional Chern insulators, which are interaction Hamiltonians with certain ideal model wave functions as exact ground states. We show that these pseudopotential Hamiltonians can be approximated by short-ranged interactions in fractional Chern insulators, and that their range will be minimized by an optimal gauge choice for the Wannier states. As illustrative examples, we explicitly write down the form of the lowest pseudopotential for several fractional Chern insulator models like the lattice Dirac model, the checkerboard model with Chern number 1, the d-wave model, and the triangular lattice model with Chern number 2. The proposed pseudopotential Hamiltonians have the 1/3 Laughlin state as their ground state when the Chern number C1=1, and a topological nematic (330) state as their ground state when C1=2. Also included are the results of an interpolation between the d-wave model and two decoupled layers of lattice Dirac models, which explicitly demonstrate the relation between C1=2 fractional Chern insulators and bilayer fractional quantum Hall states. The proposed states can be verified by future numerical works and, in particular, provide a model Hamiltonian for the topological nematic states that have not been realized numerically.

Ching Hua Lee and Xiao-Liang Qi

2014-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

431

Characterization and fractionation by ultrafiltration of guayule resin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rubber Production. 2. Solute Flow Through GPC Column. 3. Comparison of UF, MF, and RO Processes. 4. Pressure Gradient in Tubular Membrane. 5. Flow Pattern for Hollow Tube Asymmetric UF Membranes. 6. Structure of an Asymmetric Tubular Membrane. 7... information from the GPC analysis, indicates which compounds were present in each fraction. Identification and separation of potentially valuable fractions in the resin would increase the overall market value of the guayule shrub. Ultrafiltration (UF...

Daly, Monica Ann

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

432

Baytown Xylene Fractionation Energy Reduction using Dynamic Matrix Control (DMC)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Baytown Xylene Fractionation Energy Reduction using Dynamic Matrix Control (DMC) IETC 2014 New Orleans, Louisiana David Hokanson ExxonMobil Research and Engineering May 22, 2014 ESL-IE-14-05-33 Proceedings of the Thrity-Sixth Industrial Energy... Technology Conference New Orleans, LA. May 20-23, 2014 2Outline • Baytown Chemical Complex • Xylene Fractionation Overview • Dynamic Matrix Control • Results • Benefits/Wrap-Up ESL-IE-14-05-33 Proceedings of the Thrity-Sixth Industrial Energy Technology...

Hokanson, D.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

HIGH-FREQUENCY RADIO SPECTRAL ENERGY DISTRIBUTIONS AND POLARIZATION FRACTIONS OF SOURCES IN AN ATACAMA COSMOLOGY TELESCOPE SURVEY FIELD  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present flux densities and polarization percentages of 159 radio galaxies based on nearly simultaneous Very Large Array observations at four frequencies, 4.86, 8.46, 22.46, and 43.34 GHz. This sample is selected from the high-frequency Australia Telescope 20 GHz (AT20G) survey and consists of all sources with flux density S{sub 20GHz} > 40 mJy in an equatorial field of the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) survey. For a subset of 25 of these sources, we used the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) to obtain 90 GHz data. The goals of this program are: (1) a characterization of the spectra, polarization, and variability of high-frequency-selected radio sources, (2) extrapolating from the few GHz regime to the {approx}150 GHz regime of the ACT survey, allowing for more accurate removal of the radio source signal in our particular field, and (3) providing a data set that will allow more accurate modeling of the high-frequency radio source contamination in current and future Sunyaev-Zeldovich and cosmic microwave background experiments. We find that, as expected, this sample consists of flatter spectrum and more compact or point-like sources than low-frequency-selected samples. In the K band, variability is typically {approx}<20%, although there are exceptions. The higher frequency data are well suited to the detection of extreme gigahertz peak spectrum sources. The inclusion of the 43 GHz data causes the relative fraction of inverted spectrum sources to go down and of peaked spectrum sources to go up when compared with the AT20G survey results. The trend largely continues with the inclusion of the 90 GHz data, although {approx}10% of the sources with GBT data show a spectral upturn from 43 GHz to 90 GHz. The measured polarization fractions are typically <5%, although in some cases they are measured to be up to {approx}20%. For sources with detected polarized flux in all four bands, about 40% of the sample, the polarization fractions typically increase with frequency. This trend is stronger for steeper spectrum sources as well as for the lower flux density sources.

