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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including digester gases" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Greenhouse gases emissions accounting for typical sewage sludge digestion with energy utilization and residue land application in China  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer GHGs emissions from sludge digestion + residue land use in China were calculated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The AD unit contributes more than 97% of total biogenic GHGs emissions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AD with methane recovery is attractive for sludge GHGs emissions reduction. - Abstract: About 20 million tonnes of sludge (with 80% moisture content) is discharged by the sewage treatment plants per year in China, which, if not treated properly, can be a significant source of greenhouse gases (GHGs) emissions. Anaerobic digestion is a conventional sewage sludge treatment method and will continue to be one of the main technologies in the following years. This research has taken into consideration GHGs emissions from typical processes of sludge thickening + anaerobic digestion + dewatering + residue land application in China. Fossil CO{sub 2}, biogenic CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4,} and avoided CO{sub 2} as the main objects is discussed respectively. The results show that the total CO{sub 2}-eq is about 1133 kg/t DM (including the biogenic CO{sub 2}), while the net CO{sub 2}-eq is about 372 kg/t DM (excluding the biogenic CO{sub 2}). An anaerobic digestion unit as the main GHGs emission source occupies more than 91% CO{sub 2}-eq of the whole process. The use of biogas is important for achieving carbon dioxide emission reductions, which could reach about 24% of the total CO{sub 2}-eq reduction.

Niu Dongjie, E-mail: niudongjie@tongji.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Yangtze Aquatic Environment, Ministry of Education, College of Environmental Science and Engineering of Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); UNEP-Tongji Institute of Environment for Sustainable Development, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); Huang Hui [Key Laboratory of Yangtze Aquatic Environment, Ministry of Education, College of Environmental Science and Engineering of Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); Dai Xiaohu [Key Laboratory of Yangtze Aquatic Environment, Ministry of Education, College of Environmental Science and Engineering of Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); National Engineering Research Center for Urban Pollution Control, Shanghai 200092 (China); Zhao Youcai [Key Laboratory of Yangtze Aquatic Environment, Ministry of Education, College of Environmental Science and Engineering of Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China)

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

2

Ruminant digestion  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ruminant digestion Ruminant digestion Name: hignell Status: N/A Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: Around 1993 Question: How long it takes for the digestive process to work in a ruminant? With the various chambers and would digestion take longer than in other mammals? Replies: A friend in animal nutrition is looking up an exact figure, but as he does, here are a few guidelines: Time of digestion largely depends on the type of food an animal ingests: CARNIVORES: short, uncomplicated digestive systems. They eat very high on the food chain (other animals), which provide food stuff which is relatively easy to digest. Hence, rapid digestion. OMNIVORES: medium length, medium complex digestive systems. We eat at all levels of the food chain, and so need a balanced system. Medium time of digestion (roughly 2-10 hours per meal, depending on proportions of carbohydrates, fats, proteins).

3

Digestion Experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Blank in Bulletin] BULLETIN NO. 291 FEBRUARY, 1922 DIGESTION EXPERIMENTS This is the sixth bulletin in a series whose object is to ascertain the Aceding value of Texas feeding stuffs by means of digestion experiments. Previous bulletins... The productive values and the values for digestible protein in t Bulletin have been calculated from the results of digestion esperiine? with sheep. The method of conducting the experiments is described Bulletins Nos. 147 and 166 of this Station. The production...

Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

1922-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Power plant including an exhaust gas recirculation system for injecting recirculated exhaust gases in the fuel and compressed air of a gas turbine engine  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A power plant is provided and includes a gas turbine engine having a combustor in which compressed gas and fuel are mixed and combusted, first and second supply lines respectively coupled to the combustor and respectively configured to supply the compressed gas and the fuel to the combustor and an exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system to re-circulate exhaust gas produced by the gas turbine engine toward the combustor. The EGR system is coupled to the first and second supply lines and configured to combine first and second portions of the re-circulated exhaust gas with the compressed gas and the fuel at the first and second supply lines, respectively.

Anand, Ashok Kumar; Nagarjuna Reddy, Thirumala Reddy; Shaffer, Jason Brian; York, William David

2014-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

5

Digestion Simulations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Digestion Simulations Digestion Simulations Name: Lisa Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: My 5th grade students are beginning an experiment next week and their hypothesis involves edibility(edibleness?). Is there a way to replicate the stomach in, say, a bottle?? Are there ways to test for edibleness(?) without actually ingesting the experiment yourself? Replies: I would not recommend the idea of a bottle stomach. The stomach digests only proteins anyway with HCl [pH 1.0] which is very, very strong acid that will burn seriously if in contact with skin. The intestine is just as much responsible for digestion of lipids [bile], carbohydrates and remaining proteins using enzymes, many of these you do not want to be handling, let alone purchase. As a high school teacher, I have lab exercises dealing with digestion, but I can not recommend any of these unless you are set up with a functional science laboratory and all the safety equipment necessary.

6

Optimization Online - Digest Archive  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optimization Online Digest Archive. Subscribe to the digest. ... Online is supported by the Mathematical Optmization Society. Mathematical Optimization Society.

7

Digestion time  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Digestion time Digestion time Name: Don Mancosh Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: I have always given the rule of thumb in class that material we eat is with us for about 24 hours before exiting the body. The question arises about the time value of liquids. Getting a big coke prior to a 3 hour drive generally means that there will be a stop along the way. Is there a generalization made about liquids in the body similar to the one for solid food? Replies: A physician would give a better answer, but I hazard this: the only liquids which people consume (deliberately) in significant quantities are water, ethyl alcohol and various oils. Water and alcohol are absorbed on a time scale of seconds to minutes through the mouth, stomach and digestive tract. The oils are huge molecules, so I'd guess like any other greasy food they get absorbed in the upper digestive tract. Some of them, perhaps the longest and most nonpolar, are not absorbed at all --- cf. the old-time remedy of mineral oil for constipation --- so there should be some average time-before-what's-left-is-excreted such as you're looking for, and my (wild) guess is that it would not differ substantially from that for food. You can define an average lifetime in the body for alcohol, since the natural level is zero. Rough guidelines are widespread in the context of drunk driving laws. But this is not really possible for water. One's body is normally full up to the brim with water, and there's no way for the body to distinguish between water molecules recently absorbed and molecules that've been moping around since the Beatles split up. Thus the water entering the toilet bowl after the pit stop is not in general the same water as was in the big coke. If you were to consider for water just the average time between drinking and peeing, it would seem to depend strongly on how well hydrated the body was before the drink, and how much was drunk. During sustained heavy exertion in the sun and dry air one can easily drink a pint of water an hour without peeing at all. On the other hand, if one is willing to drink enough water fast enough, so as to establish a high excess of body water one can pee 8 ounces 15 minutes or less after drinking 8 ounces.

8

Anaerobic Digestion Basics | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Anaerobic Digestion Basics Anaerobic Digestion Basics Anaerobic Digestion Basics August 14, 2013 - 1:07pm Addthis Anaerobic digestion is a common technology in today's agriculture, municipal waste, and brewing industries. It uses bacteria to break down waste organic materials into methane and other gases, which can be used to produce electricity or heat. Methane and Anaerobic Bacteria Methane is a gas that contains molecules of methane with one atom of carbon and four atoms of hydrogen (CH4). It is the major component of the natural gas used in many homes for cooking and heating. It is odorless, colorless, and yields about 1,000 British thermal units (Btu) [252 kilocalories (kcal)] of heat energy per cubic foot (0.028 cubic meters) when burned. Natural gas is a fossil fuel that was created eons ago by the anaerobic

9

Anaerobic Digestion of Algae  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...would be desirable to remove the algae from the lagoon effluent. Under...anaerobic digestion. Digestion of algae to provide a source of fuel is an attractive possibility...through the anaerobic digestion of algae to produce methane. Energy is...

C. G. Golueke; W. J. Oswald; H. B. Gotaas

1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Optimization Online - Digest  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Complete the form below to subscribe to the free Optimization Online Digest. ... Type your e-mail address to unsubscribe from the Optimization Online Digest.

11

ESTABoues, a decision tool to assess greenhouse gases of sewage sludge treatment and di  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

digestion, aerobic digestion, dewatering, al composting, drying) and sludge disposal route (land applicationORBIT2012 G ESTABoues, a decision tool to assess greenhouse gases of sewage sludge treatment and di-laure.reverdy@irstea.fr EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Sewage sludge production increases continuously reaching almost 20% (946 700 t 1 118 795

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

12

Separation of polar gases from nonpolar gases  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Polar gases such as hydrogen sulfide, sulfur dioxide and ammonia may be separated from nonpolar gases such as methane, nitrogen, hydrogen or carbon dioxide by passing a mixture of polar and nonpolar gases over the face of a multicomponent membrane at separation conditions. The multicomponent membrane which is used to effect the separation will comprise a mixture of a glycol plasticizer having a molecular weight of from about 200 to about 600 and an organic polymer cast on a porous support. The use of such membranes as exemplified by polyethylene glycol and silicon rubber composited on polysulfone will permit greater selectivity accompanied by a high flux rate in the separation process.

Kulprathipanja, S.; Kulkarni, S.S.

1986-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

13

Separation of polar gases from nonpolar gases  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Polar gases such as hydrogen sulfide, sulfur dioxide and ammonia may be separated from nonpolar gases such as methane, nitrogen, hydrogen or carbon dioxide by passing a mixture of polar and nonpolar gases over the face of a multicomponent membrane at separation conditions. The multicomponent membrane which is used to effect the separation will comprise a mixture of a glycol plasticizer having a molecular weight of from about 200 to about 600 and an organic polymer cast on a porous support. The use of such membranes as exemplified by polyethylene glycol and silicon rubber composited on polysulfone will permit greater selectivity accompanied by a high flux rate in the separation process.

Kulprathipanja, Santi (Hoffman Estates, IL); Kulkarni, Sudhir S. (Hoffman Estates, IL)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Statistical Digest No. 70 Fishery Statistics of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. These statistics include data on the volume and value of landed catches, employment, quantity of gear operatedStatistical Digest No. 70 Statistics of the United States 1976 Washington National Marine Fisheries Service #12;#12;Statistical Digest No. 70 Fishery Statistics of the United States

15

Market Digest: Natural Gas  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The Energy Information Administration's Natural Gas Market Digest provides information and analyses on all aspects of natural gas markets.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Biological Removal of Siloxanes from Landfill and Digester Gases  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

volatilize from waste at landfills and wastewater treatment plants (1). As a result, biogas produced, as well as an increase in maintenance costs (6, 7). The presence of VMSs in biogas is thus a challenge recommended by most equipment manufacturers for un- hindered use (6). Of all VMSs in biogas

17

Strongly interacting Fermi gases  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Strongly interacting gases of ultracold fermions have become an amazingly rich test-bed for many-body theories of fermionic matter. Here we present our recent experiments on these systems. Firstly, we discuss high-precision ...

Bakr, W.

18

Photoenhanced anaerobic digestion of organic acids  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is described for rapid conversion of organic acids and alcohols anaerobic digesters into hydrogen and carbon dioxide, the optimal precursor substrates for production of methane. The process includes addition of photosynthetic bacteria to the digester and exposure of the bacteria to radiant energy (e.g., solar energy). The process also increases the pH stability of the digester to prevent failure of the digester. Preferred substrates for photosynthetic bacteria are the organic acid and alcohol waste products of fermentative bacteria. In mixed culture with methanogenic bacteria or in defined co-culture with non-aceticlastic methanogenic bacteria, photosynthetic bacteria are capable of facilitating the conversion or organic acids and alcohols into methane with low levels of light energy input.

Weaver, Paul F. (Golden, CO)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Turkey vs. human digestion  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Turkey vs. human digestion Turkey vs. human digestion Name: wallyb Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: How is the digestive system of turkeys different from that of humans? Replies: Hmmm.. been a while since I had sophomore biology, so I can't completely answer this one, but I can say a few things. One, since turkeys are birds, and birds as a general rule have not had teeth for several million years at least, the turkey needs a way to mash up its food -- thus, the crop, which is essentially like another stomach: the turkey (and many other birds, for that matter) swallows small stones which serve in lieu of teeth, mashing up food via muscular action in the crop, from whence the "chewed" food moves on into the rest of the digestive tract. As for any other differences, I'll have to leave that to someone else with more ornithological experience...

20

Steam Digest 2001  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Steam Digest 2001 chronicles BestPractices Program's contributions to the industrial trade press for 2001, and presents articles that cover technical, financial and managerial aspects of steam optimization.

Not Available

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including digester gases" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Reading Comprehension - Digestion and Nutrition  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Digestion and Nutrition Digestion and Nutrition 1. The pouchlike muscular organ that secretes acids and digestive enzymes is the _________ stomach esophagus intestines . 2. _________ saliva enzymes chime is the watery material that results form digestion in the stomach. 3. Iron, potassium, and iodine are _________ vitamins minerals amino acids . 4. The human body is about 60 percent _________ salt water nutrients . 5. The teeth break down food by _________ chemical digestion mechanical digestion . 6. _________ Teeth Your tongue Saliva in the mouth helps to chemically digest food. 7. _________ Mechanical digestion Chemical digestion takes place in the mouth, stomach, and small intestine with the help of chemicals called _________ amino acids vitamins enzymes . 8. Proteins are made up of smaller building blocks called _________

22

Anxiety and Digestion  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Anxiety and Digestion Anxiety and Digestion Name: Donna Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: Explain how anxiety may be responsible for slowing down the process of digestion Replies: Your body really has 2 nervous systems. One is the peripheral nervous system that controls how you move and think etc. the other is called the autonomic (not automatic) nervous system It controls all of your everyday functions such as your heart, your blood vessel diameter and your digestive system, etc. There are 2 divisions of the ANS. One is called the parasympathetic and the other is the sympathetic. The parasympathetic is your everyday division, and is usually in control. When you come upon a stressful or dangerous situation, your sympathetic division takes over. It gets you ready to "fight or flee". Some parts of your body are put on alert. Your blood vessels constrict in some areas and dilate in others to get blood flowing to areas that will help you in a dangerous situation and to get glucose (fuel) to those areas quickly. Your heart starts to beat faster to send blood to those areas quicker, your pupils dilate. Other parts of your body are put on hold; those that aren't needed in a danger situation. Your digestive system is one that is put on hold. When you are under stress, your body doesn't know whether you are in danger or not but acts like it is. So if you are under constant stress, your digestive system is affected.

23

The adaptation of digestive enzymes to the diet : Its physiological significance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The adaptation of digestive enzymes to the diet : Its physiological significance T. CORRING Laboratoire de Physiologie de la Nutrition, LN.R.A. 78350 Jouy en Josas, France. Summary. Digestive enzymes that this process includes many enzymes. The intestinal step of digestion is the most important in the enzyme

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

24

PalladianDigest Transportation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PalladianDigest CONNECT. EMPOWER. GROW. Tackling Transportation Challenges Nebraska has been a vital link in the nation's transportation system since the days when carts, wagons to University of Nebraska­Lincoln research. That's fine with UNL transportation researchers, said Larry Rilett

Farritor, Shane

25

EA-1907: Biogas Anaerobic Digester Facility, Oakley, Kansas | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

907: Biogas Anaerobic Digester Facility, Oakley, Kansas 907: Biogas Anaerobic Digester Facility, Oakley, Kansas EA-1907: Biogas Anaerobic Digester Facility, Oakley, Kansas Summary This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal by DOE and USDA to provide funding to Western Plains Energy, LLC (WPE) to construct, purchase equipment, and operate a new Biogas Anaerobic Digester at WPE's existing Ethanol Facility, located at 3022 County Road 18, Grinnell Township (Oakley), Gove County, Kansas. The proposed facility will include a receiving building, digester, and related infrastructure. Based on the analysis in USDA's Final EA and FONSI, DOE has determined that DOE's proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action that would significantly affect the quality of the human or natural environment.

26

Control of pollutants in flue gases and fuel gases  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and gasification technologies for heat and power . . . . . . . . 2-3 2.4 Waste incineration and waste . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-1 2.2 Flue gases and fuel gases: combustion, gasification, pyrolysis, incineration and other . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3 3.3 Formation of sulphur compounds during combustion and gasification . 3-5 3.4 Emission

Laughlin, Robert B.

27

Control of pollutants in flue gases and fuel gases  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-1 2.2 Flue gases and fuel gases: combustion, gasification, pyrolysis, incineration and other and gasification technologies for heat and power . . . . . . . . 2-3 2.4 Waste incineration and waste . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3 3.3 Formation of sulphur compounds during combustion and gasification . . 3-5 3.4 Emission

Zevenhoven, Ron

28

Studying coherence in ultra-cold atomic gases  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis will discuss the study of coherence properties of ultra-cold atomic gases. The atomic systems investigated include a thermal cloud of atoms, a Bose-Einstein condensate and a fermion pair condensate. In each ...

Miller, Daniel E. (Daniel Edward)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - High-GWP gases  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5. High-GWP gases 5. High-GWP gases 5.1. Total emissions Greenhouse gases with high global warming potential (high-GWP gases) are hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), perfluorocarbons (PFCs), and sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), which together represented 3 percent of U.S. greenhouse gas emissions in 2009. Emissions estimates for the high-GWP gases are provided to EIA by the EPA's Office of Air and Radiation. The estimates for emissions of HFCs not related to industrial processes or electric transmission are derived from the EPA Vintaging Model. Emissions from manufacturing and utilities are derived by the EPA from a mix of public and proprietary data, including from the EPA's voluntary emission reduction partnership programs. For this year's EIA inventory, 2008 values for HFC-23 from HCFC-22

30

Potential digestibilities and digestion kinetics of forage cell wall components  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LITERATURE REVIEW. EXPERIMENTAL PROCEDURES. Chemical Analysis Colorimetric Determinations Statistical Evaluation. 10 13 15 IV RESULTS AND DISCUSSION 16 V Characteristics of Forage Kinetics of Cell Wall Digestion SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS... and both of these variables appear to be the result of several dynamic processes. The amount of structural carbohydrates, the main constituents of the fibrous cell wall, ruminants can digest appears to be limited by the potential digestibility...

Tauskey, William Henry

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Method of converting environmentally pollutant waste gases to methanol  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A continuous flow method is described of converting environmentally pollutant by-product gases emitted during the manufacture of silicon carbide to methanol comprising: (a) operating a plurality of batch furnaces of a silicon carbide manufacturing plant thereby producing silicon carbide and emitting by-product gases during the operation of the furnaces; (b) staggering the operation of the batch furnaces to achieve a continuous emission of the by-product gases; (c) continuously flowing the by-product gases as emitted from the batch furnaces directly to a methanol manufacturing plant; (d) cleansing the by-product gases of particulate matter, including removing the element sulfur from the by-product gases, as they are flowed to the methanol manufacturing plant, sufficiently for use of the by-product gases in producing methanol; and (e) immediately producing methanol from the by-product gases at the methanol manufacturing plant whereby the producing of silicon carbide is joined with the producing of methanol as a unified process.

Pfingstl, H.; Martyniuk, W.; Hennepin, A. Ill; McNally, T.; Myers, R.; Eberle, L.

1993-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

32

Federal Energy Management Program: Greenhouse Gases  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Greenhouse Gases Greenhouse Gases to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Greenhouse Gases on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Greenhouse Gases on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Greenhouse Gases on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Greenhouse Gases on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Greenhouse Gases on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Greenhouse Gases on AddThis.com... Sustainable Buildings & Campuses Operations & Maintenance Greenhouse Gases Basics Federal Requirements Guidance & Reporting Inventories & Performance Mitigation Planning Resources Contacts Water Efficiency Data Center Energy Efficiency Industrial Facilities Sustainable Federal Fleets

33

Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program was suspended May 2011. It was a mechanism by which corporations, government agencies, individuals, voluntary organizations, etc., could report to the Energy Information Administration, any actions taken that have or are expected to reduce/avoid emissions of greenhouse gases or sequester carbon.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Global warming description using Daisyworld model with greenhouse gases  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Daisyworld is an archetypal model of the earth that is able to describe the global regulation that can emerge from the interaction between life and environment. This article proposes a model based on the original Daisyworld considering greenhouse gases emission and absorption, allowing the description of the global warming phenomenon. Global and local analyses are discussed evaluating the influence of greenhouse gases in the planet dynamics. Numerical simulations are carried out showing the general qualitative behavior of the Daisyworld for different scenarios that includes solar luminosity variations and greenhouse gases effect. Nonlinear dynamics perspective is of concern discussing a way that helps the comprehension of the global warming phenomenon.

Susana L.D. Paiva; Marcelo A. Savi; Flavio M. Viola; Albino J.K. Leiroz

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

The Anaerobic Digestion of Organic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, pursuing alternative and renewable energy has become imperative from both practical and ethical standpoints production is just one of the many renewable energy alternatives out there. Defined as the digestion of Anaerobic Digestion 3.1. Municipal Waste Management 3.2. Climate Change Mitigation 3.2.1. Untreated

Iglesia, Enrique

36

Greenhouse Gases | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Greenhouse Gases Greenhouse Gases Greenhouse Gases October 7, 2013 - 9:59am Addthis Executive Order 13514 requires Federal agencies to inventory and manage greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to meet Federal goals and mitigate climate change. Basics: Read an overview of greenhouse gases. Federal Requirements: Look up requirements for agency greenhouse gas management as outlined in Federal initiatives and executive orders. Guidance and Reporting: Find guidance documents and resources for greenhouse gas accounting and reporting. GHG Inventories and Performance: See detailed comprehensive GHG inventories by Federal agency and progress toward achieving Scope 1 and 2 GHG and Scope 3 GHG reduction targets. Mitigation Planning: Learn how Federal agencies can cost-effectively meet their GHG reduction goals.

37

Degenerate quantum gases of strontium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Degenerate quantum gases of alkaline-earth-like elements open new opportunities in research areas ranging from molecular physics to the study of strongly correlated systems. These experiments exploit the rich electronic structure of these elements, which is markedly different from the one of other species for which quantum degeneracy has been attained. Specifically, alkaline-earth-like atoms, such as strontium, feature metastable triplet states, narrow intercombination lines, and a non-magnetic, closed-shell ground state. This review covers the creation of quantum degenerate gases of strontium and the first experiments performed with this new system. It focuses on laser-cooling and evaporation schemes, which enable the creation of Bose-Einstein condensates and degenerate Fermi gases of all strontium isotopes, and shows how they are used for the investigation of optical Feshbach resonances, the study of degenerate gases loaded into an optical lattice, as well as the coherent creation of Sr_2 molecules.

Stellmer, Simon; Killian, Thomas C

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Turning greenhouse gases into gold  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

gases, with carbon dioxide (CO2) often accused of being the primary instigator of global climate change. As a result, numerous efforts are under way to find ways to prevent,...

39

ARM - What are Greenhouse Gases?  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

radiative forcing (which means they enhance global warming). Many of these gases are naturally occurring and are essential to life on earth by providing a blanket for marine and...

40

Greenhouse Gases and Emissions Trading  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases have grown rapidly since the beginning of this century. Unless emissions are controlled, the world could face rapid climate changes, incl...

Alice LeBlanc; Daniel J. Dudek

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including digester gases" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

RECOMMENDATIONS TO INCLUDE IN CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION'S 2009 INTEGRATED ENERGY POLICY REPORT (IEPR)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and to strike a balance between control of criteria pollutants and control of greenhouse gases. We intend criteria pollutants during electricity generation, such as dairy methane digesters, applicants have been unable - or have found it extremely difficult, time-consuming and expensive - to obtain the necessary air

Kammen, Daniel M.

42

United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff practice and procedure digest  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Revision 9 of the fifth edition of the NRC Staff Practice and Procedure Digest contains a digest of a number of Commission, Atomic Safety and Licensing Appeal Board, and Atomic Safety and Licensing Board decisions issued during the period from July 1, 1972 to September 30, 1990 interpreting the NRC's Rules of Practice in 10 CFR Part 2. This Revision 9 replaces in part earlier editions and revisions and includes appropriate changes reflecting the amendments to the Rules of Practice effective through September 30, 1990. This edition of the Digest was prepared by attorneys from Aspen Systems Corporation pursuant to Contract number 18-89-346. Persons using this Digest are placed on notice that it may not be used as an authoritative citation in support of any position before the Commission or any of its adjudicatory tribunals. Persons using this Digest are also placed on notice that it is intended for use only as an initial research tool, that it may, and likely does, contain errors, including errors in analysis and interpretation of decisions, and that the user should not rely on the Digest analyses and interpretations but must read, analyze and rely on the user's own analysis of the actual Commission, Appeal Board and Licensing Board decisions cited. Further, neither the United States, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Aspen Systems Corporation, nor any of their employees makes any expressed or implied warranty or assumes liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness or usefulness of any material presented in the Digest. The Digest is roughly structured in accordance with the chronological sequence of the nuclear facility licensing process as set forth in Appendix A to 10 CFR Part 2. Those decisions which did not fit into that structure are dealt with in a section on general matters. Where appropriate, particular decisions are indexed under more than one heading. (JF)

Not Available

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

RCM Digesters | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

RCM Digesters RCM Digesters Jump to: navigation, search Name RCM Digesters Place Berkeley, California Zip CA 94704 Product Manufactures anaerobic manure digesters which process animal waste into biogas. Coordinates 38.748315°, -90.334929° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.748315,"lon":-90.334929,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

44

Climate VISION: Greenhouse Gases Information  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

GHG Information GHG Information Greenhouse Gases, Global Climate Change, and Energy Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 2001 [1605(a)] This report, required by Section 1605(a) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992, provides estimates of U.S. emissions of greenhouse gases, as well as information on the methods used to develop the estimates. The estimates are based on activity data and applied emissions factors, not on measured or metered emissions monitoring. Available Energy Footprints Industry NAICS* All Manufacturing Alumina & Aluminum 3313 Cement 327310 Chemicals 325 Fabricated Metals 332 Food and Beverages 311, 312 Forest Products 321, 322 Foundries 3315 Glass & Glass Products, Fiber Glass 3272, 3296 Iron & Steel Mills 331111 Machinery & Equipment 333, 334, 335, 336

45

Investigating and Using Biomass Gases  

K-12 Energy Lesson Plans and Activities Web site (EERE)

Students will be introduced to biomass gasification and will generate their own biomass gases. Students generate these everyday on their own and find it quite amusing, but this time theyll do it by heating wood pellets or wood splints in a test tube. They will collect the resulting gases and use the gas to roast a marshmallow. Students will also evaluate which biomass fuel is the best according to their own criteria or by examining the volume of gas produced by each type of fuel.

46

Clean Gases for Gas Chromatography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......to purchase such clean gases. Even research grades...no maintenance, at the cost of 500 watts of electrical...Exploration and Production Research Division, Hous...hour. The maintenance cost of the cold trap is only...displaces the contaminated gas which has passed into......

B. Osborne Prescott; Harold L. Wise

1966-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Industrial Gases as a Vehicle for Competitiveness  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the diversity and options available to enable cost savings and environmentally driven process improvements. Industrial gases have come of age during the last fifteen years. Engineers and scientists have looked beyond the paradigms of their operations...INDUSTRIAL GASES AS A VEHICLE FOR COMPETITIVENESS James R. Dale, Director, Technology Programs, Airco Industrial Gases Division, The BOC Group, Inc., Murray Hill, New Jersey ABSTRACT Industrial gases are produced using compressed air...

Dale, J. R.

48

Biofuels Digest | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Digest Digest Jump to: navigation, search Name Biofuels Digest Address 801 Brickell Avenue Suite 900 Place Miami, Florida Zip 33131 Sector Services Product Information Year founded 2007 Number of employees 1-10 Phone number 786-393-8530 Website http://www.biofuelsdigest.com Coordinates 25.765653°, -80.190405° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":25.765653,"lon":-80.190405,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

49

Greenhouse Gases Converted to Fuel  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Greenhouse Greenhouse Gases Converted to Fuel Greenhouse Gases Converted to Fuel carbon-conversion-fig-1.jpg Key Challenges: An important strategy for reducing global CO2 emissions calls for capturing the greenhouse gas and converting it to fuels and chemicals. Although researchers working toward that goal demonstrated in 1992 such a reaction in the lab, a key outstanding scientific challenge was explaining the details of how the reaction took place - its "mechanism." Why it Matters: An important potential strategy for reducing global CO2 emissions calls for capturing the greenhouse gas and converting it electrochemically to fuels and chemicals. Accomplishments: Computation to explain how carbon dioxide can be converted to small organic molecules with little energy input. The

50

Ozone treatment of biomass to enhance digestibility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is very resistant to enzymatic degradation. Lignocellulosic materials require pretreatment to enhance their digestibility. The main objective of this research was to further enhance the digestibility of biomass (bagasse) with ozonation as a follow...

Almendarez, Maria Elena

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Kinetic modeling and experimentation of anaerobic digestion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Anaerobic digesters convert organic waste (agricultural and food waste, animal or human manure, and other organic waste), into energy (in the form of biogas or electricity). An added benefit to bio-digestion is a leftover ...

Rea, Jonathan (Jonathan E.)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Inactivation of poliovirus in digested sludge.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Inactivation of poliovirus in digested sludge. R L Ward C S Ashley The effect of anaerobically digested sludge on poliovirus during incubation at temperatures...Although virus was fully recoverable from sludge, its infectivity decreased in proportion...

R L Ward; C S Ashley

1976-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

?enseignement de ?endoscopie digestive en Italie  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

En Italie, nous disposons de deux coles de postgraduat : Gastroentrologie et Endoscopie Digestive et ?autre part : Chirurgie Digestive et Endoscopie Chirurgicale. Le premier cours dure quatre ans, le second cin...

A. Russo

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material, such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

55

Optimizing the Operation of a Two-Phase Anaerobic Digestion System Digesting Grass Silage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Methane Yields from Grass Biomethane Digesters ... biomethane potential test ... biomethane potential test ...

Abdul-Sattar Nizami; Jerry D. Murphy

2011-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

56

Use of low temperature blowers for recirculation of hot gases  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus is described for maintaining motors at low operating temperatures during recirculation of hot gases in fuel cell operations and chemical processes such as fluidized bed coal gasification. The apparatus includes a means for separating the hot process gas from the motor using a secondary lower temperature gas, thereby minimizing the temperature increase of the motor and associated accessories.

Maru, H.C.; Forooque, M.

1982-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

57

Mitigation options for accidental releases of hazardous gases  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this paper is to review and compare technologies available for mitigation of unconfined releases of toxic and flammable gases. These technologies include: secondary confinement, deinventory, vapor barriers, foam spraying, and water sprays/monitors. Guidelines for the design and/or operation of effective post-release mitigation systems and case studies involving actual industrial mitigation systems are also presented.

Fthenakis, V.M.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Emissions of greenhouse gases in the United States 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the sixth annual report on aggregate US national emissions of greenhouse gases. It covers emissions over the period 1990--1996, with preliminary estimates of emissions for 1997. Chapter one summarizes some background information about global climate change and the greenhouse effect. Important recent developments in global climate change activities are discussed, especially the third Conference of the Parties to the Framework Convention on Climate Change, which was held in December of 1997 in Kyoto, Japan. Chapters two through five cover emissions of carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, halocarbons and related gases, respectively. Chapter six describes potential sequestration and emissions of greenhouse gases as a result of land use changes. Six appendices are included in the report. 96 refs., 38 tabs.

NONE

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Assess Potential Agency Size Changes to Reduce Greenhouse Gases Using  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Assess Potential Agency Size Changes to Reduce Greenhouse Gases Assess Potential Agency Size Changes to Reduce Greenhouse Gases Using Renewable Energy in Buildings Assess Potential Agency Size Changes to Reduce Greenhouse Gases Using Renewable Energy in Buildings October 7, 2013 - 11:15am Addthis To support planning for using renewable energy to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions at the Federal agency or program-level, it is important to consider what changes to the agencies building or land-holding portfolio may have on opportunities for renewable energy. Changes to consider include: Addition of new buildings or sites to the agencies portfolio Major renovations to existing buildings Office moves into or out of agency-owned or leased space. As is the case with planning energy efficiency measures, planning for renewable energy in new construction can be more cost-effective than

60

Raman/FTIR spectroscopy of oil shale retort gases  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Raman facility was assembled in order to aid in the evaluation of the feasibility of using Raman or FTIR spectroscopy for analyzing gas mixtures of interest in oil shale. Applications considered in oil shale research included both retort monitoring and laboratory kinetic studies. Both techniques gave limits of detection between 10 and 1000 ppM for ten representative pertinent gases. Both techniques are inferior as a general analytical technique for oil shale gas analysis in comparison with mass spectroscopy, which had detection limits between 1 and 50 ppM for the same gases. The conclusion of the feasibility study was to recommend that mass spectroscopic techniques be used for analyzing gases of interest to oil shale.

Richardson, J H; Monaco, S B; Sanborn, R H; Hirschfeld, T B; Taylor, J R

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including digester gases" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Intermediate-scale high-solids anaerobic digestion system operational development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Anaerobic bioconversion of solid organic wastes represents a disposal option in which two useful products may be produced, including a medium Btu fuel gas (biogas) and a compost-quality organic residue. The application of high-solids technology may offer several advantages over conventional low-solids digester technology. Operation of the anaerobic digestion process at high solids reduces the level of process water and thereby the size and capital costs for the digester system. In addition, by virtue of the lack of available water, the microbial catalysts are more productive in feedstock polymer hydrolysis. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has developed a unique digester system capable of uniformly mixing high-solids materials at low cost. Information gained from laboratory-scale digester research was used to develop die intermediate-scale digester system. This system represents a 50-fold scale-up of the original digester system and includes continuous feed addition and computer monitoring and control. During the first 1.15 years of operation, a variety of modifications and improvements were instituted to increase the safety, reliability, and performance of the system. Those improvements -- which may be critical in further scale-up efforts using the NREL high-solids digester design -- are detailed in this report.

Rivard, C.J.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Atmospheric Trace Gases from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

CDIAC products are indexed and searchable through a customized interface powered by ORNL's Mercury search engine. Products include numeric data packages, publications, trend data, atlases, models, etc. and can be searched for by subject area, keywords, authors, product numbers, time periods, collection sites, spatial references, etc. Some of the collections may also be included in the CDIAC publication, Trends Online: A Compendium of Global Change Data. Most data sets, many with numerous data files, are free to download from CDIAC's ftp area. The collections under the CDIAC heading of Atmospheric Trace Gases include: Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide, Atmospheric Methane, Atmospheric Carbon Monoxide, Atmospheric Hydrogen, Isotopes in Greenhouse Gases, Radionuclides, Aerosols, and Other Trace Gases.

63

Shortcuts to adiabaticity for trapped ultracold gases  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study, experimentally and theoretically, the controlled transfer of harmonically trapped ultracold gases between different quantum states. In particular we experimentally demonstrate a fast decompression and displacement of both a non-interacting gas and an interacting Bose-Einstein condensate which are initially at equilibrium. The decompression parameters are engineered such that the final state is identical to that obtained after a perfectly adiabatic transformation despite the fact that the fast decompression is performed in the strongly non-adiabatic regime. During the transfer the atomic sample goes through strongly out-of-equilibrium states while the external confinement is modified until the system reaches the desired stationary state. The scheme is theoretically based on the invariants of motion and scaling equations techniques and can be generalized to decompression trajectories including an arbitrary deformation of the trap. It is also directly applicable to arbitrary initial non-equilibrium sta...

Schaff, Jean-Franois; Labeyrie, Guillaume; Vignolo, Patrizia

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Shortcuts to adiabaticity for trapped ultracold gases  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study, experimentally and theoretically, the controlled transfer of harmonically trapped ultracold gases between different quantum states. In particular we experimentally demonstrate a fast decompression and displacement of both a non-interacting gas and an interacting Bose-Einstein condensate which are initially at equilibrium. The decompression parameters are engineered such that the final state is identical to that obtained after a perfectly adiabatic transformation despite the fact that the fast decompression is performed in the strongly non-adiabatic regime. During the transfer the atomic sample goes through strongly out-of-equilibrium states while the external confinement is modified until the system reaches the desired stationary state. The scheme is theoretically based on the invariants of motion and scaling equations techniques and can be generalized to decompression trajectories including an arbitrary deformation of the trap. It is also directly applicable to arbitrary initial non-equilibrium states.

Jean-Franois Schaff; Pablo Capuzzi; Guillaume Labeyrie; Patrizia Vignolo

2011-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

65

Contribution of Anaerobic Digesters to Emissions Mitigation and Electricity Generation Under U.S. Climate Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Livestock husbandry in the U.S. significantly contributes to many environmental problems, including the release of methane, a potent greenhouse gas (GHG). Anaerobic digesters (ADs) break down organic wastes using bacteria ...

Zaks, David P. M.

66

The Viscosity of Compressed Gases  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

New data and a new theory for the viscosity of compressed gases are presented. Data for nitrogen, hydrogen and a mixture of these gases are given, in the calculation of which, the "end effects" are not neglected as has been done in the past. Previous viscosity data are of doubtful validity owing to neglect of this factor. The theory is based on an analogy between the kinetic pressure and viscosity of a gas and is derived using an equation of state of the Lorentz type. Allowance is made for the difference between the viscosity and compressibility covolumes. The theory is substantiated experimentally and further confirmed by the recalculation of other data on the variation of Reynolds' criterion with the pressure, which is here shown to be constant. The mixture data offer a direct opportunity of comparing the Lorentz and linear rules for the calculation of the covolume of a mixture from the covolumes of the components and such comparison indicates that the Lorentz rule is not to be preferred. The substantiation of the new theory is the first direct proof of the validity of the separate treatment of the kinetic and cohesive pressures in the equation of state.

James H. Boyd; Jr.

1930-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

67

ARM - Lesson Plans: Dissolved Gases in Water  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

released into the air, additional CO2 Would intensify an already-problematic greenhouse effect. Preparation Demonstrate that water contains invisible gases. Collect and cover...

68

Granular gases under extreme driving  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study inelastic gases in two dimensions using event-driven molecular dynamics simulations. Our focus is the nature of the stationary state attained by rare injection of large amounts of energy to balance the dissipation due to collisions. We find that under such extreme driving, with the injection rate much smaller than the collision rate, the velocity distribution has a power-law high energy tail. The numerically measured exponent characterizing this tail is in excellent agreement with predictions of kinetic theory over a wide range of system parameters. We conclude that driving by rare but powerful energy injection leads to a well-mixed gas and constitutes an alternative mechanism for agitating granular matter. In this distinct nonequilibrium steady-state, energy cascades from large to small scales. Our simulations also show that when the injection rate is comparable with the collision rate, the velocity distribution has a stretched exponential tail.

W. Kang; J. Machta; E. Ben-Naim

2010-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

69

Raman Spectra of Polyatomic Gases  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Raman spectra of gaseous CO2, N2O, NH3, CH4 and C2H4 have been photographed using the line ?2536 of mercury as the exciting radiation. Vibrational transitions have been observed in all the gases investigated, and rotational transitions in the cases of NH3 and CH4. For the frequency shifts due to the vibrational transitions, the following numerical values (in cm-1) have been found: CO2: 1264.5; 1285.1; 1387.7; 1408.4.CH4: 2914.8; 3022.1; 3071.5.N2O: 1281.8C2H4: 1342.4; 1623.3; 2880.1; 3019.3; 3240.3; 3272.3.NH3: 3333.6 Raman spectra of liquid NH3 have been photographed and found to give the two frequency shifts: 3298.4 and 3214.5. In the case of gaseous NH3, pure rotational transitions lead to a moment of inertia having the value I0=2.7910-40. In the case of methane, the positive and negative branches of the 3022.1 band lead to the value I0=5.1710-40. The relations between these data and infra-red absorption data are discussed.

R. G. Dickinson, R. T. Dillon, and F. Rasetti

1929-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

70

Chemical Reactor Analysis and Optimal Digestion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

J 310 Chemical Reactor Analysis and Optimal Digestion An optimal digestion theory can be readily derived from basic principles o f chemical reactor analysis and design Deborah L. Penry and Peter for formulating and solving optimization problems (Bellman 1957), the entire process is optimized only

Jumars, Pete

71

Methane Digester Loan Program | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Methane Digester Loan Program Methane Digester Loan Program Methane Digester Loan Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Savings Category Bioenergy Maximum Rebate RFA can provide up to $250,000 of loan principal Program Info Funding Source Minnesota Rural Finance Authority (RFA) State Minnesota Program Type State Loan Program Rebate Amount RFA participation limited to 45% of loan principal Provider Minnesota Department of Agriculture Established in 1998, the Minnesota Dept. of Agriculture Methane Digester Loan Program helps livestock producers install on-farm anaerobic digesters used for the production of electricity by providing zero-interest loans to eligible borrowers. The loan program is part of the Rural Finance Authority (RFA) revolving loan fund, through which farmers can receive financial aid

72

Colorado Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Colorado Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

73

EIA-Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program - What are...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

gases such as hydrofluorocarbons, perfluorocarbons, and sulfur hexafluoride). The Greenhouse Effect Concentrations of several important greenhouse gases have increased by about 33...

74

T-728: Apache Tomcat HTTP DIGEST Authentication Weaknesses Let...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

8: Apache Tomcat HTTP DIGEST Authentication Weaknesses Let Remote Users Conduct Bypass Attacks T-728: Apache Tomcat HTTP DIGEST Authentication Weaknesses Let Remote Users Conduct...

75

Fluid clathrate system for continuous removal of heavy noble gases from mixtures of lighter gases  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method for separation of heavy noble gas in a gas volume. An apparatus and method have been devised which includes a reservoir containing an oil exhibiting a clathrate effect for heavy noble gases with a reservoir input port and the reservoir is designed to enable the input gas volume to bubble through the oil with the heavy noble gas being absorbed by the oil exhibiting a clathrate effect. The gas having reduced amounts of heavy noble gas is output from the oil reservoir, and the oil having absorbed heavy noble gas can be treated by mechanical agitation and/or heating to desorb the heavy noble gas for analysis and/or containment and allow recycling of the oil to the reservoir.

