Sample records for including residual asphaltic

  1. Asphalt landscape after all : residual suburban surface as public infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Connor, Joseph Michael, M. Arch. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The thesis proposes a hybridized commercial retail strip inserted into a residual suburban condition as a manner of investigating the latent potential of suburban logic, both its constituent elements and its formal rules ...

  2. Chip Seals for Asphalt Concrete Pavements: A Proposed Emulsion Residue Specification and Existing Pavement Texture Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoyt, Denise

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Chip seals are a pavement surface treatment used for maintaining asphalt concrete pavements. National Cooperative Highway Research Program (NCHRP) Project 14-17 was performed to produce a national Chip Seal Manual which would consolidate the best...

  3. asphalt concrete pavement: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    this thesis. It included the following tasks: investigation of a testing and grading system for grading asphalt binder residues... Hoyt, Denise 2012-07-16 8 Full-Depth Pavement...

  4. asphaltic concrete pavement: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    this thesis. It included the following tasks: investigation of a testing and grading system for grading asphalt binder residues... Hoyt, Denise 2012-07-16 8 Full-Depth Pavement...

  5. asphalt concrete pavements: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    this thesis. It included the following tasks: investigation of a testing and grading system for grading asphalt binder residues... Hoyt, Denise 2012-07-16 8 Full-Depth Pavement...

  6. asphaltic concrete pavements: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    this thesis. It included the following tasks: investigation of a testing and grading system for grading asphalt binder residues... Hoyt, Denise 2012-07-16 8 Full-Depth Pavement...

  7. Aged asphalt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Kenneth Lloyd

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dorchester Asphalts Exxon Asphalts CONCLUSIONS RECOMMENDATIONS LITERATURE CITED APPENDIX 41 42 48 59 70 84 90 93 96 99 103 105 106 A. GEL PERMEATION CHROMATOGRAMS OF TEST ASPHALTS 108 B. FOURIER-TRANSFORM INFRARED SPECTRUMS OF TEST... Apparatus 5. Abson Method Apparatus 6. ASTM D 2171 Apparatus 7. Sample Pellet Die 8. Sample Pellet Holder 21 23 27 29 38 40 9. GPC of Lufkin Exxon AC-20 Extracted by Two Methods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 10. GPC of Dickens Exxon AC-20 51...

  8. Rapid determination of actinides in asphalt samples

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Maxwell, Sherrod L.; Culligan, Brian K.; Hutchison, Jay B.

    2014-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A new rapid method for the determination of actinides in asphalt samples has been developed that can be used in emergency response situations or for routine analysis If a radiological dispersive device (RDD), Improvised Nuclear Device (IND) or a nuclear accident such as the accident at the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant in March, 2011 occurs, there will be an urgent need for rapid analyses of many different environmental matrices, including asphalt materials, to support dose mitigation and environmental clean up. The new method for the determination of actinides in asphalt utilizes a rapid furnace step to destroy bitumen and organicsmore »present in the asphalt and sodium hydroxide fusion to digest the remaining sample. Sample preconcentration steps are used to collect the actinides and a new stacked TRU Resin + DGA Resin column method is employed to separate the actinide isotopes in the asphalt samples. The TRU Resin plus DGA Resin separation approach, which allows sequential separation of plutonium, uranium, americium and curium isotopes in asphalt samples, can be applied to soil samples as well.« less

  9. Rapid determination of actinides in asphalt samples

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Maxwell, Sherrod L.; Culligan, Brian K.; Hutchison, Jay B.

    2014-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A new rapid method for the determination of actinides in asphalt samples has been developed that can be used in emergency response situations or for routine analysis If a radiological dispersive device (RDD), Improvised Nuclear Device (IND) or a nuclear accident such as the accident at the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant in March, 2011 occurs, there will be an urgent need for rapid analyses of many different environmental matrices, including asphalt materials, to support dose mitigation and environmental clean up. The new method for the determination of actinides in asphalt utilizes a rapid furnace step to destroy bitumen and organics present in the asphalt and sodium hydroxide fusion to digest the remaining sample. Sample preconcentration steps are used to collect the actinides and a new stacked TRU Resin + DGA Resin column method is employed to separate the actinide isotopes in the asphalt samples. The TRU Resin plus DGA Resin separation approach, which allows sequential separation of plutonium, uranium, americium and curium isotopes in asphalt samples, can be applied to soil samples as well.

  10. Asphalt Oxidation Kinetics and Pavement Oxidation Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jin, Xin

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Most paved roads in the United States are surfaced with asphalt. These asphalt pavements suffer from fatigue cracking and thermal cracking, aggravated by the oxidation and hardening of asphalt. This negative impact of asphalt oxidation on pavement...

  11. Use of recycled chunk rubber asphalt concrete (CRAC) on low volume roads and use of recycled crumb rubber modifier in asphalt pavements. Final report, June 1993-June 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hossain, M.; Funk, L.P.; Sadeq, M.A.; Marucci, G.

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The major objective of this project was to formulate a Chunk Rubber Asphalt Concrete (CRAC) mix for use on low volume roads. CRAC is a rubber modified asphalt concrete product produced by the `dry process` where rubber chunks of 1/2 inch size are used as aggregate in a cold mix with a type C fly ash. The second objective of this project was to develop guidelines concerning the use of rubber modified asphalt concrete hot mix to include: (1) Design methods for use of asphalt-rubber mix for new construction and overlay, (2) Mix design method for asphalt-rubber, and (3) Test method for determining the amount of rubber in an asphalt-rubber concrete for quality control purposes.

  12. asphalt: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    asphalt pavements containing asphalt binder and aggregates. The use of RAP can reduce the cost of construction materials, reduce the amount of waste... Thakur, Jitendra Kumar...

  13. asphalts: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    asphalt pavements containing asphalt binder and aggregates. The use of RAP can reduce the cost of construction materials, reduce the amount of waste... Thakur, Jitendra Kumar...

  14. Tertiary nitrogen heterocyclic material to reduce moisture-induced damage in asphalt-aggregate mixtures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Plancher, Henry (Laramie, WY); Petersen, Joseph C. (Laramie, WY)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Asphalt-aggregate roads crack when subjected to freezing and thawing cycles. Herein, the useful life of asphalts are substantially improved by a minor amount of a moisture damage inhibiting agent selected from compounds having a pyridine moiety, including acid salts of such compounds. A shale oil fraction may serve as the source of the improving agent and may simply be blended with conventional petroleum asphalts.

  15. BBR Asphalt mixture creep test BBR Asphalt mixture creep size effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    #12;Outline ŘBBR Asphalt mixture creep test ŘBBR Asphalt mixture creep size effect ŘBBR Asphalt Point Bending Test Low temperature 3-point bending creep tests on specimens with three different sizes mixture strength test ŘBBR Asphalt binder strength test #12;Asphalt Pavements ŘRecent efforts under NCHRP

  16. The use of HPGPC for determination of MWD of asphalt cement - A spectrophotometric vs. gravimetric finish

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bishara, S.W.; McReynolds, R.L. (Kansas Dept. of Transportation, Topeka (United States))

    1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A comparison between spectrophotometric and gravimetric methods to study MWD of asphalt is presented. Spectrophotometry suffers from not detecting saturated compounds, as well as from variation of molar absorptivity during analysis. To address these shortcoming, the whole asphalt sample is fractionated, and the relative molar absorptivity determined for each fraction. Using another sample weight of the whole asphalt, the saturates are separated, and injected to get their MWD using refractive index detection. This information, when used to mathematically treat the whole asphalt distribution data, can correct the latter to include saturates as well, but can only partially account for continuous variation of the molar absorptivity.

  17. Asphalt Pavement Aging and Temperature Dependent Properties through a Functionally

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paulino, Glaucio H.

    Asphalt Pavement Aging and Temperature Dependent Properties through a Functionally Graded ­ II ­ Asphalt Pavements ­ Effect of Aging ­ Simulations ­ Concluding Remarks #12;3 Objectives Develop) Correspondence Principle based formulation Application: Asphalt concrete pavements (Part II) #12;4 Asphalt

  18. #include #include

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campbell, Andrew T.

    process #12;#include #include pid_t pid = fork(); if (pid () failed */ } else if (pid == 0) { /* parent process */ } else { /* child process */ } #12;thread #12

  19. Life Cycle Assessment of Reclaimed Asphalt Pavement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Life Cycle Assessment of Reclaimed Asphalt Pavement to Improve Asphalt Pavement Sustainability By Pavement (RAP) Courtesy of http://myconstructionphotos.smugmug.com/ RAP #12;Transport Back to the Plant-melt old binder on the RAP #12;Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) · #12;Asphalt Pavement Life Cycle Road

  20. State of the practice: Design and construction of asphalt paving materials with crumb-rubber modifier. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heitzman, M.A.

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The document is a comprehensive overview of the terminology, processes, products, and applications of crumb rubber modifier (CRM) technology. The technology includes any use of scrap tire rubber in asphalt paving materials. In general, CRM technology can be divided into two categories--the wet process and the dry process. When CRM is incorporated into an asphalt paving material, it will modify the properties of the binder (asphalt rubber) and/or act as a rubber aggregate (rubber modified hot mix asphalt). The five concepts for using CRM discussed in the report are McDonald, PlusRide, generic dry, chunk rubber asphalt concrete, and continuous blending asphalt rubber. There are two principal unresolved engineering issues related to the use of CRM in asphalt paving materials. On the national level, the ability to recycle asphalt paving mixes containing CRM has not been demonstrated. At the State and local levels, these modified asphalt mixes must be field evaluated to establish expected levels of performance. The appendices provide guidelines for material specifications, mix design, and construction specifications. An experimental work plan for monitoring performance and a stack emission testing program are also included.

  1. #include #include

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poinsot, Laurent

    #include #include //Rappels : "getpid()" permet d'obtenir son propre pid // "getppid()" renvoie le pid du père d'un processus int main (void) { pid_t pid_fils; pid_fils = fork(); if(pid_fils==-1) { printf("Erreur de création du processus fils\

  2. Recycled tire rubber and other waste materials in asphalt mixtures. Transportation research record

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The papers in this volume, dealing with various facets of recycled tire rubber and other waste materials in asphalt mixtures, should be of interest to state and local construction, design, materials, and research engineers as well as contractors and material producers. In the first papers, Rebala and Estakhri, Malpass and Khosla, and Baker and Connolly describe research related to crumb rubber modified mixtures that was done for the Texas, North Carolina, and New Jersey State Departments of Transportation. Ali et al. report on their research in Canada to determine the feasibility of sing reclaimed roofing materials in hot mix asphalt pavement. Emery discusses the evaluation of 11 Ontario rubber modified demonstration projects in terms of pavement performance, environmental impacts, and recyclability. In the last paper, Fwa and Aziz report on their work in Singapore related to the use of incinerator residue in asphalt mixtures.

  3. Asphalt deposition in miscible floods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasan, Syed Mir Ahmed

    1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    : Petroleum Engineering ASPHALT DEPOSITION IN MISCIBLE FLOODS A Thesis By SYED MIR AHMED HASAN Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) ommittee Member) Committee Member) Head of Department), (Co 'ttee Member) January, f964... Subject: Petroleum Engineering TABLE OF CONTENTS ABS TRAC T. Page 2. INTRODUCTION. 3 DESCRIPTION OF EQUIPMENT AND MATERIALS. . . . . , . 6 4. EXPERIMENTAL PROCEDURE 5. INTERPRETATION AND DISCUSSION OF RESULTS. . . . . . 13 6. CONCLUSIONS. 7...

  4. Winter Performance and Maintenance of Porous Asphalt Pavements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Concrete (HSG-B)Porous Asphalt (HSG-C) #12;Cold Climate Performance Results #12;12 Porous Asphalt SurfaceWinter Performance and Maintenance of Porous Asphalt Pavements Robert M. Roseen, Ph.D., P.E., D impacts for new development and reverse impacts in areas with redevelopment. #12;Porous Asphalt Design

  5. Compatibilizer for crumb rubber modified asphalt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Labib, M.E. [New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, NJ (United States); Memon, G.M.; Chollar, B.H. [Federal Highway Administration, McLean, VA (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States of America discards more than 300 million tires each year, and out of that a large fraction of the tires is dumped into stock piles. This large quantity of tires creates an environmental problem. The use of scrap tires is limited. There is a usage potential in such fields as fuel for combustion and Crumb Rubber-Modified Asphalt binder (CRMA). The use of crumb rubber in modifying asphalt is not a new technique; it is been used since early 1960 by pavement engineers. Crumb rubber is a composite of different blends of natural and synthetic rubber (natural rubber, processing oils, polybutadiene, polystyrene butadiene, and filler). Prior research had concluded that the performance of crumb rubber modified asphalt is asphalt dependent. In some cases it improves the Theological properties and in some cases it degrades the properties of modified asphalt.

  6. Materials characterization of asphalt and polymer modified asphalt 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paramasivam, Mohan

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    specimen mold made of aluminum ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? - 28 5. Strain sweep of Santa Maria AC10/AR4000 at 100 rad/sec --- 33 6. Strain sweep of Conoco AC10 at 10 rad/sec ------------- 34 7. Stress relaxation modulus of AAM grade asphalt at 25'C --- 37 8.... The verification of Cox-Merz rule for Santa Maria AC6/AR2000 at 40'C- 9. The master curve of Santa Maria AC6/Muehlstein LDPE shifted to 25'C showing the errors 10. Master curve (G') of Santa Maria AC6 shifted to 25'C ? ? ? ? ? 43 11. Master curve of Santa...

  7. Materials characterization of asphalt and polymer modified asphalt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paramasivam, Mohan

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    specimen mold made of aluminum ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? - 28 5. Strain sweep of Santa Maria AC10/AR4000 at 100 rad/sec --- 33 6. Strain sweep of Conoco AC10 at 10 rad/sec ------------- 34 7. Stress relaxation modulus of AAM grade asphalt at 25'C --- 37 8.... The verification of Cox-Merz rule for Santa Maria AC6/AR2000 at 40'C- 9. The master curve of Santa Maria AC6/Muehlstein LDPE shifted to 25'C showing the errors 10. Master curve (G') of Santa Maria AC6 shifted to 25'C ? ? ? ? ? 43 11. Master curve of Santa...

  8. Integrated coke, asphalt and jet fuel production process and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shang, Jer Y. (McLean, VA)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process and apparatus for the production of coke, asphalt and jet fuel m a feed of fossil fuels containing volatile carbon compounds therein is disclosed. The process includes the steps of pyrolyzing the feed in an entrained bed pyrolyzing means, separating the volatile pyrolysis products from the solid pyrolysis products removing at least one coke from the solid pyrolysis products, fractionating the volatile pyrolysis products to produce an overhead stream and a bottom stream which is useful as asphalt for road pavement, condensing the overhead stream to produce a condensed liquid fraction and a noncondensable, gaseous fraction, and removing water from the condensed liquid fraction to produce a jet fuel-containing product. The disclosed apparatus is useful for practicing the foregoing process. the process provides a useful method of mass producing and jet fuels from materials such as coal, oil shale and tar sands.

  9. Mirzahosseini et. al. ANN-Based Prediction Model for Rutting Propensity of Asphalt Mixtures1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Thomas

    in a repeated load permanent deformation test.21 Dynamic creep test is one of the best tools for assessing of load cycles is the most23 important output of the dynamic creep test. This curve includes primary based on volumetric proportioning of the asphalt mixture. This method does16 not include any direct test

  10. TECHNICAL POLLUTION PREVENTION GUIDE FOR ASPHALT PREPARATION OPERATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delivery, Storage and Cold Feed . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 2.3.2 Liquid Asphalt Delivery, Storage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 2 INDUSTRY PROFILE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 2.1 ASPHALT and Heating . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 2.3.3 Cold Feed Drying and Heating

  11. An investigation of the use of tire rubber in asphalt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koo, Heamo Lee

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -rubber binder. The selected variables chosen are curing time, curing temperature, rubber content (weight percent), rubber particle size, base asphalt type, and carbonyl area. Results confirmed that the addition of rubber increased the viscosity of the asphalt...

  12. asphalt composition aplicacao: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Warm mix asphalt (WMA) is not a hot mix asphalt (HMA), it's just warm mix The WMA production temperature typically ranges from 100 to 140o C, whereas for HMA it ranges Das,...

  13. Moisture Diffusion in Asphalt Binders and Fine Aggregate Mixtures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vasconcelos, Kamilla L.

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    cost in highway maintenance and vehicle operations. One key mechanism of how moisture reaches the asphalt-aggregate interface is by its permeation or diffusion through the asphalt binder or mastic. Different techniques are available for diffusion...

  14. Controlling Thermal Properties of Asphalt Concrete and its Multifunctional Applications 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shi, Xijun

    2014-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    ) by controlling thermal properties of the construction materials. To change thermal properties of asphalt concrete, expanded polypropylene (EPP) pellet and graphite were selected as the additives and mixed into asphalt concrete. Experimental tests are classified...

  15. Damage analysis in asphalt concrete mixtures based on parameter relationships 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, Injun

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Asphalt pavements experience damage due to traffic loading under various environmental conditions. Damage can be caused by viscopl microcracks, fracture due to fatigue cracking, or fracture due to thermal cracking. Asphalt ...

  16. Evaluation of Rexene polymers in hot mixed asphalt concrete 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodriguez, Mary Anne Reese

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Committee: Dr. Dallas N. Little The objective of this research was to provide a comprehensive characterization of asphalt binders and paving mixtures modified with four polymers produced by the Rexene Products Company (Odessa, Texas). The four polymers... LITERATURE REVIEW AND INTERPRETATION General Available Asphalt Additives Practical Application of Asphalt Additives Benefit-Costs for Additives Future Outlook for Additives MATERIALS AND TEST METHODS Polymers Asphalt Cements Aggregate Procedure...

  17. Disk-shaped Compact Tension Test for Asphalt Concrete Fracture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paulino, Glaucio H.

    Disk-shaped Compact Tension Test for Asphalt Concrete Fracture by M.P.Wagoner, W.G. Buttlar and G geometry is the ability to test cylindrical cores obtained from in-place asphalt concrete pavements finalizing the specimen geometry, a typical asphalt concrete surface mixture was tested at various

  18. Asphalt Pavement Aging and Temperature Dependent Properties through a Functionally

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paulino, Glaucio H.

    Asphalt Pavement Aging and Temperature Dependent Properties through a Functionally Graded ­ Verification ­ Concluding Remarks Part ­ II (Companion presentation) ­ Asphalt Pavements ­ Effect of Aging: Asphalt concrete pavements (Part II) E1 E2 E3 Eh 1 2 3 h #12;Graded Finite Elements Graded Elements

  19. What's the future for rubberized asphalt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article describes the debate over the use of rubberized asphalt for highway surfacing. The Department of Transportation claims that the process is too costly; that it presents potential air pollution, safety and health problems. They also claim that there is a lack of understanding between rubber and asphalt cement and of the recyclability of the product. The Legislative Commission on Solid Waste Management claims that the mixture performs as well or better than conventional asphalt at reduced thicknesses. In addition, there could be savings of local funds currently expended for regulation of tire dumps, fire-fighting and clean-up, vector control and scrap tire disposal costs ranging from $.50 to $2.00 per tire.

  20. The potential use of tar sand bitumen as paving asphalt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petersen, J.C.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper several research reports describing the preparation of potential paving asphalts from tar sand bitumen are reviewed and the results of the studies compared. The tar sand asphalts described in the studies were prepared from 1) hot water-recovered bitumen from deposits near San Luis Obispo, California (Edna deposits), and deposits near Vernal and Sunnyside, Utah; and 2) bitumen recovered from the Northwest Asphalt Ridge deposits near Vernal, Utah, by both in situ steamflood and in situ combustion recovery processes. Important properties of the tar sand asphalts compare favorably with those of specification petroleum asphalts. Laboratory data suggest that some tar sand asphalts may have superior aging characteristics and produce more water-resistant paving mixtures than typical petroleum asphalts.

  1. The potential use of tar sand bitumen as paving asphalt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petersen, J.C.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The properties of several tar sand asphalts prepared in past studies by several different investigators were compared with each other and with the properties of petroleum asphalts. These results were reviewed and discussed with regard to the potential use of tar sand bitumen in pavement applications. The data show that tar sand bitumen has good potential for use in highway pavements that meet today's performance specifications. No deficiencies in the tar sand asphalts were found that would be expected to seriously affect performance. On the other hand, the data indicate that some tar sand asphalts may have superior aging characteristics, being relatively resistant to oxidative age hardening compared with typical petroleum asphalts. Asphalt-aggregate mixtures prepared using two tar sand asphalts also showed acceptable strength properties and excellent resistance to moisture-induced damage.

  2. Evaluation of polyethylene-modified asphalt blends

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Consuegra Granger, Fernando

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    aggregate and asphalt modified with LDPE (binder contents of 4. 8%%u and 5. 87'). 42 Table 9. Summary of statistical parameters derived from IDT testing on crushed granite mixtures bound with AC-20 + LDPE (4. 8%, and 5. 8/ binder). 46 Table 10. Summary... of creep to rupture data for crushed granite mixtures. 71 Table 11. Summary of the results of IDT repeated load fatigue testing of river gravel mixtures bound with Texaco asphalt: AC- 10, AC-10 + LDPE and AC-20. Table 12. K, ' and n, values of river...

  3. Mixture design and performance prediction of rubber-modified asphalt in Ohio. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liang, R.Y.

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Appropriate disposal of scrap tires has been a major environmental concern over the years, mainly due to potential fire and health hazards associated with uncontrolled stockpiling. Primarily driven by this environmental concern, the Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act (ISTEA) of 1991 has required each State to begin incorporating scrap tire rubber into its asphalt paving materials. Although in the revision of the original ISTEA, the mandate has been eliminated, there remains a language of encouraging the use of crumb rubbers in asphalt paving materials. Ohio Department of Transportation (ODOT) desires to develop the mix design procedure, construction practice, and performance specifications for crumb rubber modified asphalt paving materials. This research was conducted to develop the needed design and construction guidance for meeting the ODOT anticipated needs. Specifically, the objectives of this research encompass the following scope: (1) investigation of the rheological properties of asphalt-rubber binder to determine optimum content of crumb rubber, (2) development of optimum mix design for various applications, including both wet and dry mix processes, (3) characterization of mechanical properties of recommended paving mixtures, including resilient modulus, fatigue cracking behavior, low-temperature thermal cracking resistance, water sensitivity test, incremental creep test and loaded wheel track test, and (4) comparison of performance of selected paving mixes.

  4. The effect of asphalt deposition on recovery of oil by a pentane slug

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhagia, Nanik S

    1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ":ty reduction increases, in general, with the increase in amount of, asphalt contained ir the oil. The increases in recovery at breakthrough due to asphalt deposition were noted for four asphaltic crude oils and were compared to those of asphalt-free refined... substantial range, the gain in recovery at breakthrough of asphaltic oils over refined oils of the same viscosity increases with increase in size of slug used. This is attributed to more favorable mobility ratios resulting from asphalt deposition during...

  5. Asphalt Pavement Aging and TemperatureAsphalt Pavement Aging and Temperature Dependent Properties using a FunctionallyDependent Properties using a Functionally

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paulino, Glaucio H.

    Asphalt Pavement Aging and TemperatureAsphalt Pavement Aging and Temperature Dependent Properties Analysis Time Integration Analysis Application Examples: Asphalt Pavement Summary and Conclusions #12) ­ Large fraction produced as hot-mix asphalt (HMA) ­ Most common form of pavement surfacing material (96

  6. Investigation of Noise and Durability Performance Trends for Asphaltic Pavement Surface Types: Three-Year Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Qing; Kohler, Erwin R.; Harvey, John T; Ongel, Aybike

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Trends for Asphalt Pavement Surface Types: First- andResults. University of California Pavement Research Center,Trends for Asphaltic Pavement Surface Types: First- and

  7. A novel technique for the production of cool colored concrete tile and asphalt shingle roofing products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levinson, Ronnen

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for providing concrete tiles, and Lou Hahn of GAF-Elk forof cool colored concrete tile and asphalt shingle roofingsolar-reflective nonwhite concrete tile and asphalt shingle

  8. Predicting the fatigue life of asphalt concrete overlay systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Germann, Frederick P

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ON CRACK GROWTH IN VISCOELASTIC MATERIALS C'HAPTER V - STATE OF THE ART Effect of Mix Variables on Fatigue and Cracking Resistance in Asphalt Concrete Pavements . Field Performance of Asphalt Overlays with Fabric Summary CHAPTER VI ? MATERIALS... LIFE OF AN ASPHALT OVERLAY CHAPTER X - CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS REFERENCES APPENDIX A. CRACK TIP STRESS ANALYSIS APPENDIX B. CONSTRUCTION OF THE MASTER RESILIENT MODULUS AND MASTER CREEP COMPLIANCE CURVES APPENDIX C. CRACK GROWTH RATES, da...

  9. Microstructural Characterization of Material Properties and Damage in Asphalt Composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohammad Khorasani, Sara

    2013-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    MICROSTRUCTURAL CHARACTERIZATION OF MATERIAL PROPERTIES AND DAMAGE IN ASPHALT COMPOSITES A Thesis by SARA MOHAMMAD KHORASANI Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... Engineering Copyright 2013 Sara Mohammad Khorasani ii ABSTRACT Asphalt composites are used to construct 90% of roads in the United States. These composites consist of asphalt binder, which is a product of the refinery process of oil, aggregates...

  10. asphalt technology test: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and evaluated its performance when used in split mastic asphalt (SMA) mixture using Marshall Characteristic and dynamic charateristics (resilient modulus). As many as 90...

  11. anionic emulsified asphalt: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to Volucm Change... Gandhi, Poduru Mohandas Karamchand 1966-01-01 15 Life Cycle Assessment of Reclaimed Asphalt Pavement Energy Storage, Conversion and Utilization Websites...

  12. asphalt rock: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Corrections to Volucm Change... Gandhi, Poduru Mohandas Karamchand 1966-01-01 17 Life Cycle Assessment of Reclaimed Asphalt Pavement Energy Storage, Conversion and Utilization...

  13. asphaltic sand: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Corrections to Volucm Change... Gandhi, Poduru Mohandas Karamchand 1966-01-01 19 Life Cycle Assessment of Reclaimed Asphalt Pavement Energy Storage, Conversion and Utilization...

  14. asphalt concrete overlays: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    experimental results for concrete containing virgin limestone Paulino, Glaucio H. 71 Life Cycle Assessment of Reclaimed Asphalt Pavement Energy Storage, Conversion and Utilization...

  15. asphalt overlay design: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    these overlay networks. Routing and search in these overlay ... Cheng, Bow-Nan 69 Life Cycle Assessment of Reclaimed Asphalt Pavement Energy Storage, Conversion and Utilization...

  16. asphalt binder extraction: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Corrections to Volucm Change... Gandhi, Poduru Mohandas Karamchand 1966-01-01 43 Life Cycle Assessment of Reclaimed Asphalt Pavement Energy Storage, Conversion and Utilization...

  17. Full-Depth Pavement Reclamation with Foamed Asphalt: Final Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, David; Fu, P.; Harvey, John T; Halles, F.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    University of California Pavement Research Center. (WP-2005-8 th Conference on Asphalt Pavements for Southern Africa (International Journal of Pavement Engineering, Vol 8, No

  18. asphalt concrete bases: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    large amounts of PS wastes in civil engineering constructions. Key words: Asphalt surfaces Disposable dishes Polystyrene (PS) Wastes Environment A. Akbari Motlagh; A....

  19. asphalt concrete soil: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    large amounts of PS wastes in civil engineering constructions. Key words: Asphalt surfaces Disposable dishes Polystyrene (PS) Wastes Environment A. Akbari Motlagh; A....

  20. Compositional evaluation of asphalt binder recycling agents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Madrid, Richard Charles

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    from: Exxon Research and Engineering Company, The National Consortium for Graduate Degrees for Minorities in Engineering and Science, Inc. Fellowship (GEM), and the DOW Technical Fellowship is greatly appreciated. I thank Sophie and Ignacio Madrid... for Recycled Blends . . . . . Asphaltic Materials. . 54 58 63 69 V-2 V-3 V-4 V-5 V-6 V-7 Fina DMO and Exxon Tank Compositions and Viscosities. . . . Blend Compositions and Viscosities...

  1. Rheological Investigation of the Influence of Acrylate Polymers on the Modification of Asphalt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hussein, Ibnelwaleed A.

    and superior ACM properties when blended with the high asphaltenes Arabian asphalt. © 2006 Wiley Periodicals

  2. Recycled rubber, aggregate, and filler in asphalt paving mixtures. Transportation research record

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    ;Contents(Partial): Evaluation Systems for Crumb Rubber Modified Binders and Mixtures; Hot Mix Asphalt Rubber Applications in Virginia; Evaluation of Pyrolized Carbon Black from Scrap Tires as Additive in Hot Mix Asphalt; Use of Scrap Tire Chips in Asphaltic Membrane; Effects of Mineral Fillers on Properties of Stone Matrix Asphalt Mixtures; and Quantitative Analysis of Aggregate Based on Hough Transform.

  3. Field Manual for Crack Sealing in Asphalt Pavements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Field Manual for Crack Sealing in Asphalt Pavements Yetkin Yildirim, Ahmed Qatan, and Jorge Prozzi January 2006 3208RedRiver Austin,TX78705 #12;Dr. Yetkin Yildirim, P.E. Director Texas Pavement for Crack Sealing in Asphalt Pavements #12;Performing Organization: Center for Transportation Research

  4. Recycling asphalt overview of more than 25 years of use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Recycling asphalt overview of more than 25 years of use in France Y. Brosseaud ­ LCPC hal with ring for recycling ­ Average rate with high proportion : 30 to 50% ­ Used of rejuvenators (soft oil,version1-20May2011 #12;4 Hot recycling asphalt on mixing plant Recycling in place in hot or cold

  5. Relationship Between Surface Free Energy and Total Work of Fracture of Asphalt Binder and Asphalt Binder-Aggregate Interfaces 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howson, Jonathan Embrey

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    is the surface free energy of the asphalt binder and the aggregate. Surface free energy, which is a thermodynamic material property, is directly related to the adhesive bond energy between the asphalt binder and the aggregate as well as the cohesive bond energy...

  6. Relationship Between Surface Free Energy and Total Work of Fracture of Asphalt Binder and Asphalt Binder-Aggregate Interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howson, Jonathan Embrey

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    is the surface free energy of the asphalt binder and the aggregate. Surface free energy, which is a thermodynamic material property, is directly related to the adhesive bond energy between the asphalt binder and the aggregate as well as the cohesive bond energy...

  7. Improvements to a Transport Model of Asphalt Binder Oxidation in Pavements: Pavement Temperature Modeling, Oxygen Diffusivity in Asphalt Binders and Mastics, and Pavement Air Void Characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Rongbin

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Although evidence is mounting that asphalt binder oxidizes in pavements, and that oxidation and subsequent hardening of asphalt binder has a profound effect on pavement durability, important implementation issues remain to be better understood...

  8. Asphalt Pavement Aging and Temperature Dependent Properties through a Functionally Graded Viscoelastic Model, Part-II: Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paulino, Glaucio H.

    Asphalt Pavement Aging and Temperature Dependent Properties through a Functionally Graded simulation of functionally graded viscoelastic properties in asphalt concrete pavements. The techniques properties. A full-depth asphalt concrete pavement has been simulated to demonstrate the applicability

  9. Chemical characterization of beach asphalts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    May, Lloyd Alexander

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and flameless atomic absorption spectroscopy for vanadium, nickel, and iron. The neutron activation procedure was shown to be superior for vanadium, but no significant difference in methods was noted for nickel and iron. Other trace metals were done... by activation analysis. These include: mercury, gold, chromium, bromine, zinc, scandium, cobalt, and antimony. Use of the vanadium to nickel ratio, and of other trace element data, was discussed. As a key to understanding the nature of vanadium in crude...

  10. The curing of asphalt with rubber and its effect on the physical and chemical properties of asphalt-rubber binders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chun, Jay Sung

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    10% TG-40 and 90% Exxon AC-5. 105 B-1 Molecular Size Distribution of Rubber in Asphalt 5% TG-40 and 95% Fina AC-10. . . 123 B-2 Molecular Size Distribution of Rubber in Asphalt 10% TG-40 and 90% Fina AC-10. . 124 xlv FIGURE B-3 Molecular Size.... 0 Frequency (rad/s) 10. 0 100. 0 Figure III-2: Effect of Frequency on Viscosity Measurements Fina AC-10 Tank Asphalt 2500 2000 0 a 1500 1000 o 0 0 0 0 o o 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 o 0 Fina AC-10 with 5% TG-40 mesh rubber Cured at 375 F and 500...

  11. asphalt emulsions: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 21 Life Cycle Assessment of Reclaimed Asphalt Pavement Energy Storage, Conversion and Utilization...

  12. Characterization of Fatigue Cracking and Healing of Asphalt Mixtures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luo, Xue

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    mixtures using an energy-based mechanistic approach. A controlled-strain repeated direct tension (RDT) test is selected to generate both fatigue cracking and permanent deformation in an asphalt mixture specimen. Fatigue cracking is separated from...

  13. Viscoelastic{Viscoplastic Damage Model for Asphalt Concrete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graham, Michael A.

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents a continuum model for asphalt concrete incorporating non- linear viscoelasticity, viscoplasticity, mechanically-induced damage and moisture- induced damage. The Schapery single-integral viscoelastic model describes the nonlinear...

  14. A thermodynamic approach for compaction of asphaltic composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koneru, Saradhi

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    and Focus of Current Work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 B. Outline of the Thesis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 C. Notations Used . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 II LITERATURE REVIEW... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 b. Asphalt Binder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 C. Compaction Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 1. Field Compaction Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 a. Static Steel Wheel Rollers . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 b...

  15. asphaltic pavements microsurfacing: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    service have been... Lau, Chee Keung 1991-01-01 14 A utility evaluation of nondestructive testing devices used on asphalt concrete pavements Texas A&M University - TxSpace...

  16. asphalt pavement cracking: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    service have been... Lau, Chee Keung 1991-01-01 16 A utility evaluation of nondestructive testing devices used on asphalt concrete pavements Texas A&M University - TxSpace...

  17. asphalt pavement rap: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    service have been... Lau, Chee Keung 1991-01-01 14 A utility evaluation of nondestructive testing devices used on asphalt concrete pavements Texas A&M University - TxSpace...

  18. asphalt pavements: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    service have been... Lau, Chee Keung 1991-01-01 14 A utility evaluation of nondestructive testing devices used on asphalt concrete pavements Texas A&M University - TxSpace...

  19. Measurements of moisture suction in hot mix asphalt mixes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kassem, Emad Abdel-Rahman

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    with different bond energies and exhibited different field performance in terms of resistance to moisture damage. The suction measurements in sand asphalt specimens were used to calculate the moisture diffusion coefficient. The results revealed that water...

  20. Moisture Diffusion in Asphalt Binders and Fine Aggregate Mixtures 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vasconcelos, Kamilla L.

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    coefficient measurement of a wide variety of polymersolvent systems. For the asphalt-water system studied, the focus is on two techniques: (i) Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR)-Attenuated Total Reflectance (ATR) spectrometry and (ii) Gravimetric Sorption...

  1. Imparting Electrical Conductivity into Asphalt Composites Using Graphite 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baranikumar, Aishwarya

    2013-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    publications showed the potential of graphite in mitigating the sudden transition. The study presented herein investigates possibility of precisely controlling the electrical conductivity of asphalt concrete only by adding filler size graphite powder. Nine...

  2. asphalt concrete performance: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Robert L. 2014-01-01 23 Establishing material properties for thin asphalt concrete surfaces on granular bases Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: of MASTER OF SCIENCE...

  3. Study of properties of sand asphalt using a torsional rheometer 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kasula, Lavan Kumar Reddy

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The modeling of Sand Asphalt and experiments to measure their rheological properties are of vital concern to many industrial processes especially highway and roadway pavement construction industry. A variety of hot mix ...

  4. Use of VFDs on Asphalt Plant Induced Draft Fans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, G. R.; Case, P. L.; Lowery, J.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies of 10 asphalt plants in the Intermountain Region have identified average ID fan energy savings of 68% by controlling airflow using Variable Frequency Drives (VFDs) on the fan motors in place of damper control (inlet or outlet). Average...

  5. Fiber reinforcement of asphalt concrete using cow manure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bakar, Mohammed Abu

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Specimens were made according to the Marshall Method of Mixture Design and tested for 1) Marshall Stability 2) Hveem Stability and 3) Hater Susceptibil- ity. Test results indicated that 4. 4 percent cow manure by volume of rhe total aggregate when used... Voids in Mineral Aggregate 11 LIST OF FIGURES Figures Page l. 2 l. 3 1. 4 1. 5 1. 6 Determination of Optimum Asphalt Content by the Marshall Method Determination of Optimum Asphalt Content by the Marshall Method Determination of Optimum...

  6. Characterization of road asphalt using Gel Permeation Chromatography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Donaldson, Guy Randal

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    inconsistent and inconsistent. Six were consistent, three were slightly inconsist nt, and three were inconsistent. To study the relationship between GPC and performance, samples from test pavements at three locations were obtained. Both original asphalts... Columns/Toluene/100 Nicroliters/ 7X 3 ' 2. Reproducibility of the Standard Asphalt in THF . ~ . . ~ . ~ . . . 500 and 50 Angstrom Columns/Toluene/100 Nicroliters/ 7X 19 3. 3. Differences in Refractive Index Detector Response. Exxon AC-10/Dumas Tank...

