National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for including crop residue

  1. ABSTRACT: Bioenergy Harvesting Technologies to Supply Crop Residues...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    objectives for the integration of advanced logistical systems and focused bioenergy harvesting technologies that supply crop residues and energy crops in a large bale format....

  2. Cost Methodology for Biomass Feedstocks: Herbaceous Crops and Agricultural Residues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turhollow Jr, Anthony F; Webb, Erin; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine

    2009-12-01

    This report describes a set of procedures and assumptions used to estimate production and logistics costs of bioenergy feedstocks from herbaceous crops and agricultural residues. The engineering-economic analysis discussed here is based on methodologies developed by the American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers (ASABE) and the American Agricultural Economics Association (AAEA). An engineering-economic analysis approach was chosen due to lack of historical cost data for bioenergy feedstocks. Instead, costs are calculated using assumptions for equipment performance, input prices, and yield data derived from equipment manufacturers, research literature, and/or standards. Cost estimates account for fixed and variable costs. Several examples of this costing methodology used to estimate feedstock logistics costs are included at the end of this report.

  3. Effect of crop residue harvest on long-term crop yield, soil erosion, and carbon balance: tradeoffs for a sustainable bioenergy feedstock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregg, Jay S.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.

    2010-08-26

    Agricultural residues are a potential feedstock for bioenergy production, if residue harvest can be done sustainably. The relationship between crop residue harvest, soil erosion, crop yield and carbon balance was modeled with the Erosion Productivity Impact Calculator/ Environment Policy Integrated Climate (EPIC) using a factorial design. Four crop rotations (winter wheat [Triticum aestivum (L.)] Ė sunflower [Helianthus annuus]; spring wheat [Triticum aestivum (L.)] Ė canola [Brassica napus]; corn [Zea mays L.] Ė soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.]; and cotton [Gossypium hirsutum] Ė peanut [Arachis hypogaea]) were simulated at four US locations each, under different topographies (0-10% slope), and management practices [crop residue removal rates (0-75%), conservation practices (no till, contour cropping, strip cropping, terracing)].

  4. Determine metrics and set targets for soil quality on agriculture residue and energy crop pathways

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ian Bonner; David Muth

    2013-09-01

    There are three objectives for this project: 1) support OBP in meeting MYPP stated performance goals for the Sustainability Platform, 2) develop integrated feedstock production system designs that increase total productivity of the land, decrease delivered feedstock cost to the conversion facilities, and increase environmental performance of the production system, and 3) deliver to the bioenergy community robust datasets and flexible analysis tools for establishing sustainable and viable use of agricultural residues and dedicated energy crops. The key project outcome to date has been the development and deployment of a sustainable agricultural residue removal decision support framework. The modeling framework has been used to produce a revised national assessment of sustainable residue removal potential. The national assessment datasets are being used to update national resource assessment supply curves using POLYSIS. The residue removal modeling framework has also been enhanced to support high fidelity sub-field scale sustainable removal analyses. The framework has been deployed through a web application and a mobile application. The mobile application is being used extensively in the field with industry, research, and USDA NRCS partners to support and validate sustainable residue removal decisions. The results detailed in this report have set targets for increasing soil sustainability by focusing on primary soil quality indicators (total organic carbon and erosion) in two agricultural residue management pathways and a dedicated energy crop pathway. The two residue pathway targets were set to, 1) increase residue removal by 50% while maintaining soil quality, and 2) increase soil quality by 5% as measured by Soil Management Assessment Framework indicators. The energy crop pathway was set to increase soil quality by 10% using these same indicators. To demonstrate the feasibility and impact of each of these targets, seven case studies spanning the US are presented. The analysis has shown that the feedstock production systems are capable of simultaneously increasing productivity and soil sustainability.

  5. Using a Decision Support System to Optimize Production of Agricultural Crop Residue Biofeedstock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reed L. Hoskinson; Ronald C. Rope; Raymond K. Fink

    2007-04-01

    For several years the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has been developing a Decision Support System for Agriculture (DSS4Ag) which determines the economically optimum recipe of various fertilizers to apply at each site in a field to produce a crop, based on the existing soil fertility at each site, as well as historic production information and current prices of fertilizers and the forecast market price of the crop at harvest, for growing a crop such as wheat, potatoes, corn, or cotton. In support of the growing interest in agricultural crop residues as a bioenergy feedstock, we have extended the capability of the DSS4Ag to develop a variable-rate fertilizer recipe for the simultaneous economically optimum production of both grain and straw, and have been conducting field research to test this new DSS4Ag. In this paper we report the results of two years of field research testing and enhancing the DSS4Agís ability to economically optimize the fertilization for the simultaneous production of both grain and its straw, where the straw is an agricultural crop residue that can be used as a biofeedstock.

  6. Crop and Soil Science Sequence This concentration emphasizes the scientific aspects of agronomy including

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Branoff, Theodore J.

    Crop and Soil Science Sequence This concentration emphasizes the scientific aspects of agronomy and improving the soil physical, chemical and microbial characteristics to enhance crop production breeding, soil and crop management, cropping systems, and plant nutrition. Agronomists are employed by seed

  7. Sedimentary Rocks, Processes, and Environments Sediments are loose grains and chemical residues of earth materials, which include things such as

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, X. Rong

    Sedimentary Rocks, Processes, and Environments Sediments are loose grains and chemical residues, and rust (oxidized iron). Formation of Sediments All sediments have a source or provenance, a place and sediments. Erosion and Transportation of Sediments Weathered materials are transported via wind, water

  8. Weed Management in Organic Crops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guiltinan, Mark

    Weed Management in Organic Crops Research Results Update Bill Curran Penn State University #12;Weed management tactics for organic production ∑ Crop rotation ∑ Cover crops - dead mulches and green manures ∑ Primary and secondary tillage ∑ Irrigation and drainage ∑ Crop residue management ∑ Planting date

  9. Experiments with Fertilizers on Rotated and Non-Rotated Crops.†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reynolds, E. B. (Elbert Brunner)

    1928-01-01

    ., Assisiant; Ranch Recoi and Accounts RURAL HOME RESEARCH: JESSIE WHITACRE. Ph. D., Chief MAMIE GRIMES, M. S., Textile and Clothing S~ecral~st M. S.. Nutrition Spec L. G. RAGSDALE, B: S.. Soil Siruewor ROTANY: SIMON E. WOLFF, M. S., Botanist SWINE... This is a report of experiments conducted over a period of 14 years to study the effect of fertilizers, manure, removal. of crop residues, and rota- tion on the yield of crops. The fertilizer treatments included superphos- phate; superphosphate and manure...

  10. Potential of biomass residue availability; The case of Thailand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhattacharya, S.C.; Shrestha, R.M.; Ngamkajornvivat, S. (Energy Technology Div., Asian Institute of Technology, Bangkok 10501 (TH))

    1989-01-01

    An acute shortage of fuel wood and charcoal prevails in many developing countries. A logical approach to the problem places emphasis on the development of alternative energy sources, including use of biomass residues. An assessment of the potential of biomass residues for energy and other uses calls for an estimation of their annual production. Also, because the residues are normally bulky they should be utilized near their place of origin whenever possible to avoid high transportation costs. Thus knowledge of the total national generation of residues per year does not provide enough information for planning residue utilization. This article illustrates a method of residue estimation that takes the case of Thailand as an example. It presents the annual generation of nine agricultural resides (paddy husk, paddy straw, bagasse, cotton stalk, corn cob, groundnut shell, cassava stalk and coconut husk and shell) and one forestry residue (sawdust) in different agroeconomic zones and regions of Thailand. The methodology used for the investigation of crop-to-residue ratios is outlined. The annual generation figures for the different residues along with observations about their traditional uses are presented.

  11. Radioactivity in food crops

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drury, J.S.; Baldauf, M.F.; Daniel, E.W.; Fore, C.S.; Uziel, M.S.

    1983-05-01

    Published levels of radioactivity in food crops from 21 countries and 4 island chains of Oceania are listed. The tabulation includes more than 3000 examples of 100 different crops. Data are arranged alphabetically by food crop and geographical origin. The sampling date, nuclide measured, mean radioactivity, range of radioactivities, sample basis, number of samples analyzed, and bibliographic citation are given for each entry, when available. Analyses were reported most frequently for /sup 137/Cs, /sup 40/K, /sup 90/Sr, /sup 226/Ra, /sup 228/Ra, plutonium, uranium, total alpha, and total beta, but a few authors also reported data for /sup 241/Am, /sup 7/Be, /sup 60/Co, /sup 55/Fe, /sup 3/H, /sup 131/I, /sup 54/Mn, /sup 95/Nb, /sup 210/Pb, /sup 210/Po, /sup 106/Ru, /sup 125/Sb, /sup 228/Th, /sup 232/Th, and /sup 95/Zr. Based on the reported data it appears that radioactivity from alpha emitters in food crops is usually low, on the order of 0.1 Bq.g/sup -1/ (wet weight) or less. Reported values of beta radiation in a given crop generally appear to be several orders of magnitude greater than those of alpha emitters. The most striking aspect of the data is the great range of radioactivity reported for a given nuclide in similar food crops with different geographical origins.

  12. An Integrated Model for Assessment of Sustainable Agricultural Residue Removal Limits for Bioenergy Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. Muth; K. M. Bryden

    2003-12-01

    Agricultural residues have been identified as a significant potential resource for bioenergy production, but serious questions remain about the sustainability of harvesting residues. Agricultural residues play an important role in limiting soil erosion from wind and water and in maintaining soil organic carbon. Because of this, multiple factors must be considered when assessing sustainable residue harvest limits. Validated and accepted modeling tools for assessing these impacts include the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation Version 2 (RUSLE2), the Wind Erosion Prediction System (WEPS), and the Soil Conditioning Index. Currently, these models do not work together as a single integrated model. Rather, use of these models requires manual interaction and data transfer. As a result, it is currently not feasible to use these computational tools to perform detailed sustainable agricultural residue availability assessments across large spatial domains or to consider a broad range of land management practices. This paper presents an integrated modeling strategy that couples existing datasets with the RUSLE2 water erosion, WEPS wind erosion, and Soil Conditioning Index soil carbon modeling tools to create a single integrated residue removal modeling system. This enables the exploration of the detailed sustainable residue harvest scenarios needed to establish sustainable residue availability. Using this computational tool, an assessment study of residue availability for the state of Iowa was performed. This study included all soil types in the state of Iowa, four representative crop rotation schemes, variable crop yields, three tillage management methods, and five residue removal methods. The key conclusions of this study are that under current management practices and crop yields nearly 26.5 million Mg of agricultural residue are sustainably accessible in the state of Iowa, and that through the adoption of no till practices residue removal could sustainably approach 40 million Mg. However, when considering the economics and logistics of residue harvest, yields below 2.25 Mg ha-1 are generally considered to not be viable for a commercial bioenergy system. Applying this constraint, the total agricultural residue resource available in Iowa under current management practices is 19 million Mg. Previously published results have shown residue availability from 22 million Mg to over 50 million Mg in Iowa.

  13. Residuals, Sludge, and Composting (Maine)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Maine Department of Environmental Protection's Residuals, Sludge, and Composting program regulates the land application and post-processing of organic wastes, including sewage sludge, septage,...

  14. A national research & development strategy for biomass crop feedstocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, L.L.; Cushman, J.H.

