Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including digester gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Market Digest: Natural Gas  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The Energy Information Administration's Natural Gas Market Digest provides information and analyses on all aspects of natural gas markets.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Anaerobic Digester Gas-to-Electricity Rebate and Performance Incentive |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Anaerobic Digester Gas-to-Electricity Rebate and Performance Anaerobic Digester Gas-to-Electricity Rebate and Performance Incentive Anaerobic Digester Gas-to-Electricity Rebate and Performance Incentive < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Institutional Local Government Nonprofit Residential Schools Tribal Government Savings Category Bioenergy Maximum Rebate Total Incentive: $2 million (combined production and capacity incentives) Fixed Base + Capacity Incentive: varies, limited to the total maximum incentive of $2 million minus the applicable performance incentive Program Info Funding Source RPS surcharge; NYPA Expiration Date 01/31/2013 State New York Program Type State Rebate Program Rebate Amount Fixed Base Incentive: varies Capacity Incentive: varies Production Incentive: $0.025/kWh production payment for new systems for up

3

Nitrogen availability and indirect measurements of greenhouse gas emissions from aerobic and anaerobic biowaste digestates applied to agricultural soils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: • Nitrogen release in digestate-amended soil depends on the digestate type. • Overall N release is modulated by digestate mineral and mineralisable N contents. • Microbial immobilisation does not influence overall release of digestate N in soil. • Digestate physical properties and soil type interact to affect overall N recovery. • High labile C inputs in digestate may promote denitrification in fine-textured soil. - Abstract: Recycling biowaste digestates on agricultural land diverts biodegradable waste from landfill disposal and represents a sustainable source of nutrients and organic matter (OM) to improve soil for crop production. However, the dynamics of nitrogen (N) release from these organic N sources must be determined to optimise their fertiliser value and management. This laboratory incubation experiment examined the effects of digestate type (aerobic and anaerobic), waste type (industrial, agricultural and municipal solid waste or sewage sludge) and soil type (sandy loam, sandy silt loam and silty clay) on N availability in digestate-amended soils and also quantified the extent and significance of the immobilisation of N within the soil microbial biomass, as a possible regulatory mechanism of N release. The digestate types examined included: dewatered, anaerobically digested biosolids (DMAD); dewatered, anaerobic mesophilic digestate from the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (DMADMSW); liquid, anaerobic co-digestate of food and animal slurry (LcoMAD) and liquid, thermophilic aerobic digestate of food waste (LTAD). Ammonium chloride (NH{sub 4}Cl) was included as a reference treatment for mineral N. After 48 days, the final, maximum net recoveries of mineral N relative to the total N (TN) addition in the different digestates and unamended control treatments were in the decreasing order: LcoMAD, 68%; LTAD, 37%, DMAD, 20%; and DMADMSW, 11%. A transient increase in microbial biomass N (MBN) was observed with LTAD application, indicating greater microbial activity in amended soil and reflecting the lower stability of this OM source, compared to the other, anaerobic digestate types, which showed no consistent effects on MBN compared to the control. Thus, the overall net release of digestate N in different soil types was not regulated by N transfer into the soil microbial biomass, but was determined primarily by digestate properties and the capacity of the soil type to process and turnover digestate N. In contrast to the sandy soil types, where nitrate (NO{sub 3}{sup -}) concentrations increased during incubation, there was an absence of NO{sub 3}{sup -} accumulation in the silty clay soil amended with LTAD and DMADMSW. This provided indirect evidence for denitrification activity and the gaseous loss of N, and the associated increased risk of greenhouse gas emissions under certain conditions of labile C supply and/or digestate physical structure in fine-textured soil types. The significance and influence of the interaction between soil type and digestate stability and physical properties on denitrification processes in digestate-amended soils require urgent investigation to ensure management practices are appropriate to minimise greenhouse gas emissions from land applied biowastes.

Rigby, H.; Smith, S.R., E-mail: s.r.smith@imperial.ac.uk

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

4

Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material, such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

5

Greenhouse Gas Emission Reductions from Domestic Anaerobic Digesters Linked with Sustainable Sanitation in Rural China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Greenhouse Gas Emission Reductions from Domestic Anaerobic Digesters Linked with Sustainable Sanitation in Rural China ... (3) A key technology that may permit a switch from solid fuels to cleaner gaseous fuels in rural China is anaerobic digestion, where organic human and animal wastes are digested under anaerobic conditions generating biogas, composed primarily of methane (CH4), which can be sequestered and burned for cooking, heating, and lighting. ...

Radhika Dhingra; Erick R. Christensen; Yang Liu; Bo Zhong; Chang-Fu Wu; Michael G. Yost; Justin V. Remais

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

6

DOE Considers Natural Gas Utility Service Options: Proposal Includes  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Considers Natural Gas Utility Service Options: Proposal Considers Natural Gas Utility Service Options: Proposal Includes 30-mile Natural Gas Pipeline from Pasco to Hanford DOE Considers Natural Gas Utility Service Options: Proposal Includes 30-mile Natural Gas Pipeline from Pasco to Hanford January 23, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Cameron Hardy, DOE , (509) 376-5365, Cameron.Hardy@rl.doe.gov RICHLAND, WASH. - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is considering natural gas transportation and distribution requirements to support the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) and evaporator operations at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. DOE awarded a task order worth up to $5 million to the local, licensed supplier of natural gas in the Hanford area, Cascade Natural Gas Corporation (Cascade). Cascade will support DOE and its Environmental

7

Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyNrmlYrMwhYrDigesterLandfillGas | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SPPurchasedEngyNrmlYrMwhYrDigesterLandfillGas SPPurchasedEngyNrmlYrMwhYrDigesterLandfillGas Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type String. Digester / landfill gas Pages using the property "Building/SPPurchasedEngyNrmlYrMwhYrDigesterLandfillGas" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0003 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0004 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0005 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0006 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0007 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0008 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0009 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0010 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0011 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0012 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0013 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0014 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0015 + 0.0 +

8

Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyPerAreaKwhM2DigesterLandfillGas | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

DigesterLandfillGas DigesterLandfillGas Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type String. Digester / landfill gas Pages using the property "Building/SPPurchasedEngyPerAreaKwhM2DigesterLandfillGas" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0003 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0004 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0005 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0006 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0007 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0008 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0009 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0010 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0011 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0012 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0013 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0014 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0015 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0016 + 0.0 +

9

Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyForPeriodMwhYrDigesterLandfillGas | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SPPurchasedEngyForPeriodMwhYrDigesterLandfillGas SPPurchasedEngyForPeriodMwhYrDigesterLandfillGas Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type String. Digester / landfill gas Pages using the property "Building/SPPurchasedEngyForPeriodMwhYrDigesterLandfillGas" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0003 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0004 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0005 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0006 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0007 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0008 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0009 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0010 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0011 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0012 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0013 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0014 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0015 + 0.0 +

10

DOE/EA-1624: Environmental Assessment for Auburn Landfill Gas Electric Generators and Anaerobic Digester Energy Facilities (December 2008)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Auburn Landfill Gas Electric Generators and Auburn Landfill Gas Electric Generators and Anaerobic Digester Energy Facilities Auburn, New York Final Environmental Assessment DOE/EA-1624 Prepared for: U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory January 2009 INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK AUBURN LANDFILL GAS ELECTRIC GENERATORS AND ANAEROBIC DIGESTER ELECTRIC FACILITIES FINAL EA DOE/EA-1624 i Table of Contents 1.0 INTRODUCTION .......................................................................................................................................... 1 1.1 BACKGROUND............................................................................................................................................... 2 1.2 PURPOSE AND NEED ...................................................................................................................................... 4

11

Percentage of Total Natural Gas Industrial Deliveries included...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Industrial Price Percentage of Total Industrial Deliveries included in Prices Vehicle Fuel Price Electric Power Price Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download...

12

Percentage of Total Natural Gas Commercial Deliveries included in Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

City Gate Price Residential Price Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices Commercial Price Percentage of Total Commercial Deliveries included in Prices Industrial Price Percentage of Total Industrial Deliveries included in Prices Electric Power Price Period: Monthly Annual City Gate Price Residential Price Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices Commercial Price Percentage of Total Commercial Deliveries included in Prices Industrial Price Percentage of Total Industrial Deliveries included in Prices Electric Power Price Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History U.S. 63.3 59.3 57.9 57.0 57.4 61.3 1983-2013 Alabama 71.7 71.0 68.5 68.2 68.4 66.7 1989-2013 Alaska 94.1 91.6 91.1 91.0 92.3 92.6 1989-2013 Arizona 84.0 83.0 81.6 80.3 82.8 82.7 1989-2013 Arkansas 37.8 28.3 28.1 28.6 26.7 28.0 1989-2013

13

Percentage of Total Natural Gas Industrial Deliveries included in Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

City Gate Price Residential Price Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices Commercial Price Percentage of Total Commercial Deliveries included in Prices Industrial Price Percentage of Total Industrial Deliveries included in Prices Electric Power Price Period: Monthly Annual City Gate Price Residential Price Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices Commercial Price Percentage of Total Commercial Deliveries included in Prices Industrial Price Percentage of Total Industrial Deliveries included in Prices Electric Power Price Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History U.S. 16.5 16.3 16.0 16.2 16.6 16.9 2001-2013 Alabama 22.1 21.7 21.6 22.8 22.0 22.7 2001-2013 Alaska 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2001-2013 Arizona 13.4 15.7 15.3 13.8 13.7 13.9 2001-2013 Arkansas 1.7 1.4 1.2 1.4 1.3 1.5 2001-2013

14

Energy Department Expands Gas Gouging Reporting System to Include 1-800  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Expands Gas Gouging Reporting System to Include Expands Gas Gouging Reporting System to Include 1-800 Number: 1-800-244-3301 Energy Department Expands Gas Gouging Reporting System to Include 1-800 Number: 1-800-244-3301 September 6, 2005 - 9:50am Addthis Washington, DC - Energy Secretary Samuel W. Bodman announced today that the Department of Energy has expanded its gas gouging reporting system to include a toll-free telephone hotline. The hotline is available to American consumers starting today. "While we've largely seen the best of American generosity and unity throughout the recovery effort, we recognize that there are some bad actors that may try to take advantage of the situation. Consumers are our first line of defense in guarding against gas price gouging. I can assure you, our Administration - from the President down - takes this issue very

15

Reduced gas pressure operation of sludge digesters: Expanded studies. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Previous investigations strongly suggested that the municipal anaerobic sludge digestion process could be enhanced by reactor operation with subatmospheric headspace pressures. Enhanced solids destruction and methane production along with increased process stability were observed in these earlier studies. However, due to the small scale of the anaerobic reactors used ( {approx}1.5 L), definitive steady-state measurements could not be obtained. These expanded studies were undertaken to verify and define the magnitude of the benefits that might be obtained with vacuum operation of sludge digesters. Four reactors ({approx}15.0 L) were fed municipal sludge at three different organic loading rates while being maintained with a 15-day solids retention time. One reactor had a constant headspace pressure of 1.02 atm; a second was maintained at 0.75 atm; and the remaining two reactors were operated for the majority of the day at 1.02 atm, and for part of the day with a 0.75 atm headspace pressure. Additional small-scale, batch experiments were performed to help identify controlling digestion mechanisms. The results of these expanded studies indicate that vacuum operation did not yield significant advantages over the organic loading range investigated (0.088 to 0.352 lb VSS/ft{sup 3}{center_dot}d).

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Power plant including an exhaust gas recirculation system for injecting recirculated exhaust gases in the fuel and compressed air of a gas turbine engine  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A power plant is provided and includes a gas turbine engine having a combustor in which compressed gas and fuel are mixed and combusted, first and second supply lines respectively coupled to the combustor and respectively configured to supply the compressed gas and the fuel to the combustor and an exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system to re-circulate exhaust gas produced by the gas turbine engine toward the combustor. The EGR system is coupled to the first and second supply lines and configured to combine first and second portions of the re-circulated exhaust gas with the compressed gas and the fuel at the first and second supply lines, respectively.

Anand, Ashok Kumar; Nagarjuna Reddy, Thirumala Reddy; Shaffer, Jason Brian; York, William David

2014-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

17

The Study of Two Stages Anaerobic Digestion Application and Suitable Bio-Film as an Effort to Improve Bio-Gas Productivity from Jatropha Curcas Linn Capsule Husk  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The conversion program from kerosene to LPG in Indonesia has positive impact on saving budget of fuel subsidized. However, the program does not only depend on LPG supply from overseas but also inadvisable related to the LPG availability in the world. Bio-gas is renewable energy which categorized as modern cooking oil. This gaseous bio- fuel is feasible in Indonesia due to plenty of bio-gas resources such as bio-mass and waste, simple technology, supporting tropical climate on bio-gas process, no food competition on material supply, minimizing global warming, reducing water pollution and producing organic fertilizer. Some series of study are conducted on dried Jatropha curcas Linn. capsule husk (JCL-CH) as bio-gas feedstock. The objective of the study is to create technology for managing JCL integrally according to bio-refinery principle. This paper will present two studies, JCL-CH performance in single stage digester compared with two stages digester in laboratory and palm fiber compared with glass wool as bio-film/bio-carrier in methanogenesis reactor. The studies were conducted in Research Laboratory PT. Bumimas Ekapersada, Bekasi, West Java from March until May 2012. A liter of glass bottle as digester, arranged in Randomized Complete Design, three replications per treatment placed in 32 °C water bath. The bio-gas feedstock was put continuously with Organic Loading Rate – OLR or concentration 1: 12 in single stage compared with 1: 12 and 1: 8 in two stages. The observed parameters were pH, temperature, bio-gas volume, methane concentration, volatile solid and acetic acid concentration. Bio-gas volume was measured by water displacement method and methane concentration was measured by gas chromatography. T-test was used for statistical analysis. The studies showed that two stages digester more efficient since it can increase methane concentration and bio-gas volume/gram VS. The bio-gas volume increase 63.83% in OLR 1: 8. Glass wool was more effective as bio-film carrier compared with palm fiber.

Praptiningsih G. Adinurani; Tony Liwang; Salafudin; Leopold O. Nelwan; Yosephianus Sakri; Satriyo K. Wahono; Roy Hendroko

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Ruminant digestion  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ruminant digestion Ruminant digestion Name: hignell Status: N/A Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: Around 1993 Question: How long it takes for the digestive process to work in a ruminant? With the various chambers and would digestion take longer than in other mammals? Replies: A friend in animal nutrition is looking up an exact figure, but as he does, here are a few guidelines: Time of digestion largely depends on the type of food an animal ingests: CARNIVORES: short, uncomplicated digestive systems. They eat very high on the food chain (other animals), which provide food stuff which is relatively easy to digest. Hence, rapid digestion. OMNIVORES: medium length, medium complex digestive systems. We eat at all levels of the food chain, and so need a balanced system. Medium time of digestion (roughly 2-10 hours per meal, depending on proportions of carbohydrates, fats, proteins).

19

Contribution of Anaerobic Digesters to Emissions Mitigation and Electricity Generation Under U.S. Climate Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Livestock husbandry in the U.S. significantly contributes to many environmental problems, including the release of methane, a potent greenhouse gas (GHG). Anaerobic digesters (ADs) break down organic wastes using bacteria ...

Zaks, David P. M.

20

Fuel Gas Production from Organic Wastes by Low Capital Cost Batch Digestion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The technical background is reviewed on energy recovery from biomass--i.e., all organic wastes, especially municipal solid wastes, but also including agricultural residues and crops grown specifically for ener...

Donald L. Wise; Alfred P. Leuschner…

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including digester gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Waste-to-wheel analysis of anaerobic-digestion-based renewable natural gas pathways with the GREET model.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2009, manure management accounted for 2,356 Gg or 107 billion standard cubic ft of methane (CH{sub 4}) emissions in the United States, equivalent to 0.5% of U.S. natural gas (NG) consumption. Owing to the high global warming potential of methane, capturing and utilizing this methane source could reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The extent of that reduction depends on several factors - most notably, how much of this manure-based methane can be captured, how much GHG is produced in the course of converting it to vehicular fuel, and how much GHG was produced by the fossil fuel it might displace. A life-cycle analysis was conducted to quantify these factors and, in so doing, assess the impact of converting methane from animal manure into renewable NG (RNG) and utilizing the gas in vehicles. Several manure-based RNG pathways were characterized in the GREET (Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation) model, and their fuel-cycle energy use and GHG emissions were compared to petroleum-based pathways as well as to conventional fossil NG pathways. Results show that despite increased total energy use, both fossil fuel use and GHG emissions decline for most RNG pathways as compared with fossil NG and petroleum. However, GHG emissions for RNG pathways are highly dependent on the specifics of the reference case, as well as on the process energy emissions and methane conversion factors assumed for the RNG pathways. The most critical factors are the share of flared controllable CH{sub 4} and the quantity of CH{sub 4} lost during NG extraction in the reference case, the magnitude of N{sub 2}O lost in the anaerobic digestion (AD) process and in AD residue, and the amount of carbon sequestered in AD residue. In many cases, data for these parameters are limited and uncertain. Therefore, more research is needed to gain a better understanding of the range and magnitude of environmental benefits from converting animal manure to RNG via AD.

Han, J.; Mintz, M.; Wang, M. (Energy Systems)

2011-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

22

Digestion Experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Blank in Bulletin] BULLETIN NO. 291 FEBRUARY, 1922 DIGESTION EXPERIMENTS This is the sixth bulletin in a series whose object is to ascertain the Aceding value of Texas feeding stuffs by means of digestion experiments. Previous bulletins... The productive values and the values for digestible protein in t Bulletin have been calculated from the results of digestion esperiine? with sheep. The method of conducting the experiments is described Bulletins Nos. 147 and 166 of this Station. The production...

Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

1922-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Integrated capture of fossil fuel gas pollutants including CO.sub.2 with energy recovery  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of reducing pollutants exhausted into the atmosphere from the combustion of fossil fuels. The disclosed process removes nitrogen from air for combustion, separates the solid combustion products from the gases and vapors and can capture the entire vapor/gas stream for sequestration leaving near-zero emissions. The invention produces up to three captured material streams. The first stream is contaminant-laden water containing SO.sub.x, residual NO.sub.x particulates and particulate-bound Hg and other trace contaminants. The second stream can be a low-volume flue gas stream containing N.sub.2 and O.sub.2 if CO2 purification is needed. The final product stream is a mixture comprising predominantly CO.sub.2 with smaller amounts of H.sub.2O, Ar, N.sub.2, O.sub.2, SO.sub.X, NO.sub.X, Hg, and other trace gases.

Ochs, Thomas L. (Albany, OR); Summers, Cathy A. (Albany, OR); Gerdemann, Steve (Albany, OR); Oryshchyn, Danylo B. (Philomath, OR); Turner, Paul (Independence, OR); Patrick, Brian R. (Chicago, IL)

2011-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

24

Parametric study of an efficient renewable power-to-substitute-natural-gas process including high-temperature steam electrolysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Power-to-Substitute Natural Gas processes are investigated to offer solutions for renewable energy storing or transportation. In the present study, an original Power-to-SNG process combining high-temperature steam electrolysis and CO2 methanation is implemented and simulated. A reference process is firstly defined, including a specific modelling approach of the electrolysis and a methanation modelling including a kinetic law. The process also integrates a unit to clean the gas from residual CO2, H2 and H2O for gas network injection. Having set all the units, simulations are performed with ProsimPlus 3™ software for a reference case where the electrolyser and the methanation reactors are designed. The reference case allows to produce 67.5 Nm3/h of SNG with an electrical energy consumption of 14.4 kW h/Nm3. The produced SNG satisfies specifications required for network injection. From this reference process, two sensitivity analyses on electrolysis and methanation working points and on external parameters and constraints are considered. As a main result, we observe that the reference case maximises both process efficiency and SNG production when compared with other studied cases.

Myriam De Saint Jean; Pierre Baurens; Chakib Bouallou

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Digestion Simulations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Digestion Simulations Digestion Simulations Name: Lisa Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: My 5th grade students are beginning an experiment next week and their hypothesis involves edibility(edibleness?). Is there a way to replicate the stomach in, say, a bottle?? Are there ways to test for edibleness(?) without actually ingesting the experiment yourself? Replies: I would not recommend the idea of a bottle stomach. The stomach digests only proteins anyway with HCl [pH 1.0] which is very, very strong acid that will burn seriously if in contact with skin. The intestine is just as much responsible for digestion of lipids [bile], carbohydrates and remaining proteins using enzymes, many of these you do not want to be handling, let alone purchase. As a high school teacher, I have lab exercises dealing with digestion, but I can not recommend any of these unless you are set up with a functional science laboratory and all the safety equipment necessary.

26

Intermediate-scale high-solids anaerobic digestion system operational development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Anaerobic bioconversion of solid organic wastes represents a disposal option in which two useful products may be produced, including a medium Btu fuel gas (biogas) and a compost-quality organic residue. The application of high-solids technology may offer several advantages over conventional low-solids digester technology. Operation of the anaerobic digestion process at high solids reduces the level of process water and thereby the size and capital costs for the digester system. In addition, by virtue of the lack of available water, the microbial catalysts are more productive in feedstock polymer hydrolysis. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has developed a unique digester system capable of uniformly mixing high-solids materials at low cost. Information gained from laboratory-scale digester research was used to develop die intermediate-scale digester system. This system represents a 50-fold scale-up of the original digester system and includes continuous feed addition and computer monitoring and control. During the first 1.15 years of operation, a variety of modifications and improvements were instituted to increase the safety, reliability, and performance of the system. Those improvements -- which may be critical in further scale-up efforts using the NREL high-solids digester design -- are detailed in this report.

Rivard, C.J.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Optimization Online - Digest Archive  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optimization Online Digest Archive. Subscribe to the digest. ... Online is supported by the Mathematical Optmization Society. Mathematical Optimization Society.

28

Digestion time  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Digestion time Digestion time Name: Don Mancosh Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: I have always given the rule of thumb in class that material we eat is with us for about 24 hours before exiting the body. The question arises about the time value of liquids. Getting a big coke prior to a 3 hour drive generally means that there will be a stop along the way. Is there a generalization made about liquids in the body similar to the one for solid food? Replies: A physician would give a better answer, but I hazard this: the only liquids which people consume (deliberately) in significant quantities are water, ethyl alcohol and various oils. Water and alcohol are absorbed on a time scale of seconds to minutes through the mouth, stomach and digestive tract. The oils are huge molecules, so I'd guess like any other greasy food they get absorbed in the upper digestive tract. Some of them, perhaps the longest and most nonpolar, are not absorbed at all --- cf. the old-time remedy of mineral oil for constipation --- so there should be some average time-before-what's-left-is-excreted such as you're looking for, and my (wild) guess is that it would not differ substantially from that for food. You can define an average lifetime in the body for alcohol, since the natural level is zero. Rough guidelines are widespread in the context of drunk driving laws. But this is not really possible for water. One's body is normally full up to the brim with water, and there's no way for the body to distinguish between water molecules recently absorbed and molecules that've been moping around since the Beatles split up. Thus the water entering the toilet bowl after the pit stop is not in general the same water as was in the big coke. If you were to consider for water just the average time between drinking and peeing, it would seem to depend strongly on how well hydrated the body was before the drink, and how much was drunk. During sustained heavy exertion in the sun and dry air one can easily drink a pint of water an hour without peeing at all. On the other hand, if one is willing to drink enough water fast enough, so as to establish a high excess of body water one can pee 8 ounces 15 minutes or less after drinking 8 ounces.

29

Anaerobic Digestion of Algae  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...would be desirable to remove the algae from the lagoon effluent. Under...anaerobic digestion. Digestion of algae to provide a source of fuel is an attractive possibility...through the anaerobic digestion of algae to produce methane. Energy is...

C. G. Golueke; W. J. Oswald; H. B. Gotaas

1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Optimization Online - Digest  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Complete the form below to subscribe to the free Optimization Online Digest. ... Type your e-mail address to unsubscribe from the Optimization Online Digest.

31

Anaerobic Digestion Basics | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Anaerobic Digestion Basics Anaerobic Digestion Basics Anaerobic Digestion Basics August 14, 2013 - 1:07pm Addthis Anaerobic digestion is a common technology in today's agriculture, municipal waste, and brewing industries. It uses bacteria to break down waste organic materials into methane and other gases, which can be used to produce electricity or heat. Methane and Anaerobic Bacteria Methane is a gas that contains molecules of methane with one atom of carbon and four atoms of hydrogen (CH4). It is the major component of the natural gas used in many homes for cooking and heating. It is odorless, colorless, and yields about 1,000 British thermal units (Btu) [252 kilocalories (kcal)] of heat energy per cubic foot (0.028 cubic meters) when burned. Natural gas is a fossil fuel that was created eons ago by the anaerobic

32

Statistical Digest No. 70 Fishery Statistics of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. These statistics include data on the volume and value of landed catches, employment, quantity of gear operatedStatistical Digest No. 70 Statistics of the United States 1976 Washington National Marine Fisheries Service #12;#12;Statistical Digest No. 70 Fishery Statistics of the United States

33

Baltimore Zoo digester project. Final report. [Elephants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results of a project to produce methane using the manure from zoo animals as a feedstock is presented. Two digesters are in operation, the first (built in 1974) utilizing wastes from the Hippo House and a second (built in 1980) utilizing wastes from the Elephant House. Demonstrations on the utilization of the gas were performed during zoo exhibits. The Elephant House Digester has a capacity of 4200 gallons and a floating gas dome which can retain at least 150 cu ft of gas. Solar energy has been incorporated into the design to maintain digester temperature at 95/sup 0/F. The system produces 50 cu ft per day. After cleaning the gas, it is used to generate electricity to power an electric light, a roof fan, and an air conditioner. The gas is also used to operate a gas range and a gas lamp. During the opening day exhibit, 50 meals were cooked using the bio-gas from just 2 elephants. (DMC)

Gibson, P.W.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Investigation of materials performances in high moisture environments including corrosive contaminants typical of those arising by using alternative fuels in gas turbines  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

materials performances in high moisture materials performances in high moisture environments including corrosive contaminants typical of those arising by using alternative fuels in gas turbines Gerald Meier, Frederick Pettit and Keeyoung Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Jung University of Pittsburgh Pittsburgh, PA 15260 Peer review Workshop III UTSR Project 04 01 SR116 October 18-20, 2005 Project Approach Task I Selection and Preparation of Specimens Task II Selection of Test Conditions Specimens : GTD111+CoNiCrAlY and Pt Aluminides, N5+Pt Aluminides Deposit : No Deposit, CaO, CaSO 4 , Na 2 SO 4 1150℃ Dry 1150℃ Wet 950℃ Wet 750℃ SO 3 950℃ Dry Selection of Test Temperature, T 1 , Gas Environment and Deposit Composition, D

35

Anaerobic Digestion and Combined Heat and Power Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the underlying objectives of this study is to recover the untapped energy in wastewater biomass. Some national statistics worth considering include: (1) 5% of the electrical energy demand in the US is used to treat municipal wastewater; (2) This carbon rich wastewater is an untapped energy resource; (3) Only 10% of wastewater treatment plants (>5mgd) recover energy; (4) Wastewater treatment plants have the potential to produce > 575 MW of energy nationwide; and (5) Wastewater treatment plants have the potential to capture an additional 175 MW of energy from waste Fats, Oils and Grease. The WSSC conducted this study to determine the feasibility of utilizing anaerobic digestion and combined heat and power (AD/CHP) and/or biosolids gasification and drying facilities to produce and utilize renewable digester biogas. Digester gas is considered a renewable energy source and can be used in place of fossil fuels to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The project focus includes: (1) Converting wastewater Biomass to Electricity; (2) Using innovative technologies to Maximize Energy Recovery; and (3) Enhancing the Environment by reducing nutrient load to waterways (Chesapeake Bay), Sanitary Sewer Overflows (by reducing FOG in sewers) and Greenhouse Gas Emissions. The study consisted of these four tasks: (1) Technology screening and alternative shortlisting, answering the question 'what are the most viable and cost effective technical approaches by which to recover and reuse energy from biosolids while reducing disposal volume?'; (2) Energy recovery and disposal reduction potential verification, answering the question 'how much energy can be recovered from biosolids?'; (3) Economic environmental and community benefit analysis, answering the question 'what are the potential economic, environmental and community benefits/impacts of each approach?'; and (4) Recommend the best plan and develop a concept design.

Frank J. Hartz; Rob Taylor; Grant Davies

2011-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

36

List of Anaerobic Digestion Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Anaerobic Digestion Incentives Anaerobic Digestion Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 285 Anaerobic Digestion Incentives. CSV (rows 1 - 285) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active APS - Renewable Energy Incentive Program (Arizona) Utility Rebate Program Arizona Commercial Residential Anaerobic Digestion Biomass Daylighting Geothermal Electric Ground Source Heat Pumps Landfill Gas Other Distributed Generation Technologies Photovoltaics Small Hydroelectric Solar Pool Heating Solar Space Heat Solar Thermal Process Heat Solar Water Heat Wind energy Yes Advanced Energy Job Stimulus Program (Ohio) Industry Recruitment/Support Ohio Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Local Government Nonprofit State Government

37

Experimental study of industrial gas turbine flames including quantification of pressure influence on flow field, fuel/air premixing and flame shape  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A commercial swirl burner for industrial gas turbine combustors was equipped with an optically accessible combustion chamber and installed in a high-pressure test-rig. Several premixed natural gas/air flames at pressures between 3 and 6 bar and thermal powers of up to 1 MW were studied by using a variety of measurement techniques. These include particle image velocimetry (PIV) for the investigation of the flow field, one-dimensional laser Raman scattering for the determination of the joint probability density functions of major species concentrations, mixture fraction and temperature, planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) of OH for the visualization of the flame front, chemiluminescence measurements of OH* for determining the lift-off height and size of the flame and acoustic recordings. The results give insights into important flame properties like the flow field structure, the premixing quality and the turbulence–flame interaction as well as their dependency on operating parameters like pressure, inflow velocity and equivalence ratio. The 1D Raman measurements yielded information about the gradients and variation of the mixture fraction and the quality of the fuel/air mixing, as well as the reaction progress. The OH PLIF images showed that the flame was located between the inflow of fresh gas and the recirculated combustion products. The flame front structures varied significantly with Reynolds number from wrinkled flame fronts to fragmented and strongly corrugated flame fronts. All results are combined in one database that can be used for the validation of numerical simulations.

Ulrich Stopper; Wolfgang Meier; Rajesh Sadanandan; Michael Stöhr; Manfred Aigner; Ghenadie Bulat

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerobic digestion process Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Technologies ; Environmental Sciences and Ecology 9 www.manuremanagement.cornell.edu Biogas Casebook Summary: of gas handling equipment for an anaerobic digester system....

39

Biomethane production by anaerobic digestion of organic waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Anaerobic Digestion (AD) is a biological process that takes place naturally when bacteria break down organic matter in environments with or without oxygen. Controlled anaerobic digestion of organic waste in enclosed landfill will generate methane. Almost any organic material can be processed with AD, including waste paper and cardboard (of a grade that is too low to recycle because of food contamination), grass clippings, leftover food, industrial effluents, sewage and animal waste. AD produces biogas which is comprised of around 60% methane (CH4) and 40% carbon dioxide (CO2). This biogas can be used to generate heat or electricity and/or can be used as a vehicular fuel. If the intended use is for power generation the biogas must be scrubbed to remove a number of impurities. After conditioning the biogas can be used for onsite power generation, to heat homes or can be added to the national natural gas grid. In recent years several research groups have shown the possibility of upgrading the biogas for biomethane production [1]. This study will show the feasibility of integrating anaerobic digestion plant with onsite polymeric membrane purification system for conditioned biomethane production.

A. Molino; F. Nanna; Y. Ding; B. Bikson; G. Braccio

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Photoenhanced anaerobic digestion of organic acids  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is described for rapid conversion of organic acids and alcohols anaerobic digesters into hydrogen and carbon dioxide, the optimal precursor substrates for production of methane. The process includes addition of photosynthetic bacteria to the digester and exposure of the bacteria to radiant energy (e.g., solar energy). The process also increases the pH stability of the digester to prevent failure of the digester. Preferred substrates for photosynthetic bacteria are the organic acid and alcohol waste products of fermentative bacteria. In mixed culture with methanogenic bacteria or in defined co-culture with non-aceticlastic methanogenic bacteria, photosynthetic bacteria are capable of facilitating the conversion or organic acids and alcohols into methane with low levels of light energy input.

Weaver, Paul F. (Golden, CO)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including digester gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Turkey vs. human digestion  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Turkey vs. human digestion Turkey vs. human digestion Name: wallyb Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: How is the digestive system of turkeys different from that of humans? Replies: Hmmm.. been a while since I had sophomore biology, so I can't completely answer this one, but I can say a few things. One, since turkeys are birds, and birds as a general rule have not had teeth for several million years at least, the turkey needs a way to mash up its food -- thus, the crop, which is essentially like another stomach: the turkey (and many other birds, for that matter) swallows small stones which serve in lieu of teeth, mashing up food via muscular action in the crop, from whence the "chewed" food moves on into the rest of the digestive tract. As for any other differences, I'll have to leave that to someone else with more ornithological experience...

42

Steam Digest 2001  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Steam Digest 2001 chronicles BestPractices Program's contributions to the industrial trade press for 2001, and presents articles that cover technical, financial and managerial aspects of steam optimization.

Not Available

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Interstellar Simulations Using A Unified Microscopic-Macroscopic Monte Carlo Model with a full Gas-Grain Network including Bulk Diffusion in Ice Mantles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have designed an improved algorithm that enables us to simulate the chemistry of cold dense interstellar clouds with a full gas-grain reaction network. The chemistry is treated by a unified microscopic-macroscopic Monte Carlo approach that includes photon penetration and bulk diffusion. To determine the significance of these two processes, we simulate the chemistry with three different models. In Model 1, we use an exponential treatment to follow how photons penetrate and photodissociate ice species throughout the grain mantle. Moreover, the products of photodissociation are allowed to diffuse via bulk diffusion and react within the ice mantle. Model 2 is similar to Model 1 but with a slower bulk diffusion rate. A reference Model 0, which only allows photodissociation reactions to occur on the top two layers, is also simulated. Photodesorption is assumed to occur from the top two layers in all three models. We found that the abundances of major stable species in grain mantles do not differ much among these...

Chang, Qiang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Reading Comprehension - Digestion and Nutrition  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Digestion and Nutrition Digestion and Nutrition 1. The pouchlike muscular organ that secretes acids and digestive enzymes is the _________ stomach esophagus intestines . 2. _________ saliva enzymes chime is the watery material that results form digestion in the stomach. 3. Iron, potassium, and iodine are _________ vitamins minerals amino acids . 4. The human body is about 60 percent _________ salt water nutrients . 5. The teeth break down food by _________ chemical digestion mechanical digestion . 6. _________ Teeth Your tongue Saliva in the mouth helps to chemically digest food. 7. _________ Mechanical digestion Chemical digestion takes place in the mouth, stomach, and small intestine with the help of chemicals called _________ amino acids vitamins enzymes . 8. Proteins are made up of smaller building blocks called _________

45

Anxiety and Digestion  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Anxiety and Digestion Anxiety and Digestion Name: Donna Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: Explain how anxiety may be responsible for slowing down the process of digestion Replies: Your body really has 2 nervous systems. One is the peripheral nervous system that controls how you move and think etc. the other is called the autonomic (not automatic) nervous system It controls all of your everyday functions such as your heart, your blood vessel diameter and your digestive system, etc. There are 2 divisions of the ANS. One is called the parasympathetic and the other is the sympathetic. The parasympathetic is your everyday division, and is usually in control. When you come upon a stressful or dangerous situation, your sympathetic division takes over. It gets you ready to "fight or flee". Some parts of your body are put on alert. Your blood vessels constrict in some areas and dilate in others to get blood flowing to areas that will help you in a dangerous situation and to get glucose (fuel) to those areas quickly. Your heart starts to beat faster to send blood to those areas quicker, your pupils dilate. Other parts of your body are put on hold; those that aren't needed in a danger situation. Your digestive system is one that is put on hold. When you are under stress, your body doesn't know whether you are in danger or not but acts like it is. So if you are under constant stress, your digestive system is affected.