  7. Fatigue Resistance of Asphalt Mixtures Affected by Water Vapor Movement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tong, Yunwei

    2013-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    aggregate contact due to dust particles on the aggregate surface. The rupture may occur because of the construction loads and operating traffic during construction, or could be environmentally induced by freeze-thaw cycling. Once a break in the film... design, environment and traffic, can be defined as progressive degradation of asphalt mixture material due to the presence of water. The occurrence of moisture damage in asphalt material is a rather complex phenomenon, which involves chemical, physical...

  8. Investigation of Conditions for Moisture Damage in Asphalt Concrete and Appropriate Laboratory Test Methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Qing

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Asphalt Concrete-Physical Testing. ” Final Report, #930-of Asphalt Concrete: Chemical Testing. ” Alabama Highwayconcrete mixes, it is preferred to use a mix that would have good moisture resistance under laboratory testing

  9. Investigation of Conditions for Moisture Damage in Asphalt Concrete and Appropriate Laboratory Test Methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harvey, John T; Lu, Qing

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Asphalt Concrete-Physical Testing. ” Final Report no.of Asphalt Concrete: Chemical Testing. ” Alabama Highwayconcrete mixes, it is preferable to use a mix that would have good moisture resistance under laboratory testing

  10. A Coupled Micromechanical Model of Moisture-Induced Damage in Asphalt Mixtures: Formulation and Applications 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caro Spinel, Silvia

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The deleterious effect of moisture on the structural integrity of asphalt mixtures has been recognized as one of the main causes of early deterioration of asphalt pavements. This phenomenon, usually referred to as moisture damage, is defined...

  11. Experimental Study on Geocell-Reinforced Recycled Asphalt Pavement (RAP) Bases under Static and Cyclic Loading

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thakur, Jitendra Kumar

    2011-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Recycled Asphalt Pavement (RAP) is a removed and reprocessed pavement material containing asphalt and aggregates which can be used as a base course material for pavement applications. Geocells are a three-dimensional interconnected honeycomb type...

  12. Asphalt compositions containing spurted polyolefin fibers with improved dispersibility in hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jabloner, H.

    1987-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A cutback asphalt composition is described comprising asphalt and a hydrocarbon solvent. The improvement composition comprises a water-dispersible spurted polyolefin pulp having precipitated a natural rubber or synthetic elastomer that is swellable in hydrocarbon solvents.

  13. E-Print Network 3.0 - asphalt mix design Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Environmental Engineering, Arizona State University Collection: Engineering 35 Bi Oil i A h ltBio-Oil in Asphalt ApplicationsApplications Summary: tons of hot mix asphalt...

  14. Evaluation of the filler effects on fatique cracking and permanent deformation of asphalt concrete mixtures 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Izzo, Richard P

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The addition of hydrated lime to asphalt has shown to be beneficial with an improvement in the Theological properties of the binder, as well as resistance to permanent deformation (rutting) and fatigue cracking of asphalt concrete mixtures...

  15. Evaluation of the filler effects on fatique cracking and permanent deformation of asphalt concrete mixtures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Izzo, Richard P

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The addition of hydrated lime to asphalt has shown to be beneficial with an improvement in the Theological properties of the binder, as well as resistance to permanent deformation (rutting) and fatigue cracking of asphalt concrete mixtures...

  16. Development of asphalts and pavements using recycled tire rubber. Phase 1: technical feasibility. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bullin, J.A.; Davison, R.R.; Glover, C.J. [and others

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the technical progress made on the development of asphalts and pavements using recycled tire rubber.

  17. A study of the mixing viscosity of asphalt in hot-mix production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khan, Md. Musharraf Hossain

    1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gravity and Absorption of Aggregates. 36 Sieve Analysis of Combined Aggregates 37 Centrifuge Kerosene Equivalent Test Data for Estimated Optimum Asphalt Content . 38 Test Data on Molded Specimens for Optimum Asphalt Content 39 XIII . Test Data... there is available to be filled with asphalt. The Centrifuge Kerosene Equivalent (CKE) Test was performed to 11 determine the estimated optimum asphalt content as a percentage of the 10 The American Association of State Highway Officials, "Standard...

  18. Asphalt Roofing Shingles Into Energy Project Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jameson, Rex, PE

    2008-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on a widely cited September, 1999 report by the Vermont Agency of Natural Resources, nearly 11 million tons of asphalt roofing shingle wastes are produced in the United States each year. Recent data suggests that the total is made up of about 9.4 million tons from roofing tear-offs and about 1.6 million tons from manufacturing scrap. Developing beneficial uses for these materials would conserve natural resources, promote protection of the environment and strengthen the economy. This project explored the feasibility of using chipped asphalt shingle materials in cement manufacturing kilns and circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boilers. A method of enhancing the value of chipped shingle materials for use as fuel by removing certain fractions for use as substitute raw materials for the manufacture of new shingles was also explored. Procedures were developed to prevent asbestos containing materials from being processed at the chipping facilities, and the frequency of the occurrence of asbestos in residential roofing tear-off materials was evaluated. The economic feasibility of each potential use was evaluated based on experience gained during the project and on a review of the well established use of shingle materials in hot mix asphalt. This project demonstrated that chipped asphalt shingle materials can be suitable for use as fuel in circulating fluidized boilers and cement kilns. More experience would be necessary to determine the full benefits that could be derived and to discover long term effects, but no technical barriers to full scale commercial use of chipped asphalt shingle materials in these applications were discovered. While the technical feasibility of various options was demonstrated, only the use of asphalt shingle materials in hot mix asphalt applications is currently viable economically.

  19. Recycling of plastic and rubber tire waste in asphalt pavements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morrison, G.R.; Lee, N.K.; Hesp, S.A.M. [Queen`s Univ., Kingston, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Chemistry

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses some important issues related to the use of recycled thermoplastics and rubber tire waste in asphalt binders for hot-mix pavements. Both high temperature rheological and low temperature fracture studies are presented on recycled polyethylene, devulcanized and crumb rubber-modified asphalt binders. The results are compared to unmodified and commercially available modified binders. This research is especially timely in light of the US Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991, Section 1038 which, starting in 1995, will force state and local governments to use significant amounts of recycled rubber tire or plastic waste in federally funded highway projects. High temperature rheological measurements of the loss modulus, loss tangent and complex modulus show a significant improvement when only small quantities of crumb rubber, devulcanized crumb rubber or waste polyethylene are added to the asphalt binders. The low temperature fracture performance of the modified asphalts is greatly influenced by the interfacial strength between the dispersed and continuous phase. The fracture toughness increases dramatically, only when low molecular weight polymers are grafted in-situ onto the rubber and polymer dispersed phases in order to strength the interface. This points to a crack-pinning mechanism as being responsible for the dramatic increase in fracture toughness that is observed in this work. Single phase, devulcanized crumb rubber-asphalt systems perform quite poorly at low temperatures.

  20. 1 INTRODUCTION A typical flexible pavement system includes four

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    1 INTRODUCTION A typical flexible pavement system includes four distinct layers: asphalt concrete course in order to reduce costs or to minimize capil- lary action under the pavement. Figure 1: Cross-section of flexible pavement system (Muench 2006) Pavement distress may occur due to either traffic or environmental

  1. Effect of pyrolyzed carbon black on asphalt cement. Part 2. Asphalt binder. Final report, September 1993-May 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zeng, Y.; Lovell, C.W.

    1996-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Scrap tires derived from automobiles have become a large environmental problem in the United States. In the study, research is carried out to investigate the potential use of tire-derived pyrolyzed carbon black from scrap tires as an asphalt cement modifier. The asphlat cements used in the research were AC10 and AC20. Penetration and softening point tests were performed to obtain the consistency of the asphalt cements. The pyrolyzed carbon black, as provided by Wolf Industries, was combined with the asphalt cement in the following percentages: 5%, 10%, 15% and 20%. Penetration, softening point and ductility tests were performed to determine the temperature susceptibility of the modified binder as altered by the pyrolyzed carbon black. In order that the results are comparable to previous testing, commercial carbon black purchased from CABOT Industry was also used as a modifier in the tests. The same test procedures were applied to the asphalt cements modified by commercial carbon black. The test results contained in the report illustrate the viability of the pyrolyzed carbon black as an asphalt modifier. Recommendations are provided to facilitate further research on this particular project. A preliminary assessment of a test road using the pyrolyzed carbon is appended.

  2. A study of the effects of limestone rock asphalt screenings on the structural properties of hot-mix asphaltic concrete made with siliceous materials 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Albritton, Oscar Willard

    1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LiSRagy pptt8pp py IEXAa A STUDY OF THE EFFECTS OF LIMESTONE ROCK ASPHALT SCREENINGS ON THE STRUCTURAL PROPERTIES OF HOT-MIX ASPHALTIC CONCRETE MADE WITH SILICEOUS MATERIALS A Thesis By OSCAR WILLARD. AQBRITTON Submitted to the Graduate... ON THE STRUCTURAL PROPERTIES OF HOT-MIX ASPHALTIC CONCRETE MADE WITH SILICEOUS MATERIALS A Thesis By OSCAR WILLARD ALBRITTON Approved as to Style and Content by: Chairman of Committee ead of Departme t August 1958 ACKNOWLEDGMENTS Acknowledgment is due...

  3. Recycling asphaltic concrete with sulphur as a supplemental binder

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barnett, Robert William

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the United States, and the use of this secondary sulphur for construction purposes could provide not only a vast savings of natural resources and reusable materials but also aid industry in recovering the cost of environ- mental protection. The waste... industry [25, 26, 27, 28]. Research has been undertaken to investigate the use of sulphur in sand-asphalt- sulphur pavement mixes [11, 25, 29, 30]. The use of sulphur in sulphur-asphalt emulsions to serve as a binder has also been studied [26, 31, 32...

  4. Asphalt roofing industry Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy modified bitumen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Request for Emissions Testing at Four Asphalt Roofing and Processing Facilities was submitted by the US EPA Emission Standards Division (ESD), Minerals and Inorganic Chemicals Group (MICG) to the Emission Measurement Center (EMC). The Emission Measurement Center directed Midwest Research Institute (MRI) to conduct emissions testing at asphalt roofing plants. This report presents results of MRI`s FTIR and Method 25A testing conducted at US Intec in Port Arthur, Texas. The field measurements were performed in September 1997 under several test conditions for both controlled and uncontrolled emissions.

  5. Automated titration method for use on blended asphalts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pauli, Adam T. (Cheyenne, WY); Robertson, Raymond E. (Laramie, WY); Branthaver, Jan F. (Chatham, IL); Schabron, John F. (Laramie, WY)

    2012-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for determining parameters and compatibility of a substance such as an asphalt or other petroleum substance uses titration to highly accurately determine one or more flocculation occurrences and is especially applicable to the determination or use of Heithaus parameters and optimal mixing of various asphalt stocks. In a preferred embodiment, automated titration in an oxygen gas exclusive system and further using spectrophotometric analysis (2-8) of solution turbidity is presented. A reversible titration technique enabling in-situ titration measurement of various solution concentrations is also presented.

  6. Recycling spent sandblasting grit and similar wastes as aggregate in asphaltic concrete. Technical data sheet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heath, J.C.; Nelson, B.

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Naval Facilities Engineering Service Center (NFESC), Port Hueneme, California, and Naval Facilities Engineering Command Engineering Field Activity, West, San Bruno, California, took overall leadership in identifying and testing methods to manage waste generated from a machine shop located at Hunters Point Annex, at Naval Station, Treasure Island, California. Ship cleaning and equipment maintenance resulted in the accumulation of 4,665 tons of spent sandblasting grit at the site. The spent grit, consisting of silica sand plus a small amount of slag-derived grit, had the physical characteristics of coarse-grained beach sand and also contained fragments of coatings. The spent grit had the potential for exhibiting hazardous characteristics since the coatings included lead-based primers, copper, and butyltin-containing antifouling topcoats. The most beneficial application of reusing the spent grit was to use it as a replacement for some of the fine aggregate in asphaltic concrete. A test program was established that included characterization, bench-scale testing, long-term pilot scale testing, and a full-scale demonstration. Full-scale asphalt production provided samples which proved both the chemical leaching resistance and physical performance characteristics were acceptable.

  7. A Methodology of Quantifying Precipitation Exposure for Wet-Weather Collisions and Evaluating Effectiveness of Open-Grade Asphalt Concrete as a Countermeasure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, Ching-Yao; Jin, Eui-Jae; Oh, Soon Mi; Ragland, David R

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Open-graded Asphaltic Concrete Friction Courses in Arizona.for Open-Graded Asphalt Concrete (OGAC) Wearing Courses.of Open-Grade Asphalt Concrete as a Countermeasure Ching-Yao

  8. asphalt technology development: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    asphalt technology development First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Development and...

  9. asphalt based materials: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    asphalt based materials First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Establishing material...

  10. Controlling Thermal Properties of Asphalt Concrete and its Multifunctional Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shi, Xijun

    2014-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    of the thermally modified asphalt mixtures on the surface temperature of pavements and bridges, a series of heat transfer analysis were conducted using the finite difference heat transfer model. In addition, a case study of a building using EPP modified cement...

  11. Measurements of moisture suction in hot mix asphalt mixes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kassem, Emad Abdel-Rahman

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The presence of moisture in hot mix asphalt (HMA) causes loss of strength and durability of the mix, which is referred to as moisture damage. This study deals with the development of experimental methods for measuring total suction in HMA, which can...

  12. asphalt construction premature: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    asphalt construction premature First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Moisture Diffusion in...

  13. Summary of Construction Activities and Results from Six Initial Accelerated Pavement Tests Conducted on Asphalt Concrete Pavement Section for Modified-Binder Overlay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bejarano, Manuel O.; Morton, Bruce S.; Scheffy, Clark

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Testing on the Asphalt Concrete FWD testing was conducted onin asphalt concrete modulus after HVS testing for Sectionsconcrete pavements under accelerated pavement testing. This

  14. The use of sulfer modified bottom ash (SMBA) as an aggregate in asphaltic mixtures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chimakurthy, Harshavardhan

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , bottom ash is lighter in weight and generally much cheaper than conventional quality aggregates such as limestone, sand and gravel. This research was designed to up-grade the load-bearing charactcnstics of bottom ash and maximize its usc m asphaltic... and gravel. According to a study done by Hafizuddin Ahmad in 1974, sulfur was used extensively in sand-asphalt sulfur to upgrade marginal aggregates for use in asphaltic mixtures, was developed at Texas Transportation Institute (TT1) (JO). TTI's work...

  15. Experimental Study on Geocell-Reinforced Flexible Pavements with Recycled Asphalt Pavement (RAP) Bases under Cyclic Loading

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acharya, B. S.

    2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    ABSTRACT The reprocessed old hot mix asphalt (HMA) concrete also called "Recycled Asphalt Pavement (RAP)", if used to build new roads or to maintain existing roads, would have several benefits, such as preservation of natural resources for future...

  16. Asphalt Pavement Aging and Temperature Dependent Properties through a Functionally Graded Viscoelastic Model, Part-I: Development,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paulino, Glaucio H.

    Asphalt Pavement Aging and Temperature Dependent Properties through a Functionally Graded simulations, correspondence principle, finite-element method Abstract. Asphalt concrete pavements to climatic conditions are the major cause of such graded non-homogeneity. Current pavement analysis

  17. Microstructural Characterization of the Chemo-mechanical Behavior of Asphalt in Terms of Aging and Fatigue Performance Properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Robert Grover

    2013-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The study of asphalt chemo-mechanics requires a basic understanding of the physical properties and chemical composition of asphalt and how these properties are linked to changes in performance induced by chemical modifications. This work uniquely...

  18. Residuals, Sludge, and Composting (Maine)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Maine Department of Environmental Protection's Residuals, Sludge, and Composting program regulates the land application and post-processing of organic wastes, including sewage sludge, septage,...

  19. Microstructural Characterization of Material Properties and Damage in Asphalt Composites 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohammad Khorasani, Sara

    2013-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    by NPRP grant # 08-310-2-110 from the Qatar National Research Fund (a member of Qatar Foundation). The statements made herein are solely the responsibility of the authors. vi TABLE OF CONTENTS Page ABSTRACT... ........................................................................................................................ 17 3D Experimental Investigation of the Microstructure of Cement Pastes Using Synchrotron X-Ray Microtomography (?CT) .......................................................... 18 Dynamic Modulus Simulation of the Asphalt Concrete Using the X...

  20. Evaluation of Rexene polymers in hot mixed asphalt concrete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodriguez, Mary Anne Reese

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -- polyethylene, polypropylene, ethylene-vinyl acetate (EVA) and ethylene-propylene rubbers -- show increased stability and stiffness modulus, increased resistance to permanent deformation and lower temperature susceptibility. Carpenter and VanDam (14... five asphalt additives: block copolymer rubber, SBR latex, EVA, polyethylene and carbon black. Mixture stability, stiffness, tensile strength and resistance to fatigue, thermal cracking, permanent deformation and moisture damage were tested. Three...

  1. A novel method of bitumen extraction from asphalt pavement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Houser, T.J. (Western Michigan Univ., Kalamazoo (United States))

    1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new method of extracting bitumen from asphalt pavement mixtures has been developed which does not require chlorinated or aromatic compounds for solvents. The preferred solvent is cyclohexane (although cyclopentane may be used) at high temperatures and pressures. The new method requires equipment that is less costly than the centrifuge method currently used and takes less time than extractions with Bioact but more time than when chlorocompounds are used.

  2. INTRODUCTION The increase in energy costs has led to a significant rise in the cost of mixtures containing asphalt cement. This resulted

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harms, Kyle E.

    containing asphalt cement. This resulted in a need to search for alternatives that reduce the cost of those mixed with low percentages (1 percent below standard HMA mixtures) of paving grade asphalt cement and lower percentages of asphalt cement binder and easier compaction efforts. Asphalt treated mixtures can

  3. Effect of pavement temperature on the macrotexture of a semidense asphalt surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Effect of pavement temperature on the macrotexture of a semidense asphalt surface J. Luong, M the pavement temperature could change the texture surface of the pavement. The aim of this work is to analyze the influence of the surface temperature on the macrotexture of a semidense asphalt pavement located in an urban

  4. Dynamic Effects on Moisture Transport in Asphalt Concrete M. Emin Kutay1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aydilek, Ahmet

    Dynamic Effects on Moisture Transport in Asphalt Concrete M. Emin Kutay1 and Ahmet H. Aydilek2 2007 133:7 406 CE Database subject headings: Moisture; Asphalt concrete; Dynamics; Hydraulic and Magdalena 2002 ; however, limited research has been conducted in modeling dynamic flow in porous geomedia

  5. RESEARCH REPORT 987-9 ASPHALT OVERLAY DESIGN METHODS FOR RIGID

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    by using a fractional factorial design. An analysis of variance (ANOVA) was performed to identifyRESEARCH REPORT 987-9 ASPHALT OVERLAY DESIGN METHODS FOR RIGID PAVEMENTS CONSIDERING RUTTING's Catalog No. 5. Report Date October 1998 4. Title and Subtitle ASPHALT OVERLAY DESIGN METHODS FOR RIGID

  6. Characterization of asphalt cements modified with crumbed rubber from discarded tires. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daly, W.H.; Negulescu, I.I.

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The potential legislative requirement for incorporation of scrap rubber into asphalt blends mandated a thorough evaluation of the influence of scrap rubber additives on the physical properties and aging characteristics of rubber/asphalt blends. Blends with up to 20 percent ground vulcanized rubber (both crumb and 200 mesh powder particles) from recycled tires were prepared with asphalt cements of various grades (AC5 - AC30) and evaluated using DMA. Blends produced from powdered rubber particles exhibited Newtonian behavior at high temperatures; similar behavior was not observed with crumb rubber blends. The mechanical properties of asphalt-rubber blends depend upon the concentration of rubber additives, the particle dimensions, and the chemical composition of the asphalt.

  7. A study of the effects of limestone rock asphalt screenings on the structural properties of hot-mix asphaltic concrete made with siliceous materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Albritton, Oscar Willard

    1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Society for Testing Materials, Phila. , Pa. 15 PROCEDURE To limit the wide variations of aggregate grading, specifica- tions of the Texas Highway Department for a Type "D" Hot-Mix, Hot- Laid, Asphaltic Concrete were used as a guide in the design... Standards on Mineral Aggregates, Concrete, and Nonbituminous Highway Materials, American Society for Testing Materials, Phila, , Pa. Benson, Fred J, and Bh. Subbaraju, "Specific Gravity of Aggregates in Asphaltic Paving Mixtures, " Texas Engineering...

  8. High temperature performance of scrap tire rubber modified asphalt concrete

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coomarasamy, A. [Ministry of Transportation, Downsview, Ontario (Canada); Manolis, S.; Hesp, S. [Queen`s Univ., Kingston, Ontario (Canada)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Wheel track rutting tests on mixes modified with 30 mesh, 80 mesh, and very fine colloidal crumb rubber particles show that a very significant improvement in performance occurs with a reduction in the rubber particle size. The SHRP binder test for rutting, which was originally developed for homogeneous systems only, does not predict the performance improvement for smaller rubber particles. If these new scrap rubber binder systems are to be used in pavements then rutting tests on the asphalt-aggregate mixture should be conducted in order to accurately predict high temperature performance.

  9. Fusion Residues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenneth Intriligator

    1991-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss when and how the Verlinde dimensions of a rational conformal field theory can be expressed as correlation functions in a topological LG theory. It is seen that a necessary condition is that the RCFT fusion rules must exhibit an extra symmetry. We consider two particular perturbations of the Grassmannian superpotentials. The topological LG residues in one perturbation, introduced by Gepner, are shown to be a twisted version of the $SU(N)_k$ Verlinde dimensions. The residues in the other perturbation are the twisted Verlinde dimensions of another RCFT; these topological LG correlation functions are conjectured to be the correlation functions of the corresponding Grassmannian topological sigma model with a coupling in the action to instanton number.

  10. Transforms for prediction residuals in video coding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kam??l?, Fatih

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Typically the same transform, the 2-D Discrete Cosine Transform (DCT), is used to compress both image intensities in image coding and prediction residuals in video coding. Major prediction residuals include the motion ...

  11. Influence of fundamental material properties and air void structure on moisture damage of asphalt mixes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arambula Mercado, Edith

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    parameters were obtained using mechanical tests and surface energy measurements. The microstructure of asphalt mixes prepared in the laboratory having different air void structures was captured using X-ray CT, and image analysis techniques were used...

  12. Evaluation of healing in asphalt binders using dynamic shear rheometer and molecular modeling techniques 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bommavaram, Ramamohan Reddy

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A self-healing material has the inherent ability to partially reverse damage such as crack formation that might have occurred during its service. Significant evidence exists in the literature to indicate that asphalt binder is a self...

  13. A Continuum Coupled Moisture-mechanical Constitutive Model for Asphalt Concrete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shakiba, Maryam

    2013-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    procedure and give insight into the various damage inducing mechanisms in asphalt concrete. In this dissertation, thermo-hygro-mechanical constitutive relationships are developed based on the principle of virtual power and laws of thermodynamics in order...

  14. Development of superior asphalt recycling agency: Phase 1, Technical feasibility. Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bullin, J.A.; Glover, C.J.; Davison, R.R.; Lin, Moon-Sun; Chaffin, J.; Liu, Meng; Eckhardt, C.

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    About every 12 years, asphalt roads must be reworked, and this is usually done by placing thick layers (hot-mix overlays) of new material on top of failed material, resulting in considerable waste of material and use of new asphalt binder. A good recycling agent is needed, not only to reduce the viscosity of the aged material but also to restore compatibility. Objective is to establish the technical feasibility (Phase I) of determining the specifications and operating parameters for producing high quality recycling agents which will allow most/all the old asphalt-based road material to be recycled. It is expected that supercritical fractionation can be used. The advanced road aging simulation procedure will be used to study aging of blends of old asphalt and recycling agents.

  15. A program to design asphalt concrete overlays to mitigate reflection cracking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Satyanarayana Rao, Sindhu

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the research are to understand the occurrence and behavior of reflection cracking and for devising ways of mitigating them and to put together an effective and complete package of computer programs to design asphalt concrete overlays. Another primary objective...

  16. Evaluation of healing in asphalt binders using dynamic shear rheometer and molecular modeling techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bommavaram, Ramamohan Reddy

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    the parameters of characteristic healing function of asphalt binders. In the second part of this study, Molecular Modeling (MM) techniques were used to determine the interrelationship between molecular structure, surface free energy, self diffusivity, and other...

  17. Laboratory evaluation of crumb rubber asphalt concrete mixtures using the concepts of SMA mixtures 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rebala, Somasekhar Reddy

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Eight CRM asphalt concrete mixtures were evaluated using AAMAS characterization procedures: Four wet-process mixtures and four dry-process mixtures. These mixtures were compared to a conventional dense graded mixture. It was determined that CRM has...

  18. Automated Protocol for the Analysis of Dynamic Mechanical Analyzer Date from Fine Aggregate Asphalt Mixes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cavalcanti De Sousa, Pedro

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Fatigue cracking and moisture damage are two important modes of distresses in asphalt pavements. Recently, the Dynamic Mechanical Analyzer (DMA) was used to characterize fatigue cracking and evaluate the effects of moisture ...

  19. The morphology of polymer modified asphalt and its relationship to rheology and durability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kraus, Zachary Rothman

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    % % loglog * deg6010* deg6010 ?? , where d%A is the change in asphaltene in the asphalt (19). The other theory is that only the polar aromatics and napthene aromatics fluoresce when separated from the asphalt binder (16). Therefore as polar and napthene... aromatics change to asphaltenes with oxidative aging, the brightness would decrease. This brightness decrease would correspond to the increase in asphaltene with carbonyl area leading to a graph that looks like a chart for hardening susceptibility...

  20. An investigation of three problems concerning the analysis of airborne asphalt fumes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laird, Larry Teal

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AN INVESTIGATION OF THREE PROBLEMS CONCERNING THE ANALYSIS OF AIRBORNE ASPHALT FUMES A Thesis by LARRY TEAL LAIRD Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE May 1981 Major Subject: Industrial Hygiene AN INVESTIGATION OF THREE PROBLEMS CONCERNING THE ANALYSIS OF AIRBORNE ASPHALT FUMES A Thesis by LARRY T. LAIRD Approved as to style and content by: (Chairm of Committee) (Head of Department...

  1. Evaluation of oil shale bitumen as a pavement asphalt additive to reduce moisture damage susceptibility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robertson, R.E.; Harnsberger, P.M.; Wolf, J.M.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An unrefined shale bitumen was evaluated as an agent to reduce moisture damage susceptibility of asphalt aggregate mixtures. Some activity was observed but less than might have been expected based on the molecular weight and nitrogen content of the bitumen. The counter effects of free carboxylic acids, which are known to be variable in asphalt and which are also present in the unrefined bitumen, appear to diminish the activity of the bitumen to inhibit moisture damage. 5 refs., 1 tab.

  2. Evaluation of the effects of crumb rubber and SBR on rutting resistance of asphalt concrete

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shih, Chuang-Tsair; Tia, Mang; Ruth, B.E. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the results of a study to evaluate the effects of addition of crumb rubber (CR) and styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR) on the rutting resistance of asphalt concrete. These two additives were blended with an AC-20 and an AC-30 grade asphalt cements at different levels of concentrations. These modified and unmodified asphalt blends were tested at intermediate and high temperatures to evaluate their rutting resistance characteristics. They were also used to make Florida type S-I structural surface mixtures. These mixtures were made into Marshall-size specimens by using Gyratory Testing Machine (GTM) equipped with air-roller to compact and density to three compaction levels which simulate three different conditions in the pavement. The FDOT`s (Florida Department of Transportation) Loaded Wheel Tester was also used to evaluate the rutting resistance of these asphalt mixtures. The test results indicate that the modified asphalt mixtures show relatively better rutting resistance and shear resistance as compared with the unmodified asphalt mixtures.

  3. Development of statistical wet weather model to evaluate frictional properties at the pavement-tire interface on hot mix asphalt concrete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bedi, Harpreet

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Skid resistance on wet pavements is influenced by friction at the tire-pavement interface as well as overall hot mix asphalt (HMA) performance. It is important to control aggregate, asphalt, and mix properties to achieve desirable frictional...

  4. Application of Metagenomics for Identification of Novel Petroleum Hydrocarbon Degrading Enzymes in Natural Asphalts from the Rancho La Brea Tar Pits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baquiran, Jean-Paul Mendoza

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and the origin of heavy oil. Nature, 426, 344-352. HEITKAMP,natural asphalts and heavy oil compounds. A major questionmainly of asphalts and heavy oils, which have saturated into

  5. Department of Energy and Mineral Engineering Spring Roller Design to Increase the Lifespan of Asphalt Compactor Wiper Blades

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demirel, Melik C.

    the Lifespan of Asphalt Compactor Wiper Blades By: Thomas Krupa, Eric Resch, Phillip Yesenosky, John Marshall, Asset Kusmanov Overview Volvo CE's asphalt compactors have a polymer wiper blade that is used life. o The roller was tested five times as long as the wipers and never showed any change in diameter

  6. Development of superior asphalt recycling agents. Phase 1, Technical feasibility. Final technical progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bullin, J.A.; Davison, R.R.; Glover, C.J.; Chaffin, J.; Liu, M.; Madrid, R.

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    After an introduction and a literature survey in Chap. 1, Chap. 2 describes the tasks, together with objectives and important results obtained for each task throughout the entire project. Chaps. 3 thru 7 detail work in developing a qualitative and quantitative knowledge of asphalt oxidation, composition dependence of asphalt properties, and guidelines for producing superior asphalt binders through composition control. They also detail the development of a kinetic model for asphalt oxidative aging and present an understanding of the composition dependence of asphalt oxidation as well as other performance-related properties. Chaps. 8 and 9 compare the aging performance of recycled blends produced using commercial recycling agents and industrial supercritical fractions as rejuvenating agents. Oxidative aging of the recycled blends were evaluated along with the performance of the recycled blends in terms of the strategic highway research program performance grading procedure. Chap. 10 summarizes the work completed in the areas of processing schemes development, projection updates, and scale-up and commercialization plans.

  7. Effects of carboxylic acids on the rheological properties of crumb rubber modified asphalt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tauer, J.E.; Robertson, R.E. [Western Research Institute, Laramie, WY (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Federal mandate of 1991-1995 on the use of scrap tires in Federal roadway construction sparked a major interest in gaining a fundamental understanding of the behavior of rubber in asphalt. This study is a systematic elucidation of what chemistry controls the final crumb rubber modified asphalt (CRMA) product quality. We discovered that the type and total acid content in the asphalt are the most influential chemical factors that determine the changes in the important roadway properties of shear modulus (G*) and loss angle ({delta}) of CRMA. Low acid (<0.005 m/L) asphalts were modified with three types of carboxylic acid and each made into CRMA using typical field mixing conditions of 1 hour at 175{degrees}C. Rheological measurements were then made at various storage times up to 192 hours following storage at both 156 and 200{degrees}C. We found the changes in CRMA theological properties correspond to the acid type spiked into the asphalt.

  8. Viscoroute 2.0: a tool for the simulation of moving load effects on asphalt pavement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chabot, Armelle; Deloffre, Lydie; Duhamel, Denis

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As shown by strains measured on full scale experimental aircraft structures, traffic of slow-moving multiple loads leads to asymmetric transverse strains that can be higher than longitudinal strains at the bottom of asphalt pavement layers. To analyze this effect, a model and a software called ViscoRoute have been developed. In these tools, the structure is represented by a multilayered half-space, the thermo-viscoelastic behaviour of asphalt layers is accounted by the Huet-Sayegh rheological law and loads are assumed to move at constant speed. First, the paper presents a comparison of results obtained with ViscoRoute to results stemming from the specialized literature. For thick asphalt pavement and several configurations of moving loads, other ViscoRoute simulations confirm that it is necessary to incorporate viscoelastic effects in the modelling to well predict the pavement behaviour and to anticipate possible damages in the structure.

  9. Asphalt emulsion radon barrier systems for uranium mill tailings: an overview of the technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, E.G.; Hartley, J.N.; Freeman, H.D.; Gates, T.E.; Nelson, D.A.; Dunning, R.L.

    1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), under contract to the US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRAP) office, has developed an asphalt emulsion cover system to reduce the release of radon from uranium mill tailings. The system has been field tested at Grand Junction, Colorado. Results from laboratory and field tests indicate that this system is effective in reducing radon release to near-background levels (<2.5 pCi m/sup -2/s/sup -1/) and has the properties required for long-term effectiveness and stability. Engineering specifications have been developed, and analysis indicates that asphalt emulsion covers are cost-competitive with other cover systems. This report summarizes the technology for asphalt emulsion radon barrier systems. 59 references, 45 figures, 36 tables.

  10. Application of pyrolized carbon black from scrap tires in asphalt pavement design and construction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, T.; Coree, B.J. [Indiana Department of Transportation, West Lafayette, IN (United States). Division of Research; Lovell, C.W. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States). School of Civil Engineering

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    According to EPA reports (1991) of the over 242 million waste generated each year in the United State, 5% are exported, 6% recycled, 11% incinerated, and 78% are landfilled, stockpiled, or illegally dumped. A variety of uses for these tires are being studied. Among these is pyrolysis which produces 5 5% of oil, 25% of carbon black, 9% of steel, 5% of fiber and 6% of gas. Pyrolized carbon black contains 9 % of ash, 4% of sulfur, 12% of butadine copolymer and 75% of carbon black. The objective of this research is to investigate the viability of using PCB as an additive in hot mix asphalt. The use of PCB in asphalt pavement is expected not only to improve the performance of conventional asphalt, but also to provide a means for the mass disposal of waste fires.

  11. Studies of asphalt air blowing and development of a new short-term aging technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vassiliev, Nicolai

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , Table m-2. Low temperature hardening properi. ies of air blown asphalt fractions and blends. Table III-3. Parent asphalt HS, oxidation rate, and HR . Table IV-1. Estimated time required to achieve same degrcc of aging as RTFOT for Exxon AC-10 films... of varying I. hickness . 70 Table IV-2 Effect of air blowing conditions for Exxon AC- I 0, 325 'F, 70 min. 70 Table IV-3. Condensed volatiles and RTFOT mass change . 80 Table IV-4. Reproducibility analysis. LIST OF FIGURES P ige Figure I-l. Thin film...

  12. Influence of coarse aggregate size, shape and surface texture on rutting of hot mix asphalt concrete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yeggoni, Mohan

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    increased Hveem Stability, Marshall Stability and resistance to creep of hot mix asphalt concrete. The resilient modulus of the specimens was also enhanced by the increase in the amount of crushed aggregate in the mix at high temperatures (115'F). Fractal...

  13. The State of the Practice and Common Pitfalls for Porous Asphalt for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of stormwater treatment systems · To provide resources to stormwater communities currently involved in design)-131 Porous Asphalt Pavements (2008) NAPA IS-115 Open-Graded Friction Courses (2002) 3 #12;Overview 1. State of the Practice 2. Water Quality Performance 3. Hydraulic Performance 4. Cold Climate

  14. Project Information Form Project Title Evaluation of the Combined Effect of Recycled Asphalt Pavement (RAP),

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    Pavement (RAP), Recycled Asphalt Shingles (RAS), and Different Virgin Binder Sources on Performance of Research Project As virgin material sources become increasingly scarce, and the volume of pavement material for pavement construction. The California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) has recently increased

  15. FIELD PERFORMANCE AND LABORATORY EVALUATION OF WARM MIX ASPHALT PRODUCED WITH RUBBERIZED BITUMEN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    FIELD PERFORMANCE AND LABORATORY EVALUATION OF WARM MIX ASPHALT PRODUCED WITH RUBBERIZED BITUMEN of rubberized bitumen has been spread out mainly due to environmental aspects, but high mixing and compaction temperatures are necessary due to the higher viscosity of this bitumen. A WMA mixture (using a surfactant

  16. Creep Compliance Analysis Technique for the Flattened Indirect Tension Test of Asphalt Concrete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paulino, Glaucio H.

    Creep Compliance Analysis Technique for the Flattened Indirect Tension Test of Asphalt Concrete: ­ Cored Sample (Cylindrical) Indirect tensile testing (IDT) (Strength/Creep) ­ AASHTO T-322 Damage under and Flattened IDT · 1000-sec creep tests on three replicates · 0, -10, and -20 deg. C · Displacement

  17. Asphalt and Asphaltic Concrete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, A. R.

    1914-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , and combined curb and gutter furnished and set, the rate for resetting old curbing; the rate per cubic yard for extra concrete, if any is used; the price per cubic yard for broken stone or gravel; the rate per square yard for paving and for relaying old...- tified and given access to the same at least ten days be- fore it is required for use, and any work in which re- jected cement was used will be rejected altogether. 5. The cement shall be packed in strong bags having printed on the outside the brand...

  18. A comparison of the fracture properties of conventional and polymer-modified two-layer asphalt concrete overlay systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reddy, Praveena Gutha

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The problem of reflection cracking through the conventional asphalt concrete overlays has increased the need to find new materials which could resist cracking or fracture more effectively. It is for this reason that polymers ...

  19. Comparison of fatigue analysis approaches for predicting fatigue lives of hot-mix asphalt concrete (HMAC) mixtures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walubita, Lubinda F.

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Hot-mix asphalt concrete (HMAC) mixture fatigue characterization constitutes a fundamental component of HMAC pavement structural design and analysis to ensure adequate field fatigue performance. HMAC is a heterogeneous complex composite material...