    1997-07-01

    Planning was initiated in 1996 with the objective of reevaluating current biomass feedstock research and development strategies to: (1) assure that by 2005, one or more commercial lignocellulosic to ethanol projects will be able to acquire a dependable supply of biomass crop feedstocks; (2) assure that recently initiated demonstrations of crops to electricity will be successful and; (3) assure that the research base needed to support future biomass industry expansion is being developed. Multiple trends and analyses indicate that biomass energy research and development strategies must take into account the fact that competition for land will define the upper limits of available biomass energy crop supplies and will largely dictate the price of those supplies. Only crop production and utilization strategies which contribute profit to the farmer or landowner and to energy producers will be used commercially for biomass energy production. Strategies for developing biomass {open_quotes}energy{close_quotes} crop supplies must take into consideration all of the methods by which biomass crops will enter biomass energy markets. The lignocellulosic materials derived from crops can be available as primary residues or crop by-products; secondary residues or processing by-products; co-products (at both the crop production and processing stages); or, as dedicated energy crops. Basic research and development (R&D) leading to yield improvement continues to be recommended as a major long-term focus for dedicated energy crops. Many additional near term topics need attention, some of which are also applicable to by-products and co-products. Switchgrass R&D should be expanded and developed with greater collaboration of USDA and state extension groups. Woody crop research should continue with significant cost-share from industries developing the crops for other commercial products. Co-product options need more investigation.

  15. Wind Turbines Benefit Crops

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Takle, Gene

    2013-03-01

    Ames Laboratory associate scientist Gene Takle talks about research into the effect of wind turbines on nearby crops. Preliminary results show the turbines may have a positive effect by cooling and drying the crops and assisting with carbon dioxide uptake.

  16. Wind Turbines Benefit Crops

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takle, Gene

    2010-01-01

    Ames Laboratory associate scientist Gene Takle talks about research into the effect of wind turbines on nearby crops. Preliminary results show the turbines may have a positive effect by cooling and drying the crops and assisting with carbon dioxide uptake.

  17. Transforms for prediction residuals in video coding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kam??l?, Fatih

    2010-01-01

    Typically the same transform, the 2-D Discrete Cosine Transform (DCT), is used to compress both image intensities in image coding and prediction residuals in video coding. Major prediction residuals include the motion ...

  18. Crop Revenue Coverage (CRC)†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stokes, Kenneth; Barnaby, G. A. Art; Waller, Mark L.; Outlaw, Joe

    2008-10-17

    Crop Revenue Coverage guarantees a stated amount of revenue based on commodity futures prices. This publication explains how CRC works and gives examples based on harvest price scenarios....

  19. Evaluation of residue drum storage safety risks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conner, W.V.

    1994-06-17

    A study was conducted to determine if any potential safety problems exist in the residue drum backlog at the Rocky Flats Plant. Plutonium residues stored in 55-gallon drums were packaged for short-term storage until the residues could be processed for plutonium recovery. These residues have now been determined by the Department of Energy to be waste materials, and the residues will remain in storage until plans for disposal of the material can be developed. The packaging configurations which were safe for short-term storage may not be safe for long-term storage. Interviews with Rocky Flats personnel involved with packaging the residues reveal that more than one packaging configuration was used for some of the residues. A tabulation of packaging configurations was developed based on the information obtained from the interviews. A number of potential safety problems were identified during this study, including hydrogen generation from some residues and residue packaging materials, contamination containment loss, metal residue packaging container corrosion, and pyrophoric plutonium compound formation. Risk factors were developed for evaluating the risk potential of the various residue categories, and the residues in storage at Rocky Flats were ranked by risk potential. Preliminary drum head space gas sampling studies have demonstrated the potential for formation of flammable hydrogen-oxygen mixtures in some residue drums.

  20. Texas Crop Profile: Watermelon†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Kent D.; Holloway, Rodney L.; Smith, Dudley

    2000-04-12

    .? Texas Agricultural Extension Service. B-5022, ?Weed Control in Vegetable, Fruit and Nut Crops.? Texas Agricultural Extension Service. National Agricultural Pesticide Impact Assessment Program Web Site http://ipmwww.ncsu.edu/opmppiap/. Texas A...

  1. Forage quality of Sorghum crop residues after grain harvest†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhodes, Gregory Allen

    2002-01-01

    OF SCIENCF. Approy ed as to style and content hy ?, l Donald M Victor (Chair of Committee) C 1 C M Mortimer Isothmann (Member) Ki ilia Rvoney (Member) C Mark A Hussey (Head ot Department) August 200 1tilol Soli)cet A" I onolny ABSTRACT Forage... sorghum production is to be successful. It has been well established that as plants mature forage quality decreased. In addition, the forage quality of tropical species is lower than temperate species, and the quahty of C4 plants tends to be less than C...

  2. ABSTRACT: Bioenergy Harvesting Technologies to Supply Crop Residues In a

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a l De p u t y A s s iof1 ofDensified Large Square Bale Format |

  3. ABSTRACT: Bioenergy Harvesting Technologies to Supply Crop Residues In a

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsofProgram:Y-12 Beta-3 Racetracks25 AMOSystem forAAPGABENGOA BIOENERGYDensified

  4. ReproducedfromCropScience.PublishedbyCropScienceSocietyofAmerica.Allcopyrightsreserved. CROP SCIENCE, VOL. 47, MAYJUNE 2007 1281

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pfrender, Michael

    ReproducedfromCropScience.PublishedbyCropScienceSocietyofAmerica.Allcopyrightsreserved. CROP in Crop Sci. 47:1281≠1288 (2007). doi: 10.2135/cropsci2006.11.0702 © Crop Science Society of America 677 S online May 31, 2007Published online May 31, 2007 #12;ReproducedfromCropScience.PublishedbyCropScience

  5. Review: Balancing Limiting Factors and Economic Drivers to Achieve Sustainable Midwestern US Agricultural Residue Feedstock Supplies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wally W. Wilhelm; J. Richard Hess; Douglas L. Karlen; David J. Muth; Jane M. F. Johnson; John M. Baker; Hero T. Gollany; Jeff M. Novak; Diane E. Stott; Gary E. Varvel

    2010-10-01

    Advanced biofuels will be developed using cellulosic feedstock rather than grain or oilseed crops that can also be used for food and feed. To be sustainable, these new agronomic production systems must be economically viable without degrading soil resources. This review examines six agronomic factors that collectively define many of the limits and opportunities for harvesting crop residue for biofuel feedstock. These six ďlimiting factorsĒ are discussed in relationship to economic drivers associated with harvesting corn (Zea mays L.) stover as a potential cellulosic feedstock. The limiting factors include soil organic carbon, wind and water erosion, plant nutrient balance, soil water and temperature dynamics, soil compaction, and off-site environmental impacts. Initial evaluations using the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation 2.0 (RUSLE2) show that a single factor analysis based on simply meeting tolerable soil loss might indicate stover could be harvested sustainably, but the same analysis based on maintaining soil organic carbon shows the practice to be non-sustainable. Modifying agricultural management to include either annual or perennial cover crops is shown to meet both soil erosion and soil carbon requirements. The importance of achieving high yields and planning in a holistic manner at the landscape scale are also shown to be crucial for balancing limitations and drivers associated with renewable bioenergy production.

  6. Smarter Cropping: Internet program helps farmers make decisions about crops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2009-01-01

    Wythe tx H2O | pg. 26 Smarter Cropping Internet program helps farmers make decisions about crops Along the coastal plains of Texas, farmers and crop managers are using the Internet to make more informed decisions about growing cotton. This Web...

  7. Issues Driving the Outlook for Specialty Crops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    % Vegetables and melons 19% Nursery/green house 10% Grains and cotton 9% Hay and forage crops 19% Fruits 15% Tree nuts 13%Vegetables and melons 9% Nursery/green house 0.004% Grains and cotton 38% #12;Geographic, ≠ Regulations (including greenhouse gas policy), water, labor, air quality, water quality, etc. #12;The

  8. CROP STAGES Keith Mason

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isaacs, Rufus

    are at early fruit coloring. WEATHER NOTES Complete weather data for your area can be found at enviroweather through the weekend with temperatures returning to normal. DEGREE DAYS GDD (from March 1) Base 42 Base 50-23-08 1242 726 6-30-08 1423 852 Projected for 7-7-08 1609 982 Contents ∑ Crop Stages ∑ Weather notes

  9. Biomass from Logging Residue and Mill Residue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biomass from Logging Residue and Mill Residue in East Texas, 2008 by Curtis L. VanderSchaaf, Forest Resource Analyst October 2009 #12;N Introduction The abundance of woody biomass from East Texas forests. This report represents the most current data on the availability of woody biomass in the form of logging

  10. EFFICACY AND TIMING OF FUNGICIDES, BACTERICIDES, AND BIOLOGICALS for DECIDUOUS TREE FRUIT, NUT, STRAWBERRY, AND VINE CROPS 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adaskaveg, James E; Gubler, W D; Michailides, Themis J.; Holtz, Brent A.

    2010-01-01

    Apricot, plum, prune, peach Strawberry Apricot, peach,nectarine, plum StrawberryStrawberry Pome and stone fruit crops including almond;

  11. Crop Biotechnology: Feeds for Livestock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Eenennaam, Alison L.

    ? A biotech crop is a crop plant that has been genetically engineered using recombinant DNA technology either also been developed using biotechnology, and crops with modified composition or nutritional properties they are grown. In the United States, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is responsible for evaluating

  12. Plant Science 200: Modern Crop Production Instructor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Kuang-Yu

    classification, soil conservation and tillage. Crop classification and morphology (distinguish among the grains Crop Production Introduction Crop Importance Soil Survey/Soil Conservation Crop Classification /Sustainable Agriculture #12;References on Reserve in Chang Library: Forages: An Introduction to Grassland

  13. RESIDUAL STRESS EFFECTS IN FRACTURE OF COMPOSITES AND ADHESIVES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nairn, John A.

    RESIDUAL STRESS EFFECTS IN FRACTURE OF COMPOSITES AND ADHESIVES JOHN A. NAIRN ABSTRACT Because by including residual stresses in fracture mechanics models of failure. This chapter gives general results examples of including residual stresses in fracture mechanics interpretation of experimental results

  14. Particulate residue separators for harvesting devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoskinson, Reed L.; Kenney, Kevin L.; Wright, Christopher T.; Hess, John R.

    2010-06-29

    A particulate residue separator and a method for separating a particulate residue stream may include a plenum borne by a harvesting device, and have a first, intake end and a second, exhaust end; first and second particulate residue air streams which are formed by the harvesting device and which travel, at least in part, along the plenum and in a direction of the second, exhaust end; and a baffle assembly which is located in partially occluding relation relative to the plenum, and which substantially separates the first and second particulate residue air streams.

  15. Methods of separating particulate residue streams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoskinson, Reed L. (Rigby, ID); Kenney, Kevin L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wright, Christopher T. (Idaho Falls, ID); Hess, J. Richard (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2011-04-05

    A particulate residue separator and a method for separating a particulate residue stream may include an air plenum borne by a harvesting device, and have a first, intake end and a second, exhaust end; first and second particulate residue air streams that are formed by the harvesting device and that travel, at least in part, along the air plenum and in a direction of the second, exhaust end; and a baffle assembly that is located in partially occluding relation relative to the air plenum and that substantially separates the first and second particulate residue air streams.

