National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for including wind plants

  1. Wind Plant Ramping Behavior

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ela, E.; Kemper, J.

    2009-12-01

    With the increasing wind penetrations, utilities and operators (ISOs) are quickly trying to understand the impacts on system operations and planning. This report focuses on ramping imapcts within the Xcel service region.

  2. Dynamic Models for Wind Turbines and Wind Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, M.; Santoso, S.

    2011-10-01

    The primary objective of this report was to develop universal manufacturer-independent wind turbine and wind power plant models that can be shared, used, and improved without any restrictions by project developers, manufacturers, and engineers. Manufacturer-specific models of wind turbines are favored for use in wind power interconnection studies. While they are detailed and accurate, their usages are limited to the terms of the non-disclosure agreement, thus stifling model sharing. The primary objective of the work proposed is to develop universal manufacturer-independent wind power plant models that can be shared, used, and improved without any restrictions by project developers, manufacturers, and engineers. Each of these models includes representations of general turbine aerodynamics, the mechanical drive-train, and the electrical characteristics of the generator and converter, as well as the control systems typically used. To determine how realistic model performance is, the performance of one of the models (doubly-fed induction generator model) has been validated using real-world wind power plant data. This work also documents selected applications of these models.

  3. Web-based Tool for Preliminary Assessment of Wind Power Plant Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borissova, Daniela

    Web-based Tool for Preliminary Assessment of Wind Power Plant Design Daniela Borissova1 and Ivan. Designing of reliable and cost-effective industrial wind power plant is a prerequisite for the effective use of wind power as an alternative resource. The design of a wind power plant includes the determination

  4. Development of Regional Wind Resource and Wind Plant Output Datasets for the Hawaiian Islands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manobianco, J.; Alonge, C.; Frank, J.; Brower, M.

    2010-07-01

    In March 2009, AWS Truepower was engaged by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to develop a set of wind resource and plant output data for the Hawaiian Islands. The objective of this project was to expand the methods and techniques employed in the Eastern Wind Integration and Transmission Study (EWITS) to include the state of Hawaii.

  5. Wind Plant Cost of Energy: Past and Future (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hand, M.

    2013-03-01

    This presentation examines trends in wind plant cost of energy over the last several decades and discusses methods and examples of projections for future cost trends. First, the presentation explores cost trends for wind energy from the 1980s, where there had been an overall downward trend in wind plant energy costs. Underlying factors that influenced these trends, including turbine technology innovation for lower wind speed sites, are explored. Next, the presentation looks at projections for the future development of wind energy costs and discusses a variety of methods for establishing these projections including the use of learning curves, qualitative assessment using expert elicitation, and engineering-based analysis. A comparison of the methods is provided to explore their relative merits. Finally, a brief introduction is provided for the U.S. Department of Energy program-wide shift towards an integrative use of qualitative and quantitative methods for assessing the potential impacts of wind plant technology innovations on reducing the wind plant cost of energy.

  6. Web-based Tool for Preliminary Assessment of Wind Power Plant Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mustakerov, Ivan

    of type, number and layout of wind turbines for given site area. Preliminary assessment of de- sign by real data for wind turbines and pa- rameters of the wind site. Keywords: wind power plant, design) is a complex and iterative process. It includes choice of turbines and definition of proper layout conforming

  7. Using wind plant data to increase reliability.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, Valerie A. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Ogilvie, Alistair B.; McKenney, Bridget L.

    2011-01-01

    Operators interested in improving reliability should begin with a focus on the performance of the wind plant as a whole. To then understand the factors which drive individual turbine performance, which together comprise the plant performance, it is necessary to track a number of key indicators. Analysis of these key indicators can reveal the type, frequency, and cause of failures and will also identify their contributions to overall plant performance. The ideal approach to using data to drive good decisions includes first determining which critical decisions can be based on data. When those required decisions are understood, then the analysis required to inform those decisions can be identified, and finally the data to be collected in support of those analyses can be determined. Once equipped with high-quality data and analysis capabilities, the key steps to data-based decision making for reliability improvements are to isolate possible improvements, select the improvements with largest return on investment (ROI), implement the selected improvements, and finally to track their impact.

  8. Harmonics and Resonance Issues with Wind Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradt, M. [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Badrzadeh, Babak [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Camm, E H [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Castillo, Nestor [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Mueller, David [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Siebert, T. [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Schoene, Jens [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Smith, Travis M [ORNL; Starke, Michael R [ORNL; Walling, R. [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group

    2011-01-01

    Wind plants are susceptible to lightly-damped resonances which can attract and amplify ambient grid harmonic distortion and magnify wind turbine harmonic generation. Long-accepted harmonic modeling assumptions and practices are not appropriate for wind plants. VSCs are not ideal current sources and grid impedance is important. Attention to modeling detail and thorough evaluation over range of conditions is critical to meaningful analysis. In general, wind turbines are very slight sources of harmonics. Most harmonic issues are a result of resonance, caused by capacitor banks (for reactive power compensation) or from the extensive underground cabling in a collector system. Converter controls instability can be exacerbated by power system resonances. In some cases this has caused severe voltage distorDon and other problems. The IEEE 519 recommended guidelines are very restrictive. I recommend that they are used to resolve serious harmonic issues, and not to create petty problems.

  9. Aalborg Universitet Methodologies for Wind Turbine and STATCOM Integration in Wind Power Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bak, Claus Leth

    Aalborg Universitet Methodologies for Wind Turbine and STATCOM Integration in Wind Power Plant Integration in Wind Power Plant Models for Harmonic Resonances Assessment. In Proceedings of the 14th Wind Integration Workshop: International Workshop on Large-Scale Integration of Wind Power into Power Systems

  10. Introduction to Small-Scale Wind Energy Systems (Including RETScreen...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    production of a wind turbine or farm. It covers topics such as vertical and horizontal axis wind turbines. There is also a tutorial for RETscreen's wind tool, in which the...

  11. FULL-SCALE, WIND TUNNEL AND CFD WIND ENGINEERING STUDIES A variety of methods can be used to obtain wind engineering design information. These include

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Savory, Eric

    FULL-SCALE, WIND TUNNEL AND CFD WIND ENGINEERING STUDIES A variety of methods can be used to obtain wind engineering design information. These include codes of practice, full-scale, wind tunnel are listed in the table below: Table 1. Relative advantages and disadvantages of wind engineering techniques

  12. Continuous Reliability Enhancement for Wind (CREW) database : wind plant reliability benchmark.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hines, Valerie Ann-Peters; Ogilvie, Alistair B.; Bond, Cody R.

    2013-09-01

    To benchmark the current U.S. wind turbine fleet reliability performance and identify the major contributors to component-level failures and other downtime events, the Department of Energy funded the development of the Continuous Reliability Enhancement for Wind (CREW) database by Sandia National Laboratories. This report is the third annual Wind Plant Reliability Benchmark, to publically report on CREW findings for the wind industry. The CREW database uses both high resolution Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) data from operating plants and Strategic Power Systems' ORAPWind%C2%AE (Operational Reliability Analysis Program for Wind) data, which consist of downtime and reserve event records and daily summaries of various time categories for each turbine. Together, these data are used as inputs into CREW's reliability modeling. The results presented here include: the primary CREW Benchmark statistics (operational availability, utilization, capacity factor, mean time between events, and mean downtime); time accounting from an availability perspective; time accounting in terms of the combination of wind speed and generation levels; power curve analysis; and top system and component contributors to unavailability.

  13. Aalborg Universitet FACTS Devices for Large Wind Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berning, Torsten

    of wind power has become significant, grid performance and stability is affected [3]-[5]. ThereforeAalborg Universitet FACTS Devices for Large Wind Power Plants Adamczyk, Andrzej Grzegorz., Teodorescu, R., Rodriguez, P., & Mukerjee, R. N. (2010). FACTS Devices for Large Wind Power Plants

  14. Wind Power Plant Prediction by Using Neural Networks: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Z.; Gao, W.; Wan, Y. H.; Muljadi, E.

    2012-08-01

    This paper introduces a method of short-term wind power prediction for a wind power plant by training neural networks based on historical data of wind speed and wind direction. The model proposed is shown to achieve a high accuracy with respect to the measured data.

  15. OTC 23597-MS Numerical Simulation of Floating Offshore Wind Turbines Including Aero-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sweetman, Bert

    OTC 23597-MS Numerical Simulation of Floating Offshore Wind Turbines Including Aero- Elasticity methodology is presented for simulation of dynamic behavior of floating offshore wind turbines. Wind forces. Introduction and Background The economic potential of offshore deep water wind turbines has not yet been fully

  16. Wind Power Plant Voltage Stability Evaluation: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muljadi, E.; Zhang, Y. C.

    2014-09-01

    Voltage stability refers to the ability of a power system to maintain steady voltages at all buses in the system after being subjected to a disturbance from a given initial operating condition. Voltage stability depends on a power system's ability to maintain and/or restore equilibrium between load demand and supply. Instability that may result occurs in the form of a progressive fall or rise of voltages of some buses. Possible outcomes of voltage instability are the loss of load in an area or tripped transmission lines and other elements by their protective systems, which may lead to cascading outages. The loss of synchronism of some generators may result from these outages or from operating conditions that violate a synchronous generator's field current limit, or in the case of variable speed wind turbine generator, the current limits of power switches. This paper investigates the impact of wind power plants on power system voltage stability by using synchrophasor measurements.

  17. Test Cases for Wind Power Plant Dynamic Models on Real-Time Digital Simulator: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, M.; Muljadi, E.; Gevorgian, V.

    2012-06-01

    The objective of this paper is to present test cases for wind turbine generator and wind power plant models commonly used during commissioning of wind power plants to ensure grid integration compatibility. In this paper, different types of wind power plant models based on the Western Electricity Coordinating Council Wind Generator Modeling Group's standardization efforts are implemented on a real-time digital simulator, and different test cases are used to gauge their grid integration capability. The low-voltage ride through and reactive power support capability and limitations of wind turbine generators under different grid conditions are explored. Several types of transient events (e.g., symmetrical and unsymmetrical faults, frequency dips) are included in the test cases. The differences in responses from different types of wind turbine are discussed in detail.

  18. Providing Minute-to-Minute Regulation from Wind Plants: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirby, B.; Milligan, M.; Ela, E.

    2010-10-01

    In this paper, we extend the previous analysis using time series data from existing wind plants, system loads, and regulation and energy markets.

  19. Impact of Wind Power Plants on Voltage and Transient Stability of Power Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muljadi, E.; Nguyen, Tony B.; Pai, M. A.

    2008-09-30

    A standard three-machine, nine-bus wind power system is studied and augmented by a radially connected wind power plant that contains 22 wind turbine generators.

  20. Optimal site selection and sizing of distributed utility-scale wind power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milligan, M.R. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Artig, R. [Minnesota Dept. of Public Service, St. Paul, MN (United States)

    1998-04-01

    As electric market product unbundling occurs, sellers in the wholesale market for electricity will find it to their advantage to be able to specify the quantity of electricity available and the time of availability. Since wind power plants are driven by the stochastic nature of the wind itself, this can present difficulties. To the extent that an accurate wind forecast is available, contract deviations, and therefore penalties, can be significantly reduced. Even though one might have the ability to accurately forecast the availability of wind power, it might not be available during enough of the peak period to provide sufficient value. However, if the wind power plant is developed over geographically disperse locations, the timing and availability of wind power from these multiple sources could provide a better match with the utility`s peak load than a single site. There are several wind plants in various stages of planning or development in the US. Although some of these are small-scale demonstration projects, significant wind capacity has been developed in Minnesota, with additional developments planned in Wyoming and Iowa. As these and other projects are planned and developed, there is a need to perform analysis of the value of geographically diverse sites on the efficiency of the overall wind plant. In this paper, the authors use hourly wind-speed data from six geographically diverse sites to provide some insight into the potential benefits of disperse wind plant development. They provide hourly wind power from each of these sites to an electric reliability simulation model. This model uses generating plant characteristics of the generators within the state of Minnesota to calculate various reliability indices. Since they lack data on wholesale power transactions, they do not include them in the analysis, and they reduce the hourly load data accordingly. The authors present and compare results of their methods and suggest some areas of future research.

  1. Oscillation Damping: A Comparison of Wind and Photovoltaic Power Plant Capabilities: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, M.; Allen, A.; Muljadi, E.; Gevorgian, V.

    2014-07-01

    This work compares and contrasts strategies for providing oscillation damping services from wind power plants and photovoltaic power plants.

  2. Understanding Inertial and Frequency Response of Wind Power Plants: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muljadi, E.; Gevorgian, V.; Singh, M.; Santoso, S.

    2012-07-01

    The objective of this paper is to analyze and quantify the inertia and frequency responses of wind power plants with different wind turbine technologies (particularly those of fixed speed, variable slip with rotor-resistance controls, and variable speed with vector controls).

  3. NREL Software Models Performance of Wind Plants (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2015-01-01

    This NREL Highlight is being developed for the 2015 February Alliance S&T Meeting, and describes NREL's Simulator for Offshore Wind Farm Applications (SOWFA) software in collaboration with Norway-based Statoil, to optimize layouts and controls of wind plants arrays.

  4. Solar-wind magnetosphere coupling, including relativistic electron energization, during high-speed streams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyons, Larry

    Solar-wind­ magnetosphere coupling, including relativistic electron energization, during high. If this inference is correct, and if it is chorus that energizes the relativistic electrons, then high-speed solar-speed solar wind streams, and fluxes of relativistic electrons observed at geosynchronous orbit enhance

  5. NWTC Researchers Field-Test Advanced Control Turbine Systems to Increase Performance, Decrease Structural Loading of Wind Turbines and Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-08-01

    Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) are studying component controls, including new advanced actuators and sensors, for both conventional turbines as well as wind plants. This research will help develop innovative control strategies that reduce aerodynamic structural loads and improve performance. Structural loads can cause damage that increase maintenance costs and shorten the life of a turbine or wind plant.

  6. Role of Design Standards in Wind Plant Optimization (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veers, P.; Churchfield, M.; Lee, S.; Moon, J.; Larsen, G.

    2013-10-01

    When a turbine is optimized, it is done within the design constraints established by the objective criteria in the international design standards used to certify a design. Since these criteria are multifaceted, it is a challenging task to conduct the optimization, but it can be done. The optimization is facilitated by the fact that a standard turbine model is subjected to standard inflow conditions that are well characterized in the standard. Examples of applying these conditions to rotor optimization are examined. In other cases, an innovation may provide substantial improvement in one area, but be challenged to impact all of the myriad design load cases. When a turbine is placed in a wind plant, the challenge is magnified. Typical design practice optimizes the turbine for stand-alone operation, and then runs a check on the actual site conditions, including wakes from all nearby turbines. Thus, each turbine in a plant has unique inflow conditions. The possibility of creating objective and consistent inflow conditions for turbines within a plant, for used in optimization of the turbine and the plant, are examined with examples taken from LES simulation.

  7. Sensitivity Analysis of Wind Plant Performance to Key Turbine Design Parameters: A Systems Engineering Approach; Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dykes, K.; Ning, A.; King, R.; Graf, P.; Scott, G.; Veers, P.

    2014-02-01

    This paper introduces the development of a new software framework for research, design, and development of wind energy systems which is meant to 1) represent a full wind plant including all physical and nonphysical assets and associated costs up to the point of grid interconnection, 2) allow use of interchangeable models of varying fidelity for different aspects of the system, and 3) support system level multidisciplinary analyses and optimizations. This paper describes the design of the overall software capability and applies it to a global sensitivity analysis of wind turbine and plant performance and cost. The analysis was performed using three different model configurations involving different levels of fidelity, which illustrate how increasing fidelity can preserve important system interactions that build up to overall system performance and cost. Analyses were performed for a reference wind plant based on the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's 5-MW reference turbine at a mid-Atlantic offshore location within the United States.

  8. Wind of change: new insights on the ecology and evolution of pollination and mating in wind-pollinated plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrett, Spencer C.H.

    . For example, traits such as small, unisexual flowers and dry pollen may facilitate tran- sitions to windREVIEW Wind of change: new insights on the ecology and evolution of pollination and mating in wind- pollinated plants. At least 10 % of angiosperms are wind pollinated, and this mode of pollination has evolved

  9. Design and Application of Cables and Overhead Lines in Wind Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Behnke, M. R. [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Bellei, T.A. [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Bloethe, W.G. [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Bradt, M. [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Brooks, C. [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Camm, E H [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Dilling, W. [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Goltz, B. [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Hermanson, J. [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Li, J. [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Loy, P. [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; McLean, K. [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Niemira, J. [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Nuckles, K. [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Patino, J. [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Reza, M [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Richardson, B. [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Samaan, N. [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Schoene, Jens [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Smith, Travis M [ORNL; Snyder, Isabelle B [ORNL; Starke, Michael R [ORNL; Tesch, M. [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Walling, R. [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Zahalka, G. [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a summary of the most impor- tant considerations for wind power plant collection system un- derground and overhead cable designs. Various considerations, including conductor selection, soil thermal properties, installa- tion methods, splicing, concentric grounding, and NESC/NEC requirements are discussed.

  10. Introducing WISDEM:An Integrated System Modeling for Wind Turbines and Plant (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dykes, K.; Graf, P.; Scott, G.; Ning, A.; King, R.; Guo, Y.; Parsons, T.; Damiani, R.; Felker, F.; Veers, P.

    2015-01-01

    The National Wind Technology Center wind energy systems engineering initiative has developed an analysis platform to leverage its research capabilities toward integrating wind energy engineering and cost models across wind plants. This Wind-Plant Integrated System Design & Engineering Model (WISDEM) platform captures the important interactions between various subsystems to achieve a better National Wind Technology Center wind energy systems engineering initiative has developed an analysis platform to leverage its research capabilities toward integrating wind energy engineering and cost models across wind plants. This Wind-Plant Integrated System Design & Engineering Model (WISDEM) platform captures the important interactions between various subsystems to achieve a better understanding of how to improve system-level performance and achieve system-level cost reductions. This work illustrates a few case studies with WISDEM that focus on the design and analysis of wind turbines and plants at different system levels.

  11. SOWFA Super-Controller: A High-Fidelity Tool for Evaluating Wind Plant Control Approaches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fleming, P.; Gebraad, P.; van Wingerden, J. W.; Lee, S.; Churchfield, M.; Scholbrock, A.; Michalakes, J.; Johnson, K.; Moriarty, P.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a new tool for testing wind plant controllers in the Simulator for Offshore Wind Farm Applications (SOWFA). SOWFA is a high-fidelity simulator for the interaction between wind turbine dynamics and the fluid flow in a wind plant. The new super-controller testing environment in SOWFA allows for the implementation of the majority of the wind plant control strategies proposed in the literature.

  12. Large-Eddy Simulation of Wind-Plant Aerodynamics: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Churchfield, M. J.; Lee, S.; Moriarty, P. J.; Martinez, L. A.; Leonardi, S.; Vijayakumar, G.; Brasseur, J. G.

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we present results of a large-eddy simulation of the 48 multi-megawatt turbines composing the Lillgrund wind plant. Turbulent inflow wind is created by performing an atmospheric boundary layer precursor simulation and turbines are modeled using a rotating, variable-speed actuator line representation. The motivation for this work is that few others have done wind plant large-eddy simulations with a substantial number of turbines, and the methods for carrying out the simulations are varied. We wish to draw upon the strengths of the existing simulations and our growing atmospheric large-eddy simulation capability to create a sound methodology for performing this type of simulation. We have used the OpenFOAM CFD toolbox to create our solver.

  13. Adapting ORAP to wind plants : industry value and functional requirements.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-08-01

    Strategic Power Systems (SPS) was contracted by Sandia National Laboratories to assess the feasibility of adapting their ORAP (Operational Reliability Analysis Program) tool for deployment to the wind industry. ORAP for Wind is proposed for use as the primary data source for the CREW (Continuous Reliability Enhancement for Wind) database which will be maintained by Sandia to enable reliability analysis of US wind fleet operations. The report primarily addresses the functional requirements of the wind-based system. The SPS ORAP reliability monitoring system has been used successfully for over twenty years to collect RAM (Reliability, Availability, Maintainability) and operations data for benchmarking and analysis of gas and steam turbine performance. This report documents the requirements to adapt the ORAP system for the wind industry. It specifies which existing ORAP design features should be retained, as well as key new requirements for wind. The latter includes alignment with existing and emerging wind industry standards (IEEE 762, ISO 3977 and IEC 61400). There is also a comprehensive list of thirty critical-to-quality (CTQ) functional requirements which must be considered and addressed to establish the optimum design for wind.

  14. Land-Based Wind Plant Balance-of-System Cost Drivers and Sensitivities (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mone, C.; Maples, B.; Hand, M.

    2014-04-01

    With Balance of System (BOS) costs contributing up to 30% of the installed capital cost, it is fundamental to understand the BOS costs for wind projects as well as potential cost trends for larger turbines. NREL developed a BOS model using project cost estimates developed by industry partners. Aspects of BOS covered include engineering and permitting, foundations for various wind turbines, transportation, civil work, and electrical arrays. The data introduce new scaling relationships for each BOS component to estimate cost as a function of turbine parameters and size, project parameters and size, and geographic characteristics. Based on the new BOS model, an analysis to understand the non?turbine wind plant costs associated with turbine sizes ranging from 1-6 MW and wind plant sizes ranging from 100-1000 MW has been conducted. This analysis establishes a more robust baseline cost estimate, identifies the largest cost components of wind project BOS, and explores the sensitivity of the capital investment cost and the levelized cost of energy to permutations in each BOS cost element. This presentation shows results from the model that illustrate the potential impact of turbine size and project size on the cost of energy from US wind plants.

  15. Aalborg Universitet Control and Protection of Wind Power Plants with VSC-HVDC Connection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhary, Sanjay

    to a higher energy yield. Europe has a huge potential of offshore wind energy, which is a green energy. The European Union expects to generate 230 GW wind power, in which the offshore wind power is expected to contribute 40 GW. Offshore wind power plants have better wind velocity profile leading

  16. Aalborg Universitet Harmonic Resonances in Wind Power Plants: Modeling, Analysis and Active Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bak, Claus Leth

    Aalborg Universitet Harmonic Resonances in Wind Power Plants: Modeling, Analysis and Active. (2015). Harmonic Resonances in Wind Power Plants: Modeling, Analysis and Active Mitigation Methods from vbn.aau.dk on: juli 04, 2015 #12;Harmonic Resonances in Wind Power Plants: Modeling, Analysis

  17. Aalborg Universitet An assessment of converter modelling needs for offshore wind power plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bak, Claus Leth

    Aalborg Universitet An assessment of converter modelling needs for offshore wind power plants). An assessment of converter modelling needs for offshore wind power plants connected via VSC-HVDC networks Power into Power Systems as well as on Transmission Networks for Offshore Wind Plants. Energynautics

  18. Aalborg Universitet HVDC Connected Offshore Wind Power Plants: Review and Outlook of Current

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bak, Claus Leth

    Aalborg Universitet HVDC Connected Offshore Wind Power Plants: Review and Outlook of Current., ... Kjær, P. C. (2013). HVDC Connected Offshore Wind Power Plants: Review and Outlook of Current Research Power into Power Systems as well as on Transmission Networks for Offshore Wind Power Plants

  19. Pantex Plant Wind Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII JumpQuarterly Smart GridNorth Carolina: EnergyIncPan AfricanHomePantex Plant

  20. Synchrophasor Measurement-Based Wind Plant Inertia Estimation: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Y.; Bank, J.; Wan, Y. H.; Muljadi, E.; Corbus, D.

    2013-05-01

    The total inertia stored in all rotating masses that are connected to power systems, such as synchronous generations and induction motors, is an essential force that keeps the system stable after disturbances. To ensure bulk power system stability, there is a need to estimate the equivalent inertia available from a renewable generation plant. An equivalent inertia constant analogous to that of conventional rotating machines can be used to provide a readily understandable metric. This paper explores a method that utilizes synchrophasor measurements to estimate the equivalent inertia that a wind plant provides to the system.

  1. Operation of Concentrating Solar Power Plants in the Western Wind and Solar Integration Phase 2 Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denholm, P.; Brinkman, G.; Lew, D.; Hummon, M.

    2014-05-01

    The Western Wind and Solar Integration Study (WWSIS) explores various aspects of the challenges and impacts of integrating large amounts of wind and solar energy into the electric power system of the West. The phase 2 study (WWSIS-2) is one of the first to include dispatchable concentrating solar power (CSP) with thermal energy storage (TES) in multiple scenarios of renewable penetration and mix. As a result, it provides unique insights into CSP plant operation, grid benefits, and how CSP operation and configuration may need to change under scenarios of increased renewable penetration. Examination of the WWSIS-2 results indicates that in all scenarios, CSP plants with TES provides firm system capacity, reducing the net demand and the need for conventional thermal capacity. The plants also reduced demand during periods of short-duration, high ramping requirements that often require use of lower efficiency peaking units. Changes in CSP operation are driven largely by the presence of other solar generation, particularly PV. Use of storage by the CSP plants increases in the higher solar scenarios, with operation of the plant often shifted to later in the day. CSP operation also becomes more variable, including more frequent starts. Finally, CSP output is often very low during the day in scenarios with significant PV, which helps decrease overall renewable curtailment (over-generation). However, the configuration studied is likely not optimal for High Solar Scenario implying further analysis of CSP plant configuration is needed to understand its role in enabling high renewable scenarios in the Western United States.

  2. Method of Equivalencing for a Large Wind Power Plant with Multiple Turbine Representation: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muljadi, E.; Pasupulati, S.; Ellis, A.; Kosterov, D.

    2008-07-01

    This paper focuses on our effort to develop an equivalent representation of a Wind Power Plant collector system for power system planning studies.

  3. Land-Use Requirements of Modern Wind Power Plants in the United...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 August 2009 Land-Use Requirements of Modern Wind Power Plants in the United States Paul Denholm, Maureen Hand, Maddalena Jackson, and Sean Ong National Renewable Energy...

  4. NREL Develops Simulations for Wind Plant Power and Turbine Loads (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-04-01

    NREL researchers are the first to use a high-performance computing tool for a large-eddy simulation of an entire wind plant.

  5. Offshore Wind Plant Balance-of-Station Cost Drivers and Sensitivities (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saur, G.; Maples, B.; Meadows, B.; Hand, M.; Musial, W.; Elkington, C.; Clayton, J.

    2012-09-01

    With Balance of System (BOS) costs contributing up to 70% of the installed capital cost, it is fundamental to understanding the BOS costs for offshore wind projects as well as potential cost trends for larger offshore turbines. NREL developed a BOS model using project cost estimates developed by GL Garrad Hassan. Aspects of BOS covered include engineering and permitting, ports and staging, transportation and installation, vessels, foundations, and electrical. The data introduce new scaling relationships for each BOS component to estimate cost as a function of turbine parameters and size, project parameters and size, and soil type. Based on the new BOS model, an analysis to understand the non-turbine costs associated with offshore turbine sizes ranging from 3 MW to 6 MW and offshore wind plant sizes ranging from 100 MW to 1000 MW has been conducted. This analysis establishes a more robust baseline cost estimate, identifies the largest cost components of offshore wind project BOS, and explores the sensitivity of the levelized cost of energy to permutations in each BOS cost element. This presentation shows results from the model that illustrates the potential impact of turbine size and project size on the cost of energy from US offshore wind plants.

  6. Wind Power Variability, Its Cost, and Effect on Power Plant Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wind Power Variability, Its Cost, and Effect on Power Plant Emissions A Dissertation Submitted The recent growth in wind power is transforming the operation of electricity systems by introducing. As a result, system operators are learning in real-time how to incorporate wind power and its variability

  7. Optimizing a Hybrid Energy Storage System for a Virtual Power Plant for Improved Wind Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teodorescu, Remus

    Optimizing a Hybrid Energy Storage System for a Virtual Power Plant for Improved Wind Power approach to find two optimum energy storages (ESs) to build a hybrid system which is part of a virtual power plant. In this paper it means the combination of the hybrid energy storage system and wind power

  8. Abstract--A novel methodology for economic evaluation of hydrogen storage for a mixed wind-nuclear power plant is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cañizares, Claudio A.

    .e. transmission congestion. Index Terms--wind power, nuclear power, hydrogen storage, Hydrogen Economy, power power plant production (MW) NP : nuclear power plant production (MW) CP : electrolyzer consumption (MW with the market (kg) WIND ipwP ,, : wind-nuclear power consumed for wind scenario w and price scenario p in hour i

  9. New Aerodynamics Simulations Provide Better Understanding of Wind Plant Underperformance and Loading (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-02-01

    Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) develop a high-fidelity large-eddy simulation model designed to predict the performance of large wind plants with a higher degree of accuracy than current models.

  10. Using supply chain management techniques to make wind plant and energy storage operation more profitable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saran, Prashant

    2009-01-01

    Our research demonstrates that supply chain management techniques can improve the incremental gross profits of wind plant and storage operations by up to five times. Using Monte-Carlo simulation we create and test scenarios ...

  11. includes passing a plant identification exam of common landscape plants. Both NCAN and NCLA have a list of plant material and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krings, Alexander

    a list of plant material and those fagaceous species from this list are included in HS 211. Third, someincludes passing a plant identification exam of common landscape plants. Both NCAN and NCLA have of taxa (Castanea, Fagus and Quercus) previ- ously covered in labs. Table 1 provides a list of species

  12. Land Use Requirements of Modern Wind Power Plants in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denholm, P.; Hand, M.; Jackson, M.; Ong, S.

    2009-08-01

    This report provides data and analysis of the land use associated with modern, large wind power plants (defined as greater than 20 megawatts (MW) and constructed after 2000). The analysis discusses standard land-use metrics as established in the life-cycle assessment literature, and then discusses their applicability to wind power plants. The report identifies two major 'classes' of wind plant land use: 1) direct impact (i.e., disturbed land due to physical infrastructure development), and 2) total area (i.e., land associated with the complete wind plant project). The analysis also provides data for each of these classes, derived from project applications, environmental impact statements, and other sources. It attempts to identify relationships among land use, wind plant configuration, and geography. The analysts evaluated 172 existing or proposed projects, which represents more than 26 GW of capacity. In addition to providing land-use data and summary statistics, they identify several limitations to the existing wind project area data sets, and suggest additional analysis that could aid in evaluating actual land use and impacts associated with deployment of wind energy.

  13. Generating Economic Development from a Wind Power Plant in Spanish...

    Wind Powering America (EERE)

    of the utility companies. In Utah, the Commission is responsible for determining avoided cost rates for qualifying facilities. As will be noted later, the Spanish Fork Wind...

  14. New IEC Specifications Help Define Wind Plant Performance Reporting...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    prices. Source: NREL Award-winning research takes a fresh look at Geothermal Energy Small Wind Turbine Certifications Signal Maturing Industry Study Shows Active Power Controls...

  15. Symmetrical and Unsymmetrical Fault Currents of a Wind Power Plant: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gevorgian, V.; Singh, M.; Muljadi, E.

    2011-12-01

    This paper investigates the short-circuit behavior of a wind power plant for different types of wind turbines. Both symmetrical faults and unsymmetrical faults are investigated. The size of wind power plants (WPPs) keeps getting bigger and bigger. The number of wind plants in the U.S. has increased very rapidly in the past 10 years. It is projected that in the U.S., the total wind power generation will reach 330 GW by 2030. As the importance of WPPs increases, planning engi-neers must perform impact studies used to evaluate short-circuit current (SCC) contribution of the plant into the transmission network under different fault conditions. This information is needed to size the circuit breakers, to establish the proper sys-tem protection, and to choose the transient suppressor in the circuits within the WPP. This task can be challenging to protec-tion engineers due to the topology differences between different types of wind turbine generators (WTGs) and the conventional generating units. This paper investigates the short-circuit behavior of a WPP for different types of wind turbines. Both symmetrical faults and unsymmetrical faults are investigated. Three different soft-ware packages are utilized to develop this paper. Time domain simulations and steady-state calculations are used to perform the analysis.

  16. Variable Frequency Operations of an Offshore Wind Power Plant with HVDC-VSC: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gevorgian, V.; Singh, M.; Muljadi, E.

    2011-12-01

    In this paper, a constant Volt/Hz operation applied to the Type 1 wind turbine generator. Various control aspects of Type 1 generators at the plant level and at the turbine level will be investigated. Based on DOE study, wind power generation may reach 330 GW by 2030 at the level of penetration of 20% of the total energy production. From this amount of wind power, 54 GW of wind power will be generated at offshore wind power plants. The deployment of offshore wind power plants requires power transmission from the plant to the load center inland. Since this power transmission requires submarine cable, there is a need to use High-Voltage Direct Current (HVDC) transmission. Otherwise, if the power is transmitted via alternating current, the reactive power generated by the cable capacitance may cause an excessive over voltage in the middle of the transmission distance which requires unnecessary oversized cable voltage breakdown capability. The use of HVDC is usually required for transmission distance longer than 50 kilometers of submarine cables to be economical. The use of HVDC brings another advantage; it is capable of operating at variable frequency. The inland substation will be operated to 60 Hz synched with the grid, the offshore substation can be operated at variable frequency, thus allowing the wind power plant to be operated at constant Volt/Hz. In this paper, a constant Volt/Hz operation applied to the Type 1 wind turbine generator. Various control aspects of Type 1 generators at the plant level and at the turbine level will be investigated.