Sajina, Anna [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Tufts University, Medford, MA 02155 (United States); Partridge, Bruce; Evans, Tyler; Vechik, Nicholas [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Haverford College, Haverford, PA 19041 (United States); Stefl, Shannon [Kent State University, Kent, OH 44242 (United States); Myers, Steve [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Dicker, Simon; Korngut, Phillip [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Addressing the inclusion of English language learners the educational accountability system:lessons learned from peer review.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This study investigated the inclusion of English language learners (ELLs) in state standards and assessments, as measured by comments made by peer reviewers in the… (more)

Christensen, Laurene L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

U.S. Office of Personnel Management, Office of Diversity and Inclusion  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Government-Wide Diversity Government-Wide Diversity and Inclusion Strategic Plan 2011 Our Nation derives strength from the diversity of its population and from its commitment to equal opportunity for all. We are at our best when we draw on the talents of all parts of our society, and our greatest accomplishments are achieved when diverse perspectives are brought to bear to overcome our greatest challenges. - President Obama, Executive Order 13583 U.S. Office of Personnel Management Office of Diversity and Inclusion 2 Table of Contents Overview........................................................................................................................................3

436

Bring All People Together: Maximizing Diversity & Inclusion at Hallmark Cards, Inc.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and corporate Diversity & Inclusion roles to design an integrative solution that maximizes the impact of D&I on the marketplace. Background Story 1 Diversity & Inclusion (D&I) at Hallmark Over the past two decades, diversity councils and employee resource...Central.com: Diversity at Work, 2011 3. Strategy After research and commissioning a team of writers and designers to explore a more universal approach to faith and spirituality, a plan was put in place to create a program that would help guide product development...

Wimberly, Richard Buck

2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

437

DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200900615 From Branched Networks of Actin Filaments to Bundles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200900615 From Branched Networks of Actin Filaments to Bundles Yifat Brill- ses. Cell movement is driven by the dynamic growth of polar actin networks of various structures,[1 containing the lamellipodium, but lacking the nucleus, micro- tubules and other organels can perform movement

Ben-Shaul, Avinoam

438

Predation on infected host promotes evolutionary branching of virulence and pathogens' biodiversity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Predation on infected host promotes evolutionary branching of virulence and pathogens' biodiversity G H L I G H T S c We investigate the role of predators in biodiversity of the pathogens of prey. c investigate the possible role of predators in promoting biodiversity and disruptive evolution (evolutionary

439

Branching processes in random environment a view on critical and subcritical cases  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Branching processes in random environment ­ a view on critical and subcritical cases M. Birkner1 environment. Then the transition from subcriticality to supercriticality proceeds in several steps, and there occurs a second `transition' in the subcritical phase (besides the phase-transition from (sub)criticality

Birkner, Matthias

440

New analysis of O-14 beta decay: Branching ratios and conserved vector current consistency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The ground-state Gamow-Teller transition in the decay of O-14 is strongly hindered and the electron spectrum shape deviates markedly from the allowed shape. A reanalysis of the only available data on this spectrum changes the branching ratio...

Towner, IS; Hardy, John C.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inclusive branching fractions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

High-Energy Phonon Branches of an Individual Metallic Carbon Nanotube J. Maultzsch,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High-Energy Phonon Branches of an Individual Metallic Carbon Nanotube J. Maultzsch,1 S. Reich,1 U, 70569 Stuttgart, Germany (Received 13 December 2002; published 19 August 2003) We present excitation-energy dependent Raman measurements between 2.05 and 2.41 eVon the same individual carbon nanotube. We find

Nabben, Reinhard

442

Harbor Branch researcher on top of bottom life ahead of oil spill  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Harbor Branch researcher on top of bottom life ahead of oil spill By Ed Killer Saturday, June 12 like if touched by an underwater plume of oil. No doubt, much of it would be gone forever. Reed inhabiting the reefs, Reed hoped the oil would not be swept around the tip of Florida and onto the fragile

Belogay, Eugene A.

443

Dynamic rupture through a branched fault2 configuration at Yucca Mountain and resulting3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dynamic rupture through a branched fault2 configuration at Yucca Mountain and resulting3 ground analyses. This is motivated by the normal faults in the vicinity10 of Yucca Mountain, NV, a potential site fault12 located approximately 1 km west of the crest of Yucca Mountain, is the13 most active

Dmowska, Renata

444

Dynamic Rupture through a Branched Fault Configuration at Yucca Mountain, and Resulting Ground Motions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dynamic Rupture through a Branched Fault Configuration at Yucca Mountain, and Resulting Ground of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, a potential site for a high-level radioactive waste repository. The Solitario km away from the SCF beneath the crest of Yucca Mountain, causing the repository site to experience

445

Branching Random Walk in inhomogeneous breeding Sergey Bocharov, Simon C. Harris  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Branching Random Walk in inhomogeneous breeding potential Sergey Bocharov, Simon C. Harris) If p > 2 then Texplo Harris and S. Harris [7]. Theorem 1.4 (J. Harris and S. Harris). Consider a BBM model. a) If p [0, 2) then lim t Rt t

Harris, Simon Colin

446

Some path large deviation results for a branching diffusion Robert Hardy and Simon C. Harris  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Git, J.Harris and S.C.Harris [4]. Our approach involves an application of a change of measureSome path large deviation results for a branching diffusion Robert Hardy and Simon C. Harris of Hardy and Harris [5, 7, 6]. Our proof combines simple martingale ideas with applications of Varadhan

Harris, Simon Colin

447

Large deviations and martingales for a typed branching diffusion, 1 Simon C Harris and David Williams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Large deviations and martingales for a typed branching diffusion, 1 by Simon C Harris and David are rather complicated; and these are only sketched here ­ see Harris (1995) and Harris and Williams (1995 for a simpler problem in Champneys, Harris, Toland, Warren and Williams (1995); in the present context

Harris, Simon Colin

448

Impact of Branching on the UV Degradation of metallocene LLDPE Ibnelwaleed A. Hussein1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

& Petrochemicals, KFUPM, Dhahran, Saudi Arabia Abstract The effect of UV degradation on metallocene linear low exposed to natural weather condition. The extent of the degradation on these LLDPEs was measured; High Density polyethylene; Weathering; Branching content; Cross-linking, mechanical properties ihussein

Hussein, Ibnelwaleed A.