46

The adaptation of digestive enzymes to the diet : Its physiological significance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The adaptation of digestive enzymes to the diet : Its physiological significance T. CORRING Laboratoire de Physiologie de la Nutrition, LN.R.A. 78350 Jouy en Josas, France. Summary. Digestive enzymes that this process includes many enzymes. The intestinal step of digestion is the most important in the enzyme

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

47

PalladianDigest Transportation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PalladianDigest CONNECT. EMPOWER. GROW. Tackling Transportation Challenges Nebraska has been a vital link in the nation's transportation system since the days when carts, wagons to University of Nebraska­Lincoln research. That's fine with UNL transportation researchers, said Larry Rilett

Farritor, Shane

48

EA-1907: Biogas Anaerobic Digester Facility, Oakley, Kansas | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

907: Biogas Anaerobic Digester Facility, Oakley, Kansas 907: Biogas Anaerobic Digester Facility, Oakley, Kansas EA-1907: Biogas Anaerobic Digester Facility, Oakley, Kansas Summary This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal by DOE and USDA to provide funding to Western Plains Energy, LLC (WPE) to construct, purchase equipment, and operate a new Biogas Anaerobic Digester at WPE's existing Ethanol Facility, located at 3022 County Road 18, Grinnell Township (Oakley), Gove County, Kansas. The proposed facility will include a receiving building, digester, and related infrastructure. Based on the analysis in USDA's Final EA and FONSI, DOE has determined that DOE's proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action that would significantly affect the quality of the human or natural environment.

49

Potential digestibilities and digestion kinetics of forage cell wall components  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LITERATURE REVIEW. EXPERIMENTAL PROCEDURES. Chemical Analysis Colorimetric Determinations Statistical Evaluation. 10 13 15 IV RESULTS AND DISCUSSION 16 V Characteristics of Forage Kinetics of Cell Wall Digestion SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS... and both of these variables appear to be the result of several dynamic processes. The amount of structural carbohydrates, the main constituents of the fibrous cell wall, ruminants can digest appears to be limited by the potential digestibility...

Tauskey, William Henry

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Numerical Simulations of Bubble Dynamics and Heat Transfer in Pool Boiling--Including the Effects of Conjugate Conduction, Level of Gravity, and Noncondensable Gas Dissolved in the Liquid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Microgravity Fluid Physics and Heat Transfer, 62-71. 47.that included the heat transfer between the fluid and solidflux, only one fluid—water—showed significant heat transfer

Aktinol, Eduardo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Outer Continental Shelf oil and gas activities in the Gulf of Alaska (including Lower Cook Inlt) and their onshore impacts: a summary report, September 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The search for oil and gas on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) in the Gulf of Alaska subregion of the Alaska leasing region began in 1967, when geophysical surveys of the area were initiated. Two lease sales have been held in the subregion. Lease Sale 39, for the Northern Gulf of Alaska, was held on April 13, 1976, and resulted in the leasing of 76 tracts. Lease Sale CI, for Lower Cook Inlet, was held on October 27, 1977, and resulted in the leasing of 87 tracts. Exploratory drilling on the tracts leased in Sale 39 began in September 1976, and exploratory drilling on tracts leased in Sale CI began in July 1978. Commercial amounts of hydrocarbons have not been found in any of the wells drilled in either sale area. Seventy-four of the leases issued in the Northern Gulf of Alaska have been relinquished. As of June 1980, exploratory drilling in both areas had ceased, and none was planned for the near future. The next lease sale in the Gulf of Alaska, Sale 55, is scheduled for October 1980. Lease Sale 60 (Lower Cook Inlet and Shelikof Strait) is scheduled for September 1981, and Lease Sale 61 (OCS off Kodiak Island) is scheduled for April 1983. Sale 60 will be coordinated with a State lease sale in adjacent State-owned waters. The most recent estimates (June 1980) by the US Geological Survey of risked, economically recoverable resources for the 2 tracts currently under lease in the Northern Gulf of Alaska are negligible. For the 87 tracts currently under lease in Lower Cook Inlet, the USGS has produced risked, economically recoverable resource estimates of 35 million barrels of oil and 26 billion cubic feet of gas. These resource estimates for the leased tracts in both areas are short of commercially producible amounts. Onshore impacts from OCS exploration have been minimal. Two communities - Yakutat and Seward - served as support bases for the Northern Gulf of Alaska.

Jackson, J.B.; Dorrier, R.T.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

The Anaerobic Digestion of Organic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, pursuing alternative and renewable energy has become imperative from both practical and ethical standpoints production is just one of the many renewable energy alternatives out there. Defined as the digestion of Anaerobic Digestion 3.1. Municipal Waste Management 3.2. Climate Change Mitigation 3.2.1. Untreated

Iglesia, Enrique

53

Halophytic microalgae as a feedstock for anaerobic digestion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Anaerobic digestion can be employed to produce methane biogas from residual microalgae biomass derived from either a lipid based biofuel process or wastewater treatment. There is interest in using halophytic microalgae for biofuel production due to their potential robustness in large-scale open pond production. The anaerobic digestion of halophytic microalgae biomass would however be challenging due to the high salinities not typically experienced in anaerobic digestion scenarios. Halophytic microalgae biomass as a potential substrate feedstock for anaerobic digestion would have salinities in excess of 3.5%, which is typically found in marine environments. To investigate the anaerobic digestion of halophytic microalgae issue the first stage of the reported study focuses on the changes undertaken in the bacterial community associated with the anaerobic digestion of piggery effluent under increasing saline conditions, with the aim of establishing a saline tolerant anaerobic digestion inoculum capable of digesting feedstocks under high salinity conditions. Favourable results from this inoculum development study allowed the investigation of anaerobic digestion of halophytic microalgae. The reported results demonstrate that a saline tolerant inoculum was maintained. Subsequent denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) fingerprinting of the resulting halophytic bacterial community showed several halophytic methanogens. The inoculum was used to digest the halophytic microalgae. The resulting gas data showed that biogas production of 358 ± 53 mL/g of volatile solids (VS) with a methane content of 54 ± 4.3% methane was achieved at 7% salinity. The volume of biogas produced on a wet weight microalgae biomass basis was 122 ± 26 and 175 ± 25 mL/g of halophytic microalgae biomass respectively (74 ± 2.8 wt.% moisture content). The conversion of carbon in the feedstock to methane achieved an efficiency of 26.4% and 46.6% at 3.4% and 7% salinity respectively. A halo-tolerant anaerobic digestion microbial community could be further optimized to complete the loop with nutrient recycle required with the production of halophytic microalgae based biofuels and potentially, hypersaline wastewater treatment applications.

Andrew Ward; Andy Ball; David Lewis

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Emission difference between natural gas usage and digester gas usage.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??M.S. It is important to burn the air toxics and harmful gases which come from water and wastewater treatment processes. In common practice, instead of… (more)

Ghorbanian, Mahyar, 1986-

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff practice and procedure digest  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Revision 9 of the fifth edition of the NRC Staff Practice and Procedure Digest contains a digest of a number of Commission, Atomic Safety and Licensing Appeal Board, and Atomic Safety and Licensing Board decisions issued during the period from July 1, 1972 to September 30, 1990 interpreting the NRC's Rules of Practice in 10 CFR Part 2. This Revision 9 replaces in part earlier editions and revisions and includes appropriate changes reflecting the amendments to the Rules of Practice effective through September 30, 1990. This edition of the Digest was prepared by attorneys from Aspen Systems Corporation pursuant to Contract number 18-89-346. Persons using this Digest are placed on notice that it may not be used as an authoritative citation in support of any position before the Commission or any of its adjudicatory tribunals. Persons using this Digest are also placed on notice that it is intended for use only as an initial research tool, that it may, and likely does, contain errors, including errors in analysis and interpretation of decisions, and that the user should not rely on the Digest analyses and interpretations but must read, analyze and rely on the user's own analysis of the actual Commission, Appeal Board and Licensing Board decisions cited. Further, neither the United States, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Aspen Systems Corporation, nor any of their employees makes any expressed or implied warranty or assumes liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness or usefulness of any material presented in the Digest. The Digest is roughly structured in accordance with the chronological sequence of the nuclear facility licensing process as set forth in Appendix A to 10 CFR Part 2. Those decisions which did not fit into that structure are dealt with in a section on general matters. Where appropriate, particular decisions are indexed under more than one heading. (JF)

Not Available

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

RCM Digesters | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

RCM Digesters RCM Digesters Jump to: navigation, search Name RCM Digesters Place Berkeley, California Zip CA 94704 Product Manufactures anaerobic manure digesters which process animal waste into biogas. Coordinates 38.748315°, -90.334929° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.748315,"lon":-90.334929,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

57

Biofuels Digest | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Digest Digest Jump to: navigation, search Name Biofuels Digest Address 801 Brickell Avenue Suite 900 Place Miami, Florida Zip 33131 Sector Services Product Information Year founded 2007 Number of employees 1-10 Phone number 786-393-8530 Website http://www.biofuelsdigest.com Coordinates 25.765653°, -80.190405° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":25.765653,"lon":-80.190405,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

58

Ozone treatment of biomass to enhance digestibility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is very resistant to enzymatic degradation. Lignocellulosic materials require pretreatment to enhance their digestibility. The main objective of this research was to further enhance the digestibility of biomass (bagasse) with ozonation as a follow...

Almendarez, Maria Elena

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Kinetic modeling and experimentation of anaerobic digestion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Anaerobic digesters convert organic waste (agricultural and food waste, animal or human manure, and other organic waste), into energy (in the form of biogas or electricity). An added benefit to bio-digestion is a leftover ...

Rea, Jonathan (Jonathan E.)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Inactivation of poliovirus in digested sludge.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Inactivation of poliovirus in digested sludge. R L Ward C S Ashley The effect of anaerobically digested sludge on poliovirus during incubation at temperatures...Although virus was fully recoverable from sludge, its infectivity decreased in proportion...

R L Ward; C S Ashley

1976-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including digester gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

?enseignement de ?endoscopie digestive en Italie  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

En Italie, nous disposons de deux écoles de postgraduat : Gastroentérologie et Endoscopie Digestive et ?autre part : Chirurgie Digestive et Endoscopie Chirurgicale. Le premier cours dure quatre ans, le second cin...

A. Russo

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Optimizing the Operation of a Two-Phase Anaerobic Digestion System Digesting Grass Silage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Methane Yields from Grass Biomethane Digesters ... biomethane potential test ... biomethane potential test ...

Abdul-Sattar Nizami; Jerry D. Murphy

2011-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

63

Power generation method including membrane separation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for generating electric power, such as at, or close to, natural gas fields. The method includes conditioning natural gas containing C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons and/or acid gas by means of a membrane separation step. This step creates a leaner, sweeter, drier gas, which is then used as combustion fuel to run a turbine, which is in turn used for power generation.

Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Union City, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

System for chemically digesting low level radioactive, solid waste material  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved method and system for chemically digesting low level radioactive, solid waste material having a high through-put. The solid waste material is added to an annular vessel (10) substantially filled with concentrated sulfuric acid. Concentrated nitric acid or nitrogen dioxide is added to the sulfuric acid within the annular vessel while the sulfuric acid is reacting with the solid waste. The solid waste is mixed within the sulfuric acid so that the solid waste is substantilly fully immersed during the reaction. The off gas from the reaction and the products slurry residue is removed from the vessel during the reaction.

Cowan, Richard G. (Kennewick, WA); Blasewitz, Albert G. (Richland, WA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Extension of the semi-empirical correlation for the effects of pipe diameter and internal surface roughness on the decompression wave speed to include High Heating Value Processed Gas mixtures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The decompression wave speed, which is used throughout the pipeline industry in connection with the Battelle two-curve method for the control of propagating ductile fracture, is typically calculated using GASDECOM (GAS DECOMpression). GASDECOM, developed in the 1970's, idealizes the decompression process as isentropic and one-dimensional, taking no account of pipe wall frictional effects or pipe diameter. Previous shock tube tests showed that decompression wave speeds in smaller diameter and rough pipes are consistently slower than those predicted by GASDECOM for the same conditions of mixture composition and initial pressure and temperature. Previous analysis based on perturbation theory and the fundamental momentum equation revealed a correction term to be subtracted from the ‘idealized’ value of the decompression speed calculated by GASDECOM. One parameter in this correction term involves a dynamic spatial pressure gradient of the outflow at the rupture location. While this is difficult to obtain without a shock tube or actual rupture test, data from 14 shock tube tests, as well as from 14 full scale burst tests involving a variety of gas mixture compositions, were analyzed to correlate the variation of this pressure gradient with two characteristics of the gas mixture, namely; the molecular weight and the higher heating value (HHV). For lean to moderately-rich gas mixes, the developed semi-empirical correlation was found to fit very well the experimentally determined decompression wave speed curve. For extremely rich gas mixes, such as High Heating Value Processed Gas (HHVPG) mixtures of HHV up to 58 MJ/m3, it was found that it overestimates the correction term. Therefore, additional shock tube tests were conducted on (HHVPG) mixes, and the previously developed semi-empirical correlation was extended (revised) to account for such extremity in the richness of the gas mixtures. The newly developed semi-empirical correlation covers a wider range of natural gas mixtures from as lean as pure methane up to HHVPG mixtures of HHV = 58 MJ/m3.

K.K. Botros; L. Carlson; M. Reed

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Feasibility study for alternate fuels production: unconventional natural gas from wastewater treatment plants. Volume II, Appendix D. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Data are presented from a study performed to determined the feasibility of recovering methane from sewage at a typical biological secondary wastewater treatment plant. Three tasks are involved: optimization of digester gas; digester gas scrubbing; and application to the East Bay Municipal Utility District water pollution control plant. Results indicate that excess digester gas can be used economically at the wastewater treatment plant and that distribution and scrubbing can be complex and costly. (DMC) 193 references, 93 figures, 26 tables.

Overly, P.; Tawiah, K.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Chemical Reactor Analysis and Optimal Digestion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

J 310 Chemical Reactor Analysis and Optimal Digestion An optimal digestion theory can be readily derived from basic principles o f chemical reactor analysis and design Deborah L. Penry and Peter for formulating and solving optimization problems (Bellman 1957), the entire process is optimized only

Jumars, Pete

68

Methane Digester Loan Program | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Methane Digester Loan Program Methane Digester Loan Program Methane Digester Loan Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Savings Category Bioenergy Maximum Rebate RFA can provide up to $250,000 of loan principal Program Info Funding Source Minnesota Rural Finance Authority (RFA) State Minnesota Program Type State Loan Program Rebate Amount RFA participation limited to 45% of loan principal Provider Minnesota Department of Agriculture Established in 1998, the Minnesota Dept. of Agriculture Methane Digester Loan Program helps livestock producers install on-farm anaerobic digesters used for the production of electricity by providing zero-interest loans to eligible borrowers. The loan program is part of the Rural Finance Authority (RFA) revolving loan fund, through which farmers can receive financial aid

69

T-728: Apache Tomcat HTTP DIGEST Authentication Weaknesses Let...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

8: Apache Tomcat HTTP DIGEST Authentication Weaknesses Let Remote Users Conduct Bypass Attacks T-728: Apache Tomcat HTTP DIGEST Authentication Weaknesses Let Remote Users Conduct...

70

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic sludge digestion Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

digestion Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: anaerobic sludge digestion...

71

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic sludge digester Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

digester Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: anaerobic sludge digester...

72

Fuel gas conditioning process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for conditioning natural gas containing C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons and/or acid gas, so that it can be used as combustion fuel to run gas-powered equipment, including compressors, in the gas field or the gas processing plant. Compared with prior art processes, the invention creates lesser quantities of low-pressure gas per unit volume of fuel gas produced. Optionally, the process can also produce an NGL product.

Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Union City, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Electricity Production from Anaerobic Digestion of Household Organic Waste in Ontario: Techno-Economic and GHG Emission Analyses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Electricity Production from Anaerobic Digestion of Household Organic Waste in Ontario: Techno-Economic and GHG Emission Analyses ... The life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and economics of electricity generation through anaerobic digestion (AD) of household source-separated organic waste (HSSOW) are investigated within the FiT program. ... AD can potentially provide considerable GHG emission reductions (up to 1 t CO2eq/t HSSOW) at relatively low to moderate cost (-$35 to 160/t CO2eq) by displacing fossil electricity and preventing the emission of landfill gas. ...

David Sanscartier; Heather L. MacLean; Bradley Saville

2011-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

74

Enteric bacteria in aerobically digested sludge.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Research Article Enteric bacteria in aerobically digested sludge. S R Farrah G Bitton Indicator bacteria, Salmonella...aerobic bacteria were determined in samples of undigested sludge and sludge that had been treated by one or two stages of aerobic...

S R Farrah; G Bitton

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

BETO Ranks High in Biofuels Digest’s Top 125 in the Advanced Bioeconomy  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Biofuels Digest recently released its “Top 125 in the Advanced Bioeconomy,” ranking Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) Director Dr. Jonathan Male , Deputy Director Dr. Valerie Reed, Technology...

76

Desulfurization of Digester Gas on Industrial-Sludge-Derived Adsorbents  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The performance of adsorbents in the breakthrough tests is summarized in Tables 1 and 2, where besides the capacity expressed in milligrams per unit mass of an adsorbent or in milligrams per unit bed volume, the amount of water adsorbed during prehumidification, bed density, and pH before and after exposure to DG are listed. ... Probably the most important negative effect can be linked to the engagement of magnesium and calcium oxides in the carbonate entities, which, besides lowering surface pH and thus the number of HS- ions formed, limits the extent of reactions 2 and 7. Nevertheless, the performance of our adsorbents in desulfurization of DG is better than that of catalytically activated carbons, such as Midas or DarcoH2S, for which 73 and 39 mg/g of H2S adsorbed, respectively, was reported. ... result in adsorbents whose capacity, although smaller than that for the single-component waste oil sludge-based adsorbent, is high compared to that of conventional activated carbons. ...

Mykola Seredych; Teresa J. Bandosz

2007-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

77

Pump apparatus including deconsolidator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A pump apparatus includes a particulate pump that defines a passage that extends from an inlet to an outlet. A duct is in flow communication with the outlet. The duct includes a deconsolidator configured to fragment particle agglomerates received from the passage.

Sonwane, Chandrashekhar; Saunders, Timothy; Fitzsimmons, Mark Andrew

2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

78

U.S. Nuclear Regulation Data (Information Digest, 2010 - 2011) | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nuclear Regulation Data (Information Digest, 2010 - 2011) Nuclear Regulation Data (Information Digest, 2010 - 2011) Dataset Summary Description The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) publishes an Information Digest containing summary information about the NRC and its industry. The report's appendices include demographic data on U.S. nuclear power reactors, both commercial and test facilities. Details include licensee data, location, and capacity. In addition there is information on dry spent fuel storage. The data include activities through 2009 or the most current data available. Source U.S. Nuclear Reactor Commission (USNRC) Date Released August 31st, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords nuclear Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon US Commercial Nuclear Power Reactors (xls, 132.6 KiB) application/vnd.ms-excel icon US Commercial Nuclear Power Reactors, Permanently Shutdown (xls, 32.8 KiB)

79

Methane Digesters and Biogas Recovery - Masking the Environmental Consequences of Industrial Concentrated Livestock Production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Methane Digesters and Biogas Recovery-Masking theII. METHANE DIGESTERS AND BIOGAs RECOVERY- IN THE2011] METHANE DIGESTERS AND BIOGAS RECOVERY methane, and 64%

Di Camillo, Nicole G.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Sustainable use of California biomass resources can help meet state and national bioenergy targets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2006. * Does not include landfill gas from municipal wastemegawatts from solid-fuel, landfill gas and digester gasother fuels. Both landfill gas and digester ecological and

Jenkins, Bryan M; Williams, Robert B; Gildart, Martha C; Kaffka, Stephen R.; Hartsough, Bruce; Dempster, Peter G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including digester gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Digestion Experiments With Texas Feeding Stuffs.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

477-514-15m TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION BULLETIN NO. 166. MAK, 1914 DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY Digestion Experiments With Texas Feeding Stuffs Digeisston oExxprp gmWmhETa FdWSEu oEfTm1a ep2Wu VON BOECKMANN-JONES CO., PRINTERS, AUSTIN... EXPERIMENTS WITH TEXAS FEEDING STUFFS B Y Gr. S. PRAPS., P H . D., Chemist. This bulletin contains the results of digestion tests with the ordi? nary fodder groups of certain feeding stuffs. Other results have been published in Bulletin 149...

Fraps, G. S.

1914-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Digestion Experiments on Men with Cottonseed Meal.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Charge W . Z. M i l l e r , B . S., Scientific Assistant , Animal Husbandman SUBSTATION NO . 6 : Krum, Denton County D IV ISION OF EN TOM OLOGY T - W - B u e l l , B . S., Superintendent W ilm on N ew e ll , M . S., Entomologist in SUBSTATION... beings. Mendel and Fine (J . Biol. Chem. I I , I ) fed cottonseed flour to dogs and found that 71.6 per cent of the proteins were digested, on an average, and when meat was fed to the same animals that 91.0 per cent protein was digested. Since...

Rather, J. B. (James Burness)

1913-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Gas sensor incorporating a porous framework  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The disclosure provides sensor for gas sensing including CO.sub.2 gas sensors comprising a porous framework sensing area for binding an analyte gas.

Yaghi, Omar M; Czaja, Alexander U; Wang, Bo; Galatsis, Kosmas; Wang, Kang L; Furukawa, Hiroyasu

2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

84

A new temperature controlled digester for anaerobic digestion for biogas production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Various types of insulating composite materials were used on ceramic digesters for the control of temperature. Maintenance of temperature is highlighted in this paper. The above types of digesters can adequately control the temperature, especially in the winter season. The results of extensive experimental and theoretical studies have been cited in this paper. This work is beneficial for those plants which are generally in higher altitude stations with low atmospheric temperature, like Leh (India). These types of digesters were found to be very useful for the production of biogas, especially from aquatic biomass like water hyacinth.

Upama Misra; Sanjay Singh; Amarika Singh; G.N. Pandey

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Economic implications of anaerobic digesters on dairy farms in Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-selling price, digesters are less economically feasible than current waste management strategies, lagoons, even after considering potential environmental penalties. However, selling electricity and capturing by-product heat for cost savings makes the digester...

Jackson, Randy Scott, Jr.

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

86

Transmission line including support means with barriers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gas insulated transmission line includes an elongated outer sheath, a plurality of inner conductors disposed within and extending along the outer sheath, and an insulating gas which electrically insulates the inner conductors from the outer sheath. A support insulator insulatably supports the inner conductors within the outer sheath, with the support insulator comprising a main body portion including a plurality of legs extending to the outer sheath, and barrier portions which extend between the legs. The barrier portions have openings therein adjacent the main body portion through which the inner conductors extend.

Cookson, Alan H. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Biomass Anaerobic Digestion Facilities and Biomass Gasification Facilities (Indiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Indiana Department of Environmental Management requires permits before the construction or expansion of biomass anaerobic digestion or gasification facilities.

88

Thermophilic Anaerobic Digestion to Increase the Net Energy Balance of Corn Grain Ethanol  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thermophilic Anaerobic Digestion to Increase the Net Energy Balance of Corn Grain Ethanol ... However, the calculation did not include the energetic costs to physically replace the evaporator with the integrated digester system (this will be a relatively small fraction of the energy input because the percentage of energy input per unit of ethanol energy output for construction of the entire conventional dry mill is 0.2% (4)); the improved quality in animal feed (DDG vs DDGS); nor the available waste heat from circumventing thin stillage evaporation. ...

Matthew T. Agler; Marcelo L. Garcia; Eric S. Lee; Martha Schlicher; Largus T. Angenent

2008-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

89

Digestibility and Production Coefficients of Hog Feeds.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LIDEARY, A t% !*I COLLEGE, CA%!PUS. TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATiON A. B. CONNER, DIRECTOR COLLEGE STATION, BRAZOS COUNTY, TEXAS 7 BULLETIN NO. 454 SEPTEMBER, 1932 Digestibility and Production Coefficients of Hog Feeds AGRICULTURAI... .................................................................. 16 Compositjon and feeding values of pig feeds 17 Standards for pig feeding ----__.-_._----------- 1 22 Summary ----__..-----_--_-.---.--------------------- 23 Ref erenczs --------------.---------- 24 BULLETIN NO. 454 SEPTEMBER, 1932...

Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

1932-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Digestion Experiments with Texas Hays and Fodders.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. T. MILNER. .College Station I I STATION STAFF. I ............................................. B. YOUNGIILOOD, M S. .Director ......................................... M. FRANCIS, D. V. S.. Veterinarian.... B. Gottlieb, and T. L. Ogier. Special mention should be made of the services of J. B. Rather. TABLE +COMPOSITION OF FEEDING STUFFS AND RESIDUES FROM DIGESTION ZSPERTMENTS. Nitro- Pro- Ether Crude tein. 1 - 1 fiber. I frr$: TVater. 1 Labora...

Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

1912-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Optimization of solid state anaerobic digestion of the OFMSW by digestate recirculation: A new approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Dry anaerobic digestion (AD) of OFMSW was optimized in order to produce biogas avoiding the use of solid inoculum. Doing so the dry AD was performed irrigating the solid waste with liquid digestate (flow rate of 1:1.18–1:0.9 w/w waste/digestate; 21 d of hydraulic retention time – HRT) in order to remove fermentation products inhibiting AD process. Results indicated that a high hydrolysis rate of organic matter (OM) and partial biogas production were obtained directly during the dry AD. Hydrolysate OM was removed from digester by the percolate flow and it was subsequently used to feed a liquid anaerobic digester. During dry AD a total loss of 36.9% of total solids was recorded. Methane balance indicated that 18.4% of potential methane can be produced during dry AD and 49.7% by the percolate. Nevertheless results obtained for liquid AD digestion indicated that only 20.4% and 25.7% of potential producible methane was generated by adopting 15 and 20 days of HRT, probably due to the AD inhibition due to high presence of toxic ammonia forms in the liquid medium.

Pognani Michele; D’Imporzano Giuliana; Minetti Carlo; Scotti Sergio; Adani Fabrizio

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Oil and Gas Exploration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Metals Industrial Minerals Oil and Gas Geothermal Exploration Development Mining Processing Nevada, oil and gas, and geothermal activities and accomplishments in Nevada: production statistics, exploration and development including drilling for petroleum and geothermal resources, discoveries of ore

Tingley, Joseph V.

93

Natural gas annual 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1994 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1990 to 1994 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level.

NONE

1995-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

94

Natural gas annual 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1995 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1991 to 1995 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level.

NONE

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Community-Scale Anaerobic Digesters Webinar | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Community-Scale Anaerobic Digesters Webinar Community-Scale Anaerobic Digesters Webinar Community-Scale Anaerobic Digesters Webinar April 16, 2013 1:00PM MDT Webinar This free webinar will be held on April 16, 2013, from 1-2:15 p.m. Mountain Daylight Time. It will provide information on San Jose, California's, commercial-scale, high solids dry fermentation anaerobic digestion system, and the Forest County Potawatomi Community's anaerobic digester project. Implementing Anaerobic Digestion in San Jose's Integrated Processing Infrastructure This presentation will provide background on San Jose, California's, leading-edge program using the nation's first commercial-scale, high solids dry fermentation anaerobic digestion system to process commercial organics from more than 8,000 businesses in the city. Phase one of the Zero Waste

96

Model calibration and validation for OFMSW and sewage sludge co-digestion reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: > Disintegration is the limiting step of the anaerobic co-digestion process. > Disintegration kinetic constant does not depend on the waste particle size. > Disintegration kinetic constant depends only on the waste nature and composition. > The model calibration can be performed on organic waste of any particle size. - Abstract: A mathematical model has recently been proposed by the authors to simulate the biochemical processes that prevail in a co-digestion reactor fed with sewage sludge and the organic fraction of municipal solid waste. This model is based on the Anaerobic Digestion Model no. 1 of the International Water Association, which has been extended to include the co-digestion processes, using surface-based kinetics to model the organic waste disintegration and conversion to carbohydrates, proteins and lipids. When organic waste solids are present in the reactor influent, the disintegration process is the rate-limiting step of the overall co-digestion process. The main advantage of the proposed modeling approach is that the kinetic constant of such a process does not depend on the waste particle size distribution (PSD) and rather depends only on the nature and composition of the waste particles. The model calibration aimed to assess the kinetic constant of the disintegration process can therefore be conducted using organic waste samples of any PSD, and the resulting value will be suitable for all the organic wastes of the same nature as the investigated samples, independently of their PSD. This assumption was proven in this study by biomethane potential experiments that were conducted on organic waste samples with different particle sizes. The results of these experiments were used to calibrate and validate the mathematical model, resulting in a good agreement between the simulated and observed data for any investigated particle size of the solid waste. This study confirms the strength of the proposed model and calibration procedure, which can thus be used to assess the treatment efficiency and predict the methane production of full-scale digesters.

Esposito, G., E-mail: giovanni.esposito@unicas.it [Department of Mechanics, Structures and Environmental Engineering, University of Cassino, via Di Biasio 43, 03043 Cassino (Italy); Frunzo, L., E-mail: luigi.frunzo@unina.it [Department of Mathematics and Applications Renato Caccioppoli, University of Naples Federico II, via Cintia, Monte S. Angelo, I-80126 Naples (Italy); Panico, A., E-mail: anpanico@unina.it [Department of Hydraulic, Geotechnical and Environmental Engineering, University of Naples Federico II, via Claudio 21, 80125 Naples (Italy); Pirozzi, F., E-mail: francesco.pirozzi@unina.it [Department of Hydraulic, Geotechnical and Environmental Engineering, University of Naples Federico II, via Claudio 21, 80125 Naples (Italy)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

97

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 1,032 979 1,003 855 565 457 471 518 560 657 654 1,014 1990 1,195 903 893 857 577 244 413 365 508 587 763 774 1991 1,089 979 864 605 667 414 538 540 555 628 496 895 1992 1,076 1,128 1,103 1,047 676 498 448 479 411 609 654 951 1993 1,140 1,359 1,325 907 429 330 273 364 243 503 1,008 1,324 1994 1,919 1,974 1,626 1,092 653 542 343 599 384 569 1,010 1,338 1995 1,077 1,679 1,883 1,353 901 562 413 582 294 580 1,216 1,523 1996 1,963 1,919 1,606 1,251 757 446 421 443 581 648 972 1,290 1997 1,694 1,744 1,739 1,144 892 537 430 399 460 637 1,211 1,416 1998 1,817 1,642 1,518 1,141 694 506 496 195 483 628 1,019 1,338

98

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Pennsylvania (Including Vehicle Fuel)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 96,012 79,547 77,363 52,992 33,092 26,098 25,208 27,662 29,499 38,457 46,614 63,083 2002 80,458 74,651 70,773 53,368 38,209 33,401 32,700 34,743 30,425 40,462 58,542 83,877 2003 101,975 96,176 79,246 53,759 36,015 29,095 30,298 32,640 26,799 39,895 47,467 78,054 2004 100,298 95,715 73,189 54,937 42,873 33,367 36,047 33,735 32,060 34,578 50,908 74,224 2005 90,958 84,388 85,058 50,137 38,196 34,547 36,133 37,648 32,674 35,439 50,234 80,301 2006 76,519 77,324 76,877 49,039 37,224 36,803 44,307 41,471 31,545 40,867 49,703 63,941 2007 78,283 95,894 81,570 63,089 41,955 37,217 42,996 50,308 38,092 42,936 57,228 82,068

99

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 6,069 7,033 6,197 2,868 1,601 1,279 1,180 1,097 1,241 1,528 2,542 5,873 1990 7,587 5,618 4,176 3,424 2,281 1,519 1,312 1,355 1,235 1,613 2,520 4,567 1991 8,702 6,014 4,265 2,489 1,702 1,330 1,290 1,279 1,299 1,590 3,974 5,653 1992 6,180 5,310 3,653 2,956 1,785 1,540 1,407 1,292 1,240 1,449 2,608 5,771 1993 7,076 6,147 5,910 3,743 2,057 1,439 1,324 1,432 1,345 1,544 3,424 5,327 1994 6,644 6,611 4,717 2,954 1,875 1,384 1,364 1,256 1,384 1,475 2,207 4,632 1995 6,358 6,001 5,160 2,968 2,354 1,794 1,558 1,524 1,903 1,836 3,020 5,164 1996 7,808 7,923 5,595 4,413 2,222 1,770 1,798 1,678 1,759 1,900 3,273 6,014

100

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Ohio (Including Vehicle Fuel)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 136,340 110,078 102,451 66,525 41,541 34,864 34,025 32,667 33,129 48,517 59,935 87,118 2002 106,011 98,576 94,429 70,082 51,854 40,885 40,538 38,774 34,999 51,972 76,275 108,800 2003 140,436 123,688 99,629 65,861 43,326 32,959 33,810 37,562 32,918 52,253 65,617 103,846 2004 137,568 117,976 93,845 67,347 46,827 33,561 34,567 34,689 34,129 47,268 64,279 99,290 2005 122,404 107,459 105,183 63,669 47,239 37,221 35,833 37,060 33,808 42,569 65,578 113,292 2006 95,548 97,666 85,732 52,957 42,766 33,443 36,271 36,307 35,048 54,845 69,951 88,329 2007 105,108 128,279 87,809 70,627 41,797 34,877 33,361 40,637 34,554 41,730 69,858 102,787

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including digester gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Nebraska (Including Vehicle Fuel)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 17,481 15,747 13,983 11,129 7,094 5,429 8,556 6,368 5,506 5,854 10,730 11,012 2002 16,123 14,049 12,938 10,424 6,676 4,984 8,748 7,414 6,786 6,218 9,753 13,269 2003 15,675 15,319 13,354 8,644 6,232 4,472 7,653 7,469 5,904 6,758 8,775 13,011 2004 16,104 16,445 12,058 7,983 6,255 5,830 6,952 6,641 4,338 5,935 8,995 13,129 2005 17,242 14,641 11,440 8,360 6,579 5,853 7,874 8,028 6,345 6,081 8,200 13,733 2006 15,551 13,741 13,940 10,766 7,411 7,500 9,685 9,019 6,665 7,092 10,375 13,432 2007 17,851 19,390 16,040 10,333 9,436 7,602 10,286 11,264 8,529 7,818 10,704 15,974 2008 20,241 20,433 17,488 13,024 9,556 9,390 10,050 10,893 8,126 10,847 13,250 17,360

102

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 23,636 24,435 21,187 13,360 8,237 3,927 3,565 3,735 4,397 8,946 15,949 30,143 1990 25,317 19,642 20,361 13,373 7,446 4,838 3,975 4,165 4,240 7,272 13,757 19,190 1991 26,286 24,481 20,157 11,779 6,341 3,971 3,703 3,933 4,196 8,065 15,488 21,940 1992 26,321 24,820 20,215 15,893 7,455 5,016 4,291 4,260 4,418 9,092 15,094 23,770 1993 25,230 26,706 25,531 15,019 6,359 5,221 3,939 3,860 4,492 9,636 14,979 23,071 1994 33,573 29,301 22,713 14,498 7,933 5,111 4,027 4,287 4,492 7,331 12,594 20,936 1995 28,306 29,814 21,860 14,128 8,132 4,979 4,697 4,406 4,623 7,916 18,650 27,649 1996 33,993 29,732 26,650 16,833 8,960 7,661 4,569 4,401 4,048 8,548 18,274 26,298

