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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including marginal wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Economic Recovery of Oil Trapped at Fan Margins Using High Angle Wells and Multiple Hydraulic Fractures  

SciTech Connect

This project attempts to demonstrate the effectiveness of exploiting thin-layered, low-energy deposits at the distal margin of a propagating turbidite complex through the use of hydraulically-fractured horizontal or high-angle wells. The combination of a horizontal or high-angled well and hydraulic fracturing will allow greater pay exposure than can be achieved with conventional vertical wells while maintaining vertical communication between thininterbedded layers and the well bore.

Mike L. Laue

1997-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

2

Economic Recovery of Oil Trapped at Fan Margins Using High Angle Wells and Multiple Hydraulic Fractures  

SciTech Connect

This project attempts to demonstrate the effectiveness of exploiting thin-layered, low-energy deposits at the distal margin of a prograding turbidite complex through the use of hydraulically fractured horizontal or high-angle wells. The combination of a horizontal or high-angle well and hydraulic fracturing will allow greater pay exposure than can be achieved with conventional vertical wells while maintaining vertical communication between thin interbedded layers and the wellbore.

Laue, M.L.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Economic Recovery of Oil Trapped at Fan Margins Using High Angle Wells and Multiple Hydraulic Fractures  

SciTech Connect

The distal fan margin in the northeast portion of the Yowlumne field contains significant reserves but is not economical to develop using vertical wells. Numerous interbedded shales and deteriorating rock properties limit producibility. In addition, extreme depths (13,000 ft) present a challenging environment for hydraulic fracturing and artificial lift. Lastly, a mature waterflood increases risk because of the uncertainty with size and location of flood fronts. This project attempts to demonstrate the effectiveness of exploiting the distal fan margin of this slope-basin clastic reservoir through the use of a high-angle well completed with multiple hydraulic-fracture treatments. The combination of a high-angle (or horizontal) well and hydraulic fracturing will allow greater pay exposure than can be achieved with conventional vertical wells while maintaining vertical communication between thin interbedded layers and the wellbore. The equivalent production rate and reserves of three vertical wells are anticipated at one-half to two-thirds the cost.

Mike L. Laue

1997-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

4

Economic Recovery of Oil Trapped at Fan Margins Using High Angle Wells and Multiple Hydraulic Fractures  

SciTech Connect

This project attempts to demonstrate the effectivensss of exploiting thin-layered, low energy deposits at the distal margin of a propagating turbinite complex through u se of hydraulically fractgured horizontal of high-angle wells. TGhe combinaton of a horizontal or high-angle weoo and hydraulic fracturing will allow greater pay exposure than can be achieved with conventional vertical wells while maintaining vertical communication between thin interbedded layers and the wellbore.

Mike L. Laue

1998-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

5

ECONOMIC RECOVERY OF OIL TRAPPED AT FAN MARGINS USING HIGH ANGLE WELLS AND MULTIPLE HYDRAULIC FRACTURES  

SciTech Connect

This project attempts to demonstrate the effectiveness of exploiting thin-layered, low-energy deposits at the distal margin of a prograding turbidite complex through the use of hydraulically fractured horizontal or high-angle wells. The combination of a horizontal or high-angle well and hydraulic fracturing will allow greater pay exposure than can be achieved with conventional vertical wells while maintaining vertical communication between thin interbedded layers and the wellbore. A high-angle well will be drilled in the fan-margin portion of a slope-basin clastic reservoir and will be completed with multiple hydraulic-fracture treatments. Geologic modeling, reservoir characterization, and fine-grid reservoir simulation will be used to select the well location and orientation. Design parameters for the hydraulic-fracture treatments will be determined, in part, by fracturing an existing test well. Fracture azimuth will be predicted by passive seismic monitoring of a fracture-stimulation treatment in the test well using logging tools in an offset well.

Mike L. Laue

1998-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

6

Prediction of future well performance, including reservoir depletion effects  

SciTech Connect

In the past, the reservoir material balance (voidage) effects occurring between the end of the measured (known) production history and future Inflow Performance Relationship (IPR) time levels have been commonly ignored in the computation of the future IPR behavior. Neglecting the reservoir voidage that occurs during the time interval between the end of the known production history and the future IPR time levels results in erroneous estimates of the future IPR behavior. A detailed description is given of the mathematically rigorous technique that has been used in the development of a multilayer well performance simulator that properly accounts for the reservoir voidage effects. Some of the more significant results are also presented of an extensive effort to develop an accurate and computationally efficient well performance simulation model. The reservoir can be considered to be multilayered, with mixed reservoir layer completion types and outer boundary shapes, drainage areas and boundary conditions. The well performance model can be used to simulate performance in three different operating modes: (1) constant wellhead rate, (2) constant bottomhole pressure, and (3) constant wellhead pressure. The transient performance of vertical, vertically fractured and horizontal wells can be simulated with this well performance model. The well performance model uses mathematically rigorous transient solutions and not simply the approximate solutions for each of the well types, as do most of the other commercially available well performance models.

Poe, B.D. Jr.; Elbel, J.L.; Spath, J.B.; Wiggins, M.L.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

7

ECONOMIC RECOVERY OF OIL TRAPPED AT FAN MARGINS USING HIGH ANGLE WELLS AND MULTIPLE HYDRAULIC FRACTURES  

SciTech Connect

This project attempts to demonstrate the effectiveness of exploiting thin-layered, low-energy deposits at the distal margin of a prograding turbidite complex through the use of hydraulically fractured horizontal or high-angle wells. The combination of a horizontal or high-angle well and hydraulic fracturing will allow greater pay exposure than can be achieved with conventional vertical wells while maintaining vertical communication between thin interbedded layers and the wellbore. A high-angle well will be drilled in the fan-margin portion of a slope-basin clastic reservoir and will be completed with multiple hydraulic-fracture treatments. Geologic modeling, reservoir characterization, and fine-grid reservoir simulation will be used to select the well location and orientation. Design parameters for the hydraulic-fracture treatments will be determined, in part, by fracturing an existing test well. Fracture azimuth will be predicted by passive seismic monitoring of a fracture-stimulation treatment in the test well using logging tools in an offset well. The long radius, near horizontal well was drilled during the first quarter of 1996. Well conditions resulted in the 7 in. production liner sticking approximately 900 ft off bottom. Therefore, a 5 in. production liner was necessary to case this portion of the target formation. Swept-out sand intervals and a poor cement bond behind the 5 in. liner precluded two of the three originally planned hydraulic fracture treatments. As a result, all pay intervals behind the 5 in. liner were perforated and stimulated with a non-acid reactive fluid. Following a short production period, the remaining pay intervals in the well (behind the 7 in. liner) were perforated. The well was returned to production to observe production trends and pressure behavior and assess the need to stimulate the new perforations.

Mike L. Laue

2001-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

8

Economic Recovery of Oil Trapped at Fan Margins Using High Angle Wells and Multiple Hydraulic Fractures  

SciTech Connect

This project attempts to demonstrate the effectiveness of exploiting thin-layered, low energy deposits at the distal end of a protruding turbidite complex through use of hydraulically fractured horizontal of high-angle wells. The combination of a horizontal or high-angle well and hydraulic fracturing will allow greater pay exposure than conventional vertical wells while maintaining vertical communication between thin interbedded layers and the well bore.

Mike L. Laue

1998-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

9

Shut-down margin study for the next generation VVER-1000 reactor including 13 × 13 hexagonal annular assemblies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Shut-Down Margin (SDM) for the next generation annular fuel core of typical VVER-1000, 13 × 13 assemblies are calculated as the main aim of the present research. We have applied the MCNP-5 code for many cases with different values of core burn up at various core temperatures, and therefore their corresponding coolant densities and boric acid concentrations. There is a substantial drop in SDM in the case of annular fuel for the same power level. Specifically, SDM for our proposed VVER-1000 annular pins is calculated when the average fuel burn up values at the BOC, MOC, and EOC are 0.531, 11.5, and 43 MW-days/kg-U, respectively.

Farshad Faghihi; S. Mohammad Mirvakili

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Economic recovery of oil trapped at fan margins using high angle wells and multiple hydraulic fractures. Annual report, September 28, 1995--September 27, 1996  

SciTech Connect

The digital fan margin in the northeast portion of the Yowlumne field contains significant reserves but is not economic to develop using verticle wells. Numerous interbedded shales and deteriorating rock properties limit producibility. In addition, extreme depths (13,000 ft) present a challenging environment for hydraulic fracturing and artificial lift. Lastly, a mature waterflood increases risk because of the uncertainty with size and location of flood fronts. This project attempts to demonstrate the effectiveness of exploiting the distal fan margin of this slope-basin clastic reservoir through the use of a high-angle well completed with multiple hydraulic-fracture treatments. The combination of a high-angle (or horizontal) well and hydraulic fracturing will allow greater pay exposure than can be achieved with conventional verticle wells while maintaining verticle communication between thin interbedded layers and the wellbore. The equivalent production rate and reserves of three verticle wells are anticipated at one-half to two-thirds the cost.

Niemeyer, B.L.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Compressional and shear-wave velocities from gas hydrate bearing sediments: Examples from the India and Cascadia margins as well as Arctic permafrost regions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Shear wave velocity data have been acquired at several marine gas hydrate drilling expeditions, including the India National Gas Hydrate Program Expedition 1 (NGHP-01), the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Leg 204, and Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 311 (X311). In this study we use data from these marine drilling expeditions to develop an understanding of general grain-size control on the P- and S-wave properties of sediments. A clear difference in the downhole trends of P-wave (Vp) and S-wave (Vs) velocity and the Vp/Vs ratio from all three marine regions was observed: the northern Cascadia margin (IODP X311) shows the highest P-wave and S-wave velocity values overall and those from the India margin (Expedition NGHP-01) are the lowest. The southern Cascadia margin (ODP Leg 204) appears to have similar low P-wave and S-wave velocity values as seen off India. S-wave velocity values increase relative to the sites off India, but they are not as high as those seen on the northern Cascadia margin. Such regional differences can be explained by the amount of silt/sand (or lack thereof) occurring at these sites, with northern Cascadia being the region of the highest silt/sand occurrences. This grain-size control on P-wave and S-wave velocity and associated mineral composition differences is amplified when compared to the Arctic permafrost environments, where gas hydrate predominantly occurs in sand- and silt-dominated formations. Using a cross-plot of gamma ray values versus the Vp/Vs ratio, we compare the marine gas hydrate occurrences in these regions: offshore eastern India margin, offshore Cascadia margin, the Ignik-Sikumi site in Alaska, and the Mallik 5L-38 site in the Mackenzie Delta. The log-data from the Arctic permafrost regions show a strongly linear Vp–Vs relationship, similar to the previously defined empirical relationships by Greenberg and Castagna (1992). P- and S-wave velocity data from the India margin and ODP Leg 204 deviate strongly from these linear trends, whereas data from IODP X311 plot closer to the trend of the Arctic data sets and previously published relationships. Three new linear relationships for different grain size marine sediment hosts are suggested:a) mud-dominated (Mahanadi Basin, ODP Leg 204 & NGHP-01-17): Vs = 1.5854 × Vp ? 2.1649 b) silty-mud (KG Basin): Vs = 0.8105 × Vp ? 1.0223 c) silty-sand (IODP X311): Vs = 0.5316 × Vp ? 0.4916 We investigate the relationship of gas hydrate saturation determined from electrical resistivity on the Vp/Vs ratio and found that the sand-dominated Arctic hosts show a clearly decreasing trend of Vp/Vs ratio with gas hydrate saturation. Though limited due to lower overall GH saturations, a similar trend is seen for sites from IODP X311 and at the ash-dominated NGHP-01-17 sediment in the Andaman Sea. Gas hydrate that occurs predominantly in fractured clay hosts show a different trend where the Vp/Vs ratio is much higher than at sand-dominated sites and remains constant or increases slightly with increasing gas hydrate saturation. This trend may be the result of anisotropy in fracture-dominated systems, where P- and S-wave velocities appear higher and Archie-based saturations of gas hydrate are overestimated. Gas hydrate concentrations were also estimated in these three marine settings and at Arctic sites using an effective medium model, combining P- and S-wave velocities as equally weighted constraints on the calculation. The effective medium approach generally overestimates S-wave velocity in high-porosity, clay-dominated sediments, but can be accurately used in sand-rich formations.

M. Riedel; D. Goldberg; G. Guerin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

The marketing programme includes an all-important introduction to man-agement decision-making, as well as a set of business functions. Market-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The marketing programme includes an all-important introduction to man- agement decision-making, as well as a set of business functions. Market- ing is indispensable in top management's choice of markets to each of the following marketing policy areas: innovation and channel management, product/market

13

Petroleum prospectivity of Australia's southern margin  

SciTech Connect

Australia's southern margin extends for almost 4000 km, from the Naturaliste Plateau in the west to the South Tasman Rise in the southeast, and developed from the Gondwana rift system which also gave rise to the Bass basin and prolific Gippsland basin of southeastern Australia. It incorporates six major sedimentary basins - Bremer, Eyre, Great Australian Bight (GAB), Duntroon, Otway, and Sorell - which are the products of Gondwana fragmentation. Exploration targets generated by this complex tectonic history include fault blocks and associated rollovers; wrench-related anticlines and flower structures, often developed over reactivated transfer faults; strongly eroded unconformities; and deltas of Neocomian and Maastrichtian-Cenomanian age. The southern margin basins contain several sandstone units with good reservoir potential. Hydrocarbons are being actively generated, at least within the Otway and Sorell basins, as indicated by abnormally high concentrations of thermogenic gases in surface sediment samples and the presence of free oil in the Cape Sorell 1 well. Deposits containing oil-prone type I organic matter occur in the Lower Cretaceous section of the Otway basin. To date, exploration has been light, with 17 of the total 27 wells having been sited in the Otway basin. The huge GAB basin (/approximately/ 400 /times/ 200 /times/ 10 km thick) contains only one exploration well, sited near the northern margin of the basin, and this basin is an obvious focus for further exploration effort.

Willcox, J.B.; Stagg, H.M.J.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Common marginal cold pools  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study examines marginal cold pools forming in a shallow valley. “Marginal” refers to cold pools that are generally weak and intermittent. Nineteen stations were instrumented with sonic anemometers and accurate slow-response temperature ...

L. Mahrt; Robert Heald

15

Uranium hydrogeochemical survey of well waters from an area around Pie Town, Catron County, West-Central New Mexico, including concentrations of twenty-three additional elements  

SciTech Connect

As part of the Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE), the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) conducted a detailed hydrogeochemical survey of well waters in a 4250-km/sup 2/ area near Pie Town in west-central New Mexico. A total of 300 well samples was collected and analyzed for uranium and 23 other elements. The results of these analyses and carbonate and bicarbonate ion concentrations are presented in the Appendixes of this report. Uranium concentrations range from below the detection limit of 0.02 parts per billion (ppB) to 293.18 ppB and average 8.71 ppB. Samples containing high levels of uranium were collected from the Largo Creek valley west of Quemado, from a small area about 6 km east of Quemado, from a small area surrounding Pie Town, and from scattered locations in the area surrounding Adams Diggings north of Pie Town. Most of the samples containing high uranium concentrations were collected from wells associated with the volcanic sedimentary facies of the Datil formation. This formation is a likely source of mobile uranium that may be precipitating in the underlying Baca formation, a known uranium host unit. Bicarbonate ion concentration, while proportional to uranium concentration in some cases, is not a strong controlling factor in the uranium concentrations in samples from this area.

Morgan, T.L.; George, W.E.; Hensley, W.K.; Thomas, G.J.; Langhorst, A.L.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Loading margin Stable operating  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Linear approximation at p1 Actual loading margin Loadingmargin Parameter p p1 p2 p3 IEEE Transactions collapse. Linear and quadratic estimates to the variation of the loading margin with respect to any sys power support, wheeling, load model param- eters, line susceptance, and generator dispatch. The accuracy

17

Maintaining plant safety margins  

SciTech Connect

The Final Safety Analysis Report Forms the basis of demonstrating that the plant can operate safely and meet all applicable acceptance criteria. In order to assure that this continues through each operating cycle, the safety analysis is reexamined for each reload core. Operating limits are set for each reload core to assure that safety limits and applicable acceptance criteria are not exceeded for postulated events within the design basis. These operating limits form the basis for plant operation, providing barriers on various measurable parameters. The barriers are refereed to as limiting conditions for operation (LCO). The operating limits, being influenced by many factors, can change significantly from cycle to cycle. In order to be successful in demonstrating safe operation for each reload core (with adequate operating margin), it is necessary to continue to focus on ways to maintain/improve existing safety margins. Existing safety margins are a function of the plant type (boiling water reactor/pressurized water reactor (BWR/PWR)), nuclear system supply (NSSS) vendor, operating license date, core design features, plant design features, licensing history, and analytical methods used in the safety analysis. This paper summarizes the experience at Yankee Atomic Electric Company (YAEC) in its efforts to provide adequate operating margin for the plants that it supports.

Bergeron, P.A.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Hanford wells  

SciTech Connect

Records describing wells located on or near the Hanford Site have been maintained by Pacific Northwest Laboratory and the operating contractor, Westinghouse Hanford Company. In support of the Ground-Water Surveillance Project, portions of the data contained in these records have been compiled into the following report, which is intended to be used by those needing a condensed, tabular summary of well location and basic construction information. The wells listed in this report were constructed over a period of time spanning almost 70 years. Data included in this report were retrieved from the Hanford Envirorunental Information System (HEIS) database and supplemented with information not yet entered into HEIS. While considerable effort has been made to obtain the most accurate and complete tabulations possible of the Hanford Site wells, omissions and errors may exist. This document does not include data on lithologic logs, ground-water analyses, or specific well completion details.

Chamness, M.A.; Merz, J.K.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 165: Areas 25 and 26 Dry Well and Washdown Areas, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (including Record of Technical Change Nos. 1, 2, and 3) (January 2002, Rev. 0)  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 165 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 165 consists of eight Corrective Action Sites (CASs): CAS 25-20-01, Lab Drain Dry Well; CAS 25-51-02, Dry Well; CAS 25-59-01, Septic System; CAS 26-59-01, Septic System; CAS 25-07-06, Train Decontamination Area; CAS 25-07-07, Vehicle Washdown; CAS 26-07-01, Vehicle Washdown Station; and CAS 25-47-01, Reservoir and French Drain. All eight CASs are located in the Nevada Test Site, Nevada. Six of these CASs are located in Area 25 facilities and two CASs are located in Area 26 facilities. The eight CASs at CAU 165 consist of dry wells, septic systems, decontamination pads, and a reservoir. The six CASs in Area 25 are associated with the Nuclear Rocket Development Station that operated from 1958 to 1973. The two CASs in Area 26 are associated with facilities constructed for Project Pluto, a series of nuclear reactor tests conducted between 1961 to 1964 to develop a nuclear-powered ramjet engine. Based on site history, the scope of this plan will be a two-phased approach to investigate the possible presence of hazardous and/or radioactive constituents at concentrations that could potentially pose a threat to human health and the environment. The Phase I analytical program for most CASs will include volatile organic compounds, semivolatile organic compounds, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act metals, total petroleum hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, and radionuclides. If laboratory data obtained from the Phase I investigation indicates the presence of contaminants of concern, the process will continue with a Phase II investigation to define the extent of contamination. Based on the results of Phase I sampling, the analytical program for Phase II investigation may be reduced. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office (NNSA/NV)

2002-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

20

Distribution and Production of Oil and Gas Wells by State  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Distribution and Production of Oil and Gas Wells by State Distribution and Production of Oil and Gas Wells by State Distribution and Production of Oil and Gas Wells by State Release date: January 7, 2011 | Next Release Date: To be determined Distribution tables of oil and gas wells by production rate for all wells, including marginal wells, are now available for most states for the years 1995 to 2009. Graphs displaying historical behavior of well production rate are also available. To download data for all states and all years, including years prior to 1995, in an Excel spreadsheet XLS (4,000 KB). The quality and completeness of data is dependent on update lag times and the quality of individual state and commercial source databases. Undercounting of the number of wells occurs in states where data is sometimes not available at the well level but only at the lease level. States not listed below will be added later as data becomes available.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including marginal wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Maximal rank of extremal marginal tracial states  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

States on coupled quantum system whose restrictions to each subsystems are normalized traces are called marginal tracial states. We investigate extremal marginal tracial states and maximal rank of such states. Diagonal marginal tracial states are also considered.

Hiromichi Ohno

2009-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

22

Divergent/passive margin basins  

SciTech Connect

This book discusses the detailed geology of the four divergent margin basins and establishes a set of analog scenarios which can be used for future petroleum exploration. The divergent margin basins are the Campos basin of Brazil, the Gabon basin, the Niger delta, and the basins of the northwest shelf of Australia. These four petroleum basins present a wide range of stratigraphic sequences and structural styles that represent the diverse evolution of this large and important class of world petroleum basins.

Edwards, J.D. (Shell Oil Company (US)); Santogrossi, P.A. (Shell Offshore Inc. (US))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Marginal Energy Prices - RECS97 Update  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Marginal Energy Prices - RECS97 Update Marginal Energy Prices - RECS97 Update The original estimation of residential marginal energy prices at the individual household level (as reported in the Marginal Energy Prices Report, http://www.eren.doe.gov/buildings/codes_standards/applbrf/pdfs/marginal_ energy_price.pdf) was based on household energy billing data from EIA's 1993 RECS survey. When the 1997 RECS survey data became available, LBNL updated its estimation of residential marginal energy prices at the individual household level using that data. In addition, LBNL incorporated several refinements (as described below) to the marginal price estimation method it had originally developed. Presented below are the: * RECS97-based results. * Refinements to LBNL's marginal price estimation method.

24

Marginal Energy Prices - RECS97 Update  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Marginal Energy Prices - RECS97 Update Marginal Energy Prices - RECS97 Update The original estimation of residential marginal energy prices at the individual household level (as reported in the Marginal Energy Prices Report, http://www.eren.doe.gov/buildings/codes_standards/applbrf/pdfs/marginal_ energy_price.pdf) was based on household energy billing data from EIA's 1993 RECS survey. When the 1997 RECS survey data became available, LBNL updated its estimation of residential marginal energy prices at the individual household level using that data. In addition, LBNL incorporated several refinements (as described below) to the marginal price estimation method it had originally developed. Presented below are the: * RECS97-based results. * Refinements to LBNL's marginal price estimation method.

25

Landscape Evolution at an Active Plate Margin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Landscape Evolution at an Active Plate Margin edited and compiled by David R. Jessey and Robert E;32009 Desert Symposium Table of contents Landscape evolution at an active plate margin: a field trip

de Lijser, Peter

26

Marginal Energy Prices- RECS97 Update  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

An updated estimation of residential marginal energy prices at the individual house level using the 1997 RECS survey data

27

South Atlantic margins of Africa. page 1 South Atlantic continental margins of Africa  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

South Atlantic margins of Africa. page 1 South Atlantic continental margins of Africa: a comparison The South Atlantic continental passive margins of Africa comprise the major depocentres on the African plate of the tectonic vs climate interplay on the evolution of equatorial west Africa and SW Africa margins Michel

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

28

Marginal Energy Price Report - July 1999  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

J:\marginal\FinalDraftReport7-29-99.wpd J:\marginal\FinalDraftReport7-29-99.wpd DRAFT Marginal Energy Prices Report July 1999 U.S. Department of Energy Assistant Secretary, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Office of Codes and Standards Washington, DC 20585 ii J:\marginal\FinalDraftReport7-29-99.wpd This document was prepared for the Department of Energy by staff members of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) iii J:\marginal\FinalDraftReport7-29-99.wpd MARGINAL ENERGY PRICES Final Report Page Outline i Executive Summary 1 I. Background 2 II. Methods 4 III. Analysis and Results - Commercial 6 IV. Analysis and Results - Residential 12 V. Residential Heating Oil and Propane 19 VI. Taxes 22 Appendices Appendix 1. Tariffs Used in the Commercial Analysis 26

29

Marginal Energy Price Report - July 1999  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

J:\marginal\FinalDraftReport7-29-99.wpd J:\marginal\FinalDraftReport7-29-99.wpd DRAFT Marginal Energy Prices Report July 1999 U.S. Department of Energy Assistant Secretary, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Office of Codes and Standards Washington, DC 20585 ii J:\marginal\FinalDraftReport7-29-99.wpd This document was prepared for the Department of Energy by staff members of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) iii J:\marginal\FinalDraftReport7-29-99.wpd MARGINAL ENERGY PRICES Final Report Page Outline i Executive Summary 1 I. Background 2 II. Methods 4 III. Analysis and Results - Commercial 6 IV. Analysis and Results - Residential 12 V. Residential Heating Oil and Propane 19 VI. Taxes 22 Appendices Appendix 1. Tariffs Used in the Commercial Analysis 26

30

Petroleum geology of Pacific margin of Central America and northern South America, from Guatemala to Ecuador  

SciTech Connect

Exploration for hydrocarbons along the Pacific margin of Central America and northern South America has been limited and spasmodic. Less than 100 exploration wells have been drilled, with nearly 50 of these being in the Santa Elena, Progreso, and Guayas basins in Ecuador. Shows have been reported in some wells, and a few oil seeps are known. The only commercial production established to date has been from the Santa Elena Peninsula in Ecuador in the extreme south of the study area. Understanding of the geology in this part of the continental margin is incomplete at best. This paper reviews present-day knowledge in an attempt to define the sedimentary basins better, to characterize their structure and stratigraphy, and to assess their petroleum prospects. The area of continental margin reviewed is to the north, located northwest of the trench system where oceanic crust of the Cocos plate subducts under the Caribbean plate, and to the south, where the northern part of the Nazca plate collides with the South American plate. This plate tectonic setting forms the framework on which local structural and sedimentary events have created a series of relatively small trench-slope and forearc basins in what is now the coastal plain and adjacent offshore area of Central and South America, south or west of a line of mountain ranges with active volcanism. Sedimentary fill is generally of Tertiary age. The basins and subbasins recognized and described include: in Ecuador - Guayas, Santa Elena, Progreso, Valdivia, Bajo Grande, Manta, Muisne-Esmeraldas, and Borbon; in Colombia - Choco-Pacific; in Panama - Gulf of Panama basin complex (Santiago, Tonosi, Sambu), and Burica-Chiriqui; in Costa Rica - Terraba and Coronado/Tempisque; in Nicaragua - San Juan del Sur; and in the Honduras, El Salvador, and Guatemala - the Pacific coastal basin.

Scrutton, M.E.; Escalante, G.F.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Phenomenal well-being  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rated against the experience of the individualÂ?s other possible lives. Unlike well-being, PWB is guaranteed to track more robust experiential benefits that a person gets out of living a life. In this work, I discuss the concept of well-being, including...

Campbell, Stephen Michael

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

32

Definition: Capacity Benefit Margin | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Benefit Margin Benefit Margin Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Capacity Benefit Margin The amount of firm transmission transfer capability preserved by the transmission provider for Load- Serving Entities (LSEs), whose loads are located on that Transmission Service Provider's system, to enable access by the LSEs to generation from interconnected systems to meet generation reliability requirements. Preservation of CBM for an LSE allows that entity to reduce its installed generating capacity below that which may otherwise have been necessary without interconnections to meet its generation reliability requirements. The transmission transfer capability preserved as CBM is intended to be used by the LSE only in times of emergency generation deficiencies.[1] Related Terms

33

Margins, Liquidity and the Cost of Hedging  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent financial reforms, such as the Dodd-Frank Act in the U.S. and the European Market Infrastructure Regulation, encourage greater use of clearing and therefore increased margining of derivative trades. They also impose ...

Mello, Antonio S.

2012-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

34

Are buoyancy forces important during the formation of rifted margins?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......asterisks. (f) Peclet number vs margin extension. Letter code for margins: C = Carolina, C2 = Carolina (alternative...West (alternative), LE = Labrador East, NS = Nova Scotia, NS2 = Nova Scotia (alternative), NEW = Newfoundland margin, GEO......

Mark Davis; Nick Kusznir

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Well Permits (District of Columbia)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Well permits are required for the installation of wells in private and public space. Wells are defined as any trest hole, shaft, or soil excavation created by any means including, but not limited...

36

Well log evaluation of natural gas hydrates  

SciTech Connect

Gas hydrates are crystalline substances composed of water and gas, in which a solid-water-lattice accommodates gas molecules in a cage-like structure. Gas hydrates are globally widespread in permafrost regions and beneath the sea in sediment of outer continental margins. While methane, propane, and other gases can be included in the clathrate structure, methane hydrates appear to be the most common in nature. The amount of methane sequestered in gas hydrates is probably enormous, but estimates are speculative and range over three orders of magnitude from about 100,000 to 270,000,000 trillion cubic feet. The amount of gas in the hydrate reservoirs of the world greedy exceeds the volume of known conventional gas reserves. Gas hydrates also represent a significant drilling and production hazard. A fundamental question linking gas hydrate resource and hazard issues is: What is the volume of gas hydrates and included gas within a given gas hydrate occurrence? Most published gas hydrate resource estimates have, of necessity, been made by broad extrapolation of only general knowledge of local geologic conditions. Gas volumes that may be attributed to gas hydrates are dependent on a number of reservoir parameters, including the areal extent ofthe gas-hydrate occurrence, reservoir thickness, hydrate number, reservoir porosity, and the degree of gas-hydrate saturation. Two of the most difficult reservoir parameters to determine are porosity and degreeof gas hydrate saturation. Well logs often serve as a source of porosity and hydrocarbon saturation data; however, well-log calculations within gas-hydrate-bearing intervals are subject to error. The primary reason for this difficulty is the lack of quantitative laboratory and field studies. The primary purpose of this paper is to review the response of well logs to the presence of gas hydrates.

Collett, T.S.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Well log evaluation of natural gas hydrates  

SciTech Connect

Gas hydrates are crystalline substances composed of water and gas, in which a solid-water-lattice accommodates gas molecules in a cage-like structure. Gas hydrates are globally widespread in permafrost regions and beneath the sea in sediment of outer continental margins. While methane, propane, and other gases can be included in the clathrate structure, methane hydrates appear to be the most common in nature. The amount of methane sequestered in gas hydrates is probably enormous, but estimates are speculative and range over three orders of magnitude from about 100,000 to 270,000,000 trillion cubic feet. The amount of gas in the hydrate reservoirs of the world greedy exceeds the volume of known conventional gas reserves. Gas hydrates also represent a significant drilling and production hazard. A fundamental question linking gas hydrate resource and hazard issues is: What is the volume of gas hydrates and included gas within a given gas hydrate occurrence Most published gas hydrate resource estimates have, of necessity, been made by broad extrapolation of only general knowledge of local geologic conditions. Gas volumes that may be attributed to gas hydrates are dependent on a number of reservoir parameters, including the areal extent ofthe gas-hydrate occurrence, reservoir thickness, hydrate number, reservoir porosity, and the degree of gas-hydrate saturation. Two of the most difficult reservoir parameters to determine are porosity and degreeof gas hydrate saturation. Well logs often serve as a source of porosity and hydrocarbon saturation data; however, well-log calculations within gas-hydrate-bearing intervals are subject to error. The primary reason for this difficulty is the lack of quantitative laboratory and field studies. The primary purpose of this paper is to review the response of well logs to the presence of gas hydrates.

Collett, T.S.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

U.S. Distribution and Production of Oil and Gas Wells | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Distribution and Production of Oil and Gas Wells Distribution and Production of Oil and Gas Wells Dataset Summary Description Distribution tables of oil and gas wells by production rate for all wells, including marginal wells, are available from the EIA for most states for the years 1919 to 2009. Graphs displaying historical behavior of well production rate are also available. The quality and completeness of data is dependent on update lag times and the quality of individual state and commercial source databases. Undercounting of the number of wells occurs in states where data is sometimes not available at the well level but only at the lease level. States not listed below will be added later as data becomes available. Source EIA Date Released January 07th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords

39

Geological history and petroleum resources of the continental margins in the central sector of Tethys  

SciTech Connect

The history of the closure of Tethys explains the distribution and nature of occurrence of petroleum. The enormous resources known in basins of the former passive Gondwanan margin, including those of the Persian Gulf, are mostly in carbonate reservoirs. In contrast, the resources in basins of the former active Eurasian margin, from Spain to Iran, are very much smaller. 4 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

Geodekyan, A.A.; Zabanbark, A.; Konyukov, A.I.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Pump apparatus including deconsolidator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pump apparatus includes a particulate pump that defines a passage that extends from an inlet to an outlet. A duct is in flow communication with the outlet. The duct includes a deconsolidator configured to fragment particle agglomerates received from the passage.

Sonwane, Chandrashekhar; Saunders, Timothy; Fitzsimmons, Mark Andrew

2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including marginal wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Risk Informed Margins Management as part of Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization  

SciTech Connect

The ability to better characterize and quantify safety margin is important to improved decision making about Light Water Reactor (LWR) design, operation, and plant life extension. A systematic approach to characterization of safety margins and the subsequent margin management options represents a vital input to the licensee and regulatory analysis and decision making that will be involved. In addition, as research and development in the LWR Sustainability (LWRS) Program and other collaborative efforts yield new data, sensors, and improved scientific understanding of physical processes that govern the aging and degradation of plant SSCs needs and opportunities to better optimize plant safety and performance will become known. To support decision making related to economics, readability, and safety, the Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Pathway provides methods and tools that enable mitigation options known as risk informed margins management (RIMM) strategies.

Curtis Smith

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Focus on Venezuelan heavy crude: refining margins  

SciTech Connect

Of six crudes refined in the US Gulf Coast, heavy Venezuelan crude Lagunillas (15/sup 0/ API) provides the best margin per barrel. Data for end of December 1983 and the first three weeks of January show that margins on all crudes are on the rise in this market, due to a turnaround in product prices. The lighter crudes are showing the greatest increase in Gross Product Worth. This is having a modest shrinking effect on the margin differential between light and heavy crudes in this market. The domestic crude West Texas Intermediate, at 40/sup 0/ API, provides the highest GPW in this crude slate sample, over US $31 per barrel, compared to GPW of under US $28 per barrel for Lagunillas. Still, as Lagunillas cost about US $8 less than does WTI, refiners with sufficient residue conversion capacity can be earning about US $3.50 more in margin per barrel than they can with WTI. Although few refiners would be using a 15/sup 0/ API crude exclusively for any length of time, heavier oil's inclusion in modern refiners' diets is enhancing their competitive position more than any other single factor. This issue of Energy Detente presents the fuel price/tax series and industrial fuel prices for January 1984 for countries of the Western Hemisphere.

Not Available

1984-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

43

Margins in high temperature leak-before-break assessments  

SciTech Connect

Developments in the defect assessment procedure R6 to include high-temperature mechanisms in Leak-before-Break arguments are described. In particular, the effect of creep on the time available to detect a leak and on the crack opening area, and hence leak rate, is discussed. The competing influence of these two effects is emphasized by an example. The application to Leak-before-Break of the time-dependent failure assessment diagram approach for high temperature defect assessment is then outlined. The approach is shown to be of use in assessing the erosion of margins by creep.

Budden, P.J.; Hooton, D.G.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Experimental validation of the van Herk margin formula for lung radiation therapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To validate the van Herk margin formula for lung radiation therapy using realistic dose calculation algorithms and respiratory motion modeling. The robustness of the margin formula against variations in lesion size, peak-to-peak motion amplitude, tissue density, treatment technique, and plan conformity was assessed, along with the margin formula assumption of a homogeneous dose distribution with perfect plan conformity.Methods: 3DCRT and IMRT lung treatment plans were generated within the ORBIT treatment planning platform (RaySearch Laboratories, Sweden) on 4DCT datasets of virtual phantoms. Random and systematic respiratory motion induced errors were simulated using deformable registration and dose accumulation tools available within ORBIT for simulated cases of varying lesion sizes, peak-to-peak motion amplitudes, tissue densities, and plan conformities. A detailed comparison between the margin formula dose profile model, the planned dose profiles, and penumbra widths was also conducted to test the assumptions of the margin formula. Finally, a correction to account for imperfect plan conformity was tested as well as a novel application of the margin formula that accounts for the patient-specific motion trajectory.Results: The van Herk margin formula ensured full clinical target volume coverage for all 3DCRT and IMRT plans of all conformities with the exception of small lesions in soft tissue. No dosimetric trends with respect to plan technique or lesion size were observed for the systematic and random error simulations. However, accumulated plans showed that plan conformity decreased with increasing tumor motion amplitude. When comparing dose profiles assumed in the margin formula model to the treatment plans, discrepancies in the low dose regions were observed for the random and systematic error simulations. However, the margin formula respected, in all experiments, the 95% dose coverage required for planning target volume (PTV) margin derivation, as defined by the ICRU; thus, suitable PTV margins were estimated. The penumbra widths calculated in lung tissue for each plan were found to be very similar to the 6.4 mm value assumed by the margin formula model. The plan conformity correction yielded inconsistent results which were largely affected by image and dose grid resolution while the trajectory modified PTV plans yielded a dosimetric benefit over the standard internal target volumes approach with up to a 5% decrease in the V20 value.Conclusions: The margin formula showed to be robust against variations in tumor size and motion, treatment technique, plan conformity, as well as low tissue density. This was validated by maintaining coverage of all of the derived PTVs by 95% dose level, as required by the formal definition of the PTV. However, the assumption of perfect plan conformity in the margin formula derivation yields conservative margin estimation. Future modifications to the margin formula will require a correction for plan conformity. Plan conformity can also be improved by using the proposed trajectory modified PTV planning approach. This proves especially beneficial for tumors with a large anterior–posterior component of respiratory motion.

Ecclestone, Gillian; Heath, Emily [Department of Physics, Ryerson University, Toronto, Ontario M5B 2K3 (Canada)] [Department of Physics, Ryerson University, Toronto, Ontario M5B 2K3 (Canada); Bissonnette, Jean-Pierre [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9, Canada and Department of Radiation Physics, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9, Canada and Department of Radiation Physics, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

45

Projections of Marginal Wells and Their Contributions to Oil and Natural Gas Supplies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5, Society of Petroleum Engineers 5, Society of Petroleum Engineers This paper was prepared for presentation at the 2005 SPE Eastern Regional Meeting held in Morgantown, W.V., 14-16 September 2005. This paper was selected for presentation by an SPE Program Committee following review of information contained in a proposal submitted by the author(s). Contents of the paper, as presented, have not been reviewed by the Society of Petroleum Engineers and are subject to correction by the author(s). The material, as presented, does not necessarily reflect any position of the Society of Petroleum Engineers, its officers, or members. Papers presented at SPE meetings are subject to publication review by Editorial Committees of the Society of Petroleum Engineers. Electronic reproduction, distribution, or storage of any part of this paper

46

Ocean Margins Program: Cape Hatteras Experiment. Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The central objectives of the Ocean Margins Program (OMP) were to quantify the oceanographic and meteorological processes affecting the cycling of carbon on the US East Coast Continental Margin.

Pietrafesa, Leonard J.