449

Lifeasweknowit To understand the human genome, researchers must spread their wings to all branches of life.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and a worm to its ENCODE project, which aims to catalogue all the functional parts of the human genome is moving more forcefully into purely human genomics. The biggest new projects recently announcedLifeasweknowit To understand the human genome, researchers must spread their wings to all branches

Pratt, Vaughan

450

AAACCOMPLISHMENTSCCOMPLISHMENTSCCOMPLISHMENTS 2012201220122012 FAU Harbor Branch Research Highlights INDIAN RIVER LAGOON OBSERVATORY PROGRAM ESTABLISHED  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Applications for the undersea imaging include naval mine detection and characterization, inspection of ship Scientists from the FAU Harbor Branch Marine Biomedical and Biotechnology Research (MBBR) program (supported use of manzamine A, a natural product isolated from a marine sponge, as a treatment in pancreatic

Fernandez, Eduardo

451

BRANCH-AND-PRICE: COLUMN GENERATION FOR SOLVING HUGE INTEGER PROGRAMS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia (Received February 1994; revisions received May 1995, January 1996; accepted relaxation because there are too many constraints to handle efficiently, and most of them will not be binding, allows separation and cutting to be applied throughout the branch-and-bound tree. The philosophy

Gendron, Bernard

452

Self-Assembly in Chains, Rings, and Branches: A Single Component System with Two Critical Points  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Self-Assembly in Chains, Rings, and Branches: A Single Component System with Two Critical Points October 2013) We study the interplay between phase separation and self-assembly in chains, rings. The emergence of the lower critical point is caused by the self-assembly of rings taking place in the vapor

Sciortino, Francesco

453

Molecular Plant Pages 110, 2011 RESEARCH ARTICLE Catabolism of Branched Chain Amino Acids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Horticultural Sciences Department and the Plant Molecular & Cellular Biology Program, University of Florida of branched chain amino acid transaminases 1 and 3, evaluating the rates of respiration in fruits deficient of the rapamycin (mTOR) pathway, in part, by serving both as a mitochondrial fuel through oxidative carboxylation

Klee, Harry J.

454

VEGETATED ROOFS FOR URBAN ECOSYSTEM REMEDIATION: PERFORMANCE AND POLICY IN THE TANYARD BRANCH WATERSHED  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

VEGETATED ROOFS FOR URBAN ECOSYSTEM REMEDIATION: PERFORMANCE AND POLICY IN THE TANYARD BRANCH their environmental impact, innovative practices must be developed that replace ecosystem services lost during systems for urban ecosystem remediation. The stormwater retention performance of a thin-layer green roof

Rosemond, Amy Daum

455

Supporting Streams of Changes during Branch Integration Vernica Uquillas Gmez, Stphane Ducasse, and Andy Kellens  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Supporting Streams of Changes during Branch Integration Verónica Uquillas Gómez, Stéphane Ducasse, and Andy Kellens Software Languages Lab, Vrije Universiteit Brussel and RMoD, Inria Lille ­ Nord Europe that analyzes changes within a sequence of changes (stream of changes): such analysis identifies

Boyer, Edmond

456

Crystal-symmetry preserving Wannier states for fractional Chern insulators  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recently, many numerical evidences of fractional Chern insulator, i.e., the fractional quantum Hall states on lattices, are proposed when a Chern band is partially filled. Some trial wave functions of fractional Chern insulators can be obtained by mapping the fractional quantum Hall wave functions defined in the continuum onto the lattice through the Wannier state representation [Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 126803 (2011)] in which the single particle Landau orbits in the Landau levels are identified with the one-dimensional Wannier states of the Chern bands with Chern number C=1. However, this mapping generically breaks the lattice point group symmetry. In this paper we discuss a general approach of modifying the mapping to accommodate the lattice rotational symmetry. The wave functions constructed through this modified mapping should serve as better trial wave functions in the thermodynamical limit and on the rotationally invariant finite lattice. Also these wave functions will form a good basis for the construction of lattice symmetry preserving pseudopotential formalism for fractional Chern insulators. The focus of this paper shall be mainly on the C4 rotational symmetry of square lattices. Similar analysis can be straightforwardly generalized to triangular or hexagonal lattices with C6 symmetry. We also generalize the discussion to the lattice symmetry of fractional Chern insulators with high Chern number bands.