  17. New IEC Specifications Help Define Wind Plant Performance Reporting...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Reporting Metrics January 6, 2014 - 10:00am Addthis This is an excerpt from the Fourth Quarter 2013 edition of the Wind Program R&D Newsletter. The U.S. Department of Energy...

  18. Documentation, User Support, and Verification of Wind Turbine and Plant Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Zavadil; Vadim Zheglov; Yuriy Kazachkov; Bo Gong; Juan Sanchez; Jun Li

    2012-09-18

    As part of the Utility Wind Energy Integration Group (UWIG) and EnerNex's Wind Turbine Modeling Project, EnerNex has received ARRA (federal stimulus) funding through the Department of Energy (DOE) to further the progress of wind turbine and wind plant models. Despite the large existing and planned wind generation deployment, industry-standard models for wind generation have not been formally adopted. Models commonly provided for interconnection studies are not adequate for use in general transmission planning studies, where public, non-proprietary, documented and validated models are needed. NERC MOD (North American Electric Reliability Corporation) reliability standards require that power flow and dynamics models be provided, in accordance with regional requirements and procedures. The goal of this project is to accelerate the appropriate use of generic wind turbine models for transmission network analysis by: (1) Defining proposed enhancements to the generic wind turbine model structures that would allow representation of more advanced; (2) Comparative testing of the generic models against more detailed (and sometimes proprietary) versions developed by turbine vendors; (3) Developing recommended parameters for the generic models to best mimic the performance of specific commercial wind turbines; (4) Documenting results of the comparative simulations in an application guide for users; (5) Conducting technology transfer activities in regional workshops for dissemination of knowledge and information gained, and to engage electric power and wind industry personnel in the project while underway; (6) Designing of a "living" homepage to establish an online resource for transmission planners.

  19. Different Factors Affecting Short Circuit Behavior of a Wind Power Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muljadi, E.; Samaan, Nader A.; Gevorgian, Vahan; Li, Jun; Pasupulati, Subbaiah

    2013-01-31

    A wind power plant consists of a large number of turbines interconnected by underground cable. A pad-mount transformer at each turbine steps up the voltage from generating voltage (690 V) to a medium voltage (34.5 kV). All turbines in the plant are connected to the substation transformer where the voltage is stepped up to the transmission level. An important aspect of wind power plant (WPP) impact studies is to evaluate the short-circuit (SC) current contribution of the plant into the transmission network under different fault conditions. This task can be challenging to protection engineers due to the topology differences between different types of wind turbine generators (WTGs) and the conventional generating units. This paper investigates the short circuit behavior of a wind power plant for different types of faults. The impact of wind turbine types, the transformer configuration, and the reactive compensation capacitor will be investigated. The voltage response at different buses will be observed. Finally, the SC line currents will be presented along with its symmetrical components.

  20. Different Factors Affecting Short Circuit Behavior of a Wind Power Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muljadi, E.; Samaan, Nader A.; Gevorgian, Vahan; Li, Jun; Pasupulati, Subbaiah

    2010-12-21

    A wind power plant consists of a large number of turbines interconnected by underground cable. A pad-mount transformer at each turbine steps up the voltage from generating voltage (690 V) to a medium voltage (34.5 kV). All turbines in the plant are connected to the substation transformer where the voltage is stepped up to the transmission level. An important aspect of wind power plant (WPP) impact studies is to evaluate the short-circuit (SC) current contribution of the plant into the transmission network under different fault conditions. This task can be challenging to protection engineers due to the topology differences between different types of wind turbine generators (WTGs) and the conventional generating units. This paper investigates the short circuit behavior of a wind power plant for different types of faults. The impact of wind turbine types, the transformer configuration, and the reactive compensation capacitor will be investigated. The voltage response at different buses will be observed. Finally, the SC line currents will be presented along with its symmetrical components.

  1. Analyzing Effects of Turbulence on Power Generation Using Wind Plant Monitoring Data: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, J.; Chowdhury, S.; Hodge, B. M.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a methodology is developed to analyze how ambient and wake turbulence affects the power generation of a single wind turbine within an array of turbines. Using monitoring data from a wind power plant, we selected two sets of wind and power data for turbines on the edge of the wind plant that resemble (i) an out-of-wake scenario (i.e., when the turbine directly faces incoming winds) and (ii) an in-wake scenario (i.e., when the turbine is under the wake of other turbines). For each set of data, two surrogate models were then developed to represent the turbine power generation (i) as a function of the wind speed; and (ii) as a function of the wind speed and turbulence intensity. Support vector regression was adopted for the development of the surrogate models. Three types of uncertainties in the turbine power generation were also investigated: (i) the uncertainty in power generation with respect to the published/reported power curve, (ii) the uncertainty in power generation with respect to the estimated power response that accounts for only mean wind speed; and (iii) the uncertainty in power generation with respect to the estimated power response that accounts for both mean wind speed and turbulence intensity. Results show that (i) under the same wind conditions, the turbine generates different power between the in-wake and out-of-wake scenarios, (ii) a turbine generally produces more power under the in-wake scenario than under the out-of-wake scenario, (iii) the power generation is sensitive to turbulence intensity even when the wind speed is greater than the turbine rated speed, and (iv) there is relatively more uncertainty in the power generation under the in-wake scenario than under the out-of-wake scenario.

  2. Short-Circuit Modeling of a Wind Power Plant: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muljadi, E.; Gevorgian, V.

    2011-03-01

    This paper investigates the short-circuit behavior of a WPP for different types of wind turbines. The short-circuit behavior will be presented. Both the simplified models and detailed models are used in the simulations and both symmetrical faults and unsymmetrical faults are discussed.

  3. Synchronized Phasor Data for Analyzing Wind Power Plant Dynamic Behavior and Model Validation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wan, Y. H.

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. power industry is undertaking several initiatives that will improve the operations of the power grid. One of those is the implementation of 'wide area measurements' using phasor measurement units (PMUs) to dynamically monitor the operations and the status of the network and provide advanced situational awareness and stability assessment. This project seeks to obtain PMU data from wind power plants and grid reference points and develop software tools to analyze and visualize synchrophasor data for the purpose of better understanding wind power plant dynamic behaviors under normal and contingency conditions.

  4. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF HYDROGEN ENERGY Accepted June 2008 HYDROGEN STORAGE FOR MIXED WIND-NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cañizares, Claudio A.

    evaluation of hydrogen production and storage for a mixed wind-nuclear power plant considering some new for existent nuclear and wind power generation facilities. Keywords: hydrogen production, hydrogen storage, hydrogen economy, nuclear power, wind power, electricity markets, mixed-integer stochastic linear

  5. 1. CONTRIBUTOR'S NAME: Mary Bricker 2. NAME OF INQUIRY: Plants on the move-testing wind-dispersed seeds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brewer, Carol

    1. CONTRIBUTOR'S NAME: Mary Bricker 2. NAME OF INQUIRY: Plants on the move-testing wind on the wind? b. How do plants move to new places? b. Ecological Theme(s): a. Diversity of life for our class, when previously we had focused mainly on making observations and generating questions.) d

  6. Development of Eastern Regional Wind Resource and Wind Plant Output Datasets: March 3, 2008 -- March 31, 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brower, M.

    2009-12-01

    The objective of this project was to provide wind resource inputs to the Eastern Wind Integration and Transmission Study.

  7. Preventive techniques of pollution control, the reliability and safety in core sectors including thermal power plant installations and economic evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tewari, J.K.

    1997-12-31

    This paper reports on a study of pollution control techniques, thermal power plant reliability and safety, and economics. Included are some illustrative examples dealing with pollution control. Topics include environmental planning, prevention strategy, pesticide use, food pollution, soil pollution, water pollution, thermal power plant emissions, and pollution control equipment.

  8. Coupling a Mesoscale Numerical Weather Prediction Model with Large-Eddy Simulation for Realistic Wind Plant Aerodynamics Simulations (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Draxl, C.; Churchfield, M.; Mirocha, J.; Lee, S.; Lundquist, J.; Michalakes, J.; Moriarty, P.; Purkayastha, A.; Sprague, M.; Vanderwende, B.

    2014-06-01

    Wind plant aerodynamics are influenced by a combination of microscale and mesoscale phenomena. Incorporating mesoscale atmospheric forcing (e.g., diurnal cycles and frontal passages) into wind plant simulations can lead to a more accurate representation of microscale flows, aerodynamics, and wind turbine/plant performance. Our goal is to couple a numerical weather prediction model that can represent mesoscale flow [specifically the Weather Research and Forecasting model] with a microscale LES model (OpenFOAM) that can predict microscale turbulence and wake losses.

  9. lue light affects many aspects of plant growth and develop-ment. Plant blue-light responses include inhibition of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Chentao

    B lue light affects many aspects of plant growth and develop- ment. Plant blue-light responses have identified three blue- light receptors: cryptochrome 1, cryptochrome 2 and phototropin, which of the cryptochromes Plant blue-light receptors have long been recognized from their action spectra to have roles

  10. Capacity Value of Wind Plants and Overview of U.S. Experience (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milligan, M.

    2011-08-01

    This presentation provides an overview and summary of the capacity value of wind power plants, based primarily on the U.S. experience. Resource adequacy assessment should explicitly consider risk. Effective load carrying capability (ELCC) captures each generators contribution to resource adequacy. On their own, reserve margin targets as a percent of peak can't capture risks effectively. Recommend benchmarking reliability-based approaches with others.

  11. Comparison of the Dynamic Wake Meandering Model, Large-Eddy Simulation, and Field Data at the Egmond aan Zee Offshore Wind Plant: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Churchfield, M. J.; Moriarty, P. J.; Hao, Y.; Lackner, M. A.; Barthelmie, R.; Lundquist, J.; Oxley, G. S.

    2014-12-01

    The focus of this work is the comparison of the dynamic wake meandering model and large-eddy simulation with field data from the Egmond aan Zee offshore wind plant composed of 36 3-MW turbines. The field data includes meteorological mast measurements, SCADA information from all turbines, and strain-gauge data from two turbines. The dynamic wake meandering model and large-eddy simulation are means of computing unsteady wind plant aerodynamics, including the important unsteady meandering of wakes as they convect downstream and interact with other turbines and wakes. Both of these models are coupled to a turbine model such that power and mechanical loads of each turbine in the wind plant are computed. We are interested in how accurately different types of waking (e.g., direct versus partial waking), can be modeled, and how background turbulence level affects these loads. We show that both the dynamic wake meandering model and large-eddy simulation appear to underpredict power and overpredict fatigue loads because of wake effects, but it is unclear that they are really in error. This discrepancy may be caused by wind-direction uncertainty in the field data, which tends to make wake effects appear less pronounced.

  12. Reactive power interconnection requirements for PV and wind plants : recommendations to NERC.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDowell, Jason; Walling, Reigh; Peter, William; Von Engeln, Edi; Seymour, Eric; Nelson, Robert; Casey, Leo; Ellis, Abraham; Barker, Chris.

    2012-02-01

    Voltage on the North American bulk system is normally regulated by synchronous generators, which typically are provided with voltage schedules by transmission system operators. In the past, variable generation plants were considered very small relative to conventional generating units, and were characteristically either induction generator (wind) or line-commutated inverters (photovoltaic) that have no inherent voltage regulation capability. However, the growing level of penetration of non-traditional renewable generation - especially wind and solar - has led to the need for renewable generation to contribute more significantly to power system voltage control and reactive power capacity. Modern wind-turbine generators, and increasingly PV inverters as well, have considerable dynamic reactive power capability, which can be further enhanced with other reactive support equipment at the plant level to meet interconnection requirements. This report contains a set of recommendations to the North-America Electricity Reliability Corporation (NERC) as part of Task 1-3 (interconnection requirements) of the Integration of Variable Generation Task Force (IVGTF) work plan. The report discusses reactive capability of different generator technologies, reviews existing reactive power standards, and provides specific recommendations to improve existing interconnection standards.

  13. Dynamic Response of Large Wind Power Plant Affected by Diverse Conditions at Individual Turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elizondo, Marcelo A.; Lu, Shuai; Lin, Guang; Wang, Shaobu

    2014-07-31

    Diverse operating conditions at individual wind turbine generators (WTG) within wind power plants (WPPs) can affect the WPP dynamic response to system faults. For example, individual WTGs can experience diverse terminal voltage and power output caused by different wind direction and speed, affecting the response of protection and control limiters. In this paper, we present a study to investigate the dynamic response of a detailed WPP model under diverse power outputs of its individual WTGs. Wake effect is considered as the reason for diverse power outputs. The diverse WTG power output is evaluated in a test system where a large 168-machine test WPP is connected to the IEEE-39-bus system. The power output from each WTG is derived from a wake effect model that uses realistic statistical data for incoming wind speed and direction. The results show that diverse WTG output due to wake effect can affect the WPP dynamic response activating specialized control in some turbines. In addition, transient stability is affected by exhibiting uncertainty in critical clearing time calculation.

  14. Forecastability as a Design Criterion in Wind Resource Assessment: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, J.; Hodge, B. M.

    2014-04-01

    This paper proposes a methodology to include the wind power forecasting ability, or 'forecastability,' of a site as a design criterion in wind resource assessment and wind power plant design stages. The Unrestricted Wind Farm Layout Optimization (UWFLO) methodology is adopted to maximize the capacity factor of a wind power plant. The 1-hour-ahead persistence wind power forecasting method is used to characterize the forecastability of a potential wind power plant, thereby partially quantifying the integration cost. A trade-off between the maximum capacity factor and the forecastability is investigated.

  15. Systems Performance Analyses of Alaska Wind-Diesel Projects; Selawik, Alaska (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baring-Gould, I.

    2009-04-01

    This fact sheet summarizes a systems performance analysis of the wind-diesel project in Selawik, Alaska. Data provided for this project include community load data, wind turbine output, diesel plant output, thermal load data, average wind speed, average net capacity factor, optimal net capacity factor based on Alaska Energy Authority wind data, average net wind penetration, and estimated fuel savings.

  16. Systems Performance Analyses of Alaska Wind-Diesel Projects; Toksook Bay, Alaska (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baring-Gould, I.

    2009-04-01

    This fact sheet summarizes a systems performance analysis of the wind-diesel project in Toksook Bay, Alaska. Data provided for this project include community load data, average wind turbine output, average diesel plant output, thermal load data, average net capacity factor, optimal net capacity factor based on Alaska Energy Authority wind data, average net wind penetration, estimated fuel savings, and wind system availability.

  17. Choosing wind power plant locations and sizes based on electric reliability measures using multiple-year wind speed measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milligan, M.R.; Artig, R.

    1999-07-08

    To project the US potential to meet future electricity demands with wind energy, estimates of available wind resource and costs to access that resource are critical. The US Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Information Administration (EIA) annually estimates the US market penetration of wind in its Annual Energy Outlook series. For these estimates, the EIA uses wind resource data developed by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for each region of the country. However, the EIA multiplies the cost of windpower by several factors, some as large as 3, to account for resource quality, market factors associated with accessing the resource, electric grid impacts, and rapid growth in the wind industry. This paper examines the rationale behind these additional costs and suggests alternatives.

  18. Aalborg Universitet How to improve the design of the electrical system in future wind power plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bak, Claus Leth

    of the main electrical components in wind farms. Two of the Ph.D. projects focus specifically to offshore wind on the transient and temporary overvoltages known to appear in the collection grid of offshore wind farms.D. project Harmonics in Large Offshore Wind Farms will provide in-depth knowledge of all relevant aspects

  19. Optimization of Industrial Refrigeration Plants: Including a Case Study at Stonyfield Farm Yogurt 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dixon, R.; McCowan, B.; Drake, L.; Epstein, G.; D'Antonio, M.; Moray, S.

    2006-01-01

    is then throttled to the high-pressure receiver (HPR). A portion of the high-pressure liquid ammonia is directed to the ice making system to remove heat from the chilled water system where the ammonia flashes to gas after extracting the heat from the ice storage... on the assessed data. This paper will: provide an overview of typical industrial ammonia refrigeration systems; discuss the various components of the system including the compressors, condensers, evaporators and controls that make up a refrigeration system...

  20. 2012 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    Xcel Energy. 2011. Wind Induced Coal Plant Cyclingand the Implications of Wind Curtailment for Public Serviceof Colorado 2 GW and 3 GW Wind Integration Cost Study.

  1. 2009 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2010-01-01

    land- based wind energy technology. 2009 Wind TechnologiesRenewable Energy 2009 WIND TECHNOLOGIES MARKET REPORT AUGUSTfor a variety of energy technologies, including wind energy.

  2. 2011 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2013-01-01

    land-based wind energy technology. 2011 Wind Technologiesfor a variety of energy technologies, including wind energy.Renewable Energy Laboratory’s National Wind Technology

  3. 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2012-01-01

    land-based wind energy technology. 2010 Wind Technologiesfor a variety of energy technologies, including wind energy.2010 Wind Technologies Market Report Federal Energy

  4. 2012 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    land-based wind energy technology. 2012 Wind Technologiesfor a variety of energy technologies, including wind energy.of Energy (DOE) Wind & Water Power Technology Office team

  5. DISPOSAL OF TRU WASTE FROM THE PLUTONIUM FINISHING PLANT IN PIPE OVERPACK CONTAINERS TO WIPP INCLUDING NEW SECURITY REQUIREMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hopkins, A.M.; Sutter, C.; Hulse, G.; Teal, J.

    2003-02-27

    The Department of Energy is responsible for the safe management and cleanup of the DOE complex. As part of the cleanup and closure of the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) located on the Hanford site, the nuclear material inventory was reviewed to determine the appropriate disposition path. Based on the nuclear material characteristics, the material was designated for stabilization and packaging for long term storage and transfer to the Savannah River Site or, a decision for discard was made. The discarded material was designated as waste material and slated for disposal to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Prior to preparing any residue wastes for disposal at the WIPP, several major activities need to be completed. As detailed a processing history as possible of the material including origin of the waste must be researched and documented. A technical basis for termination of safeguards on the material must be prepared and approved. Utilizing process knowledge and processing history, the material must be characterized, sampling requirements determined, acceptable knowledge package and waste designation completed prior to disposal. All of these activities involve several organizations including the contractor, DOE, state representatives and other regulators such as EPA. At PFP, a process has been developed for meeting the many, varied requirements and successfully used to prepare several residue waste streams including Rocky Flats incinerator ash, Hanford incinerator ash and Sand, Slag and Crucible (SS&C) material for disposal. These waste residues are packed into Pipe Overpack Containers for shipment to the WIPP.

  6. Doubly Fed Induction Generator in an Offshore Wind Power Plant Operated at Rated V/Hz: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muljadi, E.; Singh, M.; Gevorgian, V.

    2012-06-01

    This paper introduces the concept of constant Volt/Hz operation of offshore wind power plants. The deployment of offshore WPPs requires power transmission from the plant to the load center inland. Since this power transmission requires submarine cables, there is a need to use High-Voltage Direct Current transmission, which is economical for transmission distances longer than 50 kilometers. In the concept presented here, the onshore substation is operated at 60 Hz synced with the grid, and the offshore substation is operated at variable frequency and voltage, thus allowing the WPP to be operated at constant Volt/Hz.

  7. The Political Economy of Wind Power in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swanson, Ryan Landon

    2011-01-01

    wind manufacturers to produce offshore wind turbines withturbines, including those suitable for offshore wind farms.

  8. Systems Performance Analyses of Alaska Wind-Diesel Projects; St. Paul, Alaska (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baring-Gould, I.

    2009-04-01

    This fact sheet summarizes a systems performance analysis of the wind-diesel project in St. Paul, Alaska. Data provided for this project include load data, average wind turbine output, average diesel plant output, dump (controlling) load, average net capacity factor, average net wind penetration, estimated fuel savings, and wind system availability.

  9. Systems Performance Analyses of Alaska Wind-Diesel Projects; Kasigluk, Alaska (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baring-Gould, I.

    2009-04-01

    This fact sheet summarizes a systems performance analysis of the wind-diesel project in Kasigluk, Alaska. Data provided for this project include community load data, average wind turbine output, average diesel plant output, thermal load data, average net capacity factor, average net wind penetration, estimated fuel savings, and wind system availability.

  10. Simulating the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect(s): including radiative cooling and energy injection by galactic winds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin White; Lars Hernquist; Volker Springel

    2002-07-08

    We present results on the thermal and kinetic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effects from a sequence of high resolution hydrodynamic simulations of structure formation, including cooling, feedback and metal injection. These simulations represent a self-consistent thermal model which incorporates ideas from the `pre-heating' scenario while preserving good agreement with the low density IGM at z~3 probed by the Ly-a forest. Four simulations were performed, at two different resolutions with and without radiative effects and star formation. The long-wavelength modes in each simulation were the same, so that we can compare the results on an object by object basis. We demonstrate that our simulations are converged to the sub-arcminute level. The effect of the additional physics is to suppress the mean Comptonization parameter by 20% and to suppress the angular power spectrum of fluctuations by just under a factor of two in this model while leaving the source counts and properties relatively unchanged. We quantify how non-Gaussianity in the SZ maps increases the sample variance over the standard result for Gaussian fluctuations. We identify a large scatter in the Y-M relation which will be important in searches for clusters using the SZ effect(s).

  11. Wind Power Plant Enhancement with a Fault-Current Limiter: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muljadi, E.; Gevorgian, V.; DeLaRosa, F.

    2011-03-01

    This paper investigates the capability of a saturable core fault-current limiter to limit the short circuit current of different types of wind turbine generators.

  12. Validation of Power Output for the WIND Toolkit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, J.; Clifton, A.; Hodge, B. M.

    2014-09-01

    Renewable energy integration studies require wind data sets of high quality with realistic representations of the variability, ramping characteristics, and forecast performance for current wind power plants. The Wind Integration National Data Set (WIND) Toolkit is meant to be an update for and expansion of the original data sets created for the weather years from 2004 through 2006 during the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study and the Eastern Wind Integration Study. The WIND Toolkit expands these data sets to include the entire continental United States, increasing the total number of sites represented, and it includes the weather years from 2007 through 2012. In addition, the WIND Toolkit has a finer resolution for both the temporal and geographic dimensions. Three separate data sets will be created: a meteorological data set, a wind power data set, and a forecast data set. This report describes the validation of the wind power data set.

  13. Reassessing Wind Potential Estimates for India: Economic and Policy Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phadke, Amol

    2012-01-01

    Use Requirements of Modern Wind Power Plants in the UnitedScale Integration of Wind Power and on Transmission Networks11 Wind Power Density and Wind Speed

  14. Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phadke, Amol

    2008-01-01

    power plant pulverized coal power plant v Advanced Coal WindMW coal gasification combined cycle power plant equippedMW coal gasification, combined cycle power plant equipped

  15. The use of real-time off-site observations as a methodology for increasing forecast skill in prediction of large wind power ramps one or more hours ahead of their impact on a wind plant.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin Wilde, Principal Investigator

    2012-12-31

    ABSTRACT Application of Real-Time Offsite Measurements in Improved Short-Term Wind Ramp Prediction Skill Improved forecasting performance immediately preceding wind ramp events is of preeminent concern to most wind energy companies, system operators, and balancing authorities. The value of near real-time hub height-level wind data and more general meteorological measurements to short-term wind power forecasting is well understood. For some sites, access to onsite measured wind data - even historical - can reduce forecast error in the short-range to medium-range horizons by as much as 50%. Unfortunately, valuable free-stream wind measurements at tall tower are not typically available at most wind plants, thereby forcing wind forecasters to rely upon wind measurements below hub height and/or turbine nacelle anemometry. Free-stream measurements can be appropriately scaled to hub-height levels, using existing empirically-derived relationships that account for surface roughness and turbulence. But there is large uncertainty in these relationships for a given time of day and state of the boundary layer. Alternatively, forecasts can rely entirely on turbine anemometry measurements, though such measurements are themselves subject to wake effects that are not stationary. The void in free-stream hub-height level measurements of wind can be filled by remote sensing (e.g., sodar, lidar, and radar). However, the expense of such equipment may not be sustainable. There is a growing market for traditional anemometry on tall tower networks, maintained by third parties to the forecasting process (i.e., independent of forecasters and the forecast users). This study examines the value of offsite tall-tower data from the WINDataNOW Technology network for short-horizon wind power predictions at a wind farm in northern Montana. The presentation shall describe successful physical and statistical techniques for its application and the practicality of its application in an operational setting. It shall be demonstrated that when used properly, the real-time offsite measurements materially improve wind ramp capture and prediction statistics, when compared to traditional wind forecasting techniques and to a simple persistence model.

  16. Common Aquatic Plants -- Identification, Control. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klussmann, Wallace G. (Wallace Glenn); Lowman, Fred G.

    1964-01-01

    root. Duckweed float freely and are moved by wind current. Often they can be removed mechanically by net or similar device when plants are crowded against the shore by a strong wind. Use Chemical Control No.8. FLOATING PLANTS WATER STAR GRASS.... The genus Potamogeton J commonly called pond weeds, includes many species common to Texas waters. Group characteristics include alternate leaves with flowers and fruits in spikes or heads. Many have two kinds of leaves: (1) floating and firm textured and (2...

  17. Protection from ground faults in the stator winding of generators at power plants in the Siberian networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vainshtein, R. A.; Lapin, V. I.; Naumov, A. M.; Doronin, A. V.; Yudin, S. M.

    2010-05-15

    The experience of many years of experience in developing and utilization of ground fault protection in the stator winding of generators in the Siberian networks is generalized. The main method of protection is to apply a direct current or an alternating current with a frequency of 25 Hz to the primary circuits of the stator. A direct current is applied to turbo generators operating in a unit with a transformer without a resistive coupling to the external grid or to other generators. Applying a 25 Hz control current is appropriate for power generation systems with compensation of a capacitive short circuit current to ground. This method forms the basis for protection of generators operating on busbars, hydroelectric generators with a neutral grounded through an arc-suppression reactor, including in consolidated units with generators operating in parallel on a single low-voltage transformer winding.

  18. INL Wind Farm Project Description Document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Siefert

    2009-07-01

    The INL Wind Farm project proposes to install a 20 MW to 40 MW wind farm on government property, consisting of approximately ten to twenty full-sized (80-meter hub height) towers with 2 MW turbines, and access roads. This includes identifying the optimal turbine locations, building access roads, and pouring the tower foundations in preparation for turbine installation. The project successfully identified a location on INL lands with commercially viable wind resources (i.e., greater than 11 mph sustained winds) for a 20 to 40 MW wind farm. Additionally, the proposed Wind Farm was evaluated against other General Plant Projects, General Purpose Capital Equipment projects, and Line Item Construction Projects at the INL to show the relative importance of the proposed Wind Farm project.

  19. Wind turbine reliability database update.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, Valerie A.; Hill, Roger Ray; Stinebaugh, Jennifer A.; Veers, Paul S.

    2009-03-01

    This report documents the status of the Sandia National Laboratories' Wind Plant Reliability Database. Included in this report are updates on the form and contents of the Database, which stems from a fivestep process of data partnerships, data definition and transfer, data formatting and normalization, analysis, and reporting. Selected observations are also reported.

  20. Impact of Increasing Distributed Wind Power and Wind Turbine Siting on Rural Distribution Feeder Voltage Profiles: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, A.; Zhang, Y. C.; Hodge, B. M.

    2013-09-01

    Many favorable wind energy resources in North America are located in remote locations without direct access to the transmission grid. Building transmission lines to connect remotely-located wind power plants to large load centers has become a barrier to increasing wind power penetration in North America. By connecting utility-sized megawatt-scale wind turbines to the distribution system, wind power supplied to consumers could be increased greatly. However, the impact of including megawatt-scale wind turbines on distribution feeders needs to be studied. The work presented here examined the impact that siting and power output of megawatt-scale wind turbines have on distribution feeder voltage. This is the start of work to present a general guide to megawatt-scale wind turbine impact on the distribution feeder and finding the amount of wind power that can be added without adversely impacting the distribution feeder operation, reliability, and power quality.

  1. Structural Health and Prognostics Management for Offshore Wind Plants; Final Report of Sandia R&D Activities.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffith, Daniel Todd

    2015-04-01

    This final report is a compilation of resear ch efforts - funded by the US Department of Energy Wind and Water Power Technolog ies Office over a four-year period from FY11 through FY14. The goals of this re search program were to develop and evaluate technical innovati ons with promise for maxi mizing revenues and reducing levelized cost of energy (LCOE) for offs hore wind plants - more specifically the goals of the Structural H ealth and Prognostics Management (SHPM) program were to reduce O&M costs and increase energy capture through use of SHPM-based technologies. A technology roadmap was deve loped at the start of the project to guide the research efforts. This roadmap identified and outlined six major research thrust areas each having five stages of ma turity. Research was conducted in each of these thrust areas, as documented throughout this report, although a major focus was on development of damage detection strategi es for the most frequent blade damage conditions and damage mitigation and life-exte nsion strategies via changes in turbine operations (smart loads management). Th e work summarized in this compilation report is the product of the work of many researchers. A summary of the major findings, status of the SHPM Technology Ro admap and recommendations for future work are also provided.

  2. Wind Power Software

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wind Analysis ms - 3.0MB Excel Excel Wind Analysis Presentation - 8.2MB PowerPoint Excel Wind Analysis With Power Curves Included - 3.7MB Excel WindR.exe - 44kB Weibull Excel Wind...

  3. Multifuel fossil fired Power Plant combined with off-shore wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    diagram of the Multifuel Concept Biomass Gas/Coal/ Oil/ Boiler Steam Turbine plant Gas turbine with waste heat boiler Biomass Coal or oil ElectricityNatural gas District heat Wood Natural gas Electricity #12 Ultra Super Critical water/steam process Biomass fired boiler Filter Gas Oil Straw Wood Gas Wood #12;E2

  4. Proceedings Nordic Wind Power Conference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Estimation of Possible Power for Wind Plant Control Power Fluctuations from Offshore Wind Farms; Model Validation System grounding of wind farm medium voltage cable grids Faults in the Collection Grid of Offshore systems of wind turbines and wind farms. NWPC presents the newest research results related to technical

  5. Using Mesoscale Weather Model Output as Boundary Conditions for Atmospheric Large-Eddy Simulations and Wind-Plant Aerodynamic Simulations (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Churchfield, M. J.; Michalakes, J.; Vanderwende, B.; Lee, S.; Sprague, M. A.; Lundquist, J. K.; Moriarty, P. J.

    2013-10-01

    Wind plant aerodynamics are directly affected by the microscale weather, which is directly influenced by the mesoscale weather. Microscale weather refers to processes that occur within the atmospheric boundary layer with the largest scales being a few hundred meters to a few kilometers depending on the atmospheric stability of the boundary layer. Mesoscale weather refers to large weather patterns, such as weather fronts, with the largest scales being hundreds of kilometers wide. Sometimes microscale simulations that capture mesoscale-driven variations (changes in wind speed and direction over time or across the spatial extent of a wind plant) are important in wind plant analysis. In this paper, we present our preliminary work in coupling a mesoscale weather model with a microscale atmospheric large-eddy simulation model. The coupling is one-way beginning with the weather model and ending with a computational fluid dynamics solver using the weather model in coarse large-eddy simulation mode as an intermediary. We simulate one hour of daytime moderately convective microscale development driven by the mesoscale data, which are applied as initial and boundary conditions to the microscale domain, at a site in Iowa. We analyze the time and distance necessary for the smallest resolvable microscales to develop.

  6. Wind energy bibliography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-05-01

    This bibliography is designed to help the reader search for information on wind energy. The bibliography is intended to help several audiences, including engineers and scientists who may be unfamiliar with a particular aspect of wind energy, university researchers who are interested in this field, manufacturers who want to learn more about specific wind topics, and librarians who provide information to their clients. Topics covered range from the history of wind energy use to advanced wind turbine design. References for wind energy economics, the wind energy resource, and environmental and institutional issues related to wind energy are also included.

  7. Wind Power

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wind Power Bioenergy Power Systems Wind Power Wind Power Main Page Outreach Programs Image Gallery FAQs Links Software Hydro Power INL Home Wind Power Introduction The Wind Power...

  8. 2008 Wind Energy Projects, Wind Powering America (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-01-01

    The Wind Powering America program produces a poster at the end of every calendar year that depicts new U.S. wind energy projects. The 2008 poster includes the following projects: Stetson Wind Farm in Maine; Dutch Hill Wind Farm in New York; Grand Ridge Wind Energy Center in Illinois; Hooper Bay, Alaska; Forestburg, South Dakota; Elbow Creek Wind Project in Texas; Glacier Wind Farm in Montana; Wray, Colorado; Smoky Hills Wind Farm in Kansas; Forbes Park Wind Project in Massachusetts; Spanish Fork, Utah; Goodland Wind Farm in Indiana; and the Tatanka Wind Energy Project on the border of North Dakota and South Dakota.

  9. IEA Wind Task 26 - Multi-national Case Study of the Financial Cost of Wind Energy; Work Package 1 Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwabe, P.; Lensink, S.; Hand, M.