Gross, Kenneth C. (Bolingbrook, IL); Markun, Francis (Joliet, IL); Zawadzki, Mary T. (South Bend, IN)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Fluid clathrate system for continuous removal of heavy noble gases from mixtures of lighter gases  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method are disclosed for separation of heavy noble gas in a gas volume. An apparatus and method have been devised which includes a reservoir containing an oil exhibiting a clathrate effect for heavy noble gases with a reservoir input port and the reservoir is designed to enable the input gas volume to bubble through the oil with the heavy noble gas being absorbed by the oil exhibiting a clathrate effect. The gas having reduced amounts of heavy noble gas is output from the oil reservoir, and the oil having absorbed heavy noble gas can be treated by mechanical agitation and/or heating to desorb the heavy noble gas for analysis and/or containment and allow recycling of the oil to the reservoir. 6 figs.

Gross, K.C.; Markun, F.; Zawadzki, M.T.

1998-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

77

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic sludge digestion Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

digestion Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: anaerobic sludge digestion...

78

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic sludge digester Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

digester Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: anaerobic sludge digester...

79

The extreme nonlinear optics of gases and femtosecond optical filamentation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under certain conditions, powerful ultrashort laser pulses can form greatly extended, propagating filaments of concentrated high intensity in gases, leaving behind a very long trail of plasma. Such filaments can be much longer than the longitudinal scale over which a laser beam typically diverges by diffraction, with possible applications ranging from laser-guided electrical discharges to high power laser propagation in the atmosphere. Understanding in detail the microscopic processes leading to filamentation requires ultrafast measurements of the strong field nonlinear response of gas phase atoms and molecules, including absolute measurements of nonlinear laser-induced polarization and high field ionization. Such measurements enable the assessment of filamentation models and make possible the design of experiments pursuing applications. In this paper, we review filamentation in gases and some applications, and discuss results from diagnostics developed at Maryland for ultrafast measurements of laser-gas interactions.

Milchberg, H. M.; Chen, Y.-H.; Cheng, Y.-H.; Jhajj, N.; Palastro, J. P.; Rosenthal, E. W.; Varma, S.; Wahlstrand, J. K.; Zahedpour, S. [Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)

2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

80

Comparing greenhouse gases for policy purposes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In order to derive optimal policies for greenhouse gas emissions control, the discounted marginal damages of emissions of different gases must be compared. The greenhouse warming potential (GWP) index, which is most often ...

Schmalensee, Richard

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including digester gases" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Voluntary reporting of greenhouse gases, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Voluntary Reporting Program for greenhouse gases is part of an attempt by the U.S. Government to develop innovative, low-cost, and nonregulatory approaches to limit emissions of greenhouse gases. It is one element in an array of such programs introduced in recent years as part of the effort being made by the United States to comply with its national commitment to stabilize emissions of greenhouse gases under the Framework Convention on Climate Change. The Voluntary Reporting Program, developed pursuant to Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992, permits corporations, government agencies, households, and voluntary organizations to report to the Energy Information Administration (EIA) on actions taken that have reduced or avoided emissions of greenhouse gases.

NONE

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

1 - Solubility of Atmospheric Gases in Freshwater  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This chapter presents tabular information on the standard air saturation concentration (moist air at 1atm) for oxygen, nitrogen, argon, and carbon dioxide gas in terms of ?mol/kg, mg/L, and mL/L; and in terms of Bunsen coefficients L real gas/(Latm); mg real gas/(LmmHg); and mg real gas/(LkPa) for 040C and freshwater conditions. Because the mole fraction of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is changing, solubility information is provided for 2010 (390?atm) and for 2030 (440?atm) based on projected atmospheric values. Tabular information is also provided to allow computation of standard air saturation concentrations of carbon dioxide gas directly as a function of atmospheric mole fraction. Conversion factors are presented to convert these concentrations to other commonly used units. Equations and tabular information are provided to compute air saturation concentration for moist air at local barometric pressure for the four atmospheric gases. Because of the importance of dissolved oxygen in biological processes, the air solubility concentration is also presented as a function of elevation for both metric and English elevations. Equations and tabular information are provided to allow conversion of concentrations in mg/L to partial pressures in mmHg. Sample problems are included for representative examples. Keywords gas solubility, freshwater, oxygen, nitrogen, argon, carbon dioxide, standard air solubility, air solubility, Bunsen coefficients, partial pressures

John Colt

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Gases for an SSC muon detector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent measurements of electron drift velocities as a function of the density-reduced electric field E/N are reported for a number of unitary gases and the mixtures CO{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} and NH{sub 3}/CF{sub 4}/Ar. Calculated values of the mean electron energy as a function of E/N are also reported for unitary gases and mixtures of CO{sub 2}/CH{sub 4}. 7 refs., 5 figs.

Christophorou, L.G.; Datskos, P.G.; Carter, J.G. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA) Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (USA). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Nitrogen availability and indirect measurements of greenhouse gas emissions from aerobic and anaerobic biowaste digestates applied to agricultural soils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Nitrogen release in digestate-amended soil depends on the digestate type. Overall N release is modulated by digestate mineral and mineralisable N contents. Microbial immobilisation does not influence overall release of digestate N in soil. Digestate physical properties and soil type interact to affect overall N recovery. High labile C inputs in digestate may promote denitrification in fine-textured soil. - Abstract: Recycling biowaste digestates on agricultural land diverts biodegradable waste from landfill disposal and represents a sustainable source of nutrients and organic matter (OM) to improve soil for crop production. However, the dynamics of nitrogen (N) release from these organic N sources must be determined to optimise their fertiliser value and management. This laboratory incubation experiment examined the effects of digestate type (aerobic and anaerobic), waste type (industrial, agricultural and municipal solid waste or sewage sludge) and soil type (sandy loam, sandy silt loam and silty clay) on N availability in digestate-amended soils and also quantified the extent and significance of the immobilisation of N within the soil microbial biomass, as a possible regulatory mechanism of N release. The digestate types examined included: dewatered, anaerobically digested biosolids (DMAD); dewatered, anaerobic mesophilic digestate from the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (DMADMSW); liquid, anaerobic co-digestate of food and animal slurry (LcoMAD) and liquid, thermophilic aerobic digestate of food waste (LTAD). Ammonium chloride (NH{sub 4}Cl) was included as a reference treatment for mineral N. After 48 days, the final, maximum net recoveries of mineral N relative to the total N (TN) addition in the different digestates and unamended control treatments were in the decreasing order: LcoMAD, 68%; LTAD, 37%, DMAD, 20%; and DMADMSW, 11%. A transient increase in microbial biomass N (MBN) was observed with LTAD application, indicating greater microbial activity in amended soil and reflecting the lower stability of this OM source, compared to the other, anaerobic digestate types, which showed no consistent effects on MBN compared to the control. Thus, the overall net release of digestate N in different soil types was not regulated by N transfer into the soil microbial biomass, but was determined primarily by digestate properties and the capacity of the soil type to process and turnover digestate N. In contrast to the sandy soil types, where nitrate (NO{sub 3}{sup -}) concentrations increased during incubation, there was an absence of NO{sub 3}{sup -} accumulation in the silty clay soil amended with LTAD and DMADMSW. This provided indirect evidence for denitrification activity and the gaseous loss of N, and the associated increased risk of greenhouse gas emissions under certain conditions of labile C supply and/or digestate physical structure in fine-textured soil types. The significance and influence of the interaction between soil type and digestate stability and physical properties on denitrification processes in digestate-amended soils require urgent investigation to ensure management practices are appropriate to minimise greenhouse gas emissions from land applied biowastes.

Rigby, H.; Smith, S.R., E-mail: s.r.smith@imperial.ac.uk

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

85

THE FUTURE OF ENERGY GASES David G. Howell, Editor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

totally independent of oil. Methane is found in association with coal; it is a byproduct of metabolic the term "energy gases" to distinguish those natural gases, primarily methane, that have utility for energy consequences associated with an expanded role of energy gases? Energy gases, particularly methane, are commonly

86

Measuring the Isotopic Composition of Solar Wind Noble Gases  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

noble gases. #12;Exploring the Solar Wind94 Light solar wind noble gases were directly measured by mass of the light gases are known to vary with energy, so none of these provided solar isotopic and elemental5 Measuring the Isotopic Composition of Solar Wind Noble Gases Alex Meshik, Charles Hohenberg, Olga

87

Comparative Analysis of Alternative Means for Removing Noncondensable Gases  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Comparative Analysis of Alternative Means for Removing Noncondensable Gases Comparative Analysis of Alternative Means for Removing Noncondensable Gases from Flashed-Steam Geothermal Power Plants:April 1999 - March 2000 Dataset Summary Description This dataset corresponds to the final report on a screening study to compare six methods of removing noncondensable gases from direct-use geo-thermal steam power plants. This report defines the study methodologies and compares the performance and economics of selected gas-removal systems. Recommendations are presented for follow-up investigations and implementation of some of the technologies discussed. The specific gas-removal methods include five vacuum system configurations using the conventional approach of evacuating gas/vapor mixtures from the power plant condenser system and a system for physical separation of steam and gases upstream of the power turbine. The study focused on flashed-steam applications, but the results apply equally well to flashed-steam and dry-steam geothermal power plant configurations. Two gas-removal options appear to offer profitable economic potential. The hybrid vacuum system configurations and the reboiler process yield positive net present value results over wide-ranging gas concentrations. The hybrid options look favorable for both low-temperature and high-temperature resource applications. The reboiler looks profitable for low-temperature resource applications for gas levels above about 20,000 parts per million by volume. A vacuum system configuration using a three-stage turbocompressor battery may be profitable for low-temperature resources, but results show that the hybrid system is more profitable. The biphase eductor alternative cannot be recommended for commercialization at this time. The report is available from NREL's publication database.

88

Enteric bacteria in aerobically digested sludge.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Research Article Enteric bacteria in aerobically digested sludge. S R Farrah G Bitton Indicator bacteria, Salmonella...aerobic bacteria were determined in samples of undigested sludge and sludge that had been treated by one or two stages of aerobic...

S R Farrah; G Bitton

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

BETO Ranks High in Biofuels Digests Top 125 in the Advanced Bioeconomy  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Biofuels Digest recently released its Top 125 in the Advanced Bioeconomy, ranking Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) Director Dr. Jonathan Male , Deputy Director Dr. Valerie Reed, Technology...

90

Thermodynamics of Ultracold Fermi Gases  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We measure the equation of state of a low-temperature two-component ultracold Fermi gas for a wide range of interaction strengths. A detailed comparison with theories including...

Nascimbne, Sylvain; Navon, Nir; Chevy, Frdric; Salomon, Christophe

91

Biomethane production by anaerobic digestion of organic waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Anaerobic Digestion (AD) is a biological process that takes place naturally when bacteria break down organic matter in environments with or without oxygen. Controlled anaerobic digestion of organic waste in enclosed landfill will generate methane. Almost any organic material can be processed with AD, including waste paper and cardboard (of a grade that is too low to recycle because of food contamination), grass clippings, leftover food, industrial effluents, sewage and animal waste. AD produces biogas which is comprised of around 60% methane (CH4) and 40% carbon dioxide (CO2). This biogas can be used to generate heat or electricity and/or can be used as a vehicular fuel. If the intended use is for power generation the biogas must be scrubbed to remove a number of impurities. After conditioning the biogas can be used for onsite power generation, to heat homes or can be added to the national natural gas grid. In recent years several research groups have shown the possibility of upgrading the biogas for biomethane production [1]. This study will show the feasibility of integrating anaerobic digestion plant with onsite polymeric membrane purification system for conditioned biomethane production.

A. Molino; F. Nanna; Y. Ding; B. Bikson; G. Braccio

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Purchase, Delivery, and Storage of Gases  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Purchase, Delivery, and Storage of Gases Print Purchase, Delivery, and Storage of Gases Print ALS users should follow Berkeley Lab policy, as described below, for the purchase, delivery, storage, and use of all gases at the ALS. See Shipping and Receiving for information on any non-gas deliveries. Contacts: Gas purchase or delivery: ALS Receiving, 510-486-4494 Gas use and storage: Experiment Coordination, 510-486-7222, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it Gas Storage: Berkeley Lab Chemical Inventory All gas bottles and cylinders at the ALS must be identified with bar code and logged into the Berkeley Lab Chemical Inventory by ALS staff. The inventory will be updated periodically; for more information contact Experiment Coordination. Gases are stored either in the racks between buildings 6 and 7; toxic and corrosive gases are stored in Building 6, room 6C across the walkway from beamline 10.0.

93

Scramjet including integrated inlet and combustor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes a scramjet engine. It comprises: a first surface including an aft facing step; a cowl including: a leading edge and a trailing edge; an upper surface and a lower surface extending between the leading edge and the trailing edge; the cowl upper surface being spaced from and generally parallel to the first surface to define an integrated inlet-combustor therebetween having an inlet for receiving and channeling into the inlet-combustor supersonic inlet airflow; means for injecting fuel into the inlet-combustor at the step for mixing with the supersonic inlet airflow for generating supersonic combustion gases; and further including a spaced pari of sidewalls extending between the first surface to the cowl upper surface and wherein the integrated inlet-combustor is generally rectangular and defined by the sidewall pair, the first surface and the cowl upper surface.

Kutschenreuter, P.H. Jr.; Blanton, J.C.

1992-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

94

Pump apparatus including deconsolidator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A pump apparatus includes a particulate pump that defines a passage that extends from an inlet to an outlet. A duct is in flow communication with the outlet. The duct includes a deconsolidator configured to fragment particle agglomerates received from the passage.

Sonwane, Chandrashekhar; Saunders, Timothy; Fitzsimmons, Mark Andrew

2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

95

Sorption of organic gases in residential rooms  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

residential rooms residential rooms Title Sorption of organic gases in residential rooms Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-59303 Year of Publication 2007 Authors Singer, Brett C., Alfred T. Hodgson, Toshifumi Hotchi, Katherine Y. Ming, Richard G. Sextro, Emily E. Wood, and Nancy J. Brown Journal Atmospheric Environment Volume 41 Start Page Chapter Pagination 3251-3265 Keywords adsorption, hazardous air pollutants, nerve agents, sink effect, volatile organic compounds Abstract Experiments were conducted to characterize organic gas sorption in residential rooms studied ''as-is'' with furnishings and material surfaces unaltered and in a furnished chamber designed to simulate a residential room. Results are presented for 10 rooms (five bedrooms, two bathrooms, a home office, and two multi-function spaces) and the chamber. Exposed materials were characterized and areas quantified. A mixture of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) was rapidly volatilized within each room as it was closed and sealed for a 5-h Adsorb phase; this was followed by 30-min Flush and 2-h closed-room Desorb phases. Included were alkane, aromatic, and oxygenated VOCs representing a range of ambient and indoor air pollutants. Three organophosphorus compounds served as surrogates for Sarin-like nerve agents. Measured gas-phase concentrations were fit to three variations of a mathematical model that considers sorption occurring at a surface sink and potentially a second, embedded sink. The 3-parameter sink-diffusion model provided acceptable fits for most compounds and the 4-parameter two-sink model provided acceptable fits for the others. Initial adsorption rates and sorptive partitioning increased with decreasing vapor pressure for the alkanes, aromatics and oxygenated VOCs. Best-fit sorption parameters obtained from experimental data from the chamber produced best-fit sorption parameters similar to those obtained from the residential rooms

96

Analysis of air pollution and greenhouse gases  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The current objective of the project Analysis of Air Pollution and Greenhouse Gases'' is to develop a study of emissions and emission sources that could easily be linked to models of economic activity. Initial studies were conducted to evaluate data currently available linking activity rates and emissions estimates. The emissions inventory developed for the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP) presents one of the most comprehensive data sets, and was chosen for our initial studies, which are described in this report. Over 99% of the SO{sub 2} emissions, 98% of the NO{sub x} emission and 57% of the VOC emissions from area sources are related to fuel combustion. The majority of emission from these sources are generated by the transportation sector. Activity rates for area sources are not archived with the NAPAP inventory; alternative derivations of these data will be part of the future activities of this project. The availability and completeness of the fuel heat content data in the NAPAP inventory were also studied. Approximately 10% of the SO{sub 2} emissions, 13% of the NO{sub x} emissions and 46% of the VOC emissions are generated by sources with unavailable data for fuel heat content. Initial estimates of pollutant emission rate per unit fuel heat content. Initial estimates of pollutant emission rate per unit fuel heat content were generated. Future studies for this project include the derivation of activity rates for area sources, improved explanations for the default fuel parameters defined in the NAPAP inventory and the development of links to data bases of economic activity.

Benkovitz, C.M.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

U.S. Nuclear Regulation Data (Information Digest, 2010 - 2011) | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nuclear Regulation Data (Information Digest, 2010 - 2011) Nuclear Regulation Data (Information Digest, 2010 - 2011) Dataset Summary Description The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) publishes an Information Digest containing summary information about the NRC and its industry. The report's appendices include demographic data on U.S. nuclear power reactors, both commercial and test facilities. Details include licensee data, location, and capacity. In addition there is information on dry spent fuel storage. The data include activities through 2009 or the most current data available. Source U.S. Nuclear Reactor Commission (USNRC) Date Released August 31st, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords nuclear Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon US Commercial Nuclear Power Reactors (xls, 132.6 KiB) application/vnd.ms-excel icon US Commercial Nuclear Power Reactors, Permanently Shutdown (xls, 32.8 KiB)

98

Emissions of greenhouse gases in the United States, 1985--1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Earth`s capacity to support life depends on the moderating influences of gases that envelop the planet and warm its surface and protect it from harmful radiation. These gases are referred to as ``greenhouse gases.`` Their warming capacity, called ``the greenhouse effect,`` is essential to maintaining a climate hospitable to all plant, animal, and human life. In recent years, however, there has been increasing concern that human activity may be affecting the intricate balance between the Earth`s absorption of heat from the sun and its capacity to reradiate excess heat back into space. Emissions of greenhouse gases from human activities may be an important mechanism that affects global climate. Thus, research is intensifying to improve our understanding of the role human activities might play in influencing atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases. On the basis of scientific findings of the past few decades, the US Government and the international community at large are now taking steps toward stabilizing greenhouse gas emissions. This report contributes to that process. Mandated by Congress this report provides estimates of US emissions of the principal greenhouse gases--carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, chlorofluorcarbons, carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, and nonmethane volatile organic compounds. Estimates are for the period 1985 to 1990. Preliminary estimates for 1991 have also been included, whenever data were available.

Not Available

1993-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

99

Methane Digesters and Biogas Recovery - Masking the Environmental Consequences of Industrial Concentrated Livestock Production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Methane Digesters and Biogas Recovery-Masking theII. METHANE DIGESTERS AND BIOGAs RECOVERY- IN THE2011] METHANE DIGESTERS AND BIOGAS RECOVERY methane, and 64%

Di Camillo, Nicole G.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Chemical Properties of the Rare Gases  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... of argon of about 100 atm. I have already shown by an independent method1 that radon, too, forms a hydrate which is much more stable than those of other rare ... , forms a hydrate which is much more stable than those of other rare gases. Radon is easily held by crystals of sulphur dioxide hydrates, when they are formed from ...

B. A. NIKITIN

1937-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including digester gases" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

New instruments for measuring landfill gases  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

New instruments for measuring landfill gases ... The legislation mandates that landfill operators monitor more than 1200 active sites for specific pollution products. ... According to Varian, the instrumentation systems can be adapted easily to meet landfill testing requirements that might be enacted in states other than California. ...

RUDY BAUM

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Sorption of organic gases in residential bedrooms and bathrooms  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sorption of organic gases in residential bedrooms and bathrooms Sorption of organic gases in residential bedrooms and bathrooms Title Sorption of organic gases in residential bedrooms and bathrooms Publication Type Conference Paper LBNL Report Number LBNL-56787 Year of Publication 2005 Authors Singer, Brett C., Alfred T. Hodgson, Toshifumi Hotchi, Katherine Y. Ming, Richard G. Sextro, Emily E. Wood, and Nancy J. Brown Conference Name Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Indoor Air Quality and Climate - Indoor Air 2005 Volume 2(9) Publisher Tsinghua University Press Conference Location Beijing, China Abstract Experiments were conducted to characterize organic gas sorption in residential bedrooms (n=4), bathrooms (n=2), and a furnished test chamber. Rooms were studied "as-is" with material surfaces and furnishings unaltered. Surface materials were characterized and areas quantified. Experiments included rapid volatilization of a volatile organic compound (VOC) mixture with the room closed and sealed for a 5-h Adsorb phase, followed by 30-min Flush and 2-h closed-room Desorb phases. The mixture included n-alkanes, aromatics, glycol ethers, 2-ethyl-1-hexanol, dichlorobenzene, and organophosphorus compounds. Measured gas-phase concentrations were fit to three variations of a mathematical model that considers sorption occurring at one surface sink and one potential embedded sink. The 2-parameter sink model tracked measurements for most compounds, but improved fits were obtained for some VOCs with a 3-parameter sink-diffusion or a 4-parameter two-sink model. Sorptive partitioning and initial adsorption rates increased with decreasing vapour pressure within each chemical class.

103

Waste Heat Recovery from High Temperature Off-Gases from Electric Arc Furnace  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article presents a study and review of available waste heat in high temperature Electric Arc Furnace (EAF) off gases and heat recovery techniques/methods from these gases. It gives details of the quality and quantity of the sensible and chemical waste heat in typical EAF off gases, energy savings potential by recovering part of this heat, a comprehensive review of currently used waste heat recovery methods and potential for use of advanced designs to achieve a much higher level of heat recovery including scrap preheating, steam production and electric power generation. Based on our preliminary analysis, currently, for all electric arc furnaces used in the US steel industry, the energy savings potential is equivalent to approximately 31 trillion Btu per year or 32.7 peta Joules per year (approximately $182 million US dollars/year). This article describes the EAF off-gas enthalpy model developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to calculate available and recoverable heat energy for a given stream of exhaust gases coming out of one or multiple EAF furnaces. This Excel based model calculates sensible and chemical enthalpy of the EAF off-gases during tap to tap time accounting for variation in quantity and quality of off gases. The model can be used to estimate energy saved through scrap preheating and other possible uses such as steam generation and electric power generation using off gas waste heat. This article includes a review of the historical development of existing waste heat recovery methods, their operations, and advantages/limitations of these methods. This paper also describes a program to develop and test advanced concepts for scrap preheating, steam production and electricity generation through use of waste heat recovery from the chemical and sensible heat contained in the EAF off gases with addition of minimum amount of dilution or cooling air upstream of pollution control equipment such as bag houses.

Nimbalkar, Sachin U [ORNL; Thekdi, Arvind [E3M Inc; Keiser, James R [ORNL; Storey, John Morse [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Anaerobic Digestion and Combined Heat and Power Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the underlying objectives of this study is to recover the untapped energy in wastewater biomass. Some national statistics worth considering include: (1) 5% of the electrical energy demand in the US is used to treat municipal wastewater; (2) This carbon rich wastewater is an untapped energy resource; (3) Only 10% of wastewater treatment plants (>5mgd) recover energy; (4) Wastewater treatment plants have the potential to produce > 575 MW of energy nationwide; and (5) Wastewater treatment plants have the potential to capture an additional 175 MW of energy from waste Fats, Oils and Grease. The WSSC conducted this study to determine the feasibility of utilizing anaerobic digestion and combined heat and power (AD/CHP) and/or biosolids gasification and drying facilities to produce and utilize renewable digester biogas. Digester gas is considered a renewable energy source and can be used in place of fossil fuels to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The project focus includes: (1) Converting wastewater Biomass to Electricity; (2) Using innovative technologies to Maximize Energy Recovery; and (3) Enhancing the Environment by reducing nutrient load to waterways (Chesapeake Bay), Sanitary Sewer Overflows (by reducing FOG in sewers) and Greenhouse Gas Emissions. The study consisted of these four tasks: (1) Technology screening and alternative shortlisting, answering the question 'what are the most viable and cost effective technical approaches by which to recover and reuse energy from biosolids while reducing disposal volume?'; (2) Energy recovery and disposal reduction potential verification, answering the question 'how much energy can be recovered from biosolids?'; (3) Economic environmental and community benefit analysis, answering the question 'what are the potential economic, environmental and community benefits/impacts of each approach?'; and (4) Recommend the best plan and develop a concept design.

Frank J. Hartz; Rob Taylor; Grant Davies

2011-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

105

Gas Cleaning Methods for Ambient Air and Compressed Gases  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cleaning air or compressed gases in cleanroom installations requires removal of particulate and/or ... The technology used for cleaning gases for the cleanroom is derived from processes long used in ... fossil fu...

Alvin Lieberman

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Perdido LF-Gase to Electricity | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Perdido LF-Gase to Electricity Perdido LF-Gase to Electricity This presentation was given at the July 17, 2012, Community Renewable Energy Deployment webinar on successful landfill...

107

BOC Lienhwa Industrial Gases BOCLH | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

BOC Lienhwa Industrial Gases BOCLH BOC Lienhwa Industrial Gases BOCLH Jump to: navigation, search Name BOC Lienhwa Industrial Gases (BOCLH) Place Taipei, Taiwan Sector Solar Product BOCLH is a joint venture between the Lien Hwa Industrial Corporation and the BOC Group in the United Kingdom and produces high-purity gases used in solar component production. References BOC Lienhwa Industrial Gases (BOCLH)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. BOC Lienhwa Industrial Gases (BOCLH) is a company located in Taipei, Taiwan . References ↑ "BOC Lienhwa Industrial Gases (BOCLH)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=BOC_Lienhwa_Industrial_Gases_BOCLH&oldid=342956

108

Digestion Experiments With Texas Feeding Stuffs.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

477-514-15m TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION BULLETIN NO. 166. MAK, 1914 DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY Digestion Experiments With Texas Feeding Stuffs Digeisston oExxprp gmWmhETa FdWSEu oEfTm1a ep2Wu VON BOECKMANN-JONES CO., PRINTERS, AUSTIN... EXPERIMENTS WITH TEXAS FEEDING STUFFS B Y Gr. S. PRAPS., P H . D., Chemist. This bulletin contains the results of digestion tests with the ordi? nary fodder groups of certain feeding stuffs. Other results have been published in Bulletin 149...

Fraps, G. S.

1914-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Digestion Experiments on Men with Cottonseed Meal.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Charge W . Z. M i l l e r , B . S., Scientific Assistant , Animal Husbandman SUBSTATION NO . 6 : Krum, Denton County D IV ISION OF EN TOM OLOGY T - W - B u e l l , B . S., Superintendent W ilm on N ew e ll , M . S., Entomologist in SUBSTATION... beings. Mendel and Fine (J . Biol. Chem. I I , I ) fed cottonseed flour to dogs and found that 71.6 per cent of the proteins were digested, on an average, and when meat was fed to the same animals that 91.0 per cent protein was digested. Since...

Rather, J. B. (James Burness)

1913-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Method for enhancing microbial utilization rates of gases using perfluorocarbons  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of enhancing the bacterial reduction of industrial gases using perfluorocarbons (PFCs) is disclosed. Because perfluorocarbons (PFCs) allow for a much greater solubility of gases than water does, PFCs have the potential to deliver gases in higher concentrations to microorganisms when used as an additive to microbial growth media thereby increasing the rate of the industrial gas conversion to economically viable chemicals and gases.

Turick, Charles E. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

A new temperature controlled digester for anaerobic digestion for biogas production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Various types of insulating composite materials were used on ceramic digesters for the control of temperature. Maintenance of temperature is highlighted in this paper. The above types of digesters can adequately control the temperature, especially in the winter season. The results of extensive experimental and theoretical studies have been cited in this paper. This work is beneficial for those plants which are generally in higher altitude stations with low atmospheric temperature, like Leh (India). These types of digesters were found to be very useful for the production of biogas, especially from aquatic biomass like water hyacinth.

Upama Misra; Sanjay Singh; Amarika Singh; G.N. Pandey

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Economic implications of anaerobic digesters on dairy farms in Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-selling price, digesters are less economically feasible than current waste management strategies, lagoons, even after considering potential environmental penalties. However, selling electricity and capturing by-product heat for cost savings makes the digester...

Jackson, Randy Scott, Jr.

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

113

Biomass Anaerobic Digestion Facilities and Biomass Gasification Facilities (Indiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Indiana Department of Environmental Management requires permits before the construction or expansion of biomass anaerobic digestion or gasification facilities.

114

A BIOMASS-BASED MODEL TO ESTIMATE THE PLAUSIBILITY OF EXOPLANET BIOSIGNATURE GASES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Biosignature gas detection is one of the ultimate future goals for exoplanet atmosphere studies. We have created a framework for linking biosignature gas detectability to biomass estimates, including atmospheric photochemistry and biological thermodynamics. The new framework is intended to liberate predictive atmosphere models from requiring fixed, Earth-like biosignature gas source fluxes. New biosignature gases can be considered with a check that the biomass estimate is physically plausible. We have validated the models on terrestrial production of NO, H{sub 2}S, CH{sub 4}, CH{sub 3}Cl, and DMS. We have applied the models to propose NH{sub 3} as a biosignature gas on a 'cold Haber World', a planet with a N{sub 2}-H{sub 2} atmosphere, and to demonstrate why gases such as CH{sub 3}Cl must have too large of a biomass to be a plausible biosignature gas on planets with Earth or early-Earth-like atmospheres orbiting a Sun-like star. To construct the biomass models, we developed a functional classification of biosignature gases, and found that gases (such as CH{sub 4}, H{sub 2}S, and N{sub 2}O) produced from life that extracts energy from chemical potential energy gradients will always have false positives because geochemistry has the same gases to work with as life does, and gases (such as DMS and CH{sub 3}Cl) produced for secondary metabolic reasons are far less likely to have false positives but because of their highly specialized origin are more likely to be produced in small quantities. The biomass model estimates are valid to one or two orders of magnitude; the goal is an independent approach to testing whether a biosignature gas is plausible rather than a precise quantification of atmospheric biosignature gases and their corresponding biomasses.

Seager, S.; Bains, W.; Hu, R. [Department of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

A Biomass-based Model to Estimate the Plausibility of Exoplanet Biosignature Gases  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Biosignature gas detection is one of the ultimate future goals for exoplanet atmosphere studies. We have created a framework for linking biosignature gas detectability to biomass estimates, including atmospheric photochemistry and biological thermodynamics. The new framework is intended to liberate predictive atmosphere models from requiring fixed, Earth-like biosignature gas source fluxes. New biosignature gases can be considered with a check that the biomass estimate is physically plausible. We have validated the models on terrestrial production of NO, H2S, CH4, CH3Cl, and DMS. We have applied the models to propose NH3 as a biosignature gas on a "cold Haber World," a planet with a N2-H2 atmosphere, and to demonstrate why gases such as CH3Cl must have too large of a biomass to be a plausible biosignature gas on planets with Earth or early-Earth-like atmospheres orbiting a Sun-like star. To construct the biomass models, we developed a functional classification of biosignature gases, and found that gases (such as CH4, H2S, and N2O) produced from life that extracts energy from chemical potential energy gradients will always have false positives because geochemistry has the same gases to work with as life does, and gases (such as DMS and CH3Cl) produced for secondary metabolic reasons are far less likely to have false positives but because of their highly specialized origin are more likely to be produced in small quantities. The biomass model estimates are valid to one or two orders of magnitude; the goal is an independent approach to testing whether a biosignature gas is plausible rather than a precise quantification of atmospheric biosignature gases and their corresponding biomasses.

S. Seager; W. Bains; R. Hu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Thermophilic Anaerobic Digestion to Increase the Net Energy Balance of Corn Grain Ethanol  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thermophilic Anaerobic Digestion to Increase the Net Energy Balance of Corn Grain Ethanol ... However, the calculation did not include the energetic costs to physically replace the evaporator with the integrated digester system (this will be a relatively small fraction of the energy input because the percentage of energy input per unit of ethanol energy output for construction of the entire conventional dry mill is 0.2% (4)); the improved quality in animal feed (DDG vs DDGS); nor the available waste heat from circumventing thin stillage evaporation. ...

Matthew T. Agler; Marcelo L. Garcia; Eric S. Lee; Martha Schlicher; Largus T. Angenent

2008-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

117

Digestibility and Production Coefficients of Hog Feeds.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LIDEARY, A t% !*I COLLEGE, CA%!PUS. TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATiON A. B. CONNER, DIRECTOR COLLEGE STATION, BRAZOS COUNTY, TEXAS 7 BULLETIN NO. 454 SEPTEMBER, 1932 Digestibility and Production Coefficients of Hog Feeds AGRICULTURAI... .................................................................. 16 Compositjon and feeding values of pig feeds 17 Standards for pig feeding ----__.-_._----------- 1 22 Summary ----__..-----_--_-.---.--------------------- 23 Ref erenczs --------------.---------- 24 BULLETIN NO. 454 SEPTEMBER, 1932...

Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

1932-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Digestion Experiments with Texas Hays and Fodders.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. T. MILNER. .College Station I I STATION STAFF. I ............................................. B. YOUNGIILOOD, M S. .Director ......................................... M. FRANCIS, D. V. S.. Veterinarian.... B. Gottlieb, and T. L. Ogier. Special mention should be made of the services of J. B. Rather. TABLE +COMPOSITION OF FEEDING STUFFS AND RESIDUES FROM DIGESTION ZSPERTMENTS. Nitro- Pro- Ether Crude tein. 1 - 1 fiber. I frr$: TVater. 1 Labora...

Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

1912-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Optimization of solid state anaerobic digestion of the OFMSW by digestate recirculation: A new approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Dry anaerobic digestion (AD) of OFMSW was optimized in order to produce biogas avoiding the use of solid inoculum. Doing so the dry AD was performed irrigating the solid waste with liquid digestate (flow rate of 1:1.181:0.9 w/w waste/digestate; 21d of hydraulic retention time HRT) in order to remove fermentation products inhibiting AD process. Results indicated that a high hydrolysis rate of organic matter (OM) and partial biogas production were obtained directly during the dry AD. Hydrolysate OM was removed from digester by the percolate flow and it was subsequently used to feed a liquid anaerobic digester. During dry AD a total loss of 36.9% of total solids was recorded. Methane balance indicated that 18.4% of potential methane can be produced during dry AD and 49.7% by the percolate. Nevertheless results obtained for liquid AD digestion indicated that only 20.4% and 25.7% of potential producible methane was generated by adopting 15 and 20days of HRT, probably due to the AD inhibition due to high presence of toxic ammonia forms in the liquid medium.

Pognani Michele; DImporzano Giuliana; Minetti Carlo; Scotti Sergio; Adani Fabrizio

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Community-Scale Anaerobic Digesters Webinar | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Community-Scale Anaerobic Digesters Webinar Community-Scale Anaerobic Digesters Webinar Community-Scale Anaerobic Digesters Webinar April 16, 2013 1:00PM MDT Webinar This free webinar will be held on April 16, 2013, from 1-2:15 p.m. Mountain Daylight Time. It will provide information on San Jose, California's, commercial-scale, high solids dry fermentation anaerobic digestion system, and the Forest County Potawatomi Community's anaerobic digester project. Implementing Anaerobic Digestion in San Jose's Integrated Processing Infrastructure This presentation will provide background on San Jose, California's, leading-edge program using the nation's first commercial-scale, high solids dry fermentation anaerobic digestion system to process commercial organics from more than 8,000 businesses in the city. Phase one of the Zero Waste

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including digester gases" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Emissions Of Greenhouse Gases From Rice Agriculture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project produced detailed data on the processes that affect methane and nitrous oxide emissions from rice agriculture and their inter-relationships. It defines the shifting roles and potential future of these gases in causing global warming and the benefits and tradeoffs of reducing emissions. The major results include: 1). Mechanisms and Processes Leading to Methane Emissions are Delineated. Our experiments have tested the standard model of methane emissions from rice fields and found new results on the processes that control the flux. A mathematical mass balance model was used to unravel the production, oxidation and transport of methane from rice. The results suggested that when large amounts of organic matter are applied, the additional flux that is observed is due to both greater production and reduced oxidation of methane. 2). Methane Emissions From China Have Been Decreasing Over the Last Two Decades. We have calculated that methane emissions from rice fields have been falling in recent decades. This decrease is particularly large in China. While some of this is due to reduced area of rice agriculture, the bigger effect is from the reduction in the emission factor which is the annual amount of methane emitted per hectare of rice. The two most important changes that cause this decreasing emission from China are the reduced use of organic amendments which have been replaced by commercial nitrogen fertilizers, and the increased practice of intermittent flooding as greater demands are placed on water resources. 3). Global Methane Emissions Have Been Constant For More Than 20 Years. While the concentrations of methane in the atmosphere have been leveling off in recent years, our studies show that this is caused by a near constant total global source of methane for the last 20 years or more. This is probably because as some anthropogenic sources have increased, others, such as the rice agriculture source, have fallen. Changes in natural emissions appear small. 4). Nitrous Oxide Emissions From Rice Fields Increase as Methane Emissions Drop. Inundated conditions favor anaerobic methane production with high emission rates and de-nitrification resulting in modest nitrous oxide emissions. Under drier conditions such as intermittent flooding, methane emissions fall and nitrous oxide emissions increase. Increased nitrogen fertilizer use increases nitrous oxide emissions and is usually accompanied by reduced organic matter applications which decreases methane emissions. These mechanisms cause a generally inverse relationship between methane and nitrous oxide emissions. Reduction of methane from rice agriculture to control global warming comes with tradeoffs with increased nitrous oxide emissions. 5). High Spatial Resolution Maps of Emissions Produced. Maps of methane and nitrous oxide emissions at a resolution of 5 min 5 min have been produced based on the composite results of this research. These maps are necessary for both scientific and policy uses.

M. Aslam K. Khalil

2009-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

122

Efficieny handling effluent gases through chemical scrubbing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper is presented as an information source for efficiencies of chemical scrubbing. In it, we will discuss the specific problems of scrubbing silane, disilane, diborane, phosphine, hydrogen selenide and arsine. We will explain the scrubber dynamics, gases and flow rates used along with liquid mediums. The equipment and procedures used for testing, as well as the determination of the results, will be discussed. We intend to give examples of possible reactions and documentation of our efficiencies. Installation and maintenance will be touched, as well as our experiments into accidental catastrophic releases. From all of this we will derive conclusions as to the best possible means of wet chemical scrubbing.

Herman, T.; Soden, S.

1988-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

123

Heat conduction in relativistic neutral gases revisited  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The kinetic theory of dilute gases to first order in the gradients yields linear relations between forces and fluxes. The heat flux for the relativistic gas has been shown to be related not only to the temperature gradient but also to the density gradient in the representation where number density, temperature and hydrodynamic velocity are the independent state variables. In this work we show the calculation of the corresponding transport coefficients from the full Boltzmann equation and compare the magnitude of the relativistic correction.

A. L. Garcia-Perciante; A. R. Mendez

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

124

Model calibration and validation for OFMSW and sewage sludge co-digestion reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: > Disintegration is the limiting step of the anaerobic co-digestion process. > Disintegration kinetic constant does not depend on the waste particle size. > Disintegration kinetic constant depends only on the waste nature and composition. > The model calibration can be performed on organic waste of any particle size. - Abstract: A mathematical model has recently been proposed by the authors to simulate the biochemical processes that prevail in a co-digestion reactor fed with sewage sludge and the organic fraction of municipal solid waste. This model is based on the Anaerobic Digestion Model no. 1 of the International Water Association, which has been extended to include the co-digestion processes, using surface-based kinetics to model the organic waste disintegration and conversion to carbohydrates, proteins and lipids. When organic waste solids are present in the reactor influent, the disintegration process is the rate-limiting step of the overall co-digestion process. The main advantage of the proposed modeling approach is that the kinetic constant of such a process does not depend on the waste particle size distribution (PSD) and rather depends only on the nature and composition of the waste particles. The model calibration aimed to assess the kinetic constant of the disintegration process can therefore be conducted using organic waste samples of any PSD, and the resulting value will be suitable for all the organic wastes of the same nature as the investigated samples, independently of their PSD. This assumption was proven in this study by biomethane potential experiments that were conducted on organic waste samples with different particle sizes. The results of these experiments were used to calibrate and validate the mathematical model, resulting in a good agreement between the simulated and observed data for any investigated particle size of the solid waste. This study confirms the strength of the proposed model and calibration procedure, which can thus be used to assess the treatment efficiency and predict the methane production of full-scale digesters.