Chao-Ming Jian and Xiao-Liang Qi

2013-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

457

A spine proof of a lower bound for a typed branching Robert Hardy and Simon C. Harris  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of an important and difficult path large-deviations lower bound for a typed branching diffusion as found in Git, J.HarrisA spine proof of a lower bound for a typed branching diffusion Robert Hardy and Simon C. Harris March 8, 2004 Abstract We follow the spine approach as found in Hardy and Harris [6, 8, 7] to define new

Harris, Simon Colin

458

Potential for Branch Predictor Adaptation at the Program and Phase Level for Performance and Energy-Efficiency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Potential for Branch Predictor Adaptation at the Program and Phase Level for Performance and Energy-Efficiency savings were performed. The performance and energy- efficiency of an 8-wide issue, out-of-order processor of the branch predictor configuration to improve overall processor energy- efficiency. The results

Co, Michele

459

Using measures of similarity and inclusion for multiple classifier fusion by decision templates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

types of combination: classifier selection and classifier fusion (see [16]). The presumptionUsing measures of similarity and inclusion for multiple classifier fusion by decision templates-407. Abstract Decision templates (DT) are a technique for classifier fusion for continuous-valued individual

Kuncheva, Ludmila I.

460

TEMPLATE for project inclusion in the NOAA OGP Climate Change Data and Detection (C  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TEMPLATE for project inclusion in the NOAA OGP Climate Change Data and Detection (C 2 D 2 ) Applied Research Center (ARC) for Data Set Development Sydney Levitus NODC/NOAA Project: Ocean Data Archaeology of the Climate-Quality Data Set A- quality control procedures, including ongoing improvements QC procedures

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inclusive branching fractions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Inclusive Computer Science Education Using a Ready-made Computer Game Framework  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Inclusive Computer Science Education Using a Ready-made Computer Game Framework Joseph Distasio and Thomas P. Way Applied Computing Technology Laboratory Department of Computing Sciences Villanova the prevailing interest in computer games among college students, both for entertainment and as a possible career

Way, Thomas

462

Modeling a distribution of point defects as misfitting inclusions in stressed solids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, as in the case of solid solution strengthening, or undesirable effects, as with hydrogen embrittlement-stress limit. Key words: solute, point defect, hydrogen, inclusion, dislocation 1 Introduction Solid solutions and Physics of Solids (2014) #12;or processing, or via attack by highly permeable contaminants (e.g. hydrogen

Cai, Wei

463

One-loop Single Real Emission Contributions to Inclusive Higgs Production at NNNLO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I discuss the contributions of the one-loop single-real-emission amplitudes, $gg\\to H g$, $qg\\to H q$, etc. to inclusive Higgs boson production through next-to-next-to-next-to-leading order in the strong coupling.

William B. Kilgore

2014-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

464

ISDA 2010, Montpellier, June 28-30, 2010 1 INNOVATION FOR POVERTY REDUCTION WITH INCLUSION IN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

social needs social process (Engel, 1996)2 . An innovation system can be defined as the networkISDA 2010, Montpellier, June 28-30, 2010 1 INNOVATION FOR POVERTY REDUCTION WITH INCLUSION IN THE ANDEAN REGION Panorama Andino - Learning from case studies on locally promoted innovation experiences

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

465

Moving towards inclusive design guidelines for socially and ethically aware HCI  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Standard on managing Inclusive Design (BS 7000-6); CEN/CENELEC Guide 6 3...living in the same house, has evolved to a nuclear family including only parents and children...expensiveWhen possible, select the lower cost choice Invasive and/or socially unacceptable......

Julio Abascal; Colette Nicolle

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Minimal energy for elastic inclusions By Hans Knupfer and Robert V. Kohn  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Minimal energy for elastic inclusions By Hans Kn¨upfer and Robert V. Kohn Courant Institute, New York University Mercer Street 251, New York, NY 10012, USA We consider a variant of the isoperimetric the emergence of the new phase, the interfacial energy provides an energy barrier for the creation and growth

467

The evolution of helping and harming on graphs: the return of the inclusive fitness effect  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The evolution of helping and harming on graphs: the return of the inclusive fitness effect L relatedness between individuals promotes helping behaviour, evolu- tionary graph theory emphasizes., 2006; Ohtsuki & Nowak, 2006). Evolutionary graph theory models allow the effect of space on helping

Alvarez, Nadir

468

e-inclusion in the Province of Cordoba: relations between social and digital divide  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper analyzes the socio-economic and demographic factors associated with the digital divide in the province of Cordoba. Specifically we see to what extent factors such as gender, age, education level, socioeconomic status, industry, combined and ... Keywords: ICT, digital divide, e-inclusion, social stratification

Cecilia Díaz; Carola Jones

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

A relict refractory inclusion in a ferromagnesian chondrule from the Allende meteorite  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... ferromagnesian type9. The most characteristic feature of the chondrule is that a coarse, subhedral spinel grain (up to 200 um in size) containing silicate inclusions and tiny metallic grains ... inside a ferromagnesian chondrule from the Allende meteorite. Sheng et al.10 described FeO-poor spinel grains in chondrules (they refer to the objects as plagioclase-

Keiji Misawa; Takashl Fujita

1994-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

470

Novel inclusive search for the Higgs boson in the four-lepton final state at CDF  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An inclusive search for the standard model Higgs boson using the four-lepton final state in proton-antiproton collisions produced by the Tevatron at ?s=1.96??TeV is conducted. The data are recorded by the CDF II detector ...