    2011-03-01

    The lifetime cost of wind energy is comprised of a number of components including the investment cost, operation and maintenance costs, financing costs, and annual energy production. Accurate representation of these cost streams is critical in estimating a wind plant's cost of energy. Some of these cost streams will vary over the life of a given project. From the outset of project development, investors in wind energy have relatively certain knowledge of the plant's lifetime cost of wind energy. This is because a wind energy project's installed costs and mean wind speed are known early on, and wind generation generally has low variable operation and maintenance costs, zero fuel cost, and no carbon emissions cost. Despite these inherent characteristics, there are wide variations in the cost of wind energy internationally, which is the focus of this report. Using a multinational case-study approach, this work seeks to understand the sources of wind energy cost differences among seven countries under International Energy Agency (IEA) Wind Task 26 - Cost of Wind Energy. The participating countries in this study include Denmark, Germany, the Netherlands, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, and the United States. Due to data availability, onshore wind energy is the primary focus of this study, though a small sample of reported offshore cost data is also included.

  10. Midsize Wind Turbines for the U.S. Community Wind Market | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Midsize Wind Turbines for the U.S. Community Wind Market Midsize Wind Turbines for the U.S. Community Wind Market A presentation on the midsize wind markets, including town-owned,...

  11. Power plant including an exhaust gas recirculation system for injecting recirculated exhaust gases in the fuel and compressed air of a gas turbine engine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anand, Ashok Kumar; Nagarjuna Reddy, Thirumala Reddy; Shaffer, Jason Brian; York, William David

    2014-05-13

    A power plant is provided and includes a gas turbine engine having a combustor in which compressed gas and fuel are mixed and combusted, first and second supply lines respectively coupled to the combustor and respectively configured to supply the compressed gas and the fuel to the combustor and an exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system to re-circulate exhaust gas produced by the gas turbine engine toward the combustor. The EGR system is coupled to the first and second supply lines and configured to combine first and second portions of the re-circulated exhaust gas with the compressed gas and the fuel at the first and second supply lines, respectively.

  12. Community Wind Benefits (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-11-01

    This fact sheet explores the benefits of community wind projects, including citations to published research.

  13. The National Wind Technology Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thresher, R.W.; Hock, S.M.; Loose, R.R.; Cadogon, J.B.

    1994-07-01

    Wind energy research began at the Rocky Flats test site in 1976 when Rockwell International subcontracted with the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA). The Rocky Flats Plant was competitively selected from a number of ERDA facilities primarily because it experienced high instantaneous winds and provided a large, clear land area. By 1977, several small wind turbines were in place. During the facility`s peak of operation, in 1979-1980, researchers were testing as many as 23 small wind turbines of various configurations, including commercially available machines and prototype turbines developed under subcontract to Rocky Flats. Facilities also included 8-kW, 40-kW, and 225-kW dynamometers; a variable-speed test bed; a wind/hybrid test facility; a controlled velocity test facility (in Pueblo, Colorado); a modal test facility, and a multimegawatt switchgear facility. The main laboratory building was dedicated in July 1981 and was operated by the Rocky Flats Plant until 1984, when the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) and Rocky Flats wind energy programs were merged and transferred to SERI. SERI and now the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) continued to conduct wind turbine system component tests after 1987, when most program personnel were moved to the Denver WEst Office Park in Golden and site ownership was transferred back to Rocky Flats. The Combined Experiment test bed was installed and began operation in 1988, and the NREL structural test facility began operation in 1990. In 1993, the site`s operation was officially transferred to the DOE Golden Field Office that oversees NREL. This move was in anticipation of NREL`s renovation and reoccupation of the facility in 1994.

  14. Western Wind and Solar Integration Study (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-09-01

    Initiated in 2007 to examine the operational impact of up to 35% penetration of wind, photovoltaic (PV), and concentrating solar power (CSP) energy on the electric power system, the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study (WWSIS) is one of the largest regional wind and solar integration studies to date. The goal is to understand the effects of variability and uncertainty of wind, PV, and CSP on the grid. In the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study Phase 1, solar penetration was limited to 5%. Utility-scale PV was not included because of limited capability to model sub-hourly, utility-scale PV output . New techniques allow the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study Phase 2 to include high penetrations of solar - not only CSP and rooftop PV but also utility-scale PV plants.

  15. Understanding Trends in Wind Turbine Prices Over the Past Decade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2012-01-01

    impacts on wind turbine and wind energy pricing. ReferencesProduction from a V112 Turbine Wind Plant. Prepared forBloomberg NEF”). 2011c. Wind Turbine Price Index, Issue V.

  16. EEE 463 Electrical Power Plants (3) [F] Course (Catalog) Description

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Junshan

    using fossil, nuclear and renewable, including solar, geothermal, wind, hydroelectric, biomass and ocean. Components and operation of a nuclear power plant (2 lectures) 7. Hydroelectric power (1 lecture) 8

  17. 2011 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2013-01-01

    from Canada and Mexico; unlike for wind-powered generatingHonduras (16%), Mexico (8%), and Canada (8%). Wind turbineWind belt states include Colorado, Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, New Mexico,

  18. 2009 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2010-01-01

    AWEA). 2010b. AWEA Small Wind Turbine Global Market Survey,a brief discussion on Small Wind Turbines is provided on2010a) sometimes also includes small wind turbines. Other

  19. Wind energy information guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-04-01

    This book is divided into nine chapters. Chapters 1--8 provide background and annotated references on wind energy research, development, and commercialization. Chapter 9 lists additional sources of printed information and relevant organizations. Four indices provide alphabetical access to authors, organizations, computer models and design tools, and subjects. A list of abbreviations and acronyms is also included. Chapter topics include: introduction; economics of using wind energy; wind energy resources; wind turbine design, development, and testing; applications; environmental issues of wind power; institutional issues; and wind energy systems development.

  20. Distributed Wind 2015

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Distributed Wind 2015 is committed to the advancement of both distributed and community wind energy. This two day event includes a Business Conference with sessions focused on advancing the...

  1. Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phadke, Amol

    2008-01-01

    IGCC PC advanced coal-wind hybrid combined cycle power plantnatural gas combined cycle gas turbine power plant carboncrude gasification combined cycle power plant with carbon

  2. Analysis of Wind Power and Load Data at Multiple Time Scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coughlin, Katie

    2011-01-01

    The spectrum of power from wind turbines. Journal of PowerAWEA 2010. American Wind Energy Association ProjectsErik and Jason Kemper. 2009. Wind Plant Ramping Behavior.

  3. Wind energy applications guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    anon.

    2001-01-01

    The brochure is an introduction to various wind power applications for locations with underdeveloped transmission systems, from remote water pumping to village electrification. It includes an introductory section on wind energy, including wind power basics and system components and then provides examples of applications, including water pumping, stand-alone systems for home and business, systems for community centers, schools, and health clinics, and examples in the industrial area. There is also a page of contacts, plus two specific example applications for a wind-diesel system for a remote station in Antarctica and one on wind-diesel village electrification in Russia.

  4. Apple latent spherical virus vectors for reliable and effective virus-induced gene silencing among a broad range of plants including tobacco, tomato, Arabidopsis thaliana, cucurbits, and legumes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Igarashi, Aki; Yamagata, Kousuke; Sugai, Tomokazu; Takahashi, Yukari; Sugawara, Emiko; Tamura, Akihiro; Yaegashi, Hajime; Yamagishi, Noriko; Takahashi, Tsubasa; Isogai, Masamichi; Takahashi, Hideki; Yoshikawa, Nobuyuki

    2009-04-10

    Apple latent spherical virus (ALSV) vectors were evaluated for virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) of endogenous genes among a broad range of plant species. ALSV vectors carrying partial sequences of a subunit of magnesium chelatase (SU) and phytoene desaturase (PDS) genes induced highly uniform knockout phenotypes typical of SU and PDS inhibition on model plants such as tobacco and Arabidopsis thaliana, and economically important crops such as tomato, legume, and cucurbit species. The silencing phenotypes persisted throughout plant growth in these plants. In addition, ALSV vectors could be successfully used to silence a meristem gene, proliferating cell nuclear antigen and disease resistant N gene in tobacco and RCY1 gene in A. thaliana. As ALSV infects most host plants symptomlessly and effectively induces stable VIGS for long periods, the ALSV vector is a valuable tool to determine the functions of interested genes among a broad range of plant species.

  5. Energy 101: Wind Turbines - 2014 Update

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2014-06-05

    See how wind turbines generate clean electricity from the power of wind. The video highlights the basic principles at work in wind turbines, and illustrates how the various components work to capture and convert wind energy to electricity. This updated version also includes information on the Energy Department's efforts to advance offshore wind power. Offshore wind energy footage courtesy of Vestas.

  6. Energy 101: Wind Turbines - 2014 Update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-05-06

    See how wind turbines generate clean electricity from the power of wind. The video highlights the basic principles at work in wind turbines, and illustrates how the various components work to capture and convert wind energy to electricity. This updated version also includes information on the Energy Department's efforts to advance offshore wind power. Offshore wind energy footage courtesy of Vestas.

  7. MHK Technologies/New Knowledge Wind and Wave Renewable Mobile...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage New Knowledge Wind and Wave Renewable Mobile Wind and Wave Power Plant Platform.jpg...

  8. Wind/Water Nexus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2006-04-01

    Nobel laureate Richard Smalley cited energy and water as among humanity's top problems for the next 50 years as the world's population increases from 6.3 billion to 9 billion. The U.S. Department of Energy's Wind and Hydropower Program has initiated an effort to explore wind energy's role as a technical solution to this critically important issue in the United States and the world. This four-page fact sheet outlines five areas in which wind energy can contribute: thermoelectric power plant/water processes, irrigation, municipal water supply, desalination, and wind/hydropower integration.

  9. The Wind Integration National Dataset (WIND) toolkit (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caroline Draxl: NREL

    2014-01-01

    Regional wind integration studies require detailed wind power output data at many locations to perform simulations of how the power system will operate under high penetration scenarios. The wind datasets that serve as inputs into the study must realistically reflect the ramping characteristics, spatial and temporal correlations, and capacity factors of the simulated wind plants, as well as being time synchronized with available load profiles.As described in this presentation, the WIND Toolkit fulfills these requirements by providing a state-of-the-art national (US) wind resource, power production and forecast dataset.

  10. Final Technical Report - Kotzebue Wind Power Project - Volume II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rana Zucchi, Global Energy Concepts, LLC; Brad Reeve, Kotzebue Electric Association; DOE Project Officer - Doug Hooker

    2007-10-31

    The Kotzebue Wind Power Project is a joint undertaking of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE); Kotzebue Electric Association (KEA); and the Alaska Energy Authority (AEA). The goal of the project is to develop, construct, and operate a wind power plant interconnected to a small isolated utility grid in an arctic climate in Northwest Alaska. The primary objective of KEA’s wind energy program is to bring more affordable electricity and jobs to remote Alaskan communities. DOE funding has allowed KEA to develop a multi-faceted approach to meet these objectives that includes wind project planning and development, technology transfer, and community outreach. The first wind turbines were installed in the summer of 1997 and the newest turbines were installed in the spring of 2007. The total installed capacity of the KEA wind power project is 1.16 MW with a total of 17 turbines rated between 65 kW and 100 kW. The operation of the wind power plant has resulted in a wind penetration on the utility system in excess of 35% during periods of low loads. This document and referenced attachments are presented as the final technical report for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) grant agreement DE-FG36-97GO10199. Interim deliverables previously submitted are also referenced within this document and where reasonable to do so, specific sections are incorporated in the report or attached as appendices.

  11. Wind Tunnel 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-08-17

    The increased interest in the offshore wind resource in both industry and academic and the extension of the wind field where offshore wind turbine can be deployed has stimulated quite a number of offshore wind turbines concepts. This thesis presents...

  12. 2012 Wind Technologies Market Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

    2013-08-01

    An annual report on the wind energy industry including key statistics, economic data, installation, capacity, and generation statistics, and more.

  13. 2011 Wind Technologies Market Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

    2012-08-01

    An annual report on the wind energy industry including key statistics, economic data, installation, capacity, and generation statistics, and more.

  14. Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolinger, Mark A; Hand, Maureen; Blair, Nate; Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Hern, Tracy; Miller, Bart; O'Connell, R.

    2008-06-09

    The Wind Energy Deployment System model was used to estimate the costs and benefits associated with producing 20% of the nation's electricity from wind technology by 2030. This generation capacity expansion model selects from electricity generation technologies that include pulverized coal plants, combined cycle natural gas plants, combustion turbine natural gas plants, nuclear plants, and wind technology to meet projected demand in future years. Technology cost and performance projections, as well as transmission operation and expansion costs, are assumed. This study demonstrates that producing 20% of the nation's projected electricity demand in 2030 from wind technology is technically feasible, not cost-prohibitive, and provides benefits in the forms of carbon emission reductions, natural gas price reductions, and water savings.

  15. Wind Electrolysis: Hydrogen Cost Optimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saur, G.; Ramsden, T.

    2011-05-01

    This report describes a hydrogen production cost analysis of a collection of optimized central wind based water electrolysis production facilities. The basic modeled wind electrolysis facility includes a number of low temperature electrolyzers and a co-located wind farm encompassing a number of 3MW wind turbines that provide electricity for the electrolyzer units.

  16. Understanding Trends in Wind Turbine Prices Over the Past Decade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2012-01-01

    include some offshore wind turbines. That said, the factoffshore wind still accounts for a relatively small portion of Vestas’ turbine

  17. Long-Term Wind Power Variability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wan, Y. H.

    2012-01-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory started collecting wind power data from large commercial wind power plants (WPPs) in southwest Minnesota with dedicated dataloggers and communication links in the spring of 2000. Over the years, additional WPPs in other areas were added to and removed from the data collection effort. The longest data stream of actual wind plant output is more than 10 years. The resulting data have been used to analyze wind power fluctuations, frequency distribution of changes, the effects of spatial diversity, and wind power ancillary services. This report uses the multi-year wind power data to examine long-term wind power variability.

  18. Active Power Controls from Wind Power: Bridging the Gaps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ela, E.; Gevorgian, V.; Fleming, P.; Zhang, Y. C.; Singh, M.; Muljadi, E.; Scholbrook, A.; Aho, J.; Buckspan, A.; Pao, L.; Singhvi, V.; Tuohy, A.; Pourbeik, P.; Brooks, D.; Bhatt, N.

    2014-01-01

    This paper details a comprehensive study undertaken by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Electric Power Research Institute, and the University of Colorado to understand how the contribution of wind power providing active power control (APC) can benefit the total power system economics, increase revenue streams, improve the reliability and security of the power system, and provide superior and efficient response while reducing any structural and loading impacts that may reduce the life of the wind turbine or its components. The study includes power system simulations, control simulations, and actual field tests using turbines at NREL's National Wind Technology Center (NWTC). The study focuses on synthetic inertial control, primary frequency control, and automatic generation control, and analyzes timeframes ranging from milliseconds to minutes to the lifetime of wind turbines, locational scope ranging from components of turbines to large wind plants to entire synchronous interconnections, and additional topics ranging from economics to power system engineering to control design.

  19. Wind Power Price Trends in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

    2009-07-15

    For the fourth year in a row, the United States led the world in adding new wind power capacity in 2008, and also surpassed Germany to take the lead in terms of cumulative installed wind capacity. The rapid growth of wind power in the U.S. over the past decade (Figure 1) has been driven by a combination of increasingly supportive policies (including the Federal production tax credit (PTC) and a growing number of state renewables portfolio standards), uncertainty over the future fuel costs and environmental liabilities of natural gas and coal-fired power plants, and wind's competitive position among generation resources. This article focuses on just the last of these drivers - i.e., trends in U.S. wind power prices - over the period of strong capacity growth since 1998.

  20. WIND ENERGY Wind Energ. (2014)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peinke, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    to generate in this way wind speed fluctuations with similar statistics as observed in nature. Forces wereWIND ENERGY Wind Energ. (2014) Published online in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary wind inflow conditions M. R. Luhur, J. Peinke, J. Schneemann and M. Wächter ForWind-Center for Wind

  1. Advancements in Wind Integration Study Data Modeling: The Wind Integration National Dataset (WIND) Toolkit; Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Draxl, C.; Hodge, B. M.; Orwig, K.; Jones, W.; Searight, K.; Getman, D.; Harrold, S.; McCaa, J.; Cline, J.; Clark, C.

    2013-10-01

    Regional wind integration studies in the United States require detailed wind power output data at many locations to perform simulations of how the power system will operate under high-penetration scenarios. The wind data sets that serve as inputs into the study must realistically reflect the ramping characteristics, spatial and temporal correlations, and capacity factors of the simulated wind plants, as well as be time synchronized with available load profiles. The Wind Integration National Dataset (WIND) Toolkit described in this paper fulfills these requirements. A wind resource dataset, wind power production time series, and simulated forecasts from a numerical weather prediction model run on a nationwide 2-km grid at 5-min resolution will be made publicly available for more than 110,000 onshore and offshore wind power production sites.

  2. Argonne National Laboratory Develops Extreme-Scale Wind Farm...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to conduct studies of complex flow and wind turbine interactions in large land-based and offshore wind farms that will improve wind plant design and reduce the levelized cost of...

  3. Electricity Plant Cost Uncertainties (released in AEO2009)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2009-01-01

    Construction costs for new power plants have increased at an extraordinary rate over the past several years. One study, published in mid-2008, reported that construction costs had more than doubled since 2000, with most of the increase occurring since 2005. Construction costs have increased for plants of all types, including coal, nuclear, natural gas, and wind.

  4. Small Wind Site Assessment Guidelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, Tim; Preus, Robert

    2015-09-01

    Site assessment for small wind energy systems is one of the key factors in the successful installation, operation, and performance of a small wind turbine. A proper site assessment is a difficult process that includes wind resource assessment and the evaluation of site characteristics. These guidelines address many of the relevant parts of a site assessment with an emphasis on wind resource assessment, using methods other than on-site data collection and creating a small wind site assessment report.

  5. Wind energy conversion system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Longrigg, Paul (Golden, CO)

    1987-01-01

    The wind energy conversion system includes a wind machine having a propeller connected to a generator of electric power, the propeller rotating the generator in response to force of an incident wind. The generator converts the power of the wind to electric power for use by an electric load. Circuitry for varying the duty factor of the generator output power is connected between the generator and the load to thereby alter a loading of the generator and the propeller by the electric load. Wind speed is sensed electro-optically to provide data of wind speed upwind of the propeller, to thereby permit tip speed ratio circuitry to operate the power control circuitry and thereby optimize the tip speed ratio by varying the loading of the propeller. Accordingly, the efficiency of the wind energy conversion system is maximized.

  6. Wind tower service lift

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Oliphant, David; Quilter, Jared; Andersen, Todd; Conroy, Thomas

    2011-09-13

    An apparatus used for maintaining a wind tower structure wherein the wind tower structure may have a plurality of legs and may be configured to support a wind turbine above the ground in a better position to interface with winds. The lift structure may be configured for carrying objects and have a guide system and drive system for mechanically communicating with a primary cable, rail or other first elongate member attached to the wind tower structure. The drive system and guide system may transmit forces that move the lift relative to the cable and thereby relative to the wind tower structure. A control interface may be included for controlling the amount and direction of the power into the guide system and drive system thereby causing the guide system and drive system to move the lift relative to said first elongate member such that said lift moves relative to said wind tower structure.

  7. Understanding Wind Turbine Price Trends in the U.S. Over the Past Decade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2013-01-01

    impacts on wind turbine and wind energy pricing. ReferencesProduction from a V112 Turbine Wind Plant. Prepared forBloomberg NEF”). 2011c. Wind Turbine Price Index, Issue V.

  8. Collegiate Wind Competition Wind Tunnel Specifications | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Wind Tunnel Specifications Collegiate Wind Competition Wind Tunnel Specifications Collegiate Wind Competition Wind Tunnel Specifications Teams competing in the U.S. Department of...

  9. Wind for Schools: A Wind Powering America Project (Alaska) (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-02-01

    This brochure provides an overview of Wind Powering America's Wind for Schools Project, including a description of the project, the participants, funding sources, the basic configurations, and how interested parties can become involved.

  10. Wind for Schools: A Wind Powering America Project (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baring-Gould, I.

    2009-08-01

    This brochure provides an overview of Wind Powering America's Wind for Schools Project, including a description of the project, the participants, funding sources, the basic configurations, and how interested parties can become involved.

  11. Technical Review Panel ? NRELs Wind Energy Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Moriarty 16:15 Wind Plant Reliability WestergaardKeller 16:45 Integrated Wind Plant Design and Analysis Ananthan 17:00 Adjourn for the day 18:30 Closed Panel Dinner &...

  12. Summary Report of Wind Farm Data: September 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wan, Y. H.

    2009-05-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) began a project to collect wind power plant output data from several large commercial wind plants during the spring of 2000. This data is summarized in this report.

  13. AT GUANTANAMO BAY: A HYBRID WIND-DIESEL SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND POWER AT GUANTANAMO BAY: A HYBRID WIND-DIESEL SYSTEM FOR THE US NAVY AT GUANTANAMO NAVAL BASE Laboratory and are actively developing what will be the world's largest wind-diesel hybrid electric plant. The pending installation of four 950-kW wind turbines to supplement the 22.8 MW diesel electricity plant

  14. New North Dakota Factory to Produce Wind Towers, Jobs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Wind tower factory could bring back some of the jobs lost when a machine manufacturing plant closed.

  15. WIND ENERGY Wind Energ. (2014)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-01-01

    , wind power has been expanding globally in recent years and it has become a dominant renewable energy the turbulent atmosphere and the wind turbine wake in order to optimize the design of the wind turbine as wellWIND ENERGY Wind Energ. (2014) Published online in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary

  16. A Stochastic Unit-Commitment Model to Estimate the Costs of Changing Power Plant Operation under High Amounts of Intermittent Wind Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    High Amounts of Intermittent Wind Power Integration Meibom, P.1 , Brand, H.2 , Barth, R.2 and Weber, C Integration Costs" Extended Abstract A fast growth of the installation of wind turbines has been experienced in several European countries. The introduction of substantial amounts of wind power in a liberalized

  17. Modeling of wind farm controllers Poul Srensen1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (typically offshore) wind farms has initiated the development of advanced, automatic wind farm controllers. As the first large offshore wind farm, the Horns Rev offshore wind farm controller is probably the most plants (CHP) provide increased supply during cold days. The main aim of the advanced offshore wind farm

  18. wind energy

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    5%2A en Pantex to Become Wind Energy Research Center http:nnsa.energy.govfieldofficesnponpopressreleasespantex-become-wind-energy-research-center

  19. Community-Owned wind power development: The challenge of applying the European model in the United States, and how states are addressing that challenge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2004-01-01

    Bolinger, M. 2001. Community Wind Power Ownership Schemes infor Communities to Facilitate Wind Power Plant Projects. ”at 2003 Oklahoma Wind Power and Bioenergy Conference, June

  20. Vertical axis wind turbines

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krivcov, Vladimir (Miass, RU); Krivospitski, Vladimir (Miass, RU); Maksimov, Vasili (Miass, RU); Halstead, Richard (Rohnert Park, CA); Grahov, Jurij (Miass, RU)

    2011-03-08

    A vertical axis wind turbine is described. The wind turbine can include a top ring, a middle ring and a lower ring, wherein a plurality of vertical airfoils are disposed between the rings. For example, three vertical airfoils can be attached between the upper ring and the middle ring. In addition, three more vertical airfoils can be attached between the lower ring and the middle ring. When wind contacts the vertically arranged airfoils the rings begin to spin. By connecting the rings to a center pole which spins an alternator, electricity can be generated from wind.

  1. Wind/Hybrid Electricity Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDaniel, Lori

    2001-03-31

    Wind energy is widely recognized as the most efficient and cost effective form of new renewable energy available in the Midwest. New utility-scale wind farms (arrays of large turbines in high wind areas producing sufficient energy to serve thousands of homes) rival the cost of building new conventional forms of combustion energy plants, gas, diesel and coal power plants. Wind energy is not subject to the inflationary cost of fossil fuels. Wind energy can also be very attractive to residential and commercial electric customers in high wind areas who would like to be more self-sufficient for their energy needs. And wind energy is friendly to the environment at a time when there is increasing concern about pollution and climate change. However, wind energy is an intermittent source of power. Most wind turbines start producing small amounts of electricity at about 8-10 mph (4 meters per second) of wind speed. The turbine does not reach its rated output until the wind reaches about 26-28 mph (12 m/s). So what do you do for power when the output of the wind turbine is not sufficient to meet the demand for energy? This paper will discuss wind hybrid technology options that mix wind with other power sources and storage devices to help solve this problem. This will be done on a variety of scales on the impact of wind energy on the utility system as a whole, and on the commercial and small-scale residential applications. The average cost and cost-benefit of each application along with references to manufacturers will be given. Emerging technologies that promise to shape the future of renewable energy will be explored as well.

  2. Wind Generation Challenges & New Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCalley, James D.

    · Introduction · Grid Integration Challenges · "New" Technologies · Conclusions #12;Introduction #12;Proprietary · Testing and modeling thermal and renewable plants for grid code compliance GE Wind Generator & Electrical: AWEA, 1Q 2014 [1] #12;Wind Integration Challenges #12;Proprietary Information: This document contains

  3. Sensitivity Analysis of Offshore Wind Cost of Energy (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dykes, K.; Ning, A.; Graf, P.; Scott, G.; Damiami, R.; Hand, M.; Meadows, R.; Musial, W.; Moriarty, P.; Veers, P.

    2012-10-01

    No matter the source, offshore wind energy plant cost estimates are significantly higher than for land-based projects. For instance, a National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) review on the 2010 cost of wind energy found baseline cost estimates for onshore wind energy systems to be 71 dollars per megawatt-hour ($/MWh), versus 225 $/MWh for offshore systems. There are many ways that innovation can be used to reduce the high costs of offshore wind energy. However, the use of such innovation impacts the cost of energy because of the highly coupled nature of the system. For example, the deployment of multimegawatt turbines can reduce the number of turbines, thereby reducing the operation and maintenance (O&M) costs associated with vessel acquisition and use. On the other hand, larger turbines may require more specialized vessels and infrastructure to perform the same operations, which could result in higher costs. To better understand the full impact of a design decision on offshore wind energy system performance and cost, a system analysis approach is needed. In 2011-2012, NREL began development of a wind energy systems engineering software tool to support offshore wind energy system analysis. The tool combines engineering and cost models to represent an entire offshore wind energy plant and to perform system cost sensitivity analysis and optimization. Initial results were collected by applying the tool to conduct a sensitivity analysis on a baseline offshore wind energy system using 5-MW and 6-MW NREL reference turbines. Results included information on rotor diameter, hub height, power rating, and maximum allowable tip speeds.

  4. Wind Technology Advancements and Impacts on Western Wind Resources (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robichaud, R.

    2014-09-01

    Robi Robichaud made this presentation at the Bureau of Land Management West-wide Wind Opportunities and Constraints Mapping (WWOCM) Project public meeting in Denver, Colorado in September 2014. This presentation outlines recent wind technology advancements, evolving turbine technologies, and industry challenges. The presentation includes maps of mean wind speeds at 50-m, 80-m, and 100-m hub heights on BLM lands. Robichaud also presented on the difference in mean wind speeds from 80m to 100m in Wyoming.

  5. Wind Energy Information Guide 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    anon.

    2004-01-01

    The guide provides a list of contact information and Web site addresses for resources that provide a range of general and technical information about wind energy, including general information, wind and renewable energy, university programs and research institutes, international wind energy associations and others.

  6. An Exploration of Wind Energy & Wind Turbines | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    blade shape, height of turbine, etc Student worksheets are included to facilitate the design and analysis process. Learning Goals: Below are the learning targets for the wind...

  7. Wind Energy Benefits, Wind Powering America (WPA) (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-04-01

    This fact sheet outlines the top 10 benefits of wind energy, including cost, water savings, job creation, indigenous resource, and low operating costs.

  8. HOW DO INVASIVE EXOTIC PLANTS AFFECT NATIVE PLANTS, BIRDS AND MAMMALS IN GREENWAYS?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hess, George

    to recognize that only a small percentage of exotic species are invasive. Many exotic plants that are featured of all, they are located primarily in urban areas, where many gardens include some of the most invasive species. These gardens provide seeds of exotics that can enter the greenway by being blown in by wind

  9. Wind Energy Benefits (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2015-01-01

    This fact sheet outlines the top 10 benefits of wind energy, including cost, water savings, job creation, indigenous resource, and low operating costs.

  10. Wind Energy Benefits, Wind Powering America (WPA) (Fact Sheet), Wind And Water Power Program (WWPP)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This fact sheet outlines the top 10 benefits of wind energy, including cost, water savings, job creation, indigenous resource, and low operating costs.

  11. Wind Farm

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The wind farm in Greensburg, Kansas, was completed in spring 2010, and consists of ten 1.25 megawatt (MW) wind turbines that supply enough electricity to power every house, business, and municipal...

  12. Stakeholder Priorities in Wind Energy (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lantz, E.

    2011-05-01

    This presentation provides an overview of stakeholder priorities as they relate to wind power, including priorities by region and type.

  13. Workforce Development and Wind for Schools (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newcomb, C.; Baring-Gould, I.

    2012-06-01

    As the United States dramatically expands wind energy deployment, the industry is faced with the need to quickly develop a skilled workforce and to address public acceptance. Wind Powering America's Wind for Schools project addresses these challenges. This poster, produced for the American Wind Energy Association's annual WINDPOWER conference, provides an overview of the project, including objectives, methods, and results.

  14. Ris Energy Report 5 Technical challenges to energy systems' operation and markets 55 A future energy system that includes a high propor-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of wind power plants Large wind farms such as the 160 MW Horns Rev and the 165 MW Nysted offshore wind farms in Denmark are connected to the transmission system, in that sense these wind farms are comparable power in the wind. since there are no fuel savings the cost reduction of a wind farm is very limited

  15. Understanding Wind Turbine Price Trends in the U.S. Over the Past Decade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2013-01-01

    include some offshore wind turbines. That said, the factoffshore wind still accounts for a relatively small portion of Vestas’ turbine

  16. Reduced vibration motor winding arrangement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Slavik, C.J.; Rhudy, R.G.; Bushman, R.E.

    1997-11-11

    An individual phase winding arrangement having a sixty electrical degree phase belt width for use with a three phase motor armature includes a delta connected phase winding portion and a wye connected phase winding portion. Both the delta and wye connected phase winding portions have a thirty electrical degree phase belt width. The delta and wye connected phase winding portions are each formed from a preselected number of individual coils each formed, in turn, from an unequal number of electrical conductor turns in the approximate ratio of {radical}3. The individual coils of the delta and wye connected phase winding portions may either be connected in series or parallel. This arrangement provides an armature winding for a three phase motor which retains the benefits of the widely known and utilized thirty degree phase belt concept, including improved mmf waveform and fundamental distribution factor, with consequent reduced vibrations and improved efficiency. 4 figs.

  17. Reduced vibration motor winding arrangement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Slavik, Charles J. (Rexford, NY); Rhudy, Ralph G. (Scotia, NY); Bushman, Ralph E. (Lathem, NY)

    1997-01-01

    An individual phase winding arrangement having a sixty electrical degree phase belt width for use with a three phase motor armature includes a delta connected phase winding portion and a wye connected phase winding portion. Both the delta and wye connected phase winding portions have a thirty electrical degree phase belt width. The delta and wye connected phase winding portions are each formed from a preselected number of individual coils each formed, in turn, from an unequal number of electrical conductor turns in the approximate ratio of .sqroot.3. The individual coils of the delta and wye connected phase winding portions may either be connected in series or parallel. This arrangement provides an armature winding for a three phase motor which retains the benefits of the widely known and utilized thirty degree phase belt concept, including improved mmf waveform and fundamental distribution factor, with consequent reduced vibrations and improved efficiency.

  18. Answers for energy. www.siemens.com/wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    wind power plants develop capacities similar to conventional power plants, power generation companies within most markets. 4 #12;In designing a wind turbine, a holistic view of the design and construction is a reliable investment in the future of power generation." Henrik Stiesdal, CTO, Siemens Wind Power 5 #12

  19. 2013 Wind Technologies Market Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiser, R.; Bolinger, M.; Barbose, G.; Darghouth, N.; Hoen, B.; Mills, A.; Weaver, S.; Porter, K.; Buckley, M.; Oteri, F.; Tegen, S.

    2014-08-01

    This annual report provides a detailed overview of developments and trends in the U.S. wind power market, with a particular focus on 2013. This 2013 edition updates data presented in previous editions while highlighting key trends and important new developments. The report includes an overview of key installation-related trends; trends in wind power capacity growth; how that growth compares to other countries and generation sources; the amount and percentage of wind energy in individual states; the status of offshore wind power development and the quantity of proposed wind power capacity in various interconnection queues in the United States.

  20. Webtrends Archives by Fiscal Year — Wind and Water

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    From the EERE Web Statistics Archive: Wind and Water Power Technologies Office, Webtrends archives for the sites, including Wind Powering America, by fiscal year.

  1. New Report Evaluates Impacts of DOE's Wind Powering America Initiative...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    which are intended to increase the deployment of utility-scale, community, and small wind systems. These state-level activities include the formation of wind working groups...

  2. Analysis of Wind Power and Load Data at Multiple Time Scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coughlin, Katie

    2011-01-01

    Huei. 2005. Primer on Wind Power for Utility Applications.Wan, Yih-Huei. 2004. Wind Power Plant Behaviors: Analysesof Long-Term Wind Power Data. National Renewable Energy Lab

  3. Ex Post Analysis of Economic Impacts from Wind Power Development in U.S. Counties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Jason P.