  20. Fatigue resistance of hot-mix asphalt concrete (HMAC) mixtures using the calibrated mechanistic with surface energy (CMSE) measurements approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ofori-Abebresse, Edward Kwame

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Fatigue cracking is one of the fundamental distresses that occur in the life of a Hot Mix Asphalt Concrete (HMAC) pavement. This load induced distress leads to structural collapse of the entire pavement ultimately and can only be remedied...

  1. Fatigue resistance of hot-mix asphalt concrete (HMAC) mixtures using the calibrated mechanistic with surface energy (CMSE) measurements approach 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ofori-Abebresse, Edward Kwame

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Fatigue cracking is one of the fundamental distresses that occur in the life of a Hot Mix Asphalt Concrete (HMAC) pavement. This load induced distress leads to structural collapse of the entire pavement ultimately and can ...

  2. Particulate residue separators for harvesting devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoskinson, Reed L.; Kenney, Kevin L.; Wright, Christopher T.; Hess, John R.

    2010-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A particulate residue separator and a method for separating a particulate residue stream may include a plenum borne by a harvesting device, and have a first, intake end and a second, exhaust end; first and second particulate residue air streams which are formed by the harvesting device and which travel, at least in part, along the plenum and in a direction of the second, exhaust end; and a baffle assembly which is located in partially occluding relation relative to the plenum, and which substantially separates the first and second particulate residue air streams.

  3. Methods of separating particulate residue streams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoskinson, Reed L. (Rigby, ID); Kenney, Kevin L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wright, Christopher T. (Idaho Falls, ID); Hess, J. Richard (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2011-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A particulate residue separator and a method for separating a particulate residue stream may include an air plenum borne by a harvesting device, and have a first, intake end and a second, exhaust end; first and second particulate residue air streams that are formed by the harvesting device and that travel, at least in part, along the air plenum and in a direction of the second, exhaust end; and a baffle assembly that is located in partially occluding relation relative to the air plenum and that substantially separates the first and second particulate residue air streams.

  4. A unified method for the analysis of nonlinear viscoelasticity and fatigue cracking of asphalt mixtures using the dynamic mechanical analyzer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Castelo Branco, Veronica Teixeira Franco

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A UNIFIED METHOD FOR THE ANALYSIS OF NONLINEAR VISCOELASTICITY AND FATIGUE CRACKING OF ASPHALT MIXTURES USING THE DYNAMIC MECHANICAL ANALYZER A Dissertation by VERONICA TEIXEIRA FRANCO CASTELO BRANCO Submitted to the Office... VISCOELASTICITY AND FATIGUE CRACKING OF ASPHALT MIXTURES USING THE DYNAMIC MECHANICAL ANALYZER A Dissertation by VERONICA TEIXEIRA FRANCO CASTELO BRANCO Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment...

  5. A study of substitution solvents in asphalt fume extraction and the effects of heating duration and temperature 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Curry, Noel Thomas

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    may be used as substitute solvents for the solvent extraction analytical method for asphalt furres proposed by NlnSH and currently in use by OSHA. Benzene is known to orovide IC0% effic- 1 iency in asphalt fume extraction. The results..., rather than the solvents' effic- iency loss, was responsible for the differences. The importance of the data lies in the fact that the other two test solvents exhibited a consiatency equal to that of benzene. 'Ahile the exact coefficient of any...

  6. INTRODUCTION Asphalt is a mixture of a wide variety of chemical compounds that include aliphatic hydrocarbons and highly fused

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harms, Kyle E.

    hydrocarbons and highly fused aromatic ring systems.They are classified as asphaltenes (medium molecular weight

  7. An analysis of some properties of paving asphalts in Texas as they relate to pavement performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DuBose, Emmett Haygood

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    51 73 93 115 115 DISTRESS AND CRACKING FACTORS THE PAVEMENT PERFORMANCE SYSTEM 5 CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS CONCLUSIONS RECOMMENDATIONS REFERENCES . APPENDIX A: RAW DATA APPENDIX B: PAVEMENT PERFORMANCE VS. TIME CURVES APPENDIX C... harden1ng model. It had been shown in earlier research that excessive asphalt1c concrete binder hardening was a detrimental factor influencing certain types of pavement distress such as thermal cracking, raveling, fatigue cracking, and reflective crack...

  8. Thickness estimation of subsurface layers in asphalt pavement using monstatic ground penetrating radar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lau, Chun Lok

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1991 Major Subject: Electrical Engineering THICKNESS ESTIMATION OF SUBSURFACE LAYERS IN ASPHALT PAVEMENT USING MONSTATIC GROUND PENETRATING RADAR A Thesis CHUN LOK LAU Approved as to style and content by... ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS. LIST OF FIGURES. . CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION. 1. 1 Importance of pavement profile data. 1. 2 Principle of Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) . . . 1. 3 Subsurface layer thickness measurement method. . . . . . II GPR ANTENNA AND SYSTEM CALIBRATION...

  9. Oxidative reactions and their impact on the properties of asphalt as a pavement binder

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lau, Chee Keung

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    mechanical spectrometer was found to increase with aging time. Correlation was shown to exist between the limiting complex viscosity and the carbonyl area as determined by infrared analysis. The correlation was unique for each asphalt and was independent... of aging temperature. The carbonyl area growth rate was a strong function of the aging temperature and the temperature dependence of the rate constant followed the Arrhenius relation within the temperature range tested. The results led...

  10. Viscosity, relaxation time, and dynamics within a model asphalt of larger molecules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Derek D.; Greenfield, Michael L., E-mail: greenfield@egr.uri.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Rhode Island, Kingston, Rhode Island 02881 (United States)

    2014-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The dynamics properties of a new “next generation” model asphalt system that represents SHRP AAA-1 asphalt using larger molecules than past models is studied using molecular simulation. The system contains 72 molecules distributed over 12 molecule types that range from nonpolar branched alkanes to polar resins and asphaltenes. Molecular weights range from 290 to 890 g/mol. All-atom molecular dynamics simulations conducted at six temperatures from 298.15 to 533.15 K provide a wealth of correlation data. The modified Kohlrausch-Williams-Watts equation was regressed to reorientation time correlation functions and extrapolated to calculate average rotational relaxation times for individual molecules. The rotational relaxation rate of molecules decreased significantly with increasing size and decreasing temperature. Translational self-diffusion coefficients followed an Arrhenius dependence. Similar activation energies of ?42 kJ/mol were found for all 12 molecules in the model system, while diffusion prefactors spanned an order of magnitude. Viscosities calculated directly at 533.15 K and estimated at lower temperatures using the Debye-Stokes-Einstein relationship were consistent with experimental data for asphalts. The product of diffusion coefficient and rotational relaxation time showed only small changes with temperature above 358.15 K, indicating rotation and translation that couple self-consistently with viscosity. At lower temperatures, rotation slowed more than diffusion.

  11. Development of asphalts and pavements using recycled tire rubber. Phase 1, Technical feasibility. Technical progress report, September 1, 1994--August 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bullin, J.A.; Davison, R.R.; Glover, C.J. [and others

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    About 285 million tires are discarded every year; less than 100 million are currently being recycled, with the rest being placed in landfills and other waste sites. A solution to reduce the littering of the environment is to use ground tire rubber in road construction. Currently, about 27 million tons of asphalt are used each year in road construction and maintenance of the country`s 2 million miles of roads. If all of the waste tire rubber could be combined with asphalt in road construction, it would displace less than 6% of the total asphalt used each year, yet could save about 60 trillion Btus annually. Purpose of this project is to provide data needed to optimize the performance of rubber-asphalt concretes. The first phase is to develop asphalts and recycling agents tailored for compatibility with ground tire rubber. Chapter 2 presents results on Laboratory Testing and Evaluation: fractionate asphalt material, reblending for aromatic asphalts, verifying optimal curing parameters, aging of blends, and measuring ductilities of asphalt-rubber binders. Chapter 3 focuses on Evaluating Mixture Characteristics (modified binders). Chapter 4 covers Adhesion Test Development (water susceptibility is also covered). The final chapter focuses on the Performance/Economic Update and Commercialization Plan.

  12. Experimental Study on Shear Fatigue Behavior and Stiffness Performance of Warm Mix Asphalt by adding Synthetic Wax

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petit, Christophe; Canestrari, Francesco; Pannunzio, Valter; Virgili, Amadeo

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Synthetic waxes produced by standard and registered processes may be used to manufacture Warm Mix Asphalt (WMA), which is a modified asphalt concrete produced, applied and compacted at temperatures below those typically required. This feature leads to environmental benefits, such as reduced energy consumption, gas and fume emissions, as well as to economic/operational advantages, such as lower production costs and greater hauling distances for extended construction seasons with tighter schedules. The present article serves to compare the mechanical performance of a WMA produced by adding synthetic wax with a traditional Hot Mix Asphalt (HMA) specimen, in terms of shear fatigue response and both complex and stiffness moduli. The experimental results and related modeling work demonstrate that adding synthetic wax into the WMA composition does not hinder either the destructive or non-destructive performance of an HMA, and this finding is corroborated by respectively measuring fatigue life and stiffness.

  13. Experimental Study on Shear Fatigue Behavior and Stiffness Performance of Warm Mix Asphalt by adding Synthetic Wax

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christophe Petit; Anne Millien; Francesco Canestrari; Valter Pannunzio; Amadeo Virgili

    2012-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Synthetic waxes produced by standard and registered processes may be used to manufacture Warm Mix Asphalt (WMA), which is a modified asphalt concrete produced, applied and compacted at temperatures below those typically required. This feature leads to environmental benefits, such as reduced energy consumption, gas and fume emissions, as well as to economic/operational advantages, such as lower production costs and greater hauling distances for extended construction seasons with tighter schedules. The present article serves to compare the mechanical performance of a WMA produced by adding synthetic wax with a traditional Hot Mix Asphalt (HMA) specimen, in terms of shear fatigue response and both complex and stiffness moduli. The experimental results and related modeling work demonstrate that adding synthetic wax into the WMA composition does not hinder either the destructive or non-destructive performance of an HMA, and this finding is corroborated by respectively measuring fatigue life and stiffness.

  14. Establishing material properties for thin asphalt concrete surfaces on granular bases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosson, Barry Thomas

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    cross-section of a Goodyear Hi -Miler 10. 00-20 14-ply bias truck tire carcass was obtained; the input data for the Tielking tire model was developed by measuring cord locations, angles, and plies on a section of the tire; and the tire pressure.... Since little work in the past has been done in the area of thin asphalt concrete surface analysis, re-evaluation of several assumptions concerning the tire load were necessary. The truck tire pressures on Texas highways have dramatically increased...

  15. The Effects of Using Alkali-Silica Reaction Affected Recycled Concrete Aggregate in Hot Mix Asphalt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geiger, Brian James

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    mix asphalt (HMA) were investigated in this study. Dilatometer and modified beam tests were performed to determine the possibility of new ASR occurring in reactive aggregates within the HMA or re-expansion of existing gel. The Lottman test... (XRD) was used to check for the potential presence of gel in the filler fraction of the ASR-RCAs. Micro-deval and freeze-thaw tests were evaluated for their potential to indicate the presence of excess micro-cracks or ASR gel. Expansion testing...

  16. Whole House Thermal Performance of Asphalt Shingles Exploiting Special Infrared Reflective Pigments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hahn, L.; Miller, W.; Desjarlais, A.; Jacobs, J.; Youngquist, A.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -04 using cycle 4 as described in Table X2.1, Common Exposure Conditions, of the G 154 standard (ASTM 2002b). A UVB-340 lamp was used for simulating direct solar UV radiation; this lamp has no UV output below 300 nm, which is the cutoff wavelength... for this behavior is unknown; overall, however, the data clearly show that the IRR shingles perform just as well when subjected to direct solar UV radiation as standard products accepted on the open market. The IRR asphalt shingles do not lose solar reflectance...

  17. Porous Asphalt Pavement for Stormwater Management The UNH Stormwater Center Web: www.unh.edu/erg/cstev/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Porous Asphalt Pavement for Stormwater Management The UNH Stormwater Center Web: www. Extended Pavement Life Due to Well Drained Base and Reduced Freeze-Thaw Disadvantages · Requires Routine. Standard Pavement Applications where Stormwater Infrastructure is Required · Materials Cost is ~20-25% More

  18. SOURCE: UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA PAVEMENT RESEARCH CENTER FIGURE 1 Moisture-induced stripping in asphalt treated base layer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    SOURCE: UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA PAVEMENT RESEARCH CENTER FIGURE 1 Moisture-induced stripping in asphalt treated base layer PAVEMENT TECHNOLOGY UPDATE This Technology Transfer Program publication is provided by the University of California Pavement Research Center. The University of California Pavement

  19. Excess Foundry Sand Characterization and Experimental Investigation in Controlled Low-Strength Material and Hot-Mixing Asphalt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul J. Tikalsky, Hussain U. Bahia, An Deng and Thomas Snyder

    2004-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides technical data regarding the reuse of excess foundry sand. The report addresses three topics: a statistically sound evaluation of the characterization of foundry sand, a laboratory investigation to qualify excess foundry sand as a major component in controlled low-strength material (CLSM), and the identification of the best methods for using foundry sand as a replacement for natural aggregates for construction purposes, specifically in asphalt paving materials. The survival analysis statistical technique was used to characterize foundry sand over a full spectrum of general chemical parameters, metallic elements, and organic compounds regarding bulk analysis and leachate characterization. Not limited to characterization and environmental impact, foundry sand was evaluated by factor analyses, which contributes to proper selection of factor and maximization of the reuse marketplace for foundry sand. Regarding the integration of foundry sand into CLSM, excavatable CLSM and structural CLSM containing different types of excess foundry sands were investigated through laboratory experiments. Foundry sand was approved to constitute a major component in CLSM. Regarding the integration of foundry sand into asphalt paving materials, the optimum asphalt content was determined for each mixture, as well as the bulk density, maximum density, asphalt absorption, and air voids at Nini, Ndes, and Nmax. It was found that foundry sands can be used as an aggregate in hot-mix asphalt production, but each sand should be evaluated individually. Foundry sands tend to lower the strength of mixtures and also may make them more susceptible to moisture damage. Finally, traditional anti-stripping additives may decrease the moisture sensitivity of a mixture containing foundry sand, but not to the level allowed by most highway agencies.

  20. Excess Foundry Sand Characterization and Experimental Investigation in Controlled Low-Strength Material and Hot-Mixing Asphalt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pauul J. Tikalsky

    2004-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides technical data regarding the reuse of excess foundry sand. The report addresses three topics: (1) a statistically sound evaluation of the characterization of foundry sand, (2) a laboratory investigation to qualify excess foundry sand as a major component in controlled low-strength material (CLSM), and (3) the identification of the best methods for using foundry sand as a replacement for natural aggregates for construction purposes, specifically in asphalt paving materials. The survival analysis statistical technique was used to characterize foundry sand over a full spectrum of general chemical parameters, metallic elements, and organic compounds regarding bulk analysis and leachate characterization. Not limited to characterization and environmental impact, foundry sand was evaluated by factor analyses, which contributes to proper selection of factor and maximization of the reuse marketplace for foundry sand. Regarding the integration of foundry sand into CLSM, excavatable CLSM and structural CLSM containing different types of excess foundry sands were investigated through laboratory experiments. Foundry sand was approved to constitute a major component in CLSM. Regarding the integration of foundry sand into asphalt paving materials, the optimum asphalt content was determined for each mixture, as well as the bulk density, maximum density, asphalt absorption, and air voids at N{sub ini}, N{sub des}, and N{sub max}. It was found that foundry sands can be used as an aggregate in hot-mix asphalt production, but each sand should be evaluated individually. Foundry sands tend to lower the strength of mixtures and also may make them more susceptible to moisture damage. Finally, traditional anti-stripping additives may decrease the moisture sensitivity of a mixture containing foundry sand, but not to the level allowed by most highway agencies.

  1. Internship Contract (Includes Practicum)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thaxton, Christopher S.

    Internship Contract (Includes Practicum) Student's name-mail: _________________________________________ Internship Agency Contact Agency Name: ____________________________________ Address-mail: __________________________________________ Location of Internship, if different from Agency: ________________________________________________ Copies

  2. Two- and Three-Dimensional Microstructural Modeling of Asphalt Particulate Composite Materials using a Unified Viscoelastic-Viscoplastic-Viscodamage Constitutive Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    You, Taesun

    2013-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The main objective of this study is to develop and validate a framework for microstructural modeling of asphalt composite materials using a coupled thermo-viscoelastic, thermo-viscoplastic, and thermo-viscodamage constitutive model. In addition...

  3. Pump apparatus including deconsolidator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sonwane, Chandrashekhar; Saunders, Timothy; Fitzsimmons, Mark Andrew

    2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A pump apparatus includes a particulate pump that defines a passage that extends from an inlet to an outlet. A duct is in flow communication with the outlet. The duct includes a deconsolidator configured to fragment particle agglomerates received from the passage.

  4. Living Expenses (includes approximately

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maroncelli, Mark

    & engineering programs All other programs Graduate: MBA/INFSY at Erie & Harrisburg (12 credits) Business Guarantee 3 (Does not include Dependents Costs4 ) Altoona, Berks, Erie, and Harrisburg 12-Month Estimated

  5. Use of shredded tires in the subbase layer of asphalt pavements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Papp, W.J. Jr.; Maher, M.H. [Rutgers Univ., Piscataway, NJ (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Baker, R.F. [New Jersey Dept. of Transportation, Trenton, NJ (United States)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Research was conducted on the use of shredded scrap tires for use in the subbase layer of asphalt pavements. Mixtures of shredded scrap tires with virgin soil provide a means of recycling unwanted tires and conserving a finite supply of virgin soil. The mechanistic procedure for the design of pavement systems requires resilient modulus values. Plastic and elastic strains were measured using external LVDT`s and internal proximity sensors. Resilient modulus measurements were conducted on cohesionless soils mixed with various amounts of shredded tire chips. The performance f the shredded tire mixture is compared to that of the naturally occurring virgin soil used in subbase applications in New Jersey. A number of experimental issues are discussed such as: method of compaction, optimum ratio of shredded tire chips to soil, optimum size and gradation of shredded tire chips, and strength testing using California Bearing Ratio.

  6. Sustainable System for Residual Hazards Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kevin M. Kostelnik; James H. Clarke; Jerry L. Harbour

    2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hazardous, radioactive and other toxic substances have routinely been generated and subsequently disposed of in the shallow subsurface throughout the world. Many of today’s waste management techniques do not eliminate the problem, but rather only concentrate or contain the hazardous contaminants. Residual hazards result from the presence of hazardous and/or contaminated material that remains on-site following active operations or the completion of remedial actions. Residual hazards pose continued risk to humans and the environment and represent a significant and chronic problem that require continuous longterm management (i.e. >1000 years). To protect human health and safeguard the natural environment, a sustainable system is required for the proper management of residual hazards. A sustainable system for the management of residual hazards will require the integration of engineered, institutional and land-use controls to isolate residual contaminants and thus minimize the associated hazards. Engineered controls are physical modifications to the natural setting and ecosystem, including the site, facility, and/or the residual materials themselves, in order to reduce or eliminate the potential for exposure to contaminants of concern (COCs). Institutional controls are processes, instruments, and mechanisms designed to influence human behavior and activity. System failure can involve hazardous material escaping from the confinement because of system degradation (i.e., chronic or acute degradation) or by externalintrusion of the biosphere into the contaminated material because of the loss of institutional control. An ongoing analysis of contemporary and historic sites suggests that the significance of the loss of institutional controls is a critical pathway because decisions made during the operations/remedial action phase, as well as decisions made throughout the residual hazards management period, are key to the longterm success of the prescribed system. In fact, given that society has become more reliant on and confident of engineered controls, there may be a growing tendency to be even less concerned with institutional controls.

  7. Recycled brake linings as partial aggregate substitute in asphalt paving. Construction and final report. Report for July 1992-August 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, P.A.; Sukley, R.

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this project was to evaluate the performance of asphalt containing various percentages of brake lining as an aggregate, and compare its performance to that of normal asphalt containing natural aggregate. This project is an effort to explore alternate ways to use waste product. Four test section of FB-2 Modified mix containing brake lining materials were placed in July 1992 along with one control section on SR 3022 in Mercer county. To date all sections are performing satisfactory, and Brake linings should be recommended as a viable partial replacement of aggregate in bituminous materials. This study only considered the performance of only off-spec brake linings, therefore, any performance data or enviromental effects of placement of used brake material should be addressed.

  8. Electrochemical assessment and service-life prediction of mechanically stabilized earth walls backfilled with crushed concrete and recycled asphalt pavement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Esfeller, Michael Watts, Jr.

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 2006 Major Subject: Civil Engineering ELECTROCHEMICAL ASSESSMENT AND SERVICE-LIFE PREDICTION... OF MECHANICALLY STABILIZED EARTH WALLS BACKFILLED WITH CRUSHED CONCRETE AND RECYCLED ASPHALT PAVEMENT A Thesis by MICHAEL WATTS ESFELLER, JR. Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment...

  9. Residuals in steel products -- Impacts on properties and measures to minimize them

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Emi, Toshihiko [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Inst. for Advanced Materials Processing; Wijk, O. [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Process Metallurgy

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of major residual elements on the properties of steel products is summarized. Measures to minimize these elements are discussed including the pretreatment of raw materials, innovative refining processes and environmental issues. This paper addresses (1) scrap situation, (2) upper limit of residual concentrations acceptable for processing and product quality, (3) possible means to reduce the residuals, and (4) consideration on the practicable measures to solve the residuals problem in a systematic way. 52 refs.

  10. Value-added utilisation of recycled concrete in hot-mix asphalt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wong, Yiik Diew [School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Sun, Darren Delai [School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)]. E-mail: ddsun@ntu.edu.sg; Lai, Dickson [School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The feasibility of partial substitution of granite aggregate in hot-mix asphalt (HMA) with waste concrete aggregate was investigated. Three hybrid HMA mixes incorporating substitutions of granite fillers/fines with 6%, 45% untreated, and 45% heat-treated concrete were evaluated by the Marshall mix design method; the optimum binder contents were found to be 5.3%, 6.5% and 7.0% of grade Pen 60/70 bitumen, respectively. All three hybrid mixes satisfied the Marshall criteria of the Singapore Land Transport Authority (LTA) W3B wearing course specification. The hybrid mix with 6% concrete fillers gave comparable resilient modulus and creep resistance as the conventional W3B mix, while hybrid mixes with higher concrete substitutions achieved better performance. X-ray diffraction (XRD) showed the distinct presence of free lime in the heat-treated concrete, while the scanning electron microscope (SEM) provided an in-depth perspective of the concrete grains in the HMA matrix. The results suggest feasible use of waste concrete as partial aggregate substitution in HMA.

  11. Modeling Sustainable Agricultural Residue Removal at the Subfield Scale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muth, D.J.; McCorkle, D.S.; Koch, J.B.; Bryden, K.M.

    2012-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This study developed a computational strategy that utilizes data inputs from multiple spatial scales to investigate how variability within individual fields can impact sustainable residue removal for bioenergy production. Sustainable use of agricultural residues for bioenergy production requires consideration of the important role that residues play in limiting soil erosion and maintaining soil C, health, and productivity. Increased availability of subfield-scale data sets such as grain yield data, high-fidelity digital elevation models, and soil characteristic data provides an opportunity to investigate the impacts of subfield-scale variability on sustainable agricultural residue removal. Using three representative fields in Iowa, this study contrasted the results of current NRCS conservation management planning analysis with subfield-scale analysis for rake-and-bale removal of agricultural residue. The results of the comparison show that the field-average assumptions used in NRCS conservation management planning may lead to unsustainable residue removal decisions for significant portions of some fields. This highlights the need for additional research on subfield-scale sustainable agricultural residue removal including the development of real-time variable removal technologies for agricultural residue.

  12. Contribution of Building Materials to Urban Wet-Weather Pollutant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Shirley E.

    and to prevent stripping of asphalt from binders. · Fillers include carbon black from pyrolized tires. Asphalt · Khandal et al. (1995) investigated incorporation recycled asphalt pavement (RAP) into new

  13. A study of substitution solvents in asphalt fume extraction and the effects of heating duration and temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Curry, Noel Thomas

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (denoted Dl). Duration two ( D2) ran from time 60 minutes to time 90 minutes, Dl and DZ were separated by a 30 minute period in wh i ch no sampling occurred. The total time of heati ng at this temperature range was 90 minutes, which was near the limit... of the filter to hold it in position, and the cassette cap was placed on top of this. 3oth ends were then plugged. (Figure 2) After a warming period of approximately 30 minutes, the temperature of the liquid asphalt was raised to 250 C. iihen it reached...

  14. A novel technique for the production of cool colored concrete tile and asphalt shingle roofing products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levinson, Ronnen; Akbari, Hashem; Berdahl, Paul; Wood, Kurt; Skilton, Wayne; Petersheim, Jerry

    2009-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The widespread use of solar-reflective roofing materials can save energy, mitigate urban heat islands and slow global warming by cooling the roughly 20% of the urban surface that is roofed. In this study we created prototype solar-reflective nonwhite concrete tile and asphalt shingle roofing materials using a two-layer spray coating process intended to maximize both solar reflectance and factory-line throughput. Each layer is a thin, quick-drying, pigmented latex paint based on either acrylic or a poly(vinylidene fluoride)/acrylic blend. The first layer is a titanium dioxide rutile white basecoat that increases the solar reflectance of a gray-cement concrete tile from 0.18 to 0.79, and that of a shingle surfaced with bare granules from 0.06 to 0.62. The second layer is a 'cool' color topcoat with weak near-infrared (NIR) absorption and/or strong NIR backscattering. Each layer dries within seconds, potentially allowing a factory line to pass first under the white spray, then under the color spray. We combined a white basecoat with monocolor topcoats in various shades of red, brown, green and blue to prepare 24 cool color prototype tiles and 24 cool color prototypes shingles. The solar reflectances of the tiles ranged from 0.26 (dark brown; CIELAB lightness value L* = 29) to 0.57 (light green; L* = 76); those of the shingles ranged from 0.18 (dark brown; L* = 26) to 0.34 (light green; L* = 68). Over half of the tiles had a solar reflectance of at least 0.40, and over half of the shingles had a solar reflectance of at least 0.25.

  15. Chemical Characterization of Individual Particles and Residuals...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Individual Particles and Residuals of Cloud Droplets and Ice Crystals Collected On Board Research Chemical Characterization of Individual Particles and Residuals of Cloud Droplets...

  16. Asphaltenes and Asphalts, 2. Developments in Petroleum Science, 40 B edited by T.F. Yen and G.V. Chilingarian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ă?agin, Tahir

    Asphaltenes and Asphalts, 2. Developments in Petroleum Science, 40 B edited by T.F. Yen and G OF ASPHALTENES: A PREDICTIVE APPROACH BASED ON COMPUTER ASSISTED STRUCTURE ELUCIDATION AND ATOMISTIC SIMULATIONS, asphaltenes and resins [1­4]. Asphaltenes are operationally defined as the non-volatile and polar fraction

  17. DISSOLUTION OF NEPTUNIUM OXIDE RESIDUES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kyser, E

    2009-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the development of a dissolution flowsheet for neptunium (Np) oxide (NpO{sub 2}) residues (i.e., various NpO{sub 2} sources, HB-Line glovebox sweepings, and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) thermogravimetric analysis samples). Samples of each type of materials proposed for processing were dissolved in a closed laboratory apparatus and the rate and total quantity of off-gas were measured. Samples of the off-gas were also analyzed. The quantity and type of solids remaining (when visible) were determined after post-dissolution filtration of the solution. Recommended conditions for dissolution of the NpO{sub 2} residues are: Solution Matrix and Loading: {approx}50 g Np/L (750 g Np in 15 L of dissolver solution), using 8 M nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}), 0.025 M potassium fluoride (KF) at greater than 100 C for at least 3 hours. Off-gas: Analysis of the off-gas indicated nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}) and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) as the only identified components. No hydrogen (H{sub 2}) was detected. The molar ratio of off-gas produced per mole of Np dissolved ranged from 0.25 to 0.4 moles of gas per mole of Np dissolved. A peak off-gas rate of {approx}0.1 scfm/kg bulk oxide was observed. Residual Solids: Pure NpO{sub 2} dissolved with little or no residue with the proposed flowsheet but the NpCo and both sweepings samples left visible solid residue after dissolution. For the NpCo and Part II Sweepings samples the residue amounted to {approx}1% of the initial material, but for the Part I Sweepings sample, the residue amounted to {approx}8 % of the initial material. These residues contained primarily aluminum (Al) and silicon (Si) compounds that did not completely dissolve under the flowsheet conditions. The residues from both sweepings samples contained minor amounts of plutonium (Pu) particles. Overall, the undissolved Np and Pu particles in the residues were a very small fraction of the total solids.

  18. Thin layer chromatography residue applicator sampler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nunes, Peter J. (Danville, CA); Kelly, Fredrick R. (Modesto, CA); Haas, Jeffrey S. (San Ramon, CA); Andresen, Brian D. (Livermore, CA)

    2007-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A thin layer chromatograph residue applicator sampler. The residue applicator sampler provides for rapid analysis of samples containing high explosives, chemical warfare, and other analyses of interest under field conditions. This satisfied the need for a field-deployable, small, hand-held, all-in-one device for efficient sampling, sample dissolution, and sample application to an analytical technique. The residue applicator sampler includes a sampling sponge that is resistant to most chemicals and is fastened via a plastic handle in a hermetically sealed tube containing a known amount of solvent. Upon use, the wetted sponge is removed from the sealed tube and used as a swiping device across an environmental sample. The sponge is then replaced in the hermetically sealed tube where the sample remains contained and dissolved in the solvent. A small pipette tip is removably contained in the hermetically sealed tube. The sponge is removed and placed into the pipette tip where a squeezing-out of the dissolved sample from the sponge into the pipette tip results in a droplet captured in a vial for later instrumental analysis, or applied directly to a thin layer chromatography plate for immediate analysis.

  19. Residual stresses and stress corrosion cracking in pipe fittings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parrington, R.J.; Scott, J.J.; Torres, F.

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Residual stresses can play a key role in the SCC performance of susceptible materials in PWR primary water applications. Residual stresses are stresses stored within the metal that develop during deformation and persist in the absence of external forces or temperature gradients. Sources of residual stresses in pipe fittings include fabrication processes, installation and welding. There are a number of methods to characterize the magnitude and orientation of residual stresses. These include numerical analysis, chemical cracking tests, and measurement (e.g., X-ray diffraction, neutron diffraction, strain gage/hole drilling, strain gage/trepanning, strain gage/section and layer removal, and acoustics). This paper presents 400 C steam SCC test results demonstrating that residual stresses in as-fabricated Alloy 600 pipe fittings are sufficient to induce SCC. Residual stresses present in as-fabricated pipe fittings are characterized by chemical cracking tests (stainless steel fittings tested in boiling magnesium chloride solution) and by the sectioning and layer removal (SLR) technique.

  20. PUFF TOO: a residual stress experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, C.W.

    1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Following the passage of the dynamic effects in a contained explosive detonation, there remains a strong compressive stress field in the material about the cavity. In this experiment, a 454-kg (1000 lb) sphere of high explosive was detonated in saturated ashfall tuff. Instrumentation measured peak stresses over the range of 0.1 to 6.0 GPa (1 to 6 kbar) and the complete stress-time waveform, including the so-called residual stress, at the 0.1 GPa (1 kbar) peak stress range. Mineback revealed detonation-induced fractures and fractures induced by postevent work.

  1. Residual activation of accelerator components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rakhno, I.L.; Mokhov, N.V.; Striganov, S.I.; /Fermilab

    2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method to calculate residual activation of accelerator components is presented. A model for residual dose estimation for thick objects made of arbitrary composite materials for arbitrary irradiation and cooling times is employed in this study. A scaling procedure is described to apply the model to thin objects with linear dimensions less than a fraction of a nuclear interaction length. The scaling has been performed for various materials and corresponding factors have been determined for objects of certain shapes (slab, solid and hollow cylinder) that can serve as models for beam pipes, magnets and collimators. Both contact residual dose and dose attenuation in the air outside irradiated objects are considered. A relation between continuous and impulse irradiation is accounted for as well.

  2. Utilize Cementitious High Carbon Fly Ash (CHCFA) to Stabilize Cold In-Place Recycled (CIR) Asphalt Pavement as Base Coarse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wen, Haifang; Li, Xiaojun; Edil, Tuncer; O'Donnell, Jonathan; Danda, Swapna

    2011-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of cementitious high carbon fly ash (CHCFA) stabilized recycled asphalt pavement as a base course material in a real world setting. Three test road cells were built at MnROAD facility in Minnesota. These cells have the same asphalt surface layers, subbases, and subgrades, but three different base courses: conventional crushed aggregates, untreated recycled pavement materials (RPM), and CHCFA stabilized RPM materials. During and after the construction of the three cells, laboratory and field tests were carried out to characterize the material properties. The test results were used in the mechanistic-empirical pavement design guide (MEPDG) to predict the pavement performance. Based on the performance prediction, the life cycle analyses of cost, energy consumption, and greenhouse gasses were performed. The leaching impacts of these three types of base materials were compared. The laboratory and field tests showed that fly ash stabilized RPM had higher modulus than crushed aggregate and RPM did. Based on the MEPDG performance prediction, the service life of the Cell 79 containing fly ash stabilized RPM, is 23.5 years, which is about twice the service life (11 years) of the Cell 77 with RPM base, and about three times the service life (7.5 years) of the Cell 78 with crushed aggregate base. The life cycle analysis indicated that the usage of the fly ash stabilized RPM as the base of the flexible pavement can significantly reduce the life cycle cost, the energy consumption, the greenhouse gases emission. Concentrations of many trace elements, particularly those with relatively low water quality standards, diminish over time as water flows through the pavement profile. For many elements, concentrations below US water drinking water quality standards are attained at the bottom of the pavement profile within 2-4 pore volumes of flow.

  3. Modeling, Optimization and Economic Evaluation of Residual Biomass Gasification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Georgeson, Adam

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    . .............................................................................. 7 Table 2. Components Used in Simulation. ...................................................................... 20 Table 3. Composition of Biomass Feedstock to Biorefinery. ......................................... 43 Table 4. Operating... for optimizing gasification plant design from an economic perspective. Specifically, the problem addressed in this work is stated as follows: Given are: ? A set of biomass feedstocks {i|i = 1,2,?,I } which includes fresh as well as residue biomass ? A set...

  4. Alcohol production from agricultural and forestry residues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dale, L; Opilla, R; Surles, T

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Technologies available for the production of ethanol from whole corn are reviewed. Particular emphasis is placed on the environmental aspects of the process, including land utilization and possible air and water pollutants. Suggestions are made for technological changes intended to improve the economics of the process as well as to reduce some of the pollution from by-product disposal. Ethanol may be derived from renewable cellulosic substances by either enzymatic or acid hydrolysis of cellulose to sugar, followed by conventional fermentation and distillation. The use of two agricultural residues - corn stover (field stalks remaining after harvest) and straw from wheat crops - is reviewed as a cellulosic feedstock. Two processes have been evaluated with regard to environmental impact - a two-stage acid process developed by G.T. Tsao of Purdue University and an enzymatic process based on the laboratory findings of C.R. Wilke of the University of California, Berkeley. The environmental residuals expected from the manufacture of methyl and ethyl alcohols from woody biomass are covered. The methanol is produced in a gasification process, whereas ethanol is produced by hydrolysis and fermentation processes similar to those used to derive ethanol from cellulosic materials.

  5. Alcohol production from agricultural and forestry residues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Opilla, R.; Dale, L.; Surles, T.

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A variety of carbohydrate sources can be used as raw material for the production of ethanol. Section 1 is a review of technologies available for the production of ethanol from whole corn. Particular emphasis is placed on the environmental aspects of the process, including land utilization and possible air and water pollutants. Suggestions are made for technological changes intended to improve the economics of the process as well as to reduce some of the pollution from by-product disposal. Ethanol may be derived from renewable cellulosic substances by either enzymatic or acid hydrolysis of cellulose to sugar, followed by conventional fermentation and distillation. Section 2 is a review of the use of two agricultural residues - corn stover (field stalks remaining after harvest) and straw from wheat crops - as a cellulosic feedstock. Two processes have been evaluated with regard to environmental impact - a two-stage acid process developed by G.T. Tsao of Purdue University and an enzymatic process based on the laboratory findings of C.R. Wilke of the University of California, Berkeley. Section 3 deals with the environmental residuals expected from the manufacture of methyl and ethyl alcohols from woody biomass. The methanol is produced in a gasification process, whereas ethanol is produced by hydrolysis and fermentation processes similar to those used to derive ethanol from cellulosic materials.

  6. Rutting Performance of Airport Hot-Mix Asphalt Characterized by Laboratory Performance Testing, Full-Scale Accelerated Pavement Testing, and Finite Element Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rushing, John Ford

    2014-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    California Bearing Ratio DoD Department of Defense DSR Dynamic Shear Rheometer ERDC U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center FAA Federal Aviation Administration FN flow number FT flow time HMA Hot Mix Asphalt HVS heavy vehicle simulator... aircraft continue to necessitate modifications in the procedures by which HMA mixtures are designed so that rutting does not become a prevalent distress on airport pavements. The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has predominantly required use...

  7. Management of high sulfur coal combustion residues, issues and practices: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chugh, Y.P.; Beasley, G.A. [eds.