Esposito, G., E-mail: giovanni.esposito@unicas.it [Department of Mechanics, Structures and Environmental Engineering, University of Cassino, via Di Biasio 43, 03043 Cassino (Italy); Frunzo, L., E-mail: luigi.frunzo@unina.it [Department of Mathematics and Applications Renato Caccioppoli, University of Naples Federico II, via Cintia, Monte S. Angelo, I-80126 Naples (Italy); Panico, A., E-mail: anpanico@unina.it [Department of Hydraulic, Geotechnical and Environmental Engineering, University of Naples Federico II, via Claudio 21, 80125 Naples (Italy); Pirozzi, F., E-mail: francesco.pirozzi@unina.it [Department of Hydraulic, Geotechnical and Environmental Engineering, University of Naples Federico II, via Claudio 21, 80125 Naples (Italy)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

125

EIA-Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program - Why Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Why Report Why Report Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program Why Report What Is the Purpose of Form EIA-1605? Form EIA-1605 provides the means for the voluntary reporting of greenhouse gas emissions, reductions, and sequestration under Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992. The purpose of the Voluntary Reporting Program is to encourage corporations, government agencies, non-profit organizations, households, and other private and public entities to submit annual reports of their greenhouse gas emissions, emission reductions, and sequestration activities. Form EIA-1605 provides a means for voluntary reporting that is complete, reliable, and consistent. How Will My Entity Benefit From Reporting? There are a number of ways for your entity to benefit from reporting, including:

126

Assess Potential Agency Size Changes that Impact Greenhouse Gases from  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Employee Commuting Employee Commuting Assess Potential Agency Size Changes that Impact Greenhouse Gases from Employee Commuting October 7, 2013 - 1:42pm Addthis YOU ARE HERE Step 1 For employee commuting, it is important to account for any planned or expected changes in a Federal agency's size when estimating the greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction potential for different operating units or worksites. Considerations include: Are employment levels expected to change in the next decade at specific facilities or agency-wide? Are there any planned facility moves at major worksites? Employee commute coordinators may want to engage human resources and strategic planners in this effort to establish likely changes in employment numbers. Facility planners may be engaged to understand changes in commutes

127

Finite-size energy of non-interacting Fermi gases  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We prove the asymptotics of the difference of the ground-state energies of two non-interacting $N$-particle Fermi gases on the half line of length $L$ in the thermodynamic limit up to order $1/L$. We are particularly interested in subdominant terms proportional to $1/L$, called finite-size energy. In the nineties Affleck and co-authors [Aff97, ZA97, AL94] claimed that the finite-size energy equals the decay exponent occuring in Anderson's orthogonality catastrophe. It turns out that the finite-size energy depends on the details of the thermodynamic limit and typically also includes a linear term in the scattering phase shift.

Martin Gebert

2014-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

128

Crab digestive phospholipase: A new invertebrate member  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Crab digestive phospholipase (CDPL) was purified from the hepatopancreas of Carcinus mediterraneus crabs. Homogeneous enzyme was obtained after two chromatography steps: anion exchange and size exclusion HPLC column. Homogeneous CDPL has a molecular mass of 14kDa as determined by SDS/PAGE analysis. Unlike known digestive phospholipases like porcine PLA2 (PPPL), CDPL displayed its maximal activity at 50C and not at 37C. A specific activity of 40U/mg for the purified CDPL was measured using PC as substrate under optimal conditions (pH 8 and 50C) in the presence of 8mM sodium deoxycholate (NaDC) and 10mM CaCl2. In contrast to PPPL, purified CDPL was completely inactivated at 60C. The N-terminal sequence was determined by automatic Edman degradation. No similarity between 12 N-terminal amino acid residues of CDPL was found with those of known digestive phospholipases. CDPL appears to be a new member of invertebrate phospholipases, and it is potentially useful for treat phospholipid-rich industrial effluents, or to synthesize useful chemical compounds which can be used in the food industry.

Slim Cherif; Abir Ben Bacha; Yassine Ben Ali; Habib Horchani; Wiem Rekik; Youssef Gargouri

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Method of digesting an explosive nitro compound  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is a process wherein bleaching oxidants are used to digest explosive nitro compounds. The process has an excellent reaction rate for digesting explosives and operates under multivariate conditions. Reaction solutions may be aqueous, non-aqueous or a combination thereof, and can also be any pH, but preferably have a pH between 2 and 9. The temperature may be ambient as well as any temperature above which freezing of the solution would occur and below which any degradation of the bleaching oxidant would occur or below which any explosive reaction would be initiated. The pressure may be any pressure, but is preferably ambient or atmospheric, or a pressure above a vapor pressure of the aqueous solution to avoid boiling of the solution. Because the bleaching oxidant molecules are small, much smaller than an enzyme molecule for example, they can penetrate the microstructure of plastic explosives faster. The bleaching oxidants generate reactive hydroxyl radicals, which can destroy other organic contaminants, if necessary, along with digesting the explosive nitro compound.

Shah, Manish M. (Richland, WA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Baltimore Zoo digester project. Final report. [Elephants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results of a project to produce methane using the manure from zoo animals as a feedstock is presented. Two digesters are in operation, the first (built in 1974) utilizing wastes from the Hippo House and a second (built in 1980) utilizing wastes from the Elephant House. Demonstrations on the utilization of the gas were performed during zoo exhibits. The Elephant House Digester has a capacity of 4200 gallons and a floating gas dome which can retain at least 150 cu ft of gas. Solar energy has been incorporated into the design to maintain digester temperature at 95/sup 0/F. The system produces 50 cu ft per day. After cleaning the gas, it is used to generate electricity to power an electric light, a roof fan, and an air conditioner. The gas is also used to operate a gas range and a gas lamp. During the opening day exhibit, 50 meals were cooked using the bio-gas from just 2 elephants. (DMC)

Gibson, P.W.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Sorption of organic gases in a furnished room  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

a furnished room a furnished room Title Sorption of organic gases in a furnished room Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-53943 Year of Publication 2004 Authors Singer, Brett C., Kenneth L. Revzan, Toshifumi Hotchi, Alfred T. Hodgson, and Nancy J. Brown Journal Atmospheric Environment Volume 38 Start Page Chapter Issue 16 Pagination 2483-2494 Abstract We present experimental data and semi-empirical models describing the sorption of organic gases in a simulated indoor residential environment. Two replicate experiments were conducted with 20 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in a 50-m3 room finished with painted wallboard, carpet and cushion, draperies and furnishings. The VOCs span a wide volatility range and include ten Hazardous Air Pollutants. VOCs were introduced to the static chamber as a pulse and their gas-phase concentrations were measured during a net adsorption period and a subsequent net desorption period. Three sorption models were fit to the measured concentrations for each compound to determine the simplest formulation needed to adequately describe the observed behavior. Sorption parameter values were determined by fitting the models to adsorption period data then checked by comparing measured and predicted behavior during desorption. The adequacy of each model was evaluated using a goodness of fit parameter calculated for each period. Results indicate that sorption usually does not greatly affect indoor concentrations of methyl-tert-butyl ether, 2-butanone, isoprene and benzene. In contrast, sorption appears to be a relevant indoor process for many of the VOCs studied, including C8-C10 aromatic hydrocarbons (HC), terpenes, and pyridine. These compounds sorbed at rates close to typical residential air change rates and exhibited substantial sorptive partitioning at equilibrium. Polycyclic aromatic HCs, aromatic alcohols, ethenylpyridine and nicotine initially adsorbed to surfaces at rates of 1.5 to >6 h-1 and partitioned 95 to >99% in the sorbed phase at equilibrium

132

EIA-Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program - Greenhouse Gases and  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Greenhouse Gases and Global Warming Potentials (GWP) Greenhouse Gases and Global Warming Potentials (GWP) Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program Greenhouse Gases and Global Warming Potentials (GWP) (From Appendix E of the instructions to Form EIA-1605) GREENHOUSE GAS NAME GREENHOUSE GAS CODE FORMULA GWP TAR1 AR42 (1) Carbon Dioxide CO2 CO2 1 1 (2) Methane CH4 CH4 23 25 (3) Nitrous Oxide N2O N2O 296 298 (4) Hydroflourocarbons HFC-23 (trifluoromethane) 15 CHF3 12000 14800 HFC-32 (difluoromethane) 16 CH2F2 550 675 HFC-41 (monofluoromethane) 43 CH3F 97 -3 HFC-125 (pentafluoroethane) 17 CHF2CF3 3400 3500 HFC-134 (1,1,2,2-tetrafluoroethane) 44 CHF2CHF2 1100 -3 HFC-134a (1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane) 18 CH2FCF3 1300 1430 HFC-143 (1,1,2-trifluorethane) 45 CHF2CH2F 330 -3 HFC-143a (1,1,1-trifluoroethane) 46 CF3CH3 4300 4470 HFC-152 (1,2-difluorethane) 47 CH2FCH2F

133

Asia-wide emissions of greenhouse gases  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Emissions of principal greenhouse gases (GHGs) from Asia are increasing faster than those from any other continent. This is a result of rapid economic growth, as well as the fact that almost half of the world`s population lives in Asian countries. In this paper, the author provides estimates of emissions of the two principal greenhouse gases, carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and methane (CH{sub 4}), from individual countries and areas. Recent literature has been reviewed for emission estimates for individual sources, such as carbon dioxide from cement manufacture, and methane from rice fields. There are very large uncertainties in many of these estimates, so several estimates are provided, where available. The largest anthropogenic source of CO{sub 2} emissions is the use of fossil fuels. Energy consumption data from 1992 have been used to calculate estimated emissions of CO{sub 2} from this source. In view of the ongoing negotiations to limit future greenhouse gas emissions, estimates of projected CO{sub 2} emissions from the developing countries of Asia are also provided. These are likely to be 3 times their 1986 levels by 2010, under business as usual scenarios. Even with the implementation of energy efficiency measures and fuel switching where feasible, the emissions of CO{sub 2} are likely to double within the same time period.

Siddiqi, T.A. [East-West Center, Honolulu, HI (United States). Program on Environment

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

The greenhouse gases HFCs, PFCs Danish consumption and emissions, 2007  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The greenhouse gases HFCs, PFCs and SF6 Danish consumption and emissions, 2007 Tomas Sander Poulsen AND EMISSION OF F-GASES 7 1.1.1 Consumption 7 1.1.2 Emission 7 1.1.3 Trends in total GWP contribution from F 21 4 EMISSION OF F-GASES 23 4.1.1 Emissions of HFCs from refrigerants 23 4.1.2 Emissions of HFCs from

135

Suspended two-dimensional electron and hole gases  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on the fabrication of fully suspended two-dimensional electron and hole gases in III-V heterostructures. Low temperature transport measurements verify that the properties of the suspended gases are only slightly degraded with respect to the non-suspended gases. Focused ion beam technology is used to pattern suspended nanostructures with minimum damage from the ion beam, due to the small width of the suspended membrane.

Kazazis, D.; Bourhis, E.; Gierak, J.; Gennser, U. [Laboratoire de Photonique et de Nanostructures, CNRS-LPN, Route de Nozay, 91460 Marcoussis (France); Bourgeois, O. [Institut Nel, CNRS-UJF, BP 166, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Antoni, T. [Laboratoire de Photonique et de Nanostructures, CNRS-LPN, Route de Nozay, 91460 Marcoussis, France and Laboratoire Kastler Brossel, Universit Pierre et Marie Curie, 4 Place Jussieu, 75005 Paris (France)

2013-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

136

EIA-Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program - Emission...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AP-42 Volume 2 mobile sources Global Warming Potentials The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) revised GWPs for certain greenhouse gases in 2007 for the Fourth...

137

Energetic Materials for EGS Well Stimulation (solids, liquids, gases)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Energetic Materials for EGS Well Stimulation (solids, liquids, gases) presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado.

138

Index to the Digest of Green Reports and Studies Complete "Green"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Index to the Digest of Green Reports and Studies Complete "Green" Publication Title Author and Organization Status of Digest Summary Web Address of Complete Publication Link to Green Digest Summary 1 of 25.labormarketinfo.edd.ca.gov/conte ntpub/GreenDigest/Bay-Region-Solar- Industry-Workforce-Study.pdf #12;Index to the Digest of Green

139

The mucosal/epithelial barrier disruption and transport of pancreatic digestive enzymes in early stages of intestinal ischemia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Allows Entry of Digestive Enzymes during Early Periods ofas Barrier to Digestive Enzymes in the Ischemic Rat SmallAllows Entry of Digestive Enzymes during Early Periods of

Chang, Marisol

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

FLAMMABILITY CHARACTERISTICS OF COMBUSTIBLE GASES AND VAPORS  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Bulletin 627 Bulletin 627 BUREAU o b MINES FLAMMABILITY CHARACTERISTICS OF COMBUSTIBLE GASES AND VAPORS By Michael G. Zabetakis DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency Thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including digester gases" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Refinery Yield of Liquefied Refinery Gases  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Refinery Yield Refinery Yield (Percent) Product: Liquefied Refinery Gases Finished Motor Gasoline Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Residual Fuel Oil Naphtha for Petrochemical Feedstock Use Other Oils for Petrochemical Feedstock Use Special Naphthas Lubricants Waxes Petroleum Coke Asphalt and Road Oil Still Gas Miscellaneous Products Processing Gain(-) or Loss(+) Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Product Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History U.S. 5.3 5.4 5.2 5.2 5.1 3.9 1993-2013 PADD 1 4.4 5.1 4.9 4.9 4.6 2.1 1993-2013 East Coast 4.4 5.3 5.1 5.1 4.9 2.2 1993-2013

142

Voluntary reporting of greenhouse gases 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program, required by Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992, records the results of voluntary measures to reduce, avoid, or sequester greenhouse gas emissions. In 1998, 156 US companies and other organizations reported to the Energy information Administration that, during 1997, they had achieved greenhouse gas emission reductions and carbon sequestration equivalent to 166 million tons of carbon dioxide, or about 2.5% of total US emissions for the year. For the 1,229 emission reduction projects reported, reductions usually were measured by comparing an estimate of actual emissions with an estimate of what emissions would have been had the project not been implemented.

NONE

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Bogoliubov spectrum of interacting Bose gases  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the large-N limit of a system of N bosons interacting with a potential of intensity 1/N. When the ground state energy is to the first order given by Hartree's theory, we study the next order, predicted by Bogoliubov's theory. We show the convergence of the lower eigenvalues and eigenfunctions towards that of the Bogoliubov Hamiltonian (up to a convenient unitary transform). We also prove the convergence of the free energy when the system is sufficiently trapped. Our results are valid in an abstract setting, our main assumptions being that the Hartree ground state is unique and non-degenerate, and that there is complete Bose-Einstein condensation on this state. Using our method we then treat two applications: atoms with ''bosonic'' electrons on one hand, and trapped 2D and 3D Coulomb gases on the other hand.

Mathieu Lewin; Phan Thnh Nam; Sylvia Serfaty; Jan Philip Solovej

2014-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

144

A systemic approach for dimensioning and designing anaerobic bio-digestion/energy generation biomass supply networks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Anaerobic bio-digestion/energy generation complexes using animal waste raw materials represent an important component of renewable energy initiatives and policies worldwide, and are significant contributors to broaden sustainability efforts. In such projects bio-power feasibility depends heavily on generation complex access to biomass which is of costly transportation. As a result, an important component of renewable energy planning is the optimization of a logistics system to guarantee low-cost access to animal waste. This access is a function of local characteristics including number and geographic location of organic waste sources, operating and maintenance costs of the generation facility, energy prices, and marginal contribution of biomass collected and delivered to the anaerobic bio-digestion unit. Because biomass exhibits high transportation costs per unit of energy ultimately generated, and because different types of biomass have different biogas-generating properties, design of the supply logistics system can be the determinant factor towards economic viability of energy generation from an anaerobic bio-digestion plant. Indeed, to address this problem it is helpful to consider the farms, the logistics system, the anaerobic bio-digestion plant, and the generation plant as subsystems in an integrated system. Additionally, the existence of an outlet for manure may allow farmers to significantly raise boundaries of one constraint they face, namely disposing of animal waste, therefore permitting increases in farm production capacity. This paper suggests and outlines a systematic methodology to address the design of such systems.

Joo Neiva de Figueiredo; Srgio Fernando Mayerle

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

List of Anaerobic Digestion Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Anaerobic Digestion Incentives Anaerobic Digestion Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 285 Anaerobic Digestion Incentives. CSV (rows 1 - 285) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active APS - Renewable Energy Incentive Program (Arizona) Utility Rebate Program Arizona Commercial Residential Anaerobic Digestion Biomass Daylighting Geothermal Electric Ground Source Heat Pumps Landfill Gas Other Distributed Generation Technologies Photovoltaics Small Hydroelectric Solar Pool Heating Solar Space Heat Solar Thermal Process Heat Solar Water Heat Wind energy Yes Advanced Energy Job Stimulus Program (Ohio) Industry Recruitment/Support Ohio Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Local Government Nonprofit State Government

146

aerobic sludge digestion: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of organic wastes) and digestion (anaerobic treatment of organic wastes combined with biogas production) are important waste management strategies with increasing significance...

147

Enhanced Biomass Digestion with Wood Wasp Bacteria - Energy Innovation...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Enhanced Biomass Digestion with Wood Wasp Bacteria Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center Contact GLBRC About This Technology Technology Marketing Summary Plant biomass represents a...

148

Biomass Gasification and Methane Digester Property Tax Exemption  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Michigan exempts certain energy production related farm facilities from real and personal property taxes. Among exempted property are certain methane digesters, biomass gasification equipment,...

149

Commercialization of Anaerobic Contact Process for Anaerobic Digestion of Algae.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The commercialization of anaerobic contact process for the digestion of algal biomass has been shown to be feasible on a technical and economic basis. The (more)

Andlay, Gunjan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Anaerobic Digestion Optimization for Enhanced Renewable Biomethane Production.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The scope of this research project was to operate suspended growth, continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) anaerobic digesters at the bench-scale level to evaluate improved (more)

Stover, Ted Ross

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

A Biomass-based Model to Estimate the Plausibility of Exoplanet Biosignature Gases  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biosignature gas detection is one of the ultimate future goals for exoplanet atmosphere studies. We have created a framework for linking biosignature gas detectability to biomass estimates, including atmospheric photochemistry and biological thermodynamics. The new framework is intended to liberate predictive atmosphere models from requiring fixed, Earth-like biosignature gas source fluxes. New biosignature gases can be considered with a check that the biomass estimate is physically plausible. We have validated the models on terrestrial production of NO, H2S, CH4, CH3Cl, and DMS. We have applied the models to propose NH3 as a biosignature gas on a "cold Haber World," a planet with a N2-H2 atmosphere, and to demonstrate why gases such as CH3Cl must have too large of a biomass to be a plausible biosignature gas on planets with Earth or early-Earth-like atmospheres orbiting a Sun-like star. To construct the biomass models, we developed a functional classification of biosignature gases, and found that gases (such...

Seager, S; Hu, R

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Batch load anaerobic digestion of dairy manure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

flask. Influent was added through a funnel in a rubber stopper in the top of the flask. The flask was kept in a water bath to maintain the optimum temperature of 32 C, 0 A liquid displacement system was used to collect the biogas and measure.... Biogas production was measured with a Rockwell No, 175 S Test Meter. Electrical energy input to the system was measured with a watt-hour meter. The energy required for digester heating was determined by the time required to expend the propane in sn...

Egg, Richard P

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

153

OBTAINING LAWS OF THERMODYNAMICS FOR IDEAL GASES USING ELASTIC COLLISIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OBTAINING LAWS OF THERMODYNAMICS FOR IDEAL GASES USING ELASTIC COLLISIONS STEPHEN MONTGOMERY law of expansion of ideal gases. 1. The Second Law of Thermodynamics A thermally isolated container-SMITH AND HANNAH MORGAN Abstract. The purpose of this note is to see to what extent ideal gas laws can be obtained

Montgomery-Smith, Stephen

154

Continuous cryopump with a method for removal of solidified gases  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved cryopump for the removal of gases from a high vacuum, comprising a cryopanel incorporating honeycomb structure, refrigerant means thermally connected to the cryopanel, and a rotatable channel moving azimuthally around an axis located near the center of the cryopanel, removing gases adsorbed within the honeycomb structure by subliming them and conducting them outside the vacuum vessel. 4 figs.

Carlson, L.W.; Herman, H.

1988-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

155

The Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation Model (GREET) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: The Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation Model (GREET Fleet) Agency/Company /Organization: Argonne National Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Greenhouse Gas, Transportation Phase: Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options Topics: Baseline projection, GHG inventory Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: greet.es.anl.gov/main Cost: Free OpenEI Keyword(s): EERE tool, The Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation Model, GREET References: GREET Fleet Main Page[1] Logo: The Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation Model (GREET Fleet)

156

EIA-Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

of Greenhouse Gases Program of Greenhouse Gases Program Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program ***THE VOLUNTARY REPORTING OF GREENHOUSE GASES ("1605(b)") PROGRAM HAS BEEN SUSPENDED.*** This affects all survey respondents. Please visit the What's New page for full details. What Is the Voluntary Reporting Program? logo Established by Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992, the Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program encourages corporations, government agencies, non-profit organizations, households, and other private and public entities to submit annual reports of their greenhouse gas emissions, emission reductions, and sequestration activities. The Program provides a means for voluntary reporting that is complete, reliable, and consistent. More information on the program...

157

Membranes, methods of making membranes, and methods of separating gases using membranes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Membranes, methods of making membranes, and methods of separating gases using membranes are provided. The membranes can include at least one hydrophilic polymer, at least one cross-linking agent, at least one base, and at least one amino compound. The methods of separating gases using membranes can include contacting a gas stream containing at least one of CO.sub.2, H.sub.2S, and HCl with one side of a nonporous and at least one of CO.sub.2, H.sub.2S, and HCl selectively permeable membrane such that at least one of CO.sub.2, H.sub.2S, and HCl is selectively transported through the membrane.

Ho, W. S. Winston

2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

158

Joint Polar Satellite System Science Seminar Annual Digest  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

iii Joint Polar Satellite System Science Seminar Annual Digest 2013 #12;#12;Joint Polar Satellite Polar Satellite System (JPSS) Program Science, it is my pleasure to present this digest, which services, such as forecasting of severe weather events and environmental monitoring of land, ocean

159

Anaerobic batch co-digestion of Spartina alterniflora and potato  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The potential of mesophilic anaerobic batch digestion for the treatment of Spartina alterniflora, an invasive species widely distributed along Chinese coastlines, through co-digestion with readily biodegradable organics has been assessed. The accumulative biogas yield from S. alterniflora alone was 251 ml/g Total Solid (TS) (at 35C), at TS of 6%, co-digestion with 80% of S. alterniflora and 20% of potato representing 6% of TS, gave a biogas yield of 383 ml/g TS (at 35C). This is an increase of 52.5% compared with that obtained from digestion of pure S. alterniflora. In conclusion, using readily biodegradable potato as co-substrate of S. alterniflora can increase its anaerobic digestibility and biogas yield.

Jihong Li; Shiguan Yang; Zheng Zheng; Huamin Song; Zhuo Meng

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Key Science and Engineering Indicators: Digest 2012 | Data.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Key Science and Engineering Indicators: Digest 2012 Key Science and Engineering Indicators: Digest 2012 BusinessUSA Data/Tools Apps Challenges Let's Talk BusinessUSA You are here Data.gov » Communities » BusinessUSA » Data Key Science and Engineering Indicators: Digest 2012 Dataset Summary Description This 2012 digest of key S&E indicators is an interactive tool that draws from the National Science Board's (NSB's) Science and Engineering Indicators report. The digest serves to draw attention to important trends and data points from across Indicators and to introduce readers to the data resources available in the report. Tags {science,engineering,indicators,statistics,nsf,nsb,srs,federal,government,education,labor,employment,workforce,research,development,industry,international,global,r&d,technology,patents,"research citations"}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including digester gases" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

E-Print Network 3.0 - artificial digestion methods Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Resources which provide more detailed infor- mation on anaerobic digesters are listed. Biogas... (oxygen free) digestion of organic matter whereby the organic matter is converted...

162

E-Print Network 3.0 - animal manure digestion Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

with other organic wastes. Co-digestion has the primary advan- tage... to generate biogas from animal manure. Some com- mon anaerobic digester configurations used on farms...

163

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic digestion Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Resources which provide more detailed infor- mation on anaerobic digesters are listed. Biogas... on the source of the organic matter and the management of the anaerobic digestion...

164

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic digestion technology Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

technology on livestock farms... dioxide (EPA AgStar 2006). Benefits and Challenges of Biogas Technology Anaerobic digestion can convert... digester. Resources which ... Source:...

165

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic digestion analysis Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Resources which provide more detailed infor- mation on anaerobic digesters are listed. Biogas... on the source of the organic matter and the management of the anaerobic digestion...

166

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic digesters current Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Resources which provide more detailed infor- mation on anaerobic digesters are listed. Biogas... on the source of the organic matter and the management of the anaerobic digestion...

167

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic digestion usa Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Resources which provide more detailed infor- mation on anaerobic digesters are listed. Biogas... on the source of the organic matter and the management of the anaerobic digestion...

168

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic digestion final Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Resources which provide more detailed infor- mation on anaerobic digesters are listed. Biogas... on the source of the organic matter and the management of the anaerobic digestion...

169

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic digestion performance Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Resources which provide more detailed infor- mation on anaerobic digesters are listed. Biogas... on the source of the organic matter and the management of the anaerobic digestion...

170

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobically digested cattle Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Resources which provide more detailed infor- mation on anaerobic digesters are listed. Biogas... on the source of the organic matter and the management of the anaerobic digestion...

171

E-Print Network 3.0 - acid digestion procedure Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology 6 www.manuremanagement.cornell.edu Biogas Casebook Summary: digester. Methanogens Active in phase 3 of the digestion process...

172

E-Print Network 3.0 - acid digestibility coefficients Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Medicine ; Environmental Sciences and Ecology 18 5. oktober 2009 Precision control of biogas plants Summary: coupling of digesters and post digestion 2) Process inhibition 3)...

173

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic digestion heat Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Resources which provide more detailed infor- mation on anaerobic digesters are listed. Biogas... on the source of the organic matter and the management of the anaerobic digestion...

174

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic digesters treating Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Resources which provide more detailed infor- mation on anaerobic digesters are listed. Biogas... on the source of the organic matter and the management of the anaerobic digestion...

175

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic digester treating Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Resources which provide more detailed infor- mation on anaerobic digesters are listed. Biogas... on the source of the organic matter and the management of the anaerobic digestion...

176

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic thermophilic digestion Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Resources which provide more detailed infor- mation on anaerobic digesters are listed. Biogas... on the source of the organic matter and the management of the anaerobic digestion...

177

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic digester performance Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Resources which provide more detailed infor- mation on anaerobic digesters are listed. Biogas... on the source of the organic matter and the management of the anaerobic digestion...

178

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic digestion model Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Resources which provide more detailed infor- mation on anaerobic digesters are listed. Biogas... on the source of the organic matter and the management of the anaerobic digestion...

179

Measuring non-condensable gases in steam  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In surgery, medical devices that are used should be sterilized. To obtain surface steam sterilization conditions, not only in the sterilizer chamber itself but also in the loads to be sterilized, the amount of non-condensable gases (NCGs), for instance air, should be very low. Even rather small fractions of NCGs (below 1%) seriously hamper steam penetration in porous materials or devices with hollow channels (e.g., endoscopes). A recently developed instrument which might detect the presence of residual NCGs in a reliable and reproducible way is the 3M{sup TM} Electronic Test System (ETS). In this paper, a physical model is presented that describes the behavior of this instrument. This model has been validated by experiments in which known fractions of NCGs were introduced in a sterilizer chamber in which an ETS was placed. Despite several approximations made in the model, a good agreement is found between the model predictions and the experimental results. The basic principle of the ETS, measuring the heat transfer by condensation on a cooled surface, permits a very sensitive detection of NCGs in harsh environments like water vapor at high temperatures and pressures. Our model may serve to develop adapted and optimized versions of this instrument for use outside the field of sterilization, e.g., in heat exchangers based on steam condensation.

Doornmalen, J. P. C. M. van; Kopinga, K., E-mail: k.kopinga@tue.nl [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

180

Emission difference between natural gas usage and digester gas usage.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??M.S. It is important to burn the air toxics and harmful gases which come from water and wastewater treatment processes. In common practice, instead of (more)

Ghorbanian, Mahyar, 1986-

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including digester gases" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Energy Efficiency and Greenhouse Gases | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Energy Efficiency Energy Efficiency and Greenhouse Gases Energy Efficiency and Greenhouse Gases Mission The team establishes an energy conservation program as defined in Executive Order (EO) 13423, Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management, and (EO) 13514, Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance, and DOE Order 436.1, Departmental Sustainability, and approved by LM. The team incorporates requirements for energy efficiency and reductions in greenhouse gases, and it advocates conserving environmental resources and improving operational capabilities and mission sustainability. Scope The team evaluates how to maintain and operate its buildings and facilities in a resource-efficient, sustainable, and economically viable manner. The

182

Unified Theory of Lattice Boltzmann Models for Nonideal Gases  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A nonideal gas lattice Boltzmann model is directly derived, in an {ital a priori} fashion, from the Enskog equation for dense gases. The model is rigorously obtained by a systematic procedure to discretize the Enskog equation (in the presence of an external force) in both phase space and time. The lattice Boltzmann model derived here is thermodynamically consistent and is free of the defects which exist in previous lattice Boltzmann models for nonideal gases. The existing lattice Boltzmann models for nonideal gases are analyzed and compared with the model derived here. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

Luo, L. [ICASE, MS 403, NASA Langley Research Center, 6 North Dryden Street, Building 1298, Hampton, Virginia 23681-0001 (United States)] [ICASE, MS 403, NASA Langley Research Center, 6 North Dryden Street, Building 1298, Hampton, Virginia 23681-0001 (United States)

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Anaerobic digestion of wool scouring wastewater in a digester operated semi-continuously for biomass retention  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An anaerobic digester, operated semi-continuously in order to retain high concentrations of biomass in the digester, was used to treat wool scouring wastewater. At a space load of 99 kg COD m?3 day ?1 (hydraulic retention time, 28 days) >56% of the COD and >47% of the grease were removed. At these efficiencies, this rate was estimated to be at least 253 times greater than that which would be achieved in a continuously stirred digester. Preliminary studies of enzymatic pretreatment of the scouring effluent showed that significantly improved treatment rates and/or efficiencies could be achievedi.e. >70% removal of both the COD and grease at a space load of 12 kg COD m?3 day?1. It is unlikely that any substancial levels of flocculation would develop in this system and it is expected that the moderate use of polyelectrolytes would be required to help maintain the VSS concentration in the reactor.

R.G. Cail; J.P. Barford; R. Lichacz

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Procedures for safe handling of off-gases from electric vehicle lead-acid batteries during overcharge  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The potential for generation of toxic gases from lead-acid batteries has long been recognized. Prior to the current interest in electric vehicles, there were no studies specificaly oriented to toxic gas release from traction batteries, however. As the Department of Energy Demonstration Project (in the Electric and Hybrid Vehicle Program) progresses, available data from past studies and parallel health effects programs must be digested into guidance to the drivers and maintenance personnel, tailored to their contact with electric vehicles. The basic aspects of lead-acid battery operation, vehicle use, and health effects of stibine and arsine to provide electric vehicle users with the information behind the judgment that vehicle operation and testing may proceed are presented. Specifically, it is concluded that stibine generation or arsine generation at rapid enough rates to induce acute toxic response is not at all likely. Procedures to guard against low-level exposure until more definitive data on ambient concentrations of the gases are collected are presented for both charging the batteries and driving the vehicles. A research plan to collect additional quantitative data from electric traction batteries is presented.

LaBelle, S.J.; Bhattacharyya, M.H.; Loutfy, R.O.; Varma, R.

1980-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

185

Carbon dioxide Information Analysis Center and World Data Center: A for Atmospheric trace gases. Annual progress report, FY 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the activities and accomplishments made by the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center and World Data Center-A for Atmospheric Trace Gases during the fiscal year 1994. Topics discussed in this report include; organization and staff, user services, systems, communications, Collaborative efforts with China, networking, ocean data and activities of the World Data Center-A.

Burtis, M.D. [comp.] [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Energy, Environment and Resources Center; Cushman, R.M.; Boden, T.A.; Jones, S.B.; Nelson, T.R.; Stoss, F.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Biological production of acetic acid from waste gases with Clostridium ljungdahlii  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus are disclosed for converting waste gases from industrial processes such as oil refining, carbon black, coke, ammonia, and methanol production, into useful products. The method includes introducing the waste gases into a bioreactor where they are fermented to various organic acids or alcohols by anaerobic bacteria within the bioreactor. These valuable end products are then recovered, separated and purified. In an exemplary recovery process, the bioreactor raffinate is passed through an extraction chamber into which one or more non-inhibitory solvents are simultaneously introduced to extract the product. Then, the product is separated from the solvent by distillation. Gas conversion rates can be maximized by use of centrifuges, hollow fiber membranes, or other means of ultrafiltration to return entrained anaerobic bacteria from the bioreactor raffinate to the bioreactor itself, thus insuring the highest possible cell concentration. 5 figs.

Gaddy, J.L.

1998-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

187

Removal of oxides of nitrogen from gases in multi-stage coal combustion  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Polluting NO.sub.x gas values are removed from off-gas of a multi-stage coal combustion process which includes an initial carbonizing reaction, firing of char from this reaction in a fluidized bed reactor, and burning of gases from the carbonizing and fluidized bed reactions in a topping combustor having a first, fuel-rich zone and a second, fuel-lean zone. The improvement by means of which NO.sub.x gases are removed is directed to introducing NO.sub.x -free oxidizing gas such as compressor air into the second, fuel-lean zone and completing combustion with this source of oxidizing gas. Excess air fed to the fluidized bed reactor is also controlled to obtain desired stoichiometry in the first, fuel-rich zone of the topping combustor.

Mollot, Darren J. (Morgantown, WV); Bonk, Donald L. (Louisville, OH); Dowdy, Thomas E. (Orlando, FL)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Nuclear magnetic resonance of laser-polarized noble gases in molecules, materials and organisms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Conventional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are fundamentally challenged by the insensitivity that stems from the ordinarily low spin polarization achievable in even the strongest NMR magnets. However, by transferring angular momentum from laser light to electronic and nuclear spins, optical pumping methods can increase the nuclear spin polarization of noble gases by several orders of magnitude, thereby greatly enhancing their NMR sensitivity. This dissertation is primarily concerned with the principles and practice of optically pumped nuclear magnetic resonance (OPNMR). The enormous sensitivity enhancement afforded by optical pumping noble gases can be exploited to permit a variety of novel NMR experiments across many disciplines. Many such experiments are reviewed, including the void-space imaging of organisms and materials, NMR and MRI of living tissues, probing structure and dynamics of molecules in solution and on surfaces, and zero-field NMR and MRI.

Goodson, Boyd M.

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Adsorption of molecular gases on porous materials in the SAFT-VR approximation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A simple molecular thermodynamic approach is applied to the study of the adsorption of gases of chain molecules on solid surfaces. We use a model based on the Statistical Associating Fluid Theory for Variable Range (SAFT-VR) potentials [A. Gil-Villegas, A. Galindo, P. J. Whitehead, S. J. Mills, G. Jackson, A. N. Burgess, J. Chem. Phys. 106 (1997) 4168] that we extend by including a quasi-two-dimensional approximation to describe the adsorption properties of this type of real gases [A. Martinez, M. Castro, C. McCabe, A. Gil-Villegas, J. Chem. Phys. 126 (2007) 074707]. The model is applied to ethane, ethylene, propane, and carbon dioxide adsorbed on activated carbon and silica gel, which are porous media of significant industrial interest. We show that the adsorption isotherms obtained by means of the present SAFT-VR modeling are in fair agreement with the experimental results provided in the literature

Castro, M; Martinez, A; Rosu, H C; 10.1016/j.physa.2010.04.028

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Global Research Alliance on Agricultural Greenhouse Gases | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Global Research Alliance on Agricultural Greenhouse Gases Global Research Alliance on Agricultural Greenhouse Gases Jump to: navigation, search Name Global Research Alliance on Agricultural Greenhouse Gases Agency/Company /Organization United States Department of Agriculture Sector Land Focus Area Agriculture Topics GHG inventory, Policies/deployment programs Resource Type Guide/manual, Lessons learned/best practices Website http://globalresearchalliance. References Global Research Alliance on Agricultural Greenhouse Gases [1] Background "The Alliance is a bottom-up network, founded on the voluntary, collaborative efforts of countries. It will coordinate research on agricultural greenhouse gas emission reductions by linking up existing and new research efforts across a range of sub-sectors and work areas. It will

191

Semi-Continuous Detection of Mercury in Gases  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Continuous Detection of Mercury in Gases Continuous Detection of Mercury in Gases Opportunity Research is currently active on the patented technology "Semi-Continuous Detection of Mercury in Gases." The technology, which is a spinoff of the National Energy Technology Laboratory's (NETL) GP-254 Process (U.S. patent 6,576,092), is available for licensing and/or further collaborative research from the U.S. Department of Energy's NETL. Overview This invention discloses a method for the quantitative detection of heavy metals, especially mercury, in effluent gas streams. The method employs photo-deposition and an array of surface acoustic wave sensors where each sensor monitors a specific metal. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency issued a national regulation for mercury removal from coal-derived flue and fuel gases in December 2011,

192

Method of producing pyrolysis gases from carbon-containing materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gasification process of improved efficiency is disclosed. A dual bed reactor system is used in which carbon-containing feedstock materials are first treated in a gasification reactor to form pyrolysis gases. The pyrolysis gases are then directed into a catalytic reactor for the destruction of residual tars/oils in the gases. Temperatures are maintained within the catalytic reactor at a level sufficient to crack the tars/oils in the gases, while avoiding thermal breakdown of the catalysts. In order to minimize problems associated with the deposition of carbon-containing materials on the catalysts during cracking, a gaseous oxidizing agent preferably consisting of air, oxygen, steam, and/or mixtures thereof is introduced into the catalytic reactor at a high flow rate in a direction perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the reactor. This oxidizes any carbon deposits on the catalysts, which would normally cause catalyst deactivation.

Mudge, Lyle K. (Richland, WA); Brown, Michael D. (West Richland, WA); Wilcox, Wayne A. (Kennewick, WA); Baker, Eddie G. (Richland, WA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

BIOSIGNATURE GASES IN H?-DOMINATED ATMOSPHERES ON ROCKY EXOPLANETS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Super-Earth exoplanets are being discovered with increasing frequency and some will be able to retain stable H2-dominated atmospheres. We study biosignature gases on exoplanets with thin H2 atmospheres and habitable surface ...

Seager, Sara

194

Spontaneous detonation of a mixture of two odd electron gases  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Spontaneous detonation of a mixture of two odd electron gases ... Instructions for safe detonation of ClO2 and NO (the fastest known reaction between two stable molecules at room temperature). ...

Thomas S. Briggs

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Suitability of Non-Energy Greenhouse Gases for Emissions Trading  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper assesses the suitability of different sources of non-energy greenhouse gases for emissions trading. Different forms of emissions trading are defined and criteria for determining whether a source is sui...

Erik Haites; Angelo Proestos

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Improved 3-omega measurement of thermal conductivity in liquid, gases, and powders using a metal-coated optical fiber  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A novel 3?thermal conductivitymeasurement technique called metal-coated 3? is introduced for use with liquids gases powders and aerogels. This technique employs a micron-scale metal-coated glass fiber as a heater/thermometer that is suspended within the sample. Metal-coated 3? exceeds alternate 3? based fluid sensing techniques in a number of key metrics enabling rapid measurements of small samples of materials with very low thermal effusivity (gases) using smaller temperature oscillations with lower parasitic conduction losses. Its advantages relative to existing fluid measurement techniques including transient hot-wire steady-state methods and solid-wire 3? are discussed. A generalized n-layer concentric cylindrical periodic heating solution that accounts for thermal boundary resistance is presented. Improved sensitivity to boundary conductance is recognized through this model. Metal-coated 3? was successfully validated through a benchmark study of gases and liquids spanning two-orders of magnitude in thermal conductivity.

Scott N. Schiffres; Jonathan A. Malen

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Meals included in Conference Registrations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Meals included in Conference Registrations Meals included as part of the cost of a conference the most reasonable rates are obtained. Deluxe hotels and motels should be avoided. GSA rates have been for Georgia high cost areas. 75% of these amounts would be $21 for non- high cost areas and $27 for high cost

Arnold, Jonathan

198

Anaerobic Co-digestion of Brown Water and Food Waste for Energy Recovery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LIM J.W. Anaerobic Co-digestion of Brown Water and Food Waste for Energy Recovery Jun Wei LIM waste (FW) and their mixture (MW) in batch digesters was evaluated under mesophilic conditions. BW waste. Keywords Anaerobic digestion; food waste; brown water; biogas; co-digestion INTRODUCTION

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

199

Sonochemical Digestion of Soil and Sediment Samples  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work was performed as part of a broader effort to automate analytical methods for determination of plutonium and other radioisotopes in environmental samples. The work described here represented a screening study to determine the potential for applying ultrasonic irradiation to sample digestion. Two standard reference materials (SRMs) were used in this study: Columbia River Sediment and Rocky Flats Soil. The key experiments performed are listed below along with a summary of the results. The action of nitric acid, regardless of its concentration and liquid-to-solid ratio, did not achieve dissolution efficiency better that 20%. The major fraction of natural organic matter (NOM) remained undissolved by this treatment. Sonication did not result in improved dissolution for the SRMs tested. The action of hydrofluoric acid at concentrations of 8 M and higher achieved much more pronounced dissolution (up to 97% dissolved for the Rocky Flats soil sample and up to 78% dissolved for the Columbia River Sediment sample). Dissolution efficiency remains constant for solid-to-liquid ratios of up to 0.05 to 1 and decreases for the higher loadings of the solid phase. Sonication produced no measurable effect in improving the dissolution of the samples compared with the control digestion experiments. Combined treatment of the SRM by mixtures of HNO3 and HF showed inferior performance compared with the HF alone. An adverse effect of sonication was found for the Rocky Flats soil material, which became more noticeable at higher HF concentrations. Sonication of the Columbia River sediment samples had no positive effect in the mixed acid treatment. The results indicate that applying ultrasound in an isolated cup horn configuration does not offer any advantage over conventional ''heat and mix'' treatment for dissolution of the soil and sediment based on the SRM examined here. This conclusion, however, is based on an approach that uses gravimetric analysis to determine gross dissolution efficiency. This approach does not allow any conclusion regarding the possible advantage of sonication in selective dissolution of plutonium traces incorporated into an inorganic or organic fraction of the samples.

Sinkov, Sergei I.; Lumetta, Gregg J.