Gomez-Ceballos, Guillelmo

471

HELIUM ISOTOPE COMPOSITION OF FLUID INCLUSIONS HOSTED IN MASSIVE SULFIDES FROM MODERN SUBMARINE HYDROTHERMAL SYSTEMS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...resistance-heated furnace. Procedural blanks were...inclusions. The crushing efficiency depends on factors such...must be noted that the high-temperature (100...Oomori, T., 1990, Venting of carbon-dioxide-rich...2 orders of magnitude higher than expected for equilibrium...

Volker Lüders; Samuel Niedermann

472

RIS-M-2260 HEAT GRADIENT INDUCED MIGRATION OF BRINE INCLUSIONS IN ROCK SALT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;#12;- 5 - 1. INTRODUCTION The storage of heat producing radioactive waste in rock salt, will produce of the brine migration under influence of the decreasing heat production in the waste. A general expressionRISÃ?-M-2260 HEAT GRADIENT INDUCED MIGRATION OF BRINE INCLUSIONS IN ROCK SALT Mathematical treatment

473

Combined inclusive diffractive cross sections measured with forward proton spectrometers at HERA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A combination is presented of the inclusive diffractive cross section measurements made by the H1 and ZEUS Collaborations at HERA. The analysis uses samples of diffractive deep inelastic scattering data where leading protons are detected by dedicated spectrometers. Correlations of systematic uncertainties are taken into account by the combination method, resulting in improved precision.

Ruspa, Marta [Univ. Piemonte Orientale, via Solaroli 17, 28100 Novara (Italy); Collaboration: H1 Collaboration; ZEUS Collaboration

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

474

Model of Fractionalization of Faraday Lines in Compact Electrodynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Motivated by ideas of fractionalization and intrinsic topological order in bosonic models with short-range interactions, we consider similar phenomena in formal lattice gauge theory models. Specifically, we show that a compact quantum electrodynamics (CQED) can have, besides the familiar Coulomb and confined phases, additional unusual confined phases where excitations are quantum lines carrying fractions of the elementary unit of electric field strength. We construct a model that has $N$-tupled monopole condensation and realizes $1/N$ fractionalization of the quantum Faraday lines. This phase has another excitation which is a $Z_N$ quantum surface in spatial dimensions five and higher, but can be viewed as a quantum line or a quantum particle in four or three spatial dimensions respectively. These excitation have statistical interactions with the fractionalized Faraday lines; for example, in three spatial dimensions, the particle excitation picks up a Berry phase of $e^{i2\\pi/N}$ when going around the fractionalized Faraday line excitation. We demonstrate the existence of this phase by Monte Carlo simulations in (3+1) space-time dimensions.

Scott D. Geraedts; Olexei I. Motrunich

2014-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

475

Colloquium: Fractional calculus view of complexity: A tutorial  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The fractional calculus has been part of the mathematics and science literature for 310 years. However, it is only in the past decade or so that it has drawn the attention of mainstream science as a way to describe the dynamics of complex phenomena with long-term memory, spatial heterogeneity, along with nonstationary and nonergodic statistics. The most recent application encompasses complex networks, which require new ways of thinking about the world. Part of the new cognition is provided by the fractional calculus description of temporal and topological complexity. Consequently, this Colloquium is not so much a tutorial on the mathematics of the fractional calculus as it is an exploration of how complex phenomena in the physical, social, and life sciences that have eluded traditional mathematical modeling become less mysterious when certain historical assumptions such as differentiability are discarded and the ordinary calculus is replaced with the fractional calculus. Exemplars considered include the fractional differential equations describing the dynamics of viscoelastic materials, turbulence, foraging, and phase transitions in complex social networks.

Bruce J. West

2014-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

476

Glass Inclusions in Mariana Arc Phenocrysts: A New Perspective on Magmatic Evolution in a Typical Intra-oceanic Arc1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Glass Inclusions in Mariana Arc Phenocrysts: A New Perspective on Magmatic Evolution in a Typical at Dallas, Box 830688, Richardson, TX 75083-0688, USA A B S T R A C T Major element compositions of glass of these lavas reflects accumulation of plagioclase. Glass inclusions also show the common occurrence of felsic

Stern, Robert J.

477

E-Print Network 3.0 - ameliorates fractionated whole-brain Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

fractionated whole-brain Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: ameliorates fractionated whole-brain Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1...