    2014-01-01

    use requirements of modern wind power plants in the United2002. Economic impacts of wind power in Kittitas County:Renewable energy: Wind power’s contribution to electric

  4. Examining the Variability of Wind Power Output in the Regulation Time Frame: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hodge, B. M.; Shedd, S.; Florita, A.

    2012-08-01

    This work examines the distribution of changes in wind power for different time scales in the regulation time frame as well as the correlation of changes in power output for individual wind turbines in a wind plant.

  5. Ex Post Analysis of Economic Impacts from Wind Power Development in U.S. Counties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Jason P.

    2014-01-01

    use requirements of modern wind power plants in the United2002. Economic impacts of wind power in Kittitas County:Office, 2004. Renewable energy: Wind power’s contribution to

  6. U.S. Continues to Lead the World in Wind Power Growth | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    wind plants in 2007 alone, making the U.S. the fastest-growing wind power market in the world for the third straight year. The report also showed that wind is on a path to becoming...

  7. Examination of Capacity and Ramping Impacts of Wind Energy on Power Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirby, B.; Milligan, M.

    2008-07-01

    When wind plants serve load within the balancing area, no additional capacity required to integrate wind power into the system. We present some thought experiments to illustrate some implications for wind integration studies.

  8. U.S. Wind Energy Manufacturing and Supply Chain: A Competitiveness Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fullenkamp, Patrick H; Holody, Diane S

    2014-06-15

    The goal of the project was to develop a greater understanding of the key factors determining wind energy component manufacturing costs and pricing on a global basis in order to enhance the competitiveness of U.S. manufacturers, and to reduce installed systems cost. Multiple stakeholders including DOE, turbine OEMs, and large component manufactures will all benefit by better understanding the factors determining domestic competitiveness in the emerging offshore and next generation land-based wind industries. Major objectives of this project were to: 1. Carry out global cost and process comparisons for 5MW jacket foundations, blades, towers, and permanent magnet generators; 2. Assess U.S. manufacturers’ competitiveness and potential for cost reduction; 3. Facilitate informed decision-making on investments in U.S. manufacturing; 4. Develop an industry scorecard representing the readiness of the U.S. manufacturers’ to produce components for the next generations of wind turbines, nominally 3MW land-based and 5MW offshore; 5. Disseminate results through the GLWN Wind Supply Chain GIS Map, a free website that is the most comprehensive public database of U.S. wind energy suppliers; 6. Identify areas and develop recommendations to DOE on potential R&D areas to target for increasing domestic manufacturing competitiveness, per DOE’s Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative (CEMI). Lists of Deliverables 1. Cost Breakdown Competitive Analyses of four product categories: tower, jacket foundation, blade, and permanent magnet (PM) generator. The cost breakdown for each component includes a complete Bill of Materials with net weights; general process steps for labor; and burden adjusted by each manufacturer for their process categories of SGA (sales general and administrative), engineering, logistics cost to a common U.S. port, and profit. 2. Value Stream Map Competitiveness Analysis: A tool that illustrates both information and material flow from the point of getting a customer order at the manufacturing plant; to the orders being forwarded by the manufacturing plant to the material suppliers; to the material being received at the manufacturing plant and processed through the system; to the final product being shipped to the Customer. 3. Competitiveness Scorecard: GLWN developed a Wind Industry Supply Chain Scorecard that reflects U.S. component manufacturers’ readiness to supply the next generation wind turbines, 3MW and 5MW, for land-based and offshore applications. 4. Wind Supply Chain Database & Map: Expand the current GLWN GIS Wind Supply Chain Map to include offshore elements. This is an on-line, free access, wind supply chain map that provides a platform for identifying active and emerging suppliers for the land-based and offshore wind industry, including turbine component manufacturers and wind farm construction service suppliers.

  9. Methods and apparatus for reducing peak wind turbine loads

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moroz, Emilian Mieczyslaw

    2007-02-13

    A method for reducing peak loads of wind turbines in a changing wind environment includes measuring or estimating an instantaneous wind speed and direction at the wind turbine and determining a yaw error of the wind turbine relative to the measured instantaneous wind direction. The method further includes comparing the yaw error to a yaw error trigger that has different values at different wind speeds and shutting down the wind turbine when the yaw error exceeds the yaw error trigger corresponding to the measured or estimated instantaneous wind speed.

  10. Extended tension leg platform design for offshore wind turbine systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, Nicholas W. (Nicholas William)

    2007-01-01

    The rise of reliable wind energy application has become a primary alternative to conventional fossil fuel power plants in the United States and around the world. The feasibility of building large scale wind farms has become ...

  11. Wind Power Forecasting Data

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Operations Call 2012 Retrospective Reports 2012 Retrospective Reports 2011 Smart Grid Wind Integration Wind Integration Initiatives Wind Power Forecasting Wind Projects Email...

  12. Idaho_Wind_Data

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Site Bryans Run Cell Tower Site Wilson Peak Eckert Site Loertscher Boise State's Wind Data Link Wind Power Idaho Wind Data See also: Idaho Energy Resources - Wind, American...

  13. EEE 463 Electrical Power Plants (3) [F] Course (Catalog) Description

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Junshan

    . Environmental impact of electric generation (3 lectures) 9. Advanced energy conversion systems (geothermalEEE 463 Electrical Power Plants (3) [F] Course (Catalog) Description: Generation of electric power using fossil, nuclear and renewable, including solar, geothermal, wind, hydroelectric, biomass and ocean

  14. POWER SYSTEMS STABILITY WITH LARGE-SCALE WIND POWER PENETRATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bak-Jensen, Birgitte

    of offshore wind farms, wind power fluctuations may introduce several challenges to reliable power system behaviour due to natural wind fluctuations. The rapid power fluctuations from the large scale wind farms Generation Control (AGC) system which includes large- scale wind farms for long-term stability simulation

  15. Table 2. Ten Largest Plants by Generation Capacity, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8,"Kennecott Power Plant","Coal","Kennecott Utah Copper",212.7 9,"Milford Wind Corridor I LLC","Wind","First Wind O&M, LLC",203.5 10,"West Valley Generation...

  16. Airborne Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-09-01

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Makani Power is developing an Airborne Wind Turbine (AWT) that eliminates 90% of the mass of a conventional wind turbine and accesses a stronger, more consistent wind at altitudes of near 1,000 feet. At these altitudes, 85% of the country can offer viable wind resources compared to only 15% accessible with current technology. Additionally, the Makani Power wing can be economically deployed in deep offshore waters, opening up a resource which is 4 times greater than the entire U.S. electrical generation capacity. Makani Power has demonstrated the core technology, including autonomous launch, land, and power generation with an 8 meter wingspan, 20 kW prototype. At commercial scale, Makani Power aims to develop a 600 kW, 28 meter wingspan product capable of delivering energy at an unsubsidized cost competitive with coal, the current benchmark for low-cost power.

  17. Offshore Wind Research (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    This 2-page fact sheet describes NREL's offshore wind research and development efforts and capabilities. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory is internationally recognized for offshore wind energy research and development (R&D). Its experience and capabilities cover a wide spectrum of wind energy disciplines. NREL's offshore wind R&D efforts focus on critical areas that address the long-term needs of the offshore wind energy industry and the Department of Energy (DOE). R&D efforts include: (1) Developing offshore design tools and methods; (2) Collaborating with international partners; (3) Testing offshore systems and developing standards; (4) Conducting economic analyses; (5) Characterizing offshore wind resources; and (6) Identifying and mitigating offshore wind grid integration challenges and barriers. NREL has developed and maintains a robust, open-source, modular computer-aided engineering (CAE) tool, known as FAST. FAST's state-of-the-art capabilities provide full dynamic system simulation for a range of offshore wind systems. It models the coupled aerodynamic, hydrodynamic, control system, and structural response of offshore wind systems to support the development of innovative wind technologies that are reliable and cost effective. FAST also provides dynamic models of wind turbines on offshore fixed-bottom systems for shallow and transitional depths and floating-platform systems in deep water, thus enabling design innovation and risk reduction and facilitating higher performance designs that will meet DOE's cost of energy, reliability, and deployment objectives.

  18. Proceedings of the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats Workshop: Understanding and Resolving Bird and Bat Impacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwartz, Susan Savitt (ed.)

    2004-09-01

    Most conservation groups support the development of wind energy in the US as an alternative to fossil and nuclear-fueled power plants to meet growing demand for electrical energy. However, concerns have surfaced over the potential threat to birds, bats, and other wildlife from the construction and operation of wind turbine facilities. Co-sponsored by the American Bird Conservancy (ABC) and the American Wind Energy Association (AWEA), the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats Workshop was convened to examine current research on the impacts of wind energy development on avian and bat species and to discuss the most effective ways to mitigate such impacts. On 18-19 May 2004, 82 representatives from government, non-government organizations, private business, and academia met to (1) review the status of the wind industry and current project development practices, including pre-development risk assessment and post-construction monitoring; (2) learn what is known about direct, indirect (habitat), and cumulative impacts on birds and bats from existing wind projects; about relevant aspects of bat and bird migration ecology; about offshore wind development experience in Europe; and about preventing, minimizing, and mitigating avian and bat impacts; (3) review wind development guidelines developed by the USFWS and the Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife; and (4) identify topics needing further research and to discuss what can be done to ensure that research is both credible and accessible. These Workshop Proceedings include detailed summaries of the presentations made and the discussions that followed.

  19. 2010 Cost of Wind Energy Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tegen, S.; Hand, M.; Maples, B.; Lantz, E.; Schwabe, P.; Smith, A.

    2012-04-01

    This document provides a detailed description of NREL's levelized cost of wind energy equation, assumptions, and results in 2010, including historical cost trends and future projections for land-based and offshore utility-scale wind.

  20. 2010 Cost of Wind Energy Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tegen, S.; Hand, M.; Maples, B.; Lantz, E.; Schwabe, P.; Smith, A.

    2012-04-01

    This document provides a detailed description of NREL's levelized cost of wind energy equation, assumptions and results in 2010, including historical cost trends and future projections for land-based and offshore utility-scale wind.

  1. MAST/GEOG 667: Wind Power Meteorology Fall 2013, 3 credit hours

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    MAST/GEOG 667: Wind Power Meteorology Fall 2013, 3 credit hours 1 to understand onshore, offshore, and airborne wind power. Topics include: forces affecting winds; terrain and land-use effects; air turbulence; numerical modeling; wind power

  2. Wind Tunnel 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-08-17

    Simulation of Cooling Effect of Wind Tower on Passively Ventilated Building John Seryak Kelly Kissock Project Engineer Associate Professor Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering University of Dayton... Dayton, Ohio ABSTRACT Traditional buildings are cooled and ventilated by mechanically induced drafts. Natural ventilation aspires to cool and ventilate a building by natural means, such as cross ventilation or wind towers, without mechanical...

  3. NWTC Aerodynamics Studies Improve Energy Capture and Lower Costs of Wind-Generated Electricity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-08-01

    Researchers at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have expanded wind turbine aerodynamic research from blade and rotor aerodynamics to wind plant and atmospheric inflow effects. The energy capture from wind plants is dependent on all of these aerodynamic interactions. Research at the NWTC is crucial to understanding how wind turbines function in large, multiple-row wind plants. These conditions impact the cumulative fatigue damage of turbine structural components that ultimately effect the useful lifetime of wind turbines. This work also is essential for understanding and maximizing turbine and wind plant energy production. Both turbine lifetime and wind plant energy production are key determinants of the cost of wind-generated electricity.

  4. Wind Integration Datasets from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Wind Integration Datasets provide time-series wind data for 2004, 2005, and 2006. They are intended to be used by energy professionals such as transmission planners, utility planners, project developers, and university researchers, helping them to perform comparisons of sites and estimate power production from hypothetical wind plants. NREL cautions that the information from modeled data may not match wind resource information shown on NREL;s state wind maps as they were created for different purposes and using different methodologies.

  5. Method and apparatus for wind turbine braking

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barbu, Corneliu (Laguna Hills, CA); Teichmann, Ralph (Nishkayuna, NY); Avagliano, Aaron (Houston, TX); Kammer, Leonardo Cesar (Niskayuna, NY); Pierce, Kirk Gee (Simpsonville, SC); Pesetsky, David Samuel (Greenville, SC); Gauchel, Peter (Muenster, DE)

    2009-02-10

    A method for braking a wind turbine including at least one rotor blade coupled to a rotor. The method includes selectively controlling an angle of pitch of the at least one rotor blade with respect to a wind direction based on a design parameter of a component of the wind turbine to facilitate reducing a force induced into the wind turbine component as a result of braking.

  6. The role of plants on isolation barrier systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Link, S.O.; Downs, J.L.; Waugh, W.J.

    1994-11-01

    Surface barriers are used to isolate buried wastes from the environment. Most have been built for short-term isolation. The need to isolate radioactive wastes from the environment requires that the functional integrity of a barrier be maintained for thousands of years. Barrier function strongly depends on vegetation. Plants reduce wind and water erosion and minimize drainage, but may transport contaminants if roots extend into buried wastes. Our review of the function of plants on surface barriers focuses on the role of plants across mesic to arid environments and gives special consideration to studies done at Hanford. The Hanford Barrier Development Program was created to design and test an earthen cover system to inhibit water infiltration, plant and animal intrusion, and wind and water erosion, while isolating buried wastes for at least 1000 years. Studies at the Hanford have shown that plants will significantly interact with the barrier. Plants transpire soil water back into the atmosphere. Deep-rooted perennials best recycle water; soil water may drain through the root zone of shallow-rooted annuals. Lysimeter studies indicate that a surface layer of fine soil with deep-rooted plants precludes drainage even with three times normal precipitation. The presence of vegetation greatly reduces water and wind erosion, but deep-rooted plants pose a threat of biointrusion and contaminant transport. The Hanford barrier includes a buried rock layer and asphalt layer to prevent biointrusion.

  7. Proceedings of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory Wind Energy Systems Engineering Workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dykes, K.

    2014-12-01

    The second National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Wind Energy Systems Engineering Workshop was held in Broomfield, Colorado, from January 29 to February 1, 2013. The event included a day-and-a-half workshop exploring a wide variety of topics related to system modeling and design of wind turbines and plants. Following the workshop, 2 days of tutorials were held at NREL, showcasing software developed at Sandia National Laboratories, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Glenn Laboratories, and NREL. This document provides a brief summary of the various workshop activities and includes a review of the content and evaluation results from attendees.

  8. Offshore Wind Power USA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Offshore Wind Power USA conference provides the latest offshore wind market updates and forecasts.

  9. Economic analysis of wind-powered refrigeration cooling/water-heating systems in food processing. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garling, W.S.; Harper, M.R.; Merchant-Geuder, L.; Welch, M.

    1980-03-01

    Potential applications of wind energy include not only large central turbines that can be utilized by utilities, but also dispersed systems for farms and other applications. The US Departments of Energy (DOE) and Agriculture (USDA) currently are establishing the feasibility of wind energy use in applications where the energy can be used as available, or stored in a simple form. These applications include production of hot water for rural sanitation, heating and cooling of rural structures and products, drying agricultural products, and irrigation. This study, funded by USDA, analyzed the economic feasibility of wind power in refrigeration cooling and water heating systems in food processing plants. Types of plants included were meat and poultry, dairy, fruit and vegetable, and aquaculture.

  10. U.S. Offshore Wind Manufacturing and Supply Chain Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamilton, Bruce Duncan

    2013-02-22

    The objective of the report is to provide an assessment of the domestic supply chain and manufacturing infrastructure supporting the U.S. offshore wind market. The report provides baseline information and develops a strategy for future development of the supply chain required to support projected offshore wind deployment levels. A brief description of each of the key chapters includes: » Chapter 1: Offshore Wind Plant Costs and Anticipated Technology Advancements. Determines the cost breakdown of offshore wind plants and identifies technical trends and anticipated advancements in offshore wind manufacturing and construction. » Chapter 2: Potential Supply Chain Requirements and Opportunities. Provides an organized, analytical approach to identifying and bounding the uncertainties associated with a future U.S. offshore wind market. It projects potential component-level supply chain needs under three demand scenarios and identifies key supply chain challenges and opportunities facing the future U.S. market as well as current suppliers of the nation’s land-based wind market. » Chapter 3: Strategy for Future Development. Evaluates the gap or competitive advantage of adding manufacturing capacity in the U.S. vs. overseas, and evaluates examples of policies that have been successful . » Chapter 4: Pathways for Market Entry. Identifies technical and business pathways for market entry by potential suppliers of large-scale offshore turbine components and technical services. The report is intended for use by the following industry stakeholder groups: (a) Industry participants who seek baseline cost and supplier information for key component segments and the overall U.S. offshore wind market (Chapters 1 and 2). The component-level requirements and opportunities presented in Section 2.3 will be particularly useful in identifying market sizes, competition, and risks for the various component segments. (b) Federal, state, and local policymakers and economic development agencies, to assist in identifying policies with low effort and high impact (Chapter 3). Section 3.3 provides specific policy examples that have been demonstrated to be effective in removing barriers to development. (c) Current and potential domestic suppliers in the offshore wind market, in evaluating areas of opportunity and understanding requirements for participation (Chapter 4). Section 4.4 provides a step-by-step description of the qualification process that suppliers looking to sell components into a future U.S. offshore wind market will need to follow.

  11. Liquid Hydrogen Production and Delivery from a Dedicated Wind...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Wind Power Plant This May 2012 study assesses the costs and potential for remote renewable energy to be transported via hydrogen to a demand center for transportation use....

  12. How Does Wind Affect Coal? Cycling, Emissions, and Costs (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lew, D.; Brinkman, G.; Milligan, M.

    2011-05-01

    This presentation describes in general fashion what the emissions and economic impacts of wind power generation on fossil power plants looks like and also offers some mitigation ideas.

  13. Wind Power: How Much, How Soon, and At What Cost?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan H

    2010-01-01

    GW, predominantly from hydropower plants (Table 2). This isIf one excludes large hydropower, however, this figure dropsGeneration Technology Large Hydropower Small Hydropower Wind

  14. Wind Energy Leasing Handbook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

    Wind Energy Leasing Handbook Wind Energy Leasing Handbook E-1033 Oklahoma Cooperative Extension?..................................................................................................................... 31 What do wind developers consider in locating wind energy projects?............................................................................................ 37 How do companies and individuals invest in wind energy projects?....................................................................

  15. Field Wind Tunnel Assessment of the Potential for Wind Transport of Soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lancaster, Nicholas [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Reno, NV (United States); Metzger, Steve [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Reno, NV (United States)

    2005-02-01

    This report documents a series of field experiments carried out in the Double Tracks area of the Tonopah Test Range in June, July, and August 1996 and March and July 1997. The aim of the experiments was to: (1) determine the wind speeds necessary to entrain surface particles from excavated surfaces in the study area and (2) determine dust emissions from surfaces that had been stabilized permanently by planted natural vegetation. This investigation assessed the potential for wind transport of surface soils, including resuspension and emission of dust sized particles from areas of surface heavy metal contamination, following site remediation, as well as the actual emissions from these areas. The remediation site is located in Area 73 of the Tonopah Test Range. The goal of the field experiments was to measure the velocities with which boundary layer winds might initiate dust emissions from the affected site, and to gage the effectiveness of surface stabilization procedures to prevent such emissions. Particle movement measurements were generated through the use of a portable wind tunnel laid directly on the excavated surface.

  16. Winding for linear pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kliman, G.B.; Brynsvold, G.V.; Jahns, T.M.

    1989-08-22

    A winding and method of winding for a submersible linear pump for pumping liquid sodium are disclosed. The pump includes a stator having a central cylindrical duct preferably vertically aligned. The central vertical duct is surrounded by a system of coils in slots. These slots are interleaved with magnetic flux conducting elements, these magnetic flux conducting elements forming a continuous magnetic field conduction path along the stator. The central duct has placed therein a cylindrical magnetic conducting core, this core having a cylindrical diameter less than the diameter of the cylindrical duct. The core once placed to the duct defines a cylindrical interstitial pumping volume of the pump. This cylindrical interstitial pumping volume preferably defines an inlet at the bottom of the pump, and an outlet at the top of the pump. Pump operation occurs by static windings in the outer stator sequentially conveying toroidal fields from the pump inlet at the bottom of the pump to the pump outlet at the top of the pump. The winding apparatus and method of winding disclosed uses multiple slots per pole per phase with parallel winding legs on each phase equal to or less than the number of slots per pole per phase. The slot sequence per pole per phase is chosen to equalize the variations in flux density of the pump sodium as it passes into the pump at the pump inlet with little or no flux and acquires magnetic flux in passage through the pump to the pump outlet. 4 figs.

  17. 2008 WIND TECHNOLOGIES MARKET REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiser, Ryan H.; Bolinger, Mark; Barbose, G.; Mills, A.; Rosa, A.; Porter, K.; Fink, S.; Tegen, S.; Musial, W.; Oteri, F.; Heimiller, D.; Rberts, B.; Belyeu, K.; Stimmel, R.

    2009-07-15

    The U.S. wind industry experienced a banner year in 2008, again surpassing even optimistic growth projections from years past. At the same time, the last year has been one of upheaval, with the global financial crisis impacting near-term growth prospects for the wind industry, and with federal policy changes enacted to push the industry towards continued aggressive expansion. This rapid pace of development has made it difficult to keep up with trends in the marketplace. Yet, the need for timely, objective information on the industry and its progress has never been greater. This report - the third of an ongoing annual series - attempts to meet this need by providing a detailed overview of developments and trends in the U.S. wind power market, with a particular focus on 2008. As with previous editions, this report begins with an overview of key wind power installation-related trends: trends in wind capacity growth in the U.S., how that growth compares to other countries and generation sources, the amount and percentage of wind in individual states and serving specific utilities, and the quantity of proposed wind capacity in various interconnection queues in the United States. Next, the report covers an array of wind industry trends, including developments in turbine manufacturer market share, manufacturing and supply-chain investments, wind turbine and wind project size, project financing developments, and trends among wind power developers, project owners, and power purchasers. The report then turns to a discussion of wind project price, cost, and performance trends. In so doing, it reviews the price of wind power in the United States, and how those prices compare to the cost of fossil-fueled generation, as represented by wholesale power prices. It also describes trends in installed wind project costs, wind turbine transaction prices, project performance, and operations and maintenance expenses. Next, the report examines other policy and market factors impacting the domestic wind power market, including federal and state policy drivers, transmission issues, and grid integration. Finally, the report concludes with a preview of possible near- to medium-term market developments. This version of the Annual Report updates data presented in the previous editions, while highlighting key trends and important new developments from 2008. New to this edition is an executive summary of the report and an expanded final section on near- to medium-term market development. The report concentrates on larger-scale wind applications, defined here as individual turbines or projects that exceed 50 kW in size. The U.S. wind power sector is multifaceted, however, and also includes smaller, customer-sited wind turbines used to power the needs of residences, farms, and businesses. Data on these applications are not the focus of this report, though a brief discussion on Distributed Wind Power is provided on page 4. Much of the data included in this report were compiled by Berkeley Lab, and come from a variety of sources, including the American Wind Energy Association (AWEA), the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC). The Appendix provides a summary of the many data sources used in the report. Data on 2008 wind capacity additions in the United States are based on information provided by AWEA; some minor adjustments to those data may be expected. In other cases, the data shown here represent only a sample of actual wind projects installed in the United States; furthermore, the data vary in quality. As such, emphasis should be placed on overall trends, rather than on individual data points. Finally, each section of this document focuses on historical market information, with an emphasis on 2008; with the exception of the final section, the report does not seek to forecast future trends.

  18. Wind energy systems information user study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belew, W.W.; Wood, B.L.; Marle, T.L.; Reinhardt, C.L.

    1981-01-01

    This report describes the results of a series of telephone interviews with potential users of information on wind energy conversion. These interviews, part of a larger study covering nine different solar technologies, attempted to identify: the type of information each distinctive group of information users needed, and the best way of getting information to that group. Groups studied include: wind energy conversion system researchers; wind energy conversion system manufacturer representatives; wind energy conversion system distributors; wind turbine engineers; utility representatives; educators; county agents and extension service agents; and wind turbine owners.

  19. Updated Eastern Interconnect Wind Power Output and Forecasts for ERGIS: July 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pennock, K.

    2012-10-01

    AWS Truepower, LLC (AWST) was retained by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to update wind resource, plant output, and wind power forecasts originally produced by the Eastern Wind Integration and Transmission Study (EWITS). The new data set was to incorporate AWST's updated 200-m wind speed map, additional tall towers that were not included in the original study, and new turbine power curves. Additionally, a primary objective of this new study was to employ new data synthesis techniques developed for the PJM Renewable Integration Study (PRIS) to eliminate diurnal discontinuities resulting from the assimilation of observations into mesoscale model runs. The updated data set covers the same geographic area, 10-minute time resolution, and 2004?2006 study period for the same onshore and offshore (Great Lakes and Atlantic coast) sites as the original EWITS data set.

  20. Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phadke, Amol

    2008-01-01

    wind generation; • Higher heat rate of the G+CC+CCS plant inLevelized fuel price (FP), heat rate(HR) Variable O&M (VO&M)Fuel Price ($/MMBtu) Heat Rate(Btu/kWh) Capacity Factor (%)

  1. ISU Wind Energy Laboratory Nicholas David

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCalley, James D.

    , Dynamometers, Power Electronics Blades, Gearboxes, Structures Sensors & Actuators Design and Analysis Tools Speed Aerodynamics M2I lab - Design and Fabrication Industrial & Manufacturing Systems Engineering: Wind & Characterization U.S. Dept. of Energy - 3D Metals Printing ISU Power Plant - 100 kW Wind Turbine N. David & J. Mc

  2. The Wind Forecast Improvement Project (WFIP). A Public/Private Partnership for Improving Short Term Wind Energy Forecasts and Quantifying the Benefits of Utility Operations -- the Northern Study Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finley, Cathy

    2014-04-30

    This report contains the results from research aimed at improving short-range (0-6 hour) hub-height wind forecasts in the NOAA weather forecast models through additional data assimilation and model physics improvements for use in wind energy forecasting. Additional meteorological observing platforms including wind profilers, sodars, and surface stations were deployed for this study by NOAA and DOE, and additional meteorological data at or near wind turbine hub height were provided by South Dakota State University and WindLogics/NextEra Energy Resources over a large geographical area in the U.S. Northern Plains for assimilation into NOAA research weather forecast models. The resulting improvements in wind energy forecasts based on the research weather forecast models (with the additional data assimilation and model physics improvements) were examined in many different ways and compared with wind energy forecasts based on the current operational weather forecast models to quantify the forecast improvements important to power grid system operators and wind plant owners/operators participating in energy markets. Two operational weather forecast models (OP_RUC, OP_RAP) and two research weather forecast models (ESRL_RAP, HRRR) were used as the base wind forecasts for generating several different wind power forecasts for the NextEra Energy wind plants in the study area. Power forecasts were generated from the wind forecasts in a variety of ways, from very simple to quite sophisticated, as they might be used by a wide range of both general users and commercial wind energy forecast vendors. The error characteristics of each of these types of forecasts were examined and quantified using bulk error statistics for both the local wind plant and the system aggregate forecasts. The wind power forecast accuracy was also evaluated separately for high-impact wind energy ramp events. The overall bulk error statistics calculated over the first six hours of the forecasts at both the individual wind plant and at the system-wide aggregate level over the one year study period showed that the research weather model-based power forecasts (all types) had lower overall error rates than the current operational weather model-based power forecasts, both at the individual wind plant level and at the system aggregate level. The bulk error statistics of the various model-based power forecasts were also calculated by season and model runtime/forecast hour as power system operations are more sensitive to wind energy forecast errors during certain times of year and certain times of day. The results showed that there were significant differences in seasonal forecast errors between the various model-based power forecasts. The results from the analysis of the various wind power forecast errors by model runtime and forecast hour showed that the forecast errors were largest during the times of day that have increased significance to power system operators (the overnight hours and the morning/evening boundary layer transition periods), but the research weather model-based power forecasts showed improvement over the operational weather model-based power forecasts at these times.

  3. Energy from Offshore Wind: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Musial, W.; Butterfield, S.; Ram, B.

    2006-02-01

    This paper provides an overview of the nascent offshore wind energy industry including a status of the commercial offshore industry and the technologies that will be needed for full market development.

  4. Massachusetts Wind Working Group Meeting

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The meeting will feature a panel presentation and discussion on Shadow-Flicker, as well as updates related to the Community Wind Outreach Initiative.   Panel speakers so far include: Elizabeth King...

  5. Alstom 3-MW Wind Turbine Installed at NWTC (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-09-01

    The 3-MW Alstom wind turbine was installed at NREL's NWTC in October 2010. Test data will be used to validate advanced turbine design and analysis tools. NREL signed a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement with Alstom in 2010 to conduct certification testing on the company's 3-MW ECO 100 wind turbine and to validate models of Alstom's unique drivetrain concept. The turbine was installed at NREL's National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) in October 2010 and engineers began certification testing in 2011. Tests to be conducted by NREL include a power quality test to finalize the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) requirements for type certification of the 60-Hz unit. The successful outcome of this test will enable Alstom to begin commercial production of ECO 100 in the United States. NREL also will obtain additional measurements of power performance, acoustic noise, and system frequency to complement the 50 Hz results previously completed in Europe. After NREL completes the certification testing on the ECO 100, it will conduct long-term testing to validate gearbox performance to gain a better understanding of the machine's unique ALSTOM PURE TORQUE{trademark} drivetrain concept. In conventional wind turbines, the rotor is supported by the shaft-bearing gearbox assembly. Rotor loads are partially transmitted to the gearbox and may reduce gearbox reliability. In the ALSTOM PURE TORQUE concept, the rotor is supported by a cast frame running through the hub, which transfers bending loads directly to the tower. Torque is transmitted to the shaft through an elastic coupling at the front of the hub. According to Alstom, this system will increase wind turbine reliability and reduce operation and maintenance costs by isolating the gearbox from rotor loads. Gearbox reliability has challenged the wind energy industry for more than two decades. Gearbox failures require expensive and time-consuming replacement, significantly increasing the cost of wind plant operation while reducing the plant's power output and revenue. To solve gearbox reliability issues, NREL launched a Gearbox Reliability Collaborative (GRC) in 2006 and brought together the world's leading turbine manufacturers, consultants, and experts from more than 30 companies and organizations. GRC's goal was to validate the typical design process-from wind turbine system loads to bearing ratings-through a comprehensive dynamometer and field-test program. Design analyses will form a basis for improving reliability of future designs and retrofit packages. Through its study of Alstom's Eco 100 gearbox, NREL can compare its GRC model gearbox with Alstom's and add the results to the GRC database, which is helping to advance more reliable wind turbine technology.

  6. Wind Vision: Impacts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wind Vision: Impacts Rich Tusing New West Technologies, LLC For EERE's Wind and Water Power Technologies Office July 15, 2015 2 | Wind and Water Power Technologies Office...

  7. Wind Program News

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-01-06

    Stay current on the news about the wind side of the Wind and Water Power Program and important wind energy events around the U.S.

  8. Wind Power Link

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wind Power Links These other web sites may provide additional information of interest: American Wind Energy Association Idaho Department of Energy Wind Power Information Utah...

  9. Energy 101: Wind Turbines

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-05-29

    See how wind turbines generate clean electricity from the power of the wind. Highlighted are the various parts and mechanisms of a modern wind turbine.

  10. Energy 101: Wind Turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-01-01

    See how wind turbines generate clean electricity from the power of the wind. Highlighted are the various parts and mechanisms of a modern wind turbine.

  11. Vandenberg_Wind_Data

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Air Force and other branches of the Department of Defense for several years doing wind data collection and assessment, wind power feasibility studies, and wind farm design....

  12. Direct drive wind turbine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bywaters, Garrett Lee; Danforth, William; Bevington, Christopher; Stowell, Jesse; Costin, Daniel

    2006-09-19

    A wind turbine is provided that minimizes the size of the drive train and nacelle while maintaining the power electronics and transformer at the top of the tower. The turbine includes a direct drive generator having an integrated disk brake positioned radially inside the stator while minimizing the potential for contamination. The turbine further includes a means for mounting a transformer below the nacelle within the tower.

  13. Direct drive wind turbine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bywaters, Garrett; Danforth, William; Bevington, Christopher; Jesse, Stowell; Costin, Daniel

    2007-02-27

    A wind turbine is provided that minimizes the size of the drive train and nacelle while maintaining the power electronics and transformer at the top of the tower. The turbine includes a direct drive generator having an integrated disk brake positioned radially inside the stator while minimizing the potential for contamination. The turbine further includes a means for mounting a transformer below the nacelle within the tower.

  14. Direct drive wind turbine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bywaters, Garrett; Danforth, William; Bevington, Christopher; Stowell, Jesse; Costin, Daniel

    2006-07-11

    A wind turbine is provided that minimizes the size of the drive train and nacelle while maintaining the power electronics and transformer at the top of the tower. The turbine includes a direct drive generator having an integrated disk brake positioned radially inside the stator while minimizing the potential for contamination. The turbine further includes a means for mounting a transformer below the nacelle within the tower.

  15. Direct drive wind turbine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bywaters, Garrett; Danforth, William; Bevington, Christopher; Jesse, Stowell; Costin, Daniel

    2006-10-10

    A wind turbine is provided that minimizes the size of the drive train and nacelle while maintaining the power electronics and transformer at the top of the tower. The turbine includes a direct drive generator having an integrated disk brake positioned radially inside the stator while minimizing the potential for contamination. The turbine further includes a means for mounting a transformer below the nacelle within the tower.