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Papers presented at the following sessions are included in this proceedings: (1) overview topic; (2) characterization of coal combustion residues; (3) environmental impacts of residues management; (4) materials handling and utilization, Part I; and (5) materials handling and utilization, Part II. Selected paper have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  8. Residual Stresses in Weldments by Neutron Diffraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandara, Arosha

    Rectors and Pressurised Water Reactors Source of Problem · Internal Residual Stress · Material propertiesResidual Stresses in Weldments by Neutron Diffraction Shanmukha Rao M, Jon James, Shirley Northover of Residual Stress inside Materials Material: 3 Pass Weld Austenitic Stainless Steel Working Principle

  9. DRAINED RESIDUAL STRENGTH OF COHESIVE SOILSa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that the residual friction angle is independent of the original shear strength, water content, and liquidity indexDRAINED RESIDUAL STRENGTH OF COHESIVE SOILSa Discussion by Robert W. Day,3 Fellow, ASCE The authors have preparcd an important paper on the drained residual shear strength of cohesive soil. The authors

  10. Method For Characterizing Residual Stress In Metals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jacobson, Loren A. (Santa Fe, NM); Michel, David J. (Alexandria, VA); Wyatt, Jeffrey R. (Burke, VA)

    2002-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is provided for measuring the residual stress in metals. The method includes the steps of drilling one or more holes in a metal workpiece to a preselected depth and mounting one or more acoustic sensors on the metal workpiece and connecting the sensors to an electronic detecting and recording device. A liquid metal capable of penetrating into the metal workpiece placed at the bottom of the hole or holes. A recording is made over a period of time (typically within about two hours) of the magnitude and number of noise events which occur as the liquid metal penetrates into the metal workpiece. The magnitude and number of noise events are then correlated to the internal stress in the region of the workpiece at the bottom of the hole.

  11. Recovery of gallium from aluminum industry residues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carvalho, M.S.; Neto, K.C.M.; Nobrega, A.W.; Medeiros, J.A.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A procedure is proposed to recover gallium from flue dust aluminum residues produced in plants by using solid-phase extraction with a commercial polyether-type polyurethane foam (PUF). Gallium can be separated from high concentrations of aluminum, iron, nickel, titanium, vanadium, copper, zinc, sulfate, fluoride, and chloride by extraction with PUF from 3 M sulfuric acid and 3 M sodium chloride concentration medium with at least a 92% efficiency. Gallium backextraction was fast and quantitative with ethanol solution. In all recovery steps commercial-grade reagents could be used, including tap water. The recovered gallium was precipitated with sodium hydroxide solution, purified by dissolution and precipitation, calcinated, and the final oxide was 98.6% pure.

  12. Countries Gasoline Prices Including Taxes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Selected Countries (U.S. dollars per gallon, including taxes) Date Belgium France Germany Italy Netherlands UK US 51115 6.15 6.08 6.28 6.83 6.96 6.75 3.06 5415 6.14 6.06...

  13. Sponsorship includes: Agriculture in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    Sponsorship includes: · Agriculture in the Classroom · Douglas County Farm Bureau · Gifford Farm · University of Nebraska Agricultural Research and Development Center · University of Nebraska- Lincoln Awareness Coalition is to help youth, primarily from urban communities, become aware of agriculture

  14. MODELING OF PLUTONIUM RECOVERY AND DISCARD PROCESSES FOR THE PURPOSE OF SELECTING OPTIMUM (MINIMUM WASTE, COST AND DOSE) RESIDUE DISPOSITIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. A. ROBINSON; M. B. KINKER; ET AL

    2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Researchers have developed a quantitative basis for disposition of actinide-bearing process residues. Research included the development of a technical rationale for determining when residues could be considered unattractive for proliferation purposes, and establishing plutonium-concentration-based discard ceilings of unimmobilized residues and richer discard ceilings for immobilized monolithic waste forms. Further quantitative analysis (process modeling) identifies the plutonium (Pu) concentration at which residues should be discarded to immobilization in order to minimize the quantifiable negative consequences of residue processing (cost, waste, dose). Results indicate that optimum disposition paths can be identified by process modeling, and that across-the-board discard decisions maximize negative consequences.

  15. Process to recycle shredder residue

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jody, Bassam J. (Chicago, IL); Daniels, Edward J. (Oak Lawn, IL); Bonsignore, Patrick V. (Channahon, IL)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system and process for recycling shredder residue, in which separating any polyurethane foam materials are first separated. Then separate a fines fraction of less than about 1/4 inch leaving a plastics-rich fraction. Thereafter, the plastics rich fraction is sequentially contacted with a series of solvents beginning with one or more of hexane or an alcohol to remove automotive fluids; acetone to remove ABS; one or more of EDC, THF or a ketone having a boiling point of not greater than about 125.degree. C. to remove PVC; and one or more of xylene or toluene to remove polypropylene and polyethylene. The solvents are recovered and recycled.

  16. An Integrated Model for Assessment of Sustainable Agricultural Residue Removal Limits for Bioenergy Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. Muth; K. M. Bryden

    2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Agricultural residues have been identified as a significant potential resource for bioenergy production, but serious questions remain about the sustainability of harvesting residues. Agricultural residues play an important role in limiting soil erosion from wind and water and in maintaining soil organic carbon. Because of this, multiple factors must be considered when assessing sustainable residue harvest limits. Validated and accepted modeling tools for assessing these impacts include the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation Version 2 (RUSLE2), the Wind Erosion Prediction System (WEPS), and the Soil Conditioning Index. Currently, these models do not work together as a single integrated model. Rather, use of these models requires manual interaction and data transfer. As a result, it is currently not feasible to use these computational tools to perform detailed sustainable agricultural residue availability assessments across large spatial domains or to consider a broad range of land management practices. This paper presents an integrated modeling strategy that couples existing datasets with the RUSLE2 water erosion, WEPS wind erosion, and Soil Conditioning Index soil carbon modeling tools to create a single integrated residue removal modeling system. This enables the exploration of the detailed sustainable residue harvest scenarios needed to establish sustainable residue availability. Using this computational tool, an assessment study of residue availability for the state of Iowa was performed. This study included all soil types in the state of Iowa, four representative crop rotation schemes, variable crop yields, three tillage management methods, and five residue removal methods. The key conclusions of this study are that under current management practices and crop yields nearly 26.5 million Mg of agricultural residue are sustainably accessible in the state of Iowa, and that through the adoption of no till practices residue removal could sustainably approach 40 million Mg. However, when considering the economics and logistics of residue harvest, yields below 2.25 Mg ha-1 are generally considered to not be viable for a commercial bioenergy system. Applying this constraint, the total agricultural residue resource available in Iowa under current management practices is 19 million Mg. Previously published results have shown residue availability from 22 million Mg to over 50 million Mg in Iowa.

  17. Pulp and paper mill fibrous residuals in excavatable flowable fill Y.-m. Chun, T.R. Naik, & R.N. Kraus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    biological treatment of wastewater. Fiber reclaim is composed of wood cellulose fibers and moisture mills Fibrous residuals from pulp and paper mills include wastewater-treatment residuals (also called sludge), fiber reclaim, and screening rejects. The basic components of the wastewater-treatment residuals

  18. Characterization Report on Sand, Slag, and Crucible Residues and on Fluoride Residues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murray, A.M.

    1999-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports on the chemical characterization of the sand, slag, and crucible (SS and C) residues and the fluoride residues that may be shipped from the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) to Savannah River Site (SRS).

  19. Contributions to the development of residual discretizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Contributions to the development of residual discretizations for hyperbolic conservation laws with application to shallow water flows Manuscript submitted in fulfillment of the requirements for the obtention;Contents 1 Overview 9 1.1 Residual schemes for hyperbolic conservation laws

  20. Asymptotics for GARCH Squared Residual Correlations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kokoszka, Piotr

    Asymptotics for GARCH Squared Residual Correlations Istv'an Berkes \\Lambda A. R'enyi Institute a GARCH(p; q) model. Denoting by â?? r n (k); k â?? 1; these autocorrelations computed from a realization words and phrases: GARCH(p; q) sequence, quasi--maximum likelihood esti­ mator, squared residuals

  1. University of Pittsburgh Residual Funds on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sibille, Etienne

    University of Pittsburgh Residual Funds on FINANCIAL GUIDELINE Subject: Sponsored Projects I by the sponsor. Funds cannot be unilaterally retained by the University. Failure to return residual funds related funds on sponsored grants and contracts on the financial accounting records of the University

  2. Data Conversion in Residue Number System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zilic, Zeljko

    for direct conversion when interaction with the real analog world is required. We first develop two efficient schemes for direct analog-to-residue conversion. Another efficient scheme for direct residue analogique réel est nécessaire. Nous dévelopons deux systèmes efficaces pour la conversion directe du domaine

  3. Conversion of geothermal waste to commercial products including silica

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Premuzic, Eugene T. (East Moriches, NY); Lin, Mow S. (Rocky Point, NY)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for the treatment of geothermal residue includes contacting the pigmented amorphous silica-containing component with a depigmenting reagent one or more times to depigment the silica and produce a mixture containing depigmented amorphous silica and depigmenting reagent containing pigment material; separating the depigmented amorphous silica and from the depigmenting reagent to yield depigmented amorphous silica. Before or after the depigmenting contacting, the geothermal residue or depigmented silica can be treated with a metal solubilizing agent to produce another mixture containing pigmented or unpigmented amorphous silica-containing component and a solubilized metal-containing component; separating these components from each other to produce an amorphous silica product substantially devoid of metals and at least partially devoid of pigment. The amorphous silica product can be neutralized and thereafter dried at a temperature from about 25.degree. C. to 300.degree. C. The morphology of the silica product can be varied through the process conditions including sequence contacting steps, pH of depigmenting reagent, neutralization and drying conditions to tailor the amorphous silica for commercial use in products including filler for paint, paper, rubber and polymers, and chromatographic material.

  4. Process for treatment of residual gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nolden, K.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is disclosed for the treatment of the residual gases which are produced when hydrogen sulfide is reduced, by combustion, to elementary sulfur by the Claus process. The residual gases are fed through a heated conduit and gas scrubber, wherein the temperature of those residual gases are maintained above the melting point of sulfur. A portion of the raw coke oven gas condensate is admitted to the gas scrubber to be returned to the coke oven battery main from the flushing liquid separator as flushing liquor. The residual gases are then conducted through the coke oven gas purification process equipment along with the raw coke oven gas where the residual gases are intermixed with the raw coke oven gas prior to tar separation.

  5. An evaluation of permanent deformation properties of crumb rubber modified (CRM) asphalt concrete mixtures 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Makunike, Danai Ellarin

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    that are associated with permanent deformation. These include Hveem stability, air voids, permeability, creep response, and compressive strength. Three CRMAC mixtures were used, each containing different amounts of RAP. The study aimed at defining how these properties...

  6. Laboratory Evaluation of Hot-Mix Asphalt Concrete Fatigue Cracking Resistance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jamison, Brandon Parker

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    that the crack initiates in the center of the specimen, including Walubita et al. (5), Mohammad et al. (10), and Mull et al. (21). Notch depths vary depending on many factors such as specimen thickness, diameter, loading rate, test temperature, and mix type...

  7. Mobilisation of arsenic from bauxite residue (red mud) affected soils: Effect of pH and redox conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burke, Ian

    ). Typically, it comprises residual iron oxides, quartz, sodium aluminosilicates, titanium dioxide, calciumMobilisation of arsenic from bauxite residue (red mud) affected soils: Effect of pH and redox elements, including arsenic. Aerobic and anaer- obic batch experiments were prepared using soils from near

  8. SOLAR HEATING OF TANK BOTTOMS Application of Solar Heating to Asphaltic and Parrafinic Oils Reducing Fuel Costs and Greenhouse Gases Due to Use of Natural Gas and Propane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eugene A. Fritzler

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The sale of crude oil requires that the crude meet product specifications for BS&W, temperature, pour point and API gravity. The physical characteristics of the crude such as pour point and viscosity effect the efficient loading, transport, and unloading of the crude oil. In many cases, the crude oil has either a very high paraffin content or asphalt content which will require either hot oiling or the addition of diluents to the crude oil to reduce the viscosity and the pour point of the oil allowing the crude oil to be readily loaded on to the transport. Marginal wells are significantly impacted by the cost of preheating the oil to an appropriate temperature to allow for ease of transport. Highly paraffinic and asphaltic oils exist throughout the D-J basin and generally require pretreatment during cold months prior to sales. The current study addresses the use of solar energy to heat tank bottoms and improves the overall efficiency and operational reliability of stripper wells.

  9. Arabian crude-oil residues evaluated

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ali, M.F.; Bukhari, A.; Hasan, M.; Saleem, M.

    1985-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This article evaluates detailed physical and chemical characteristics for four important Saudi Arabian resids. Petroleum residues are composed of a mixture of large and complex hydrocarbon molecules along with one or more heteroatoms such as sulfur, oxygen, nitrogen, vanadium, and nickel. The amount of residue and its physical and chemical composition depend on the source of the crude oil and methods of processing. Residues from four Saudi Arabian crude oils produced by the Arabian American Oil Co. (Aramco) were evaluated. The crude oils are 38.5 degrees API Arabian Extra Light, 33.8 degrees API Arabian Light, 30.4 degrees Api Arabian Medium, and 28.03 degrees API Arabian Heavy. Results are presented and residue preparation, and physical and chemical characteristics are analyzed.

  10. California: Agricultural Residues Produce Renewable Fuel | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Logos Technologies and EERE partnered with EdeniQ of Visalia, California, to construct a pilot plant that processes 1.2 tons per day of agricultural residues, such as corn stover...

  11. Residual stress in nanocrystalline nickel tungsten electrodeposits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ziebell, Tiffany D. (Tiffany Dawn)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Characterizing the residual stress of thick nanocrystalline electrodeposits poses several unique challenges due to their fine grain structure, thickness distribution, and matte surface. We employ a three-dimensional ...

  12. Residual Toxicities of Insecticides to Cotton Insects.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hightower, B. G.; Gaines, J. C.

    1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Summary Results of experiments conducted to determine leafworm, the salt-marsh caterpillar and the garden the effect of natural or simulated climatic conditions webworm. on the residual toxicities of several chlorinated hydro- carbon... variety of weathering conditions. Based on residual properties alone, toxaphene and dieldrin ranked with endrin and Sevin, but the initial toxicities of dieldrin and endrin to the boll weevil were appreciably greater than those of toxaphene...

  13. Residual Toxicities of Insecticides to Cotton Insects. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hightower, B. G.; Gaines, J. C.

    1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Summary Results of experiments conducted to determine leafworm, the salt-marsh caterpillar and the garden the effect of natural or simulated climatic conditions webworm. on the residual toxicities of several chlorinated hydro- carbon... variety of weathering conditions. Based on residual properties alone, toxaphene and dieldrin ranked with endrin and Sevin, but the initial toxicities of dieldrin and endrin to the boll weevil were appreciably greater than those of toxaphene...

  14. ABSTRACT: Bioenergy Harvesting Technologies to Supply Crop Residues...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ABSTRACT: Bioenergy Harvesting Technologies to Supply Crop Residues In a Densified Large Square Bale Format ABSTRACT: Bioenergy Harvesting Technologies to Supply Crop Residues In a...

  15. Sustainable Agricultural Residue Removal for Bioenergy: A Spatially Comprehensive National Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. Muth, Jr.; K. M. Bryden; R. G. Nelson

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study provides a spatially comprehensive assessment of sustainable agricultural residue removal potential across the United States. Earlier assessments determining the quantity of agricultural residue that could be sustainably removed for bioenergy production at the regional and national scale faced a number of computational limitations. These limitations included the number of environmental factors, the number of land management scenarios, and the spatial fidelity and spatial extent of the assessment. This study utilizes integrated multi-factor environmental process modeling and high fidelity land use datasets to perform a spatially comprehensive assessment of sustainably removable agricultural residues across the conterminous United States. Soil type represents the base spatial unit for this study and is modeled using a national soil survey database at the 10 – 100 m scale. Current crop rotation practices are identified by processing land cover data available from the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service Cropland Data Layer database. Land management and residue removal scenarios are identified for each unique crop rotation and crop management zone. Estimates of county averages and state totals of sustainably available agricultural residues are provided. The results of the assessment show that in 2011 over 150 million metric tons of agricultural residues could have been sustainably removed across the United States. Projecting crop yields and land management practices to 2030, the assessment determines that over 207 million metric tons of agricultural residues will be able to be sustainably removed for bioenergy production at that time.

  16. A range of soil amendments including diammonium phosphate fertilizer (DAP), municipal biosolids (BS), biosolids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Sally

    biosolids (BS), biosolids compost, and Al- and Fe-based water treatment residuals were tested on Pb-, Zn for the first season, with the highest growth in the treatments that included compost and biosolids). Application of municipal biosolids in combination with a lime source has also been shown to reduce th

  17. BY HOW MUCH CAN RESIDUAL MINIMIZATION ACCELERATE THE CONVERGENCE OF ORTHOGONAL RESIDUAL METHODS?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gutknecht, Martin H.

    . Examples of such pairs are the conjugate gradient (CG) and the conjugate residual (CR) methods, the full-minimal residual (QMR) methods. Also the pairs consisting of the (bi)conjugate gradient squared (CGS, iterative method, Krylov space method, conjugate gradient method, biconjugate gradient method, CG, CGNE

  18. Residual dust charges in discharge afterglow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coueedel, L.; Mikikian, M.; Boufendi, L.; Samarian, A. A. [GREMI - Groupe de Recherches sur l'Energetique des Milieux Ionises, CNRS/Universite d'Orleans, 14 rue d'Issoudun, 45067 Orleans Cedex 2 (France); School of Physics A28, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An on-ground measurement of dust-particle residual charges in the afterglow of a dusty plasma was performed in a rf discharge. An upward thermophoretic force was used to balance the gravitational force. It was found that positively charged, negatively charged, and neutral dust particles coexisted for more than 1 min after the discharge was switched off. The mean residual charge for 200-nm-radius particles was measured. The dust particle mean charge is about -5e at a pressure of 1.2 mbar and about -3e at a pressure of 0.4 mbar.

  19. Residual oil conversion in Ashland FCC Units

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barger, D.F.; Miller, C.B.

    1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ashland Petroleum Company is a production-poor refining and marketing company. A company must have refining flexibility to compete in today's crude and marketing situation. Ashland has adopted a dual approach to achieving the required refining flexibility: development and construction of the RCC process, and development of techniques to practice residual oil conversion in Ashland FCC units. This paper discusses the operating techniques Ashland has used to allow residual oil conversion to be practiced in their present day FCC's and shows some of the yields which have been achieved.

  20. Evaluation of low-residue soldering for military and commercial applications: A report from the Low-Residue Soldering Task Force

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iman, R.L.; Anderson, D.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Burress, R.V. [SEHO (United States)] [and others

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The LRSTF combined the efforts of industry, military, and government to evaluate low-residue soldering processes for military and commercial applications. These processes were selected for evaluation because they provide a means for the military to support the presidential mandate while producing reliable hardware at a lower cost. This report presents the complete details and results of a testing program conducted by the LRSTF to evaluate low-residue soldering for printed wiring assemblies. A previous informal document provided details of the test plan used in this evaluation. Many of the details of that test plan are contained in this report. The test data are too massive to include in this report, however, these data are available on disk as Excel spreadsheets upon request. The main purpose of low-residue soldering is to eliminate waste streams during the manufacturing process.

  1. Chemical Stabilization of Hanford Tank Residual Waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cantrell, Kirk J.; Um, Wooyong; Williams, Benjamin D.; Bowden, Mark E.; Gartman, Brandy N.; Lukens, Wayne W.; Buck, Edgar C.; Mausolf, Edward J.

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three different chemical treatment methods were tested for their ability to stabilize residual waste from Hanford tank C-202 for reducing contaminant release (Tc, Cr, and U in particular). The three treatment methods tested were lime addition [Ca(OH)2], an in-situ Ceramicrete waste form based on chemically bonded phosphate ceramics, and a ferrous iron/goethite treatment. These approaches rely on formation of insoluble forms of the contaminants of concern (lime addition and ceramicrete) and chemical reduction followed by co-precipitation (ferrous iron/goethite incorporation treatment). The results have demonstrated that release of the three most significant mobile contaminants of concern from tank residual wastes can be dramatically reduced after treatment compared to contact with simulated grout porewater without treatment. For uranium, all three treatments methods reduced the leachable uranium concentrations by well over three orders of magnitude. In the case of uranium and technetium, released concentrations were well below their respective MCLs for the wastes tested. For tank C-202 residual waste, chromium release concentrations were above the MCL but were considerably reduced relative to untreated tank waste. This innovative approach has the potential to revolutionize Hanford’s tank retrieval process, by allowing larger volumes of residual waste to be left in tanks while providing an acceptably low level of risk with respect to contaminant release that is protective of the environment and human health. Such an approach could enable DOE to realize significant cost savings through streamlined retrieval and closure operations.

  2. The National Nuclear Laboratory's Approach to Processing Mixed Wastes and Residues - 13080

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenwood, Howard; Docrat, Tahera; Allinson, Sarah J.; Coppersthwaite, Duncan P.; Sultan, Ruqayyah; May, Sarah [National Nuclear Laboratory, Springfields, Preston, UK, PR4 0XJ (United Kingdom)] [National Nuclear Laboratory, Springfields, Preston, UK, PR4 0XJ (United Kingdom)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Nuclear Laboratory (NNL) treats a wide variety of materials produced as by-products of the nuclear fuel cycle, mostly from uranium purification and fuel manufacture but also including materials from uranium enrichment and from the decommissioning of obsolete plants. In the context of this paper, treatment is defined as recovery of uranium or other activity from residues, the recycle of uranium to the fuel cycle or preparation for long term storage and the final disposal or discharge to the environment of the remainder of the material. NNL's systematic but flexible approach to residue assessment and treatment is described in this paper. The approach typically comprises up to five main phases. The benefits of a systematic approach to waste and residue assessments and processing are described in this paper with examples used to illustrate each phase of work. Benefits include early identification of processing routes or processing issues and the avoidance of investment in inappropriate and costly plant or processes. (authors)

  3. Method for using global optimization to the estimation of surface-consistent residual statics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reister, David B. (Knoxville, TN); Barhen, Jacob (Oak Ridge, TN); Oblow, Edward M. (Knoxville, TN)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An efficient method for generating residual statics corrections to compensate for surface-consistent static time shifts in stacked seismic traces. The method includes a step of framing the residual static corrections as a global optimization problem in a parameter space. The method also includes decoupling the global optimization problem involving all seismic traces into several one-dimensional problems. The method further utilizes a Stochastic Pijavskij Tunneling search to eliminate regions in the parameter space where a global minimum is unlikely to exist so that the global minimum may be quickly discovered. The method finds the residual statics corrections by maximizing the total stack power. The stack power is a measure of seismic energy transferred from energy sources to receivers.

  4. The Phase One I-710 Freeway Rehabilitation Project: Initial Design (1999) to Performance after Five-Plus Years of Traffic (2009)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monismith, Carl L.; Harvey, John T; Tsai, Bor-Wen; Long, Fenella; Signore, J.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Open-graded Porous Friction Asphalt Concrete (PBA-6a*)additional asphalt concrete and the porous friction course.concrete with asphalt rubber binder (RAC-O). The thickness including the open-graded porous

  5. RCS pressure under reduced inventory conditions following a loss of residual heat removal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palmrose, D.E.; Hughes, E.D.; Johnsen, G.W.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The thermal-hydraulic response of a closed-reactor coolant system to loss of residual heat removal (RHR) cooling is investigated. The processes examined include: core coolant boiling and steam generator reflux condensation, pressure increase on the primary side, heat transfer mechanisms on the steam generator primary and secondary sides, and effects of noncondensible gas on heat transfer processes.

  6. RCS pressure under reduced inventory conditions following a loss of residual heat removal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palmrose, D.E.; Hughes, E.D.; Johnsen, G.W.

    1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The thermal-hydraulic response of a closed-reactor coolant system to loss of residual heat removal (RHR) cooling is investigated. The processes examined include: core coolant boiling and steam generator reflux condensation, pressure increase on the primary side, heat transfer mechanisms on the steam generator primary and secondary sides, and effects of noncondensible gas on heat transfer processes.

  7. Estimating Residual Solids Volume In Underground Storage Tanks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, Jason L.; Worthy, S. Jason; Martin, Bruce A.; Tihey, John R.

    2014-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River Site liquid waste system consists of multiple facilities to safely receive and store legacy radioactive waste, treat, and permanently dispose waste. The large underground storage tanks and associated equipment, known as the 'tank farms', include a complex interconnected transfer system which includes underground transfer pipelines and ancillary equipment to direct the flow of waste. The waste in the tanks is present in three forms: supernatant, sludge, and salt. The supernatant is a multi-component aqueous mixture, while sludge is a gel-like substance which consists of insoluble solids and entrapped supernatant. The waste from these tanks is retrieved and treated as sludge or salt. The high level (radioactive) fraction of the waste is vitrified into a glass waste form, while the low-level waste is immobilized in a cementitious grout waste form called saltstone. Once the waste is retrieved and processed, the tanks are closed via removing the bulk of the waste, chemical cleaning, heel removal, stabilizing remaining residuals with tailored grout formulations and severing/sealing external penetrations. The comprehensive liquid waste disposition system, currently managed by Savannah River Remediation, consists of 1) safe storage and retrieval of the waste as it is prepared for permanent disposition; (2) definition of the waste processing techniques utilized to separate the high-level waste fraction/low-level waste fraction; (3) disposition of LLW in saltstone; (4) disposition of the HLW in glass; and (5) closure state of the facilities, including tanks. This paper focuses on determining the effectiveness of waste removal campaigns through monitoring the volume of residual solids in the waste tanks. Volume estimates of the residual solids are performed by creating a map of the residual solids on the waste tank bottom using video and still digital images. The map is then used to calculate the volume of solids remaining in the waste tank. The ability to accurately determine a volume is a function of the quantity and quality of the waste tank images. Currently, mapping is performed remotely with closed circuit video cameras and still photograph cameras due to the hazardous environment. There are two methods that can be used to create a solids volume map. These methods are: liquid transfer mapping / post transfer mapping and final residual solids mapping. The task is performed during a transfer because the liquid level (which is a known value determined by a level measurement device) is used as a landmark to indicate solids accumulation heights. The post transfer method is primarily utilized after the majority of waste has been removed. This method relies on video and still digital images of the waste tank after the liquid transfer is complete to obtain the relative height of solids across a waste tank in relation to known and usable landmarks within the waste tank (cooling coils, column base plates, etc.). In order to accurately monitor solids over time across various cleaning campaigns, and provide a technical basis to support final waste tank closure, a consistent methodology for volume determination has been developed and implemented at SRS.

  8. Directional wavelet transforms for prediction residuals in video coding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamisli, Fatih

    Various directional transforms have been developed recently to improve image compression. In video compression, however, prediction residuals of image intensities, such as the motion compensation residual or the resolution ...

  9. 1-D Transforms for the Motion Compensation Residual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamisli, Fatih

    Transforms used in image coding are also commonly used to compress prediction residuals in video coding. Prediction residuals have different spatial characteristics from images, and it is useful to develop transforms that ...

  10. In-Situ Method for Treating Residual Sodium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sherman, Steven R.; Henslee, S. Paul

    2005-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A unique process for deactivating residual sodium in Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) systems which uses humidified (but not saturated) carbon dioxide at ambient temperature and pressure to convert residual sodium into solid sodium bicarbonate.

  11. Fluidized bed gasification of agricultural residue 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groves, John David

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    is the only energy derived from such a system. The biomass energy project, of' which this re- search into gasification is a part, was designed to investi- gate both combustion and gasification as means to recover energy from agricultural wastes...FLUIDIZED BED GASIFICATION OF AGRICULTURAL RESIDUES A Thesis by JOHN DAVID GROVES Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1979 Major...

  12. MHK technologies include current energy conversion

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    research leverages decades of experience in engineering and design and analysis (D&A) of wind power technologies, and its vast research complex, including high-performance...

  13. REVIEW ARTICLE Impacts of calcium water treatment residue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    REVIEW ARTICLE Impacts of calcium water treatment residue on the soil-water-plant system in citrus of calcium water treatment residue (Ca-WTR) for stabilizing Cu in soil and its subsequent influence on Cu. Keywords Calcium water treatment residue . Citrus production . Copper contamination . Soil pH . Remediation

  14. UNCORRECTEDPROOF Effect of channel bifurcation on residual estuarine circulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Voulgaris, George

    western channel. This is the result of the fact that the magnitude of residual flow scales with the water throughout the water column of the channel while in the adjacent shoals the residual flow is directedUNCORRECTEDPROOF Effect of channel bifurcation on residual estuarine circulation: Winyah Bay, South

  15. Welding residual stresses in ferritic power plant steels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    REVIEW Welding residual stresses in ferritic power plant steels J. A. Francis*1 , H. K. D. H require therefore, an accounting of residual stresses, which often are introduced during welding. To do in the estimation of welding residual stresses in austenitic stainless steels. The progress has been less convincing

  16. Technoeconomic Comparison of Biofuels: Ethanol, Methanol, and Gasoline from Gasification of Woody Residues (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tarud, J.; Phillips, S.

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation provides a technoeconomic comparison of three biofuels - ethanol, methanol, and gasoline - produced by gasification of woody biomass residues. The presentation includes a brief discussion of the three fuels evaluated; discussion of equivalent feedstock and front end processes; discussion of back end processes for each fuel; process comparisons of efficiencies, yields, and water usage; and economic assumptions and results, including a plant gate price (PGP) for each fuel.

  17. Description of the prototype diagnostic residual gas analyzer for ITER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Younkin, T. R., E-mail: tyounkin@gatech.edu [Fusion and Materials for Nuclear Systems Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6169 (United States); Georgia Institute of Technology, Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering – Nuclear and Radiological Engineering Program, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Biewer, T. M.; Klepper, C. C.; Marcus, C. [Fusion and Materials for Nuclear Systems Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6169 (United States)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The diagnostic residual gas analyzer (DRGA) system to be used during ITER tokamak operation is being designed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to measure fuel ratios (deuterium and tritium), fusion ash (helium), and impurities in the plasma. The eventual purpose of this instrument is for machine protection, basic control, and physics on ITER. Prototyping is ongoing to optimize the hardware setup and measurement capabilities. The DRGA prototype is comprised of a vacuum system and measurement technologies that will overlap to meet ITER measurement requirements. Three technologies included in this diagnostic are a quadrupole mass spectrometer, an ion trap mass spectrometer, and an optical penning gauge that are designed to document relative and absolute gas concentrations.

  18. Cost Methodology for Biomass Feedstocks: Herbaceous Crops and Agricultural Residues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turhollow Jr, Anthony F [ORNL; Webb, Erin [ORNL; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes a set of procedures and assumptions used to estimate production and logistics costs of bioenergy feedstocks from herbaceous crops and agricultural residues. The engineering-economic analysis discussed here is based on methodologies developed by the American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers (ASABE) and the American Agricultural Economics Association (AAEA). An engineering-economic analysis approach was chosen due to lack of historical cost data for bioenergy feedstocks. Instead, costs are calculated using assumptions for equipment performance, input prices, and yield data derived from equipment manufacturers, research literature, and/or standards. Cost estimates account for fixed and variable costs. Several examples of this costing methodology used to estimate feedstock logistics costs are included at the end of this report.

  19. EE Regional Technology Roadmap Includes comparison

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EE Regional Technology Roadmap Includes comparison against 6th Power Plan (Update cyclically Data Clearinghouse BPA/RTF NEEA/Regional Programs Group Update Regional EE Technology Roadmap Lighting

  20. DIDACTICAL HOLOGRAPHIC EXHIBIT INCLUDING (HOLOGRAPHIC TELEVISION)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Aguiar, Marcus A. M.

    DIDACTICAL HOLOGRAPHIC EXHIBIT INCLUDING HoloTV (HOLOGRAPHIC TELEVISION) José J. Lunazzi , DanielCampinasSPBrasil Abstract: Our Institute of Physics exposes since 1980 didactical exhibitions of holography in Brazil where

  1. Sessions include: Beginning Farmer and Rancher

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    Sessions include: ­ Beginning Farmer and Rancher ­ New Markets and Regulations ­ Food Safety ­ Good Bug, Bad Bug ID ­ Horticulture ­ Hydroponics ­ Livestock and Pastured Poultry ­ Mushrooms ­ Organic ­ Live animal exhibits ­ Saturday evening social, and ­ Local foods Florida Small Farms and Alternative

  2. Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

    2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material, such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

  3. Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

    2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

  4. Harvesting Residuals-Economic Energy Link

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Owens, E. T.; Curtis, D. B.

    HARVESTING RESIDUALS-ECONOMIC ENERGY LINK E.T. Owens, R.P.F. Research and Productivity Council, Fredericton, N.B. D.B. Curtis, P.Eng. Dept. Forests, Mines and ABSTRACT A description of systems used in integrated harvesting of quality...-for-energy. economics INTRODUCTION The conventional wisdom in efficient harvesting Was to leave the non-merchantable and marginal trees because they had no economic value in the market place. Current technology and a change in the relative values of energy from...

  5. cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Raikhel, Natasha V. (Okemos, MI); Broekaert, Willem F. (Dilbeek, BE); Chua, Nam-Hai (Scarsdale, NY); Kush, Anil (New York, NY)

    1999-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74-79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli.

  6. CDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Raikhel, Natasha V. (Okemos, MI); Broekaert, Willem F. (Dilbeek, BE); Chua, Nam-Hai (Scarsdale, NY); Kush, Anil (New York, NY)

    1995-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74-79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli.

  7. cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Raikhel, N.V.; Broekaert, W.F.; Chua, N.H.; Kush, A.

    1995-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1,018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74--79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli. 11 figures.

  8. cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Raikhel, N.V.; Broekaert, W.F.; Chua, N.H.; Kush, A.

    1999-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74--79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli. 12 figs.

  9. Electric Power Monthly, August 1990. [Glossary included

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly summaries of electric utility statistics at the national, Census division, and State level. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data includes generation by energy source (coal, oil, gas, hydroelectric, and nuclear); generation by region; consumption of fossil fuels for power generation; sales of electric power, cost data; and unusual occurrences. A glossary is included.

  10. Combination process for upgrading residual oils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Busch, L.E.; Walters, P.W.; Zandona, O.

    1990-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This patent describes a method for upgrading high boiling residual portions of crude oils comprising metal contaminants, porphyrins, asphaltenes and high molecular weight multi-ring hydrocarbon material. It comprises: charging a high boiling residual portion of crude oil admixed with diluent in contact with suspended upflowing substantially inert fluidizable solids particulate material at an elevated thermal visbreaking temperature in a riser contact zone for a time sufficient to recover therefrom a vaporous hydrocarbon product higher boiling than gasoline partially decarbonized and demetallized to a lower contaminating metals level, quenching the vaporous product of thermal visbreaking below its dew point after separation from solids, charging quenched thermally modified high boiling hydrocarbon product with a crystalline zeolite cracking catalyst under cracking conditions for a hydrocarbon residence time in a riser cracking zone; recovering a hydrocarbon conversion product; separating a combined C{sub 4} minus wet gas product stream of the visbreaking and zeolite catalyst cracking operating to recover a C{sub 3}-C{sub 4} rich fraction separately from a C{sub 2} minus dry gas product fraction, and regenerating the crystalline zeolite contcontaining catalyst.

  11. Morphing of Geometric Composites via Residual Swelling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matteo Pezzulla; Steven A. Shillig; Paola Nardinocchi; Douglas P. Holmes

    2015-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding and controlling the shape of thin, soft objects has been the focus of significant research efforts among physicists, biologists, and engineers in the last decade. These studies aim to utilize advanced materials in novel, adaptive ways such as fabricating smart actuators or mimicking living tissues. Here, we present the controlled growth-like morphing of 2D sheets into 3D shapes by introducing a new class of geometric composite structures that deform by residual swelling. The morphing of these geometric composites is dictated by both swelling and geometry, with diffusion controlling the swelling-induced actuation, and geometric confinement dictating the structure's deformed shape. Building on a simple mechanical analog, we develop an analytical model that quantitatively describes how the Gaussian and mean curvatures of a thin disk are affected by the interplay among geometry, mechanics, and swelling. This model is in excellent agreement with our experiments and numerics. We show that the dynamics of residual swelling is dictated by a competition between two characteristic diffusive length scales governed by geometry. Our results provide the first 2D analog of Timoshenko's classical formula for the thermal bending of bimetallic beams - our generalization explains how the Gaussian curvature of a 2D geometric composite is affected by geometry and elasticity. The understanding conferred by these results suggests that the controlled shaping of geometric composites may provide a simple complement to traditional manufacturing techniques.

  12. Communication in automation, including networking and wireless

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antsaklis, Panos

    Communication in automation, including networking and wireless Nicholas Kottenstette and Panos J and networking in automation is given. Digital communication fundamentals are reviewed and networked control are presented. 1 Introduction 1.1 Why communication is necessary in automated systems Automated systems use

  13. Electrochemical cell including ribbed electrode substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Breault, R.D.; Goller, G.J.; Roethlein, R.J.; Sprecher, G.C.