2006-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

200

Energy loss characteristics of heavy ions in nitrogen, carbon dioxide, argon, hydrocarbon gases and tradescantia tissue  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy loss characteristics of heavy ions in nitrogen, carbon dioxide, argon, hydrocarbon gases and tradescantia tissue

Dennis, J A

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including digester gases" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Useful variation in in vitro digestibility within perennial ryegrass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In vitro dry matter digestibility (DMD) and dry matter yield (DMY) of herbage from plots sown with three selected perennial ryegrass varieties with similar heading dates (Ba11778, Talbot and Gator) under a range ...

P.W. Wilkins

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Design of an anaerobic digester in Quebec, Canada  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.In response to the future Quebec, Canada regulations prohibiting landfilling of organic matter by 2020, EBI, a waste management company located near Montreal is considering constructing an anaerobic digester. This thesis ...

Bouaziz, Alexandre N. (Alexandre Nathanel)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

April 16, 2013 Webinar: Community-Scale Anaerobic Digesters  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This webinar was held April 16, 2013, and provided information on San Jose, California's, commercial-scale, high solids dry fermentation anaerobic digestion system, and the Forest County Potawatomi...

204

Biochar Produced from Anaerobically Digested Fiber Reduces Phosphorus...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

dairy lagoons. The ADF was collected from a plugged flow digester, air-dried to <8% water content, and pelletized. Biochar was produced by slow pyrolysis in a barrel retort....

205

Halophytic microalgae as a feedstock for anaerobic digestion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Anaerobic digestion can be employed to produce methane biogas from residual microalgae biomass derived from either a lipid based biofuel process or wastewater treatment. There is interest in using halophytic microalgae for biofuel production due to their potential robustness in large-scale open pond production. The anaerobic digestion of halophytic microalgae biomass would however be challenging due to the high salinities not typically experienced in anaerobic digestion scenarios. Halophytic microalgae biomass as a potential substrate feedstock for anaerobic digestion would have salinities in excess of 3.5%, which is typically found in marine environments. To investigate the anaerobic digestion of halophytic microalgae issue the first stage of the reported study focuses on the changes undertaken in the bacterial community associated with the anaerobic digestion of piggery effluent under increasing saline conditions, with the aim of establishing a saline tolerant anaerobic digestion inoculum capable of digesting feedstocks under high salinity conditions. Favourable results from this inoculum development study allowed the investigation of anaerobic digestion of halophytic microalgae. The reported results demonstrate that a saline tolerant inoculum was maintained. Subsequent denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) fingerprinting of the resulting halophytic bacterial community showed several halophytic methanogens. The inoculum was used to digest the halophytic microalgae. The resulting gas data showed that biogas production of 35853mL/g of volatile solids (VS) with a methane content of 544.3% methane was achieved at 7% salinity. The volume of biogas produced on a wet weight microalgae biomass basis was 12226 and 17525mL/g of halophytic microalgae biomass respectively (742.8wt.% moisture content). The conversion of carbon in the feedstock to methane achieved an efficiency of 26.4% and 46.6% at 3.4% and 7% salinity respectively. A halo-tolerant anaerobic digestion microbial community could be further optimized to complete the loop with nutrient recycle required with the production of halophytic microalgae based biofuels and potentially, hypersaline wastewater treatment applications.

Andrew Ward; Andy Ball; David Lewis

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Anaerobic digestion of glycerol and co-digestion of glycerol and pig manure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The potential of glycerol obtained from transesterification of waste cooking oil as a main carbon source for biogas production was investigated. The glycerol was highly contaminated with oils and fats and was pretreated with sulfuric acid. Using a carbon source of glucose as a control, we compared biogas production from the acid-treated glycerol in a synthetic medium and the acid-treated glycerol mixed with pig manure. The anaerobic digestion of acid-treated glycerol with supplement in a synthetic medium was found to be satisfactory at organic loading rates (OLR) between 1.3, 1.6 and 2.6g chemical oxygen demand (COD) L?1 d?1. The maximum methane yield of 0.32L at Standard temperature and pressure (STP) g?1 COD removal was achieved at an OLR of 1.6g CODL?1 d?1 and the methane content was 54% on an average. At a higher organic loading rate of 5.4g CODL?1 d?1, the propionic acid to acetic acid ratio was higher than the critical threshold limit for metabolic imbalance. Anaerobic digestion of acid-treated glycerol with pig manure was also investigated at the COD ratio of 80:20 (glycerol:pig manure). The anaerobic digestion of acid-treated glycerol with pig manure was found to be satisfactory at organic loading rates between 1.3, 1.7, 2.9 and 5.0g CODL?1 d?1 in terms of COD reduction (>80%) and methane content of (62% on an average). However, the biogas production rate was found to significantly decrease at the highest load. The maximum methane yield of 0.24L STPg?1 COD removal was achieved at an OLR of 1.3g CODL?1 d?1.

Sasikarn Nuchdang; Chantaraporn Phalakornkule

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Sponsorship includes: Agriculture in the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sponsorship includes: · Agriculture in the Classroom · Douglas County Farm Bureau · Gifford Farm · University of Nebraska Agricultural Research and Development Center · University of Nebraska- Lincoln Awareness Coalition is to help youth, primarily from urban communities, become aware of agriculture

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

208

On surface temperature, greenhouse gases, and aerosols: models and observations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of changes in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations and sulphate aerosols on near-surface temperature is investigated using a version of the Hadley Centre atmospheric model coupled to a mixed layer ocean. The scattering of sunlight by sulphate aerosols is represented by appropriately enhancing the surface albedo. On doubling atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations, the global mean temperature increases by 5.2 K. An integration with a 39% increase in CO{sub 2}, giving the estimated change in radiative heating due to increases in greenhouse gases since 1900, produced an equilibrium warming of 2.3 K, which, even allowing for oceanic inertia, is significantly higher than the observed warming over the same period. Furthermore, the simulation suggests a substantial warming everywhere, whereas the observations indicate isolated regions of cooling, including parts of the northern midlatitude continents. The addition of an estimate of the effect of scattering by current industrial aerosols (uncertain by a factor of at least 3) leads to improved agreement with the observed pattern of changes over the northern continents and reduces the global mean warming by about 30%. Doubling the aerosol forcing produces patterns that are still compatible with the observations, but further increase leads to unrealistically extensive cooling in the midlatitudes. The diurnal range of surface temperature decreases over most of the northern extratropics on increasing CO{sub 2}, in agreement with recent observations. The addition of the current industrial aerosol had little detectable effect on the diurnal range in the model because the direct effect of reduced solar heating at the surface is approximately balanced by the indirect effects of cooling. Thus, the ratio of the reduction in diurnal range to the mean warming is increased, in closer agreement with observations. Results from further sensitivity experiments with larger increases in aerosol and CO{sub 2} are presented.

Mitchell, J.F.B.; Davis, R.A.; Ingram, W.J.; Senior, C.A. [Hadley Centre for Climate Prediction and Research, Berkshire (United Kingdom)] [Hadley Centre for Climate Prediction and Research, Berkshire (United Kingdom)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Finalize Historic National Program to Reduce Greenhouse Gases and Improve  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Finalize Historic National Program to Reduce Greenhouse Gases and Improve Finalize Historic National Program to Reduce Greenhouse Gases and Improve Fuel Economy for Cars and Trucks Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Finalize Historic National Program to Reduce Greenhouse Gases and Improve Fuel Economy for Cars and Trucks Agency/Company /Organization: EPA and NHTSA Focus Area: Standards - Incentives - Policies - Regulations Topics: Policy Impacts Resource Type: Reports, Journal Articles, & Tools Website: www.epa.gov/oms/climate/regulations/420f10014.pdf This document establish a national program consisting of new standards for model year 2012 through 2016 light-duty vehicles that will reduce greenhouse gas emissions and improve fuel economy. EPA is finalizing the first-ever national greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions standards under the

210

Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program - Electricity Factors  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Voluntary Reporting Program > Coefficients Voluntary Reporting Program > Coefficients Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program (Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program Fuel Carbon Dioxide Emission Coefficients) Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program Fuel Emission Coefficients Table 1: Carbon Dioxide Emission Factors for Stationary Combustion Table 2: Carbon Dioxide Emission Factors for Transportation Fuels Table 3: Generic Methane and Nitrous Oxide Emission Factors for Stationary Fuel Combustion Table 4: Specific Methane and Nitrous Oxide Emission Factors for Biogenic Fuel Sources Table 5: Methane and Nitrous Oxide Emissions Factors for Highway Vehicles Table 6: Methane and Nitrous Oxide Emission Factors for Alternative Fuel Vehicles Table 7: Methane and Nitrous Oxide Emission Factors for Non-Highway Mobile Combustion

211

Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) Model Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) Model Agency/Company /Organization: Argonne National Laboratory Focus Area: GHG Inventory Development Topics: Analysis Tools Website: greet.es.anl.gov/ This full life-cycle model evaluates the energy and emission impacts of advanced vehicle technologies and new transportation fuels. The model allows users to evaluate various vehicle and fuel combinations. How to Use This Tool This tool is most helpful when using these strategies: Shift - Change to low-carbon modes Improve - Enhance infrastructure & policies Learn more about the avoid, shift, improve framework for limiting air

212

Lattice vibrations of pure and doped GaSe  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Bridgman method is used to grow especially undoped and doped single crystals of GaSe. Composition and impurity content of the grown crystals were determined using X-ray fluorescence (XRF) method. X-ray diffraction, Raman scattering, photoluminescence (PL), and IR transmission measurements were performed at room temperature. The long wavelength lattice vibrations of four modifications of GaSe were described in the framework of modified one-layer linear-chain model which also takes into consideration the interaction of the selenium (Se) atom with the second nearest neighbor gallium (Ga) atom in the same layer. The existence of an eight-layer modification of GaSe is suggested and the vibrational frequencies of this modification are explained in the framework of a lattice dynamical model considered in the present work. Frequencies and the type of vibrations (gap, local, or resonance) for the impurity atoms were calculated and compared with the experimental results.

Allakhverdiev, K. [Materials Institute, Marmara Research Center, TUBITAK, Gebze/Kocaeli 41470 (Turkey) and Institute of Physics, Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences, Baku AZ1143 (Azerbaijan)]. E-mail: kerim.allahverdi@mam.gov.tr; Baykara, T. [Materials Institute, Marmara Research Center, TUBITAK, Gebze/Kocaeli 41470 (Turkey); Ellialtioglu, S. [Department of Physics, Middle East Technical University, Ankara 06531 (Turkey); Hashimzade, F. [Institute of Physics, Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences, Baku AZ1143 (Azerbaijan); Huseinova, D. [Institute of Physics, Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences, Baku AZ1143 (Azerbaijan); Kawamura, K. [Institute of Materials Science, University of Tsukuba 305-8573 (Japan); Kaya, A.A. [Materials Institute, Marmara Research Center, TUBITAK, Gebze/Kocaeli 41470 (Turkey); Kulibekov, A.M. [Department of Physics, Mugla University, Mugla 48000 (Turkey); Onari, S. [Institute of Materials Science, University of Tsukuba 305-8573 (Japan)

2006-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

213

Other States Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Other States Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 - - - - - - - - - - - - 1997 513 491 515 539 557 534 541 579 574 585 558 573 1998 578 536 591 581 517 456 486 486 471 477 457 468 1999 466 438 489 495 499 510 547 557 544 555 541 579 2000 587 539 605 587 615 570 653 629 591 627 609 611 2001 658 591 677 690 718 694 692 679 686 697 688 700 2002 639 591 587 621 622 605 654 639 649 650 623 638 2003 689 624 649 676 702 691 733 732 704 734 719 748 2004 741 697 727 692 692 688 718 729 706 723 711 718

214

Hazardous Gases VASILIS M. FTHENAKIS Department of Applied Science  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Mitigation Options for Mitigation Options for Accidental Releases of Hazardous Gases VASILIS M. FTHENAKIS Department of Applied Science Brookhaven National Laboratory Upton, N Y 11973 ABSTRACT The objective of this paper is to review and compare technologies available for mitigation of unconfined releases of toxic and flammable gases. These technologies indude: secondary confinement, de- inventory, vapor barriers, foam spraying, and water sprays/monitors. Guidelines for the design and/or operation of effective post-release mitigation systems and case studies involving actual industrial mitigation systems are also presented. 1. ACCIDENT PREVENTION & MITIGATION OPTIONS Accident prevention and mitigation in the process industries is based on the military concept of defense in

215

Dissipative dynamics of a Josephson junction in the Bose gases  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The dissipative dynamics of a Josephson junction in Bose gases is considered within the framework of the model of a tunneling Hamiltonian. The effective action that describes the dynamics of the phase difference across the junction is derived using the functional integration method. The dynamic equation obtained for the phase difference across the junction is analyzed for the finite temperatures in the low-frequency limit involving the radiation terms. The asymmetric case of the Bose gases with the different order parameters is calculated as well.

Barankov, R.A. [Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Burmistrov, S.N. [RRC 'Kurchatov Institute', Kurchatov Sq.1, 123182 Moscow (Russian Federation)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Carbonaceous adsorbent regeneration and halocarbon displacement by hydrocarbon gases  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention describes a process for regeneration of halocarbon bearing carbonaceous adsorbents through which a carbonaceous adsorbent is contacted with hydrocarbon gases, preferably propane, butane and pentane at near room temperatures and at atmospheric pressure. As the hydrocarbon gases come in contact with the adsorbent, the hydrocarbons displace the halocarbons by physical adsorption. As a result of using this process, the halocarbon concentration and the hydrocarbon eluant is increased thereby allowing for an easier recovery of pure halocarbons. By using the process of this invention, carbonaceous adsorbents can be regenerated by an inexpensive process which also allows for subsequent re-use of the recovered halocarbons. 8 figures.

Senum, G.I.; Dietz, R.N.

1994-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

217

Carbonaceous adsorbent regeneration and halocarbon displacement by hydrocarbon gases  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention describes a process for regeneration of halocarbon bearing carbonaceous adsorbents through which a carbonaceous adsorbent is contacted with hydrocarbon gases, preferably propane, butane and pentane at near room temperatures and at atmospheric pressure. As the hydrocarbon gases come in contact with the adsorbent, the hydrocarbons displace the halocarbons by physical adsorption. As a result of using this process, the halocarbon concentration and the hydrocarbon eluant is increased thereby allowing for an easier recovery of pure halocarbons. By using the process of this invention, carbonaceous adsorbents can be regenerated by an inexpensive process which also allows for subsequent re-use of the recovered halocarbons.

Senum, Gunnar I. (Patchogue, NY); Dietz, Russell N. (Patchogue, NY)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Removal of sulfur and nitrogen containing pollutants from discharge gases  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Oxides of sulfur and of nitrogen are removed from waste gases by reaction with an unsupported copper oxide powder to form copper sulfate. The resulting copper sulfate is dissolved in water to effect separation from insoluble mineral ash and dried to form solid copper sulfate pentahydrate. This solid sulfate is thermally decomposed to finely divided copper oxide powder with high specific surface area. The copper oxide powder is recycled into contact with the waste gases requiring cleanup. A reducing gas can be introduced to convert the oxide of nitrogen pollutants to nitrogen.

Joubert, James I. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Can Delignification Decrease Cellulose Digestibility in Acid Pretreated Corn Stover?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It has previously been shown that the improved digestibility of dilute acid pretreated corn stover is at least partially due to the removal of xylan and the consequent increase in accessibility of the cellulose to cellobiohydrolase enzymes. We now report on the impact that lignin removal has on the accessibility and digestibility of dilute acid pretreated corn stover. Samples of corn stover were subjected to dilute sulfuric acid pretreatment with and without simultaneous (partial) lignin removal. In addition, some samples were completely delignified after the pretreatment step using acidified sodium chlorite. The accessibility and digestibility of the samples were tested using a fluorescence-labeled cellobiohydrolase (Trichoderma reesei Cel7A) purified from a commercial cellulase preparation. Partial delignification of corn stover during dilute acid pretreatment was shown to improve cellulose digestibility by T. reesei Cel7A; however, decreasing the lignin content below 5% (g g{sup -1}) by treatment with acidified sodium chlorite resulted in a dramatic reduction in cellulose digestibility. Importantly, this effect was found to be enhanced in samples with lower xylan contents suggesting that the near complete removal of xylan and lignin may cause aggregation of the cellulose microfibrils resulting in decreased cellulase accessibility.

Ishizawa, C. I.; Jeoh, T.; Adney, W. S.; Himmel, M. E.; Johnson, D. K.; Davis, M. F.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Appendix F Cultural Resources, Including  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Appendix F Appendix F Cultural Resources, Including Section 106 Consultation STATE OF CALIFORNIA - THE RESOURCES AGENCY EDMUND G. BROWN, JR., Governor OFFICE OF HISTORIC PRESERVATION DEPARTMENT OF PARKS AND RECREATION 1725 23 rd Street, Suite 100 SACRAMENTO, CA 95816-7100 (916) 445-7000 Fax: (916) 445-7053 calshpo@parks.ca.gov www.ohp.parks.ca.gov June 14, 2011 Reply in Reference To: DOE110407A Angela Colamaria Loan Programs Office Environmental Compliance Division Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave SW, LP-10 Washington, DC 20585 Re: Topaz Solar Farm, San Luis Obispo County, California Dear Ms. Colamaria: Thank you for seeking my consultation regarding the above noted undertaking. Pursuant to 36 CFR Part 800 (as amended 8-05-04) regulations implementing Section

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including digester gases" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

PHASE BEHAVIOR OF LIGHT GASES IN HYDROCARBON AND AQUEOUS SOLVENTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under previous support from the Department of Energy, an experimental facility has been established and operated to measure valuable vapor-liquid equilibrium data for systems of interest in the production and processing of coal fluids. To facilitate the development and testing of models for prediction of the phase behavior for such systems, we have acquired substantial amounts of data on the equilibrium phase compositions for binary mixtures of heavy hydrocarbon solvents with a variety of supercritical solutes, including hydrogen, methane, ethane, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide. The present project focuses on measuring the phase behavior of light gases and water in Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) type solvents at conditions encountered in indirect liquefaction processes and evaluating and developing theoretically-based correlating frameworks to predict the phase behavior of such systems. Specific goals of the proposed work include (a) developing a state-of-the-art experimental facility to permit highly accurate measurements of equilibrium phase compositions (solubilities) of challenging F-T systems, (b) measuring these properties for systematically-selected binary, ternary and molten F-T wax mixtures to provide critically needed input data for correlation development, (c) developing and testing models suitable for describing the phase behavior of such mixtures, and (d) presenting the modeling results in generalized, practical formats suitable for use in process engineering calculations. During the present period, the Park-Gasem-Robinson (PGR) equation of state (EOS) has been modified to improve its volumetric and equilibrium predictions. Specifically, the attractive term of the PGR equation was modified to enhance the flexibility of the model, and a new expression was developed for the temperature dependence of the attractive term in this segment-segment interaction model. The predictive capability of the modified PGR EOS for vapor pressure, and saturated liquid and vapor densities was evaluated for selected normal paraffins, normal alkenes, cyclo-paraffins, light aromatics, argon, carbon dioxide and water. The generalized EOS constants and substance-specific characteristic parameters in the modified PGR EOS were obtained from the pure component vapor pressures, and saturated liquid and vapor molar volumes. The calculated phase properties were compared to those of the Peng-Robinson (PR), the simplified-perturbed-hard-chain theory (SPHCT) and the original PGR equations. Generally, the performance of the proposed EOS was better than the PR, SPHCT and original PGR equations in predicting the pure fluid properties (%AAD of 1.3, 2.8 and 3.7 for vapor pressure, saturated liquid and vapor densities, respectively).

KHALED A.M. GASEM; ROBERT L. ROBINSON, JR.

1998-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

222

Oil and gas exploration system and method for detecting trace amounts of hydrocarbon gases in the atmosphere  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An oil and gas exploration system and method for land and airborne operations, the system and method used for locating subsurface hydrocarbon deposits based upon a remote detection of trace amounts of gases in the atmosphere. The detection of one or more target gases in the atmosphere is used to indicate a possible subsurface oil and gas deposit. By mapping a plurality of gas targets over a selected survey area, the survey area can be analyzed for measurable concentration anomalies. The anomalies are interpreted along with other exploration data to evaluate the value of an underground deposit. The system includes a differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system with a spectroscopic grade laser light and a light detector. The laser light is continuously tunable in a mid-infrared range, 2 to 5 micrometers, for choosing appropriate wavelengths to measure different gases and avoid absorption bands of interference gases. The laser light has sufficient optical energy to measure atmospheric concentrations of a gas over a path as long as a mile and greater. The detection of the gas is based on optical absorption measurements at specific wavelengths in the open atmosphere. Light that is detected using the light detector contains an absorption signature acquired as the light travels through the atmosphere from the laser source and back to the light detector. The absorption signature of each gas is processed and then analyzed to determine if a potential anomaly exists.

Wamsley, Paula R. (Littleton, CO); Weimer, Carl S. (Littleton, CO); Nelson, Loren D. (Evergreen, CO); O'Brien, Martin J. (Pine, CO)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

AER1301: KINETIC THEORY OF GASES Assignment #2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AER1301: KINETIC THEORY OF GASES Assignment #2 1. Using the formalism of the text book is as follows. Assume that the particle number density is a slowly varying function of the z coordinate #27; ? is a constant. 3. Show that if the potential function, U(r), varies as 1=r 4

Groth, Clinton P. T.

224

AER1301: KINETIC THEORY OF GASES Assignment #2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AER1301: KINETIC THEORY OF GASES Assignment #2 1. Using the formalism of the text book the particle number density and temperature are both slowly varying functions of the z coordinate of the previous problem is as follows. Assume that the particle number density is a slowly varying function

Groth, Clinton P. T.

225

OPTIONS FOR ABATING GREENHOUSE GASES FROM EXHAUST STREAMS.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report examines different alternatives for replacing, treating, and recycling greenhouse gases. It is concluded that treatment (abatement) is the only viable short-term option. Three options for abatement that were tested for use in semiconductor facilities are reviewed, and their performance and costs compared. This study shows that effective abatement options are available to the photovoltaic (PV) industry, at reasonable cost.

FTHENAKIS,V.

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT RISING GREENHOUSE GASES AND CLIMATE CHANGE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, methane, and nitrous oxides. The sun's energy passes through these gases, like light passing through risen by almost 40 percent. This is attributed primarily to the burning of fossil fuels (coal, oil, gasoline). Methane and nitrous oxides are also increasing rapidly, due in part to the expansion

227

Automatic Process Chromatographs for the Analysis of Corrosive Fluoride Gases  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......hexaflu- oride matrix gas by a trapping procedure...the disadvantage of high cost and require skilled and...lacked reliability in gases of high halocarbon coolant...the uranium hexafluoride gas; impurities have a direct effect on production efficiency. Coolant-114......

J. G. Million; W. S. Pappas; C. W. Weber

1969-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Optical Third-Harmonic Coefficients for Inert Gases  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Optical third-harmonic coefficients ?zzzz(3?) for the inert gases have been calculated taking the LS coupling scheme for helium and Jj and jl coupling schemes for neon, argon, and krypton. Our calculated values agree reasonably well with the experimental values of set (i) of Ward and New.

B. P. Tripathi; R. K. Laloraya; S. L. Srivastava

1971-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

SAFT Modeling of the Solubility of Gases in Perfluoroalkanes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

SAFT Modeling of the Solubility of Gases in Perfluoroalkanes ... A molecular model within a SAFT context for quantitatively predicting the solubility of xenon and oxygen in n-perfluoroalkanes is presented and discussed here. ... Free-Volume Theory Coupled with Soft-SAFT for Viscosity Calculations: Comparison with Molecular Simulation and Experimental Data ...

Ana M. A. Dias; Josep C. Pmies; Joo A. P. Coutinho; Isabel M. Marrucho; Lourdes F. Vega

2003-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

230

Countries Gasoline Prices Including Taxes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Countries (U.S. dollars per gallon, including taxes) Countries (U.S. dollars per gallon, including taxes) Date Belgium France Germany Italy Netherlands UK US 01/13/14 7.83 7.76 7.90 8.91 8.76 8.11 3.68 01/06/14 8.00 7.78 7.94 8.92 8.74 8.09 3.69 12/30/13 NA NA NA NA NA NA 3.68 12/23/13 NA NA NA NA NA NA 3.63 12/16/13 7.86 7.79 8.05 9.00 8.78 8.08 3.61 12/9/13 7.95 7.81 8.14 8.99 8.80 8.12 3.63 12/2/13 7.91 7.68 8.07 8.85 8.68 8.08 3.64 11/25/13 7.69 7.61 8.07 8.77 8.63 7.97 3.65 11/18/13 7.99 7.54 8.00 8.70 8.57 7.92 3.57 11/11/13 7.63 7.44 7.79 8.63 8.46 7.85 3.55 11/4/13 7.70 7.51 7.98 8.70 8.59 7.86 3.61 10/28/13 8.02 7.74 8.08 8.96 8.79 8.04 3.64 10/21/13 7.91 7.71 8.11 8.94 8.80 8.05 3.70 10/14/13 7.88 7.62 8.05 8.87 8.74 7.97 3.69

231

Anaerobic Digester Gas-to-Electricity Rebate and Performance Incentive |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Anaerobic Digester Gas-to-Electricity Rebate and Performance Anaerobic Digester Gas-to-Electricity Rebate and Performance Incentive Anaerobic Digester Gas-to-Electricity Rebate and Performance Incentive < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Institutional Local Government Nonprofit Residential Schools Tribal Government Savings Category Bioenergy Maximum Rebate Total Incentive: $2 million (combined production and capacity incentives) Fixed Base + Capacity Incentive: varies, limited to the total maximum incentive of $2 million minus the applicable performance incentive Program Info Funding Source RPS surcharge; NYPA Expiration Date 01/31/2013 State New York Program Type State Rebate Program Rebate Amount Fixed Base Incentive: varies Capacity Incentive: varies Production Incentive: $0.025/kWh production payment for new systems for up

232

Digest of United States Practice in International Law 2007 | Data.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

7 7 Research Menu Data/Tools Apps Resources Let's Talk Research Alpha You are here Data.gov » Communities » Research » Data Digest of United States Practice in International Law 2007 Dataset Summary Description The Office of the Legal Adviser publishes the annual Digest of United States Practice in International Law to provide the public with a historical record of the views and practice of the Government of the United States in public and private international law. In his introduction to the 2007 Digest, then Legal Adviser John B. Bellinger, III, stated in part: "During 2006 my colleagues and I continued to engage our international partners in intensive discussions about the appropriate legal framework for the detention and treatment of international terrorists. . . . Armed conflicts during the year including those involving Israel, Lebanon, the Palestinian Authority, and Iraq raised other issues related to the law of war. "The United States welcomed the International Committee of the Red Cross' study on the customary international law of the law of war and provided what we believe are constructive initial comments on certain aspects of methodology that raise questions about the study's conclusions. "But these issues were, of course, only one facet of the office's practice during the year. The United States dispatched to Geneva two separate large, senior-level interagency delegations to present and discuss with the UN Committee Against Torture and the Human Rights Committee U.S. implementation of its obligations under the Convention Against Torture and the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights. . . . "The office continued to play a leading role in the development of U.S. treaty law and practice. . . . "In U.S. courts, the year saw further developments related to the applicability of the Alien Tort Statute, U.S. consular notification obligations under the Vienna Convention on Consular Relations, and the scope of the Foreign Sovereign Immunities Act, including several Supreme Court decisions on consular notification and immunities. . . ."

233

Anaerobic Digestion of Food Waste?recycling Wastewater  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Food waste?recycling (FWR) wastewater was evaluated as feedstock for two?stage anaerobic digestion at different hydraulic retention times (HRTs). The FWR wastewater tested contained high concentrations of organic materials and had chemical oxygen demand (COD) >130 g/L and volatile solids (VS) >55 g/L. Two identical two?stage anaerobic digesters were operated to investigate the performance at six HRTs ranging from 1025 days. In the acidogenic reactor the total carbohydrate reduction efficiency and volatile fatty acid production dramatically decreased when acidogenic HRT was wastewater as feedstock.

Gyuseong Han; Seung Gu Shin; Juntaek Lim; Minho Jo; Seokhwan Hwang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Method for producing and treating coal gases  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of generating a de-sulphurized volatile matter and a relatively low Btu gas includes the initial step of pyrolyzing coal to produce volatile matter and a char. The volatile matter is fed to a first de-sulphurizer containing a de-sulphurizing agent to remove sulphur therefrom. At the same time, the char is gasified to produce a relatively low Btu gas. The low Btu gas is fed to a second de-sulphurizer containing the de-sulphurizing agent to remove sulphur therefrom. A regenerator is provided for removing sulphur from the de-sulphurizing agent. Portions of the de-sulphurizing agent are moved among the first de-sulphurizer, the second de-sulphurizer, and the regenerator such that the regenerator regenerates the de-sulphurizing agent. Preferably, the portions of the de-sulphurizing agent are moved from the second de-sulphurizer to the first de-sulphurizer, from the first de-sulphurizer to the regenerator, and from the regenerator to the second de-sulphurizer.

Calderon, Albert (P.O. Box 126, Bowling Green, OH 43402)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Improving the Methane Production in the Co-Digestion of Microalgae and Cattle Manure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that biogas production increased when algae was added to the digester. The highest methane production in the control groups, containing only manure, digestion sludge, and newsprint was 48120 L, while the highest in the mixtures containing algae and pretreated...

Cantu, Matthew Scott

2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

236

Investigation of EPS Characteristics and their Effects on Waste Activated Sludge Digestion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Investigation of EPS Characteristics and their Effects on Waste Activated Sludge Digestion Thomas on digestibility, especially in regards to the composition of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). Samples possibilities. Characterizations made from extraction data showed curiously high EPS disruption in Amherst

Mountziaris, T. J.

237

Strongly interacting Fermi gases : non-equilibrium dynamics and dimensional crossover  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Experiments using ultracold atomic gases address fundamental problems in many-body physics. This thesis describes experiments on strongly-interacting gases of fermionic atoms, with a focus on non-equilibrium physics and ...

Sommer, Ariel T. (Ariel Tjodolv)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Heat Transfer at Low Temperatures between Tube Walls and Gases in Turbulent Flow  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...September 1947 research-article Heat Transfer at Low Temperatures between Tube...counter-flow system to study heat transfer between tube walls and gases at...Determinations on friction accompanying heat transfer with gases in turbulent flow at...

1947-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Greenhouse Gases (GHG) Emissions from Gas Field Water in Southern Gas Field, Sichuan Basin, China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In order to assess correctly the gases emissions from oil/gas field water and its contributions to the source of greenhouse gases (GHG) at the atmospheric temperature and pressure, ... first developed to study th...

Guojun Chen; Wei Yang; Xuan Fang; Jiaai Zhong

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Simultaneous Gas Chromatographic Determination of Four Toxic Gases Generally Present in Combustion Atmospheres  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......determining these gases in mixtures...dioxide, nitrogen, water vapor, and...determining these gases in mixtures...dioxide, nitrogen, water vapor, and...to the solubility of A HCN in water, which was...thevariationin gas con- centrations......

Boyd R. Endecott; Donald C. Sanders; Arvind K. Chaturvedi

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including digester gases" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric gases final Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

on Climate and Planets http:icp.giss.nasa.gov The Role of the Atmosphere and Greenhouse Effect in Summary: gases, and scenario 3 - an atmosphere and greenhouse gases. Use...

242

Community Renewable Energy Success Stories: Community-Scale Anaerobic Digesters (text version)  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

Below is the text version of the webinar titled "Community-Scale Anaerobic Digesters," originally presented on April 16, 2013.

243

System for trapping and storing gases for subsequent chemical reduction to solids  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for quantitatively reducing oxide gases. A pre-selected amount of zinc is provided in a vial. A tube is provided in the vial. The zinc and the tube are separated. A pre-selected amount of a catalyst is provided in the tube. Oxide gases are injected into the vial. The vial, tube, zinc, catalyst, and the oxide gases are cryogenically cooled. At least a portion of the vial, tube, zinc, catalyst, and oxide gases are heated.

Vogel, John S. (San Jose, CA); Ognibene, Ted J. (Oakland, CA); Bench, Graham S. (Livermore, CA); Peaslee, Graham F. (Holland, MI)

2009-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

244

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric greenhouse gases Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to longwave radiation 12;Greenhouse Gases Polyatomic molecules... the greenhouse effect ... Source: Frierson, Dargan - Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of...

245

RECIPIENT:WA Department of Commerce STATE: WA PROJECT Van Dyk Dairy Anaerobic Digester  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

of5 of5 RECIPIENT:WA Department of Commerce STATE: WA PROJECT Van Dyk Dairy Anaerobic Digester TITLE: Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number cm Number DE-EE0000139 GF0-10-604 Based on my review oftbe information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA CompUance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.1A), I have made the foUowing determination: cx, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: A9 Information gathering (including, but not limited to, literature surveys, inventories, audits), data analysis (including computer modeling), document preparation (such as conceptual design or feasibility studies, analytical energy supply and demand studies), and dissemination (including, but not limited to, document mailings, publication, and distribution;

246

What are greenhouse gases? Many chemical compounds in the atmosphere act as  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

back into space. However, greenhouse gases will not let all the infrared light pass throughWhat are greenhouse gases? Many chemical compounds in the atmosphere act as greenhouse gases the land and oceans. The warmed Earth releases this heat in the form of infrared light (longwave radiation

247

DIGESTIVE ENZYMES IN POIKILOTHERMAL VERTEBRATES. AN INVESTIGATION OF ENZYMES IN FISHES, WITH COM-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DIGESTIVE ENZYMES IN POIKILOTHERMAL VERTEBRATES. AN INVESTIGATION OF ENZYMES IN FISHES, WITH COM Tryptic digestion uu u_ 182 Ereptic digestion u n _ 186 Carbohydrate-splitting enzymes _ 184 Amylase _ 184 enzymes in representatives throughout the vertebrate series. It would be of value to know if differences

248

Composition and Digestibility of the Ether Extract of Hays and Fodders.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

556-712-5m TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATIONS. BULLETIN NO . 150 AUGUST , 1912. Division o f Chemistry TECHNICAL BULLETIN Composition and Digestibility of the Ether Extract of Hays and Fodders By G S. FRAPS and J. B. RATHER POSTOFFICE... Digestibility of the Constituents............................................................. 23 Summary and Conclusions.......................................................................29 BLANK PAGE IN ORIGINAL Composition and Digestibility of the Ether...

Fraps, G. S.; Rather, J. B.

1912-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Anaerobic Co-Digestion on Dairies in Washington State  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as food-processing wastes) to increase biogas productivity, improve digester performance, and increase in manure and other feedstock to methane-rich biogas, a source of renewable energy (US-EPA 2006) (Figure 1-EPA 2005; US-EPA 2008). In addition to biogas, AD generates fiber and Figure 1. Overview of anaerobic

Collins, Gary S.

250

How Markets Slowly Digest Changes in Supply and Demand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Transactions 86 2.5.2. Impact of Aggregate Transactions 86 2.5.3. Hidden Order Impact 88 2.5.4. Upstairs Market Impact 90 2.6. Theory of Market Impact 90 2.6.1. Why Is Individual Transaction Impact Concave? 91 2CHAPTER 2 How Markets Slowly Digest Changes in Supply and Demand Jean-Philippe Bouchaud Science

251

Original article Digestion of wheat gluten and potato protein  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Original article Digestion of wheat gluten and potato protein by the preruminant calf%) substituted by a native wheat gluten or a potato protein concentrate, were given to intact or ileo.05) with the potato than with the gluten and control diets (0.90, 0.93 and 0.95, respec- tively). The same trend

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

252

Original article Digestion and fermentation of proteins in rats fed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Original article Digestion and fermentation of proteins in rats fed keratin, albumin, cooked casein) Summary ― Dietary cooked casein promotes colon cancer in rats. We speculated and tested (hydrolysed or not) and bovine serum albumin (oxidized or not) was measured in rats. Protein fermentation

Boyer, Edmond

253

Agricultural Mitigation of Greenhouse Gases: Science and Policy Options  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Agricultural Mitigation of Greenhouse Gases: Science and Policy Options Agricultural Mitigation of Greenhouse Gases: Science and Policy Options Keith Paustian (keithp@nrel.colostate.edu; 970-491-1547) Natural Resource Ecology Laboratory Colorado State University Ft. Collins, CO 80523 Bruce Babcock (babcock@iastate.edu; 515-294-6785) Cathy Kling (ckling@iastate.edu; 515-294-5767) Center for Agriculture and Rural Development Iowa State University Ames, IA 50011-1070 Jerry Hatfield (hatfield@nstl.gov; 515-294-5723) USDA - National Soil Tilth Laboratory Ames, IA 50011 Rattan Lal (lal.1@osu.edu; 614-292-9069) School of Natural Resources The Ohio State University Columbus, OH 43210-1085 Bruce McCarl (mccarl@tamu.edu; 979-845-1706) Department of Agricultural Economics Texas A&M University College Station, TX 77843-2124 Sandy McLaughlin (un4@ornl.gov; 865-574-7358)

254

CO2 Separation from Low-Temperature Flue Gases  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

partners interested in implementing United States Patent Number 7,842,126 entitled "Co 2 Separation from Low-Temperature Flue Gases." Disclosed in this patent are novel methods for processing carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) from combustion gas streams. Researchers at NETL are focused on the development of novel sorbent systems that can effectively remove CO 2 and other gases in an economically feasible manner with limited impact on energy production cost. The current invention will help in reducing greenhouse gas emissions by using an improved, regenerable aqueous amine and soluble potassium carbonate sorbent system. This novel solvent system may be capable of achieving CO 2 capture from larger emission streams at lower overall cost. Overview Sequestration of CO

255

EIA - Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 2009  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Environment Environment Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the U. S. Release Date: March 31, 2011 | Next Release Date: Report Discontinued | Report Number: DOE/EIA-0573(2009) This report-the eighteenth annual report-presents the U.S. Energy Information Administration's latest estimates of emissions for carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and other greenhouse gases. Download the GHG Report Introduction For this report, activity data on coal and natural gas consumption and electricity sales and losses by sector were obtained from the January 2011 Monthly Energy Review (MER). In keeping with current international practice, this report presents data on greenhouse gas emissions in million metric tons carbon dioxide equivalent. The data can be converted to carbon equivalent units by

256

EIA-Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program - Getting Started  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Getting Started Getting Started Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program Getting Started Form EIA-1605 may seem daunting at first, even for entities that have reported under the original program. That's why EIA has developed the Getting Started page to help entities take a systematic approach to reporting their emissions and reductions. The Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program suggests that prospective reporters familiarize themselves with the specific requirements for reporting their entity's inventory and reductions by answering the questions embodied in the 10 steps below. In addition, EIA has prepared the interactive Getting Started tool to help reporters determine what parts of Form EIA-1605 they need to complete. Getting Started Tool Getting Started PDF Tables

257

Transporting & Shipping Hazardous Materials at LBNL: Compressed Gases  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Compressed Gases Compressed Gases Self-Transport by Hand & Foot Self-Transport by Vehicle Ship by Common Carrier Conduct Field Work Return Cylinders Self-Transport by Hand & Foot Staff may personally move (self-transport) compressed gas cylinders by hand & foot between buildings and in connecting spaces (i.e., hallways, elevators, etc.) within buildings provided it can be done safely. The following safety precautions apply: Use standard cylinder dollies to transport compressed gas cylinders. While dollies are preferred, cylinders weighing 11 Kg (25 lbs) or less may be hand-carried. Never move a cylinder with a regulator connected to it. Cylinder valve-protection caps and valve-opening caps must be in place when moving cylinders. Lecture bottles and other cylinders that are

258

Recovery of CO2 from Flue Gases: Commercial Trends  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CO CO 2 from Flue Gases: Commercial Trends Originally presented at the Canadian Society of Chemical Engineers annual meeting October 4-6, 1999, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada Authors: Dan G. Chapel (dan.chapel@fluor.com; 949-349-7530) Carl L. Mariz (carl.mariz@fluor.com; 949-349-7530) FluorDaniel One Fluor Drive Aliso Viejo CA, 92698 John Ernest (john.ernest@minimed.com; 818-576-4293) Advanced Quality Services Inc 11024 Balboa Blvd. PMB154, Granada Hills, CA 91344-5007 1 Recovery of CO 2 from Flue Gases: Commercial Trends Originally presented at the Canadian Society of Chemical Engineers annual meeting October 4-6, 1999, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada Authors: Dan Chapel - Fluor Daniel Inc., Senior Vice President Technology; Oil, Gas & Power John Ernest - Advanced Quality Services Inc., Validation Engineer

259

PPPL wins Department of Energy award for reducing greenhouse gases |  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

PPPL wins Department of Energy award for reducing greenhouse gases PPPL wins Department of Energy award for reducing greenhouse gases By Jeanne Jackson DeVoe October 2, 2012 Tweet Widget Facebook Like Google Plus One PPPL engineer Tim Stevenson checks for possible leaks of sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), the gas used to insulate electronic equipment that has the potential to cause global warming at many times the rate of carbon dioxide. PPPL reduced leaks of SF6 by 65 percent over three years - reducing overall greenhouse gas emissions by 48 percent between 2008 and 2011. (Photo by Elle Starkman/PPPL Office of Communications) PPPL engineer Tim Stevenson checks for possible leaks of sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), the gas used to insulate electronic equipment that has the potential to cause global warming at many times the rate of carbon

260

Reading Comprehension - Properties of Solids, Liquids, and Gases  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Properties of Solids, Liquids, and Gases Properties of Solids, Liquids, and Gases A solid has a definite _________ mass texture volume and a _________ 3D irregular definite shape. The particles in a solid are _________ free to move around motionless packed tightly together . Particles in a solid move by _________ sliding past one another vibrating back and forth slightly jiggling around . _________ Viscosity Amorphous Crystalline solids soften before melting. The particles in this type of solid are not arranged in regular pattern. Amorphous solids _________ do don't have a distinct melting point. Crystalline solids have a _________ distinct color and shape distinct pattern and melting point . Liquids have no _________ volume mass shape of their own. A liquid takes the shape of its container. Without a container liquids spread into a wide,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including digester gases" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

PPPL Wins Department of Energy Award For Reducing Greenhouse Gases |  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Wins Department of Energy Award For Reducing Greenhouse Gases Wins Department of Energy Award For Reducing Greenhouse Gases By Jeanne Jackson DeVoe October 2, 2012 Tweet Widget Facebook Like Google Plus One PPPL's Tim Stevenson takes inventory of the SF6 levels at a power supply tank for NSTX. (Photo by Elle Starkman, PPPL Office of Communications) PPPL's Tim Stevenson takes inventory of the SF6 levels at a power supply tank for NSTX. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) has received a federal Sustainability Award for reducing overall greenhouse gas emissions 48 percent since 2008 - far exceeding the U.S. government's goal of a 28 percent reduction. Members of the PPPL staff were among the 20 recipients of the Sustainability Awards in a ceremony in Washington, D.C., on Thursday, Sept.