  16. 2014 Wind Technologies Market Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Barbose, Galen; Daghouth, Naim; Hoen, Ben; Mills, Andrew; Hamachi LaCommare, Kristina; Millstein, Dev; Hansen, Dana; Porter, Kevin; Widiss, Rebecca; Buckley, Michael; Oteri, Frank; Smith, Aaron; Tegen, Suzanne

    2015-08-06

    Wind power capacity additions in the United States rebounded in 2014, and continued growth through 2016 is anticipated. Recent and projected near-term growth is supported by the industry’s primary federal incentive—the production tax credit (PTC)—which is available for projects that began construction by the end of 2014. Wind additions are also being driven by recent improvements in the cost and performance of wind power technologies, which have resulted in the lowest power sales prices ever seen in the U.S. wind sector. Growing corporate demand for wind energy and state-level policies play important roles as well. Expectations for continued technological advancements and cost reductions may further boost future growth. At the same time, the prospects for growth beyond 2016 are uncertain. The PTC has expired, and its renewal remains in question. Continued low natural gas prices, modest electricity demand growth, and limited near-term demand from state renewables portfolio standards (RPS) have also put a damper on growth expectations. These trends, in combination with increasingly global supply chains, have limited the growth of domestic manufacturing of wind equipment. What they mean for wind power additions through the end of the decade and beyond will be dictated in part by future natural gas prices, fossil plant retirements, and policy decisions.

  17. Wind Energy Forecasting: A Collaboration of the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) and Xcel Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parks, K.; Wan, Y. H.; Wiener, G.; Liu, Y.

    2011-10-01

    The focus of this report is the wind forecasting system developed during this contract period with results of performance through the end of 2010. The report is intentionally high-level, with technical details disseminated at various conferences and academic papers. At the end of 2010, Xcel Energy managed the output of 3372 megawatts of installed wind energy. The wind plants span three operating companies1, serving customers in eight states2, and three market structures3. The great majority of the wind energy is contracted through power purchase agreements (PPAs). The remainder is utility owned, Qualifying Facilities (QF), distributed resources (i.e., 'behind the meter'), or merchant entities within Xcel Energy's Balancing Authority footprints. Regardless of the contractual or ownership arrangements, the output of the wind energy is balanced by Xcel Energy's generation resources that include fossil, nuclear, and hydro based facilities that are owned or contracted via PPAs. These facilities are committed and dispatched or bid into day-ahead and real-time markets by Xcel Energy's Commercial Operations department. Wind energy complicates the short and long-term planning goals of least-cost, reliable operations. Due to the uncertainty of wind energy production, inherent suboptimal commitment and dispatch associated with imperfect wind forecasts drives up costs. For example, a gas combined cycle unit may be turned on, or committed, in anticipation of low winds. The reality is winds stayed high, forcing this unit and others to run, or be dispatched, to sub-optimal loading positions. In addition, commitment decisions are frequently irreversible due to minimum up and down time constraints. That is, a dispatcher lives with inefficient decisions made in prior periods. In general, uncertainty contributes to conservative operations - committing more units and keeping them on longer than may have been necessary for purposes of maintaining reliability. The downside is costs are higher. In organized electricity markets, units that are committed for reliability reasons are paid their offer price even when prevailing market prices are lower. Often, these uplift charges are allocated to market participants that caused the inefficient dispatch in the first place. Thus, wind energy facilities are burdened with their share of costs proportional to their forecast errors. For Xcel Energy, wind energy uncertainty costs manifest depending on specific market structures. In the Public Service of Colorado (PSCo), inefficient commitment and dispatch caused by wind uncertainty increases fuel costs. Wind resources participating in the Midwest Independent System Operator (MISO) footprint make substantial payments in the real-time markets to true-up their day-ahead positions and are additionally burdened with deviation charges called a Revenue Sufficiency Guarantee (RSG) to cover out of market costs associated with operations. Southwest Public Service (SPS) wind plants cause both commitment inefficiencies and are charged Southwest Power Pool (SPP) imbalance payments due to wind uncertainty and variability. Wind energy forecasting helps mitigate these costs. Wind integration studies for the PSCo and Northern States Power (NSP) operating companies have projected increasing costs as more wind is installed on the system due to forecast error. It follows that reducing forecast error would reduce these costs. This is echoed by large scale studies in neighboring regions and states that have recommended adoption of state-of-the-art wind forecasting tools in day-ahead and real-time planning and operations. Further, Xcel Energy concluded reduction of the normalized mean absolute error by one percent would have reduced costs in 2008 by over $1 million annually in PSCo alone. The value of reducing forecast error prompted Xcel Energy to make substantial investments in wind energy forecasting research and development.

  18. Madison County- Wind Energy Systems Ordinance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Madison County adopted a new land use ordinance in May 2010, which includes provisions for permitting wind turbines within the county.

  19. 10th Annual Small Wind Conference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This conference is designed for small wind professionals, including installers, manufacturers, dealers, distributors, educators, and advocates. The conference features presentations, exhibits,...

  20. Wind turbine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cheney, Jr., Marvin C. (Glastonbury, CT)

    1982-01-01

    A wind turbine of the type having an airfoil blade (15) mounted on a flexible beam (20) and a pitch governor (55) which selectively, torsionally twists the flexible beam in response to wind turbine speed thereby setting blade pitch, is provided with a limiter (85) which restricts unwanted pitch change at operating speeds due to torsional creep of the flexible beam. The limiter allows twisting of the beam by the governor under excessive wind velocity conditions to orient the blades in stall pitch positions, thereby preventing overspeed operation of the turbine. In the preferred embodiment, the pitch governor comprises a pendulum (65,70) which responds to changing rotor speed by pivotal movement, the limiter comprising a resilient member (90) which engages an end of the pendulum to restrict further movement thereof, and in turn restrict beam creep and unwanted blade pitch misadjustment.

  1. Wind Program: Wind Vision | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Wind Vision: A New Era for Wind Power in the United States With more than 4.5% of the nation's electricity supplied by wind energy today, the Department of Energy has collaborated...

  2. Wind Power Reliability: Breaking Down a Barrier

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The steady increase of wind power on the grid presents new challenges for power system operators charged with making sure the grid stays up and running. "We need to ensure that we are going down a path that will lead to better reliability [with wind power]," said Bob Zavadil, an executive vice president at EnerNex Corporation in Knoxville, Tenn., a firm specializing in renewable energy grid interconnection and integration. "If this piece isn't done, there will be problems." EnerNex has spent the last decade perfecting wind turbine and plant models that test a wind plant's influence on the grid and its ability to provide grid support. In its latest effort, the company is using American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funds worth $750,000 to develop documentation and validations of computer wind turbine models.

  3. Wind Farm Recommendation Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Reisenauer

    2011-05-01

    On April 21, 2011, an Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Land Use Committee meeting was convened to develop a wind farm recommendation for the Executive Council and a list of proposed actions for proceeding with the recommendation. In terms of land use, the INL Land Use Committee unanimously agrees that Site 6 is the preferred location of the alternatives presented for an INL wind farm. However, further studies and resolution to questions raised (stated in this report) by the INL Land Use Committee are needed for the preferred location. Studies include, but are not limited to, wind viability (6 months), bats (2 years), and the visual impact of the wind farm. In addition, cultural resource surveys and consultation (1 month) and the National Environmental Policy Act process (9 to 12 months) need to be completed. Furthermore, there is no documented evidence of developers expressing interest in constructing a small wind farm on INL, nor a specific list of expectations or concessions for which a developer might expect INL to cover the cost. To date, INL assumes the National Environmental Policy Act activities will be paid for by the Department of Energy and INL (the environmental assessment has only received partial funding). However, other concessions also may be expected by developers such as roads, fencing, power line installation, tie-ins to substations, annual maintenance, snow removal, access control, down-time, and remediation. These types of concessions have not been documented, as a request, from a developer and INL has not identified the short and long-term cost liabilities for such concessions should a developer expect INL to cover these costs. INL has not identified a go-no-go funding level or the priority this Wind Farm Project might have with respect to other nuclear-related projects, should the wind farm remain an unfunded mandate. The Land Use Committee recommends Legal be consulted to determine what, if any, liabilities exist with the Wind Farm Project and INL’s rights and responsibilities in regards to access to the wind farm once constructed. An expression of interest is expected to go out soon to developers. However, with the potential of 2 years of study remaining for Site 6, the expectation of obtaining meaningful interest from developers should be questioned.

  4. Wind | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Science & Innovation Energy Sources Renewable Energy Wind Wind Wind The United States is home to one of the largest and fastest growing wind markets in the world. To stay...

  5. Establishing a Comprehensive Wind Energy Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fleeter, Sanford

    2012-09-30

    This project was directed at establishing a comprehensive wind energy program in Indiana, including both educational and research components. A graduate/undergraduate course ME-514 - Fundamentals of Wind Energy has been established and offered and an interactive prediction of VAWT performance developed. Vertical axis wind turbines for education and research have been acquired, instrumented and installed on the roof top of a building on the Calumet campus and at West Lafayette (Kepner Lab). Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) calculations have been performed to simulate these urban wind environments. Also, modal dynamic testing of the West Lafayette VAWT has been performed and a novel horizontal axis design initiated. The 50-meter meteorological tower data obtained at the Purdue Beck Agricultural Research Center have been analyzed and the Purdue Reconfigurable Micro Wind Farm established and simulations directed at the investigation of wind farm configurations initiated. The virtual wind turbine and wind turbine farm simulation in the Visualization Lab has been initiated.

  6. Wind Energy Multiyear Program Plan for 2007-2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2009-01-18

    Detailed plan for the Wind Energy Program's activities from 2007-1012, including goals, targets, and barriers.

  7. IMPLEMENTATION OF WIND TURBINE CONTROLLERS W.E.Leithead

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, Ken

    significantly reduce the power transients at controller start-up. The relation to anti-wind-up is noted. The standard commercial design of wind turbine is a horizontal-axis grid-connected up-wind machine of wind turbines, which are presently being developed, will include large-scale designs with a rating

  8. Ris-R-1479(EN) Satellite information for wind energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risø-R-1479(EN) Satellite information for wind energy applications Morten Nielsen, Poul Astrup Title: Satellite information for wind energy applications Department: Wind Energy Department Risø-R-1479.): An introduction to satellite information relevant for wind energy applications is given. It includes digital

  9. Wind Integration National Dataset (WIND) Toolkit

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    For utility companies, grid operators and other stakeholders interested in wind energy integration, collecting large quantities of high quality data on wind energy resources is vitally important....

  10. Matter & Energy Wind Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shepelyansky, Dima

    intuitive experience of a small wind not creating a storm, and that wind needs to reach a certain threshold

  11. Electric power monthly, September 1990. [Glossary included

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-12-17

    The purpose of this report is to provide energy decision makers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues. The power plants considered include coal, petroleum, natural gas, hydroelectric, and nuclear power plants. Data are presented for power generation, fuel consumption, fuel receipts and cost, sales of electricity, and unusual occurrences at power plants. Data are compared at the national, Census division, and state levels. 4 figs., 52 tabs. (CK)

  12. Testing Active Power Control from Wind Power at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ela, E.

    2011-05-01

    In order to keep the electricity grid stable and the lights on, the power system relies on certain responses from its generating fleet. This presentation evaluates the potential for wind turbines and wind power plants to provide these services and assist the grid during critical times.

  13. Wind for Schools: Developing Education Programs to Train the Next Generation of the Wind Energy Workforce

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baring-Gould, I.; Flowers, L.; Kelly, M.; Barnett, L.; Miles, J.

    2009-08-01

    This paper provides an overview of the Wind for Schools project elements, including a description of host and collegiate school curricula developed for wind energy and the status of the current projects. The paper also provides focused information on how schools, regions, or countries can become involved or implement similar projects to expand the social acceptance and understanding of wind energy.

  14. Aalborg Universitet Ancillary Frequency Control of Direct Drive Full-Scale Converter Based Wind Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Weihao

    , integration of such a lot of wind energy into power grids presents a major challenge to power system operators more attentions all over the world. Large-scale wind power plants are increasingly integrated). Ancillary Frequency Control of Direct Drive Full-Scale Converter Based Wind Power Plants. In Proceedings

  15. Aalborg Universitet Control System interaction in the VSC-HVDC Grid Connected Offshore Wind Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bak, Claus Leth

    Aalborg Universitet Control System interaction in the VSC-HVDC Grid Connected Offshore Wind Power-HVDC Grid Connected Offshore Wind Power Plant. In Proceedings of the Cigré Symposium 2015. CIGRE. General Offshore Wind Power Plant Jakob Glasdam1,2 , Lukasz Hubert Kocewiak1 , Jesper Hjerrild1 , Claus Leth Bak2 1

  16. Solar energy system with wind vane

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grip, Robert E

    2015-11-03

    A solar energy system including a pedestal defining a longitudinal axis, a frame that is supported by the pedestal and that is rotateable relative to the pedestal about the longitudinal axis, the frame including at least one solar device, and a wind vane operatively connected to the frame to urge the frame relative to the pedestal about the longitudinal axis in response to wind acting on the wind vane.

  17. Wind turbine having a direct-drive drivetrain

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bevington, Christopher M.; Bywaters, Garrett L.; Coleman, Clint C.; Costin, Daniel P.; Danforth, William L.; Lynch, Jonathan A.; Rolland, Robert H.

    2011-02-22

    A wind turbine comprising an electrical generator that includes a rotor assembly. A wind rotor that includes a wind rotor hub is directly coupled to the rotor assembly via a simplified connection. The wind rotor and generator rotor assembly are rotatably mounted on a central spindle via a bearing assembly. The wind rotor hub includes an opening having a diameter larger than the outside diameter of the central spindle adjacent the bearing assembly so as to allow access to the bearing assembly from a cavity inside the wind rotor hub. The spindle is attached to a turret supported by a tower. Each of the spindle, turret and tower has an interior cavity that permits personnel to traverse therethrough to the cavity of the wind rotor hub. The wind turbine further includes a frictional braking system for slowing, stopping or keeping stopped the rotation of the wind rotor and rotor assembly.

  18. Wind turbine/generator set and method of making same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bevington, Christopher M.; Bywaters, Garrett L.; Coleman, Clint C.; Costin, Daniel P.; Danforth, William L.; Lynch, Jonathan A.; Rolland, Robert H.

    2013-06-04

    A wind turbine comprising an electrical generator that includes a rotor assembly. A wind rotor that includes a wind rotor hub is directly coupled to the rotor assembly via a simplified connection. The wind rotor and generator rotor assembly are rotatably mounted on a central spindle via a bearing assembly. The wind rotor hub includes an opening having a diameter larger than the outside diameter of the central spindle adjacent the bearing assembly so as to allow access to the bearing assembly from a cavity inside the wind rotor hub. The spindle is attached to a turret supported by a tower. Each of the spindle, turret and tower has an interior cavity that permits personnel to traverse therethrough to the cavity of the wind rotor hub. The wind turbine further includes a frictional braking system for slowing, stopping or keeping stopped the rotation of the wind rotor and rotor assembly.

  19. MPC for Wind Power Gradients --Utilizing Forecasts, Rotor Inertia, and Central Energy Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MPC for Wind Power Gradients -- Utilizing Forecasts, Rotor Inertia, and Central Energy Storage the control of a wind power plant, possibly consisting of many individual wind turbines. The goal. INTRODUCTION Today, wind power is the most important renewable energy source. For the years to come, many

  20. TOWARDS LIFE-CYCLE MANAGEMENT OF WIND TURBINES BASED ON STRUCTURAL HEALTH MONITORING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    for power generation in 83 countries, 52 of which having increased their totally installed wind energy for manufacturers, owners, and operators. Unlike conventional power plants, wind turbines represent unmanned remote and maintenance of wind turbines and, eventually, to operate wind turbines beyond their original design life

  1. Ris-PhD-24(EN) Stability and Control of Wind Farms in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , wind turbines substitute the power production of conventional power plants. Therefore, wind turbines. The project is based on simulations of wind turbines in a power system simulations tool. Some of the models speed turbine and its controls. To simulate realistic grid operation the wind turbine models

  2. Offshore Wind Energy Market Overview (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baring-Gould, I.

    2013-07-01

    This presentation describes the current international market conditions regarding offshore wind, including the breakdown of installation costs, how to reduce costs, and the physical siting considerations considered when planning offshore wind construction. The presentation offers several examples of international existing and planned offshore wind farm sites and compares existing international offshore resources with U.S. resources. The presentation covers future offshore wind trends and cites some challenges that the United States must overcome before it will be able to fully develop offshore wind sites.

  3. Airfoils for wind turbine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tangler, James L. (Boulder, CO); Somers, Dan M. (State College, PA)

    1996-01-01

    Airfoils for the blade of a wind turbine wherein each airfoil is characterized by a thickness in a range from 16%-24% and a maximum lift coefficient designed to be largely insensitive to roughness effects. The airfoils include a family of airfoils for a blade 15 to 25 meters in length, a family of airfoils for a blade 1 to 5 meters in length, and a family of airfoils for a blade 5 to 10 meters in length.

  4. Airfoils for wind turbine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tangler, J.L.; Somers, D.M.

    1996-10-08

    Airfoils are disclosed for the blade of a wind turbine wherein each airfoil is characterized by a thickness in a range from 16%-24% and a maximum lift coefficient designed to be largely insensitive to roughness effects. The airfoils include a family of airfoils for a blade 15 to 25 meters in length, a family of airfoils for a blade 1 to 5 meters in length, and a family of airfoils for a blade 5 to 10 meters in length. 10 figs.

  5. Wind Technologies & Evolving Opportunities (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robichaud, R.

    2014-07-01

    This presentation covers opportunities for wind technology; wind energy market trends; an overview of the National Wind Technology Center near Boulder, Colorado; wind energy price and cost trends; wind turbine technology improvements; and wind resource characterization improvements.

  6. Lake Michigan Offshore Wind Feasibility Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boezaart, Arnold; Edmonson, James; Standridge, Charles; Pervez, Nahid; Desai, Neel; Williams, Bruce; Clark, Aaron; Zeitler, David; Kendall, Scott; Biddanda, Bopi; Steinman, Alan; Klatt, Brian; Gehring, J. L.; Walter, K.; Nordman, Erik E.

    2014-06-30

    The purpose of this project was to conduct the first comprehensive offshore wind assessment over Lake Michigan and to advance the body of knowledge needed to support future commercial wind energy development on the Great Lakes. The project involved evaluation and selection of emerging wind measurement technology and the permitting, installation and operation of the first mid-lake wind assessment meteorological (MET) facilities in Michigan’s Great Lakes. In addition, the project provided the first opportunity to deploy and field test floating LIDAR and Laser Wind Sensor (LWS) technology, and important research related equipment key to the sitting and permitting of future offshore wind energy development in accordance with public participation guidelines established by the Michigan Great Lakes Wind Council (GLOW). The project created opportunities for public dialogue and community education about offshore wind resource management and continued the dialogue to foster Great Lake wind resource utilization consistent with the focus of the GLOW Council. The technology proved to be effective, affordable, mobile, and the methods of data measurement accurate. The public benefited from a substantial increase in knowledge of the wind resources over Lake Michigan and gained insights about the potential environmental impacts of offshore wind turbine placements in the future. The unique first ever hub height wind resource assessment using LWS technology over water and development of related research data along with the permitting, sitting, and deployment of the WindSentinel MET buoy has captured public attention and has helped to increase awareness of the potential of future offshore wind energy development on the Great Lakes. Specifically, this project supported the acquisition and operation of a WindSentinel (WS) MET wind assessment buoy, and associated research for 549 days over multiple years at three locations on Lake Michigan. Four research objectives were defined for the project including to: 1) test and validate floating LIDAR technology; 2) collect and access offshore wind data; 3) detect and measure bird and bat activity over Lake Michigan; 4) conduct an over water sound propagation study; 5) prepare and offer a college course on offshore energy, and; 6) collect other environmental, bathometric, and atmospheric data. Desk-top research was performed to select anchorage sites and to secure permits to deploy the buoy. The project also collected and analyzed data essential to wind industry investment decision-making including: deploying highly mobile floating equipment to gather offshore wind data; correlating offshore wind data with conventional on-shore MET tower data; and performing studies that can contribute to the advancement and deployment of offshore wind technologies. Related activities included: • Siting, permitting, and deploying an offshore floating MET facility; • Validating the accuracy of floating LWS using near shoreline cup anemometer MET instruments; • Assessment of laser pulse technology (LIDAR) capability to establish hub height measurement of wind conditions at multiple locations on Lake Michigan; • Utilizing an extended-season (9-10 month) strategy to collect hub height wind data and weather conditions on Lake Michigan; • Investigation of technology best suited for wireless data transmission from distant offshore structures; • Conducting field-validated sound propagation study for a hypothetical offshore wind farm from shoreline locations; • Identifying the presence or absence of bird and bat species near wind assessment facilities; • Identifying the presence or absence of benthic and pelagic species near wind assessment facilities; All proposed project activities were completed with the following major findings: • Floating Laser Wind Sensors are capable of high quality measurement and recordings of wind resources. The WindSentinel presented no significant operational or statistical limitations in recording wind data technology at a at a high confidence level as compared to traditional an

  7. Sandia Energy - Grid System Planning for Wind: Wind Generator...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Grid System Planning for Wind: Wind Generator Modeling Home Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Wind Energy Siting and Barrier Mitigation Grid System Planning for Wind:...

  8. 2015 Iowa Wind Power Conference and Iowa Wind Energy Association...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    2015 Iowa Wind Power Conference and Iowa Wind Energy Association Midwest Regional Energy Job Fair 2015 Iowa Wind Power Conference and Iowa Wind Energy Association Midwest Regional...

  9. Wind tunnel performance data for the Darrieus wind turbine with...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Wind tunnel performance data for the Darrieus wind turbine with NACA 0012 blades Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Wind tunnel performance data for the Darrieus wind...

  10. A National Offshore Wind Strategy: Creating an Offshore Wind...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A National Offshore Wind Strategy: Creating an Offshore Wind Energy Industry in the United States A National Offshore Wind Strategy: Creating an Offshore Wind Energy Industry in...

  11. 20% Wind Energy by 2030 - Chapter 2: Wind Turbine Technology...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    - Chapter 2: Wind Turbine Technology Summary Slides 20% Wind Energy by 2030 - Chapter 2: Wind Turbine Technology Summary Slides Summary slides for wind turbine technology, its...

  12. A Continuous Solar Thermochemical Hydrogen Production Plant Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luc, Wesley Wai

    energy including hydroelectric, wind, geothermal, biomass, photovoltaic, and solar thermal, each having its own advantages and

  13. 2008 WIND TECHNOLOGIES MARKET REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2010-01-01

    AWEA). 2009b. AWEA Small Wind Turbine Global Market Study:will ultimately benefit wind. Small Wind ITC: EESA 2008

  14. 2009 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2010-01-01

    Public Service Wind Integration Cost Impact Study. Preparedequipment-related wind turbine costs, the overall importinstalled wind power project costs, wind turbine transaction

  15. 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2012-01-01

    Public Service Wind Integration Cost Impact Study. Preparedequipment-related wind turbine costs, the overall importinstalled wind power project costs, wind turbine transaction

  16. 2009 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2010-01-01

    wind power project costs, wind turbine transaction prices,increases in the cost of wind turbines over the last severaland components and wind turbine costs. Excluded from all

  17. 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2012-01-01

    A. 2010. Impact of Wind Energy Installations on DomesticJanuary 31, 2011. American Wind Energy Association (AWEA).D.C. : American Wind Energy Association. American Wind

  18. 2011 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2013-01-01

    A. 2010. Impact of Wind Energy Installations on DomesticUniversity. American Wind Energy Association (AWEA). 2012a.D.C. : American Wind Energy Association. American Wind

  19. Expansion effects on solar wind hybrid simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parashar, Tulasi N.; Velli, Marco; Goldstein, Bruce E. [NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)

    2013-06-13

    Ion kinetic simulations of the solar wind using hybrid codes can model local wave input, heating and instabilities, but generally do not include long term evolution effects in the expanding solar wind. We further develop the expanding box model used in earlier studies to include the mirror force effects and study their role in the evolution of the proton distribution functions in the outer corona and inner heliosphere. The mirror force, significant in the acceleration region of the solar wind, is required for consistency with the conservation of magnetic moment of particles in the expanding wind. We present preliminary results from the modified 1D expanding box hybrid (EBHM) simulations.

  20. Dynamic response analysis of a 900 kW wind turbine subject to ground excitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caudillo, Adrian Felix

    2012-01-01

    Simulations of Wind Turbine Dynamics Including Soil-Modeling the Wind Turbine . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.2.2 SoilFigure 5.3: A “wind turbine” built in a modified version of

  1. Power Control and Optimization of Photovoltaic and Wind Energy Conversion Systems /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghaffari, Azad

    2013-01-01

    Output power leveling of wind turbine generator for allpower map of Distributed Generators (DG), including Photo- voltaic (PV) and WindGenerator (IG) stator. Introduction A variable speed wind turbine generates power

  2. The Cost of Transmission for Wind Energy: A Review of Transmission Planning Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mills, Andrew D.; Wiser, Ryan; Porter, Kevin

    2009-02-02

    The rapid development of wind power that the United States has experienced over the last several years has been coupled with a growing concern that wind development will require substantial additions to the nation's transmission infrastructure. Transmission is particularly important for wind power due to the locational dependence of wind resources, the relatively low capacity factor of wind plants, and the mismatch between the short lead time to build a new wind project and the longer lead time often needed to plan, permit, and construct transmission. It is clear that institutional issues related to transmission planning, siting, and cost allocation will pose major obstacles to accelerated wind power deployment, but also of concern is the potential cost of this infrastructure build out. Simply put, how much extra cost will society bear to deliver wind power to load centers? Without an answer to this question, there can be no consensus on whether or not the cost of developing transmission for wind will be a major barrier to further wind deployment, or whether the institutional barriers to transmission expansion are likely to be of more immediate concern. In this report, we review a sample of 40 detailed transmission studies that have included wind power. These studies cover a broad geographic area, and were completed from 2001-2008. Our primary goal in reviewing these studies is to develop a better understanding of the transmission costs needed to access growing quantities of wind generation. A secondary goal is to gain a better appreciation of the differences in transmission planning approaches in order to identify those methodologies that seem most able to estimate the incremental transmission costs associated with wind development. Finally, we hope that the resulting dataset and discussion might be used to inform the assumptions, methods, and results of higher-level assessment models that are sometimes used to estimate the cost of wind deployment (e.g. NEMS and WinDS). The authors and general location of the 40 detailed transmission studies included in our review are illustrated in Figure ES-1. As discussed in the body of the report, these studies vary considerably in scope, authorship, objectives, methodology, and tools. Though we recognize this diversity and are cognizant that comparisons among these studies are therefore somewhat inappropriate, we nonetheless emphasize such simple comparisons in this report. We do so in order to improve our understanding of the range of transmission costs needed to access greater quantities of wind, and to highlight some of the drivers of those costs. In so doing, we gloss over many important details and differences among the studies in our sample. In emphasizing simple comparisons, our analysis focuses primarily on the unit cost of transmission implied by each of the studies. The unit cost of transmission for wind in $/kW terms on a capacity-weighted basis is estimated by simply dividing the total transmission cost in a study by the total amount of incremental generation capacity (wind and non-wind) modeled in that study. In so doing, this metric assumes that within any individual study all incremental generation capacity imposes transmission costs in proportion to its nameplate capacity rating. The limitations to this approach are described in some detail in the body of the report.

  3. Modeling Sensitivities to the 20% Wind Scenario Report with the WinDS Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blair, N.; Hand, M.; Short, W.; Sullivan, P.

    2008-06-01

    In May 2008, DOE published '20% Wind Energy by 2030', a report which describes the costs and benefits of producing 20% of the nation's projected electricity demand in 2030 from wind technology. The total electricity system cost resulting from this scenario was modestly higher than a scenario in which no additional wind was installed after 2006. NREL's Wind Deployment System (WinDS) model was used to support this analysis. With its 358 regions, explicit treatment of transmission expansion, onshore siting considerations, shallow- and deep-water wind resources, 2030 outlook, explicit financing assumptions, endogenous learning, and stochastic treatment of wind resource variability, WinDS is unique in the level of detail it can bring to this analysis. For the 20% Wind Energy by 2030 analysis, the group chose various model structures (such as the ability to wheel power within an interconnect), and the wind industry agreed on a variety of model inputs (such as the cost of transmission or new wind turbines). For this paper, the analysis examined the sensitivity of the results to variations in those input values and model structure choices. These included wind cost and performance improvements over time, seasonal/diurnal wind resource variations, transmission access and costs, siting costs, conventional fuel cost trajectories, and conventional capital costs.

  4. Session: Poster Session + Poster Award + Scientific Award + Excellent young wind doctor award (PO.72) Track: Technical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -term forecasting of wind power and wind resource assessment including offshore wakes in large wind farms. In both offshore wakes in large wind farms. For this, it is necessary to be able to evaluate state benchmarking exercises. The POWWOW project (Prediction of Waves, Wakes and Offshore Wind, a EU Coordination

  5. Systems Performance Analyses of Alaska Wind-Diesel Projects; Kotzebue, Alaska (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baring-Gould, I.

    2009-04-01

    This fact sheet summarizes a systems performance analysis of the wind-diesel project in Kotzebue, Alaska. Data provided for this project include wind turbine output, average wind speed, average net capacity factor, and optimal net capacity factor based on Alaska Energy Authority wind data, estimated fuel savings, and wind system availability.

  6. Wind Integration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired SolarAbout /Two0Photos andSeminarsDesign » DesignMay »helpWind

  7. Wind Power

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking WithTelecentricNCubicthe FOIA?ResourceMeasurement Buoy AdvancesWind

  8. Pump apparatus including deconsolidator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sonwane, Chandrashekhar; Saunders, Timothy; Fitzsimmons, Mark Andrew

    2014-10-07

    A pump apparatus includes a particulate pump that defines a passage that extends from an inlet to an outlet. A duct is in flow communication with the outlet. The duct includes a deconsolidator configured to fragment particle agglomerates received from the passage.

  9. A survey on wind power ramp forecasting.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferreira, C.; Gama, J.; Matias, L.; Botterud, A.; Wang, J.

    2011-02-23

    The increasing use of wind power as a source of electricity poses new challenges with regard to both power production and load balance in the electricity grid. This new source of energy is volatile and highly variable. The only way to integrate such power into the grid is to develop reliable and accurate wind power forecasting systems. Electricity generated from wind power can be highly variable at several different timescales: sub-hourly, hourly, daily, and seasonally. Wind energy, like other electricity sources, must be scheduled. Although wind power forecasting methods are used, the ability to predict wind plant output remains relatively low for short-term operation. Because instantaneous electrical generation and consumption must remain in balance to maintain grid stability, wind power's variability can present substantial challenges when large amounts of wind power are incorporated into a grid system. A critical issue is ramp events, which are sudden and large changes (increases or decreases) in wind power. This report presents an overview of current ramp definitions and state-of-the-art approaches in ramp event forecasting.

  10. Wind turbine spoiler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sullivan, William N. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1985-01-01

    An aerodynamic spoiler system for a vertical axis wind turbine includes spoilers on the blades initially stored near the rotor axis to minimize drag. A solenoid latch adjacent the central support tower releases the spoilers and centrifugal force causes the spoilers to move up the turbine blades away from the rotor axis, thereby producing a braking effect and actual slowing of the associated wind turbine, if desired. The spoiler system can also be used as an infinitely variable power control by regulated movement of the spoilers on the blades over the range between the undeployed and fully deployed positions. This is done by the use of a suitable powered reel and cable located at the rotor tower to move the spoilers.

  11. 2011 Wind Technologies Market Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Barbose, Galen; Darghouth, Naim; Hoen, Ben; Mills, Andrew; Porter, Kevin; Buckley, Michael; Fink, Sari; Oteri, Frank; Tegen, Suzanne

    2012-08-01

    The U.S. wind power industry is facing uncertain times. With 2011 capacity additions having risen from 2010 levels and with a further sizable increase expected in 2012, there are – on the surface – grounds for optimism. Key factors driving growth in 2011 included continued state and federal incentives for wind energy, recent improvements in the cost and performance of wind power technology, and the need to meet an end-of-year construction start deadline in order to qualify for the Section 1603 Treasury grant program. At the same time, the currently-slated expiration of key federal tax incentives for wind energy at the end of 2012 – in concert with continued low natural gas prices and modest electricity demand growth – threatens to dramatically slow new builds in 2013.

  12. National Offshore Wind Energy Grid Interconnection Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel, John P.; Liu, Shu; Ibanez, Eduardo; Pennock, Ken; Reed, Greg; Hanes, Spencer

    2014-07-30

    The National Offshore Wind Energy Grid Interconnection Study (NOWEGIS) considers the availability and potential impacts of interconnecting large amounts of offshore wind energy into the transmission system of the lower 48 contiguous United States. A total of 54GW of offshore wind was assumed to be the target for the analyses conducted. A variety of issues are considered including: the anticipated staging of offshore wind; the offshore wind resource availability; offshore wind energy power production profiles; offshore wind variability; present and potential technologies for collection and delivery of offshore wind energy to the onshore grid; potential impacts to existing utility systems most likely to receive large amounts of offshore wind; and regulatory influences on offshore wind development. The technologies considered the reliability of various high-voltage ac (HVAC) and high-voltage dc (HVDC) technology options and configurations. The utility system impacts of GW-scale integration of offshore wind are considered from an operational steady-state perspective and from a regional and national production cost perspective.