103

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Georgia (Including Vehicle Fuel)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 49,414 34,292 35,867 25,368 20,633 20,544 24,229 26,863 21,857 25,679 23,983 34,450 2002 44,041 37,992 33,260 23,775 22,612 24,924 30,113 29,701 24,899 23,785 32,829 47,106 2003 56,470 43,704 31,355 30,232 21,920 20,512 23,789 26,828 21,628 22,981 26,920 45,508 2004 52,486 48,806 31,529 28,718 26,610 24,562 26,132 26,093 22,927 22,025 29,012 49,125 2005 47,756 39,503 39,085 25,191 23,198 26,957 31,619 33,089 28,453 26,199 32,483 52,399 2006 39,904 45,015 35,118 26,670 26,891 30,790 36,980 38,808 25,412 31,321 35,677 40,816 2007 49,163 47,589 32,236 31,955 27,318 31,415 32,039 49,457 31,028 27,420 33,851 41,413

104

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in New Hampshire (Including Vehicle  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 3,171 3,309 2,951 2,280 1,441 1,134 1,003 888 1,182 1,589 1,904 2,520 2002 2,917 3,188 2,833 2,179 1,815 1,423 1,657 1,055 1,381 1,038 1,847 3,507 2003 6,844 6,457 5,490 3,772 3,085 2,034 3,900 5,640 4,166 4,643 3,574 4,515 2004 5,204 7,595 6,870 6,131 2,712 4,473 4,167 4,306 4,766 3,194 5,704 6,026 2005 6,958 7,545 6,875 5,691 6,049 5,824 5,780 6,010 4,491 4,069 5,173 5,988 2006 7,782 6,823 7,852 4,511 2,505 2,608 3,895 5,107 5,407 5,917 3,850 6,263 2007 6,645 5,329 5,157 5,429 3,826 4,223 5,642 5,420 5,969 4,295 4,527 5,641 2008 7,786 7,653 7,558 5,076 4,511 4,124 5,536 4,876 5,352 5,548 6,443 6,692

105

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 1,357 1,414 1,111 852 521 368 285 233 268 396 724 1,022 1990 1,305 1,199 1,085 822 628 410 247 234 241 378 759 1,132 1991 1,639 1,249 996 830 680 362 272 248 269 449 873 1,233 1992 1,404 1,078 821 668 438 309 264 269 287 439 760 1,271 1993 1,631 1,376 1,262 882 639 400 362 389 378 667 874 1,407 1994 1,351 1,412 1,065 869 544 369 291 270 308 550 915 1,287 1995 1,671 1,247 1,217 987 873 594 373 258 NA NA NA NA 1996 1,176 1,203 1,030 925 712 342 197 197 250 640 1,301 1,748 1997 1,570 1,309 1,403 1,189 958 491 623 287 316 554 966 1,088 1998 1,628 1,322 1,279 936 597 442 371 253 343 493 927 1,822

106

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Maryland (Including Vehicle Fuel)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 28,398 21,618 21,408 13,900 9,252 8,342 9,046 11,007 9,109 12,662 13,558 17,125 2002 24,221 22,802 20,670 12,534 8,846 8,846 10,514 12,842 10,157 12,911 20,408 28,827 2003 31,739 28,530 21,240 15,685 9,809 8,723 8,128 7,986 7,131 11,863 16,167 27,049 2004 33,576 27,062 20,558 14,623 9,867 8,560 7,704 8,271 7,535 11,725 16,222 26,279 2005 29,469 25,497 24,272 13,414 10,273 10,104 9,641 11,634 8,302 12,060 16,807 28,263 2006 24,101 24,846 19,870 11,807 9,034 9,251 11,438 11,236 8,042 11,895 16,300 21,239 2007 24,841 32,498 20,950 15,805 8,835 9,239 9,540 12,974 9,655 10,242 17,911 25,311 2008 28,394 26,094 20,551 12,340 9,832 9,808 10,778 7,669 8,974 12,394 20,316 25,502

107

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Wyoming (Including Vehicle Fuel)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 7,475 6,484 5,643 5,505 4,182 3,864 3,515 3,541 3,688 4,790 5,518 6,170 2002 6,844 5,846 6,319 5,737 5,034 4,070 4,980 4,124 4,599 6,126 7,421 8,523 2003 7,672 7,313 7,026 5,737 4,976 4,408 4,112 4,164 4,356 5,062 5,554 7,236 2004 7,555 7,180 6,077 5,400 4,775 4,216 4,064 4,187 4,024 5,032 6,153 6,963 2005 7,585 6,443 6,231 5,612 5,092 4,247 4,081 3,903 4,080 4,829 5,360 7,262 2006 7,304 6,824 6,957 5,389 4,762 4,109 4,108 4,063 3,935 5,157 5,893 6,958 2007 7,982 7,322 6,900 5,469 4,958 4,253 3,873 3,944 4,150 5,003 6,095 7,723 2008 8,446 7,443 6,660 5,737 5,057 4,098 3,749 3,805 3,520 4,922 5,595 7,419

108

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Colorado (Including Vehicle Fuel)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 57,089 50,447 49,042 41,157 30,506 23,904 22,403 22,033 19,905 22,672 30,231 42,797 2002 47,541 44,713 45,909 30,319 24,230 22,105 26,301 21,119 21,764 34,563 38,884 46,826 2003 44,971 47,164 38,292 25,380 24,811 18,484 23,772 23,529 20,981 22,248 39,408 48,023 2004 47,548 44,859 30,853 28,458 23,766 20,408 22,895 21,210 20,651 26,731 39,719 50,977 2005 50,356 41,495 39,617 33,501 25,108 20,725 26,350 23,387 22,698 29,399 38,140 54,566 2006 45,074 45,360 42,614 26,074 20,799 20,115 23,277 22,817 18,928 30,373 38,546 49,332 2007 62,803 46,554 33,579 30,243 25,136 25,014 28,465 26,787 27,444 32,786 39,145 57,263

109

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 1,567 1,575 1,160 692 409 355 301 249 321 435 785 1,176 1990 1,313 1,283 1,000 610 479 389 293 280 292 459 822 1,315 1991 1,848 1,291 956 822 623 405 316 304 329 424 942 1,321 1992 1,543 1,167 834 643 447 343 345 330 369 465 889 1,557 1993 1,806 1,673 1,294 828 566 387 383 360 381 507 947 1,543 1994 1,510 1,457 1,121 771 480 377 374 306 357 571 1,098 1,667 1995 1,754 1,319 1,154 951 708 487 361 346 392 591 997 1,300 1996 1,734 1,783 1,359 996 710 477 346 354 421 597 1,107 1,621 1997 1,810 1,778 1,341 1,037 684 397 372 354 409 584 979 1,687 1998 1,969 1,564 1,417 1,072 686 535 405 380 386 577 1,045 1,640

110

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Maine (Including Vehicle Fuel)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 6,537 6,903 6,950 5,791 7,780 6,957 8,161 9,020 8,835 8,864 9,644 9,127 2002 9,857 10,737 9,131 9,186 10,030 9,602 7,965 10,909 8,186 10,974 12,161 11,924 2003 8,047 5,034 5,581 5,924 4,577 4,916 6,000 5,629 5,606 6,652 5,970 6,036 2004 7,095 8,049 7,635 7,137 6,496 6,314 6,648 7,333 6,100 7,027 7,786 7,858 2005 5,882 5,823 5,955 5,764 4,162 5,163 5,883 6,097 4,936 4,955 4,236 2,234 2006 3,888 4,850 5,239 4,090 5,138 4,996 6,505 5,264 5,580 6,835 5,939 5,217 2007 6,180 5,355 4,869 4,768 4,222 4,680 6,405 6,403 4,340 3,731 4,999 6,480 2008 6,142 5,066 5,389 5,928 5,679 4,545 6,177 5,002 5,965 5,812 6,785 6,712

111

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Vermont (Including Vehicle Fuel)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 1,164 1,003 1,084 834 544 381 304 307 361 438 658 827 2002 1,127 1,149 960 808 575 428 330 336 348 485 803 1,003 2003 1,153 1,191 1,062 906 539 367 293 312 325 502 708 1,029 2004 1,154 1,381 1,072 829 517 421 331 342 365 479 769 1,011 2005 1,211 1,280 1,199 776 558 404 310 298 295 418 666 943 2006 1,112 1,063 1,190 745 501 415 318 318 347 481 658 893 2007 1,104 1,375 1,250 915 536 382 340 331 342 423 696 1,158 2008 1,202 1,217 1,137 865 512 384 331 333 361 480 702 1,084 2009 1,407 1,307 1,076 794 507 409 348 321 337 508 684 922 2010 1,270 1,126 897 685 488 376 344 335 348 581 801 1,177

112

Percentage of Total Natural Gas Commercial Deliveries included in Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

80.4 79.7 77.8 77.5 67.3 65.2 1987-2012 80.4 79.7 77.8 77.5 67.3 65.2 1987-2012 Alabama 79.8 80.2 78.8 79.3 78.9 76.2 1990-2012 Alaska 76.0 74.9 85.3 87.7 88.6 94.9 1990-2012 Arizona 93.4 93.1 88.0 88.7 87.8 86.6 1990-2012 Arkansas 70.4 64.5 59.4 55.6 51.5 40.2 1990-2012 California 60.7 56.7 54.9 54.1 54.3 50.0 1990-2012 Colorado 95.7 95.2 94.8 94.6 93.8 92.2 1990-2012 Connecticut 71.5 70.7 69.0 65.4 65.4 65.1 1990-2012 Delaware 74.8 70.6 53.5 49.8 53.4 43.7 1990-2012 District of Columbia 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 16.9 17.9 1990-2012 Florida 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 38.5 37.0 1990-2012 Georgia 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1990-2012 Hawaii 100 100 100 100 100 100 1990-2012 Idaho 84.8 86.0 83.7 82.0 80.8 77.0 1990-2012 Illinois

113

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 2,133 2,021 2,066 1,635 999 803 692 763 712 775 1,090 2,052 1990 1,986 1,857 1,789 1,384 951 699 514 572 721 574 836 1,589 1991 2,204 2,308 2,131 1,381 1,063 784 705 794 689 658 1,071 1,764 1992 2,300 2,256 2,132 1,774 1,056 764 718 673 653 753 1,103 1,921 1993 2,352 2,438 2,166 1,550 1,150 731 664 703 684 841 1,040 1,909 1994 2,303 1,865 1,483 1,588 979 815 753 692 740 785 1,082 1,658 1995 2,280 2,583 2,089 1,607 1,158 884 820 744 766 794 1,116 2,194 1996 2,147 1,942 1,551 1,925 1,233 824 878 750 774 804 1,195 2,325 1997 2,334 2,315 2,183 1,738 1,372 951 782 853 852 899 1,354 2,379

114

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 2,156 2,125 1,533 1,100 1,004 890 790 805 811 954 1,257 1,690 1990 1,959 1,963 1,740 1,185 1,006 970 879 782 701 1,157 1,026 1,705 1991 2,447 1,839 1,739 1,593 1,333 1,121 947 1,005 761 1,104 1,095 1,976 1992 2,327 1,873 1,725 1,335 1,012 945 1,015 824 872 982 1,022 2,170 1993 2,271 2,110 2,016 1,314 1,341 1,052 919 939 909 1,047 1,421 2,211 1994 2,334 2,277 1,995 1,456 1,300 1,136 995 909 978 1,146 1,541 2,625 1995 2,551 2,139 1,868 1,784 1,558 1,268 1,082 978 1,009 1,151 1,444 1,871 1996 2,466 2,309 2,268 1,811 1,454 1,286 1,145 1,062 1,116 1,269 1,817 2,417 1997 2,717 2,634 2,447 1,900 1,695 1,412 1,099 1,148 1,195 1,273 1,800 2,638

115

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Wisconsin (Including Vehicle Fuel)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 52,126 51,020 52,466 24,969 17,238 15,421 16,478 16,540 16,716 25,355 26,981 41,400 2002 49,850 43,815 48,646 31,946 24,278 16,100 16,531 15,795 16,659 28,429 39,330 49,912 2003 62,523 55,695 44,756 32,270 20,752 15,502 15,630 18,099 16,485 24,636 36,907 47,677 2004 65,038 48,498 41,599 27,544 21,106 15,420 15,949 14,951 16,063 23,268 33,602 56,693 2005 59,667 45,463 47,647 29,885 23,265 22,788 21,959 22,549 19,566 23,868 35,232 54,600 2006 44,700 49,036 42,628 24,331 20,527 17,607 20,221 19,919 18,038 31,566 36,227 44,483 2007 53,637 61,738 41,274 32,627 19,348 17,305 18,156 21,627 17,044 22,827 36,770 53,091

116

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Kansas (Including Vehicle Fuel)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 35,585 27,368 26,284 16,906 10,552 11,171 18,862 17,962 13,422 11,375 14,263 20,610 2002 28,513 25,068 25,566 17,348 13,424 13,947 18,253 20,062 15,937 13,007 21,946 26,371 2003 31,180 29,594 25,952 16,337 13,386 11,371 15,614 15,421 13,725 13,096 15,980 25,771 2004 30,087 29,036 21,955 15,496 13,148 12,282 11,912 13,013 13,177 13,809 15,207 23,992 2005 29,876 25,291 20,604 15,459 12,953 11,687 13,164 13,264 12,147 11,254 14,924 25,902 2006 25,596 23,451 22,320 16,673 12,748 14,289 18,023 17,171 12,559 13,555 17,451 24,135 2007 29,886 31,709 22,007 16,753 13,449 14,165 16,842 20,565 16,098 15,324 19,705 29,579

117

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Oklahoma (Including Vehicle Fuel)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 45,337 36,026 35,468 29,023 26,153 28,194 41,056 38,697 30,910 29,194 26,719 33,193 2002 42,957 42,546 40,981 36,989 28,784 31,741 39,440 43,092 34,007 26,058 27,197 34,574 2003 44,633 43,363 39,395 32,941 30,147 32,417 46,076 47,914 30,139 28,937 26,588 39,627 2004 44,286 47,720 40,198 35,528 36,608 33,843 39,855 38,791 36,056 30,069 25,036 35,444 2005 42,941 41,516 38,987 36,599 35,972 45,327 48,696 49,698 42,454 32,097 30,402 42,813 2006 42,641 45,534 43,562 45,754 43,689 44,512 51,955 56,344 37,425 35,388 34,881 46,374 2007 55,048 57,329 44,646 43,762 41,758 42,250 47,969 58,650 43,759 42,172 36,392 49,540

118

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Kentucky (Including Vehicle Fuel)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 31,659 23,182 21,670 14,953 9,527 8,890 9,668 9,881 10,024 12,591 16,271 23,216 2002 26,131 24,533 23,241 14,879 12,317 11,623 13,804 10,869 11,129 14,628 21,069 27,646 2003 34,776 29,032 20,580 14,017 10,797 9,334 9,467 10,296 10,390 13,196 16,933 27,218 2004 32,640 27,566 21,630 15,771 12,331 11,249 10,810 11,428 10,883 13,355 17,689 27,203 2005 29,373 24,036 24,578 15,557 13,614 13,693 12,658 14,134 12,122 14,104 19,304 29,050 2006 23,093 23,721 20,380 14,447 13,054 12,108 12,861 13,777 11,131 14,865 17,982 22,930 2007 26,916 29,946 20,044 17,410 12,573 11,418 10,304 16,709 11,848 13,874 18,696 24,799

119

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 2,176 1,936 2,098 1,489 1,094 891 908 808 866 970 1,324 1,964 1990 2,455 1,649 1,576 1,262 1,040 846 836 830 872 965 1,315 1,749 1991 2,199 2,076 1,746 1,143 908 818 810 859 875 952 1,492 1,917 1992 2,276 2,158 1,745 1,436 1,068 944 820 882 875 1,006 1,345 2,089 1993 2,268 2,155 2,200 1,507 1,007 877 832 840 846 947 1,463 2,070 1994 2,845 2,472 1,910 1,174 1,027 1,342 913 949 947 1,089 1,361 1,843 1995 2,600 2,626 2,111 1,382 1,045 1,013 950 956 1,044 1,054 1,674 2,414 1996 3,136 2,782 2,190 1,884 1,154 997 940 957 1,041 1,157 1,644 2,447 1997 2,378 2,381 1,793 1,202 1,268 1,096 989 1,004 1,884 1,167 1,757 2,639

120

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 4,784 4,016 4,367 3,046 2,022 1,568 1,475 1,454 1,534 1,843 2,639 4,396 1990 5,379 3,690 3,400 2,747 1,820 1,445 1,394 1,480 1,596 1,795 2,715 3,817 1991 4,947 4,647 3,990 2,629 1,928 1,677 1,613 1,679 1,789 2,052 3,200 4,162 1992 5,169 5,066 3,983 3,296 2,205 1,733 1,591 1,607 1,679 2,138 3,010 4,941 1993 5,866 5,566 5,426 3,602 1,988 1,532 1,437 1,539 1,674 2,067 3,379 3,292 1994 7,247 6,269 4,727 2,761 1,844 1,605 1,487 1,647 1,831 2,115 2,817 4,592 1995 5,839 6,031 4,241 3,065 1,766 1,579 1,487 1,475 1,597 1,740 3,263 5,279 1996 6,913 6,421 4,851 3,760 1,970 1,586 1,415 1,575 1,658 1,917 3,240 5,160

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including digester gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Delaware (Including Vehicle Fuel)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 5,014 4,742 5,389 3,439 2,924 3,276 3,324 4,609 4,923 5,078 3,908 3,419 2002 5,258 4,880 4,847 3,830 2,810 2,738 6,396 3,816 4,170 3,843 3,936 5,597 2003 6,397 5,499 5,102 3,399 2,081 2,433 3,570 3,550 2,728 2,949 3,547 4,833 2004 6,827 5,602 4,600 3,387 3,731 2,595 2,620 2,437 2,880 2,484 4,033 6,759 2005 6,870 5,543 5,427 2,696 2,517 2,866 3,287 3,735 2,652 2,870 3,515 4,876 2006 5,025 4,699 4,451 2,549 2,659 3,204 3,812 3,447 2,516 2,972 3,454 4,379 2007 4,855 5,154 4,783 3,486 2,804 3,196 3,833 4,160 3,127 3,346 3,838 5,551 2008 5,197 5,132 4,474 3,574 2,885 3,871 4,077 3,567 3,009 2,937 4,178 5,239

122

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 26,553 25,448 24,717 16,375 10,150 5,954 4,570 4,467 5,047 8,855 15,776 28,269 1990 26,939 22,780 20,870 15,431 9,230 5,638 4,610 4,865 5,117 8,592 14,122 21,237 1991 29,054 24,902 21,321 14,617 9,583 5,601 4,916 4,508 5,510 9,450 12,966 23,131 1992 26,677 24,979 22,443 17,769 10,406 5,883 4,981 4,964 5,431 9,760 16,298 24,211 1993 28,122 27,427 25,623 18,238 9,009 5,968 5,035 4,140 5,767 10,193 16,875 23,833 1994 33,440 31,356 24,263 16,330 10,123 6,207 5,343 5,363 5,719 8,796 14,511 21,617 1995 27,945 29,223 23,980 18,384 11,004 6,372 5,664 5,778 6,417 9,647 19,742 29,922 1996 32,468 30,447 27,914 19,664 12,272 6,343 5,673 5,383 6,146 9,472 19,486 26,123

123

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Arizona (Including Vehicle Fuel)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 19,804 23,088 21,742 19,153 21,113 17,703 18,312 16,919 14,352 14,127 12,164 19,204 2002 19,840 19,954 18,340 14,544 14,463 17,262 23,546 22,088 20,988 19,112 17,712 21,662 2003 20,639 18,895 21,753 16,848 14,559 16,858 28,981 30,940 25,278 24,409 16,317 18,043 2004 25,379 30,143 26,925 23,982 26,878 29,819 35,860 33,244 27,591 23,349 23,090 26,140 2005 24,400 22,209 17,591 20,779 22,660 23,609 35,036 34,587 26,451 24,130 22,651 28,011 2006 26,212 24,177 22,606 21,814 22,339 30,548 34,718 36,448 30,678 32,378 24,493 29,027 2007 34,237 26,857 17,051 20,379 28,959 35,463 43,104 40,305 33,790 29,544 27,001 33,835

124

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Iowa (Including Vehicle Fuel)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 33,183 29,626 26,788 17,172 12,430 10,449 10,249 10,177 10,494 14,476 16,865 23,400 2002 28,527 25,072 25,693 18,706 13,413 10,076 9,731 9,815 10,403 14,561 22,219 27,225 2003 31,445 32,450 25,482 16,870 12,421 10,288 9,892 10,030 10,550 13,644 20,542 26,599 2004 32,639 30,955 23,081 15,569 11,543 10,481 9,546 10,080 10,193 14,132 20,759 27,591 2005 34,272 27,838 24,671 18,370 13,180 12,206 11,888 11,542 11,838 13,551 19,595 30,763 2006 26,997 26,909 23,941 17,158 14,088 12,588 13,244 11,886 12,277 18,360 22,732 25,747 2007 35,848 38,728 28,204 22,726 17,742 14,922 15,363 15,754 14,595 18,051 24,001 35,021

125

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 3,976 3,700 4,247 2,586 1,701 1,154 968 941 978 1,220 1,801 3,647 1990 4,168 3,115 3,057 2,477 1,557 1,131 1,049 961 1,016 1,095 1,686 2,738 1991 5,709 5,334 4,545 3,320 2,108 1,602 1,545 1,465 1,486 2,289 3,582 5,132 1992 6,323 6,382 5,073 3,807 2,391 1,784 1,553 1,586 1,615 2,491 3,895 5,565 1993 6,273 6,568 6,232 3,772 2,110 1,861 1,507 1,567 1,700 2,231 3,898 5,915 1994 8,122 6,354 5,634 2,844 2,547 1,709 1,732 1,588 2,016 2,531 3,582 5,475 1995 6,743 7,826 4,472 3,736 2,388 1,994 1,612 1,722 2,065 1,907 4,871 7,538 1996 7,648 6,515 5,476 3,766 2,672 1,816 1,608 1,866 1,922 2,427 4,693 5,433

126

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 3,493 3,435 3,545 3,083 2,670 2,570 2,525 2,369 2,484 2,444 2,868 3,620 1990 4,101 3,305 3,246 3,026 2,860 2,673 2,584 2,497 2,483 2,521 3,285 3,725 1991 3,875 3,770 3,782 3,363 2,978 2,674 2,845 2,708 2,998 2,798 3,519 3,954 1992 4,408 4,364 3,856 3,741 3,382 3,085 2,976 2,881 2,849 2,954 3,317 3,914 1993 3,951 4,078 4,088 3,871 3,362 3,085 2,919 2,830 2,887 2,983 3,336 3,760 1994 4,619 3,941 3,853 3,374 3,078 2,937 2,855 2,909 2,896 2,814 3,089 3,570 1995 4,274 4,361 3,900 3,433 3,055 2,930 2,970 2,751 2,818 2,840 3,171 3,883 1996 4,731 4,272 4,167 3,918 3,336 3,029 2,836 2,716 2,840 2,957 3,179 3,830

127

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 3,919 4,336 3,961 2,180 1,261 1,357 1,019 1,007 1,096 1,245 1,948 3,942 1990 4,957 3,368 2,807 2,223 1,398 1,065 1,030 1,043 1,081 1,260 1,948 2,949 1991 5,034 4,043 2,848 1,778 1,211 1,027 998 1,023 1,045 1,184 2,497 3,297 1992 4,159 3,861 2,708 2,114 1,358 1,108 1,062 1,022 1,029 1,219 2,078 3,596 1993 4,757 4,174 3,999 2,923 1,540 1,078 1,013 1,047 1,126 1,389 2,480 3,473 1994 5,101 4,707 3,388 2,306 1,360 1,107 990 887 1,253 1,275 1,897 3,136 1995 4,387 4,171 3,478 2,027 1,337 1,156 1,015 1,021 1,060 1,183 2,265 4,311 1996 5,411 5,249 3,895 2,964 1,519 1,052 1,056 1,060 1,106 1,356 2,462 3,876

128

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Arkansas (Including Vehicle Fuel)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 26,139 20,654 21,940 16,528 13,819 12,558 14,779 16,061 15,014 18,239 19,675 22,233 2002 24,431 24,940 22,284 19,166 15,635 16,964 18,741 17,700 16,789 16,932 17,770 21,567 2003 27,116 27,256 22,904 18,625 17,603 17,849 18,208 18,467 15,282 16,402 16,960 20,603 2004 24,746 25,909 21,663 16,382 15,991 14,085 14,456 14,551 11,956 14,094 13,138 18,337 2005 22,386 19,719 19,170 15,597 14,643 15,315 16,703 17,392 13,113 13,511 15,272 20,113 2006 19,984 19,909 19,394 17,499 17,865 19,198 19,107 19,963 16,976 17,107 15,346 19,021 2007 20,936 22,984 17,280 15,779 16,099 17,982 17,998 22,294 15,747 13,225 15,235 18,728

129

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Utah (Including Vehicle Fuel)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 20,043 17,426 13,012 11,173 7,791 7,056 6,214 6,023 6,572 9,189 11,646 18,505 2002 19,727 17,659 15,165 8,453 7,113 5,260 5,915 6,481 7,591 11,589 13,814 16,447 2003 16,474 16,494 12,825 10,664 6,942 5,612 6,174 6,166 6,229 7,898 13,299 16,533 2004 21,414 17,627 10,247 9,033 6,775 5,344 6,398 5,617 6,456 8,714 13,097 17,058 2005 18,357 16,430 13,763 12,951 9,253 7,461 7,380 6,187 6,053 6,449 9,027 16,786 2006 19,708 17,533 16,428 13,496 8,309 8,516 8,734 8,180 8,599 9,422 13,464 19,710 2007 27,918 22,251 16,927 13,476 12,260 11,106 9,771 9,790 10,976 12,425 15,630 20,497 2008 27,371 26,146 20,495 17,995 13,506 10,286 10,157 10,919 10,422 11,249 14,386 19,141

130

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in North Carolina (Including Vehicle  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 29,800 21,808 20,434 14,585 11,544 11,979 13,229 15,763 11,364 14,905 15,898 19,179 2002 27,750 25,444 22,993 16,550 13,274 14,816 16,400 17,088 13,640 15,047 19,024 27,257 2003 32,135 30,180 20,979 15,717 12,038 9,338 12,359 13,177 11,210 12,814 16,520 25,999 2004 31,785 30,416 22,379 16,242 16,033 12,711 12,866 13,027 11,970 11,729 15,635 24,946 2005 30,538 27,324 26,203 17,851 13,162 12,669 15,688 16,197 12,616 12,082 15,331 25,731 2006 25,596 23,904 23,271 15,873 13,091 13,120 17,476 19,153 11,452 14,070 18,457 22,889 2007 26,988 29,743 21,686 17,606 13,644 14,343 14,640 22,849 15,744 14,159 17,540 23,411

131

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 3,283 3,376 2,280 1,227 653 472 357 346 390 522 1,313 2,304 1990 2,864 2,779 2,272 1,203 860 581 373 364 374 629 1,382 2,540 1991 4,055 3,108 2,282 1,771 1,316 668 405 375 407 551 1,634 2,704 1992 3,330 2,952 1,866 1,155 642 457 410 372 405 545 1,329 3,120 1993 3,922 3,682 2,988 1,839 1,248 707 597 594 606 946 2,023 3,436 1994 3,929 3,846 2,665 2,037 962 814 820 787 882 1,883 3,542 4,335 1995 4,244 3,324 2,948 2,429 1,675 1,122 861 899 1,088 1,905 2,605 3,724 1996 4,549 4,604 3,129 2,479 1,356 892 904 874 1,279 2,073 3,185 4,220 1997 5,030 4,454 3,350 2,664 1,263 942 923 939 1,120 2,012 3,174 5,257

132

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Michigan (Including Vehicle Fuel)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 133,140 112,047 111,301 76,191 48,707 41,686 43,845 44,577 40,142 59,283 71,352 92,053 2002 119,902 108,891 104,208 87,138 63,810 52,457 51,899 47,094 40,938 53,419 82,015 114,268 2003 140,545 133,702 114,085 80,651 53,258 37,279 35,261 42,115 32,744 49,901 69,659 99,067 2004 137,906 127,671 102,442 76,978 54,610 41,310 38,001 37,565 37,285 48,239 71,870 107,025 2005 133,079 112,812 108,608 72,884 50,886 47,768 50,667 44,890 35,502 42,661 64,574 111,058 2006 104,803 99,454 96,633 65,814 43,901 35,824 43,332 39,459 31,740 50,167 70,643 85,634 2007 100,406 124,441 98,314 69,491 43,699 33,353 30,415 38,655 30,211 36,831 59,171 97,411

133

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Louisiana (Including Vehicle Fuel)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 90,750 82,773 86,038 87,577 81,223 77,877 93,937 105,743 93,365 92,353 85,277 92,797 2002 102,807 96,945 102,315 94,281 91,511 97,058 107,870 109,348 97,986 94,054 96,857 102,289 2003 106,504 91,821 89,554 89,376 88,426 78,863 91,469 95,243 85,824 84,198 83,677 94,139 2004 101,114 98,005 96,851 86,763 89,143 89,075 96,344 98,583 93,156 94,397 89,577 99,046 2005 102,652 87,403 100,620 97,398 104,027 102,860 104,234 99,244 82,252 75,899 72,958 91,598 2006 80,495 79,755 88,341 86,459 88,047 89,170 97,472 103,508 88,124 89,721 89,141 94,300 2007 100,669 93,075 95,251 91,900 94,668 99,373 92,367 104,606 87,792 91,661 83,575 89,348

134

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Florida (Including Vehicle Fuel)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 34,086 30,338 35,463 39,708 42,466 46,947 53,430 53,352 55,306 52,955 42,205 47,598 2002 50,177 41,302 50,453 55,845 56,767 62,343 67,197 70,144 65,136 64,259 47,600 45,144 2003 53,384 43,538 54,761 51,487 62,575 58,312 64,041 61,764 62,150 59,558 56,488 50,525 2004 50,877 49,866 51,687 53,442 62,663 69,628 72,443 70,540 70,259 66,961 50,122 53,169 2005 59,417 49,956 60,238 55,269 64,436 69,719 90,376 84,114 67,877 63,782 55,683 46,489 2006 54,827 56,557 68,707 73,645 85,346 87,268 88,949 86,772 83,397 76,817 58,594 56,867 2007 57,409 56,412 60,397 70,366 76,461 81,312 93,683 97,040 88,865 89,976 66,512 67,153

135

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 28,465 29,564 21,880 18,656 19,249 21,469 15,319 17,351 19,452 19,856 21,665 26,192 1990 30,798 34,767 27,425 23,423 18,540 17,392 21,030 17,705 23,233 17,384 22,637 30,759 1991 31,793 23,911 26,128 28,375 21,468 20,003 22,080 16,547 23,307 26,510 20,109 27,379 1992 38,234 23,834 24,413 18,379 27,118 22,150 21,150 21,633 19,247 19,112 20,999 28,738 1993 27,151 31,334 21,654 18,276 18,032 15,638 18,341 14,348 16,845 19,708 20,404 28,553 1994 29,342 27,032 23,156 18,463 22,621 18,091 25,752 14,123 14,604 17,844 25,032 25,929 1995 31,883 25,693 23,399 23,976 24,831 19,028 21,954 18,362 19,391 21,272 22,818 26,152

136

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Colorado (Including Vehicle...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 272,530 289,945 288,147 2000's 321,784 412,773 404,873 377,794 378,894 405,509 383,452 435,360...

137

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 8,109 11,224 12,435 1970's 14,500 16,073 17,005 15,420 16,247 15,928 16,694 16,813 16,940 16,830...

138

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 3,909 3,749 3,937 2,897 2,106 1,625 1,528 1,579 1,551 1,685 2,324 3,891 1990 4,318 3,869 3,369 3,009 1,743 1,483 1,358...

139

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Connecticut (Including...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 142,216 130,664 149,294 2000's 156,692 143,330 175,072 150,692 159,259 164,740 169,504 175,820...

140

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Connecticut (Including...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 18,442 15,861 16,485 10,646 7,197 7,730 7,420 9,010 11,276 11,370 12,345 15,400 2002 19,009 18,410 17,585 13,782 12,805...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including digester gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Dec 1989 21,163 22,930 20,215 15,779 11,310 10,731 12,786 11,350 9,367 10,345 12,823 23,871 1990 21,376 16,323 17,118 14,054 12,299 14,204 14,184 11,592 9,448 9,571 12,192 19,981...

142

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

285,213 323,054 347,818 1950's 387,838 464,309 515,669 530,650 584,957 629,219 716,871 775,916 871,774 975,107 1960's 1,020,222 1,076,849 1,206,668 1,267,783 1,374,717...

143

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Ohio (Including Vehicle...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 877,039 792,617 823,448 2000's 871,444 787,719 813,735 832,563 812,084 811,759 729,264 791,733 780,187 723,471 2010's...

144

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Rhode Island (Including...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 116,871 130,415 117,758 2000's 88,124 95,326 87,472 78,074 72,301 80,070 76,401 87,150 88,391...

145

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

40,988 43,950 42,953 43,080 37,466 42,422 40,532 39,821 47,326 1980's 28,576 32,055 30,871 30,758 25,299 24,134 23,816 25,544 25,879 26,920 1990's 24,051 38,117 42,464 43,635...

146

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in North Dakota (Including...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,988 3,550 3,908 4,743 2003 5,308 4,986 4,115 2,464 2,072 1,511 1,109 963 1,664 2,336 3,871 6,879 2004 5,976 4,565 4,243 2,998 2,087 1,270 1,207 1,858 2,219 2,970 3,638 4,990 2005...

147

Energy Department Expands Gas Gouging Reporting System to Include...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

U.S.'s part of this action). The Treasury Department and IRS announced that "dyed diesel fuel" normally limited to off-road use would be permitted for road use. This action will...

148

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 25,565 24,630 25,344 18,494 12,079 8,747 8,382 8,305 8,812 11,741 16,631 27,650 1990 24,659 23,697 22,939 17,706 11,586 10,272 9,602 9,683 10,261 12,661 17,210 24,715 1991 28,442 25,685 23,462 17,684 11,669 9,641 10,331 9,764 9,195 11,571 17,033 25,121 1992 29,246 29,912 27,748 23,039 13,518 9,915 9,327 9,456 9,582 12,860 16,804 25,808 1993 28,857 29,740 28,926 20,266 11,667 11,221 10,477 10,502 9,972 13,970 18,205 26,928 1994 31,014 32,757 29,376 21,207 13,641 11,207 10,158 10,485 10,002 12,399 16,783 24,226 1995 28,329 29,345 28,182 20,813 14,459 11,501 11,281 10,797 10,619 13,394 22,325 30,309 1996 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA

149

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in South Carolina (Including Vehicle  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 17,028 13,472 12,569 10,957 8,683 9,367 10,138 11,625 9,077 11,870 11,334 12,725 2002 20,494 17,611 16,270 14,448 14,921 14,889 16,325 15,616 11,675 10,993 12,221 16,164 2003 18,666 17,514 12,917 11,948 9,803 8,615 10,304 12,231 8,766 8,909 9,675 14,460 2004 19,029 19,575 14,664 11,619 12,602 10,686 12,311 13,363 11,234 9,815 10,497 15,861 2005 19,494 16,945 17,212 12,523 11,619 12,506 16,813 18,833 10,439 8,087 9,210 15,920 2006 14,609 15,594 14,881 12,013 11,535 13,578 18,401 19,755 10,930 12,902 14,061 14,246 2007 18,348 19,666 12,154 11,405 11,154 12,705 14,438 22,784 13,231 12,270 11,398 13,530

150

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Indiana (Including Vehicle Fuel)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 77,275 61,840 57,608 37,045 27,762 26,685 25,473 29,184 25,697 34,650 39,146 51,997 2002 65,893 58,962 58,569 44,882 32,659 27,696 30,899 30,668 28,357 37,204 49,556 68,056 2003 80,534 70,155 52,368 35,903 31,266 25,652 24,580 26,666 27,072 34,914 46,556 64,253 2004 80,680 70,341 53,056 37,842 30,840 25,006 25,592 27,498 26,658 33,102 43,630 65,054 2005 72,775 58,428 61,390 39,473 30,697 28,897 28,628 29,602 26,476 32,838 44,576 70,488 2006 56,899 57,392 54,200 34,311 30,004 26,873 29,579 29,996 27,630 39,210 47,253 56,403 2007 66,914 76,347 49,045 40,498 29,129 27,272 28,150 34,503 29,267 35,013 48,878 63,510

151

Crab digestive phospholipase: A new invertebrate member  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Crab digestive phospholipase (CDPL) was purified from the hepatopancreas of Carcinus mediterraneus crabs. Homogeneous enzyme was obtained after two chromatography steps: anion exchange and size exclusion HPLC column. Homogeneous CDPL has a molecular mass of 14 kDa as determined by SDS/PAGE analysis. Unlike known digestive phospholipases like porcine PLA2 (PPPL), CDPL displayed its maximal activity at 50 °C and not at 37 °C. A specific activity of 40 U/mg for the purified CDPL was measured using PC as substrate under optimal conditions (pH 8 and 50 °C) in the presence of 8 mM sodium deoxycholate (NaDC) and 10 mM CaCl2. In contrast to PPPL, purified CDPL was completely inactivated at 60 °C. The N-terminal sequence was determined by automatic Edman degradation. No similarity between 12 N-terminal amino acid residues of CDPL was found with those of known digestive phospholipases. CDPL appears to be a new member of invertebrate phospholipases, and it is potentially useful for treat phospholipid-rich industrial effluents, or to synthesize useful chemical compounds which can be used in the food industry.