2003-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

47

Tectonic significance of Synrift sediment packages across the Congo continental margin  

SciTech Connect

The tectonic and stratigraphic development of the Congo continental margin reflects the timing, magnitude, and distribution of lithospheric extension responsible for its formation. Details of the lithospheric extension process are recorded in the stratigraphic successions preserved along and across the margin. By using the stratal relationships (e.g., onlap, downlap, and truncation) and lithofacies determined from seismic reflection and exploratory well data as input into our basin-modeling strategy, we have developed an integrated approach to determine the relationship between the timing, magnitude, and distribution of lithospheric extension across the margin. Two hinge zones, an eastern and Atlantic hinge formed along the Congo margin in response to discrete extensional events occurring from the Berriasian to the Aptian. The eastern hinge zone demarcates the eastern limit of the broadly distributed Berriasian extension. This extension resulted in the formation of deep anoxic, lacustrine systems. In contrast, the Atlantic hinge, located [approximately]90 km west of the eastern hinge, marks the eastern limit of a second phase of extension, which began in the Hauterivian. Consequent footwall uplift and rotation exposed the earlier synrift and prerift stratigraphy to at least wave base causing varying amounts of erosional truncation across the Atlantic hinge zone along much of the Gabon, Congo, and Angola margins. The absence of the Melania Formation across the Congo margin implies that uplift of the Atlantic hinge was relatively minor compared to that across the Angola and Gabon margins. In addition, material eroded from the adjacent and topographically higher hinge zones may in part account for the thick wedge of sediment deposited seaward of the Congo Atlantic hinge. A third phase of extension reactivated both the eastern and Atlantic hinge zones and was responsible for creating the accommodation space for Marnes Noires source rock deposition.

McGinnis, J.P.; Karner, G.D.; Driscoll, N.W. (Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory, Palisades, NY (United States)); Brumbaugh, W.D. (Conoco, Worldwide Exploration Services, Houston, TX (United States)); Cameron, N. (Conoco Ltd., London (United Kingdom))

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Advanced Test Reactor  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Advanced Test Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Advanced Test Reactor Demonstration Case Study Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Advanced Test Reactor Demonstration Case Study Safety is central to the design, licensing, operation, and economics of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). Consequently, the ability to better characterize and quantify safety margin holds the key to improved decision making about light water reactor design, operation, and plant life extension. A systematic approach to characterization of safety margins and the subsequent margins management options represents a vital input to the licensee and regulatory analysis and decision making that will be involved. The purpose of the Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC)

49

Decontaminating Flooded Wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This publication explains how to decontaminate and disinfect a well, test the well water and check for well damage after a flood....

Boellstorff, Diana; Dozier, Monty; Provin, Tony; Dictson, Nikkoal; McFarland, Mark L.

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

50

Observations of the internal tide on the California continental margin near Monterey Bay  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Observations of the semidiurnal internal tide on the California continental margin between Monterey Bay and Point Sur confirm the existence of northward energy flux predicted by numerical models of the region. Both a short-duration tide-resolving survey with expendable profilers and a multi-week timeseries from FLIP measured northward flux in the mean, supporting the hypothesis that topographic features off Point Sur are the source of the strong internal tides observed in Monterey Canyon. However, the observed depth-integrated semidiurnal flux of 450±200 W m?1 is approximately twice as large as the most directly-comparable model and FLIP results. Though dominated by low modes with O(100 km) horizontal wavelengths, a number of properties of the semidiurnal internal tide, including kinetic and potential energy, as well as energy flux, show lateral variability on O(5 km) scales. Potential causes of this spatial variability include interference of waves from multiple sources, the sharp delineation of beams generated by abrupt topography due to limited azimuthal extent, and local generation and scattering of the internal tide into higher modes by small-scale topography. A simple two-source model of a first-mode interference pattern reproduces some of the most striking aspects of the observations.

Samantha R. Terker; James B. Girton; Eric Kunze; Jody M. Klymak; Robert Pinkel

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Completion Report for Well ER-EC-5  

SciTech Connect

Well ER-EC-5 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. This well was drilled in the summer of 1999 as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's hydrogeologic investigation program in the Western Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley region just west of the Nevada Test Site. A 44.5-centimeter surface hole was drilled and cased off to a depth of 342.6 meters below ground surface. The borehole diameter was then decreased to 31.1 centimeters for drilling to a total depth of 762.0 meters. One completion string with three isolated slotted intervals was installed in the well. A preliminary composite, static water level was measured at the depth of 309.9 meters, 40 days after installation of the completion string. Detailed lithologic descriptions with stratigraphic assignments are included in the report. These are based on composite drill cuttings collected every 3 meters, and 18 sidewall samples taken at various depths below 349.6 meters, supplemented by geophysical log data and results from detailed chemical and mineralogical analyses of rock samples. The well penetrated Tertiary-age tuffs of the Thirsty Canyon Group, caldera moat-filling sedimentary deposits, lava of the Beatty Wash Formation, and landslide breccia and tuffs of the Timber Mountain Group. The well reached total depth in welded ashflow tuff of the Ammonia Tanks Tuff after penetrating 440.1 meters of this unit, which is also the main water-producing unit in the well. The geologic interpretation of data from this well constrains the western margin of the Ammonia Tanks caldera to the west of the well location.

Bechtel Nevada

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Wellness Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Program Program Wellness Program Workers spend 200 hours per month at work, and keeping a healthy work-life balance is essential. The Headquarters Wellness Program provides support and assistance to DOE employees through a variety of programs and resources geared toward enhancing their mental and physical well-being. Wellness programs include: Accommodations, the Child Development Centers, the Employee Assistance Program (EAP), the Forrestal (FOHO) and Germantown (GOHO) Fitness Centers, the Occupational Health Clinics and the DOE WorkLife4You Program. Programs Disability Services Child Development Centers Headquarters Employee Assistance Program (EAP) Headquarters Occupational Health Clinics Headquarters Accommodation Program DOE Worklife4You Program Health Foreign Travel Health & Wellness Tips

53

Assessment of safety margins in zircaloy oxidation and embrittlement criteria for ECCS acceptance  

SciTech Connect

Current Emergency Core Cooling System (ECCS) Acceptance Criteria for light-water reactors include certain requirements pertaining to calculations of core performance during a Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA). The Baker-Just correlation must be used to calculate Zircaloy-steam oxidation, calculated peak cladding temperatures (PCT) must not exceed 1204/sup 0/C, and calculated oxidation must not exceed 17% equivalent cladding reacted (17% ECR). The minimum margin of safety was estimated for each of these criteria, based on research performed in the last decade. Margins were defined as the amounts of conservatism over and above the expected extreme values computed from the data base at specified confidence levels. The currently required Baker-Just oxidation correlation provides margins only over the 1100/sup 0/C to 1500/sup 0/C temperature range at the 95% confidence level. The PCT margins for thermal shock and handling failures are adequate at oxidation temperatures above 1204/sup 0/C for 210 and 160 seconds, respectively, at the 95% confidence level. ECR thermal shock and handling margins at the 50% and 95% confidence levels, respectively, range between 2% and 7% ECR for the Baker-Just correlation, but vanish at temperatures between 1100/sup 0/C and 1160/sup 0/C for the best-estimate Cathcart-Pawel correlation. Use of the Cathcart-Pawel correlation for LOCA calculations can be justified at the 85% to 88% confidence level if cooling rate effects can be neglected. 75 refs., 21 figs.

Williford, R.E.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Large margin gaussian mixture models for discriminative training in language recognition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper we try to integrate the concept of large margin gaussian mixture models (large margin GMMs) into discriminative training for language recognition. We proposed a new language recognition system (SVM-LM-ModelPushing system) which combines model pushing by large margin GMMs (LM-ModelPushing) with original model pushing by SVM (ModelPushing). Our experiments show that LM-ModelPushing includes the language dependent information. What's more our experiments show that LM-ModelPushing contains different language dependent information comparing to ModelPushing. Experiment results on 2007 National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) language Recognition Evaluation (LRE) databases show SVM-LM-ModelPushing system gains relative improvement in EER of 9.1% and in minDCF of 8.8% comparing to original ModelPushing system in 30-second tasks.

Jinchao Yang; Yonghong Yan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Well control procedures for extended reach wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

been found to be critical to the success of ERD are torque and drag, drillstring design, wellbore stability, hole cleaning, casing design, directional drilling optimization, drilling dynamics and rig sizing.4 Other technologies of vital importance... are the use of rotary steerable systems (RSS) together with measurement while drilling (MWD) and logging while drilling (LWD) to geosteer the well into the geological target.5 Many of the wells drilled at Wytch Farm would not have been possible to drill...

Gjorv, Bjorn

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

56

ECN GHG Marginal Abatement Cost curves (NAMAC) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ECN GHG Marginal Abatement Cost curves (NAMAC) ECN GHG Marginal Abatement Cost curves (NAMAC) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: ECN GHG Marginal Abatement Cost curves for the Non-Annex I region (NAMAC) Agency/Company /Organization: Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands Sector: Energy, Land Topics: Resource assessment, Pathways analysis, Background analysis Website: www.ecn.nl/docs/library/report/2006/e06060.pdf References: GHG Marginal Abatement Cost curves for the Non-Annex I region[1] GHG Marginal Abatement Cost curves for the Non-Annex I region (NAMAC) (1999-present) ECN has developed a Marginal Abatement Cost curve containing detailed information on mitigation technologies and abatement costs in developing countries. * The MAC was first developed for the Dutch Ministry of Foreign

57

Intrusion Margins and Associated Fractures | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Intrusion Margins and Associated Fractures Intrusion Margins and Associated Fractures Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Intrusion Margins and Associated Fractures Dictionary.png Intrusion Margins and Associated Fractures: No definition has been provided for this term. Add a Definition Controlling Structures List of controlling structures typically associated with geothermal systems: Major Normal Fault Termination of a Major Normal Fault Stepover or Relay Ramp in Normal Fault Zones Apex or Salient of Normal Fault Fault Intersection Accommodation Zone Displacement Transfer Zone Pull-Apart in Strike-Slip Fault Zone Intrusion Margins and Associated Fractures Stratigraphic Boundaries Fissure Swarms Caldera Rim Margins Lithologically Controlled Fractures caused by igneous activity creates permeability, allowing water

58

Groundwater and Wells (Nebraska)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This section describes regulations relating to groundwater protection, water wells, and water withdrawals, and requires the registration of all water wells in the state.

59

Marginal, Erodible Land Retirement Policy (Minnesota) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Marginal, Erodible Land Retirement Policy (Minnesota) Marginal, Erodible Land Retirement Policy (Minnesota) Marginal, Erodible Land Retirement Policy (Minnesota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Environmental Regulations It is state policy to encourage the retirement of marginal, highly erodible

60

Marginal Abatement Cost Tool (MACTool) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Marginal Abatement Cost Tool (MACTool) Marginal Abatement Cost Tool (MACTool) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Marginal Abatement Cost Tool (MACTool) Agency/Company /Organization: World Bank Climate Smart Planning Platform Sector: Climate, Energy Topics: Analysis Tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Complexity/Ease of Use: Simple Website: climatesmartplanning.org/node/33 Cost: Free Related Tools Global Relationship Assessment to Protect the Environment (GRAPE) Global Trade and Analysis Project (GTAP) Model MIT Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis (EPPA) Model ... further results Find Another Tool FIND DEVELOPMENT IMPACTS ASSESSMENT TOOLS A spreadsheet tool for building marginal abatement cost curves, and for calculating break-even carbon prices. Supports comparison of costs and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including marginal wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

EOCENE BIRDS FROM THE WESTERN MARGIN OF SOUTHERNMOST SOUTH AMERICA .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study presents the first record of Eocene birds from the western margin of southernmost South America. Three localities in Magallanes, southern Chile, have yielded… (more)

Sallaberry, Michel

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Kimberly Well - Photos  

SciTech Connect

The Snake River Plain (SRP), Idaho, hosts potential geothermal resources due to elevated groundwater temperatures associated with the thermal anomaly Yellowstone-Snake River hotspot. Project HOTSPOT has coordinated international institutions and organizations to understand subsurface stratigraphy and assess geothermal potential. Over 5.9km of core were drilled from three boreholes within the SRP in an attempt to acquire continuous core documenting the volcanic and sedimentary record of the hotspot: (1) Kimama, (2) Kimberly, and (3) Mountain Home. The Kimberly drill hole was selected to document continuous volcanism when analysed in conjunction with the Kimama and is located near the margin of the plain. Data submitted by project collaborator Doug Schmitt, University of Alberta

John Shervais

2011-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

63

Thermal well-test method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A well-test method involving injection of hot (or cold) water into a groundwater aquifer, or injecting cold water into a geothermal reservoir is disclosed. By making temperature measurements at various depths in one or more observation wells, certain properties of the aquifer are determined. These properties, not obtainable from conventional well test procedures, include the permeability anisotropy, and layering in the aquifer, and in-situ thermal properties. The temperature measurements at various depths are obtained from thermistors mounted in the observation wells.

Tsang, C.F.; Doughty, C.A.

1984-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

64

Plugging Abandoned Water Wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. It is recommended that before you begin the process of plugging an aban- doned well that you seek advice from your local groundwater conservation district, a licensed water well driller in your area, or the Water Well Drillers Program with the Texas Department... hire a licensed water well driller or pump installer to seal and plug an abandoned well. Well contractors have the equipment and an understanding of soil condi- tions to determine how a well should be properly plugged. How can you take care...

Lesikar, Bruce J.

2002-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

65

Completion Report for Well ER-18-2  

SciTech Connect

Well ER-18-2 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. This well, located on Buckboard Mesa in the western part of the Nevada Test Site, was drilled in the spring of 1999 as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's hydrogeologic investigation well program in the Western Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley region just west of the Test Site. A 44.5-centimeter surface hole was drilled and cased off to the depth 408.1 meters below the surface. The hole diameter was then decreased to 31.1 centimeters for drilling to a total depth of 762.0 meters. A preliminary composite, static, water level was measured at the depth of approximately 369.7 meters approximately two months after the completion string was installed. One completion string with three isolated, slotted intervals was installed in the well. Detailed lithologic descriptions with preliminary stratigraphic assignments are included in the report. These are based on composite drill cuttings collected every 3 meters and 15 sidewall samples taken at various depths below 420 meters, supplemented by geophysical log data and results of detailed chemical and mineralogical studies of rock samples. The upper part of the well penetrated Tertiary-age basalt, underlain by tuffaceous moat-filling sediments interbedded with ash-flow tuff units of the Thirsty Canyon Group and the Beatty Wash Formation. The lower half of the drill hole penetrated ash-flow tuff of the mafic-rich Ammonia Tanks Tuff. The geologic interpretation of data from Well ER-18-2 indicates that this site is located inside the structural margin of the Ammonia Tanks caldera.

Bechtel Nevada

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Integrating Safety Assessment Methods using the Risk Informed Safety Margins Characterization (RISMC) Approach  

SciTech Connect

Safety is central to the design, licensing, operation, and economics of nuclear power plants (NPPs). As the current light water reactor (LWR) NPPs age beyond 60 years, there are possibilities for increased frequency of systems, structures, and components (SSC) degradations or failures that initiate safety significant events, reduce existing accident mitigation capabilities, or create new failure modes. Plant designers commonly “over-design” portions of NPPs and provide robustness in the form of redundant and diverse engineered safety features to ensure that, even in the case of well-beyond design basis scenarios, public health and safety will be protected with a very high degree of assurance. This form of defense-in-depth is a reasoned response to uncertainties and is often referred to generically as “safety margin.” Historically, specific safety margin provisions have been formulated primarily based on engineering judgment backed by a set of conservative engineering calculations. The ability to better characterize and quantify safety margin is important to improved decision making about LWR design, operation, and plant life extension. A systematic approach to characterization of safety margins and the subsequent margin management options represents a vital input to the licensee and regulatory analysis and decision making that will be involved. In addition, as research and development (R&D) in the LWR Sustainability (LWRS) Program and other collaborative efforts yield new data, sensors, and improved scientific understanding of physical processes that govern the aging and degradation of plant SSCs needs and opportunities to better optimize plant safety and performance will become known. To support decision making related to economics, readability, and safety, the RISMC Pathway provides methods and tools that enable mitigation options known as margins management strategies. The purpose of the RISMC Pathway R&D is to support plant decisions for risk-informed margin management with the aim to improve economics, reliability, and sustain safety of current NPPs. As the lead Department of Energy (DOE) Laboratory for this Pathway, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is tasked with developing and deploying methods and tools that support the quantification and management of safety margin and uncertainty.

Curtis Smith; Diego Mandelli

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Horizontal well IPR calculations  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the calculation of near-wellbore skin and non-Darcy flow coefficient for horizontal wells based on whether the well is drilled in an underbalanced or overbalanced condition, whether the well is completed openhole, with a slotted liner, or cased, and on the number of shots per foot and phasing for cased wells. The inclusion of mechanical skin and the non-Darcy flow coefficient in previously published horizontal well equations is presented and a comparison between these equations is given. In addition, both analytical and numerical solutions for horizontal wells with skin and non-Darcy flow are presented for comparison.

Thomas, L.K.; Todd, B.J.; Evans, C.E.; Pierson, R.G.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

68

A risk-informed approach to safety margins analysis  

SciTech Connect

The Risk Informed Safety Margins Characterization (RISMC) Pathway is a systematic approach developed to characterize and quantify safety margins of nuclear power plant structures, systems and components. The model has been tested on the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Lab.

Curtis Smith; Diego Mandelli

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Assessment of Biomass Resources from Marginal Lands in APEC Economies  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this study is to examine the marginal lands in Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) economies and evaluate their biomass productivity potential. Twelve categories of marginal lands are identified using the Global Agro-Ecological Zones system of the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization.

Milbrandt, A.; Overend, R. P.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

INTRODUCTION Margin evolution and plate-reconstruction models require a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, such as the volcanic Wallaby Plateau/Bernier Platform and the non-volcanic Bight Basin. Following this we use-rift fit of conjugate margins. This in turn has economic significance for tectonic and sedimentary basin on the architecture of the Australian continental margin (Stagg et al. 1999) and adjacent ocean basins (Müller et al

Müller, Dietmar

71

Underground Wells (Oklahoma)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Class I, III, IV and V injection wells require a permit issued by the Executive Director of the Department of Environmental Quality; Class V injection wells utilized in the remediation of...

72

Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Advanced Test Reactor  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(RISMC) Advanced Test (RISMC) Advanced Test Reactor Demonstration Case Study Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Advanced Test Reactor Demonstration Case Study Safety is central to the design, licensing, operation, and economics of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). Consequently, the ability to better characterize and quantify safety margin holds the key to improved decision making about light water reactor design, operation, and plant life extension. A systematic approach to characterization of safety margins and the subsequent margins management options represents a vital input to the licensee and regulatory analysis and decision making that will be involved. The purpose of the Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Pathway research and development (R&D) is to support plant decisions for

73

Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization Case Study: Selection of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Case Study: Selection Case Study: Selection of Electrical Equipment To Be Subjected to Environmental Qualification Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization Case Study: Selection of Electrical Equipment To Be Subjected to Environmental Qualification Reference 1 discussed key elements of the process for developing a margins-based "safety case" to support safe and efficient operation for an extended period. The present report documents (in Appendix A) a case study, carrying out key steps of the Reference 1 process, using an actual plant Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) model. In general, the margins-based safety case helps the decision-maker manage plant margins most effectively. It tells the plant decision-maker such things as what margin is present (at the plant level, at the functional

74

Economic design of wells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...concepts and the general principles outlined...with wells of the general configuration shown...internal com- bustion engine. It is assumed that...analysis, consider a diesel- powered well of...modified to use either a general expression for performance...written in terms of diesel-powered wells...

R. F. Stoner; D. M. Milne; P. J. Lund

75

BUFFERED WELL FIELD OUTLINES  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

OIL & GAS FIELD OUTLINES FROM BUFFERED WELLS OIL & GAS FIELD OUTLINES FROM BUFFERED WELLS The VBA Code below builds oil & gas field boundary outlines (polygons) from buffered wells (points). Input well points layer must be a feature class (FC) with the following attributes: Field_name Buffer distance (can be unique for each well to represent reservoirs with different drainage radii) ...see figure below. Copy the code into a new module. Inputs: In ArcMap, data frame named "Task 1" Well FC as first layer (layer 0). Output: Polygon feature class in same GDB as the well points FC, with one polygon field record (may be multiple polygon rings) per field_name. Overlapping buffers for the same field name are dissolved and unioned (see figure below). Adds an attribute PCTFEDLAND which can be populated using the VBA

76

Well drilling apparatus  

SciTech Connect

A drill rig for drilling wells having a derrick adapted to hold and lower a conductor string and drill pipe string. A support frame is fixed to the derrick to extend over the well to be drilled, and a rotary table, for holding and rotating drill pipe strings, is movably mounted thereon. The table is displaceable between an active position in alignment with the axis of the well and an inactive position laterally spaced therefrom. A drill pipe holder is movably mounted on the frame below the rotary table for displacement between a first position laterally of the axis of the well and a second position in alignment with the axis of the well. The rotary table and said drill pipe holder are displaced in opposition to each other, so that the rotary table may be removed from alignment with the axis of the well and said drill pipe string simultaneously held without removal from said well.

Prins, K.; Prins, R.K.

1982-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

77

Completion Report for Well ER-EC-8  

SciTech Connect

Well ER-EC-8 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. This well was drilled in the summer of 1999 as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's hydrogeologic investigation program in the Western Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley region just west of the Nevada Test Site. A 44.5-centimeter surface hole was drilled and cased off to a depth of 129.8 meters below the surface. The hole diameter was then decreased to 31.1 centimeters for drilling to a total depth of 609.6 meters. One completion string with three isolated slotted intervals was installed in the well. A preliminary composite, static water level was measured at the depth of 98.4 meters, 24 days after installation of the completion string. Detailed lithologic descriptions with stratigraphic assignments are included in the report. These are based on evaluation of composite drill cuttings collected every 3 meters, and 20 sidewall samples taken at various depths below 157.9 meters, supplemented by geophysical log data and results of detailed chemical and mineralogical studies of rock samples. Drilling began in Tertiary-age tuff of the Thirsty Canyon Group, and penetrated tuffs of the Beatty Wash Formation, tuff of Buttonhook Wash, and the upper portion of the Ammonia Tanks Tuff. The geologic interpretation of data from this well helps define the location of the western margin of the Timber Mountain caldera complex in the southwestern Nevada volcanic field. Geologic and hydrologic data from the well will aid in development of models to predict groundwater flow and contaminant migration within and near the Nevada Test Site.

Bechtel Nevada

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

well | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

43 43 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142280543 Varnish cache server well Dataset Summary Description The California Division of Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Resources contains oil, gas, and geothermal data for the state of California. Source California Division of Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Resources Date Released February 01st, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords California data gas geothermal oil well Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon California district 1 wells (xls, 10.1 MiB) application/vnd.ms-excel icon California district 2 wells (xls, 4 MiB) application/vnd.ms-excel icon California district 3 wells (xls, 3.8 MiB) application/zip icon California district 4 wells (zip, 11.2 MiB)

79

Estimating Marginal Residential Energy Prices in the Analysis of Proposed  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Marginal Residential Energy Prices in the Analysis of Proposed Marginal Residential Energy Prices in the Analysis of Proposed Appliance Energy Efficiency Standards Title Estimating Marginal Residential Energy Prices in the Analysis of Proposed Appliance Energy Efficiency Standards Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-44230 Year of Publication 2000 Authors Chaitkin, Stuart, James E. McMahon, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, Robert D. Van Buskirk, and James D. Lutz Document Number LBNL-44230 Date Published March 1 Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley Abstract Use of marginal energy prices, instead of average energy prices, represents a theoretically valuable and challenging refinement to the usual life-cycle cost analysis conducted for proposed appliance energy efficiency standards. LBNL developed a method to estimate marginal residential energy prices using a regression analysis based on a nationally representative sample of actual consumer energy bills. Based on the 1997 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), national mean marginal electricity prices were estimated to be 2.5% less than average electricity prices in the summer and 10.0% less than average prices in the non-summer months. For natural gas, marginal prices were 4.4% less than average prices in the winter and 15.3% less than average prices in the non-winter months.

80

Petroleum well costs.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This is the first academic study of well costs and drilling times for Australia??s petroleum producing basins, both onshore and offshore. I analyse a substantial… (more)

Leamon, Gregory Robert

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including marginal wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Completion strategy includes clay and precipitate control  

SciTech Connect

This article describes the conditions which are necessary for a successful oil well completion in the Mississippi and Cherokee zones of South Central Kansas. Topics considered include paraffin precipitation, clay swelling and migration, and iron precipitation. Clays in these zones are sensitive to water-base treating fluids and tend to swell and migrate to the well bore, thereby causing permeability damage. The presence of iron in the Mississippi and Cherokee formations has been indicated by cuttings, core samples, and connate water samples.

Sandy, T.; Gardner, G.R.

1985-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

82

Advancing Wellness in Reproductive Health Reproductive health includes a diverse range of diseases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

technologies in assisted reproduction and science in general may have unrecognized ethical, social and legal - Dr. V. Feyles _ Pre-conceptual Counselling; Medications in Pregnancy - Dr. R. Gratton _ Effects of Stress on Fertility Dr. C. Newton _ Third Party Reproduction - D. Broadbent _ Interpreting Semen Analysis

Sinnamon, Gordon J.

83

Assessment of Biomass Resources from Marginal Lands in APEC Countries |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

from Marginal Lands in APEC Countries from Marginal Lands in APEC Countries Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Assessment of Biomass Resources from Marginal Lands in APEC Countries Name Assessment of Biomass Resources from Marginal Lands in APEC Countries Agency/Company /Organization National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sector Energy Focus Area Biomass Topics Resource assessment Resource Type Dataset, Maps, Publications Website http://www.biofuels.apec.org/p Country Australia, Brunei, Canada, Chile, China, Indonesia, Japan, South Korea, Malaysia, Mexico, New Zealand, Papua New Guinea, Peru, Philippines, Russia, Chinese Taipei, Thailand, United States, Vietnam Australia and New Zealand, South-Eastern Asia, Northern America, South America, Eastern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, Eastern Asia, Eastern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, Central America, Australia and New Zealand, Melanesia, South America, South-Eastern Asia, Eastern Europe, , South-Eastern Asia, Northern America, South-Eastern Asia

84

ITP Steel: Steel Industry Marginal Opportunity Study September 2005  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The objective of this study is to generate a marginal opportunity curve for the ITP steel subprogram showing the location of the current portfolio compared against all opportunities for steel manufacturing.

85

BUFFERED WELL FIELD OUTLINES  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

drainage radii) ...see figure below. Copy the code into a new module. Inputs: In ArcMap, data frame named "Task 1" Well FC as first layer (layer 0). Output: Polygon feature class...

86

Shock Chlorination of Wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shock chlorination is a method of disinfecting a water well. This publication gives complete instructions for chlorinating with bleach or with dry chlorine. It is also available in Spanish as publication L-5441S...

McFarland, Mark L.; Dozier, Monty

2003-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

87

Global-local Structural Optimization Using Response Surfaces of Local Optimization Margins  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Global-local Structural Optimization Using Response Surfaces of Local Optimization Margins Boyang optimization problems. First, a large number of component optimizations for maximization of margins are performed. Response surface approximations (RSA) for maximum margins of component optimization

Neumaier, Arnold

88

Well Owner's Guide To Water Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

's groundwater and guidelines, including national drinking water standards, to test well water to insure safe drinking water in private wells. National drinking water standards and common methods of home water .....................22 Contaminants in Water........................................23 Drinking Water Guidelines

Fay, Noah

89

Meals included in Conference Registrations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Meals included in Conference Registrations Meals included as part of the cost of a conference the most reasonable rates are obtained. Deluxe hotels and motels should be avoided. GSA rates have been for Georgia high cost areas. 75% of these amounts would be $21 for non- high cost areas and $27 for high cost

Arnold, Jonathan

90

Influence of intrafraction motion on margins for prostate radiotherapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To assess the impact of intrafraction intervention on margins for prostate radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Eleven supine prostate patients with three implanted transponders were studied. The relative transponder positions were monitored for 8 min and combined with previously measured data on prostate position relative to skin marks. Margins were determined for situations of (1) skin-based positioning, and (2) pretreatment transponder positioning. Intratreatment intervention was simulated assuming conditions of (1) continuous tracking, and (2) a 3-mm threshold for position correction. Results: For skin-based setup without and with inclusion of intrafraction motion, prostate treatments would have required average margins of 8.0, 7.3, and 10.0 mm and 8.2, 10.2, and 12.5 mm, about the left-right, anterior-posterior, and cranial-caudal directions, respectively. Positioning by prostate markers at the start of the treatment fraction reduced these values to 1.8, 5.8, and 7.1 mm, respectively. Interbeam adjustment further reduced margins to an average of 1.4, 2.3, and 1.8 mm. Intrabeam adjustment yielded margins of 1.3, 1.5, and 1.5 mm, respectively. Conclusion: Significant reductions in margins might be achieved by repositioning the patient before each beam, either radiographically or electromagnetically. However, 2 of the 11 patients would have benefited from continuous target tracking and threshold-based intervention.

Litzenberg, Dale W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)]. E-mail: litzen@umich.edu; Balter, James M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Hadley, Scott W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Sandler, Howard M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Willoughby, Twyla R. [M.D. Anderson Cancer Center Orlando, Orlando, FL (United States); Kupelian, Patrick A. [M.D. Anderson Cancer Center Orlando, Orlando, FL (United States); Levine, Lisa [Calypso Medical Technologies, Seattle, WA (United States)

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

On the marginal instability threshold condition of the aperiodic ordinary mode  

SciTech Connect

The purely growing ordinary (O) mode instability has recently received renewed attention owing to its potential applicability to the solar wind plasma. Here, an analytical marginal instability condition is derived for counter-streaming bi-Maxwellian plasma particle distribution functions. The derived marginal instability condition as a function of the temperature anisotropy and plasma beta agrees remarkably well with the numerically determined instability condition. The existence of a new instability domain of the O-mode at small plasma beta values is confirmed with the leading A??{sub ?}{sup ?1}-dependence, if the counter-stream parameter P{sub e} exceeds a critical value. At small plasma beta values at large enough counter-stream parameter, the O-mode also operates for temperature anisotropies A?=?T{sub ?}/T{sub ?}?>?1 even larger than unity, as the parallel counter-stream free energy exceeds the perpendicular bi-Maxwellian free energy.

Schlickeiser, R. [Institut für Theoretische Physik, Lehrstuhl IV: Weltraum- and Astrophysik, Ruhr-Universität, 44780 Bochum (Germany); Yoon, P. H. [Institute for Physical Science and Technology, University of Maryland, College Park, 20742 Maryland (United States); School of Space Research, Kyung Hee University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

92

NETL: News Release - Ultra-low Cost Well Monitoring Could Save Thousands of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

January 19, 2005 January 19, 2005 Ultra-low Cost Well Monitoring Could Save Thousands of Marginal Oil Wells DOE-funded Project in California Tested Successfully TULSA, OKLA. - A new, ultra-low cost method for monitoring marginal oil wells promises to help rescue thousands of U.S. wells from an early demise. Developed with funding from the Department of Energy (DOE) and project-managed by DOE's National Energy Technology Laboratory, this novel, inexpensive, monitoring-system prototype helps improve the efficiency of rod-pumped oil wells. The ultimate payoff for such an approach could be the recovery of millions of barrels of oil otherwise permanently lost while the United States watches its oil production continue to slide. MORE INFO Marginal Expense Oil Well Wireless Surveillance MEOWS -Phase II final technical report [PDF-294KB]

93

E-Print Network 3.0 - adjacent continental margin Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

adjacent to the margin. The lack of these features is also characteristic of modern transform margins... -early Paleozoic southern Lau- rentian continental ... Source: Huerta,...

94

E-Print Network 3.0 - african continental margin Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sciences, University of Melbourne Collection: Geosciences 3 South Atlantic margins of Africa. page 1 South Atlantic continental margins of Africa Summary: The South Atlantic...

95

Economic design of wells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...year, c is the cost per lb of diesel fuel, and Co is the cost per...program was written in terms of diesel-powered wells, modifications...charac- teristics of pump-engine combinations and are again...water encountered. There is a fundamental difference between the design...

R. F. Stoner; D. M. Milne; P. J. Lund

96

1982 geothermal well drilling summary  

SciTech Connect

This summary lists all geothermal wells spudded in 1982, which were drilled to a depth of at least 2,000 feet. Tables 1 and 2 list the drilling information by area, operator, and well type. For a tabulation of all 1982 geothermal drilling activity, including holes less than 2,000 feet deep, readers are referred to the February 11, 1983, issue of Petroleum Information's ''National Geothermal Service.'' The number of geothermal wells drilled in 1982 to 2,000 feet or more decreased to 76 wells from 99 ''deep'' wells in 1981. Accordingly, the total 1982 footage drilled was 559,110 feet of hole, as compared to 676,127 feet in 1981. Most of the ''deep'' wells (49) completed were drilled for development purposes, mainly in The Geysers area of California. Ten field extension wells were drilled, of which nine were successful. Only six wildcat wells were drilled compared to 13 in 1980 and 20 in 1981, showing a slackening of exploration compared to earlier years. Geothermal drilling activity specifically for direct use projects also decreased from 1981 to 1982, probably because of the drastic reduction in government funding and the decrease in the price of oil. Geothermal power generation in 1982 was highlighted by (a) an increase of 110 Mw geothermal power produced at The Geysers (to a total of 1,019 Mw) by addition of Unit 17, and (b) by the start-up of the Salton Sea 10 Mw single flash power plant in the Imperial Valley, which brought the total geothermal electricity generation in this area to 31 Mw.

Parmentier, P.P.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Sedimentary sources of old high molecular weight dissolved organic carbon from the ocean margin benthic nepheloid layer  

SciTech Connect

Average {sup 14}C ages of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in the ocean are 3--6,000 years, and are influenced by old DOC from continental margins. However, sources of DOC from terrestrial, autochthonous, and sedimentary organic carbon seem to be too young to be responsible for the old DOC observed in the ocean. Since colloidal organic carbon (COC, i.e., high molecular weight DOC), which is chemically very similar to that of bulk DOC, can be effectively isolated from seawater using cross-flow ultrafiltration, it can hold clues to sources and pathways of DOC turnover in the ocean. Radiocarbon measurements on COC in the water column and benthic nepheloid layer (BNL) from two continental margin areas (the Middle Atlantic Bight and the Gulf of Mexico) and controlled laboratory experiments were carried out to study sources of old DOC in the ocean margin areas. Vertical distributions of suspended particulate matter (SPM), particulate organic carbon (POC), nitrogen (PON), and DOC in the water column and bottom waters near the sediment-water interface all demonstrate a well developed benthic nepheloid layer in both ocean margin areas. COC from the BNL was much older than COC from the overlying water column. These results, together with strong concentration gradients of SPM, POC, PON, and DOC, suggest a sedimentary source for organic carbon species and possibly for old COC as well in BNL waters. This is confirmed by the results from controlled laboratory experiments. The heterogeneity of {Delta}{sup 14}C signatures in bulk SOC thus points to a preferential release of old organic components from sediment resuspension, which can be the transport mechanism of the old benthic COC observed in ocean margin areas. Old COC from continental margin nepheloid layers may thus be a potential source of old DOC to the deep ocean.

Guo, L. Santschi, P.H.

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Sponsorship includes: Agriculture in the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sponsorship includes: · Agriculture in the Classroom · Douglas County Farm Bureau · Gifford Farm · University of Nebraska Agricultural Research and Development Center · University of Nebraska- Lincoln Awareness Coalition is to help youth, primarily from urban communities, become aware of agriculture

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

99

WELLNESS NETWORK SPRING 2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(20% response rate) Stratified by college/school & undergrad/grad #12;Included in the instrument.6 1.7 A verbal threat 18.1 11.8 14.2 Sexual touching w/out consent 2.0 6.4 4.7 Sexual penetration % Female % Total Sexual penetration without consent 0.7 2.0 1.5 Stalking 3.3 6.1 5.0 An emotionally abusive

Hofmann, Hans A.

100

Local well-posedness for Gross-Pitaevskii hierarchies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the Cauchy problem for the Gross-Pitaevskii infinite linear hierarchy of equations on $\\mathbb{R}^n.$ By introducing a (F)-norm in certain Sobolev type spaces of sequences of marginal density matrices, we establish local existence, uniqueness and stability of solutions. Explicit space-time type estimates for the solutions are obtained as well. In particular, this (F)-norm is compatible with the usual Sobolev space norm whenever the initial data is factorized.

Zeqian Chen

2010-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including marginal wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Acoustic well cleaner  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus are disclosed for cleaning the wellbore and the near wellbore region. A sonde is provided which is adapted to be lowered into a borehole and which includes a plurality of acoustic transducers arranged around the sonde. Electrical power provided by a cable is converted to acoustic energy. The high intensity acoustic energy directed to the borehole wall and into the near wellbore region, redissolves or resuspends the material which is reducing the permeability of the formation and/or restricting flow in the wellbore.

Maki, Jr., Voldi E. (11904 Bell Ave., Austin, TX 78759-2415); Sharma, Mukul M. (Dept. of Petroleum Engr. Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX 78712)

1997-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

102

Appendix F Cultural Resources, Including  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Appendix F Appendix F Cultural Resources, Including Section 106 Consultation STATE OF CALIFORNIA - THE RESOURCES AGENCY EDMUND G. BROWN, JR., Governor OFFICE OF HISTORIC PRESERVATION DEPARTMENT OF PARKS AND RECREATION 1725 23 rd Street, Suite 100 SACRAMENTO, CA 95816-7100 (916) 445-7000 Fax: (916) 445-7053 calshpo@parks.ca.gov www.ohp.parks.ca.gov June 14, 2011 Reply in Reference To: DOE110407A Angela Colamaria Loan Programs Office Environmental Compliance Division Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave SW, LP-10 Washington, DC 20585 Re: Topaz Solar Farm, San Luis Obispo County, California Dear Ms. Colamaria: Thank you for seeking my consultation regarding the above noted undertaking. Pursuant to 36 CFR Part 800 (as amended 8-05-04) regulations implementing Section

103

Altering Reservoir Wettability to Improve Production from Single Wells  

SciTech Connect

Many carbonate reservoirs are naturally fractured and typically produce less than 10% original oil in place during primary recovery. Spontaneous imbibition has proven an important mechanism for oil recovery from fractured reservoirs, which are usually weak waterflood candidates. In some situations, chemical stimulation can promote imbibition of water to alter the reservoir wettability toward water-wetness such that oil is produced at an economic rate from the rock matrix into fractures. In this project, cores and fluids from five reservoirs were used in laboratory tests: the San Andres formation (Fuhrman Masho and Eagle Creek fields) in the Permian Basin of Texas and New Mexico; and the Interlake, Stony Mountain, and Red River formations from the Cedar Creek Anticline in Montana and South Dakota. Solutions of nonionic, anionic, and amphoteric surfactants with formation water were used to promote waterwetness. Some Fuhrman Masho cores soaked in surfactant solution had improved oil recovery up to 38%. Most Eagle Creek cores did not respond to any of the tested surfactants. Some Cedar Creek anticline cores had good response to two anionic surfactants (CD 128 and A246L). The results indicate that cores with higher permeability responded better to the surfactants. The increased recovery is mainly ascribed to increased water-wetness. It is suspected that rock mineralogy is also an important factor. The laboratory work generated three field tests of the surfactant soak process in the West Fuhrman Masho San Andres Unit. The flawlessly designed tests included mechanical well clean out, installation of new pumps, and daily well tests before and after the treatments. Treatments were designed using artificial intelligence (AI) correlations developed from 23 previous surfactant soak treatments. The treatments were conducted during the last quarter of 2006. One of the wells produced a marginal volume of incremental oil through October. It is interesting to note that the field tests were conducted in an area of the field that has not met production expectations. The dataset on the 23 Phosphoria well surfactant soaks was updated. An analysis of the oil decline curves indicted that 4.5 lb of chemical produced a barrel of incremental oil. The AI analysis supports the adage 'good wells are the best candidates.' The generally better performance of surfactant in the high permeability core laboratory tests supports this observation. AI correlations were developed to predict the response to water-frac stimulations in a tight San Andres reservoir. The correlations maybe useful in the design of Cedar Creek Anticline surfactant soak treatments planned for next year. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance scans of dolomite cores to measure porosity and saturation during the high temperature laboratory work were acquired. The scans could not be correlated with physical measurement using either conventional or AI methods.