262

Apparatus for the plasma destruction of hazardous gases  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A plasma cell for destroying hazardous gases. An electric-discharge cell having an electrically conducting electrode onto which an alternating high-voltage waveform is impressed and a dielectric barrier adjacent thereto, together forming a high-voltage electrode, generates self-terminating discharges throughout a volume formed between this electrode and a grounded conducting liquid electrode. The gas to be transformed is passed through this volume. The liquid may be flowed, generating thereby a renewable surface. Moreover, since hydrochloric and hydrofluoric acids may be formed from destruction of various chlorofluorocarbons in the presence of water, a conducting liquid may be selected which will neutralize these corrosive compounds. The gases exiting the discharge region may be further scrubbed if additional purification is required.

Kang, Michael (Los Alamos, NM)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Apparatus for the plasma destruction of hazardous gases  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A plasma cell for destroying hazardous gases is described. An electric-discharge cell having an electrically conducting electrode onto which an alternating high-voltage waveform is impressed and a dielectric barrier adjacent thereto, together forming a high-voltage electrode, generates self-terminating discharges throughout a volume formed between this electrode and a grounded conducting liquid electrode. The gas to be transformed is passed through this volume. The liquid may be flowed, generating thereby a renewable surface. Moreover, since hydrochloric and hydrofluoric acids may be formed from destruction of various chlorofluorocarbons in the presence of water, a conducting liquid may be selected which will neutralize these corrosive compounds. The gases exiting the discharge region may be further scrubbed if additional purification is required. 4 figs.

Kang, M.

1995-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

264

Decontamination of combustion gases in fluidized bed incinerators  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Sulfur-containing atmospheric pollutants are effectively removed from exit gas streams produced in a fluidized bed combustion system by providing a fluidized bed of particulate material, i.e. limestone and/or dolomite wherein a concentration gradient is maintained in the vertical direction. Countercurrent contacting between upwardly directed sulfur containing combustion gases and descending sorbent particulate material creates a concentration gradient across the vertical extent of the bed characterized in progressively decreasing concentration of sulfur, sulfur dioxide and like contaminants upwardly and decreasing concentration of e.g. calcium oxide, downwardly. In this manner, gases having progressively decreasing sulfur contents contact correspondingly atmospheres having progressively increasing concentrations of calcium oxide thus assuring optimum sulfur removal.

Leon, Albert M. (Mamaroneck, NY)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Reduction of greenhouse gases using renewable energies in Mexico 2025  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study presents three scenarios relating to the environmental futures of Mexico up to the year 2025. The first scenario emphasizes the use of oil products, particularly fueloil, and represents the energy policy path that was in effect until 1990. The second scenario prioritizes the use of natural gas, reflecting the energy consumption pattern that arose in the mid-1990s as a result of reforms in the energy sector. In the third scenario, the high participation of renewable sources of energy, in particular renewable hydrogen, is considered feasible from a technical and economic point of view. The three scenarios are evaluated up to the year 2025 in terms of greenhouse gases (GHG), acid rain precursor gases (ARPG), and environmentenergy intensity factors.

F Manzini; J Islas; M Mart??nez

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Evaluacin de la generacin de gases de efecto invernadero asociados al ciclo de vida de los biocombustibles colombianos = Assessment of greenhouse gases emissions associated to colombian biofuels lifecycle.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Valencia Botero, Monica Julieth (2012) Evaluacin de la generacin de gases de efecto invernadero asociados al ciclo de vida de los biocombustibles colombianos = Assessment (more)

Valencia Botero, Monica Julieth

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Extraction of uranium from spent fuels using liquefied gases  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For reprocessing of spent nuclear fuels, a novel method to extract actinides from spent fuel using highly compressed gases, nitrogen dioxide and carbon dioxide was proposed. As a fundamental study, the nitrate conversion with liquefied nitrogen dioxide and the nitrate extraction with supercritical carbon dioxide were demonstrated by using uranium dioxide powder, uranyl nitrate and tri-n-butylphosphate complex in the present study. (authors)

Sawada, Kayo; Hirabayashi, Daisuke; Enokida, Youichi [EcoTopia Science Institute, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, 464-8603 (Japan)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Performance Demonstration Program Plan for Analysis of Simulated Headspace Gases  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Performance Demonstration Program (PDP) for headspace gases distributes sample gases of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) for analysis. Participating measurement facilities (i.e., fixed laboratories, mobile analysis systems, and on-line analytical systems) are located across the United States. Each sample distribution is termed a PDP cycle. These evaluation cycles provide an objective measure of the reliability of measurements performed for transuranic (TRU) waste characterization. The primary documents governing the conduct of the PDP are the Quality Assurance Program Document (QAPD) (DOE/CBFO-94-1012) and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Waste Analysis Plan (WAP) contained in the Hazardous Waste Facility Permit (NM4890139088-TSDF) issued by the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED). The WAP requires participation in the PDP; the PDP must comply with the QAPD and the WAP. This plan implements the general requirements of the QAPD and the applicable requirements of the WAP for the Headspace Gas (HSG) PDP. Participating measurement facilities analyze blind audit samples of simulated TRU waste package headspace gases according to the criteria set by this PDP Plan. Blind audit samples (hereafter referred to as PDP samples) are used as an independent means to assess each measurement facilitys compliance with the WAP quality assurance objectives (QAOs). To the extent possible, the concentrations of VOC analytes in the PDP samples encompass the range of concentrations anticipated in actual TRU waste package headspace gas samples. Analyses of headspace gases are required by the WIPP to demonstrate compliance with regulatory requirements. These analyses must be performed by measurement facilities that have demonstrated acceptable performance in this PDP. These analyses are referred to as WIPP analyses and the TRU waste package headspace gas samples on which they are performed are referred to as WIPP samples in this document. Participating measurement facilities must analyze PDP samples using the same procedures used for routine waste characterization analyses of WIPP samples.

Carlsbad Field Office

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Analysis of greenhouse gases trading system using conversations among stakeholders  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction agreement makes up the targeted reduction of a legally binding GHG for each country or region. It enables us to buy and sell some GHG with other countries; it is the GHG trading system. But now, some free riders, ... Keywords: GHG emissions, GHG trading systems, MAS, agent-based modelling, agent-based systems, consumer behaviour, emissions reduction, free riders, genetic algorithms, global warming, greenhouse gases, multi-agent simulation, multi-agent systems

Setsuya Kurahashi; Masato Ohori

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Chemical production from industrial by-product gases: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The potential for conservation of natural gas is studied and the technical and economic feasibility and the implementation of ventures to produce such chemicals using carbon monoxide and hydrogen from byproduct gases are determined. A survey was performed of potential chemical products and byproduct gas sources. Byproduct gases from the elemental phosphorus and the iron and steel industries were selected for detailed study. Gas sampling, preliminary design, market surveys, and economic analyses were performed for specific sources in the selected industries. The study showed that production of methanol or ammonia from byproduct gas at the sites studied in the elemental phosphorus and the iron and steel industries is technically feasible but not economically viable under current conditions. Several other applications are identified as having the potential for better economics. The survey performed identified a need for an improved method of recovering carbon monoxide from dilute gases. A modest experimental program was directed toward the development of a permselective membrane to fulfill that need. A practical membrane was not developed but further investigation along the same lines is recommended. (MCW)

Lyke, S.E.; Moore, R.H.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Production of quantum degenerate strontium gases: Larger, better, faster, colder  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report on an improved scheme to generate Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) and degenerate Fermi gases of strontium. This scheme allows us to create quantum gases with higher atom number, a shorter time of the experimental cycle, or deeper quantum degeneracy than before. We create a BEC of 84-Sr exceeding 10^7 atoms, which is a 30-fold improvement over previously reported experiments. We increase the atom number of 86-Sr BECs to 2.5x10^4 (a fivefold improvement), and refine the generation of attractively interacting 88-Sr BECs. We present a scheme to generate 84-Sr BECs with a cycle time of 2s, which, to the best of our knowledge, is the shortest cycle time of BEC experiments ever reported. We create deeply-degenerate 87-Sr Fermi gases with T/T_F as low as 0.10(1), where the number of populated nuclear spin states can be set to any value between one and ten. Furthermore, we report on a total of five different double-degenerate Bose-Bose and Bose-Fermi mixtures. These studies prepare an excellent starting poi...

Stellmer, Simon; Schreck, Florian

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

EIA-Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program - What's New  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Environment > Voluntary Reporting Program > What's New Environment > Voluntary Reporting Program > What's New Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program What's New Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program Suspended May 2011 The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases ("1605(b)") Program has been suspended. The suspension is due to recent reductions in budget appropriations and is effective immediately. Survey respondents may still submit data to the 1605(b) Program using the program's Workbook Form via EIA's Secure File Transfer mechanism. However, EIA will not be able to process and review submitted data or offer respondent support on the submitted data. Should a respondant submit data under the current collection cycle to EIA, the data will be retained in our electronic records. If the 1605(b) Program resumes normal operations, your submitted data will be reviewed and processed at that time. You will be notified in the future if the 1605(b) Program resumes normal operation. If you have any questions, please contact the survey manager, Paul McArdle, at paul.mcardle@eia.gov

273

DNA digestion protocol & hints Overview: Although it is pretty standard to digest DNA with restriction enzymes, here  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with restriction enzymes, here are a standardized protocol and some hints... References: *Current protocols · restriction enzyme · DNA loading buffer · Agarose gel 0.8% (or different depending on expected band sizes.1 to 4 µg 10x Digestion buffer 2 µl 5 µl Enzyme ? ? Water Rest of volume Rest of volume 2. Add the enzyme

Doering, Tamara

274

Use of PC-SAFT for Global Phase Diagrams in Binary Mixtures Relevant to Natural Gases. 2. n-Alkane + Other Hydrocarbons  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Use of PC-SAFT for Global Phase Diagrams in Binary Mixtures Relevant to Natural Gases. ... In this work, we extend the previously reported study of global phase diagrams in binary mixtures relevant for the description of natural gases using the perturbed-chain statistical associating fluid theory (PC-SAFT) model to systems containing n-alkanes + other nonlinear hydrocarbons. ... The PC-SAFT model usually describes properly the previously reported n-alkane + n-alkane binary mixtures, including their varied and complex phase behavior. ...

Santiago Aparicio-Martnez; Kenneth R. Hall

2006-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

275

PHASE BEHAVIOR OF LIGHT GASES IN HYDROGEN AND AQUEOUS SOLVENTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under previous support from the US Department of Energy, an experimental facility has been established and operated to measure valuable vapor-liquid equilibrium data for systems of interest in the production and processing of coal fluids. To facilitate the development and testing of models for prediction of the phase behavior for such systems, we have acquired substantial amounts of data on the equilibrium phase compositions for binary mixtures of heavy hydrocarbon solvents with a variety of supercritical solutes, including hydrogen, methane, ethane, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide. The present project focuses on measuring the phase behavior of light gases and water in Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) type solvents at conditions encountered in indirect liquefaction processes and evaluating and developing theoretically-based correlating frameworks to predict the phase behavior of such systems. Specific goals of the proposed work include (a) developing a state-of-the-art experimental facility to permit highly accurate measurements of equilibrium phase compositions (solubilities) of challenging F-T systems, (b) measuring these properties for systematically-selected binary, ternary and molten F-T wax mixtures to provide critically needed input data for correlation development, (c) developing and testing models suitable for describing the phase behavior of such mixtures, and (d) presenting the modeling results in generalized, practical formats suitable for use in process engineering calculations. During the present reporting period, the solubilities of hydrogen in n-hexane, carbon monoxide in cyclohexane, and nitrogen in phenanthrene and pyrene were measured using a static equilibrium cell over the temperature range from 344.3 to 433.2 K and pressures to 22.8 MPa. The uncertainty in these new solubility measurements is estimated to be less than 0.001 in mole fraction. The data were analyzed using the Peng-Robinson (PR) equation of state (EOS). In general, the PR EOS represents the experimental data well when a single interaction parameter (C{sub ij}) is used for each isotherm. In addition, the predictive capability of the modified Park-Gasem-Robinson (PGR) equation of state (EOS) was evaluated for selected carbon dioxide + normal paraffins, ethane + normal paraffins, and hydrogen + normal paraffins. A set of mixing rules was proposed for the modified EOS to extend its predictive capabilities to mixtures. The predicted bubble point pressures for the ethane + n-paraffin and carbon dioxide + n-paraffin binaries were compared to those of the Peng-Robinson (PR), simplified-perturbed-hard-chain theory (SPHCT) and original PGR equations. The predictive capability of the proposed equation is better or comparable to the PR, SPHCT and original PGR equations of state for the ethane binaries (%AAD of 1.9) and carbon dioxide binaries (%AAD of 2.0). For the hydrogen binaries, the modified PGR EOS showed much better performance (%AAD of 1.7) than the original PGR equation and comparable to the PR equation.

KHALED A.M. GASEM; ROBERT L. ROBINSON, JR.

1999-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

276

Phase Behavior of Light Gases in Hydrocarbon and Aqueous Solvents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under previous support from the Department of Energy, an experimental facility has been established and operated to measure valuable vapor-liquid equilibrium data for systems of interest in the production and processing of coal fluids. To facilitate the development and testing of models for prediction of the phase behavior for such systems, we have acquired substantial amounts of data on the equilibrium phase compositions for binary mixtures of heavy hydrocarbon solvents with a variety of supercritical solutes, including hydrogen, methane, ethane, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide. The present project focuses on measuring the phase behavior of light gases and water in Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) type solvents at conditions encountered in indirect liquefaction processes and evaluating and developing theoretically-based correlating frameworks to predict the phase behavior of such systems. Specific goals of the proposed work include (a) developing a state-of-the-art experimental facility to permit highly accurate measurements of equilibrium phase compositions (solubilities) of challenging F-T systems, (b) measuring these properties for systematically-selected binary, ternary and molten F-T wax mixtures to provide critically needed input data for correlation development, (c) developing and testing models suitable for describing the phase behavior of such mixtures, and (d) presenting the modeling results in generalized, practical formats suitable for use in process engineering calculations. During the present reporting period, our solubility apparatus was refurbished and restored to full service. To test the experimental apparatus and procedures used, measurements were obtained for the solubility Of C0{sub 2} in benzene at 160{degrees}F. Having confirmed the accuracy of the newly acquired data in comparison with our previous measurements and data reported in the literature for this test system, we have begun to measure the solubility of hydrogen in hexane. The measurements for this system will cover the temperature range from 160 to 280{degrees}F at pressures to 2,500 psia. As part of our model evaluation efforts, we examined the predictive abilities of an alternative approach we have proposed for calculating the phase behavior properties of highly non-ideal systems. Using this approach, the liquid phase fugacities generated from an equation of state (EOS) are augmented by a fugacity deviation function correction. The correlative abilities of this approach are compared with those of an EOS equipped with the recently introduced Wong-Sandler (MWS) mixing rules. These two approaches are compared with the current methods for vapor-liquid equilibrium (VLE) calculations, i.e., the EOS (0/0) approach with the van der Waals mixing rules and the split (y/0) approach. The evaluations were conducted on a database comprised of non-ideal low pressure binary systems as well as asymmetric high pressure binary systems. These systems are of interest in the coal liquefaction and utilization processes. The Peng-Robinson EOS was selected for the purposes of this evaluation.

Gasem, K.A.M.; Robinson, R.L., Jr.; Trvedi, N.J., Gao, W.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Greenhouse gases, climate change and the transition from coal to low-carbon electricity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A transition from the global system of coal-based electricity generation to low-greenhouse-gas-emission energy technologies is required to mitigate climate change in the long term. The use of current infrastructure to build this new low-emission system necessitates additional emissions of greenhouse gases, and the coal-based infrastructure will continue to emit substantial amounts of greenhouse gases as it is phased out. Furthermore, ocean thermal inertia delays the climate benefits of emissions reductions. By constructing a quantitative model of energy system transitions that includes life-cycle emissions and the central physics of greenhouse warming, we estimate the global warming expected to occur as a result of build-outs of new energy technologies ranging from 100GWe to 10TWe in size and 1100yr in duration. We show that rapid deployment of low-emission energy systems can do little to diminish the climate impacts in the first half of this century. Conservation, wind, solar, nuclear power, and possibly carbon capture and storage appear to be able to achieve substantial climate benefits in the second half of this century; however, natural gas cannot.

N P Myhrvold; K Caldeira

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

High pressure/high temperature vapor liquid equilibrium study of light gases in hydrogen-coal liquid model compound systems using perturbation chromatography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Perturbation chromatography or gas-liquid partition chromatography (GLPC) provides a powerful tool for making physicochemical measurements. In this investigation GLPC was applied to study the vapor-liquid equilibrium behavior of light gases in nonvolatile coal liquid model compound solvents at high temperatures and high pressures. Improvements made in existing GLPC techniques include: the use of a high pressure tandem proportioning pump to give precise control of the carrier gas flow rate and low pressure drops; a high pressure ionization chamber to detect the injection of very dilute radioactive sample gases; and the use of a microcomputer to provide instantaneous integration and very precise retention times of the chromatographic peaks. Infinite dilution K-values for methane, ethane, propane, n-butane, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen sulfide in hydrogen-dibenzofuran systems were obtained at 100 and 125 C and up to 800 psia. Infinite dilution K-values for the same light gases in hydrogen-9-methylanthracene systems were obtained at 100, 125, 150, 175, and 200 C and up to 3000 psia. Henry's constants were determined for the light gases in 9-methylanthracene. Second cross virial coefficients and vapor phase infinite dilution fugacity coefficients were calculated for methane, ethane, propane, and n-butane in hydrogen. These results were combined with the experimental K-value measurements to obtain Henry's constants in hydrogen-9-methylanthracene mixtures of fixed liquid compositions. Infinite dilution heats of solution of the solute gases in the mixtures were calculated.

Kragas, T.K.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

April 16, 2013 Webinar: Community-Scale Anaerobic Digesters | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

April 16, 2013 Webinar: Community-Scale Anaerobic Digesters April 16, 2013 Webinar: Community-Scale Anaerobic Digesters April 16, 2013 Webinar: Community-Scale Anaerobic Digesters This webinar was held April 16, 2013, and provided information on San Jose, California's, commercial-scale, high solids dry fermentation anaerobic digestion system, and the Forest County Potawatomi Community's (FCPC) anaerobic digester project. Download the presentations below, watch the webinar (WMV 125 MB), or view the text version. Find more CommRE webinars. Implementing Anaerobic Digestion in San Jose's Integrated Processing Infrastructure This presentation provided background on San Jose, California's, leading-edge program using the nation's first commercial-scale, high solids dry fermentation anaerobic digestion system to process commercial organics

280

Digest of United States Practice in International Law 2002 | Data.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2 2 Research Menu Data/Tools Apps Resources Let's Talk Research Alpha You are here Data.gov » Communities » Research » Data Digest of United States Practice in International Law 2002 Dataset Summary Description The Office of the Legal Adviser publishes the annual Digest of United States Practice in International Law to provide the public with a historical record of the views and practice of the Government of the United States in public and private international law. "In his introduction to the 2002 volume, then Legal Adviser William H. Taft IV stated in part: "Calendar year 2002 gave rise to a broad range of significant and sometimes novel issues of international law. Many developments again highlighted the need to protect our national security against a different kind of enemy through the use of force in self-defense, non-proliferation and arms control efforts, the detention of unlawful enemy combatants and establishment of military commissions, continued counter-terrorism efforts, the imposition of sanctions, and the freezing of governmental assets, sometimes made available for payment of claims by individuals against terrorist states. At the same time, there were notable developments in non-confrontational contexts, including the fields of human rights, trade and investment, law of the sea, international claims and state responsibility, treaty practice, and international crime. . . ."

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including digester gases" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Flux analysis of the human proximal colon using anaerobic digestion model 1  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The colon can be regarded as an anaerobic digestive compartment within the gastro intestinal tract (GIT). An in silico model simulating the fluxes in the human proximal colon was developed on basis of the anaerobic digestion model 1 (ADM1), which is traditionally used to model waste conversion to biogas. Model calibration was conducted using data from invitro fermentation of the proximal colon (TIM-2), and, amongst others, supplemented with the bio kinetics of prebiotic galactooligosaccharides (GOS) fermentation. The impact of water and solutes absorption by the host was also included. Hydrolysis constants of carbohydrates and proteins were estimated based on total short chain fatty acids (SCFA) and ammonia production invitro. Model validation was established using an independent dataset of a different invitro model: an invitro three-stage continuous culture system. The in silico model was shown to provide quantitative insight in the microbial community structure in terms of functional groups, and the substrate and product fluxes between these groups as well as the host, as a function of the substrate composition, pH and the solids residence time (SRT). The model confirms the experimental observation that methanogens are washed out at low pH or low SRT-values. The in silico model is proposed as useful tool in the design of experimental setups for invitro experiments by giving insight in fermentation processes in the proximal human colon.

Anne Marieke Motelica-Wagenaar; Arjen Nauta; Ellen G.H.M. van den Heuvel; Robbert Kleerebezem

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Composition, Digestibility and Energy Values of Some Human Foods.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Almond 13 Pumpkin Brnzil nuts 19 Turnip roots Chestnut Coconut 2 1 Fruits Peanut 11 Apples Pecans 17 Prunes Walnut, English 13 Dates Vegetables 1"gs Grapes Potato, white Potato, sweet Mustard nreens Spinach Chard leaves & e Turnip greens...-free extract in some foods (21). COMPOSITION. DIGESTIBILITY AND ENERGY OF SOME HUMAN FOODS 7 The protein in many human foods consists almost entirely of proteids but green vegetables and fruits contain appreciable percentages of non- proteids...

Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

1946-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Performance Demonstration Program Plan for Analysis of Simulated Headspace Gases  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Performance Demonstration Program (PDP) for headspace gases distributes blind audit samples in a gas matrix for analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Participating measurement facilities (i.e., fixed laboratories, mobile analysis systems, and on-line analytical systems) are located across the United States. Each sample distribution is termed a PDP cycle. These evaluation cycles provide an objective measure of the reliability of measurements performed for transuranic (TRU) waste characterization. The primary documents governing the conduct of the PDP are the Quality Assurance Program Document (QAPD) (DOE/CBFO-94-1012) and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Waste Analysis Plan (WAP) contained in the Hazardous Waste Facility Permit (NM4890139088-TSDF) issued by the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED). The WAP requires participation in the PDP; the PDP must comply with the QAPD and the WAP. This plan implements the general requirements of the QAPD and the applicable requirements of the WAP for the Headspace Gas (HSG) PDP. Participating measurement facilities analyze blind audit samples of simulated TRU waste package headspace gases according to the criteria set by this PDP Plan. Blind audit samples (hereafter referred to as PDP samples) are used as an independent means to assess each measurement facilitys compliance with the WAP quality assurance objectives (QAOs). To the extent possible, the concentrations of VOC analytes in the PDP samples encompass the range of concentrations anticipated in actual TRU waste package headspace gas samples. Analyses of headspace gases are required by the WIPP to demonstrate compliance with regulatory requirements. These analyses must be performed by measurement facilities that have demonstrated acceptable performance in this PDP. These analyses are referred to as WIPP analyses and the TRU waste package headspace gas samples on which they are performed are referred to as WIPP samples in this document. Participating measurement facilities must analyze PDP samples using the same procedures used for routine waste characterization analyses of WIPP samples.

Carlsbad Field Office

2007-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

284

Performance Demonstration Program Plan for Analysis of Simulated Headspace Gases  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Performance Demonstration Program (PDP) for headspace gases distributes blind audit samples in a gas matrix for analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Participating measurement facilities (i.e., fixed laboratories, mobile analysis systems, and on-line analytical systems) are located across the United States. Each sample distribution is termed a PDP cycle. These evaluation cycles provide an objective measure of the reliability of measurements performed for transuranic (TRU) waste characterization. The primary documents governing the conduct of the PDP are the Quality Assurance Program Document (QAPD) (DOE/CBFO-94-1012) and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Waste Analysis Plan (WAP) contained in the Hazardous Waste Facility Permit (NM4890139088-TSDF) issued by the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED). The WAP requires participation in the PDP; the PDP must comply with the QAPD and the WAP. This plan implements the general requirements of the QAPD and the applicable requirements of the WAP for the Headspace Gas (HSG) PDP. Participating measurement facilities analyze blind audit samples of simulated TRU waste package headspace gases according to the criteria set by this PDP Plan. Blind audit samples (hereafter referred to as PDP samples) are used as an independent means to assess each measurement facilitys compliance with the WAP quality assurance objectives (QAOs). To the extent possible, the concentrations of VOC analytes in the PDP samples encompass the range of concentrations anticipated in actual TRU waste package headspace gas samples. Analyses of headspace gases are required by the WIPP to demonstrate compliance with regulatory requirements. These analyses must be performed by measurement facilities that have demonstrated acceptable performance in this PDP. These analyses are referred to as WIPP analyses and the TRU waste package headspace gas samples on which they are performed are referred to as WIPP samples in this document. Participating measurement facilities must analyze PDP samples using the same procedures used for routine waste characterization analyses of WIPP samples.

Carlsbad Field Office

2007-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

285

EIA-Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program - Reporting Guidelines  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Reporting Guidelines Reporting Guidelines Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program Reporting Guidelines The purpose of the guidelines is to establish the procedures and requirements for filing voluntary reports, and to ensure that the annual reports of greenhouse gas emissions, emission reductions, and sequestration activities submitted by corporations, government agencies, non-profit organizations, households, and other private and public entities to submit are complete, reliable, and consistent. Over time, it is anticipated that these reports will provide a reliable record of the contributions reporting entities have made toward reducing their greenhouse gas emissions. General Guidelines General Guidelines Technical Guidelines Technical Guidelines Appendices to the Technical Guidelines:

286

Prospecting by sampling and analysis of airborne particulates and gases  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is claimed for prospecting by sampling airborne particulates or gases at a ground position and recording wind direction values at the time of sampling. The samples are subsequently analyzed to determine the concentrations of a desired material or the ratios of the desired material to other identifiable materials in the collected samples. By comparing the measured concentrations or ratios to expected background data in the vicinity sampled, one can select recorded wind directions indicative of the upwind position of the land-based source of the desired material.

Sehmel, G.A.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Coherence Length of Cold Exciton Gases in Coupled Quantum Wells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A Mach-Zehnder interferometer with spatial and spectral resolution was used to probe spontaneous coherence in cold exciton gases, which are implemented experimentally in the ring of indirect excitons in coupled quantum wells. A strong enhancement of the exciton coherence length is observed at temperatures below a few Kelvin. The increase of the coherence length is correlated with the macroscopic spatial ordering of excitons. The coherence length at the lowest temperature corresponds to a very narrow spread of the exciton momentum distribution, much smaller than that for a classical exciton gas.

Sen Yang, A. T. Hammack, M. M. Fogler, L. V. Butov, and A. C. Gossard

2006-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

288

Zero sound modes of dilute Fermi gases with arbitrary spin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Motivated by the recent success of optical trapping of alkali-metal bosons, we have studied the zero sound modes of dilute Fermi gases with arbitrary spin-f, which are spin-S excitations (0<~S<~2f). The dispersion of the mode (S) depends on a single Landau parameter F(S), which is related to the scattering lengths of the system through a simple formula. Measurement of (even a subset of) these modes in finite magnetic fields will enable one to determine all the interaction parameters of the system.

S.-K. Yip and Tin-Lun Ho

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Optical Kerr and Cotton-Mouton effects in atomic gases: a quantum-statistical study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Theory of the birefringence of the refractive index in atomic diamagnetic dilute gases in the presence of static electric (optical Kerr effect) and magnetic (Cotton-Mouton effect) fields is formulated. Quantum-statistical expressions for the second Kerr and Cotton-Mouton virial coefficients, valid both in the low and high temperature regimes, are derived. It is shown that both virial coefficients can rigorously be related to the difference of the fourth derivatives of the thermodynamic (pressure) virial coefficient with respect to the strength of the non-resonant optical fields with parallel and perpendicular polarizations and with respect to the external static (electric or magnetic) field. Semiclassical expansions of the Kerr and Cotton-Mouton coefficients are also considered, and quantum corrections up to and including the second order are derived. Calculations of the second Kerr and Cotton-Mouton virial coefficients of the helium-4 gas at various temperatures are reported. The role of the quantum-mechanic...

Skomorowski, Wojciech

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Process for coal liquefaction by separation of entrained gases from slurry exiting staged dissolvers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

There is described an improved liquefaction process by which coal is converted to a low ash and low sulfur carbonaceous material that can be used as a fuel in an environmentally acceptable manner without costly gas scrubbing equipment. In the process, coal is slurried with a solvent, passed through a preheater and at least two dissolvers in series in the presence of hydrogen-rich gases at elevated temperatures and pressures. Solids, including mineral ash and unconverted coal macerals are separated from the condensed dissolver effluent. In accordance with the improved process, fresh hydrogen is fed to each dissolver and the entrained gas from each dissolver is separated from the slurry phase and removed from the reactor system before the condensed phase is passed to the next dissolver in the series. In accordance with another process, the feeds to the dissolvers are such that the top of each downstream dissolver is used as a gas-liquid separator.

Givens, Edwin N. (Bethlehem, PA); Ying, David H. S. (Macungie, PA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

An Accelerated Multiboson Algorithm for Coulomb Gases with Dynamical Dielectric Effects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A recent reformulation [1] of the problem of Coulomb gases in the presence of a dynamical dielectric medium showed that finite temperature simulations of such systems can be accomplished on the basis of completely local Hamiltonians on a spatial lattice by including additional bosonic fields. For large systems, the Monte Carlo algorithm proposed in Ref. [1] becomes inefficient due to a low acceptance rate for particle moves in a fixed background multiboson field. We show here how this problem can be circumvented by use of a coupled particle-multiboson update procedure that improves acceptance rates on large lattices by orders of magnitude. The method is tested on a one-component plasma with neutral dielectric particles for a variety of system sizes.

A. Duncan; R. D. Sedgewick

2006-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

292

Instantaneous and efficient surface wave excitation of a low pressure gas or gases  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for instantaneously ionizing and continuously delivering energy in the form of surface waves to a low pressure gas or mixture of low pressure gases, comprising a source of rf energy, a discharge container, (such as a fluorescent lamp discharge tube), an rf shield, and a coupling device responsive to rf energy from the source to couple rf energy directly and efficiently to the gas or mixture of gases to ionize at least a portion of the gas or gases and to provide energy to the gas or gases in the form of surface waves. The majority of the rf power is transferred to the gas or gases near the inner surface of the discharge container to efficiently transfer rf energy as excitation energy for at least one of the gases. The most important use of the invention is to provide more efficient fluorescent and/or ultraviolet lamps.

Levy, Donald J. (Berkeley, CA); Berman, Samuel M. (San Francisco, CA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Illinois Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1992 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1993 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1994 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1995 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1996 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

294

Colorado Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Colorado Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Colorado Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 - - - - - - - - - - - - 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2008 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2011 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA

295

Colorado Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Colorado Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Colorado Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 - - - - - - - - - - - - 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2008 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2011 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA

296

A model of anaerobic digestion for biogas production using Abel equations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider a nonlinear mathematical model for the study of anaerobic digestion processes. We decompose the original system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations into subsystems. For these subsystems we prove existence of lower and upper solutions in reverse order for one of the va\\-ria\\-bles. The upper and lower solutions are constructed in analytical form. Furthermore, the upper solutions of subsystem for feeding bacteria are related with solutions of Abel equations of the first kind. Using numerical and theoretical arguments we examine how to obtain upper and lower solutions approximated to the numerical solution of the system. In this work we establish special techniques of lower-upper solution, which includes reverse order for non monotone systems, in contrast to the techniques used by H.L. Smith and P. Waltman on their monograph.

Primitivo B. Acosta-Humnez; Maximiliano Machado-Higuera; Alexander V. Sinitsyn

2014-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

297

Synthetic Lorentz force in classical atomic gases via Doppler effect and radiation pressure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We theoretically predict a novel type of synthetic Lorentz force for classical (cold) atomic gases, which is based on the Doppler effect and radiation pressure. A fairly uniform and strong force can be constructed for gases in macroscopic volumes of several cubic millimeters and more. This opens the possibility to mimic classical charged gases in magnetic fields, such as those in a tokamak, in cold atom experiments.

Dub?ek, T; Juki?, D; Aumiler, D; Ban, T; Buljan, H

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

E-Print Network 3.0 - automobile exhaust gases Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

exhaust gases Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Ability of Catalytic Converters to Reduce Air Pollution Summary: Air Pollution MEASUREMENT OF SELECTED AIR POLLUTANTS IN CAR EXHAUST...

299

E-Print Network 3.0 - aircraft exhaust gases Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

gases FAA, 2005. Water in the aircraft exhaust at altitude may have a greenhouse effect... . Aircraft ... Source: Ecole Polytechnique, Centre de mathmatiques...

300

Fact #825: June 16, 2014 Tier 3 Non-Methane Organic Gases Plus...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

organic gases (NMOG) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) that new light vehicles with gasoline engines are allowed to produce for model years 2017 to 2025. These standards apply to...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including digester gases" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Utilisation digestive de rations riches en lignines chez le lapin en croissance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Utilisation digestive de rations riches en lignines chez le lapin en croissance: mesures de flux et digestion de la ration sont mal connus chez le lapin. L'effet de hautes teneurs en lignines sur la digestion), caractérisé essentiellement par sa teneur variable en lignines VAN SOEST: 7,4 (lot B) ; 12,8 (lot M) et 16,0 p

Boyer, Edmond

302

Growth performance, voluntary intake and nutrient digestibility in horses grazing Bermudagrass pastures and fed Bermudagrass hay  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Intake of Forages Digestibility of Cell-Wall Constituents Digestibility of Crude Protein in Forages Digestibility of Gross Energy in Forages Relationships Between Availability of Forage and Animal Production Relationships Between Forage IIuality... of growth to reach mature size, which places an importance on maximum production per animal. Research conducted with ruminants has utilized regression analyses to describe the relationship between average daily gain and stocking rate. Peterson et al...

Aiken, Glen Eris

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

303

Greenhouse Gas Emission Reductions from Domestic Anaerobic Digesters Linked with Sustainable Sanitation in Rural China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Greenhouse Gas Emission Reductions from Domestic Anaerobic Digesters Linked with Sustainable Sanitation in Rural China ... (3) A key technology that may permit a switch from solid fuels to cleaner gaseous fuels in rural China is anaerobic digestion, where organic human and animal wastes are digested under anaerobic conditions generating biogas, composed primarily of methane (CH4), which can be sequestered and burned for cooking, heating, and lighting. ...

Radhika Dhingra; Erick R. Christensen; Yang Liu; Bo Zhong; Chang-Fu Wu; Michael G. Yost; Justin V. Remais

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

304

Emissions of trace gases and aerosols during the open combustion of biomass  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Emissions of trace gases and aerosols during the open combustion of biomass Emissions of trace gases and aerosols during the open combustion of biomass in the laboratory Title Emissions of trace gases and aerosols during the open combustion of biomass in the laboratory Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2009 Authors McMeeking, Gavin R., Sonia M. Kreidenweis, Stephen Baker, Christian M. Carrico, Judith C. Chow, Jeffrey Collett L. Jr., Wei Min Hao, Amanda S. Holden, Thomas W. Kirchstetter, William C. Malm, Hans Moosmuller, Amy P. Sullivan, and Cyle E. Wold Journal Journal of Geophysical Research Volume 114 Abstract We characterized the gas- and speciated aerosol-phase emissions from the open combustion of 33 different plant species during a series of 255 controlled laboratory burns during the Fire Laboratory at Missoula Experiments (FLAME). The plant species we tested were chosen to improve the existing database for U.S. domestic fuels: laboratory-based emission factors have not previously been reported for many commonly burned species that are frequently consumed by fires near populated regions and protected scenic areas. The plants we tested included the chaparral species chamise, manzanita, and ceanothus, and species common to the southeastern United States (common reed, hickory, kudzu, needlegrass rush, rhododendron, cord grass, sawgrass, titi, and wax myrtle). Fire-integrated emission factors for gas-phase CO2, CO, CH4, C2-4 hydrocarbons, NH3, SO2, NO, NO2, HNO3, and particle-phase organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon (EC), SO4 2, NO3, Cl, Na+, K+, and NH4 + generally varied with both fuel type and with the fire-integrated modified combustion efficiency (MCE), a measure of the relative importance of flaming- and smoldering-phase combustion to the total emissions during the burn. Chaparral fuels tended to emit less particulate OC per unit mass of dry fuel than did other fuel types, whereas southeastern species had some of the largest observed emission factors for total fine particulate matter. Our measurements spanned a larger range of MCE than prior studies, and thus help to improve estimates of the variation of emissions with combustion conditions for individual fuels.

305

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic digestion concept Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to methane. The anaerobic digestion consortium was introduced to high... M, and a biogas composition of 55%-60% methane. INTRODUCTION Economic evaluations of ... Source:...

306

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic digestion program Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Resources which provide more detailed infor- mation on anaerobic digesters are listed. Biogas... on the source of the organic matter and the management ... Source: Liskiewicz,...

307

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic closed digester Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to methane. The anaerobic digestion consortium was introduced to high... M, and a biogas composition of 55%-60% methane. INTRODUCTION Economic evaluations of ... Source:...

308

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerobic digestion Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Council (WTERT) Collection: Renewable Energy 8 www.manuremanagement.cornell.edu Biogas Casebook Summary: Riverhead, NY 11901 Corwin Duck FarmCorwin Duck Farm Digester type...

309

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobically digested sludge Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Resources which provide more detailed infor- mation on anaerobic digesters are listed. Biogas... on the source of the organic ... Source: Liskiewicz, Maciej - Institut fr...

310

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic digestion role Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Implementation of Summary: ;12;Abstract Anaerobic digestion of dairy manure produces biogas that can be captured and used for fuel while... offering environmental benefits. Dairy...

311

E-Print Network 3.0 - autothermal aerobic digestion Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Council (WTERT) Collection: Renewable Energy 12 www.manuremanagement.cornell.edu Biogas Casebook Summary: Riverhead, NY 11901 Corwin Duck FarmCorwin Duck Farm Digester type...

312

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic digester sludge Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Resources which provide more detailed infor- mation on anaerobic digesters are listed. Biogas... on the source of the organic ... Source: Liskiewicz, Maciej - Institut fr...

313

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerobic digestion atad Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Council (WTERT) Collection: Renewable Energy 11 www.manuremanagement.cornell.edu Biogas Casebook Summary: Riverhead, NY 11901 Corwin Duck FarmCorwin Duck Farm Digester type...

314

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobically digested municipal Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

This publication provides a general overview of anaero- Summary: . Scrubbing the biogas with iron-impregnated wood chips has been used in anaerobic digesters in municipal......

315

A Design-Builder's Perspective: Anaerobic Digestion, Forest County Potawatomi Community- A Case Study  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

Presented by Jason Rieth, Industrial Construction Executive at Miron Construction at the April 16, 2013, Community-Scale Anaerobic Digesters CommRE Webinar.

316

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerobic digestion process Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Technologies ; Environmental Sciences and Ecology 9 www.manuremanagement.cornell.edu Biogas Casebook Summary: of gas handling equipment for an anaerobic digester system....

317

Treatment program of organic matter by anaerobic digestion and composting (PTMOBC) (Quebec, Canada)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Program for processing of organic matter by anaerobic digestion and composting (PTMOBC) provides financial assistance to municipalities and the private sector for the installation of...

318

Method for digesting a nitro-bearing explosive compound  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is a process wherein superoxide radicals from superoxide salt are used to break down the explosive compounds. The process has an excellent reaction rate for degrading explosives, and operates at ambient temperature and atmospheric pressure in aqueous or non-aqueous conditions. Because the superoxide molecules are small, much smaller than an enzyme molecule for example, they can penetrate the microstructure of plastic explosives faster. The superoxide salt generates reactive hydroxyl radicals, which can destroy other organic contaminants, if necessary, along with digesting the explosive nitro-bearing compound.

Shah, Manish M. (Richland, WA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

System for chemically digesting low level radioactive, solid waste material  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved method and system for chemically digesting low level radioactive, solid waste material having a high through-put. The solid waste material is added to an annular vessel (10) substantially filled with concentrated sulfuric acid. Concentrated nitric acid or nitrogen dioxide is added to the sulfuric acid within the annular vessel while the sulfuric acid is reacting with the solid waste. The solid waste is mixed within the sulfuric acid so that the solid waste is substantilly fully immersed during the reaction. The off gas from the reaction and the products slurry residue is removed from the vessel during the reaction.