    1981-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrochemical cell including an electrolyte retaining matrix layer located between and in contact with cooperating anode and cathode electrodes is disclosed herein. Each of the electrodes is comprised of a ribbed (or grooved) substrate including a gas porous body as its main component and a catalyst layer located between the substrate and one side of the electrolyte retaining matrix layer. Each substrate body includes a ribbed section for receiving reactant gas and lengthwise side portions on opposite sides of the ribbed section. Each of the side portions includes a channel extending along its entire length from one surface thereof (e.g., its outer surface) to but stopping short of an opposite surface (e.g., its inner surface) so as to provide a web directly between the channel and the opposite surface. Each of the channels is filled with a gas impervious substance and each of the webs is impregnated with a gas impervious substance so as to provide a gas impervious seal along the entire length of each side portion of each substrate and between the opposite faces thereof (e.g., across the entire thickness thereof).

  14. Prices include compostable serviceware and linen tablecloths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    & BLACK BEAN ENCHILADAS Fresh corn tortillas stuffed with tender brown butter sautéed butternut squash, black beans and yellow on- ions, garnished with avocado and sour cream. $33 per person EDAMAME & CORN SQUASH & BLACK BEAN ENCHILADA FREE RANGE CHICK- EN SANDWICH PLATED ENTREES All plated entrees include

  15. Energy Consumption of Personal Computing Including Portable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Namboodiri, Vinod

    Energy Consumption of Personal Computing Including Portable Communication Devices Pavel Somavat1 consumption, questions are being asked about the energy contribution of computing equipment. Al- though studies have documented the share of energy consumption by this type of equipment over the years, research

  16. Combustion turbine deposition observations from residual and simulated residual oil studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitlow, G.A.; Cohn, A.; Lee, S.Y.; Mulik, P.R.; Sherlock, T.P.; Wenglarz, R.A.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Burning residual oil in utility combustion turbines and the consequent deposition on blades and vanes may adversely affect reliability and operation. Corrosion and deposition data for combustion turbine materials have been obtained through dynamic testing in pressurized passages. The deposition produced by the 1900/sup 0/F (1038/sup 0/C) combustion gases from a simulated and a real residual oil on cooled Udimet 500 surfaces is described. Higher deposition rates for the doped fuel than for the real residual oil raised questions of whether true simulation with this approach can be achieved. Particles 4-8..mu.. m in diameter predominated in the gas stream, with some fraction in the 0.1-12 ..mu.. m range. Deposition rates seemed to be influenced by thermophoretic delivery of small molten particles, tentatively identified as magnesium pyro and metavanadates and free vanadium pentoxide, which may act to bond the larger solid particles arriving by inertial impaction to turbine surfaces. Estimated maintenance intervals for current utility turbines operating with washed and treated residual oil agreed well with field experience.

  17. Subterranean barriers including at least one weld

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nickelson, Reva A.; Sloan, Paul A.; Richardson, John G.; Walsh, Stephanie; Kostelnik, Kevin M.

    2007-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A subterranean barrier and method for forming same are disclosed, the barrier including a plurality of casing strings wherein at least one casing string of the plurality of casing strings may be affixed to at least another adjacent casing string of the plurality of casing strings through at least one weld, at least one adhesive joint, or both. A method and system for nondestructively inspecting a subterranean barrier is disclosed. For instance, a radiographic signal may be emitted from within a casing string toward an adjacent casing string and the radiographic signal may be detected from within the adjacent casing string. A method of repairing a barrier including removing at least a portion of a casing string and welding a repair element within the casing string is disclosed. A method of selectively heating at least one casing string forming at least a portion of a subterranean barrier is disclosed.

  18. Power generation method including membrane separation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Union City, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for generating electric power, such as at, or close to, natural gas fields. The method includes conditioning natural gas containing C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons and/or acid gas by means of a membrane separation step. This step creates a leaner, sweeter, drier gas, which is then used as combustion fuel to run a turbine, which is in turn used for power generation.

  19. Rotor assembly including superconducting magnetic coil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Snitchler, Gregory L. (Shrewsbury, MA); Gamble, Bruce B. (Wellesley, MA); Voccio, John P. (Somerville, MA)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Superconducting coils and methods of manufacture include a superconductor tape wound concentrically about and disposed along an axis of the coil to define an opening having a dimension which gradually decreases, in the direction along the axis, from a first end to a second end of the coil. Each turn of the superconductor tape has a broad surface maintained substantially parallel to the axis of the coil.

  20. Electric power monthly, September 1990. [Glossary included

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide energy decision makers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues. The power plants considered include coal, petroleum, natural gas, hydroelectric, and nuclear power plants. Data are presented for power generation, fuel consumption, fuel receipts and cost, sales of electricity, and unusual occurrences at power plants. Data are compared at the national, Census division, and state levels. 4 figs., 52 tabs. (CK)

  1. Process converts incineration slag into stabilized residue

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thauront, J.; Deneux-Mustin, S. (EMC-Services, Paris (France)); Durecu, S. (EMC-Services, Vandoeuvre-Les Nancy (France)); Fraysse, G. (EMC-Services, Saint-Vulbas (France)); Berthelin, J. (Centre de Pedologie Biologique, Vandoeuvre-Les Nancy (France))

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During 1973 and 1974, EMC-Services designed and built a physico-chemical treatment plant in Hombourg, in France's Alsatian region. The plant is still in operation. Since then, EMC-Services has developed substantial experience in environmental projects, becoming one of the top companies internationally with experience and practice in designing, building and operating hazardous waste treatment plants. EMC-Services operates in France in Salaise, Strasbourg, Mitry-Mory, and Saint-Vulbas, where eight incinerators treat solid, liquid, highly halogenated and nonhazardous industrial waste. The incinerators, built or updated by EMC-Services, have a total capacity of about 200,000 tons per year. In the new process, incineration of special industrial wastes produces non-volatilized solid residue or slag, which is sent for disposal, in compliance with regulations, to special disposal plants. Future European regulations will incorporate landfilling criteria requiring such slag to be stabilized.

  2. Bioassays of weathered residues of several organic phosphorus insecticides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hightower, Billie Gene

    1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    at high temperatures on the residual toxicities of Gut hi on, Sevin, and toxaphene to the boll weevil, Anthonomus grandis Boh........................ . . . . ........ 3^ 3? The effects of simulated wind on the residual toxicities of Guthion, dieldrin..., and toxaphene dusts to the boll weevil, Anthonomus grandis Boh. 36 The effects of high temperatures on the residual toxicities of methyl parathion, malathion, and toxaphene to the boll weevil, Anthonomus grandis Boh...................... 3$ 5. The effects...

  3. Bioassays of weathered residues of several organic phosphorus insecticides 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hightower, Billie Gene

    1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    at high temperatures on the residual toxicities of Gut hi on, Sevin, and toxaphene to the boll weevil, Anthonomus grandis Boh........................ . . . . ........ 3^ 3? The effects of simulated wind on the residual toxicities of Guthion, dieldrin..., and toxaphene dusts to the boll weevil, Anthonomus grandis Boh. 36 The effects of high temperatures on the residual toxicities of methyl parathion, malathion, and toxaphene to the boll weevil, Anthonomus grandis Boh...................... 3$ 5. The effects...

  4. Multiverse rate equation including bubble collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael P. Salem

    2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The volume fractions of vacua in an eternally inflating multiverse are described by a coarse-grain rate equation, which accounts for volume expansion and vacuum transitions via bubble formation. We generalize the rate equation to account for bubble collisions, including the possibility of classical transitions. Classical transitions can modify the details of the hierarchical structure among the volume fractions, with potential implications for the staggering and Boltzmann-brain issues. Whether or not our vacuum is likely to have been established by a classical transition depends on the detailed relationships among transition rates in the landscape.

  5. antimicrobial residue monitoring: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    though no flow is present. The macroscopic stress evolution is connected to a length scale of residual liquefaction displayed by microscopic mean-squared displacements. The...

  6. acs residual ischemic: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    though no flow is present. The macroscopic stress evolution is connected to a length scale of residual liquefaction displayed by microscopic mean-squared displacements. The...

  7. acetamido trideoxyhexose residue: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The macroscopic stress evolution is connected to a length scale of residual liquefaction displayed by microscopic mean-squared displacements. The theory describes this...

  8. autophosphorylated residues required: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    though no flow is present. The macroscopic stress evolution is connected to a length scale of residual liquefaction displayed by microscopic mean-squared displacements. The...

  9. abradable coating residual: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The macroscopic stress evolution is connected to a length scale of residual liquefaction displayed by microscopic mean-squared displacements. The theory describes this...

  10. A Practical Model for Mobile, Residual, and Entrapped NAPL in...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    phase. Residual NAPL is defined as immobile, nonwater entrapped NAPL that does not drain from the pore spaces and is conceptualized as being either continuous or...

  11. Wet Gasification of Ethanol Residue: A Preliminary Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Michael D.; Elliott, Douglas C.

    2008-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A preliminary technoeconomic assessment has been made of several options for the application of catalytic hydrothermal gasification (wet gasification) to ethanol processing residues.

  12. Table 19. U.S. Refiner Residual Fuel Oil Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Prices," source for backcast estimates prior to January 1983. 19. U.S. Refiner Residual Fuel Oil Prices 36 Energy Information Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual 1997...

  13. Table 19. U.S. Refiner Residual Fuel Oil Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Prices," source for backcast estimates prior to January 1983. 19. U.S. Refiner Residual Fuel Oil Prices 36 Energy Information Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual 1996...

  14. active site residue: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in human transferrin and Tyr Oksana Lockridge 2008-01-01 140 RESEARCH ARTICLE Benefits of organic residues and chemical fertilizer Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: RESEARCH...

  15. active site residues: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in human transferrin and Tyr Oksana Lockridge 2008-01-01 140 RESEARCH ARTICLE Benefits of organic residues and chemical fertilizer Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: RESEARCH...

  16. acid residues determine: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tomihiro Takano; Yasuhiro Kojima; Tetsufumi Ohno 2013-01-01 206 EFFECTIVE RESIDUE-TILLAGE-MANURE Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: AS POSSIBLE KEEP RECORDS 12;SPREADER...

  17. Water dynamics clue to key residues in protein folding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Meng [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)] [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Zhu, Huaiqiu, E-mail: hqzhu@pku.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)] [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Yao, Xin-Qiu [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China) [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Department of Biophysics, Kyoto University, Sakyo Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); She, Zhen-Su, E-mail: she@pku.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)] [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2010-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A computational method independent of experimental protein structure information is proposed to recognize key residues in protein folding, from the study of hydration water dynamics. Based on all-atom molecular dynamics simulation, two key residues are recognized with distinct water dynamical behavior in a folding process of the Trp-cage protein. The identified key residues are shown to play an essential role in both 3D structure and hydrophobic-induced collapse. With observations on hydration water dynamics around key residues, a dynamical pathway of folding can be interpreted.

  18. Residual Stresses for Structural Analysis and Fatigue Life Prediction...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Stresses for Structural Analysis and Fatigue Life Prediction in Vehicle Components: Success stories from the High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML) User Program Residual...

  19. Recovery of fissile materials from plutonium residues, miscellaneous spent nuclear fuel, and uranium fissile wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forsberg, C.W.

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new process is proposed that converts complex feeds containing fissile materials into a chemical form that allows the use of existing technologies (such as PUREX and ion exchange) to recover the fissile materials and convert the resultant wastes to glass. Potential feed materials include (1) plutonium scrap and residue, (2) miscellaneous spent nuclear fuel, and (3) uranium fissile wastes. The initial feed materials may contain mixtures of metals, ceramics, amorphous solids, halides, and organics. 14 refs., 4 figs.

  20. Optical panel system including stackable waveguides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DeSanto, Leonard (Dunkirk, MD); Veligdan, James T. (Manorville, NY)

    2007-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical panel system including stackable waveguides is provided. The optical panel system displays a projected light image and comprises a plurality of planar optical waveguides in a stacked state. The optical panel system further comprises a support system that aligns and supports the waveguides in the stacked state. In one embodiment, the support system comprises at least one rod, wherein each waveguide contains at least one hole, and wherein each rod is positioned through a corresponding hole in each waveguide. In another embodiment, the support system comprises at least two opposing edge structures having the waveguides positioned therebetween, wherein each opposing edge structure contains a mating surface, wherein opposite edges of each waveguide contain mating surfaces which are complementary to the mating surfaces of the opposing edge structures, and wherein each mating surface of the opposing edge structures engages a corresponding complementary mating surface of the opposite edges of each waveguide.

  1. Optical panel system including stackable waveguides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DeSanto, Leonard; Veligdan, James T.

    2007-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical panel system including stackable waveguides is provided. The optical panel system displays a projected light image and comprises a plurality of planar optical waveguides in a stacked state. The optical panel system further comprises a support system that aligns and supports the waveguides in the stacked state. In one embodiment, the support system comprises at least one rod, wherein each waveguide contains at least one hole, and wherein each rod is positioned through a corresponding hole in each waveguide. In another embodiment, the support system comprises at least two opposing edge structures having the waveguides positioned therebetween, wherein each opposing edge structure contains a mating surface, wherein opposite edges of each waveguide contain mating surfaces which are complementary to the mating surfaces of the opposing edge structures, and wherein each mating surface of the opposing edge structures engages a corresponding complementary mating surface of the opposite edges of each waveguide.

  2. Thermovoltaic semiconductor device including a plasma filter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baldasaro, Paul F. (Clifton Park, NY)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermovoltaic energy conversion device and related method for converting thermal energy into an electrical potential. An interference filter is provided on a semiconductor thermovoltaic cell to pre-filter black body radiation. The semiconductor thermovoltaic cell includes a P/N junction supported on a substrate which converts incident thermal energy below the semiconductor junction band gap into electrical potential. The semiconductor substrate is doped to provide a plasma filter which reflects back energy having a wavelength which is above the band gap and which is ineffectively filtered by the interference filter, through the P/N junction to the source of radiation thereby avoiding parasitic absorption of the unusable portion of the thermal radiation energy.

  3. End-of-life vehicle recycling : state of the art of resource recovery from shredder residue.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jody, B. J.; Daniels, E. J.; Energy Systems

    2007-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Each year, more than 50 million vehicles reach the end of their service life throughout the world. More than 95% of these vehicles enter a comprehensive recycling infrastructure that includes auto parts recyclers/dismantlers, remanufacturers, and material recyclers (shredders). Today, about 75% of automotive materials are profitably recycled via (1) parts reuse and parts and components remanufacturing and (2) ultimately by the scrap processing (shredding) industry. The process by which the scrap processors recover metal scrap from automobiles involves shredding the obsolete automobiles, along with other obsolete metal-containing products (such as white goods, industrial scrap, and demolition debris), and recovering the metals from the shredded material. The single largest source of recycled ferrous scrap for the iron and steel industry is obsolete automobiles. The non-metallic fraction that remains after the metals are recovered from the shredded materials (about 25% of the weight of the vehicle)--commonly called shredder residue--is disposed of in landfills. Over the past 10 to 15 years, a significant amount of research and development has been undertaken to enhance the recycle rate of end-of-life vehicles (ELVs), including enhancing dismantling techniques and improving remanufacturing operations. However, most of the effort has focused on developing technology to recover materials, such as polymers, from shredder residue. To make future vehicles more energy efficient, more lighter-weight materials--primarily polymers and polymer composites--will be used in manufacturing these vehicles. These materials increase the percentage of shredder residue that must be disposed of, compared with the percentage of metals. Therefore, as the complexity of automotive materials and systems increases, new technologies will be required to sustain and maximize the ultimate recycling of these materials and systems at end-of-life. Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne), in cooperation with the Vehicle Recycling Partnership (VRP) and the American Plastics Council (APC), is working to develop technology for recycling materials from shredder residue. Several other organizations worldwide are also working on developing technology for recycling shredder residue. Without a commercially viable shredder industry, our nation may face greater environmental challenges and a decreased supply of quality scrap and be forced to turn to primary ores for the production of finished metals. This document presents a review of the state of the art in shredder residue recycling. Available technologies and emerging technologies for the recycling of materials from shredder residue are discussed.

  4. SOLID PHASE MICROEXTRACTION SAMPLING OF FIRE DEBRIS RESIDUES IN THE PRESENCE OF RADIONUCLIDE SURROGATE METALS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duff, M; Keisha Martin, K; S Crump, S

    2007-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) Laboratory currently does not have on site facilities for handling radioactive evidentiary materials and there are no established FBI methods or procedures for decontaminating highly radioactive fire debris (FD) evidence while maintaining evidentiary value. One experimental method for the isolation of FD residue from radionuclide metals involves using solid phase microextraction (SPME) fibers to remove the residues of interest. Due to their high affinity for organics, SPME fibers should have little affinity for most (radioactive) metals. The focus of this research was to develop an examination protocol that was applicable to safe work in facilities where high radiation doses are shielded from the workers (as in radioactive shielded cells or ''hot cells''). We also examined the affinity of stable radionuclide surrogate metals (Co, Ir, Re, Ni, Ba, Cs, Nb, Zr and Nd) for sorption by the SPME fibers. This was done under exposure conditions that favor the uptake of FD residues under conditions that will provide little contact between the SPME and the FD material (such as charred carpet or wood that contains commonly-used accelerants). Our results from mass spectrometric analyses indicate that SPME fibers show promise for use in the room temperature head space uptake of organic FD residue (namely, diesel fuel oil, kerosene, gasoline and paint thinner) with subsequent analysis by gas chromatography (GC) with mass spectrometric (MS) detection. No inorganic forms of ignitable fluids were included in this study.

  5. Engine lubrication circuit including two pumps

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lane, William H.

    2006-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A lubrication pump coupled to the engine is sized such that the it can supply the engine with a predetermined flow volume as soon as the engine reaches a peak torque engine speed. In engines that operate predominately at speeds above the peak torque engine speed, the lubrication pump is often producing lubrication fluid in excess of the predetermined flow volume that is bypassed back to a lubrication fluid source. This arguably results in wasted power. In order to more efficiently lubricate an engine, a lubrication circuit includes a lubrication pump and a variable delivery pump. The lubrication pump is operably coupled to the engine, and the variable delivery pump is in communication with a pump output controller that is operable to vary a lubrication fluid output from the variable delivery pump as a function of at least one of engine speed and lubrication flow volume or system pressure. Thus, the lubrication pump can be sized to produce the predetermined flow volume at a speed range at which the engine predominately operates while the variable delivery pump can supplement lubrication fluid delivery from the lubrication pump at engine speeds below the predominant engine speed range.

  6. Models of Procyon A including seismic constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Eggenberger; F. Carrier; F. Bouchy

    2005-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Detailed models of Procyon A based on new asteroseismic measurements by Eggenberger et al (2004) have been computed using the Geneva evolution code including shellular rotation and atomic diffusion. By combining all non-asteroseismic observables now available for Procyon A with these seismological data, we find that the observed mean large spacing of 55.5 +- 0.5 uHz favours a mass of 1.497 M_sol for Procyon A. We also determine the following global parameters of Procyon A: an age of t=1.72 +- 0.30 Gyr, an initial helium mass fraction Y_i=0.290 +- 0.010, a nearly solar initial metallicity (Z/X)_i=0.0234 +- 0.0015 and a mixing-length parameter alpha=1.75 +- 0.40. Moreover, we show that the effects of rotation on the inner structure of the star may be revealed by asteroseismic observations if frequencies can be determined with a high precision. Existing seismological data of Procyon A are unfortunately not accurate enough to really test these differences in the input physics of our models.

  7. RESIDUAL STRESS EFFECTS IN FRACTURE OF COMPOSITES AND ADHESIVES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nairn, John A.

    RESIDUAL STRESS EFFECTS IN FRACTURE OF COMPOSITES AND ADHESIVES JOHN A. NAIRN ABSTRACT Because composites and adhesive joints are made from different phases with different thermal expansion coefficients, they inevitably develop residual thermal stresses. When designing composites or adhesive joints, it is important

  8. Randomized Quantile Residuals Peter K. Dunn and Gordon K. Smyth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smyth, Gordon K.

    . Keywords: deviance residual; exponential regression; generalized linear model; lo- gistic regression, play a central role in the checking of statistical models. In normal linear regression the residuals are normally distributed and can be standardized to have equal variances. In non-normal regression situations

  9. Minimization of welding residual stress and distortion in large structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michaleris, Panagiotis

    1 Minimization of welding residual stress and distortion in large structures P. Michaleris at Champaign Urbana, Urbana, IL Abstract Welding distortion in large structures is usually caused by buckling due to the residual stress. In cases where the design is fixed and minimum weld size requirements

  10. Original article Residues in wax and honey after Apilife VAR®

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Original article Residues in wax and honey after Apilife VAR® treatment Stefan Bogdanov Anton and foundation were exposed to the air during storage. © Inra/DIB/AGIB/Elsevier, Paris honey / wax / residue to accumulation of these substances in beeswax and less so in honey [1, 17]. The accumulation in wax depends

  11. Computing Symmetrized Weight Enumerators for Lifted Quadratic Residue Codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duursma, Iwan M.

    Computing Symmetrized Weight Enumerators for Lifted Quadratic Residue Codes I. M. Duursma Dept for the computation of structural parameters for ring-linear codes. This article therefore presents a method to eĂ?ciently compute weight enumerators of linear codes over primary integer residue rings. For the lifted QR-codes

  12. Residual Energy-Aware Cooperative Transmission (REACT) in Wireless Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leung, Kin K.

    Residual Energy-Aware Cooperative Transmission (REACT) in Wireless Networks Erwu Liu, Qinqing Zhang the lifetime of the network and we call the selection method a residual energy-aware cooperative transmission- works, where energy efficiency is a critical design consideration. We assume that multiple relay nodes

  13. Parallel FPGA Implementation of RSA with Residue Number Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parallel FPGA Implementation of RSA with Residue Number Systems --- Can side­channel threats Multiplication based on Residue Num­ ber Systems. Thanks to RNS, we develop a design able to perform an RSA signature in parallel on a set of identical and independent copro­ cessors. Of independent interest, we

  14. Parallel FPGA Implementation of RSA with Residue Number Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parallel FPGA Implementation of RSA with Residue Number Systems -- Can side-channel threats Multiplication based on Residue Num- ber Systems. Thanks to RNS, we develop a design able to perform an RSA signature in parallel on a set of identical and independent copro- cessors. Of independent interest, we

  15. Conversion of direct process high-boiling residue to monosilanes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brinson, Jonathan Ashley (Vale of Glamorgan, GB); Crum, Bruce Robert (Madison, IN); Jarvis, Jr., Robert Frank (Midland, MI)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for the production of monosilanes from the high-boiling residue resulting from the reaction of hydrogen chloride with silicon metalloid in a process typically referred to as the "direct process." The process comprises contacting a high-boiling residue resulting from the reaction of hydrogen chloride and silicon metalloid, with hydrogen gas in the presence of a catalytic amount of aluminum trichloride effective in promoting conversion of the high-boiling residue to monosilanes. The present process results in conversion of the high-boiling residue to monosilanes. At least a portion of the aluminum trichloride catalyst required for conduct of the process may be formed in situ during conduct of the direct process and isolation of the high-boiling residue.

  16. Phase Chemistry of Tank Sludge Residual Components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.L. Krumhansl

    2002-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has millions of gallons of high level nuclear waste stored in underground tanks at Hanford, Washington and Savannah River, South Carolina. These tanks will eventually be emptied and decommissioned. This will leave a residue of sludge adhering to the interior tank surfaces that may contaminate nearby groundwaters with radionuclides and RCRA metals. Performance assessment (PA) calculations must be carried out prior to closing the tanks. This requires developing radionuclide release models from the sludges so that the PA calculations can be based on credible source terms. These efforts continued to be hindered by uncertainties regarding the actual nature of the tank contents and the distribution of radionuclides among the various phases. In particular, it is of vital importance to know what radionuclides are associated with solid sludge components. Experimentation on actual tank sludges can be difficult, dangerous and prohibitively expensive. The research funded under this grant for the past three years was intended to provide a cost-effective method for developing the needed radionuclide release models using non-radioactive artificial sludges. Insights gained from this work will also have more immediate applications in understanding the processes responsible for heel development in the tanks and in developing effective technologies for removing wastes from the tanks.

  17. End-of-life vehicle recycling : state of the art of resource recovery from shredder residue.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jody, B. J.; Daniels, E. J.; Duranceau, C. M.; Pomykala, J. A.; Spangenberger, J. S. (Energy Systems)

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Each year, more than 25 million vehicles reach the end of their service life throughout the world, and this number is rising rapidly because the number of vehicles on the roads is rapidly increasing. In the United States, more than 95% of the 10-15 million scrapped vehicles annually enter a comprehensive recycling infrastructure that includes auto parts recyclers/dismantlers, remanufacturers, and material recyclers (shredders). Today, over 75% of automotive materials, primarily the metals, are profitably recycled via (1) parts reuse and parts and components remanufacturing and (2) ultimately by the scrap processing (shredding) industry. The process by which the scrap processors recover metal scrap from automobiles involves shredding the obsolete automobile hulks, along with other obsolete metal-containing products (such as white goods, industrial scrap, and demolition debris), and recovering the metals from the shredded material. The single largest source of recycled ferrous scrap for the iron and steel industry is obsolete automobiles. The non-metallic fraction that remains after the metals are recovered from the shredded materials - commonly called shredder residue - constitutes about 25% of the weight of the vehicle, and it is disposed of in landfills. This practice is not environmentally friendly, wastes valuable resources, and may become uneconomical. Therefore, it is not sustainable. Over the past 15-20 years, a significant amount of research and development has been undertaken to enhance the recycle rate of end-of-life vehicles, including enhancing dismantling techniques and improving remanufacturing operations. However, most of the effort has been focused on developing technology to separate and recover non-metallic materials, such as polymers, from shredder residue. To make future vehicles more energy efficient, more lightweighting materials - primarily polymers, polymer composites, high-strength steels, and aluminum - will be used in manufacturing these vehicles. Many of these materials increase the percentage of shredder residue that must be disposed of, compared with the percentage of metals that are recovered. In addition, the number of hybrid vehicles and electric vehicles on the road is rapidly increasing. This trend will also introduce new materials for disposal at the end of their useful lives, including batteries. Therefore, as the complexity of automotive materials and systems increases, new technologies will be required to sustain and maximize the ultimate recycling of these materials and systems. Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne), the Vehicle Recycling Partnership, LLC. (VRP) of the United States Council for Automotive Research, LLC. (USCAR), and the American Chemistry Council-Plastics Division (ACC-PD) are working to develop technology for recovering materials from end-of-life vehicles, including separating and recovering polymers and residual metals from shredder residue. Several other organizations worldwide are also working on developing technology for recycling materials from shredder residue. Without a commercially viable shredder industry, our nation and the world will most likely face greater environmental challenges and a decreased supply of quality scrap, and thereby be forced to turn to primary ores for the production of finished metals. This will result in increased energy consumption and increased damage to the environment, including increased greenhouse gas emissions. The recycling of polymers, other organics, and residual metals in shredder residue saves the equivalent of over 23 million barrels of oil annually. This results in a 12-million-ton reduction in greenhouse gas emissions. This document presents a review of the state-of-the-art in the recycling of automotive materials.

  18. EIS-0109: Long-Term Management of the Existing Radioactive Wastes and Residues at the Niagara Falls Storage Site

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy developed this statement to evaluate the environmental impacts of several alternatives for management and control of the radioactive wastes and residues at the Niagara Falls Storage Site, including a no action alternative, an alternative to manage wastes on-site, and two off-site management alternatives.

  19. Evaluation of improved materials for stationary diesel engines operating on residual and coal based fuels. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental results to date from an on-going research program on improved materials for stationary diesel engines using residual or coal-based fuels are presented with little discussion of conclusions about these results. Information is included on ring and liner wear, fuel oil qualities, ceramic materials, coatings, test procedures and equipment, and tribology test results. (LCL)

  20. DDT RESIDUES IN SEAWATER AND PARTICULATE MATTER IN THE CALIFORNIA CURRENT SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DDT RESIDUES IN SEAWATER AND PARTICULATE MATTER IN THE CALIFORNIA CURRENT SYSTEM JAMES L. COX in the California current system were analyzed for DDT residues. DDT residue concentrations in whole seawater are discussed in relation to mechanisms of land-sea DDT residue transfer. DDT residue concentrations

  1. Recovery of flexible polyurethane foam from shredder residue.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniels, E. J.; Jody, b. J.

    1999-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Argonne National Laboratory has developed a patented, continuous process for the recovery of flexible polyurethane foam (PUF) from auto shredder residue (ASR). To test the process, Argonne researchers conceived of, designed, and built a continuous foam washing and drying system that was pilot-tested at a shredder facility for six months. Economic analysis of the process, using manufacturers' quotes and operating data from Argonne's pilot plant, indicates a payback of less than two years for a plant producing about 1,000 ton/yr of foam. Samples of clean foam were shipped to three major foam reprocessors; all three indicated that the quality of the PUF recovered by the Argonne process met their requirements. Tests of the recovered foam by an independent testing laboratory showed that the recycled foam met the specifications for several automotive applications, including carpet padding, headliner, and sound-suppression support materials. Recovery of foam reduces the mass and the volume of material going to the landfill by about 5% and 30%, respectively. Annually, recovery will save about 1.2 x 10{sup 12} Btu of energy, cut the amount of solid waste being landfilled by about 150,000 tons, and eliminate the emission of about 250 tons of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into the air.

  2. Dependence of the residual surface resistance of superconducting radio frequency cavities on the cooling dynamics around T{sub c}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Romanenko, A., E-mail: aroman@fnal.gov; Grassellino, A., E-mail: annag@fnal.gov; Melnychuk, O.; Sergatskov, D. A. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois 60510 (United States)

    2014-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a strong effect of the cooling dynamics through T{sub c} on the amount of trapped external magnetic flux in superconducting niobium cavities. The effect is similar for fine grain and single crystal niobium and all surface treatments including electropolishing with and without 120?°C baking and nitrogen doping. Direct magnetic field measurements on the cavity walls show that the effect stems from changes in the flux trapping efficiency: slow cooling leads to almost complete flux trapping and higher residual resistance, while fast cooling leads to the much more efficient flux expulsion and lower residual resistance.

  3. Single-well experimental design for studying residual trapping of superciritcal carbon dioxide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Y.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    nonaqueous phase liquid and water residual. Environ. Sci.plume near residual saturation; and (4) water injection intoboth a water-saturated system and a system with residual gas

  4. Evaluation of approaches to quantify total residual oxidants in ballast water management systems employing chlorine for disinfection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zimmer-Faust, AG; Ambrose, RF; Ambrose, RF; Tamburri, MN

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    quantify total residual oxidants in ballast water managementand discharge (residual concentrations) during ballast waterquantifying residual chlorine levels in natural waters (e.g.

  5. A methodology for estimating the residual contamination contribution to the source term in a spent-fuel transport cask

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanders, T.L. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Jordan, H. (EG and G Rocky Flats, Inc., Golden, CO (United States). Rocky Flats Plant); Pasupathi, V. (Battelle, Columbus, OH (United States)); Mings, W.J. (USDOE Idaho Field Office, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)); Reardon, P.C. (GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States))

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the ranges of the residual contamination that may build up in spent-fuel transport casks. These contamination ranges are calculated based on data taken from published reports and from previously unpublished data supplied by cask transporters. The data involve dose rate measurements, interior smear surveys, and analyses of water flushed out of cask cavities during decontamination operations. A methodology has been developed to estimate the effect of residual contamination on spent-fuel cask containment requirements. Factors in estimating the maximum permissible leak rates include the form of the residual contamination; possible release modes; internal gas-borne depletion; and the temperature, pressure, and vibration characteristics of the cask during transport under normal and accident conditions. 12 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs.

  6. Residual zonal flows in tokamaks and stellarators at arbitrary wavelengths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monreal, P; Sánchez, E; Parra, F I; Bustos, A; Könies, A; Kleiber, R; Görler, T

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the linear collisionless limit, a zonal potential perturbation in a toroidal plasma relaxes, in general, to a non-zero residual value. Expressions for the residual value in tokamak and stellarator geometries, and for arbitrary wavelengths, are derived. These expressions involve averages over the lowest order particle trajectories, that typically cannot be evaluated analytically. In this work, an efficient numerical method for the evaluation of such expressions is reported. It is shown that this method is faster than direct gyrokinetic simulations. Calculations of the residual value in stellarators are provided for much shorter wavelengths than previously available in the literature. Electrons must be treated kinetically in stellarators because, unlike in tokamaks, kinetic electrons modify the residual value even at long wavelengths. This effect, that had already been predicted theoretically, is confirmed by gyrokinetic simulations.

  7. An urban infill : a residual site in Boston

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Savvides, Andreas L. (Andreas Loucas)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis is concerned with the treatment of residual sites in the context of the urban environment and in particular with the wounds inflicted by the passage of the Massachusetts Turnpike through the city of Boston. The ...

  8. Residual dust charges in an afterglow plasma , M. Mikikian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    plasma was performed in a rf discharge. An upward thermophoretic force was used to balance]. For the study concerning residual charges, the top electrode was cooled. An upward thermophoretic force

  9. Minimizing High Spatial Frequency Residual in Active Space Telescope Mirrors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Miller June 2008 SSL # 4-08 #12;#12;Minimizing High Spatial Frequency Residual in Active Space Telescope Mirrors Thomas Gray, David W. Miller June 2008 SSL # 4-08 This work is based on the unaltered text

  10. RetroFILL : residual spaces as urban infill

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kobel, Marika

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In any city there are small slivers and chunks of awkward spaces - in between buildings, occupying edge conditions, not large enough to warrant many forms of traditional use - which can be termed residual. These areas of ...

  11. Residual stress in electrodeposited nanocrystalline nickel-tungsten coatings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ziebell, Tiffany D.

    Characterizing the residual stress of thick nanocrystalline electrodeposits poses several unique challenges due to their fine grain structure, thickness distribution, and matte surface. We use a three-dimensional ...

  12. Modeling, Optimization and Economic Evaluation of Residual Biomass Gasification 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Georgeson, Adam

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Gasification is a thermo-chemical process which transforms biomass into valuable synthesis gas. Integrated with a biorefinery it can address the facility’s residue handling challenges and input demands. A number of feedstock, technology, oxidizer...

  13. Characterization of mercury-enriched coal combustion residues from electric utilities using enhanced sorbents for mercury control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanchez, F.; Keeney, R.; Kosson, D.; Delapp, R. [Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    2006-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This report evaluates changes that may occur to coal-fired power plant air pollution control residues from the use of activated carbon and other enhanced sorbents for reducing air emissions of mercury and evaluates the potential for captured pollutants leaching during the disposal or use of these residues. Leaching of mercury, arsenic, and selenium during land disposal or beneficial use of coal combustion residues (CCRs) is the environmental impact pathway evaluated in this report. Coal combustion residues refer collectively to fly ash and other air pollution control solid residues generated during the combustion of coal collected through the associated air pollution control system. This research is part of an on-going effort by US Environmental protection Agency (EPA) to use a holistic approach to account for the fate of mercury and other metals in coal throughout the life-cycle stages of CCR management. This report focuses on facilities that use injected sorbents for mercury control. It includes four facilities with activated carbon injection (ACI) and two facilities using brominated ACI. Fly ash has been obtained from each facility with and without operation of the sorbent injection technology for mercury control. Each fly ash sampled was evaluated in the laboratory for leaching as a function of pH and liquid-to-solid ratio. Mercury, arsenic and selenium were the primary constituent of interest; results for these elements are presented here. 30 refs., 30 figs., 14 tabs., 10 apps.

  14. An investigation of residual stress in welded joints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moffat, William Hugh

    1951-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . flummery and Conclusions VII. '-. &uggested Procedure for I"uture Investigation 18 o i' VIII. ? . Ppendix IX. Bibliography LIST OP EIGURES Ro. Title Page 1. 'welded Plates snd Gptical Gage Used by Soulton and Martin ~ ~ 6 2. Dr. Rao~s Method... AN INVESTIGATION OF RESIDUAL STRESS IN WELDED JOINTS INTRODUCTION The object of the research reported in this paper was to investigate the magnitude of transverse and longi- tudial residual stress in a welded Joint. These are the stresses in a direction...

  15. An investigation of residual stress in welded joints 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moffat, William Hugh

    1951-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . flummery and Conclusions VII. '-. &uggested Procedure for I"uture Investigation 18 o i' VIII. ? . Ppendix IX. Bibliography LIST OP EIGURES Ro. Title Page 1. 'welded Plates snd Gptical Gage Used by Soulton and Martin ~ ~ 6 2. Dr. Rao~s Method... AN INVESTIGATION OF RESIDUAL STRESS IN WELDED JOINTS INTRODUCTION The object of the research reported in this paper was to investigate the magnitude of transverse and longi- tudial residual stress in a welded Joint. These are the stresses in a direction...

  16. GEOCHEMICAL TESTING AND MODEL DEVELOPMENT - RESIDUAL TANK WASTE TEST PLAN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CANTRELL KJ; CONNELLY MP

    2010-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This Test Plan describes the testing and chemical analyses release rate studies on tank residual samples collected following the retrieval of waste from the tank. This work will provide the data required to develop a contaminant release model for the tank residuals from both sludge and salt cake single-shell tanks. The data are intended for use in the long-term performance assessment and conceptual model development.

  17. Residue disposal from waste-to-energy facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walsh, P.; O'Leary, P.; Cross, F.

    1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    When considering a waste-to-energy project, some local officials believe that waste-to-energy is a complete alternative to landfilling. While these projects can reduce waste volume substantially, the process will still produce residues that must be properly handled in order to protect the environment. All systems produce fly ash and bottom ash, and some systems also produce wastewater. This article discusses alternative methods for addressing these residue control problems.