Slim Cherif; Abir Ben Bacha; Yassine Ben Ali; Habib Horchani; Wiem Rekik; Youssef Gargouri

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Method of digesting an explosive nitro compound  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is a process wherein bleaching oxidants are used to digest explosive nitro compounds. The process has an excellent reaction rate for digesting explosives and operates under multivariate conditions. Reaction solutions may be aqueous, non-aqueous or a combination thereof, and can also be any pH, but preferably have a pH between 2 and 9. The temperature may be ambient as well as any temperature above which freezing of the solution would occur and below which any degradation of the bleaching oxidant would occur or below which any explosive reaction would be initiated. The pressure may be any pressure, but is preferably ambient or atmospheric, or a pressure above a vapor pressure of the aqueous solution to avoid boiling of the solution. Because the bleaching oxidant molecules are small, much smaller than an enzyme molecule for example, they can penetrate the microstructure of plastic explosives faster. The bleaching oxidants generate reactive hydroxyl radicals, which can destroy other organic contaminants, if necessary, along with digesting the explosive nitro compound.

Shah, Manish M. (Richland, WA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Recirculating rotary gas compressor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A positive displacement, recirculating Roots-type rotary gas compressor is described which operates on the basis of flow work compression. The compressor includes a pair of large diameter recirculation conduits which return compressed discharge gas to the compressor housing, where it is mixed with low pressure inlet gas, thereby minimizing adiabatic heating of the gas. The compressor includes a pair of involutely lobed impellers and an associated port configuration which together result in uninterrupted flow of recirculation gas. The large diameter recirculation conduits equalize gas flow velocities within the compressor and minimize gas flow losses. The compressor is particularly suited to applications requiring sustained operation at higher gas compression ratios than have previously been feasible with rotary pumps, and is particularly applicable to refrigeration or other applications requiring condensation of a vapor. 12 figs.

Weinbrecht, J.F.

1992-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

154

Recirculating rotary gas compressor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A positive displacement, recirculating Roots-type rotary gas compressor which operates on the basis of flow work compression. The compressor includes a pair of large diameter recirculation conduits (24 and 26) which return compressed discharge gas to the compressor housing (14), where it is mixed with low pressure inlet gas, thereby minimizing adiabatic heating of the gas. The compressor includes a pair of involutely lobed impellers (10 and 12) and an associated port configuration which together result in uninterrupted flow of recirculation gas. The large diameter recirculation conduits equalize gas flow velocities within the compressor and minimize gas flow losses. The compressor is particularly suited to applications requiring sustained operation at higher gas compression ratios than have previously been feasible with rotary pumps, and is particularly applicable to refrigeration or other applications requiring condensation of a vapor.

Weinbrecht, John F. (601 Oakwood Loop, NE., Albuquerque, NM 87123)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Index to the Digest of Green Reports and Studies Complete "Green"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Index to the Digest of Green Reports and Studies Complete "Green" Publication Title Author and Organization Status of Digest Summary Web Address of Complete Publication Link to Green Digest Summary 1 of 25.labormarketinfo.edd.ca.gov/conte ntpub/GreenDigest/Bay-Region-Solar- Industry-Workforce-Study.pdf #12;Index to the Digest of Green

156

Natural gas monthly, July 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents information pertaining to the natural gas industry. Data are included on production, consumption, distribution, and pipeline activities.

NONE

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

The mucosal/epithelial barrier disruption and transport of pancreatic digestive enzymes in early stages of intestinal ischemia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Allows Entry of Digestive Enzymes during Early Periods ofas Barrier to Digestive Enzymes in the Ischemic Rat SmallAllows Entry of Digestive Enzymes during Early Periods of

Chang, Marisol

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

A systemic approach for dimensioning and designing anaerobic bio-digestion/energy generation biomass supply networks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Anaerobic bio-digestion/energy generation complexes using animal waste raw materials represent an important component of renewable energy initiatives and policies worldwide, and are significant contributors to broaden sustainability efforts. In such projects bio-power feasibility depends heavily on generation complex access to biomass which is of costly transportation. As a result, an important component of renewable energy planning is the optimization of a logistics system to guarantee low-cost access to animal waste. This access is a function of local characteristics including number and geographic location of organic waste sources, operating and maintenance costs of the generation facility, energy prices, and marginal contribution of biomass collected and delivered to the anaerobic bio-digestion unit. Because biomass exhibits high transportation costs per unit of energy ultimately generated, and because different types of biomass have different biogas-generating properties, design of the supply logistics system can be the determinant factor towards economic viability of energy generation from an anaerobic bio-digestion plant. Indeed, to address this problem it is helpful to consider the farms, the logistics system, the anaerobic bio-digestion plant, and the generation plant as subsystems in an integrated system. Additionally, the existence of an outlet for manure may allow farmers to significantly raise boundaries of one constraint they face, namely disposing of animal waste, therefore permitting increases in farm production capacity. This paper suggests and outlines a systematic methodology to address the design of such systems.

João Neiva de Figueiredo; Sérgio Fernando Mayerle

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

aerobic sludge digestion: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of organic wastes) and digestion (anaerobic treatment of organic wastes combined with biogas production) are important waste management strategies with increasing significance...

160

Enhanced Biomass Digestion with Wood Wasp Bacteria - Energy Innovation...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Enhanced Biomass Digestion with Wood Wasp Bacteria Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center Contact GLBRC About This Technology Technology Marketing Summary Plant biomass represents a...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including digester gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Biomass Gasification and Methane Digester Property Tax Exemption  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Michigan exempts certain energy production related farm facilities from real and personal property taxes. Among exempted property are certain methane digesters, biomass gasification equipment,...

162

Commercialization of Anaerobic Contact Process for Anaerobic Digestion of Algae.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The commercialization of anaerobic contact process for the digestion of algal biomass has been shown to be feasible on a technical and economic basis. The… (more)

Andlay, Gunjan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Anaerobic Digestion Optimization for Enhanced Renewable Biomethane Production.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The scope of this research project was to operate suspended growth, continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) anaerobic digesters at the bench-scale level to evaluate improved… (more)

Stover, Ted Ross

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Batch load anaerobic digestion of dairy manure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

flask. Influent was added through a funnel in a rubber stopper in the top of the flask. The flask was kept in a water bath to maintain the optimum temperature of 32 C, 0 A liquid displacement system was used to collect the biogas and measure.... Biogas production was measured with a Rockwell No, 175 S Test Meter. Electrical energy input to the system was measured with a watt-hour meter. The energy required for digester heating was determined by the time required to expend the propane in sn...

Egg, Richard P

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

165

Quantifying the Air Pollution Exposure Consequences of Distributed Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fuels, including oil, landfill gas, and diesel. For most ofopportunity fuels" such as landfill gas) and fuel cells withconsumed (natural gas, landfill gas, digester gas, diesel

Heath, Garvin A.; Granvold, Patrick W.; Hoats, Abigail S.; Nazaroff, William W

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Methods of natural gas liquefaction and natural gas liquefaction plants utilizing multiple and varying gas streams  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of natural gas liquefaction may include cooling a gaseous NG process stream to form a liquid NG process stream. The method may further include directing the first tail gas stream out of a plant at a first pressure and directing a second tail gas stream out of the plant at a second pressure. An additional method of natural gas liquefaction may include separating CO.sub.2 from a liquid NG process stream and processing the CO.sub.2 to provide a CO.sub.2 product stream. Another method of natural gas liquefaction may include combining a marginal gaseous NG process stream with a secondary substantially pure NG stream to provide an improved gaseous NG process stream. Additionally, a NG liquefaction plant may include a first tail gas outlet, and at least a second tail gas outlet, the at least a second tail gas outlet separate from the first tail gas outlet.

Wilding, Bruce M; Turner, Terry D

2014-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

167

Joint Polar Satellite System Science Seminar Annual Digest  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

iii Joint Polar Satellite System Science Seminar Annual Digest 2013 #12;#12;Joint Polar Satellite Polar Satellite System (JPSS) Program Science, it is my pleasure to present this digest, which services, such as forecasting of severe weather events and environmental monitoring of land, ocean

168

Cryogenic treatment of gas  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Systems and methods of treating a gas stream are described. A method of treating a gas stream includes cryogenically separating a first gas stream to form a second gas stream and a third stream. The third stream is cryogenically contacted with a carbon dioxide stream to form a fourth and fifth stream. A majority of the second gas stream includes methane and/or molecular hydrogen. A majority of the third stream includes one or more carbon oxides, hydrocarbons having a carbon number of at least 2, one or more sulfur compounds, or mixtures thereof. A majority of the fourth stream includes one or more of the carbon oxides and hydrocarbons having a carbon number of at least 2. A majority of the fifth stream includes hydrocarbons having a carbon number of at least 3 and one or more of the sulfur compounds.

Bravo, Jose Luis (Houston, TX); Harvey, III, Albert Destrehan (Kingwood, TX); Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX)

2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

169

Natural Gas Annual, 2001  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Data Publications Natural Gas Annual, 2001 The Natural Gas Annual, 2001 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2001. Summary data are presented for each State for 1997 to 2001. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 2001 are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CSV file format. This volume emphasizes information for 2001, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file. Also available are files containing the following data: Summary Statistics - Natural Gas in the United States, 1997-2001 (Table 1) ASCII TXT, and Natural Gas Supply and Disposition by State, 2001 (Table 2) ASCII TXT.

170

Microminiature gas chromatograph  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A microminiature gas chromatograph (.mu.GC) comprising a least one silicon wafer, a gas injector, a column, and a detector. The gas injector has a normally closed valve for introducing a mobile phase including a sample gas in a carrier gas. The valve is fully disposed in the silicon wafer(s). The column is a microcapillary in silicon crystal with a stationary phase and is mechanically connected to receive the mobile phase from the gas injector for the molecular separation of compounds in the sample gas. The detector is mechanically connected to the column for the analysis of the separated compounds of sample gas with electronic means, e.g., ion cell, field emitter and PIN diode.

Yu, Conrad M. (Antioch, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Anaerobic batch co-digestion of Spartina alterniflora and potato  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The potential of mesophilic anaerobic batch digestion for the treatment of Spartina alterniflora, an invasive species widely distributed along Chinese coastlines, through co-digestion with readily biodegradable organics has been assessed. The accumulative biogas yield from S. alterniflora alone was 251 ml/g Total Solid (TS) (at 35°C), at TS of 6%, co-digestion with 80% of S. alterniflora and 20% of potato representing 6% of TS, gave a biogas yield of 383 ml/g TS (at 35°C). This is an increase of 52.5% compared with that obtained from digestion of pure S. alterniflora. In conclusion, using readily biodegradable potato as co-substrate of S. alterniflora can increase its anaerobic digestibility and biogas yield.

Jihong Li; Shiguan Yang; Zheng Zheng; Huamin Song; Zhuo Meng

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Key Science and Engineering Indicators: Digest 2012 | Data.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Key Science and Engineering Indicators: Digest 2012 Key Science and Engineering Indicators: Digest 2012 BusinessUSA Data/Tools Apps Challenges Let's Talk BusinessUSA You are here Data.gov » Communities » BusinessUSA » Data Key Science and Engineering Indicators: Digest 2012 Dataset Summary Description This 2012 digest of key S&E indicators is an interactive tool that draws from the National Science Board's (NSB's) Science and Engineering Indicators report. The digest serves to draw attention to important trends and data points from across Indicators and to introduce readers to the data resources available in the report. Tags {science,engineering,indicators,statistics,nsf,nsb,srs,federal,government,education,labor,employment,workforce,research,development,industry,international,global,r&d,technology,patents,"research citations"}

173

E-Print Network 3.0 - artificial digestion methods Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Resources which provide more detailed infor- mation on anaerobic digesters are listed. Biogas... (oxygen free) digestion of organic matter whereby the organic matter is converted...

174

E-Print Network 3.0 - animal manure digestion Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

with other organic wastes. Co-digestion has the primary advan- tage... to generate biogas from animal manure. Some com- mon anaerobic digester configurations used on farms...

175

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic digestion Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Resources which provide more detailed infor- mation on anaerobic digesters are listed. Biogas... on the source of the organic matter and the management of the anaerobic digestion...

176

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic digestion technology Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

technology on livestock farms... dioxide (EPA AgStar 2006). Benefits and Challenges of Biogas Technology Anaerobic digestion can convert... digester. Resources which ... Source:...

177

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic digestion analysis Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Resources which provide more detailed infor- mation on anaerobic digesters are listed. Biogas... on the source of the organic matter and the management of the anaerobic digestion...

178

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic digesters current Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Resources which provide more detailed infor- mation on anaerobic digesters are listed. Biogas... on the source of the organic matter and the management of the anaerobic digestion...

179

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic digestion usa Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Resources which provide more detailed infor- mation on anaerobic digesters are listed. Biogas... on the source of the organic matter and the management of the anaerobic digestion...

180

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic digestion final Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Resources which provide more detailed infor- mation on anaerobic digesters are listed. Biogas... on the source of the organic matter and the management of the anaerobic digestion...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including digester gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic digestion performance Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Resources which provide more detailed infor- mation on anaerobic digesters are listed. Biogas... on the source of the organic matter and the management of the anaerobic digestion...

182

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobically digested cattle Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Resources which provide more detailed infor- mation on anaerobic digesters are listed. Biogas... on the source of the organic matter and the management of the anaerobic digestion...

183

E-Print Network 3.0 - acid digestion procedure Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology 6 www.manuremanagement.cornell.edu Biogas Casebook Summary: digester. Methanogens Active in phase 3 of the digestion process...

184

E-Print Network 3.0 - acid digestibility coefficients Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Medicine ; Environmental Sciences and Ecology 18 5. oktober 2009 Precision control of biogas plants Summary: coupling of digesters and post digestion 2) Process inhibition 3)...

185

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic digestion heat Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Resources which provide more detailed infor- mation on anaerobic digesters are listed. Biogas... on the source of the organic matter and the management of the anaerobic digestion...

186

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic digesters treating Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Resources which provide more detailed infor- mation on anaerobic digesters are listed. Biogas... on the source of the organic matter and the management of the anaerobic digestion...

187

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic digester treating Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Resources which provide more detailed infor- mation on anaerobic digesters are listed. Biogas... on the source of the organic matter and the management of the anaerobic digestion...

188

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic thermophilic digestion Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Resources which provide more detailed infor- mation on anaerobic digesters are listed. Biogas... on the source of the organic matter and the management of the anaerobic digestion...

189

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic digester performance Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Resources which provide more detailed infor- mation on anaerobic digesters are listed. Biogas... on the source of the organic matter and the management of the anaerobic digestion...

190

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic digestion model Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Resources which provide more detailed infor- mation on anaerobic digesters are listed. Biogas... on the source of the organic matter and the management of the anaerobic digestion...

191

Natural gas annual 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1997 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1993 to 1997 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level. 27 figs., 109 tabs.

NONE

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Anaerobic digestion of wool scouring wastewater in a digester operated semi-continuously for biomass retention  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An anaerobic digester, operated semi-continuously in order to retain high concentrations of biomass in the digester, was used to treat wool scouring wastewater. At a space load of 9·9 kg COD m?3 day ?1 (hydraulic retention time, 2·8 days) >56% of the COD and >47% of the grease were removed. At these efficiencies, this rate was estimated to be at least 2·5·3· times greater than that which would be achieved in a continuously stirred digester. Preliminary studies of enzymatic pretreatment of the scouring effluent showed that significantly improved treatment rates and/or efficiencies could be achieved—i.e. >70% removal of both the COD and grease at a space load of 12 kg COD m?3 day?1. It is unlikely that any substancial levels of flocculation would develop in this system and it is expected that the moderate use of polyelectrolytes would be required to help maintain the VSS concentration in the reactor.

R.G. Cail; J.P. Barford; R. Lichacz

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Displacing Natural Gas Consumption and Lowering Emissions  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

fuels and thereby reduce their natural gas consumption. Opportunity gas fuels include biogas from animal and agri- cultural wastes, wastewater plants, and landfills, as well as...

194

Dense gas-compatible enzymes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An enzymatic reaction system including a modified enzyme, and a dense gas system; modified enzymes; and methods of reacting modified enzymes in a dense gas system or liquid carbon dioxide.

Kao, Fu-jung (Dracut, MA); Laintz, Kenneth E. (Los Alamos, NM); Sawan, Samuel P. (Tyngsborough, MA); Sivils, L. Dale (Jupiter, FL); Spall, W. Dale (Los Alamos, NM)

1998-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

195

Oil and Gas Conservation (Montana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Parts 1 and 2 of this chapter contain a broad range of regulations pertaining to oil and gas conservation, including requirements for the regulation of oil and gas exploration and extraction by the...

196

Gas Utility Pipeline Tax (Texas)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

All gas utilities, including any entity that owns, manages, operates, leases, or controls a pipeline for the purpose of transporting natural gas in the state for sale or compensation, as well as...

197

Natural Gas Annual, 2004  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Data Publications Natural Gas Annual, 2004 Natural Gas Annual 2004 Release date: December 19, 2005 Next release date: January 2007 The Natural Gas Annual, 2004 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2004. Summary data are presented for each State for 2000 to 2004. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 2004 is available as self-extracting executable file or CSV file format. This volume emphasizes information for 2004, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

198

Meals included in Conference Registrations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Meals included in Conference Registrations Meals included as part of the cost of a conference the most reasonable rates are obtained. Deluxe hotels and motels should be avoided. GSA rates have been for Georgia high cost areas. 75% of these amounts would be $21 for non- high cost areas and $27 for high cost

Arnold, Jonathan

199

Anaerobic Co-digestion of Brown Water and Food Waste for Energy Recovery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LIM J.W. Anaerobic Co-digestion of Brown Water and Food Waste for Energy Recovery Jun Wei LIM waste (FW) and their mixture (MW) in batch digesters was evaluated under mesophilic conditions. BW waste. Keywords Anaerobic digestion; food waste; brown water; biogas; co-digestion INTRODUCTION

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

200

Natural Gas Annual, 2002  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Data Publications Natural Gas Annual, 2002 Natural Gas Annual 2002 Release date: January 29, 2004 Next release date: January 2005 The Natural Gas Annual, 2002 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2002. Summary data are presented for each State for 1998 to 2002. “The Natural Gas Industry and Markets in 2002” is a special report that provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2002 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2002. Changes to data sources for this Natural Gas Annual, as a result of ongoing data quality efforts, have resulted in revisions to several data series. Production volumes have been revised for the Federal offshore and several States. Several data series based on the Form EIA-176, including deliveries to end-users in several States, were also revised. Additionally, revisions have been made to include updates to the electric power and vehicle fuel end-use sectors.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including digester gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Natural Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

30 May 1974 research-article Natural Gas C. P. Coppack This paper reviews the world's existing natural gas reserves and future expectations, together with natural gas consumption in 1972, by main geographic...

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Sonochemical Digestion of Soil and Sediment Samples  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work was performed as part of a broader effort to automate analytical methods for determination of plutonium and other radioisotopes in environmental samples. The work described here represented a screening study to determine the potential for applying ultrasonic irradiation to sample digestion. Two standard reference materials (SRMs) were used in this study: Columbia River Sediment and Rocky Flats Soil. The key experiments performed are listed below along with a summary of the results. The action of nitric acid, regardless of its concentration and liquid-to-solid ratio, did not achieve dissolution efficiency better that 20%. The major fraction of natural organic matter (NOM) remained undissolved by this treatment. Sonication did not result in improved dissolution for the SRMs tested. The action of hydrofluoric acid at concentrations of 8 M and higher achieved much more pronounced dissolution (up to 97% dissolved for the Rocky Flats soil sample and up to 78% dissolved for the Columbia River Sediment sample). Dissolution efficiency remains constant for solid-to-liquid ratios of up to 0.05 to 1 and decreases for the higher loadings of the solid phase. Sonication produced no measurable effect in improving the dissolution of the samples compared with the control digestion experiments. Combined treatment of the SRM by mixtures of HNO3 and HF showed inferior performance compared with the HF alone. An adverse effect of sonication was found for the Rocky Flats soil material, which became more noticeable at higher HF concentrations. Sonication of the Columbia River sediment samples had no positive effect in the mixed acid treatment. The results indicate that applying ultrasound in an isolated cup horn configuration does not offer any advantage over conventional ''heat and mix'' treatment for dissolution of the soil and sediment based on the SRM examined here. This conclusion, however, is based on an approach that uses gravimetric analysis to determine gross dissolution efficiency. This approach does not allow any conclusion regarding the possible advantage of sonication in selective dissolution of plutonium traces incorporated into an inorganic or organic fraction of the samples.

Sinkov, Sergei I.; Lumetta, Gregg J.

2006-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

203

Useful variation in in vitro digestibility within perennial ryegrass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In vitro dry matter digestibility (DMD) and dry matter yield (DMY) of herbage from plots sown with three selected perennial ryegrass varieties with similar heading dates (Ba11778, Talbot and Gator) under a range ...

P.W. Wilkins

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Design of an anaerobic digester in Quebec, Canada  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.In response to the future Quebec, Canada regulations prohibiting landfilling of organic matter by 2020, EBI, a waste management company located near Montreal is considering constructing an anaerobic digester. This thesis ...

Bouaziz, Alexandre N. (Alexandre Nathanel)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

April 16, 2013 Webinar: Community-Scale Anaerobic Digesters  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This webinar was held April 16, 2013, and provided information on San Jose, California's, commercial-scale, high solids dry fermentation anaerobic digestion system, and the Forest County Potawatomi...

206

Biochar Produced from Anaerobically Digested Fiber Reduces Phosphorus...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

dairy lagoons. The ADF was collected from a plugged flow digester, air-dried to <8% water content, and pelletized. Biochar was produced by slow pyrolysis in a barrel retort....

207

Shale Gas 101  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This webpage has been developed to answer the many questions that people have about shale gas and hydraulic fracturing (or fracking). The information provided below explains the basics, including what shale gas is, where it’s found, why it’s important, how it’s produced, and challenges associated with production.

208

Anaerobic digestion of glycerol and co-digestion of glycerol and pig manure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The potential of glycerol obtained from transesterification of waste cooking oil as a main carbon source for biogas production was investigated. The glycerol was highly contaminated with oils and fats and was pretreated with sulfuric acid. Using a carbon source of glucose as a control, we compared biogas production from the acid-treated glycerol in a synthetic medium and the acid-treated glycerol mixed with pig manure. The anaerobic digestion of acid-treated glycerol with supplement in a synthetic medium was found to be satisfactory at organic loading rates (OLR) between 1.3, 1.6 and 2.6 g chemical oxygen demand (COD) L?1 d?1. The maximum methane yield of 0.32 L at Standard temperature and pressure (STP) g?1 COD removal was achieved at an OLR of 1.6 g COD L?1 d?1 and the methane content was 54% on an average. At a higher organic loading rate of 5.4 g COD L?1 d?1, the propionic acid to acetic acid ratio was higher than the critical threshold limit for metabolic imbalance. Anaerobic digestion of acid-treated glycerol with pig manure was also investigated at the COD ratio of 80:20 (glycerol:pig manure). The anaerobic digestion of acid-treated glycerol with pig manure was found to be satisfactory at organic loading rates between 1.3, 1.7, 2.9 and 5.0 g COD L?1 d?1 in terms of COD reduction (>80%) and methane content of (62% on an average). However, the biogas production rate was found to significantly decrease at the highest load. The maximum methane yield of 0.24 L STP g?1 COD removal was achieved at an OLR of 1.3 g COD L?1 d?1.

Sasikarn Nuchdang; Chantaraporn Phalakornkule

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Natural Gas Hydrate Dissociation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Materials for hydrate synthesis mainly include methane gas of purity 99.9% (produced by Nanjing Special Gases Factory Co., Ltd.), natural sea sand of grain sizes 0.063?0.09,...

Qingguo Meng; Changling Liu; Qiang Chen; Yuguang Ye

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

EIA - All Natural Gas Analysis  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

All Natural Gas Analysis All Natural Gas Analysis 2010 Peaks, Plans and (Persnickety) Prices This presentation provides information about EIA's estimates of working gas peak storage capacity, and the development of the natural gas storage industry. Natural gas shale and the need for high deliverability storage are identified as key drivers in natural gas storage capacity development. The presentation also provides estimates of planned storage facilities through 2012. Categories: Prices, Storage (Released, 10/28/2010, ppt format) U.S Natural Gas Imports and Exports: 2009 This report provides an overview of U.S. international natural gas trade in 2009. Natural gas import and export data, including liquefied natural gas (LNG) data, are provided through the year 2009 in Tables SR1-SR9. Categories: Imports & Exports/Pipelines (Released, 9/28/2010, Html format)

211

Sponsorship includes: Agriculture in the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sponsorship includes: · Agriculture in the Classroom · Douglas County Farm Bureau · Gifford Farm · University of Nebraska Agricultural Research and Development Center · University of Nebraska- Lincoln Awareness Coalition is to help youth, primarily from urban communities, become aware of agriculture

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

212

Gas Separation With Graphene Membranes By Will Soutter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gas Separation With Graphene Membranes By Will Soutter Introduction What is Graphene? Benefits of Graphene in Gas Separation Membranes Recent Developments Conclusion References Introduction The separation applications including fuel cells, batteries, gas sensors and gas purification. The materials

Bunch, Scott

213

Homeowners: Respond to Natural Gas Disruptions | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

your gas company to report any problems, including: Emergencies-Report gas leaks, pipeline breaks, and other gas-related emergencies to your gas company and the local fire...

214

Chapter 8 - Natural Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Although natural gas is a nonrenewable resource, it is included for discussion because its sudden growth from fracking will impact the development and use of renewable fuels. Firms who are engaged in the development of processes that employ synthesis gas as an intermediate have concluded that the synthesis gas is more economically obtainable by steam reforming of natural gas than by gasification of waste cellulose. In some instances, firms have largely abandoned the effort to produce a renewable fuel as such, and in others firms are developing hybrid processes that employ natural gas in combination with a fermentation system. Moreover, natural gas itself is an attractive fuel for internal combustion engines since it can be the least expensive option on a cost per joule basis. It is also aided by its high octane number of 130.

Arthur M. Brownstein

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at selected points in the flow of gas from the wellhead to the burner-tip. Data include production, transmission within the United States, imports and exports of natural gas, underground storage activities, and deliveries to consumers. The publication presents historical data at the national level for 1930-1996 and detailed annual historical information by State for 1967-1996. The Historical Natural Gas Annual tables are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CDF file formats. Tables 1-3 present annual historical data at the national level for 1930-1996. The remaining tables contain detailed annual historical information, by State, for 1967-1996. Please read the file entitled READMEV2 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

216

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at selected points in the flow of gas from the wellhead to the burner-tip. Data include production, transmission within the United States, imports and exports of natural gas, underground storage activities, and deliveries to consumers. The publication presents historical data at the national level for 1930-1997 and detailed annual historical information by State for 1967-1997. The Historical Natural Gas Annual tables are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CDF file formats. Tables 1-3 present annual historical data at the national level for 1930-1997. The remaining tables contain detailed annual historical information, by State, for 1967-1997. Please read the file entitled READMEV2 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

217

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at selected points in the flow of gas from the wellhead to the burner-tip. Data include production, transmission within the United States, imports and exports of natural gas, underground storage activities, and deliveries to consumers. The publication presents historical data at the national level for 1930-1998 and detailed annual historical information by State for 1967-1998. The Historical Natural Gas Annual tables are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CDF file formats. Tables 1-3 present annual historical data at the national level for 1930-1998. The remaining tables contain detailed annual historical information, by State, for 1967-1998. Please read the file entitled READMEV2 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

218

Natural Gas Annual, 2003  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Data Publications Natural Gas Annual, 2003 Natural Gas Annual 2003 Release date: December 22, 2004 Next release date: January 2006 The Natural Gas Annual, 2003 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2003. Summary data are presented for each State for 1999 to 2003. “The Natural Gas Industry and Markets in 2003” is a special report that provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2003 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2003. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 2003 is available as self-extracting executable file or CSV file format. This volume emphasizes information for 2003, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

219

Greenhouse gases emissions accounting for typical sewage sludge digestion with energy utilization and residue land application in China  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer GHGs emissions from sludge digestion + residue land use in China were calculated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The AD unit contributes more than 97% of total biogenic GHGs emissions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AD with methane recovery is attractive for sludge GHGs emissions reduction. - Abstract: About 20 million tonnes of sludge (with 80% moisture content) is discharged by the sewage treatment plants per year in China, which, if not treated properly, can be a significant source of greenhouse gases (GHGs) emissions. Anaerobic digestion is a conventional sewage sludge treatment method and will continue to be one of the main technologies in the following years. This research has taken into consideration GHGs emissions from typical processes of sludge thickening + anaerobic digestion + dewatering + residue land application in China. Fossil CO{sub 2}, biogenic CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4,} and avoided CO{sub 2} as the main objects is discussed respectively. The results show that the total CO{sub 2}-eq is about 1133 kg/t DM (including the biogenic CO{sub 2}), while the net CO{sub 2}-eq is about 372 kg/t DM (excluding the biogenic CO{sub 2}). An anaerobic digestion unit as the main GHGs emission source occupies more than 91% CO{sub 2}-eq of the whole process. The use of biogas is important for achieving carbon dioxide emission reductions, which could reach about 24% of the total CO{sub 2}-eq reduction.

Niu Dongjie, E-mail: niudongjie@tongji.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Yangtze Aquatic Environment, Ministry of Education, College of Environmental Science and Engineering of Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); UNEP-Tongji Institute of Environment for Sustainable Development, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); Huang Hui [Key Laboratory of Yangtze Aquatic Environment, Ministry of Education, College of Environmental Science and Engineering of Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); Dai Xiaohu [Key Laboratory of Yangtze Aquatic Environment, Ministry of Education, College of Environmental Science and Engineering of Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); National Engineering Research Center for Urban Pollution Control, Shanghai 200092 (China); Zhao Youcai [Key Laboratory of Yangtze Aquatic Environment, Ministry of Education, College of Environmental Science and Engineering of Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China)

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

220

Life cycle greenhouse gas footprint of shale gas: a probabilistic approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

With the increase in natural gas (NG) production in recent years, primarily from shale gas, some sources, including the US Environmental ... the data from the Montney and Horn River shale gas basins in the Northe...

Anjuman Shahriar; Rehan Sadiq…

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including digester gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Natural gas monthly, July 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. The feature article this month is entitled ``Intricate puzzle of oil and gas reserves growth.`` A special report is included on revisions to monthly natural gas data. 6 figs., 24 tabs.

NONE

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Can Delignification Decrease Cellulose Digestibility in Acid Pretreated Corn Stover?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It has previously been shown that the improved digestibility of dilute acid pretreated corn stover is at least partially due to the removal of xylan and the consequent increase in accessibility of the cellulose to cellobiohydrolase enzymes. We now report on the impact that lignin removal has on the accessibility and digestibility of dilute acid pretreated corn stover. Samples of corn stover were subjected to dilute sulfuric acid pretreatment with and without simultaneous (partial) lignin removal. In addition, some samples were completely delignified after the pretreatment step using acidified sodium chlorite. The accessibility and digestibility of the samples were tested using a fluorescence-labeled cellobiohydrolase (Trichoderma reesei Cel7A) purified from a commercial cellulase preparation. Partial delignification of corn stover during dilute acid pretreatment was shown to improve cellulose digestibility by T. reesei Cel7A; however, decreasing the lignin content below 5% (g g{sup -1}) by treatment with acidified sodium chlorite resulted in a dramatic reduction in cellulose digestibility. Importantly, this effect was found to be enhanced in samples with lower xylan contents suggesting that the near complete removal of xylan and lignin may cause aggregation of the cellulose microfibrils resulting in decreased cellulase accessibility.

Ishizawa, C. I.; Jeoh, T.; Adney, W. S.; Himmel, M. E.; Johnson, D. K.; Davis, M. F.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Division of Oil, Gas, and Mining Permitting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

" or "Gas" does not include any gaseous or liquid substance processed from coal, oil shale, or tar sands

Utah, University of

224

Greenhouse Gas Program Overview (Revised) (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Overview of the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) Greenhouse Gas program, including Federal requirements, FEMP services, and contacts.

Not Available

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Natural gas monthly: December 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. Articles are included which are designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Appendix F Cultural Resources, Including  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Appendix F Appendix F Cultural Resources, Including Section 106 Consultation STATE OF CALIFORNIA - THE RESOURCES AGENCY EDMUND G. BROWN, JR., Governor OFFICE OF HISTORIC PRESERVATION DEPARTMENT OF PARKS AND RECREATION 1725 23 rd Street, Suite 100 SACRAMENTO, CA 95816-7100 (916) 445-7000 Fax: (916) 445-7053 calshpo@parks.ca.gov www.ohp.parks.ca.gov June 14, 2011 Reply in Reference To: DOE110407A Angela Colamaria Loan Programs Office Environmental Compliance Division Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave SW, LP-10 Washington, DC 20585 Re: Topaz Solar Farm, San Luis Obispo County, California Dear Ms. Colamaria: Thank you for seeking my consultation regarding the above noted undertaking. Pursuant to 36 CFR Part 800 (as amended 8-05-04) regulations implementing Section

227

Countries Gasoline Prices Including Taxes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Countries (U.S. dollars per gallon, including taxes) Countries (U.S. dollars per gallon, including taxes) Date Belgium France Germany Italy Netherlands UK US 01/13/14 7.83 7.76 7.90 8.91 8.76 8.11 3.68 01/06/14 8.00 7.78 7.94 8.92 8.74 8.09 3.69 12/30/13 NA NA NA NA NA NA 3.68 12/23/13 NA NA NA NA NA NA 3.63 12/16/13 7.86 7.79 8.05 9.00 8.78 8.08 3.61 12/9/13 7.95 7.81 8.14 8.99 8.80 8.12 3.63 12/2/13 7.91 7.68 8.07 8.85 8.68 8.08 3.64 11/25/13 7.69 7.61 8.07 8.77 8.63 7.97 3.65 11/18/13 7.99 7.54 8.00 8.70 8.57 7.92 3.57 11/11/13 7.63 7.44 7.79 8.63 8.46 7.85 3.55 11/4/13 7.70 7.51 7.98 8.70 8.59 7.86 3.61 10/28/13 8.02 7.74 8.08 8.96 8.79 8.04 3.64 10/21/13 7.91 7.71 8.11 8.94 8.80 8.05 3.70 10/14/13 7.88 7.62 8.05 8.87 8.74 7.97 3.69

228

Gas Turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

When the gas turbine generator was introduced to the power generation ... fossil-fueled power plant. Twenty years later, gas turbines were established as an important means of ... on utility systems. By the early...