Cowan, Richard G. (Kennewick, WA); Blasewitz, Albert G. (Richland, WA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Digest of United States Practice in International Law 1989-1990 | Data.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1989-1990 1989-1990 Research Menu Data/Tools Apps Resources Let's Talk Research Alpha You are here Data.gov » Communities » Research » Data Digest of United States Practice in International Law 1989-1990 Dataset Summary Description The Office of the Legal Adviser publishes the annual Digest of United States Practice in International Law to provide the public with a historical record of the views and practice of the Government of the United States in public and private international law. In his April 2003 introduction to the 1989-1990 Digest, then Legal Adviser William H. Taft IV stated in part: "The year 1989-90 was a transitional period in international relations, as the world community continued to deal with implications of the end of the Cold War and the unsteady emergence of a new era. Many of the tensions and ambiguities of the time are reflected in the documents excerpted in this volume. For example, the Immigration Act of 1990 was adopted against the background of domestic U.S. concerns about terrorism, admission of refugees and exclusion of aliens-issues that continue to be important today. Other significant domestic law issues involved reservations to treaties (in this case, the 1948 Genocide Convention), the application of doctrines of foreign sovereign immunity (the Wallenberg Case), the interplay between sanctions and foreign assistance (e.g., Hungary, Poland, Czechoslovakia and the German Democratic Republic), and the allocation of foreign affairs authority in our federal system. "At the same time, the volume records U.S. efforts to deal effectively with the legal dimensions of very diverse issues on the international plane, including the Iraqi attack on the U.S.S. Stark, the downing of Iran Air Flight 655, the deployment of U.S. armed forces in Panama, maritime interdiction incidents, irregular rendition of criminal suspects, and the Treaty on Conventional Forces in Europe. Concerns about human rights, terrorism, and the war on drugs are indicated by the adoption of domestic legislation implementing, or relating to the implementation of, the UN Convention on Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment, the UN Convention Against Illicit Traffic in Narcotic Drugs and Psychotropic Substances, the Montreal Protocol on Suppression of Unlawful Acts of Violence at Airports, and the IMO Convention on the Suppression of Unlawful Acts Against the Safety of Maritime Navigation (negotiated in the aftermath of the Achille Lauro incident) and its related Protocol on Fixed Platforms. . . ."

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including digester gases" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Assess Potential Agency Size Changes that Impact Greenhouse Gases from  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Vehicles and Mobile Equipment Vehicles and Mobile Equipment Assess Potential Agency Size Changes that Impact Greenhouse Gases from Vehicles and Mobile Equipment October 7, 2013 - 11:31am Addthis YOU ARE HERE Step 1 Planned changes in a Federal agency's size, missions, transportation needs, and vehicle inventory all impact the strategic portfolio planning efforts that target greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions mitigation for vehicles and mobile equipment. Under Section 142 of the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) and Section 8 of Executive Order (E.O.) 13514, agencies are required to develop a plan that will reduce fleet GHG emissions to meet Federally mandated petroleum reduction and alternative fuel increase targets. Agencies can use these plans as a basis for determining potential changes in fleet size and

322

Simulations of Deflagration-to-Detonation Transition in Reactive Gases |  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

numerically generated pseudo-schlieren image numerically generated pseudo-schlieren image Weak ignition behind a reflected Mach=1.5 shock in a stoichiometric hydrogen-oxygen mixture at 0.1 atm initial pressure. Picture shows a numerically generated pseudo-schlieren image of the onset of a detonation in a turbulent boundary layer. Alexei Khokhlov, University of Chicago; Charles Bacon, Argonne National Laboratory, Joanna Austin, Andrew Knisely, University of Illinois at Urbanna-Champaign Simulations of Deflagration-to-Detonation Transition in Reactive Gases PI Name: Alexei Khokhlov PI Email: ajk@oddjob.uchicago.edu Institution: The University of Chicago Allocation Program: INCITE Allocation Hours at ALCF: 130 Million Year: 2013 Research Domain: Chemistry Hydrogen is an abundant, environmentally friendly fuel with the potential

323

The Breakdown of Gases in High Frequency Electrical Fields  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A theory is proposed to explain the mechanism of breakdown of gases in high frequency electrical fields. It is assumed that breakdown occurs when the electrical field and the frequency are such that an electron acquires the ionizing energy at the end of one mean free path. The field for breakdown is thus a function of the frequency of the applied potential and the ionization potential and pressure of the gas. The fields for breakdown of argon and xenon are calculated and expressed as functions of the frequency and the gas pressure. The calculated potentials are compared with experimental data, and good agreement is found for frequencies greater than 10106 c.p.s.

Donald H. Hale

1948-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

WIMP Dark Matter Direct-Detection Searches in Noble Gases  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cosmological observations and the dynamics of the Milky Way provide ample evidence for an invisible and dominant mass component. This so-called dark matter could be made of new, colour and charge neutral particles, which were non-relativistic when they decoupled from ordinary matter in the early universe. Such weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) are predicted to have a non-zero coupling to baryons and could be detected via their collisions with atomic nuclei in ultra-low background, deep underground detectors. Among these, detectors based on liquefied noble gases have demonstrated tremendous discovery potential over the last decade. After briefly introducing the phenomenology of direct dark matter detection, I will review the main properties of liquefied argon and xenon as WIMP targets and discuss sources of background. I will then describe existing and planned argon and xenon detectors that employ the so-called single- and dual-phase detection techniques, addressing their complementarity and science...

Baudis, Laura

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

WIMP Dark Matter Direct-Detection Searches in Noble Gases  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cosmological observations and the dynamics of the Milky Way provide ample evidence for an invisible and dominant mass component. This so-called dark matter could be made of new, colour and charge neutral particles, which were non-relativistic when they decoupled from ordinary matter in the early universe. Such weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) are predicted to have a non-zero coupling to baryons and could be detected via their collisions with atomic nuclei in ultra-low background, deep underground detectors. Among these, detectors based on liquefied noble gases have demonstrated tremendous discovery potential over the last decade. After briefly introducing the phenomenology of direct dark matter detection, I will review the main properties of liquefied argon and xenon as WIMP targets and discuss sources of background. I will then describe existing and planned argon and xenon detectors that employ the so-called single- and dual-phase detection techniques, addressing their complementarity and science reach.

Laura Baudis

2014-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

326

Trace gases, CO2, climate, and the greenhouse effect  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Weather is driven by the suns energy input and the difference between insolation per unit area of the poles and the equator. The energy flux of the Earth is in long?term balanceas much is radiated away by the Earth as is absorbed or the mean temperature would have to increase or decrease steadily (and of course this is not observed). CO2 and other trace gases can cause the Earths mean temperature to rise through the Greenhouse Effect. The mean temperature in the Little Ice Age was only 1?C cooler but large effects were felt especially toward the poles. The CO2 which stays in the atmosphere will raise Earths mean temperature with effects which are relatively certain: a lot of warming at the poles and a very small amount of warming at the equator.

Gordon J. Aubrecht II

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Highly polarized Fermi gases across a narrow Feshbach resonance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We address the phase of a highly polarized Fermi gases across a narrow Feshbach resonance starting from the problem of a single down-spin fermion immersed in a Fermi sea of up spins. Both polaron and pairing states are considered using the variational wave function approach, and we find that the polaron-to-pairing transition will take place on the BCS side of the resonance, strongly in contrast to a wide resonance where the transition is located at the BEC side. For the pairing phase, we find the critical strength of the repulsive interaction between pairs above which the mixture of pairs and fermions will not phase separate. Therefore, nearby a narrow resonance, it is quite likely that magnetism can coexist with s-wave BCS superfluidity at large Zeeman fields, which is a remarkable property absent in conventional BCS superconductors (or fermion-pair superfluids).

Ran Qi and Hui Zhai

2012-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

328

Granular Gases of Rod-Shaped Grains in Microgravity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Granular gases are convenient model systems to investigate the statistical physics of nonequilibrium systems. In the literature, one finds numerous theoretical predictions, but only few experiments. We study a weakly excited dilute gas of rods, confined in a cuboid container in microgravity during a suborbital rocket flight. With respect to a gas of spherical grains at comparable filling fraction, the mean free path is considerably reduced. This guarantees a dominance of grain-grain collisions over grain-wall collisions. No clustering was observed, unlike in similar experiments with spherical grains. Rod positions and orientations were determined and tracked. Translational and rotational velocity distributions are non-Gaussian. Equipartition of kinetic energy between translations and rotations is violated.

K. Harth; U. Kornek; T. Trittel; U. Strachauer; S. Hme; K. Will; R. Stannarius

2013-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

329

Carrier cooling and exciton formation in GaSe  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The initial cooling of hot carriers and the subsequent exciton formation in GaSe are studied by time-resolved photoluminescence (PL) using femtosecond up-conversion techniques. From the time-resolved PL spectra of this layered III-VI semiconductor two different energy relaxation channels are derived. After an initial subpicosecond cooling due to Frhlich-type interaction of carriers with longitudinal optical E?(22) phonons a slower regime follows, which is dominated by deformation potential interaction with the nonpolar optical A1?(12) phonons. The coupling constant for nonpolar optical phonon scattering is derived. The subsequent formation of excitons is studied at different carrier densities and detection energies. A cross section for the free-exciton formation is determined based on a rate equation model.

S. Nsse; P. Haring Bolivar; H. Kurz; V. Klimov; F. Levy

1997-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

330

Kovacs-like memory effect in driven granular gases  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

While memory effects have been reported for dense enough disordered systems such as glasses, we show here by a combination of analytical and simulation techniques that they are also intrinsic to the dynamics of dilute granular gases. By means of a certain driving protocol, we prepare the gas in a state where the granular temperature $T$ coincides with its long time limit. However, $T$ does not subsequently remain constant, but exhibits a non-monotonic evolution before reaching its non-equilibrium steady value. The corresponding so-called Kovacs hump displays a normal behavior for weak dissipation (as observed in molecular systems), but is reversed under strong dissipation, where it thus becomes anomalous.

A. Prados; E. Trizac

2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

331

Theory of the lattice Boltzmann method: Lattice Boltzmann models for nonideal gases Li-Shi Luo*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Theory of the lattice Boltzmann method: Lattice Boltzmann models for nonideal gases Li-Shi Luo is presented. This treat- ment provides a unified theory of lattice Boltzmann models for nonideal gases. The lattice Boltzmann equation is systematically obtained by discretizing the Enskog equation in phase space

Luo, Li-Shi

332

Preserving noble gases in a convecting mantle Helge M. Gonnermann1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of a processed and out- gassed lower-mantle source, residues of mantle melting10,11 , depleted in uranium and mixing of noble-gas-depleted slabs dilutes the concentrations of noble gases in the mantle, thereby melt, which forms the ocean crust and leaves the residual mantle severely depleted of noble gases

Mukhopadhyay, Sujoy

333

Biomethane CNG hybrid: A reduction by more than 80% of the greenhouse gases emissions compared to gasoline  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recent results of GDF SUEZ Research and Innovation Division (RID) activities on Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) vehicles are depicted in this paper: The prototype Toyota Prius II Hybrid CNG Vehicle, developed with IFP Energies Nouvelles, combines a natural gas thermal engine with a hybrid electric motorization. After optimization, CO2 emissions, measured on chassis dynamometer, were 76g/km on NEDC cycle. The use of raw biogas in CNG Vehicle has been explored. These tests have shown that raw biogas (not upgraded) can be used as a fuel, if blended with natural gas. In fact, the use of raw biogas can be envisaged in dedicated CNG engines, if new engine technologies (lean CNG combustion) are developed. In such a case natural gas can be blended with up to 70% volume of not upgraded biogas. The potential reduction of greenhouse gases (GHG) emissions related both to the optimization of the CNG vehicle and to the use of biomethane as a vehicle fuel has been evaluated. GHG emissions from CNG vehicles (mono-fuel and hybrid) may be significantly lower than emissions of gasoline vehicles: around 17% lower in the case of dedicated CNG Vehicle and up to 51% lower in the case of hybrid CNG vehicles. In addition, biomethane (from the anaerobic digestion of waste) brings the GHG emission levels, over the course of the life cycle, down to more than 80% compared to a gasoline vehicle. Emission levels are lowered by 87% in the case of the Toyota Prius CNG Hybrid prototype fuelled by biomethane produced from waste (in comparison to a gasoline vehicle). Thus, biomethane allows a reduction of GHG emissions far below the minimum required by the European Directive on the Promotion of Renewable Energy Sources (2009/28/EC). These results have shown that the combination of optimized and innovative engines with the use of biomethane as a fuel permits to significantly reduce the GHG emissions.

Olivier Bordelanne; Micheline Montero; Frdrique Bravin; Anne Prieur-Vernat; Olga Oliveti-Selmi; Hlne Pierre; Marion Papadopoulo; Thomas Muller

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Helium Isotopes In Geothermal And Volcanic Gases Of The Western United  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Helium Isotopes In Geothermal And Volcanic Gases Of The Western United Helium Isotopes In Geothermal And Volcanic Gases Of The Western United States, I, Regional Variability And Magmatic Origin Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Helium Isotopes In Geothermal And Volcanic Gases Of The Western United States, I, Regional Variability And Magmatic Origin Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Helium isotope ratios in gases of thirty hot springs and geothermal wells and of five natural gas wells in the western United States show no relationship to regional conductive heat flow, but do show a correlation with magma-based thermal activity and reservoir fluid temperature (or total convective heat discharge). Gases from high-T (> 200°C) reservoirs have 3He/4He > 2 _ the atmospheric value, with high He

335

A Design-Builder's Perspective: Anaerobic Digestion, Forest County Potawatomi Community - A Case Study  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Design-Builder's Perspective: Anaerobic Digestion Design-Builder's Perspective: Anaerobic Digestion Forest County Potawatomi Community - A Case Study Presented by Jason Rieth, P.E., LEED AP BD + C Industrial Construction Executive Miron Construction Co., Inc. 715.841.4029 | jason.rieth@miron-construction.com * Overview of the FCPC Renewable Generation Facility

336

Long-term investigation of microbial fuel cells treating primary sludge or digested sludge  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Biogas production was produced from primary sludge and quantified. Total energy production in MFCs could: Microbial fuel cell Primary sludge Digested sludge Energy Biogas a b s t r a c t The long-term performance. Digested sludge can be further composted for agriculture uses, and biogas can be con- verted

337

Sequential anaerobic/anaerobic digestion for enhanced sludge stabilization: comparison of the process performance for mixed and waste sludge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Sequential anaerobic-aerobic digestion has been demonstrated as a promising alternative for enhanced sludge stabilization. In this paper, a feasibility ... the sequential digestion applied to real waste activated...

M. Concetta Tomei; Nicola Antonello Carozza

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Experimental co-digestion of corn stalk and vermicompost to improve biogas production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Anaerobic co-digestion of corn stalk and vermicompost (VC) as well as mono-digestion of corn stalk were investigated. Batch mono-digestion experiments were performed at 35 {+-} 1 {sup o}C and initial total solid loading (TSL) ranged from 1.2% to 6.0%. Batch co-digestion experiments were performed at 35 {+-} 1 {sup o}C and initial TSL of 6% with VC proportions ranged from 20% to 80% of total solid (TS). For mono-digestion of corn stalk, a maximum methane yield of 217.60 {+-} 13.87 mL/g TS{sub added} was obtained at initial TSL of 4.8%, and acidification was found at initial TSL of 6.0% with the lowest pH value of 5.10 on day 4. Co-digestion improved the methane yields by 4.42-58.61% via enhancing volatile fatty acids (VFAs) concentration and pH value compared with mono-digestion of corn stalk. The maximum biogas yield of 410.30 {+-} 11.01 mL/g TS{sub added} and methane yield of 259.35 {+-} 13.85 mL/g TS{sub added} were obtained for 40% VC addition. Structure analysis by X-ray diffractometry (XRD) showed that the lowest crystallinity of 35.04 of digested corn stalk was obtained from co-digestion with 40% VC, which decreased 29.4% compared to 49.6 obtained from un-treated corn stalk. It is concluded that co-digestion with VC is beneficial for improving biodigestibility and methane yield from corn stalk.

Chen Guangyin [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Zheng Zheng, E-mail: zzhenghj@fudan.edu.c [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Yang Shiguan [National Engineering Laboratory of Biomass Power Generation Equipment, School of Renewable Energy, North China Electric Power University, Beijing 102206 (China); Fang Caixia; Zou Xingxing; Luo Yan [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

339

Air pollution policy in Europe: Quantifying the interaction with greenhouse gases and climate change policies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper uses the computable general equilibrium model WorldScan to analyse interactions between EU's air pollution and climate change policies. Covering the entire world and seven EU countries, WorldScan simulates economic growth in a neo-classical recursive dynamic framework, including emissions and abatement of greenhouse gases (CO2, N2O and CH4) and air pollutants (SO2, NOx, NH3 and PM2.5). Abatement includes the possibility of using end-of-pipe control options that remove pollutants without affecting the emission-producing activity itself. This paper analyses several variants of EU's air pollution policies for the year 2020. Air pollution policy will depend on end-of-pipe controls for not more than two thirds, thus also at least one third of the required emission reduction will come from changes in the use of energy through efficiency improvements, fuel switching and other structural changes in the economy. Greenhouse gas emissions thereby decrease, which renders climate change policies less costly. Our results show that carbon prices will fall, and may even drop to zero when the EU agrees on a more stringent air pollution policy.

Johannes Bollen; Corjan Brink

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Use of hollow core fibers, fiber lasers, and photonic crystal fibers for spark delivery and laser ignition in gases  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The fiber-optic delivery of sparks in gases is challenging as the output beam must be refocused to high

Joshi, Sachin; Yalin, Azer P; Galvanauskas, Almantas

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including digester gases" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Net Taxable Gasoline Gallons (Including Aviation Gasoline)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Net Taxable Gasoline Gallons (Including Aviation Gasoline) Period 2000 2001 (2) 2002 2003 2004 "gross" to "net" , was deemed impractical. (5) This report replaces the Gross Taxable Gasoline Gallons (Including Aviation Gasoline) report which will not be produced after December 2002. (6) The November 2007

342

Rapid?sampling system for dusts and gases  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Bureau of Mines has developed a system for the rapid grab sampling of heterogeneous mixtures of gases and dusts during the preignition and postignition stages of dust explosions. The combustion chamber in which the explosion occurs is first fitted with a hypodermic sampling needle with its inlet end at the desired sampling point within the chamber and its sharp injecting end protruding outside of the chamber. Rapid sampling (approximately 25 to 50 ms) is achieved with a double?acting air?pressure?actuated cylinder. The forward stroke of the cylinder thrusts the rubber septum seal of an evacuated glass sampling tube onto the protruding needle which punctures the septum filling the tube with gas and dust from the combustion chamber. The return stroke of the cylinder reseals the sampling tube by returning the mechanism to its original position. The initial time of sampling and the duration of sampling are independently variable and controlled by a microprocessor. Results obtained with a trimodal distribution of coal dust show no significant size discrimination at least up to 70 ?m. Data obtained from laboratory?scale coal dust explosion tests are also presented. Such data provide valuable insights into the basic phenomena involved in explosions.

R. S. Conti; M. Hertzberg; F. T. Duda; K. L. Cashdollar

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Application of dried anaerobic digested sewage sludge as phenol biosorbent  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Untreated anaerobically digested sewage sludge was used for the first time as a biosorbent for removing phenol from aqueous solution. Results showed that adsorption capacity was influenced by the pH of the aqueous solution with an observed maximum phenol removal at pH around 6-8. The adsorption equilibrium of phenolic compounds was obtained after almost two hours with an adsorption of approximately 90% of the phenolic compounds. A sorbent concentration of 1.8 g/L was found to insure the best removal percentage and the best sorbent capacity. Both Langmuir and Freundlich models have provided reasonable fittings for the data of phenol adsorption. The experimental data fitted the pseudo-second-order kinetic model and the intraparticle diffusion model. The values of change in Gibbs free energy (?G), enthalpy (?H) and entropy (?S) were calculated. The thermodynamic study of adsorption process showed that the process was exothermic in nature.

Alaa H. Hawari

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Some factors influencing digestion and growth rates of beef steers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

~K 20i49 34. 78 '2221 20+49 26. 81 mgs 20i49 26, 81 19i92 66i51 KlI 19a92 ~38. 7 21i10 ~0+9 Oi93 Oe93 0. 93 0, 90 8. 5T 98 e9 0 94 8. 63 98. 9 Oi94 Oi94 5. 23 li03 7. 49 4 01 KGF 1 i03 4il2 li22 lg ilHSUL')S kg... of the steers under the ccnditicns cf this oxparincnt? Dttssttss trials Tho results of tbo digestion tria1s aro a~ed in Table 5. Ths addition of cny supple+mt to tbo basal ration u ed throughout tlaso studies very signifioantIy (p (0. 01) inprcved ths...

Gossett, John Warren

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

345

Digestibility of Sugar, Starches, and Pentosans of Roughages.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

gms. No. 3649-50. ..................... Eaten ........................................ Excreted 1491 gms. No. 3700.. .................. Sugars Mono. 55.8 2.6 53.2 1.5 51.7 97.2 97.5 F8.0 28.0 Starch. 212.4 10.0 202.4 6.7 195.7 96.6... 95.9 35.2 35.2 Di. 54.0 .3 -- 53.7 .7 53.5 99.6 99.7 12.8 12.8 .1 99.2 99.2 33.6 0 33.6 1.1 32.5 96.7 1.2 ................................. Digested. Reduc- ing sugar from hemi- cellulose. 111.2 5.2 106.0 48.8 57...

Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

1916-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Synthesis and Exploratory Catalysis of 3d Metals: Group-Transfer Reactions, and the Activation and Functionalization of Small Molecules Including Greenhouse Gases  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Our work over the past three years has resulted in the development of electron rich and low-coordinate vanadium fragments, molecular nitrides of vanadium and parent imide systems of titanium, and the synthesis of phosphorus containing molecules of the 3d transition metal series. Likewise, with financial support from BES Division in DOE (DE-FG02-07ER15893), we now completed the full characterization of the first single molecular magnet (SMM) of Fe(III). We demonstrated that this monomeric form of Fe(III) has an unusual slow relaxation of the magnetization under zero applied field. To make matters more interesting, this system also undergoes a rare example of an intermediate to high-spin transition (an S = 3/2 to S = 5/2 transition). In 2010 we reported the synthesis of the first neutral and low-coordinate vanadium complexes having the terminal nitride functionality. We have now completed a full study to understand formation of the nitride ligand from the metastable azide precursor, and have also explored the reactivity of the nitride ligand in the context of incomplete and complete N-atom transfer. During the 2010-2013 period we also discovered a facile approach to assemble low-coordinate and low-valent vanadium(II) complexes and exploit their multielectron chemistry ranging from 1-3 electrons. Consequently, we can now access 3d ligand frameworks such as cyclo-P3 (and its corresponding radical anion), nitride radical anions and cations, low-coordinate vanadium oxos, and the first example of a vanadium thionitrosyl complex. A cis-divacant iron(IV) imido having some ligand centered radical has been also discovered, and we are in the process of elucidating its electronic structure (in particular the sign of zero field splitting and the origin of its magnitude), bonding and reactivity. We have also revisited some paramagnetic and classic metallocene compounds with S >1/2 ground states in order to understand their reactivity patterns and electronic structure. Lastly, we are completing the synthesis and characterization of a titanium nitride anion and formation of the first example of boryl and aluminyl imido titanium complexes.

Mindiola, Daniel J.

2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

347

Gases as Working Fluid in Parabolic Trough CSP Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The energetic dimension of actual economy is massively oriented towards the use of fossil fuels: they cover a share of 87% of the energy needs and the trend of this share is increasing, in spite of the commitments adopted by almost all the Countries in the World. Most crucial concern is CO2 levels in the atmosphere and the positive feedback between Earth's temperature increase and carbon. Actual technologies which make use of renewable sources seem to be not fully suitable to invert this continuous increase of fossil fuels. Concentrated Solar Power plants (CSP) have had, recently, a huge attention as a technology able to give, in the mean future, a strong contribution to the electrical energy generation. CSP technology has an intrinsic superiority with respect to the other renewable plants but actual plants suffer of many drawbacks which slow down a massive diffusion: these aspects increase costs and do not insure the reliability levels required to make the investments profitable. Gas as heat transfer fluid inside solar receiver in a CSP Parabolic Trough (PT) type plant is discussed in this paper: this would simplify actual technology in the conversion section, downstream the solar energy collecting phase. The use of gases calls for a new conversion section discussed in this paper based on a direct expansion in gas turbine plants. The success of this concept is related to the possibility to increase the fluid (gas) temperature above the actual operating maximum values. The paper discusses the performances of a new gas cycle, the performances of actual receivers when fed with gas and introduces and discusses an optimization design parameter which allows a cost decrease and industrial reliability improvement.

Roberto Cipollone; Andrea Cinocca; Angelo Gualtieri

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Excitation spectrum and quasiparticles in quantum gases. A rigorous approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis is devoted to a rigorous study of interacting quantum gases. The main objects of interest are the closely related concepts of excitation spectrum and quasiparticles. The immediate motivation of this work is to propose a spectral point of view concerning these two concepts. In the first part of this thesis we discuss the concepts of excitation spectrum and quasiparticles. We provide an overview of physical motivations and based on that we propose a spectral and Hamiltonian-based approach towards these terms. Based on that, we formulate definitions and propositions related to these concepts. In the second part we recall the Bogoliubov and Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov approximations, which in the physics literature are used to obtain the quasiparticle picture. We show how these two approaches fit into a universal scheme which allows us to arrive at a quasiparticle picture in a more general setup. This scheme is based on the minimization of Hamiltonians over the so-called Gaussian states. Its abstract formulation is the content of Beliaev's Theorem. In the last part we present a rigorous result concerning the justification of the Bogoliubov approximation. This justification employs the concept of the mean-field and infinite-volume limit. We show that for a large number of particles, a large volume and a sufficiently high density, the low-lying energy-momentum spectrum of the homogeneous Bose gas is well described by the Bogoliubov approximation. This result, which is formulated in the form of a theorem, can be seen as the main result of this thesis.

Marcin Napirkowski

2014-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

349

Geochemical Data on Waters, Gases, Scales, and Rocks from the Dixie Valley  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geochemical Data on Waters, Gases, Scales, and Rocks from the Dixie Valley Geochemical Data on Waters, Gases, Scales, and Rocks from the Dixie Valley Region, Nevada (1996-1999) Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Geochemical Data on Waters, Gases, Scales, and Rocks from the Dixie Valley Region, Nevada (1996-1999) Abstract This report tabulates an extensive geochemical database on waters, gases, scales,rocks, and hot-spring deposits from the Dixie Valley region, Nevada. The samples fromwhich the data were obtained were collected and analyzed during 1996 to 1999. Thesedata provide useful information for ongoing and future investigations on geothermalenergy, volcanism, ore deposits, environmental issues, and groundwater quality in thisregion. Authors Los Alamos National Laboratory and NM Published

350

Intensive Sampling Of Noble Gases In Fluids At Yellowstone- I, Early  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Intensive Sampling Of Noble Gases In Fluids At Yellowstone- I, Early Intensive Sampling Of Noble Gases In Fluids At Yellowstone- I, Early Overview Of The Data, Regional Patterns Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Intensive Sampling Of Noble Gases In Fluids At Yellowstone- I, Early Overview Of The Data, Regional Patterns Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Roving Automated Rare Gas Analysis (RARGA) lab of Berkeley's Physics Department was deployed in Yellowstone National Park for a 19 week period commencing in June, 1983. During this time 66 gas and water samples representing 19 different regions of hydrothermal activity within and around the Yellowstone caldera were analyzed on site. Routinely, the abundances of five stable noble gases and the isotopic compositions of He,

351

Clarifying the Roles of Greenhouse Gases and ENSO in Recent Global Warming through Their Prediction Performance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is well known that natural external forcings and decadal-to-millennial variability drove changes in the climate system throughout the Holocene. Regarding recent times, attribution studies have shown that greenhouse gases (GHGs) determined the ...

Umberto Triacca; Antonello Pasini; Alessandro Attanasio; Alessandro Giovannelli; Marco Lippi

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Eddy covariance flux measurements of pollutant gases in urban Mexico City  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Eddy covariance (EC) flux measurements of the atmosphere/surface exchange of gases over an urban area are a direct way to improve and evaluate emissions inventories, and, in turn, to better understand urban atmospheric ...

Velasco, Erik

353

Characteristic parameters of geigermller counter gases. Propane-argon and propane-helium mixtures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The combination of the Wilkinson and the Diethorn-Kohman expressions of counter operation was tested under conditions in which different rare gases were used with the same quench gas as Geiger-Mller counter f...

Richard G. Pannbacker; Robert W. Kiser

1962-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Cosmogenic and trapped rare gases in Luna-24 drill core samples  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The elemental and isotopic composition of noble gases in six samples from different depths of the Luna-24 drill core soil column, obtained by mass spectrometric analyses, are presented and the results are comp...

J. T. Padia; M. N. Rao; T. R. Venkatesan

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Adsorption Modeling of Coalbed Gases and the Effects of Water on Their Adsorption Behavior.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The simplified local-density/Peng-Robinson (SLD-PR) adsorption model was utilized to investigate the adsorption behavior of coalbed gases on coals of varying rank. The model parameters were (more)

Mohammad, Sayeed Ahmed

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Quantifying emissions of greenhouse gases from South Asia through a targeted measurement campaign  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Methane (CH 4 ), nitrous oxide (N20) and sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) are powerful greenhouse gases with global budgets that are well-known but regional distributions that are not adequately constrained for the purposes of ...

Ganesan, Anita Lakshmi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Load Preheating Using Flue Gases from a Fuel-Fired Heating System  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This tip sheet discusses how the thermal efficiency of a process heating system can be improved significantly by using heat contained in furnace flue gases to preheat the furnace load.

358

Intentionally Including - Engaging Minorities in Physics Careers |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Intentionally Including - Engaging Minorities in Physics Careers Intentionally Including - Engaging Minorities in Physics Careers Intentionally Including - Engaging Minorities in Physics Careers April 24, 2013 - 4:37pm Addthis Joining Director Dot Harris (second from left) were Marlene Kaplan, the Deputy Director of Education and director of EPP, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Claudia Rankins, a Program Officer with the National Science Foundation and Jim Stith, the past Vice-President of the American Institute of Physics Resources. Joining Director Dot Harris (second from left) were Marlene Kaplan, the Deputy Director of Education and director of EPP, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Claudia Rankins, a Program Officer with the National Science Foundation and Jim Stith, the past Vice-President of the

359

Transmission line including support means with barriers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gas insulated transmission line includes an elongated outer sheath, a plurality of inner conductors disposed within and extending along the outer sheath, and an insulating gas which electrically insulates the inner conductors from the outer sheath. A support insulator insulatably supports the inner conductors within the outer sheath, with the support insulator comprising a main body portion including a plurality of legs extending to the outer sheath, and barrier portions which extend between the legs. The barrier portions have openings therein adjacent the main body portion through which the inner conductors extend.

Cookson, Alan H. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Iron-based alloys with corrosion resistance to oxygen-sulfur mixed gases  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An iron-based alloy with improved performance with exposure to oxygen-sulfur mixed gases with the alloy containing about 9--30 wt. % Cr and a small amount of Nb and/or Zr implanted on the surface of the alloy to diffuse a depth into the surface portion, with the alloy exhibiting corrosion resistance to the corrosive gases without bulk addition of Nb and/or Zr and without heat treatment at temperatures of 1000--1100 C. 7 figs.

Natesan, K.

1992-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including digester gases" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Iron-based alloys with corrosion resistance to oxygen-sulfur mixed gases  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An iron-based alloy with improved performance with exposure to oxygen-sulfur mixed gases with the alloy containing about 9-30 wt. % Cr and a small amount of Nb and/or Zr implanted on the surface of the alloy to diffuse a depth into the surface portion, with the alloy exhibiting corrosion resistance to the corrosive gases without bulk addition of Nb and/or Zr and without heat treatment at temperatures of 1000.degree.-1100.degree. C.

Natesan, Krishnamurti (Naperville, IL)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Factors affecting the recovery of petroleum in projects involving the injection of liquefied petroleum gases (LPG)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FACTORS AFFECTING THE RECOVERY OF PETROLEUM IN PROJECTS INVOLVING THE INJECTION OF LIQUEFIED PETROLEUM GASES (LPG) A Thesis By GERRY A. GRAHAM Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August, 1961 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering GERRY A. GRAHAM FACTORS AFFECTING THE RECOVERY OF PETROLEUM IN PROJECTS INVOLVING THE INJECTION OF LIQUEFIED PETROLEUM GASES (LPG) A...

Graham, Gerry A

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

363

Influence de l'addition de phosphore sur la digestion d'une paille traite l'ammoniac par les microorganismes du rumen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

infusing the fermenters containing 15 g ammoniated straw per bag improved significantly fiber digestion

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

364

Energy Consumption of Personal Computing Including Portable  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Consumption of Personal Computing Including Portable Communication Devices Pavel Somavat1 consumption, questions are being asked about the energy contribution of computing equipment. Al- though studies have documented the share of energy consumption by this type of equipment over the years, research

Namboodiri, Vinod

365

EE Regional Technology Roadmap Includes comparison  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EE Regional Technology Roadmap Includes comparison against 6th Power Plan (Update cyclically Roadmap with a strong linkage to utility programs Scan for Technologies 1. How does it address the NW Data Clearinghouse BPA/RTF NEEA/Regional Programs Group Update Regional EE Technology Roadmap Lighting

366

Video Topics Include Freshman Inquiry Course  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Video Topics Include Freshman Inquiry Course Open Advisement/ Group Advisement Dinning Campus: End of Spring 2012, Commencement May 18: Grades available on MAX after 4:30pm AdvisementYouTubeVideoSeries I N S I D E T H I S I S S U E : YouTube Video Series 1 Mark Your Calendar 1 Exploring Major Tips 2

Hardy, Christopher R.

367

Including Ocean Model Uncertainties in Climate Predictions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Including Ocean Model Uncertainties in Climate Predictions Chris Brierley, Alan Thorpe, Mat Collins's to perform the integrations Currently uses a `slab' ocean #12;An Ocean Model Required to accurately model transient behaviour Will have its own uncertainties Requires even more computing power Create new models

Jones, Peter JS

368

Floodplain Assessment for Installation of a Renewable Energy Anaerobic Digester Facility  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

Floodplain Assessment for Installation of a Renewable Energy Anaerobic Digester Facility at the University of California, Davis in Yolo County, California, as posted on the U.S. Department of Energy website.

369

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic digestion held Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

anaerobic digestion held Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 www.manuremanagement.cornell.edu Biogas Casebook Summary: 1 www.manuremanagement.cornell.edu Biogas Casebook: NYS On-farm...

370

Biomass Program Perspectives on Anaerobic Digestion and Fuel Cell Integration at Biorefineries  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE Biomass Program perspective on anaerobic digestion and fuel cell integratin at biorefineries. Presented by Brian Duff, DOE Biomass Program, at the NREL/DOE Biogas and Fuel Cells Workshop held June 11-13, 2012, in Golden, Colorado.

371

Determination of Wear Metals in Marine Lubricating Oils by Microwave Digestion and Atomic Absorption Spectrometry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

?The difficulties associated with the development of a microwave-assisted acid digestion of lubricating oils in determination of wear metals are presented. The interest of this sample treatment lies in its bas...

Celestino Sanz-Segundo; Mara P. Hernndez-Artiga

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Chemical oxidation of tryptic digests to improve sequence coverage in peptide mass fingerprint protein identification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Peptide mass fingerprinting (PMF) of protein digests is a widely-accepted method for protein identification in MS-based proteomic studies. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI) is the technique of choice in PMF...

Lucas, Jessica Elaine

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

373

Experimental evaluation of anaerobic digestion for coffee wastewater treatment and its biomethane recovery potential  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to evaluate the performance of anaerobic digestion (AD) as an eco-friendly technology for coffee wastewater (CWW) management. First, we have characterized the CWW and found that...

A. Beyene; D. Yemane; T. Addis

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Rotational spectrum of HD perturbed by He or Ar gases: The effects of rotationally inelastic collisions on the interference between allowed and collisionally induced components  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The spectral line shapes for the HD rotational spectra perturbed by He and Ar gases, which show interference between allowed and collisionally induced dipole transitions, are calculated including the effects of inelastic rotational collisions. The general parametrization of the line shape, including inelastic collisions, requires six independent real parameters as opposed to four in the theory of Herman, Tipping, and Poll [Phys. Rev. A 20, 2006 (1979)]. Semiclassical calculations based on classical trajectories indicate the importance of the inelastic effects and show qualitative agreement with the experimental parameters. However, it is clear that a full explanation of experimental data will eventually require a full quantum treatment.

Bo Gao; J. Cooper; G. C. Tabisz

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

What CO2 well gases tell us about the origin of noble gases in the mantle and their relationship to the atmosphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...mantle-rich CO2 well gases, with samples lying on the air-solar mixing line. The most solar-rich gas, from Bravo Dome in New Mexico, had a 10 per cent excess above air value. Since solar and Q-Xe are so similar in composition, it is not possible...

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Fast non-explosive gases for drift chambers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Typical gases which are stock at Fermilab are Ar:C/sub 2/H/sub 6/(50:50) and Ar:CO/sub 2/ (80:20). Argon:Ethane has the virtue of high gas gain and a saturated drift velocity. In fact, parametrizing the drift velocity as a function of electric field we find v/sub d/(E) = v/sub o/(1/minus/e/sup -E/E/o) with v/sub o/ approx. = 5.4 cm/..mu..sec and E/sub o/ = 160 V/cm. However, safety considerations make this gas somewhat inconvenient. The addition of alcohol as quencher also raises the saturation field to, for example, E/sub o/ approx. = 500 V/cm for 1.5% added alcohol. This gas also tends to break up in a high-beam flux environment and leave carbon deposits. The addition of alcohol to avoid such aging often takes a unit cell out of saturation over its entire volume. Finally, for collider applications it is useful to exclude free protons from the gas in order to reduce the sensitivity to the sea of slow neutrons which are present in the collider environment. In contrast, Ar:CO/sub 2/ (80:20) is a gas with more moderate gas gain. The drift velocity at high field is v/sub d/(E > 1.5 kV/cm) approx. = 5.8 cm/..mu..sec. For most field configurations this gas does not saturate, causing a long tail in the drift time distrubtion due to low field regions in the unit cell. The virtues of this gas mixture are that it is cheap, not flammable, and stable under high-beam flux. However as the Collider Upgrade progresses, we wish to find a gas which is faster than 5.0 cm/..mu..sec since the time separation between collisions will at some point be less than drift time of 1..mu..sec for drift distance of 5 cm. 3 refs., 5 figs.

Green, D.; Haggerty, H.; Oshima, N.; Yamada, R.

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

A Theory of the Electric Discharge Through Gases  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Three general differential equations are set up which determine the average behavior of a discharge of electricity through a gas. Approximate solutions, giving the electric field E and the concentration of electrons and positive ions, n1 and n2, at any distance x from the cathode, are found for several ranges of value of E.When E is large, the solution corresponds to the conditions in the cathode and anode fall spaces in a glow discharge. Equations are obtained for the potential drop V across the fall space; the current density at the electrode divided by the square of the gas pressure, jp2; and the thickness of the fall space times the pressure, pd.These equations indicate that for the cathode fall space there is a certain minimum value of V, called Vn; and for jp2, called jnp2; and a corresponding maximum value of pd, pdn, beyond which values the discharge ceases. These stationary values are shown to be constants, dependent only on the nature of the gas used and of the cathode material, and correspond to the normal cathode fall space. The equation determining Vn is shown to be of the right from by comparison with the experimentally determined values. From these values of Vn, values of jnp2 and of pdn are calculated for four gases and four cathode materials, and the calculated values check with the experimental data. The corresponding equations for the anode fall space show why there is no corresponding normal anode fall.A consideration of the discharge when E is large throughout the distance between electrodes indicates that there is another stationary value of the cathode fall space when the current density at the cathode reaches its maximum possible value. The V in this case is much smaller than the Vn for the glow discharge, and the form of the equations indicate that they describe the conditions in an electric arc.Another approximate equation is obtained when E is constant, which is the case in the positive column of a glow discharge. This solution indicates that within certain limits of pressure and current density, small sinusoidal variations about the average value Ep, are possible in E. These correspond to the striations sometimes observed in the positive column. The equations determining Ep and those determining the distance between striations check with the known empirical laws relating these amounts to the pressure, the radius of the discharge tube and the critical potentials of the gas used. A general discussion is given of the Faraday dark space and reasons are given why it should be near the cathode rather than the anode.

Philip M. Morse

1928-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

An in vitro digestibility study on human milk and related proteins used in infant formula  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Formula. (August 1988) Adriana Coromoto Vethencourt-Petrini, B. S. , Texas A & M University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Charles W. Dill Human skim milk, whey proteins and soy protein isolate were subjected to a pepsin-pancreatin in vitro..., respectively. The digestion was monitored by measuring the automatic addition of acid or base, the increase of free amino groups, and the decrease in molecular weight of the protein components involved in the digestion. Whey proteins needed the largest...

Vethencourt-Petrini, Adriana Coromoto

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

379

Effect of sorghum type on the digestibility of segmented and whole plant sorghum silages  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EFFECT OF SORGHUM TYPE ON THE DIGESTIBILITY OF SEGMENTED AND NHOLE PLANT SORGHUM SILAGES A Thesis RODRIGO E. SPIEGEL Submitted to the Grs duate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE May 1975 Major Suhject: Animal Nutri tion EFFECT OF SORGHUM TYPE ON THE DIGESTIBILITY OF SEGMENTED AND WHOLE PLANT SORGHUM SILAGES A Thesis by RODRIGO E. SPIEGEL Approved as to style and content by: ' Chairman o . Cdmmittee Member Head...