  16. The examination of residual plots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsai, Chih-Ling; Cai, Zongwu; Wu, Xizhi

    1998-01-01

    , then equations (14) and (18) indicate that the plot of eą(i) (or eąi) versus yąi might not reveal a nonlinear pattern even though the true mean function includes the nonlinear component, g(Z). Cookís Example 7.1 (1994) illustrates this point. In practice...), Examples 7.1 and 7.2) has shown that this type of plot may provide misleading information when fitted values are used, we therefore suggest using the linear residual plot (residuals versus explanatory variables case) for the detection of nonlinearity...

  17. Integrating Cover Crops into Strip-Till Cropping Systems in a Semi-Arid Environment†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noland, Reagan Lee

    2014-05-02

    į12'34.47"N, 99į45'5.97"W; 282 m), TX. The main effect was row crop with split-plots strip-tilled into the residue of four legume species [Medicago polymorpha L. cv. Armadillo (burr medic), M. lupulina L. cv. Bee Black (black medic), M. minima (L.) L. cv... planted using a Tye Pasture Pleaser no-till drill (The Tye Co., Lockney, Texas) on November 8, 2011 and November 12, 2012. Seeding rates were the same as those commonly recommended and were 11 kg ha- 1 for Armadillo and Bee Black, 6.7 kg ha-1 for Devine...

  18. Variable Crop Share Leases.†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sartin, Marvin; Sammons, Ray

    1980-01-01

    and management. To adequately value these items, an understanding of the concepts of fixed cost is necessary. FIXED (OWNERSHIP) COSTS of particular assets consist primarily of depreciation and interest on investment. These costs are not always apparent because... broad categories: cash and crop-shares. Under a cash lease, the tenant pays for the rights to farm the land. Cash leases usually provide the tenant operator with more freedom in making management decisions, and the tenant must accept more...

  19. Texas Crop Profile: Peppers†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Kent D.; Holloway, Rodney L.

    2001-02-13

    -head sorghum can get 10 to 12 feet high. Onion yields have been shown to increase by 50 percent to 100 percent with windbreaks. Currently, only about 10 percent to 25 percent of growers use windbreaks. Planting: Statewide, 80 to 90 percent of the peppers... and liniments. Peppers also play a part in rituals, magic and folklore. Gulamic acid (AuxiGro ? ) is a newly registered agrochemical that acts as a plant growth regula- tor. It enhances crop growth and yield. It is registered on bell peppers and other vegetables...

  20. Duality, Residues, Fundamental class

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-05-22

    May 22, 2011 ... Duality, Residues, Fundamental class. Joseph Lipman. Purdue University. Department of Mathematics lipman@math.purdue.edu. May 22†...

  1. Biomass from Logging Residue and Mill Residue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    as a renewable energy resource or for chemical extraction. This report represents the most current data harvesting or are cut off the central stem of the tree due to a merchantability standard. Limbs refer for energy production or chemical extraction. Table 1 shows the logging residue available in East Texas

  2. Biomass Energy Crops: Massachusetts' Potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schweik, Charles M.

    plant fuel. We examine potential biomass energy demand in the 5-county area, and then review cropBiomass Energy Crops: Massachusetts' Potential Prepared for: Massachusetts Division of Energy is thought to have significantly more potential than forest biomass energy (Perlack, Wright et al. 2005). One

  3. Collection Policy: Crop and Soil Sciences Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angenent, Lars T.

    Collection Policy: Crop and Soil Sciences ___________________________________________________________________________________ Introduction: This 2007 collection policy review for the Department of Crops and Soil Sciences comes several the Department of Atmospheric and Earth Sciences. Since then, Crops and Soil Sciences has reorganized into three

  4. EFFICACY AND TIMING OF FUNGICIDES,BACTERICIDES, AND BIOLOGICALS for DECIDUOUS TREE FRUIT, NUT, STRAWBERRY, AND VINE CROPS 2010 (rev. April 1, 2010)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adaskaveg, J E; Gubler, W D; Michailides, Themis J.; Holtz, Brent A.

    2010-01-01

    Apricot, plum, prune, peach Strawberry Apricot, peach,nectarine, plum StrawberryStrawberry Pome and stone fruit crops including almond;

  5. The Environmental Impacts of Subsidized Crop Insurance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LaFrance, Jeffrey T.; Shimshack, J. P.; Wu, S. Y.

    2001-01-01

    May 1996): 428-438. Environmental Impacts of Subsidized CropPaper No. 912 THE ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS OF SUBSIDIZED CROPsuch copies. The Environmental Impacts of Subsidized Crop

  6. Biodiesel is produced from a wide variety of oilseed crops. In Europe, canola is the major biodiesel crop while in the U.S. soybeans dominates. Montana State University and USDA researchers have

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Rick L.

    for License Increased Oil Yield in Oilseed Crops to Enhance Biodiesel Production #12; have developed a protein that can be expressed in a variety of oilseed crops to increase the oil yield to work for a broad range of oilseed plants including biodiesel and cereal crops. Increased oil

  7. Crop Insurance Terms and Definitions†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stokes, Kenneth; Waller, Mark L.; Outlaw, Joe; Barnaby, G. A. Art

    2008-10-17

    on the date coverage begins for the crop year. To qualify, an enterprise unit must contain all of the insurable acreage of the same insured crop in: One or more basic units that are located 1. in two or more separate sections, section equivalents, FSA... by the termination date specified in the Crop Provisions. Earliest planting date. The initial planting date contained in the Special Provisions, which is the earliest date the insured may plant an in- sured agricultural commodity and qualify for a replanting...

  8. Hanford Tank Waste Residuals

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Hanford Tank Waste Residuals DOE HLW Corporate Board November 6, 2008 Chris Kemp, DOE ORP Bill Hewitt, YAHSGS LLC Hanford Tanks & Tank Waste * Single-Shell Tanks (SSTs) - 27...

  9. Cover Crops for the Garden

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01

    matter for your soil or compost pile. Organic matter is thatin the spring or made into compost, cover crops will act asgathered up and added to your compost pile. The first method

  10. Traffic lights for crop-based biofuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phalan, Ben

    stream_source_info Phalan_311010.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 11462 Content-Encoding UTF-8 stream_name Phalan_311010.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 Traffic lights for crop-based biofuels Ben... if it reduces the number of pedestrians killed and injured. How is this relevant to biofuels? There are many different kinds of biofuels, including some with considerable potential to generate cleaner energy and boost rural economies, but also others which...

  11. Abundant and Stable Char Residues in Soils: Implications for Soil Fertility and Carbon Sequestration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lehmann, Johannes

    Abundant and Stable Char Residues in Soils: Implications for Soil Fertility and Carbon Department of Chemistry, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011, United States ß Department of Crop and Soil, Ames, Iowa 50011, United States *S Supporting Information ABSTRACT: Large-scale soil application

  12. Pump apparatus including deconsolidator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sonwane, Chandrashekhar; Saunders, Timothy; Fitzsimmons, Mark Andrew

    2014-10-07

    A pump apparatus includes a particulate pump that defines a passage that extends from an inlet to an outlet. A duct is in flow communication with the outlet. The duct includes a deconsolidator configured to fragment particle agglomerates received from the passage.

  13. ReproducedfromCropScience.PublishedbyCropScienceSocietyofAmerica.Allcopyrightsreserved. 2558 CROP SCIENCE, VOL. 47, NOVEMBERDECEMBER 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montgomery, David R.

    ReproducedfromCropScience.PublishedbyCropScienceSocietyofAmerica.Allcopyrightsreserved. 2558 CROP SCIENCE, VOL. 47, NOVEMBER≠DECEMBER 2007 BOOK REVIEW Dirt: The Erosion of Civilization. David R science along with very readable prose to document the boom and bust cycles in agricul- ture that have

  14. FIELD CROPS 2012 Weeds: Corn 5-53

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    in Delmarva corn production. To be successful in controlling weeds in corn, the weed control program must this record to plan your weed control program. Cultural control. Several aspects of cultural weed control should be considered in planning a corn weed control program. These include weed-free seed, cover crops

  15. Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, Michael D.

    Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa ≠ 2002 The estimated costs of corn, corn silage. They include the annual Iowa Farm Business Association record summaries, production and costs data from and a survey of selected agricultural cooperatives and other input suppliers around the state. These costs

  16. Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa 2000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, Michael D.

    Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa ≠ 2000 The estimated costs of corn, corn silage. They include the annual Iowa Farm Business Association record summaries, production and costs data from and a survey of selected agriculture cooperatives around the state. These costs estimates are representative

  17. Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, Michael D.

    Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa ≠ 2006 The estimated costs of corn, corn silage. They include the annual Iowa Farm Business Association record summaries, production and costs data from and a survey of selected agricultural cooperatives and other input suppliers around the state. These costs

  18. Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, Michael D.

    Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa ≠ 2005 The estimated costs of corn, corn silage. They include the annual Iowa Farm Business Association record summaries, production and costs data from and a survey of selected agricultural cooperatives and other input suppliers around the state. These costs

  19. Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa 2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, Michael D.

    Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa ≠ 2001 The estimated costs of corn, corn silage. They include the annual Iowa Farm Business Association record summaries, production and costs data from and a survey of selected agriculture cooperatives around the state. These costs estimates are representative

  20. SRC Residual fuel oils

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tewari, Krishna C. (Whitehall, PA); Foster, Edward P. (Macungie, PA)

    1985-01-01

    Coal solids (SRC) and distillate oils are combined to afford single-phase blends of residual oils which have utility as fuel oils substitutes. The components are combined on the basis of their respective polarities, that is, on the basis of their heteroatom content, to assure complete solubilization of SRC. The resulting composition is a fuel oil blend which retains its stability and homogeneity over the long term.

  1. SRC residual fuel oils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tewari, K.C.; Foster, E.P.

    1985-10-15

    Coal solids (SRC) and distillate oils are combined to afford single-phase blends of residual oils which have utility as fuel oils substitutes. The components are combined on the basis of their respective polarities, that is, on the basis of their heteroatom content, to assure complete solubilization of SRC. The resulting composition is a fuel oil blend which retains its stability and homogeneity over the long term.

  2. Emergency Alternative Crops for South Texas†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Livingston, Stephen; Bade, David H.

    1996-10-21

    is the best choice. Details are provided on soybeans, various types of peas, alyce clover, sorghums and other crops....

  3. Regional Focus on GM Crop Regulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Church, George M.

    Regional Focus on GM Crop Regulation THE RECENT MEDIA COVERAGE OF THE DEVEL- opments in Brazil for com- mercial genetically modified (GM) crops in both the scientific and regulatory arena. The release of GM crops in these coun- tries might result in the unintentional entry of GM seeds into neighboring

  4. Interdisciplinary Pest Management Potentials of Cover Cropping Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bachie, Oli Gurmu

    2011-01-01

    Cover Crop. J. Agronomy & Crop Science 186, 145-149 Allisonresistance in cowpea. Crop Science 40:611-618. Finch S. andProduction. J. Agronomy & Crop Science 191: 172ó Krueger

  5. Evaluating Crop-Share Leases.†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sartin, Marvin; Brints, Norman

    1979-01-01

    with the greatest influence on yield (fertilizer, insecticide, irrigation, etc.) should be shared by the landowner and the tenant. An equitable crop-share lease encourages the tenant to use the same quantity of inputs and produce the same yield level... lease agree ment is calculation of the proportion of total (fixed and variable) inputs supplied by the tenant and landowner. While this approach requires time and detail, those who exercise care with data development can formulate an equitable lease...