  13. Wind Resource and Feasibility Assessment Report for the Lummi Reservation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DNV Renewables Inc.; J.C. Brennan & Associates, Inc.; Hamer Environmental L.P.

    2012-08-31

    This report summarizes the wind resource on the Lummi Indian Reservation (Washington State) and presents the methodology, assumptions, and final results of the wind energy development feasibility assessment, which included an assessment of biological impacts and noise impacts.

  14. Utility-Scale Wind Turbines | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    turbines as greater than 1 megawatt. This technology class includes land-based and offshore wind projects. 1 Learn more about utility-scale wind at the links below....

  15. Wind Farm Growth Through the Years | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the 2012 Wind Technologies Market Report, we are excited to break down some recent EIA data not included in the report that shows significant wind farm growth across the nation....

  16. Wind energy resource atlas. Volume 10. Alaska region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wise, J.L.; Wentink, T. Jr.; Becker, R. Jr.; Comiskey, A.L.; Elliott, D.L.; Barchet, W.R.; George, R.L.

    1980-12-01

    This atlas of the wind energy resource is composed of introductory and background information, a regional summary of the wind resource, and assessments of the wind resource in each subregion of Alaska. Background is presented on how the wind resource is assessed and on how the results of the assessment should be interpreted. A description of the wind resource on a state scale is given. The results of the wind energy assessments for each subregion are assembled into an overview and summary of the various features of the Alaska wind energy resource. An outline to the descriptions of the wind resource given for each subregion is included. Assessments for individual subregions are presented as separate chapters. The subregion wind energy resources are described in greater detail than is the Alaska wind energy resource, and features of selected stations are discussed. This preface outlines the use and interpretation of the information found in the subregion chapters.

  17. Coastal Ohio Wind Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorsevski, Peter; Afjeh, Abdollah; Jamali, Mohsin; Bingman, Verner

    2014-04-04

    The Coastal Ohio Wind Project intends to address problems that impede deployment of wind turbines in the coastal and offshore regions of Northern Ohio. The project evaluates different wind turbine designs and the potential impact of offshore turbines on migratory and resident birds by developing multidisciplinary research, which involves wildlife biology, electrical and mechanical engineering, and geospatial science. Firstly, the project conducts cost and performance studies of two- and three-blade wind turbines using a turbine design suited for the Great Lakes. The numerical studies comprised an analysis and evaluation of the annual energy production of two- and three-blade wind turbines to determine the levelized cost of energy. This task also involved wind tunnel studies of model wind turbines to quantify the wake flow field of upwind and downwind wind turbine-tower arrangements. The experimental work included a study of a scaled model of an offshore wind turbine platform in a water tunnel. The levelized cost of energy work consisted of the development and application of a cost model to predict the cost of energy produced by a wind turbine system placed offshore. The analysis found that a floating two-blade wind turbine presents the most cost effective alternative for the Great Lakes. The load effects studies showed that the two-blade wind turbine model experiences less torque under all IEC Standard design load cases considered. Other load effects did not show this trend and depending on the design load cases, the two-bladed wind turbine showed higher or lower load effects. The experimental studies of the wake were conducted using smoke flow visualization and hot wire anemometry. Flow visualization studies showed that in the downwind turbine configuration the wake flow was insensitive to the presence of the blade and was very similar to that of the tower alone. On the other hand, in the upwind turbine configuration, increasing the rotor blade angle of attack reduced the wake size and enhanced the vortices in the flow downstream of the turbine-tower compared with the tower alone case. Mean and rms velocity distributions from hot wire anemometer data confirmed that in a downwind configuration, the wake of the tower dominates the flow, thus the flow fields of a tower alone and tower-turbine combinations are nearly the same. For the upwind configuration, the mean velocity shows a narrowing of the wake compared with the tower alone case. The downwind configuration wake persisted longer than that of an upwind configuration; however, it was not possible to quantify this difference because of the size limitation of the wind tunnel downstream of the test section. The water tunnel studies demonstrated that the scale model studies could be used to adequately produce accurate motions to model the motions of a wind turbine platform subject to large waves. It was found that the important factors that affect the platform is whether the platform is submerged or surface piercing. In the former, the loads on the platform will be relatively reduced whereas in the latter case, the structure pierces the wave free surface and gains stiffness and stability. The other important element that affects the movement of the platform is depth of the sea in which the wind turbine will be installed. Furthermore, the wildlife biology component evaluated migratory patterns by different monitoring systems consisting of marine radar, thermal IR camera and acoustic recorders. The types of radar used in the project are weather surveillance radar and marine radar. The weather surveillance radar (1988 Doppler), also known as Next Generation Radar (NEXRAD), provides a network of weather stations in the US. Data generated from this network were used to understand general migratory patterns, migratory stopover habitats, and other patterns caused by the effects of weather conditions. At a local scale our marine radar was used to complement the datasets from NEXRAD and to collect additional monitoring parameters such as passage rates, flight paths, flight directi

  18. Wind Powering America Fact Sheet Series 1 Wind energy is more expensive than conventional energy.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    to an Xcel Energy solicitation bidding process (except for one small hydro plant). The commission also noted small hydro plant). #12;Top photo page 1: © GE Wind Energy All Rights Reserved/PIX12335 A Strong Energy engineers show these costs to be relatively small--less than about 2 mills/kilowatt-hour (k

  19. Wind Power Today

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2006-05-01

    Wind Power Today is an annual publication that provides an overview of the wind energy research conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy Wind and Hydropower Technologies Program.

  20. Table 2. Ten Largest Plants by Generation Capacity, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    General Electric Co",487 9,"Hermiston Generating Plant","Natural gas","Hermiston Generating Co LP",464 10,"Biglow Canyon Wind Farm","Wind","Portland General Electric Co",449....

  1. Scale Models & Wind Turbines

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Turbines * Readings about Cape Wind and other offshore and onshore siting debates for wind farms * Student Worksheet * A number of scale model items: Ken, Barbie or other dolls...

  2. Wind Power Outreach Campaign

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wind Power Wind Power Main Page Outreach Programs Image Gallery FAQs Links Software Hydro Power INL Home Outreach Programs A team of educators and scientists from the Idaho...

  3. Wind/Hydro Study

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    WindHydro Integration Feasibility Study Announcements (Updated July 8, 2010) The Final WindHydro Integration Feasibility Study Report, dated June 2, 2009, has been submitted to...

  4. Wind for Schools (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baring-Gould, I.

    2010-05-01

    As the United States dramatically expands wind energy deployment, the industry is challenged with developing a skilled workforce and addressing public resistance. Wind Powering America's Wind for Schools project addresses these issues by developing Wind Application Centers (WACs) at universities; WAC students assist in implementing school wind turbines and participate in wind courses, by installing small wind turbines at community "host" schools, by implementing teacher training with interactive curricula at each host school. This poster provides an overview of the first two years of the Wind for Schools project, primarily supporting activities in Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, South Dakota, Montana, and Idaho.

  5. Small Wind Conference 2015

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Small Wind Conference brings together small wind installers, site assessors, manufacturers, dealers and distributors, supply chain stakeholders, educators, public benefits program managers, and...

  6. Wind Turbine Tribology Seminar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Wind turbine reliability issues are often linked to failures of contacting components, such as bearings, gears, and actuators. Therefore, special consideration to tribological design in wind...

  7. For Cape Wind, Summer Breeze Makes Offshore Wind Feel Fine |...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    For Cape Wind, Summer Breeze Makes Offshore Wind Feel Fine For Cape Wind, Summer Breeze Makes Offshore Wind Feel Fine July 1, 2014 - 8:44am Addthis For Cape Wind, Summer Breeze...

  8. Power Plant Power Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stillwater Power Plant Wabuska Power Plant Casa Diablo Power Plant Glass Mountain Geothermal Area Lassen Geothermal Area Coso Hot Springs Power Plants Lake City Geothermal Area Thermo Geothermal Area Lakeview Geothermal Area Raft River Geothermal Area Cove Fort Power Plant Roosevelt Power Plant Borax Lake

  9. the risk issue of wind measurement for wind turbine operation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leu, Tzong-Shyng "Jeremy"

    Sciences, National Taiwan University #12;outline · Wind measurement in meteorology and wind farm design-related issues on wind turbine operation 3/31/2011 2 #12;WIND MEASUREMENT IN METEOROLOGY & WIND FARM DESIGN 3://www.atm.ncu.edu.tw/93/wind/ MM5 simulation (1996~2000 database) Wind speed (m/s) at 50mWind power (100W/m2) at 50m http://wind.itri.org.tw/wind

  10. U.S. Wind Energy Manufacturing and Supply Chain: A Competitiveness...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    plant assets and focusing manpower resources in the process to eliminate lag times in infusion, molding and downstream processes. The wind turbine blade industry should continue...

  11. 2009 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2010-01-01

    of Energy’s (DOE) Wind & Water Power Program. For reviewingwere funded by the Wind & Water Power Program, Office ofWind Technologies Market Report Wind Energy Web Sites U.S. Department of Energy Wind and Water Power

  12. Western Wind and Solar Integration Study Phase 3A: Low Levels of Synchronous Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Nicholas W.; Leonardi, Bruno; D'Aquila, Robert; Clark, Kara

    2015-11-17

    The stability of the North American electric power grids under conditions of high penetrations of wind and solar is a significant concern and possible impediment to reaching renewable energy goals. The 33% wind and solar annual energy penetration considered in this study results in substantial changes to the characteristics of the bulk power system. This includes different power flow patterns, different commitment and dispatch of existing synchronous generation, and different dynamic behavior from wind and solar generation. The Western Wind and Solar Integration Study (WWSIS), sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, is one of the largest regional solar and wind integration studies to date. In multiple phases, it has explored different aspects of the question: Can we integrate large amounts of wind and solar energy into the electric power system of the West? The work reported here focused on the impact of low levels of synchronous generation on the transient stability performance in one part of the region in which wind generation has displaced synchronous thermal generation under highly stressed, weak system conditions. It is essentially an extension of WWSIS-3. Transient stability, the ability of the power system to maintain synchronism among all elements following disturbances, is a major constraint on operations in many grids, including the western U.S. and Texas systems. These constraints primarily concern the performance of the large-scale bulk power system. But grid-wide stability concerns with high penetrations of wind and solar are still not thoroughly understood. This work focuses on 'traditional' fundamental frequency stability issues, such as maintaining synchronism, frequency, and voltage. The objectives of this study are to better understand the implications of low levels of synchronous generation and a weak grid on overall system performance by: 1) Investigating the Western Interconnection under conditions of both high renewable generation (e.g., wind and solar) and low synchronous generation (e.g., significant coal power plant decommitment or retirement); and 2) Analyzing both the large-scale stability of the Western Interconnection and regional stability issues driven by more geographically dispersed renewable generation interacting with a transmission grid that evolved with large, central station plants at key nodes. As noted above, the work reported here is an extension of the research performed in WWSIS-3.

  13. Wind Energy Education and Training Programs (Postcard)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-07-01

    As the United States dramatically expands wind energy deployment, the industry is challenged with developing a skilled workforce to support it. The Wind Powering America website features a map of wind energy education and training program locations at community colleges, universities, and other institutions in the United States. The map includes links to contacts and program details. This postcard is a marketing piece that stakeholders can provide to interested parties; it will guide them to this online resource for wind energy education and training programs episodes.

  14. Capacity Building in Wind Energy for PICs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (biomass, hydro, and a bit of solar and wind). · Other half comes from imported oil, mainly dependency on petroleum are country specific but include wind, solar, small-scale hydro, biomass granted funding to UNEP for a project to strengthen the capability of PICs to plan and manage

  15. Sault Tribe Wind Energy Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toni Osterhout; Global Energy Concepts

    2005-07-31

    The Sault Tribe conducted a feasibility study on tribal lands in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan to determine the technical and economic feasibility of both small and large-scale wind power development on tribal lands. The study included a wind resource assessment, transmission system analysis, engineering and regulatory analyzes and assessments.

  16. Wind power costs in Portugal Saleiro, Carla

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wind power costs in Portugal Saleiro, Carla Department of Biological Engineering, University, following the European tendency. This analysis sets out to evaluate the total generating cost of wind power and CCGT in Portugal. A life cycle cost analysis was conducted, including investment costs, O&M costs, fuel

  17. Vertical axis wind turbine airfoil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krivcov, Vladimir; Krivospitski, Vladimir; Maksimov, Vasili; Halstead, Richard; Grahov, Jurij Vasiljevich

    2012-12-18

    A vertical axis wind turbine airfoil is described. The wind turbine airfoil can include a leading edge, a trailing edge, an upper curved surface, a lower curved surface, and a centerline running between the upper surface and the lower surface and from the leading edge to the trailing edge. The airfoil can be configured so that the distance between the centerline and the upper surface is the same as the distance between the centerline and the lower surface at all points along the length of the airfoil. A plurality of such airfoils can be included in a vertical axis wind turbine. These airfoils can be vertically disposed and can rotate about a vertical axis.

  18. Combined Experiment Phase 1. [Horizontal axis wind turbines: wind tunnel testing versus field testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butterfield, C.P.; Musial, W.P.; Simms, D.A.

    1992-10-01

    How does wind tunnel airfoil data differ from the airfoil performance on an operating horizontal axis wind turbine (HAWT) The National Renewable Energy laboratory has been conducting a comprehensive test program focused on answering this question and understanding the basic fluid mechanics of rotating HAWT stall aerodynamics. The basic approach was to instrument a wind rotor, using an airfoil that was well documented by wind tunnel tests, and measure operating pressure distributions on the rotating blade. Based an the integrated values of the pressure data, airfoil performance coefficients were obtained, and comparisons were made between the rotating data and the wind tunnel data. Care was taken to the aerodynamic and geometric differences between the rotating and the wind tunnel models. This is the first of two reports describing the Combined Experiment Program and its results. This Phase I report covers background information such as test setup and instrumentation. It also includes wind tunnel test results and roughness testing.

  19. Simulating Turbulent Wind Fields for Offshore Turbines in Hurricane-Prone Regions (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Y.; Damiani, R.; Musial, W.

    2014-04-01

    Extreme wind load cases are one of the most important external conditions in the design of offshore wind turbines in hurricane prone regions. Furthermore, in these areas, the increase in load with storm return-period is higher than in extra-tropical regions. However, current standards have limited information on the appropriate models to simulate wind loads from hurricanes. This study investigates turbulent wind models for load analysis of offshore wind turbines subjected to hurricane conditions. Suggested extreme wind models in IEC 61400-3 and API/ABS (a widely-used standard in oil and gas industry) are investigated. The present study further examines the wind turbine response subjected to Hurricane wind loads. Three-dimensional wind simulator, TurbSim, is modified to include the API wind model. Wind fields simulated using IEC and API wind models are used for an offshore wind turbine model established in FAST to calculate turbine loads and response.

  20. Fate of Radionuclides in Wastewater Treatment Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shabani Samgh Abadi, Farzaneh

    2013-01-01

    21 3. NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS……………………………………………….. 23 3.1-25 3.2- WASTES FROM NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS………………………… 28 4.radionuclides 3. Nuclear Power Plants, which includes some

  1. Winding Trail 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-09-05

    Dataset includes 23 GPS files that describe fishing trips made by Dominican fishers to fish aggregating devices. Files are in RData file format.

  2. EIS-0255: Kenetech/Pacificorp Wind Power Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS analyzes BPA's proposed agreement with Sea West Corporation, a wind developer, off San Diego, California, to install additional turbines at the Wyoming Windpower Plant in Carbon County, Wyoming.

  3. Wind Power Forecasting Error Distributions over Multiple Timescales: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hodge, B. M.; Milligan, M.

    2011-03-01

    In this paper, we examine the shape of the persistence model error distribution for ten different wind plants in the ERCOT system over multiple timescales. Comparisons are made between the experimental distribution shape and that of the normal distribution.

  4. Fact Sheet: Wind Firming EnergyFarm (October 2012)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Research Institute (EPRI). The EnergyFarm will displace a planned 73 million natural-gas-fired power plant intended to smooth (or firm) the output of intermittent wind and...

  5. Estimation of Wind Speed in Connection to a Wind Turbine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Estimation of Wind Speed in Connection to a Wind Turbine X. Ma #3; , N. K. Poulsen #3; , H. Bindner y December 20, 1995 Abstract The wind speed varies over the rotor plane of wind turbine making the wind speed on the rotor plane will be estimated by using a wind turbine as a wind measuring device

  6. Wind energy offers considerable promise; the wind itself is free,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langendoen, Koen

    Wind energy offers considerable promise; the wind itself is free, wind power is clean. One of these sources, wind energy, offers considerable promise; the wind itself is free, wind power is clean, and it is virtually inexhaustible. In recent years, research on wind energy has accelerated

  7. Wind Resource Maps (Postcard)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Powering America initiative provides high-resolution wind maps and estimates of the wind resource potential that would be possible from development of the available windy land areas after excluding areas unlikely to be developed. This postcard is a marketing piece that stakeholders can provide to interested parties; it will guide them to Wind Powering America's online wind energy resource maps.

  8. Wind Climatology Literature Review Jake Crouch October 12, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wind Climatology Literature Review Jake Crouch ­ October 12, 2010 The National Centers and climate forecast models and to monitor atmospheric phenomenon such as atmospheric winds, temperature dataset, including atmospheric winds, and set a precedent for using the dataset in a climate monitoring

  9. Observed and CAM3 GCM Sea Surface Wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zender, Charles

    Observed and CAM3 GCM Sea Surface Wind Speed Distributions: Characterization, Comparison, and Bias climatological surface wind speed probability density functions (PDFs) estimated from observations and use them to evaluate, for the first time, contemporaneous wind PDFs predicted by a GCM. The ob- servations include NASA

  10. Offshore Series Wind Turbine Variable Hub heights & rotor diameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    3.6MW Offshore Series Wind Turbine GE Energy #12;Feature Variable Hub heights & rotor diameters-savings feature, considering the rigors of offshore power generation. The 3.6 MW offshore wind turbine also, for both on and offshore use. Special features include... As the world's first commercially available wind

  11. WIND OBSERVATIONS OF SUPRATHERMAL ELECTRONS IN THE INTERPLANETARY MEDIUM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    WIND OBSERVATIONS OF SUPRATHERMAL ELECTRONS IN THE INTERPLANETARY MEDIUM R. P. LIN Space Sciences Particle Instrument on the WIND spacecraft, which provides high sensitivity electron and ion measurements from solar wind thermal plasma up to &MeV energies. These results include: (1) the observation of solar

  12. A Vision for Systems Engineering Applied to Wind Energy (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Felker, F.; Dykes, K.

    2015-01-01

    This presentation was given at the Third Wind Energy Systems Engineering Workshop on January 14, 2015. Topics covered include the importance of systems engineering, a vision for systems engineering as applied to wind energy, and application of systems engineering approaches to wind energy research and development.

  13. Physical Plant Power Plant - 43 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2005-06-30

    with higher efficiency / R&D Climate friendly Power Plants Build coal fired Power Plants with CCS-technology 4 B a c k u p va W GGEHEN ESL-IC-08-10-27 Proceedings of the Eighth International Conference for Enhanced Building Operations, Berlin, Germany..., October 20-22, 2008 RWE Energy / Energieeffizienz bei Immobilien / U. K?nig / ICEBO '08 SEITE 9 Electricity Production: All Energy Sources have to be included! Lignite Power Plant (BoA) produces 8,8 TWh = appr. 12% of the annual demand for electricity...

  14. Sinomatech Wind Power Blade aka Sinoma Science Technology Wind...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sinomatech Wind Power Blade aka Sinoma Science Technology Wind Turbine Blade Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Sinomatech Wind Power Blade (aka Sinoma Science & Technology...

  15. Wind energy offers considerable promise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langendoen, Koen

    Wind energy offers considerable promise: the wind itself is free, wind power is clean: the wind itself is free, wind power is clean, and it is inexhaustible. In recent years, research on wind · Wind farm aerodynamics Rotor Design · Aerodynamics · Structure and design · Composite design, material

  16. Wind energy offers considerable promise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langendoen, Koen

    Wind energy offers considerable promise: the wind itself is free, wind power is clean, wind power is clean, and it is inexhaustible. In recent years, research on wind energy has accelerated that are offered are: Wind Physics · Atmospheric aerodynamics and turbulence · Wind farm aerodynamics Rotor Design

  17. Federal Incentives for Wind Power (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-05-01

    This fact sheet describes the federal incentives available as of April 2013 that encourage increased development and deployment of wind energy technologies, including research grants, tax incentives, and loan programs.

  18. Methods and apparatus for cooling wind turbine generators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salamah, Samir A. (Niskayuna, NY); Gadre, Aniruddha Dattatraya (Rexford, NY); Garg, Jivtesh (Schenectady, NY); Bagepalli, Bharat Sampathkumaran (Niskayuna, NY); Jansen, Patrick Lee (Alplaus, NY); Carl, Jr., Ralph James (Clifton Park, NY)

    2008-10-28

    A wind turbine generator includes a stator having a core and a plurality of stator windings circumferentially spaced about a generator longitudinal axis. A rotor is rotatable about the generator longitudinal axis, and the rotor includes a plurality of magnetic elements coupled to the rotor and cooperating with the stator windings. The magnetic elements are configured to generate a magnetic field and the stator windings are configured to interact with the magnetic field to generate a voltage in the stator windings. A heat pipe assembly thermally engaging one of the stator and the rotor to dissipate heat generated in the stator or rotor.

  19. Performance Indicators of Wind Energy Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D'Amico, G; Prattico, F

    2015-01-01

    Modeling wind speed is one of the key element when dealing with the production of energy through wind turbines. A good model can be used for forecasting, site evaluation, turbines design and many other purposes. In this work we are interested in the analysis of the future financial cash flows generated by selling the electrical energy produced. We apply an indexed semi-Markov model of wind speed that has been shown, in previous investigation, to reproduce accurately the statistical behavior of wind speed. The model is applied to the evaluation of financial indicators like the Internal Rate of Return, semi-Elasticity and relative Convexity that are widely used for the assessment of the profitability of an investment and for the measurement and analysis of interest rate risk. We compare the computation of these indicators for real and synthetic data. Moreover, we propose a new indicator that can be used to compare the degree of utilization of different power plants.

  20. WIND DATA REPORT Presque Isle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Presque Isle June 1, 2005 ­ August 31, 2005 Prepared for United States Department...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distributions

  1. WIND DATA REPORT Presque Isle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Presque Isle December 1, 2004 ­ February 28, 2005 Prepared for United States.................................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distributions

  2. WIND DATA REPORT Presque Isle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Presque Isle December 1, 2004 ­ December 1, 2005 Prepared for United States ......................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distributions

  3. WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island June 1, 2003 ­ August 31, 2003 Prepared for Massachusetts...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distribution

  4. WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island December 1, 2003 ­ February 29, 2004 Prepared for Massachusetts.................................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Distribution

  5. WIND DATA REPORT Presque Isle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Presque Isle March 1, 2005 ­ May 31, 2005 Prepared for United States Department.................................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distributions

  6. WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island March 1, 2003 ­ May 31, 2003 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distributions

  7. WIND DATA REPORT FALMOUTH, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT FALMOUTH, MA June1, 2004 to August 31, 2004. Prepared for Massachusetts Technology...................................................................................................................... 8 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 8 Wind Speed Distributions

  8. WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island September 1, 2003 ­ November 30, 2003 Prepared for Massachusetts...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distribution

  9. WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island March 1, 2004 ­ May 31, 2004 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distribution

  10. WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island June 1, 2004 ­ August 31, 2004 Prepared for Massachusetts...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distribution

  11. 2012 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    with the section on offshore wind; Donna Heimiller and Billyof 2012, global cumulative offshore wind capacity stood ats (DOE’s) investments in offshore wind energy research and

  12. 2008 WIND TECHNOLOGIES MARKET REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2010-01-01

    11 “advanced-stage” offshore wind project proposals totalingcontinued in 2008 (see Offshore Wind Development Activities,Market Report Offshore Wind Development Activities In

  13. 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2012-01-01

    for deepwater offshore wind and tidal energy demonstrationand Minnesota (12%). Offshore Wind Power Project and Policythe emergence of an offshore wind power market still faces

  14. 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2012-01-01

    and Minnesota (12%). Offshore Wind Power Project and Policythe emergence of an offshore wind power market still facesexists in developing offshore wind energy in several parts

  15. 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2012-01-01

    of Energy?s (DOE) Wind & Water Power Program. For reviewingfor offshore wind power development in federal waters fromof Water and Power (LADWP). 2011. Completion of Wind Power

  16. 2008 WIND TECHNOLOGIES MARKET REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Table 8 Figure 30. Wind Integration Costs at Various LevelsOperations and Maintenance Costs Wind project operations andPublic Service Wind Integration Cost Impact Study. Prepared

  17. 2011 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2013-01-01

    charging wind power projects for balancing services. 81 BPA,in balancing reserves with increased wind power penetrationin balancing reserves with increased wind power penetration

  18. 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2012-01-01

    charging wind power projects for balancing services. 88 BPA,in balancing reserves with increased wind power penetrationin balancing reserves with increased wind power penetration

  19. Wind Farms in North America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoen, Ben

    2014-01-01

    Opinion About Large Offshore Wind Power: Underlying Factors.Delaware Opinion on Offshore Wind Power - Interim Report.Newark, DE. 16 pages. Global Wind Energy Council (GWEC) (

  20. 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2012-01-01

    be provided by wind power generators to provide frequencyof wind power capacity in that state) because generatorsgenerators to provide the needed flexibility to integrate wind power.

  1. 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2012-01-01

    2010. Status of Centralized Wind Power Forecasting in NorthInterconnection Policies and Wind Power: A Discussion ofLADWP). 2011. Completion of Wind Power Project Brings More

  2. 2011 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2013-01-01

    and K. Porter. 2011. Wind Power and Electricity Markets.The Effects of Integrating Wind Power on Transmission System41 6. Wind Power Price

  3. 2011 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2013-01-01

    exists in developing offshore wind energy in several partsexclusively on offshore wind energy will be published laterexclusively on offshore wind energy will be published later

  4. 2009 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2010-01-01

    assistance with the offshore wind energy discussion; Donnaactivity in the offshore wind energy sector. Data fromexpanded discussion of offshore wind energy development, and

  5. 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2012-01-01

    exists in developing offshore wind energy in several partsstrides relating to offshore wind energy have been madeactivity in the offshore wind energy sector. Data from

  6. WIND DATA REPORT Nantucket, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Nantucket, MA March 1st 2006 to May 31th 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts.................................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Distribut

  7. 2009 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2010-01-01

    2010. International Wind Energy Development: World MarketUniversity. American Wind Energy Association (AWEA). 2010a.Washington, DC: American Wind Energy Association. American

  8. 2008 WIND TECHNOLOGIES MARKET REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2010-01-01

    2008. Washington, DC: American Wind Energy Association.American Wind Energy Association ( AWEA). 2009b. AWEA SmallWashington, DC: American Wind Energy Association. Bolinger,

  9. 2008 WIND TECHNOLOGIES MARKET REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2010-01-01

    2008. Washington, DC: American Wind Energy Association.American Wind Energy Association ( AWEA).2009b. AWEA Small Wind Turbine Global Market Study: Year

  10. 2009 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2010-01-01

    Prepared for the Utility Wind Integration Group. Arlington,Consult. 2010. International Wind Energy Development: WorldUBS Global I/O: Global Wind Sector. UBS Investment Research.

  11. AWEA Wind Energy Fall Symposium

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The AWEA Wind Energy Fall Symposium gathers wind energy professionals for informal yet productive interactions with industry peers. Jose Zayas, Director, Wind & Water Power Technologies Office,...

  12. The survey also investigates out-of-state -Opinions on wind power in general and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    · The survey also investigates out-of-state beachgoer: - Opinions on wind power in general research has been undertaken to examine offshore wind power's effect (positive and negative) on tourism turbines is less than the avoidance of fossil fuel power plants, and avoidance of beaches with wind

  13. A next-generation modeling capability assesses wind turbine array fluid dynamics and aeroelastic simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A next-generation modeling capability assesses wind turbine array fluid dynamics and aeroelastic simulations Characterizing and optimizing overall performance of wind plants composed of large numbers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) are coupling physical models of the atmosphere and wind

  14. Risk-Based Strategies for Wind/Pumped-Hydro Coordination under Electricity Markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    be reduced by coupling the wind farm with energy storage facilities, thus constituting a virtual power plant1 Risk-Based Strategies for Wind/Pumped-Hydro Coordination under Electricity Markets Franck Bourry is able to minimize the imbalance penalty risks associated to wind power forecast uncertainty through

  15. 66 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SUSTAINABLE ENERGY, VOL. 1, NO. 2, JULY 2010 Optimization of Wind Turbine Performance With

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kusiak, Andrew

    . Three different objectives, wind power output, vibration of drive train, and vibration of tower intensified in recent years. Areas with the most research progress include the design of wind turbines [1], [2], the design and reliability of wind farms [3]­[5], the control of wind turbines [6], [7], [22], [23], wind

  16. Wind Power Career Chat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. Flowers

    2011-01-01

    This document will teach students about careers in the wind energy industry. Wind energy, both land-based and offshore, is expected to provide thousands of new jobs in the next several decades. Wind energy companies are growing rapidly to meet America's demand for clean, renewable, and domestic energy. These companies need skilled professionals. Wind power careers will require educated people from a variety of areas. Trained and qualified workers manufacture, construct, operate, and manage wind energy facilities. The nation will also need skilled researchers, scientists, and engineers to plan and develop the next generation of wind energy technologies.

  17. U.S. Leads International Collaborative to Address Wind Energy...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    other literature on the environmental challenges pertaining to land-based and offshore wind energy development. Other key features of WREN Hub will include a calendar of upcoming...

  18. Using Wind and Solar to Reliably Meet Electricity Demand, Greening...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and wind generation technologies. A variety of approaches can be deployed, including demand response, which can be used to shift demand to periods of greater renewable output,...

  19. ConcreteTowers for Onshore and OffshoreWind Farms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCalley, James D.

    systems, hovercraft, wave energy systems, wind turbine blades, strengthening techniques for structures in emerging materials, technologies and fields of engineering.These have included pre-fabricated building

  20. Active Power Controls from Wind Power: Bridging the Gaps | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    This report evaluates how wind power can support power system reliability, and do so economically. The study includes a number of different power system simulations, control...

  1. Deployment Barriers to Distributed Wind Energy: Workshop Report...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    could be created or modified to better support the development of a distributed wind power market. Ideas included longer- term extensions of existing tax credits and an effort...

  2. Wind Power: How Much, How Soon, and At What Cost?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan H

    2010-01-01

    Energy Technology Strategy: Addressing Climate Change."Climate Problem for the Next 50 Years with Current Technologies."technology solutions - including wind - in combating global climate

  3. EERE 2014 Wind Technologies Market Report Finds Wind Power at...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2014 Wind Technologies Market Report Finds Wind Power at Record Low Prices EERE 2014 Wind Technologies Market Report Finds Wind Power at Record Low Prices August 10, 2015 - 11:00am...

  4. 20% Wind Energy by 2030: Increasing Wind Energy's Contribution...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    20% Wind Energy by 2030: Increasing Wind Energy's Contribution to U.S. Electricity Supply 20% Wind Energy by 2030: Increasing Wind Energy's Contribution to U.S. Electricity Supply...

  5. ARRA-Multi-Level Energy Storage and Controls for Large-Scale Wind Energy Integration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Wenzhong Gao

    2012-09-30

    The Project Objective is to design innovative energy storage architecture and associated controls for high wind penetration to increase reliability and market acceptance of wind power. The project goals are to facilitate wind energy integration at different levels by design and control of suitable energy storage systems. The three levels of wind power system are: Balancing Control Center level, Wind Power Plant level, and Wind Power Generator level. Our scopes are to smooth the wind power fluctuation and also ensure adequate battery life. In the new hybrid energy storage system (HESS) design for wind power generation application, the boundary levels of the state of charge of the battery and that of the supercapacitor are used in the control strategy. In the controller, some logic gates are also used to control the operating time durations of the battery. The sizing method is based on the average fluctuation of wind profiles of a specific wind station. The calculated battery size is dependent on the size of the supercapacitor, state of charge of the supercapacitor and battery wear. To accommodate the wind power fluctuation, a hybrid energy storage system (HESS) consisting of battery energy system (BESS) and super-capacitor is adopted in this project. A probability-based power capacity specification approach for the BESS and super-capacitors is proposed. Through this method the capacities of BESS and super-capacitor are properly designed to combine the characteristics of high energy density of BESS and the characteristics of high power density of super-capacitor. It turns out that the super-capacitor within HESS deals with the high power fluctuations, which contributes to the extension of BESS lifetime, and the super-capacitor can handle the peaks in wind power fluctuations without the severe penalty of round trip losses associated with a BESS. The proposed approach has been verified based on the real wind data from an existing wind power plant in Iowa. An intelligent controller that increases battery life within hybrid energy storage systems for wind application was developed. Comprehensive studies have been conducted and simulation results are analyzed. A permanent magnet synchronous generator, coupled with a variable speed wind turbine, is connected to a power grid (14-bus system). A rectifier, a DC-DC converter and an inverter are used to provide a complete model of the wind system. An Energy Storage System (ESS) is connected to a DC-link through a DC-DC converter. An intelligent controller is applied to the DC-DC converter to help the Voltage Source Inverter (VSI) to regulate output power and also to control the operation of the battery and supercapacitor. This ensures a longer life time for the batteries. The detailed model is simulated in PSCAD/EMTP. Additionally, economic analysis has been done for different methods that can reduce the wind power output fluctuation. These methods are, wind power curtailment, dumping loads, battery energy storage system and hybrid energy storage system. From the results, application of single advanced HESS can save more money for wind turbines owners. Generally the income would be the same for most of methods because the wind does not change and maximum power point tracking can be applied to most systems. On the other hand, the cost is the key point. For short term and small wind turbine, the BESS is the cheapest and applicable method while for large scale wind turbines and wind farms the application of advanced HESS would be the best method to reduce the power fluctuation. The key outcomes of this project include a new intelligent controller that can reduce energy exchanged between the battery and DC-link, reduce charging/discharging cycles, reduce depth of discharge and increase time interval between charge/discharge, and lower battery temperature. This improves the overall lifetime of battery energy storages. Additionally, a new design method based on probability help optimize the power capacity specification for BESS and super-capacitors. Recommendations include experimental imp

  6. Master Plant List for Texas Range and Pasture Plant Identification Contests 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ragsdale, Bobby

    2000-05-03

    Entrants in range and pasture plant identification contests will find this reference useful. It includes explanations of plant characteristics and a master list of plants....