Spiegel Richa, Rodrigo Enrique

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

380

Comparison of the intake and digestibility of different diets in Ilamas and sheep  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

conditions in llamas, which are more efficient in digesting plant cell walls than sheep. MATERIALS efficient than that of sheep. intake / digestibility / roughage / sheep / Ilama Résumé -Comparaison de l, lamas et moutons ont ingéré la même quantité de foin (17,4 glkg PV), mais les lamas ont ingéré 14% de

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including digester gases" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Composition and nutrient digestibility of weather-damaged sorghum in swine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COMPOSITION AND NUTRIENT DIGESTIBILITY OF WEATHER-DAMAGED SORGHUM IN SWINE A Thesis by Wendell Craig Bailey Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE December 1980 Major subject: Animal Science COMPOSITION AND NUTRIENT DIGESTIBILITY OF WEATHER-DAMAGED SORGHUM IN SWINE A Thesis by Wendell Craig Bailey Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman) u~~4 ~ (Member) (Member) (Member...

Bailey, Wendell Craig

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

382

Purification and properties of a biologically active peptide released from bovine lactoferrin by pepsin digestion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PURIFICATION AND PROPERTIES OF A BIOLOGICALLY ACTIVE PEPTIDE RELEASED FROM BOVINE LACTOFERRIN BY PEPSIN DIGESTION A Thesis by DENISSE ALICIA MAURER Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER QF SCIENCE May 1995 Major Subject: Food Science and Technology PURIFICATION AND PROPERTIES OF A BIOLOGICALLY ACTIVE PEPTIDE RELEASED FROM BOVINE LACTOFERRIN BY PEPSIN DIGESTION A Thesis by DENISSE ALICIA MAURER...

Maurer, Denisse Alicia

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Buildings Included on EMS Reports"  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Buildings Included on EMS Reports" "Site","Property Name","Property ID","GSF","Incl. in Water Baseline (CY2007)","Water Baseline (sq. ft.)","Water CY2008 (sq. ft.)","Water CY2009 (sq. ft.)","Water Notes","Incl. in Energy Baseline (CY2003)","Energy Baseline (sq. ft.)","CY2008 Energy (sq. ft.)","CY2009 Energy (sq. ft.)","Energy Notes","Included as Existing Building","CY2008 Existing Building (sq. ft.)","Reason for Building Exclusion" "Column Totals",,"Totals",115139,,10579,10579,22512,,,3183365,26374,115374,,,99476 "Durango, CO, Disposal/Processing Site","STORAGE SHED","DUD-BLDG-STORSHED",100,"no",,,,,"no",,,,"OSF","no",,"Less than 5,000 GSF"

384

Power generation method including membrane separation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for generating electric power, such as at, or close to, natural gas fields. The method includes conditioning natural gas containing C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons and/or acid gas by means of a membrane separation step. This step creates a leaner, sweeter, drier gas, which is then used as combustion fuel to run a turbine, which is in turn used for power generation.

Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Union City, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Completion strategy includes clay and precipitate control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article describes the conditions which are necessary for a successful oil well completion in the Mississippi and Cherokee zones of South Central Kansas. Topics considered include paraffin precipitation, clay swelling and migration, and iron precipitation. Clays in these zones are sensitive to water-base treating fluids and tend to swell and migrate to the well bore, thereby causing permeability damage. The presence of iron in the Mississippi and Cherokee formations has been indicated by cuttings, core samples, and connate water samples.

Sandy, T.; Gardner, G.R.

1985-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

386

Jet-calculus approach including coherence effects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We show how integrodifferential equations typical of jet calculus can be combined with an averaging procedure to obtain jet-calculus-based results including the Mueller interference graphs. Results in longitudinal-momentum fraction x for physical quantities are higher at intermediate x and lower at large x than with the conventional incoherent jet calculus. These results resemble those of Marchesini and Webber, who used a Monte Carlo approach based on the same dynamics.

L. M. Jones; R. Migneron; K. S. S. Narayanan

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Nitrification of centrate from dewatering of anaerobically digested sludge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nitrification of anaerobically digested sludge centrate was studied in bench-scale suspended growth and fixed film enhanced suspended growth systems at temperatures of 10.5-28.5C and pH values of 6.0-9.1. Nitrification followed zero-order kinetics in both systems, and ammonia removals in excess of 99% were observed. The temperature dependency of the suspended growth nitrification rate observed under not fully acclimated biomass conditions at pH between 6.8 and 8.5, was expressed as kT = k20?T-20where k20 and ? were found to be 0.34 mg NH3-N/MLVSS-d and 1.033, respectively. The nitrification rate in the fixed film enhanced suspended growth system involving styrofoam pads ranged from 0.11 to 0.13 mg NH3-N/mg MLVSS-d at temperatures of 21.5-25C and pH values of 7.8-8.6. The process contained suspended solids in the range of 10-20 mg/l.

M. Kawsar Ali; C.G. Marquez; J. Fillos; V. Diyamandoglu; L.A. Carrio

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Nitrogen content, amino acid composition and digestibility of fungi from a nutritional perspective in animal mycophagy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fungi comprise a major part of the diet of many animals. Even so, the nutritional value of fungi has been much debated, with some arguing that fungi are nutritionally poor. However, the chemical composition of fungi and of the biology of the animals that eat them are not well understood, particularly in reference to amino acid (AA) composition of fungi and digestibility of fungal protein. We analysed fibre, total nitrogen (N), available N, and AA contents and measured invitro digestibility of a wide range of epigeous and hypogeous fungi collected in Australia and the USA to test three hypotheses: (i) fungi are nutritionally poor because they contain few nutrients or are otherwise of low digestibility, (ii) fungi vary substantially in their nutritional composition; and (iii) animals can counter this variable quality by eating diverse taxa. Resultant data indicate many fungi are a reasonable source of \\{AAs\\} and digestible nitrogen. However, they vary highly between species in AA content, and the protein has a poor balance of digestible AAs. This helps explain why many mycophagous animals eat a wide array of fungi and often have digestive strategies to cope with fungi, such as foregut fermentation. Another common strategy is to supplement the diet with high quality protein, such as insect protein. Accordingly, evaluating nutritional value of fungi requires consideration of physiology of the animal species and their whole diet.

Ian R. Wallis; Andrew W. Claridge; James M. Trappe

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Temporal variation in methanogen communities of four different full-scale anaerobic digesters treating food waste-recycling wastewater  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Methanogen communities were investigated using 454 pyrosequencing in four different full-scale anaerobic digesters treating food waste-recycling wastewater. Seasonal samples were collected for 2years, and 24 samples were available for microbial analysis from a plug flow thermophilic (PT) digester, a continuously-stirred tank thermophilic (CT) digester, an upflow anerobic sludge blanket mesophilic (UM) digester, and a continuously-stirred tank mesophilic (CM) digester. Methanoculleus, Methanobacterium, Methanothermobacter, and Methanosaeta were revealed to be key methanogens in full-scale anaerobic digestion process treating food waste-recycling wastewater. In the PT digester, Methanoculleus was dominant (96.8%). In the CT digester, Methanoculleus was dominant (95.4%) during the first year of operation, but the dominant genus was shifted to Methanothermobacter (98.5%) due to pH increase. In the UM digester, Methanosaeta was dominant (87.2%). In the CM digester, Methanoculleus was constantly dominant (74.8%) except during CM5 when Methanosaeta was dominant (62.6%) due to the low residual acetate concentration (0.1g/L).

Joonyeob Lee; Byungchul Hwang; Taewoan Koo; Seung Gu Shin; Woong Kim; Seokhwan Hwang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Pulsed Laser Deposition of Photoresponsive Two-Dimensional GaSe Nanosheet Networks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Here we explore pulsed laser deposition (PLD), a well known and versatile synthesis method principally used for epitaxial oxide thin film growth, for the synthesis of functional metal chalcogenide (GaSe) nanosheet networks by stoichiometric transfer of laser vaporized material from bulk GaSe targets in Ar background gas. Uniform coverage of interconnected, crystalline, few-layer, photoresponsive GaSe nanosheets in both in-plane and out-of-plane orientations were achieved under different ablation plume conditions over ~1.5 cm2 areas. Plume propagation was characterized by in situ ICCD-imaging. High (1 Torr) Ar background gas pressures were found to be crucial for the stoichiometric growth of GaSe nanosheet networks. Individual 1-3 layer GaSe triangular nanosheets of ~ 200 nm domain size were formed within 30 laser pulses, coalescing to form nanosheet networks in as few as 100 laser pulses. The thickness of the deposited networks increased linearly with pulse number, adding layers in a two-dimensional (2D) growth mode while maintaining a surface roughness of 2 GaSe layers for increasing overall thickness. Field effect transistors using these interconnected crystalline GaSe networks showed p-type semiconducting characteristics with mobilities reaching as high as 0.1 cm2V-1s-1. Spectrally-resolved photoresponsivities and external quantum efficiencies ranged from 0.4 AW-1 and 100% at 700 nm, to 1.4 AW-1 and 600 % at 240 nm, respectively. Pulsed laser deposition under these conditions appears to provide a versatile and rapid approach to stoichiometrically transfer and deposit photoresponsive networks of 2D nanosheets with digital thickness control and substrate-scale uniformity for a variety of applications.

Mahjouri-Samani, Masoud [ORNL; Gresback, Ryan G [ORNL; Tian, Mengkun [ORNL; Puretzky, Alexander A [ORNL; Rouleau, Christopher M [ORNL; Eres, Gyula [ORNL; Ivanov, Ilia N [ORNL; Xiao, Kai [ORNL; McGuire, Michael A [ORNL; Duscher, Gerd [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Geohegan, David B [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Phase-equilibria for design of coal-gasification processes: dew points of hot gases containing condensible tars. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research is concerned with the fundamental physical chemistry and thermodynamics of condensation of tars (dew points) from the vapor phase at advanced temperatures and pressures. Fundamental quantitative understanding of dew points is important for rational design of heat exchangers to recover sensible heat from hot, tar-containing gases that are produced in coal gasification. This report includes essentially six contributions toward establishing the desired understanding: (1) Characterization of Coal Tars for Dew-Point Calculations; (2) Fugacity Coefficients for Dew-Point Calculations in Coal-Gasification Process Design; (3) Vapor Pressures of High-Molecular-Weight Hydrocarbons; (4) Estimation of Vapor Pressures of High-Boiling Fractions in Liquefied Fossil Fuels Containing Heteroatoms Nitrogen or Sulfur; and (5) Vapor Pressures of Heavy Liquid Hydrocarbons by a Group-Contribution Method.

Prausnitz, J.M.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Low-Value Waste Gases as an Energy Source  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

designing new furnaces to use them. In addition, because of the difficulties in burning them and the chemical compounds that may be included in them, the potential pollutant emissions from these waste streams is also a significant consideration....

Waibel, R. T.

393

Optical panel system including stackable waveguides  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An optical panel system including stackable waveguides is provided. The optical panel system displays a projected light image and comprises a plurality of planar optical waveguides in a stacked state. The optical panel system further comprises a support system that aligns and supports the waveguides in the stacked state. In one embodiment, the support system comprises at least one rod, wherein each waveguide contains at least one hole, and wherein each rod is positioned through a corresponding hole in each waveguide. In another embodiment, the support system comprises at least two opposing edge structures having the waveguides positioned therebetween, wherein each opposing edge structure contains a mating surface, wherein opposite edges of each waveguide contain mating surfaces which are complementary to the mating surfaces of the opposing edge structures, and wherein each mating surface of the opposing edge structures engages a corresponding complementary mating surface of the opposite edges of each waveguide.

DeSanto, Leonard (Dunkirk, MD); Veligdan, James T. (Manorville, NY)

2007-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

394

Thermovoltaic semiconductor device including a plasma filter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A thermovoltaic energy conversion device and related method for converting thermal energy into an electrical potential. An interference filter is provided on a semiconductor thermovoltaic cell to pre-filter black body radiation. The semiconductor thermovoltaic cell includes a P/N junction supported on a substrate which converts incident thermal energy below the semiconductor junction band gap into electrical potential. The semiconductor substrate is doped to provide a plasma filter which reflects back energy having a wavelength which is above the band gap and which is ineffectively filtered by the interference filter, through the P/N junction to the source of radiation thereby avoiding parasitic absorption of the unusable portion of the thermal radiation energy.

Baldasaro, Paul F. (Clifton Park, NY)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Critical point anomalies include expansion shock waves  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

From first-principle fluid dynamics, complemented by a rigorous state equation accounting for critical anomalies, we discovered that expansion shock waves may occur in the vicinity of the liquid-vapor critical point in the two-phase region. Due to universality of near-critical thermodynamics, the result is valid for any common pure fluid in which molecular interactions are only short-range, namely, for so-called 3-dimensional Ising-like systems, and under the assumption of thermodynamic equilibrium. In addition to rarefaction shock waves, diverse non-classical effects are admissible, including composite compressive shock-fan-shock waves, due to the change of sign of the fundamental derivative of gasdynamics.

Nannan, N. R., E-mail: ryan.nannan@uvs.edu [Mechanical Engineering Discipline, Anton de Kom University of Suriname, Leysweg 86, PO Box 9212, Paramaribo, Suriname and Process and Energy Department, Delft University of Technology, Leeghwaterstraat 44, 2628 CA Delft (Netherlands); Guardone, A., E-mail: alberto.guardone@polimi.it [Department of Aerospace Science and Technology, Politecnico di Milano, Via La Masa 34, 20156 Milano (Italy); Colonna, P., E-mail: p.colonna@tudelft.nl [Propulsion and Power, Delft University of Technology, Kluyverweg 1, 2629 HS Delft (Netherlands)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

396

Complex shell model representation including antibound states  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A generalization of the complex shell model formalism is presented that includes antibound states in the basis. These states, together with bound states, Gamow states, and the continuum background, represented by properly chosen scattering waves, form a representation in which all states are treated on the same footing. Two-particle states are evaluated within this formalism, and observable two-particle resonances are defined. The formalism is illustrated in the well-known case of Li11 in its bound ground state and in Ca70(g.s.), which is also bound. Both cases are found to have a halo structure. These halo structures are described within the generalized complex shell model. We investigated the formation of two-particle resonances in these nuclei, but no evidence of such resonances was found.

R. Id Betan; R. J. Liotta; N. Sandulescu; T. Vertse; R. Wyss

2005-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

397

Combustion behavior of a spark ignition engine fueled with synthetic gases derived from biogas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Combustion results obtained from a spark ignition engine fueled with two synthetic gases obtained from catalytic decomposition of biogas are presented in this paper. These results are compared with those obtained when the engine was fueled with gasoline, methane and with the biogas from which synthetic gases are extracted. Experimental tests were performed under a wide range of speeds and at three equivalence ratios. Results showed that fractions of hydrogen in synthetic gases increased maximum pressures inside cylinder. Moreover, peak pressures were detected closer to top dead center than methane and biogas. Despite the fraction of diluents in the composition of synthetic gases, high speeds and lean conditions resulted in higher indicated efficiencies than those obtained with gasoline. Moreover, combustion speed and heat release rate were strongly influenced by the proportion of diluents and hydrogen in gaseous blends. CO and CO2 content in the composition of synthetic gases contributed to increase the exhaust concentrations of these pollutants compared with the other fuels, while HC decreased because of the small fraction of methane which remained unburned. Although \\{NOx\\} emissions were mitigated by diluents, like CO2 and air excess, high hydrogen fraction in composition of syngas involved elevated \\{NOx\\} emissions due to the increase in flame temperature that hydrogen produces.

J. Arroyo; F. Moreno; M. Muoz; C. Monn; N. Bernal

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Analysis of air pollution and greenhouse gases. Initial studies, FY 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The current objective of the project ``Analysis of Air Pollution and Greenhouse Gases`` is to develop a study of emissions and emission sources that could easily be linked to models of economic activity. Initial studies were conducted to evaluate data currently available linking activity rates and emissions estimates. The emissions inventory developed for the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP) presents one of the most comprehensive data sets, and was chosen for our initial studies, which are described in this report. Over 99% of the SO{sub 2} emissions, 98% of the NO{sub x} emission and 57% of the VOC emissions from area sources are related to fuel combustion. The majority of emission from these sources are generated by the transportation sector. Activity rates for area sources are not archived with the NAPAP inventory; alternative derivations of these data will be part of the future activities of this project. The availability and completeness of the fuel heat content data in the NAPAP inventory were also studied. Approximately 10% of the SO{sub 2} emissions, 13% of the NO{sub x} emissions and 46% of the VOC emissions are generated by sources with unavailable data for fuel heat content. Initial estimates of pollutant emission rate per unit fuel heat content. Initial estimates of pollutant emission rate per unit fuel heat content were generated. Future studies for this project include the derivation of activity rates for area sources, improved explanations for the default fuel parameters defined in the NAPAP inventory and the development of links to data bases of economic activity.

Benkovitz, C.M.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

SEEPAGE MODEL FOR PA INCLUDING DRIFT COLLAPSE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to document the predictions and analyses performed using the seepage model for performance assessment (SMPA) for both the Topopah Spring middle nonlithophysal (Tptpmn) and lower lithophysal (Tptpll) lithostratigraphic units at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Look-up tables of seepage flow rates into a drift (and their uncertainty) are generated by performing numerical simulations with the seepage model for many combinations of the three most important seepage-relevant parameters: the fracture permeability, the capillary-strength parameter 1/a, and the percolation flux. The percolation flux values chosen take into account flow focusing effects, which are evaluated based on a flow-focusing model. Moreover, multiple realizations of the underlying stochastic permeability field are conducted. Selected sensitivity studies are performed, including the effects of an alternative drift geometry representing a partially collapsed drift from an independent drift-degradation analysis (BSC 2004 [DIRS 166107]). The intended purpose of the seepage model is to provide results of drift-scale seepage rates under a series of parameters and scenarios in support of the Total System Performance Assessment for License Application (TSPA-LA). The SMPA is intended for the evaluation of drift-scale seepage rates under the full range of parameter values for three parameters found to be key (fracture permeability, the van Genuchten 1/a parameter, and percolation flux) and drift degradation shape scenarios in support of the TSPA-LA during the period of compliance for postclosure performance [Technical Work Plan for: Performance Assessment Unsaturated Zone (BSC 2002 [DIRS 160819], Section I-4-2-1)]. The flow-focusing model in the Topopah Spring welded (TSw) unit is intended to provide an estimate of flow focusing factors (FFFs) that (1) bridge the gap between the mountain-scale and drift-scale models, and (2) account for variability in local percolation flux due to stochastic hydrologic properties and flow processes.

C. Tsang

2004-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

400

Solubility Coefficients for Solar Liquids, a New Method to Quantify Undissolved Gases and Practical Recommendations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Solubility of nitrogen in propylene glycol/water mixtures (25%, 41.84% and 100% glycol by weight) have been determined in a temperature range from 10C to 110C using a static isochoric measuring method and are compared to the solubility of a typical solar liquid. To evaluate the amount of gas in a solar system it is necessary to measure the part of gases dissolved in the solar liquid, but also to consider the fraction of free gases (gas bubbles or gas cushions) in the system. Measuring this part was either not possible or only possible with a big technical effort until now. Therefore a new method was developed, which easily and fast identifies the volume of undissolved gases (Gas Bubble Test). The method was validated in extensive investigations in real solar systems.

Martin Heymann; Felix Panitz; Karin Rhling; Clemens Felsmann

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including digester gases" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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401

Composting of the solid fraction of digestate derived from pig slurry: Biological processes and compost properties  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The aim of this paper was to assess the characteristics of the solid fractions (SF) obtained by mechanical separation of digestate, their compostability and compost quality. To do so, the SF of digestates obtained from anaerobic digestion of pig slurry, energy crops and agro-industrial residues were sampled in five plants located in Northern Italy. Results obtained indicated that anaerobic digestion by itself promoted the high biological stability of biomasses with a Potential Dynamic Respiration Index (PDRI) close to 1000mgO2kgVS?1h?1. Subsequent composting of digestates, with an added bulking agent, did not give remarkably different results, and led only to a slight modification of the characteristics of the initial non-composted mixtures; the composts obtained fully respected the legal limits for high quality compost. Chemical studies of organic matter composition of the biomasses by using CP MAS 13C NMR, indicated that the compost was composed of a high relative content of O-alkyl-C (71.47% of total C) (cellulose and hemicelluloses) and a low alkyl-C (12.42%) (i.e. volatile fatty acids, steroid-like molecules, aliphatic biopolymers and proteins).

Fulvia Tambone; Laura Terruzzi; Barbara Scaglia; Fabrizio Adani

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Modelling the energy performance of a farm-scale cellulose to ethanol process with on-site cellulase production and anaerobic digestion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A farm-scale process for converting wheat straw to ethanol was modelled to assess its energy performance. The process incorporates the on-site production of crude unprocessed liquid cellulase produced via solid-state fermentation, and the anaerobic digestion of process residues to supply heat and electricity. Results include energy yield ratios from 6 to 9, reductions of 8090 % in the energy required to produce and transport the cellulase compared to commercial preparations, and a net surplus of on-site heat and electricity. From these improvements in process efficiency, environmental benefits follow.

Mitchell Lever

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

GEI 41040G - Specification for Fuel Gases for COmbustion in Heavy-Duty Gas Turbines  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Gas Turbine Gas Turbine Revised, January 2002 GEI 41040G These instructions do not purport to cover all details or variations in equipment nor to provide for every possible contingency to be met in connection with installation, operation or maintenance. Should further information be desired or should particular problems arise which are not covered sufficiently for the purchaser's purposes the matter should be referred to the GE Company. © 1999 GENERAL ELECTRIC COMPANY Specification for Fuel Gases for Combustion in Heavy-Duty Gas Turbines GEI 41040G Specification for Fuel Gases for Combustion in Heavy-Duty Gas Turbines 2 TABLE OF CONTENTS I. INTRODUCTION 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

404

Dissipative Dynamics of a Josephson Junction In the Bose-Gases  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The dissipative dynamics of a Josephson junction in the Bose-gases is considered within the framework of the model of a tunneling Hamiltonian. The effective action which describes the dynamics of the phase difference across the junction is derived using functional integration method. The dynamic equation obtained for the phase difference across the junction is analyzed for the finite temperatures in the low frequency limit involving the radiation terms. The asymmetric case of the Bose-gases with the different order parameters is calculated as well.

R. A. Barankov; S. N. Burmistrov

2003-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

405

Spin noise spectroscopy to probe quantum states of ultracold fermionic atom gases  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We theoretically demonstrate that optical measurements of electron spin noise can be a spectroscopic probe of the entangled quantum states of ultracold fermionic atom gases and unambiguously reveal the detailed nature of the underlying interatomic correlations. Different models of the effective interatomic interactions predict entirely new sets of resonances in the spin noise spectrum. Once the correct effective interatomic interaction model is identified, the detailed noise line shapes of the spin noise can be used to constrain this model. We estimate the magnitude of spin noise signals expected in ultracold fermionic atom gases via noise measurements in classical alkali vapors, which demonstrate the feasibility of this approach.

Mihaila, Bogdan; Blagoev, Krastan B.; Smith, Darryl L. [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Crooker, Scott A.; Rickel, Dwight G. [National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Littlewood, Peter B. [Cavendish Laboratory, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom)

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

406

High-temperature sorbent method for removal of sulfur containing gases from gaseous mixtures  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A copper oxide-zinc oxide mixture is used as a sorbent for removing hydrogen sulfide and other sulfur containing gases at high temperatures from a gaseous fuel mixture. This high-temperature sorbent is especially useful for preparing fuel gases for high temperature fuel cells. The copper oxide is initially reduced in a preconditioning step to elemental copper and is present in a highly dispersed state throughout the zinc oxide which serves as a support as well as adding to the sulfur sorption capacity. The spent sorbent is regenerated by high-temperature treatment with an air fuel, air steam mixture followed by hydrogen reduction to remove and recover the sulfur.

Young, John E. (Woodridge, IL); Jalan, Vinod M. (Concord, MA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

High-temperature sorbent method for removal of sulfur-containing gases from gaseous mixtures  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A copper oxide-zinc oxide mixture is used as a sorbent for removing hydrogen sulfide and other sulfur containing gases at high temperatures from a gaseous fuel mixture. This high-temperature sorbent is especially useful for preparing fuel gases for high temperature fuel cells. The copper oxide is initially reduced in a preconditioning step to elemental copper and is present in a highly dispersed state throughout the zinc oxide which serves as a support as well as adding to the sulfur sorbtion capacity. The spent sorbent is regenerated by high-temperature treatment with an air fuel, air steam mixture followed by hydrogen reduction to remove and recover the sulfur.

Young, J.E.; Jalan, V.M.

1982-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

408

High-temperature sorbent method for removal of sulfur containing gases from gaseous mixtures  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A copper oxide-zinc oxide mixture is used as a sorbent for removing hydrogen sulfide and other sulfur containing gases at high temperatures from a gaseous fuel mixture. This high-temperature sorbent is especially useful for preparing fuel gases for high temperature fuel cells. The copper oxide is initially reduced in a preconditioning step to elemental copper and is present in a highly dispersed state throughout the zinc oxide which serves as a support as well as adding to the sulfur sorption capacity. The spent sorbent is regenerated by high-temperature treatment with an air fuel, air steam mixture followed by hydrogen reduction to remove and recover the sulfur.

Young, J.E.; Jalan, V.M.

1984-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

409

Methods and systems for remote detection of gases  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Novel systems and methods for remotely detecting at least one constituent of a gas via infrared detection are provided. A system includes at least one extended source of broadband infrared radiation and a spectrally sensitive receiver positioned remotely from the source. The source and the receiver are oriented such that a surface of the source is in the field of view of the receiver. The source includes a heating component thermally coupled to the surface, and the heating component is configured to heat the surface to a temperature above ambient temperature. The receiver is operable to collect spectral infrared absorption data representative of a gas present between the source and the receiver. The invention advantageously overcomes significant difficulties associated with active infrared detection techniques known in the art, and provides an infrared detection technique with a much greater sensitivity than passive infrared detection techniques known in the art.

Johnson, Timothy J. (Pasco, WA)

2007-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

410

Methods and systems for remote detection of gases  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Novel systems and methods for remotely detecting at least one constituent of a gas via infrared detection are provided. A system includes at least one extended source of broadband infrared radiation and a spectrally sensitive receiver positioned remotely from the source. The source and the receiver are oriented such that a surface of the source is in the field of view of the receiver. The source includes a heating component thermally coupled to the surface, and the heating component is configured to heat the surface to a temperature above ambient temperature. The receiver is operable to collect spectral infrared absorption data representative of a gas present between the source and the receiver. The invention advantageously overcomes significant difficulties associated with active infrared detection techniques known in the art, and provides an infrared detection technique with a much greater sensitivity than passive infrared detection techniques known in the art.

Johnson, Timothy J

2012-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

411

NREL: News - NREL Finds a New Cellulose Digestion Mechanism by a  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

114 114 NREL Finds a New Cellulose Digestion Mechanism by a Fast-eating Enzyme CelA digests cellulose faster than enzymes from commercial preparations January 2, 2014 Researchers at the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have discovered that an enzyme from a microorganism first found in the Valley of Geysers on the Kamchatka Peninsula in Russia in 1990 can digest cellulose almost twice as fast as the current leading component cellulase enzyme on the market. If the enzyme continues to perform well in larger tests, it could help drive down the price of making lignocellulosic fuels, from ethanol to other biofuels that can be dropped into existing infrastructure. A paper reporting this finding, "Revealing Nature's Cellulase Diversity: The

412

Citrus essential oils and their influence on the anaerobic digestion process: An overview  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Citrus waste accounts for more than half of the whole fruit when processed for juice extraction. Among valorisation possibilities, anaerobic digestion for methane generation appears to be the most technically feasible and environmentally friendly alternative. However, citrus essential oils can inhibit this biological process. In this paper, the characteristics of citrus essential oils, as well as the mechanisms of their antimicrobial effects and potential adaptation mechanisms are reviewed. Previous studies of anaerobic digestion of citrus waste under different conditions are presented; however, some controversy exists regarding the limiting dosage of limonene for a stable process (24192mg of citrus essential oil per liter of digester and day). Successful strategies to avoid process inhibition by citrus essential oils are based either on recovery or removal of the limonene, by extraction or fungal pre-treatment respectively.

B. Ruiz; X. Flotats

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Waste-to-wheel analysis of anaerobic-digestion-based renewable natural gas pathways with the GREET model.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2009, manure management accounted for 2,356 Gg or 107 billion standard cubic ft of methane (CH{sub 4}) emissions in the United States, equivalent to 0.5% of U.S. natural gas (NG) consumption. Owing to the high global warming potential of methane, capturing and utilizing this methane source could reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The extent of that reduction depends on several factors - most notably, how much of this manure-based methane can be captured, how much GHG is produced in the course of converting it to vehicular fuel, and how much GHG was produced by the fossil fuel it might displace. A life-cycle analysis was conducted to quantify these factors and, in so doing, assess the impact of converting methane from animal manure into renewable NG (RNG) and utilizing the gas in vehicles. Several manure-based RNG pathways were characterized in the GREET (Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation) model, and their fuel-cycle energy use and GHG emissions were compared to petroleum-based pathways as well as to conventional fossil NG pathways. Results show that despite increased total energy use, both fossil fuel use and GHG emissions decline for most RNG pathways as compared with fossil NG and petroleum. However, GHG emissions for RNG pathways are highly dependent on the specifics of the reference case, as well as on the process energy emissions and methane conversion factors assumed for the RNG pathways. The most critical factors are the share of flared controllable CH{sub 4} and the quantity of CH{sub 4} lost during NG extraction in the reference case, the magnitude of N{sub 2}O lost in the anaerobic digestion (AD) process and in AD residue, and the amount of carbon sequestered in AD residue. In many cases, data for these parameters are limited and uncertain. Therefore, more research is needed to gain a better understanding of the range and magnitude of environmental benefits from converting animal manure to RNG via AD.

Han, J.; Mintz, M.; Wang, M. (Energy Systems)

2011-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

414

Nutrient leaching following land application of aerobically digested municipal sewage sludge in a northern hardwood forest  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Concentrations of selected cations and anions were determined in soil solutions from a forested site in southern New Hampshire during the first growing season after surface application of an aerobically digested, limed, liquid municipal sludge. Sludge was applied in June 1989 at 0, 3.3, 6.9, and 14.5 Mg ha{sup -1}, which corresponded to 199, 396, and 740 kg N ha{sup -1} as total Kjeldahl N (TKN). Porous, suction-cup lysimeters were used to sample soil solutions below the rooting zone ({approximately}60 cm) within subplots designed to include (untrenched) or exclude (trenched) uptake by vegetation. Following sludge application, measured solute concentrations remained low until September 1989, when NO{sub 3}, Cl, Ca, Mg, Na, and K in trenched subplots increased simultaneously to maximum values in October or November 1989, just before the soil froze for the winter. Nitrate was the dominant anion in soil solutions from trenched subplots and averaged in excess of 0.71 mmol L{sup -1} (10 mg L{sup -1} NO{sub 3}-N) at all loading rates. Highest concentrations of NO{sub 3} occurred on subplots with the highest sludge application rates. In the entrenched areas, NO{sub 3} concentrations rarely exceeded 0.001 mmol L{sup -1}; Cl increased in treated areas and was the dominant anion by the end of the season. Soil solution NH{sub 4}, PO{sub 4}, SO{sub 4} K, and pH did not change significantly for any sludge application rate. Comparison of results from trenched and untrenched areas suggests that, at application rates of up to 14.5 Mg ha{sup -1 }(799 kg TKN ha{sup -1}), a combination of physical, chemical, and biological factors (most likely plant uptake) limited the movement of sludge or sludge-derived constituents from the sites of application. 37 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

Medalie, L.; Bowden, W.B.; Smith, C.T. [Univ. of New Hampshire, Durham, NH (United States)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Spectroscopy and kinetics of combustion gases at high temperatures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This program involves two complementary activities: (1) development and application of cw ring dye laser absorption methods for sensitive detection of radical species and measurement of fundamental spectroscopic parameters at high temperatures; and (2) shock tube studies of reaction kinetics relevant to combustion. Species currently under investigation in the spectroscopic portion of the research include NO and CH{sub 3}; this has necessitated the continued operated at wavelengths in the range 210-230 nm. Shock tube studies of reaction kinetics currently are focussed on reactions involving CH{sub 3} radicals.

Hanson, R.K.; Bowman, C.T. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Contribution of Anaerobic Digesters to Emissions Mitigation and Electricity Generation Under U.S. Climate Policy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Anaerobic digesters (ADs) can produce renewable energy from livestock manure, prevent the release of methane, and reduce air and water pollution, and digested manure can be applied to crops as a fertilizer. ... Comprehensive inclusion of the GHG mitigation benefits and low-carbon energy generation of AD projects within a federal climate and energy policy would further enhance prospects for new projects. ... Arthurson, V.Closing the Global Energy and Nutrient Cycles through Application of Biogas Residue to Agricultural Land - Potential Benefits and Drawbacks Energies 2009, 2 ( 2) 226 242 ...

David P. M. Zaks; Niven Winchester; Christopher J. Kucharik; Carol C. Barford; Sergey Paltsev; John M. Reilly

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

417

Detection of Irradiated Frozen Deboned Seafood with the Level of Radiolytic H2 and CO Gases as a Probe  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A method to detect irradiated frozen shrimp without cuticle, cod slices, and deshelled oyster has been developed based on the fact that radiolytic H2 and CO gases are retained in the irradiated samples for a certain period during the storage. These gases ...

Masakazu Furuta; Takaaki Dohmaru; Tadashi Katayama; Hirokazu Toratani; Atsuhiko Takeda

1997-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

418

Method and apparatus for separating gases based on electrically and magnetically enhanced monolithic carbon fiber composite sorbents  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for separating gases or other fluids involves placing a magnetic field on a monolithic carbon fiber composite sorption material to more preferentially attract certain gases or other fluids to the sorption material to which a magnetic field is applied. This technique may be combined with the known pressure swing adsorption'' technique utilizing the same sorption material. 1 fig.

Judkins, R.R.; Burchell, T.D.

1999-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

419

Method and apparatus for separating gases based on electrically and magnetically enhanced monolithic carbon fiber composite sorbents  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for separating gases or other fluids involves placing a magnetic field on a monolithic carbon fiber composite sorption material to more preferentially attract certain gases or other fluids to the sorption material to which a magnetic field is applied. This technique may be combined with the known "pressure swing adsorption" technique utilizing the same sorption material.

Judkins, Roddie R. (9917 Rainbow Dr., Knoxville, TN 37922); Burchell, Timothy D. (109 Greywood Pl., Oak Ridge, TN 37830)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Theoretical Gas Phase Mass Transfer Coefficients for Endogenous Gases in the Lungs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Theoretical Gas Phase Mass Transfer Coefficients for Endogenous Gases in the Lungs PETER CONDORELLI of California at Irvine, Irvine, CA (Received 18 November 1997; accepted 9 February 1999) Abstract--Gas phase in terms of a lumped variable, Per(L/D)n . (Sh) increases as the solu- bility of the gas in tissue

George, Steven C.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including digester gases" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Photoconductivity and luminescence in GaSe crystals at high levels of optical excitation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The photoconductivity and luminescence of GaSe layered crystals at high levels of optical excitation are studied experimentally. The specific features observed in the photoconductivity and photoluminescence spectra are controlled by the nonlinear optical absorption in the region of excitonic resonance.

Kyazym-zade, A. G.; Salmanov, V. M., E-mail: vagif_salmanov@yahoo.com; Salmanova, A. A. [Baku State University (Azerbaijan); Alieva, A. M.; Ibaeva, R. Z. [National Academy of Sciences, Institute of Physics (Azerbaijan)

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

422

Effects of Biochar and Basalt Additions on Carbon Sequestration and Fluxes of Greenhouse Gases in Soils  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effects of Biochar and Basalt Additions on Carbon Sequestration and Fluxes of Greenhouse Gases Emissions--Carbon Dioxide Emissions--Sequestration and Storage--Biochar--Basalt--Organic Fertilizers, this investigation focuses on the range of potential of different soil additives to enhance sequestration and storage

Vallino, Joseph J.

423

Operational aspects of the desulfurization process of energy gases mimics in biotrickling filters5  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Introduction Energy rich off-gases such as biogas are sometimes not used for electric power generation due impurities. H2S concentrations in biogas can range from 0.1 to 5 We dedicate this article to the memory/v (1000e20,000 ppmv), whereas the specifications for the maximum content of H2S in typical biogas

424

1988 Pilot Institute on Global Change on trace gases and the biosphere  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This proposal seeks multi-agency funding to conduct an international, multidisciplinary 1988 Pilot Institute on Global Change to take place from August 7 through 21, 1988, on the topic: Trace Gases and the Biosphere. The institute, to be held in Snowmass, Colorado, is envisioned as a pilot version of a continuing series of institutes on Global Change (IGC). This proposal seeks support for the 1988 pilot institute only. The concept and structure for the continuing series, and the definition of the 1988 pilot institute, were developed at an intensive and multidisciplinary Summer Institute Planning Meeting in Boulder, Colorado, on August 24--25, 1987. The theme for the 1988 PIGC, Trace Gases and the Biosphere, will focus a concerted, high-level multidisciplinary effort on a scientific problem central to the Global Change Program. Dramatic year-to-year increases in the global concentrations of radiatively-active trace gases such as methane and carbon dioxide are now well documented. The predicted climatic effects of these changes lend special urgency to efforts to study the biospheric sources and sinks of these gases and to clarify their interactions and role in the geosphere-biosphere system.

Eddy, J.A.; Moore, B. III

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Bose-Einstein Condensation in Atomic Gases Jerzy Zachorowski and Wojciech Gawlik  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. It is instructive to compare orders of magnitude typical for the thermal and condensed gas samples. For atom gasBose-Einstein Condensation in Atomic Gases Jerzy Zachorowski and Wojciech Gawlik M. Smoluchowski on the Bose-Einstein condensate. We also present main parameters and expected characteristics of the first Pol

426

Ion fragmentation in an electrospray ionization mass spectrometer interface with different gases  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the gas phase. However, particularly in multi- component samples, this may not be enough to unambigu predicts that the degree of ion fragmentation increases with increasing mass of the curtain gas. However with argon and krypton is caused by condensation of the gases within the free jet expansion between

Chen, David D.Y.

427

UA Researchers design a catalyst that neutralizes the gases responsible for climate change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UA Researchers design a catalyst that neutralizes the gases responsible for climate change Toxic Researchers at the University of Alicante have developed and patented a novel catalyst capable of decomposing gas streams. "However, nitrous oxide can be decomposed at lower temperatures using a suitable catalyst

Escolano, Francisco

428

Radiative-convective model of warming Mars with artificial greenhouse gases  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

spectra of seven artificial greenhouse gases (CF4, C2F6, C3F8, SF6, CF3Cl, CF3Br, CF2Cl2 ecosynthesis, CF4, C2F6, and SF6 were 17%, 49%, and 48% as effective as C3F8, respectively. The optimal mixture

Kite, Edwin

429

Article published Greenhouse Gases: Science and Technology DOI: 10.1002/ghg.1395  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Article published Greenhouse Gases: Science and Technology DOI: 10.1002/ghg.1395 National Corridors.1002/ghg.1395 #12;1 Introduction The need to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by present energy.1, 2 Carbon dioxide (CO2) is the most worrisome GHG because of its long residence time

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

430

Ballistic spin transport in exciton gases A. V. Kavokin,1, 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, or spin-optronics challeng- ing. How possibly one can explore the current, which is carried by neutral are possible in exciton and exciton-polariton Bose gases. Bosonic spintronics or spin-optronics operates,28 . Combined with evident advantages of bosonic amplifica- tion and low dephasing, this makes spin-optronics

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

431

Gas Chromatographic Measurement of Trace Oxygen and Other Dissolved Gases in Thermally Stressed Jet Fuel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......additional light hydrocarbon gases (e.g...stream, and the data can be obtained...system. The output data from this analytical...F33615-87-C-2714 and the Combustion and Heat Transfer Studies...from deoxygenated hydrocarbons: I. General features......

Wayne A. Rubey; Richard C. Striebich; Michael D. Tissandier; Debra A. Tirey; Steven D. Anderson

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Experimental observation of a traveling plasma grating formed by two crossing filaments in gases  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The spatial motion and effective duration of a traveling plasma grating formed by two interfering femtosecond laser filaments in gases is characterized by its Doppler effect imparted on a probe pulse. The shift velocity determined experimentally agrees with the theoretical calculations.