  6. Field Guide to the Insects, Mites and Mollusks of Nursery, Floral and Greenhouse Crops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gouge, Dawn H.; Smith, Kirk A.; Wilkerson, Don

    2000-01-12

    This field guide provides excellent photo identification keys for numerous pests and beneficials found in nursery, greenhouse and floral crops. The text includes a physical description, examples of damage and information on the life cycle of each...

  7. Agronomy Journal Volume 106, Issue 2 2014 545 Crop Ecology & Physiology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Eugster, Marc L. Fischer, John A. Gamon, Maheteme T. Gebremedhin, Aaron J. Glenn, Timothy J. Griffis- Ramirez et al., 2011; Gebremedhin et al., 2012). In these studies, including legume crops with different

  8. Response of Peanuts to Irrigation Management at Different Crop Growth Stages†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howell, T. A.; McFarland, M. J.; Reddell, D. L.; Brown, K. W.; Newton, R. J.; Dahmen, P.

    1980-01-01

    for peanuts at different crop growth stages for the Spanish and the Florunner varieties. The yield of the two varieties was evaluated under seven different irrigation treatments including a "no stress" check treatment and a dryland treatment. Each treatment...

  9. Recursive Programming Model for Crop Production on the Texas High Plains†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reneau, D. R.; Lacewell, R. D.; Ellis, J. R.

    1984-01-01

    A flexible, recursive programming model of crop production on the Texas High Plains was developed. Besides the linear programming (LP) Optimization routine and recursive feedback section, the model also includes a matrix generator and report writer...

  10. Materials recovery from shredder residues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniels, E. J.; Jody, B. J.; Pomykala, J., Jr.

    2000-07-24

    Each year, about five (5) million ton of shredder residues are landfilled in the US. Similar quantities are landfilled in Europe and the Pacific Rim. Landfilling of these residues results in a cost to the existing recycling industry and also represents a loss of material resources that are otherwise recyclable. In this paper, the authors outline the resources recoverable from typical shredder residues and describe technology that they have developed to recover these resources.

  11. Residuals in steel products -- Impacts on properties and measures to minimize them

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Emi, Toshihiko [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Inst. for Advanced Materials Processing; Wijk, O. [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Process Metallurgy

    1996-12-31

    The effect of major residual elements on the properties of steel products is summarized. Measures to minimize these elements are discussed including the pretreatment of raw materials, innovative refining processes and environmental issues. This paper addresses (1) scrap situation, (2) upper limit of residual concentrations acceptable for processing and product quality, (3) possible means to reduce the residuals, and (4) consideration on the practicable measures to solve the residuals problem in a systematic way. 52 refs.

  12. Residual Energy Spectrum of Solar Wind Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, C H K; Salem, C S; Maruca, B A

    2013-01-01

    It has long been known that the energy in velocity and magnetic field fluctuations in the solar wind is not in equipartition. In this paper, we present an analysis of 5 years of Wind data at 1 AU to investigate the reason for this. The residual energy (difference between energy in velocity and magnetic field fluctuations) was calculated using both the standard magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) normalization for the magnetic field and a kinetic version, which includes temperature anisotropies and drifts between particle species. It was found that with the kinetic normalization, the fluctuations are closer to equipartition, with a mean normalized residual energy of sigma_r = -0.19 and mean Alfven ratio of r_A = 0.71. The spectrum of residual energy, in the kinetic normalization, was found to be steeper than both the velocity and magnetic field spectra, consistent with some recent MHD turbulence predictions and numerical simulations, having a spectral index close to -1.9. The local properties of residual energy and cros...

  13. The Potential for Pennsylvania Crops as Biofuels Higher energy costs over the past few years have created opportunities for the use of crops and crop residues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Dongwon

    for ethanol production or for direct combustion in grain stoves or furnaces. Both of these areas have been://live.psu.edu/story/18683). As a home-heating fuel, corn is worth about $7.00/bushel when propane is $2.00/gallon. We have

  14. Engineered High Energy Crop (EHEC) Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK Engineered High Energy Crop Programs Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement DOEEIS-0481 JULY 2015 THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK...

  15. Cassava, a potential biofuel crop in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jansson, C.

    2010-01-01

    18-673389 Keywords: cassava; bioethanol; biofuel; metabolicRecently, cassava-derived bioethanol production has beenbenefits compared to other bioethanol- producing crops in

  16. Cassava, a potential biofuel crop in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jansson, C.

    2010-01-01

    Cassava, a potential biofuel crop in China Christer Janssoncassava; bioethanol; biofuel; metabolic engineering; Chinathe potentials of cassava in the biofuel sector and point to

  17. Methods for generating or increasing revenues from crops

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Copenhaver, Gregory P.; Keith, Kevin; Preuss, Daphne

    2007-03-20

    The present invention provides methods of doing business and providing services. For example, methods of increasing the revenue of crops are provided. To this end, the method includes the use of a nucleic acid sequences of plant centromeres. This will permit construction of stably inherited recombinant DNA constructs and mini chromosomes which can serve as vectors for the construction of transgenic plant and animal cells.

  18. Developing an Integrated Model Framework for the Assessment of Sustainable Agricultural Residue Removal Limits for Bioenergy Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Muth, Jr.; Jared Abodeely; Richard Nelson; Douglas McCorkle; Joshua Koch; Kenneth Bryden

    2011-08-01

    Agricultural residues have significant potential as a feedstock for bioenergy production, but removing these residues can have negative impacts on soil health. Models and datasets that can support decisions about sustainable agricultural residue removal are available; however, no tools currently exist capable of simultaneously addressing all environmental factors that can limit availability of residue. The VE-Suite model integration framework has been used to couple a set of environmental process models to support agricultural residue removal decisions. The RUSLE2, WEPS, and Soil Conditioning Index models have been integrated. A disparate set of databases providing the soils, climate, and management practice data required to run these models have also been integrated. The integrated system has been demonstrated for two example cases. First, an assessment using high spatial fidelity crop yield data has been run for a single farm. This analysis shows the significant variance in sustainably accessible residue across a single farm and crop year. A second example is an aggregate assessment of agricultural residues available in the state of Iowa. This implementation of the integrated systems model demonstrates the capability to run a vast range of scenarios required to represent a large geographic region.

  19. A survey of DDT residues in fish from the Brazos and Navasota Rivers and Somerville Reservoir†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kramer, Robert Edwin

    1971-01-01

    of the long-term effects of hard pesticides in the bi osphere. This growing concern over the massive release of pest1cides in- to the environment prompted scientific investigation of pesticide residue levels, concentrations, and physiological effects... analysis. Because many of the organochlorine pesticides were trans- located from crops and soil by rainfall runoff to streams and rivers or were sprayed directly on surface waters of ponds and lakes, investigations were begun concerning the effects...

  20. Reducing the negative human-health impacts of bioenergy crop...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Reducing the negative human-health impacts of bioenergy crop emissions through region-specific crop selection Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Reducing the negative...

  1. Crop physiology calibration in the CLM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bilionis, I.; Drewniak, B. A.; Constantinescu, E. M.

    2015-04-15

    Farming is using more of the land surface, as population increases and agriculture is increasingly applied for non-nutritional purposes such as biofuel production. This agricultural expansion exerts an increasing impact on the terrestrial carbon cycle. In order to understand the impact of such processes, the Community Land Model (CLM) has been augmented with a CLM-Crop extension that simulates the development of three crop types: maize, soybean, and spring wheat. The CLM-Crop model is a complex system that relies on a suite of parametric inputs that govern plant growth under a given atmospheric forcing and available resources. CLM-Crop development used measurements of gross primary productivity (GPP) and net ecosystem exchange (NEE) from AmeriFlux sites to choose parameter values that optimize crop productivity in the model. In this paper, we calibrate these parameters for one crop type, soybean, in order to provide a faithful projection in terms of both plant development and net carbon exchange. Calibration is performed in a Bayesian framework by developing a scalable and adaptive scheme based on sequential Monte Carlo (SMC). The model showed significant improvement of crop productivity with the new calibrated parameters. We demonstrate that the calibrated parameters are applicable across alternative years and different sites.

  2. Crop physiology calibration in the CLM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bilionis, I. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Mathematics and Computer Science Div.; Drewniak, B. A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Science Div.; Constantinescu, E. M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Mathematics and Computer Science Div.

    2015-01-01

    Farming is using more of the land surface, as population increases and agriculture is increasingly applied for non-nutritional purposes such as biofuel production. This agricultural expansion exerts an increasing impact on the terrestrial carbon cycle. In order to understand the impact of such processes, the Community Land Model (CLM) has been augmented with a CLM-Crop extension that simulates the development of three crop types: maize, soybean, and spring wheat. The CLM-Crop model is a complex system that relies on a suite of parametric inputs that govern plant growth under a given atmospheric forcing and available resources. CLM-Crop development used measurements of gross primary productivity (GPP) and net ecosystem exchange (NEE) from AmeriFlux sites to choose parameter values that optimize crop productivity in the model. In this paper, we calibrate these parameters for one crop type, soybean, in order to provide a faithful projection in terms of both plant development and net carbon exchange. Calibration is performed in a Bayesian framework by developing a scalable and adaptive scheme based on sequential Monte Carlo (SMC). The model showed significant improvement of crop productivity with the new calibrated parameters. We demonstrate that the calibrated parameters are applicable across alternative years and different sites.

  3. Crop physiology calibration in the CLM

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bilionis, I.; Drewniak, B. A.; Constantinescu, E. M.

    2015-04-15

    Farming is using more of the land surface, as population increases and agriculture is increasingly applied for non-nutritional purposes such as biofuel production. This agricultural expansion exerts an increasing impact on the terrestrial carbon cycle. In order to understand the impact of such processes, the Community Land Model (CLM) has been augmented with a CLM-Crop extension that simulates the development of three crop types: maize, soybean, and spring wheat. The CLM-Crop model is a complex system that relies on a suite of parametric inputs that govern plant growth under a given atmospheric forcing and available resources. CLM-Crop development used measurementsmore†Ľof gross primary productivity (GPP) and net ecosystem exchange (NEE) from AmeriFlux sites to choose parameter values that optimize crop productivity in the model. In this paper, we calibrate these parameters for one crop type, soybean, in order to provide a faithful projection in terms of both plant development and net carbon exchange. Calibration is performed in a Bayesian framework by developing a scalable and adaptive scheme based on sequential Monte Carlo (SMC). The model showed significant improvement of crop productivity with the new calibrated parameters. We demonstrate that the calibrated parameters are applicable across alternative years and different sites.ę†less

  4. Reducing the negative human-health impacts of bioenergy crop emissions through region-specific crop selection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Porter, WC; Rosenstiel, TN; Guenther, A; Lamarque, J-F; Barsanti, K

    2015-01-01

    bioenergy crops such as eucalyptus, giant reed, anduse of crops such as poplar, eucalyptus, and switchgrass asemitters such as eucalyptus. The com- bined health bene?ts

  5. Thin layer chromatography residue applicator sampler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nunes, Peter J. (Danville, CA); Kelly, Fredrick R. (Modesto, CA); Haas, Jeffrey S. (San Ramon, CA); Andresen, Brian D. (Livermore, CA)

    2007-07-24

    A thin layer chromatograph residue applicator sampler. The residue applicator sampler provides for rapid analysis of samples containing high explosives, chemical warfare, and other analyses of interest under field conditions. This satisfied the need for a field-deployable, small, hand-held, all-in-one device for efficient sampling, sample dissolution, and sample application to an analytical technique. The residue applicator sampler includes a sampling sponge that is resistant to most chemicals and is fastened via a plastic handle in a hermetically sealed tube containing a known amount of solvent. Upon use, the wetted sponge is removed from the sealed tube and used as a swiping device across an environmental sample. The sponge is then replaced in the hermetically sealed tube where the sample remains contained and dissolved in the solvent. A small pipette tip is removably contained in the hermetically sealed tube. The sponge is removed and placed into the pipette tip where a squeezing-out of the dissolved sample from the sponge into the pipette tip results in a droplet captured in a vial for later instrumental analysis, or applied directly to a thin layer chromatography plate for immediate analysis.