W. W. Weiss

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

104

RADIO EMISSION FROM INSTABILITIES IN SPACE PLASMAS: MARGINAL STABILITY,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I t RADIO EMISSION FROM INSTABILITIES IN SPACE PLASMAS: MARGINAL STABILITY, 4TOCHASTIC GROWTH emission, hich is an indirect emission process first discussed by Ginaburg and Zhe/eznyakoe, 9581, and electron cyclotron maser emission (ECME), which is a direct emission ess first discussed in the presently

Melrose, Don

105

Countries Gasoline Prices Including Taxes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Countries (U.S. dollars per gallon, including taxes) Countries (U.S. dollars per gallon, including taxes) Date Belgium France Germany Italy Netherlands UK US 01/13/14 7.83 7.76 7.90 8.91 8.76 8.11 3.68 01/06/14 8.00 7.78 7.94 8.92 8.74 8.09 3.69 12/30/13 NA NA NA NA NA NA 3.68 12/23/13 NA NA NA NA NA NA 3.63 12/16/13 7.86 7.79 8.05 9.00 8.78 8.08 3.61 12/9/13 7.95 7.81 8.14 8.99 8.80 8.12 3.63 12/2/13 7.91 7.68 8.07 8.85 8.68 8.08 3.64 11/25/13 7.69 7.61 8.07 8.77 8.63 7.97 3.65 11/18/13 7.99 7.54 8.00 8.70 8.57 7.92 3.57 11/11/13 7.63 7.44 7.79 8.63 8.46 7.85 3.55 11/4/13 7.70 7.51 7.98 8.70 8.59 7.86 3.61 10/28/13 8.02 7.74 8.08 8.96 8.79 8.04 3.64 10/21/13 7.91 7.71 8.11 8.94 8.80 8.05 3.70 10/14/13 7.88 7.62 8.05 8.87 8.74 7.97 3.69

106

New well control companies stress planning, engineering  

SciTech Connect

The technology for capping a blowing well has not changed during the last 50 years. Still, operators are finding new ways of using well control companies' expertise to help avoid potentially disastrous situations. This trend is especially critical given the current environmentally sensitive and cost-cutting times facing the oil industry. While regulatory agencies world-wide continue to hinder well control efforts during an offshore event, well control companies are focusing on technologies to make their job easier. Some of the most exciting are the hydraulic jet cutter, which gained fame in Kuwait, and electromagnetic ranging for drilling more accurate relief wells. With the number of subsea wells increasing, subsea intervention is a major target for future innovations. Well control companies are experiencing a change in their role to the offshore oil industry. Well control professionals discuss this expanded responsibility as well as other aspects of offshore blowouts including regulatory hindrances, subsea intervention and future technologies.

Bell, S.; Wright, R.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

System for stabbing well casing  

SciTech Connect

Apparatus for stabbing well casing to join casing sections to each other, includes a rotary table assembly for supporting a casing section in a well bore, a derrick over the rotary table assembly, a crown block at the top of the derrick, a first piston and cylinder subassembly pivotally mounted on one side of the derrick over the rotary table assembly and below the crown block for pivotation about a horizontal axis, a second piston and cylinder subassembly pivotally mounted on a second side of the derrick for pivotation about a horizontal axis. The second piston and cylinder subassembly is located over the rotary table assembly and below the crown block and extends substantially normal to the direction of extension of the first piston and cylinder subassembly. The cooperating casing clamping elements are carried on the piston rods of the first and second piston and cylinder subassemblies, and counter balancing subassemblies are connected to the first and second piston and cylinder subassemblies for pivoting the first and second piston and cylinder subassemblies to a vertically extending inoperative position.

McArthur, J.R.

1984-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

108

The wave energy resource along Australia’s Southern margin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Southern Australian margin is one of the most energetic regions in the world suitable for the extraction of waveenergy for electricity generation. We have produced a data set in which the deep-water waveenergy resource for the region is described by three representative deep-water wave states equivalent to the 10th 50th and 90th percentiles of the deep-water waveenergy flux derived from archives of the USA National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) WaveWatch III (NWW3) operational wavemodel. The Simulating WAves Nearshore (SWAN) wavemodel is then applied along the full Southern Australian margin to propagate these representative wave states into the near-shore region to quantify the effects of shallow water processes such as refraction shoaling and bottom friction. The waveenergy incident on the 25-m isobath ( ? 30 – 50 ? kW / m ) is approximately 35%–50% less than the World Energy Council estimates of offshore waveenergy but is approximately 20% greater than the energy observed from long-term buoy deployments on the midshelf. The latter discrepancy is attributed to an overestimation of significant wave height along the Southern Australian margin by the NWW3 model. The near-shore model applied in this study adequately simulates the attenuation of wave heights across the continental shelf when compared with estimates of wave height attenuation obtained from the Topex satellite altimeter. The attenuation of waveenergy across the continental shelf reduces the estimates of offshore waveenergy as given by the World Energy Council; however the waveenergy resource incident on the Southern Australian margin remains considerable. We estimate that if 10% of the incident near-shore energy in this region which is an ambitious target when conversion efficiency is considered were converted to electricity approximately 130 TW?h/yr (one-half of Australia’s total present-day electricity consumption) would be produced.

M. A. Hemer; D. A. Griffin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Reporting on Marginal Lands for Bioenergy Feedstock Production: a Modest Proposal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Since the 1930s, the use of the term “marginal land(s)” or “marginal soil(s)” in the scientific literature has steadily increased based on our review of the literature (Fig. 1...), although prior to 2005, this in...

Brian K. Richards; Cathelijne R. Stoof; Ian J. Cary…

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

WHAT GOOD IS WEALTH WITHOUT HEALTH? THE EFFECT OF HEALTH ON THE MARGINAL UTILITY OF CONSUMPTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We estimate how the marginal utility of consumption varies with health. To do so, we develop a simple model in which the impact of health on the marginal utility of consumption can be estimated from data on permanent income, ...

Finkelstein, Amy

111

Bioenergy crop productivity and potential climate change mitigation from marginal lands in the United States: An  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bioenergy crop productivity and potential climate change mitigation from marginal lands bioenergy crops grown on marginal lands in the United States. Two broadly tested cellulosic crops June 2014 Introduction Bioenergy, an important renewable energy produced from biological materials

Zhuang, Qianlai

112

Single-Well and Cross-Well Seismic At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Single-Well and Cross-Well Seismic At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Single-Well and Cross-Well Seismic At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Single-Well and Cross-Well Seismic At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Salt Wells Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Activity Date 2008 - 2008 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Vulcan increased exploration efforts in the summer and fall of 2008, during which time the company drilled two temperature gradient holes (86-15 O on Pad 1 and 17-16 O on Pad 3); conducted seismic, gravity and magnetotelluric surveys; and drilled deep exploration wells at Pads 6 and 8 and binary

113

Bounds for cell entries in contingency tables given marginal totals and decomposable graphs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...clique Ci , hence the marginals nS2 , ... , nSp will also be fixed...is presented below in pseudo-code. With every clique C...nCp , the marginals nS2 , ... , nSq will also be fixed...This implies that the marginals nS2 , ... , nSq will be fixed once...

Adrian Dobra; Stephen E. Fienberg

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Kimberly Well - Borehole Geophysics Database  

SciTech Connect

The Snake River Plain (SRP), Idaho, hosts potential geothermal resources due to elevated groundwater temperatures associated with the thermal anomaly Yellowstone-Snake River hotspot. Project HOTSPOT has coordinated international institutions and organizations to understand subsurface stratigraphy and assess geothermal potential. Over 5.9km of core were drilled from three boreholes within the SRP in an attempt to acquire continuous core documenting the volcanic and sedimentary record of the hotspot: (1) Kimama, (2) Kimberly, and (3) Mountain Home. The Kimberly drill hole was selected to document continuous volcanism when analysed in conjunction with the Kimama and is located near the margin of the plain. Data submitted by project collaborator Doug Schmitt, University of Alberta

John Shervais

2011-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

115

Complex shell model representation including antibound states  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A generalization of the complex shell model formalism is presented that includes antibound states in the basis. These states, together with bound states, Gamow states, and the continuum background, represented by properly chosen scattering waves, form a representation in which all states are treated on the same footing. Two-particle states are evaluated within this formalism, and observable two-particle resonances are defined. The formalism is illustrated in the well-known case of Li11 in its bound ground state and in Ca70(g.s.), which is also bound. Both cases are found to have a halo structure. These halo structures are described within the generalized complex shell model. We investigated the formation of two-particle resonances in these nuclei, but no evidence of such resonances was found.

R. Id Betan; R. J. Liotta; N. Sandulescu; T. Vertse; R. Wyss

2005-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

116

Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization Case Study: Selection of Electrical Equipment to Be Subjected to Environmental Qualification  

SciTech Connect

The Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) pathway of the DOE’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) program focuses on advancing the state of the art in safety analysis and risk assessment to support decision-making on nuclear power plant operation well beyond the originally designed lifetime of the plants (i.e., beyond 60 years). Among the issues being addressed in RISMC is the significance of SSC aging and how confident we are about our understanding of its impact on the margin between the loads SSCs are expected to see during normal operation and accident conditions, and the SSC capacities (their ability to resist those loads) as the SSCs age. In this paper, a summary is provided of a case study that examines SSC aging from an environmental qualification (EQ) perspective. The case study illustrates how the state of knowledge regarding SSC margin can be characterized given the overall integrated plant design, and was developed to demonstrate a method for deciding on which cables to focus, which cables are not so important from an environmental qualification margin standpoint, and what plant design features or operating characteristics determine the role that environmental qualification plays in establishing a safety case on which decisions regarding margin can be made. The selection of cables for which demonstration of margin with respect to aging and environmental challenges uses a technique known as Prevention Analysis. Prevention Analysis is a Boolean method for optimal selection of SSCs (that is, those combinations of SSCs both necessary and sufficient to meet a predetermined selection criterion) in a manner that allows demonstration that plant-level safety can be demonstrated by the collection of selected SSCs alone. Choosing the set of SSCs that is necessary and sufficient to satisfy the safety objectives, and demonstrating that the safety objectives can be met effectively, determines where resources are best allocated to assure SSC performance margin. The paper describes the resulting component types that were selected by Prevention Analysis and identifies the accident sequence characteristics that cause these component types to be important from an EQ and aging perspective (and, hence, worthwhile evaluating the extent of safety margin). In addition, component types not selected as needing significant margin from an EQ and aging perspective are discussed and an engineering rationale is developed justifying the lack of need to apply resources to demonstrating margin for these component types. This rationale is in terms of design features of the plant and operating characteristics that make these component types less important from an EQ and aging perspective. While the case study focuses on EQ and aging of equipment and cables located inside the containment of this PWR, the prevention analysis method is demonstrated to be an effective technique for identification of minimal collections of components that would be effective in managing safety for a variety of issues associated with aging and long-term operation of the fleet of plants.

D. P. Blanchard; R. W. Youngblood

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Well-pump alignment system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved well-pump for geothermal wells, an alignment system for a well-pump, and to a method for aligning a rotor and stator within a well-pump are disclosed, wherein the well-pump has a whistle assembly formed at a bottom portion thereof, such that variations in the frequency of the whistle, indicating misalignment, may be monitored during pumping. 6 figs.

Drumheller, D.S.

1998-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

118

Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Risk-Informed Safety Margins Characterization (RISMC) PathwayTechnical Program Plan  

SciTech Connect

Safety is central to the design, licensing, operation, and economics of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). As the current Light Water Reactor (LWR) NPPs age beyond 60 years, there are possibilities for increased frequency of Systems, Structures, and Components (SSCs) degradations or failures that initiate safety-significant events, reduce existing accident mitigation capabilities, or create new failure modes. Plant designers commonly “over-design” portions of NPPs and provide robustness in the form of redundant and diverse engineered safety features to ensure that, even in the case of well-beyond design basis scenarios, public health and safety will be protected with a very high degree of assurance. This form of defense-in-depth is a reasoned response to uncertainties and is often referred to generically as “safety margin.” Historically, specific safety margin provisions have been formulated, primarily based on “engineering judgment.”

Curtis Smith; Cristian Rabiti; Richard Martineau

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Variability of geochemical properties in a microbially dominated coalbed gas system from the eastern margin of the Illinois Basin, USA  

SciTech Connect

This study outlines gas characteristics along the southeastern margins of the Illinois Basin and evaluates regional versus local gas variations in Seelyville and Springfield coal beds. Our findings suggest that high permeability and shallow (100–250 m) depths of these Indiana coals allowed inoculation with methanogenic microbial consortia, thus leading to widespread microbial methane generation along the eastern marginal part of the Illinois Basin. Low maturity coals in the Illinois Basin with a vitrinite reflectance Ro~0.6% contain significant amounts of coal gas (~3 m3/t, 96 scf/t) with ?97 vol.% microbial methane. The amount of coal gas can vary significantly within a coal seam both in a vertical seam section as well as laterally from location to location. Therefore sampling of an entire core section is required for accurate estimates of coal gas reserves.

Strapoc, D.; Mastalerz, M.; Schimmelmann, A.; Drobniak, A.; Hedges, S.W.

2008-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

120

Health And Wellness Department Of Health And Wellness  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Health And Wellness Department Of Health And Wellness Lutchmie Narine, Chair, 315-443-9630 426 The Department of Health and Wellness offers a 123-credit Bachelor of Science degree (B.S.) in public health. Our graduates are prepared to work in community health education and health promotion in public health agencies

McConnell, Terry

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including marginal wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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121

Small-angle scattering in a marginal Fermi liquid  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We study the magnetotransport properties of a model of small-angle scattering in a marginal Fermi liquid. Such a model has been proposed by Varma and Abrahams [Phys. Rev. Lett. 86, 4652 (2001)] to account for the anomalous temperature dependence of in-plane magnetotransport properties of the high-Tc cuprates. We study the resistivity, Hall angle, and magnetoresistance using both analytical and numerical techniques. We find that small-angle scattering only generates a difference in temperature dependence between the inverse Hall angle and the resistivity near particle-hole symmetric Fermi surfaces where the conventional Hall term vanishes. The magnetoresistance always shows Kohler’s rule behavior.

E. C. Carter and A. J. Schofield

2002-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

122

Exploratory Well | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Exploratory Well Exploratory Well Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Exploratory Well Details Activities (8) Areas (3) Regions (0) NEPA(5) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Drilling Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Exploration Drilling Parent Exploration Technique: Exploration Drilling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Can provide core or cuttings Stratigraphic/Structural: Identify stratigraphy and structural features within a well Hydrological: -Water samples can be used for geochemical analysis -Fluid pressures can be used to estimate flow rates Thermal: -Temperatures can be measured within the hole -Information about the heat source Dictionary.png Exploratory Well: An exploratory well is drilled for the purpose of identifying the

123

Ultra Thin Quantum Well Materials  

SciTech Connect

This project has enabled Hi-Z technology Inc. (Hi-Z) to understand how to improve the thermoelectric properties of Si/SiGe Quantum Well Thermoelectric Materials. The research that was completed under this project has enabled Hi-Z Technology, Inc. (Hi-Z) to satisfy the project goal to understand how to improve thermoelectric conversion efficiency and reduce costs by fabricating ultra thin Si/SiGe quantum well (QW) materials and measuring their properties. In addition, Hi-Z gained critical new understanding on how thin film fabrication increases the silicon substrate's electrical conductivity, which is important new knowledge to develop critical material fabrication parameters. QW materials are constructed with alternate layers of an electrical conductor, SiGe and an electrical insulator, Si. Film thicknesses were varied, ranging from 2nm to 10nm where 10 nm was the original film thickness prior to this work. The optimum performance was determined at a Si and SiGe thickness of 4nm for an electrical current and heat flow parallel to the films, which was an important conclusion of this work. Essential new information was obtained on how the Si substrate electrical conductivity increases by up to an order of magnitude upon deposition of QW films. Test measurements and calculations are accurate and include both the quantum well and the substrate. The large increase in substrate electrical conductivity means that a larger portion of the electrical current passes through the substrate. The silicon substrate's increased electrical conductivity is due to inherent impurities and thermal donors which are activated during both molecular beam epitaxy and sputtering deposition of QW materials. Hi-Z's forward looking cost estimations based on future high performance QW modules, in which the best Seebeck coefficient and electrical resistivity are taken from separate samples predict that the electricity cost produced with a QW module could be achieved at <$0.35/W. This price would open many markets for waste heat recovery applications. By installing Hi-Z's materials in applications in which electricity could be produced from waste heat sources could result in significant energy savings as well as emissions reductions. For example, if QW thermoelectric generators could be introduced commercially in 2015, and assuming they could also capture an additional 0.1%/year of the available waste heat from the aluminum, steel, and iron industries, then by 2020, their use would lead to a 2.53 trillion Btu/year reduction in energy consumption. This translates to a $12.9 million/year energy savings, and 383.6 million lb's of CO2 emissions reduction per year. Additionally, Hi-Z would expect that the use of QW TE devices in the automotive, manufacturing, and energy generation industries would reduce the USA's petroleum and fossil fuel dependence, and thus significantly reduce emissions from CO2 and other polluting gasses such as NOx, SOx, and particulate matter (PM), etc.

Dr Saeid Ghamaty

2012-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

124

Toward a more rigorous application of margins and uncertainties within the nuclear weapons life cycle : a Sandia perspective.  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the conceptual framework that is being used to define quantification of margins and uncertainties (QMU) for application in the nuclear weapons (NW) work conducted at Sandia National Laboratories. The conceptual framework addresses the margins and uncertainties throughout the NW life cycle and includes the definition of terms related to QMU and to figures of merit. Potential applications of QMU consist of analyses based on physical data and on modeling and simulation. Appendix A provides general guidelines for addressing cases in which significant and relevant physical data are available for QMU analysis. Appendix B gives the specific guidance that was used to conduct QMU analyses in cycle 12 of the annual assessment process. Appendix C offers general guidelines for addressing cases in which appropriate models are available for use in QMU analysis. Appendix D contains an example that highlights the consequences of different treatments of uncertainty in model-based QMU analyses.

Klenke, Scott Edward; Novotny, George Charles; Paulsen Robert A., Jr.; Diegert, Kathleen V.; Trucano, Timothy Guy; Pilch, Martin M.

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Well Monitoring Systems for EGS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Well Monitoring Systems for EGS presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado.

126

Production Wells | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Production Wells Production Wells (Redirected from Development Wells) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Production Wells Details Activities (13) Areas (13) Regions (0) NEPA(7) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Drilling Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Development Drilling Parent Exploration Technique: Development Drilling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Drill cuttings are analyzed to determine lithology and mineralogy Stratigraphic/Structural: Fractures, faults, and geologic formations that the well passes through are identified and mapped. Hydrological: Identify aquifers, reservoir boundaries, flow rates, fluid pressure, and chemistry Thermal: Direct temperature measurements from within the reservoir

127

Production Wells | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Production Wells Production Wells Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Production Wells Details Activities (13) Areas (13) Regions (0) NEPA(7) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Drilling Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Development Drilling Parent Exploration Technique: Development Drilling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Drill cuttings are analyzed to determine lithology and mineralogy Stratigraphic/Structural: Fractures, faults, and geologic formations that the well passes through are identified and mapped. Hydrological: Identify aquifers, reservoir boundaries, flow rates, fluid pressure, and chemistry Thermal: Direct temperature measurements from within the reservoir Dictionary.png Production Wells:

128

Well Deepening | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Well Deepening Well Deepening Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Well Deepening Details Activities (5) Areas (3) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Drilling Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Development Drilling Parent Exploration Technique: Development Drilling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Drill cuttings are analyzed to determine lithology and mineralogy Stratigraphic/Structural: Fractures, faults, and geologic formations that the well passes through are identified and mapped. Hydrological: Identify aquifers, reservoir boundaries, flow rates, fluid pressure, and chemistry Thermal: Direct temperature measurements from within the reservoir Dictionary.png Well Deepening:

129

Observation Wells | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Observation Wells Observation Wells Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Observation Wells Details Activities (7) Areas (7) Regions (0) NEPA(15) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Drilling Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Development Drilling Parent Exploration Technique: Development Drilling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Total dissolved solids, fluid pressure, flow rates, and flow direction Thermal: Monitors temperature of circulating fluids Dictionary.png Observation Wells: An observation well is used to monitor important hydrologic parameters in a geothermal system that can indicate performance, longevity, and transient processes. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle

130

Procedures in Modules (1) Including all procedures within modules  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Procedures in Modules (1) Including all procedures within modules works very well in almost all designing these if possible #12;Procedures in Modules (2) These are very much like internal procedures Works very well in almost all programs Everything accessible in the module can also be used in the procedure

131

well records | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

well records well records Dataset Summary Description The Alabama State Oil and Gas Board publishes well record permits to the public as they are approved. This dataset is comprised of 50 recent well record permits from 2/9/11 - 3/18/11. The dataset lists the well name, county, operator, field, and date approved, among other fields. State's make oil and gas data publicly available for a range of topics. Source Geological Survey of Alabama Date Released February 09th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated March 18th, 2011 (3 years ago) Keywords Alabama board gas oil state well records Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon Well records 2/9/11 - 3/18/11 (xls, 28.7 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period License License Open Data Commons Attribution License

132

Fast prediction of transient stability margin in systems with SVC control and HVDC link  

SciTech Connect

Recent developments in transient stability margin (TSM) prediction using the energy-based direct method have included excitation controllers, power system stabilizers (PSSs) and/or static VAr compensators (SVCs). These devices can be represented in their detailed dynamic models to desired degrees of complexity while the proposed extended equal-area criterion can still be effectively applied. This paper describes further development of this technique to incorporate an HVDC transmission into the test network for TSM prediction. The method is examined with a practical 17-machine power network representing the South China/Hong Kong system. An SVC control scheme is also installed in a weak bus of the test network for transient stability improvement. The results obtained show that there is no sacrifice in accuracy, speed or reliability of the TSM method with SVC and HVDC realistically incorporated into the study.

Tso, S.K. [City Univ. of Hong Kong (Hong Kong). Dept. of Manufacturing Engineering; Cheung, S.P. [ABB Transmission and Distribution Ltd., Hong Kong (Hong Kong). Dept. of Power Systems

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

133

Fracturing pressures and near-well fracture geometry of arbitrarily oriented and horizontal wells  

SciTech Connect

The hydraulic fracturing of arbitrarily oriented and horizontal wells is made challenging by the far more complicated near-well fracture geometry compared to that of conventional vertical wells. This geometry is important both for hydraulic fracture propagation and the subsequent post-treatment well performance. Fracture tortuosity of arbitrarily oriented and horizontal wells is likely to cause large initiation pressures and reduction in the fracture widths. This paper presents a comprehensive study of the effects of important variables, including the principal stresses, wellbore orientation, and perforation configuration on fracture geometry. Initiation pressures, the contact between arbitrarily oriented wells and the fracture plane, and the near-well fracture geometry are determined and discussed. This study also shows that because of the near-well stress concentration the fracture width at the wellbore is always smaller than the maximum fracture width. This can have important consequences during hydraulic fracturing.

Chen, Z.; Economides, M.J.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

134

Third invitational well-testing symposium: well testing in low permeability environments  

SciTech Connect

The testing of low permeability rocks is common to waste disposal, fossil energy resource development, underground excavation, and geothermal energy development. This document includes twenty-six papers and abstracts, divided into the following sessions: opening session, case histories and related phenomena, well test design in low permeability formations, analysis and interpretation of well test data, and instrumentation for well tests. Separate abstracts were prepared for 15 of the 16 papers; the remaining paper has been previously abstracted. (DLC)

Doe, T.W.; Schwarz, W.J. (eds.)

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Well Monitoring System for EGS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

EGS well monitoring tools offer a unique set of solutions which will lower costs and increase confidence in future geothermal projects.

136

Apparatus for stringing well pipe of casing  

SciTech Connect

An apparatus for use in running a string of threaded well pipe or casing in a vertical configuration in a deep well bore which is adapted to convert a top head drive drilling rig for use in running each length of pipe into the well bore. A drive spindle adaptor is provided which may be securely attached in a removably mounted manner to the rotary drive spindle or sub of a top head drive drilling rig. The drive spindle includes a pair of opposing, outwardly extending lugs disposed at a right angle to the axial direction of the spindle and a true centering guide means. A collar is included which is provided with frictional gripping members for removably securing the collar to one end of a length of conventional pipe and a pair of axially extending, spaced ears which cooperate upon engagement with said lugs on said spindle adaptor to transfer rotary motion of said spindle to said length of pipe.

Sexton, J.L.

1984-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

137

ELSEVIER Earth and Planetary Science Letters I56 (1998) 239-252 Gravity anomalies and segmentation of the continental margin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in extensional regions. Like many margins, the edge effect `high' offshore Gabon. West Africa is located at the shelf break in the region of maximum sediment thickness. Gabon differs, however, from other margins along-strike of the Gabon margin and that passive margins may be highly segmented as regards their long

Watts, A. B. "Tony"

138

Geothermal-Reservoir Well-Stimulation Program. Program status report  

SciTech Connect

Seven experimental fracture stimulation treatments completed to date and the laboratory work performed to develop the stimulation technology are described. A discussion of the pre-stimulation and post-stimulation data and their evaluation is provided for each experiment. Six of the seven stimulation experiments were at least technically successful in stimulating the wells. The two fracture treatments in East Mesa 58-30 more than doubled the producing rate of the previously marginal producer. The two fracture treatments in Raft River and the two in Baca were all successful in obtaining significant production from previously nonproductive intervals. However, these treatments failed to establish commercial production due to deficiencies in either fluid temperature or flow rate. The acid etching treatment in the well at The Geysers did not have any material effect on producing rate.

Not Available

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Establishment of an Industry-Driven Consortium Focused on Improving the Production Performance of Domestic Stripper Wells  

SciTech Connect

The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) established a national industry-driven Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) that is focused on improving the production performance of domestic petroleum and/or natural gas stripper wells. The consortium creates a partnership with the U.S. petroleum and natural gas producers, trade associations, state funding agencies, academia, and the National Energy Technology Laboratory. This report serves as the ninth quarterly technical progress report for the SWC. Key activities for this reporting period include: (1) Develop and process subcontract awards for the nine projects selected at the 2006 Spring meeting; (2) Continue distribution of the DVD on ''Independent Oil: Rediscovering American's Forgotten Wells''; (3) Improving communications; (4) New member recruitment; (5) Identify SWC projects to be showcased for booth exhibition, preparing an exhibit, promoting and marketing for the 2006 Oklahoma Oil and Gas Trade Expo organized by the OK Marginal Well Commission, Oklahoma City, OK; and (6) Identify projects and draft agenda for the fall technical workshop in Pittsburgh, PA.

Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

140

E-Print Network 3.0 - appalachian margin foundering Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

margin foundering Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Appalachian State University Foundation, Inc. Monthly Payroll Deduction Form (A-3) Summary: Appalachian State University...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including marginal wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Geology of the San Diego margin, Carlsbad to La Jolla, San Diego County, California.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Geophysical interpretation of nearly 800 line km of various types of seismic reflection data along the San Diego margin between Carlsbad and San Diego was… (more)

Webb, James Franklin

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

E-Print Network 3.0 - australian continental margin Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to study cool-water carbonate facies... -water carbonate continental margin, Eucla Basin, western Great Australian Bight. Geology, 23:427-430. Feary, D... of the Ocean...

143

Treatment of Passive Component Reliability in Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization FY 2010 Report  

SciTech Connect

The Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) pathway is a set of activities defined under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program. The overarching objective of RISMC is to support plant life-extension decision-making by providing a state-of-knowledge characterization of safety margins in key systems, structures, and components (SSCs). A technical challenge at the core of this effort is to establish the conceptual and technical feasibility of analyzing safety margin in a risk-informed way, which, unlike conventionally defined deterministic margin analysis, is founded on probabilistic characterizations of SSC performance.

Robert W Youngblood

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

E-Print Network 3.0 - atlantic passive margin Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and the Cretaceous to Summary: stress evolution of the Equatorial Atlantic margin of Africa Supervisors: Graeme Eagles and Peter Burgess... Project Description The African...

145

E-Print Network 3.0 - african equatorial margin Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Leone to Togo-Benin has been... stress evolution of the Equatorial Atlantic margin of Africa Supervisors: Graeme Eagles and Peter Burgess... , if available, subsurface data from...

146

Quantum well multijunction photovoltaic cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A monolithic, quantum well, multilayer photovoltaic cell comprises a p-n junction comprising a p-region on one side and an n-region on the other side, each of which regions comprises a series of at least three semiconductor layers, all p-type in the p-region and all n-type in the n-region; each of said series of layers comprising alternating barrier and quantum well layers, each barrier layer comprising a semiconductor material having a first bandgap and each quantum well layer comprising a semiconductor material having a second bandgap when in bulk thickness which is narrower than said first bandgap, the barrier layers sandwiching each quantum well layer and each quantum well layer being sufficiently thin that the width of its bandgap is between said first and second bandgaps, such that radiation incident on said cell and above an energy determined by the bandgap of the quantum well layers will be absorbed and will produce an electrical potential across said junction.

Chaffin, Roger J. (Albuquerque, NM); Osbourn, Gordon C. (Albuquerque, NM)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Pressure analysis for horizontal wells  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents horizontal-well test design and interpretation methods. Analytical solutions are developed that can be handled easily by a desktop computer to carry out design as well as interpretation with semilog and log-log analysis. These analytical solutions point out the distinctive behavior of horizontal wells: (1) at early time, there is a circular radial flow in a vertical plane perpendicular to the well, and (2) at late time, there is a horizontal pseudoradial flow. Each type of flow is associated with a semilog straight line to which semilog analysis has to be adapted. The horizontal pseudoradial flow takes into account a pseudoskin depending on system geometry, which is a priori defined and estimated. Practical time criteria are proposed to determine the beginning and the end of each type of flow and to provide a guide to semilog analysis and well test design. The authors study the behavior of uniform-flux or infinite-conductivity horizontal wells, with wellbore storage and skin. The homogeneous reservoir is infinite or limited by impermeable or constant-pressure boundaries. A method is also outlined to transform all our solutions for homogeneous reservoirs into corresponding solutions for double-porosity reservoirs.

Davlau, F.; Mouronval, G.; Bourdarot, G.; Curutchet, P.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Seismotectonics of the Coso Range-Indian Wells Valley region, California:  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Seismotectonics of the Coso Range-Indian Wells Valley region, California: Transtensional deformation along the southeastern margin of the Sierra Nevada microplate Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Seismotectonics of the Coso Range-Indian Wells Valley region, California: Transtensional deformation along the southeastern margin of the Sierra Nevada microplate Abstract not available Authors Jeffrey R. Unruh, Egill Hauksson, Francis C. Monastero and Robert J. Twiss and Jonathan C. Lewis Published Journal Geological Society of America, 2002 DOI 10.1130/0-8137-1195-9.277 Online Internet link for Seismotectonics of the Coso Range-Indian Wells Valley region, California: Transtensional deformation along the

149

Optimization of fractured well performance of horizontal gas wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

................................................24 3.4 Ideal Number of Transverse Fractures..........................................26 3.5 Constant Volume Transverse Fractures ........................................32 3.6... of a longitudinal fracture..............................................10 2.5 Example of horizontal well with longitudinal fracture performance .............11 2.6 DVS representation of transverse fractures...

Magalhaes, Fellipe Vieira

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

150

Well record | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Well record Well record Dataset Summary Description This dataset contains oil and gas drilling and permit records for February 2011. State oil and gas boards and commissions make oil and gas data and information open to the public. To view the full range of data contained at the Alaska Oil and Gas Conservation Commission, visit http://doa.alaska.gov/ogc/ Source Alaska Oil and Gas Conservation Commission Date Released February 28th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords Alaska Commission gas oil Well record Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon http://doa.alaska.gov/ogc/drilling/dindex.html (xls, 34.3 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Monthly Time Period License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL)

151

Gas well operation with liquid production  

SciTech Connect

Prediction of liquid loading in gas wells is discussed in terms of intersecting tubing or system performance curves with IPR curves and by using a more simplified critical velocity relationship. Different methods of liquid removal are discussed including such methods as intermittent lift, plunger lift, use of foam, gas lift, and rod, jet, and electric submersible pumps. Advantages, disadvantages, and techniques for design and application of the methods of liquid removal are discussed.

Lea, J.F.; Tighe, R.E.

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Bounding the marginal cost of producing potable water including the use of seawater desalinization as a backstop potable water production technology  

SciTech Connect

The analysis presented in this technical report should allow for the creation of high, medium, and low cost potable water prices for GCAM. Seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO) based desalinization should act as a backstop for the cost of producing potable water (i.e., the literature seems clear that SWRO should establish an upper bound for the plant gate cost of producing potable water). Transporting water over significant distances and having to lift water to higher elevations to reach end-users can also have a significant impact on the cost of producing water. The three potable fresh water scenarios describe in this technical report are: low cost water scenario ($0.10/m3); medium water cost scenario ($1.00/m3); and high water cost scenario ($2.50/m3).

Dooley, James J.

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Marginal formations of the last Kara and Barents ice sheets in northern European Russia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Marginal formations of the last Kara and Barents ice sheets in northern European Russia VALERY I): Marginal formations of the last Kara and Barents ice sheets in northern European Russia. Boreas, Vol. 28, pp. 23­45. Oslo. ISSN 0300-9483. Glacial landforms in northern Russia, from the Timan Ridge

Ingólfsson, �lafur

154

100,000 Years of African monsoon variability recorded in sediments of the Nile margin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

100,000 Years of African monsoon variability recorded in sediments of the Nile margin Marie Revel a in hemipelagic sediments deposited on the Nile margin in order to reconstruct Nile River palaeohydrological. This allows the use of a high-resolution continuous Fe record as a proxy of Blue Nile sediment input over

Demouchy, Sylvie

155

A Package to Set Margins to Full Page Patrick W. Daly  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) for 1 inch % cm for 1.5 cm % plain (default) sets \\pagestyle{plain the margins to one inch; cmsets the margins to 1.5 cm (one centimeter is really too little); plain(default) selects the plain page style, i.e., with no headers but only a footer; emptyfor neither

Mintmire, John W.

156

Reporting on marginal lands for bioenergy feedstock production -a modest proposal Brian K. Richards1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Reporting on marginal lands for bioenergy feedstock production - a modest proposal Brian K.edu ---PREPRINT In press 2014, BioEnergy Research --- Abstract Growing bioenergy feedstocks can provide a long research. Using marginal lands for bioenergy feedstock production Discussions of renewable bioenergy

Walter, M.Todd

157

The Continental Margin is a Key Source of Iron to the HNLC North Pacific Ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Continental Margin is a Key Source of Iron to the HNLC North Pacific Ocean Phoebe J. Lam1 concentrations in the upper 500m of the Western Subarctic Pacific, an iron-limited High Nutrient Low Chlorophyll a key source of bioavailable Fe to the HNLC North Pacific. Keywords: iron, continental margin, HNLC 1

158

Well-test data from geothermal reservoirs  

SciTech Connect

Extensive well testing in geothermal resources has been carried out throughout the western United States and in northern Mexico since 1975. Each resource tested and each well test conducted by LBL during the eight-year period are covered in brief. The information, collected from published reports and memoranda, includes test particulars, special instrumentation, data interpretation when available, and plots of actual data. Brief geologic and hydrologic descriptions of the geothermal resources are also presented. The format is such that well test descriptions are grouped, in the order performed, into major sections according to resource, each section containing a short resource description followed by individual test details. Additional information regarding instrumentation is provided. Source documentation is provided throughout to facilitate access to further information and raw data.

Bodvarsson, M.G.; Benson, S.M.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Risk of Local Failure in Breast Cancer Patients With Lobular Carcinoma In Situ at the Final Surgical Margins: Is Re-excision Necessary?  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To compare the outcome of patients with invasive breast cancer both with and without lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS)-positive/close surgical margins after breast-conserving treatment. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively studied 2358 patients with T1-T2 invasive breast cancer treated with lumpectomy and radiation therapy from January 1980 to December 2009. Median age was 57 years (range, 24-91 years). There were 82 patients (3.5%) with positive/close LCIS margins (<0.2 cm) and 2232 patients (95.7%) with negative margins. A total of 1789 patients (76%) had negative lymph nodes. Patients who received neoadjuvant chemotherapy were excluded. A total of 1783 patients (76%) received adjuvant systemic therapy. Multivariable analysis (MVA) was performed using Cox's proportional hazards model. Results: The 5-year cumulative incidence of locoregional recurrence (LRR) was 3.2% (95% confidence interval [CI] 2.5%-4.1%) for the 2232 patients with LCIS-negative surgical margins (median follow-up 104 months) and 2.8% (95% CI 0.7%-10.8%) for the 82 patients with LCIS-positive/close surgical margins (median follow-up 90 months). This was not statistically significant (P=.5). On MVA, LCIS-positive margins after the final surgery were not associated with increased risk of LRR (hazard ratio [HR] 3.4, 95% CI 0.5-24.5, P=.2). Statistically significant prognostic variables on Cox's MVA for risk of LRR included systemic therapy (HR 0.5, 95% CI 0.33-0.75, P=.001), number of positive lymph nodes (HR 1.11, 95% CI 1.05-1.18, P=.001), menopausal status (HR 0.96, 95% CI 0.95-0.98, P=.001), and histopathologic grade (grade 3 vs grade 1/2) (HR 2.6, 95% CI 1.4-4.7, P=.003). Conclusion: Our results suggest that the presence of LCIS at the surgical margin after lumpectomy does not increase the risk of LRR or the final outcome. These findings suggest that re-excision or mastectomy in patients with LCIS-positive/close final surgical margins is unnecessary.

Sadek, Betro T.; Shenouda, Mina N.; Abi Raad, Rita F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Niemierko, Andrzej [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Statistics Section, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Keruakous, Amany R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Goldberg, Saveli I. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Statistics Section, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Taghian, Alphonse G., E-mail: ataghian@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

160

Development of a hybrid margin angle controller for HVDC continuous operation  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this paper is to present a new hybrid margin angle control method for HVDC continuous operation under AC system fault conditions. For stable continuous operation of HVDC systems, the margin angle controller must be designed to maintain the necessary margin angle to avoid commutation failures. The proposed method uses the open loop margin angle controller (MAC) as the basic controller, and adds output from the closed loop MAC to correct the control angle. A fast voltage detection algorithm is used for open loop control, and margin angle reference correction using harmonics detection for closed loop control are also developed. The combination of open and closed loop control provides quick responses when faults occur with stable and speedy recovery after fault clearance. The effectiveness of the developed controller is confirmed through EMTP digital simulations and also with the experiments using an analogue simulator.