478

Pressurized water reactor fuel assembly subchannel void fraction measurement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The void fraction measurement experiment of pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel assemblies has been conducted since 1987 under the sponsorship of the Ministry of International Trade and Industry as a Japanese national project. Two types of test sections are used in this experiment. One is a 5 x 5 array rod bundle geometry, and the other is a single-channel geometry simulating one of the subchannels in the rod bundle. Wide gamma-ray beam scanners and narrow gamma-ray beam computed tomography scanners are used to measure the subchannel void fractions under various steady-state and transient conditions. The experimental data are expected to be used to develop a void fraction prediction model relevant to PWR fuel assemblies and also to verify or improve the subchannel analysis method. The first series of experiments was conducted in 1992, and a preliminary evaluation of the data has been performed. The preliminary results of these experiments are described.

Akiyama, Yoshiei [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Yokohama (Japan). Nuclear Fuel and Core Engineering Dept.; Hori, Keiichi [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Hyougo (Japan); Miyazaki, Keiji [Osaka Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Mishima, Kaichiro [Kyoto Univ., Osaka (Japan). Research Reactor Inst.; Sugiyama, Shigekazu [Nuclear Power Engineering Corp., Tokyo (Japan). Nuclear Fuel Dept.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

THE PAIR FRACTION OF MASSIVE GALAXIES AT 0 {<=} z {<=} 3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using a mass-selected (M{sub *} {>=} 10{sup 11} M{sub Sun }) sample of 198 galaxies at 0 {<=} z {<=} 3.0 with Hubble Space Telescope/NICMOS H{sub 160}-band images from the COSMOS survey, we find evidence for the evolution of the pair fraction above z {approx} 2, an epoch in which massive galaxies are believed to undergo significant structural and mass evolution. We observe that the pair fraction of massive galaxies is 0.15 {+-} 0.08 at 1.7 {<=}z {<=} 3.0, where galaxy pairs are defined as massive galaxies having a companion of flux ratio from 1:1 to 1:4 within a projected separation of 30 kpc. This is slightly lower but still consistent with the pair fraction measured previously in other studies, and the merger fraction predicted in halo-occupation modeling. The redshift evolution of the pair fraction is described by a power law F(z) = (0.07 {+-} 0.04) Multiplication-Sign (1 + z){sup 0.6{+-}0.5}. The merger rate is consistent with no redshift evolution; however it is difficult to constrain due to the limited sample size and the high uncertainties in the merging timescale. Based on the merger rate calculation, we estimate that a massive galaxy undergoes on average 1.1 {+-} 0.5 major mergers from z = 3 to 0. The observed merger fraction is sufficient to explain the number density evolution of massive galaxies, but insufficient to explain the size evolution. This is a hint that mechanism(s) other than major merging may be required to increase the sizes of the massive, compact quiescent galaxies from z {approx} 2 to 0.

Man, Allison W. S.; Toft, Sune; Zirm, Andrew W. [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen (Denmark); Wuyts, Stijn [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, Garching bei Muenchen (Germany); Van der Wel, Arjen, E-mail: allison@dark-cosmology.dk, E-mail: sune@dark-cosmology.dk, E-mail: azirm@dark-cosmology.dk, E-mail: swuyts@mpe.mpg.de, E-mail: vdwel@mpia.de [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, Heidelberg (Germany)

2012-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

480

Village of the Branch, New York: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Branch, New York: Energy Resources Branch, New York: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 40.8562092°, -73.1873349° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.8562092,"lon":-73.1873349,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inclusive branching fractions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Single-enzyme kinetics with branched pathways: exact theory and series expansion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The progress of the successive rounds of catalytic conversion of substrates into product(s) by a single enzyme is characterized by the distribution of turnover times. Establishing the most general form of dependence of this distribution on the substrate concentration [S] is one of the fundamental challenges in single molecule enzymology. The distribution of the times of dwell of a molecular motor at the successive positions on its track is an analogous quantity. We derive approximate series expansions for the [ATP]-dependence of the first two moments of the dwell time distributions of motors that catalyze hydrolysis of ATP to draw input energy. Comparison between our results for motors with branched pathways and the corresponding expressions reported earlier for linear enzymatic pathways provides deep insight into the effects of the branches. Such insight is likely to help in discovering the most general form of [S]-dependence of these fundamental distributions.

Ashok Garai; Debashish Chowdhury

2014-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

482

Striking Photospheric Abundance Anomalies in Blue Horizontal-Branch Stars in Globular Cluster M13  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High-resolution optical spectra of thirteen blue horizontal-branch (BHB) stars in the globular cluster M13 show enormous deviations in element abundances from the expected cluster metallicity. In the hotter stars (T_eff > 12000 K), helium is depleted by factors of 10 to 100 below solar, while iron is enhanced to three times the solar abundance, two orders of magnitude above the canonical metallicity [Fe/H] ~= -1.5 dex for this globular cluster. Nitrogen, phosphorus, and chromium exhibit even more pronounced enhancements, and other metals are also mildly overabundant, with the exception of magnesium, which stays very near the expected cluster metallicity. These photospheric anomalies are most likely due to diffusion --- gravitational settling of helium, and radiative levitation of the other elements --- in the stable radiative atmospheres of these hot stars. The effects of these mechanisms may have some impact on the photometric morphology of the cluster's horizontal branch and on estimates of its age and distance.