Jeffrey M. Smith

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Gas Turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... the time to separate out the essentials and the irrelevancies in a text-book. The gas ...gasturbine ...

H. CONSTANT

1950-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

230

Digest of United States Practice in International Law 2007 | Data.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

7 7 Research Menu Data/Tools Apps Resources Let's Talk Research Alpha You are here Data.gov » Communities » Research » Data Digest of United States Practice in International Law 2007 Dataset Summary Description The Office of the Legal Adviser publishes the annual Digest of United States Practice in International Law to provide the public with a historical record of the views and practice of the Government of the United States in public and private international law. In his introduction to the 2007 Digest, then Legal Adviser John B. Bellinger, III, stated in part: "During 2006 my colleagues and I continued to engage our international partners in intensive discussions about the appropriate legal framework for the detention and treatment of international terrorists. . . . Armed conflicts during the year including those involving Israel, Lebanon, the Palestinian Authority, and Iraq raised other issues related to the law of war. "The United States welcomed the International Committee of the Red Cross' study on the customary international law of the law of war and provided what we believe are constructive initial comments on certain aspects of methodology that raise questions about the study's conclusions. "But these issues were, of course, only one facet of the office's practice during the year. The United States dispatched to Geneva two separate large, senior-level interagency delegations to present and discuss with the UN Committee Against Torture and the Human Rights Committee U.S. implementation of its obligations under the Convention Against Torture and the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights. . . . "The office continued to play a leading role in the development of U.S. treaty law and practice. . . . "In U.S. courts, the year saw further developments related to the applicability of the Alien Tort Statute, U.S. consular notification obligations under the Vienna Convention on Consular Relations, and the scope of the Foreign Sovereign Immunities Act, including several Supreme Court decisions on consular notification and immunities. . . ."

231

Anaerobic Digestion of Food Waste?recycling Wastewater  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Food waste?recycling (FWR) wastewater was evaluated as feedstock for two?stage anaerobic digestion at different hydraulic retention times (HRTs). The FWR wastewater tested contained high concentrations of organic materials and had chemical oxygen demand (COD) >130 g/L and volatile solids (VS) >55 g/L. Two identical two?stage anaerobic digesters were operated to investigate the performance at six HRTs ranging from 10–25 days. In the acidogenic reactor the total carbohydrate reduction efficiency and volatile fatty acid production dramatically decreased when acidogenic HRT was wastewater as feedstock.

Gyuseong Han; Seung Gu Shin; Juntaek Lim; Minho Jo; Seokhwan Hwang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Methane Emissions  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

credit for renewable energy, including waste-to-energy and landfill gas combustion. Wastewater treatment, including both domestic wastewater (about two-thirds) and industrial...

233

Improving the Methane Production in the Co-Digestion of Microalgae and Cattle Manure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that biogas production increased when algae was added to the digester. The highest methane production in the control groups, containing only manure, digestion sludge, and newsprint was 48120 L, while the highest in the mixtures containing algae and pretreated...

Cantu, Matthew Scott

2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

234

Investigation of EPS Characteristics and their Effects on Waste Activated Sludge Digestion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Investigation of EPS Characteristics and their Effects on Waste Activated Sludge Digestion Thomas on digestibility, especially in regards to the composition of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). Samples possibilities. Characterizations made from extraction data showed curiously high EPS disruption in Amherst

Mountziaris, T. J.

235

Colorado Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Colorado Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

236

California Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) California Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

237

Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

238

Michigan Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Michigan Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

239

Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

240

Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including digester gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

242

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

243

Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

244

Maryland Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Maryland Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

245

Illinois Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Illinois Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

246

Missouri Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Missouri Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

247

Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

248

Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

249

Community Renewable Energy Success Stories: Community-Scale Anaerobic Digesters (text version)  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

Below is the text version of the webinar titled "Community-Scale Anaerobic Digesters," originally presented on April 16, 2013.

250

RECIPIENT:WA Department of Commerce STATE: WA PROJECT Van Dyk Dairy Anaerobic Digester  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

of5 of5 RECIPIENT:WA Department of Commerce STATE: WA PROJECT Van Dyk Dairy Anaerobic Digester TITLE: Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number cm Number DE-EE0000139 GF0-10-604 Based on my review oftbe information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA CompUance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.1A), I have made the foUowing determination: cx, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: A9 Information gathering (including, but not limited to, literature surveys, inventories, audits), data analysis (including computer modeling), document preparation (such as conceptual design or feasibility studies, analytical energy supply and demand studies), and dissemination (including, but not limited to, document mailings, publication, and distribution;

251

U.S. crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids reserves 1997 annual report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents estimates of proved reserves of crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids as of December 31, 1997, as well as production volumes for the US and selected States and State subdivisions for the year 1997. Estimates are presented for the following four categories of natural gas: total gas (wet after lease separation), nonassociated gas and associated-dissolved gas (which are the two major types of wet natural gas), and total dry gas (wet gas adjusted for the removal of liquids at natural gas processing plants). In addition, reserve estimates for two types of natural gas liquids, lease condensate and natural gas plant liquids, are presented. Also included is information on indicated additional crude oil reserves and crude oil, natural gas, and lease condensate reserves in nonproducing reservoirs. A discussion of notable oil and gas exploration and development activities during 1997 is provided. 21 figs., 16 tabs.

NONE

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Oil and Gas Supply Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

States, acquire natural gas from foreign producers for resale States, acquire natural gas from foreign producers for resale in the United States, or sell U.S. gas to foreign consumers. OGSM encompasses domestic crude oil and natural gas supply by both conventional and nonconventional recovery techniques. Nonconventional recovery includes unconventional gas recovery from low permeability formations of sandstone and shale, and coalbeds. Foreign gas transactions may occur via either pipeline (Canada or Mexico) or transport ships as liquefied natural gas (LNG). Energy Information Administration/Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 89 Figure 7. Oil and Gas Supply Model Regions Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting. Report #:DOE/EIA-0554(2006) Release date: March 2006

253

Natural Gas Exports from Iran  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This assessment of the natural gas sector in Iran, with a focus on Iran’s natural gas exports, was prepared pursuant to section 505 (a) of the Iran Threat Reduction and Syria Human Rights Act of 2012 (Public Law No: 112-158). As requested, it includes: (1) an assessment of exports of natural gas from Iran; (2) an identification of the countries that purchase the most natural gas from Iran; (3) an assessment of alternative supplies of natural gas available to those countries; (4) an assessment of the impact a reduction in exports of natural gas from Iran would have on global natural gas supplies and the price of natural gas, especially in countries identified under number (2); and (5) such other information as the Administrator considers appropriate.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

DIGESTIVE ENZYMES IN POIKILOTHERMAL VERTEBRATES. AN INVESTIGATION OF ENZYMES IN FISHES, WITH COM-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DIGESTIVE ENZYMES IN POIKILOTHERMAL VERTEBRATES. AN INVESTIGATION OF ENZYMES IN FISHES, WITH COM Tryptic digestion uu u_ 182 Ereptic digestion u n _ 186 Carbohydrate-splitting enzymes _ 184 Amylase _ 184 enzymes in representatives throughout the vertebrate series. It would be of value to know if differences

255

Composition and Digestibility of the Ether Extract of Hays and Fodders.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

556-712-5m TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATIONS. BULLETIN NO . 150 AUGUST , 1912. Division o f Chemistry TECHNICAL BULLETIN Composition and Digestibility of the Ether Extract of Hays and Fodders By G S. FRAPS and J. B. RATHER POSTOFFICE... Digestibility of the Constituents............................................................. 23 Summary and Conclusions.......................................................................29 BLANK PAGE IN ORIGINAL Composition and Digestibility of the Ether...

Fraps, G. S.; Rather, J. B.

1912-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Biogenic gas nanostructures as ultrasonic molecular reporters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biogenic gas nanostructures as ultrasonic molecular reporters Mikhail G. Shapiro1,2,3 *, Patrick W on the nanoscale. Here, we introduce a new class of reporters for ultrasound based on genetically encoded gas nanostructures from microorganisms, including bacteria and archaea. Gas vesicles are gas-filled protein

Schaffer, David V.

257

Direct fired absorption machine flue gas recuperator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A recuperator which recovers heat from a gas, generally the combustion gas of a direct-fired generator of an absorption machine. The recuperator includes a housing with liquid flowing therethrough, the liquid being in direct contact with the combustion gas for increasing the effectiveness of the heat transfer between the gas and the liquid.

Reimann, Robert C. (Lafayette, NY); Root, Richard A. (Spokane, WA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Cryostat including heater to heat a target  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A cryostat is provided which comprises a vacuum vessel; a target disposed within the vacuum vessel; a heat sink disposed within the vacuum vessel for absorbing heat from the detector; a cooling mechanism for cooling the heat sink; a cryoabsorption mechanism for cryoabsorbing residual gas within the vacuum vessel; and a heater for maintaining the target above a temperature at which the residual gas is cryoabsorbed in the course of cryoabsorption of the residual gas by the cryoabsorption mechanism. 2 figs.

Pehl, R.H.; Madden, N.W.; Malone, D.F.

1990-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

259

Anaerobic Co-Digestion on Dairies in Washington State  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as food-processing wastes) to increase biogas productivity, improve digester performance, and increase in manure and other feedstock to methane-rich biogas, a source of renewable energy (US-EPA 2006) (Figure 1-EPA 2005; US-EPA 2008). In addition to biogas, AD generates fiber and Figure 1. Overview of anaerobic

Collins, Gary S.

260

How Markets Slowly Digest Changes in Supply and Demand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Transactions 86 2.5.2. Impact of Aggregate Transactions 86 2.5.3. Hidden Order Impact 88 2.5.4. Upstairs Market Impact 90 2.6. Theory of Market Impact 90 2.6.1. Why Is Individual Transaction Impact Concave? 91 2CHAPTER 2 How Markets Slowly Digest Changes in Supply and Demand Jean-Philippe Bouchaud Science

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including digester gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Original article Digestion of wheat gluten and potato protein  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Original article Digestion of wheat gluten and potato protein by the preruminant calf%) substituted by a native wheat gluten or a potato protein concentrate, were given to intact or ileo.05) with the potato than with the gluten and control diets (0.90, 0.93 and 0.95, respec- tively). The same trend

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

262

Original article Digestion and fermentation of proteins in rats fed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Original article Digestion and fermentation of proteins in rats fed keratin, albumin, cooked casein) Summary ― Dietary cooked casein promotes colon cancer in rats. We speculated and tested (hydrolysed or not) and bovine serum albumin (oxidized or not) was measured in rats. Protein fermentation

Boyer, Edmond

263

Pore-scale mechanisms of gas flow in tight sand reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

include tight gas sands, gas shales, and coal-bed methane.Figure 3. Although the gas-shale production grows at a

Silin, D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Apparatus for gas sorption measurement with integrated gas composition measurement device and gas mixing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An apparatus for testing of multiple material samples includes a gas delivery control system operatively connectable to the multiple material samples and configured to provide gas to the multiple material samples. Both a gas composition measurement device and pressure measurement devices are included in the apparatus. The apparatus includes multiple selectively openable and closable valves and a series of conduits configured to selectively connect the multiple material samples individually to the gas composition device and the pressure measurement devices by operation of the valves. A mixing system is selectively connectable to the series of conduits and is operable to cause forced mixing of the gas within the series of conduits to achieve a predetermined uniformity of gas composition within the series of conduits and passages.

Micklash. II, Kenneth James; Dutton, Justin James; Kaye, Steven

2014-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

265

DNA digestion protocol & hints Overview: Although it is pretty standard to digest DNA with restriction enzymes, here  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with restriction enzymes, here are a standardized protocol and some hints... References: *Current protocols · restriction enzyme · DNA loading buffer · Agarose gel 0.8% (or different depending on expected band sizes.1 to 4 µg 10x Digestion buffer 2 µl 5 µl Enzyme ? ? Water Rest of volume Rest of volume 2. Add the enzyme

Doering, Tamara

266

Monetizing stranded gas : economic valuation of GTL and LNG projects.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Globally, there are significant quantities of natural gas reserves that lie economically or physically stranded from markets. Options to monetize such reserves include Gas to… (more)

Black, Brodie Gene, 1986-

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

EIA responds to Nature article on shale gas projections  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas Exploration and reserves, storage, imports and...

268

Gas Companies Operating Within the State of Connecticut (Connecticut)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These regulations apply a broad definition of “gas company”, which includes any person or entity involved in the manufacture or transportation of gas within Connecticut. The regulations set...

269

Natural Gas Annual, 2000  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Annual, 2000 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2000. Summary data are presented for each Census Division and State for 1996 to 2000. A section of historical data at the National level shows industry activities back to the 1930's. Natural Gas Annual, 2000 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2000. Summary data are presented for each Census Division and State for 1996 to 2000. A section of historical data at the National level shows industry activities back to the 1930's. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 2000 are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CSV file formats. This volume emphasizes information for 2000, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file. Also available are files containing the following data: Summary Statistics - Natural Gas in the United States, 1996-2000 (Table 1) ASCII TXT, and Natural Gas Supply and Disposition by State, 2000 (Table 2) ASCII TXT, are also available.

270

Natural Gas Regulation | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Natural Gas Regulation Natural Gas Regulation Natural Gas Regulation Natural Gas Regulation The Natural Gas Act of 1938, as amended, requires anyone who wants to import or export natural gas, including liquefied natural gas (LNG) from or to a foreign country must first obtain an authorization from the Department of Energy. The Office of Oil and Gas Global Security and Supply, Division of Natural Gas Regulatory Activities is the one-stop-shopping place to obtain these authorizations in the Department. The import/export authorizations are necessary for anyone who wants to import or export natural gas, including LNG. There are basically two types of authorizations, blanket and long-term authorizations. The blanket authorization enables you to import or export on a short-term or spot market basis for a period of up to two years. The

271

April 16, 2013 Webinar: Community-Scale Anaerobic Digesters | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

April 16, 2013 Webinar: Community-Scale Anaerobic Digesters April 16, 2013 Webinar: Community-Scale Anaerobic Digesters April 16, 2013 Webinar: Community-Scale Anaerobic Digesters This webinar was held April 16, 2013, and provided information on San Jose, California's, commercial-scale, high solids dry fermentation anaerobic digestion system, and the Forest County Potawatomi Community's (FCPC) anaerobic digester project. Download the presentations below, watch the webinar (WMV 125 MB), or view the text version. Find more CommRE webinars. Implementing Anaerobic Digestion in San Jose's Integrated Processing Infrastructure This presentation provided background on San Jose, California's, leading-edge program using the nation's first commercial-scale, high solids dry fermentation anaerobic digestion system to process commercial organics

272

Digest of United States Practice in International Law 2002 | Data.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2 2 Research Menu Data/Tools Apps Resources Let's Talk Research Alpha You are here Data.gov » Communities » Research » Data Digest of United States Practice in International Law 2002 Dataset Summary Description The Office of the Legal Adviser publishes the annual Digest of United States Practice in International Law to provide the public with a historical record of the views and practice of the Government of the United States in public and private international law. "In his introduction to the 2002 volume, then Legal Adviser William H. Taft IV stated in part: "Calendar year 2002 gave rise to a broad range of significant and sometimes novel issues of international law. Many developments again highlighted the need to protect our national security against a different kind of enemy through the use of force in self-defense, non-proliferation and arms control efforts, the detention of unlawful enemy combatants and establishment of military commissions, continued counter-terrorism efforts, the imposition of sanctions, and the freezing of governmental assets, sometimes made available for payment of claims by individuals against terrorist states. At the same time, there were notable developments in non-confrontational contexts, including the fields of human rights, trade and investment, law of the sea, international claims and state responsibility, treaty practice, and international crime. . . ."

273

Flux analysis of the human proximal colon using anaerobic digestion model 1  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The colon can be regarded as an anaerobic digestive compartment within the gastro intestinal tract (GIT). An in silico model simulating the fluxes in the human proximal colon was developed on basis of the anaerobic digestion model 1 (ADM1), which is traditionally used to model waste conversion to biogas. Model calibration was conducted using data from in vitro fermentation of the proximal colon (TIM-2), and, amongst others, supplemented with the bio kinetics of prebiotic galactooligosaccharides (GOS) fermentation. The impact of water and solutes absorption by the host was also included. Hydrolysis constants of carbohydrates and proteins were estimated based on total short chain fatty acids (SCFA) and ammonia production in vitro. Model validation was established using an independent dataset of a different in vitro model: an in vitro three-stage continuous culture system. The in silico model was shown to provide quantitative insight in the microbial community structure in terms of functional groups, and the substrate and product fluxes between these groups as well as the host, as a function of the substrate composition, pH and the solids residence time (SRT). The model confirms the experimental observation that methanogens are washed out at low pH or low SRT-values. The in silico model is proposed as useful tool in the design of experimental setups for in vitro experiments by giving insight in fermentation processes in the proximal human colon.

Anne Marieke Motelica-Wagenaar; Arjen Nauta; Ellen G.H.M. van den Heuvel; Robbert Kleerebezem

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

,366 ,366 95,493 1.08 0 0.00 1 0.03 29,406 0.56 1,206 0.04 20,328 0.64 146,434 0.73 - Natural Gas 1996 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: South Carolina South Carolina 88. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas South Carolina, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ...........................................

275

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0,216 0,216 50,022 0.56 135 0.00 49 1.67 85,533 1.63 8,455 0.31 45,842 1.45 189,901 0.95 - Natural Gas 1996 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: M a r y l a n d Maryland 68. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Maryland, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 9 7 7 7 8 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 33 28 26 22 135 From Oil Wells ...........................................

276

Chapter 1 - Natural Gas Fundamentals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Natural gas is the most energy-efficient fossil fuel; it offers important energy-saving benefits when it is used instead of oil or coal. Although the primary use of natural gas is as a fuel, it is also a source of hydrocarbons for petrochemical feedstocks and a major source of elemental sulfur, an important industrial chemical. Its popularity as an energy source is expected to grow substantially in the future because natural gas can help achieve two important energy goals for the twenty-first century: providing the sustainable energy supplies and services needed for social and economic development and reducing adverse impacts on global climate and the environment in general. Natural gas consumption and trade have been growing steadily over the past two decades, and natural gas has strengthened its position in the world energy mix. Although natural gas demand declined in 2009, as a result of the economic slowdown, it is expected to resume growth in both emerging and traditional markets in the coming decades. Such increase in the near future will be driven because of additional demand in current uses, primarily power generation. There is yet little overlap between the use of natural gas and oil in all large markets. However, there are certain moves in the horizon, including the electrifying of transportation, that will push natural gas use to ever higher levels. This book gives the reader an introduction to natural gas by describing the origin and composition of natural gas, gas sources, phase behavior and properties, and transportation methods. Keywords: Absolute Open Flow, bulk modulus of elasticity, coal-bed methane, cricondenbar, cricondentherm, Expected Ultimate Recovery, gas deviation factor, higher heating value, Inflow Performance Relationship, kerogen, laminar flow, liquefied natural gas, primary thermogenic gas, pyrobitumen, secondary thermogenic gas, super-compressibility factor, thiol, Tubing Performance Curve, turbulent flow, unconventional gas resources, Wobbe Index, Wobbe Number.

Saeid Mokhatab; William A. Poe

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Gas Storage Technology Consortium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is crucial in meeting the needs of these new markets. To address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created - the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of January1, 2007 through March 31, 2007. Key activities during this time period included: {lg_bullet} Drafting and distributing the 2007 RFP; {lg_bullet} Identifying and securing a meeting site for the GSTC 2007 Spring Proposal Meeting; {lg_bullet} Scheduling and participating in two (2) project mentoring conference calls; {lg_bullet} Conducting elections for four Executive Council seats; {lg_bullet} Collecting and compiling the 2005 GSTC Final Project Reports; and {lg_bullet} Outreach and communications.

Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

278

Gas Storage Technology Consortium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is crucial in meeting the needs of these new markets. To address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of April 1, 2007 through June 30, 2007. Key activities during this time period included: (1) Organizing and hosting the 2007 GSTC Spring Meeting; (2) Identifying the 2007 GSTC projects, issuing award or declination letters, and begin drafting subcontracts; (3) 2007 project mentoring teams identified; (4) New NETL Project Manager; (5) Preliminary planning for the 2007 GSTC Fall Meeting; (6) Collecting and compiling the 2005 GSTC project final reports; and (7) Outreach and communications.

Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

279

Gas hydrate cool storage system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention presented relates to the development of a process utilizing a gas hydrate as a cool storage medium for alleviating electric load demands during peak usage periods. Several objectives of the invention are mentioned concerning the formation of the gas hydrate as storage material in a thermal energy storage system within a heat pump cycle system. The gas hydrate was formed using a refrigerant in water and an example with R-12 refrigerant is included. (BCS)

Ternes, M.P.; Kedl, R.J.

1984-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

280

Composition, Digestibility and Energy Values of Some Human Foods.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Almond 13 Pumpkin Brnzil nuts 19 Turnip roots Chestnut Coconut 2 1 Fruits Peanut 11 Apples Pecans 17 Prunes Walnut, English 13 Dates Vegetables 1"gs Grapes Potato, white Potato, sweet Mustard nreens Spinach Chard leaves & e Turnip greens...-free extract in some foods (21). COMPOSITION. DIGESTIBILITY AND ENERGY OF SOME HUMAN FOODS 7 The protein in many human foods consists almost entirely of proteids but green vegetables and fruits contain appreciable percentages of non- proteids...

Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

1946-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including digester gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Method and apparatus for controlling gas evolution from chemical reactions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is directed toward monitoring a thermally driven gas evolving chemical reaction with an acoustic apparatus. Signals from the acoustic apparatus are used to control a heater to prevent a run-away condition. A digestion module in combination with a robotic arm further automate physical handling of sample material reaction vessels. The invention is especially useful for carrying out sample procedures defined in EPA Methods SW-846.

Skorpik, James R. (Kennewick, WA); Dodson, Michael G. (Richland, WA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Method and apparatus for controlling gas evolution from chemical reactions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is directed toward monitoring a thermally driven gas evolving chemical reaction with an acoustic apparatus. Signals from the acoustic apparatus are used to control a heater to prevent a run-away condition. A digestion module in combination with a robotic arm further automate physical handling of sample material reaction vessels. The invention is especially useful for carrying out sample procedures defined in EPA Methods SW-846. 8 figs.

Skorpik, J.R.; Dodson, M.G.

1999-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

283

,"Missouri Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas Wells (MMcf)","Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (MMcf)","Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)","Missouri Natural...

284

Italy (including San Marino) Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Western Europe » Italy Western Europe » Italy (including San Marino) Italy (including San Marino) Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions Graph graphic Graphics Data graphic Data Trends As occurred in many industrialized nations, CO2 emissions from Italy rose steeply since the late 1940's until the growth was abruptly terminated in 1974. Since 1974, emissions from liquid fuels have vacillated, dropping from 76% to 46% of a static but varying total. Significant increases in natural gas consumption have compensated for the drop in oil consumption. In 2008, 35.8% of Italy's fossil-fuel CO2 emissions were due to natural gas consumption. Coal usage grew steadily until 1985 when CO2 emissions from coal consumption reached 16 million metric tons of carbon. Not until 2004 did coal usage exceed 1985 levels and now accounts for 13.9% of Italy's

285

Is the situation and immediate threat to life and health? Spill/Leak/Release Medical Emergency Fire or Flammable Gas Spill/Leak/Release Medical Emergency Fire or Flammable Gas Chemical Odor? Possible Fire / Natural Gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

? Possible Fire / Natural Gas (including chemicals and bio agents") (not including chemicals or bio agents Fire or Flammable Gas Spill/Leak/Release Medical Emergency Fire or Flammable Gas Chemical Odor

286

Well log evaluation of natural gas hydrates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas hydrates are crystalline substances composed of water and gas, in which a solid-water-lattice accommodates gas molecules in a cage-like structure. Gas hydrates are globally widespread in permafrost regions and beneath the sea in sediment of outer continental margins. While methane, propane, and other gases can be included in the clathrate structure, methane hydrates appear to be the most common in nature. The amount of methane sequestered in gas hydrates is probably enormous, but estimates are speculative and range over three orders of magnitude from about 100,000 to 270,000,000 trillion cubic feet. The amount of gas in the hydrate reservoirs of the world greedy exceeds the volume of known conventional gas reserves. Gas hydrates also represent a significant drilling and production hazard. A fundamental question linking gas hydrate resource and hazard issues is: What is the volume of gas hydrates and included gas within a given gas hydrate occurrence? Most published gas hydrate resource estimates have, of necessity, been made by broad extrapolation of only general knowledge of local geologic conditions. Gas volumes that may be attributed to gas hydrates are dependent on a number of reservoir parameters, including the areal extent ofthe gas-hydrate occurrence, reservoir thickness, hydrate number, reservoir porosity, and the degree of gas-hydrate saturation. Two of the most difficult reservoir parameters to determine are porosity and degreeof gas hydrate saturation. Well logs often serve as a source of porosity and hydrocarbon saturation data; however, well-log calculations within gas-hydrate-bearing intervals are subject to error. The primary reason for this difficulty is the lack of quantitative laboratory and field studies. The primary purpose of this paper is to review the response of well logs to the presence of gas hydrates.

Collett, T.S.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Well log evaluation of natural gas hydrates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas hydrates are crystalline substances composed of water and gas, in which a solid-water-lattice accommodates gas molecules in a cage-like structure. Gas hydrates are globally widespread in permafrost regions and beneath the sea in sediment of outer continental margins. While methane, propane, and other gases can be included in the clathrate structure, methane hydrates appear to be the most common in nature. The amount of methane sequestered in gas hydrates is probably enormous, but estimates are speculative and range over three orders of magnitude from about 100,000 to 270,000,000 trillion cubic feet. The amount of gas in the hydrate reservoirs of the world greedy exceeds the volume of known conventional gas reserves. Gas hydrates also represent a significant drilling and production hazard. A fundamental question linking gas hydrate resource and hazard issues is: What is the volume of gas hydrates and included gas within a given gas hydrate occurrence Most published gas hydrate resource estimates have, of necessity, been made by broad extrapolation of only general knowledge of local geologic conditions. Gas volumes that may be attributed to gas hydrates are dependent on a number of reservoir parameters, including the areal extent ofthe gas-hydrate occurrence, reservoir thickness, hydrate number, reservoir porosity, and the degree of gas-hydrate saturation. Two of the most difficult reservoir parameters to determine are porosity and degreeof gas hydrate saturation. Well logs often serve as a source of porosity and hydrocarbon saturation data; however, well-log calculations within gas-hydrate-bearing intervals are subject to error. The primary reason for this difficulty is the lack of quantitative laboratory and field studies. The primary purpose of this paper is to review the response of well logs to the presence of gas hydrates.

Collett, T.S.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Central Hudson Gas and Electric (Gas) - Commercial Energy Efficiency  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Commercial Energy Commercial Energy Efficiency Program Central Hudson Gas and Electric (Gas) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Installer/Contractor Institutional Local Government Nonprofit Schools Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Construction Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Maximum Rebate See Program Info State New York Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Furnace: $500 Furnace with ECM Fan: $700 - $900 Water Boiler: $800 - $1,200 Steam Boiler: $800 Boiler Reset Control: $100 Indirect Water Heater: $300 Programmable Thermostats: $25 Provider Central Hudson Gas and Electric The Business Energy SavingsCentral program is for non-residential gas customers of Central Hudson. This includes businesses, local governments,

289

History of Gas Lasers, Part 2: Pulsed Gas Lasers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this second article of a two-part series, Colin Webb explores the origins of pulsed gas lasers, which made possible many critical applications of laser technology, including...

Webb, Colin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

68,747 68,747 34,577 0.39 0 0.00 34 1.16 14,941 0.29 0 0.00 11,506 0.36 61,058 0.31 I d a h o Idaho 60. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Idaho, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented

291

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00 540 0.01 0 0.00 2,132 0.07 2,672 0.01 H a w a i i Hawaii 59. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Hawaii, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared

292

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

483,052 483,052 136,722 1.54 6,006 0.03 88 3.00 16,293 0.31 283,557 10.38 41,810 1.32 478,471 2.39 F l o r i d a Florida 57. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Florida, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 47 50 98 92 96 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Total.............................................................. 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ...............

293

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

291,898 291,898 113,995 1.29 0 0.00 4 0.14 88,078 1.68 3,491 0.13 54,571 1.73 260,140 1.30 I o w a Iowa 63. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Iowa, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0

294

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Vehicle Fuel: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: New England New England 36. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New England, 1992-1996 Table 691,089 167,354 1.89 0 0.00 40 1.36 187,469 3.58 80,592 2.95 160,761 5.09 596,215 2.98 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................

295

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

29,693 29,693 0 0.00 0 0.00 6 0.20 17,290 0.33 0 0.00 16,347 0.52 33,644 0.17 District of Columbia District of Columbia 56. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas District of Columbia, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

296

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

42,980 42,980 14,164 0.16 0 0.00 1 0.03 9,791 0.19 23,370 0.86 6,694 0.21 54,020 0.27 D e l a w a r e Delaware 55. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Delaware, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

297

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-49,536 -49,536 7,911 0.09 49,674 0.25 15 0.51 12,591 0.24 3 0.00 12,150 0.38 32,670 0.16 North Dakota North Dakota 82. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas North Dakota, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 496 525 507 463 462 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 104 101 104 99 108 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 12,461 18,892 19,592 16,914 16,810 From Oil Wells ........................................... 47,518 46,059 43,640 39,760 38,906 Total.............................................................. 59,979 64,951 63,232 56,674 55,716 Repressuring ................................................

298

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

21,547 21,547 4,916 0.06 0 0.00 0 0.00 7,012 0.13 3 0.00 7,099 0.22 19,031 0.10 N e w H a m p s h i r e New Hampshire 77. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New Hampshire, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

299

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

139,881 139,881 26,979 0.30 463 0.00 115 3.92 27,709 0.53 19,248 0.70 28,987 0.92 103,037 0.52 A r i z o n a Arizona 50. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Arizona, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 6 6 6 7 7 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 721 508 711 470 417 From Oil Wells ........................................... 72 110 48 88 47 Total.............................................................. 794 618 759 558 464 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease

300

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Middle Middle Atlantic Middle Atlantic 37. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Middle Atlantic, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,857 1,981 2,042 1,679 1,928 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 36,906 36,857 26,180 37,159 38,000 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 161,372 152,717 140,444 128,677 152,494 From Oil Wells ........................................... 824 610 539 723 641 Total.............................................................. 162,196 153,327 140,982 129,400 153,134 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including digester gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

386,690 386,690 102,471 1.16 0 0.00 43 1.47 142,319 2.72 5,301 0.19 98,537 3.12 348,671 1.74 M i n n e s o t a Minnesota 71. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Minnesota, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

302

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,108,583 1,108,583 322,275 3.63 298 0.00 32 1.09 538,749 10.28 25,863 0.95 218,054 6.90 1,104,972 5.52 I l l i n o i s Illinois 61. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Illinois, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 382 385 390 372 370 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 337 330 323 325 289 From Oil Wells ........................................... 10 10 10 10 9 Total.............................................................. 347 340 333 335 298 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ...............

303

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

286,485 286,485 71,533 0.81 25 0.00 31 1.06 137,225 2.62 5,223 0.19 72,802 2.31 286,814 1.43 M i s s o u r i Missouri 73. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Missouri, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 5 8 12 15 24 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 27 14 8 16 25 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 27 14 8 16 25 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

304

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

411,951 411,951 100,015 1.13 0 0.00 5 0.17 114,365 2.18 45,037 1.65 96,187 3.05 355,609 1.78 Massachusetts Massachusetts 69. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Massachusetts, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

305

Gas vesicles.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...in the suspending water, of concentration...MPa and balances the atmospheric pressure. Note that...versely, liquid water could not form by condensation inside the gas vesicle...presumably surrounded by water on all sides. At...

A E Walsby

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

226,798 226,798 104,124 1.17 0 0.00 0 0.00 58,812 1.12 2,381 0.09 40,467 1.28 205,783 1.03 North Carolina North Carolina 81. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas North Carolina, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

307

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic digester gas Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Department of Physics, Stanford University Collection: Physics 6 Managing Manure with Biogas Recovery Systems Summary: emissions and capture biogas--a useful source of energy....

308

EIA - Natural Gas Publications & Analysis  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Publications & Analysis Publications & Analysis Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report Estimates of natural gas in underground storage for the U.S. and three regions of the U.S. Natural Gas Weekly Update Analysis of current price, supply, and storage data; and a weather snapshot. Natural Gas Monthly U.S. production, supply, consumption, disposition, storage, imports, exports, and prices. Natural Gas Annual Provides comprehensive information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the U.S. ... see complete list of Natural Gas Publications Basics All Prices Exploration & Reserves Production Imports/Exports & Pipelines Storage Consumption Natural Gas Survey Forms Natural Gas Section from International Energy Annual Forecasts & Analysis Includes petroleum and natural gas forecasts and analysis for consumption, production, prices, and sales.

309

Natural Gas Program Archive (Disk1)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Eastern U.S. Gas Eastern U.S. Gas Shales Eastern U.S. Gas Eastern U.S. Gas Shales Shales Program Program This DVD contains information related to research and development (R&D) undertaken by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) during the 1976-1995 time period. This R&D focused on improving industry understanding of ways to locate and produce natural gas from the fractured organic gas shales of the Eastern U.S. A second DVD is also available that includes similar information related to the five other R&D programs targeting unconventional natural gas during roughly the same time frame: Western U.S. Gas Sands (1977-1992), Methane Recovery from Coalbeds (1978-1982), Methane Hydrates (1982-1992), Deep Source Gas Project (1982-1992), and Secondary Gas Recovery (1987-1995). The following items are found on this DVD.

310

A model of anaerobic digestion for biogas production using Abel equations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider a nonlinear mathematical model for the study of anaerobic digestion processes. We decompose the original system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations into subsystems. For these subsystems we prove existence of lower and upper solutions in reverse order for one of the va\\-ria\\-bles. The upper and lower solutions are constructed in analytical form. Furthermore, the upper solutions of subsystem for feeding bacteria are related with solutions of Abel equations of the first kind. Using numerical and theoretical arguments we examine how to obtain upper and lower solutions approximated to the numerical solution of the system. In this work we establish special techniques of lower-upper solution, which includes reverse order for non monotone systems, in contrast to the techniques used by H.L. Smith and P. Waltman on their monograph.

Primitivo B. Acosta-Humánez; Maximiliano Machado-Higuera; Alexander V. Sinitsyn

2014-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

311

Gas turbine combustor transition  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is described for converting a steam cooled transition to an air cooled transition in a gas turbine having a compressor in fluid communication with a combustor, a turbine section in fluid communication with the combustor, the transition disposed in a combustor shell and having a cooling circuit connecting a steam outlet and a steam inlet and wherein hot gas flows from the combustor through the transition and to the turbine section, includes forming an air outlet in the transition in fluid communication with the cooling circuit and providing for an air inlet in the transition in fluid communication with the cooling circuit. 7 figs.

Coslow, B.J.; Whidden, G.L.

1999-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

312

Gas cooled traction drive inverter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present invention provides a modular circuit card configuration for distributing heat among a plurality of circuit cards. Each circuit card includes a housing adapted to dissipate heat in response to gas flow over the housing. In one aspect, a gas-cooled inverter includes a plurality of inverter circuit cards, and a plurality of circuit card housings, each of which encloses one of the plurality of inverter cards.

Chinthavali, Madhu Sudhan

2013-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

313

Economics of natural gas upgrading  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Natural gas could be an important alternative energy source in meeting some of the market demand presently met by liquid products from crude oil. This study was initiated to analyze three energy markets to determine if greater use could be made of natural gas or natural gas derived products and if those products could be provided on an economically competitive basis. The three markets targeted for possible increases in gas use were motor fuels, power generation, and the chemical feedstocks market. The economics of processes to convert natural gas to transportation fuels, chemical products, and power were analyzed. The economic analysis was accomplished by drawing on a variety of detailed economic studies, updating them and bringing the results to a common basis. The processes analyzed included production of methanol, MTBE, higher alcohols, gasoline, CNG, and LNG for the transportation market. Production and use of methanol and ammonia in the chemical feedstock market and use of natural gas for power generation were also assessed. Use of both high and low quality gas as a process feed stream was evaluated. The analysis also explored the impact of various gas price growth rates and process facility locations, including remote gas areas. In assessing the transportation fuels market the analysis examined production and use of both conventional and new alternative motor fuels.