Sato, M. [Kansai Electric Power Co., Osaka (Japan)] [Kansai Electric Power Co., Osaka (Japan); Yamaji, K. [Shikoku Electric Power Co., Takamatsu (Japan)] [Shikoku Electric Power Co., Takamatsu (Japan); Sekita, M. [Electric Power Development Co., Tokyo (Japan)] [Electric Power Development Co., Tokyo (Japan); Amano, M.; Nishimura, M.; Konishi, H.; Oomori, T. [Hitachi, Ltd. (Japan)] [Hitachi, Ltd. (Japan)

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including marginal wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Net Taxable Gasoline Gallons (Including Aviation Gasoline)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Net Taxable Gasoline Gallons (Including Aviation Gasoline) Period 2000 2001 (2) 2002 2003 2004 "gross" to "net" , was deemed impractical. (5) This report replaces the Gross Taxable Gasoline Gallons (Including Aviation Gasoline) report which will not be produced after December 2002. (6) The November 2007

162

Snubdrilling a new well in Venezuela  

SciTech Connect

A new well was successfully drilled using a snubbing jack. The drill bit was rotated using a rotary table, downhole motors and combination of the two. Expected high-pressure zones prompted this use of ``snubdrilling.`` The primary objective was to drill a vertical well through underlying sands and gain information about formation pressures. This data would aid in the drilling of a relief well using a conventional drilling rig. The secondary objective was to relieve pressure by putting this new well on production. In addition to special high-pressure drilling jobs, there are other drilling applications where snubbing jacks are a feasible alternative to conventional rotary drilling rigs or coiled tubing units. Slimhole, underbalanced and flow drilling, and sidetracking of existing wells are excellent applications for snubdrilling. Advantages of snubdrilling vs. coiled tubing drilling, include ability to rotate drillstrings, use high-torque downhole motors, pump at high rates and pressures, apply significant overpull in case of stuck pipe, and run casing and liners without rigging down. Shortcomings of drilling with snubbing jacks compared to coiled tubing are the need to stop circulation while making new connections and inability to run continuous cable inside workstrings.

Aasen, J.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization Methods Development Work  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the research activity developed during the Fiscal year 2014 within the Risk Informed Safety Margin and Characterization (RISMC) pathway within the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) campaign. This research activity is complementary to the one presented in the INL/EXT-??? report which shows advances Probabilistic Risk Assessment Analysis using RAVEN and RELAP-7 in conjunction to novel flooding simulation tools. Here we present several analyses that prove the values of the RISMC approach in order to assess risk associated to nuclear power plants (NPPs). We focus on simulation based PRA which, in contrast to classical PRA, heavily employs system simulator codes. Firstly we compare, these two types of analyses, classical and RISMC, for a Boiling water reactor (BWR) station black out (SBO) initiating event. Secondly we present an extended BWR SBO analysis using RAVEN and RELAP-5 which address the comments and suggestions received about he original analysis presented in INL/EXT-???. This time we focus more on the stochastic analysis such probability of core damage and on the determination of the most risk-relevant factors. We also show some preliminary results regarding the comparison between RELAP5-3D and the new code RELAP-7 for a simplified Pressurized Water Reactors system. Lastly we present some conceptual ideas regarding the possibility to extended the RISMC capabilities from an off-line tool (i.e., as PRA analysis tool) to an online-tool. In this new configuration, RISMC capabilities can be used to assist and inform reactor operator during real accident scenarios.

Smith, Curtis L; Ma, Zhegang; Tom Riley; Mandelli, Diego; Nielsen, Joseph W; Alfonsi, Andrea; Rabiti, Cristian

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Hydrocarbon potential of basins along Australia's southern margin  

SciTech Connect

Seven discrete sedimentary basins are recognized along the southern margin of the Australian continent; namely, from east to west, the Gippsland, Bass, Sorell, Otway, Duntroon, Bight, and Bremer. All formed since the Late Jurassic in response to the separation of Australia and Antarctica, and to the opening of the Tasman Sea. Only the Gippsland basin, which has proved initial oil reserves exceeding 3.6 billion barrels, is a prolific oil province. The search for oil in the other basins has been virtually fruitless despite many similarities between these basins and the Gippsland in terms of stratigraphy and structural geology. Rift and drift components are discernible in the sedimentary successions of all basins but the precise tectonic controls on respective basin formation remain conjectural. The lack of drilling success in the Bremer, Bight, Duntroon, Otway, and Sorell basins has been attributed mainly to the paucity of mature, oil-prone source rocks. The common occurrence of stranded bitumens along the entire coastline, however, indicates oil generation. The Bass and Gippsland basins are both characterized by excellent oil-prone source rocks developed in Late Cretaceous to Early Tertiary sediments. Limited exploration success in the Bass basin is due to poorer reservoir development. The Gippsland basin is at a mature stage of exploration whereas the other basins are moderately to very sparsely explored. Consequently, there is a comparable potential for undiscovered hydrocarbons in all basins. Success in the under-explored basins will come only to those prepared to challenge the perception of low prospectivity. Many play types remain to be tested by the drill.

Willink, R.J. (SAGASCO Resources Limited, Adelaide (Australia))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Energy characterisation of herbaceous biomasses irrigated with marginal waters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The paper reports the results of a research program aiming to evaluate the agronomic, and energy sustainability of the biomass production by perennial non-food herbaceous crops irrigated with different kinds of marginal waters. In four different sites (Bologna, Padova, Reggio Calabria, and Catania) the same four species (Arundo, Typha, Phragmites, and Lythrum), usually tested without irrigation, were planted and monitored during 2008–2010. The results show that a planting density of 10 m?2 is necessary to obtain a maximum dry yield levels already from the second year of transplanting. The maximum productivity was obtained with Arundo (close to 100 Mg ha?1 y?1 in Bologna and 86 Mg ha?1 y?1 in Padova, 50–60 Mg ha?1 y?1 in the southern locations). Lythrum productivity ranged from 5.2 to 9.2 Mg ha?1 y?1 in all the RUs, with the exception of Reggio Calabria. Typha (around 10 Mg ha?1 y?1 at the third year) and Phragmites (5–8 Mg ha?1 y?1) gave significant production only in the northern locations. The \\{HHVs\\} were close to 15.5 MJ kg?1 for Phragmites (except for Catania and Reggio Calabria with 20.0 MJ kg?1) 18.0 MJ kg?1 for the Arundo (except for Catania with 20.0 MJ kg?1), 18.5 MJ kg?1 for the Typha and Lythrum (except for Catania with 20.0 MJ kg?1).

Giovanni Molari; Mirco Milani; Attilio Toscano; Maurizio Borin; Giuseppe Taglioli; Giulia Villani; Demetrio Antonio Zema

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material, such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

167

A new well surveying tool  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

directional well was to tip the entire rig, then block up one side of the rotary table so as to incline the uppermost joint of the drill pipe. The accuracy obtained by this method left much to be desired. The technique of controlled directional drilling... by Surveying Device for S and 19 , N and 41 . 21 3. Comparison of Measured Angles and Angles Indicated by Surveying Device for NE snd 9 , W and 45 . . . . . . . ~ 22 ABSTRNl T Ever since the advent of rotary drilling the petroleum industry has been...

Haghighi, Manuchehr Mehdizabeh

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Health Education & Wellness - HPMC Occupational Health Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wellness Health Education & Wellness Health Education & Wellness Downloads & Patient Materials Health & Productivity Health Calculators & Logs Health Coaching Health Fairs and...

169

Method of drilling and casing a well  

SciTech Connect

A well drilling rig having a rotary table for driving a drill string rotatively and having jacking mechanism for lowering casing into the well after drilling, with the jacking mechanism including fluid pressure actuated piston and cylinder means which may be left in the rig during drilling and which are positioned low enough in the rig to avoid interference with operation of the rotary table. The jacking mechanism also includes a structure which is adapted to be connected to the piston and cylinder means when the casing or other well pipe is to be lowered and which is actuable upwardly and downwardly and carries one of two pipe gripping units for progressively jacking the pipe downwardly by vertical reciprocation of that structure. The reciprocating structure may take the form of a beam extending between two pistons and actuable thereby, with a second beam being connected to cylinders within which the pistons are contained and being utilized to support the second gripping element. In one form of the invention, the rotary table when in use is supported by this second beam.

Boyadjieff, G.I.; Campbell, A.B.

1983-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

170

Category:Production Wells | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Production Wells page? For detailed information on Production Wells, click here. Category:Production Wells Add.png Add a new Production Wells Technique Pages in category...

171

Soda Lake Well Lithology Data and Geologic Cross-Sections  

SciTech Connect

Comprehensive catalogue of drill?hole data in spreadsheet, shapefile, and Geosoft database formats. Includes XYZ locations of well heads, year drilled, type of well, operator, total depths, well path data (deviations), lithology logs, and temperature data. Plus, 13 cross?sections in Adobe Illustrator format.

Faulds, James E.

2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

172

Number of Producing Gas Wells  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Producing Gas Wells Producing Gas Wells Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 452,945 476,652 493,100 487,627 514,637 482,822 1989-2012 Alabama 6,591 6,860 6,913 7,026 7,063 6,327 1989-2012 Alaska 239 261 261 269 277 185 1989-2012 Arizona 7 6 6 5 5 5 1989-2012 Arkansas 4,773 5,592 6,314 7,397 8,388 8,538 1989-2012 California 1,540 1,645 1,643 1,580 1,308 1,423 1989-2012 Colorado 22,949 25,716 27,021 28,813 30,101 32,000 1989-2012 Gulf of Mexico 2,552 1,527 1,984 1,852 1,559 1,474 1998-2012 Illinois 43 45 51 50 40 40 1989-2012 Indiana 2,350 525 563 620 914 819 1989-2012 Kansas

173

The potential impact of global warming on the efficacy of field margins sown for the conservation of bumble-bees  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Raffaelli The potential impact of global warming on the efficacy of field margins...change. We simulated the effect of global warming on the network of plant-pollinator...future-proof margins against global warming are discussed. climate change...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Lost Circulation Experience in Geothermal Wells  

SciTech Connect

Lost circulation during drilling and cementing in geothermal wells is a problem common to most geothermal areas. Material and rig time costs due to lost circulation often represent one fourth or more of the total well cost. Assessment of the general drilling and completion practices commonly used for handling lost circulation have been surveyed and evaluated under a study sponsored by Sandia National Laboratories. Results of this study, including interviews with geothermal production companies and with drilling fluid service companies, are reported in the paper. Conclusions and recommendations are presented for control of lost circulation during geothermal operations. Recent improvements in lost circulation materials and techniques and potential equipment solutions to the lost circulation problem are discussed. Research needs are also identified.

Goodman, M. A.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Consortium for Petroleum & Natural Gas Stripper Wells  

SciTech Connect

The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), established a national industry-driven Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) that is focused on improving the production performance of domestic petroleum and/or natural gas stripper wells. The SWC represents a partnership between U.S. petroleum and natural gas producers, trade associations, state funding agencies, academia, and the NETL. This document serves as the twelfth quarterly technical progress report for the SWC. Key activities for this reporting period included: (1) Drafting and releasing the 2007 Request for Proposals; (2) Securing a meeting facility, scheduling and drafting plans for the 2007 Spring Proposal Meeting; (3) Conducting elections and announcing representatives for the four 2007-2008 Executive Council seats; (4) 2005 Final Project Reports; (5) Personal Digital Assistant Workshops scheduled; and (6) Communications and outreach.

Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

176

Boise geothermal injection well: Final environmental assessment  

SciTech Connect

The City of Boise, Idaho, an Idaho Municipal Corporation, is proposing to construct a well with which to inject spent geothermal water from its hot water heating system back into the geothermal aquifer. Because of a cooperative agreement between the City and the US Department of Energy to design and construct the proposed well, compliance to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) is required. Therefore, this Environmental Assessment (EA) represents the analysis of the proposed project required under NEPA. The intent of this EA is to: (1) briefly describe historical uses of the Boise Geothermal Aquifer; (2) discuss the underlying reason for the proposed action; (3) describe alternatives considered, including the No Action Alternative and the Preferred Alternative; and (4) present potential environmental impacts of the proposed action and the analysis of those impacts as they apply to the respective alternatives.

NONE

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

177

Intentionally Including - Engaging Minorities in Physics Careers |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Intentionally Including - Engaging Minorities in Physics Careers Intentionally Including - Engaging Minorities in Physics Careers Intentionally Including - Engaging Minorities in Physics Careers April 24, 2013 - 4:37pm Addthis Joining Director Dot Harris (second from left) were Marlene Kaplan, the Deputy Director of Education and director of EPP, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Claudia Rankins, a Program Officer with the National Science Foundation and Jim Stith, the past Vice-President of the American Institute of Physics Resources. Joining Director Dot Harris (second from left) were Marlene Kaplan, the Deputy Director of Education and director of EPP, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Claudia Rankins, a Program Officer with the National Science Foundation and Jim Stith, the past Vice-President of the

178

Scramjet including integrated inlet and combustor  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a scramjet engine. It comprises: a first surface including an aft facing step; a cowl including: a leading edge and a trailing edge; an upper surface and a lower surface extending between the leading edge and the trailing edge; the cowl upper surface being spaced from and generally parallel to the first surface to define an integrated inlet-combustor therebetween having an inlet for receiving and channeling into the inlet-combustor supersonic inlet airflow; means for injecting fuel into the inlet-combustor at the step for mixing with the supersonic inlet airflow for generating supersonic combustion gases; and further including a spaced pari of sidewalls extending between the first surface to the cowl upper surface and wherein the integrated inlet-combustor is generally rectangular and defined by the sidewall pair, the first surface and the cowl upper surface.

Kutschenreuter, P.H. Jr.; Blanton, J.C.

1992-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

179

Transmission line including support means with barriers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas insulated transmission line includes an elongated outer sheath, a plurality of inner conductors disposed within and extending along the outer sheath, and an insulating gas which electrically insulates the inner conductors from the outer sheath. A support insulator insulatably supports the inner conductors within the outer sheath, with the support insulator comprising a main body portion including a plurality of legs extending to the outer sheath, and barrier portions which extend between the legs. The barrier portions have openings therein adjacent the main body portion through which the inner conductors extend.

Cookson, Alan H. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Strike variability of carbonate platform margin stratal architecture and cycle stacking patterns: Outcrop and seismic examples from lower Permian depositional sequences of the Permian Basin, U. S. A  

SciTech Connect

Strike variability in stratal architecture, cycle stacking patterns and facies differentiation within sequences exemplifies the potential for differential stratigraphic response of platforms to eustasy. Variability exists within base-level cycles of several scales within a compound stratigraphic hierarchy, though the causes may vary among different scales. Cross-sections from outcrops in the Sierra Diablo document the framework and stacking pattern of 3rd-order sequences (HFS), including: two progradational middle Wolfcampian HFS (mW1-2), one backstepped upper Wolfcampian HFS (uW1), one progradational lower Leonardin HFS (L1), aggradational middle (L2) and upper Leonardian HFS (L3), three progradatic upper Leonardian HFS (L4-6), and two backstepped, aggradational upper Leonardian HFS (L7-8). Seismic lines from the northern Delaware and Midland Basins and San Simon Channel area document the regional consistency of 3rd-order sequence stacking patterns (a response to eustasy), but show variability related to local subsidence, antecedent topography (owing to deeper structures and platform margin erosion), windward vs. leeward facing, and siliciclastic sediment supply. Sequences L2 and L3 appear to exhibit the greatest variability in stacking pattern. Strike variability in 4th/5th-order cycle stacking patterns within 3rd-order sequences as studied in outcrop is greatest in sequences L2 and L3, in which headland-bight margin trends are developed on a lateral scale of 1-2 miles. Aggrational to backstepping reef-margin facies with steep ([le]35[degrees]) foreslopes developed along headlands. Mudstones abut these margin facies abruptly along headlands and may contain megabreccias at the toe-of-slope. More gently sloping (10-15[degrees]) [open quotes]ramp[close quotes] margin strata composed of fusulinid packstones characterize bights.

Fitchen, W.M. (Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States))

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including marginal wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

South Atlantic continental margins of Africa: A comparison of the tectonic vs climate interplay on the evolution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

South Atlantic continental margins of Africa: A comparison of the tectonic vs climate interplay on the evolution of equatorial west Africa and SW Africa margins Michel Se´ranne *, Zahie Anka UMR 5573 Dynamique February 2005; accepted 18 July 2005 Abstract Africa displays a variety of continental margin structures

Demouchy, Sylvie

182

Energy Consumption of Personal Computing Including Portable  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Consumption of Personal Computing Including Portable Communication Devices Pavel Somavat1 consumption, questions are being asked about the energy contribution of computing equipment. Al- though studies have documented the share of energy consumption by this type of equipment over the years, research

Namboodiri, Vinod

183

EE Regional Technology Roadmap Includes comparison  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EE Regional Technology Roadmap Includes comparison against 6th Power Plan (Update cyclically Roadmap with a strong linkage to utility programs Scan for Technologies 1. How does it address the NW Data Clearinghouse BPA/RTF NEEA/Regional Programs Group Update Regional EE Technology Roadmap Lighting

184

Video Topics Include Freshman Inquiry Course  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Video Topics Include Freshman Inquiry Course Open Advisement/ Group Advisement Dinning Campus: End of Spring 2012, Commencement May 18: Grades available on MAX after 4:30pm AdvisementYouTubeVideoSeries I N S I D E T H I S I S S U E : YouTube Video Series 1 Mark Your Calendar 1 Exploring Major Tips 2

Hardy, Christopher R.

185

Including Ocean Model Uncertainties in Climate Predictions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Including Ocean Model Uncertainties in Climate Predictions Chris Brierley, Alan Thorpe, Mat Collins's to perform the integrations Currently uses a `slab' ocean #12;An Ocean Model Required to accurately model transient behaviour Will have its own uncertainties Requires even more computing power Create new models

Jones, Peter JS

186

Visualizing motion in potential wells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The concept of potential-energy diagrams is of fundamental importance in the study of quantum physics. Yet students are rarely exposed to this powerful alternative description in introductory classes and thus have difficulty comprehending its significance when they encounter it in beginning-level quantum courses. We describe a learning unit that incorporates a sequence of computer-interfaced experiments using dynamics or air-track systems. This unit is designed to make the learning of potential-energy diagrams less abstract. Students begin by constructing the harmonic or square-well potential diagrams using either the velocity data and assuming conservation of energy or the force-displacement graph for the elasticinteraction of an object constrained by springs or bouncing off springy blocks. Then they investigate the motion of a rider magnetinteracting with a configuration of field magnets and plot directly the potential-energy diagrams using a magnetic field sensor. The ease of measurement allows exploring the motion in a large variety of potential shapes in a short duration class.

Pratibha Jolly; Dean Zollman; N. Sanjay Rebello; Albena Dimitrova

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

A Physical Model For The Origin Of Volcanism Of The Tyrrhenian Margin- The  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Model For The Origin Of Volcanism Of The Tyrrhenian Margin- The Model For The Origin Of Volcanism Of The Tyrrhenian Margin- The Case Of Neapolitan Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Physical Model For The Origin Of Volcanism Of The Tyrrhenian Margin- The Case Of Neapolitan Area Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The onset of volcanism in the Neapolitan area and the tensile tectonics of the Tyrrhenian margin of the Apennine chain have been related to the opening of the Tyrrhenian Basin, which may have resulted in horizontal asthenosphere flows giving rise, in turn, to crustal distension, local mantle upwellings and ensuing volcanism. Geological and structural data were taken into consideration: the existence of a shallow crust-mantle discontinuity in the Neapolitan area, the onset of volcanism in a

188

Marginalization and aggregation of exponential smoothing models in forecasting portfolio volatility  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper examines exponentially weighted moving average models for predicting volatility and assessing risk in portfolios. It proposes a method that identifies the decay factors of the marginal volatility mo...

Giacomo Sbrana; Andrea Silvestrini

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Test to Determine Margin-to-Failure for Hy-100 Steel with Undermatched Welds  

SciTech Connect

This test program was undertaken to determine the flaw tolerance and to quantify the strength margin-to-failure of high yield strength steel fillet welded specimens. The tests demonstrate adequate margin-to-failure for HY-100 specimens fabricated with matched welding systems. In the use of high yield (HY) steel materials in designs required to accommodate rapidly applied dynamic loads, the concern was raised where the possibility of decreased flaw tolerance and premature failure by unstable ductile tearing could limit their use. Tests were developed and conducted to demonstrate adequate margin-to-failure in HY-100 fillet and partial penetration welded structures. In addition, inelastic analytical predictions were performed to assess the accuracy of such predictive tools compared to actual test data. Results showed that adequate margin-to-failure exists when using matched welding systems.

K.R. Arpin; T.F. Trimble

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

The evolution of lithospheric deformation and crustal structure from continental margins to oceanic spreading centers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis investigates the evolution of lithospheric deformation and crustal structure from continental margins to mid-ocean ridges. The first part (Ch. 2) examines the style of segmentation along the U.S. East Coast ...

Behn, Mark Dietrich, 1974-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Understanding the Zongo : processes of socio-spatial marginalization in Ghana  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The spatial processes of marginalization and ghettoization have been described, labeled, and theorized extensively in the United States and Europe, yet there has been little research dedicated to these processes in the ...

Williamson, Emily Anne

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Marginal metabolic scope and growth of hatchery-produced, juvenile red drum by progeny group  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nine broodstock groups of red drum Sciaenops ocellatus (each consisting of two males and three females) at a State of Texas fish hatchery spawned 13 concurrent progeny groups for which two performance factors, marginal metabolic scope (MMS...

Clark, Kevin Wilson

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

193

Marginal yield, technological advances, and emissions timing in corn ethanol’s carbon payback time  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Previous estimates of carbon payback time (CPT) of corn ethanol expansion assumed that marginal yields of newly ... these estimates assumed that the productivity of corn ethanol system and climate change impacts ...

Yi Yang; Sangwon Suh

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Light polymerization during cavity filling: influence of total energy density on shrinkage and marginal adaptation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Volumetric contraction during light cured polymerization of methacrylate based dental composites...1]. If the material is adhesively fixed to a tooth cavity, these stresses will be transferred to the margins and ...

Tissiana Bortolotto; Federico Prando; Didier Dietschi; Ivo Krejci

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

E-Print Network 3.0 - asian marginal seas Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

marginal seas Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Chlorofluorocarbons in the East Sea (Sea of Japan) D-H Min and R F Weiss (Both at: Scripps Institution of Oceanography, Summary: in the...

196

Multi-well sample plate cover penetration system  

SciTech Connect

An apparatus for penetrating a cover over a multi-well sample plate containing at least one individual sample well includes a cutting head, a cutter extending from the cutting head, and a robot. The cutting head is connected to the robot wherein the robot moves the cutting head and cutter so that the cutter penetrates the cover over the multi-well sample plate providing access to the individual sample well. When the cutting head is moved downward the foil is pierced by the cutter that splits, opens, and folds the foil inward toward the well. The well is then open for sample aspiration but has been protected from cross contamination.

Beer, Neil Reginald (Pleasanton, CA)

2011-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

197

Developing improved nuclear magnetic resonance marginal oscillator spectrometers for advanced teaching laboratories  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DEVELOPING IMPROVED NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE MARGINAL OSCILLATOR SPECTROMETERS FOR ADVANCED TEACHING LABORATORIES A Thesis by FRANK PHILLIP WILLINGHAM Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ASM University in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE D e cemb er 1988 Major Subject: Physics DEVELOPING IMPROVED NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE MARGINAL OSCILLATOR SPECTROMETERS FOR ADVANCED TEACHING LABORATORIES A Thesis by FRANK PHILLIP...

Willingham, Frank Phillip

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Buildings Included on EMS Reports"  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Buildings Included on EMS Reports" "Site","Property Name","Property ID","GSF","Incl. in Water Baseline (CY2007)","Water Baseline (sq. ft.)","Water CY2008 (sq. ft.)","Water CY2009 (sq. ft.)","Water Notes","Incl. in Energy Baseline (CY2003)","Energy Baseline (sq. ft.)","CY2008 Energy (sq. ft.)","CY2009 Energy (sq. ft.)","Energy Notes","Included as Existing Building","CY2008 Existing Building (sq. ft.)","Reason for Building Exclusion" "Column Totals",,"Totals",115139,,10579,10579,22512,,,3183365,26374,115374,,,99476 "Durango, CO, Disposal/Processing Site","STORAGE SHED","DUD-BLDG-STORSHED",100,"no",,,,,"no",,,,"OSF","no",,"Less than 5,000 GSF"

199

Power generation method including membrane separation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for generating electric power, such as at, or close to, natural gas fields. The method includes conditioning natural gas containing C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons and/or acid gas by means of a membrane separation step. This step creates a leaner, sweeter, drier gas, which is then used as combustion fuel to run a turbine, which is in turn used for power generation.

Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Union City, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Jet-calculus approach including coherence effects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We show how integrodifferential equations typical of jet calculus can be combined with an averaging procedure to obtain jet-calculus-based results including the Mueller interference graphs. Results in longitudinal-momentum fraction x for physical quantities are higher at intermediate x and lower at large x than with the conventional ‘‘incoherent’’ jet calculus. These results resemble those of Marchesini and Webber, who used a Monte Carlo approach based on the same dynamics.

L. M. Jones; R. Migneron; K. S. S. Narayanan

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including marginal wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Geological overview of the Angola-Congo Margin, the Congo deep-sea fan and its submarine valleys  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Congo deep-sea fan is one of the largest fans in the world still affected by presently active turbidity currents. The present activity of deep-sea sedimentary processes is linked to the existence of a direct connection between the Congo River estuary and the Congo canyon head that allows relatively continuous sediment feeding of the deep-sea environment, in spite of a wide continental shelf (150 km). Because of this important activity in terms of sedimentary processes, the deep-sea environment of the Congo-Angola margin presents major interests concerning physical, chemical and biological studies near the sea floor. The main aim of this paper is to present the initial geological context of the BioZaire Program, showing a synthesis of the major results of the ZaïAngo Project including (1) the brief geological setting of the Congo-Angola margin, (2) the structure of the modern Congo deep-sea fan, (3) the sedimentary architecture of the recent Congo turbidite system (from the canyon to the distal lobes), and (4) the recent and present turbidite sedimentation. In order to provide useful information and advice relevant to biological and geochemical studies across the Congo sedimentary system, this article focuses on the present sedimentary processes and the present activity of turbidity current along the Congo canyon and channel.

unknown authors

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Remote down-hole well telemetry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention includes an apparatus and method for telemetry communication with oil-well monitoring and recording instruments located in the vicinity of the bottom of gas or oil recovery pipes. Such instruments are currently monitored using electrical cabling that is inserted into the pipes; cabling has a short life in this environment, and requires periodic replacement with the concomitant, costly shutdown of the well. Modulated reflectance, a wireless communication method that does not require signal transmission power from the telemetry package will provide a long-lived and reliable way to monitor down-hole conditions. Normal wireless technology is not practical since batteries and capacitors have to frequently be replaced or recharged, again with the well being removed from service. RF energy generated above ground can also be received, converted and stored down-hole without the use of wires, for actuating down-hole valves, as one example. Although modulated reflectance reduces or eliminates the loss of energy at the sensor package because energy is not consumed, during the transmission process, additional stored extra energy down-hole is needed.

Briles, Scott D. (Los Alamos, NM); Neagley, Daniel L. (Albuquerque, NM); Coates, Don M. (Santa Fe, NM); Freund, Samuel M. (Los Alamos, NM)

2004-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

203

Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy: Interpretation of New Wells in the Coso  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Stratigraphy: Interpretation of New Wells in the Coso Stratigraphy: Interpretation of New Wells in the Coso Geothermal Field Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy: Interpretation of New Wells in the Coso Geothermal Field Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: This paper focuses on the interpretation of the additional wells (4 bore holes) and comparison to the previous wells. Preliminary correlation between wells is also presented. Analyses from multiple boreholes show fluid stratigraphy that correlates from well to well. The wells include large producers, small to moderate producers, problem producers, injectors, and non producers Author(s): Dilley, L.M.; Newman, D.L. ; McCulloch, J.; Wiggett, G. Published: Geothermal Resource Council Transactions 2005, 1/1/2005

204

Prairie Canal Well No. 1, Calcasieu Parish, Louisiana. Volume II. Well test data. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The following are included in appendices: field test data, field non-edited data, raw data, tentative method of testing for hydrogen sulfide in natural gas using length of stain tubes, combined sample log, report on reservoir fluids study, well test analysis, analysis of solids samples from primary zone, chemical analysis procedures, scale and corrosion evaluation, laboratory report on scale deposits, and sand detector strip charts. (MHR)

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Including Tunneling in Non-Born–Oppenheimer Simulations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Including Tunneling in Non-Born–Oppenheimer Simulations ... We note that tunneling may be included in the modeling of electronically nonadiabatic processes by other methods as well, for example, quantal wave packet methods where the wave packet is not restricted to follow a classical trajectory,(18) path integral dynamics,(19-21) and the initial value representation,(22) but these methods will require more development of efficient computational strategies for their practical application to complex systems, whereas the method proposed here has a cost comparable to non-Born–Oppenheimer (NBO) trajectory calculations that do not include tunneling. ... We also ran Born–Oppenheimer trajectories with the same total energy on the adiabatic ground state for comparison. ...

Jingjing Zheng; Rubén Meana-Pañeda; Donald G. Truhlar

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

206

Optical panel system including stackable waveguides  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An optical panel system including stackable waveguides is provided. The optical panel system displays a projected light image and comprises a plurality of planar optical waveguides in a stacked state. The optical panel system further comprises a support system that aligns and supports the waveguides in the stacked state. In one embodiment, the support system comprises at least one rod, wherein each waveguide contains at least one hole, and wherein each rod is positioned through a corresponding hole in each waveguide. In another embodiment, the support system comprises at least two opposing edge structures having the waveguides positioned therebetween, wherein each opposing edge structure contains a mating surface, wherein opposite edges of each waveguide contain mating surfaces which are complementary to the mating surfaces of the opposing edge structures, and wherein each mating surface of the opposing edge structures engages a corresponding complementary mating surface of the opposite edges of each waveguide.

DeSanto, Leonard (Dunkirk, MD); Veligdan, James T. (Manorville, NY)

2007-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

207

Thermovoltaic semiconductor device including a plasma filter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermovoltaic energy conversion device and related method for converting thermal energy into an electrical potential. An interference filter is provided on a semiconductor thermovoltaic cell to pre-filter black body radiation. The semiconductor thermovoltaic cell includes a P/N junction supported on a substrate which converts incident thermal energy below the semiconductor junction band gap into electrical potential. The semiconductor substrate is doped to provide a plasma filter which reflects back energy having a wavelength which is above the band gap and which is ineffectively filtered by the interference filter, through the P/N junction to the source of radiation thereby avoiding parasitic absorption of the unusable portion of the thermal radiation energy.

Baldasaro, Paul F. (Clifton Park, NY)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Critical point anomalies include expansion shock waves  

SciTech Connect

From first-principle fluid dynamics, complemented by a rigorous state equation accounting for critical anomalies, we discovered that expansion shock waves may occur in the vicinity of the liquid-vapor critical point in the two-phase region. Due to universality of near-critical thermodynamics, the result is valid for any common pure fluid in which molecular interactions are only short-range, namely, for so-called 3-dimensional Ising-like systems, and under the assumption of thermodynamic equilibrium. In addition to rarefaction shock waves, diverse non-classical effects are admissible, including composite compressive shock-fan-shock waves, due to the change of sign of the fundamental derivative of gasdynamics.

Nannan, N. R., E-mail: ryan.nannan@uvs.edu [Mechanical Engineering Discipline, Anton de Kom University of Suriname, Leysweg 86, PO Box 9212, Paramaribo, Suriname and Process and Energy Department, Delft University of Technology, Leeghwaterstraat 44, 2628 CA Delft (Netherlands); Guardone, A., E-mail: alberto.guardone@polimi.it [Department of Aerospace Science and Technology, Politecnico di Milano, Via La Masa 34, 20156 Milano (Italy); Colonna, P., E-mail: p.colonna@tudelft.nl [Propulsion and Power, Delft University of Technology, Kluyverweg 1, 2629 HS Delft (Netherlands)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

209

Borehole completion data package for well 199-N-81  

SciTech Connect

Well 199-N-81 was drilled in 1993 as a RCRA groundwater monitoring for the 1324-N network. The well is completed at the top of the uppermost aquifer, in the Ringold Formation. This data package includes information on drilling, construction, development, and aquifer testing. Copies of forms, notes, and diagrams completed in the field comprise the bulk of this document. Few interpretations are included. Lithologic contacts were picked by the site geologist. An attempt was made to interpret aquifer test data.

Hartman, M.J.

1994-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

210

The Local Wind Pump for Marginal Societies in Indonesia: A Perspective of Fault Tree Analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

There are many efforts to reduce a cost of investment of well established hybrid wind pump applied to rural areas. A recent study on a local wind pump (LWP) for marginal societies in Indonesia (traditional farmers peasant and tribes) was one of the efforts reporting a new application area. The objectives of the study were defined to measure reliability value of the LWP due to fluctuated wind intensity low wind speed economic point of view regarding a prolong economic crisis occurring and an available local component of the LWP and to sustain economics productivity (agriculture product) of the society. In the study a fault tree analysis (FTA) was deployed as one of three methods used for assessing the LWP. In this article the FTA has been thoroughly discussed in order to improve a better performance of the LWP applied in dry land watering system of Mesuji district of Lampung province?Indonesia. In the early stage all of local component of the LWP was classified in term of its function. There were four groups of the components. Moreover all of the sub components of each group were subjected to failure modes of the FTA namely (1) primary failure modes; (2) secondary failure modes and (3) common failure modes. In the data processing stage an available software package ITEM was deployed. It was observed that the component indicated obtaining relative a long life duration of operational life cycle in 1 666 hours. Moreover to enhance high performance the LWP maintenance schedule critical sub component suffering from failure and an overhaul priority have been identified in term of quantity values. Throughout a year pilot project it can be concluded that the LWP is a reliable product to the societies enhancing their economics productivities.

Insan Gunawan; Ahmad Taufik

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Kuwait poised for massive well kill effort  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports that full scale efforts to extinguish Kuwait's oil well fires are to begin. The campaign to combat history's worst oil fires, originally expected to begin in mid-March, has been hamstrung by logistical problems, including delays in equipment deliveries caused by damage to Kuwait's infrastructure. Meantime, production from a key field off Kuwait--largely unaffected by the war--is expected to resume in May, but Kuwaiti oil exports will still be hindered by damaged onshore facilities. In addition, Kuwait is lining up equipment and personnel to restore production from its heavily damaged oil fields. Elsewhere in the Persian Gulf, Saudi Arabia reports progress in combating history's worst oil spills but acknowledges a continuing threat.

Not Available

1991-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

212

Drilling of wells with top drive unit  

SciTech Connect

Well drilling apparatus including a top drive drilling assembly having a motor driven stem adapted to be attached to the upper end of a drill string and drive it during a drilling operation, a torque wrench carried by the top drive assembly and movable upwardly and downwardly therewith and operable to break a threated connection between the drill string and the stem, and an elevator carried by and suspended from the top drive assembly and adapted to engage a section of drill pipe beneath the torque wrench in suspending relation. The torque wrench and elevator are preferably retained against rotation with the rotary element which drives the drill string, but may be movable vertically relative to that rotary element and relative to one another in a manner actuating the apparatus between various different operating conditions.

Boyadjieff, G.I.

1984-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

213

Historically, estuaries have been the focal point of extensive industrial activity for maritime nations. Similarly, it is well established that such marginal marine environments are particularly  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- and sediment-based pollution. In future, these areas will be placed under enhanced environmental pressure. AllHistorically, estuaries have been the focal point of extensive industrial activity for maritime anthropogenic influences, such as: maritime transport (port construction, navigational dredging and dumping

Quartly, Graham

214

Well injection valve with retractable choke  

SciTech Connect

An injection valve is described for use in a well conduit consisting of: a housing having a bore, a valve closure member in the bore moving between open and closed positions, a flow tube telescopically movable in the housing for controlling the movement of the valve closure member, means for biasing the flow tube in a direction for allowing the valve closure member to move to the closed position, an expandable and contractible fluid restriction connected to the flow tube and extending into the bore for moving the flow tube to the open position in response to injection fluid, but allowing the passage of well tools through the valve, the restriction contractible in response to fluid flow, the restriction includes, segments movable into and out of the bore, and biasing means yieldably urging the segments into the bore, a no-go shoulder on the flow tube, and releasable lockout means between the flow tube and the housing for locking the flow tube and valve in the open position.

Pringle, R.E.

1986-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

215

SEEPAGE MODEL FOR PA INCLUDING DRIFT COLLAPSE  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to document the predictions and analyses performed using the seepage model for performance assessment (SMPA) for both the Topopah Spring middle nonlithophysal (Tptpmn) and lower lithophysal (Tptpll) lithostratigraphic units at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Look-up tables of seepage flow rates into a drift (and their uncertainty) are generated by performing numerical simulations with the seepage model for many combinations of the three most important seepage-relevant parameters: the fracture permeability, the capillary-strength parameter 1/a, and the percolation flux. The percolation flux values chosen take into account flow focusing effects, which are evaluated based on a flow-focusing model. Moreover, multiple realizations of the underlying stochastic permeability field are conducted. Selected sensitivity studies are performed, including the effects of an alternative drift geometry representing a partially collapsed drift from an independent drift-degradation analysis (BSC 2004 [DIRS 166107]). The intended purpose of the seepage model is to provide results of drift-scale seepage rates under a series of parameters and scenarios in support of the Total System Performance Assessment for License Application (TSPA-LA). The SMPA is intended for the evaluation of drift-scale seepage rates under the full range of parameter values for three parameters found to be key (fracture permeability, the van Genuchten 1/a parameter, and percolation flux) and drift degradation shape scenarios in support of the TSPA-LA during the period of compliance for postclosure performance [Technical Work Plan for: Performance Assessment Unsaturated Zone (BSC 2002 [DIRS 160819], Section I-4-2-1)]. The flow-focusing model in the Topopah Spring welded (TSw) unit is intended to provide an estimate of flow focusing factors (FFFs) that (1) bridge the gap between the mountain-scale and drift-scale models, and (2) account for variability in local percolation flux due to stochastic hydrologic properties and flow processes.

C. Tsang

2004-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

216

Three-dimensional representations of salt-dome margins at four active strategic petroleum reserve sites.  

SciTech Connect

Existing paper-based site characterization models of salt domes at the four active U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve sites have been converted to digital format and visualized using modern computer software. The four sites are the Bayou Choctaw dome in Iberville Parish, Louisiana; the Big Hill dome in Jefferson County, Texas; the Bryan Mound dome in Brazoria County, Texas; and the West Hackberry dome in Cameron Parish, Louisiana. A new modeling algorithm has been developed to overcome limitations of many standard geological modeling software packages in order to deal with structurally overhanging salt margins that are typical of many salt domes. This algorithm, and the implementing computer program, make use of the existing interpretive modeling conducted manually using professional geological judgement and presented in two dimensions in the original site characterization reports as structure contour maps on the top of salt. The algorithm makes use of concepts of finite-element meshes of general engineering usage. Although the specific implementation of the algorithm described in this report and the resulting output files are tailored to the modeling and visualization software used to construct the figures contained herein, the algorithm itself is generic and other implementations and output formats are possible. The graphical visualizations of the salt domes at the four Strategic Petroleum Reserve sites are believed to be major improvements over the previously available two-dimensional representations of the domes via conventional geologic drawings (cross sections and contour maps). Additionally, the numerical mesh files produced by this modeling activity are available for import into and display by other software routines. The mesh data are not explicitly tabulated in this report; however an electronic version in simple ASCII format is included on a PC-based compact disk.