  6. PETRO: Higher Productivity Crops for Biofuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-01-01

    PETRO Project: The 10 projects that comprise ARPA-Eís PETRO Project, short for ďPlants Engineered to Replace Oil,Ē aim to develop non-food crops that directly produce transportation fuel. These crops can help supply the transportation sector with agriculturally derived fuels that are cost-competitive with petroleum and do not affect U.S. food supply. PETRO aims to redirect the processes for energy and carbon dioxide (CO2) capture in plants toward fuel production. This would create dedicated energy crops that serve as a domestic alternative to petroleum-based fuels and deliver more energy per acre with less processing prior to the pump.

  7. Economics of biomass fuels for electricity production: a case study with crop residues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maung, Thein Aye

    2009-05-15

    In the United Sates and around the world, electric power plants are among the biggest sources of greenhouse gas emissions which the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change argued was the main cause of climate change and global warming...

  8. ABSTRACT: Bioenergy Harvesting Technologies to Supply Crop Residues In a Densified Large Square Bale Format

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Financing ToolInternationalReportOffice | DepartmentVery1, in:QuarterlyA SolarAADensified

  9. Modelling the UK perennial energy crop market†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander, Peter Mark William

    2014-11-27

    Biomass produced from perennial energy crops, Miscanthus and willow or poplar grown as short-rotation coppice, is expected to contribute to UK renewable energy targets and reduce the carbon intensity of energy production. ...

  10. SHORT ROTATION WOODY CROPS FACTSHEET SERIES # 5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    SHORT ROTATION WOODY CROPS FACTSHEET SERIES # 5 Sustainability of SRWC for Energy1 WHAT of the SRWC systems and the relatively narrow genetic base in Salix, Populus or Eucalyptus SRWC may promote

  11. Cassava, a potential biofuel crop in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jansson, C.

    2010-01-01

    as a means to produce novel biodiesel crops. We also donítto oil Ethanol and biodiesel are the two major bio-basedin transportation. Compared to biodiesel, the net energy

  12. Features . . . Cover Crop Value to Cotton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    .............................................................................................Page 6 Fuel Prices Projections - Encouraging News .......................Page 7 Agronomy Notes VolumeFeatures . . . Cotton Cover Crop Value to Cotton Cotton Price and Rotation ..............................................................Page 5 Miscellaneous Large differences in nitrogen prices.......................................Page 6

  13. Risk in agriculture : a study of crop yield distributions and crop insurance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gayam, Narsi Reddy

    2006-01-01

    Agriculture is a business fraught with risk. Crop production depends on climatic, geographical, biological, political, and economic factors, which introduce risks that are quantifiable given the appropriate mathematical ...

  14. Covering Note INTER-ACADEMY REPORT ON GM CROPS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giri, Ranjit K.

    Covering Note for INTER-ACADEMY REPORT ON GM CROPS (Updated) The Inter-Academy Report on GM crops the main conclusions and recommendations. The literature on GM crops is voluminous. More than a hundred seek to enunciate a national strategy on GM crops. The rest deals with concerns, surveillance etc. #12

  15. 1132 WWW.CROPS.ORG CROP SCIENCE, VOL. 52, MAYJUNE 2012 While varying regionally, root-feeding plant-parasitic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douches, David S.

    1132 WWW.CROPS.ORG CROP SCIENCE, VOL. 52, MAY≠JUNE 2012 RESEARCH While varying regionally, root, Statistician, Department of Crop and Soil Sciences, Plant and Soil Science Building, Michigan State University.08.0409 © Crop Science Society of America | 5585 Guilford Rd., Madison, WI 53711 USA All rights reserved. No part

  16. 2212 WWW.CROPS.ORG CROP SCIENCE, VOL. 51, SEPTEMBEROCTOBER 2011 Turfgrass quality is evaluated by integrating factors of canopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2212 WWW.CROPS.ORG CROP SCIENCE, VOL. 51, SEPTEMBER≠OCTOBER 2011 RESEARCH Turfgrass quality.2135/cropsci2010.12.0728 Published online 6 July 2011. © Crop Science Society of America | 5585 Guilford Rd, reflectance at 661 nm; R935, reflectance at 935 nm. Published in Crop Sci. 51:2212≠2218 (2011). doi: 10

  17. Selection on Crop-Derived Traits and QTL in Sunflower (Helianthus annuus) Crop-Wild Hybrids under Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burke, John M.

    Selection on Crop-Derived Traits and QTL in Sunflower (Helianthus annuus) Crop-Wild Hybrids under grown under wild-like low water conditions. Crop-derived petiole length and head diameter were favored size and leaf pressure potential. Interestingly, the additive effect of the crop-derived allele

  18. Higher U.S. Crop Prices Trigger Little Area Expansion so Marginal Land for Biofuel Crops Is Limited

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swinton, S.; Babcock, Bruce; James, Laura; Bandaru, Varaprasad

    2011-06-12

    By expanding energy biomass production on marginal lands that are not currently used for crops, food price increases and indirect climate change effects can be mitigated. Studies of the availability of marginal lands for dedicated bioenergy crops have focused on biophysical land traits, ignoring the human role in decisions to convert marginal land to bioenergy crops. Recent history offers insights about farmer willingness to put non-crop land into crop production. The 2006-09 leap in field crop prices and the attendant 64% gain in typical profitability led to only a 2% increase in crop planted area, mostly in the prairie states

  19. CliCrop: a Crop Water-Stress and Irrigation Demand Model for an Integrated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CliCrop: a Crop Water-Stress and Irrigation Demand Model for an Integrated Global Assessment Blanc and C. Adam Schlosser Report No. 214 April 2012 #12;The MIT Joint Program on the Science Change Science (CGCS) and the Center for Energy and Environmental Policy Research (CEEPR). These two

  20. CropS/Pl P 403/503 Advanced Cropping Systems Fall 2013, 3 Credits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pappu, Hanu R.

    CropS/Pl P 403/503 Advanced Cropping Systems Fall 2013, 3 Credits Time: Tu,Th 1:25-2:40; Field, whichever you prefer on your transcripts. Undergraduates generally enroll as 403 and graduates as 503 to critically interpret agronomic literature. GRADING: 403 and 503 Credit: ∑ Five quizzes (40 points each

  1. Cryostat including heater to heat a target

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pehl, R.H.; Madden, N.W.; Malone, D.F.

    1990-09-11

    A cryostat is provided which comprises a vacuum vessel; a target disposed within the vacuum vessel; a heat sink disposed within the vacuum vessel for absorbing heat from the detector; a cooling mechanism for cooling the heat sink; a cryoabsorption mechanism for cryoabsorbing residual gas within the vacuum vessel; and a heater for maintaining the target above a temperature at which the residual gas is cryoabsorbed in the course of cryoabsorption of the residual gas by the cryoabsorption mechanism. 2 figs.

  2. Modeling EU electricity market competition using the residual supply index

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swinand, Gregory; Scully, Derek; Ffoulkes, Stuart; Kessler, Brian

    2010-11-15

    An econometric approach to related hourly Residual Supply Index to price-cost margins in the major EU electricity generation markets suggests that market structure, as measured by the RSI, is a significant explanatory factor for markups, even when scarcity and other explanatory variables are included. (author)

  3. Countries Gasoline Prices Including Taxes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas Exploration and reserves, storage, imports and...

  4. Residue management at Rocky Flats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olencz, J.

    1995-12-31

    Past plutonium production and manufacturing operations conducted at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) produced a variety of plutonium-contaminated by-product materials. Residues are a category of these materials and were categorized as {open_quotes}materials in-process{close_quotes} to be recovered due to their inherent plutonium concentrations. In 1989 all RFETS plutonium production and manufacturing operations were curtailed. This report describes the management of plutonium bearing liquid and solid wastes.

  5. Vitrification of NAC process residue

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merrill, R.A.; Whittington, K.F.; Peters, R.D. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Vitrification tests have been performed with simulated waste compositions formulated to represent the residue which would be obtained from the treatment of low-level, nitrate wastes from Hanford and Oak Ridge by the nitrate to ammonia and ceramic (NAC) process. The tests were designed to demonstrate the feasibility of vitrifying NAC residue and to quantify the impact of the NAC process on the volume of vitrified waste. The residue from NAC treatment of low-level nitrate wastes consists primarily of oxides of aluminum and sodium. High alumina glasses were formulated to maximize the waste loading of the NAC product. Transparent glasses with up to 35 wt% alumina, and even higher contents in opaque glasses, were obtained at melting temperatures of 1,200 C to 1,400 C. A modified TCLP leach test showed the high alumina glasses to have good chemical durability, leaching significantly less than either the ARM-1 or the DWPF-EA high-level waste reference glasses. A significant increase in the final waste volume would be a major result of the NAC process on LLW vitrification. For Hanford wastes, NAC-treatment of nitrate wastes followed by vitrification of the residue will increase the final volume of vitrified waste by 50% to 90%; for Melton Valley waste from Oak Ridge, the increase in final glass volume will be 260% to 280%. The increase in volume is relative to direct vitrification of the waste in a 20 wt% Na{sub 2}O glass formulation. The increase in waste volume directly affects not only disposal costs, but also operating and/or capital costs. Larger plant size, longer operating time, and additional energy and additive costs are direct results of increases in waste volume. Such increases may be balanced by beneficial impacts on the vitrification process; however, those effects are outside the scope of this report.

  6. Vitrification of NAC process residue

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merrill, R.A.; Whittington, K.F.; Peters, R.D.

    1995-09-01

    Vitrification tests have been performed with simulated waste compositions formulated to represent the residue which would be obtained from the treatment of low-level, nitrate wastes from Hanford and Oak Ridge by the nitrate to ammonia and ceramic (NAC) process. The tests were designed to demonstrate the feasibility of vitrifying NAC residue and to quantify the impact of the NAC process on the volume of vitrified waste. The residue from NAC treatment of low-level nitrate wastes consists primarily of oxides of aluminum and sodium. High alumina glasses were formulated to maximize the waste loading of the NAC product. Transparent glasses with up to 35 wt% alumina, and even higher contents in opaque glasses, were obtained at melting temperatures of 1200{degrees}C to 1400{degrees}C. A modified TCLP leach test showed the high alumina glasses to have good chemical durability, leaching significantly less than either the ARM-1 or the DWPF-EA high-level waste reference glasses. A significant increase in the final waste volume would be a major result of the NAC process on LLW vitrification. For Hanford wastes, NAC-treatment of nitrate wastes followed by vitrification of the residue will increase the final volume of vitrified waste by 50% to 90%; for Melton Valley waste from Oak Ridge, the increase in final glass volume will be 260% to 280%. The increase in volume is relative to direct vitrification of the waste in a 20 wt% Na{sub 2}O glass formulation. The increase in waste volume directly affects not only disposal costs, but also operating and/or capital costs. Larger plant size, longer operating time, and additional energy and additive costs are direct results of increases in waste volume. Such increases may be balanced by beneficial impacts on the vitrification process; however, those effects are outside the scope of this report.