Hackworth, J.H.; Koch, R.W.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

AVESTAR® - Shale Gas Processing (SGP)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Shale Gas Processing (SGP) Shale Gas Processing (SGP) SPG The shale gas revolution is transforming America's energy landscape and economy. The shale gas boom, including the Marcellus play in Appalachia, is driving job creation and investment in the energy sector and is also helping to revive other struggling sectors of the economy like manufacturing. Continued growth in domestic shale gas processing requires that energy companies maximize the efficiency and profitability from their operations through excellent control and drive maximum business value from all their plant assets, all while reducing negative environmental impact and improving safety. Changing demographics and rapidly evolving plant automation and control technologies also necessitate training and empowering the next-generation of shale gas process engineering and

315

NETL: Gasification Systems - Gas Cleaning  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cleaning Cleaning Chemicals from Coal Complex Chemicals from Coal Complex (Eastman Company) Novel gas cleaning and conditioning are crucial technologies for achieving near-zero emissions, while meeting gasification system performance and cost targets. DOE's Gasification Systems program supports technology development in the area of gas cleaning and conditioning, including advanced sorbents and solvents, particulate filters, and other novel gas-cleaning approaches that remove and convert gas contaminants into benign and marketable by-products. To avoid the cost and efficiency penalties associated with cooling the gas stream to temperatures at which conventional gas clean-up systems operate, novel processes are being developed that operate at mild to high temperatures and incorporate multi-contaminant control to

316

List of Landfill Gas Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Incentives Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 377 Landfill Gas Incentives. CSV (rows 1 - 377) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active APS - Renewable Energy Incentive Program (Arizona) Utility Rebate Program Arizona Commercial Residential Anaerobic Digestion Biomass Daylighting Geothermal Electric Ground Source Heat Pumps Landfill Gas Other Distributed Generation Technologies Photovoltaics Small Hydroelectric Solar Pool Heating Solar Space Heat Solar Thermal Process Heat Solar Water Heat Wind energy Yes Advanced Energy Fund (Ohio) Public Benefits Fund Ohio Commercial Industrial Institutional Residential Utility Biomass CHP/Cogeneration Fuel Cells Fuel Cells using Renewable Fuels Geothermal Electric

317

Utilisation digestive de rations riches en lignines chez le lapin en croissance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Utilisation digestive de rations riches en lignines chez le lapin en croissance: mesures de flux et digestion de la ration sont mal connus chez le lapin. L'effet de hautes teneurs en lignines sur la digestion), caractérisé essentiellement par sa teneur variable en lignines VAN SOEST: 7,4 (lot B) ; 12,8 (lot M) et 16,0 p

Boyer, Edmond

318

Growth performance, voluntary intake and nutrient digestibility in horses grazing Bermudagrass pastures and fed Bermudagrass hay  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Intake of Forages Digestibility of Cell-Wall Constituents Digestibility of Crude Protein in Forages Digestibility of Gross Energy in Forages Relationships Between Availability of Forage and Animal Production Relationships Between Forage IIuality... of growth to reach mature size, which places an importance on maximum production per animal. Research conducted with ruminants has utilized regression analyses to describe the relationship between average daily gain and stocking rate. Peterson et al...

Aiken, Glen Eris

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

319

Historical Natural Gas Annual 1999  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1999 1999 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at selected points in the flow of gas from the wellhead to the burner-tip. Data include production, transmission within the United States, imports and exports of natural gas, underground storage activities, and deliveries to consumers. The publication presents historical data at the national level for 1930-1999 and detailed annual historical information by State for 1967-1999. The Historical Natural Gas Annual tables are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CSV file formats. Tables 1-3 present annual historical data at the national level for 1930-1999. The remaining tables contain detailed annual historical information, by State, for 1967-1999. Please read the file entitled READMEV2 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

320

Ground Gas Handbook  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...pathways of least resistance to gas transport, and applications are discussed, such as migrating landfill gas emissions, also from leaking landfill gas collection systems, as well as natural gas and oil-field gas leakage from abandoned production...

Allen W Hatheway

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including digester gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic digestion concept Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to methane. The anaerobic digestion consortium was introduced to high... M, and a biogas composition of 55%-60% methane. INTRODUCTION Economic evaluations of ... Source:...

322

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic digestion program Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Resources which provide more detailed infor- mation on anaerobic digesters are listed. Biogas... on the source of the organic matter and the management ... Source: Liskiewicz,...

323

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic closed digester Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to methane. The anaerobic digestion consortium was introduced to high... M, and a biogas composition of 55%-60% methane. INTRODUCTION Economic evaluations of ... Source:...

324

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerobic digestion Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Council (WTERT) Collection: Renewable Energy 8 www.manuremanagement.cornell.edu Biogas Casebook Summary: Riverhead, NY 11901 Corwin Duck FarmCorwin Duck Farm Digester type...

325

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobically digested sludge Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Resources which provide more detailed infor- mation on anaerobic digesters are listed. Biogas... on the source of the organic ... Source: Liskiewicz, Maciej - Institut fr...

326

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic digestion role Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Implementation of Summary: ;12;Abstract Anaerobic digestion of dairy manure produces biogas that can be captured and used for fuel while... offering environmental benefits. Dairy...

327

E-Print Network 3.0 - autothermal aerobic digestion Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Council (WTERT) Collection: Renewable Energy 12 www.manuremanagement.cornell.edu Biogas Casebook Summary: Riverhead, NY 11901 Corwin Duck FarmCorwin Duck Farm Digester type...

328

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic digester sludge Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Resources which provide more detailed infor- mation on anaerobic digesters are listed. Biogas... on the source of the organic ... Source: Liskiewicz, Maciej - Institut fr...

329

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerobic digestion atad Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Council (WTERT) Collection: Renewable Energy 11 www.manuremanagement.cornell.edu Biogas Casebook Summary: Riverhead, NY 11901 Corwin Duck FarmCorwin Duck Farm Digester type...

330

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobically digested municipal Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

This publication provides a general overview of anaero- Summary: . Scrubbing the biogas with iron-impregnated wood chips has been used in anaerobic digesters in municipal......

331

A Design-Builder's Perspective: Anaerobic Digestion, Forest County Potawatomi Community- A Case Study  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

Presented by Jason Rieth, Industrial Construction Executive at Miron Construction at the April 16, 2013, Community-Scale Anaerobic Digesters CommRE Webinar.

332

Treatment program of organic matter by anaerobic digestion and composting (PTMOBC) (Quebec, Canada)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Program for processing of organic matter by anaerobic digestion and composting (PTMOBC) provides financial assistance to municipalities and the private sector for the installation of...

333

The Gas Flow from the Gas Attenuator to the Beam Line  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The gas leak from the gas attenuator to the main beam line of the Linac Coherent Light Source has been evaluated, with the effect of the Knudsen molecular beam included. It has been found that the gas leak from the gas attenuator of the present design, with nitrogen as a working gas, does not exceed 10{sup -5} torr x l/s even at the highest pressure in the main attenuation cell (20 torr).

Ryutov, D.D.

2010-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

334

Evaluation of gas-liquid separation performance of natural gas filters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fibrous filters are often used to remove contaminants including both dusts and liquid droplets from natural gas. This paper aims to evaluate the gas-liquid separation performance of three types of cartridge filte...

Baisong Li; Zhongli Ji; Xue Yang

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

gas cylinder storage guidelines  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Compressed Gas Cylinder Storage Guidelines Compressed Gas Cylinder Storage Guidelines All cylinders must be stored vertical, top up across the upper half the cylinder but below the shoulder. Small cylinder stands or other methods may be appropriate to ensure that the cylinders are secured from movement. Boxes, cartons, and other items used to support small cylinders must not allow water to accumulate and possible cause corrosion. Avoid corrosive chemicals including salt and fumes - keep away from direct sunlight and keep objects away that could fall on them. Use Gas pressure regulators that have been inspected in the last 5 years. Cylinders that contain fuel gases whether full or empty must be stored away from oxidizer cylinders at a minimum of 20 feet. In the event they are stored together, they must be separated by a wall 5 feet high with

336

Gas-Saving Tips  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Gas-Saving Tips Gas-Saving Tips Some consumers believe fuel economy ratings are a fixed number, like engine size or cargo volume. However, a vehicle's fuel economy can vary significantly due to several factors, including how the vehicle is driven, the vehicle's mechanical condition, and the environment in which it is driven. That's good news. It means you may be able to improve your vehicle's gas mileage through proper maintenance and driving habits. In fact, studies suggest the average driver can improve his/her fuel economy by roughly 10 percent. Here are a few simple tips to help you get the best possible fuel economy from your vehicle and reduce your fuel costs. Adopt Good Driving Habits Drive Sensibly Aggressive driving (speeding, rapid acceleration and braking)

337

Natural Gas Annual, 1998  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Historical The Natural Gas Annual, 1998 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 1998. Summary data are presented for each Census Division and State for 1994 to 1998. A section of historical data at the National level shows industry activities back to the 1930's. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 1998 are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CDF file formats. This volume emphasizes information for 1998, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

338

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0, 2009 0, 2009 Next Release: August 27, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, August 19, 2009) Natural gas spot prices declined this report week (August 12-19), with the largest decreases generally occurring in the western half of the country. The Henry Hub spot price decreased by $0.34 to $3.02 per million Btu (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices decreased as supplies continued to be viewed as more than adequate to address near-term demand, including heating-related demand increases this winter. The futures contract for September delivery decreased by $0.36 on the week to $3.12 per MMBtu. Working gas in underground storage as of last Friday is estimated to

339

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. 5, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: October 22, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, October 14, 2009) Natural gas spot prices increased this report week (October 7-14) as a cold-air mass moved over major consuming areas of the country, including the populous Northeast. The Henry Hub spot price increased by $0.12 to $3.82 per million Btu (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices decreased significantly after increasing for 5 consecutive weeks. The futures contract for November delivery decreased by $0.47 per MMBtu on the week to $4.436. Working gas in underground storage as of last Friday (October 9) is estimated to have been 3,716 billion cubic feet (Bcf), a record high

340

Natural Gas Annual, 1997  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Historical The Natural Gas Annual, 1997 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 1997. Summary data are presented for each Census Division and State for 1993 to 1997. A section of historical data at the National level shows industry activities back to the 1930's. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 1997 are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CDF file formats. This volume emphasizes information for 1997, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including digester gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

16, 2009 16, 2009 Next Release: April 23, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, April 15, 2009) Since Wednesday, April 8, natural gas spot prices increased at most market locations in the Lower 48 States, with some exceptions including those in the Northeast, Midwest, and Midcontinent. Despite this weekÂ’s upticks at most locations, natural gas spot prices remain at relatively low levels and have continued to trade within a limited range for the past 4 weeks. The Henry Hub spot market prices gained about 10 cents or 2.9 percent per million Btu (MMBtu), ending trading yesterday at $3.60 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for May delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday (April 15) at $3.693

342

Gas Delivered  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. Average . Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers, 1980-1996 Figure 1980 1982 1984 1986 1988 1990 1992 1994 1996 0 2 4 6 8 10 0 40 80 120 160 200 240 280 320 Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet Dollars per Thousand Cubic Meters Nominal Dollars Constant Dollars Sources: Nominal dollars: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." Constant dollars: Prices were converted to 1995 dollars using the chain-type price indexes for Gross Domestic Product (1992 = 1.0) as published by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Economic Analysis. Residential: Prices in this publication for the residential sector cover nearly all of the volumes of gas delivered. Commercial and Industrial: Prices for the commercial and industrial sectors are often associated with

343

Underground natural gas storage reservoir management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to research technologies and methodologies that will reduce the costs associated with the operation and maintenance of underground natural gas storage. This effort will include a survey of public information to determine the amount of natural gas lost from underground storage fields, determine the causes of this lost gas, and develop strategies and remedial designs to reduce or stop the gas loss from selected fields. Phase I includes a detailed survey of US natural gas storage reservoirs to determine the actual amount of natural gas annually lost from underground storage fields. These reservoirs will be ranked, the resultant will include the amount of gas and revenue annually lost. The results will be analyzed in conjunction with the type (geologic) of storage reservoirs to determine the significance and impact of the gas loss. A report of the work accomplished will be prepared. The report will include: (1) a summary list by geologic type of US gas storage reservoirs and their annual underground gas storage losses in ft{sup 3}; (2) a rank by geologic classifications as to the amount of gas lost and the resultant lost revenue; and (3) show the level of significance and impact of the losses by geologic type. Concurrently, the amount of storage activity has increased in conjunction with the net increase of natural gas imports as shown on Figure No. 3. Storage is playing an ever increasing importance in supplying the domestic energy requirements.

Ortiz, I.; Anthony, R.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Method for digesting a nitro-bearing explosive compound  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is a process wherein superoxide radicals from superoxide salt are used to break down the explosive compounds. The process has an excellent reaction rate for degrading explosives, and operates at ambient temperature and atmospheric pressure in aqueous or non-aqueous conditions. Because the superoxide molecules are small, much smaller than an enzyme molecule for example, they can penetrate the microstructure of plastic explosives faster. The superoxide salt generates reactive hydroxyl radicals, which can destroy other organic contaminants, if necessary, along with digesting the explosive nitro-bearing compound.

Shah, Manish M. (Richland, WA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

GAS STORAGE TECHNOLOGY CONSORTIUM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. To accomplish this objective, the project is divided into three phases that are managed and directed by the GSTC Coordinator. Base funding for the consortium is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). In addition, funding is anticipated from the Gas Technology Institute (GTI). The first phase, Phase 1A, was initiated on September 30, 2003, and is scheduled for completion on March 31, 2004. Phase 1A of the project includes the creation of the GSTC structure, development of constitution (by-laws) for the consortium, and development and refinement of a technical approach (work plan) for deliverability enhancement and reservoir management. This report deals with the second 3-months of the project and encompasses the period December 31, 2003, through March 31, 2003. During this 3-month, the dialogue of individuals representing the storage industry, universities and the Department of energy was continued and resulted in a constitution for the operation of the consortium and a draft of the initial Request for Proposals (RFP).

Robert W. Watson

2004-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

346

Gas Storage Technology Consortium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created-the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of July 1, 2006 to September 30, 2006. Key activities during this time period include: {lg_bullet} Subaward contracts for all 2006 GSTC projects completed; {lg_bullet} Implement a formal project mentoring process by a mentor team; {lg_bullet} Upcoming Technology Transfer meetings: {sm_bullet} Finalize agenda for the American Gas Association Fall Underground Storage Committee/GSTC Technology Transfer Meeting in San Francisco, CA. on October 4, 2006; {sm_bullet} Identify projects and finalize agenda for the Fall GSTC Technology Transfer Meeting, Pittsburgh, PA on November 8, 2006; {lg_bullet} Draft and compile an electronic newsletter, the GSTC Insider; and {lg_bullet} New members update.

Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

347

GAS STORAGE TECHNOLOGY CONSORTIUM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. To accomplish this objective, the project is divided into three phases that are managed and directed by the GSTC Coordinator. Base funding for the consortium is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). In addition, funding is anticipated from the Gas Technology Institute (GTI). The first phase, Phase 1A, was initiated on September 30, 2003, and was completed on March 31, 2004. Phase 1A of the project included the creation of the GSTC structure, development and refinement of a technical approach (work plan) for deliverability enhancement and reservoir management. This report deals with Phase 1B and encompasses the period April 1, 2004, through June 30, 2004. During this 3-month period, a Request for Proposals (RFP) was made. A total of 17 proposals were submitted to the GSTC. A proposal selection meeting was held June 9-10, 2004 in Morgantown, West Virginia. Of the 17 proposals, 6 were selected for funding.

Robert W. Watson

2004-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

348

Digest of United States Practice in International Law 1989-1990 | Data.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1989-1990 1989-1990 Research Menu Data/Tools Apps Resources Let's Talk Research Alpha You are here Data.gov » Communities » Research » Data Digest of United States Practice in International Law 1989-1990 Dataset Summary Description The Office of the Legal Adviser publishes the annual Digest of United States Practice in International Law to provide the public with a historical record of the views and practice of the Government of the United States in public and private international law. In his April 2003 introduction to the 1989-1990 Digest, then Legal Adviser William H. Taft IV stated in part: "The year 1989-90 was a transitional period in international relations, as the world community continued to deal with implications of the end of the Cold War and the unsteady emergence of a new era. Many of the tensions and ambiguities of the time are reflected in the documents excerpted in this volume. For example, the Immigration Act of 1990 was adopted against the background of domestic U.S. concerns about terrorism, admission of refugees and exclusion of aliens-issues that continue to be important today. Other significant domestic law issues involved reservations to treaties (in this case, the 1948 Genocide Convention), the application of doctrines of foreign sovereign immunity (the Wallenberg Case), the interplay between sanctions and foreign assistance (e.g., Hungary, Poland, Czechoslovakia and the German Democratic Republic), and the allocation of foreign affairs authority in our federal system. "At the same time, the volume records U.S. efforts to deal effectively with the legal dimensions of very diverse issues on the international plane, including the Iraqi attack on the U.S.S. Stark, the downing of Iran Air Flight 655, the deployment of U.S. armed forces in Panama, maritime interdiction incidents, irregular rendition of criminal suspects, and the Treaty on Conventional Forces in Europe. Concerns about human rights, terrorism, and the war on drugs are indicated by the adoption of domestic legislation implementing, or relating to the implementation of, the UN Convention on Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment, the UN Convention Against Illicit Traffic in Narcotic Drugs and Psychotropic Substances, the Montreal Protocol on Suppression of Unlawful Acts of Violence at Airports, and the IMO Convention on the Suppression of Unlawful Acts Against the Safety of Maritime Navigation (negotiated in the aftermath of the Achille Lauro incident) and its related Protocol on Fixed Platforms. . . ."

349

On-line gas chromatographic analysis of airborne particles  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for the in-situ, chemical analysis of an aerosol. The method may include the steps of: collecting an aerosol; thermally desorbing the aerosol into a carrier gas to provide desorbed aerosol material; transporting the desorbed aerosol material onto the head of a gas chromatography column; analyzing the aerosol material using a gas chromatograph, and quantizing the aerosol material as it evolves from the gas chromatography column. The apparatus includes a collection and thermal desorption cell, a gas chromatograph including a gas chromatography column, heated transport lines coupling the cell and the column; and a quantization detector for aerosol material evolving from the gas chromatography column.

Hering, Susanne V. (Berkeley, CA); Goldstein, Allen H. (Orinda, CA)

2012-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

350

Treatment of gas from an in situ conversion process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of producing methane is described. The method includes providing formation fluid from a subsurface in situ conversion process. The formation fluid is separated to produce a liquid stream and a first gas stream. The first gas stream includes olefins. At least the olefins in the first gas stream are contacted with a hydrogen source in the presence of one or more catalysts and steam to produce a second gas stream. The second gas stream is contacted with a hydrogen source in the presence of one or more additional catalysts to produce a third gas stream. The third gas stream includes methane.

Diaz, Zaida (Katy, TX); Del Paggio, Alan Anthony (Spring, TX); Nair, Vijay (Katy, TX); Roes, Augustinus Wilhelmus Maria (Houston, TX)

2011-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

351

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

73,669 73,669 141,300 1.59 221,822 1.12 3 0.10 46,289 0.88 33,988 1.24 31,006 0.98 252,585 1.26 A r k a n s a s Arkansas 51. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Arkansas, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,750 1,552 1,607 1,563 1,470 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,500 3,500 3,500 3,988 4,020 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 171,543 166,273 161,967 161,390 182,895 From Oil Wells ........................................... 39,364 38,279 33,446 33,979 41,551 Total.............................................................. 210,906 204,552 195,413 195,369 224,446 Repressuring ................................................

352

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-1,080,240 -1,080,240 201,024 2.27 1,734,887 8.78 133 4.54 76,629 1.46 136,436 4.99 46,152 1.46 460,373 2.30 O k l a h o m a Oklahoma 84. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Oklahoma, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 13,926 13,289 13,487 13,438 13,074 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 28,902 29,118 29,121 29,733 29,733 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 1,674,405 1,732,997 1,626,858 1,521,857 1,467,695 From Oil Wells ........................................... 342,950 316,945 308,006 289,877 267,192 Total.............................................................. 2,017,356 2,049,942 1,934,864

353

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7,038,115 7,038,115 3,528,911 39.78 13,646,477 69.09 183 6.24 408,861 7.80 1,461,718 53.49 281,452 8.91 5,681,125 28.40 West South Central West South Central 42. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West South Central, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 87,198 84,777 88,034 88,734 62,357 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 92,212 95,288 94,233 102,525 102,864 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 11,599,913 11,749,649 11,959,444 11,824,788 12,116,665 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,313,831 2,368,395 2,308,634 2,217,752 2,151,247 Total..............................................................

354

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

77,379 77,379 94,481 1.07 81,435 0.41 8 0.27 70,232 1.34 1,836 0.07 40,972 1.30 207,529 1.04 K e n t u c k y Kentucky 65. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Kentucky, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,084 1,003 969 1,044 983 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 12,483 12,836 13,036 13,311 13,501 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 79,690 86,966 73,081 74,754 81,435 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 79,690 86,966 73,081 74,754 81,435 Repressuring ................................................

355

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-67,648 -67,648 75,616 0.85 480,828 2.43 0 0.00 16,720 0.32 31,767 1.16 29,447 0.93 153,549 0.77 Pacific Noncontiguous Pacific Noncontiguous 45. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Pacific Noncontiguous, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,638 9,907 9,733 9,497 9,294 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 112 113 104 100 102 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 198,603 190,139 180,639 179,470 183,747 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,427,110 2,588,202 2,905,261 3,190,433 3,189,837 Total.............................................................. 2,625,713 2,778,341

356

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-310,913 -310,913 110,294 1.24 712,796 3.61 2 0.07 85,376 1.63 22,607 0.83 57,229 1.81 275,508 1.38 K a n s a s Kansas 64. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Kansas, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,681 9,348 9,156 8,571 7,694 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 18,400 19,472 19,365 22,020 21,388 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 580,572 605,578 628,900 636,582 629,755 From Oil Wells ........................................... 79,169 82,579 85,759 86,807 85,876 Total.............................................................. 659,741 688,157 714,659 723,389 715,631 Repressuring ................................................

357

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

819,046 819,046 347,043 3.91 245,740 1.24 40 1.36 399,522 7.62 32,559 1.19 201,390 6.38 980,555 4.90 M i c h i g a n Michigan 70. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Michigan, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,223 1,160 1,323 1,294 2,061 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,257 5,500 6,000 5,258 5,826 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 120,287 126,179 136,989 146,320 201,123 From Oil Wells ........................................... 80,192 84,119 91,332 97,547 50,281 Total.............................................................. 200,479 210,299 228,321 243,867 251,404 Repressuring ................................................

358

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

W W y o m i n g -775,410 50,253 0.57 666,036 3.37 14 0.48 13,534 0.26 87 0.00 9,721 0.31 73,609 0.37 Wyoming 98. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Wyoming, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 10,826 10,933 10,879 12,166 12,320 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,111 3,615 3,942 4,196 4,510 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 751,693 880,596 949,343 988,671 981,115 From Oil Wells ........................................... 285,125 142,006 121,519 111,442 109,434 Total.............................................................. 1,036,817 1,022,602 1,070,862 1,100,113 1,090,549 Repressuring

359

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-67,648 -67,648 75,616 0.85 480,828 2.43 0 0.00 16,179 0.31 31,767 1.16 27,315 0.86 150,877 0.75 A l a s k a Alaska 49. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Alaska, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,638 9,907 9,733 9,497 9,294 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 112 113 104 100 102 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 198,603 190,139 180,639 179,470 183,747 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,427,110 2,588,202 2,905,261 3,190,433 3,189,837 Total.............................................................. 2,625,713 2,778,341 3,085,900 3,369,904 3,373,584 Repressuring

360

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

628,189 628,189 449,511 5.07 765,699 3.88 100 3.41 528,662 10.09 39,700 1.45 347,721 11.01 1,365,694 6.83 West North Central West North Central 39. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West North Central, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 10,177 9,873 9,663 9,034 8,156 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 18,569 19,687 19,623 22,277 21,669 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 594,551 626,728 651,594 655,917 648,822 From Oil Wells ........................................... 133,335 135,565 136,468 134,776 133,390 Total.............................................................. 727,886 762,293

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including digester gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,048,760 1,048,760 322,661 3.64 18,131 0.09 54 1.84 403,264 7.69 142,688 5.22 253,075 8.01 1,121,742 5.61 N e w Y o r k New York 80. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New York, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 329 264 242 197 232 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 5,906 5,757 5,884 6,134 6,208 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 22,697 20,587 19,937 17,677 17,494 From Oil Wells ........................................... 824 610 539 723 641 Total.............................................................. 23,521 21,197 20,476 18,400 18,134 Repressuring ................................................

362

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,554,530 1,554,530 311,229 3.51 3,094,431 15.67 442 15.08 299,923 5.72 105,479 3.86 210,381 6.66 927,454 4.64 Mountain Mountain 43. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Mountain, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 38,711 38,987 37,366 39,275 38,944 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 30,965 34,975 38,539 38,775 41,236 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 2,352,729 2,723,393 3,046,159 3,131,205 3,166,689 From Oil Wells ........................................... 677,771 535,884 472,397 503,986 505,903 Total.............................................................. 3,030,499 3,259,277 3,518,556

363

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,592,465 1,592,465 716,648 8.08 239,415 1.21 182 6.21 457,792 8.73 334,123 12.23 320,153 10.14 1,828,898 9.14 South Atlantic South Atlantic 40. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas South Atlantic, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 3,307 3,811 4,496 4,427 4,729 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 39,412 35,149 41,307 37,822 36,827 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 206,766 208,892 234,058 236,072 233,409 From Oil Wells ........................................... 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Total.............................................................. 214,349 216,903 242,526 243,204 240,115

364

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,999,161 1,999,161 895,529 10.10 287,933 1.46 1,402 47.82 569,235 10.86 338,640 12.39 308,804 9.78 2,113,610 10.57 Pacific Contiguous Pacific Contiguous 44. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Pacific Contiguous, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 3,896 3,781 3,572 3,508 2,082 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 1,142 1,110 1,280 1,014 996 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 156,635 124,207 117,725 96,329 88,173 From Oil Wells ........................................... 294,800 285,162 282,227 289,430 313,581 Total.............................................................. 451,435 409,370

365

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-122,394 -122,394 49,997 0.56 178,984 0.91 5 0.17 37,390 0.71 205 0.01 28,025 0.89 115,622 0.58 West Virginia West Virginia 96. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West Virginia, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 2,356 2,439 2,565 2,499 2,703 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 38,250 33,716 39,830 36,144 35,148 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... E 182,000 171,024 183,773 186,231 178,984 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. E 182,000 171,024 183,773 186,231 178,984 Repressuring ................................................

366

Gas vesicles.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the gas vesicles simply reduce their sinking rates and...remaining suspended in the water column. A microorganism...phenomena as stratification, water- bloom formation, and...the many proteins that make up the phycobilisome (73...flagellate bacteria in natural waters. The natural selection...

A E Walsby

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Gas vesicles.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...these costs can be compared is in units of energy expenditure per time (joules per second...requires 7.24 x 10-18 kg of Gvp. The energy cost of making this protein, Eg, is...Eg = 2.84 x 101- o J. The rate of energy expenditure in gas vesicle synthesis then...

A E Walsby

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Gas sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gas sensor is described which incorporates a sensor stack comprising a first film layer of a ferromagnetic material, a spacer layer, and a second film layer of the ferromagnetic material. The first film layer is fabricated so that it exhibits a dependence of its magnetic anisotropy direction on the presence of a gas, That is, the orientation of the easy axis of magnetization will flip from out-of-plane to in-plane when the gas to be detected is present in sufficient concentration. By monitoring the change in resistance of the sensor stack when the orientation of the first layer's magnetization changes, and correlating that change with temperature one can determine both the identity and relative concentration of the detected gas. In one embodiment the stack sensor comprises a top ferromagnetic layer two mono layers thick of cobalt deposited upon a spacer layer of ruthenium, which in turn has a second layer of cobalt disposed on its other side, this second cobalt layer in contact with a programmable heater chip.

Schmid, Andreas K.; Mascaraque, Arantzazu; Santos, Benito; de la Figuera, Juan

2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

369

Gas-liquid separator and method of operation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for gas-liquid separation in electrolysis processes is provided. The system includes a first compartment having a liquid carrier including a first gas therein and a second compartment having the liquid carrier including a second gas therein. The system also includes a gas-liquid separator fluidically coupled to the first and second compartments for separating the liquid carrier from the first and second gases.

Soloveichik, Grigorii Lev (Latham, NY); Whitt, David Brandon (Albany, NY)

2009-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

370

Definition: Liquid natural gas | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Liquid natural gas Liquid natural gas Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Liquid natural gas Natural gas (primarily methane) that has been liquefied by reducing its temperature to -260 degrees Fahrenheit at atmospheric pressure.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Liquefied natural gas or LNG is natural gas that has been converted to liquid form for ease of storage or transport. Liquefied natural gas takes up about 1/600th the volume of natural gas in the gaseous state. It is odorless, colorless, non-toxic and non-corrosive. Hazards include flammability after vaporization into a gaseous state, freezing and asphyxia. The liquefaction process involves removal of certain components, such as dust, acid gases, helium, water, and heavy hydrocarbons, which could cause difficulty downstream. The natural gas is then condensed into a

371

Historical Natural Gas Annual - 1930 Through 2000  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Historical Natural Gas Annual Historical Natural Gas Annual 1930 Through 2000 EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Data Publications Historical Natural Gas Annual The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at selected points in the flow of gas from the wellhead to the burner-tip. Data include production, transmission within the United States, imports and exports of natural gas, underground storage activities, and deliveries to consumers. The publication presents historical data at the national level for 1930-2000 and detailed annual historical information by State for 1967-2000. To read reports in PDF format download a free copy of Adobe Acrobat Reader.

372

Passive gas separator and accumulator device  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A separation device employing a gas separation filter and swirler vanes for separating gas from a gas-liquid mixture is provided. The cylindrical filter utilizes the principle that surface tension in the pores of the filter prevents gas bubbles from passing through. As a result, the gas collects in the interior region of the filter and coalesces to form larger bubbles in the center of the device. The device is particularly suited for use in microgravity conditions since the swirlers induce a centrifugal force which causes liquid to move from the inner region of the filter, pass the pores, and flow through the outlet of the device while the entrained gas is trapped by the filter. The device includes a cylindrical gas storage screen which is enclosed by the cylindrical gas separation filter. The screen has pores that are larger than those of the filters. The screen prevents larger bubbles that have been formed from reaching and interfering with the pores of the gas separation filter. The device is initially filled with a gas other than that which is to be separated. This technique results in separation of the gas even before gas bubbles are present in the mixture. Initially filling the device with the dissimilar gas and preventing the gas from escaping before operation can be accomplished by sealing the dissimilar gas in the inner region of the separation device with a ruptured disc which can be ruptured when the device is activated for use. 3 figs.

Choe, H.; Fallas, T.T.

1994-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

373

Flammable gas project topical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The flammable gas safety issue was recognized in 1990 with the declaration of an unreviewed safety question (USQ) by the U. S. Department of Energy as a result of the behavior of the Hanford Site high-level waste tank 241-SY-101. This tank exhibited episodic releases of flammable gas that on a couple of occasions exceeded the lower flammability limit of hydrogen in air. Over the past six years there has been a considerable amount of knowledge gained about the chemical and physical processes that govern the behavior of tank 241-SY-1 01 and other tanks associated with the flammable gas safety issue. This report was prepared to provide an overview of that knowledge and to provide a description of the key information still needed to resolve the issue. Items covered by this report include summaries of the understanding of gas generation, retention and release mechanisms, the composition and flammability behavior of the gas mixture, the amounts of stored gas, and estimated gas release fractions for spontaneous releases. `Me report also discusses methods being developed for evaluating the 177 tanks at the Hanford Site and the problems associated with these methods. Means for measuring the gases emitted from the waste are described along with laboratory experiments designed to gain more information regarding rates of generation, species of gases emitted and modes of gas storage and release. Finally, the process for closing the USQ is outlined as are the information requirements to understand and resolve the flammable gas issue.

Johnson, G.D.

1997-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

374

Liquid Natural Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Liquid Natural Gas ... IN A new technique for storing natural gas at the East Ohio Gas Co. plant, Cleveland, Ohio, the gas is liquefied before passing to the gas holders. ... Natural gas contains moisture and carbon dioxide, both of which liquefy before the natural gas and are somewhat of a nuisance because upon solidification they clog the pipes. ...

W. F. SCHAPHORST

1941-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

375

9 - Hybrid fuel cell gas turbine (FC/GT) combined cycle systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract: Hybrid fuel cell gas turbine systems consisting of high-temperature fuel cells (HTFCs) integrated into cycles with gas turbines can significantly increase fuel-to-electricity conversion efficiency and lower emissions of greenhouse gases and criteria pollutants from the electric power sector. In addition, the separated anode and cathode compartments of the fuel cell can enable CO2 separation and sequestration for some cycle configurations. Hybrid fuel cell gas turbine technology has the potential to operate on natural gas, digester gas, landfill gas, and coal and biomass syngas. HTFC technologies are emerging with high reliability and durability, which should enable them to be integrated with gas turbine technology to produce modern hybrid power systems. Advanced thermodynamic and dynamic simulation capabilities have been developed and demonstrated to enable future system integration and control.

J. Brouwer

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Anaerobic Digestion in California Dairies: Electricty Generation or Biomethane Upgrading.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??California is worldwide one of the major Green House Gas emitter due to a large use of fossil fuels in power generation and transportation. The… (more)

Bandini, Francesco

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

A Design-Builder's Perspective: Anaerobic Digestion, Forest County Potawatomi Community - A Case Study  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Design-Builder's Perspective: Anaerobic Digestion Design-Builder's Perspective: Anaerobic Digestion Forest County Potawatomi Community - A Case Study Presented by Jason Rieth, P.E., LEED AP BD + C Industrial Construction Executive Miron Construction Co., Inc. 715.841.4029 | jason.rieth@miron-construction.com * Overview of the FCPC Renewable Generation Facility

378

Long-term investigation of microbial fuel cells treating primary sludge or digested sludge  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Biogas production was produced from primary sludge and quantified. Total energy production in MFCs could: Microbial fuel cell Primary sludge Digested sludge Energy Biogas a b s t r a c t The long-term performance. Digested sludge can be further composted for agriculture uses, and biogas can be con- verted

379

NATURAL GAS MARKET ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION NATURAL GAS MARKET ASSESSMENT PRELIMINARY RESULTS In Support.................................................................................... 6 Chapter 2: Natural Gas Demand.................................................................................................. 10 Chapter 3: Natural Gas Supply

380

,"Missouri Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas Sold to Commercial Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Missouri Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Missouri Natural Gas Price Sold to...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including digester gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

natural gas production output. Rigs Natural Gas Transportation Update Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company yesterday (August 4) said it is mobilizing equipment and manpower for...

382

Sequential anaerobic/anaerobic digestion for enhanced sludge stabilization: comparison of the process performance for mixed and waste sludge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Sequential anaerobic-aerobic digestion has been demonstrated as a promising alternative for enhanced sludge stabilization. In this paper, a feasibility ... the sequential digestion applied to real waste activated...

M. Concetta Tomei; Nicola Antonello Carozza

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Shale gas is natural gas trapped inside  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Shale gas is natural gas trapped inside formations of shale - fine grained sedimentary rocks that can be rich sources of petroleum and natural gas. Just a few years ago, much of...