Rautman, Christopher Arthur; Stein, Joshua S.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

PLUTINO DETECTION BIASES, INCLUDING THE KOZAI RESONANCE  

SciTech Connect

Because of their relative proximity within the trans-Neptunian region, the plutinos (objects in the 3:2 mean-motion resonance with Neptune) are numerous in flux-limited catalogs, and well-studied theoretically. We perform detailed modeling of the on-sky detection biases for plutinos, with special attention to those that are simultaneously in the Kozai resonance. In addition to the normal 3:2 resonant argument libration, Kozai plutinos also show periodic oscillations in eccentricity and inclination, coupled to the argument of perihelion ({omega}) oscillation. Due to the mean-motion resonance, plutinos avoid coming to pericenter near Neptune's current position in the ecliptic plane. Because Kozai plutinos are restricted to certain values of {omega}, perihelion always occurs out of the ecliptic plane, biasing ecliptic surveys against finding these objects. The observed Kozai plutino fraction f{sub koz}{sup obs} has been measured by several surveys, finding values between 8% and 25%, while the true Kozai plutino fraction f{sub koz}{sup true} has been predicted to be between 10% and 30% by different giant planet migration simulations. We show that f{sub koz}{sup obs} varies widely depending on the ecliptic latitude and longitude of the survey, so debiasing to find the true ratio is complex. Even a survey that covers most or all of the sky will detect an apparent Kozai fraction that is different from f{sub koz}{sup true}. We present a map of the on-sky plutino Kozai fraction that would be detected by all-sky flux-limited surveys. This will be especially important for the Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid Response System and Large Synoptic Survey Telescope projects, which may detect large numbers of plutinos as they sweep the sky. f{sub koz}{sup true} and the distribution of the orbital elements of Kozai plutinos may be a diagnostic of giant planet migration; future migration simulations should provide details on their resonant Kozai populations.

Lawler, S. M.; Gladman, B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, 6224 Agricultural Road, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Health and Wellness Guide for Students Introduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dimensions of health and wellness. The 7 dimensions are: Physical Wellness � Taking care of your body Wellness � Taking care of what's around you 2Health andWellness Guide for Students #12;Physical Wellness � Communicate with your partner if you have questions or concerns � Meet with a Health Care Provider on campus

219

Using Marginal Lands for Biofuels | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Using Marginal Lands for Biofuels Using Marginal Lands for Biofuels Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Searchable Archive of BER Highlights External link Benefits of BER Funding Opportunities Biological & Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC) News & Resources Contact Information Biological and Environmental Research U.S. Department of Energy SC-23/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3251 F: (301) 903-5051 E: sc.ber@science.doe.gov More Information » January 2013 Using Marginal Lands for Biofuels Assessment shows Midwest could support biomass production while benefiting climate. Print Text Size: A A A Subscribe FeedbackShare Page Click to enlarge photo. Enlarge Photo Image courtesy of Macmillan Publishers Ltd: Gelfand, I., et al.

220

INVITATIONAL WELL-TESTING SYMPOSIUM PROCEEDINGS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oil, Gas, • . . 81 and Geothermal Well Tests (abstract) W.has been testing geothermal wells for about three years, andof Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Well Tests W. E. Brigham

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including marginal wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Integrated approach towards the application of horizontal wells to improve waterflooding performance. Quarterly report, January 1--March 31, 1997  

SciTech Connect

The overall purpose of the proposed project is to improve secondary recovery performance of a marginal oil field through the use of an appropriate reservoir management plan. The selection of plan will be based on the detailed reservoir description using an integrated approach. The authors expect that 2 to 5% of the original oil in place will be recovered using this method. This should extend the life of the reservoir by at least 10 years. The project is divided into two stages. In Stage 1 of the project, the authors selected part of the Glenn Pool Field-Self Unit. They conducted cross borehole tomography surveys and formation micro scanner logs through a newly drilled well. By combining the state-of-the-art data with conventional core and log data, they developed a detailed reservoir description based on an integrated approach. After conducting extensive reservoir simulation studies, they evaluated alternate reservoir management strategies to improve the reservoir performance including drilling of a horizontal injection well. They observed that selective completion of many wells followed by an increase in the injection rate was the most feasible option to improve the performance of the Self Unit. This management plan is currently being implemented and the performance is being monitored. Stage 2 of the project will involve selection of part of the same reservoir (Berryhill Unit-Tract 7), development of reservoir description using only conventional data, simulation of flow performance using developed reservoir description, selection of an appropriate reservoir management plan, and implementation of the plan followed by monitoring of reservoir performance.

Kelkar, M.; Liner, C.; Kerr, D.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Structure of the Gabon Margin from integrated seismic reflection and gravity data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the South Gabon Basin, deep multi-channel seismic reflection and gravity modeling analysis have shed light on key features of the structure of the margin. The thinned continental crust beneath the Gabon Margin appears to be composed of two distinct layers, separated by a clear, strong and more or less continuous reflector running in the 7–10 s TWT window. The lower crust is characterized by a higher density, intermediate between the lower values of the upper crust and the denser values of the mantle. The lower crust is irregularly shaped and presents lateral thickness variations along the direction of thinning and along the coast. In the offshore thinned continental domain, the lower and upper crust form a 20–25 km thick body. Crustal thicknesses point to a relatively sharp and narrow transition, along a few tens of kilometers, between the unthinned and the thinned continental crust. The high density layer identified offshore Gabon presents similar characteristics in density, geometry and spatial distribution, as the underplated magmatic bodies observed along volcanic margins, e.g. along the South Atlantic Namibia Margin or the North Atlantic Vøring Margin. Although this lower crustal body could possibly represent ultra mafic serpentinized rocks or high grade metamorphic crustal rocks, we suggest that it could be composed of mafic rocks. Magmas resulting from partial melting during rifting may underplate the crust and/or be intruded in the lower crust through a system of dykes and sills. In this view, the present-day crustal thicknesses along rifted margins, characterized by magmatic underplating and/or intrusion, are not representative of the thinning that the crust experienced during rifting. Results of this study point to relatively shallow sedimentary basins along the South Gabon Margin. The deepest offshore depocenters located under the westernmost side of the continental platform appear to be associated with the deepest syn-rift basins These basins seem to extend along 20 to 40 km in the ~ NE–SW direction with a present-day average thickness of 7.3 km. Offshore Gabon, whereas the crustal thinning appears significant, the syn-rift deposit are not thick. We suggest that the area was anomalously uplifted during the rifting phase, due to an elevated thermal lithospheric gradient. The conclusions derived from our seismic and gravity analysis are consistent with the implications such a thermal anomaly would have on the tectonic evolution of a rifted margin with 1) an underplated high density lower crustal layer, 2) shallow depth syn-rift basins associated with a relatively thin crust and subsequently 3) elevated recorded subsidence rates in the initial post-rift stages.

Stéphanie Dupré; Sierd Cloetingh; Giovanni Bertotti

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Capping of Water Wells for Future Use  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in determining the condition of your well, contact: S your local groundwater conservation dis- trict http://www.tceq.state.tx.us/permitting/ water_supply/groundwater/districts.html S a licensed water well driller in your area S the Water Well Drillers Program... are the steps in capping a well? The landowner, a licensed well driller or a licensed pump installer may cap a well. There are several steps involved. The well casing should extend above the ground surface to limit the risk of water entering the well...

Lesikar, Bruce J.; Mechell, Justin

2007-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

224

Functionalized Graphene Nanoroads for Quantum Well Device. |...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nanoroads for Quantum Well Device. Functionalized Graphene Nanoroads for Quantum Well Device. Abstract: Using density functional theory, a series of calculations of structural and...

225

Observation Wells (Ozkocak, 1985) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Observation Wells Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Reinjection test wells can be used to obtain quite precise measurements of reservoir permeability....

226

EPA - UIC Well Classifications | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Well Classifications Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: EPA - UIC Well Classifications Author Environmental Protection Agency Published...

227

Philip Henry Wicksteed's marginal productivity theory of distribution and an investigation of those factors which influenced its formulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is. . . the most exhaustive non-mathematical exposition of the technical and philo- sophical complications of the so-called marginal theory 37 Lionel Robbins, "The Economic Works of Philip Wicksteed", Economica, Vol. 10 (November, 1930), 247. 38...*k: Doubleday Page and Co. , 1904 , p. 213. 63 Robbins, "Economic Works of Wicksteed", Economica, p. 247. 23 are rewarded in accord with their marginal products and the total product would then be exactly exhausted, the marginal productivity theory used...

Garner, Joseph Key

1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Fraced horizontal well shows potential of deep tight gas  

SciTech Connect

Successful completion of a multiple fraced, deep horizontal well demonstrated new techniques for producing tight gas sands. In Northwest Germany, Mobil Erdgas-Erdoel GmbH drilled, cased, and fraced the world`s deepest horizontal well in the ultra-tight Rotliegendes ``Main`` sand at 15,687 ft (4,783 m) true vertical depth. The multiple frac concept provides a cost-efficient method to economically produce significant gas resources in the ultra-tight Rotliegendes ``Main`` sand. Besides the satisfactory initial gas production rate, the well established several world records, including deepest horizontal well with multiple fracs, and proved this new technique to develop ultra-tight sands.

Schueler, S. [Mobil Erdgas-Erdoel GmbH, Celle (Germany); Santos, R. [Mobil Erdgas-Erdoel GmbH, Hamburg (Germany)

1996-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

229

Helicopter magnetic survey conducted to locate wells  

SciTech Connect

A helicopter magnetic survey was conducted in August 2007 over 15.6 sq mi at the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3’s (NPR-3) Teapot Dome Field near Casper, Wyoming. The survey’s purpose was to accurately locate wells drilled there during more than 90 years of continuous oilfield operation. The survey was conducted at low altitude and with closely spaced flight lines to improve the detection of wells with weak magnetic response and to increase the resolution of closely spaced wells. The survey was in preparation for a planned CO2 flood for EOR, which requires a complete well inventory with accurate locations for all existing wells. The magnetic survey was intended to locate wells missing from the well database and to provide accurate locations for all wells. The ability of the helicopter magnetic survey to accurately locate wells was accomplished by comparing airborne well picks with well locations from an intense ground search of a small test area.

Veloski, G.A.; Hammack, R.W.; Stamp, V. (Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center); Hall, R. (Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center); Colina, K. (Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Advanced Test Reactor Demonstration Case Study  

SciTech Connect

Safety is central to the design, licensing, operation, and economics of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). Consequently, the ability to better characterize and quantify safety margin holds the key to improved decision making about LWR design, operation, and plant life extension. A systematic approach to characterization of safety margins and the subsequent margins management options represents a vital input to the licensee and regulatory analysis and decision making that will be involved. The purpose of the RISMC Pathway R&D is to support plant decisions for risk-informed margins management with the aim to improve economics, reliability, and sustain safety of current NPPs. Goals of the RISMC Pathway are twofold: (1) Develop and demonstrate a risk-assessment method coupled to safety margin quantification that can be used by NPP decision makers as part of their margin recovery strategies. (2) Create an advanced “RISMC toolkit” that enables more accurate representation of NPP safety margin. This report describes the RISMC methodology demonstration where the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) was used as a test-bed for purposes of determining safety margins. As part of the demonstration, we describe how both the thermal-hydraulics and probabilistic safety calculations are integrated and used to quantify margin management strategies.

Curtis Smith; David Schwieder; Cherie Phelan; Anh Bui; Paul Bayless

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

A geophysical overview of the southern continental margin of North America in the Late Precambrian/Cambrian  

SciTech Connect

Recent geophysical studies have shed considerable light on the nature and extent of the southern Continental margin of North America which formed during the Late Precambrian/Cambrian. To the east between Arkansas and Alabama, the PASSCAL/Ouachita seismic experiment and older results in Mississippi indicate that this margin is largely preserved beneath allochthonous rocks emplaced during the Ouachita orogeny. Here the margin is fairly abrupt suggesting transtension was important in this origin. The Wiggins and Sabine blocks appear to be continental fragments which may have formed along this margin. In Texas, the margin extends around the Llano uplift in a sinuous fashion. In this area, Mesozoic extension clouds the picture considerably. However, structural complexities along this portion of he margin can be inferred form gravity data. In West Texas, the margin bends westward and then southward. A very deep oil exploration test which was recently drilled in this area provides valuable constraints for geophysical models of this portion of the margin. Recent results in Mexico allows the authors to trace this margin further south into the state of Chihuahua than previously possible.

Keller, G.R. (Univ. of Texas, El Paso, TX (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences)

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Investigation on the Benefits of Safety Margin Improvement in CANDU Nuclear Power Plant Using an FPGA-based Shutdown System.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The relationship between response time and safety margin of CANadian Deuterium Uranium (CANDU) nuclear power plant (NPP) is investigated in this thesis. Implementation of safety… (more)

She, Jingke

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Thank you for joining: 360WELLNESS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

shortly. If you are experiencing technical difficulties with Adobe Connect, please call 1 March 22, 2012 12 pm ­ 1pm ET #12;360° WELLNESS: Achieving Wellness At Work And At Home Workshop & Self-Assessment © Joe Rosenlicht, Certified Coach 3 #12;8 Wellness Areas Wellness Nutrition Brain Power Fitness Sleep

Vertes, Akos

234

Track 4: Employee Health and Wellness  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

ISM Workshop Presentations Knoxville Convention Center, Knoxville, TN August 2009 Track 4: Employee Health and Wellness

235

Hydrologic Tests at Characterization Well R-14  

SciTech Connect

Well R-14 is located in Ten Site Canyon and was completed at a depth of 1316 ft below ground surface (bgs) in August 2002 within unassigned pumiceous deposits located below the Puye Formation (fanglomerate). The well was constructed with two screens positioned below the regional water table. Individual static depths measured for each isolated screen after the Westbay{trademark} transducer monitoring system was installed in mid-December 2002 were nearly identical at 1177 ft bgs, suggesting only horizontal subsurface flow at this time, location, and depth. Screen 1 straddles the geologic contact between the Puye fanglomerate and unassigned pumiceous deposits. Screen 2 is located about 50 ft deeper than screen 1 and is only within the unassigned pumiceous deposits. Constant-rate, straddle-packer, injection tests were conducted at screen 2, including two short tests and one long test. The short tests were 1 minute each but at different injection rates. These short tests were used to select an appropriate injection rate for the long test. We analyzed both injection and recovery data from the long test using the Theis, Theis recovery, Theis residual-recovery, and specific capacity techniques. The Theis injection, Theis recovery, and specific capacity methods correct for partial screen penetration; however, the Theis residual-recovery method does not. The long test at screen 2 involved injection at a rate of 10.1 gallons per minute (gpm) for 68 minutes and recovery for the next 85 minutes. The Theis analysis for screen 2 gave the best fit to residual recovery data. These results suggest that the 158-ft thick deposits opposite screen 2 have a transmissivity (T) equal to or greater than 143 ft{sup 2}/day, and correspond to a horizontal hydraulic conductivity (K) of at least 0.9 ft/day. The specific capacity method yielded a T value equal to or greater than 177 ft{sup 2}/day, and a horizontal K of at least 1.1 ft/day. Results from the injection and recovery phases of the test at screen 2 were similar to those from the residual-recovery portion of the test, but were lower by a factor of about two. The response to injection was typical for a partially penetrating well screen in a very thick aquifer.

S. McLin; W. Stone

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Definition: Artesian Well | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Well Well Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Artesian Well An artesian well is a water well that doesn't require a pump to bring water to the surface; this occurs when there is enough pressure in the aquifer. The pressure causes hydrostatic equilibrium and if the pressure is high enough the water may even reach the ground surface in which case the well is called a flowing artesian well.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition See Great Artesian Basin for the water source in Australia. An artesian aquifer is a confined aquifer containing groundwater under positive pressure. This causes the water level in a well to rise to a point where hydrostatic equilibrium has been reached. This type of well is called an artesian well. Water may even reach the ground surface if the natural

237

Method for polymer synthesis in a reaction well  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of synthesis is described for building a polymer chain, oligonucleotides in particular, by sequentially adding monomer units to at least one solid support for growing and immobilizing a polymer chain thereon in a liquid reagent solution. The method includes the step of: (A) depositing a liquid reagent in a reaction well in contact with at least one solid support and at least one monomer unit of the polymer chain affixed to the solid support. The well includes at least one orifice extending into the well, and is of a size and dimension to form a capillary liquid seal to retain the reagent solution in the well to enable polymer chain growth on the solid support. The method further includes the step of (B) expelling the reagent solution from the well, while retaining the polymer chain therein. This is accomplished by applying a first gas pressure to the reaction well such that a pressure differential between the first gas pressure and a second gas pressure exerted on an exit of the orifice exceeds a predetermined amount sufficient to overcome the capillary liquid seal and expel the reagent solution from the well through the orifice exit. 9 figs.

Brennan, T.M.

1998-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

238

Renormalization of two-dimensional Ising systems with irrelevant, marginal and relevant aperiodic (dis)order  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Renormalization of two-dimensional Ising systems with irrelevant, marginal and relevant aperiodic Morgenstelle 14, D-72076 Tubingen, Germany Abstract We introduce a class of 2d Ising models with aperiodic: quasicrystals, aperiodic order, renormalization group, Ising spin systems 1. Introduction One important question

Baake, Michael

239

Long-Term Mitigation Strategies and Marginal Abatement Cost Curves: A Case Study on Brazil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the power sector, renewable power, electric vehicles, energy efficiency improvements in combustion enginesLong-Term Mitigation Strategies and Marginal Abatement Cost Curves: A Case Study on Brazil Adrien World Bank, Washington D.C., USA 3The World Bank, Brasilia, Brazil Abstract Decision makers facing

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

240

Separation and Volatility of Locational Marginal Prices in Restructured Wholesale Power Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Test Bed I. INTRODUCTION THE wholesale power market design proposed by the U.S. Federal Energy1 Separation and Volatility of Locational Marginal Prices in Restructured Wholesale Power Markets (LMPs) in an ISO-managed restructured wholesale power market operating over an AC transmission grid

Tesfatsion, Leigh

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including marginal wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Subsidence history, crustal structure, and evolution of the Somaliland-Yemen conjugate margin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Subsidence history, crustal structure, and evolution of the Somaliland-Yemen conjugate margin M. Y feature that formed following the rifting apart and breakup of the African and Arabian plates ~32 Ma. Our Mesozoic rift system. The oldest episode of rifting initiated at ~156 Ma and lasted for ~10 Ma and had a NW

Ali, Mohammed

242

Crustal-scale architecture and segmentation of the Argentine margin and its conjugate off South Africa  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......along the volcanic margin off Argentina/Uruguay, South Atlantic...la Plataforma Continental Argentina, relatorio XIII0 Congreso...Petr., Buenos Aires, Argentina. Ramos V.A. , 2004. La...G., 2006. The effect of energy feedbacks on continental strength......

Olav A. Blaich; Jan Inge Faleide; Filippos Tsikalas; Dieter Franke; Enric León

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Marginal costs of freeway traffic congestion with on-road pollution exposure externality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Traffic congestion On-road In-vehicle Pollution exposure Vehicle emissions a b s t r a c t The health cost improvements. When considering distinct vehicle classes, inclusion of on-road exposure costs greatly increases heavy-duty vehicle marginal costs because of their higher emissions rates and greater roadway capacity

Bertini, Robert L.

244

Uplift and strength evolution of passive margins inferred from 2-D conductive modelling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......the margin, because of local heating in the rifted region. After...re-adjustment and lateral heating. Consequently, the vertical...offshore sedimentation, in The Oil and Gas Habitats of the South...Res., 96, 19 941-19 963. Price S. , Brodie J., Whitham A......

Marie Leroy; Frédéric Gueydan; Olivier Dauteuil

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Master1RservoirsGologiquesDynamiquedesBassins-MichelSranne Post-rift tectonics on passive margins  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

postrift ? South Gabon 38 Master1RéservoirsGéologiquesDynamiquedesBassins-MichelSéranne Parameters : Niger delta evaporites décollement : Gabon margin 40 Master1Réservoirs view Evaporites = décollement shortening extension Salt tectonics = fonction (slope & load) Gabon

Demouchy, Sylvie

246

Binary Join Trees for Computing Marginals in the Shenoy-Shafer Architecture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The main goal of this paper is to describe a data structure called binary join trees that are useful in computing multiple marginals efficiently in the Shenoy-Shafer architecture. We define binary join trees, describe their utility, and describe a...

Shenoy, Prakash P.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Rapid sea level rise along the Antarctic margins driven by increased glacial1 Supplementary material4  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rapid sea level rise along the Antarctic margins driven by increased glacial1 discharge2 3 of the signal of anomalously rapid sea level rise in the41 Antarctic subpolar seas at the core of this study.42, the Antarctic coastal sea level rise signal is significantly different from47 zero with 95% confidence

Naveira Garabato, Alberto

248

FIRE HISTORY AT THE EASTERN GREAT PLAINS MARGIN, MISSOURI RIVER LOESS HILLS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FIRE HISTORY AT THE EASTERN GREAT PLAINS MARGIN, MISSOURI RIVER LOESS HILLS Michael C. Stambaugh-Columbia Columbia, MO 65211 stambaughm@missouri.edu and Daniel C. Dey United States Forest Service, North Central Hills of northwest Missouri. We sampled 33 bur oak (Quercus macrocarpa Michx.), chinkapin oak (Q

Stambaugh, Michael C

249

6Seismic stratigraphy and subsidence history of the United Arab Emirates (UAE) rifted margin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

6Seismic stratigraphy and subsidence history of the United Arab Emirates (UAE) rifted margin and into the oil window in response of formation of a foreland basin (Ali and Watts 2009). Foreland basins develop by lithospheric flexure in front of migrating thrust and fold loads (e.g., Price 1971; Beaumont 1981

Watts, A. B. "Tony"

250

Safety margins in zircaloy oxidation and embrittlement criteria for emergency core cooling system acceptance  

SciTech Connect

Current emergency core cooling system acceptance criteria for light water reactors specify that, under loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) conditions, the Baker-Just (BJ) correlation must be used to calculate Zircaloy-steam oxidation, calculated peak cladding temperatures (PCT) must not exceed 1204/sup 0/C, and calculated oxidation must not exceed 17% equivalent cladding reacted (ECR). An appropriately defined minimum margin of safety was estimated for each of these criteria. The currently required BJ oxidation correlation provides margins only over the 1100 to 1500/sup 0/C temperature range at the 95% confidence level. The PCT margins for thermal shock and handling failures are adequate at oxidation temperatures above 1204/sup 0/C for up to 210 and 160 s, respectively, at the 95% confidence level. The ECR thermal shock and handling margins at the 50 and 95% confidence levels, respectively, range between 2 and 7% ECR for the BJ correlation, but vanish at temperatures above 1100 to 1160/sup 0/C for the best-estimate Cathcart-Pawel correlation. However, use of the Cathcart Pawel correlation for ''design basis'' LOCA calculations can be justified at the 85 to 88% confidence level if cooling rate effects can be neglected.

Williford, R.E.

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Continent—ocean-transition across a trans-tensional margin segment: off Bear Island, Barents Sea  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......5007 Bergen, Norway 4 Department of...N-2007 Kjeller, Norway A 410 km long...performed in the sea. Offshore airgun shooting...noise and strong winds. Figure 3 Comparison...contain most of energy, relatively weak...expressions of the offshore sedimentary basins...continental margin off Norway and the Barents......

Wojciech Czuba; Marek Grad; Rolf Mjelde; Aleksander Guterch; Audun Libak; Frank Krüger; Yoshio Murai; Johannes Schweitzer; IPY Project Group

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

ECG Denoising Using a Dynamical Model and a Marginalized Particle Filter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ECG Denoising Using a Dynamical Model and a Marginalized Particle Filter Chao Lin1,3, M of robust ECG denoising tech- niques is important for automatic diagnoses of cardiac diseases. Based on a previously suggested nonlinear dynamic model for the generation of realistic synthetic ECG, we introduce

Tourneret, Jean-Yves

253

Assessment of tsunami hazard to the U.S. Atlantic margin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Tsunami hazard is a very low-probability, but potentially high-risk natural hazard, posing unique challenges to scientists and policy makers trying to mitigate its impacts. These challenges are illustrated in this assessment of tsunami hazard to the U.S. Atlantic margin. Seismic activity along the U.S. Atlantic margin in general is low, and confirmed paleo-tsunami deposits have not yet been found, suggesting a very low rate of hazard. However, the devastating 1929 Grand Banks tsunami along the Atlantic margin of Canada shows that these events continue to occur. Densely populated areas, extensive industrial and port facilities, and the presence of ten nuclear power plants along the coast, make this region highly vulnerable to flooding by tsunamis and therefore even low-probability events need to be evaluated. We can presently draw several tentative conclusions regarding tsunami hazard to the U.S. Atlantic coast. Landslide tsunamis likely constitute the biggest tsunami hazard to the coast. Only a small number of landslides have so far been dated and they are generally older than 10,000 years. The geographical distribution of landslides along the margin is expected to be uneven and to depend on the distribution of seismic activity along the margin and on the geographical distribution of Pleistocene sediment. We do not see evidence that gas hydrate dissociation contributes to the generation of landslides along the U.S. Atlantic margin. Analysis of landslide statistics along the fluvial and glacial portions of the margin indicate that most of the landslides are translational, were probably initiated by seismic acceleration, and failed as aggregate slope failures. How tsunamis are generated from aggregate landslides remains however, unclear. Estimates of the recurrence interval of earthquakes along the continental slope may provide maximum estimates for the recurrence interval of landslide along the margin. Tsunamis caused by atmospheric disturbances and by coastal earthquakes may be more frequent than those generated by landslides, but their amplitudes are probably smaller. Among the possible far-field earthquake sources, only earthquakes located within the Gulf of Cadiz or west of the Tore-Madeira Rise are likely to affect the U.S. coast. It is questionable whether earthquakes on the Puerto Rico Trench are capable of producing a large enough tsunami that will affect the U.S. Atlantic coast. More information is needed to evaluate the seismic potential of the northern Cuba fold-and-thrust belt. The hazard from a volcano flank collapse in the Canary Islands is likely smaller than originally stated, and there is not enough information to evaluate the magnitude and frequency of flank collapse from the Azores Islands. Both deterministic and probabilistic methods to evaluate the tsunami hazard from the margin are available for application to the Atlantic margin, but their implementation requires more information than is currently available.

U.S. ten Brink; J.D. Chaytor; E.L. Geist; D.S. Brothers; B.D. Andrews

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Well Log Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Well Log Techniques Well Log Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Well Log Techniques Details Activities (4) Areas (4) Regions (1) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Well Log Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Downhole Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: depth and thickness of formations; lithology and porosity can be inferred Stratigraphic/Structural: reservoir thickness, reservoir geometry, borehole geometry Hydrological: permeability and fluid composition can be inferred Thermal: direct temperature measurements; thermal conductivity and heat capacity Dictionary.png Well Log Techniques: Well logging is the measurement of formation properties versus depth in a

255

Vapor port and groundwater sampling well  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus has been developed for combining groundwater monitoring wells with unsaturated-zone vapor sampling ports. The apparatus allows concurrent monitoring of both the unsaturated and the saturated zone from the same well at contaminated areas. The innovative well design allows for concurrent sampling of groundwater and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the vadose (unsaturated) zone from a single well, saving considerable time and money. The sample tubes are banded to the outer well casing during installation of the well casing.

Hubbell, Joel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wylie, Allan H. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Geothermal/Well Field | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Geothermal/Well Field < Geothermal(Redirected from Well Field) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Print PDF Geothermal Well Fields and Reservoirs General Techniques Tree Techniques Table Regulatory Roadmap NEPA (45) Geothermal energy plant at The Geysers near Santa Rosa in Northern California, the world's largest electricity-generating hydrothermal geothermal development. Copyright © 1995 Warren Gretz Geothermal Well Fields discussion Groups of Well Field Techniques

257

Surface Indicators of Geothermal Activity at Salt Wells, Nevada, USA,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Surface Indicators of Geothermal Activity at Salt Wells, Nevada, USA, Surface Indicators of Geothermal Activity at Salt Wells, Nevada, USA, Including Warm Ground, Borate Deposits, and Siliceous Alteration Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Surface Indicators of Geothermal Activity at Salt Wells, Nevada, USA, Including Warm Ground, Borate Deposits, and Siliceous Alteration Abstract Surface indicators of geothermal activity are often present above blind or concealed geothermal systems in the Great Basin, but their expressions are sometimes subtle. When mapped in detail, these indicators yield valuable information on the location, structural controls, and potential subsurface reservoir temperatures of geothermal fluids. An example is provided by the Salt Wells geothermal system in Churchill County, Nevada, USA, where

258

IGS Petroleum Well Symbols--Explanation 12/8/2010 p 1/1 IGS Petroleum Well Symbols--Explanation 6/10/2010 p 1/1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IGS Petroleum Well Symbols--Explanation 12/8/2010 p 1/1 IGS Petroleum Well Symbols--Explanation 6/10/2010 p 1/1 The following symbols include all of the primary Petroleum Well Symbols used by the Indiana of the Petroleum Symbol Set. Trenton well; only available information is an uncertain location Symbol Modifiers

Polly, David

259

Fluid-Rock Characterization and Interactions in NMR Well Logging  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project was to characterize the fluid properties and fluid-rock interactions which are needed for formation evaluation by NMR well logging. NMR well logging is finding wide use in formation evaluation. The formation parameters commonly estimated were porosity, permeability, and capillary bound water. Special cases include estimation of oil viscosity, residual oil saturation, location of oil/water contact, and interpretation on whether the hydrocarbon is oil or gas.

Hirasaki, George J.; Mohanty, Kishore K.

2003-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

260

Geothermal/Well Field | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal/Well Field Geothermal/Well Field < Geothermal Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Print PDF Geothermal Well Fields and Reservoirs General Techniques Tree Techniques Table Regulatory Roadmap NEPA (42) Geothermal energy plant at The Geysers near Santa Rosa in Northern California, the world's largest electricity-generating hydrothermal geothermal development. Copyright © 1995 Warren Gretz Geothermal Well Fields discussion Groups of Well Field Techniques There are many different techniques that are utilized in geothermal well field development and reservoir maintenance depending on the region's geology, economic considerations, project maturity, and other considerations such as land access and permitting requirements. Well field

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including marginal wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

RFI Well Integrity 06 JUL 1400  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This PowerPoint report entitled "Well Integrity During Shut - In Operations: DOE/DOI Analyses" describes risks and suggests risk management recommendations associated with shutting in the well.

262

Essays on Well-Being in Japan.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This dissertation is comprised of four papers on well-being in Japan and aims to examine three important measures of well-being: perceptions of job insecurity, self-reported… (more)

Kuroki, Masanori

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Method for the magnetization of well casing  

SciTech Connect

A well casing is magnetized by traversing an internal magnetizer along and within the well casing while periodically reversing the direction of the magnetic field of the magnetizer to create a plurality of magnetic flux leakage points along the well casing.

Hoehn, G.L. Jr.

1984-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

264

Calculator program aids well cost management  

SciTech Connect

A TI-59 calculator program designed to track well costs on daily and weekly bases can dramatically facilitate the task of monitoring well expenses. The program computes the day total, cumulative total, cumulative item-row totals, and day-week total. For carrying these costs throughout the drilling project, magnetic cards can store the individual and total cumulative well expenses.

Doyle, C.J.

1982-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

265

The integrity of oil and gas wells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Analyses of 8,000 offshore wells in the Gulf of Mexico show that 11–12% of wells developed pressure in the outer...underground gas storage, and even geothermal energy (16–20). We...to learn about how often wells fail, when and why they...

Robert B. Jackson

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Spontaneous Potential Well Log | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Spontaneous Potential Well Log Spontaneous Potential Well Log Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Spontaneous Potential Well Log Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Well Log Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Well Log Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: SP technique originally applied to locating sulfide ore-bodies. Stratigraphic/Structural: -Formation bed thickness and boundaries -Detection and tracing of faults -Permeability and porosity Hydrological: Determination of fluid flow patterns: electrochemical coupling processes due to variations in ionic concentrations, and electrokinetic coupling processes due to fluid flow in the subsurface.

267

Regulations of Wells (Florida) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Regulations of Wells (Florida) Regulations of Wells (Florida) Regulations of Wells (Florida) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Florida Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Florida Department of Environmental Protection The Department of Environmental Protection regulates the construction, repair, and abandonment of wells, as well as the persons and businesses undertaking such practices. Governing boards of water management districts

268

seismic margin  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

particulate air (filter) HFE human failure event HLW high-level radioactive waste HVAC heating, ventilation, and air conditioning ITS important to safety LLW low-level...

269

Well Log Techniques At Coso Geothermal Area (1985) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coso Geothermal Area (1985) Coso Geothermal Area (1985) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Well Log Techniques Activity Date 1985 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Impact of long term testing on the well pressure Notes The downhole pressure monitoring equipment for each well included a stainless steel pressure chamber attached to a 0.25 inch stainless steel capillary tubing. The surface end of the capillary tubing was connected to a Paroscientific quartz pressure trandsducer. References Sanyal, S.; Menzies, A.; Granados, E.; Sugine, S.; Gentner, R. (20 January 1987) Long-Term Testing of Geothermal Wells in the Coso Hot Springs KGRA Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Well_Log_Techniques_At_Coso_Geothermal_Area_(1985)&oldid=600462

270

Seismic geomorphological analysis of deepwater gravity-driven deposits on a slope system of the southern Colombian Caribbean margin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Gravity-driven processes are important agents for transporting sediments downslope into deep-marine environments. The Pliocene to Holocene offshore succession of the Colombian Caribbean margin and its stratigraphic distribution, have been affected by faulting and mud diapirism, and have been characterized using 3D seismic data. Nine stratigraphic intervals were characterized within the study, and are interpreted to consist of a range of seismic geomorphologies, including slumps and debrites. Nine gravity-driven deposits were defined within the study area, interpreted to have been transported to the north and northwest. Slumps display high-amplitude, high continuity, elongated, stratified, lobate and confined morphologies, while debrites have a reflection-free pattern or show discontinuous, low-amplitude and chaotic reflections. Mixed slumps-turbidites-debrites deposits are composed by a succession of laterally and vertically interfingered slumps, debrites and turbidites. These deposits are morphologically lobate and broadly scattered. In addition, erosional features such as basal small scours, megascours, linear scours and rafted blocks were used as kinematic indicators within the gravity-driven deposits. There are several candidates triggering mechanism, including over-steepening of slope (related to high sediment supply or slope tectonism). In the study area, confined slumps and debrites with a main transport direction from south to north have been observed, while transport direction of the mixed slumps-turbidites-debrites was toward northwest. Additionally, the fact that slumps and debrites are found in depocenters between periclines suggests a confined environment of deposition. Finally, mixed slumps-turbidites-debrites are unconfined without evident structural control. We suggest that local intraslope sub-basin margin become over-steepened as a result of mud diapirism in the subsurface. In this situation, the paleobathymetry was sufficient to trap the resultant gravity-driven deposits within the sub-basins, suggesting a local origin. Seismic evidence of BSR (Bottom Simulating Reflector) suggests the presence of gas hydrate in the study area, and is taken as an additional potential mechanism to provide instability of slope and generate gravity-driven deposits.

Esteban Alfaro; Michael Holz

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Step-out Well | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Step-out Well Step-out Well Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Step-out Well Details Activities (5) Areas (5) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Drilling Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Exploration Drilling Parent Exploration Technique: Exploration Drilling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Drill cuttings are analyzed to determine lithology and mineralogy Stratigraphic/Structural: Fractures, faults, and geologic formations that the well passes through are identified and mapped Hydrological: Identify aquifers, reservoir boundaries, flow rates, fluid pressure, and chemistry Thermal: Direct temperature measurements from within the reservoir Dictionary.png Step-out Well: A well drilled outside of the proven reservoir boundaries to investigate a

272

Well purge and sample apparatus and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention specifically permits purging and/or sampling of a well but only removing, at most, about 25% of the fluid volume compared to conventional methods and, at a minimum, removing none of the fluid volume from the well. The invention is an isolation assembly with a packer, pump and exhaust, that is inserted into the well. The isolation assembly is designed so that only a volume of fluid between the outside diameter of the isolation assembly and the inside diameter of the well over a fluid column height from the bottom of the well to the top of the active portion (lower annulus) is removed. The packer is positioned above the active portion thereby sealing the well and preventing any mixing or contamination of inlet fluid with fluid above the packer. Ports in the wall of the isolation assembly permit purging and sampling of the lower annulus along the height of the active portion.

Schalla, Ronald (Kennewick, WA); Smith, Ronald M. (Richland, WA); Hall, Stephen H. (Kennewick, WA); Smart, John E. (Richland, WA); Gustafson, Gregg S. (Redmond, WA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Well purge and sample apparatus and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention specifically permits purging and/or sampling of a well but only removing, at most, about 25% of the fluid volume compared to conventional methods and, at a minimum, removing none of the fluid volume from the well. The invention is an isolation assembly with a packer, pump and exhaust, that is inserted into the well. The isolation assembly is designed so that only a volume of fluid between the outside diameter of the isolation assembly and the inside diameter of the well over a fluid column height from the bottom of the well to the top of the active portion (lower annulus) is removed. The packer is positioned above the active portion thereby sealing the well and preventing any mixing or contamination of inlet fluid with fluid above the packer. Ports in the wall of the isolation assembly permit purging and sampling of the lower annulus along the height of the active portion. 8 figs.

Schalla, R.; Smith, R.M.; Hall, S.H.; Smart, J.E.; Gustafson, G.S.

1995-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

274

Geothermal Well Completion Tests | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Well Completion Tests Geothermal Well Completion Tests Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Geothermal Well Completion Tests Abstract This paper reviews the measurements that are typically made in a well immediately after drilling is completed - the Completion Tests. The objective of these tests is to determine the properties of the reservoir, and of the reservoir fluid near the well. A significant amount of information that will add to the characterisation of the reservoir and the well, can only be obtained in the period during and immediately after drilling activities are completed. Author Hagen Hole Conference Petroleum Engineering Summer School; Dubrovnik, Croatia; 2008/06/09 Published N/A, 2008 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org

275

MIMO Control during Oil Well Drilling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A drilling system consists of a rotating drill string, which is placed into the well. The drill fluid is pumped through the drill string and exits through the choke valve. An important scope of the drill fluid is to maintain a certain pressure gradient along the length of the well. Well construction is a complex job in which annular pressures must be kept inside the operational window (limited by fracture and pore pressure). Monitoring bottom hole pressure to avoid fluctuations out of operational window limits is an extremely important job, in order to guarantee safe conditions during drilling. Under a conventional oil well drilling task, the pore pressure (minimum limit) and the fracture pressure (maximum limit) define mud density range and pressure operational window. During oil well drilling, several disturbances affect bottom hole pressure; for example, as the length of the well increases, the bottom hole pressure varies for growing hydrostatic pressure levels. In addition, the pipe connection procedure, performed at equal time intervals, stopping the drill rotation and mud injection, mounting a new pipe segment, restarting the drill fluid pump and rotation, causes severe fluctuations in well fluids flow, changing well pressure. Permeability and porous reservoir pressure governs native reservoir fluid well influx, affecting flow patterns inside the well and well pressure. In this work, a non linear mathematical model (gas-liquid-solid), representing an oil well drilling system, was developed, based on mass and momentum balances. Besides, for implementing classic control (PI), alternative control schemes were analyzed using mud pump flow rate, choke opening index and weight on bit as manipulated variables in order to control annulus bottomhole pressure and rate of penetration. Classic controller tuning was performed for servo and regulatory control studies, under MIMO frameworks.

Márcia Peixoto Vega; Marcela Galdino de Freitas; André Leibsohn Martins

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Existence of the Wigner function with correct marginal distributions along tilted lines on a lattice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In order to determine the Wigner function uniquely, we introduce a new condition which ensures that the Wigner function has correct marginal distributions along tilted lines. For a system in $N$ dimensional Hilbert space, whose "phase space" is a lattice with $N^2$ sites, we get different results depending on whether $N$ is odd or even. Under the new condition, the Wigner function is determined if $N$ is an odd number, but it does not exist if $N$ is even.