Bradford B. Behr; Judith G. Cohen; James K. McCarthy; S. George Djorgovski

1999-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

483

This form is to be completed by Executive Branch employees who are contacted by  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

The information on this form will be available to the public on the Executive Branch agency's recovery website. The information on this form will be available to the public on the Executive Branch agency's recovery website. Written materials prepared by registered lobbyists should be attached to this form for posting on the website. To be completed by the employee contacted. Registered Lobbyist($) Name: Marc Marotta (Not a Federal Lobbyist) William S. Minahan (Not a Federal Lobbyist) David L. Jaeckels (Not a Federal Lobbyist) Steve Kelley (Not a Federal Lobbyist) Bill Broydrick (Registered Federal Lob L Brief description of the contact: (attach separate sheet if necessary) A general discussion on DOE'S efforts to improve building energy efficiency through the Recovery Act and other initiatives Date and time of contact: 1 01 14/09 1 1 :30am Name of the

484

Fluorescent spectra of chromatographic fractions of crude oils  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Number 4 exhibits the j400 Ao peak. Again all Fig. 7 0 Fluorescent Spectra of n-heptane Fraction, Cut No. 2 ()) 0 fE 30 ( 3) / (lI I I I I (&) )/ I 000 travelength in Ao significant intensity ranges from 3400 A to 4600 A... as $ Transnlssion Cyclohexane Fraction 7'ave Length& Ao Relative Fluorescent Intensity ude o 3000 3100 3200 3300 3400 3500 3600 3F' jwo 4100 4200 4300 4400 4500 4600 QOO 4900 5000 5200 5400 56OO 5'800 6000 65oo 7000 Oe0 Oeo O. e 2 ' 4...

Dixon, William Samuel

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

485

Separation of carbon nanotubes into chirally enriched fractions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A mixture of single-walled carbon nanotubes ("SWNTs") is separated into fractions of enriched chirality by preparing an aqueous suspension of a mixture of SWNTs and a surfactant, injecting a portion of the suspension on a column of separation medium having a density gradient, and centrifuging the column. In some embodiments, salt is added prior to centrifugation. In other embodiments, the centrifugation is performed at a temperature below room temperature. Fractions separate as colored bands in the column. The diameter of the separated SWNTs decreases with increasing density along the gradient of the column. The colored bands can be withdrawn separately from the column.

Doorn, Stephen K. (Los Alamos, NM); Niyogi, Sandip (Los Alamos, NM)

2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

486

D-T gamma-to-neutron branching ratio determined from inertial confinement fusion plasmasa)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new deuterium-tritium (D-T)fusion gamma-to-neutron branching ratio [3H(d ?)5He/3H(d n)4He] value of (4.2?±?2.0)?×?10?5 was recently reported by this group [Y. Kim et al. Phys. Rev. C (submitted)]. This measurement conducted at the OMEGA laser facility located at the University of Rochester was made for the first time using inertial confinement fusion(ICF)plasmas. Neutron-induced backgrounds are significantly reduced in these experiments as compared to traditional beam-target accelerator-based experiments due to the short pulse nature of ICF implosions and the use of gas Cherenkov ?-ray detectors with fast temporal responses and inherent energy thresholds. It is expected that this ICF-based measurement will help resolve the large and long-standing inconsistencies in previously reported accelerator-based values which vary by a factor of approximately 30. The reported value at ICF conditions was determined by averaging the results of two methods: (1) a direct measurement of ICFD-T ?-ray and neutron emissions using absolutely calibrated detectors and (2) a separate cross-calibration against the better known D-3He gamma-to-proton branching ratio [3He(d ??)5Li/3He(d p)4He]. Here we include a detailed explanation of these results and introduce as a corroborative method an in-situ ?-ray detectorcalibration using neutron-induced ?-rays. Also by extending the established techniques to two additional series of implosions with significantly different ion temperatures we test the branching ratio dependence on ion temperature. The data show a D-T branching ratio is nearly constant over the temperature range 2–9?keV. These studies motivate further investigation into the 5He and 5Li systems resulting from D-T and D-3He fusion respectively and result in improved ICF ?-ray reaction history diagnosis at the National Ignition Facility.