384

Gas Chromatography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Researchers from the University of Missouri and ICx Nomadics have reported on the use of a optofluidic ring resonator (OFRR) sensor for on-column detection ?. ... Although substantial differences were noted between fresh and aged (or oxidized) oils, many of the compounds in the oxidized oil went unidentified due to lack of library mass spectral data. ... A high resolution MEMS based gas chromatography column for the analysis of benzene and toluene gaseous mixtures ...

Frank L. Dorman; Joshua J. Whiting; Jack W. Cochran; Jorge Gardea-Torresdey

2010-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

385

NETL: Gasification Systems - Gas Separation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Separation Separation Ion-Transport Membrane Oxygen Separation Modules Ion-Transport Membrane Oxygen Separation Modules Gas separation unit operations represent major cost elements in gasification plants. The gas separation technology being supported in the DOE program promises significant reduction in cost of electricity, improved thermal efficiency, and superior environmental performance. Gasification-based energy conversion systems rely on two gas separation processes: (1) separation of oxygen from air for feed to oxygen-blown gasifiers; and (2) post-gasification separation of hydrogen from carbon dioxide following (or along with) the shifting of gas composition when carbon dioxide capture is required or hydrogen is the desired product. Research efforts include development of advanced gas separation

386

Experimental co-digestion of corn stalk and vermicompost to improve biogas production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Anaerobic co-digestion of corn stalk and vermicompost (VC) as well as mono-digestion of corn stalk were investigated. Batch mono-digestion experiments were performed at 35 {+-} 1 {sup o}C and initial total solid loading (TSL) ranged from 1.2% to 6.0%. Batch co-digestion experiments were performed at 35 {+-} 1 {sup o}C and initial TSL of 6% with VC proportions ranged from 20% to 80% of total solid (TS). For mono-digestion of corn stalk, a maximum methane yield of 217.60 {+-} 13.87 mL/g TS{sub added} was obtained at initial TSL of 4.8%, and acidification was found at initial TSL of 6.0% with the lowest pH value of 5.10 on day 4. Co-digestion improved the methane yields by 4.42-58.61% via enhancing volatile fatty acids (VFAs) concentration and pH value compared with mono-digestion of corn stalk. The maximum biogas yield of 410.30 {+-} 11.01 mL/g TS{sub added} and methane yield of 259.35 {+-} 13.85 mL/g TS{sub added} were obtained for 40% VC addition. Structure analysis by X-ray diffractometry (XRD) showed that the lowest crystallinity of 35.04 of digested corn stalk was obtained from co-digestion with 40% VC, which decreased 29.4% compared to 49.6 obtained from un-treated corn stalk. It is concluded that co-digestion with VC is beneficial for improving biodigestibility and methane yield from corn stalk.

Chen Guangyin [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Zheng Zheng, E-mail: zzhenghj@fudan.edu.c [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Yang Shiguan [National Engineering Laboratory of Biomass Power Generation Equipment, School of Renewable Energy, North China Electric Power University, Beijing 102206 (China); Fang Caixia; Zou Xingxing; Luo Yan [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

387

Passive gas separator and accumulator device  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A separation device employing a gas separation filter and swirler vanes for separating gas from a gasliquid mixture is provided. The cylindrical filter utilizes the principle that surface tension in the pores of the filter prevents gas bubbles from passing through. As a result, the gas collects in the interior region of the filter and coalesces to form larger bubbles in the center of the device. The device is particularly suited for use in microgravity conditions since the swirlers induce a centrifugal force which causes liquid to move from the inner region of the filter, pass the pores, and flow through the outlet of the device while the entrained gas is trapped by the filter. The device includes a cylindrical gas storage screen which is enclosed by the cylindrical gas separation filter. The screen has pores that are larger than those of the filters. The screen prevents larger bubbles that have been formed from reaching and interfering with the pores of the gas separation filter. The device is initially filled with a gas other than that which is to be separated. This technique results in separation of the gas even before gas bubbles are present in the mixture. Initially filling the device with the dissimilar gas and preventing the gas from escaping before operation can be accomplished by sealing the dissimilar gas in the inner region of the separation device with a ruptured disc which can be ruptured when the device is activated for use.

Choe, Hwang (Saratoga, CA); Fallas, Thomas T. (Berkeley, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

U.S. crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids reserves 1995 annual report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The EIA annual reserves report series is the only source of comprehensive domestic proved reserves estimates. This publication is used by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, industry, and other interested parties to obtain accurate estimates of the Nation`s proved reserves of crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids. These data are essential to the development, implementation, and evaluation of energy policy and legislation. This report presents estimates of proved reserves of crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids as of December 31, 1995, as well as production volumes for the US and selected States and State subdivisions for the year 1995. Estimates are presented for the following four categories of natural gas: total gas (wet after lease separation), nonassociated gas and associated-dissolved gas (which are the two major types of wet natural gas), and total dry gas (wet gas adjusted for the removal of liquids at natural gas processing plants). In addition, reserve estimates for two types of natural gas liquids, lease condensate and natural gas plant liquids, are presented. Also included is information on indicated additional crude oil reserves and crude oil, natural gas, and lease condensate reserves in nonproducing reservoirs. A discussion of notable oil and gas exploration and development activities during 1995 is provided. 21 figs., 16 tabs.

NONE

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

US crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids reserves 1996 annual report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The EIA annual reserves report series is the only source of comprehensive domestic proved reserves estimates. This publication is used by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, industry, and other interested parties to obtain accurate estimates of the Nation`s proved reserves of crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids. These data are essential to the development, implementation, and evaluation of energy policy and legislation. This report presents estimates of proved reserves of crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids as of December 31, 1996, as well as production volumes for the US and selected States and State subdivisions for the year 1996. Estimates are presented for the following four categories of natural gas: total gas (wet after lease separation), nonassociated gas and associated-dissolved gas (which are the two major types of wet natural gas), and total dry gas (wet gas adjusted for the removal of liquids at natural gas processing plants). In addition, reserve estimates for two types of natural gas liquids, lease condensate and natural gas plant liquids, are presented. Also included is information on indicated additional crude oil reserves and crude oil, natural gas, and lease condensate reserves in nonproducing reservoirs. A discussion of notable oil and gas exploration and development activities during 1996 is provided. 21 figs., 16 tabs.

NONE

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Next Generation Natural Gas Vehicle Activity: Natural Gas Engine and Vehicle Research & Development (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes the status of the Next Generation Natural Gas Vehicle (NGNGV) activity, including goals, R&D progress, NGV implementation, and the transition to hydrogen.

Not Available

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Gas Sampling Considerations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gas sampling is carried out to measure the quality of a gas. Gas samples are sometimes acquired by in situ observation within the main gas body by using remote or visual observation for specific properties. A mor...

Alvin Lieberman

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Georgia Tech Dangerous Gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Georgia Tech Dangerous Gas Safety Program March 2011 #12;Georgia Tech Dangerous Gas Safety.......................................................................................................... 5 6. DANGEROUS GAS USAGE REQUIREMENTS................................................. 7 6.1. RESTRICTED PURCHASE/ACQUISITION RULES: ................................................ 7 7. FLAMMABLE GAS

Sherrill, David

393

Sequential injection gas guns for accelerating projectiles  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Gas guns and methods for accelerating projectiles through such gas guns are described. More particularly, gas guns having a first injection port located proximate a breech end of a barrel and a second injection port located longitudinally between the first injection port and a muzzle end of the barrel are described. Additionally, modular gas guns that include a plurality of modules are described, wherein each module may include a barrel segment having one or more longitudinally spaced injection ports. Also, methods of accelerating a projectile through a gas gun, such as injecting a first pressurized gas into a barrel through a first injection port to accelerate the projectile and propel the projectile down the barrel past a second injection port and injecting a second pressurized gas into the barrel through the second injection port after passage of the projectile and to further accelerate the projectile are described.

Lacy, Jeffrey M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Chu, Henry S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Novascone, Stephen R. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

394

Net Taxable Gasoline Gallons (Including Aviation Gasoline)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Net Taxable Gasoline Gallons (Including Aviation Gasoline) Period 2000 2001 (2) 2002 2003 2004 "gross" to "net" , was deemed impractical. (5) This report replaces the Gross Taxable Gasoline Gallons (Including Aviation Gasoline) report which will not be produced after December 2002. (6) The November 2007

395

Global Natural Gas Market Trends, 2. edition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report provides an overview of major trends occurring in the natural gas industry and includes a concise look at the drivers behind recent rapid growth in gas usage and the challenges faced in meeting that growth. Topics covered include: an overview of Natural Gas including its history, the current market environment, and its future market potential; an analysis of the overarching trends that are driving a need for change in the Natural Gas industry; a description of new technologies being developed to increase production of Natural Gas; an evaluation of the potential of unconventional Natural Gas sources to supply the market; a review of new transportation methods to get Natural Gas from producing to consuming countries; a description of new storage technologies to support the increasing demand for peak gas; an analysis of the coming changes in global Natural Gas flows; an evaluation of new applications for Natural Gas and their impact on market sectors; and, an overview of Natural Gas trading concepts and recent changes in financial markets.

NONE

2007-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

396

Application of dried anaerobic digested sewage sludge as phenol biosorbent  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Untreated anaerobically digested sewage sludge was used for the first time as a biosorbent for removing phenol from aqueous solution. Results showed that adsorption capacity was influenced by the pH of the aqueous solution with an observed maximum phenol removal at pH around 6-8. The adsorption equilibrium of phenolic compounds was obtained after almost two hours with an adsorption of approximately 90% of the phenolic compounds. A sorbent concentration of 1.8 g/L was found to insure the best removal percentage and the best sorbent capacity. Both Langmuir and Freundlich models have provided reasonable fittings for the data of phenol adsorption. The experimental data fitted the pseudo-second-order kinetic model and the intraparticle diffusion model. The values of change in Gibbs free energy (?G°), enthalpy (?H°) and entropy (?S°) were calculated. The thermodynamic study of adsorption process showed that the process was exothermic in nature.

Alaa H. Hawari

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Some factors influencing digestion and growth rates of beef steers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

~K 20i49 34. 78 '2221 20+49 26. 81 mgs 20i49 26, 81 19i92 66i51 KlI 19a92 ~38. 7 21i10 ~0+9 Oi93 Oe93 0. 93 0, 90 8. 5T 98 e9 0 94 8. 63 98. 9 Oi94 Oi94 5. 23 li03 7. 49 4 01 KGF 1 i03 4il2 li22 lg ilHSUL')S kg... of the steers under the ccnditicns cf this oxparincnt? Dttssttss trials Tho results of tbo digestion tria1s aro a~ed in Table 5. Ths addition of cny supple+mt to tbo basal ration u ed throughout tlaso studies very signifioantIy (p (0. 01) inprcved ths...

Gossett, John Warren

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

398

Digestibility of Sugar, Starches, and Pentosans of Roughages.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

gms. No. 3649-50. ..................... Eaten ........................................ Excreted 1491 gms. No. 3700.. .................. Sugars Mono. 55.8 2.6 53.2 1.5 51.7 97.2 97.5 F8.0 28.0 Starch. 212.4 10.0 202.4 6.7 195.7 96.6... 95.9 35.2 35.2 Di. 54.0 .3 -- 53.7 .7 53.5 99.6 99.7 12.8 12.8 .1 99.2 99.2 33.6 0 33.6 1.1 32.5 96.7 1.2 ................................. Digested. Reduc- ing sugar from hemi- cellulose. 111.2 5.2 106.0 48.8 57...

Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

1916-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

EIA - Analysis of Natural Gas Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Prices Prices 2010 Peaks, Plans and (Persnickety) Prices This presentation provides information about EIA's estimates of working gas peak storage capacity, and the development of the natural gas storage industry. Natural gas shale and the need for high deliverability storage are identified as key drivers in natural gas storage capacity development. The presentation also provides estimates of planned storage facilities through 2012. Categories: Prices, Storage (Released, 10/28/2010, ppt format) Natural Gas Year-In-Review 2009 This is a special report that provides an overview of the natural gas industry and markets in 2009 with special focus on the first complete set of supply and disposition data for 2009 from the Energy Information Administration. Topics discussed include natural gas end-use consumption trends, offshore and onshore production, imports and exports of pipeline and liquefied natural gas, and above-average storage inventories. Categories: Prices, Production, Consumption, Imports/Exports & Pipelines, Storage (Released, 7/9/2010, Html format)

400

Gas Chromatography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

He received his B.S. degree in 1970 from Rhodes College in Memphis, TN, his M.S. degree in 1973 from the University of Missouri, Columbia, MO, and his Ph.D. degree in 1975 from Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. ... A review (with 145 references) on the role of carrier gases on the separation process (A4) demonstrates that carrier gas interactions are integral to the chromatographic process. ... In another report, activity coefficients for refrigerants were evaluated with a polyol ester oil stationary phase (C22). ...

Gary A. Eiceman; Herbert H. Hill, Jr.; Jorge Gardea-Torresdey

2000-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including digester gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Tax Treatment of Natural Gas The "landowner" referred to in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. There are a number of oil and gas regulations and laws such as the Oil and Gas Act, Coal and Gas Resource Coor OGM, including the Clean Streams Law, the Dam Safety and Encroach- ments Act, the Solid Waste Manage advances in drilling technology and rising natural gas prices have attracted new interest

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

402

Samson Sherman President Obama's Energy Plan & Natural Gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Samson Sherman President Obama's Energy Plan & Natural Gas The Plan On March 30, President Obama" but includes wind, solar, nuclear, natural gas, and coal plants that can capture and store CO2 emissions period. Natural Gas Natural gas is considered the cleanest of all fossil fuels. Mostly comprised

Toohey, Darin W.

403

DRAFT DRAFT Electricity and Natural Gas Sector Description  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DRAFT DRAFT Electricity and Natural Gas Sector Description For Public Distribution AB 32 Scoping of electricity and natural gas; including electricity generation, combined heat and power, and electricity and natural gas end uses for residential and commercial purposes. Use of electricity and/or gas for industrial

404

Natural gas strategic plan and program crosscut plans  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The natural gas strategic plan recognizes the challenges and opportunities facing increased U.S. natural gas use. Focus areas of research include natural gas supply, delivery, and storage, power generation, industrial, residential and commercial, natural gas vehicles, and the environment. Historical aspects, mission, situation analysis, technology trends, strategic issues, performance indicators, technology program overviews, and forecasting in the above areas are described.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Gas fluidized-bed stirred media mill  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gas fluidized-bed stirred media mill is provided for comminuting solid ticles. The mill includes a housing enclosing a porous fluidizing gas diffuser plate, a baffled rotor and stator, a hollow drive shaft with lateral vents, and baffled gas exhaust exit ports. In operation, fluidizing gas is forced through the mill, fluidizing the raw material and milling media. The rotating rotor, stator and milling media comminute the raw material to be ground. Small entrained particles may be carried from the mill by the gas through the exit ports when the particles reach a very fine size.

Sadler, III, Leon Y. (Tuscaloosa, AL)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 24, 2007) 7, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 24, 2007) Natural gas spot and futures prices increased slightly this week (Wednesday-Wednesday, May 9-16), despite the usual lull in demand during this shoulder period between the winter heating and summer cooling seasons. The upward price trend likely resulted from a variety of factors, including rising prices for competing petroleum products (as evidenced by an increase in the underlying crude oil price). Additionally, concerns over current and future supplies do not appear to have eased. The official start of the hurricane season is imminent, and the first named tropical storm appeared this week. However, imports of liquefied natural gas (LNG) have increased markedly in the past few months. On the week, the Henry Hub spot price increased 16 cents per MMBtu, or 2 percent, to $7.62. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the contract for June delivery increased 17.0 cents per MMBtu on the week to a daily settlement of $7.890 yesterday (May 16). EIA's Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report today reported natural gas storage supplies of 1,842 Bcf as of Friday, May 11, reflecting an implied net injection of 95 Bcf. This level of working gas in underground storage is 20.6 percent above the 5-year average inventory for this time of year. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $1.03 per barrel on the week to $62.57 per barrel, or $10.79 per MMBtu.

407

California: Microturbine Protects Environment, Creates Jobs ...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

wide range of fuels using existing infrastructure including natural gas, landfill gas, biogas generated from anaerobic digesters, and syngas. While many commercial, industrial, and...

408

Flammable Gas Detection for the D-Zero Gas System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of flammable gas and high voltage in detector systems is common in many experiments at Fermilab. To mitigate the hazards associated with these systems, Fermilab Engineering Standard SD-45B (Ref. 1) was adopted. Since this note is meant to be a guide and not a mandatory standard, each experiment is reviewed for compliance with SD-45B by the flammable gas safety subcommittee. Currently, there are only two types of flammable gas in use, ethane (Appendix A) and methane (Appendix B). The worst flammable-gas case is C2H6 (ethane), which has an estimated flow rate that is 73% of the CH4 (methane) flow but a heat of combustion (in kcal/g-mole) that is 173% of that of methane. In the worst case, if ethane were to spew through its restricting orifice into its gas line at 0 psig and then through a catastrophic leak into Room 215 (TRD) or Room 511 (CDC/FDCNTX), the time that would be required to build up a greater than Class 1 inventory (0.4kg H2 equivalent) would be 5.2 hours (Ref. 2). Therefore a worst-case flammable gas leak would have to go undetected for over 5 hours in order to transform a either mixing room to an environment with a Risk Class greater than Class 1. The mixing systems, gas lines, and detectors themselves will be thoroughly leak checked prior to active service. All vessels that are part of the mixing systems will be protected from overpressure by safety valves vented outside the building. Both the input and output of all detector volumes are protected from overpressure in the same way. The volume immediately outside the central tracking detectors is continuously purged by nitrogen from boiloff from the main nitrogen dewar at the site. However, if flammable gas were to build up in the mixing rooms or particular detector areas, no matter how unlikely, flammable gas detectors that are part of the interlock chain of each gas mixing system will shut down the appropriate system. This includes shutting off the output of flammable gas manifolds within the gas shed. Similarly, if a fire were to break out anywhere in the D-ZERO Hall, fire sensors would stop the output of all flammable gas manifolds within the gas shed, by unpowering electrically controlled solenoid valves that are normally closed in the event of a power failure. Fire sensor contacts have not yet been installed.

Spires, L.D.; Foglesong, J.; /Fermilab

1991-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

409

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5, 2009 5, 2009 Next Release: February 12, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, February 4, 2009) Natural gas spot prices decreased in half of the trading regions in the Lower 48 States this report week. Generally, areas east of the Rockies and particularly those that experienced frigid temperatures posted weekly price increases. However, there were some exceptions, including the Midcontinent and East Texas. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures trading for the near-month contract was fairly volatile, with daily price changes ranging between a 16-cent loss and a 16-cent increase. The March 2009 contract ended trading yesterday 18 cents higher than on the previous Wednesday.

410

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2008 9, 2008 Next Release: June 5, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview Natural gas spot price movements were mixed this report week (Wednesday–Wednesday, May 21-28), with price decreases generally occurring in markets west of the Mississippi River and price increases dominant in trading locations in the eastern parts of the country. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price increased $0.20 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $11.60. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices increased for the report week, continuing a trend of rising prices that has occurred in futures markets for many commodities this spring, including futures prices for crude oil. The futures contract for June delivery, for

411

Evaluation of protein fractionation and ruminal and intestinal digestibility of corn milling co-products  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Novel corn milling co-products developed from technological advancements in ethanol production vary widely in chemical composition and nutrient availability. The objectives of this study were to characterize feed protein fractions and evaluate differences in rumen-undegradable protein (RUP) and its digestible fraction (dRUP), amino acid concentration, and in vitro gas production of 7 corn milling co-products. The crude protein (CP; % of dry matter) of co-products was 12.7 for germ, 26.9 for dried distillers grains plus solubles that had no heat exposure before fermentation (DDGS1), 45.4 for high-protein dried distillers grains (HPDDG), 12.7 for bran, 30.2 for wet distillers grains plus solubles (WDGS), 23.1 for wet corn gluten feed (WCGF), and 26.0 for dried distillers grains plus solubles that had heat exposure before fermentation (DDGS2). Two ruminally and duodenally fistulated Holstein steers weighing 663 ± 24 kg were used to determine RUP and dRUP with the in situ and mobile bag techniques. Samples of each feed were ruminally incubated for 16 h, and mobile bags were exposed to simulated abomasal digestion before insertion into the duodenum and subsequent collection in the feces. Protein fractions A, B1, B2, B3, and C were characterized as follows (% CP): germ = 30.0, 15.0, 38.1, 13.5, 3.4; DDGS1 = 17.0, 7.0, 67.0, 4.8, 4.2; HPDDG = 7.4, 0.6, 82.4, 8.8, 0.8; bran = 33.5, 4.0, 54.3, 6.0, 2.2; WDGS = 18.6, 2.4, 53.1, 11.0, 14.9; WCGF = 36.6, 15.9, 33.2, 10.1, 4.1; and DDGS2 = 17.9, 2.1, 41.1, 11.1, 27.9. The proportions of RUP and dRUP were different and are reported as follows (% CP): DDGS2 = 56.3, 91.9; HPDDG = 55.2, 97.7; WDGS = 44.7, 93.1; DDGS1 = 33.2, 92.1; bran = 20.7, 65.8; germ = 16.5, 66.8; and WCGF = 11.5, 51.1. The concentrations of Lys and Met in the RUP were different and are listed as follows (% CP): germ = 2.9, 2.0; DDGS1 = 1.9, 2.0; HPDDG = 2.0, 3.2; bran = 3.2, 1.5; WDGS = 1.9, 2.3; WCGF = 3.5, 1.6; and DDGS2 = 1.9, 2.4. In vitro gas production (mL/48 h) was highest for germ (52.1) followed by bran (50.1), WDGS (40.7), DDGS2 (40.1), WCGF (39.0), DDGS1 (38.6), and HPDDG (37.5). Comparison of co-products defined differences in chemical composition, protein fractionation, ruminal availability, and microbial fermentation.

J.M. Kelzer; P.J. Kononoff; L.O. Tedeschi; T.C. Jenkins; K. Karges; M.L. Gibson

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

National Energy Board Act Part VI (Oil and Gas) Regulations (Canada)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These regulations from the National Energy Board cover licensing for oil and gas, including the exportation and importation of natural gas. The regulations also cover inspections, reporting...

413

Gas sensitive materials for gas detection and methods of making  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A gas sensitive material comprising SnO.sub.2 nanocrystals doped with In.sub.2O.sub.3 and an oxide of a platinum group metal, and a method of making the same. The platinum group metal is preferably Pd, but also may include Pt, Ru, Ir, and combinations thereof. The SnO.sub.2 nanocrystals have a specific surface of 7 or greater, preferably about 20 m2/g, and a mean particle size of between about 10 nm and about 100 nm, preferably about 40 nm. A gas detection device made from the gas sensitive material deposited on a substrate, the gas sensitive material configured as a part of a current measuring circuit in communication with a heat source.

Trakhtenberg, Leonid Israilevich; Gerasimov, Genrikh Nikolaevich; Gromov, Vladimir Fedorovich; Rozenberg, Valeriya Isaakovna

2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

414

BioGas Energy Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

BioGas Energy Inc BioGas Energy Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name BioGas Energy Inc Address 4509 Interlake Ave N # 222 Place Seattle, Washington Zip 98103 Sector Biomass Product Makes anaerobic digesters that convert manure into methane for fuel Website http://www.biogas-energy.com/s Coordinates 47.6163159°, -122.3463563° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.6163159,"lon":-122.3463563,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

415

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Rhode Island (Including Vehicle Fuel)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 9,425 8,875 9,886 7,566 7,317 6,419 6,971 7,536 7,493 7,652 6,918 9,231 2002 10,511 8,745 7,848 6,823 6,244 5,757 5,873 5,748 5,630 5,720 8,981 9,553 2003 9,510 10,141 9,429 5,721 4,332 4,902 5,830 5,423 4,891 4,709 6,468 6,670 2004 9,122 9,552 6,607 6,373 5,874 5,299 4,296 4,885 3,594 3,675 6,015 6,955 2005 8,403 8,917 7,847 7,729 6,062 6,293 5,990 6,010 4,836 5,169 5,246 7,434 2006 8,207 6,737 7,405 5,579 5,935 5,619 6,982 5,512 5,724 6,845 5,472 6,230 2007 7,988 9,766 8,374 7,190 6,533 4,869 7,009 7,571 6,437 6,185 5,880 9,217 2008 10,073 9,216 8,387 9,366 6,092 6,760 7,028 6,288 5,544 6,433 5,614 7,492

416

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in New York (Including Vehicle Fuel)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 135,000 121,033 117,080 87,191 75,087 78,246 82,949 95,148 84,785 85,317 85,604 117,809 2002 130,795 125,601 121,522 96,684 77,319 74,903 86,308 87,878 74,748 77,281 106,098 130,678 2003 145,176 150,464 132,321 96,357 69,848 57,468 66,369 71,177 61,893 63,566 74,370 103,175 2004 143,310 146,400 118,918 96,553 76,708 61,518 59,080 60,352 63,530 61,753 84,337 116,290 2005 131,102 130,863 130,581 94,151 72,115 68,850 75,042 73,408 58,655 53,370 68,534 109,966 2006 117,077 122,348 125,713 88,492 72,223 71,803 85,597 79,345 63,354 74,825 81,800 99,716 2007 123,033 141,204 137,001 102,645 76,067 71,823 74,597 83,048 66,970 67,841 92,753 133,841

417

Intentionally Including - Engaging Minorities in Physics Careers |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Intentionally Including - Engaging Minorities in Physics Careers Intentionally Including - Engaging Minorities in Physics Careers Intentionally Including - Engaging Minorities in Physics Careers April 24, 2013 - 4:37pm Addthis Joining Director Dot Harris (second from left) were Marlene Kaplan, the Deputy Director of Education and director of EPP, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Claudia Rankins, a Program Officer with the National Science Foundation and Jim Stith, the past Vice-President of the American Institute of Physics Resources. Joining Director Dot Harris (second from left) were Marlene Kaplan, the Deputy Director of Education and director of EPP, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Claudia Rankins, a Program Officer with the National Science Foundation and Jim Stith, the past Vice-President of the

418

Scramjet including integrated inlet and combustor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes a scramjet engine. It comprises: a first surface including an aft facing step; a cowl including: a leading edge and a trailing edge; an upper surface and a lower surface extending between the leading edge and the trailing edge; the cowl upper surface being spaced from and generally parallel to the first surface to define an integrated inlet-combustor therebetween having an inlet for receiving and channeling into the inlet-combustor supersonic inlet airflow; means for injecting fuel into the inlet-combustor at the step for mixing with the supersonic inlet airflow for generating supersonic combustion gases; and further including a spaced pari of sidewalls extending between the first surface to the cowl upper surface and wherein the integrated inlet-combustor is generally rectangular and defined by the sidewall pair, the first surface and the cowl upper surface.

Kutschenreuter, P.H. Jr.; Blanton, J.C.

1992-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

419

Influence de l'addition de phosphore sur la digestion d'une paille traite l'ammoniac par les microorganismes du rumen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

infusing the fermenters containing 15 g ammoniated straw per bag improved significantly fiber digestion

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

420

1 - Introduction to gas turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract: This chapter provides an overview of the importance of gas turbines for the power generation and oil and gas sector and – in less detail – the aviation sector. Worldwide trends in power generation and electricity conversion processes and the role of gas turbines to minimise CO2 emissions are addressed. Gas turbines are essential and crucial to reduce emissions both in aviation and in power production. Technologies for improving gas turbine and system efficiency, through higher turbine inlet temperatures, improved materials, cooling methods and thermal barrier coatings are described. New thermodynamic approaches, including intercooling, water and steam injection and hybrid cycles are addressed. Major issues are also fuel and operational flexibility, reliability and availability, cost reduction and power density, especially for the offshore sector. Market trends have been sketched. In the coming decades, gas turbines will be one of the major technologies for CO2 emission reductions in the power generation, aviation, oil and gas exploration and transport sectors. This prognosis is based on their high current efficiency and further efficiency improvement potential, both for simple cycle as for combined-cycle applications.

A.J.A. Mom

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including digester gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Energy Consumption of Personal Computing Including Portable  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Consumption of Personal Computing Including Portable Communication Devices Pavel Somavat1 consumption, questions are being asked about the energy contribution of computing equipment. Al- though studies have documented the share of energy consumption by this type of equipment over the years, research

Namboodiri, Vinod

422

EE Regional Technology Roadmap Includes comparison  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EE Regional Technology Roadmap Includes comparison against 6th Power Plan (Update cyclically Roadmap with a strong linkage to utility programs Scan for Technologies 1. How does it address the NW Data Clearinghouse BPA/RTF NEEA/Regional Programs Group Update Regional EE Technology Roadmap Lighting

423

Video Topics Include Freshman Inquiry Course  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Video Topics Include Freshman Inquiry Course Open Advisement/ Group Advisement Dinning Campus: End of Spring 2012, Commencement May 18: Grades available on MAX after 4:30pm AdvisementYouTubeVideoSeries I N S I D E T H I S I S S U E : YouTube Video Series 1 Mark Your Calendar 1 Exploring Major Tips 2

Hardy, Christopher R.

424

Including Ocean Model Uncertainties in Climate Predictions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Including Ocean Model Uncertainties in Climate Predictions Chris Brierley, Alan Thorpe, Mat Collins's to perform the integrations Currently uses a `slab' ocean #12;An Ocean Model Required to accurately model transient behaviour Will have its own uncertainties Requires even more computing power Create new models

Jones, Peter JS

425

Landfill Gas | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Landfill Gas Landfill Gas Dataset Summary Description The UK Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) publishes annual renewable energy generation and capacity by region (9 regions in England, plus Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland). Data available 2003 to 2009. Data is included in the DECC Energy Trends: September 2010 Report (available: http://www.decc.gov.uk/assets/decc/Statistics/publications/trends/558-tr...) Source UK Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) Date Released September 30th, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords Energy Generation Hydro Landfill Gas Other Biofuels Renewable Energy Consumption Sewage Gas wind Data application/zip icon 2 Excel files, 1 for generation, 1 for capacity (zip, 24.9 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

426

Floodplain Assessment for Installation of a Renewable Energy Anaerobic Digester Facility  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

Floodplain Assessment for Installation of a Renewable Energy Anaerobic Digester Facility at the University of California, Davis in Yolo County, California, as posted on the U.S. Department of Energy website.

427

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic digestion held Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

anaerobic digestion held Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 www.manuremanagement.cornell.edu Biogas Casebook Summary: 1 www.manuremanagement.cornell.edu Biogas Casebook: NYS On-farm...

428

Biomass Program Perspectives on Anaerobic Digestion and Fuel Cell Integration at Biorefineries  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE Biomass Program perspective on anaerobic digestion and fuel cell integratin at biorefineries. Presented by Brian Duff, DOE Biomass Program, at the NREL/DOE Biogas and Fuel Cells Workshop held June 11-13, 2012, in Golden, Colorado.

429

Determination of Wear Metals in Marine Lubricating Oils by Microwave Digestion and Atomic Absorption Spectrometry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

?The difficulties associated with the development of a microwave-assisted acid digestion of lubricating oils in determination of wear metals are presented. The interest of this sample treatment lies in its bas...

Celestino Sanz-Segundo; María P. Hernández-Artiga…

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Chemical oxidation of tryptic digests to improve sequence coverage in peptide mass fingerprint protein identification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Peptide mass fingerprinting (PMF) of protein digests is a widely-accepted method for protein identification in MS-based proteomic studies. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI) is the technique of choice in PMF...

Lucas, Jessica Elaine

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

431

Experimental evaluation of anaerobic digestion for coffee wastewater treatment and its biomethane recovery potential  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to evaluate the performance of anaerobic digestion (AD) as an eco-friendly technology for coffee wastewater (CWW) management. First, we have characterized the CWW and found that...

A. Beyene; D. Yemane; T. Addis…

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Ceramic gas turbine shroud  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An example gas turbine engine shroud includes a first annular ceramic wall having an inner side for resisting high temperature turbine engine gasses and an outer side with a plurality of radial slots. A second annular metallic wall is positioned radially outwardly of and enclosing the first annular ceramic wall and has a plurality of tabs in communication with the slot of the first annular ceramic wall. The tabs of the second annular metallic wall and slots of the first annular ceramic wall are in communication such that the first annular ceramic wall and second annular metallic wall are affixed.

Shi, Jun; Green, Kevin E.

2014-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

433

Thermal Barrier Coatings for Gas-Turbine Engine Applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...but in some industrial gas-turbine engines applications it can reach...shorter thermal-cycling lives than EB-PVD TBCs...extremely well in industrial gas-turbine engines, including “bucket...thermal” compressive residual stresses in...

Nitin P. Padture; Maurice Gell; Eric H. Jordan

2002-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

434

Vermont Gas- Residential Energy Efficiency Loan and Rebate Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Vermont Gas customers whose homes have used at least 0.5 Ccf per square foot of natural gas over the past year are eligible for this program, as are multi-family buildings. Typical measures include...

435

An economic analysis of Floating Liquefied Natural Gas (FLNG)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This report includes a discussion of the potential production of stranded natural gas reserves through the implementation of Floating Liquefied Natural Gas (FLNG) in a world of growing energy demand followed by an analysis ...

Marmolejo, Phillip Christian

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

EIA - AEO2010 - Natural Gas Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas Demand Gas Demand Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projections to 2035 Natural Gas Demand Figure 68. Regional growth in nonhydroelectric renewable electricity capacity including end-use capacity, 2008-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 69. Annual average lower 48 wellhead and Henry Hub spot market prices for natural gas, 1990-2035. Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 70. Ratio of low-sulfur light crude oil price to Henry Hub natural gas price on an energy equivalent basis, 1990-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 71. Annual average lower 48 wellhead prices for natural gas in three technology cases, 1990-2035. Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 72. Annual average lower 48 wellhead prices for natural gas in three oil price cases, 1990-2035

437

Definition: Natural gas | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Natural gas Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Natural gas A hydrocarbon gas obtained from underground sources, often in association with petroleum and coal deposits.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Natural gas is a naturally occurring hydrocarbon gas mixture consisting primarily of methane, but commonly includes varying amounts of other higher alkanes and even a lesser percentage of carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and hydrogen sulfide. Natural gas is an energy source often used for heating, cooking, and electricity generation. It is also used as fuel for vehicles and as a chemical feedstock in the manufacture of plastics and other commercially important organic chemicals. Natural gas is found in

438

An in vitro digestibility study on human milk and related proteins used in infant formula  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Formula. (August 1988) Adriana Coromoto Vethencourt-Petrini, B. S. , Texas A & M University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Charles W. Dill Human skim milk, whey proteins and soy protein isolate were subjected to a pepsin-pancreatin in vitro..., respectively. The digestion was monitored by measuring the automatic addition of acid or base, the increase of free amino groups, and the decrease in molecular weight of the protein components involved in the digestion. Whey proteins needed the largest...

Vethencourt-Petrini, Adriana Coromoto

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

439

Effect of sorghum type on the digestibility of segmented and whole plant sorghum silages  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EFFECT OF SORGHUM TYPE ON THE DIGESTIBILITY OF SEGMENTED AND NHOLE PLANT SORGHUM SILAGES A Thesis RODRIGO E. SPIEGEL Submitted to the Grs duate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE May 1975 Major Suhject: Animal Nutri tion EFFECT OF SORGHUM TYPE ON THE DIGESTIBILITY OF SEGMENTED AND WHOLE PLANT SORGHUM SILAGES A Thesis by RODRIGO E. SPIEGEL Approved as to style and content by: ' Chairman o . Cdmmittee Member Head...

Spiegel Richa, Rodrigo Enrique

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

440

Comparison of the intake and digestibility of different diets in Ilamas and sheep  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

conditions in llamas, which are more efficient in digesting plant cell walls than sheep. MATERIALS efficient than that of sheep. intake / digestibility / roughage / sheep / Ilama Résumé -Comparaison de l, lamas et moutons ont ingéré la même quantité de foin (17,4 glkg PV), mais les lamas ont ingéré 14% de

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including digester gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Composition and nutrient digestibility of weather-damaged sorghum in swine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COMPOSITION AND NUTRIENT DIGESTIBILITY OF WEATHER-DAMAGED SORGHUM IN SWINE A Thesis by Wendell Craig Bailey Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE December 1980 Major subject: Animal Science COMPOSITION AND NUTRIENT DIGESTIBILITY OF WEATHER-DAMAGED SORGHUM IN SWINE A Thesis by Wendell Craig Bailey Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman) u~~4 ~ (Member) (Member) (Member...