Minoru Horibe; Akiyoshi Takami; Takaaki Hashimoto; Akihisa Hayashi

2001-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

277

Marginal Cost of Steam and Power from Cogeneration Systems Using a Rational Value-Allocation Procedure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Gwaiz, BS EE Energy Conservation Engineer Saudi Aramco, Ras Tanura, Saudi Arabia majid.gwaiz@aramco.com ABSTRACT The problem of pricing steam and power from cogeneration systems has confounded engineers, economists, and accountants for a very... MARGINAL COST OF STEAM AND POWER FROM COGENERATION SYSTEMS USING A RATIONAL VALUE-ALLOCATION PROCEDURE Jimmy D Kumana, MS ChE Energy Conservation Specialist Saudi Aramco, Dhahran, Saudi Arabia jimmy.kumana@aramco.com Majid M Al...

Kumana, J. D.; Al-Gwaiz, M. M.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Well Testing Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Well Testing Techniques Well Testing Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Well Testing Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(17) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Well Testing Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Downhole Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Enable estimation of in-situ reservoir elastic parameters Stratigraphic/Structural: Fracture distribution, formation permeability, and ambient tectonic stresses Hydrological: provides information on permeability, location of permeable zones recharge rates, flow rates, fluid flow direction, hydrologic connections, storativity, reservoir pressures, fluid chemistry, and scaling.

279

Stimulation Technologies for Deep Well Completions  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring the Deep Trek Program targeted at improving the economics of drilling and completing deep gas wells. Under the DOE program, Pinnacle Technologies conducted a study to evaluate the stimulation of deep wells. The objective of the project was to review U.S. deep well drilling and stimulation activity, review rock mechanics and fracture growth in deep, high-pressure/temperature wells and evaluate stimulation technology in several key deep plays. This report documents results from this project.

Stephen Wolhart

2005-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

280

Hawaii Well Construction & Pump Installation Standards Webpage...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Hawaii Well Construction & Pump Installation Standards Webpage Abstract This webpage provides...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including marginal wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

SAFETY & WELLNESS Annual Report 2012-2013  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HEALTH, SAFETY & WELLNESS Annual Report 2012-2013 #12;HEALTH, SAFETY & WELLNESS UPDATE ON SAFETY PROGRAMS The professionals working in the Health and Safety team and Rehabilitation Services group have had a very successful year in supporting individuals to take accountability for their own safety and health

Sinnamon, Gordon J.

282

Record geothermal well drilled in hot granite  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Record geothermal well drilled in hot granite ... Researchers there have completed the second of two of the deepest and hottest geothermal wells ever drilled. ... It may become the energy source for a small electrical generating power station serving nearby communities in New Mexico. ...

1981-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

283

Salt Wells Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Salt Wells Geothermal Area Salt Wells Geothermal Area (Redirected from Salt Wells Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Salt Wells Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Future Plans 5 Exploration History 6 Well Field Description 7 Research and Development Activities 8 Technical Problems and Solutions 9 Geology of the Area 9.1 Regional Setting 9.2 Stratigraphy 9.3 Structure 10 Hydrothermal System 11 Heat Source 12 Geofluid Geochemistry 13 NEPA-Related Analyses (9) 14 Exploration Activities (28) 15 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: Operational"Operational" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

284

Salt Wells Geothermal Exploratory Drilling Program EA  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Salt Wells Geothermal Exploratory Drilling Program EA Salt Wells Geothermal Exploratory Drilling Program EA (DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2009-0006-EA) Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Salt Wells Geothermal Exploratory Drilling Program EA (DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2009-0006-EA) Abstract No abstract available. Author Bureau of Land Management Published U.S. Department of the Interior- Bureau of Land Management, Carson City Field Office, Nevada, 09/14/2009 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Salt Wells Geothermal Exploratory Drilling Program EA (DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2009-0006-EA) Citation Bureau of Land Management. Salt Wells Geothermal Exploratory Drilling Program EA (DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2009-0006-EA) [Internet]. 09/14/2009. Carson City, NV. U.S. Department of the Interior- Bureau of Land Management,

285

Geopressured-geothermal well activities in Louisiana  

SciTech Connect

Since September 1978, microseismic networks have operated continuously around US Department of Energy (DOE) geopressured-geothermal well sites to monitor any microearthquake activity in the well vicinity. Microseismic monitoring is necessary before flow testing at a well site to establish the level of local background seismicity. Once flow testing has begun, well development may affect ground elevations and/or may activate growth faults, which are characteristic of the coastal region of southern Louisiana and southeastern Texas where these geopressured-geothermal wells are located. The microseismic networks are designed to detest small-scale local earthquakes indicative of such fault activation. Even after flow testing has ceased, monitoring continues to assess any microearthquake activity delayed by the time dependence of stress migration within the earth. Current monitoring shows no microseismicity in the geopressured-geothermal prospect areas before, during, or after flow testing.

John, C.J.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

GRR/Section 19-WA-f - Water Well NOI for Replacement or Additional Wells |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 19-WA-f - Water Well NOI for Replacement or Additional Wells GRR/Section 19-WA-f - Water Well NOI for Replacement or Additional Wells < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 19-WA-f - Water Well NOI for Replacement or Additional Wells 19-WA-f - Water Well NOI for Replacement or Additional Wells.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Washington State Department of Ecology Regulations & Policies Revised Code of Washington 90.44.100 Revised Code of Washington 18.104.048 Washington Administrative Code 173-160-151 Triggers None specified A developer seeking to use ground water for an activity may need to drill a new well in a different location than a previous well, drill an additional well at an existing location, or drill a replacement well at the same

287

ADVANCED TECHNIQUES FOR RESERVOIR SIMULATION AND MODELING OF NONCONVENTIONAL WELLS  

SciTech Connect

Nonconventional wells, which include horizontal, deviated, multilateral and ''smart'' wells, offer great potential for the efficient management of oil and gas reservoirs. These wells are able to contact larger regions of the reservoir than conventional wells and can also be used to target isolated hydrocarbon accumulations. The use of nonconventional wells instrumented with downhole inflow control devices allows for even greater flexibility in production. Because nonconventional wells can be very expensive to drill, complete and instrument, it is important to be able to optimize their deployment, which requires the accurate prediction of their performance. However, predictions of nonconventional well performance are often inaccurate. This is likely due to inadequacies in some of the reservoir engineering and reservoir simulation tools used to model and optimize nonconventional well performance. A number of new issues arise in the modeling and optimization of nonconventional wells. For example, the optimal use of downhole inflow control devices has not been addressed for practical problems. In addition, the impact of geological and engineering uncertainty (e.g., valve reliability) has not been previously considered. In order to model and optimize nonconventional wells in different settings, it is essential that the tools be implemented into a general reservoir simulator. This simulator must be sufficiently general and robust and must in addition be linked to a sophisticated well model. Our research under this five year project addressed all of the key areas indicated above. The overall project was divided into three main categories: (1) advanced reservoir simulation techniques for modeling nonconventional wells; (2) improved techniques for computing well productivity (for use in reservoir engineering calculations) and for coupling the well to the simulator (which includes the accurate calculation of well index and the modeling of multiphase flow in the wellbore); and (3) accurate approaches to account for the effects of reservoir heterogeneity and for the optimization of nonconventional well deployment. An overview of our progress in each of these main areas is as follows. A general purpose object-oriented research simulator (GPRS) was developed under this project. The GPRS code is managed using modern software management techniques and has been deployed to many companies and research institutions. The simulator includes general black-oil and compositional modeling modules. The formulation is general in that it allows for the selection of a wide variety of primary and secondary variables and accommodates varying degrees of solution implicitness. Specifically, we developed and implemented an IMPSAT procedure (implicit in pressure and saturation, explicit in all other variables) for compositional modeling as well as an adaptive implicit procedure. Both of these capabilities allow for efficiency gains through selective implicitness. The code treats cell connections through a general connection list, which allows it to accommodate both structured and unstructured grids. The GPRS code was written to be easily extendable so new modeling techniques can be readily incorporated. Along these lines, we developed a new dual porosity module compatible with the GPRS framework, as well as a new discrete fracture model applicable for fractured or faulted reservoirs. Both of these methods display substantial advantages over previous implementations. Further, we assessed the performance of different preconditioners in an attempt to improve the efficiency of the linear solver. As a result of this investigation, substantial improvements in solver performance were achieved.

Louis J. Durlofsky; Khalid Aziz

2004-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

288

Foreign Travel Health & Wellness Information | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wellness Programs » Foreign Travel Health Wellness Programs » Foreign Travel Health & Wellness Information Foreign Travel Health & Wellness Information All travelers should take the following precautions, no matter the destination: Wash hands often with soap and water. Because motor vehicle crashes are a leading cause of injury among travelers, walk and drive defensively; avoid travel at night if possible and always use seat belts. Don't eat or drink dairy products unless you know they have been pasteurized. Never eat undercooked ground beef and poultry, raw eggs, and unpasteurized dairy products; raw shellfish is particularly dangerous to persons who have liver disease or compromised immune systems. Don't eat food purchased from street vendors; do not drink beverages with ice. Don't handle animals, including dogs and cats, to avoid bites and

289

Production-systems analysis for fractured wells  

SciTech Connect

Production-systems analysis has been in use for many years to design completion configurations on the basis of an expected reservoir capacity. The most common equations used for the reservoir calculations are for steady-state radial flow. Most hydraulically fractured wells require the use of an unsteady-state production simulator to predict the higher flow rates associated with the stimulated well. These high flow rates may present problems with excessive pressure drops through production tubing designed for radial-flow production. Therefore, the unsteady-state nature of fractured-well production precludes the use of steady-state radial-flow inflow performance relationships (IPR's) to calculate reservoir performance. An accurate prediction of fractured-well production must be made to design the most economically efficient production configuration. It has been suggested in the literature that a normalized reference curve can be used to generate the IPR's necessary for production-systems analysis. However, this work shows that the reference curve for fractured-well response becomes time-dependent when reservoir boundaries are considered. A general approach for constructing IPR curves is presented, and the use of an unsteady-state fractured-well-production simulator coupled with the production-systems-analysis approach is described. A field case demonstrates the application of this method to fractured wells.

Hunt, J.L. (Halliburton Services (US))

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Strike variability of carbonate platform margin stratal architecture and cycle stacking patterns: Outcrop and seismic examples from lower Permian depositional sequences of the Permian Basin, U.S.A.  

SciTech Connect

Strike variability in stratal architecture, cycle stacking patterns and facies differentiation within sequences exemplifies the potential for differential stratigraphic response of platforms to eustasy. Variability exists within base-level cycles of several scales within a compound stratigraphic hierarchy, though the causes may vary among different scales. Cross-sections from outcrops in the Sierra Diablo document the framework and stacking pattern of 3rd-order sequences (HFS), including: two progradational middle Wolfcampian HFS (mW1-2), one backstepped upper Wolfcampian HFS (uW1), one progradational lower Leonardin HFS (L1), aggradational middle (L2) and upper Leonardian HFS (L3), three progradatic upper Leonardian HFS (L4-6), and two backstepped, aggradational upper Leonardian HFS (L7-8). Seismic lines from the northern Delaware and Midland Basins and San Simon Channel area document the regional consistency of 3rd-order sequence stacking patterns (a response to eustasy), but show variability related to local subsidence, antecedent topography (owing to deeper structures and platform margin erosion), windward vs. leeward facing, and siliciclastic sediment supply. Sequences L2 and L3 appear to exhibit the greatest variability in stacking pattern. Strike variability in 4th/5th-order cycle stacking patterns within 3rd-order sequences as studied in outcrop is greatest in sequences L2 and L3, in which headland-bight margin trends are developed on a lateral scale of 1-2 miles. Aggrational to backstepping reef-margin facies with steep ({le}35{degrees}) foreslopes developed along headlands. Mudstones abut these margin facies abruptly along headlands and may contain megabreccias at the toe-of-slope. More gently sloping (10-15{degrees}) {open_quotes}ramp{close_quotes} margin strata composed of fusulinid packstones characterize bights.

Fitchen, W.M. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

291

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

292

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

293

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

294

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 7,279 6,446 3,785 3,474 3,525 Total................................................................... 7,279 6,446 3,785 3,474 3,525 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 7,279 6,446 3,785 3,474 3,525 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 788 736 431

295

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 15,206 15,357 16,957 17,387 18,120 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 463,929 423,672 401,396 369,624 350,413 From Oil Wells.................................................. 63,222 57,773 54,736 50,403 47,784 Total................................................................... 527,151 481,445 456,132 420,027 398,197 Repressuring ...................................................... 896 818 775 714 677 Vented and Flared.............................................. 527 481 456 420 398 Wet After Lease Separation................................

296

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 9 8 7 9 6 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 368 305 300 443 331 From Oil Wells.................................................. 1 1 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 368 307 301 443 331 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 368 307 301 443 331 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

297

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 98 96 106 109 111 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 869 886 904 1,187 1,229 From Oil Wells.................................................. 349 322 288 279 269 Total................................................................... 1,218 1,208 1,193 1,466 1,499 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 5 12 23 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 1,218 1,208 1,188 1,454 1,476 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .....................

298

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 4 4 4 4 4 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 7 7 6 6 5 Total................................................................... 7 7 6 6 5 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 7 7 6 6 5 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

299

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

300

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including marginal wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

302

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

303

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

304

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

305

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 380 350 400 430 280 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 1,150 2,000 2,050 1,803 2,100 Total................................................................... 1,150 2,000 2,050 1,803 2,100 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. NA NA NA 0 NA Wet After Lease Separation................................ 1,150 2,000 2,050 1,803 2,100 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .....................

306

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

307

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 1,502 1,533 1,545 2,291 2,386 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 899 1,064 1,309 1,464 3,401 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 899 1,064 1,309 1,464 3,401 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. NA NA NA 0 NA Wet After Lease Separation................................ 899 1,064 1,309 1,464 3,401 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .....................

308

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

309

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

310

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

311

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 7 7 5 7 7 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 34 32 22 48 34 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 34 32 22 48 34 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 34 32 22 48 34 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

312

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

313

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells........................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Total......................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ............................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared .................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation...................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed............................ 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production

314

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

315

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

316

Method of gravel packing a subterranean well  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a method of gravel packing a well bore penetrating a subterranean formation. It comprises blocking a first group of apertures in a liner with an immobile gel; positioning the liner within the well bore thereby defining a first annulus between the liner and the well bore; transporting a slurry comprised of gravel suspended in a fluid into the first annulus, the fluid flowing through a second group of apertures in the liner while the gravel is deposited within the first annulus to form a gravel pack; and thereafter removing substantially all of the gel from the first group of apertures.

Not Available

1991-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

317

Discussion of productivity of a horizontal well  

SciTech Connect

The authors of this paper has been using several of the analytical equations and numerical simulation to evaluate the productivity of horizontal wells that have near-wellbore damage. Through this evaluation, the author found that here are inconsistencies in the way the skin factor is introduced into the analytical equations. This discussion shows the corrections needed in various analytical equations to obtain consistency with numerical simulation. In the numerical simulation shown here, skin factor is simulated by assignment of a reduced permeability to nodes near the well. The author would appreciate any comments Babu and Odeh could make on this aspect of horizontal wells.

Gilman, J.R. (Marathon Oil Company (US))

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 17 20 18 15 15 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 1,412 1,112 837 731 467 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 1,412 1,112 837 731 467 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 1,412 1,112 837 731 467 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 198 3 0 0 0 Marketed Production

319

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

320

Mller-Bker U, Thieme S. 2007. Livelihood Strategies in a Marginal Area of Nepal (Far West Nepal), with an emphasis on labour migration to India. In  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Müller-Böker U, Thieme S. 2007. Livelihood Strategies in a Marginal Area of Nepal (Far West Nepal and The Marginal: Social Geography of Older People in Nepal · Tomás Havlícek, Population Stability, Livelihood Strategies in a Marginal Area of Nepal (Far West Nepal), with an emphasis on labour migration

Richner, Heinz

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including marginal wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

X-ray Scanner for ODP Leg 204: Drilling Gas Hydrates on Hydrate Ridge, Cascadia Continental Margin  

SciTech Connect

An x-ray scanner was designed and fabricated at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory to provide high speed acquisition of x-ray images of sediment cores collected on the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Leg 204: Drilling Gas Hydrates On Hydrate Ridge, Cascadia Continental Margin. This report discusses the design and fabrication of the instrument, detailing novel features that help reduce the weight and increase the portability of the instrument. Sample x-ray images are included. The x-ray scanner was transferred to scientific drilling vessel, the JOIDES Resolution, by the resupply ship Mauna Loa, out of Coos Bay, Oregon on July 25. ODP technicians were trained in the instruments operation. The availability of the x-ray scanner at the drilling site allows real-time imaging of cores containing methane hydrate immediately after retrieval. Thus, imaging experiments on cores can yield information on the distribution and quantity of methane hydrates. Performing these measurements at the location of core collection eliminates the need for high pressures or low temperature core handling while the cores are stored and transported to a remote imaging laboratory.

Freifeld, Barry; Kneafsey, Tim; Pruess, Jacob; Reiter, Paul; Tomutsa, Liviu

2002-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

322

Definition: Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging (Redirected from Definition:Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic) Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging Single well seismic imaging (SWSI) is the application of borehole seismic sources and receivers on the same string within a single borehole in order to acquire CMP type shot gathers. Cross well seismic places sources and receivers in adjacent wells in order to image the interwell volume.[1] Also Known As SWSI References ↑ http://library.seg.org/ Ret LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. rieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Single-Well_And_Cross-Well_Seismic_Imaging&oldid=690246"

323

Exploratory Well At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Exploratory Well At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Exploratory Well At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Exploratory Well At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Salt Wells Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Exploratory Well Activity Date 2008 - 2008 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Vulcan increased exploration efforts in the summer and fall of 2008, during which time the company drilled two temperature gradient holes (86-15 O on Pad 1 and 17-16 O on Pad 3); conducted seismic, gravity and magnetotelluric surveys; and drilled deep exploration wells at Pads 6 and 8 and binary wells at Pads 1, 2, 4, and 7. Notes Data from these wells is proprietary, and so were unavailable for inclusion

324

GRR/Section 19-WA-e - Water Well Notice of Intent for New Well | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 19-WA-e - Water Well Notice of Intent for New Well GRR/Section 19-WA-e - Water Well Notice of Intent for New Well < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 19-WA-e - Water Well Notice of Intent for New Well 19-WA-e - Water Well Notice of Intent for New Well.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Washington State Department of Ecology Regulations & Policies Revised Code of Washington 18.104.048 Washington Administrative Code 173-160-151 Triggers None specified A developer seeking to use ground water for an activity may need to drill a new well to access the ground water. When a developer needs to drill a new well, the developer must complete the Notice of Intent (NOI) to Drill a Well form and submit the form to the Washington State Department of Ecology

325

Nuclear Arms Control R&D Consortium includes Los Alamos  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Arms Control R&D Consortium includes Los Alamos Nuclear Arms Control R&D Consortium includes Los Alamos A consortium led by the University of Michigan that includes LANL as...

326

Geology and Geothermal Potential North of Wells, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The geology north of Wells, Nevada is dominated by approximately 2150 m of Tertiary lacustrine siltstones and conglomerates. The sediments are cut by a high-angle, range-bounding fault and several associated step faults. Hydrothermal alteration and silicification are associated with the high-angle faults. Two ages of Quaternary sediments locally overlie the Tertiary sediments. Lithologic and well log analyses define numerous potential aquifers in the Tertiary sediments. The shallowest of these aquifers is overlain by a tuffaceous siltstone which appears to act as an aquitard for hot water moving through the aquifers. Three possible subsurface hydrologic models can be constructed to explain the spatial relationships of the thermal water near Wells. Cost-effective steps taken to expedite geothermal development in the area might include deepening of an existing domestic well in the city of Wells to at least 180 m in order to penetrate the tuffaceous siltstone aquitard, running borehole logs for all existing wells, and conducting a shallow temperature-probe survey in the Tertiary sediments north of Wells.

Jewell, Paul W.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Completion report for Well Cluster ER-20-5  

SciTech Connect

The Well Cluster ER-20-5 drilling and completion project was conducted for the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV), in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) in Nye County, Nevada. Its primary tasks include collecting geological, geophysical, hydrological, and water chemistry data from new and existing wells to define groundwater quality in addition to pathways and rates of groundwater migration. A program of drilling wells near the sites of selected underground nuclear tests (near-field drilling) was implemented to obtain site-specific data about the nature and extent of migration of radionuclides that might have been produced by an underground nuclear explosion. Well Cluster ER-20-5 is the first near-field drilling project initiated at the NTS. This document presents construction data and summarizes the scientific data gathered during the drilling and well-installation phases for all three holes drilled at Well Cluster ER-20-5. Some of this information is preliminary and unprocessed, but was released so that drilling, geotechnical, well design, and completion data could be rapidly disseminated. Additional information about water levels, aquifer testing, and groundwater sampling will be reported after any of this work is performed. Any additional geologic and/or geophysical investigations conducted for this project is described in one or more analysis and interpretation reports. The lithologic and stratigraphic logs, however, are provided in final form.

NONE

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Salt Wells Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Salt Wells Geothermal Area Salt Wells Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Salt Wells Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Future Plans 5 Exploration History 6 Well Field Description 7 Research and Development Activities 8 Technical Problems and Solutions 9 Geology of the Area 9.1 Regional Setting 9.2 Stratigraphy 9.3 Structure 10 Hydrothermal System 11 Heat Source 12 Geofluid Geochemistry 13 NEPA-Related Analyses (9) 14 Exploration Activities (28) 15 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: Operational"Operational" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

329

Maazama Well Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Maazama Well Geothermal Area Maazama Well Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Maazama Well Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.8965,"lon":-121.9865,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

330

Willow Well Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Well Geothermal Area Well Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Willow Well Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":61.6417,"lon":-150.095,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

331

Wellness & Additional Benefits | Careers | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Working at ORNL Working at ORNL Benefits Wellness and Other Incentives View Open Positions View Postdoctoral Positions Create A Profile Internal applicants please apply here View or update your current application or profile. External applicants Internal applicants Internet Explorer Browser preferred for ORNL applicants. Chrome is not currently supported. For more information about browser compatibility please refer to the FAQs. If you have difficulty using the online application system or need an accommodation to apply due to a disability, please email ORNLRecruiting@ornl.gov or phone 1-866-963-9545 Careers Home | ORNL | Careers | Working at ORNL | Wellness and Other Incentives SHARE Wellness & Additional Benefits Wellness Program Employees have many opportunities to maintain and improve their health

332

6981 well-provided recreation facility [n  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

recr. (Well-provisioned recreation installation and equipment);s instalación [f] de recreo intensivo (Equipamiento recreacional de gran variedad y de gran calidad);f équipement [m] de loisirs lourd (...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Two-phase flow in horizontal wells  

SciTech Connect

Flow in horizontal wells and two-phase flow interaction with the reservoir were investigated experimentally and theoretically. Two-phase flow behavior has been recognized as one of the most important problems in production engineering. The authors designed and constructed a new test facility suitable for acquiring data on the relationship between pressure drop and liquid holdup along the well and fluid influx from the reservoir. For the theoretical work, an initial model was proposed to describe the flow behavior in a horizontal well configuration. The model uses the inflow-performance-relationship (IPR) approach and empirical correlations or mechanistic models for wellbore hydraulics. Although good agreement was found between the model and experimental data, a new IPR apart from the extension of Darcy`s law must be investigated extensively to aid in the proper design of horizontal wells.

Ihara, Masaru [Japan National Oil Corp., Chiba (Japan); Yanai, Koji [Nippon Kokan Corp., Yokohama (Japan); Yanai, Koji

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Well Record or History | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

History Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- OtherOther: Well Record or HistoryLegal Published NA Year Signed or Took Effect 2013...

335

Groundwater well with reactive filter pack  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for the remediation of contaminated soil and ground water wherein a reactive pack material is added to the annular fill material utilized in standard well construction techniques.

Gilmore, Tyler J. (Pasco, WA); Holdren, Jr., George R. (Kennewick, WA); Kaplan, Daniel I. (Richland, WA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Groundwater well with reactive filter pack  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus are disclosed for the remediation of contaminated soil and ground water wherein a reactive pack material is added to the annular fill material utilized in standard well construction techniques. 3 figs.

Gilmore, T.J.; Holdren, G.R. Jr.; Kaplan, D.I.

1998-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

337

Polariton dispersion of periodic quantum well structures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We studied the polariton dispersion relations of a periodic quantum-well structure with a period in the vicinity of half the exciton resonance wavelength, i.e., the Bragg structure. We classified polariton mod...

A. V. Mintsev; L. V. Butov; C. Ell; S. Mosor…

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Geological well log analysis. Third ed  

SciTech Connect

Until recently, well logs have mainly been used for correlation, structural mapping, and quantitive evaluation of hydrocarbon bearing formations. This third edition of Geologic Well Log Analysis, however, describes how well logs can be used for geological studies and mineral exploration. This is done by analyzing well logs for numerous parameters and indices of significant mineral accumulation, primarily in sediments. Contents are: SP and Eh curves as redoxomorphic logs; sedimentalogical studies by log curve shapes; exploration for stratigraphic traps; continuous dipmeter as a structural tool; continuous dipmeter as a sedimentation tool; Paleo-facies logging and mapping; hydrogeology 1--hydrodynamics of compaction; hydrogeology 2--geostatic equilibrium; and hydrogeology 3--hydrodynamics of infiltration. Appendixes cover: Computer program for calculating the dip magnitude, azimuth, and the degree and orientation of the resistivity anisotrophy; a lithology computer program for calculating the curvature of a structure; and basic log analysis package for HP-41CV programmable calculator.

Pirson, S.J.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

California Water Well Standards | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Legal Document- OtherOther: California Water Well StandardsLegal Published NA Year Signed or Took Effect 2104 Legal Citation Not provided DOI Not Provided Check for DOI...

340

Slim wells for exploration purposes in Mexico  

SciTech Connect

To invest in the construction of wells with definitive designs considerably increases the cost of a geothermal electric project in its analysis and definition stage. The Federal Commission for Electricity (Comision Federal de Electricidad, CFE) has concentrated on the task to design wells which casing and cementing programs would provide the minimum installation necessary to reach the structural objective, to confirm the existence of geothermal reservoirs susceptible to commercial exploitation, to check prior geological studies, to define the stratigraphic column and to obtain measurements of pressure, temperature and permeability. Problems of brittle, hydratable and permeable formations with severe circulation losses, must be considered within the design and drilling programs of the wells. This work explains the slim wells designs used in the exploration of three geothermal zones in Mexico: Las Derrumbadas and Acoculco in the State of Puebla and Los Negritos in the State of Michoacan.

Vaca Serrano, J.M.E.; Soto Alvarez, M.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including marginal wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Analysing sand-dominated channel systems for potential gas-hydrate-reservoirs using an AVO seismic inversion technique on the Southern Hikurangi Margin, New Zealand  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gas hydrates have recently been recognised as a class of unconventional petroleum resource and the economic viability of gas production from hydrates is now being viewed as a realistic possibility within the next decade. Therefore, potential offshore hydrate accumulations in the world-class endowed gas hydrate province, the Hikurangi Margin, New Zealand, represent a significant medium- to long-term opportunity to meet the country's future energy requirements. In this paper we delineate a potential gas hydrate reservoir in the East Coast Basin, New Zealand and quantitatively estimate its gas hydrate concentrations from 2D seismic data with no well information available. The target is interesting for exploration since it shows evidence for gas-hydrate bearing sands, in particular, buried channel systems. We use a combined analysis of high-resolution velocity analysis, amplitude-versus-offset (AVO) attribute and AVO inversion to investigate whether we can identify regions that are likely to contain highly concentrated gas hydrates and whether they are likely to be sand-dominated. To estimate hydrate concentrations we apply a rock physics model. Our results indicate the presence of several – up to 200 m thick – zones that are likely to host gas hydrates, with one location predicted to consist of high-permeable channel sands and an inferred gas hydrate saturation of ?25%. These findings suggest significant amounts of gas hydrates may be present in high-quality reservoirs on this part of the margin.

M. Fohrmann; I.A. Pecher

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Dynamics of an end-on collision, interpreted from SeaMARC II swath mapping and migrated seismic reflection data on north margin of Panama  

SciTech Connect

The authors have imaged nearly the entire North Panama thrust belt (NPTB) to determine the dynamics of the Panama arc colliding end-on with South America. Observations support a simple flexural beam model in which eastward collision of the arc against the continent is transformed into northward relative motion of the NPTB. Fold axes and thrust faults within the NPTB show remarkable uniformity in strike (075/sup 0/), changing only on the east margin across a major fault and on the west margin across a sharp flexure. The belt increases in width (and presumably convergence) eastward, as predicted by the beam model. Displacement along the Uraba fault zone separated a thin sliver of the NPTB, and two earthquake focal mechanisms on the fault show right-oblique slip. Vergence of thrust sheets within the accretionary wedge is dominantly landward in much of the central part of the thrust belt, indicating low basal shear stresses and high fluid pressures along the decollement. Mud volcanoes within the accretionary wedge attest to elevated fluid pressures. Because of an exceptionally well-developed and widespread gas hydrate layer, they suggest that pore fluids are a mixture of water and methane. However, near the central part of the thrust belt, a concentrated zone of mud volcanoes has breached the crests of seaward-verging anticlines. They propose that the zone of anomalous seaward-verging thrust sheets results from widespread release of pore fluids from the decollement, leading to increased basal friction.

Silver, E.A.; Reed, D.L.; Heil, D.H.; Tagudin, J.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Preventing Water Quality Contamination through the Texas Well Owners Network (TWON): Final Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Tex*A*Syst materials, additional TWON Fact Sheets were developed: ? Hydraulic Fracturing and Your Private Water Well (ESC-012) ? Protect Your Water Well During Drought (ESC-014) A TWON curriculum, including a handbook for participants...

Boellstorff, D.; Gholson, D.; Kalisek, D.; Smith, J.; Gerlich, R.; Wagner, K.; McFarland, M.; Mukhtar, S.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Upgrading of substandard housing in Portugal : planning strategies for the technical improvement of marginal settlements, case study, the Casal Ventoso  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The primary scope of this thesis is to deal, from a technical standpoint, with the implementation of the upgrading concept in marginal settlements in Portugal. It consists mainly of two parts: The rationale of the concept, ...

De Castello-Branco, Fernando N. B

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Abstract--This paper proposes an effective VAR planning based on reactive power margin for the enhancement of dynamic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

networks. Distributed generation based on renewable energy sources offers a promising solution1 Abstract-- This paper proposes an effective VAR planning based on reactive power margin for the enhancement of dynamic voltage stability in distribution networks with distributed wind generation

Pota, Himanshu Roy

346

The Role of Hospital Heterogeneity in Measuring Marginal Returns to Medical Care: A Reply to Barreca, Guldi, Lindo, and Waddell  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In Almond et al. (2010), we describe how marginal returns to medical care can be estimated by comparing patients on either side of diagnostic thresholds. Our application examines at-risk newborns near the very low birth ...

Almond, Douglas

347

Errors of Mean Dynamic Topography and Geostrophic Current Estimates in China’s Marginal Seas from GOCE and Satellite Altimetry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Gravity Field and Steady-State Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) and satellite altimetry can provide very detailed and accurate estimates of the mean dynamic topography (MDT) and geostrophic currents in China’s marginal seas, such as, the ...

Shuanggen Jin; Guiping Feng; Ole Andersen

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Magmatism at the west Iberia non-volcanic rifted continental margin: evidence from analyses of magnetic anomalies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......the production of greater volumes of melt leads...the Jeanne d'Arc Basin, offshore Newfoundland...margin of Australia: Great Australian Bight and western sections...magnetic anomalies in the Australian-Antarctic Basin: are they isochrons......

S. M. Russell; R. B. Whitmarsh

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Mapping the Potential for Biofuel Production on Marginal Lands: Differences in Definitions, Data and Models across Scales  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

J.E. ; Lobell, D.B. Biomass energy: The scale of theS. Marginal Land-based Biomass Energy Production in China.crops none none none biomass energy none none none none none

Lewis, Sarah M

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Chronic disease projections in heterogeneous ageing populations: approximating multi-state models of joint distributions by modelling marginal distributions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......marginal probability values conditional on survival, while the capital S as defined above represents unconditional probability values...costs of obesity: prevention no cure for increasing health expenditure. PLoS Med., 5, e29. WOLFSON, M. C. (1994) POHEM......

Rudolf T. Hoogenveen; Pieter H. M. van Baal; Hendriek C. Boshuizen

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74-79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli.

Raikhel, Natasha V. (Okemos, MI); Broekaert, Willem F. (Dilbeek, BE); Chua, Nam-Hai (Scarsdale, NY); Kush, Anil (New York, NY)

1999-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

352

CDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74-79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli.

Raikhel, Natasha V. (Okemos, MI); Broekaert, Willem F. (Dilbeek, BE); Chua, Nam-Hai (Scarsdale, NY); Kush, Anil (New York, NY)

1995-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

353

cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74--79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli. 12 figs.

Raikhel, N.V.; Broekaert, W.F.; Chua, N.H.; Kush, A.

1999-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

354

cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1,018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74--79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli. 11 figures.

Raikhel, N.V.; Broekaert, W.F.; Chua, N.H.; Kush, A.

1995-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

355

Process simulation of refinery units including chemical reactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Process simulation methods for design and operation of refinery units are well established as long as no chemical reactors are included. The feedstocks are divided into pseudo-components which enables calculation of phase equilibria and transport properties. When chemical reactors are present some chemical conversion takes place which obviously affects the nature of the pseudo-components and their properties. The stream leaving the reactor will not only be of a different composition than the stream entering the reactor but in addition, the pseudo-components making up the outlet stream will also have other physical properties than the ones in the inlet stream. These changes affect not only the reactor unit but also the simulation of the whole flow-sheet. The paper presents a detailed model for an adiabatic distillate hydrotreater which takes into account the elemental composition of the feed. A special simulation strategy has been developed to incorporate such reactor units into process simulators. Finally, the simulation strategy is illustrated for a hydrotreating plant.

Jens A. Hansen; Barry H. Cooper

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Methods for determining vented volumes during gas well blowouts  

SciTech Connect

Several methods are presented for determining vented volumes during gas well blowouts. The methods described apply to gas production in which no liquids phase(s), hydrocarbon and/or water, are present in the gas. Each method is illustrated with a numerical example. Sensitivity analyses provide estimates of probable errors. The method of crossplotting formation and flow string resistances is the only one which does not require special measurements. It is therefore applicalbe to cratered wells and underwater blowouts. The report includes several suggestions for investigations which might lead to better methods.

Hawkins, M.F. Jr.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Imbibition well stimulation via neural network design  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for stimulation of hydrocarbon production via imbibition by utilization of surfactants. The method includes use of fuzzy logic and neural network architecture constructs to determine surfactant use.

Weiss, William (Socorro, NM)

2007-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

358

Agrochemicals in field margins—Field evaluation of plant reproduction effects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Field margins are important habitats for various plant species in agro-ecosystems but they can also be exposed to agrochemicals. In this experimental field study, effects of herbicide, insecticide, and fertilizer misplacements in field margins on the plant frequency and reproductive capacity of four wild plant species (Ranunculus acris, Lathyrus pratensis, Vicia sepium, Rumex acetosa) were investigated from 2010 to 2012. Individual and combined effects of the agrochemicals were studied in a randomized block design and plant community assessments were performed every year. Additionally, seeds of the four species were harvested in 2012 to detect effects on plant reproduction. Plant frequencies of the four species were significantly reduced in all herbicide and fertilizer treatments in the third year. The plant frequency of R. acris and L. pratensis was more affected in the fertilizer treatments than in the herbicide treatments, whereas the plant frequency of V. sepium and R. acetosa was similarly affected by fertilizer and herbicide treatments. However, the treatment combinations of fertilizer and herbicide resulted in additive effects on the plant frequency of V. sepium and R. acetosa. Furthermore, herbicide treatments suppressed the formation of flowers and, hence, led to a significantly reduced seed production of R. acris, L. pratensis, and V. sepium. Because field margins are exposed to repeated agrochemical applications over several years, the observed effects will possibly lead to shifts in plant community compositions and cause the disappearance of the affected plants in the long run. In the current risk assessment of herbicides for nontarget plants no reproduction effects are considered, and therefore, it seems that herbicide effects on wild plants species are potentially underestimated.

Juliane Schmitz; Karoline Schäfer; Carsten A. Brühl

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Project management improves well control events  

SciTech Connect

During a well control operation, the efficient use of personnel and equipment, through good project management techniques, contributes to increased safety and ensures a quality project. The key to a successful blowout control project is to use all resources in the most efficient manner. Excessive use of resources leads to unnecessary expenditures and delays in bringing the project under control. The Kuwait well control project, which involved more than 700 blowouts, was accomplished in a much shorter time (8 months) than first estimated (5 years). This improvement partly resulted from the application of sound project management techniques. These projects were prime examples of the need for a formal project management approach to handling wild well projects. There are many examples of projects that were successful in controlling wells but were economic disasters. Only through the effective application of project management can complex well control projects be completed in reasonable time frames at reasonable cost. The paper describes team management, project scope, organizational structures, scheduling, tracking models, critical path method, and decision trees.

Oberlender, G.D. [Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States); Abel, L.W. [Wild Well Control Inc., Spring, TX (United States)

1995-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

360

Number of Producing Gas Wells (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count) Count) Data Series: Wellhead Price Imports Price Price of Imports by Pipeline Price of LNG Imports Exports Price Price of Exports by Pipeline Price of LNG Exports Pipeline and Distribution Use Price Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Vehicle Fuel Price Electric Power Price Proved Reserves as of 12/31 Reserves Adjustments Reserves Revision Increases Reserves Revision Decreases Reserves Sales Reserves Acquisitions Reserves Extensions Reserves New Field Discoveries New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields Estimated Production Number of Producing Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production Natural Gas Processed NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals LNG Storage Additions LNG Storage Withdrawals LNG Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Lease Fuel Plant Fuel Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period:

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including marginal wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Breast-Conserving Therapy: Radiotherapy Margins for Breast Tumor Bed Boost  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To quantify the interfraction position variability of the excision cavity (EC) and to compare the rib and breast surface as surrogates for the cavity. Additionally, we sought to determine the required margin for on-line, off-line and no correction protocols in external beam radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 20 patients were studied who had been treated in the supine position for 28 daily fractions. Cone-beam computed tomography scans were regularly acquired according to a shrinking action level setup correction protocol based on bony anatomy registration of the ribs and sternum. The position of the excision area was retrospectively analyzed by gray value cone-beam computed tomography-to-computed tomography registration. Subsequently, three setup correction strategies (on-line, off-line, and no corrections) were applied, according to the rib and breast surface registrations, to estimate the residual setup errors (systematic [{sigma}] and random [{sigma}]) of the excision area. The required margins were calculated using a margin recipe. Results: The image quality of the cone-beam computed tomography scans was sufficient for localization of the EC. The margins required for the investigated setup correction protocols and the setup errors for the left-right, craniocaudal and anteroposterior directions were 8.3 mm ({sigma} = 3.0, {sigma} = 2.6), 10.6 mm ({sigma} = 3.8, {sigma} = 3.2), and 7.7 mm ({sigma} = 2.7, {sigma} = 2.9) for the no correction strategy; 5.6 mm ({sigma} = 2.0, {sigma} = 1.8), 6.5 mm ({sigma} = 2.3, {sigma} = 2.3), and 4.5 mm ({sigma} = 1.5, {sigma} = 1.9) for the on-line rib strategy; and 5.1 mm ({sigma} = 1.8, {sigma} = 1.7), 4.8 mm ({sigma} = 1.7, {sigma} = 1.6), and 3.3 mm ({sigma} = 1.1, {sigma} = 1.6) for the on-line surface strategy, respectively. Conclusion: Considerable geometric uncertainties in the position of the EC relative to the bony anatomy and breast surface have been observed. By using registration of the breast surface, instead of the rib, the uncertainties in the position of the EC area were reduced.