Y. Kim; J. M. Mack; H. W. Herrmann; C. S. Young; G. M. Hale; S. Caldwell; N. M. Hoffman; S. C. Evans; T. J. Sedillo; A. McEvoy; J. Langenbrunner; H. H. Hsu; M. A. Huff; S. Batha; C. J. Horsfield; M. S. Rubery; W. J. Garbett; W. Stoeffl; E. Grafil; L. Bernstein; J. A. Church; D. B. Sayre; M. J. Rosenberg; C. Waugh; H. G. Rinderknecht; M. Gatu Johnson; A. B. Zylstra; J. A. Frenje; D. T. Casey; R. D. Petrasso; E. Kirk Miller; V. Yu Glebov; C. Stoeckl; T. C. Sangster

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

"Branches of a Tree" 31 October 2009 Edwards (Ted) Atwood, Ph.D., 1976  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

"Branches of a Tree" ­ 31 October 2009 #12;#12; Edwards (Ted) Atwood, Ph.D., 1976 Kumar Bhushan, PD, 2003-2005 Alex Bonner, Ph.D., 1975 Ting Chen, PD, 2001-2003 Kyung-Hee (Kay) Choi, Ph.D., 1998 Hann--Bin Chuang, Ph.D., 1986 Gejing Deng, Ph.D., 1997 Daniel DeOliveira, Ph.D., 1998 J.D. Dixon, Ph

Spence, Harlan Ernest

488

GLLH EM Invisible Cloak With Novel Front Branching And Without Exceed Light Speed Violation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, we propose new Global and Local (GL) electromagnetic (EM) cloaks with distinctive class material a_{\\alpha \\beta}\\log ^\\alpha (b_{\\alpha \\beta}/h) h^\\beta (GLLH Cloak) without exceed light speed violation. The refractive index of the GLLH cloak material, $n(r)$, is large than one or equal to one. Our GLLH cloak is created by GL EM modeling and GL EM cloak inversion with searching class \\it a_{\\alpha \\beta}\\log ^\\alpha (b_{\\alpha \\beta}/h) h^\\beta. The GLLH cloaks in this paper have finite speed and have no exceed light speed? physical violations and have more advantages. The GLLH EM cloaks can be practicable by using normal materials and are available for all broad frequency band. The GL EM cloak inversion and electromagnetic integral equation for cloak are presented in this paper. The novel EM wave propagation and front branching in the GLLH cloak by GL EM modeling are presented in this paper. The EM wave front propagation in GLLH cloak is behind of the front in free space. At time steps $118 dt$, in the GLLH cloak, the wave front is curved as a crescent like and propagates slower than the light in free space. At the time step $119dt$, the EM wave inside of the GLLH cloak propagates slower than light speed, moreover, its two crescent front peaks intersect at a front branching point. At the front branching point, the front is split to two fronts. The novel front branching and crescent like wave propagation are displayed in the following figure 1, figure 2 and figures 5 -20 in this paper. All copyright and patent of the GLLH EM cloaks and GL modeling and inversion methods are reserved by authors in GL Geophysical Laboratory.

Ganquan Xie; Jianhua Li; Lee Xie; Feng Xie

2010-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

489

Photospheric Opacity and Over-Expanded Envelopes of Asymptotic Giant Branch Stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I suggest that the behavior of the photospheric opacity in oxygen-rich (similar to solar abundance) upper asymptotic giant branch stars may cause these stars to substantially expand for a few thousand years. I term this process over-expansion. This may occur when the photospheric (effective) temperature drops to Tp~3000K, and because the opacity sharply increases as temperature further decreases down to Tp~2000K$. The much higher opacity implies a much lower photospheric density, which stabilizes the envelope structure. As mass loss proceeds, the star eventually contracts to become a post-asymptotic giant branch star. Some possible outcomes of the over-expanded phase are discussed: (1) The over-expanded phase may be connected to the formation of semi-periodic concentric arcs (rings; shells); (2) The over-expanded phase may be related to the positive correlation between the mass loss rate and the transition to axisymmetric mass loss geometry; and (3) An over-expanded asymptotic giant branch star, which doubles its radius, is somewhat more likely to swallow a low mass companion.

Noam Soker

2003-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

490

Airborne release fractions/rates and respirable fractions for nonreactor nuclear facilities. Volume 1, Analysis of experimental data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This handbook contains (1) a systematic compilation of airborne release and respirable fraction experimental data for nonreactor nuclear facilities, (2) assessments of the data, and (3) values derived from assessing the data that may be used in safety analyses when the data are applicable. To assist in consistent and effective use of this information, the handbook provides: identification of a consequence determination methodology in which the information can be used; discussion of the applicability of the information and its general technical limits; identification of specific accident phenomena of interest for which the information is applicable; and examples of use of the consequence determination methodology and airborne release and respirable fraction information.

Not Available

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Process for removing polymer-forming impurities from naphtha fraction  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Polymer precursor materials are vaporized without polymerization or are removed from a raw naphtha fraction by passing the raw naphtha to a vaporization zone and vaporizing the naphtha in the presence of a wash oil while stripping with hot hydrogen to prevent polymer deposits in the equipment. 2 figs.

Kowalczyk, D.C.; Bricklemyer, B.A.; Svoboda, J.J.

1983-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

492

Empirical Relationships for Estimating Liquid Water Fraction of Melting Snowflakes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The liquid water fraction of individual snowflakes f is an important parameter when calculating the radar reflectivity of a melting layer. A ground-based observation of f at Nagaoka, Japan, was conducted by using dye-treated filter pape