  7. Summary of Time Period-Based and Other Approximation Methods for Determining the Capacity Value of Wind and Solar in the United States: September 2010 - February 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rogers, J.; Porter, K.

    2012-03-01

    This paper updates previous work that describes time period-based and other approximation methods for estimating the capacity value of wind power and extends it to include solar power. The paper summarizes various methods presented in utility integrated resource plans, regional transmission organization methodologies, regional stakeholder initiatives, regulatory proceedings, and academic and industry studies. Time period-based approximation methods typically measure the contribution of a wind or solar plant at the time of system peak - sometimes over a period of months or the average of multiple years.

  8. DOE/NREL supported wind energy activities in Indonesia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drouilhet, S.

    1997-12-01

    This paper describes three wind energy related projects which are underway in Indonesia. The first is a USAID/Winrock Wind for Island and Nongovernmental Development (WIND) project. The objectives of this project are to train local nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) in the siting, installation, operation, and maintenance of small wind turbines. Then to install up to 20 wind systems to provide electric power for productive end uses while creating micro-enterprises which will generate enough revenue to sustain the wind energy systems. The second project is a joint Community Power Corporation/PLN (Indonesian National Electric Utility) case study of hybrid power systems in village settings. The objective is to evaluate the economic viability of various hybrid power options for several different situations involving wind/photovoltaics/batteries/diesel. The third project is a World Bank/PLN preliminary market assessment for wind/diesel hybrid systems. The objective is to estimate the size of the total potential market for wind/diesel hybrid power systems in Indonesia. The study will examine both wind retrofits to existing diesel mini-grids and new wind-diesel plants in currently unelectrified villages.

  9. Hardware-in-the-Loop Simulations and Control Design for a Small Vertical Axis Wind Turbine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yanikoglu, Berrin

    the dynamics of the rotor. To deal with disturbance torques in the HIL system, a virtual plant is introduced to obtain an error between the speeds in the HIL system and virtual plant. This error is used by a pro a maximum power point tracking (MPPT) algorithm for small vertical axis wind turbines (VAWTs). Wind torque

  10. Hybrid Wind Power Balance Control Strategy using Thermal Power, Hydro Power and Flow Batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacDonald, Mark

    Hybrid Wind Power Balance Control Strategy using Thermal Power, Hydro Power and Flow Batteries the con- trolled use of hybrid flow battery, thermal and hydro power plant system, to support wind power on range of thermal and hydro power plant reaction times. This work suggests that power and energy

  11. Annual Technology Baseline (Including Supporting Data); NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blair, Nate; Cory, Karlynn; Hand, Maureen; Parkhill, Linda; Speer, Bethany; Stehly, Tyler; Feldman, David; Lantz, Eric; Augusting, Chad; Turchi, Craig; O'Connor, Patrick

    2015-07-08

    Consistent cost and performance data for various electricity generation technologies can be difficult to find and may change frequently for certain technologies. With the Annual Technology Baseline (ATB), National Renewable Energy Laboratory provides an organized and centralized dataset that was reviewed by internal and external experts. It uses the best information from the Department of Energy laboratory's renewable energy analysts and Energy Information Administration information for conventional technologies. The ATB will be updated annually in order to provide an up-to-date repository of current and future cost and performance data. Going forward, we plan to revise and refine the values using best available information. The ATB includes both a presentation with notes (PDF) and an associated Excel Workbook. The ATB includes the following electricity generation technologies: land-based wind; offshore wind; utility-scale solar PV; concentrating solar power; geothermal power; hydropower plants (upgrades to existing facilities, powering non-powered dams, and new stream-reach development); conventional coal; coal with carbon capture and sequestration; integrated gasification combined cycle coal; natural gas combustion turbines; natural gas combined cycle; conventional biopower. Nuclear laboratory's renewable energy analysts and Energy Information Administration information for conventional technologies. The ATB will be updated annually in order to provide an up-to-date repository of current and future cost and performance data. Going forward, we plan to revise and refine the values using best available information.

  12. Wind Power FAQ

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Power Frequently Asked Questions QUESTION: Why was the time stamp on my first wind explorer data chip incorrect? ANSWER: You need to program the proper date and time in the wind...

  13. Airplane and the wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Airplane and the wind. An airplane starts from the point A and flies to B. The speed of the airplane with respect to the air is v (constant). There is also a wind of

  14. NREL: Wind Research - Events

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Events Below are upcoming events related to wind energy technology. December 2015 Wind and Water Power Small Business Voucher Open House December 2, 2015, 9:00 - 1:00 MST Boulder,...

  15. WINDExchange: Learn About Wind

    Wind Powering America (EERE)

    wind turbines in a row at sunset. The sky is varying hues of orange and the sun is halfway past the horizon. Wind power comes in many sizes. Here, several...

  16. Residential Wind Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willis, Gary

    2011-12-16

    This research study will explore the use of residential wind power and associated engineering and environmental issues. There is various wind power generating devices available to the consumer. The study will discuss the dependencies of human...

  17. After the Wind Storm 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-09-05

    Accidents and hazards continue to plague the construction industry. One often overlooked hazard to workers is the potential for flying debris and materials during high winds. This research was designed to evaluate the wind velocity required...

  18. 2008 WIND TECHNOLOGIES MARKET REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2010-01-01

    AWEA). 2009b. AWEA Small Wind Turbine Global Market Study:will ultimately benefit wind. Small Wind ITC: EESA 2008to be relatively small, whereas the impacts of wind on load-

  19. 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2012-01-01

    AWEA). 2010. AWEA Small Wind Turbine Global Market Survey,levels. Small Wind Turbines Small wind turbines can providebelow summarizes sales of small wind turbines, 100 kW and

  20. 2008 WIND TECHNOLOGIES MARKET REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2010-01-01

    wind project costs, wind turbine transaction prices, projectincreases in the cost of wind turbines over the last severalO&M costs given the dramatic changes in wind turbine

  1. 2011 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2013-01-01

    AWEA’s Wind Energy Weekly, DOE/EPRI’s Turbine Verification10% Wind Energy Penetration New large-scale 8 wind turbines100 wind turbine installed at the National Renewable Energy

  2. 2011 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Sites U.S. Department of Energy Wind Program wind.energy.govA. 2010. Impact of Wind Energy Installations on DomesticUniversity. American Wind Energy Association (AWEA). 2012a.

  3. 2011 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2013-01-01

    AWEA). 2012b. 2011 U.S. Small Wind Turbine Market Report.a brief discussion on Small Wind This 100 kW thresholdAnnual Capacity (GW) Small Wind Turbines Small wind turbines

  4. 2012 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    a brief discussion on Small Wind Turbines is provided onO&M costs. 2012 Wind Technologies Market Report Small WindTurbines Small wind turbines can provide power directly to

  5. 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2012-01-01

    AWEA). 2010. AWEA Small Wind Turbine Global Market Survey,a brief discussion on Small Wind Turbines is provided onat 2008 and 2009 levels. Small Wind Turbines Small wind

  6. Wind Webinar Text Version

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Download the text version of the audio from the DOE Office of Indian Energy webinar on wind renewable energy.

  7. Wind Tunnel Building - 7 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2005-06-30

    or gravitational energy to some extent. Moreover, wave energy provides “15-20 times more available energy per square meter than either wind or solar” [1]. Of these the most commercially viable resources studied so far are ocean currents and waves. Some... limited commercial development and is therefore of more interest. Ocean waves arise from the transfer of energy from the sun to wind then water. Solar energy creates wind, which then blows over the ocean, converting wind energy to wave energy. Once...

  8. Wind powering America: Vermont

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NREL

    2000-04-11

    Wind resources in the state of Vermont show great potential for wind energy development according to the wind resource assessment conducted by the state, its utilities, and NREL. This fact sheet provides a brief description of the resource assessment and a link to the resulting wind resource map produced by NREL. The fact sheet also provides a description of the state's net metering program, its financial incentives, and green power programs as well as a list of contacts for more information.

  9. ECE 457 Dawson Fall 2010 Course Syllabus & Policies Fundamentals of Wind Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    to power generation. Topics include wind energy principles, wind site assessment, wind turbine components, power generation machinery, control systems, connection to the electric grid, and maintenance and societal perspectives regarding the demand for mechanical and electrical power generation from wind using

  10. Mining Markov chain transition matrix from wind speed time series data Zhe Song a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kusiak, Andrew

    . Researches related with wind speed are quite extensive, includ- ing wind speed forecasting (Kusiak, Zheng, Essiarab, & Sayigh, 2004; Sahin & Sen, 2001) and so on. Wind speed forecasting and simulation could approaches, Markov chain is a popular tool to model, forecast and simulate the wind speed in a discrete

  11. Performance and safety of rooftop wind turbines: Use of CFD to gain insight into inflow conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCalley, James D.

    to overcome, including energy yield reduction due to lower mean wind speeds in urban areas, and environmental method to model wind flows in order to perform a resource assessment for the application of small wind presents the results of research using a CFD code to model wind flows over the roof of a building

  12. Modeling the Benefits of Storage Technologies to Wind Power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, P.; Short, W.; Blair, N.

    2008-06-01

    Rapid expansion of wind power in the electricity sector is raising questions about how wind resource variability might affect the capacity value of wind farms at high levels of penetration. Electricity storage, with the capability to shift wind energy from periods of low demand to peak times and to smooth fluctuations in output, may have a role in bolstering the value of wind power at levels of penetration envisioned by a new Department of Energy report ('20% Wind by 2030, Increasing Wind Energy's Contribution to U.S. Electricity Supply'). This paper quantifies the value storage can add to wind. The analysis was done employing the Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) model, formerly known as the Wind Deployment System (WinDS) model. ReEDS was used to estimate the cost and development path associated with 20% penetration of wind in the report. ReEDS differs from the WinDS model primarily in that the model has been modified to include the capability to build and use three storage technologies: pumped-hydroelectric storage (PHS), compressed-air energy storage (CAES), and batteries. To assess the value of these storage technologies, two pairs of scenarios were run: business-as-usual, with and without storage; 20% wind energy by 2030, with and without storage. This paper presents the results from those model runs.

  13. WP2 IEA Wind Task 26:The Past and Future Cost of Wind Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lantz, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Prospects for Offshore Wind Farms. ” Wind Engineering, 28:Techniques for Offshore Wind Farms. ” Journal of Solar

  14. Wind Farms in North America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoen, Ben

    2014-01-01

    Opinion About Large Offshore Wind Power: Underlying Factors.Delaware Opinion on Offshore Wind Power - Interim Report.

  15. 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2012-01-01

    by Canada (76%) and Mexico (17%). Wind turbine component30%), Mexico (21%), and China (21%)). Total wind turbine

  16. 2008 WIND TECHNOLOGIES MARKET REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2010-01-01

    of larger balancing areas, the use of regional wind powerbalancing areas. The successful use of regional wind power

  17. 2009 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2010-01-01

    directly charging wind power projects for balancing servicesin smaller balancing areas. The successful use of wind power

  18. Wind Farms in North America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoen, Ben

    2014-01-01

    Public Opinion About Large Offshore Wind Power: UnderlyingA. (2007) Delaware Opinion on Offshore Wind Power - Interim

  19. Wind Farms in North America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoen, Ben

    2014-01-01

    Renewable Energy (Wind and Water Technologies Program) ofWind Farms in North America 1 Ben Hoen Environmental Energy Technologies

  20. 2012 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    regulation and frequency response services charge to wind energyRegulation and Frequency Response Service rate for wind energy

  1. Wind for Schools Curriculum Brief

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-08-01

    This fact sheet provides an overview of wind energy curricula as it relates to the Wind for Schools project.

  2. Aleutian Pribilof Islands Wind Energy Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruce A. Wright

    2012-03-27

    Under this project, the Aleutian Pribilof Islands Association (APIA) conducted wind feasibility studies for Adak, False Pass, Nikolski, Sand Point and St. George. The DOE funds were also be used to continue APIA's role as project coordinator, to expand the communication network quality between all participants and with other wind interest groups in the state and to provide continued education and training opportunities for regional participants. This DOE project began 09/01/2005. We completed the economic and technical feasibility studies for Adak. These were funded by the Alaska Energy Authority. Both wind and hydro appear to be viable renewable energy options for Adak. In False Pass the wind resource is generally good but the site has high turbulence. This would require special care with turbine selection and operations. False Pass may be more suitable for a tidal project. APIA is funded to complete a False Pass tidal feasibility study in 2012. Nikolski has superb potential for wind power development with Class 7 wind power density, moderate wind shear, bi-directional winds and low turbulence. APIA secured nearly $1M from the United States Department of Agriculture Rural Utilities Service Assistance to Rural Communities with Extremely High Energy Costs to install a 65kW wind turbine. The measured average power density and wind speed at Sand Point measured at 20m (66ft), are 424 W/m2 and 6.7 m/s (14.9 mph) respectively. Two 500kW Vestas turbines were installed and when fully integrated in 2012 are expected to provide a cost effective and clean source of electricity, reduce overall diesel fuel consumption estimated at 130,000 gallons/year and decrease air emissions associated with the consumption of diesel fuel. St. George Island has a Class 7 wind resource, which is superior for wind power development. The current strategy, led by Alaska Energy Authority, is to upgrade the St. George electrical distribution system and power plant. Avian studies in Nikolski and Sand Point have allowed for proper wind turbine siting without killing birds, especially endangered species and bald eagles. APIA continues coordinating and looking for funding opportunities for regional renewable energy projects. An important goal for APIA has been, and will continue to be, to involve community members with renewable energy projects and energy conservation efforts.

  3. Wind/Wave Misalignment in the Loads Analysis of a Floating Offshore Wind Turbine: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barj, L.; Stewart, S.; Stewart, G.; Lackner, M.; Jonkman, J.; Robertson, A.

    2014-02-01

    Wind resources far from the shore and in deeper seas have encouraged the offshore wind industry to look into floating platforms. The International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) is developing a new technical specification for the design of floating offshore wind turbines that extends existing design standards for land-based and fixed-bottom offshore wind turbines. The work summarized in this paper supports the development of best practices and simulation requirements in the loads analysis of floating offshore wind turbines by examining the impact of wind/wave misalignment on the system loads under normal operation. Simulations of the OC3-Hywind floating offshore wind turbine system under a wide range of wind speeds, significant wave heights, peak-spectral periods and wind/wave misalignments have been carried out with the aero-servo-hydro-elastic tool FAST [4]. The extreme and fatigue loads have been calculated for all the simulations. The extreme and fatigue loading as a function of wind/wave misalignment have been represented as load roses and a directional binning sensitivity study has been carried out. This study focused on identifying the number and type of wind/wave misalignment simulations needed to accurately capture the extreme and fatigue loads of the system in all possible metocean conditions considered, and for a down-selected set identified as the generic US East Coast site. For this axisymmetric platform, perpendicular wind and waves play an important role in the support structure and including these cases in the design loads analysis can improve the estimation of extreme and fatigue loads. However, most structural locations see their highest extreme and fatigue loads with aligned wind and waves. These results are specific to the spar type platform, but it is expected that the results presented here will be similar to other floating platforms.

  4. Hurricane Katrina Wind Investigation Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Desjarlais, A. O.

    2007-08-15

    This investigation of roof damage caused by Hurricane Katrina is a joint effort of the Roofing Industry Committee on Weather Issues, Inc. (RICOWI) and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory/U.S. Department of Energy (ORNL/DOE). The Wind Investigation Program (WIP) was initiated in 1996. Hurricane damage that met the criteria of a major windstorm event did not materialize until Hurricanes Charley and Ivan occurred in August 2004. Hurricane Katrina presented a third opportunity for a wind damage investigation in August 29, 2005. The major objectives of the WIP are as follows: (1) to investigate the field performance of roofing assemblies after major wind events; (2) to factually describe roofing assembly performance and modes of failure; and (3) to formally report results of the investigations and damage modes for substantial wind speeds The goal of the WIP is to perform unbiased, detailed investigations by credible personnel from the roofing industry, the insurance industry, and academia. Data from these investigations will, it is hoped, lead to overall improvement in roofing products, systems, roofing application, and durability and a reduction in losses, which may lead to lower overall costs to the public. This report documents the results of an extensive and well-planned investigative effort. The following program changes were implemented as a result of the lessons learned during the Hurricane Charley and Ivan investigations: (1) A logistics team was deployed to damage areas immediately following landfall; (2) Aerial surveillance--imperative to target wind damage areas--was conducted; (3) Investigation teams were in place within 8 days; (4) Teams collected more detailed data; and (5) Teams took improved photographs and completed more detailed photo logs. Participating associations reviewed the results and lessons learned from the previous investigations and many have taken the following actions: (1) Moved forward with recommendations for new installation procedures; (2) Updated and improved application guidelines and manuals from associations and manufacturers; (3) Launched certified product installer programs; and (4) Submitted building code changes to improve product installation. Estimated wind speeds at the damage locations came from simulated hurricane models prepared by Applied Research Associates of Raleigh, North Carolina. A dynamic hurricane wind field model was calibrated to actual wind speeds measured at 12 inland and offshore stations. The maximum estimated peak gust wind speeds in Katrina were in the 120-130 mph range. Hurricane Katrina made landfall near Grand Isle, Louisiana, and traveled almost due north across the city of New Orleans. Hurricane winds hammered the coastline from Houma, Louisiana, to Pensacola, Florida. The severe flooding problems in New Orleans made it almost impossible for the investigating teams to function inside the city. Thus the WIP investigations were all conducted in areas east of the city. The six teams covered the coastal areas from Bay Saint Louis, Mississippi, on the west to Pascagoula, Mississippi, on the east. Six teams involving a total of 25 persons documented damage to both low slope and steep slope roofing systems. The teams collected specific information on each building examined, including type of structure (use or occupancy), wall construction, roof type, roof slope, building dimensions, roof deck, insulation, construction, and method of roof attachment. In addition, the teams noted terrain exposure and the estimated wind speeds at the building site from the Katrina wind speed map. With each team member assigned a specific duty, they described the damage in detail and illustrated important features with numerous color photos. Where possible, the points of damage initiation were identified and damage propagation described. Because the wind speeds in Katrina at landfall, where the investigations took place, were less than code-specified design speeds, one would expect roof damage to be minimal. One team speculated that damage to all roofs in the area they examined was les

  5. Wind farm electrical system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erdman, William L.; Lettenmaier, Terry M.

    2006-07-04

    An approach to wind farm design using variable speed wind turbines with low pulse number electrical output. The output of multiple wind turbines are aggregated to create a high pulse number electrical output at a point of common coupling with a utility grid network. Power quality at each individual wind turbine falls short of utility standards, but the aggregated output at the point of common coupling is within acceptable tolerances for utility power quality. The approach for aggregating low pulse number electrical output from multiple wind turbines relies upon a pad mounted transformer at each wind turbine that performs phase multiplication on the output of each wind turbine. Phase multiplication converts a modified square wave from the wind turbine into a 6 pulse output. Phase shifting of the 6 pulse output from each wind turbine allows the aggregated output of multiple wind turbines to be a 24 pulse approximation of a sine wave. Additional filtering and VAR control is embedded within the wind farm to take advantage of the wind farm's electrical impedence characteristics to further enhance power quality at the point of common coupling.

  6. CONGRESSIONAL BRIEFING Offshore Wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    CONGRESSIONAL BRIEFING Offshore Wind Lessons Learned from Europe: Reducing Costs and Creating Jobs Thursday, June 12, 2014 Capitol Visitors Center, Room SVC 215 Enough offshore wind capacity to power six the past decade. What has Europe learned that is applicable to a U.S. effort to deploy offshore wind off

  7. Wind Economic Development (Postcard)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Powering America initiative provides information on the economic development benefits of wind energy. This postcard is a marketing piece that stakeholders can provide to interested parties; it will guide them to the economic development benefits section on the Wind Powering America website.

  8. Offshore Wind Geoff Sharples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    Offshore Wind Geoff Sharples geoff@clearpathenergyllc.com #12;Frequently Unanswered Ques?ons · Why don't "they" build more offshore wind? · Why not make States Cape Wind PPA at 18 c/kWh #12;The cycle of non-innova?on Offshore

  9. Wind power outlook 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    anon.

    2006-04-15

    This annual brochure provides the American Wind Energy Association's up-to-date assessment of the wind industry in the United States. This 2006 general assessment shows positive signs of growth, use and acceptance of wind energy as a vital component of the U.S. energy mix.

  10. Why do meteorologists use wind vanes? Wind vanes are used to determine the direction of the wind. Wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    Fun Facts Why do meteorologists use wind vanes? Wind vanes are used to determine the direction of the wind. Wind· vanes are also called weather vanes. What do wind vanes look like on a weather station? Wind vanes that are on weather stations look a lot like the one you· made! The biggest differences

  11. Small Wind Electric Systems: An Oregon Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2002-05-01

    Small Wind Electric Systems An Oregon Consumer's Guide provides consumers with enough information to help them determine if a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include: how to make your home more energy efficient, how to choose the right size turbine, the parts of a wind electric system, determining if there is enough wind resource on your site, choosing the best site for your turbine, connecting your system to the utility grid, and if it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the Oregon guide provides state specific information that includes and state wind resource map, state incentives, and state contacts for more information.

  12. Wind Turbine Generator System Duration Test Report for the Gaia-Wind 11 kW Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huskey, A.; Bowen, A.; Jager, D.

    2010-09-01

    This test was conducted as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Independent Testing project. This project was established to help reduce the barriers of wind energy expansion by providing independent testing results for small turbines. In total, five turbines are being tested at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NRELs) National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) as a part of this project. Duration testing is one of up to five tests that may be performed on the turbines, including power performance, safety and function, noise, and power quality tests. The results of the testing will provide the manufacturers with reports that may be used for small wind turbine certification. The test equipment includes a Gaia-Wind 11 kW wind turbine mounted on an 18 m monopole tower. Gaia-Wind Ltd. manufactured the turbine in Denmark, although the company is based in Scotland. The system was installed by the NWTC Site Operations group with guidance and assistance from Gaia-Wind.

  13. Great Plains Wind Energy Transmission Development Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brad G. Stevens, P.E.; Troy K. Simonsen; Kerryanne M. Leroux

    2012-06-09

    In fiscal year 2005, the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) received funding from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to undertake a broad array of tasks to either directly or indirectly address the barriers that faced much of the Great Plains states and their efforts to produce and transmit wind energy at the time. This program, entitled Great Plains Wind Energy Transmission Development Project, was focused on the central goal of stimulating wind energy development through expansion of new transmission capacity or development of new wind energy capacity through alternative market development. The original task structure was as follows: Task 1 - Regional Renewable Credit Tracking System (later rescoped to Small Wind Turbine Training Center); Task 2 - Multistate Transmission Collaborative; Task 3 - Wind Energy Forecasting System; and Task 4 - Analysis of the Long-Term Role of Hydrogen in the Region. As carried out, Task 1 involved the creation of the Small Wind Turbine Training Center (SWTTC). The SWTTC, located Grand Forks, North Dakota, consists of a single wind turbine, the Endurance S-250, on a 105-foot tilt-up guyed tower. The S-250 is connected to the electrical grid on the 'load side' of the electric meter, and the power produced by the wind turbine is consumed locally on the property. Establishment of the SWTTC will allow EERC personnel to provide educational opportunities to a wide range of participants, including grade school through college-level students and the general public. In addition, the facility will allow the EERC to provide technical training workshops related to the installation, operation, and maintenance of small wind turbines. In addition, under Task 1, the EERC hosted two small wind turbine workshops on May 18, 2010, and March 8, 2011, at the EERC in Grand Forks, North Dakota. Task 2 involved the EERC cosponsoring and aiding in the planning of three transmission workshops in the midwest and western regions. Under Task 3, the EERC, in collaboration with Meridian Environmental Services, developed and demonstrated the efficacy of a wind energy forecasting system for use in scheduling energy output from wind farms for a regional electrical generation and transmission utility. With the increased interest at the time of project award in the production of hydrogen as a critical future energy source, many viewed hydrogen produced from wind-generated electricity as an attractive option. In addition, many of the hydrogen production-related concepts involve utilization of energy resources without the need for additional electrical transmission. For this reason, under Task 4, the EERC provided a summary of end uses for hydrogen in the region and focused on one end product in particular (fertilizer), including several process options and related economic analyses.

  14. Voltage Impacts of Utility-Scale Distributed Wind

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, A.

    2014-09-01

    Although most utility-scale wind turbines in the United States are added at the transmission level in large wind power plants, distributed wind power offers an alternative that could increase the overall wind power penetration without the need for additional transmission. This report examines the distribution feeder-level voltage issues that can arise when adding utility-scale wind turbines to the distribution system. Four of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory taxonomy feeders were examined in detail to study the voltage issues associated with adding wind turbines at different distances from the sub-station. General rules relating feeder resistance up to the point of turbine interconnection to the expected maximum voltage change levels were developed. Additional analysis examined line and transformer overvoltage conditions.

  15. Wind Turbine Generator System Power Quality Test Report for the Gaia Wind 11-kW Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis, A.; Gevorgian, V.

    2011-07-01

    This report details the power quality test on the Gaia Wind 11-kW Wind Turbine as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Independent Testing Project. In total five turbines are being tested as part of the project. Power quality testing is one of up to five test that may be performed on the turbines including power performance, safety and function, noise, and duration tests. The results of the testing provide manufacturers with reports that may be used for small wind turbine certification.

  16. Wind Turbine Safety and Function Test Report for the Mariah Windspire Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huskey, A.; Bowen, A.; Jager, D.

    2010-07-01

    This test was conducted as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Independent Testing project. This project was established to help reduce the barriers to wind energy expansion by providing independent testing results for small wind turbines (SWT). In total, five turbines were tested at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) as a part of this project. Safety and function testing is one of up to five tests performed on the turbines, including power performance, duration, noise, and power-quality tests. NWTC testing results provide manufacturers with reports that may be used to meet part of small wind turbine certification requirements. The test equipment includes a Mariah Windspire wind turbine mounted on a monopole tower. L&E Machine manufactured the turbine in the United States. The inverter was manufactured separately by Technology Driven Products in the United States. The system was installed by the NWTC site operations group with guidance and assistance from Mariah Power.

  17. Small Wind Electric Systems: A U.S. Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2007-08-01

    The handbook provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy.

  18. Thermal Wind The thermal wind is defined as the vector difference between the geostrophic winds at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hennon, Christopher C.

    ATMS 310 Thermal Wind The thermal wind is defined as the vector difference between the geostrophic winds at two levels. It is not really a wind at all, just a measure of the shear of the geostrophic wind. But there are good reasons for considering the geostrophic wind; mainly, it provides a convenient way of connecting

  19. Grand Ridge Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource History View New Pages RecentPlantMagma EnergyGoogle lendsCouleeII Wind FarmWind

  20. Methods of making wind turbine rotor blades

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Livingston, Jamie T. (Pensacola, FL); Burke, Arthur H. E. (Gulf Breeze, FL); Bakhuis, Jan Willem (Nijverdal, NL); Van Breugel, Sjef (Enschede, NL); Billen, Andrew (Daarlerveen, NL)

    2008-04-01

    A method of manufacturing a root portion of a wind turbine blade includes, in an exemplary embodiment, providing an outer layer of reinforcing fibers including at least two woven mats of reinforcing fibers, providing an inner layer of reinforcing fibers including at least two woven mats of reinforcing fibers, and positioning at least two bands of reinforcing fibers between the inner and outer layers, with each band of reinforcing fibers including at least two woven mats of reinforcing fibers. The method further includes positioning a mat of randomly arranged reinforcing fibers between each pair of adjacent bands of reinforcing fibers, introducing a polymeric resin into the root potion of the wind turbine blade, infusing the resin through the outer layer, the inner layer, each band of reinforcing fibers, and each mat of random reinforcing fibers, and curing the resin to form the root portion of the wind turbine blade.

  1. 2011 Cost of Wind Energy Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tegen, S.; Lantz, E.; Hand, M.; Maples, B.; Smith, A.; Schwabe, P.

    2013-03-01

    This report describes the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) for a typical land-based wind turbine installed in the United States in 2011, as well as the modeled LCOE for a fixed-bottom offshore wind turbine installed in the United States in 2011. Each of the four major components of the LCOE equation are explained in detail, such as installed capital cost, annual energy production, annual operating expenses, and financing, and including sensitivity ranges that show how each component can affect LCOE. These LCOE calculations are used for planning and other purposes by the U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Program.

  2. Method and apparatus for wind turbine air gap control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grant, James Jonathan; Bagepalli, Bharat Sampathkumaran; Jansen, Patrick Lee; DiMascio, Paul Stephen; Gadre, Aniruddha Dattatraya; Qu, Ronghai

    2007-02-20

    Methods and apparatus for assembling a wind turbine generator are provided. The wind turbine generator includes a core and a plurality of stator windings circumferentially spaced about a generator longitudinal axis, a rotor rotatable about the generator longitudinal axis wherein the rotor includes a plurality of magnetic elements coupled to a radially outer periphery of the rotor such that an airgap is defined between the stator windings and the magnetic elements and the plurality of magnetic elements including a radially inner periphery having a first diameter. The wind turbine generator also includes a bearing including a first member in rotatable engagement with a radially inner second member, the first member including a radially outer periphery, a diameter of the radially outer periphery of the first member being substantially equal to the first diameter, the rotor coupled to the stator through the bearing such that a substantially uniform airgap is maintained.

  3. Reassessing Wind Potential Estimates for India: Economic and Policy Implications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phadke, Amol; Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Khangura, Jagmeet

    2011-09-15

    We assess developable on-shore wind potential in India at three different hub-heights and under two sensitivity scenarios – one with no farmland included, the other with all farmland included. Under the “no farmland included” case, the total wind potential in India ranges from 748 GW at 80m hub-height to 976 GW at 120m hub-height. Under the “all farmland included” case, the potential with a minimum capacity factor of 20 percent ranges from 984 GW to 1,549 GW. High quality wind energy sites, at 80m hub-height with a minimum capacity factor of 25 percent, have a potential between 253 GW (no farmland included) and 306 GW (all farmland included). Our estimates are more than 15 times the current official estimate of wind energy potential in India (estimated at 50m hub height) and are about one tenth of the official estimate of the wind energy potential in the US.

  4. Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phadke, Amol; Goldman, Charles; Larson, Doug; Carr, Tom; Rath, Larry; Balash, Peter; Yih-Huei, Wan

    2008-11-28

    Growing concern over climate change is prompting new thinking about the technologies used to generate electricity. In the future, it is possible that new government policies on greenhouse gas emissions may favor electric generation technology options that release zero or low levels of carbon emissions. The Western U.S. has abundant wind and coal resources. In a world with carbon constraints, the future of coal for new electrical generation is likely to depend on the development and successful application of new clean coal technologies with near zero carbon emissions. This scoping study explores the economic and technical feasibility of combining wind farms with advanced coal generation facilities and operating them as a single generation complex in the Western US. The key questions examined are whether an advanced coal-wind hybrid (ACWH) facility provides sufficient advantages through improvements to the utilization of transmission lines and the capability to firm up variable wind generation for delivery to load centers to compete effectively with other supply-side alternatives in terms of project economics and emissions footprint. The study was conducted by an Analysis Team that consists of staff from the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), and Western Interstate Energy Board (WIEB). We conducted a screening level analysis of the economic competitiveness and technical feasibility of ACWH generation options located in Wyoming that would supply electricity to load centers in California, Arizona or Nevada. Figure ES-1 is a simple stylized representation of the configuration of the ACWH options. The ACWH consists of a 3,000 MW coal gasification combined cycle power plant equipped with carbon capture and sequestration (G+CC+CCS plant), a fuel production or syngas storage facility, and a 1,500 MW wind plant. The ACWH project is connected to load centers by a 3,000 MW transmission line. In the G+CC+CCS plant, coal is gasified into syngas and CO{sub 2} (which is captured). The syngas is burned in the combined cycle plant to produce electricity. The ACWH facility is operated in such a way that the transmission line is always utilized at its full capacity by backing down the combined cycle (CC) power generation units to accommodate wind generation. Operating the ACWH facility in this manner results in a constant power delivery of 3,000 MW to the load centers, in effect firming-up the wind generation at the project site.