  7. Management of high sulfur coal combustion residues, issues and practices: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chugh, Y.P.; Beasley, G.A. [eds.

    1994-10-01

    Papers presented at the following sessions are included in this proceedings: (1) overview topic; (2) characterization of coal combustion residues; (3) environmental impacts of residues management; (4) materials handling and utilization, Part I; and (5) materials handling and utilization, Part II. Selected paper have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  8. Characterization of Residual Medium Peptides from Yersinia pestis Cultures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clowers, Brian H.; Wunschel, David S.; Kreuzer, Helen W.; Engelmann, Heather E.; Valentine, Nancy B.; Wahl, Karen L.

    2013-04-03

    Using a range of common microbial medium formulations (TSB, BHI, LB, and G-media), two attenuated strains of Y. pestis (KIM D27 (pgm-) and KIMD1 lcr-) were cultivated in triplicate. These cellular suspensions were used to develop a method of extracting residual medium peptides from the final microbial preparation to assess their relative abundance and identity. Across the conditions examined, which included additional cellular washing and different forms of microbial inactivation, residual medium peptides were detected. Despite the range of growth medium sources used and the associated manufacturing processes used in their production, a high degree of peptide similarity was observed for a given medium recipe. These results demonstrate that residual medium peptides are retained using traditional microbial cultivation techniques and may be used to inform forensic investigations with respect to production deduction.

  9. Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa -2014 File A1-20

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, Michael D.

    Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa - 2014 File A1-20 T he estimated costs of corn, corn. They include the annual Iowa Farm Busi- ness Association record summaries, production and costs data from, and a survey of selected agricultural cooperatives and other input suppliers around the state. These cost

  10. Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa -2007 File A1-20

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, Michael D.

    Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa - 2007 File A1-20 T he estimated costs of corn, corn sources. They include the annual Iowa Farm Business Asso- ciation record summaries, production and costs the state. These costs estimates are representative of average costs for farms in Iowa. Very large or small

  11. Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa -2012 File A1-20

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, Michael D.

    Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa - 2012 File A1-20 T he estimated costs of corn, corn. They include the annual Iowa Farm Business Asso- ciation record summaries, production and costs data from and a survey of selected agricultural cooperatives and other input suppliers around the state. These costs

  12. Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa -2009 File A1-20

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, Michael D.

    Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa - 2009 File A1-20 T he estimated costs of corn, corn sources. They include the annual Iowa Farm Business Asso- ciation record summaries, production and costs the state. These costs estimates are representative of average costs for farms in Iowa. Very large or small

  13. Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa -2013 File A1-20

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, Michael D.

    Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa - 2013 File A1-20 T he estimated costs of corn, corn. They include the annual Iowa Farm Busi- ness Association record summaries, production and costs data from and a survey of selected agricultural cooperatives and other input suppliers around the state. These cost

  14. Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa -2008 File A1-20

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, Michael D.

    Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa - 2008 File A1-20 T he estimated costs of corn, corn sources. They include the annual Iowa Farm Business Asso- ciation record summaries, production and costs the state. These costs estimates are representative of average costs for farms in Iowa. Very large or small

  15. Genetically modified food and crops: perceptions of risks†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Clare R.

    2010-01-01

    The debate around genetically modified food and crops has proved to be complex and far-reaching, involving diverse stakeholder groups and many issues. Although the extent of global uptake of GM crops has been substantial ...

  16. Neutralino relic density including coannihilations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paolo Gondolo; Joakim Edsjo

    1997-11-25

    We give an overview of our precise calculation of the relic density of the lightest neutralino, in which we included relativistic Boltzmann averaging, subthreshold and resonant annihilations, and coannihilation processes with charginos and neutralinos.

  17. Method For Characterizing Residual Stress In Metals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jacobson, Loren A. (Santa Fe, NM); Michel, David J. (Alexandria, VA); Wyatt, Jeffrey R. (Burke, VA)

    2002-12-03

    A method is provided for measuring the residual stress in metals. The method includes the steps of drilling one or more holes in a metal workpiece to a preselected depth and mounting one or more acoustic sensors on the metal workpiece and connecting the sensors to an electronic detecting and recording device. A liquid metal capable of penetrating into the metal workpiece placed at the bottom of the hole or holes. A recording is made over a period of time (typically within about two hours) of the magnitude and number of noise events which occur as the liquid metal penetrates into the metal workpiece. The magnitude and number of noise events are then correlated to the internal stress in the region of the workpiece at the bottom of the hole.

  18. Test of a solar crop dryer Danish Technological Institute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Test of a solar crop dryer Danish Technological Institute Danish Institute of Agricultural Sciences Aidt MiljÝ A/S SEC-R-6 #12;Test of a solar crop dryer SÝren ōstergaard Jensen Danish Technological/S January 2001 #12;Preface The report describes the tests carried out on a solar crop dryer. The work

  19. The Crop of the Day (c) Paul Gepts 2013 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gepts, Paul

    20130404 1 The Crop of the Day Strawberry (c) Paul Gepts 2013 1 Sources ∑ Sauer JD (1993) Fragaria Strawberries. In: Historical geography of crop plants. CRC, Boca Raton, FL: pp. 127130 ∑ Jones JK (1976) Strawberry, Fragaria ananassa (Rosaceae). In: N.W. Simmonds (ed), Evolution of crop plants, Longman, London

  20. Department of Soil and Crop Sciences Promotion and Tenure Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bermķdez, Josť Luis

    Department of Soil and Crop Sciences Promotion and Tenure Policy Adopted by Action of the Soil & Crop Sciences Faculty on June 21, 1993. Modified by departmental action in January 2012. INTRODUCTION The Soil & Crop Sciences Department at Texas A&M University seeks to retain and reward faculty members who

  1. Process to recycle shredder residue

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jody, Bassam J. (Chicago, IL); Daniels, Edward J. (Oak Lawn, IL); Bonsignore, Patrick V. (Channahon, IL)

    2001-01-01

    A system and process for recycling shredder residue, in which separating any polyurethane foam materials are first separated. Then separate a fines fraction of less than about 1/4 inch leaving a plastics-rich fraction. Thereafter, the plastics rich fraction is sequentially contacted with a series of solvents beginning with one or more of hexane or an alcohol to remove automotive fluids; acetone to remove ABS; one or more of EDC, THF or a ketone having a boiling point of not greater than about 125.degree. C. to remove PVC; and one or more of xylene or toluene to remove polypropylene and polyethylene. The solvents are recovered and recycled.

  2. CliCrop: a Crop Water-Stress and Irrigation Demand Model for an Integrated Global Assessment Model Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fant, C.A.

    This paper describes the use of the CliCrop model in the context of climate change general assessment

  3. Biomass crops can be used for biological disinfestation and remediation of soils and water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stapleton, James J; Banuelos, Gary

    2009-01-01

    Bioremediation crops should be compatible in rotations with other agronomic crops, such as cotton, wheat, of irrigation water

  4. RESIDUAL STRESSES IN 3013 CONTAINERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mickalonis, J.; Dunn, K.

    2009-11-10

    The DOE Complex is packaging plutonium-bearing materials for storage and eventual disposition or disposal. The materials are handled according to the DOE-STD-3013 which outlines general requirements for stabilization, packaging and long-term storage. The storage vessels for the plutonium-bearing materials are termed 3013 containers. Stress corrosion cracking has been identified as a potential container degradation mode and this work determined that the residual stresses in the containers are sufficient to support such cracking. Sections of the 3013 outer, inner, and convenience containers, in both the as-fabricated condition and the closure welded condition, were evaluated per ASTM standard G-36. The standard requires exposure to a boiling magnesium chloride solution, which is an aggressive testing solution. Tests in a less aggressive 40% calcium chloride solution were also conducted. These tests were used to reveal the relative stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of the as fabricated 3013 containers. Significant cracking was observed in all containers in areas near welds and transitions in the container diameter. Stress corrosion cracks developed in both the lid and the body of gas tungsten arc welded and laser closure welded containers. The development of stress corrosion cracks in the as-fabricated and in the closure welded container samples demonstrates that the residual stresses in the 3013 containers are sufficient to support stress corrosion cracking if the environmental conditions inside the containers do not preclude the cracking process.

  5. 298 WWW.CROPS.ORG CROP SCIENCE, VOL. 51, JANUARYFEBRUARY 2011 Pima cotton (Gossypium barbadense L.) was grown on 149,000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bradford, Kent

    298 WWW.CROPS.ORG CROP SCIENCE, VOL. 51, JANUARY≠FEBRUARY 2011 RESEARCH Pima cotton (Gossypium. © Crop Science Society of America | 5585 Guilford Rd., Madison, WI 53711 USA All rights reserved. No part by the publisher. #12;CROP SCIENCE, VOL. 51, JANUARY≠FEBRUARY 2011 WWW.CROPS.ORG 299 In the United States,

  6. Energy 101: Biofuels

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Biomass is an organic renewable energy source that includes materials such as agriculture and forest residues, energy crops, and algae.

  7. Implementing Performance-Based Sustainability Requirements for the Low Carbon Fuel Standard Ė Key Design Elements and Policy Considerations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yeh, Sonia; Sumner, Daniel A.; Kaffka, Stephen R.; Ogden, J; Jenkins, Bryan M.

    2009-01-01

    residue, herbaceous energy crop, forest thinning, corn, andethanol from energy crops, crop residues, and forest wastes.ethanol from energy crops, crop residues, and forest wastes.

  8. Global crop yield losses from recent warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lobell, D; Field, C

    2006-06-02

    Global yields of the world-s six most widely grown crops--wheat, rice, maize, soybeans, barley, sorghum--have increased since 1961. Year-to-year variations in growing season minimum temperature, maximum temperature, and precipitation explain 30% or more of the variations in yield. Since 1991, climate trends have significantly decreased yield trends in all crops but rice, leading to foregone production since 1981 of about 12 million tons per year of wheat or maize, representing an annual economic loss of $1.2 to $1.7 billion. At the global scale, negative impacts of climate trends on crop yields are already apparent. Annual global temperatures have increased by {approx}0.4 C since 1980, with even larger changes observed in several regions (1). While many studies have considered the impacts of future climate changes on food production (2-5), the effects of these past changes on agriculture remain unclear. It is likely that warming has improved yields in some areas, reduced them in others, and had negligible impacts in still others; the relative balance of these effects at the global scale is unknown. An understanding of this balance would help to anticipate impacts of future climate changes, as well as to more accurately assess recent (and thereby project future) technologically driven yield progress. Separating the contribution of climate from concurrent changes in other factors--such as crop cultivars, management practices, soil quality, and atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) levels--requires models that describe the response of yields to climate. Studies of future global impacts of climate change have typically relied on a bottom-up approach, whereby field scale, process-based models are applied to hundreds of representative sites and then averaged (e.g., ref 2). Such approaches require input data on soil and management conditions, which are often difficult to obtain. Limitations on data quality or quantity can thus limit the utility of this approach, especially at the local scale (6-8). At the global scale, however, many of the processes and impacts captured by field scale models will tend to cancel out, and therefore simpler empirical/statistical models with fewer input requirements may be as accurate (8, 9). Empirical/statistical models also allow the effects of poorly modeled processes (e.g., pest dynamics) to be captured and uncertainties to be readily quantified (10). Here we develop new, empirical/statistical models of global yield responses to climate using datasets on broad-scale yields, crop locations, and climate variability. We focus on global average yields for the six most widely grown crops in the world: wheat, rice, maize, soybeans, barley, and sorghum. Production of these crops accounts for over 40% of global cropland area (11). 55% of non-meat calories, and over 70% of animal feed (12).