  18. Incinerator residue in bituminous base construction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haynes, Joseph Anthony

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for use of the material in a bituminous base. Preliminary investigation on the optimum mix design included Hveem stability, Marshall stability and Durability tests, A test section consisting of the experimental hot-mixed pavement, littercrete, and a... for flexural fatigue tests, Hveem and Marshall stabilities, thermal expansion, direct tension, splitting tensile and Schmidt tests. Four in. (10. 2 cm. ) diameter cores were taken after compaction (before traffic) and after six months in service. Samples...

  19. Release of Residues from Melting NORM-Contaminated Steel Scrap - A German Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quade, U.; Thierfeldt, S.; Wvrlen, S.

    2003-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    As many raw materials like crude oil, natural gas, mineral sands, phosphor ores and others are contaminated by radionuclides from the Uranium and/or Thorium decay chain (NORM), also plants for processing these materials became contaminated during operation. When plants are shut down, large quantities of pipes, valves, pumps and other components have to be scrapped. As scrap yards and steel mills are equipped by large detector systems to avoid an input of radioactivity into the steel cycle, decontamination is required before recycling. Siempelkamp is operating a melting plant for processing NORM and/or chemically/ toxically contaminated steel scrap. Beside the decontaminated steel as output, residues like slag and filter dust have to be managed within the range of licensed values. Based on the European Safety Standard the European member states have to implement radiation exposure from work activities with NORM in their Radiation Protection Ordinances (RPO). The German government revised the RPO in July 2001. Part 3 describes exposure limits for workers and for the public. Exposures from residues management have to meet 1 mSv/year. Brenk Systemplanung has performed calculations for assessing the radiation exposure from residues of the Siempelkamp melting plant. These calculations have been based on the input of metal from different origins and include all relevant exposure pathways in a number of scenarios. The calculations have been based on the dose criterion of 1 mSv/y as required by the German RPO. The methods and results will be presented.

  20. Manual for implementing residual radioactive material guidelines using RESRAD, Version 5.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, C.; Zielen, A.J.; Cheng, J.J. [and others

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This manual presents information for implementing US Department of Energy (DOE) guidelines for residual radioactive material. It describes the analysis and models used to derive site-specific guidelines for allowable residual concentrations of radionuclides in soil and the design and use of the RESRAD computer code for calculating doses, risks, and guideline values. It also describes procedures for implementing DOE policy for reducing residual radioactivity to levels that are as low as reasonably achievable. Two new pathways, radon inhalation and soil ingestion, have been added to RESRAD. Twenty-seven new radionuclides have also been added, and the cutoff half-life for associated radionuclides has been reduced to six months. Other major improvements to the RESRAD code include the ability to run sensitivity analyses, the addition of graphical output, user-specified dose factors, updated databases, an improved groundwater transport model, optional input of a groundwater concentration and a solubility constant, special models for tritium and carbon-14, calculation of cancer incidence risk, and the use of a mouse with menus.

  1. In situ recovery from residually heated sections in a hydrocarbon containing formation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Karanikas, John Michael (Houston, TX); Ryan, Robert Charles (Houston, TX)

    2010-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods of treating a tar sands formation is described herein. The methods may include providing heat to a first section of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from a plurality of heaters located in the first section of the formation. Heat is transferred from the heaters so that at least a first section of the formation reaches a selected temperature. At least a portion of residual heat from the first section transfers from the first section to a second section of the formation. At least a portion of hydrocarbons in the second section are mobilized by providing a solvation fluid and/or a pressurizing fluid to the second section of the formation.

  2. Catalytic Hydrothermal Gasification of Lignin-Rich Biorefinery Residues and Algae Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, Douglas C.; Neuenschwander, Gary G.; Hart, Todd R.; Rotness, Leslie J.; Zacher, Alan H.; Santosa, Daniel M.; Valkenburt, Corinne; Jones, Susanne B.; Tjokro Rahardjo, Sandra A.

    2009-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the results of the work performed by PNNL using feedstock materials provided by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, KL Energy and Lignol lignocellulosic ethanol pilot plants. Test results with algae feedstocks provided by Genifuel, which provided in-kind cost share to the project, are also included. The work conducted during this project involved developing and demonstrating on the bench-scale process technology at PNNL for catalytic hydrothermal gasification of lignin-rich biorefinery residues and algae. A technoeconomic assessment evaluated the use of the technology for energy recovery in a lignocellulosic ethanol plant.

  3. Measuring depth profiles of residual stress with Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Enloe, W.S.; Sparks, R.G.; Paesler, M.A.

    1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Knowledge of the variation of residual stress is a very important factor in understanding the properties of machined surfaces. The nature of the residual stress can determine a part`s susceptibility to wear deformation, and cracking. Raman spectroscopy is known to be a very useful technique for measuring residual stress in many materials. These measurements are routinely made with a lateral resolution of 1{mu}m and an accuracy of 0.1 kbar. The variation of stress with depth; however, has not received much attention in the past. A novel technique has been developed that allows quantitative measurement of the variation of the residual stress with depth with an accuracy of 10nm in the z direction. Qualitative techniques for determining whether the stress is varying with depth are presented. It is also demonstrated that when the stress is changing over the volume sampled, errors can be introduced if the variation of the stress with depth is ignored. Computer aided data analysis is used to determine the depth dependence of the residual stress.

  4. Strengthening, Crack Arrest And Multiple Cracking In Brittle Materials Using Residual Stresses.

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Green, David J. (State College, PA); Sglavo, Vincenzo M. (Roncegno, IT); Tandon, Rajan (Fremont, CA)

    2003-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Embodiments include a method for forming a glass which displays visible cracking prior to failure when subjected to predetermined stress level that is greater than a predetermined minimum stress level and less than a failure stress level. The method includes determining a critical flaw size in the glass and introducing a residual stress profile to the glass so that a plurality of visible cracks are formed prior to failure when the glass is subjected to a stress that is greater than the minimum stress level and lower than the critical stress. One method for forming the residual stress profile includes performing a first ion exchange so that a first plurality of ions of a first element in the glass are exchanged with a second plurality of ions of a second element that have a larger volume than the first ions. A second ion exchange is also performed so that a plurality of the second ions in the glass are exchanged back to ions of the first element.

  5. Variability of hot mix asphalt produced with reclaimed asphalt pavement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Guiqin

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    percent does not significantly influence the mix variability; it is desirable to use a large percentage of RAP in the Type S-I mix, i.e., more than 40% RAP; iii) On the average, the aggregate variability increases after transportation and stockpiling...

  6. DDT residues in human milk samples from Delhi, India

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaidi, S.S.A.; Bhatnagar, V.K.; Banerjee, B.D.; Balakrishnan, G.; Shah, M.P.

    1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The widespread use of DDT in India has resulted in increased levels of the insecticide in the ecosystem and, therefore, the potential possible health hazards has been voiced. DDT-residues excreted in milk have been reported from different parts of the world; however, very few reports did appear from India. In fact, there is no report on DDT-content in human milk from Delhi area where higher levels of DDT and BHC in human adipose tissues and blood have already been reported. Higher bioaccumulation of DDT might reflect the higher excretion of residues in milk. The authors have, therefore, attempted a systematic study to monitor DDT-residues in human milk samples collected from various hospitals of Delhi (India).

  7. Residual strain mapping of Roman styli from Iulia Concordia, Italy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salvemini, Filomena, E-mail: floriana.salvemini@fi.isc.cnr.it [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi, Sesto Fiorentino, FI (Italy); Universitŕ degli Studi di Firenze, Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra (Italy); Grazzi, Francesco [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi, Sesto Fiorentino, FI (Italy); Angelini, Ivana [Universitŕ degli Studi di Padova, Dipartimento di Geoscienze (Italy); Davydov, Vadim; Vontobel, Peter [Paul Scherrer Institut, SINQ Spallation Neutron Source, Villigen (Switzerland); Vigoni, Alberto [Dedalo s.n.c., Vicolo dei Conti 6, I-35122 Padua (Italy); Artioli, Gilberto [Universitŕ degli Studi di Padova, Dipartimento di Geoscienze (Italy); Zoppi, Marco [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi, Sesto Fiorentino, FI (Italy)

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Iulia Concordia is an important Roman settlement known for the production of iron objects and weapons during the Roman Empire. A huge number of well-preserved styli were found in the past century in the bed of an old channel. In order to shed light about the production processes used by Roman for stylus manufacturing, a neutron diffraction residual strain analysis was performed on the POLDI materials science diffractometer at the Paul Scherrer Institut in Switzerland. Here, we present results from our investigation conducted on 11 samples, allowing to define, in a non-invasive way, the residual strain map related to the ancient Roman working techniques. - Highlights: • We examined 11 Roman styli from the settlement of Iulia Concordia, Italy. • We performed a neutron diffraction residual strain analysis on POLDI at PSI (CH). • We identified the production processes used by Roman for stylus manufacturing. • We clarified the way and direction of working applied for different classes of styli.

  8. Wave induced residual pore-water pressures in sandbeds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeVries, Jack Walter

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Subject: Ocean Engineering WAVE INDUCED RESIDUAL PORE-WATER PRESSURES IN SANDBEDS A Thesis by Jack W. Deyries Approved as to style and content by: J. B. Her bich (Chairman of Committee) Y. K. Lou (Member) W. A. Dunlap (Member) R. O. Reid (Member... on a buried pipel1ne using both analytical and numerical approaches. Also, a few attempts have been made at describing the generation of residual pore-water pressures using numerical methods. These attempts do not have a data base to work from...

  9. The determination of thru-thickness residual bending stresses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rinehart, Adam James

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by Bidirectional Bending for the Case y?, & y, , 110 5-1 Finite Elemenl, Mesh Used in Study 116 5-2 Comparison ol Percent Deviation of 100 and 200 Element. FE Models from Exact Solution, 800 k-in Released Moment, No Initial Stresses 123 5-3 Comparison of 200... Elcmcnt FE Solution to Exact Solution for Residual Stress Distribution Produced by 800 k-in Released Momem. in an Initially Stress Free Cross Section, . 124 5-4 Residual Stress Distributions for Increasing Levels of Released Moment, Initially Stress...

  10. Wood residuals find big uses in small pieces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glenn, J.

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With a history of finding economic uses for leftovers, the wood industry explores sustainable options for creating higher value products. Years ago, companies saw the use - any use - of residues as a sound, economic business practice. Today, many companies are looking to go beyond low value products such as mulch, animal bedding and fuel, and market to higher value end users. Additionally, with so much material from the primary industries already accounted for, consumers of wood residue are in need of additional supply from sources such as secondary mills (furniture manufacturers, etc.), as wells as the C&D and MSW streams. This paper discusses these products and markets.

  11. Nuclear Arms Control R&D Consortium includes Los Alamos

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Arms Control R&D Consortium includes Los Alamos Nuclear Arms Control R&D Consortium includes Los Alamos A consortium led by the University of Michigan that includes LANL as...

  12. A Residual Mass Ballistic Testing Method to Compare Armor Materials or Components (Residual Mass Ballistic Testing Method)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benjamin Langhorst; Thomas M Lillo; Henry S Chu

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A statistics based ballistic test method is presented for use when comparing multiple groups of test articles of unknown relative ballistic perforation resistance. The method is intended to be more efficient than many traditional methods for research and development testing. To establish the validity of the method, it is employed in this study to compare test groups of known relative ballistic performance. Multiple groups of test articles were perforated using consistent projectiles and impact conditions. Test groups were made of rolled homogeneous armor (RHA) plates and differed in thickness. After perforation, each residual projectile was captured behind the target and its mass was measured. The residual masses measured for each test group were analyzed to provide ballistic performance rankings with associated confidence levels. When compared to traditional V50 methods, the residual mass (RM) method was found to require fewer test events and be more tolerant of variations in impact conditions.

  13. A Roadmap to Success: Hiring, Retaining, and Including People...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    A Roadmap to Success: Hiring, Retaining, and Including People with Disabilities A Roadmap to Success: Hiring, Retaining, and Including People with Disabilities December 5, 2014...

  14. [Article 1 of 7: Motivates and Includes the Consumer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and include the consumer exist. Some examples include advanced two-way metering (AMI), demand response (DR), and distributed energy resources (DER). A common misconception is...

  15. Including Retro-Commissioning in Federal Energy Savings Performance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Including Retro-Commissioning in Federal Energy Savings Performance Contracts Including Retro-Commissioning in Federal Energy Savings Performance Contracts Document describes...

  16. Investigations into the Nature of Halogen Bonding Including Symmetry...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    into the Nature of Halogen Bonding Including Symmetry Adapted Perturbation Theory Analyses. Investigations into the Nature of Halogen Bonding Including Symmetry Adapted...

  17. Solid waste management of coal conversion residuals from a commercial-size facility: environmental engineering aspects. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bern, J.; Neufeld, R. D.; Shapiro, M. A.

    1980-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Major residuals generated by the conversion process and its auxiliary operations include: (a) coal preparation wastes; (b) gasifier ash; (c) liquefaction solids-char; (d) tail gas or flue gas desulfurization sludge; (e) boiler flyash and bottom ash; (f) raw water treatment sludge, and; (g) biosludges from process wastewater treatment. Recovered sulfur may also require disposal management. Potential environmental and health impacts from each of the residues are described on the basis of characterization of the waste in the perspective of water quality degradation. Coal gasification and liquefaction systems are described in great detail with respect to their associated residuals. Management options are listed with the conclusion that land disposal of the major residual streams is the only viable choice. On-site versus off-site disposal is analyzed with the selection of on-site operations to reduce political, social and institutional pressures, and to optimize the costs of the system. Mechanisms for prevention of leachate generation are described, and various disposal site designs are outlined. It is concluded that co-disposal feasibility of some waste streams must be established in order to make the most preferred solid waste management system feasible. Capacity requirements for the disposal operation were calculated for a 50,000 bbl/day coal liquefaction plant or 250 million SCF/day gasification operation.

  18. PROPERTIES OF RESIDUALS FOR SPATIAL POINT PROCESSES A. BADDELEY,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baddeley, Adrian

    PROPERTIES OF RESIDUALS FOR SPATIAL POINT PROCESSES A. BADDELEY, University of Western Australia J. MŘLLER, University of Aalborg A.G. PAKES, University of Western Australia Abstract For any point process & Statistics M019, University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Nedlands WA 6009, Australia Postal

  19. AIAA-2001-0025 SPECTRUM FATIGUE LIFETIME AND RESIDUAL STRENGTH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on a typical fiberglass laminate configuration turbine blade fiberglass material has been undertaken under at various fractions of the lifetime turbine blade materials.. are consistent with the residual strength of fiberglass spectrum have been studied. Data have been obtained for materials produce results that may

  20. Prompt optical emission from residual collisions in GRB outflows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhuo Li; Eli Waxman

    2008-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The prompt gamma-ray emission in gamma-ray bursts is believed to be produced by internal shocks within a relativistic unsteady outflow. The recent detection of prompt optical emission accompanying the prompt gamma-ray emission appears to be inconsistent with this model since the out flowing plasma is expected to be highly optically thick to optical photons. We show here that fluctuations in flow properties on short, ~ 1 ms, time scale, which drive the gamma-ray producing collisions at small radii, are expected to lead to "residual" collisions at much larger radii, where the optical depth to optical photons is low. The late residual collisions naturally account for the relatively bright optical emission. The apparent simultaneity of gamma-ray and optical emission is due to the highly relativistic speed with which the plasma expands. Residual collisions may also account for the X-ray emission during the early "steep decline" phase, where the radius is inferred to be larger than the gamma-ray emission radius. Finally, we point out that inverse-Compton emission from residual collisions at large radii is expected to contribute significantly to the emission at high energy, and may therefore "smear" the pair production spectral cut-off.

  1. RESIDUAL TYPE A POSTERIORI ERROR ESTIMATES FOR ELLIPTIC OBSTACLE PROBLEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nochetto, Ricardo H.

    to double obstacle problems are briefly discussed. Key words. a posteriori error estimates, residual Science Foundation under the grant No.19771080 and China National Key Project ``Large Scale Scientific\\Gamma satisfies / Ÿ 0 on @ and K is the convex set of admissible displacements K := fv 2 H 1 0(\\Omega\\Gamma : v

  2. Computer aided analysis for residual stress measurement using ultrasonic techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kypa, Jagan Mohan

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to detect travel-times with a precision of 0. l nanoseconds and an accuracy of less than 2.5 nanoseconds. A residual stress reference standard developed for previous research was used as the sample to measure travel-times. The sample was designed...

  3. COMMUNICATION Are Residues in a Protein Folding Nucleus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dai, Yang

    COMMUNICATION Are Residues in a Protein Folding Nucleus Evolutionarily Conserved? Yan Yuan Tseng is the hallmark of life. It is important to understand how protein folding and evolution influence each other in protein folding nucleus as measured by experi- mental f-value and selection pressure as measured by v

  4. A PROBABILISTIC FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF RESIDUAL STRESS FORMATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grujicic, Mica

    A PROBABILISTIC FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF RESIDUAL STRESS FORMATION IN SHRINK-FIT CERAMIC shrink fitting of the jacket over the lining is studied using a probabilistic finite element analysis structural analysis approach, known as the Advanced Mean Value (AMV) method, is used which enables

  5. FIXED PRICE RESIDUAL FUNDS POLICY Policy dated March 29, 1999

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weston, Ken

    FIXED PRICE RESIDUAL FUNDS POLICY Policy dated March 29, 1999 After completion of all deliverables required under a fixed-price award, after costs in fulfilling the requirements of the award have been of the University. The request will be approved if the project is consistent with broader University priorities

  6. Removal of residual particulate matter from filter media

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Almlie, Jay C; Miller, Stanley J

    2014-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for removing residual filter cakes that remain adhered to a filter after typical particulate removal methodologies have been employed, such as pulse-jet filter element cleaning, for all cleanable filters used for air pollution control, dust control, or powder control.

  7. Residual stresses in weld overlay tubes: A finite element study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taljat, B.; Zacharia, T.; Wang, X.L.; Keiser, J.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Metals and Ceramics Div.; Feng, Z. [Edison Welding Inst., Columbus, OH (United States); Jirinec, M.J. [Welding Services, Inc., Norcross, GA (United States)

    1997-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Residual stresses and strains in a tube with circumferential weld overlay were analyzed by the finite element (FE) method. The objective of this work was to develop and verify a FE model, to determine the magnitude and distribution of residual stresses in the weld overlay tube, and to evaluate the significance of two contributing factors to residual stress: (1) difference in material properties between tube and weld material, and (2) thermal gradients in the weld. An axisymmetric FE model was developed to simulate the circumferential two-layer welding process of alloy 625 overlay on SA210 tube. The first layer was modeled as a gas metal arc welding process with filler metal, whereas the autogenous gas tungsten arc welding process was modeled for the second layer. Neutron diffraction technique was used to experimentally determine residual elastic strains in the weld overlay tube. Comparison with the FE results shows overall good agreement. Both the experimental and FE results show high compressive stresses at the inside tube surface and high tensile stresses in the weld overlay. This suggests that weld overlay may be used to relieve tensile or produce compressive stresses at the inside tube surface, which is significant for applications where crack initiation is found at the root pass of the joining weld.

  8. Ammonia volatilization from soils with surface rice straw residue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barghassa, Peyam

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    rice residue and related factors on NH3 volatilization from an acid Beaumont clay (pH 5.4) and an alkaline Lake Charles clay (pH 7.4). The treatments in the greenhouse and lab consisted of all possible combinations of the following variables: surface...

  9. New Techniques for the Construction of Residue Potentials for Protein

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neumaier, Arnold

    New Techniques for the Construction of Residue Potentials for Protein Folding Arnold Neumaier­lattice protein folding studies. Our potential is a function of the amino acid labels and of the distances between­ rium geometries can determine the true effective potential energy function. Keywords. protein folding

  10. CARBON ENRICHMENT IN RESIDUAL AUSTENITE DURING MARTENSITIC TRANSFORMATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    179 CARBON ENRICHMENT IN RESIDUAL AUSTENITE DURING MARTENSITIC TRANSFORMATION S. W. Ooi1 , Y. R, retained austenite, autotempering and low carbon steel. Abstract Carbon enrichment of austenite and carbide enrich with carbon [9-11] and there has been recent work to exploit this process in the design of `quench

  11. Sorption characteristics of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in aluminum smelter residues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gijs D. Breedveld; Emilien Pelletier; Richard St. Louis; Gerard Cornelissen [Norwegian Geotechnical Institute, Oslo (Norway)

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High temperature carbon oxidation in primary aluminum smelters results in the release of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) into the environment. The main source of PAH are the anodes, which are composed of petroleum coke (black carbon, BC) and coal tar pitch. To elucidate the dominant carbonaceous phase controlling the environmental fate of PAH in aluminum smelter residues (coke BC and/or coal tar), the sorptive behavior of PAHs has been determined, using passive samplers and infinite-sink desorption methods. Samples directly from the wet scrubber were studied as well as ones from an adjacent 20-year old storage lagoon and roof dust from the smelter. Carbon-normalized distribution coefficients of native PAHs were 2 orders of magnitude higher than expected based on amorphous organic carbon (AOC)/water partitioning, which is in the same order of magnitude as reported literature values for soots and charcoals. Sorption isotherms of laboratory-spiked deuterated phenanthrene showed strong (about 100 times stronger than AOC) but nonetheless linear sorption in both fresh and aged aluminum smelter residues. The absence of nonlinear behavior typical for adsorption to BC indicates that PAH sorption in aluminum smelter residues is dominated by absorption into the semi-solid coal tar pitch matrix. Desorption experiments using Tenax showed that fresh smelter residues had a relatively large rapidly desorbing fraction of PAH (35-50%), whereas this fraction was strongly reduced (11-16%) in the lagoon and roof dust material. Weathering of the coal tar residue and/or redistribution of PAH between coal tar and BC phases could explain the reduced availability in aged samples. 38 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  12. VLSI implementation of output convertors for ASIC architectures based on the residual number system: an overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Godbole, Rajesh

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , . For example, 5 bit residues occupy only 32 locations with a word length equal to [log sM] = 18. The key to this output conversion is a quotient-remainder representation for the summands s?such that 0 & s, & M. If a particular modulus m~ is singled out... Systems 5. Mixed Radix Systems 6. Properties of Weighted and Residual Number Systems B. Algebra of Residue Classes 1. Residue Representation 2. Example: Calculation of Integer Values k Residue Digits 3. Identities Involving Residues and Integer...

  13. Residual Stresses in 21-6-9 Stainless Steel Warm Forgings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Everhart, Wesley A.; Lee, Jordan D.; Broecker, Daniel J.; Bartow, John P.; McQueen, Jamie M.; Switzner, Nathan T.; Neidt, Tod M.; Sisneros, Thomas A.; Brown, Donald W.

    2012-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Forging residual stresses are detrimental to the production and performance of derived machined parts due to machining distortions, corrosion drivers and fatigue crack drivers. Residual strains in a 21-6-9 stainless steel warm High Energy Rate Forging (HERF) were measured via neutron diffraction. The finite element analysis (FEA) method was used to predict the residual stresses that occur during forging and water quenching. The experimentally measured residual strains were used to calibrate simulations of the three-dimensional residual stress state of the forging. ABAQUS simulation tools predicted residual strains that tend to match with experimental results when varying yield strength is considered.

  14. The Tully-Fisher Relation and Its Residuals for a Broadly Selected Sample of Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James Pizagno; Francisco Prada; David H. Weinberg; Hans-Walter Rix; Richard W. Pogge; Eva K. Grebel; Daniel Harbeck; Michael Blanton; J. Brinkmann; James E. Gunn

    2007-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We measure the relation between galaxy luminosity and disk circular velocity (the Tully-Fisher [TF] relation), in the g, r, i, and z-bands, for a broadly selected sample of galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, with the goal of providing well defined observational constraints for theoretical models of galaxy formation. The input sample of 234 galaxies has a roughly flat distribution of absolute magnitudes in the range -18.5 > Mr > -22, and our only morphological selection is an axis-ratio cut b/a < 0.6 to allow accurate inclination corrections. Long-slit spectroscopy yields usable H-alpha rotation curves for 162 galaxies. Observational errors, including distance errors due to peculiar velocities, are small compared to the intrinsic scatter of the TF relation. The slope of the forward TF relation steepens from -5.5 +/- 0.2 mag/log(km/s) in the g-band to -6.6 +/- 0.2 mag/log(km/s) in the z-band. The intrinsic scatter is approximately 0.4 mag in all bands. The scatter is not dominated by rare outliers or by any particular class of galaxies, though it drops slightly, to 0.36 mag, if we restrict the sample to nearly bulgeless systems. Correlations of TF residuals with other galaxy properties are weak: bluer galaxies are significantly brighter than average in the g-band but only marginally brighter in the i-band; more concentrated galaxies are slightly fainter than average; and the TF residual is virtually independent of half-light radius, contrary to the trend expected for gravitationally dominant disks. The observed residual correlations do not account for most of the intrinsic scatter, implying that this scatter is instead driven largely by variations in the ratio of dark to luminous matter within the disk galaxy population.

  15. Derivation of uranium residual radioactive material guidelines for the Shpack site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, J.J.; Yu, C.; Monette, F.; Jones, L.

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Residual radioactive material guidelines for uranium were derived for the Shpack site in Norton, Massachusetts. This site has been identified for remedial action under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The uranium guidelines were derived on the basis of the requirement that the 50-year committed effective dose equivalent to a hypothetical individual who lives or works in the immediate vicinity of the Shpack site should not exceed a dose of 100 mrem/yr following decontamination. The DOE residual radioactive material guideline computer code, RESRAD, which implements the methodology described in the DOE manual for implementing residual radioactive material guidelines, was used in this evaluation. Three potential scenarios were considered for the site; the scenarios vary with regard to time spent at the site, sources of water used, and sources of food consumed. The results of the evaluation indicate that the basic dose limit of 100 mrem/yr will not be exceeded for uranium (including uranium-234, uranium-235, and uranium-238) within 1000 years, provided that the soil concentration of combined uranium (uranium-234 and uranium-238) at the Shpack site does not exceed the following levels: 2500 pCi/g for Scenario A (recreationist: the expected scenario); 1100 pCi/g for Scenario B (industrial worker: a plausible scenario); and 53 pCi/g for Scenario C (resident farmer using a well water as the only water source: a possible but unlikely scenario). The uranium guidelines derived in this report apply to the combined activity concentration of uranium-234 and uranium-238 and were calculated on the basis of a dose of 100 mrem/yr. In setting the actual uranium guidelines for the Shpack site, DOE will apply the as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) policy to the decision-making process, along with other factors, such as whether a particular scenario is reasonable and appropriate. 8 refs., 2 figs., 8 tabs.

  16. acid analysis including: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nairn, John A. 12 A bottom-up analysis of including aviation within theEU's Emissions Trading Scheme Geosciences Websites Summary: A bottom-up analysis of including aviation...

  17. analysis including quantification: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ausloos 2004-12-31 29 A bottom-up analysis of including aviation within theEU's Emissions Trading Scheme Geosciences Websites Summary: A bottom-up analysis of including aviation...

  18. Biomarkers Core Lab Price List Does NOT Include

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grishok, Alla

    v3102014 Biomarkers Core Lab Price List Does NOT Include Kit Cost PURCHASED by INVESTIGATOR/1/2013 Page 1 of 5 #12;Biomarkers Core Lab Price List Does NOT Include Kit Cost PURCHASED by INVESTIGATOR

  19. Example Retro-Commissioning Scope of Work to Include Services...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Retro-Commissioning Scope of Work to Include Services as Part of an ESPC Investment-Grade Audit Example Retro-Commissioning Scope of Work to Include Services as Part of an ESPC...

  20. Residual stresses in dielectrics caused by metallization lines and pads

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He, M.Y.; Lipkin, J.; Clarke, D.R. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States). Materials Dept.] [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States). Materials Dept.; Evans, A.G. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States). Div. of Applied Sciences] [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States). Div. of Applied Sciences; Tenhover, M. [Carborundum Co., Niagara Falls, NY (United States)] [Carborundum Co., Niagara Falls, NY (United States)

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Residual stresses in dielectrics and semiconductors induced by metal lines, pads and vias can have detrimental effects on the performance of devices and electronic packages. Analytical and numerical calculations of these stresses have been performed for two purposes. (1) To illustrate how these stresses relate to the residual stress in the metallization and its geometry; (2) to calibrate a piezo-spectroscopic method for measuring these stresses with high spatial resolution. The results of the calculations have been presented using non-dimensional parameters that both facilitate scaling and provide connections to the stresses in the metal, with or without yielding. Preliminary experimental results obtained for Au/Ge eutectic pads illustrate the potential of the method and the role of the stress analysis.

  1. Classification of lepton mixing matrices from finite residual symmetries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renato M. Fonseca; Walter Grimus

    2014-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Assuming that neutrinos are Majorana particles, we perform a complete classification of all possible mixing matrices which are fully determined by residual symmetries in the charged-lepton and neutrino mass matrices. The classification is based on the assumption that the residual symmetries originate from a finite flavour symmetry group. The mathematical tools which allow us to accomplish this classification are theorems on sums of roots of unity. We find 17 sporadic cases plus one infinite series of mixing matrices associated with three-flavour mixing, all of which have already been discussed in the literature. Only the infinite series contains mixing matrices which are compatible with the data at the 3 sigma level.

  2. Structural group analysis of residues from Athabasca bitumen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, M.R.; Choi, J.H.K.; Egiebor, N.O. (Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Chemical Engineering); Kirchen, R.P.; Sanford, E.C. (Syncrude Canada Ltd., Edmonton, AB (Canada))

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Although the processability of bitumen from tar sand is dependent on its chemical composition, the details of this relationship are poorly understood. In this study, residue fractions from Athabasca bitumen (topped at different temperatures) and hydrocracker and coker residues were analyzed in detail. Separated class fractions were subjected to elemental analysis, NMR and IR spectroscopy, and potentiometric titration. These data were combined mathematically to obtain a structural profile of each oil. This analysis defines the structural changes in asphaltene precipitates due to distillation and processing, as well as the quantitative changes in the overall structural composition of the oil. Hydrocarbon structures such as paraffinic chains and naphthenes show definite trends with distillation and processing.

  3. Hydroconversion of heavy oils. [Residue of tar sand bitumen distillation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garg, D.

    1986-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is described for hydroconversion of feedstocks consisting essentially of at least one heavy hydrocarbon oil selected from the group consisting of residue of petroleum oil distillation and the residue of tar sand bitumen distillation to enhance the recovery of 350/sup 0/-650/sup 0/F boiling product fraction. The method comprises treating such feed stock with hydrogen at superatmospheric pressure and in the presence of finely divided active hydrogenation catalyst in consecutive reaction stages. An initial reaction stage is carried out at a temperature in the range of 780/sup 0/-825/sup 0/F, and a subsequent reaction stage is directly carried out after the initial reaction stage at a higher temperature in the range of 800/sup 0/F-860/sup 0/F, the temperature of the subsequent reaction stage being at least 20/sup 0/F higher than that of the initial reaction stage.

  4. THE METHOD OF CONJUGATE RESIDUALS FOR SOLVING THE GALERKIN EQUATIONS ASSOCIATED WITH SYMMETRIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plato, Robert

    kind integral equations, conjugate gradient type methods, Galerkin method, regularization schemesTHE METHOD OF CONJUGATE RESIDUALS FOR SOLVING THE GALERKIN EQUATIONS ASSOCIATED WITH SYMMETRIC, the method of conjugate residuals is consid- ered. An a posteriori stopping rule is introduced

  5. Making Photosynthetic Biofuel Renewable: Recovering Phosphorus from Residual Biomass J. M. Gifford and P. Westerhoff

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    Making Photosynthetic Biofuel Renewable: Recovering Phosphorus from Residual Biomass J. M. Gifford to global warming. Biofuel from phototrophic microbes like algae and bacteria provides a viable substitute improves biofuel sustainability by refining phosphorus recycling. Biomass Production Residual Biomass

  6. Taking LID to the Streets: A Case Study of Stormwater Management on Leland Avenue in San Francisco, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thong, Michelle

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    with a variety of materials, including porous concrete,porous asphalt and concrete block pavers. For systems that

  7. The Dissolution of Desicooler Residues in H-Canyon Dissolvers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, J.H.

    2003-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of dissolution and characterization studies has been performed to determine if FB-Line residues stored in desicooler containers will dissolve using a modified H-Canyon processing flowsheet. Samples of desicooler materials were used to evaluate dissolving characteristics in the low-molar nitric acid solutions used in H-Canyon dissolvers. The selection for the H-Canyon dissolution of desicooler residues was based on their high-enriched uranium content and trace levels of plutonium. Test results showed that almost all of the enriched uranium will dissolve from the desicooler materials after extended boiling in one molar nitric acid solutions. The residue that contained uranium after completion of the extended boiling cycle consisted of brown solids that had agglomerated into large pieces and were floating on top of the dissolver solution. Addition of tenth molar fluoride to a three molar nitric acid solution containing boron did not dissolve remaining uranium from the brown solids. Only after boiling in an eight molar nitric acid-tenth molar fluoride solution without boron did remaining uranium and aluminum dissolve from the brown solids. The amount of uranium associated with brown solids would be approximately 1.4 percent of the total uranium content of the desicooler materials. The brown solids that remain in the First Uranium Cycle feed will accumulate at the organic/aqueous interface during solvent extraction operations. Most of the undissolved white residue that remained after extended boiling was aluminum oxide containing additional trace quantities of impurities. However, the presence of mercury used in H-Canyon dissolvers should complete the dissolution of these aluminum compounds.

  8. Type Ia supernova Hubble residuals and host-galaxy properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, A. G.; Aldering, G.; Aragon, C.; Bailey, S.; Fakhouri, H. K. [Physics Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Antilogus, P.; Bongard, S.; Canto, A.; Cellier-Holzem, F.; Fleury, M.; Guy, J. [Laboratoire de Physique Nucléaire et des Hautes Énergies, Université Pierre et Marie Curie Paris 6, Université Paris Diderot Paris 7, CNRS-IN2P3, 4 place Jussieu, F-75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Baltay, C. [Department of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06250-8121 (United States); Buton, C.; Feindt, U.; Greskovic, P.; Kowalski, M. [Physikalisches Institut, Universität Bonn, Nußallee 12, D-53115 Bonn (Germany); Childress, M. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2611 (Australia); Chotard, N.; Copin, Y.; Gangler, E. [Université de Lyon, F-69622 Lyon (France); Université de Lyon 1, Villeurbanne (France); CNRS/IN2P3, Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon (France); and others

    2014-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Kim et al. introduced a new methodology for determining peak-brightness absolute magnitudes of type Ia supernovae from multi-band light curves. We examine the relation between their parameterization of light curves and Hubble residuals, based on photometry synthesized from the Nearby Supernova Factory spectrophotometric time series, with global host-galaxy properties. The K13 Hubble residual step with host mass is 0.013 ± 0.031 mag for a supernova subsample with data coverage corresponding to the K13 training; at <<1?, the step is not significant and lower than previous measurements. Relaxing the data coverage requirement of the Hubble residual step with the host mass is 0.045 ± 0.026 mag for the larger sample; a calculation using the modes of the distributions, less sensitive to outliers, yields a step of 0.019 mag. The analysis of this article uses K13 inferred luminosities, as distinguished from previous works that use magnitude corrections as a function of SALT2 color and stretch parameters: steps at >2? significance are found in SALT2 Hubble residuals in samples split by the values of their K13 x(1) and x(2) light-curve parameters. x(1) affects the light-curve width and color around peak (similar to the ?m {sub 15} and stretch parameters), and x(2) affects colors, the near-UV light-curve width, and the light-curve decline 20-30 days after peak brightness. The novel light-curve analysis, increased parameter set, and magnitude corrections of K13 may be capturing features of SN Ia diversity arising from progenitor stellar evolution.

  9. Ultrasonic detection of residual stress in a turbine disk 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pathak, Nitin

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in temperature and stresses during welding. Adapted from [4] . . Cracked steam turbine rotor disk segments. Adapted from [6] . . . . 5 Electrical block diagram of Barkhausen apparatus. Adapted from [11] 10 Snell's Law. 15 Stress field and speeds of plane... International B. Effects in Engineering Design Residual stresses may be introduced into materials in a variety of ways, e. g. , in manu- facturing and repairing processes such as casting, machining, or welding. The casting process has a high probability...

  10. Residual-oil-saturation-technology test, Bell Creek Field, Montana. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A field test was conducted of the technology available to measure residual oil saturation following waterflood secondary oil recovery processes. The test was conducted in a new well drilled solely for that purpose, located immediately northwest of the Bell Creek Micellar Polymer Pilot. The area where the test was conducted was originally drilled during 1968, produced by primary until late 1970, and was under line drive waterflood secondary recovery until early 1976, when the area was shut in at waterflood depletion. This report presents the results of tests conducted to determine waterflood residual oil saturation in the Muddy Sandstone reservoir. The engineering techniques used to determine the magnitude and distribution of the remaining oil saturation included both pressure and sidewall cores, conventional well logs (Dual Laterolog - Micro Spherically Focused Log, Dual Induction Log - Spherically Focused Log, Borehole Compensated Sonic Log, Formation Compensated Density-Compensated Neutron Log), Carbon-Oxygen Logs, Dielectric Logs, Nuclear Magnetism Log, Thermal Decay Time Logs, and a Partitioning Tracer Test.