  5. Wind anisotropy and stellar evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cyril Georgy; Georges Meynet; André Maeder

    2008-07-31

    Mass loss is a determinant factor which strongly affects the evolution and the fate of massive stars. At low metallicity, stars are supposed to rotate faster than at the solar one. This favors the existence of stars near the critical velocity. In this rotation regime, the deformation of the stellar surface becomes important, and wind anisotropy develops. Polar winds are expected to be dominant for fast rotating hot stars. These polar winds allow the star to lose large quantities of mass and still retain a high angular momentum, and they modifie the evolution of the surface velocity and the final angular momentum kept in the star's core. We show here how these winds affect the final stages of massive stars, according to our knowledge about Gamma Ray Bursts. Computation of theoretical Gamma Ray Bursts rate indicates that our models have too fast rotating cores, and that we need to include an additional effect to spin them down. Magnetic fields in stars act in this direction, and we show how they modify the evolution of massive star up to the final stages.

  6. Passively cooled direct drive wind turbine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Costin, Daniel P. (Chelsea, VT)

    2008-03-18

    A wind turbine is provided that passively cools an electrical generator. The wind turbine includes a plurality of fins arranged peripherally around a generator house. Each of the fins being oriented at an angle greater than zero degrees to allow parallel flow of air over the fin. The fin is further tapered to allow a constant portion of the fin to extend beyond the air stream boundary layer. Turbulence initiators on the nose cone further enhance heat transfer at the fins.

  7. Mid-Atlantic Wind - Overcoming the Challenges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel F. Ancona III; Kathryn E. George; Richard P. Bowers; Dr. Lynn Sparling; Bruce Buckheit; Daniel LoBue

    2012-05-31

    This study, supported by the US Department of Energy, Wind Powering America Program, Maryland Department of Natural Resources and Chesapeake Bay Foundation, analyzed barriers to wind energy development in the Mid-Atlantic region along with options for overcoming or mitigating them. The Mid-Atlantic States including Delaware, Maryland, North Carolina and Virginia, have excellent wind energy potential and growing demand for electricity, but only two utility-scale projects have been installed to date. Reasons for this apathetic development of wind resources were analyzed and quantified for four markets. Specific applications are: 1) Appalachian mountain ridgeline sites, 2) on coastal plains and peninsulas, 3) at shallow water sites in Delaware and Chesapeake Bays, Albemarle and Pamlico Sounds, and 4) at deeper water sites off the Atlantic coast. Each market has distinctly different opportunities and barriers. The primary barriers to wind development described in this report can be grouped into four categories; state policy and regulatory issues, wind resource technical uncertainty, economic viability, and public interest in environmental issues. The properties of these typologies are not mutually independent and do interact. The report concluded that there are no insurmountable barriers to land-based wind energy projects and they could be economically viable today. Likewise potential sites in sheltered shallow waters in regional bay and sounds have been largely overlooked but could be viable currently. Offshore ocean-based applications face higher costs and technical and wind resource uncertainties. The ongoing research and development program, revision of state incentive policies, additional wind measurement efforts, transmission system expansion, environmental baseline studies and outreach to private developers and stakeholders are needed to reduce barriers to wind energy development.

  8. Mid-Atlantic Wind - Overcoming the Challenges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel F. Ancona III; Kathryn E. George; Lynn Sparling; Bruce C. Buckheit; Daniel LoBue; and Richard P. Bowers

    2012-06-29

    This study, supported by the US Department of Energy, Wind Powering America Program, Maryland Department of Natural Resources and Chesapeake Bay Foundation, analyzed barriers to wind energy development in the Mid-Atlantic region along with options for overcoming or mitigating them. The Mid-Atlantic States including Delaware, Maryland, North Carolina and Virginia, have excellent wind energy potential and growing demand for electricity, but only two utility-scale projects have been installed to date. Reasons for this apathetic development of wind resources were analyzed and quantified for four markets. Specific applications are: 1) Appalachian mountain ridgeline sites, 2) on coastal plains and peninsulas, 3) at shallow water sites in Delaware and Chesapeake Bays, Albemarle and Pamlico Sounds, and 4) at deeper water sites off the Atlantic coast. Each market has distinctly different opportunities and barriers. The primary barriers to wind development described in this report can be grouped into four categories; state policy and regulatory issues, wind resource technical uncertainty, economic viability, and public interest in environmental issues. The properties of these typologies are not mutually independent and do interact. The report concluded that there are no insurmountable barriers to land-based wind energy projects and they could be economically viable today. Likewise potential sites in sheltered shallow waters in regional bay and sounds have been largely overlooked but could be viable currently. Offshore ocean-based applications face higher costs and technical and wind resource uncertainties. The ongoing research and development program, revision of state incentive policies, additional wind measurement efforts, transmission system expansion, environmental baseline studies and outreach to private developers and stakeholders are needed to reduce barriers to wind energy development.

  9. Understanding Wind Power Costs: The Value of a Comprehensive Approach (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lantz, E.

    2013-05-01

    The evolution and maturity of the wind industry have often been assessed by considering changes in key metrics including capital costs, capacity factor, turbine pricing, and in some cases electricity sales data. However, wind turbines and plants represent a complex system optimization problem and each of these metrics, in isolation, fails to tell the complete story of technological progress and industry advancement. By contrast, the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) provides a more comprehensive and nuanced perspective on industry trends. LCOE can be used to analyze the effect of individual changes (by holding other variables constant) or to understand the complex interactions that might occur for example between turbine costs and productivity. Moreover, LCOE offers a reflection of the total production costs and required revenue for wind plants. This presentation provides examples of how a narrow focus on individual industry metrics can provide inaccurate representations of industry trends while also demonstrating how LCOE captures the array of critical industry variables to provide a greater level of insight.

  10. System-wide emissions implications of increased wind power penetration.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valentino, L.; Valenzuela, V.; Botterud, A.; Zhou, Z.; Conzelmann, G. (Decision and Information Sciences); (Univ. of Illinois, Champaign/Urbana); (Georgia Institute of Technology)

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses the environmental effects of incorporating wind energy into the electric power system. We present a detailed emissions analysis based on comprehensive modeling of power system operations with unit commitment and economic dispatch for different wind penetration levels. First, by minimizing cost, the unit commitment model decides which thermal power plants will be utilized based on a wind power forecast, and then, the economic dispatch model dictates the level of production for each unit as a function of the realized wind power generation. Finally, knowing the power production from each power plant, the emissions are calculated. The emissions model incorporates the effects of both cycling and start-ups of thermal power plants in analyzing emissions from an electric power system with increasing levels of wind power. Our results for the power system in the state of Illinois show significant emissions effects from increased cycling and particularly start-ups of thermal power plants. However, we conclude that as the wind power penetration increases, pollutant emissions decrease overall due to the replacement of fossil fuels.

  11. Wind energy Computerized Maintenance Management System (CMMS) : data collection recommendations for reliability analysis.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, Valerie A.; Ogilvie, Alistair B.

    2012-01-01

    This report addresses the general data requirements for reliability analysis of fielded wind turbines and other wind plant equipment. The report provides a rationale for why this data should be collected, a list of the data needed to support reliability and availability analysis, and specific data recommendations for a Computerized Maintenance Management System (CMMS) to support automated analysis. This data collection recommendations report was written by Sandia National Laboratories to address the general data requirements for reliability analysis of operating wind turbines. This report is intended to help develop a basic understanding of the data needed for reliability analysis from a Computerized Maintenance Management System (CMMS) and other data systems. The report provides a rationale for why this data should be collected, a list of the data needed to support reliability and availability analysis, and specific recommendations for a CMMS to support automated analysis. Though written for reliability analysis of wind turbines, much of the information is applicable to a wider variety of equipment and analysis and reporting needs. The 'Motivation' section of this report provides a rationale for collecting and analyzing field data for reliability analysis. The benefits of this type of effort can include increased energy delivered, decreased operating costs, enhanced preventive maintenance schedules, solutions to issues with the largest payback, and identification of early failure indicators.

  12. Proceedings of the fourth biennial conference and workshop on wind energy conversion systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kottler, R.J. Jr.

    1980-06-01

    Separate abstracts are included for papers presented concerning research and development requirements and utility interface and institutional issues for small-scale systems; design requirements and research and development requirements for large-scale systems; economic and operational requirements of large-scale wind systems; wind characteristics and wind energy siting; international activities; wind energy applications in agriculture; federal commercialization and decentralization plans; and wind energy innovative systems.

  13. Status of Wind-Diesel Applications in Arctic Climates: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baring-Gould, I.; Corbus, D.

    2007-12-01

    The rising cost of diesel fuel and the environmental regulation for its transportation, use, and storage, combined with the clear impacts of increased arctic temperatures, is driving remote communities to examine alternative methods of providing power. Over the past few years, wind energy has been increasingly used to reduce diesel fuel consumption, providing economic, environmental, and security benefits to the energy supply of communities from Alaska to Antarctica. This summary paper describes the current state of wind-diesel systems, reviews the operation of wind-diesel plants in cold climates, discusses current research activities pertaining to these systems, and addresses their technical and commercial challenges. System architectures, dispatch strategies, and operating experience from a variety of wind-diesel systems in Alaska will be reviewed. Specific focus will also be given to the control of power systems with large amounts of wind generation and the complexities of replacing diesel engine waste heat with excess wind energy, a key factor in assessing power plants for retrofit. A brief overview of steps for assessing the viability of retrofitting diesel power systems with wind technologies will also be provided. Because of the large number of isolated diesel minigrids, the market for adding wind to these systems is substantial, specifically in arctic climates and on islands that rely on diesel-only power generation.

  14. Modelling Dynamic Constraints in Electricity Markets and the Costs of Uncertain Wind Output

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Musgens, Felix; Neuhoff, Karsten

    2006-03-14

    define model demand as German demand net of CHP, run off river hydro, expected wind generation and international power exchange. Hourly wind forecasts and realisations are provided by ISET e.V. Generation plant data are taken from EWI’s plant data base... one model region and endogenously determine international power exchange. In addition, the model is directly applicable to many other empirical questions, such as the effect of CO2emission costs on plant dispatch and costs or competitive bench...

  15. Assessment of Mission Design Including Utilization of Libration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barcelona, Universitat de

    Assessment of Mission Design Including Utilization of Libration Points and Weak Stability: The International Sun-Earth Explorer 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 2.1.2 WIND/JWST: Next Generation Space Telescope . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 2.1.9 FIRST/HERSCHEL: Far Infra

  16. Due to decrease in fossil fuel levels, the world is shifting focus towards renewable sources of energy. With an annual average growth rate of 25%, wind is one of the foremost source of harnessing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , with domains including both onshore and offshore wind farms. Unlike most previous works, where wind farms were. As a single wind turbine is insufficient, multiple turbines are installed forming a wind farm. Generally, wind multiple studies centering the influence of weather on such wind farms, but no substantial research focused

  17. Small Wind Electric Systems: An Oregon Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2005-03-01

    Small Wind Electric Systems: An Oregon Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a regional wind resource map and a list of incentives and contacts for more information.

  18. Small Wind Electric Systems: A Maryland Consumer's Guide (Revised)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-08-01

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A Maryland Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a regional wind resource map and a list of incentives and contacts for more information.

  19. Small Wind Electric Systems: A Vermont Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Dell, K.

    2001-10-01

    The Vermont Consumer's Guide for Small Wind Electric Systems provides consumers with enough information to help them determine if a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include: how to make your home more energy efficient, how to choose the right size turbine, the parts of a wind electric system, determining if there is enough wind resource on your site, choosing the best site for your turbine, connecting your system to the utility grid, and if it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a state wind resource map and a list of state incentives and state contacts for more information.

  20. Gansu Xinhui Wind Power | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Xinhui Wind Power Jump to: navigation, search Name: Gansu Xinhui Wind Power Place: China Sector: Wind energy Product: China-based joint venture engaged in developing wind projects....

  1. Wind Tunnel Building - 3 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2005-06-30

    1 Energy Systems Laboratory 1 A METHODOLOGY FOR CALCULATING EMISSIONS REDUCTIONS FROM RENEWABLE ENERGY PROGRAMS AND ITS APPLICATION TO THE WIND FARMS IN THE TEXAS ERCOT REGION Zi Liu, Jeff Haberl, Juan-Carlos Baltazar, Kris Subbarao, Charles... on Sweetwater I Wind Farm Capacity Factor Analysis Application to All Wind Farms Uncertainty Analysis Emissions Reduction Summary Energy Systems Laboratory 3 SUMMARYEMISSIONS REDUCTION UNCERTAINTY ANALYSIS APPLICATIONMETHODOLOGYINTRODUCTION Background...

  2. 2012 Market Report on Wind Technologies in Distributed Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orrell, Alice C.

    2013-08-01

    An annual report on U.S. wind power in distributed applications – expanded to include small, mid-size, and utility-scale installations – including key statistics, economic data, installation, capacity, and generation statistics, and more.

  3. Wind Vision: Updating the DOE 20% Wind Energy by 2030 Report (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baring-Gould, E. I.

    2014-04-01

    The 20% Wind Energy by 2030 report was developed as part of the Advanced Energy Initiative. Published in 2008, the report was largely based on information collected and analyzed in 2006. Much has changed since then, including shifts in technology, markets, and policy. The industry needs a new, clear, vision for wind power that is shared among stakeholders from the U.S. government, industry, academia, and NGO communities. At WINDPOWER 2013, the U.S. Department of Energy, in partnership with the American Wind Energy Association and the Wind Energy Foundation, launched a project to update the 20% report with new objectives. This conference poster outlines the elements of the new Wind Vision.

  4. Wind Energy and Spatial Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schweik, Charles M.

    2/3/2011 1 Wind Energy and Spatial Technology Lori Pelech Why Wind Energy? A clean, renewable 2,600 tons of carbon emissions annually ­ The economy · Approximately 85,000 wind energy workers to Construct a Wind Farm... Geo-Spatial Components of Wind Farm Development Process Selecting a Project Site

  5. Module Handbook Specialisation Wind Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Habel, Annegret

    Module Handbook Specialisation Wind Energy 2nd Semester for the Master Programme REMA/EUREC Course 2008/2009 NTU Athens Specialisation Provider: Wind Energy #12;Specialisation Wind Energy, NTU Athens, 2nd Semester Module 1/Wind Energy: Wind potential, Aerodynamics & Loading

  6. Wind Engineering & Natural Disaster Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lennard, William N.

    Wind Engineering & Natural Disaster Mitigation For more than 45 years, Western University has been internationally recognized as the leading university for wind engineering and wind- related research. Its of environmental disaster mitigation, with specific strengths in wind and earthquake research. Boundary Layer Wind

  7. Accelerating Offshore Wind Development

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Today the Energy Department announced investments in seven offshore wind demonstration projects. Check out our map to see where these projects will be located.

  8. Talkin’ Bout Wind Generation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The amount of electricity generated by the wind industry started to grow back around 1999, and since 2007 has been increasing at a rapid pace.

  9. DOE Offers Conditional Commitment to Cape Wind Offshore Wind...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    step toward issuing a 150 million loan guarantee to support the construction of the Cape Wind offshore wind project with a conditional commitment to Cape Wind Associates, LLC. The...

  10. Wind Power Today, 2010, Wind and Water Power Program (WWPP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-05-01

    Wind Power Today is an annual publication that provides an overview of the wind energy research conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy Wind and Water Power Program.

  11. Wind Powering America's Wind for Schools Team Honored with Wirth...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Powering America's Wind for Schools Team Honored with Wirth Chair Award Wind Powering America's Wind for Schools Team Honored with Wirth Chair Award May 1, 2012 - 2:46pm Addthis...

  12. Wind turbine having a direct-drive drivetrain

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bevington, Christopher M.; Bywaters, Garrett L.; Coleman, Clint C.; Costin, Daniel P.; Danforth, William L.; Lynch, Jonathan A.; Rolland, Robert H.

    2008-10-07

    A wind turbine (100) comprising an electrical generator (108) that includes a rotor assembly (112). A wind rotor (104) that includes a wind rotor hub (124) is directly coupled to the rotor assembly via a simplified connection. The wind rotor and generator rotor assembly are rotatably mounted on a central spindle (160) via a bearing assembly (180). The wind rotor hub includes an opening (244) having a diameter larger than the outside diameter of the central spindle adjacent the bearing assembly so as to allow access to the bearing assembly from a cavity (380) inside the wind rotor hub. The spindle is attached to a turret (140) supported by a tower (136). Each of the spindle, turret and tower has an interior cavity (172, 176, 368) that permits personnel to traverse therethrough to the cavity of the wind rotor hub. The wind turbine further includes a frictional braking system (276) for slowing, stopping or keeping stopped the rotation of the wind rotor and rotor assembly.

  13. Tutorial of Wind Turbine Control for Supporting Grid Frequency through Active Power Control: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aho, J.; Buckspan, A.; Laks, J.; Fleming, P.; Jeong, Y.; Dunne, F.; Churchfield, M.; Pao, L.; Johnson, K.

    2012-03-01

    As wind energy becomes a larger portion of the world's energy portfolio and wind turbines become larger and more expensive, wind turbine control systems play an ever more prominent role in the design and deployment of wind turbines. The goals of traditional wind turbine control systems are maximizing energy production while protecting the wind turbine components. As more wind generation is installed there is an increasing interest in wind turbines actively controlling their power output in order to meet power setpoints and to participate in frequency regulation for the utility grid. This capability will be beneficial for grid operators, as it seems possible that wind turbines can be more effective at providing some of these services than traditional power plants. Furthermore, establishing an ancillary market for such regulation can be beneficial for wind plant owner/operators and manufacturers that provide such services. In this tutorial paper we provide an overview of basic wind turbine control systems and highlight recent industry trends and research in wind turbine control systems for grid integration and frequency stability.

  14. NANA Wind Resource Assessment Program Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jay Hermanson

    2010-09-23

    NANA Regional Corporation (NRC) of northwest Alaska is located in an area with abundant wind energy resources. In 2007, NRC was awarded grant DE-FG36-07GO17076 by the US Department of Energy's Tribal Energy Program for funding a Wind Resource Assessment Project (WRAP) for the NANA region. The NANA region, including Kotzebue Electric Association (KEA) and Alaska Village Electric Cooperative (AVEC) have been national leaders at developing, designing, building, and operating wind-diesel hybrid systems in Kotzebue (starting in 1996) and Selawik (2002). Promising sites for the development of new wind energy projects in the region have been identified by the WRAP, including Buckland, Deering, and the Kivalina/Red Dog Mine Port Area. Ambler, Shungnak, Kobuk, Kiana, Noorvik & Noatak were determined to have poor wind resources at sites in or very near each community. However, all five of these communities may have better wind resources atop hills or at sites with slightly higher elevations several miles away.

  15. Wind Turbine Manufacturing Process Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waseem Faidi; Chris Nafis; Shatil Sinha; Chandra Yerramalli; Anthony Waas; Suresh Advani; John Gangloff; Pavel Simacek

    2012-04-26

    To develop a practical inline inspection that could be used in combination with automated composite material placement equipment to economically manufacture high performance and reliable carbon composite wind turbine blade spar caps. The approach technical feasibility and cost benefit will be assessed to provide a solid basis for further development and implementation in the wind turbine industry. The program is focused on the following technology development: (1) Develop in-line monitoring methods, using optical metrology and ultrasound inspection, and perform a demonstration in the lab. This includes development of the approach and performing appropriate demonstration in the lab; (2) Develop methods to predict composite strength reduction due to defects; and (3) Develop process models to predict defects from leading indicators found in the uncured composites.

  16. Load attenuating passively adaptive wind turbine blade

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Veers, Paul S.; Lobitz, Donald W.

    2003-01-07

    A method and apparatus for improving wind turbine performance by alleviating loads and controlling the rotor. The invention employs the use of a passively adaptive blade that senses the wind velocity or rotational speed, and accordingly modifies its aerodynamic configuration. The invention exploits the load mitigation prospects of a blade that twists toward feather as it bends. The invention includes passively adaptive wind turbine rotors or blades with currently preferred power control features. The apparatus is a composite fiber horizontal axis wind-turbine blade, in which a substantial majority of fibers in the blade skin are inclined at angles of between 15 and 30 degrees to the axis of the blade, to produces passive adaptive aeroelastic tailoring (bend-twist coupling) to alleviate loading without unduly jeopardizing performance.

  17. Load attenuating passively adaptive wind turbine blade

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Veers, Paul S. (Albuquerque, NM); Lobitz, Donald W. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2003-01-01

    A method and apparatus for improving wind turbine performance by alleviating loads and controlling the rotor. The invention employs the use of a passively adaptive blade that senses the wind velocity or rotational speed, and accordingly modifies its aerodynamic configuration. The invention exploits the load mitigation prospects of a blade that twists toward feather as it bends. The invention includes passively adaptive wind turbine rotors or blades with currently preferred power control features. The apparatus is a composite fiber horizontal axis wind-turbine blade, in which a substantial majority of fibers in the blade skin are inclined at angles of between 15 and 30 degrees to the axis of the blade, to produces passive adaptive aeroelastic tailoring (bend-twist coupling) to alleviate loading without unduly jeopardizing performance.

  18. Appendix I3-1 to Wind HUI Initiative 1: AWST-WindNET-Phase 1 Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Zack

    2012-07-15

    This report is an appendix to the Hawaii WindHUI efforts to develop and operationalize short-term wind forecasting and wind ramp event forecasting capabilities. The report summarizes the WindNET Phase 1 efforts on the Big Island of Hawaii and includes descriptions of modeling methodologies, use of field validation data, results and recommendations. The objective of the WindNET project was to investigate the improvement that could be obtained in short-term wind power forecasting for wind generation facilities operating on the island grids operated by Hawaiian Electric Companies through the use of atmospheric sensors deployed at targeted locations. WindNET is envisioned as a multiphase project that will address the short-term wind forecasting issues of all of the wind generation facilities on the all of the Hawaiian Electric Companies' island grid systems. The first phase of the WindNET effort (referred to as WindNET-1) was focused on the wind generation facilities on the Big Island of Hawaii. With complex terrain and marine environment, emphasis was on improving the 0 to 6 hour forecasts of wind power ramps and periods of wind variability, with a particular interest in the intra-hour (0-1 hour) look-ahead period. The WindNET project was built upon a foundation that was constructed with the results from a previously completed observation targeting study for the Big Island that was conducted as part of a project supported by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and interactions with the western utilities. The observational targeting study provided guidance on which variables to measure and at what locations to get the most improvement in forecast performance at a target forecast site. The recommendations of the observation targeting study were based on the application two techniques: (1) an objective method called ensemble sensitivity analysis (ESA) (Ancell and Hakim, 2007; Torn and Hakim, 2008; Zack et al, 2010); and (2) a subjective method based on a diagnostic analysis of large ramp events. The analysis was completed for both the wind farm on the southern tip of the Big Island and on the northern tip of the island. The WindNET project was designed to also deploy sensors to validate the Big Island observational targeting study and enhance operator's understanding of predominate causes of wind variability conditions at the wind facilities. Compromises had to be made with the results from the observation targeting study to accommodate project resource limitations, availability of suitable sites, and other factors. To focus efforts, field sensor deployment activities focused on the wind facility on the southern point of Big Island.

  19. Irregular wave runup and overtopping of revetments in the presence of wind 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cinotto, Charles Matthew

    1998-01-01

    not include the effects of strong onshore winds associated with the storms considered in the design conditions. The present study attempts to quantify the effects of onshore wind on irregular wave sunup heights and overtopping rates on revetments for various...

  20. A drone's-eye view of a wind turbine | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the innovative ecoROTR wind turbine in a drone GE spent a week flying state-of-the-art drones over and around some of our biggest machines, including the ecoROTR experimental wind...

  1. Directing all emergency activities including evacuation of personnel.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Eric E.

    for employees who perform or shut down critical plant operations. · Systems to account for all employees after· Directing all emergency activities including evacuation of personnel. · Ensuring that outside emergency services are notified when necessary. · Directing the shutdown of plant operations when necessary

  2. Radar-cross-section reduction of wind turbines. part 1.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brock, Billy C.; Loui, Hung; McDonald, Jacob J.; Paquette, Joshua A.; Calkins, David A.; Miller, William K.; Allen, Steven E.; Clem, Paul Gilbert; Patitz, Ward E.

    2012-03-05

    In recent years, increasing deployment of large wind-turbine farms has become an issue of growing concern for the radar community. The large radar cross section (RCS) presented by wind turbines interferes with radar operation, and the Doppler shift caused by blade rotation causes problems identifying and tracking moving targets. Each new wind-turbine farm installation must be carefully evaluated for potential disruption of radar operation for air defense, air traffic control, weather sensing, and other applications. Several approaches currently exist to minimize conflict between wind-turbine farms and radar installations, including procedural adjustments, radar upgrades, and proper choice of low-impact wind-farm sites, but each has problems with limited effectiveness or prohibitive cost. An alternative approach, heretofore not technically feasible, is to reduce the RCS of wind turbines to the extent that they can be installed near existing radar installations. This report summarizes efforts to reduce wind-turbine RCS, with a particular emphasis on the blades. The report begins with a survey of the wind-turbine RCS-reduction literature to establish a baseline for comparison. The following topics are then addressed: electromagnetic model development and validation, novel material development, integration into wind-turbine fabrication processes, integrated-absorber design, and wind-turbine RCS modeling. Related topics of interest, including alternative mitigation techniques (procedural, at-the-radar, etc.), an introduction to RCS and electromagnetic scattering, and RCS-reduction modeling techniques, can be found in a previous report.

  3. Community Wind Handbook/Understand Your Wind Resource and Conduct...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Community Wind HandbookUnderstand Your Wind Resource and Conduct a Preliminary Estimate < Community...

  4. American Wind Energy Association Wind Energy Finance and Investment Seminar

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The American Wind Energy Association Wind Energy Finance and Investment Seminar will be attended by representatives in the financial sector, businesses, bankers, government and other nonprofit...

  5. Public Acceptance of Wind: Foundational Study Near US Wind Facilities

    Wind Powering America (EERE)

    Group * Energy Analysis and Environmental Impacts Department Public Acceptance of Wind Power Ben Hoen Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory WindExchange Webinar June 17, 2015...

  6. 20% Wind Energy by 2030: Increasing Wind Energy's Contribution...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Supply (Executive Summary) 20% Wind Energy by 2030: Increasing Wind Energy's Contribution to U.S. Electricity Supply (Executive Summary) Executive summary of a report on the...

  7. WINS. Market Simulation Tool for Facilitating Wind Energy Integration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shahidehpour, Mohammad

    2012-10-30

    Integrating 20% or more wind energy into the system and transmitting large sums of wind energy over long distances will require a decision making capability that can handle very large scale power systems with tens of thousands of buses and lines. There is a need to explore innovative analytical and implementation solutions for continuing reliable operations with the most economical integration of additional wind energy in power systems. A number of wind integration solution paths involve the adoption of new operating policies, dynamic scheduling of wind power across interties, pooling integration services, and adopting new transmission scheduling practices. Such practices can be examined by the decision tool developed by this project. This project developed a very efficient decision tool called Wind INtegration Simulator (WINS) and applied WINS to facilitate wind energy integration studies. WINS focused on augmenting the existing power utility capabilities to support collaborative planning, analysis, and wind integration project implementations. WINS also had the capability of simulating energy storage facilities so that feasibility studies of integrated wind energy system applications can be performed for systems with high wind energy penetrations. The development of WINS represents a major expansion of a very efficient decision tool called POwer Market Simulator (POMS), which was developed by IIT and has been used extensively for power system studies for decades. Specifically, WINS provides the following superiorities; (1) An integrated framework is included in WINS for the comprehensive modeling of DC transmission configurations, including mono-pole, bi-pole, tri-pole, back-to-back, and multi-terminal connection, as well as AC/DC converter models including current source converters (CSC) and voltage source converters (VSC); (2) An existing shortcoming of traditional decision tools for wind integration is the limited availability of user interface, i.e., decision results are often text-based demonstrations. WINS includes a powerful visualization tool and user interface capability for transmission analyses, planning, and assessment, which will be of great interest to power market participants, power system planners and operators, and state and federal regulatory entities; and (3) WINS can handle extended transmission models for wind integration studies. WINS models include limitations on transmission flow as well as bus voltage for analyzing power system states. The existing decision tools often consider transmission flow constraints (dc power flow) alone which could result in the over-utilization of existing resources when analyzing wind integration. WINS can be used to assist power market participants including transmission companies, independent system operators, power system operators in vertically integrated utilities, wind energy developers, and regulatory agencies to analyze economics, security, and reliability of various options for wind integration including transmission upgrades and the planning of new transmission facilities. WINS can also be used by industry for the offline training of reliability and operation personnel when analyzing wind integration uncertainties, identifying critical spots in power system operation, analyzing power system vulnerabilities, and providing credible decisions for examining operation and planning options for wind integration. Researches in this project on wind integration included (1) Development of WINS; (2) Transmission Congestion Analysis in the Eastern Interconnection; (3) Analysis of 2030 Large-Scale Wind Energy Integration in the Eastern Interconnection; (4) Large-scale Analysis of 2018 Wind Energy Integration in the Eastern U.S. Interconnection. The research resulted in 33 papers, 9 presentations, 9 PhD degrees, 4 MS degrees, and 7 awards. The education activities in this project on wind energy included (1) Wind Energy Training Facility Development; (2) Wind Energy Course Development.

  8. 2009 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2010-01-01

    al. 2010. Large-scale Offshore Wind for the United States:examined land-based and offshore wind energy in the Easternassistance with the offshore wind energy discussion; Donna

  9. 2011 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2013-01-01

    with the section on offshore wind; Donna Heimiller and Billythe end of 2011, global offshore wind power capacity stoodEnergy's investments in offshore wind R&D. Interest exists

  10. 2009 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2010-01-01

    al. 2010. Large-scale Offshore Wind for the United States:assistance with the offshore wind energy discussion; DonnaTechnologies Market Report Offshore Wind Power Project and

  11. Wind Farms in North America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoen, Ben

    2014-01-01

    Economic Analysis of a Wind Farm in Nantucket Sound. BeaconP. and Mueller, A. (2010) Wind Farm Announcements and RuralProposed Rail Splitter Wind Farm. Prepared for Hinshaw &

  12. 2011 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Public Service Wind Integration Cost Impact Study. Preparedused to estimate wind integration costs and the ability toColorado 2 GW and 3 GW Wind Integration Cost Study. Denver,

  13. 2009 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2010-01-01

    balancing areas, the use of wind forecasts, and intra-hourchallenges and costs. Wind forecasts are most accurate andare the cost of day-ahead wind forecast error; the remaining

  14. 2011 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2013-01-01

    of wind power capacity in that state) because generatorsgenerators to provide the needed flexibility to integrate wind power.wind power forecasts by system operators can significantly reduce integration challenges and costs. Intra-hour transmission scheduling and generator

  15. 2009 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2010-01-01

    AWEA). 2010b. AWEA Small Wind Turbine Global Market Survey,html David, A. 2009. Wind Turbines: Industry and Tradewhich new large-scale wind turbines were installed in 2009 (

  16. 2009 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2010-01-01

    AWEA’s Wind Energy Weekly, DOE/EPRI’s Turbine Verification10% Wind Energy Penetration New large-scale 10 wind turbineswind energy became more challenging, orders for new turbines

  17. Fort Carson Wind Resource Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robichaud, R.

    2012-10-01

    This report focuses on the wind resource assessment, the estimated energy production of wind turbines, and economic potential of a wind turbine project on a ridge in the southeastern portion of the Fort Carson Army base.

  18. 2011 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Associates. 2010. SPP WITF Wind Integration Study. LittlePool. David, A. 2011. U.S. Wind Turbine Trade in a Changing2011. David, A. 2010. Impact of Wind Energy Installations on

  19. 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2012-01-01

    ET2/TL-08-1474. May 19, 2010 Wind Technologies Market ReportAssociates. 2010. SPP WITF Wind Integration Study. Little10, 2010. David, A. 2009. Wind Turbines: Industry and Trade

  20. The Western Wind and Solar Integration Study Phase 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lew, Debra; Brinkman, Greg; Ibanez, E.; Florita, A.; Heaney, M.; Hodge, B. -M.; Hummon, M.; Stark, G.; King, J.; Lefton, S. A.; Kumar, N.; Agan, D.; Jordan, G.; Venkataraman, S.

    2013-09-01

    The electric grid is a highly complex, interconnected machine, and changing one part of the grid can have consequences elsewhere. Adding wind and solar affects the operation of the other power plants and adding high penetrations can induce cycling of fossil-fueled generators. Cycling leads to wear-and-tear costs and changes in emissions. Phase 2 of the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study (WWSIS-2) evaluated these costs and emissions and simulated grid operations for a year to investigate the detailed impact of wind and solar on the fossil-fueled fleet. This built on Phase 1, one of the largest wind and solar integration studies ever conducted, which examined operational impacts of high wind and solar penetrations in the West(GE Energy 2010).