Topolnjak, Rajko; Vliet-Vroegindeweij, Corine van; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Minkema, Danny; Remeijer, Peter; Nijkamp, Jasper; Elkhuizen, Paula [Department of Radiotherapy, Netherlands Cancer Institute/Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Huis, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Rasch, Coen [Department of Radiotherapy, Netherlands Cancer Institute/Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Huis, Amsterdam (Netherlands)], E-mail: c.rasch@nki.nl

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Monitoring voltage collapse margin with synchrophasors across transmission corridors with multiple lines and multiple contingencies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use synchrophasor measurements of the complex voltage and current at both ends of multiple transmission lines that connect areas of a power system to monitor the online voltage collapse margin. A new reduction is used to reduce the multiple transmission lines to a single line equivalent and determine how to combine the synchrophasor measurements. Generator reactive power limits can be accommodated. The results show that this methodology can capture the effect of multiple contingencies inside the transmission corridors, giving awareness to the operators about the severity of contingencies with respect to voltage stability.

Ramirez, Lina

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Transport Anomalies and Marginal-Fermi-Liquid Effects at a Quantum Critical Point  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The conductivity and the tunneling density of states of disordered itinerant electrons in the vicinity of a ferromagnetic transition at low temperature are discussed. Critical fluctuations lead to nonanalytic frequency and temperature dependencies that are distinct from the usual long-time tail effects in a disordered Fermi liquid. The crossover between these two types of behavior is proposed as an experimental check of recent theories of the quantum ferromagnetic critical behavior. In addition, the quasiparticle properties at criticality are shown to be those of a marginal Fermi liquid.

D. Belitz; T. R. Kirkpatrick; R. Narayanan; Thomas Vojta

2000-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

364

Definition: Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging Single well seismic imaging (SWSI) is the application of borehole seismic sources and receivers on the same string within a single borehole in order to acquire CMP type shot gathers. Cross well seismic places sources and receivers in adjacent wells in order to image the interwell volume.[1] Also Known As SWSI References ↑ http://library.seg.org/ Ret LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. rieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Single-Well_And_Cross-Well_Seismic_Imaging&oldid=690246" Category:

365

Salt Wells Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Salt Wells Geothermal Project Salt Wells Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Development Project: Salt Wells Geothermal Project Project Location Information Coordinates 39.580833333333°, -118.33444444444° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.580833333333,"lon":-118.33444444444,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

366

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 21,507 32,672 33,279 34,334 35,612 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 1,473,792 1,466,833 1,476,204 1,487,451 1,604,709 From Oil Wells.................................................. 139,097 148,551 105,402 70,704 58,439 Total................................................................... 1,612,890 1,615,384 1,581,606 1,558,155 1,663,148 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. NA NA NA 0 NA Wet After Lease Separation................................

367

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 94 95 100 117 117 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 13,527 13,846 15,130 14,524 15,565 From Oil Wells.................................................. 42,262 44,141 44,848 43,362 43,274 Total................................................................... 55,789 57,987 59,978 57,886 58,839 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 3,290 3,166 2,791 2,070 3,704 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 52,499 54,821 57,187 55,816 55,135

368

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 997 1,143 979 427 437 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 109,041 131,608 142,070 156,727 171,915 From Oil Wells.................................................. 5,339 5,132 5,344 4,950 4,414 Total................................................................... 114,380 136,740 147,415 161,676 176,329 Repressuring ...................................................... 6,353 6,194 5,975 6,082 8,069 Vented and Flared.............................................. 2,477 2,961 3,267 3,501 3,493 Wet After Lease Separation................................

369

GeoWells International | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GeoWells International GeoWells International Jump to: navigation, search Name GeoWells International Place Nairobi, Kenya Sector Geothermal energy, Solar, Wind energy Product Kenya-based geothermal driller. The company also supplies and installs wind and solar units. Coordinates -1.277298°, 36.806261° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":-1.277298,"lon":36.806261,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

370

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 42,475 42,000 45,000 46,203 47,117 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 264,139 191,889 190,249 187,723 197,217 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 264,139 191,889 190,249 187,723 197,217 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 264,139 191,889 190,249 187,723 197,217 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

371

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 9,907 13,978 15,608 18,154 20,244 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 1,188,657 1,467,331 1,572,728 1,652,504 1,736,136 From Oil Wells.................................................. 137,385 167,656 174,748 183,612 192,904 Total................................................................... 1,326,042 1,634,987 1,747,476 1,836,115 1,929,040 Repressuring ...................................................... 50,216 114,407 129,598 131,125 164,164 Vented and Flared.............................................. 9,945 7,462 12,356 16,685 16,848

372

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 71 68 69 61 61 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 648 563 531 550 531 From Oil Wells.................................................. 10,032 10,751 9,894 11,055 11,238 Total................................................................... 10,680 11,313 10,424 11,605 11,768 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 1,806 2,043 1,880 2,100 2,135 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 8,875 9,271 8,545 9,504 9,633 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

373

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 60,577 63,704 65,779 68,572 72,237 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 5,859,358 4,897,366 4,828,188 4,947,589 5,074,067 From Oil Wells.................................................. 999,624 855,081 832,816 843,735 659,851 Total................................................................... 6,858,983 5,752,446 5,661,005 5,791,324 5,733,918 Repressuring ...................................................... 138,372 195,150 212,638 237,723 284,491 Vented and Flared.............................................. 32,010 26,823 27,379 23,781 26,947

374

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 15,700 16,350 17,100 16,939 20,734 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 4,260,529 1,398,981 1,282,137 1,283,513 1,293,204 From Oil Wells.................................................. 895,425 125,693 100,324 94,615 88,209 Total................................................................... 5,155,954 1,524,673 1,382,461 1,378,128 1,381,413 Repressuring ...................................................... 42,557 10,838 9,754 18,446 19,031 Vented and Flared.............................................. 20,266 11,750 10,957 9,283 5,015 Wet After Lease Separation................................

375

Natural Gas Wells Near Project Rulison  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

for for Natural Gas Wells Near Project Rulison Second Quarter 2013 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Grand Junction, Colorado Date Sampled: April 3, 2013 Background: Project Rulison was the second underground nuclear test under the Plowshare Program to stimulate natural-gas recovery from deep, low-permeability formations. On September 10, 1969, a 40-kiloton-yield nuclear device was detonated 8,426 feet (1.6 miles) below the ground surface in the Williams Fork Formation, at what is now the Rulison, Colorado, Site. Following the detonation, a series of production tests were conducted. Afterward, the site was shut down and then remediated, and the emplacement well (R-E) and the reentry well (R-Ex) were plugged. Purpose: As part of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) mission

376

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 36,000 40,100 40,830 42,437 44,227 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 150,000 130,853 157,800 159,827 197,217 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 150,000 130,853 157,800 159,827 197,217 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. NA NA NA 0 NA Wet After Lease Separation................................ 150,000 130,853 157,800 159,827 197,217

377

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.................................... 4,359 4,597 4,803 5,157 5,526 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ................................................ 555,043 385,915 380,700 365,330 333,583 From Oil Wells .................................................. 6,501 6,066 5,802 5,580 5,153 Total................................................................... 561,544 391,981 386,502 370,910 338,735 Repressuring ...................................................... 13,988 12,758 10,050 4,062 1,307 Vented and Flared .............................................. 1,262 1,039 1,331 1,611 2,316 Wet After Lease Separation................................

378

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 3,321 4,331 4,544 4,539 4,971 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 61,974 71,985 76,053 78,175 87,292 From Oil Wells.................................................. 8,451 9,816 10,371 8,256 10,546 Total................................................................... 70,424 81,802 86,424 86,431 97,838 Repressuring ...................................................... 1 0 0 2 5 Vented and Flared.............................................. 488 404 349 403 1,071 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 69,936 81,397 86,075 86,027 96,762

379

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 3,051 3,521 3,429 3,506 3,870 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 71,545 71,543 76,915 R 143,644 152,495 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 71,545 71,543 76,915 R 143,644 152,495 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 71,545 71,543 76,915 R 143,644 152,495 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

380

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 33,948 35,217 35,873 37,100 38,574 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 1,484,269 1,484,856 1,432,966 1,391,916 1,397,934 From Oil Wells.................................................. 229,437 227,534 222,940 224,263 246,804 Total................................................................... 1,713,706 1,712,390 1,655,906 1,616,179 1,644,738 Repressuring ...................................................... 15,280 20,009 20,977 9,817 8,674 Vented and Flared.............................................. 3,130 3,256 2,849 2,347 3,525 Wet After Lease Separation................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including marginal wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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381

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 5,775 5,913 6,496 5,878 5,781 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 17,741 27,632 36,637 35,943 45,963 From Oil Wells.................................................. 16 155 179 194 87 Total................................................................... 17,757 27,787 36,816 36,137 46,050 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 17,757 27,787 36,816 36,137 46,050 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

382

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 4,000 4,825 6,755 7,606 3,460 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 156,333 150,972 147,734 157,039 176,221 From Oil Wells.................................................. 15,524 16,263 14,388 12,915 11,088 Total................................................................... 171,857 167,235 162,122 169,953 187,310 Repressuring ...................................................... 8 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 206 431 251 354 241 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 171,642 166,804

383

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 4,178 4,601 3,005 3,220 3,657 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 244,826 264,809 260,554 254,488 259,432 From Oil Wells.................................................. 36,290 36,612 32,509 29,871 31,153 Total................................................................... 281,117 301,422 293,063 284,359 290,586 Repressuring ...................................................... 563 575 2,150 1,785 1,337 Vented and Flared.............................................. 1,941 1,847 955 705 688 Wet After Lease Separation................................

384

Downhole Temperature Prediction for Drilling Geothermal Wells  

SciTech Connect

Unusually high temperatures are encountered during drilling of a geothermal well. These temperatures affect every aspect of drilling, from drilling fluid properties to cement formulations. Clearly, good estimates of downhole temperatures during drilling would be helpful in preparing geothermal well completion designs, well drilling plans, drilling fluid requirements, and cement formulations. The thermal simulations in this report were conducted using GEOTEMP, a computer code developed under Sandia National Laboratories contract and available through Sandia. Input variables such as drilling fluid inlet temperatures and circulation rates, rates of penetration, and shut-in intervals were obtained from the Imperial Valley East Mesa Field and the Los Alamos Hot Dry Rock Project. The results of several thermal simulations are presented, with discussion of their impact on drilling fluids, cements, casing design, and drilling practices.

Mitchell, R. F.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Apparatus for rotating and reciprocating well pipe  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes an apparatus for simultaneously rotating and reciprocating well pipe, having an upper end, and mechanically utilizing a rotary table attached to a drilling rig, comprising: a rotating pipe clamp assembly having an irregular cross-sectional mid-member and clamp members for releasably gripping the well pipe connected to the ends of the mid-member for rotation therewith; a square block for fitting to the rotary table square and having a selected grooved interior configuration; a torque transmitting means fitted into the grooves having openings therethrough having the same irregular cross-section as the mid-member cross-section; and a torque limiting means connecting the torque transmitting means and the block for limiting torque applied through the well pipe via the clamp assembly and the torque transmitting means.

Davis, K.D.

1988-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

386

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 7,068 7,425 7,700 8,600 8,500 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 241,776 224,560 224,112 194,121 212,276 From Oil Wells.................................................. 60,444 56,140 56,028 48,530 53,069 Total................................................................... 302,220 280,700 280,140 242,651 265,345 Repressuring ...................................................... 2,340 2,340 2,340 2,340 2,340 Vented and Flared.............................................. 3,324 3,324 3,324 3,324 3,324 Wet After Lease Separation................................

387

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 13,487 14,370 14,367 12,900 13,920 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 81,545 81,723 88,259 87,608 94,259 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 81,545 81,723 88,259 87,608 94,259 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 81,545 81,723 88,259 87,608 94,259 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

388

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 33,897 33,917 34,593 33,828 33,828 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 98,551 97,272 97,154 87,993 85,018 From Oil Wells.................................................. 6,574 2,835 6,004 5,647 5,458 Total................................................................... 105,125 100,107 103,158 93,641 90,476 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. NA NA NA 0 NA Wet After Lease Separation................................ 105,125 100,107 103,158

389

Resonator-quantum well infrared photodetectors  

SciTech Connect

We applied a recent electromagnetic model to design the resonator-quantum well infrared photodetector (R-QWIP). In this design, we used an array of rings as diffractive elements to diffract normal incident light into parallel propagation and used the pixel volume as a resonator to intensify the diffracted light. With a proper pixel size, the detector resonates at certain optical wavelengths and thus yields a high quantum efficiency (QE). To test this detector concept, we fabricated a number of R-QWIPs with different quantum well materials and detector geometries. The experimental result agrees satisfactorily with the prediction, and the highest QE achieved is 71%.

Choi, K. K., E-mail: kwong.k.choi.civ@mail.mil; Sun, J.; Olver, K. [Electro-Optics and Photonics Division, U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Adelphi, Maryland 20783 (United States)] [Electro-Optics and Photonics Division, U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Adelphi, Maryland 20783 (United States); Jhabvala, M. D.; Jhabvala, C. A.; Waczynski, A. [Instrument Systems and Technology Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States)] [Instrument Systems and Technology Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States)

2013-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

390

Testing of the Pleasant Bayou Well through October 1990  

SciTech Connect

Pleasant Bayou location was inactive from 1983 until the cleanout of the production and disposal wells in 1986. The surface facilities were rehabilitated and after shakedown of the system, additional repair of wellhead valves, and injection of an inhibitor pill, continuous long-term production was started in 1988. Over two years of production subsequent to that are reviewed here, including: production data, brine sampling and analysis, hydrocarbon sampling and analysis, solids sampling and analysis, scale control and corrosion monitoring and control.

Randolph, P.L.; Hayden, C.G.; Mosca, V.L.; Anhaiser, J.L.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Economic evaluation of smart well technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. At this pivotal time the role of emerging technologies is of at most importance. Smart or intelligent well technology is one of the up and coming technologies that have been developed to assist improvements in field development outcome. In this paper a...

Al Omair, Abdullatif A.

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

392

ATHLETICS AND RECREATION Health, Wellness and Recreation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ATHLETICS AND RECREATION Health, Wellness and Recreation 5 July 1.00pm ­ 4.00pm Attendees: Louise and recreation for UBC. Anticipating this `work in progress' outcome from our initial discussion, the approach and recreation as it is currently structured? 2 Closer attention to level/degree of competition vs other drivers

Handy, Todd C.

393

Well performance under solutions gas drive  

SciTech Connect

A fully implicit black-oil simulator was written to predict the drawdown and buildup responses for a single well under Solution Gas Drive. The model is capable of handling the following reservoir behaviors: Unfractured reservoir, Double-Porosity system, and Double Permeability-Double Porosity model of Bourdet. The accuracy of the model results is tested for both single-phase liquid flow and two-phase flow. The results presented here provide a basis for the empirical equations presented in the literature. New definitions of pseudopressure and dimensionless time are presented. By using these two definitions, the multiphase flow solutions correlate with the constant rate liquid flow solution for both transient and boundary-dominated flow. For pressure buildup tests, an analogue for the liquid solution is constructed from the drawdown pseudopressure, similar to the reservoir integral of J. Jones. The utility of using the producing gas-oil ration at shut in to compute pseudopressures and pseudotimes is documented. The influence of pressure level and skin factor on the Inflow Performance Relationship (IPR) of wells producing solution gas drive systems is examined. A new definition of flow efficiency that is based on the structure of the deliverability equations is proposed. This definition avoids problems that result when the presently available methods are applied to heavily stimulated wells. The need for using pseudopressures to analyze well test data for fractured reservoirs is shown. Expressions to compute sandface saturations for fractured systems are presented.

Camacho-Velazquez, R.G.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Flow tests of the Willis Hulin well  

SciTech Connect

The Hulin well was tested between 20,100 and 20,700 feet down in layers of brine-saturated clean sand with occasional intervening layers of shale. The characteristics of the brine and gas were determined in this interval and an initial determination of the reservoir properties were made.

Randolph, P.L.; Hayden, C.G.; Rogers, L.A.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

The integrity of oil and gas wells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...oil and natural gas wells passing through drinking-water aquifers (1–4). In PNAS, Ingraffea et al. (5) examine one of...Jackson RB ( 2014 ) The environmental costs and benefits of fracking. Annu Rev Environ Resour, in press . 12 Nicot JP Scanlon...

Robert B. Jackson

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

T2WELL/ECO2N  

Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

002966IBMPC00 T2Well/ECO2N Version 1.0: Multiphase and Non-Isothermal Model for Coupled Wellbore-Reservoir Flow of Carbon Dioxide and Variable Salinity Water  http:..esd.lbl.gov/tough/licensing.html 

397

Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging (Redirected from Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Borehole Seismic Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Borehole Seismic Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock unit density influences elastic wave velocities. Stratigraphic/Structural: Structural geology- faults, folds, grabens, horst blocks, sedimentary layering, discontinuities, etc. Hydrological: Combining compressional and shear wave results can indicate the presence of fluid saturation in the formation.

398

Single-Well and Cross-Well Resistivity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Single-Well and Cross-Well Resistivity Single-Well and Cross-Well Resistivity Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Single-Well and Cross-Well Resistivity Details Activities (14) Areas (13) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Well Log Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Well Log Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Identify different lithological layers, rock composition, mineral, and clay content Stratigraphic/Structural: -Fault and fracture identification -Rock texture, porosity, and stress analysis -determine dip and structural features in vicinity of borehole -Detection of permeable pathways, fracture zones, faults Hydrological: Resistivity influenced by porosity, grain size distribution, permeability, fluid saturation, fluid type and phase state of the pore water

399

Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic (Majer, 2003) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic (Majer, 2003) Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic (Majer, 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic (Majer, 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Unspecified Exploration Technique Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The goal of this work is to evaluate the most promising methods and approaches that may be used for improved geothermal exploration and reservoir assessment. It is not a comprehensive review of all seismic methods used to date in geothermal environments. This work was motivated by a need to assess current and developing seismic technology that if applied in geothermal cases may greatly improve the chances for locating new

400

Development Wells At Salt Wells Area (Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Salt Wells Area (Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, Salt Wells Area (Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Development Wells At Salt Wells Area (Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Salt Wells Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Development Drilling Activity Date 2005 - 2005 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis AMP Resources, LLC drilled one of the first operating wells, Industrial Production Well PW-2, in the spring of 2005 under geothermal project area permit #568. Notes The well was completed to a depth of 143.6 m and a peak temperature of 145°C, as indicated by static temperature surveys. Wellhead temperatures at PW-2 were 140°C at a flow rate of 157.7 liters per minute, and no

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including marginal wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Effects of fracturing fluid recovery upon well performance and ultimate recovery of hydraulically fractured gas wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EFFECTS OF FRACTURING FLUID RECOVERY UPON WELL PERFORMANCE AND ULTIMATE RECOVERY OF HYDRAULICALLY FRACTURED GAS WELLS A Thesis IAN MARIE BERTHELOT Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas AdtM University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1990 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering EFFECTS OF FRACTURING FLUID RECOVERY UPON WELL PERFORMANCE AND ULTIMATE RECOVERY OF HYDRAULICALLY FRACTURED GAS WELLS by JAN MARIE BERTIIELOT Appmved...

Berthelot, Jan Marie

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

402

Receptors and Entry Cofactors for Retroviruses Include Single and Multiple Transmembrane-Spanning Proteins as well as Newly Described Glycophosphatidylinositol-Anchored and Secreted Proteins  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...interaction. The observation that the Pit receptors are a common target...conserved among viruses that use Pit receptors implies that the mode of binding is immaterial to Pit-mediated viral entry...Anderson A. S. Lauring C. C. Burns J. Overbaugh Identification...

Julie Overbaugh; A. Dusty Miller; Maribeth V. Eiden

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Maturation of Tertiary sediments in the Asian Continental Margins: A basis for hydrocarbon generation studies  

SciTech Connect

In the marginal areas of the Asian continent, the Paleogene and Miocene coal-bearing formations are sporadically distributed. In some areas, particularly in the sea regions, their equivalents are possibly explored for oil and gas. The basins mainly formed as tectonic depressions, and are filled with fluvial to marine clastic rocks. The formations show marked lateral variation in thickness, lithology, and sediment characteristics, which are related to the geotectonic settings of the basins at active plate margins. Remarkable accumulation of overburden and high paleogeothermal conditions, which are marked in northern Kyushu, Japan, and Thailand, influenced diagenesis. Organic and inorganic maturation studies in northern Kyushu reveal a progress of diagenesis from the inland of Kyushu toward the sea region essentially controlled by additional heat supply from the sea region during and after sedimentation. The sediments on the land surface are chiefly overmatured, and/or contain minor amounts of organic carbon. High paleogeothermal influence on Tertiary maturation is clear also in northern Thailand. The high paleotemperature conditions in these areas may be related to tectonic interaction between the oceanic and continental plates.

Miki, Takashi (Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan))

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Energy-conserving perennial agriculture for marginal land in southern Appalachia. Final technical report  

SciTech Connect

USDA economists predict the end of surplus farm production in the US within this decade. More and more marginal land will be cropped to provide feed for the growing world population and to produce energy. Much of this potential cropland in Southern Appalachia is poorly suited to annual crops, such as corn. Perennial crops are much better suited to steep, rocky, and wet sites. Research was undertaken on the theoretical potentials of perennial species with high predicted yields of protein, carbohydrates, or oils. Several candidate staple perennial crops for marginal land in Southern Appalachia were identified, and estimates were made of their yields, energy input requirements, and general suitabilities. Cropping systems incorporating honeylocust, persimmon, mulberry, jujube, and beech were compared with corn cropping systems. It appears that these candidate staple perennials show distinct advantages for energy conservation and environmental preservation. Detailed economic analyses must await actual demonstration trials, but preliminary indications for ethanol conversion systems with honeylocust are encouraging. It is suggested that short-term loans to farmers undertaking this new type of agriculture would be appropriate to solve cash-flow problems.

Williams, G.

1982-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

405

The Application of Droop-Control in Distributed Energy Resources to Extend the Voltage Collapse Margin  

SciTech Connect

The growth in distributed energy resources has the potential to reduce system stresses caused by transmission grid congestion by supplying power and voltage regulation closer to load centers. However, the additional voltage regulation provided by these resources can mask the onset of voltage collapse. Local voltage support flattens the slope in the upper region of the power-voltage nose curve. Coordinating voltage-regulation behavior with the droop-control scheme in distributed resources improves the observation of voltage collapse margins. Incorporating distributed resource models in the continuation power flow analysis, allows the exploration of the power transfer gains by the application of distributed resources. The analysis provides insight to the impact of droop control on the behavior of the power-voltage curve and voltage collapse. The analysis is applied to a fixed speed induction generator wind farm with separate reactive compensation and the interconnection to the local power system. Results reveal that coordinating the droop control strategy allows the distributed resource to significantly increase the voltage collapse margin without hiding the threat of voltage stability problems.

Henry, Shawn D. [Florida State University; Rizy, D Tom [ORNL; Baldwin, Thomas L [Florida State University; Kueck, John D [ORNL; Li, Fangxing [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Including Retro-Commissioning in Federal Energy Savings Performance Contracts  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Guidance document on the importance of (and steps to) including retro-commissioning in Federal energy savings performance contracts (ESPCs).

407

Lalamilo Wells Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Farm Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Lalamilo Wells Wind Farm Facility Lalamilo Wells Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Hawaiian Electric Light Co. Developer Lalamilo Ventures Energy Purchaser Hawaii Electric Light Co. Location Big Island HI Coordinates 19.9875°, -155.765556° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":19.9875,"lon":-155.765556,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

408

GAS INJECTION/WELL STIMULATION PROJECT  

SciTech Connect

Driver Production proposes to conduct a gas repressurization/well stimulation project on a six well, 80-acre portion of the Dutcher Sand of the East Edna Field, Okmulgee County, Oklahoma. The site has been location of previous successful flue gas injection demonstration but due to changing economic and sales conditions, finds new opportunities to use associated natural gas that is currently being vented to the atmosphere to repressurize the reservoir to produce additional oil. The established infrastructure and known geological conditions should allow quick startup and much lower operating costs than flue gas. Lessons learned from the previous project, the lessons learned form cyclical oil prices and from other operators in the area will be applied. Technology transfer of the lessons learned from both projects could be applied by other small independent operators.

John K. Godwin

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Recent developments in well test analysis  

SciTech Connect

The analysis of pressure transient data in terms of model parameter values is part of the reservoir description process and must be regarded as complementary to other branches of this activity. The advantage of transient pressure data is the depth of investigation achieved by the propagating pressure disturbance. However, the problem of an interpretation`s lack of uniqueness always exists. The objective of well test analysis is to help increase the understanding of the reservoir structure so that ultimate recovery can be improved. This pressure transient analysis review summarizes the major developments that have occurred since the derivative technique was introduced in 1982. This is the first in a series that discusses recent and future developments in well test analysis.

Stewart, G. [Edinburgh Petroleum Services Ltd. (United Kingdom)]|[Heriot-Watt Univ., Edinburgh (United Kingdom)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Drop pressure optimization in oil well drilling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this research work we are interested in minimizing losses existing when drilling an oil well. This would essentially improve the load losses by acting on the rheological parameters of the hydraulic and drilling mud. For this rheological tests were performed using a six-speed rotary viscometer (FANN 35). We used several rheological models to accurately describe the actual rheological behavior of drilling mud oil-based according to the Pearson's coefficient and to the standard deviation. To model the problem we established a system of equations that describe the essential to highlight purpose and various constraints that allow for achieving this goal. To solve the problem we developed a computer program that solves the obtained equations in Visual Basic language system. Hydraulic and rheological calculation was made for in situ application. This allowed us to estimate the distribution of losses in the well.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Energy loss rate in disordered quantum well  

SciTech Connect

We report the effect of dynamically screened deformation potential on the electron energy loss rate in disordered semiconductor quantum well. Interaction of confined electrons with bulk acoustic phonons has been considered in the deformation coupling. The study concludes that the dynamically screened deformation potential coupling plays a significant role as it substantially affects the power dependency of electron relaxation on temperature and mean free path.

Tripathi, P.; Ashraf, S. S. Z. [Centre of Excellence in Nanomaterials, Faculty of Engineering and Technology, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh-202002 (India); Hasan, S. T. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, The M.S. University of Baroda, Vadodara-390002 (India); Sharma, A. C. [Physics Department, Sibli National College, Azamgarh-276128 (India)

2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

412

Program solves for gas well inflow performance  

SciTech Connect

A Windows-based program, GasIPR, can solve for the gas well inflow performance relationship (IPR). The program calculates gas producing rates at various pressures and is applicable for both turbulent and non-turbulent flow. It also has the following capabilities: computes PVT properties {gamma}{sub g}, P{sub c}, T{sub c}, heating value, Z, {mu}{sub g}, B{sub g}, and {rho}{sub g} from input gas composition data; calculates the Reynolds number (N{sub Re}) and shows the gas flow rates at the sandface at which the turbulence effect must be considered; helps the user to optimize the net perforation interval (h{sub p}) so that the turbulence effect can be minimized; and helps the user to evaluate the sensitivity of formation permeability on gas flow rate for a new play. IPR is a critical component in forecasting gas well deliverability. IPRs are used for sizing optimum tubing configurations and compressors, designing gravel packs, and solving gas well loading problems. IPR is the key reference for nodal analysis.

Engineer, R. [AERA Energy LLC, Bakersfield, CA (United States); Grillete, G. [Bechtel Petroleum Operations Inc., Tupman, CA (United States)

1997-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

413

Vibration of Generalized Double Well Oscillators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have applied the Melnikov criterion to examine a global homoclinic bifurcation and transition to chaos in a case of a double well dynamical system with a nonlinear fractional damping term and external excitation. The usual double well Duffing potential having a negative square term and positive quartic term has been generalized to a double well potential with a negative square term and a positive one with an arbitrary real exponent $q > 2$. We have also used a fractional damping term with an arbitrary power $p$ applied to velocity which enables one to cover a wide range of realistic damping factors: from dry friction $p \\to 0$ to turbulent resistance phenomena $p=2$. Using perturbation methods we have found a critical forcing amplitude $\\mu_c$ above which the system may behave chaotically. Our results show that the vibrating system is less stable in transition to chaos for smaller $p$ satisfying an exponential scaling low. The critical amplitude $\\mu_c$ as an exponential function of $p$. The analytical results have been illustrated by numerical simulations using standard nonlinear tools such as Poincare maps and the maximal Lyapunov exponent. As usual for chosen system parameters we have identified a chaotic motion above the critical Melnikov amplitude $\\mu_c$.

Grzegorz Litak; Marek Borowiec; Arkadiusz Syta

2006-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

414

Completion Report for Well Cluster ER-6-1  

SciTech Connect

Well Cluster ER-6-1 was constructed for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Division at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. This work was initiated as part of the Groundwater Characterization Project, now known as the Underground Test Area Project. The well cluster is located in southeastern Yucca Flat. Detailed lithologic descriptions with stratigraphic assignments for Well Cluster ER-6-1 are included in this report. These are based on composite drill cuttings collected every 3 meters and conventional core samples taken below 639 meters, supplemented by geophysical log data. Detailed petrographic, chemical, and mineralogical studies of rock samples were conducted on 11 samples to resolve complex interrelationships between several of the Tertiary tuff units. Additionally, paleontological analyses by the U.S. Geological Survey confirmed the stratigraphic assignments below 539 meters within the Paleozoic sedimentary section. All three wells in the Well ER-6-1 cluster were drilled within the Quaternary and Tertiary alluvium section, the Tertiary volcanic section, and into the Paleozoic sedimentary section.

Bechtel Nevada

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Completion Report for Well ER-2-1  

SciTech Connect

Well ER-2-1 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (formerly Nevada Operations Office), in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. This well was drilled in February and March of 2003, as part of a hydrogeologic investigation program for the Yucca Flat/Climax Mine Corrective Action Unit in the northeastern portion of the Nevada Test Site. Well ER-2-1 was drilled as part of the Yucca Flat Corrective Action Unit Phase I drilling initiative. The well is located in north central Yucca Flat within Area 2 of the Nevada Test Site, and provided information regarding the radiological and physical environment near underground nuclear tests conducted in a saturated volcanic aquifer setting. Detailed lithologic descriptions with stratigraphic assignments are included in this report. These are based on composite drill cuttings collected every 3 meters and 83 sidewall samples taken at various depths between 113.7 and 754.4 meters, supplemented by geophysical log data. Detailed petrographic, chemical, and mineralogical studies of rock samples were conducted on 27 samples of drill cuttings. The well was collared in tuffaceous alluvium, and penetrated Tertiary-age tuffs of the Timber Mountain and Paintbrush Groups, Calico Hills and Wahmonie Formations, Crater Flat Group, Grouse Canyon Formation, before reaching total depth in the Tunnel Bed Formation.

Bechtel Nevada

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Geothermal reservoir well stimulation program. First-year progress report  

SciTech Connect

The Geothermal Reservoir Well Stimulation Program (GRWSP) group planned and executed two field experiments at the Raft River KGRA during 1979. Well RRGP-4 was stimulated using a dendritic (Kiel) hydraulic fracture technique and Well RRGP-5 was stimulated using a conventional massive hydraulic fracture technique. Both experiments were technically successful; however, the post-stimulation productivity of the wells was disappointing. Even though the artificially induced fractures probably successfully connected with the natural fracture system, reservoir performance data suggest that productivity remained low due to the fundamentally limited flow capacity of the natural fractures in the affected region of the reservoir. Other accomplishments during the first year of the program may be summarized as follows: An assessment was made of current well stimulation technology upon which to base geothermal applications. Numerous reservoirs were evaluated as potential candidates for field experiments. A recommended list of candidates was developed which includes Raft River, East Mesa, Westmorland, Baca, Brawley, The Geysers and Roosevelt Hot Springs. Stimulation materials (fracture fluids, proppants, RA tracer chemicals, etc.) were screened for high temperature properties, and promising materials selected for further laboratory testing. Numerical models were developed to aid in predicting and evaluating stimulation experiments. (MHR)

Not Available

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Generic effluent monitoring system certification for salt well portable exhauster  

SciTech Connect

Tests were conducted to verify that the Generic Effluent Monitoring System (GEMS), as it is applied to the Salt Well Portable Exhauster, meets all applicable regulatory performance criteria for air sampling systems at nuclear facilities. These performance criteria address both the suitability of the air sampling probe location and the transport of the sample to the collection devices. The criteria covering air sampling probe location ensure that the contaminants in the stack are well mixed with the airflow at the probe location such that the extracted sample represents the whole. The sample transport criteria ensure that the sampled contaminants are quantitatively delivered to the collection device. The specific performance criteria are described in detail in the report. The tests demonstrated that the GEMS/Salt Well Exhauster system meets all applicable performance criteria. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted the testing using a mockup of the Salt Well Portable Exhauster stack at the Numatec Hanford Company`s 305 Building. The stack/sampling system configuration tested was designed to provide airborne effluent control for the Salt Well pumping operation at some U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) radioactive waste storage tanks at the Hanford Site, Washington. The portable design of the exhauster allows it to be used in other applications and over a range of exhaust air flowrates (approximately 200 - 1100 cubic feet per minute). The unit includes a stack section containing the sampling probe and another stack section containing the airflow, temperature and humidity sensors. The GEMS design features a probe with a single shrouded sampling nozzle, a sample delivery line, and sample collection system. The collection system includes a filter holder to collect the sample of record and an in-line detector head and filter for monitoring beta radiation-emitting particles.

Glissmeyer, J.A.; Maughan, A.D.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Modeling well performance in compartmentalized gas reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

index in estimating reservoir performance. • The optimization routine is done with VBA using Excel solver. Model Assumptions • The reservoir is in stabilized flow under pseudo-steady state conditions at constant pressure with no aquifer influx... is matched with a type curve to predict field performance. Fetkovich Decline Type Curves 11 is based on analytical solutions to flow equations for production at constant BHP and include both transient and boundary dominated flow periods. These log...

Yusuf, Nurudeen

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

419

Modeling well performance in compartmentalized gas reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

index in estimating reservoir performance. ? The optimization routine is done with VBA using Excel solver. Model Assumptions ? The reservoir is in stabilized flow under pseudo-steady state conditions at constant pressure with no aquifer influx... is matched with a type curve to predict field performance. Fetkovich Decline Type Curves 11 is based on analytical solutions to flow equations for production at constant BHP and include both transient and boundary dominated flow periods. These log...

Yusuf, Nurudeen

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

420

Production Well Performance Enhancement using Sonication Technology  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project was to develop a sonic well performance enhancement technology that focused on near wellbore formation damage. In order to successfully achieve this objective, a three-year project was defined. The entire project was broken into four tasks. The overall objective of all this was to foster a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in sonic energy interactions with fluid flow in porous media and adapt such knowledge for field applications. The fours tasks are: • Laboratory studies • Mathematical modeling • Sonic tool design and development • Field demonstration The project was designed to be completed in three years; however, due to budget cuts, support was only provided for the first year, and hence the full objective of the project could not be accomplished. This report summarizes what was accomplished with the support provided by the US Department of Energy. Experiments performed focused on determining the inception of cavitation, studying thermal dissipation under cavitation conditions, investigating sonic energy interactions with glass beads and oil, and studying the effects of sonication on crude oil properties. Our findings show that the voltage threshold for onset of cavitation is independent of transducer-hydrophone separation distance. In addition, thermal dissipation under cavitation conditions contributed to the mobilization of deposited paraffins and waxes. Our preliminary laboratory experiments suggest that waxes are mobilized when the fluid temperature approaches 40°C. Experiments were conducted that provided insights into the interactions between sonic wave and the fluid contained in the porous media. Most of these studies were carried out in a slim-tube apparatus. A numerical model was developed for simulating the effect of sonication in the nearwellbore region. The numerical model developed was validated using a number of standard testbed problems. However, actual application of the model for scale-up purposes was limited due to funding constraints. The overall plan for this task was to perlorm field trials with the sonication tooL These trials were to be performed in production and/or injection wells located in Pennsylvania, New York, and West Virginia. Four new wells were drilled in preparation for the field demonstration. Baseline production data were collected and reservoir simulator tuned to simulate these oil reservoirs. The sonication tools were designed for these wells. However, actual field testing could not be carried out because of premature termination of the project.

Adewumi, Michael A; Ityokumbul, M Thaddeus; Watson, Robert W; Eltohami, Eltohami; Farias, Mario; Heckman, Glenn; Houlihan, Brendan; Karoor, Samata Prakash; Miller, Bruce G; Mohammed, Nazia; Olanrewaju, Johnson; Ozdemir, Mine; Rejepov, Dautmamed; Sadegh, Abdallah A; Quammie, Kevin E; Zaghloul, Jose; Hughes, W Jack; Montgomery, Thomas C

2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including marginal wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Treating paraffin deposits in producing oil wells  

SciTech Connect

Paraffin deposition has been a problem for operators in many areas since the beginning of petroleum production from wells. An extensive literature search on paraffin problems and methods of control has been carried out, and contact was made with companies which provide chemicals to aid in the treatment of paraffin problems. A discussion of the nature of paraffins and the mechanisms of this deposition is presented. The methods of prevention and treatment of paraffin problems are summarized. Suggested procedures for handling paraffin problems are provided. Suggestions for areas of further research testing are given.

Noll, L.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Apparatus for use in rejuvenating oil wells  

SciTech Connect

A sub incorporating a check valve is connected into the lower end of a well pipestring. This valve will pass hot steam injected down the pipestring to the formations to loosen up the thick crude oil. The check valve prevents back flow and thus will hold the high pressure steam. To resume production, the production pump can then be lowered through the pipestring. The pump itself is provided with an extended probe member which will unseat the check valve when the pump is in proper position so that production pumping can resume.

Warnock, C.E. Sr.

1983-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

423

CNCC Craig Campus Geothermal Program: 82-well closed loop GHP well field to  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CNCC Craig Campus Geothermal Program: 82-well closed loop GHP well field to CNCC Craig Campus Geothermal Program: 82-well closed loop GHP well field to provide geothermal energy as a common utility for a new community college campus. Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title CNCC Craig Campus Geothermal Program: 82-well closed loop GHP well field to provide geothermal energy as a common utility for a new community college campus. Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act - Geothermal Technologies Program: Ground Source Heat Pumps Project Type / Topic 2 Topic Area 1: Technology Demonstration Projects Project Description This "geothermal central plant" concept will provide ground source loop energy as a utility to be shared by the academic and residential buildings on the soon-to-be-constructed campus.

424

Exploratory Well At Salt Wells Area (Edmiston & Benoit, 1984) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Edmiston & Benoit, 1984) Edmiston & Benoit, 1984) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Exploratory Well At Salt Wells Area (Edmiston & Benoit, 1984) Exploration Activity Details Location Salt Wells Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Exploratory Well Activity Date 1980 - 1980 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis The blind Salt Wells geothermal system was first identified when Anadarko Petroleum Corporation drilled slim hole and geothermal exploration wells at the site in 1980. Two reports detail the results of this drilling activity. This paper seeks to (1) describe several moderate-temperature (150-200°C) geothermal systems discovered and drilled during the early 1980s that had not been documented previously in the literature, (2) summarize and compare

425

Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Borehole Seismic Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Borehole Seismic Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock unit density influences elastic wave velocities. Stratigraphic/Structural: Structural geology- faults, folds, grabens, horst blocks, sedimentary layering, discontinuities, etc. Hydrological: Combining compressional and shear wave results can indicate the presence of fluid saturation in the formation. Thermal: High temperatures and pressure impact the compressional and shear wave velocities.