Bailey, Wendell Craig

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

442

Purification and properties of a biologically active peptide released from bovine lactoferrin by pepsin digestion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PURIFICATION AND PROPERTIES OF A BIOLOGICALLY ACTIVE PEPTIDE RELEASED FROM BOVINE LACTOFERRIN BY PEPSIN DIGESTION A Thesis by DENISSE ALICIA MAURER Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER QF SCIENCE May 1995 Major Subject: Food Science and Technology PURIFICATION AND PROPERTIES OF A BIOLOGICALLY ACTIVE PEPTIDE RELEASED FROM BOVINE LACTOFERRIN BY PEPSIN DIGESTION A Thesis by DENISSE ALICIA MAURER...

Maurer, Denisse Alicia

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Buildings Included on EMS Reports"  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Buildings Included on EMS Reports" "Site","Property Name","Property ID","GSF","Incl. in Water Baseline (CY2007)","Water Baseline (sq. ft.)","Water CY2008 (sq. ft.)","Water CY2009 (sq. ft.)","Water Notes","Incl. in Energy Baseline (CY2003)","Energy Baseline (sq. ft.)","CY2008 Energy (sq. ft.)","CY2009 Energy (sq. ft.)","Energy Notes","Included as Existing Building","CY2008 Existing Building (sq. ft.)","Reason for Building Exclusion" "Column Totals",,"Totals",115139,,10579,10579,22512,,,3183365,26374,115374,,,99476 "Durango, CO, Disposal/Processing Site","STORAGE SHED","DUD-BLDG-STORSHED",100,"no",,,,,"no",,,,"OSF","no",,"Less than 5,000 GSF"

444

Exhaust gas recirculation system for an internal combustion engine  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An exhaust gas recirculation system for an internal combustion engine comprises an exhaust driven turbocharger having a low pressure turbine outlet in fluid communication with an exhaust gas conduit. The turbocharger also includes a low pressure compressor intake and a high pressure compressor outlet in communication with an intake air conduit. An exhaust gas recirculation conduit fluidly communicates with the exhaust gas conduit to divert a portion of exhaust gas to a low pressure exhaust gas recirculation branch extending between the exhaust gas recirculation conduit and an engine intake system for delivery of exhaust gas thereto. A high pressure exhaust gas recirculation branch extends between the exhaust gas recirculation conduit and the compressor intake and delivers exhaust gas to the compressor for mixing with a compressed intake charge for delivery to the intake system.

Wu, Ko-Jen

2013-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

445

Category:Oil and Gas | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Gas Jump to: navigation, search This category includes companies and information related to oil (petroleum) or natural gas. Pages in category "Oil and Gas" The following 114 pages are in this category, out of 114 total. A Abu Dhabi National Oil Company Abu Dhabi Supreme Petroleum Council Al Furat Petroleum Company Alabama Oil and Gas Board Alaska Division of Oil and Gas Alaska Oil and Gas Conservation Commission Algeria Ministry of Energy and Mining Archaeological Resource Protection Act Archaeological Resources Protection Act Arizona Oil and Gas Commission Arkansas Oil and Gas Commission B Bahrain National Gas and Oil Authority Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act C California Division of Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Resources California Environmental Quality Act

446

Completion strategy includes clay and precipitate control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article describes the conditions which are necessary for a successful oil well completion in the Mississippi and Cherokee zones of South Central Kansas. Topics considered include paraffin precipitation, clay swelling and migration, and iron precipitation. Clays in these zones are sensitive to water-base treating fluids and tend to swell and migrate to the well bore, thereby causing permeability damage. The presence of iron in the Mississippi and Cherokee formations has been indicated by cuttings, core samples, and connate water samples.

Sandy, T.; Gardner, G.R.

1985-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

447

Jet-calculus approach including coherence effects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We show how integrodifferential equations typical of jet calculus can be combined with an averaging procedure to obtain jet-calculus-based results including the Mueller interference graphs. Results in longitudinal-momentum fraction x for physical quantities are higher at intermediate x and lower at large x than with the conventional ‘‘incoherent’’ jet calculus. These results resemble those of Marchesini and Webber, who used a Monte Carlo approach based on the same dynamics.

L. M. Jones; R. Migneron; K. S. S. Narayanan

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Natural gas hydrates - issues for gas production and geomechanical stability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

bearing sediments in offshore environments, I divided these data into different sections. The data included water depths, pore water salinity, gas compositions, geothermal gradients, and sedimentary properties such as sediment type, sediment mineralogy... .................................................................. 9 2.2 Hydrate patterns in sediments .................................................................... 24 3.1 Water depths and penetration for the Blake Ridge..................................... 31 3.2 Geothermal gradients measured...

Grover, Tarun

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

449

Nitrification of centrate from dewatering of anaerobically digested sludge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nitrification of anaerobically digested sludge centrate was studied in bench-scale suspended growth and fixed film enhanced suspended growth systems at temperatures of 10.5-28.5°C and pH values of 6.0-9.1. Nitrification followed zero-order kinetics in both systems, and ammonia removals in excess of 99% were observed. The temperature dependency of the suspended growth nitrification rate observed under not fully acclimated biomass conditions at pH between 6.8 and 8.5, was expressed as kT = k20?T-20where k20 and ? were found to be 0.34 mg NH3-N/MLVSS-d and 1.033, respectively. The nitrification rate in the fixed film enhanced suspended growth system involving styrofoam pads ranged from 0.11 to 0.13 mg NH3-N/mg MLVSS-d at temperatures of 21.5-25°C and pH values of 7.8-8.6. The process contained suspended solids in the range of 10-20 mg/l.

M. Kawsar Ali; C.G. Marquez; J. Fillos; V. Diyamandoglu; L.A. Carrio

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Gas distributor for fluidized bed coal gasifier  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gas distributor for distributing high temperature reaction gases to a fluidized bed of coal particles in a coal gasification process. The distributor includes a pipe with a refractory reinforced lining and a plurality of openings in the lining through which gas is fed into the bed. These feed openings have an expanding tapered shape in the downstream or exhaust direction which aids in reducing the velocity of the gas jets as they enter the bed.

Worley, Arthur C. (Mt. Tabor, NJ); Zboray, James A. (Irvine, CA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Simple Cosmological Model with Relativistic Gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We construct simple and useful approximation for the relativistic gas of massive particles. The equation of state is given by an elementary function and admits analytic solution of the Friedmann equation, including more complex cases when the relativistic gas of massive particles is considered together with radiation or with dominating cosmological constant. The model of relativistic gas may be interesting for the description of primordial Universe, especially as a candidate for the role of a Dark Matter.

Guilherme de Berredo-Peixoto; Ilya L. Shapiro; Flavia Sobreira

2005-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

452

Neutron Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We assume that the neutron-neutron potential is well-behaved and velocity-dependent. We can then apply perturbation theory to find the energy per particle of a neutron gas, in the range of Fermi wave numbers 0.5

J. S. Levinger and L. M. Simmons

1961-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Nitrogen content, amino acid composition and digestibility of fungi from a nutritional perspective in animal mycophagy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fungi comprise a major part of the diet of many animals. Even so, the nutritional value of fungi has been much debated, with some arguing that fungi are nutritionally poor. However, the chemical composition of fungi and of the biology of the animals that eat them are not well understood, particularly in reference to amino acid (AA) composition of fungi and digestibility of fungal protein. We analysed fibre, total nitrogen (N), available N, and AA contents and measured in vitro digestibility of a wide range of epigeous and hypogeous fungi collected in Australia and the USA to test three hypotheses: (i) fungi are nutritionally poor because they contain few nutrients or are otherwise of low digestibility, (ii) fungi vary substantially in their nutritional composition; and (iii) animals can counter this variable quality by eating diverse taxa. Resultant data indicate many fungi are a reasonable source of \\{AAs\\} and digestible nitrogen. However, they vary highly between species in AA content, and the protein has a poor balance of digestible AAs. This helps explain why many mycophagous animals eat a wide array of fungi and often have digestive strategies to cope with fungi, such as foregut fermentation. Another common strategy is to supplement the diet with high quality protein, such as insect protein. Accordingly, evaluating nutritional value of fungi requires consideration of physiology of the animal species and their whole diet.

Ian R. Wallis; Andrew W. Claridge; James M. Trappe

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Temporal variation in methanogen communities of four different full-scale anaerobic digesters treating food waste-recycling wastewater  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Methanogen communities were investigated using 454 pyrosequencing in four different full-scale anaerobic digesters treating food waste-recycling wastewater. Seasonal samples were collected for 2 years, and 24 samples were available for microbial analysis from a plug flow thermophilic (PT) digester, a continuously-stirred tank thermophilic (CT) digester, an upflow anerobic sludge blanket mesophilic (UM) digester, and a continuously-stirred tank mesophilic (CM) digester. Methanoculleus, Methanobacterium, Methanothermobacter, and Methanosaeta were revealed to be key methanogens in full-scale anaerobic digestion process treating food waste-recycling wastewater. In the PT digester, Methanoculleus was dominant (96.8%). In the CT digester, Methanoculleus was dominant (95.4%) during the first year of operation, but the dominant genus was shifted to Methanothermobacter (98.5%) due to pH increase. In the UM digester, Methanosaeta was dominant (87.2%). In the CM digester, Methanoculleus was constantly dominant (74.8%) except during CM5 when Methanosaeta was dominant (62.6%) due to the low residual acetate concentration (0.1 g/L).

Joonyeob Lee; Byungchul Hwang; Taewoan Koo; Seung Gu Shin; Woong Kim; Seokhwan Hwang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Chapter 4 - Natural Gas–fired Gas Turbines and Combined Cycle Power Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Gas turbines can burn a range of liquid and gaseous fuels but most burn natural gas. Power plants based on gas turbines are one of the cheapest types of plant to build, but the cost of their electricity depends heavily on the cost of their fuel. Two types of gas turbine are used for power generation: aero-derivative gas turbines and heavy-duty gas turbines. The former are used to provide power to the grid at times of peak demand. The latter are most often found in combined cycle power stations. These are capable of more than 60% efficiency. There are a number of ways of modifying the gas turbine cycle to improve efficiency, including reheating and intercooling. Micro-turbines have been developed for very small-scale generation of both electricity and heat. The main atmospheric emissions from gas turbines are carbon dioxide and nitrogen oxide.

Paul Breeze

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Natural Gas Hydrates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Natural Gas Hydrates ... Formation Characteristics of Synthesized Natural Gas Hydrates in Meso- and Macroporous Silica Gels ... Formation Characteristics of Synthesized Natural Gas Hydrates in Meso- and Macroporous Silica Gels ...

Willard I. Wilcox; D. B. Carson; D. L. Katz

1941-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Gas Kick Mechanistic Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gas kicks occur during drilling when the formation pressure is greater than the wellbore pressure causing influx of gas into the wellbore. Uncontrolled gas kicks could result in blowout of the rig causing major financial loss and possible injury...

Zubairy, Raheel

2014-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

458

NETL: Natural Gas Resources, Enhanced Oil Recovery, Deepwater Technology  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Natural Gas Projects and Natural Gas Projects Index of Research Project Summaries Use the links provided below to access detailed DOE/NETL project information, including project reports, contacts, and pertinent publications. Search Natural Gas and Oil Projects Current Projects Natural Gas Resources Shale Gas Environmental Other Natural Gas Resources Ehanced Oil Recovery CO2 EOR Environmental Other EOR & Oil Resources Deepwater Technology Offshore Architecture Safety & Environmental Other Deepwater Technology Methane Hydrates DOE/NETL Projects Completed Projects Completed Natural Gas Resources Completed Enhanced Oil Recovery Completed Deepwater Technology Completed E&P Technologies Completed Environmental Solutions Completed Methane Hydrates Completed Transmission & Distribution

459

Neural net controlled tag gas sampling system for nuclear reactors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and system for providing a tag gas identifier to a nuclear fuel rod and analyze escaped tag gas to identify a particular failed nuclear fuel rod. The method and system include disposing a unique tag gas composition into a plenum of a nuclear fuel rod, monitoring gamma ray activity, analyzing gamma ray signals to assess whether a nuclear fuel rod has failed and is emitting tag gas, activating a tag gas sampling and analysis system upon sensing tag gas emission from a failed nuclear rod and evaluating the escaped tag gas to identify the particular failed nuclear fuel rod.

Gross, Kenneth C. (Bolingbrook, IL); Laug, Matthew T. (Idaho Fall, ID); Lambert, John D. B. (Wheaton, IL); Herzog, James P. (Downers Grove, IL)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Gas turbine cooling system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gas turbine engine (10) having a closed-loop cooling circuit (39) for transferring heat from the hot turbine section (16) to the compressed air (24) produced by the compressor section (12). The closed-loop cooling system (39) includes a heat exchanger (40) disposed in the flow path of the compressed air (24) between the outlet of the compressor section (12) and the inlet of the combustor (14). A cooling fluid (50) may be driven by a pump (52) located outside of the engine casing (53) or a pump (54) mounted on the rotor shaft (17). The cooling circuit (39) may include an orifice (60) for causing the cooling fluid (50) to change from a liquid state to a gaseous state, thereby increasing the heat transfer capacity of the cooling circuit (39).

Bancalari, Eduardo E. (Orlando, FL)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including digester gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Clearing the air with natural gas engines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article examines the increased popularity of natural gas vehicles which has spurred engine designers to manipulate fuel-air ratios, compression ratios, ignition timing, and catalytic converters in ways to minimize exhaust pollutants. The topics of the article include reducing pollutants, high-octane engineering, diesel to natural gas, and the two-fuel choice.

O'Connor, L.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

5 - Combustors in gas turbine systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract: This chapter discusses combustion systems in gas turbines. It begins by reviewing basic design principles before discussing developments in technology such as advanced fuel staging and reheat combustion systems. The chapter also covers the impact of different natural gas types on combustor operations, including combustor design for low calorific gases and fuel oils.

P. Flohr; P. Stuttaford

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

464

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

465

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

466

Future of Natural Gas  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

technology is improving - Producers are drilling in liquids rich gas and crude oil shale plays due to lower returns on dry gas production - Improved well completion time...

467

Natural Gas Industrial Price  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells...

468

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Low Permeability Gas Low Permeability Gas Design and Implementation of Energized Fracture Treatment in Tight Gas Sands DE-FC26-06NT42955 Goal The goal of this project is to develop methods and tools that can enable operators to design, optimize, and implement energized fracture treatments in a systematic way. The simulator that will result from this work would significantly expand the use and cost-effectiveness of energized fracs and improve their design and implementation in tight gas sands. Performer University of Texas-Austin, Austin, TX Background A significant portion of U.S. natural gas production comes from unconventional gas resources such as tight gas sands. Tight gas sands account for 58 percent of the total proved natural gas reserves in the United States. As many of these tight gas sand basins mature, an increasing number of wells are being drilled or completed into nearly depleted reservoirs. This includes infill wells, recompletions, and field-extension wells. When these activities are carried out, the reservoir pressures encountered are not as high as the initial reservoir pressures. In these situations, where pressure drawdowns can be less than 2,000 psi, significant reductions in well productivity are observed, often due to water blocking and insufficient clean-up of fracture-fluid residues. In addition, many tight gas sand reservoirs display water sensitivity—owing to high clay content—and readily imbibe water due both to very high capillary pressures and low initial water saturations.

469

Optical panel system including stackable waveguides  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An optical panel system including stackable waveguides is provided. The optical panel system displays a projected light image and comprises a plurality of planar optical waveguides in a stacked state. The optical panel system further comprises a support system that aligns and supports the waveguides in the stacked state. In one embodiment, the support system comprises at least one rod, wherein each waveguide contains at least one hole, and wherein each rod is positioned through a corresponding hole in each waveguide. In another embodiment, the support system comprises at least two opposing edge structures having the waveguides positioned therebetween, wherein each opposing edge structure contains a mating surface, wherein opposite edges of each waveguide contain mating surfaces which are complementary to the mating surfaces of the opposing edge structures, and wherein each mating surface of the opposing edge structures engages a corresponding complementary mating surface of the opposite edges of each waveguide.

DeSanto, Leonard (Dunkirk, MD); Veligdan, James T. (Manorville, NY)

2007-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

470

Thermovoltaic semiconductor device including a plasma filter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A thermovoltaic energy conversion device and related method for converting thermal energy into an electrical potential. An interference filter is provided on a semiconductor thermovoltaic cell to pre-filter black body radiation. The semiconductor thermovoltaic cell includes a P/N junction supported on a substrate which converts incident thermal energy below the semiconductor junction band gap into electrical potential. The semiconductor substrate is doped to provide a plasma filter which reflects back energy having a wavelength which is above the band gap and which is ineffectively filtered by the interference filter, through the P/N junction to the source of radiation thereby avoiding parasitic absorption of the unusable portion of the thermal radiation energy.

Baldasaro, Paul F. (Clifton Park, NY)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Critical point anomalies include expansion shock waves  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

From first-principle fluid dynamics, complemented by a rigorous state equation accounting for critical anomalies, we discovered that expansion shock waves may occur in the vicinity of the liquid-vapor critical point in the two-phase region. Due to universality of near-critical thermodynamics, the result is valid for any common pure fluid in which molecular interactions are only short-range, namely, for so-called 3-dimensional Ising-like systems, and under the assumption of thermodynamic equilibrium. In addition to rarefaction shock waves, diverse non-classical effects are admissible, including composite compressive shock-fan-shock waves, due to the change of sign of the fundamental derivative of gasdynamics.

Nannan, N. R., E-mail: ryan.nannan@uvs.edu [Mechanical Engineering Discipline, Anton de Kom University of Suriname, Leysweg 86, PO Box 9212, Paramaribo, Suriname and Process and Energy Department, Delft University of Technology, Leeghwaterstraat 44, 2628 CA Delft (Netherlands); Guardone, A., E-mail: alberto.guardone@polimi.it [Department of Aerospace Science and Technology, Politecnico di Milano, Via La Masa 34, 20156 Milano (Italy); Colonna, P., E-mail: p.colonna@tudelft.nl [Propulsion and Power, Delft University of Technology, Kluyverweg 1, 2629 HS Delft (Netherlands)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

472

Complex shell model representation including antibound states  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A generalization of the complex shell model formalism is presented that includes antibound states in the basis. These states, together with bound states, Gamow states, and the continuum background, represented by properly chosen scattering waves, form a representation in which all states are treated on the same footing. Two-particle states are evaluated within this formalism, and observable two-particle resonances are defined. The formalism is illustrated in the well-known case of Li11 in its bound ground state and in Ca70(g.s.), which is also bound. Both cases are found to have a halo structure. These halo structures are described within the generalized complex shell model. We investigated the formation of two-particle resonances in these nuclei, but no evidence of such resonances was found.

R. Id Betan; R. J. Liotta; N. Sandulescu; T. Vertse; R. Wyss

2005-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

473

Gas-path leakage seal for a gas turbine  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gas-path leakage seal is described for generally sealing a gas-path leakage-gap between spaced-apart first and second members of a gas turbine (such as combustor casing segments). The seal includes a generally imperforate foil-layer assemblage which is generally impervious to gas and is located in the leakage-gap. The seal also includes a cloth-layer assemblage generally enclosingly contacting the foil-layer assemblage. In one seal, the first edge of the foil-layer assemblage is left exposed, and the foil-layer assemblage resiliently contacts the first member near the first edge to reduce leakage in the ``plane`` of the cloth-layer assemblage under conditions which include differential thermal growth of the two members. In another seal, such leakage is reduced by having a first weld-bead which permeates the cloth-layer assemblage, is attached to the metal-foil-layer assemblage near the first edge, and unattachedly contacts the first member. 4 figs.

Wolfe, C.E.; Dinc, O.S.; Bagepalli, B.S.; Correia, V.H.; Aksit, M.F.

1996-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

474

Supply Chain Management and Economic Valuation of Real Options in the Natural Gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Supply Chain Management and Economic Valuation of Real Options in the Natural Gas and Liquefied Natural Gas Industry Mulan Xiaofeng Wang Submitted to the Tepper School of Business in Partial Fulfillment options in the natural gas and liquefied natural gas (LNG) industry, including gas pipeline transportation

Sadeh, Norman M.

475

Natural gas 1994: Issues and trends  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides an overview of the natural gas industry in 1993 and early 1994 (Chapter 1), focusing on the overall ability to deliver gas under the new regulatory mandates of Order 636. In addition, the report highlights a range of issues affecting the industry, including: restructuring under Order 636 (Chapter 2); adjustments in natural gas contracting (Chapter 3); increased use of underground storage (Chapter 4); effects of the new market on the financial performance of the industry (Chapter 5); continued impacts of major regulatory and legislative changes on the natural gas market (Appendix A).

Not Available

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Solid fuel volatilization to produce synthesis gas  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method comprising contacting a carbon and hydrogen-containing solid fuel and a metal-based catalyst in the presence of oxygen to produce hydrogen gas and carbon monoxide gas, wherein the contacting occurs at a temperature sufficiently high to prevent char formation in an amount capable of stopping production of the hydrogen gas and the carbon monoxide gas is provided. In one embodiment, the metal-based catalyst comprises a rhodium-cerium catalyst. Embodiments further include a system for producing syngas. The systems and methods described herein provide shorter residence time and high selectivity for hydrogen and carbon monoxide.

Schmidt, Lanny D.; Dauenhauer, Paul J.; Degenstein, Nick J.; Dreyer, Brandon J.; Colby, Joshua L.

2014-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

477

Avista Utilities (Gas)- Prescriptive Commercial Incentive Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Avista Utilities offers Natural Gas saving incentives to commercial customers on rate schedule 420 and 424. This program provides rebates for a variety of equipment and appliances including cooking...

478

Our lab focuses on materials durability in extreme environments for energy, power, and propulsion applications. Current research interests include  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

has been developed that simulates the temperature, gas chemistry, and gas velocity of turbine engines for Combustion Applications SiC-based Ceramic Matrix Composites are currently under development for turbine oxide stability for use in a variety of energy applications, including solid oxide fuel cells and solar

Acton, Scott

479

Raman gas analyzer for determining the composition of natural gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We describe a prototype of a Raman gas analyzer designed for measuring the composition of natural gas. Operation of the gas analyzer was tested on a real natural gas. We show that our Raman gas analyzer prototype...

M. A. Buldakov; B. V. Korolev; I. I. Matrosov…

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Noble gas magnetic resonator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Precise measurements of a precessional rate of noble gas in a magnetic field is obtained by constraining the time averaged direction of the spins of a stimulating alkali gas to lie in a plane transverse to the magnetic field. In this way, the magnetic field of the alkali gas does not provide a net contribution to the precessional rate of the noble gas.

Walker, Thad Gilbert; Lancor, Brian Robert; Wyllie, Robert

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including digester gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

OIL & GAS INSTITUTE Introduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OIL & GAS INSTITUTE CONTENTS Introduction Asset Integrity Underpinning Capabilities 2 4 4 6 8 9 10 COMPETITIVENESS UNIVERSITY of STRATHCLYDE OIL & GAS INSTITUTE OIL & GAS EXPERTISE AND PARTNERSHIPS #12;1 The launch of the Strathclyde Oil & Gas Institute represents an important step forward for the University

Mottram, Nigel

482

SEEPAGE MODEL FOR PA INCLUDING DRIFT COLLAPSE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to document the predictions and analyses performed using the seepage model for performance assessment (SMPA) for both the Topopah Spring middle nonlithophysal (Tptpmn) and lower lithophysal (Tptpll) lithostratigraphic units at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Look-up tables of seepage flow rates into a drift (and their uncertainty) are generated by performing numerical simulations with the seepage model for many combinations of the three most important seepage-relevant parameters: the fracture permeability, the capillary-strength parameter 1/a, and the percolation flux. The percolation flux values chosen take into account flow focusing effects, which are evaluated based on a flow-focusing model. Moreover, multiple realizations of the underlying stochastic permeability field are conducted. Selected sensitivity studies are performed, including the effects of an alternative drift geometry representing a partially collapsed drift from an independent drift-degradation analysis (BSC 2004 [DIRS 166107]). The intended purpose of the seepage model is to provide results of drift-scale seepage rates under a series of parameters and scenarios in support of the Total System Performance Assessment for License Application (TSPA-LA). The SMPA is intended for the evaluation of drift-scale seepage rates under the full range of parameter values for three parameters found to be key (fracture permeability, the van Genuchten 1/a parameter, and percolation flux) and drift degradation shape scenarios in support of the TSPA-LA during the period of compliance for postclosure performance [Technical Work Plan for: Performance Assessment Unsaturated Zone (BSC 2002 [DIRS 160819], Section I-4-2-1)]. The flow-focusing model in the Topopah Spring welded (TSw) unit is intended to provide an estimate of flow focusing factors (FFFs) that (1) bridge the gap between the mountain-scale and drift-scale models, and (2) account for variability in local percolation flux due to stochastic hydrologic properties and flow processes.

C. Tsang

2004-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

483

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions Overview  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Environment Environment Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the U. S. Release Date: March 31, 2011 | Next Release Date: Report Discontinued | Report Number: DOE/EIA-0573(2009) Greenhouse Gas Emissions Overview Diagram Notes [a] CO2 emissions related to petroleum consumption (includes 64 MMTCO2 of non-fuel-related emissions). [b] CO2 emissions related to coal consumption (includes 0.3 MMTCO2 of non-fuel-related emissions). [c] CO2 emissions related to natural gas consumption (includes 13 MMTCO2 of non-fuel-related emissions). [d] Excludes carbon sequestered in nonfuel fossil products. [e] CO2 emissions from the plastics portion of municipal solid waste (11 MMTCO2) combusted for electricity generation and very small amounts (0.4 MMTCO2) of geothermal-related emissions.

484

System and method for producing substitute natural gas from coal  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides a system and method for producing substitute natural gas and electricity, while mitigating production of any greenhouse gasses. The system includes a hydrogasification reactor, to form a gas stream including natural gas and a char stream, and an oxygen burner to combust the char material to form carbon oxides. The system also includes an algae farm to convert the carbon oxides to hydrocarbon material and oxygen.

Hobbs, Raymond (Avondale, AZ)

2012-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

485

Historical Natural Gas Annual - 1930 Through 2000  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2000 2000 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at selected points in the flow of gas from the wellhead to the burner-tip. Data include production, transmission within the United States, imports and exports of natural gas, underground storage activities, and deliveries to consumers. The publication presents historical data at the national level for 1930-2000 and detailed annual historical information by State for 1967-2000. Entire . The entire report as a single file. PDF 1.5 MB Front Matter . Historical Natural Gas Annual Cover Page, Preface, Common Abbreviations Used, and Table of Contents PDF . . Tables . 1 Quantity and Average Price of Natural Gas Production in the United States, 1930-1998 PDF

486

gas rates | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

gas rates gas rates Home > Groups > Utility Rate Are there Gas Utility Rates available in OpenEI? Submitted by Nlong on 11 July, 2012 - 11:41 1 answer Points: 1 Hi, OpenEI doesn't have NG utility rates as far as I'm aware. That may be a dataset that is added in the future. You can access natural gas prices by utility and sector by downloading the EIA-176 form from the Energy Information Administration. I've included some links to help you find your way. http://205.254.135.7/survey/form/eia_176/efs176.cfm http://www.eia.gov/oil_gas/natural_gas/applications/eia176query_historical.html -Sfomail Sfomail on 12 July, 2012 - 12:04 Groups Menu You must login in order to post into this group. Recent content There is currently no way to s... ranking of utilities by demand charge?

487

Natural gas annual 1993 supplement: Company profiles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. This report, the Natural Gas Annual 1993 Supplement: Company Profiles, presents a detailed profile of 45 selected companies in the natural gas industry. The purpose of this report is to show the movement of natural gas through the various States served by the companies profiled. The companies in this report are interstate pipeline companies or local distribution companies (LDC`s). Interstate pipeline companies acquire gas supplies from company owned production, purchases from producers, and receipts for transportation for account of others. Pipeline systems, service area maps, company supply and disposition data are presented.

Not Available

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Composting of the solid fraction of digestate derived from pig slurry: Biological processes and compost properties  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The aim of this paper was to assess the characteristics of the solid fractions (SF) obtained by mechanical separation of digestate, their compostability and compost quality. To do so, the SF of digestates obtained from anaerobic digestion of pig slurry, energy crops and agro-industrial residues were sampled in five plants located in Northern Italy. Results obtained indicated that anaerobic digestion by itself promoted the high biological stability of biomasses with a Potential Dynamic Respiration Index (PDRI) close to 1000 mgO2 kg V S?1 h?1. Subsequent composting of digestates, with an added bulking agent, did not give remarkably different results, and led only to a slight modification of the characteristics of the initial non-composted mixtures; the composts obtained fully respected the legal limits for high quality compost. Chemical studies of organic matter composition of the biomasses by using CP MAS 13C NMR, indicated that the compost was composed of a high relative content of O-alkyl-C (71.47% of total C) (cellulose and hemicelluloses) and a low alkyl-C (12.42%) (i.e. volatile fatty acids, steroid-like molecules, aliphatic biopolymers and proteins).

Fulvia Tambone; Laura Terruzzi; Barbara Scaglia; Fabrizio Adani

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline System - Southwest Region  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Southwest Region Southwest Region About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 2007/2008 with selected updates Natural Gas Pipelines in the Southwest Region Overview | Export Transportation | Intrastate | Connection to Gulf of Mexico | Regional Pipeline Companies & Links Overview Most of the major onshore interstate natural gas pipeline companies (see Table below) operating in the Southwest Region (Arkansas, Louisiana, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas) are primarily exporters of the region's natural gas production to other parts of the country and Mexico, while an extensive Gulf of Mexico and intrastate natural gas pipeline network is the main conduit for deliveries within the region. More than 56,000 miles of natural gas pipeline on more than 66 intrastate natural gas pipeline systems (including offshore-to-onshore and offshore Gulf of Mexico pipelines) deliver natural gas to the region's local natural gas distribution companies and municipalities and to the many large industrial and electric power facilities located in the region.

490

EIA - Analysis of Natural Gas Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Production Production 2010 Natural Gas Year-In-Review 2009 This is a special report that provides an overview of the natural gas industry and markets in 2009 with special focus on the first complete set of supply and disposition data for 2009 from the Energy Information Administration. Topics discussed include natural gas end-use consumption trends, offshore and onshore production, imports and exports of pipeline and liquefied natural gas, and above-average storage inventories. Categories: Prices, Production, Consumption, Imports/Exports & Pipelines, Storage (Released, 7/9/2010, Html format) Natural Gas Data Collection and Estimation This presentation to the Oklahoma Independent Petroleum Association gives an overview of the EIA natural gas data collection system, Oklahoma natural gas statistics, recent changes in monthly natural gas production statistics, and the May 2010 short-term natural gas forecast. The presentation focuses on the EIA-914, the "Monthly Natural Gas Production Report," and recent changes to this survey's estimation methodology. Categories: Production (Released, 6/9/2010, ppt format)

491

Modelling the energy performance of a farm-scale cellulose to ethanol process with on-site cellulase production and anaerobic digestion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A farm-scale process for converting wheat straw to ethanol was modelled to assess its energy performance. The process incorporates the on-site production of crude unprocessed liquid cellulase produced via solid-state fermentation, and the anaerobic digestion of process residues to supply heat and electricity. Results include energy yield ratios from 6 to 9, reductions of 80–90 % in the energy required to produce and transport the cellulase compared to commercial preparations, and a net surplus of on-site heat and electricity. From these improvements in process efficiency, environmental benefits follow.

Mitchell Lever

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Natural gas annual 1992: Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and education institutions. The 1992 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production top its end use. Tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1988 to 1992 are given for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level. Volume 2 of this report presents State-level historical data.

Not Available

1993-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

493

New Jersey: Atlantic City Jitneys Running on Natural Gas | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

approximately 15 million in funding allowed he city to purchase nearly 300 compressed natural gas vehicles, including 190 Atlantic City "jitneys." The jitneys, minibuses run by...

494

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

diameter pipeline with the capacity to transport 477 million cubic feet (MMcf) of natural gas per day. Facilities would also include a compressor station, 2 meter stations, 19...

495

Air Emmissions Trading Program/Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

of Environmental Services Air Resources Division The New Hampshire Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative is a carbon dioxide emissions budget trading program. The program includes...

496

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

the Gulf Coast, including the construction of a new marine terminal for liquefied natural gas (LNG) imports. FERC approved Corpus Christi LNG, a terminal proposed by Cheniere...

497

ARM - Measurement - Trace gas concentration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

govMeasurementsTrace gas concentration govMeasurementsTrace gas concentration ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Trace gas concentration The amount per unit volume of trace gases other than carbon dioxide, ozone and water vapor, typically measured in conjunction with in situ aerosol measurements, e.g. carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide. Categories Atmospheric Carbon, Atmospheric State Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments CO : Carbon Monoxide Mixing Ratio System

498

Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics The Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics Group is dedicated to developing and applying spectroscopic and theoretical tools to challenging problems in chemical physics related to reactivity, structure, dynamics and kinetics of transient species. Recent theoretical work has included advances in exact variational solution of vibrational quantum dynamics, suitable for up to five atoms in systems where large amplitude motion or multiple strongly coupled modes make simpler approximations inadequate. Other theoretical work, illustrated below, applied direct dynamics, quantum force trajectory calculations to investigate a series of reactions of the HOCO radical. The potential energy surface for the OH + CO/ H + CO2 reaction, showing two barriers (TS1 and TS2) and the deep HOCO well along the minimum energy pathway. The inset figure shows the experimental and calculated reactivity of HOCO with selected collision partners. See J.S. Francisco, J.T. Muckerman and H.-G. Yu, "HOCO radical chemistry,"

499

Natural gas cavern storage regulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Investigation of an incident at an LPG storage facility in Texas by U.S. Department of Transportation resulted in recommendation that state regulation of natural gas cavern storage might be improved. Interstate Oil & Gas Compact Commission has established a subcommittee to analyze the benefits and risks associated with natural gas cavern storage, and to draft a regulation model which will suggest engineering and performance specifications. The resulting analysis and regulatory language will be reviewed by I.O.G.C.C., and if approved, distributed to member states (including New York) for consideration. Should the states desire assistance in modifying the language to reflect local variables, such as policy and geology, I.O.G.C.C. may offer assistance. The proposed presentation will review the I.O.G.C.C. product (if published at that date), and discuss implications of its application in New York.

Heneman, H.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

Suitability of Tedlar® gas sampling bags for siloxane quantification in landfill gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Landfill or digester gas can contain man-made volatile methylsiloxanes (VMS), usually in the range of a few milligrams per normal cubic metre (Nm3). Until now, no standard method for siloxane quantification exists and there is controversy with respect to which sampling procedure is most suitable. This paper presents an analytical and a sampling procedure for the quantification of common VMS in biogas via GC–MS and polyvinyl fluoride (Tedlar®) bags. Two commercially available Tedlar bag models are studied. One is equipped with a polypropylene valve with integrated septum, the other with a dual port fitting made from stainless steel. Siloxane recovery in landfill gas samples is investigated as a function of storage time, temperature, surface-to-volume ratio and background gas. Recovery was found to depend on the type of fitting employed. The siloxanes sampled in the bag with the polypropylene valve show high and stable recovery, even after more than 30 days. Sufficiently low detection limits below 10 ?g Nm?3 and good reproducibility can be achieved. The method is therefore well applicable to biogas, greatly facilitating sampling in comparison with other common techniques involving siloxane enrichment using sorption media.

M. Ajhar; B. Wens; K.H. Stollenwerk; G. Spalding; S. Yüce; T. Melin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z