Durand, Magali [Laboratoire d'Optique Appliquee, ENSTA ParisTech-Ecole Polytechnique-CNRS, 91761 Palaiseau (France); ONERA, Chemin de la Huniere, 91761 Palaiseau (France); Liu Yi; Forestier, Benjamin; Houard, Aurelien; Mysyrowicz, Andre [Laboratoire d'Optique Appliquee, ENSTA ParisTech-Ecole Polytechnique-CNRS, 91761 Palaiseau (France)

2011-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

433

Anode supported single chamber solid oxide fuel cells operating in exhaust gases of thermal engine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Anode supported single chamber solid oxide fuel cells operating in exhaust gases of thermal engine fuel cells are usually described as devices able to convert chemical energy into electrical energy. Conventional solid oxide fuel cells are separated into two compartments containing each electrode split

Boyer, Edmond

434

Abstract--Energy consumption and the concomitant Green House Gases (GHG) emissions of network infrastructures are  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract--Energy consumption and the concomitant Green House Gases (GHG) emissions of network on the overall power consumption and on the GHG emissions with just 25% of green energy sources. I. INTRODUCTION]. In the zero carbon approach, renewable (green) energy sources (e.g. sun, wind, tide) are employed and no GHGs

Politècnica de Catalunya, Universitat

435

Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy for dilute gases in equilibrium H. van Beijeren,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Posch,3 and Ch. Dellago3,4 1 Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Utrecht, Postbus 80006, 3508 TA Utrecht, The Netherlands 2 Institute for Physical Science and Technology and Department the kinetic theory of gases have been applied to compute the chaotic properties of simple systems such as hard

Dellago, Christoph

436

Towards a history of the international industrial gases industry Ray Stokes, Ralf Banken, and Matthias Phl  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

industrial revolution" and their component companies. From David Landes's classic study, The Unbound of the industries of the second industrial revolution has been virtually ignored in this scholarship to date1 Towards a history of the international industrial gases industry Ray Stokes, Ralf Banken

Guo, Zaoyang

437

Comparison of different liquid anaerobic digestion effluents as inocula and nitrogen sources for solid-state batch anaerobic digestion of corn stover  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Compared methane production of solid AD inoculated with different effluents. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Food waste effluent (FWE) had the largest population of acetoclastic methanogens. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Solid AD inoculated with FWE produced the highest methane yield at F/E ratio of 4. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dairy waste effluent (DWE) was rich of cellulolytic and xylanolytic bacteria. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Solid AD inoculated with DWE produced the highest methane yield at F/E ratio of 2. - Abstract: Effluents from three liquid anaerobic digesters, fed with municipal sewage sludge, food waste, or dairy waste, were evaluated as inocula and nitrogen sources for solid-state batch anaerobic digestion of corn stover in mesophilic reactors. Three feedstock-to-effluent (F/E) ratios (i.e., 2, 4, and 6) were tested for each effluent. At an F/E ratio of 2, the reactor inoculated by dairy waste effluent achieved the highest methane yield of 238.5 L/kgVS{sub feed}, while at an F/E ratio of 4, the reactor inoculated by food waste effluent achieved the highest methane yield of 199.6 L/kgVS{sub feed}. The microbial population and chemical composition of the three effluents were substantially different. Food waste effluent had the largest population of acetoclastic methanogens, while dairy waste effluent had the largest populations of cellulolytic and xylanolytic bacteria. Dairy waste also had the highest C/N ratio of 8.5 and the highest alkalinity of 19.3 g CaCO{sub 3}/kg. The performance of solid-state batch anaerobic digestion reactors was closely related to the microbial status in the liquid anaerobic digestion effluents.

Xu Fuqing; Shi Jian [Department of Food, Agricultural and Biological Engineering, Ohio State University, Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center, 1680 Madison Ave., Wooster, OH 44691 (United States); Lv Wen; Yu Zhongtang [Department of Animal Sciences, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Li Yebo, E-mail: li.851@osu.edu [Department of Food, Agricultural and Biological Engineering, Ohio State University, Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center, 1680 Madison Ave., Wooster, OH 44691 (United States)

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

438

Behaviour of digestive enzymes in the pancreatic juice and pancreas of rats fed on a low-protein diet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Behaviour of digestive enzymes in the pancreatic juice and pancreas of rats fed on a low (23.5 p. 100 mixed protein) on the activity of some pancreatic digestive enzymes and the amount also augmented. 3) The low-protein diet produced an overall decrease in enzyme activity in the pancreas

Boyer, Edmond

439

Development of Oxidative Lime Pretreatment and Shock Treatment to Produce Highly Digestible Lignocellulose for Biofuel and Ruminant Feed Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

enhanced the 72-h glucan digestibility of several promising biomass feedstocks: bagasse (74.0), corn stover (92.0), poplar wood (94.0), sorghum (71.8), and switchgrass (89.0). Highly digestible lignocellulose can also be used as ruminant animal feed. Shock...

Falls, Matthew David

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

440

Efficient and Specific Trypsin Digestion of Microgram to Nanogram Quantities of Proteins in Organic-Aqueous Solvent Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mass spectrometry-based identification of the components of multiprotein complexes often involves solution-phase proteolytic digestion of the complex. The affinity purification of individual protein complexes often yields nanogram to low-microgram amounts of protein, which poses several challenges for enzymatic digestion and protein identification. We tested different solvent systems to optimize trypsin digestions of samples containing limited amounts of protein for subsequent analysis by LC-MS-MS. Data collected from digestion of 10-, 2-, 1-, and 0.2- g portions of a protein standard mixture indicated that an organicaqueous solvent system containing 80% acetonitrile consistently provided the most complete digestion, producing more peptide identifications than the other solvent systems tested. For example, a 1-h digestion in 80% acetonitrile yielded over 52% more peptides than the overnight digestion of 1 g of a protein mixture in purely aqueous buffer. This trend was also observed for peptides from digested ribosomal proteins isolated from Rhodopseudomonas palustris. In addition to improved digestion efficiency, the shorter digestion times possible with the organic solvent also improved trypsin specificity, resulting in smaller numbers of semitryptic peptides than an overnight digestion protocol using an aqueous solvent. The technique was also demonstrated for an affinityisolated protein complex, GroEL. To our knowledge, this report is the first using mass spectrometry data to show a linkage between digestion solvent and trypsin specificity. Mass spectrometry (MS) has become a widely used method for studying proteins, protein complexes, and whole proteomes because of innovations in soft ionization techniques, bioinformatics, and chromatographic separation techniques.1-7 An example of a high-throughput mass spectrometry strategy commonly used for this purpose is a variation of the "shotgun" approach, involving in-solution digestion of a protein complex followed by onedimensional (1D) or two-dimensional (2D) liquid chromatography (LC) coupled with electrospray ionization (ESI) MS-MS.6-8 One of the applications of this method is for characterizing multiprotein complexes by identifying large numbers of proteins in a single data acquisition.9 Large-scale implementations of this strategy have been reported for yeast and Escherichia coli.10-12 To achieve a goal of characterizing large numbers of protein complexes13 isolated by affinity purification from Rhodopseudomonas palustris,14 an efficient protocol for digesting these complexes is required.

Strader, Michael B [ORNL; Tabb, Dave L [ORNL; Hervey, IV, William Judson [ORNL; Pan, Chongle [ORNL; Hurst, Gregory {Greg} B [ORNL

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including digester gases" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Method and apparatus for measuring purity of noble gases  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A device for detecting impurities in a noble gas includes a detection chamber and a source of pulsed ultraviolet light. The pulse of the ultraviolet light is transferred into the detection chamber and onto a photocathode, thereby emitting a cloud of free electrons into the noble gas within the detection chamber. The cloud of electrons is attracted to the opposite end of the detection chamber by a high positive voltage potential at that end and focused onto a sensing anode. If there are impurities in the noble gas, some or all of the electrons within the cloud will bond with the impurity molecules and not reach the sensing anode. Therefore, measuring a lower signal at the sensing anode indicates a higher level of impurities while sensing a higher signal indicates fewer impurities. Impurities in the range of one part per billion can be measured by this device.

Austin, Robert (Largo, FL)

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

2 - Solubility of Atmospheric Gases in Brackish and Marine Waters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This chapter presents tabular information on the standard air saturation concentration (moist air at 1atm) for oxygen, nitrogen, argon, and carbon dioxide gas in terms of ?mol/kg, mg/L, and as Bunsen coefficients L real gas/(Latm) and mg real gas/(LmmHg) for 040C in marine waters. Values are given at coarse salinity intervals for 040g/kg (which embraces the range likely to be encountered in most common nearshore conditions) and at finer intervals for 3337g/kg for open water conditions. Because the mole fraction of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is changing, solubility information is provided for 2010 (390?atm) and for 2030 (440?atm) based on projected atmospheric values. Tabular information is also provided to allow computation of standard air saturation concentration of carbon dioxide gas directly as a function of atmospheric mole fraction. Equations and tabular information are provided to allow conversion of concentrations in mg/L to partial pressures in mmHg. Using the equations presented in Chapter 1, air saturation concentrations (at local barometric pressure) and solubility of arbitrary gas composition mixtures can be computed. Sample problems are included for representative examples. Keywords gas solubility, marine waters, oxygen, nitrogen, argon, carbon dioxide, standard air solubility, air solubility, Bunsen coefficients, partial pressures

John Colt

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Energy and materials savings from gases and solid waste recovery in the iron and steel industry in Brazil: An industrial ecology approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper attempts to investigate, from an entropic point of view, the role of selected technologies in the production, transformation, consumption and release of energy and materials in the Iron and Steel Industry in Brazil. In a quantitative analysis, the potential for energy and materials savings with recovery of heat, gases and tar are evaluated for the Iron and Steel Industry in Brazil. The technologies for heat recovery of gases include Coke Dry Quenching (CDQ), applied only in one of the five Brazilian coke integrated steel plants, Top Gas Pressure Recovery Turbines (TPRT), recovery of Coke Oven Gas (COG), recovery of Blast Furnace Gas (BFG), recovery of BOF gas, recovery of tar, and thermal plant. Results indicate that, in a technical scenario, some 5.1 TWh of electricity can be generated if these technologies are applied to recover these remaining secondary fuels in the Iron and Steel Industry in Brazil, which is equivalent to some 45% of current total electricity consumption in the integrated plants in the country. Finally, solid waste control technologies, including options available for collection and treatment, are discussed. Estimates using the best practice methodology show that solid waste generation in the Iron and Steel Industry in Brazil reached approximately 18 million metric tons in 1994, of which 28% can be recirculated if the best practice available in the country is applied thoroughly.

Costa, M.M.; Schaeffer, R.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyNrmlYrMwhYrDigesterLandfillGas | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SPPurchasedEngyNrmlYrMwhYrDigesterLandfillGas SPPurchasedEngyNrmlYrMwhYrDigesterLandfillGas Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type String. Digester / landfill gas Pages using the property "Building/SPPurchasedEngyNrmlYrMwhYrDigesterLandfillGas" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0003 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0004 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0005 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0006 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0007 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0008 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0009 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0010 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0011 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0012 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0013 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0014 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0015 + 0.0 +

445

Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyPerAreaKwhM2DigesterLandfillGas | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

DigesterLandfillGas DigesterLandfillGas Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type String. Digester / landfill gas Pages using the property "Building/SPPurchasedEngyPerAreaKwhM2DigesterLandfillGas" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0003 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0004 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0005 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0006 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0007 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0008 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0009 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0010 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0011 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0012 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0013 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0014 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0015 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0016 + 0.0 +

446

Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyForPeriodMwhYrDigesterLandfillGas | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SPPurchasedEngyForPeriodMwhYrDigesterLandfillGas SPPurchasedEngyForPeriodMwhYrDigesterLandfillGas Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type String. Digester / landfill gas Pages using the property "Building/SPPurchasedEngyForPeriodMwhYrDigesterLandfillGas" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0003 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0004 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0005 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0006 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0007 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0008 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0009 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0010 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0011 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0012 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0013 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0014 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0015 + 0.0 +

447

Phenology, nutrient composition, digestibility and utilization of heath aster (Aster ericoides L.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and then appeared to remain relatively constant for the remainder of tne study. The in vitro coefficients of digestion (COD) varied from Sl%%d to 73%%d in leaves, and 60% to 25% in stems. Percentages of ash ranged from 8. 7% to 13. 5%%d in leaves and 2. 4% to ll...

Kallah, Muhammad Sani

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

1 OHSU Diversity Digest | July 2013 "Hope and Liberty Award" Honors Commitment to Equity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 OHSU Diversity Digest | July 2013 "Hope and Liberty Award" Honors Commitment to Equity Hope and Liberty Award, recognizing his leadership and commitment to advancing diversity and inclusion of their research project in early August. Click on the links to view profiles of Equity and CURE interns. Lead

Chapman, Michael S.

449

Billiards Digest June, 2012 "VEPP Part III: Wagon Wheel Drills" ILLUSTRATED PRINCIPLES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Control and English." "Wagon wheel" drills are very useful to help you practice and develop cue ball (CB angle slightly for each ball. There is actually a system you can use to help decide where to placeBilliards Digest June, 2012 "VEPP ­ Part III: Wagon Wheel Drills" ILLUSTRATED PRINCIPLES David

Alciatore, David G.

450

Billiards Digest October, 2012 "VEPP Part VII: 9-Ball Pattern Drills" ILLUSTRATED PRINCIPLES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Billiards Digest October, 2012 "VEPP ­ Part VII: 9-Ball Pattern Drills" ILLUSTRATED PRINCIPLES at some 9-ball pattern drills from Disc III: "VEPP III ­ Patterns and Safety Play." You can work on cut, stop, follow, draw, wagon wheel, and target drills all day long and become fairly proficient with them

Alciatore, David G.

451

Billiards Digest November, 2012 "VEPP Part VIII: 8-Ball Pattern Drills" ILLUSTRATED PRINCIPLES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Billiards Digest November, 2012 "VEPP ­ Part VIII: 8-Ball Pattern Drills" ILLUSTRATED PRINCIPLES-dave-billiards.com/vepp. Last month, we looked at some useful 9-ball pattern drills from Disc III: "VEPP III ­ Patterns and Safety Play." This month, we look at some 8-ball pattern drills, also from the 3 rd DVD. You can work

Alciatore, David G.

452

COMPARISON OF FAT SOURCES ON DIGESTION AND RUMINAL BIOHYDROGENATION IN CATTLE CONSUMING A FEEDLOT RATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

insoluble ash was used as an external marker for duodenal and fecal output determination. Intake of all nutrients did not differ (P ? 0.08) between treatments. Ruminal digestion of OM and NDF were greater in IP than AF and VOP (P ? 0.05). Ether extract...

Baber, Jessica

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

453

How Does Plant Cell Wall Nanoscale Architecture Correlate with Enzymatic Digestibility?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...C. , Pre-formed xylogtlucans and xylans increase in molecular weight in three...C. , Extracellular cross-linking of xylan and xyloglucan in maize cell-suspension...digestion took 81 h. Movie S3 AFM of the surface of delignified pSW located in the stem...

Shi-You Ding; Yu-San Liu; Yining Zeng; Michael E. Himmel; John O. Baker; Edward A. Bayer

2012-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

454

Reduction of Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria Present in Food Animal Manures by Composting and Anaerobic Digestion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reduction of Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria Present in Food Animal Manures by Composting in conventional, on-farm lagoons does not result in any significant reduction of antimicrobial resistance. Animal digestion and composting at mesophilic or moderate temperature significantly reduced the antimicrobial

Jones, Michelle

455

through the digestive tract of patients with a malabsorption syndrome. In addition, our  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

digestibility car- bon from dietary CHO. Effect of algal fibre supplementation (Eucheuma cottonii) on intestinal of their nutritional properties, this work inves- tigated the possible effects of algal polysac- charides sequence of test meals (800 g of maize starch + casein) sup- plemented either with 40 g of algal fibres

Boyer, Edmond

456

Source of Error in Determination of Chromic Oxide Using Perchloric-Sulfuric Acid Digestion Method  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...due to prolonged digestion. KATHERINE MI. DAY Department of Agricultural...irrevo-cably homothallic." H. E. WHEELER Depairtment of Botany, Louisianta...244 (1914). :3. II. E. Wheeler, Phytopathology 44, 342...P. Chilton tand H. E. Wheeler, Am. J. Botany 36, 717...

KATHERINE M. DAY

1954-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

457

Impact of EPS on Digestion of Waste Activate Sludge Thomas Gostanian  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Impact of EPS on Digestion of Waste Activate Sludge Thomas Gostanian Faculty Mentor: Professor Chul of WAS is the make-up of the Extracellular Polymeric Substances (EPS) surrounding the cells, which acts as a glue/inorganics in influent, temperature, reactor flow types, etc). Certain EPS complexes are vulnerable to specific

Mountziaris, T. J.

458

The viscoelastic behaviour of raw and anaerobic digested sludge: strong similarities with soft-glassy materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 The viscoelastic behaviour of raw and anaerobic digested sludge: strong similarities with soft confronted with a dramatically increasing flow of sewage sludge. To improve treatment efficiency, process reliable flow properties to simulate the process, this work is an attempt to approach sludge rheological

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

459

Impact of carbon nanotubes on the ingestion and digestion of bacteria by  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Impact of carbon nanotubes on the ingestion and digestion of bacteria by ciliated protozoa PARNIAN on the toxicity of carbon nanotubes has focused on human health risks1 , and little is known about their impact effluent quality8 . Here we show that single- walled carbon nanotubes are internalized by T. thermophila

Le Roy, Robert J.

460

Chemical reactor models of optimal digestion efficiency with constant foraging costs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemical reactor models of optimal digestion efficiency with constant foraging costs J. David Logan-batch reactor or plug flow reactor. Specifically, we determine the residence time that optimizes the average net , Anthony Joern , & William Wolesensky January 24, 2003 Abstract We develop quantitative optimization

Logan, David

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including digester gases" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Reducing the Anaerobic Digestion Model N1 for its application to an industrial wastewater treatment plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Anaerobic Digestion Model N°1 for its application to an industrial wastewater treatment plant treating winery effluent wastewater Carlos García-Diéguez 1 , Olivier Bernard 2 , Enrique Roca 1, * 1 USC ­ PRODES for winery effluent wastewater. A new reduced stoichiometric matrix was identified and the kinetic parameters

Boyer, Edmond

462

Improved Anaerobic Digestion by the Addition of Paper Tube Residuals: Pretreatment, Stabilizing, and Synergetic Effects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Pretreatments with steam explosion were performed on the paper tubes and evaluated by batch assays measuring the biomethane potential. ... 3.1 Biomethane Potential of Untreated and Treated Paper Tubes: Batch Assays ... The aim of this study was to elucidate the effect of steam pretreatment on the biomethane potential of biofibers from digested manure. ...

Anna Teghammar; Maria del Pilar Castillo; Johnny Ascue; Claes Niklasson; Ilona Srvri Horvth

2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

463

Formation and control of fuel-nitrogen pollutants in catalytic combustion of coal-derived gases. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this program has been the elucidation of the mechanism of high temperature catalytic oxidation of coal-derived gases, including their individual constituents,and the effects of sulfur and nitrogen impurities. Detailed experimental data were obtained and a two-dimensional model is being developed and tested by comparison with the experimental data. When complete, the model can be used to optimize designs of catalytic combustors. The model at present includes axial and radial diffusion and gas and surface chemical reactions. Measured substrate temperatures are input in lieu of complete coupling of gas and solid energy conservation equations and radiative heat transfer. Axial and radial gas temperature and composition profiles inside a catalyst channel were computed and compared with experimental measurements at the catalyst outlet. Experimental investigations were made of carbon monoxide and medium-Btu gas combustion in the presence of platinum supported on a monolithic Cordierite substrate. Axial profiles of substrate temperature, gas temperature, and gas composition were determined at different gas velocities and equivalence ratios. The effects of H/sub 2/S and NH/sub 3/ in the medium-Btu gas were also investigated. Systems were proposed for making resonance absorption and Raman scattering measurements of gas temperature and/or species concentrations in a catalytic reactor. A new pulsed multipass Raman scattering technique for increasing photon yield from a scattering volume was developed.

Walsh, P. M.; Bruno, C.; Santavicca, D. A.; Bracco, F. V.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Controlled Vapor Phase Growth of Single Crystalline, Two-Dimensional GaSe Crystals with High Photoresponse  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Abstract Compared with their bulk counterparts, atomically thin two-dimensional (2D) crystals exhibit new physical properties, and have the potential to enable next-generation electronic and optoelectronic devices. However, controlled synthesis of large uniform monolayer and multi-layer 2D crystals is still challenging. Here, we report the controlled synthesis of 2D GaSe crystals on SiO2/Si substrates using a vapor phase deposition method. For the first time, uniform, large (up to ~60 m in lateral size), single-crystalline, triangular monolayer GaSe crystals were obtained and their atomic resolution structure were characterized. The size, density, shape, thickness, and uniformity of the 2D GaSe crystals were shown to be controllable by growth duration, growth region, growth temperature, and argon carrier gas flow rate. The theoretical modeling of the electronic structure and Raman spectroscopy demonstrate a direct-to-indirect bandgap transition and progressive confinement-induced bandgap shifts for 2D GaSe crystals. The 2D GaSe crystals show p-type semiconductor characteristics and high photoresponsivity (~1.7 A/W under white light illumination) comparable to exfoliated GaSe nanosheets. These 2D GaSe crystals are potentially useful for next-generation electronic and optoelectronic devices such as photodetectors and field-effect transistors.

Li, Xufan [ORNL; Lin, Ming-Wei [ORNL; Zhang, Huidong [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Puretzky, Alexander A [ORNL; Idrobo Tapia, Juan C [ORNL; Ma, Cheng [ORNL; Chi, Miaofang [ORNL; Yoon, Mina [ORNL; Rouleau, Christopher M [ORNL; Kravchenko, Ivan I [ORNL; Geohegan, David B [ORNL; Xiao, Kai [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Molybdenum-based additives to mixed-metal oxides for use in hot gas cleanup sorbents for the catalytic decomposition of ammonia in coal gases  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates to additives to mixed-metal oxides that act simultaneously as sorbents and catalysts in cleanup systems for hot coal gases. Such additives of this type, generally, act as a sorbent to remove sulfur from the coal gases while substantially simultaneously, catalytically decomposing appreciable amounts of ammonia from the coal gases.

Ayala, Raul E. (Clifton Park, NY)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Effects of land use on surfaceatmosphere exchanges of trace gases and energy in Borneo: comparing fluxes over oil palm plantations and a rainforest  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...27 November 2011 research-article Articles...trace gases and energy in Borneo: comparing...boundary layer using a research aircraft in Sabah...exchange fluxes of energy and trace gases...Geophys. Res. Abstracts 12, EGU2010-15408...trace gases and energy in Borneo: comparing...

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

,"Ohio Natural Gas Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed (Million Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9030oh2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9030oh2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:25 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Ohio Natural Gas Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed (Million Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N9030OH2" "Date","Ohio Natural Gas Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed (Million Cubic Feet)" 33253,0 33284,0 33312,0

468

,"Tennessee Natural Gas Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed (Million Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9030tn2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9030tn2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:27 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Tennessee Natural Gas Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed (Million Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N9030TN2" "Date","Tennessee Natural Gas Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed (Million Cubic Feet)" 33253,0 33284,0

469

,"Tennessee Natural Gas Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed (Million Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2010 Annual",2010 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9030tn2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9030tn2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:27 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Tennessee Natural Gas Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed (Million Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N9030TN2" "Date","Tennessee Natural Gas Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed (Million Cubic Feet)" 35611,0 35976,0 37802,0 38898,0

470

EIA-Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program - About the 1605(b)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

About the 1605(b) Program About the 1605(b) Program Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program About the 1605(b) Program History Established by Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992, the Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program (also known as the 1605(b) Program) encourages corporations, government agencies, non-profit organizations, households, and other private and public entities to submit annual reports of their greenhouse gas emissions, emission reductions, and sequestration activities. The Program provides a means for voluntary reporting that is complete, reliable, and consistent. The Voluntary Reporting Program began operations in 1994 under the auspices of the Energy Information Administration, the statistical branch of the Department of Energy. Under the original guidelines, the Program released annual reports and a public database for each reporting cycle from the 1994 through the 2005 data years.

471

,"Virginia Natural Gas Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed (Million Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9030va2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9030va2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:29 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Virginia Natural Gas Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed (Million Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N9030VA2" "Date","Virginia Natural Gas Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed (Million Cubic Feet)" 33253,0 33284,0

472

Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 2009, DOE/EIA-0573(2009)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

March 2011 www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 2009 ii Contacts This report, Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 2009, was prepared under the general direction of John Conti, Assistant Administrator for Energy Analysis, and Paul Holtberg, Team Leader, Analysis Integration Team. General questions concerning the content of this report may be directed to the Office of Communications at 202/586-8800. Technical information concerning the content of the report may be obtained from Perry Lindstrom at 202/586-0934 (email, perry. lindstrom@eia.gov). Without the assistance of Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC), this report would not have

473

,"Pennsylvania Natural Gas Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed (Million Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2010 Annual",2010 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9030pa2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9030pa2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:26 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Pennsylvania Natural Gas Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed (Million Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N9030PA2" "Date","Pennsylvania Natural Gas Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed (Million Cubic Feet)" 35611,0 35976,0 37802,0

474

Comparative Analysis of Alternative Means for Removing Noncondensable Gases from Flashed-Steam Geothermal Power Plants  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

June 2000 * NREL/SR-550-28329 June 2000 * NREL/SR-550-28329 Martin Vorum, P.E. Englewood, Colorado Eugene A. Fritzler, P.E. Fort Morgan, Colorado Comparative Analysis of Alternative Means for Removing Noncondensable Gases from Flashed-Steam Geothermal Power Plants April 1999-March 2000 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 NREL is a U.S. Department of Energy Laboratory Operated by Midwest Research Institute * * * * Battelle * * * * Bechtel Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 June 2000 * NREL/SR-550-28329 Comparative Analysis of Alternative Means for Removing Noncondensable Gases from Flashed-Steam Geothermal Power Plants April 1999-March 2000 Martin Vorum, P.E. Englewood, Colorado Eugene A. Fritzler, P.E. Fort Morgan, Colorado NREL Technical Monitor: C. Kutscher

475

,"South Dakota Natural Gas Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9030sd2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9030sd2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:26 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: South Dakota Natural Gas Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9030SD2" "Date","South Dakota Natural Gas Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed (MMcf)" 33253,0 33284,0 33312,0 33343,0 33373,0

476

A comprehensive study of different gases in inductively coupled plasma torch operating at one atmosphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A numerical study is done to understand the possible operating regimes of RF-ICP torch (3?MHz 50?kW) using different gases for plasma formation at atmospheric pressure. A two dimensional numerical simulation of RF-ICP torch using argon nitrogen oxygen and air as plasma gas has been investigated using computational fluid dynamic (CFD) software fluent. The operating parameters varied here are central gas flow sheath gas flow RF-power dissipated in plasma and plasma gas. The temperature contours flow field axial and radial velocity profiles were investigated under different operating conditions. The plasmaresistance inductance of the torch and the heat distribution for various plasma gases have also been investigated. The plasma impedance of ICP torch varies with different operating parameters and plays an important role for RF oscillator design and power coupling. These studies will be useful to decide the design criteria for ICP torches required for different material processing applications.

Sangeeta B. Punjabi; N. K. Joshi; H. A. Mangalvedekar; B. K. Lande; A. K. Das; D. C. Kothari

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Process for removal of ammonia and acid gases from contaminated waters  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Contaminating basic gases, i.e., ammonia and acid gases, e.g., carbon dioxide, are removed from process waters or waste waters in a combined extraction and stripping process. Ammonia in the form of ammonium ion is extracted by an immiscible organic phase comprising a liquid cation exchange component, especially an organic phosphoric acid derivative, and preferably di-2-ethyl hexyl phosphoric acid, dissolved in an alkyl hydrocarbon, aryl hydrocarbon, higher alcohol, oxygenated hydrocarbon, halogenated hydrocarbon, and mixtures thereof. Concurrently, the acidic gaseous contaminants are stripped from the process or waste waters by stripping with stream, air, nitrogen, or the like. The liquid cation exchange component has the ammonia stripped therefrom by heating, and the component may be recycled to extract additional amounts of ammonia.

King, C.J.; Mackenzie, P.D.

1982-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

478

Process for removal of ammonia and acid gases from contaminated waters  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Contaminating basic gases, i.e., ammonia, and acid gases, e.g., carbon dioxide, are removed from process waters or waste waters in a combined extraction and stripping process. Ammonia in the form of ammonium ion is extracted by an immiscible organic phase comprising a liquid cation exchange component, especially an organic phosphoric acid derivative, and preferably di-2-ethyl hexyl phosphoric acid, dissolved in an alkyl hydrocarbon, aryl hydrocarbon, higher alcohol, oxygenated hydrocarbon, halogenated hydrocarbon, and mixtures thereof. Concurrently, the acidic gaseous contaminants are stripped from the process or waste waters by stripping with steam, air, nitrogen, or the like. The liquid cation exchange component has the ammonia stripped therefrom by heating, and the component may be recycled to extract additional amounts of ammonia.

King, C. Judson (Kensington, CA); MacKenzie, Patricia D. (Berkeley, CA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Bose and Fermi gases in the early Universe with self-gravitational effect  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study the self-gravitational effect on the equation of state (EoS) of Bose and Fermi gases in thermal equilibrium at the end of reheating, the period after quark-hadron transition and before big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN). After introducing new grand canonical partition functions based on the work of Uhlenbeck and Gropper, we notice some interesting features of the newly developed EoSs with distinct behaviors of relativistic and nonrelativistic gases under self-gravity. The usual negligence of the self-gravitational effect when solving the background expansion of the early Universe is justified with numerical results, showing the magnitude of the self-gravitational modification of the state constant to be less than O(10{sup -78}). This helps us to clarify the background thermal evolution of the primordial patch. Such clarification is crucial in testing gravity theories, evaluating inflation models and determining element abundances in BBN.

Niu Yuezhen; Huang Junwu; Ma Boqiang [School of Physics and State Keye Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); School of Physics and State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China) and Center for High Energy Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China) and Center for History and Philosophy of Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

480

,"Virginia Natural Gas Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed (Million Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2010 Annual",2010 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9030va2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9030va2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:29 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Virginia Natural Gas Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed (Million Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N9030VA2" "Date","Virginia Natural Gas Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed (Million Cubic Feet)" 35611,0 35976,0 37802,0 38898,0

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including digester gases" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

EIA-Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program - Original 1605(b)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Program Program Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program Original 1605(b) Program Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 established the Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program. The Program operated under the original 1994 guidelines through the 2005 data year (for reports containing data through 2005). Reports containing data through 2007 and beyond submitted beginning in 2008 will be conducted under the revised General and Technical Guidelines issued in 2006 and 2007, respectively. More about the original 1605(b) Program. Old Program Reporting Guidelines Old Program Electricity Emissions Factors Old Program Calculation Tools Old Program Forms and Software Old Program Reports for the reporting years 1994 to 2004. Old Program Data for the reporting years 1994 to 2005.

482

ARM - PI Product - ARM-LBNL-NOAA Flask Sampler for Carbon Cycle Gases  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ProductsARM-LBNL-NOAA Flask Sampler for Carbon Cycle ProductsARM-LBNL-NOAA Flask Sampler for Carbon Cycle Gases Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send PI Product : ARM-LBNL-NOAA Flask Sampler for Carbon Cycle Gases Site(s) SGP General Description Data from ccg-flasks are sampled at the ARM SGP site and analyzed by the NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL) as part of the NOAA Cooperative Global Air Sampling Network. Surface samples are collected from a 60m tower at the SGP Central Facility, usually once per week on one afternoon. The aircraft samples are collected approximately weekly from a chartered aircraft, and the collection flight path is centered over the tower where the surface samples are collected. Samples are collected by the ARM/LBNL Carbon Project. CO2 flask data contains measurements of CO2

483

,"Pennsylvania Natural Gas Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed (Million Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9030pa2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9030pa2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:26 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Pennsylvania Natural Gas Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed (Million Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N9030PA2" "Date","Pennsylvania Natural Gas Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed (Million Cubic Feet)" 33253,0

484

Plasmon mass and Drude weight in strongly spin-orbit-coupled two-dimensional electron gases  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) spin- orbit-coupled 2D electron and hole gases, which are promising candidates for semiconductor spintronics,1 (ii) graphene2 (a monolayer of carbon atoms arranged in a 2D honeycomb lattice), which has attracted a great deal of interest because..., in the case of graphene) degree of freedom. This coupling, being of relativistic origin,12 naturally breaks Galilean invariance and is thus the basic reason for a quite sensitive dependence of several observables on electron-electron interactions, even...

Agarwal, Amit; Chesi, Stefano; Jungwirth, T.; Sinova, Jairo; Vignale, G.; Polini, Marco.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Changes in atmospheric gases during isobaric storage of beef packaged pre- and post-rigor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

displacement measurements of the head- space volume were conducted during two weeks of storage. Males of the headspace gases were calculated using the general gas law (PU = nRT). Carbon dioxide absorption by the meat was greatest in steaks stored in 100% C... OF FIGURES INTRODUCTION LITERATURE REV IELV Microbiol ogical Aspects of Packaging Meat Shelf-Life of Packaged Meat Respiration . Carbon Dioxide Absorption OBJECTIVES EXPERIMENTAL PROCEDURES RESULTS AND DISCUSSION Description of Meat Samples . Molar...

Hoermann, Karen Lee

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Selective Catalytic Oxidation of Hydrogen Sulfide to Elemental Sulfur from Coal-Derived Fuel Gases  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development of low cost, highly efficient, desulfurization technology with integrated sulfur recovery remains a principle barrier issue for Vision 21 integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power generation plants. In this plan, the U. S. Department of Energy will construct ultra-clean, modular, co-production IGCC power plants each with chemical products tailored to meet the demands of specific regional markets. The catalysts employed in these co-production modules, for example water-gas-shift and Fischer-Tropsch catalysts, are readily poisoned by hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S), a sulfur contaminant, present in the coal-derived fuel gases. To prevent poisoning of these catalysts, the removal of H{sub 2}S down to the parts-per-billion level is necessary. Historically, research into the purification of coal-derived fuel gases has focused on dry technologies that offer the prospect of higher combined cycle efficiencies as well as improved thermal integration with co-production modules. Primarily, these concepts rely on a highly selective process separation step to remove low concentrations of H{sub 2}S present in the fuel gases and produce a concentrated stream of sulfur bearing effluent. This effluent must then undergo further processing to be converted to its final form, usually elemental sulfur. Ultimately, desulfurization of coal-derived fuel gases may cost as much as 15% of the total fixed capital investment (Chen et al., 1992). It is, therefore, desirable to develop new technology that can accomplish H{sub 2}S separation and direct conversion to elemental sulfur more efficiently and with a lower initial fixed capital investment.

Gardner, Todd H.; Berry, David A.; Lyons, K. David; Beer, Stephen K.; Monahan, Michael J.

2001-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

487

Purification of Natural Gases with High CO2 Content Using Gas Hydrates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Purification of Natural Gases with High CO2 Content Using Gas Hydrates ... The feed was separated using a cascade of continuously stirred tank crystallizer vessels, which can also be regarded as an ideal crystallizer column resembling a gas-hydrate-based scrubbing process. ... Pressurized gas scrubbing, pressure swing adsorption, chemical absorption, and membrane and cryogenic processes are some examples of well-established technologies for the removal of CO2 from gaseous products. ...

Nena Dabrowski; Christoph Windmeier; Lothar R. Oellrich

2009-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

488

Gas chromatographic identification of interferences and their elimination in measuring total reduced sulfur gases  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports on a selective filter that is capable of eliminating positive interference in the coulometric measurement of ambient concentrations of total reduced sulfur gases which has been successfully developed and field tested. Most of the interference was found to be caused by terpenes, which react with bromine, the active reagent in the coulometric titrators. Terpenes are given off by conifer trees in the natural environment as well as emitted in pulping and other wood-handling and lumber manufacturing operations.

de Souza, T.L.C. (Pulp and Paper Research Inst. of Canada, Pointe Claire, PQ (Canada))

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Solubility and displacement behavior of a viscous crude with CO[sub 2] and hydrocarbon gases  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The West Sak reservoir on the Alaskan North Slope contains an estimated 15 to 25 billion bbl of low-temperature, viscous crude. The reservoir has promising development potential by means of a gas injection process. An experimental study of the solubility and displacement behavior of West Sak oil with CO[sub 2] and hydrocarbon gases shows simple black-oil to complex, multiphase equilibrium behaviors.

DeRuiter, R.A.; Nash, L.J.; Singletary, M.S.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Effect of calcium buffers and whole plant processing methods on starch digestibility of sorghum based diets in Holstein cows  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Significant rela- tionships were found between fecal starch percentage and fecal pH, starch digestibility and fecal pH, and fecal starch percentage and starch d ige st ibility. Experiment 3 was a comparison of the effect on digestibility of three methods... Relationship between starch digestibility and fecal pH in Experiment 2. 15 Relationship between whole plant grain sorghum processing for silage and fecal pH in Experiment 3 . 75 16 Relationship between fecal starch percentage and fecal pH in Experiment 3...

Fernandez, John Anthony

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Domain walls and bubble-droplets in immiscible binary Bose gases  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The existence and stability of domain walls (DWs) and bubble-droplet (BD) states in binary mixtures of quasi-one-dimensional ultracold Bose gases with inter- and intra-species repulsive interactions is considered. Previously, DWs were studied by means of coupled systems of Gross-Pitaevskii equations (GPEs) with cubic terms, which model immiscible binary Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs). We address immiscible BECs with two- and three-body repulsive interactions, as well as binary Tonks--Girardeau (TG) gases, using systems of GPEs with cubic and quintic nonlinearities for the binary BEC, and coupled nonlinear Schr\\"{o}dinger equations with quintic terms for the TG gases. Exact DW\\ solutions are found for the symmetric BEC mixture, with equal intra-species scattering lengths. Stable asymmetric DWs in the BEC mixtures with dissimilar interactions in the two components, as well as of symmetric and asymmetric DWs in the binary TG gas, are found by means of numerical and approximate analytical methods. In the BEC sy...

Filatrella, G; Salerno, M

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Emissions of greenhouse gases in the United States, 1987--1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) is required by the Energy Policy Act of 1992 to prepare a report on aggregate US national emissions of greenhouse gases for the period 1987--1992, with annual updates thereafter. This is the third annual update report,covering national emissions over the period 1987--1993, with preliminary estimates of US carbon dioxide and halocarbon emissions for 1994. Calculating national aggregate emissions(or ``national inventories``) of greenhouse gases is a recently developed form of intellectual endeavor. Greenhouse gas emissions are rarely measured directly or reported to statistical agencies. Thus, to prepare emissions inventories usually requires inferring emissions indirectly from information collected for other purposes. Both the available information and the inferences drawn may be of varying reliability. Chapter 1 of this report briefly recapitulates some background information about global climate change and the greenhouse effect and discusses important recent developments in global climate change activities. Chapters 2 through 6 cover emissions of carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, halocarbons, and criteria pollutants, respectively. Chapter 7 describes potential sequestration and emissions of greenhouse gases as a result of land use changes.

NONE

1995-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

493

Mineral interactions and absorption in the equine digestive tract: calcium, phosphorus, and magnesium interaction with aluminum, and calcium digestibility of alfalfa in ponies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Chromic oxide (. 2%) was used as an indicator to measure flow through the digestive tract. There was a significant decrease in Ca, P, and Ng intake (P&. 05) with the addition of . 25/o Al due to a reduction in feed intake. Increased dietary Al resulted... in lower fecal excretions for both Ca and Mg. Quantity of Ca and Mg absorbed was slightly greater when Al was added to the diet, however, only Mg absorption was statistically significant. A significantly greater net loss of P (P&. 05) was observed...

Kapusniak, Linda J.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Fluidized bed steam reactor including two horizontal cyclone separators and an integral recycle heat exchanger  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A reactor is described comprising: a vessel; a first furnace section disposed in said vessel; a second furnace section disposed in said vessel; means in each of said furnace sections for receiving a combustible fuel for generating heat and combustion gases; a first heat recovery area located adjacent said furnace sections; a second heat recovery area located adjacent said furnace sections; means for passing said combustion gases from said first furnace section to said first heat recovery area; and means for passing said combustion gases from said second furnace section to said second heat recovery area.

Gorzegno, W.P.

1993-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

495

High-Pressure Phase Equilibria of Ionic Liquids and Compressed Gases for Applications in Reactions and Absorption Refrigeration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of high-melting solids not liquids at processing conditions. Coupling ionic liquids with compressed gases systems may overcome most of these difficulties for their applications in separations, reactions, materials processing and engineering applications...

Ren, Wei

2009-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

496

PII S0016-7037(01)00802-X Volatilization kinetics of silicon carbide in reducing gases: An experimental study with  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PII S0016-7037(01)00802-X Volatilization kinetics of silicon carbide in reducing gases occurring hexagonal sili- con carbide ( -SiC), and -SiC, the cubic form, are occasion- ally reported

Grossman, Lawrence

497

Methods for reducing emissions of dioxins and furans in flue gases at plants burning solid domestic waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Methods are discussed for reducing emissions of toxic chlorinated dibenzo-dioxins and dibenzo-furans in flue gases at plants which burn solid domestic waste. Results are presented from a study of ... number of th...

A. N. Tugov; V. F. Moskvichev; L. G. Fedorov

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

Pulsed quantum cascade laser instrument with compact design for rapid, high sensitivity measurements of trace gases in air  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have developed a compact instrument for sensitive, rapid and continuous measurement of trace gases in air, with results presented here for methane (CH4), nitric oxide (NO), nitrous oxide (N2O) and ammonia (NH3

J.B. McManus; J.H. Shorter; D.D. Nelson; M.S. Zahniser; D.E. Glenn

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

A conceptual design of a Reactive Ion Etch back end system for the direct reuse of process gases  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The use of Plasma Etching, specifically Reactive Ion Etching (RIE), is a vital tool in manufacturing semiconductor devices. Most gases used in RIE processes were initially chosen because of their relatively low toxicity and reactivity. However, many...

Tiner, Paul Alan

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

500

Coal-Fired Power Plants, Greenhouse Gases, and State Statutory Substantial Endangerment Provisions: Climate Change Comes to Kansas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

economy standards on motor vehicles by states such as California. But the states have also targeted stationary sources of greenhouse gases. In particular, they have sought to minimize carbon dioxide emissions from coal-fired power plants. States have used...

Glicksman, Robert L.

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z