  11. The effect of magnetic flutter on residual flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terry, P. W.; Pueschel, M. J.; Carmody, D. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Nevins, W. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The hypothesis that stochastic magnetic fields disrupt zonal flows associated with ion temperature gradient turbulence saturation is investigated analytically with a residual flow calculation in the presence of magnetic flutter. The calculation starts from the time-asymptotic zero-beta residual flow of Rosenbluth and Hinton [Phys. Rev. Lett. 80, 724 (1998)] with the sudden application of an externally imposed, fixed magnetic field perturbation. The short-time electron response from radial charge loss due to magnetic flutter is calculated from the appropriate gyrokinetic equation. The potential evolution has quadratic behavior, with a zero crossing at finite time. The crossing time and its parametric dependencies are compared with numerical results from a gyrokinetic simulation of residual flow in the presence of magnetic flutter. The numerical and analytical results are in good agreement and support the hypothesis that the high-beta runaway of numerical simulations is a result of the disabling of zonal flows by finite-beta charge losses associated with magnetic flutter.

  12. Single-well experimental design for studying residual trapping of superciritcal carbon dioxide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Y.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Theory and design. J. Can. Petrol. Technol. 30 (3), Tomich,residual oil saturation. J. Petrol. Technol. 25 (2), 211–

  13. Environmental and economic evaluation of energy recovery from agricultural and forestry residues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Four conversion methods and five residues are examined in this report, which describes six model systems: hydrolysis of corn residues, pyrolysis of corn residues, combustion of cotton-ginning residues, pyrolysis of wheat residues, fermentation of molasses, and combustion of pulp and papermill wastes. Estimates of material and energy flows for those systems are given per 10/sup 12/ Btu of recovered energy. Regional effects are incorporated by addressing the regionalized production of the residues. A national scope cannot be provided for every residue considered because of the biological and physical constraints of crop production. Thus, regionalization of the model systems to the primary production region for the crop from which the residue is obtained has been undertaken. The associated environmental consequences of residue utilization are then assessed for the production region. In addition, the environmental impacts of operating the model systems are examined by quantifying the residuals generated and the land, water, and material requirements per 10/sup 12/ Btu of energy generated. On the basis of estimates found in the literature, capital, operating, and maintenance cost estimates are given for the model systems. These data are also computed on the basis of 10/sup 12/ Btu of energy recovered. The cost, residual, material, land, and water data were then organized into a format acceptable for input into the SEAS data management program. The study indicates that the most serious environmental impacts arise from residue removal rather than from conversion.

  14. Sensitivity study of the residue method for the detection of aerosols from space-borne sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoffelen, Ad

    Sensitivity study of the residue method for the detection of aerosols from space-borne sensors Martin de Graaf April 2002 #12;Sensitivity study of the residue method for the detection of aerosols from of aerosol parameters on residue 3 2.1 Standard aerosol and atmosphere parameters

  15. A Gaussian-chain model for treating residual chargecharge interactions in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weston, Ken

    . According to Coulomb's law, two charged residues fully solvated in water have an interaction energy U0 332 rA Gaussian-chain model for treating residual charge­charge interactions in the unfolded state. Here I present a simple theoretical method for treating residual charge­charge interactions

  16. NOBOB-S: Salinity/Brine Exposure as a Biocide for Application to NOBOB Residuals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , eggs and spores of many taxa within the sediments and residual water of their ballast tanks (Niimi a voluntary "best management practices" approach for residual ballast water and sediment for NOBOB vesselsNOBOB-S: Salinity/Brine Exposure as a Biocide for Application to NOBOB Residuals Primary

  17. Residues, Duality, and the Fundamental Class of a scheme-map

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Mar 26, 2011 ... Page 1 ... So don't bother taking notes. Joseph Lipman (Purdue ... 4 Residues, integrals and duality: the Residue Theorem. 5 Closing ..... Now here is the main result, expressing via residues and integrals a canonical ... In what went before, ? was the sheaf of regular differentials, and c f was just the ...

  18. Microstructure, residual stress, and fracture of sputtered TiN films Liqiang Zhang a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volinsky, Alex A.

    Microstructure, residual stress, and fracture of sputtered TiN films Liqiang Zhang a , Huisheng Keywords: TiN films Residual stress Hardness Fracture toughness Morphology, structure, residual stress, hardness, and fracture toughness of magnetron sputtered titanium nitride (TiN) thin films, deposited at 300

  19. Prediction of Protein Interaction Sites From Sequence Profile and Residue Neighbor List

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weston, Ken

    Prediction of Protein Interaction Sites From Sequence Profile and Residue Neighbor List Huan Protein­protein interaction sites are predicted from a neural network with sequence profiles correctly predicted residues account for 65% of the 11,805 residues making up the 129 interfaces. The main

  20. Introduction to Small-Scale Wind Energy Systems (Including RETScreen...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Introduction to Small-Scale Wind Energy Systems (Including RETScreen Case Study) (Webinar) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Introduction to Small-Scale...

  1. Laboratory Curiosity rover ChemCam team, including Los Alamos...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MEXICO, August 23, 2012-Members of the Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover ChemCam team, including Los Alamos National Laboratory scientists, squeezed in a little extra target...

  2. PLOT: A UNIX PROGRAM FOR INCLUDING GRAPHICS IN DOCUMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Curtis, Pavel

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    simple, easy-to-read graphics language designed specificallyPROGRAM FOR INCLUDING GRAPHICS IN DOCUMENTS Pavel Curtismeanings as in the GRAFPAC graphics system. Definl. ~ tions

  3. analysis including plasma: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Assembly 2010 Space Plasmas in the Solar System, including Planetary Magnetospheres (D) Solar Variability, Cosmic Rays and Climate (D21) GEOMAGNETIC ACTIVITY AT HIGH-LATITUDE:...

  4. Energy Department Expands Gas Gouging Reporting System to Include...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Washington, DC - Energy Secretary Samuel W. Bodman announced today that the Department of Energy has expanded its gas gouging reporting system to include a toll-free telephone...

  5. arch dams including: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Websites Summary: insight into the gamut of shallow water waves, including kinematic, diffusion, dynamic, and gravity wavesDam-Breach Flood Wave Propagation Using...

  6. The conserved glycine residues in the transmembrane domain of the Semliki Forest virus fusion protein are not required for assembly and fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liao Maofu [Department of Cell Biology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, NY 10461 (United States); Kielian, Margaret [Department of Cell Biology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, NY 10461 (United States)]. E-mail: kielian@aecom.yu.edu

    2005-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The alphavirus Semliki Forest virus (SFV) infects cells via a low pH-triggered fusion reaction mediated by the viral E1 protein. Both the E1 fusion peptide and transmembrane (TM) domain are essential for membrane fusion, but the functional requirements for the TM domain are poorly understood. Here we explored the role of the five TM domain glycine residues, including the highly conserved glycine pair at E1 residues 415/416. SFV mutants with alanine substitutions for individual or all five glycine residues (5G/A) showed growth kinetics and fusion pH dependence similar to those of wild-type SFV. Mutants with increasing substitution of glycine residues showed an increasingly more stringent requirement for cholesterol during fusion. The 5G/A mutant showed decreased fusion kinetics and extent in fluorescent lipid mixing assays. TM domain glycine residues thus are not required for efficient SFV fusion or assembly but can cause subtle effects on the properties of membrane fusion.

  7. Demonstration of a computer model for residual radioactive material guidelines, RESRAD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, C.; Yuan, Y.C.; Zielen, A.J.; Wallo, A. III (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA); USDOE, Washington, DC (USA))

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A computer model was developed to calculate residual radioactive material guidelines for the US Department of Energy (DOE). This model, called RESRAD, can be run on IBM or IBM-compatible microcomputer. Seven potential exposure pathways from contaminated soil are analyzed, including external radiation exposure and internal radiation exposure from inhalation and food digestion. The RESRAD code has been applied to several DOE sites to derive soil cleanup guidelines. The experience gained indicates that a comprehensive set of site-specific hydrogeologic and geochemical input parameters must be used for a realistic pathway analysis. The RESRAD code is a useful tool; it is easy to run and very user-friendly. 6 refs., 12 figs.

  8. Standard Test Method for Gravimetric Determination of Nonvolatile Residue From Cleanroom Wipers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of solvent extractable nonvolatile residue (NVR) from wipers used in assembly, cleaning, or testing of spacecraft, but not from those used for analytical surface sampling of hardware. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.3 The NVR of interest is that which can be extracted from cleanroom wipers using a specified solvent that has been selected for its extractive qualities. Alternative solvents may be selected, but since their use may result in different values being generated, they must be identified in the procedure data sheet. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  9. Ion Mobility Separation of Isomeric Phosphopeptides from a Protein with Variant Modification of Adjacent Residues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.; Singer, David; Smith, Richard D.; Hoffmann, Ralf

    2011-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS), and particularly differential IMS or field asymmetric waveform IMS (FAIMS), was recently shown capable of separating post-translationally modified peptides with variant PTM localization. However, that work was limited to a model peptide with serine phosphorylation on fairly distant alternative sites. Here, we demonstrate that FAIMS (coupled to ESI/MS) can broadly baseline-resolve variant phosphopeptides from a biologically modified human protein, including those involving phosphorylation of different residues and adjacent sites that existing MS/MS methods are most challenged to distinguish. Singly and doubly phosphorylated variants can be resolved equally well and identified without dissociation, based on accurate separation properties. The results are unchanged over a range of infusion solvent pH, hence present approach should work in conjunction with chromatographic separations using a mobile phase gradient.

  10. Cleaning residual NaK in the fast flux test facility fuel storage cooling system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burke, T.M.; Church, W.R. [Fluor Hanford, PO Box 1000, Richland, Washington, 99352 (United States); Hodgson, K.M. [Fluor Government Group, PO Box 1050, Richland, Washington, 99352 (United States)

    2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), located on the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Reservation, is a liquid metal-cooled test reactor. The FFTF was constructed to support the U.S. Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor Program. The bulk of the alkali metal (sodium and NaK) has been drained and will be stored onsite prior to final disposition. Residual NaK needed to be removed from the pipes, pumps, heat exchangers, tanks, and vessels in the Fuel Storage Facility (FSF) cooling system. The cooling system was drained in 2004 leaving residual NaK in the pipes and equipment. The estimated residual NaK volume was 76 liters in the storage tank, 1.9 liters in the expansion tank, and 19-39 liters in the heat transfer loop. The residual NaK volume in the remainder of the system was expected to be very small, consisting of films, droplets, and very small pools. The NaK in the FSF Cooling System was not radiologically contaminated. The portions of the cooling system to be cleaned were divided into four groups: 1. The storage tank, filter, pump, and associated piping; 2. The heat exchanger, expansion tank, and associated piping; 3. Argon supply piping; 4. In-vessel heat transfer loop. The cleaning was contracted to Creative Engineers, Inc. (CEI) and they used their superheated steam process to clean the cooling system. It has been concluded that during the modification activities (prior to CEI coming onsite) to prepare the NaK Cooling System for cleaning, tank T-914 was pressurized relative to the In-Vessel NaK Cooler and NaK was pushed from the tank back into the Cooler and that on November 6, 2005, when the gas purge through the In-Vessel NaK Cooler was increased from 141.6 slm to 283.2 slm, NaK was forced from the In-Vessel NaK Cooler and it contacted water in the vent line and/or scrubber. The gases from the reaction then traveled back through the vent line coating the internal surface of the vent line with NaK and NaK reaction products. The hot gases also exited the scrubber through the stack and due to the temperature of the gas, the hydrogen auto ignited when it mixed with the oxygen in the air. There was no damage to equipment, no injuries, and no significant release of hazardous material. Even though the FSF Cooling System is the only system at FFTF that contains residual NaK, there are lessons to be learned from this event that can be applied to future residual sodium removal activities. The lessons learned are: - Before cleaning equipment containing residual alkali metal the volume of alkali metal in the equipment should be minimized to the extent practical. As much as possible, reconfirm the amount and location of the alkali metal immediately prior to cleaning, especially if additional evolutions have been performed or significant time has passed. This is especially true for small diameter pipe (<20.3 centimeters diameter) that is being cleaned in place since gas flow is more likely to move the alkali metal. Potential confirmation methods could include visual inspection (difficult in all-metal systems), nondestructive examination (e.g., ultrasonic measurements) and repeating previous evolutions used to drain the system. Also, expect to find alkali metal in places it would not reasonably be expected to be. - Staff with an intimate knowledge of the plant equipment and the bulk alkali metal draining activities is critical to being able to confirm the amount and locations of the alkali metal residuals and to safely clean the residuals. - Minimize the potential for movement of alkali metal during cleaning or limit the distance and locations into which alkali metal can move. - Recognize that when working with alkali metal reactions, occasional pops and bangs are to be anticipated. - Pre-plan emergency responses to unplanned events to assure responses planned for an operating reactor are appropriate for the deactivation phase.

  11. Articles which include chevron film cooling holes, and related processes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bunker, Ronald Scott; Lacy, Benjamin Paul

    2014-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    An article is described, including an inner surface which can be exposed to a first fluid; an inlet; and an outer surface spaced from the inner surface, which can be exposed to a hotter second fluid. The article further includes at least one row or other pattern of passage holes. Each passage hole includes an inlet bore extending through the substrate from the inlet at the inner surface to a passage hole-exit proximate to the outer surface, with the inlet bore terminating in a chevron outlet adjacent the hole-exit. The chevron outlet includes a pair of wing troughs having a common surface region between them. The common surface region includes a valley which is adjacent the hole-exit; and a plateau adjacent the valley. The article can be an airfoil. Related methods for preparing the passage holes are also described.

  12. Submillimeter residual losses in high-{Tc} superconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, D.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bolometry was used obtain accurate submillimeter residual loss data for epitaxial films of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} (YBCO), Tl{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 10}, Tl{sub 2}CaBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 2}O{sub 8} (TCBCO), and Ba{sub 0.6}K{sub 0.4}BiO{sub 3} (BKBO). We were able to fit the absorptivity measured for Nb films to an Eliashberg strong coupling calculation; excellent agreement resulted between parameters from best fits and measured Residual Resistivity Ratio. Microwave surface resistance measurements made on the same YBCO and TCBCO films are in excellent agreement with submillimeter measurements. Absorptivities for all YBCO films studied are qualitatively similar, increasing smoothly with frequency, with no gap-like features below the well known absorption edge at 450 cm{sup {minus}1}. Losses in YBCO films were fit to a weakly coupled grain model for the a-b plane conductivity. Strong phonon structure was observed in TCBCO films between 60 and 700 cm{sup {minus}1} (2 THz and 23 THz); these losses could not be fitted to the simple weakly coupled grain model, in contrast to the case for other high-{Tc} superconductors where phonon structure observed in ceramics are is absent in epitaxial oriented films and crystals because of electronic screening due to high conductivity of a-b planes. Absorptivity data for the BKBO films all show a strong absorption onset near the BCS tunneling gap of 3.5 k{sub B}{Tc}. Comparison with strong coupling Eliashberg predictions and of a Kramers-Kronig analysis indicate that the absorption onset is consistent with a superconducting energy gap. Effects of magnetic field on residual losses in YBCO films show a resonant absorption feature in vicinity of predicted

  13. www.ext.vt.edu Produced by Communications and Marketing, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    created during mixing. PPs include pervious concrete, porous asphalt, and inter- locking concrete pavers) is a modified form of asphalt or concrete with a top layer that is pervious to water due to voids intentionally

  14. Enhanced residual entropy in high-density nanoconfined bilayer ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabiano Corsetti; Jon Zubeltzu; Emilio Artacho

    2015-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel kind of crystal order in high-density nanoconfined bilayer ice is proposed from molecular dynamics and density-functional theory simulations. A first-order transition is observed between a low-temperature proton-ordered solid and a high-temperature proton-disordered solid. The latter is shown to possess crystalline order for the oxygen positions, arranged on a close-packed triangular lattice with AA stacking. Uniquely amongst the ice phases, the triangular bilayer is characterized by two levels of disorder (for the bonding network and for the protons) which results in a residual entropy twice that of bulk ice.

  15. Dual-axis hole-drilling ESPI residual stress measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steinzig, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schajer, Gary [UNIV OF BRITISH COLUMBIA

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel dual-axis ESPI hole-drilling residual stress measurement method is presented. The method enables the evaluation of all the in-plane normal stress components with similar response to measurement errors, significantly lower than with single-axis measurements. A numerical method is described that takes advantage of, and compactly handles, the additional optical data that are available from the second measurement axis. Experimental tests were conducted on a calibrated specimen to demonstrate the proposed method, and the results supported theoretical expectations.

  16. Turbomachine injection nozzle including a coolant delivery system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zuo, Baifang (Simpsonville, SC)

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    An injection nozzle for a turbomachine includes a main body having a first end portion that extends to a second end portion defining an exterior wall having an outer surface. A plurality of fluid delivery tubes extend through the main body. Each of the plurality of fluid delivery tubes includes a first fluid inlet for receiving a first fluid, a second fluid inlet for receiving a second fluid and an outlet. The injection nozzle further includes a coolant delivery system arranged within the main body. The coolant delivery system guides a coolant along at least one of a portion of the exterior wall and around the plurality of fluid delivery tubes.

  17. Workshop Report on Atomic Bomb Dosimetry--Residual Radiation Exposure: Recent Research and Suggestions for Future Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    There is a need for accurate dosimetry for studies of health effects in the Japanese atomic bomb survivors because of the important role that these studies play in worldwide radiation protection standards. International experts have developed dosimetry systems, such as the Dosimetry System 2002 (DS02), which assess the initial radiation exposure to gamma rays and neutrons but only briefly consider the possibility of some minimal contribution to the total body dose by residual radiation exposure. In recognition of the need for an up-to-date review of the topic of residual radiation exposure in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, recently reported studies were reviewed at a technical session at the 57th Annual Meeting of the Health Physics Society in Sacramento, California, 22-26 July 2012. A one-day workshop was also held to provide time for detailed discussion of these newer studies and to evaluate their potential use in clarifying the residual radiation exposures to the atomic-bomb survivors at Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Suggestions for possible future studies are also included in this workshop report.

  18. [Article 1 of 7: Motivates and Includes the Consumer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    surges; the extra cost of these premium features can be included in the electric service contract. The Smart Grid will mitigate PQ events that originate in the transmission and...

  19. Including costs of supply chain risk in strategic sourcing decisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jain, Avani

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cost evaluations do not always include the costs associated with risks when organizations make strategic sourcing decisions. This research was conducted to establish and quantify the impact of risks and risk-related costs ...

  20. Limited Personal Use of Government Office Equipment including Information Technology

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2005-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The Order establishes requirements and assigns responsibilities for employees' limited personal use of Government resources (office equipment and other resources including information technology) within DOE, including NNSA. The Order is required to provide guidance on appropriate and inappropriate uses of Government resources. This Order was certified 04/23/2009 as accurate and continues to be relevant and appropriate for use by the Department. Certified 4-23-09. No cancellation.

  1. Hybrid powertrain system including smooth shifting automated transmission

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beaty, Kevin D.; Nellums, Richard A.

    2006-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A powertrain system is provided that includes a prime mover and a change-gear transmission having an input, at least two gear ratios, and an output. The powertrain system also includes a power shunt configured to route power applied to the transmission by one of the input and the output to the other one of the input and the output. A transmission system and a method for facilitating shifting of a transmission system are also provided.

  2. Separation of metallic residues from the dissolution of a high-burnup BWR fuel using nitrogen trifluoride

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McNamara, Bruce K.; Buck, Edgar C.; Soderquist, Chuck Z.; Smith, Frances N.; Mausolf, Edward J.; Scheele, Randall D.

    2014-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Nitrogen trifluoride (NF3) was used to fluorinate the metallic residue from the dissolution of a high burnup, boiling water reactor fuel (?70 MWd/kgU). The metallic residue included the noble metal phase (containing ruthenium, rhodium, palladium, technetium, and molybdenum), and smaller amounts of zirconium, selenium, tellurium, and silver. Exposing the noble metal phase to 10% NF3 in argon between 400 and 550?C, removed molybdenum and technetium near 400?C as their volatile fluorides, and ruthenium near 500?C as its volatile fluoride. The events were thermally and temporally distinct and the conditions specified are a recipe to separate these transition metals from each other and from the noble metal phase nonvolatile residue. Depletion of the volatile fluorides resulted in substantial exothermicity. Thermal excursion behavior was recorded under non-adiabatic, isothermal conditions that typically minimize heat release. Physical characterization of the metallic noble phase and its thermal behavior are consistent with high kinetic velocity reactions encouraged by the nanoparticulate phase or perhaps catalytic influences of the mixed platinum metals with nearly pure phase structure. Post-fluorination, only two phases were present in the residual nonvolatile fraction. These were identified as a nano-crystalline, metallic palladium cubic phase and a hexagonal rhodium trifluoride (RhF3) phase. The two phases were distinct as the sub-µm crystallites of metallic palladium were in contrast to the RhF3 phase, which grew from the parent nano-crystalline noble-metal phase during fluorination, to acicular crystals exceeding 20-µm in length.

  3. Alternative cooling resource for removing the residual heat of reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, H. C.; Lee, J. H.; Lee, D. S.; Jung, C. Y.; Choi, K. Y. [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd., 260 Naa-ri Yangnam-myeon Gyeongju-si, Gyeonasangbuk-do, 780-815 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Recirculated Cooling Water (RCW) system of a Candu reactor is a closed cooling system which delivers demineralized water to coolers and components in the Service Building, the Reactor Building, and the Turbine Building and the recirculated cooling water is designed to be cooled by the Raw Service Water (RSW). During the period of scheduled outage, the RCW system provides cooling water to the heat exchangers of the Shutdown Cooling System (SDCS) in order to remove the residual heat of the reactor, so the RCW heat exchangers have to operate at all times. This makes it very hard to replace the inlet and outlet valves of the RCW heat exchangers because the replacement work requires the isolation of the RCW. A task force was formed to prepare a plan to substitute the recirculated water with the chilled water system in order to cool the SDCS heat exchangers. A verification test conducted in 2007 proved that alternative cooling was possible for the removal of the residual heat of the reactor and in 2008 the replacement of inlet and outlet valves of the RCW heat exchangers for both Wolsong unit 3 and 4 were successfully completed. (authors)

  4. Quarry residuals RI/FS scoping document. [Weldon Spring quarry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this document is to serve as a planning tool for the implementation of the Quarry Residual Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) process and to provide direct input to revising and updating the 1988 Work Plan for the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project (WSSRAP) Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study-Environmental Impact Statement for the Weldon Spring Site (RI/FS-EIS) (Peterson et al. 1988) for this effort. The scoping process is intended to outline the tasks necessary to develop and implement activities in compliance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act-National Environmental Policy Act (CERCLA-NEPA) process from detailed planning through the appropriate decision document. In addition to scoping the entire process, this document will serve as the primary tool for planning and accomplishing all activities to be developed in the Quarry Residual RI/FS Work Plan. Subsequent tasks are difficult to plan at this time. 10 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  5. A Multi-Factor Analysis of Sustainable Agricultural Residue Removal Potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jared Abodeely; David Muth; Paul Adler; Eleanor Campbell; Kenneth Mark Bryden

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Agricultural residues have significant potential as a near term source of cellulosic biomass for bioenergy production, but sustainable removal of agricultural residues requires consideration of the critical roles that residues play in the agronomic system. Previous work has developed an integrated model to evaluate sustainable agricultural residue removal potential considering soil erosion, soil organic carbon, greenhouse gas emission, and long-term yield impacts of residue removal practices. The integrated model couples the environmental process models WEPS, RUSLE2, SCI, and DAYCENT. This study uses the integrated model to investigate the impact of interval removal practices in Boone County, Iowa, US. Residue removal of 4.5 Mg/ha was performed annually, bi-annually, and tri-annually and were compared to no residue removal. The study is performed at the soil type scale using a national soil survey database assuming a continuous corn rotation with reduced tillage. Results are aggregated across soil types to provide county level estimates of soil organic carbon changes and individual soil type soil organic matter content if interval residue removal were implemented. Results show interval residue removal is possible while improving soil organic matter. Implementation of interval removal practices provide greater increases in soil organic matter while still providing substantial residue for bioenergy production.

  6. cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hev ein sequence

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Raikhel, Natasha V. (Okemos, MI); Broekaert, Willem F. (Dilbeek, BE); Chua, Nam-Hai (Scarsdale, NY); Kush, Anil (New York, NY)

    2000-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74-79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli.

  7. Caspase-3 binds diverse P4 residues in peptides as revealed by crystallography and structural modeling.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang, Bin; Fu, Guoxing; Agniswamy, Johnson; Harrison, Robert W.; Weber, Irene T.; (GSU)

    2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Caspase-3 recognition of various P4 residues in its numerous protein substrates was investigated by crystallography, kinetics, and calculations on model complexes. Asp is the most frequent P4 residue in peptide substrates, although a wide variety of P4 residues are found in the cellular proteins cleaved by caspase-3. The binding of peptidic inhibitors with hydrophobic P4 residues, or no P4 residue, is illustrated by crystal structures of caspase-3 complexes with Ac-IEPD-Cho, Ac-WEHD-Cho, Ac-YVAD-Cho, and Boc-D(OMe)-Fmk at resolutions of 1.9-2.6 {angstrom}. The P4 residues formed favorable hydrophobic interactions in two separate hydrophobic regions of the binding site. The side chains of P4 Ile and Tyr form hydrophobic interactions with caspase-3 residues Trp206 and Trp214 within a non-polar pocket of the S4 subsite, while P4 Trp interacts with Phe250 and Phe252 that can also form the S5 subsite. These interactions of hydrophobic P4 residues are distinct from those for polar P4 Asp, which indicates the adaptability of caspase-3 for binding diverse P4 residues. The predicted trends in peptide binding from molecular models had high correlation with experimental values for peptide inhibitors. Analysis of structural models for the binding of 20 different amino acids at P4 in the aldehyde peptide Ac-XEVD-Cho suggested that the majority of hydrophilic P4 residues interact with Phe250, while hydrophobic residues interact with Trp206, Phe250, and Trp214. Overall, the S4 pocket of caspase-3 exhibits flexible adaptation for different residues and the new structures and models, especially for hydrophobic P4 residues, will be helpful for the design of caspase-3 based drugs.

  8. Single-well experimental design for studying residual trapping of superciritcal carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Y.; Freifeld, B.; Finsterle, S.; Leahy, M.; Ennis-King, J.; Paterson, L.; Dance, T.

    2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of our research is to design a single-well injection-withdrawal test to evaluate residual phase trapping at potential CO{sub 2} geological storage sites. Given the significant depths targeted for CO{sub 2} storage and the resulting high costs associated with drilling to those depths, it is attractive to develop a single-well test that can provide data to assess reservoir properties and reduce uncertainties in the appraisal phase of site investigation. The main challenges in a single-well test design include (1) difficulty in quantifying the amount of CO{sub 2} that has dissolved into brine or migrated away from the borehole; (2) non-uniqueness and uncertainty in the estimate of the residual gas saturation (S{sub gr}) due to correlations among various parameters; and (3) the potential biased S{sub gr} estimate due to unaccounted heterogeneity of the geological medium. To address each of these challenges, we propose (1) to use a physical-based model to simulation test sequence and inverse modeling to analyze data information content and to quantify uncertainty; (2) to jointly use multiple data types generated from different kinds of tests to constrain the Sgr estimate; and (3) to reduce the sensitivity of the designed tests to geological heterogeneity by conducting the same test sequence in both a water-saturated system and a system with residual gas saturation. To perform the design calculation, we build a synthetic model and conduct a formal analysis for sensitivity and uncertain quantification. Both parametric uncertainty and geological uncertainty are considered in the analysis. Results show (1) uncertainty in the estimation of Sgr can be reduced by jointly using multiple data types and repeated tests; and (2) geological uncertainty is essential and needs to be accounted for in the estimation of S{sub gr} and its uncertainty. The proposed methodology is applied to the design of a CO{sub 2} injection test at CO2CRC's Otway Project Site, Victoria, Australia.

  9. Role of a cysteine residue in the active site of ERK and the MAPKK family

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ohori, Makoto [Astellas Pharma Inc., Tokodai 5-2-3, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 300-2698 (Japan); Kinoshita, Takayoshi [Department of Biological Science, Graduate School of Science, Osaka Prefecture University, Gakuencho 1-1, Sakai, Osaka 599-8531 (Japan); Yoshimura, Seiji [Astellas Pharma Inc., Tokodai 5-2-3, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 300-2698 (Japan); Warizaya, Masaichi [Astellas Pharma Inc., Tokodai 5-2-3, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 300-2698 (Japan); Nakajima, Hidenori [Astellas Pharma Inc., Tokodai 5-2-3, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 300-2698 (Japan)]. E-mail: hidenori.nakajima@jp.astellas.com; Miyake, Hiroshi [Astellas Pharma Inc., Tokodai 5-2-3, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 300-2698 (Japan)

    2007-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Kinases of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades, including extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK), represent likely targets for pharmacological intervention in proliferative diseases. Here, we report that FR148083 inhibits ERK2 enzyme activity and TGF{beta}-induced AP-1-dependent luciferase expression with respective IC{sub 50} values of 0.08 and 0.05 {mu}M. FR265083 (1'-2' dihydro form) and FR263574 (1'-2' and 7'-8' tetrahydro form) exhibited 5.5-fold less and no activity, respectively, indicating that both the {alpha},{beta}-unsaturated ketone and the conformation of the lactone ring contribute to this inhibitory activity. The X-ray crystal structure of the ERK2/FR148083 complex revealed that the compound binds to the ATP binding site of ERK2, involving a covalent bond to S{gamma} of ERK2 Cys166, hydrogen bonds with the backbone NH of Met108, N{zeta} of Lys114, backbone C=O of Ser153, N{delta}2 of Asn154, and hydrophobic interactions with the side chains of Ile31, Val39, Ala52, and Leu156. The covalent bond motif in the ERK2/FR148083 complex assures that the inhibitor has high activity for ERK2 and no activity for other MAPKs such as JNK1 and p38MAPK{alpha}/{beta}/{gamma}/{delta} which have leucine residues at the site corresponding to Cys166 in ERK2. On the other hand, MEK1 and MKK7, kinases of the MAPKK family which also can be inhibited by FR148083, contain a cysteine residue corresponding to Cys166 of ERK2. The covalent binding to the common cysteine residue in the ATP-binding site is therefore likely to play a crucial role in the inhibitory activity for these MAP kinases. These findings on the molecular recognition mechanisms of FR148083 for kinases with Cys166 should provide a novel strategy for the pharmacological intervention of MAPK cascades.

  10. A preliminary assessment of the state of harvest and collection technology for forest residues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Webb, Erin [ORNL; Perlack, Robert D [ORNL; Blackwelder, D. Brad [Idaho National Laboratory (INL); Muth, David J. [Idaho National Laboratory (INL); Hess, J. Richard [Idaho National Laboratory (INL)

    2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To meet the 'Twenty in Ten Initiative' goals set in the 2007 State of the Union address, forest resources will be needed as feedstocks for lignocellulosic ethanol production. It has been estimated that 368 million dry tons can be produced annually in the U.S. from logging residues and fuel treatment thinnings. Currently, very little of this woody biomass is used for energy production due to the costs and difficulty in collecting and transporting this material. However, minimizing biomass costs (including harvest, handling, transport, storage, and processing costs) delivered to the refinery is necessary to develop a sustainable cellulosic ethanol industry. Achieving this goal requires a fresh look at conventional timber harvesting operations to identify ways of efficiently integrating energy wood collection and developing cost-effective technologies to harvest small-diameter trees. In conventional whole-tree logging operations, entire trees are felled and skidded from the stump to the landing. The residues (also called slash), consisting of tops and limbs, accumulate at the landing when trees are delimbed. This slash can be ground at the landing with a mobile grinder or transported to another central location with a stationary grinder. The ground material is transported via chip vans, or possibly large roll on/off containers, to the user facility. Cut-to-length harvesting systems are gaining popularity in some locations. In these operations, specialized harvesters that can fall, delimb, and cut logs to length are used. The small diameter tops and limbs accumulate along the machine's track. It can be left in the forest to dry or removed soon after harvest while logs are extracted. Removing slash during the same operation as the wood has been shown to be more efficient. However, leaving residue in the forest to dry reduces moisture content, which improves grinder performance, reduces dry matter loss during storage, and inhibits colonization of fungi that produce harmful spores. In recent years, new machines that are specially designed for collection of small diameter wood have been developed in the U.S. and Europe. Residue bundlers and balers improve transportation and handling efficiency by densifying the material and packaging it so that it can be handled with conventional equipment. An experimental integrated harvester/grinder can fall small diameter trees and feed them into a grinder. The ground material is collected in a bin that can be dumped into a chip van. The harvester head is also capable of delimbing and bucking (cut into sections) small timber to be used for pulp and posts. Limitations of these new technologies are their large capital costs and complexity, leading to high maintenance costs and the need for highly trained operators. To ensure that quality feedstock materials consistently enter the mouth of the refinery, the uniform format supply system concept proposes that feedstock diversity be managed at harvest, much like the current grain supply system. This allows for standardization of key infrastructure components and facilitation of a biomass commodity system. Challenges in achieving a uniform woody biomass supply include, but are not limited to, developing machines for efficient harvest of small-diameter trees in a range of topographies and conditions, developing machines and operating plans for grinding biomass as near to the stump as possible, developing cost-effective drying strategies to reduce losses and mold growth during wood chip storage, and quantifying environmental impacts of slash removal and fuel thinnings to aid landowner decisions and policy development.

  11. Solar Energy Education. Renewable energy: a background text. [Includes glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Some of the most common forms of renewable energy are presented in this textbook for students. The topics include solar energy, wind power hydroelectric power, biomass ocean thermal energy, and tidal and geothermal energy. The main emphasis of the text is on the sun and the solar energy that it yields. Discussions on the sun's composition and the relationship between the earth, sun and atmosphere are provided. Insolation, active and passive solar systems, and solar collectors are the subtopics included under solar energy. (BCS)

  12. Methods of producing adsorption media including a metal oxide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mann, Nicholas R; Tranter, Troy J

    2014-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods of producing a metal oxide are disclosed. The method comprises dissolving a metal salt in a reaction solvent to form a metal salt/reaction solvent solution. The metal salt is converted to a metal oxide and a caustic solution is added to the metal oxide/reaction solvent solution to adjust the pH of the metal oxide/reaction solvent solution to less than approximately 7.0. The metal oxide is precipitated and recovered. A method of producing adsorption media including the metal oxide is also disclosed, as is a precursor of an active component including particles of a metal oxide.

  13. Metal vapor laser including hot electrodes and integral wick

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ault, Earl R. (Livermore, CA); Alger, Terry W. (Tracy, CA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A metal vapor laser, specifically one utilizing copper vapor, is disclosed herein. This laser utilizes a plasma tube assembly including a thermally insulated plasma tube containing a specific metal, e.g., copper, and a buffer gas therein. The laser also utilizes means including hot electrodes located at opposite ends of the plasma tube for electrically exciting the metal vapor and heating its interior to a sufficiently high temperature to cause the metal contained therein to vaporize and for subjecting the vapor to an electrical discharge excitation in order to lase. The laser also utilizes external wicking arrangements, that is, wicking arrangements located outside the plasma tube.

  14. Metal vapor laser including hot electrodes and integral wick

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ault, E.R.; Alger, T.W.

    1995-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A metal vapor laser, specifically one utilizing copper vapor, is disclosed herein. This laser utilizes a plasma tube assembly including a thermally insulated plasma tube containing a specific metal, e.g., copper, and a buffer gas therein. The laser also utilizes means including hot electrodes located at opposite ends of the plasma tube for electrically exciting the metal vapor and heating its interior to a sufficiently high temperature to cause the metal contained therein to vaporize and for subjecting the vapor to an electrical discharge excitation in order to lase. The laser also utilizes external wicking arrangements, that is, wicking arrangements located outside the plasma tube. 5 figs.

  15. Watson Library enhancements to include new service desk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    12/5/13 KU Libraries News: Watson Library enhancements to include new service desk www.lib.ku.edu/news/newservicedesk.shtml 1/1 Contact Us The University of Kansas Libraries Lawrence, KS 66045 (785) 864-8983 Copyright © 2013 by the University... of Kansas Watson Library enhancements to include new service desk The University of Kansas Libraries is adding a new service desk to Watson Library to enhance the user experience and draw attention to new and existing resources. The desk, which...

  16. Thin film solar cell including a spatially modulated intrinsic layer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Guha, Subhendu (Troy, MI); Yang, Chi-Chung (Troy, MI); Ovshinsky, Stanford R. (Bloomfield Hills, MI)

    1989-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    One or more thin film solar cells in which the intrinsic layer of substantially amorphous semiconductor alloy material thereof includes at least a first band gap portion and a narrower band gap portion. The band gap of the intrinsic layer is spatially graded through a portion of the bulk thickness, said graded portion including a region removed from the intrinsic layer-dopant layer interfaces. The band gap of the intrinsic layer is always less than the band gap of the doped layers. The gradation of the intrinsic layer is effected such that the open circuit voltage and/or the fill factor of the one or plural solar cell structure is enhanced.

  17. Finite element residual stress analysis of induction heating bended ferritic steel piping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kima, Jong Sung [Sunchon National University, 255 Jungang-ro, Sucheon, Jeonnam (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kyoung-Soo; Oh, Young-Jin; Chang, Hyung-Young; Park, Heung-Bae [KEPCO E and C, Co., Ltd., 188, Kumi-ro, Seongnam, Kyounggi (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, there is a trend to apply the piping bended by induction heating process to nuclear power plants. Residual stress can be generated due to thermo-mechanical mechanism during the induction heating bending process. It is well-known that the residual stress has important effect on crack initiation and growth. The previous studies have focused on the thickness variation. In part, some studies were performed for residual stress evaluation of the austenitic stainless steel piping bended by induction heating. It is difficult to find the residual stresses of the ferritic steel piping bended by the induction heating. The study assessed the residual stresses of induction heating bended ferriticsteel piping via finite element analysis. As a result, it was identified that high residual stresses are generated on local outersurface region of the induction heating bended ferritic piping.