  9. Characterization Report on Sand, Slag, and Crucible Residues and on Fluoride Residues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murray, A.M.

    1999-02-10

    This paper reports on the chemical characterization of the sand, slag, and crucible (SS and C) residues and the fluoride residues that may be shipped from the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) to Savannah River Site (SRS).

  10. A Benchmark Study on Casting Residual Stress

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Eric M. [John Deere -- Moline Tech Center; Watkins, Thomas R [ORNL; Schmidlin, Joshua E [ORNL; Dutler, S. A. [MAGMA Foundry Technologies, Inc.

    2012-01-01

    Stringent regulatory requirements, such as Tier IV norms, have pushed the cast iron for automotive applications to its limit. The castings need to be designed with closer tolerances by incorporating hitherto unknowns, such as residual stresses arising due to thermal gradients, phase and microstructural changes during solidification phenomenon. Residual stresses were earlier neglected in the casting designs by incorporating large factors of safety. Experimental measurement of residual stress in a casting through neutron or X-ray diffraction, sectioning or hole drilling, magnetic, electric or photoelastic measurements is very difficult and time consuming exercise. A detailed multi-physics model, incorporating thermo-mechanical and phase transformation phenomenon, provides an attractive alternative to assess the residual stresses generated during casting. However, before relying on the simulation methodology, it is important to rigorously validate the prediction capability by comparing it to experimental measurements. In the present work, a benchmark study was undertaken for casting residual stress measurements through neutron diffraction, which was subsequently used to validate the accuracy of simulation prediction. The stress lattice specimen geometry was designed such that subsequent castings would generate adequate residual stresses during solidification and cooling, without any cracks. The residual stresses in the cast specimen were measured using neutron diffraction. Considering the difficulty in accessing the neutron diffraction facility, these measurements can be considered as benchmark for casting simulation validations. Simulations were performed using the identical specimen geometry and casting conditions for predictions of residual stresses. The simulation predictions were found to agree well with the experimentally measured residual stresses. The experimentally validated model can be subsequently used to predict residual stresses in different cast components. This enables incorporation of the residual stresses at the design phase along with external loads for accurate predictions of fatigue and fracture performance of the cast components.

  11. Residual Toxicities of Insecticides to Cotton Insects.†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hightower, B. G.; Gaines, J. C.

    1960-01-01

    -ITHION. The residual toxicity of para- rliioti to the tumid spider mite was not affected by ~i1nul;ttetl rain when the spray was applied at a dosage c.cluiv;~lcnt to 0.3 pound of toxicant per acre. Kill5 or the cotton aphid on spray residues of 1),11;1thion were...

  12. Tank 12H residuals sample analysis report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oji, L. N.; Shine, E. P.; Diprete, D. P.; Coleman, C. J.; Hay, M. S.

    2015-06-11

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested by Savannah River Remediation (SRR) to provide sample preparation and analysis of the Tank 12H final characterization samples to determine the residual tank inventory prior to grouting. Eleven Tank 12H floor and mound residual material samples and three cooling coil scrape samples were collected and delivered to SRNL between May and August of 2014.

  13. Conversion of geothermal waste to commercial products including silica

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Premuzic, Eugene T. (East Moriches, NY); Lin, Mow S. (Rocky Point, NY)

    2003-01-01

    A process for the treatment of geothermal residue includes contacting the pigmented amorphous silica-containing component with a depigmenting reagent one or more times to depigment the silica and produce a mixture containing depigmented amorphous silica and depigmenting reagent containing pigment material; separating the depigmented amorphous silica and from the depigmenting reagent to yield depigmented amorphous silica. Before or after the depigmenting contacting, the geothermal residue or depigmented silica can be treated with a metal solubilizing agent to produce another mixture containing pigmented or unpigmented amorphous silica-containing component and a solubilized metal-containing component; separating these components from each other to produce an amorphous silica product substantially devoid of metals and at least partially devoid of pigment. The amorphous silica product can be neutralized and thereafter dried at a temperature from about 25.degree. C. to 300.degree. C. The morphology of the silica product can be varied through the process conditions including sequence contacting steps, pH of depigmenting reagent, neutralization and drying conditions to tailor the amorphous silica for commercial use in products including filler for paint, paper, rubber and polymers, and chromatographic material.

  14. Money Crops in Place of Cotton.†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kyle, E. J.; Morgan, J. Oscar; Burns, J. C.; Ridgway, J. W.; Proctor, W. F.; Youngblood, B.; Connor, A. B.; Conway, T. J.; Eliot, H. M.; Ousley, Clarence

    1914-01-01

    down and to absorb moisture. Plant February 20th to March 15th. Thin to approxi- mately one stalk per square yard. BLANK PAGE IN ORIGINAL BLANK PAGE IN ORIGINAL MONEY CROPS IN PLACE OF COTTON. 9 Bur Clover, Bermuda and Rescue Pastures...: For pasture and waste lands. Plow the land, harrow and sow broadcast bur clover and rescue grass seed as early as possible and not later than November 15th, using ten pounds of seed of each per acre. Follow with a smoothing harrow to cover seed. In April...

  15. Catalyst deactivation in residue hydrocracking

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oballa, M.C.; Wong, C.; Krzywicki, A. [Novacor Research and Technology Corp., Calgary, Alberta (Canada)

    1994-12-31

    The existence of a computer-controlled bench scale hydrocracking units at the authors site has made cheaper the non-stop running of experiments for long periods of time. It was, therefore possible to show, at minimal costs, when three hydrocracking catalysts in service reach their maximum lifetime. Different parameters which are helpful for catalyst life and activity predictions were calculated, e.g., relative catalyst age and the effectiveness factor. Experimental results compared well with model, giving them the minimum and maximum catalyst lifetime, as well as the deactivation profile with regard to sulfur and metals removal. Reaction rate constants for demetallization and desulfurization were also determined. Six commercial catalysts were evaluated at short term runs and the three most active were used for long term runs. Out of three catalysts tested for deactivation at long term runs, it was possible to choose one whose useful life was higher than the others. All runs were carried out in a Robinson-Mahoney continuous flow stirred tank reactor, using 50/50 volumetric mixture of Cold Lake/Lloydminster atmospheric residue and NiMo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst.

  16. Ozone impacts on the productivity of selected crops. [Corn, wheat, soybean and peanut crops

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heck, W.W.; Cure, W.W.; Shriner, D.S.; Olson, R.J.; Heagle, A.S.

    1982-01-01

    The regional impacts of ozone on corn, wheat, soybean, and peanut crops are estimated by using dose-response functions to relate ambient maximum 7 h/d seasonal ozone concentrations to crop productivity data. Linear dose-response functions were developed from open-top field chamber studies. It was assumed that the limited number of cultivars and growing conditions available for the analysis were representative of major agricultural regions. Hourly ozone data were selected to represent rural concentrations and used to calculate maximum 7-h/d average values. Seasonal ozone averages for counties were extrapolated from approximately 300 monitoring sites. Results must be interpreted with knowledge of these assumptions and sources of uncertainty. Impacts are calculated for county units for the conterminous United States with maps showing patterns and tables summarizing the potential magnitude of ozone effects on selected crop yields. The assessment estimates that approximately three billion dollars of productivity could be gained if current maximum 7 hour per day ozone levels were reduced from present levels to below 25 parts per billion. Dollar values are based on 1978 crop prices, without accounting for price effects, to provide an overall estimate of the impact. Of the estimated economic impact, soybean represents 64%, corn 17%, wheat 12%, and peanuts 7%.

  17. Simulation of the long-term accumulation of radiocontaminants in crop plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schreckhise, R.G.

    1980-03-01

    Most radiological dose assessment models ignore the long-term buildup of radiocontaminants in the soil. When they estimate levels in crop plants from root uptake, these models account only for the annual input from the source into the soil. Almost all of the models ignore the build-up of contaminants in the soil profile due to the accumulation in the roots and the build-up from the above-ground plant material that is buried by plowing. The model described in this report simulates the entire system involved in the cycling and accumulation of radionuclides in cultivated land. The model, named CROPRE, was developed to predict both the long-term accumulation of radionuclides and the resulting concentrations of radionuclides in vegetation. This model was designed to include: (1) the chronic input of contaminated irrigation water into both the soil compartment and directly onto the surface of the vegetation; (2) the incorporation of radiocontaminants in the soil organic matter pool and their eventual release for re-uptake by subsequent crops; (3) the removal of contaminants from the system when the crops are harvested; and (4) the downward movement of radionuclides and their loss from the system by percolation. The CROPRE model more realistically simulates the cycling of radiocontaminants in crop plants over long periods of time than does the other models. It is recommended that it be incorporated into existing radiation dose commitment models.

  18. HORTICULTURAL & FOREST CROPS 2013 Table of Contents 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    HORTICULTURAL & FOREST CROPS 2013 Table of Contents 1 1 Regulations and Basic Information Safe Quantities of Water ............................................................................ 1-29 Table 1

  19. HORTICULTURAL & FOREST CROPS 2014 Table of Contents 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    HORTICULTURAL & FOREST CROPS 2014 Table of Contents 1 1 Regulations and Basic Information Safe Quantities of Water ............................................................................ 1-29 Table 1

  20. Weather-based forecasts of California crop yields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lobell, D B; Cahill, K N; Field, C B

    2005-09-26

    Crop yield forecasts provide useful information to a range of users. Yields for several crops in California are currently forecast based on field surveys and farmer interviews, while for many crops official forecasts do not exist. As broad-scale crop yields are largely dependent on weather, measurements from existing meteorological stations have the potential to provide a reliable, timely, and cost-effective means to anticipate crop yields. We developed weather-based models of state-wide yields for 12 major California crops (wine grapes, lettuce, almonds, strawberries, table grapes, hay, oranges, cotton, tomatoes, walnuts, avocados, and pistachios), and tested their accuracy using cross-validation over the 1980-2003 period. Many crops were forecast with high accuracy, as judged by the percent of yield variation explained by the forecast, the number of yields with correctly predicted direction of yield change, or the number of yields with correctly predicted extreme yields. The most successfully modeled crop was almonds, with 81% of yield variance captured by the forecast. Predictions for most crops relied on weather measurements well before harvest time, allowing for lead times that were longer than existing procedures in many cases.

  1. Infrared Spectroscopy of Explosives Residues: Measurement Techniques and Spectral Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, Mark C.; Bernacki, Bruce E.

    2015-03-11

    Infrared laser spectroscopy of explosives is a promising technique for standoff and non-contact detection applications. However, the interpretation of spectra obtained in typical standoff measurement configurations presents numerous challenges. Understanding the variability in observed spectra from explosives residues and particles is crucial for design and implementation of detection algorithms with high detection confidence and low false alarm probability. We discuss a series of infrared spectroscopic techniques applied toward measuring and interpreting the reflectance spectra obtained from explosives particles and residues. These techniques utilize the high spectral radiance, broad tuning range, rapid wavelength tuning, high scan reproducibility, and low noise of an external cavity quantum cascade laser (ECQCL) system developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The ECQCL source permits measurements in configurations which would be either impractical or overly time-consuming with broadband, incoherent infrared sources, and enables a combination of rapid measurement speed and high detection sensitivity. The spectroscopic methods employed include standoff hyperspectral reflectance imaging, quantitative measurements of diffuse reflectance spectra, reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy, microscopic imaging and spectroscopy, and nano-scale imaging and spectroscopy. Measurements of explosives particles and residues reveal important factors affecting observed reflectance spectra, including measurement geometry, substrate on which the explosives are deposited, and morphological effects such as particle shape, size, orientation, and crystal structure.