426

Hydraulic fracture stimulation treatment of Well Baca 23. Geothermal Reservoir Well-Stimulation Program  

SciTech Connect

Well Stimulation Experiment No. 5 of the Geothermal Reservoir Well Stimulation Program (GRWSP) was performed on March 22, 1981 in Baca 23, located in Union's Redondo Creek Project Area in Sandoval County, New Mexico. The treatment selected was a large hydraulic fracture job designed specifically for, and utilizing frac materials chosen for, the high temperature geothermal environment. The well selection, fracture treatment, experiment evaluation, and summary of the job costs are presented herein.

Not Available

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Well testing in coalbed methane (CBM) wells: An environmental remediation case history  

SciTech Connect

In 1993, methane seepage was observed near coalbed methane wells in southwestern Colorado. Well tests were conducted to identify the source of the seeps. The well tests were complicated by two-phase flow, groundwater flow, and gas readsorption. Using the test results, production from the area was simulated. The cause of the seeps was found to be depressuring in shallow coal near the surface, and a remediation plan using water injection near the seep area was formulated.

Cox, D.P.; Young, G.B.C.; Bell, M.J.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

428

Levinson?modified Born approximation as applied to the spherical square well and to Mie theory  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A modified Born approximation for the spherical square well incorporating Levinson’s theorem and adjusted energies extends the range of validity of the conventional Born approximation to include intermediate incident energies and well depths. These modifications also result in accurate Mie phase shifts for the electromagnetic case for similar ranges of incident energies and effective (or pseudo?) well depths.

David E. Stein; Alex E. S. Green

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Productivity and Injectivity of Horizontal Wells  

SciTech Connect

A general wellbore flow model is presented to incorporate not only frictional, accelerational and gravitational pressure drops, but also the pressure drop caused by inflow. Influence of inflow or outflow on the wellbore pressure drop is analyzed. New friction factor correlations accounting for both inflow and outflow are also developed. The greatest source of uncertainty is reservoir description and how it is used in simulators. Integration of data through geostatistical techniques leads to multiple descriptions that all honor available data. The reality is never known. The only way to reduce this uncertainty is to use more data from geological studies, formation evaluation, high resolution seismic, well tests and production history to constrain stochastic images. Even with a perfect knowledge about reservoir geology, current models cannot do routine simulations at a fine enough scale. Furthermore, we normally don't know what scale is fine enough. Upscaling introduces errors and masks some of the physical phenomenon that we are trying to model. The scale at which upscaling is robust is not known and it is probably smaller in most cases than the scale actually used for predicting performance. Uncertainties in the well index can cause errors in predictions that are of the same magnitude as those caused by reservoir heterogeneities. Simplified semi-analytical models for cresting behavior and productivity predictions can be very misleading.

Khalid Aziz; Sepehr Arababi; Thomas A. Hewett

1997-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

430

Modeling techniques for simulating well behavior  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for each reservoir systems. It is a single phase, 2D simulator that is originally developed to simulate real gas flow. Later, it was modified to include the ability to simulate liquid case. It is written in Visual Basic code for Excel. It has been used... . . . . (3-2) Analytical solutions for radial flow case were calculated using a program written in Visual Basic code for Excel. It uses numerical inversion suggested by Stehfest to GO solve the flow equations in Laplace space. Analytical solutions...

Rattu, Bungen Christina

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

431

Assessment of Biomass Resources from Marginal Lands in APEC Economies, August 2009  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NREL/TP-6A2-46209 NREL/TP-6A2-46209 Posted with permission. Assessment of Biomass Resources from Marginal Lands in APEC Economies Energy Working Group August 2009 This report was prepared for the APEC Energy Working Group under EWG 11/2008A by: Anelia Milbrandt National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Golden, Colorado, USA Web site: www.nrel.gov Dr. Ralph P. Overend NREL Research Fellow (Retired) Ottawa, Ontario, Canada APEC#209-RE-01.4 Acknowledgments The authors would like to acknowledge and thank the project overseer, Mr. Jeffrey Skeer (Department of Energy, USA and chair of the APEC Biofuels Task Force), for his support, review, and guidance throughout this project. We also thank Mr. Mark Stumborg from Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada for his review and recommendations.

432

Front and Center: Bringing Marginalized Girls into Focus in STEM and CTE Education  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This week, as part of the President’s commitment to equal opportunity for all students, the White House Domestic Policy Council and the Council on Women and Girls, the Department of Education, and the Georgetown University Law Center on Poverty and Inequality highlighted programs that focus on developing the talent of girls of color and low-income girls in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) and career technical education (CTE) careers. We heard from the educators, innovators, researchers, scientists, and marginalized girls themselves who are dedicated to increasing the participation of low-income girls and girls of color in post-secondary education and in-demand careers within high-growth industry sectors.

433

Marginal Stability Boundaries for Infinite-n Ballooning Modes in a Quasi-axisymmetric Stellarator  

SciTech Connect

A method for computing the ideal-MHD stability boundaries in three-dimensional equilibria is employed. Following Hegna and Nakajima [Phys. Plasmas 5 (May 1998) 1336], a two-dimensional family of equilibria are constructed by perturbing the pressure and rotational-transform profiles in the vicinity of a flux surface for a given stellarator equilibrium. The perturbations are constrained to preserve the magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium condition. For each perturbed equilibrium, the infinite-n ballooning stability is calculated. Marginal stability diagrams are thus constructed that are analogous to (s; a) diagrams for axisymmetric configurations. A quasi-axisymmetric stellarator is considered. Calculations of stability boundaries generally show regions of instability can occur for either sign of the average magnetic shear. Additionally, regions of second-stability are present.

S.R. Hudson; C.C. Hegna

2003-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

434

Marginal stability boundaries for infinite-n ballooning modes in a quasiaxisymmetric stellarator  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A method for computing the ideal magnetohydrodynamic(MHD)stability boundaries in three-dimensional equilibria is employed. Following Hegna and Nakajima [Phys. Plasmas 5 1336 (1998)] a two-dimensional family of equilibria is constructed by perturbing the pressure and rotational-transform profiles in the vicinity of a flux surface for a given stellarator equilibrium. The perturbations are constrained to preserve the MHD equilibrium condition. For each perturbed equilibrium the infinite- n ballooning stability is calculated. Marginal stability diagrams are thus constructed that are analogous to (s ?) diagrams for axisymmetric configurations. A quasiaxisymmetric stellarator is considered. Calculations of stability boundaries generally show regions of instability can occur for either sign of the average magnetic shear. Additionally regions of second-stability are present.

S. R. Hudson; C. C. Hegna

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Sedimentation and structure of the continental margin in the vicinity of the Otway Basin, southern Australia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The continental margin of southern Australia is divisible into four contrasting physiographic provinces on the basis of shelf-break depth and continental slope gradient. These provinces correspond with four structural provinces, which in turn are intimately related to the geology. Zones of relatively stable pre-Mesozoic shallow basement extending out to the shelf edge characterize two of the above provinces, one of which occurs south of Kangaroo Island and the other off Tasmania's northwest coast. In contrast, zones of Mesozoic to Tertiary deep offshore basin formation typify the remaining two provinces, one being situated at the eastern end of the Great Australian Bight and the other along the seaward portion of the Otway Basin. A possible model is presented, based on an assumption of continental rifting and drifting, which explains the structural peculiarities of that portion of the Otway Basin which occurs beneath the present continental shelf and upper slope.

C.C. Von Der Borch; J.R. Conolly; R.S. Dietz

1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Marginal instability threshold condition of the aperiodic ordinary mode in equal-mass plasmas  

SciTech Connect

The purely growing ordinary (O) mode instability for counter-streaming bi-Maxwellian plasma particle distribution functions has recently received renewed attention due to its importance for the solar wind plasma. Here, the analytical marginal instability condition is derived for magnetized plasmas consisting of equal-mass charged particles, distributed in counter-streams with equal temperatures. The equal-mass composition assumption enormously facilitates the theoretical analysis due to the equality of the values of the electron and positron (positive and negative ion) plasma and gyrofrequencies. The existence of a new instability domain of the O-mode at small plasma beta values is confirmed, when the parallel counter-stream free energy exceeds the perpendicular bi-Maxwellian free energy.

Vafin, S.; Schlickeiser, R. [Institut für Theoretische Physik, Lehrstuhl IV: Weltraum- and Astrophysik, Ruhr-Universität, Bochum (Germany); Yoon, P. H. [Institute for Physical Science and Technology, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); School of Space Research, Kyung Hee University, Yongin-Si, Gyeonggi-Do 446-701 (Korea, Republic of)

2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

437

FEMP Expands ESPC ENABLE Program to Include More Energy Conservation...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

(ESPC) ENABLE program to include two new energy conservation measures (ECMs): solar photovoltaic (PV) and simple one-for-one heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC)...

438

SciTech Connect: Microfluidic devices and methods including porous...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

porous polymer monolith may include surfaces terminated with iniferter species. Capture molecules may then be grafted to the monolith pores. Authors: Hatch, Anson V; Sommer,...

439

Including Retro-Commissioning in Federal Energy Savings Performance Contracts  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Document describes guidance on the importance of (and steps to) including retro-commissioning in federal energy savings performance contracts (ESPCs).

440

Percentage of Total Natural Gas Industrial Deliveries included...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Industrial Price Percentage of Total Industrial Deliveries included in Prices Vehicle Fuel Price Electric Power Price Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including marginal wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Lower Permian facies of the Palo Duro Basin, Texas: depositional systems, shelf-margin evolution, paleogeography, and petroleum potential  

SciTech Connect

A Palo geological study suggests that potential hydrocarbon reservoirs occur in shelf-margin carbonates, delta-front sandstones, and fan-delta arkoses. Zones of porous (greater than 10 percent) dolomite are concentrated near shelf margins and have configurations similar to productive Lower Permian shelf-margin trends in New Mexico. Delta-front sandstones (log-computed porosity of 18 to 25 percent) are similar to producing deltaic sandstones of Morris Buie-Blaco Fields in North-Central Texas. Porous (18 percent) fan-delta sandstones along the south flank of the Amarillo Uplift may form reservoirs similiar to that of the Mobeetie Field on the north side of the Amarillo Uplife in Wheeler County, Texas. Potential hydrocarbon source beds occur in slope and basinal environments. Total organic carbon generally ranges from 1 to 2.3 percent by weight and averages 0.589 percent by weight.

Handford, C.R.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Evaluation of fission product worth margins in PWR spent nuclear fuel burnup credit calculations.  

SciTech Connect

Current criticality safety calculations for the transportation of irradiated LWR fuel make the very conservative assumption that the fuel is fresh. This results in a very substantial overprediction of the actual k{sub eff} of the transportation casks; in certain cases, this decreases the amount of spent fuel which can be loaded in a cask, and increases the cost of transporting the spent fuel to the repository. Accounting for the change of reactivity due to fuel depletion is usually referred to as ''burnup credit.'' The US DOE is currently funding a program aimed at establishing an actinide only burnup credit methodology (in this case, the calculated reactivity takes into account the buildup or depletion of a limited number of actinides). This work is undergoing NRC review. While this methodology is being validated on a significant experimental basis, it implicitly relies on additional margins: in particular, the absorption of neutrons by certain actinides and by all fission products is not taken into account. This provides an important additional margin and helps guarantee that the methodology is conservative provided these neglected absorption are known with reasonable accuracy. This report establishes the accuracy of fission product absorption rate calculations: (1) the analysis of European fission product worth experiments demonstrates that fission product cross-sections available in the US provide very good predictions of fission product worth; (2) this is confirmed by a direct comparison of European and US cross section evaluations; (3) accuracy of Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) fission product content predictions is established in a recent ORNL report where several SNF isotopic assays are analyzed; and (4) these data are then combined to establish in a conservative manner the fraction of the predicted total fission product absorption which can be guaranteed based on available experimental data.

Blomquist, R.N.; Finck, P.J.; Jammes, C.; Stenberg, C.G.

1999-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

443

Completion Report for Well ER-12-2  

SciTech Connect

Well ER-12-2 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. The well was drilled from November 2002 to January 2003 as part of a hydrogeologic investigation program for the Yucca Flat Corrective Action Unit. The overall purpose of the well was to gather subsurface data to better characterize the hydrogeology in the northwestern portion of Yucca Flat. The well was drilled to total measured depth of 2,097.9 meters. The 131.1-centimeter-diameter borehole was left open (i.e., uncased) below the base of the intermediate casing at 901.6 meters. A piezometer string was installed outside the surface casing to a depth of 176.4 meters to monitor a zone of perched water. Data gathered during and shortly after hole construction include composite drill cuttings samples collected every 3 meters, sidewall core samples from 7 depths, various geophysical logs, and water level measurements. These data indicate that the well penetrated, in descending order, 137.5 meters of Quaternary and Tertiary alluvium, 48.8 meters of Tertiary volcanic rocks, 289.6 meters of Mississippian Chainman Shale, and 1,622.5 meters of Mississippian and Upper Devonian Eleana Formation consisting of shale, argillite, sandstone, quartzite, and limestone. Forty-seven days after the well was drilled the water level inside the main hole was tagged at the depth of 65.43 meters, and the water level inside the piezometer string was tagged at 127.14 meters.

Bechtel Nevada

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Completion Report for Well ER-EC-1  

SciTech Connect

Well ER-EC-1 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. This well was drilled in the spring of 1999 as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's hydrogeologic investigation well program in the Western Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley region just west of the Test Site. A 44.5-centimeter surface hole was drilled and cased off to the depth 675.1 meters below the surface. The hole diameter was then decreased to 31.1 centimeters for drilling to a total depth of 1,524.0 meters. A preliminary composite, static, water level was measured at the depth of approximately 566.3 meters prior to installation of the completion string. One completion string with three isolated, slotted intervals was installed in the well. Detailed lithologic descriptions with preliminary stratigraphic assignments are included in the report. These are based on composite drill cuttings collected every 3 meters and 31 sidewall samples taken at various depths below 680 meters, supplemented by geophysical log data. Detailed chemical and mineralogical studies of rock samples are in progress. The well penetrated Tertiary-age lava and tuff of the Timber Mountain Group, the Paintbrush Group, the Calico Hills Formation, the Crater Flat Group, and the Volcanics of Quartz Mountain. The preliminary geologic interpretation of data from Well ER-EC-1 indicates the presence of a structural trough or bench filled with a thick section of post-Rainier Mesa lava. These data also suggest that this site is located on a buried structural ridge that may separate the Silent Canyon and Timber Mountain caldera complexes.

Townsend, M.J.

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Spatially indirect excitons in coupled quantum wells  

SciTech Connect

Microscopic quantum phenomena such as interference or phase coherence between different quantum states are rarely manifest in macroscopic systems due to a lack of significant correlation between different states. An exciton system is one candidate for observation of possible quantum collective effects. In the dilute limit, excitons in semiconductors behave as bosons and are expected to undergo Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) at a temperature several orders of magnitude higher than for atomic BEC because of their light mass. Furthermore, well-developed modern semiconductor technologies offer flexible manipulations of an exciton system. Realization of BEC in solid-state systems can thus provide new opportunities for macroscopic quantum coherence research. In semiconductor coupled quantum wells (CQW) under across-well static electric field, excitons exist as separately confined electron-hole pairs. These spatially indirect excitons exhibit a radiative recombination time much longer than their thermal relaxation time a unique feature in direct band gap semiconductor based structures. Their mutual repulsive dipole interaction further stabilizes the exciton system at low temperature and screens in-plane disorder more effectively. All these features make indirect excitons in CQW a promising system to search for quantum collective effects. Properties of indirect excitons in CQW have been analyzed and investigated extensively. The experimental results based on time-integrated or time-resolved spatially-resolved photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy and imaging are reported in two categories. (i) Generic indirect exciton systems: general properties of indirect excitons such as the dependence of exciton energy and lifetime on electric fields and densities were examined. (ii) Quasi-two-dimensional confined exciton systems: highly statistically degenerate exciton systems containing more than tens of thousands of excitons within areas as small as (10 micrometer){sup 2} were observed. The spatial and energy distributions of optically active excitons were used as thermodynamic quantities to construct a phase diagram of the exciton system, demonstrating the existence of distinct phases. Optical and electrical properties of the CQW sample were examined thoroughly to provide deeper understanding of the formation mechanisms of these cold exciton systems. These insights offer new strategies for producing cold exciton systems, which may lead to opportunities for the realization of BEC in solid-state systems.

Lai, Chih-Wei Eddy

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Determination of the Nonlethal Margin Inside the Visible 'Ice-Ball' During Percutaneous Cryoablation of Renal Tissue  

SciTech Connect

Objective. The study was designed to determine the distance between the visible 'ice-ball' and the lethal temperature isotherm for normal renal tissue during cryoablation. Methods. The Animal Care Committee approved the study. Nine adult swine were used: three to determine the optimum tissue stain and six to test the hypotheses. They were anesthetized and the left renal artery was catheterized under fluoroscopy. Under MR guidance, the kidney was ablated and (at end of a complete ablation) the nonfrozen renal tissue (surrounding the 'ice-ball') was stained via renal artery catheter. Kidneys were explanted and sent for slide preparation and examination. From each slide, we measured the maximum, minimum, and an in-between distance from the stained to the lethal tissue boundaries (margin). We examined each slide for evidence of 'heat pump' effect. Results. A total of 126 measurements of the margin (visible 'ice-ball'-lethal margin) were made. These measurements were obtained from 29 slides prepared from the 6 test animals. Mean width was 0.75 {+-} 0.44 mm (maximum 1.15 {+-} 0.51 mm). It was found to increase adjacent to large blood vessels. No 'heat pump' effect was noted within the lethal zone. Data are limited to normal swine renal tissue. Conclusions. Considering the effects of the 'heat pump' phenomenon for normal renal tissue, the margin was measured to be 1.15 {+-} 0.51 mm. To approximate the efficacy of the 'gold standard' (partial nephrectomy, {approx}98 %), a minimum margin of 3 mm is recommended (3 Multiplication-Sign SD). Given these assumptions and extrapolating for renal cancer, which reportedly is more cryoresistant with a lethal temperature of -40 Degree-Sign C, the recommended margin is 6 mm.

Georgiades, Christos, E-mail: g_christos@hotmail.com [Johns Hopkins University, Department of Vascular and Interventional Radiology, Interventional Radiology Center (United States); Rodriguez, Ronald, E-mail: rrodrig@jhmi.edu [Johns Hopkins University, Department of Urology (United States); Azene, Ezana, E-mail: eazene1@jhmi.edu; Weiss, Clifford, E-mail: cweiss@jhmi.edu [Johns Hopkins University, Department of Vascular and Interventional Radiology, Interventional Radiology Center (United States); Chaux, Alcides, E-mail: achaux1@jhmi.edu; Gonzalez-Roibon, Nilda, E-mail: ngonzal6@jhmi.edu; Netto, George, E-mail: gnetto1@jhmi.edu [Johns Hopkins University, Department of Urologic Pathology (United States)

2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

447

Natural Gas Prices: Well Above Recent Averages  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 Notes: The recent surge in spot prices at the Henry Hub are well above a typical range for 1998-1999 (in this context, defined as the average, +/- 2 standard deviations). Past price surges have been of short duration. The possibility of a downward price adjustment before the end of next winter is a source of considerable risk for storage operators who acquire gas at recent elevated prices. Storage levels in the Lower 48 States were 7.5 percent below the 5-year average (1995-1999) by mid-August (August 11), although the differential is only 6.4 percent in the East, which depends most heavily on storage to meet peak demand. Low storage levels are attributable, at least in part, to poor price incentives: high current prices combined with only small price

448

PSA_Well_Completion_Report.book  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Restoration Restoration Project U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office Environmental Restoration Project U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office Nevada Environmental Restoration Project Well Completion Report for Corrective Action Unit 447, Project Shoal Area Churchill County, Nevada Revision No.: 0 September 2006 Approved for public release; further dissemination unlimited. DOE/NV--1166 Available for public sale, in paper, from: U.S. Department of Commerce National Technical Information Service 5285 Port Royal Road Springfield, VA 22161 Phone: 800.553.6847 Fax: 703.605.6900 Email: orders@ntis.gov Online ordering: http://www.ntis.gov/ordering.htm Available electronically at http://www.osti.gov/bridge

449

CNTA_Well_Installation_Report.book  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Security Administration Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office Environmental Restoration Division Nevada Environmental Restoration Project Well Installation Report for Corrective Action Unit 443, Central Nevada Test Area Nye County, Nevada Revision No.: 0 January 2006 Approved for public release; further dissemination unlimited. DOE/NV--1102 Uncontrolled When Printed Available for public sale, in paper, from: U.S. Department of Commerce National Technical Information Service 5285 Port Royal Road Springfield, VA 22161 Phone: 800.553.6847 Fax: 703.605.6900 Email: orders@ntis.gov Online ordering: http://www.ntis.gov/ordering.htm Available electronically at http://www.osti.gov/bridge Available for a processing fee to U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors, in paper, from:

450

New multilateral well architecture in heterogeneous reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the drilling of the main horizontal well and it is cemented together with the main horizontal section. The pressure and structural integrity of these junctions is critical requirement. This integrity does not have to be compromised by any additional... with 15 horizontal lateral model Case 1 Case 6 CMG Results Eclipse Results CMG Results K v/Kh J STBD/psi J STBD/psi J(Case6)/J(Case 1) J STBD/psi J(Case6)/J(Case1) 1 13.85 12.95 93.5% 13.06 94% 0.1 5.73 5.14 89.7% 5.37 93.7% 0.01 1.93 1...

Jia, Hongqiao

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

451

Remote system for subsea wells tested  

SciTech Connect

At its experimental submarine station in the Grondin field offshore the West African state of Gabon, Societe Nationale Elf-Aquitaine has run a series of inspection, repair, and maintenance tests on two producing wells using a robot controlled from the surface. Designed for water depths beyond the range of divers, the TIM robot has a pair of manipulator arms and a rotating telescopic crane installed on a 14 by 7.6 ft carriage. Five television cameras fitted at various spots on the robot allow surface operators to direct TIM in such tasks as (1) installing a jumper pipe between a Christmas tree and the manifold, (2) connecting a jumper electric cable and hydraulic hose, (3) locally operating a safety valve, and (4) removing a guide line. During 104 hr of seabed experience, TIM outperformed divers, particularly in jobs requiring great strength.

Vielvoye, R.

1981-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

452

Fluid-Rock Characterization and Interactions in NMR Well Logging  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this report is to characterize the fluid properties and fluid-rock interactions that are needed for formation evaluation by NMR well logging. The advances made in the understanding of NMR fluid properties are summarized in a chapter written for an AAPG book on NMR well logging. This includes live oils, viscous oils, natural gas mixtures, and the relation between relaxation time and diffusivity. Oil based drilling fluids can have an adverse effect on NMR well logging if it alters the wettability of the formation. The effect of various surfactants on wettability and surface relaxivity are evaluated for silica sand. The relation between the relaxation time and diffusivity distinguishes the response of brine, oil, and gas in a NMR well log. A new NMR pulse sequence in the presence of a field gradient and a new inversion technique enables the T{sub 2} and diffusivity distributions to be displayed as a two-dimensional map. The objectives of pore morphology and rock characterization are to identify vug connectivity by using X-ray CT scan, and to improve NMR permeability correlation. Improved estimation of permeability from NMR response is possible by using estimated tortuosity as a parameter to interpolate between two existing permeability models.

George J. Hirasaki; Kishore K. Mohanty

2005-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

453

Catching sparks from well-forged neutralinos  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper we present a new search technique for electroweakinos, the superpartners of electroweak gauge and Higgs bosons, based on final states with missing transverse energy, a photon, and a dilepton pair, ?+??+?+ET. Unlike traditional electroweakino searches, which perform best when m?˜2,30?m?˜10,m?˜±?m?˜10>mZ, our search favors nearly degenerate spectra; degenerate electroweakinos typically have a larger branching ratio to photons, and the cut m???mZ effectively removes on shell Z boson backgrounds while retaining the signal. This feature makes our technique optimal for “well-tempered” scenarios, where the dark matter relic abundance is achieved with interelectroweakino splittings of ?20–70??GeV. Additionally, our strategy applies to a wider range of scenarios where the lightest neutralinos are almost degenerate, but only make up a subdominant component of the dark matter—a spectrum we dub well forged. Focusing on bino-Higgsino admixtures, we present optimal cuts and expected efficiencies for several benchmark scenarios. We find bino-Higgsino mixtures with m?˜2,30?190??GeV and m?˜2,30?m?˜10?30??GeV can be uncovered after roughly 600??fb?1 of luminosity at the 14 TeV LHC. Scenarios with lighter states require less data for discovery, while scenarios with heavier states or larger mass splittings are harder to discriminate from the background and require more data. Unlike many searches for supersymmetry, electroweakino searches are one area where the high luminosity of the next LHC run, rather than the increased energy, is crucial for discovery.

Joseph Bramante; Antonio Delgado; Fatemeh Elahi; Adam Martin; Bryan Ostdiek

2014-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

454

Microscopic nonequilibrium theory of quantum well solar cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present a microscopic theory of bipolar quantum well structures in the photovoltaic regime, based on the nonequilibrium Green’s function formalism for a multiband tight-binding Hamiltonian. The quantum kinetic equations for the single particle Green’s functions of electrons and holes are self-consistently coupled to Poisson’s equation, including intercarrier scattering on the Hartree level. Relaxation and broadening mechanisms are considered by the inclusion of acoustic and optical electron-phonon interaction in a self-consistent Born approximation of the scattering self-energies. Photogeneration of carriers is described on the same level in terms of a self-energy derived from the standard dipole approximation of the electron-photon interaction. Results from a simple two-band model are shown for the local density of states, spectral response, current spectrum, and current-voltage characteristics for generic single quantum well systems.

U. Aeberhard and R. H. Morf

2008-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

455

Inflatable kill packers used in working over Kuwaiti wells  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on inflatable packers which are being used with great success in post-well capping workover operations in Kuwait oil fields. In mid-January, about one kill packer was being run per day. Use is expected to increase in March when a second post-capping crew arrives. Of several thousand unconventional ideas submitted to Kuwait Oil Co. (KOC) for controlling the well fires left in the aftermath of lst year's Gulf War, only about a dozen were actually used. Inflatable kill packers, designed and manufactured by Baker Service Tools and marketed by Baker Oil Tools, were one of the ideas that proved effective. The kill packers are modifications of Baker's inflatable packers that have successfully been used in capping producers on many blowouts throughout the world, including the Piper Alpha disaster in the North Sea and the Saga blowout offshore Norway.

Miller, D. (Baker Oil Tools, Houston, TX (US)); Conover, G. (Baker Service Tools, Houston, TX (US))

1992-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

456

Microfluidic devices and methods including porous polymer monoliths  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Microfluidic devices and methods including porous polymer monoliths are described. Polymerization techniques may be used to generate porous polymer monoliths having pores defined by a liquid component of a fluid mixture. The fluid mixture may contain iniferters and the resulting porous polymer monolith may include surfaces terminated with iniferter species. Capture molecules may then be grafted to the monolith pores.

Hatch, Anson V; Sommer, Gregory J; Singh, Anup K; Wang, Ying-Chih; Abhyankar, Vinay V

2014-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

457

Solar Energy Education. Reader, Part II. Sun story. [Includes glossary  

SciTech Connect

Magazine articles which focus on the subject of solar energy are presented. The booklet prepared is the second of a four part series of the Solar Energy Reader. Excerpts from the magazines include the history of solar energy, mythology and tales, and selected poetry on the sun. A glossary of energy related terms is included. (BCS)

Not Available

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Range of a projectile, including air resistance. Introduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

resistance, it is easy to show (elementary physics classes) that if we throw a projectile with a speed vRange of a projectile, including air resistance. Introduction Here we study the motion of a projectile thrown through the air, including the important effects of air resistance.We will investi- gate

Young, A. Peter

459

Articles which include chevron film cooling holes, and related processes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An article is described, including an inner surface which can be exposed to a first fluid; an inlet; and an outer surface spaced from the inner surface, which can be exposed to a hotter second fluid. The article further includes at least one row or other pattern of passage holes. Each passage hole includes an inlet bore extending through the substrate from the inlet at the inner surface to a passage hole-exit proximate to the outer surface, with the inlet bore terminating in a chevron outlet adjacent the hole-exit. The chevron outlet includes a pair of wing troughs having a common surface region between them. The common surface region includes a valley which is adjacent the hole-exit; and a plateau adjacent the valley. The article can be an airfoil. Related methods for preparing the passage holes are also described.

Bunker, Ronald Scott; Lacy, Benjamin Paul

2014-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

460

What To Include In The Whistleblower Complaint? | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

To Include In The Whistleblower Complaint? | National Nuclear Security To Include In The Whistleblower Complaint? | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog What To Include In The Whistleblower Complaint? Home > About Us > Our Operations > Management and Budget > Whistleblower Program > What To Include In The Whistleblower Complaint? What To Include In The Whistleblower Complaint?

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including marginal wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Bailer for top head drive rotary well drills  

SciTech Connect

A bailer mounted to the derrick of a top head drive well drilling rig is described. The bailer includes a winch line drum mounted by a bracket to the derrick. A positive displacement hydraulic motor mounts one end of the drum and receives fluid under pressure from the existing hydraulic pressure supply. Valving is provided to allow reverse operation of the motor so equipment can either be raised or lowered relative to the derrick. The hydraulic delivery line to the motor includes a one way restrictor that will allow relatively free passage of fluid to the motor in a driving or lifting mode but will reverse flow of fluid from the motor, thereby affording a braking effect for lowering a load at a selected rate.

Bartholomew, L.

1980-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

462

Learn more about the summer course which includes a 3 week trip to South Africa.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Learn more about the summer course which includes a 3 week trip to South Africa. The program an introduction to the historical and the con- temporary South Africa as well as at least one post trip meeting@binghamton.edu or Josephine Allen at jaallen@binghamton.edu. Destination South Africa - Summer Course 2012 February 28th

Suzuki, Masatsugu

463

WBS DICTIONARY This dictionary gives a succinct definition of some of the most important tasks included  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

include the 100 kV insulating platform for the EBIS source and its associated power supplies, as well for the solenoid in order to enable use of its magnet field "tails" for the electron beam transmission in areas support structures for the EBIS, the electron gun, the LEBT line, and the external ion sources. It also

464

Productivity and injectivity of horizontal wells. Annual report, March 10, 1995--March 9, 1996  

SciTech Connect

The DOE approval for the annual renewal of the research grant to the Stanford Project on the Productivity and Injectivity of Horizontal Wells was received in early March 1995. Project goals include the advanced modeling of horizontal wells; investigation and incorporation of the effects of reservoir heterogeneities; development of improved methods of calculating multi-phase pressure drops within wellbores; development of multi-well models; testing of horizontal well models with field examples; EOR applications; and application studies and their optimization.

Aziz, K.; Hewett, T.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Flow in geothermal wells: Part III. Calculation model for self-flowing well  

SciTech Connect

The theoretical model described predicts the temperature, pressure, dynamic dryness fraction, and void fraction along the vertical channel of two-phase flow. The existing data from operating wells indicate good agreement with the model. (MHR)

Bilicki, Z.; Kestin, J.; Michaelides, E.E.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Environmental Protection Department`s well inventory (through the second quarter of 1993)  

SciTech Connect

This report is an inventory of the wells recorded in Environmental Protection Department/Environmental Monitoring Section (EPD/EMS) documents since the startup of the Savannah River Site (SRS) and includes wells monitored by special request and SRS research wells. The purpose of this report is as follows: to provide a historical record of the wells that EPD/EMS has monitored; to provide a document containing a list of wells that are currently in the EPD/EMS Groundwater Monitoring Program; to provide pertinent information about all wells listed in EPD/EMS documents.

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Completion Report for Well ER-EC-7  

SciTech Connect

Well ER-EC-7 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. This well was drilled in the summer of 1999 as part of the Department of Energy's hydrogeologic investigation program in the Western Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley region just west of the Test Site. A 44.5-centimeter surface hole was drilled and cased off to a depth of 265.8 meters below the surface. The hole diameter was then decreased to 31.1 centimeters for drilling to a total depth of 422.5 meters. The planned depth of 762 meters was not reached due to borehole stability problems. One completion string with two isolated slotted intervals was installed in the well. A preliminary composite, static, water level was measured at the depth of 227.8 meters, 20 days after installation of the completion string. Detailed lithologic descriptions with stratigraphic assignments are included in the report. These are based on composite drill cuttings, supplemented by geophysical log data, and incorporating data from detailed chemical and mineralogical studies of rock samples. Beneath a thin alluvial deposit, the well penetrated 410 meters of lava and bedded tuff of the Volcanics of Fortymile Canyon Group, deposited in the Timber Mountain caldera moat after caldera collapse. The geologic interpretation of data from this well provides information on the thickness, lithologic composition, and hydrogeologic character of moat-filling rocks in the southern portion of the Timber Mountain caldera complex in the southwestern Nevada volcanic field.

Bechtel Nevada

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

U-182: Microsoft Windows Includes Some Invalid Certificates | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

82: Microsoft Windows Includes Some Invalid Certificates 82: Microsoft Windows Includes Some Invalid Certificates U-182: Microsoft Windows Includes Some Invalid Certificates June 4, 2012 - 7:00am Addthis PROBLEM: A vulnerability was reported in Microsoft Windows. A remote user may be able to spoof code signing signatures. PLATFORM: Version(s): XP SP3, 2003 SP2, Vista SP2, 2008 SP2, 7 SP1, 2008 R2 SP1; and prior service packs ABSTRACT: The operating system includes some invalid intermediate certificates. The vulnerability is due to the certificate authorities and not the operating system itself. Reference Links: Security tracker ID 1027114 GENERIC-MAP-NOMATCH Vendor Advisory IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High Discussion: The invalid certificates and their thumbprints are: Microsoft Enforced Licensing Intermediate PCA: 2a 83 e9 02 05 91 a5 5f c6

469

FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF STEEL WELDED COVERPLATE INCLUDING COMPOSITE DOUBLERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the increasing focus on welded bridge members resulting in crack initiation and propagation, there is a large demand for creative solutions. One of these solutions includes the application of composite doublers over the critical weld. In order...

Petri, Brad

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

470

Search for Earth-like planets includes LANL star analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Search for earth-like planets Search for Earth-like planets includes LANL star analysis The mission will not only be able to search for planets around other stars, but also yield...

471

atlantic region including: Topics by E-print Network  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

R: L. Tossey, T. Beeson, Parks, B. TruittTNC, UD MPEO staff 2 Climate scenarios of sea level rise for the northeast Atlantic Ocean: a study including the effects of ocean...

472

INTRODUCTION Embryonic development is sensitive to many factors, including  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, mothers can attempt to maintain their developing embryos at an optimal temperature, and thus The Journal RESEARCH ARTICLE Maternal influences on early development: preferred temperature prior to oviposition1346 INTRODUCTION Embryonic development is sensitive to many factors, including hormones, toxins

Denardo, Dale

473

Well-to-wheels energy use and greenhouse gas emissions analysis of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles.  

SciTech Connect

Researchers at Argonne National Laboratory expanded the Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation (GREET) model and incorporated the fuel economy and electricity use of alternative fuel/vehicle systems simulated by the Powertrain System Analysis Toolkit (PSAT) to conduct a well-to-wheels (WTW) analysis of energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs). The WTW results were separately calculated for the blended charge-depleting (CD) and charge-sustaining (CS) modes of PHEV operation and then combined by using a weighting factor that represented the CD vehicle-miles-traveled (VMT) share. As indicated by PSAT simulations of the CD operation, grid electricity accounted for a share of the vehicle's total energy use, ranging from 6% for a PHEV 10 to 24% for a PHEV 40, based on CD VMT shares of 23% and 63%, respectively. In addition to the PHEV's fuel economy and type of on-board fuel, the marginal electricity generation mix used to charge the vehicle impacted the WTW results, especially GHG emissions. Three North American Electric Reliability Corporation regions (4, 6, and 13) were selected for this analysis, because they encompassed large metropolitan areas (Illinois, New York, and California, respectively) and provided a significant variation of marginal generation mixes. The WTW results were also reported for the U.S. generation mix and renewable electricity to examine cases of average and clean mixes, respectively. For an all-electric range (AER) between 10 mi and 40 mi, PHEVs that employed petroleum fuels (gasoline and diesel), a blend of 85% ethanol and 15% gasoline (E85), and hydrogen were shown to offer a 40-60%, 70-90%, and more than 90% reduction in petroleum energy use and a 30-60%, 40-80%, and 10-100% reduction in GHG emissions, respectively, relative to an internal combustion engine vehicle that used gasoline. The spread of WTW GHG emissions among the different fuel production technologies and grid generation mixes was wider than the spread of petroleum energy use, mainly due to the diverse fuel production technologies and feedstock sources for the fuels considered in this analysis. The PHEVs offered reductions in petroleum energy use as compared with regular hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). More petroleum energy savings were realized as the AER increased, except when the marginal grid mix was dominated by oil-fired power generation. Similarly, more GHG emissions reductions were realized at higher AERs, except when the marginal grid generation mix was dominated by oil or coal. Electricity from renewable sources realized the largest reductions in petroleum energy use and GHG emissions for all PHEVs as the AER increased. The PHEVs that employ biomass-based fuels (e.g., biomass-E85 and -hydrogen) may not realize GHG emissions benefits over regular HEVs if the marginal generation mix is dominated by fossil sources. Uncertainties are associated with the adopted PHEV fuel consumption and marginal generation mix simulation results, which impact the WTW results and require further research. More disaggregate marginal generation data within control areas (where the actual dispatching occurs) and an improved dispatch modeling are needed to accurately assess the impact of PHEV electrification. The market penetration of the PHEVs, their total electric load, and their role as complements rather than replacements of regular HEVs are also uncertain. The effects of the number of daily charges, the time of charging, and the charging capacity have not been evaluated in this study. A more robust analysis of the VMT share of the CD operation is also needed.

Elgowainy, A.; Burnham, A.; Wang, M.; Molburg, J.; Rousseau, A.; Energy Systems

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

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Limited Personal Use of Government Office Equipment including Information Technology  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The Order establishes requirements and assigns responsibilities for employees' limited personal use of Government resources (office equipment and other resources including information technology) within DOE, including NNSA. The Order is required to provide guidance on appropriate and inappropriate uses of Government resources. This Order was certified 04/23/2009 as accurate and continues to be relevant and appropriate for use by the Department. Certified 4-23-09. No cancellation.

2005-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

475

Percentage of Total Natural Gas Commercial Deliveries included in Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

City Gate Price Residential Price Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices Commercial Price Percentage of Total Commercial Deliveries included in Prices Industrial Price Percentage of Total Industrial Deliveries included in Prices Electric Power Price Period: Monthly Annual City Gate Price Residential Price Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices Commercial Price Percentage of Total Commercial Deliveries included in Prices Industrial Price Percentage of Total Industrial Deliveries included in Prices Electric Power Price Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History U.S. 63.3 59.3 57.9 57.0 57.4 61.3 1983-2013 Alabama 71.7 71.0 68.5 68.2 68.4 66.7 1989-2013 Alaska 94.1 91.6 91.1 91.0 92.3 92.6 1989-2013 Arizona 84.0 83.0 81.6 80.3 82.8 82.7 1989-2013 Arkansas 37.8 28.3 28.1 28.6 26.7 28.0 1989-2013

476

Percentage of Total Natural Gas Industrial Deliveries included in Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

City Gate Price Residential Price Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Pr