  18. Including Blind Students in Computer Science Through Access to Graphs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, R. Michael

    Including Blind Students in Computer Science Through Access to Graphs Suzanne Balik, Sean Mealin SKetching tool, GSK, to provide blind and sighted people with a means to create, examine, and share graphs (node-link diagrams) in real-time. GSK proved very effective for one blind computer science student

  19. Bayesian hierarchical reconstruction of protein profiles including a digestion model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Bayesian hierarchical reconstruction of protein profiles including a digestion model Pierre to recover the protein biomarkers content in a robust way. We will focus on the digestion step since and each branch to a molecular processing such as digestion, ionisation and LC-MS separation

  20. Biomass Potentials from California Forest and Shrublands Including Fuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biomass Potentials from California Forest and Shrublands Including Fuel Reduction Potentials-04-004 February 2005 Revised: October 2005 Arnold Schwarzenegger, Governor, State of California #12;Biomass Tiangco, CEC Bryan M. Jenkins, University of California #12;Biomass Potentials from California Forest

  1. Optimal Energy Management Strategy including Battery Health through Thermal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Optimal Energy Management Strategy including Battery Health through Thermal Management for Hybrid: Energy management strategy, Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, Li-ion battery aging, thermal management, Pontryagin's Minimum Principle. 1. INTRODUCTION The interest for energy management strategy (EMS) of Hybrid

  2. Area of cooperation includes: Joint research and development on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buyya, Rajkumar

    Technologies August 2, 2006: HCL Technologies Ltd (HCL), India's leading global IT services company, has signed projects that are using this technology currently such as BioGrid in Japan, National Grid Service in UKArea of cooperation includes: · Joint research and development on Grid computing technologies

  3. Energy Transitions: A Systems Approach Including Marcellus Shale Gas Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    Energy Transitions: A Systems Approach Including Marcellus Shale Gas Development A Report Engineering) W. VA #12;Energy Transitions: A Systems Approach August 2011 version Page 2 Energy Transitions sources globally, some very strong short-term drivers of energy transitions reflect rising concerns over

  4. SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAM Including the Chemical Hygiene Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Paul G.

    SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAM Including the Chemical Hygiene Plan Wisconsin Center for Applied, Technical Staff & Chemical Hygiene Officer kakupcho@wisc.edu 262-2982 Lab Facility Website http..........................................................................................................3 CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN III. Work-site Analysis and Hazard Identification 3.1 Hazardous Chemical

  5. HTS Conductor Design Issues Including Quench and Stability,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HTS Conductor Design Issues Including Quench and Stability, AC Losses, and Fault Currents M. J objective and technical approach · The purpose of this collaborative R&D project is an investigation of HTS conductor design optimization with emphasis on stability and protection issues for YBCO wires and coils

  6. Free Energy Efficiency Kit includes CFL light bulbs,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, Annkatrin

    Free Energy Efficiency Kit Kit includes CFL light bulbs, spray foam, low-flow shower head, and more for discounted energy assessments. FREE HOME ENERGY EFFICIENCY SEMINAR N e w R i ver L i g ht & Pow e r a n d W! Building Science 101 Presentation BPI Certified Building Professionals will present home energy efficiency

  7. DO NOT INCLUDE: flatten cardboard staples, tape & envelope windows ok

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolfe, Patrick J.

    / bottles Metal items other than cans/foil Napkins Paper towels Plastic bags Plastic films Plastic utensilsDO NOT INCLUDE: flatten cardboard staples, tape & envelope windows ok Aerosol cans Books Bottle, PDAs, inkjet cartridges, CFL bulbs (cushioned, sealed in plastic) computers, printers, printer

  8. cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Raikhel, N.V.; Broekaert, W.F.; Namhai Chua; Kush, A.

    1993-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1,018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids.

  9. Perhaps federal research grants can include infrastructure costs.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sur, Mriganka

    Perhaps federal research grants can include infrastructure costs. There are signs to find favour in China, a country beset by similar problems. The particular structure of Indian science and healthystart-uppackages. The government could contribute to these costs. 487 NATURE|Vol 436|28 July 2005

  10. Quantification of residual stress from photonic signatures of fused silica

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cramer, K. Elliott; Yost, William T. [NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA 23681 (United States); Hayward, Maurice [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA 23185 (United States)

    2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A commercially available grey-field polariscope (GFP) instrument for photoelastic examination is used to assess impact damage inflicted upon the outer-most pane of Space Shuttle windows made from fused silica. A method and apparatus for calibration of the stress-optic coefficient using four-point bending is discussed. The results are validated on known material (acrylic) and are found to agree with literature values to within 6%. The calibration procedure is then applied to fused-silica specimens and the stress-optic coefficient is determined to be 2.43 ± 0.54 × 10{sup ?12} Pa{sup ?1}. Fused silica specimens containing impacts artificially made at NASA’s Hypervelocity Impact Technology Facility (HIT-F), to simulate damage typical during space flight, are examined. The damage sites are cored from fused silica window carcasses and examined with the GFP. The calibrated GFP measurements of residual stress patterns surrounding the damage sites are presented.

  11. Residual energy in magnetohydrodynamic turbulence and in the solar wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanislav Boldyrev; Jean Carlos Perez; Vladimir Zhdankin

    2011-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent observations indicate that kinetic and magnetic energies are not in equipartition in the solar wind turbulence. Rather, magnetic fluctuations are more energetic and have somewhat steeper energy spectrum compared to the velocity fluctuations. This leads to the presence of the so-called residual energy E_r=E_v-E_b in the inertial interval of turbulence. This puzzling effect is addressed in the present paper in the framework of weak turbulence theory. Using a simple model of weakly colliding Alfv\\'en waves, we demonstrate that the kinetic-magnetic equipartition indeed gets broken as a result of nonlinear interaction of Alfv\\'en waves. We establish that magnetic energy is indeed generated more efficiently as a result of these interactions, which proposes an explanation for the solar wind observations.

  12. Erk phosphorylates threonine 42 residue of ribosomal protein S3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Hag Dong [Laboratory of Biochemistry, School of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, and BioInstitute, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae Yung [Department of Biology, Mokpo National University, Chonnam 534-729 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Joon [Laboratory of Biochemistry, School of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, and BioInstitute, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of)]. E-mail: joonkim@korea.ac.kr

    2005-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The ribosomal protein S3 (rpS3) is involved in ribosome biogenesis as a member of ribosomal small subunit and also plays a role in the repair of damaged DNA. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk), a MAP kinase, is known to play important roles in the regulation of cell growth, differentiation, and apoptosis. In this study, the sequence analysis of rpS3 protein revealed that this protein has a putative FXFP motif which is believed to be an Erk binding site. Indeed, the motif was demonstrated as an Erk binding site by co-immunoprecipitation. In addition to this, it was revealed that Erk specifically phosphorylated Thr 42 residue of rpS3 in vitro and in vivo using the various mutants of rpS3. Taken together, rpS3 appears to be phosphorylated by activated Erk in proliferating cells, resulting in the decreased interaction between two proteins.

  13. Evaluation of the residue from microset on various metal surfaces.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brumbach, Michael Todd

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fast-curing impression materials are sometimes used to cast negative-mold replications of physical defects on material surfaces. The negative-mold impressions can then be used for further measurements to record the nature of the defect. These impression materials have been designed to cure quickly, and with very low adhesion, so that they can be easily removed from the surface leaving little residual contamination. Unfortunately, some contaminant is retained by the substrate material. This investigation seeks to identify the composition and quantity of the remaining material upon removal of Microset Synthetic Rubber Replicating Compound from several material surfaces. Coe-Flex was used as a relative comparison to Microset. On fifteen different substrate materials the Microset leaves no visible trace of contaminant, however, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy shows evidence of a thin silicone-based contaminant film of approximately 2 nm thickness.

  14. Estimators and characteristics of logging residue in California. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howard, J.O.; Bulgrin, J.K.

    1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ratios are presented for estimating volume and characteristics of logging residue. The ratios relate cubic-foot volume of residue to thousand board feet of timber harvested and to acres harvested. Tables show gross and net volume of residue with and without bark, by diameter and length classes, by number of pieces per acre, by softwoods and hardwoods, by percent soundness, and by degree of slope and distance to roads.

  15. E-Print Network 3.0 - acid residues required Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Engineering, Columbia University Collection: Engineering ; Biology and Medicine 13 Protein folding with stochastic L-systems Gemma Danks1 Summary: 70 amino acid residues to 1000s...

  16. alters less-conserved residues: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The macroscopic stress evolution is connected to a length scale of residual liquefaction displayed by microscopic mean-squared displacements. The theory describes this...

  17. Neutron scattering residual stress measurements on gray cast iron brake discs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spooner, S.; Payzant, E.A.; Hubbard, C.R. [and others

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutron diffraction was used to investigate the effects of a heat treatment designed to remove internal residual stresses in brake discs. It is believed that residual stresses may change the rate of deformation of the discs during severe braking conditions when the disc temperature is increased significantly. Neutron diffraction was used to map out residual strain distributions in a production disc before and after a stress-relieving heat treatment. Results from these neutron diffraction experiments show that some residual strains were reduced by as much as 400 microstrain by stress relieving. 5 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Effect of the Basic Residue on the Energetics, Dynamics and Mechanisms...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    surface-induced dissociation (SID) of singly protonated peptides with the N-terminal arginine residue and their analogs, in which arginine is replaced with less basic...

  19. Table 42. Residual Fuel Oil Prices by PAD District and State

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1999 203 Table 42. Residual Fuel Oil Prices by PAD District and State (Cents per Gallon Excluding Taxes) - Continued...

  20. Table 42. Residual Fuel Oil Prices by PAD District and State

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1998 203 Table 42. Residual Fuel Oil Prices by PAD District and State (Cents per Gallon Excluding Taxes) - Continued...

  1. Table A3. Refiner/Reseller Prices of Distillate and Residual...

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Marketing Annual 1999 441 Table A3. RefinerReseller Prices of Distillate and Residual Fuel Oils, by PAD District, 1983-Present (Cents per Gallon Excluding Taxes) - Continued...

  2. Table 42. Residual Fuel Oil Prices by PAD District and State

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Information Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual 1995 245 Table 42. Residual Fuel Oil Prices by PAD District and State (Cents per Gallon Excluding Taxes) - Continued...

  3. The effects of drainage and amendments on the physical and chemical properties of bauxite residue 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Thomas Lee

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on the properties of the residue were studied. The objective was to improve the properties of the residue before adding it to sandy soils. The CEC increased with pH, as would be expected with variable-charge minerals, and the adsorption of phosphate decreased...), or into the ocean (Baseden, 1976). Baseden (1976) reported that seawater could be mixed with the residue, reducing the pH of the residue by precipitating Ca and Ng carbonates. The resulting supernatant solution was then pumped into the ocean. This method...

  4. Review: Balancing Limiting Factors and Economic Drivers to Achieve Sustainable Midwestern US Agricultural Residue Feedstock Supplies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wally W. Wilhelm; J. Richard Hess; Douglas L. Karlen; David J. Muth; Jane M. F. Johnson; John M. Baker; Hero T. Gollany; Jeff M. Novak; Diane E. Stott; Gary E. Varvel

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advanced biofuels will be developed using cellulosic feedstock rather than grain or oilseed crops that can also be used for food and feed. To be sustainable, these new agronomic production systems must be economically viable without degrading soil resources. This review examines six agronomic factors that collectively define many of the limits and opportunities for harvesting crop residue for biofuel feedstock. These six “limiting factors” are discussed in relationship to economic drivers associated with harvesting corn (Zea mays L.) stover as a potential cellulosic feedstock. The limiting factors include soil organic carbon, wind and water erosion, plant nutrient balance, soil water and temperature dynamics, soil compaction, and off-site environmental impacts. Initial evaluations using the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation 2.0 (RUSLE2) show that a single factor analysis based on simply meeting tolerable soil loss might indicate stover could be harvested sustainably, but the same analysis based on maintaining soil organic carbon shows the practice to be non-sustainable. Modifying agricultural management to include either annual or perennial cover crops is shown to meet both soil erosion and soil carbon requirements. The importance of achieving high yields and planning in a holistic manner at the landscape scale are also shown to be crucial for balancing limitations and drivers associated with renewable bioenergy production.

  5. Multi-processor including data flow accelerator module

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Davidson, George S. (Albuquerque, NM); Pierce, Paul E. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An accelerator module for a data flow computer includes an intelligent memory. The module is added to a multiprocessor arrangement and uses a shared tagged memory architecture in the data flow computer. The intelligent memory module assigns locations for holding data values in correspondence with arcs leading to a node in a data dependency graph. Each primitive computation is associated with a corresponding memory cell, including a number of slots for operands needed to execute a primitive computation, a primitive identifying pointer, and linking slots for distributing the result of the cell computation to other cells requiring that result as an operand. Circuitry is provided for utilizing tag bits to determine automatically when all operands required by a processor are available and for scheduling the primitive for execution in a queue. Each memory cell of the module may be associated with any of the primitives, and the particular primitive to be executed by the processor associated with the cell is identified by providing an index, such as the cell number for the primitive, to the primitive lookup table of starting addresses. The module thus serves to perform functions previously performed by a number of sections of data flow architectures and coexists with conventional shared memory therein. A multiprocessing system including the module operates in a hybrid mode, wherein the same processing modules are used to perform some processing in a sequential mode, under immediate control of an operating system, while performing other processing in a data flow mode.

  6. Gas Generation Test Support for Transportation and Storage of Plutonium Residue Materials - Part 1: Rocky Flats Sand, Slag, and Crucible Residues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Livingston, R.R.

    1999-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to present experimental results that can be used to establish one segment of the safety basis for transportation and storage of plutonium residue materials.

  7. PRP is a dedicated academic and research initiative incorporating research, education, and training activities in the fields of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neimark, Alexander V.

    , and reflective cracking · Tire/pavement interaction (acoustics) and modeling · Remaining service life evaluation · Conventional and polymer-modified asphalt · Innovative materials in hot mix asphalt · Recycled materials and runways. Examples include: · Northeast pooled fund study on high recycled asphalt pave- ment (RAP) mixes

  8. POST-OPERATIONAL TREATMENT OF RESIDUAL NA COOLLANT IN EBR-2 USING CARBONATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherman, S.; Knight, C.

    2011-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    At the end of 2002, the Experimental Breeder Reactor Two (EBR-II) facility became a U.S. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) permitted site, and the RCRA permit1 compelled further treatment of the residual sodium in order to convert it into a less reactive chemical form and remove the by-products from the facility, so that a state of RCRA 'closure' for the facility may be achieved (42 U.S.C. 6901-6992k, 2002). In response to this regulatory driver, and in recognition of project budgetary and safety constraints, it was decided to treat the residual sodium in the EBR-II primary and secondary sodium systems using a process known as 'carbonation.' In early EBR-II post-operation documentation, this process is also called 'passivation.' In the carbonation process (Sherman and Henslee, 2005), the system containing residual sodium is flushed with humidified carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). The water vapor in the flush gas reacts with residual sodium to form sodium hydroxide (NaOH), and the CO{sub 2} in the flush gas reacts with the newly formed NaOH to make sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO{sub 3}). Hydrogen gas (H{sub 2}) is produced as a by-product. The chemical reactions occur at the exposed surface of the residual sodium. The NaHCO{sub 3} layer that forms is porous, and humidified carbon dioxide can penetrate the NaHCO{sub 3} layer to continue reacting residual sodium underneath. The rate of reaction is controlled by the thickness of the NaHCO{sub 3} surface layer, the moisture input rate, and the residual sodium exposed surface area. At the end of carbonation, approximately 780 liters of residual sodium in the EBR-II primary tank ({approx}70% of original inventory), and just under 190 liters of residual sodium in the EBR-II secondary sodium system ({approx}50% of original inventory), were converted into NaHCO{sub 3}. No bare surfaces of residual sodium remained after treatment, and all remaining residual sodium deposits are covered by a layer of NaHCO{sub 3}. From a safety standpoint, the inventory of residual sodium in these systems was greatly reduced by using the carbonation process. From a regulatory standpoint, the process was not able to achieve deactivation of all residual sodium, and other more aggressive measures will be needed if the remaining residual sodium must also be deactivated to meet the requirements of the existing environmental permit. This chapter provides a project history and technical summary of the carbonation of EBR-II residual sodium. Options for future treatment are also discussed.

  9. The influence of quench sensitivity on residual stresses in the aluminium alloys 7010 and 7075

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robinson, J.S., E-mail: jeremy.robinson@ul.ie [Materials and Surface Science Institute, University of Limerick (Ireland); Tanner, D.A. [Materials and Surface Science Institute, University of Limerick (Ireland); Truman, C.E. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Bristol (United Kingdom); Paradowska, A.M. [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot (United Kingdom); Wimpory, R.C. [Helmholtz Centre Berlin for Materials and Energy, Hahn Meitner Platz 1, Berlin (Germany)

    2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The most critical stage in the heat treatment of high strength aluminium alloys is the rapid cooling necessary to form a supersaturated solid solution. A disadvantage of quenching is that the thermal gradients can be sufficient to cause inhomogeneous plastic deformation which in turn leads to the development of large residual stresses. Two 215 mm thick rectilinear forgings have been made from 7000 series alloys with widely different quench sensitivity to determine if solute loss in the form of precipitation during quenching can significantly affect residual stress magnitudes. The forgings were heat treated and immersion quenched using cold water to produce large magnitude residual stresses. The through thickness residual stresses were measured by neutron diffraction and incremental deep hole drilling. The distribution of residual stresses was found to be similar for both alloys varying from highly triaxial and tensile in the interior, to a state of biaxial compression in the surface. The 7010 forging exhibited larger tensile stresses in the interior. The microstructural variation from surface to centre for both forgings was determined using optical and transmission electron microscopy. These observations were used to confirm the origin of the hardness variation measured through the forging thickness. When the microstructural changes were accounted for in the through thickness lattice parameter, the residual stresses in the two forgings were found to be very similar. Solute loss in the 7075 forging appeared to have no significant effect on the residual stress magnitudes when compared to 7010. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Through thickness residual stress measurements made on large Al alloy forgings. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Residual stress characterised using neutron diffraction and deep hole drilling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Biaxial compressive surface and triaxial subsurface residual stresses. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quench sensitivity of 7075 promotes significant microstructural differences to 7010. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer When precipitation is accounted for, residual stress in both forgings are similar.

  10. Composite armor, armor system and vehicle including armor system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chu, Henry S.; Jones, Warren F.; Lacy, Jeffrey M.; Thinnes, Gary L.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Composite armor panels are disclosed. Each panel comprises a plurality of functional layers comprising at least an outermost layer, an intermediate layer and a base layer. An armor system incorporating armor panels is also disclosed. Armor panels are mounted on carriages movably secured to adjacent rails of a rail system. Each panel may be moved on its associated rail and into partially overlapping relationship with another panel on an adjacent rail for protection against incoming ordnance from various directions. The rail system may be configured as at least a part of a ring, and be disposed about a hatch on a vehicle. Vehicles including an armor system are also disclosed.

  11. cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Raikhel, Natasha V. (Okemos, MI); Broekaert, Willem F. (Dilbeek, BE); Chua, Nam-Hai (Scarsdale, NY); Kush, Anil (New York, NY)

    1993-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a pu GOVERNMENT RIGHTS This application was funded under Department of Energy Contract DE-AC02-76ER01338. The U.S. Government has certain rights under this application and any patent issuing thereon.

  12. Composite material including nanocrystals and methods of making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bawendi, Moungi G.; Sundar, Vikram C.

    2010-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Temperature-sensing compositions can include an inorganic material, such as a semiconductor nanocrystal. The nanocrystal can be a dependable and accurate indicator of temperature. The intensity of emission of the nanocrystal varies with temperature and can be highly sensitive to surface temperature. The nanocrystals can be processed with a binder to form a matrix, which can be varied by altering the chemical nature of the surface of the nanocrystal. A nanocrystal with a compatibilizing outer layer can be incorporated into a coating formulation and retain its temperature sensitive emissive properties.

  13. A coke oven model including thermal decomposition kinetics of tar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munekane, Fuminori; Yamaguchi, Yukio [Mitsubishi Chemical Corp., Yokohama (Japan); Tanioka, Seiichi [Mitsubishi Chemical Corp., Sakaide (Japan)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A new one-dimensional coke oven model has been developed for simulating the amount and the characteristics of by-products such as tar and gas as well as coke. This model consists of both heat transfer and chemical kinetics including thermal decomposition of coal and tar. The chemical kinetics constants are obtained by estimation based on the results of experiments conducted to investigate the thermal decomposition of both coal and tar. The calculation results using the new model are in good agreement with experimental ones.

  14. Numerical evaluation of propeller noise, including non-linear effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Terence Alan

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    University Chairman of Advisor y Commitee: Dr. Kenneth Korkan Using the transonic flow field(s) generated by the NASPROP-E computer code for an eight blade SR3-series propeller, a method is investigated to calculate the total noise values and frequency... in three dimensions, and the influence of the damping on the calculated noise values is investigated. Since the flow field includes the wave systems near the blade surface, the quadr upole noise sour ce term is accounted for as are the monopole...

  15. What To Include In The Whistleblower Complaint? | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved: 5-13-14Russian Nuclear Warheads ArrivesAdministration To Include In

  16. Community Assessment Tool for Public Health Emergencies Including Pandemic Influenza

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ORAU's Oak Ridge Institute for Science Education (HCTT-CHE)

    2011-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The Community Assessment Tool (CAT) for Public Health Emergencies Including Pandemic Influenza (hereafter referred to as the CAT) was developed as a result of feedback received from several communities. These communities participated in workshops focused on influenza pandemic planning and response. The 2008 through 2011 workshops were sponsored by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Feedback during those workshops indicated the need for a tool that a community can use to assess its readiness for a disaster - readiness from a total healthcare perspective, not just hospitals, but the whole healthcare system. The CAT intends to do just that - help strengthen existing preparedness plans by allowing the healthcare system and other agencies to work together during an influenza pandemic. It helps reveal each core agency partners (sectors) capabilities and resources, and highlights cases of the same vendors being used for resource supplies (e.g., personal protective equipment [PPE] and oxygen) by the partners (e.g., public health departments, clinics, or hospitals). The CAT also addresses gaps in the community's capabilities or potential shortages in resources. This tool has been reviewed by a variety of key subject matter experts from federal, state, and local agencies and organizations. It also has been piloted with various communities that consist of different population sizes, to include large urban to small rural communities.

  17. Solving The High Energy Evolution Equation Including Running Coupling Corrections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Javier L. Albacete; Yuri V. Kovchegov

    2007-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the solution of the nonlinear BK evolution equation with the recently calculated running coupling corrections [hep-ph/0609105, hep-ph/0609090]. Performing a numerical solution we confirm the earlier result of [hep-ph/0408216] that the high energy evolution with the running coupling leads to a universal scaling behavior for the dipole scattering amplitude. The running coupling corrections calculated recently significantly change the shape of the scaling function as compared to the fixed coupling case leading to a considerable increase in the anomalous dimension and to a slow-down of the evolution with rapidity. The difference between the two recent calculations is due to an extra contribution to the evolution kernel, referred to as the subtraction term, which arises when running coupling corrections are included. These subtraction terms were neglected in both recent calculations. We evaluate numerically the subtraction terms for both calculations, and demonstrate that when the subtraction terms are added back to the evolution kernels obtained in the two works the resulting dipole amplitudes agree with each other! We then use the complete running coupling kernel including the subtraction term to find the numerical solution of the resulting full non-linear evolution equation with the running coupling corrections. Again the scaling regime is recovered at very large rapidity.

  18. Cogeneration handbook for the petroleum refining industry. [Glossary included

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Handbook deals only with industrial cogeneration, that is, simultaneous production of both heat and electricity at the industrial plant site. The cogenerator has the option of either selling all cogenerated power to the utility while simultaneously purchasing power to satisfy his plant demand, or directly supplying the plant demand with cogenerated power, thus displacing utility-supplied power. This Handbook provides the refinery plant manager or company energy coordinator with a framework for making a preliminary assessment of the feasibility and viability of cogeneration at a particular plant. The handbook is intended to provide an understanding of the potential of several standardized cogeneration systems, as well as their limitations. However, because the decision to cogenerate is very site specific, the handbook cannot provide all of the answers. It does attempt, however, to bring to light the major issues that should be addressed in the decision-making process. The decision of whether to cogenerate involves several considerations, including technical, economic, environmental, legal, and regulatory issues. Each of these issues is addressed separately in this handbook. In addition, a chapter is included on preparing a three-phase work statement, which is needed to guide the design of a cogeneration system. 39 figures, 37 tables.

  19. Hydrodesulfurization and hydrodemetallization of different origin vacuum residues: New modeling approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    impurities, such as sulfur or metals. Residue hydrotreatment in fixed beds, under high hydrogen pressure can processes, fixed bed hydrotreatment units are the most frequently used. The residue fixed bed hydrotreatment process, Hyvahl TM developed by IFPEN in 1982 [2], consists of several trickle bed reactors in series

  20. Ma,BonzongoandGao/UniversityofFlorida Characterization and Leachability of Coal Combustion Residues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    Ma,BonzongoandGao/UniversityofFlorida Characterization and Leachability of Coal Combustion Residues an important solid waste in Florida, i.e., coal combustion residues (CCR) detailed in #2-4 of the current simulating ash slurry stored in ash ponds. Our research should greatly benefit FDEP, the public and utility

  1. Justification of RHIC EBIS vacuum system. 1. Requirements to the pressure of residual gas inside the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    volume, the influx and accumulation of residual gas ions reduces the number of working ions in a trap for internal elements, technology of processing and equipment should be adequate. The components of the gasJustification of RHIC EBIS vacuum system. A. Pikin 1. Requirements to the pressure of residual gas

  2. A NEW ON-LINE DETECTING APPARATUS OF THE RESIDUAL CHLORINE IN DISINFECTANT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A NEW ON-LINE DETECTING APPARATUS OF THE RESIDUAL CHLORINE IN DISINFECTANT FOR FRESH-CUT VEGETABLES of residual chlorine is 0~300ppm. Key words: e-government, knowledge management, frameworks, e-governance 1 is chlorine molecule, hypochlorous acid or calcium hypochlorite. Chloric disinfectant hydrolysis in water

  3. Application of conservative residual distribution schemes to the solution of the shallow water equations on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abgrall, RĂ©mi

    Application of conservative residual distribution schemes to the solution of the shallow water. Keywords: Conservative schemes; Residual distribution; Shallow water equations; Lake at rest solution solution of the shallow water equations on unstructured grids. We focus on flows over wet areas

  4. STANDARD ADDITION METHOD FOR THE DETERMINATION OF1 PHARMACEUTICAL RESIDUES IN DRINKING WATER BY SPE-2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    STANDARD ADDITION METHOD FOR THE DETERMINATION OF1 PHARMACEUTICAL RESIDUES IN DRINKING WATER BY SPE-MS/MS is a powerful23 analytical tool often used to determine pharmaceutical residues at trace level in water.24 compounds in drinking or waste22 water processes has become very popular in recent years. LC

  5. Speciation of Sb in airborne particulate matter, vehicle brake linings, and brake pad wear residues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Short, Daniel

    Speciation of Sb in airborne particulate matter, vehicle brake linings, and brake pad wear residues: XAS XANES EXAFS Antimony Particulate matter Brake linings a b s t r a c t Insights into the speciation of Sb in samples of brake linings, brake pad wear residues, road dust, and atmospheric particulate

  6. UPTAKE, ASSIMILATION, AND LOSS OF DDT RESIDUES BY Euphausia pacifica, A EUPHAUSIID SHRIMP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UPTAKE, ASSIMILATION, AND LOSS OF DDT RESIDUES BY Euphausia pacifica, A EUPHAUSIID SHRIMP ABSTRACT acquire sufficient DDT residue from its food to account for amounts found in its tissues. Assimilation effii- ciencies for DDT in ingested food are similar to published figures for assimilation of carbon

  7. Measuring the Residual Ferrite Content of Rapidly Solidified Stainless Steel Alloys-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eagar, Thomas W.

    -Gage and ferrite meters have been developed to measure the amount of residual ferrite in duplex stainless steel) ) Measuring the Residual Ferrite Content of Rapidly Solidified Stainless Steel Alloys. Electron beam welds, laser beam welds and rapidly solidified stainless steel alloys have small physical

  8. Prediction of catalytic residues in proteins using machine-learning techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prediction of catalytic residues in proteins using machine-learning techniques Natalia V. Petrova) and prediction of protein function using various properties of proteins and amino acids (2). Prediction of the functional residues is a challenging and interesting task. The results of such prediction could

  9. Prediction of Interface Residues in ProteinProtein Complexes by a Consensus Neural Network Method: Test

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weston, Ken

    Prediction of Interface Residues in Protein­Protein Complexes by a Consensus Neural Network Method important information for predicting struc- tures of new protein complexes. This motivated us to develop the PPISP method for predicting inter- face residues in protein­protein complexes. In PPISP, sequence

  10. MALATHION RESIDUES IN GREEK HONEY Andreas T. THRASYVOULOU Michael D. IFANTIDIS Nikos L. PAPPAS*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    -1982 were analyzed for malathion residues. Residues were extracted with acetonitrile/water solution, parti the north, the south, and some Greek islands as well. Reagents Acetonitrile - Nanograde (Mallinckrodt, Inc. Fifty ml of a 10/90 wa- ter/acetonitrile solution was added and the funnel shaken vigorously until

  11. Pulse transmission transmitter including a higher order time derivate filter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dress Jr., William B.; Smith, Stephen F.

    2003-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems and methods for pulse-transmission low-power communication modes are disclosed. A pulse transmission transmitter includes: a clock; a pseudorandom polynomial generator coupled to the clock, the pseudorandom polynomial generator having a polynomial load input; an exclusive-OR gate coupled to the pseudorandom polynomial generator, the exclusive-OR gate having a serial data input; a programmable delay circuit coupled to both the clock and the exclusive-OR gate; a pulse generator coupled to the programmable delay circuit; and a higher order time derivative filter coupled to the pulse generator. The systems and methods significantly reduce lower-frequency emissions from pulse transmission spread-spectrum communication modes, which reduces potentially harmful interference to existing radio frequency services and users and also simultaneously permit transmission of multiple data bits by utilizing specific pulse shapes.

  12. Hydraulic engine valve actuation system including independent feedback control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marriott, Craig D

    2013-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A hydraulic valve actuation assembly may include a housing, a piston, a supply control valve, a closing control valve, and an opening control valve. The housing may define a first fluid chamber, a second fluid chamber, and a third fluid chamber. The piston may be axially secured to an engine valve and located within the first, second and third fluid chambers. The supply control valve may control a hydraulic fluid supply to the piston. The closing control valve may be located between the supply control valve and the second fluid chamber and may control fluid flow from the second fluid chamber to the supply control valve. The opening control valve may be located between the supply control valve and the second fluid chamber and may control fluid flow from the supply control valve to the second fluid chamber.

  13. Fuel cell repeater unit including frame and separator plate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yamanis, Jean; Hawkes, Justin R; Chiapetta, Jr., Louis; Bird, Connie E; Sun, Ellen Y; Croteau, Paul F

    2013-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    An example fuel cell repeater includes a separator plate and a frame establishing at least a portion of a flow path that is operative to communicate fuel to or from at least one fuel cell held by the frame relative to the separator plate. The flow path has a perimeter and any fuel within the perimeter flow across the at least one fuel cell in a first direction. The separator plate, the frame, or both establish at least one conduit positioned outside the flow path perimeter. The conduit is outside of the flow path perimeter and is configured to direct flow in a second, different direction. The conduit is fluidly coupled with the flow path.

  14. Copper laser modulator driving assembly including a magnetic compression laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cook, Edward G. (Livermore, CA); Birx, Daniel L. (Oakley, CA); Ball, Don G. (Livermore, CA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser modulator (10) having a low voltage assembly (12) with a plurality of low voltage modules (14) with first stage magnetic compression circuits (20) and magnetic assist inductors (28) with a common core (91), such that timing of the first stage magnetic switches (30b) is thereby synchronized. A bipolar second stage of magnetic compression (42) is coupled to the low voltage modules (14) through a bipolar pulse transformer (36) and a third stage of magnetic compression (44) is directly coupled to the second stage of magnetic compression (42). The low voltage assembly (12) includes pressurized boxes (117) for improving voltage standoff between the primary winding assemblies (34) and secondary winding (40) contained therein.

  15. Electra-optical device including a nitrogen containing electrolyte

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bates, John B. (Oak Ridge, TN); Dudney, Nancy J. (Knoxville, TN); Gruzalski, Greg R. (Oak Ridge, TN); Luck, Christopher F. (Knoxville, TN)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Described is a thin-film battery, especially a thin-film microbattery, and a method for making same having application as a backup or primary integrated power source for electronic devices. The battery includes a novel electrolyte which is electrochemically stable and does not react with the lithium anode and a novel vanadium oxide cathode Configured as a microbattery, the battery can be fabricated directly onto a semiconductor chip, onto the semiconductor die or onto any portion of the chip carrier. The battery can be fabricated to any specified size or shape to meet the requirements of a particular application. The battery is fabricated of solid state materials and is capable of operation between -15.degree. C. and 150.degree. C.

  16. Electra-optical device including a nitrogen containing electrolyte

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bates, J.B.; Dudney, N.J.; Gruzalski, G.R.; Luck, C.F.

    1995-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Described is a thin-film battery, especially a thin-film microbattery, and a method for making same having application as a backup or primary integrated power source for electronic devices. The battery includes a novel electrolyte which is electrochemically stable and does not react with the lithium anode and a novel vanadium oxide cathode. Configured as a microbattery, the battery can be fabricated directly onto a semiconductor chip, onto the semiconductor die or onto any portion of the chip carrier. The battery can be fabricated to any specified size or shape to meet the requirements of a particular application. The battery is fabricated of solid state materials and is capable of operation between {minus}15 C and 150 C.

  17. Including stereoscopic information in the reconstruction of coronal magnetic fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Wiegelmann; T. Neukirch

    2008-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a method to include stereoscopic information about the three dimensional structure of flux tubes into the reconstruction of the coronal magnetic field. Due to the low plasma beta in the corona we can assume a force free magnetic field, with the current density parallel to the magnetic field lines. Here we use linear force free fields for simplicity. The method uses the line of sight magnetic field on the photosphere as observational input. The value of $\\alpha$ is determined iteratively by comparing the reconstructed magnetic field with the observed structures. The final configuration is the optimal linear force solution constrained by both the photospheric magnetogram and the observed plasma structures. As an example we apply our method to SOHO MDI/EIT data of an active region. In the future it is planned to apply the method to analyse data from the SECCHI instrument aboard the STEREO mission.

  18. Improving Planck calibration by including frequency-dependent relativistic corrections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quartin, Miguel

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Planck satellite detectors are calibrated in the 2015 release using the "orbital dipole", which is the time-dependent dipole generated by the Doppler effect due to the motion of the satellite around the Sun. Such an effect has also relativistic time-dependent corrections of relative magnitude 10^(-3), due to coupling with the "solar dipole" (the motion of the Sun compared to the CMB rest frame), which are included in the data calibration by the Planck collaboration. We point out that such corrections are subject to a frequency-dependent multiplicative factor. This factor differs from unity especially at the highest frequencies, relevant for the HFI instrument. Since currently Planck calibration errors are dominated by systematics, to the point that polarization data is currently unreliable at large scales, such a correction can in principle be highly relevant for future data releases.

  19. Protoplanetary disks including radiative feedback from accreting planets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montesinos, Matias; Perez, Sebastian; Baruteau, Clement; Casassus, Simon

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    While recent observational progress is converging on the detection of compact regions of thermal emission due to embedded protoplanets, further theoretical predictions are needed to understand the response of a protoplanetary disk to the planet formation radiative feedback. This is particularly important to make predictions for the observability of circumplanetary regions. In this work we use 2D hydrodynamical simulations to examine the evolution of a viscous protoplanetary disk in which a luminous Jupiter-mass planet is embedded. We use an energy equation which includes the radiative heating of the planet as an additional mechanism for planet formation feedback. Several models are computed for planet luminosities ranging from $10^{-5}$ to $10^{-3}$ Solar luminosities. We find that the planet radiative feedback enhances the disk's accretion rate at the planet's orbital radius, producing a hotter and more luminous environement around the planet, independently of the prescription used to model the disk's turbul...

  20. Actuator assembly including a single axis of rotation locking member

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Quitmeyer, James N.; Benson, Dwayne M.; Geck, Kellan P.

    2009-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    An actuator assembly including an actuator housing assembly and a single axis of rotation locking member fixedly attached to a portion of the actuator housing assembly and an external mounting structure. The single axis of rotation locking member restricting rotational movement of the actuator housing assembly about at least one axis. The single axis of rotation locking member is coupled at a first end to the actuator housing assembly about a Y axis and at a 90.degree. angle to an X and Z axis providing rotation of the actuator housing assembly about the Y axis. The single axis of rotation locking member is coupled at a second end to a mounting structure, and more particularly a mounting pin, about an X axis and at a 90.degree. angle to a Y and Z axis providing rotation of the actuator housing assembly about the X axis. The actuator assembly is thereby restricted from rotation about the Z axis.