  2. Agronomic Suitability of Bioenergy Crops in Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lemus, Rocky; Baldwin, Brian; Lang, David

    2011-10-01

    In Mississippi, some questions need to be answered about bioenergy crops: how much suitable land is available? How much material can that land produce? Which production systems work best in which scenarios? What levels of inputs will be required for productivity and longterm sustainability? How will the crops reach the market? What kinds of infrastructure will be necessary to make that happen? This publication helps answer these questions: √?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬Ę√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬Ę Which areas in the state are best for bioenergy crop production? √?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬Ę√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬Ę How much could these areas produce sustainably? √?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬Ę√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬Ę How can bioenergy crops impact carbon sequestration and carbon credits? √?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬Ę√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬Ę How will these crops affect fertilizer use and water quality? √?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬Ę√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬

  3. Developing Switchgrass as a Bioenergy Crop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bouton, J.; Bransby, D.; Conger, B.; McLaughlin, S.; Ocumpaugh, W.; Parrish, D.; Taliaferro, C.; Vogel, K.; Wullschleger, S.

    1998-11-08

    The utilization of energy crops produced on American farms as a source of renewable fuels is a concept with great relevance to current ecological and economic issues at both national and global scales. Development of a significant national capacity to utilize perennial forage crops, such as switchgrass (Panicum virgatum, L.) as biofuels could benefit our agricultural economy by providing an important new source of income for farmers. In addition energy production from perennial cropping systems, which are compatible with conventional fining practices, would help reduce degradation of agricultural soils, lower national dependence on foreign oil supplies, and reduce emissions of greenhouse gases and toxic pollutants to the atmosphere (McLaughlin 1998). Interestingly, on-farm energy production is a very old concept, extending back to 19th century America when both transpofiation and work on the farm were powered by approximately 27 million draft animals and fueled by 34 million hectares of grasslands (Vogel 1996). Today a new form of energy production is envisioned for some of this same acreage. The method of energy production is exactly the same - solar energy captured in photosynthesis, but the subsequent modes of energy conversion are vastly different, leading to the production of electricity, transportation fuels, and chemicals from the renewable feedstocks. While energy prices in the United States are among the cheapest in the world, the issues of high dependency on imported oil, the uncertainties of maintaining stable supplies of imported oil from finite reserves, and the environmental costs associated with mining, processing, and combusting fossil fuels have been important drivers in the search for cleaner burning fuels that can be produced and renewed from the landscape. At present biomass and bioenergy combine provide only about 4% of the total primary energy used in the U.S. (Overend 1997). By contrast, imported oil accounts for approximately 44% of the foreign trade deficit in the U.S. and about 45% of the total annual U.S. oil consumption of 34 quads (1 quad = 1015 Btu, Lynd et al. 1991). The 22 quads of oil consumed by transportation represents approximately 25% of all energy use in the US and excedes total oil imports to the US by about 50%. This oil has environmental and social costs, which go well beyond the purchase price of around $15 per barrel. Renewable energy from biomass has the potential to reduce dependency on fossil fhels, though not to totally replace them. Realizing this potential will require the simultaneous development of high yielding biomass production systems and bioconversion technologies that efficiently convert biomass energy into the forms of energy and chemicals usable by industry. The endpoint criterion for success is economic gain for both agricultural and industrial sectors at reduced environmental cost and reduced political risk. This paper reviews progress made in a program of research aimed at evaluating and developing a perennial forage crop, switchgrass as a regional bioenergy crop. We will highlight here aspects of research progress that most closely relate to the issues that will determine when and how extensively switchgrass is used in commercial bioenergy production.

  4. #include #include

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kessler, Christoph

    ] (where a[n] = +infty). C's * bsearch() can't be used, it requires a[j]==key. */ int findloc( void *key Combine≠CRCW BSP≠Quicksort * variant by Gerbessiotis/Valiant JPDC 22(1994) * implemented in NestStep≠C. */ int N=10; // default value /** findloc(): find largest index j in [0..n≠1] with * a[j

  5. Mobilisation of arsenic from bauxite residue (red mud) affected soils: Effect of pH and redox conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burke, Ian

    ). Typically, it comprises residual iron oxides, quartz, sodium aluminosilicates, titanium dioxide, calciumMobilisation of arsenic from bauxite residue (red mud) affected soils: Effect of pH and redox elements, including arsenic. Aerobic and anaer- obic batch experiments were prepared using soils from near

  6. Research Master's Degree in Soil and Crop Sciences A candidate for a research master's degree in Soil and Crop Sciences is expected to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Tsuhan

    ___________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________ Research Master's Degree in Soil and Crop Sciences A candidate for a research master's degree in Soil and Crop Sciences is expected to demonstrate mastery of knowledge and skill in the Field of Soil and Crop research in the field of soil and crop sciences. Candidates are expected to synthesize and create new

  7. Water footprint assessment of crop production in Shaanxi, China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vellekoop, Michel

    #12;i Water footprint assessment of crop production in Shaanxi, China Bachelor Thesis Civil, Yangling, China Keywords: Agricultural crops, water footprint, Shaanxi province, CROPWAT #12;ii #12;iii ABSTRACT The water footprint, introduced by professor A.Y. Hoekstra, is an indicator of freshwater use

  8. Developing salt-tolerant crop plants: challenges and opportunities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blumwald, Eduardo

    Developing salt-tolerant crop plants: challenges and opportunities Toshio Yamaguchi and Eduardo areas of the world; the need to produce salt-tolerant crops is evident. Two main approaches are being used to improve salt tolerance: (i) the exploitation of natural genetic variations, either through

  9. Translational genomics of Vegetable Crops Las Vegas, NV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douches, David S.

    Translational genomics of Vegetable Crops Las Vegas, NV July 21, 2005 David Francis and Allen Van Deynze At the recent ASHS meetings in Las Vegas, a workshop "Translational Genomics of Vegetable Crops interventions" (Minna and Gazdar, 1996). In applied plant science, "translational genomics" implies

  10. Profitability of Willow Biomass Crops Affected by Incentive Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    Crops in New York Short-rotation woody crops (SRWC) like shrub willow (Salix spp.) are a potential source of biomass for energy generation and bioproducts in the USA [1, 2] and globally [3]. While@syr.edu Bioenerg. Res. (2013) 6:53≠64 DOI 10.1007/s12155-012-9234-y #12;result in a very positive net energy

  11. Faculty of Landscape Architecture, Horticulture and Crop Production Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faculty of Landscape Architecture, Horticulture and Crop Production Science Agroecology 2 years science. Among the subjects covered are:Agronomy with ecological and conservation awareness; Integrated - Environmental Issues in Crop Production, 15 credits - Project Based Research Training, 15 credits - or other

  12. GEOGRAPHICAL APPROACHES TO CROP CONSERVATION: THE PARTITIONINGOF GENETIC DIVERSITY IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douches, David S.

    , University of Wisconsin, Mad- ison, W15 3706) and David S. Douches(Department of Crop and Soil ScienceGEOGRAPHICAL APPROACHES TO CROP CONSERVATION: THE PARTITIONINGOF GENETIC DIVERSITY IN ANDEAN POTATOES1 KARL S. ZIMMERER AND DAVID S. DOUCHES Zimmerer,Karl S. (Department of Geography, 384 Science Hall

  13. Energy Crops and their Implications on Surface Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jain, Atul K.

    Energy Crops and their Implications on Surface Energy and Water Balance Yang Song Rahul Barman Phenological differences Variation in water and thermal energy consumption #12;Objectives Examine potential crops on energy and water balance Temporal and spatial patterns of · Evapotranspiration · Radiation

  14. Arabian crude-oil residues evaluated

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ali, M.F.; Bukhari, A.; Hasan, M.; Saleem, M.

    1985-08-12

    This article evaluates detailed physical and chemical characteristics for four important Saudi Arabian resids. Petroleum residues are composed of a mixture of large and complex hydrocarbon molecules along with one or more heteroatoms such as sulfur, oxygen, nitrogen, vanadium, and nickel. The amount of residue and its physical and chemical composition depend on the source of the crude oil and methods of processing. Residues from four Saudi Arabian crude oils produced by the Arabian American Oil Co. (Aramco) were evaluated. The crude oils are 38.5 degrees API Arabian Extra Light, 33.8 degrees API Arabian Light, 30.4 degrees Api Arabian Medium, and 28.03 degrees API Arabian Heavy. Results are presented and residue preparation, and physical and chemical characteristics are analyzed.

  15. Residual stress in nanocrystalline nickel tungsten electrodeposits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ziebell, Tiffany D. (Tiffany Dawn)

    2011-01-01

    Characterizing the residual stress of thick nanocrystalline electrodeposits poses several unique challenges due to their fine grain structure, thickness distribution, and matte surface. We employ a three-dimensional ...

  16. Harvesting Residuals-Economic Energy Link†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Owens, E. T.; Curtis, D. B.

    1986-01-01

    A description of systems used in integrated harvesting of quality and unmerchantable trees is outlined for three areas in New Brunswick, Canada. The silvicultural benefits and the use of residues as an alternative to ...

  17. FINAL REPORT LGP Discrimination and Residual Risk Analysis on Standardized

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Thomas

    FINAL REPORT LGP Discrimination and Residual Risk Analysis on Standardized Test Sites ≠ Camp Sibert............................................................................................................... 10 2.1.6 Residual Risk Analysis

  18. Wavelet analysis of MODIS time series to detect expansion and intensification of row-crop agriculture in Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    and agriculture, including changes in carbon and nitrogen storage, trace gas emissions, quality of surface water from natural vegetation and pastures to row-crop agricultural with the potential to affect regional changed. Today, pastures and areas of natural vegetation are being converted to large-scale croplands

  19. May 27, 1996 Paul Gepts 1 The Crop of the DayThe Crop of the Day

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gepts, Paul

    ://monsterbit.com/touch/greentea.html: Touchstone - Green tea http://newcrop.hort.purdue.edu/hort/newcrops/Crops/Tea: New Crops (Purdue U.): Tea million lbs. ≠ green: 12 ≠ oolong: 2 ≠ jasmine: 0.5 Biggest suppliers? Argentina (33% of black tea), China. Three types of tea derived from Camellia sinensis: green, black, and oolong tea. ≠ For green tea, leaves

  20. Factors that Most Influence Success or Failure in Illicit Crop Reduction and Drug Supply Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Listerman, Jeffrey Sloan

    2014-12-31

    Several interrelated drivers of illicit crop cultivation appear remarkably consistent across virtually all illegal crop producing regions: insurgency or armed conflict, insufficient state authority and weak territorial ...

  1. Density derived estimates of standing crop and net primary production in the giant kelp Macrocystis pyrifera

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reed, Daniel; Rassweiler, Andrew; Arkema, Katie

    2009-01-01

    1991) Production and standing stocks of the kelp MacrocystisDensity derived estimates of standing crop and net primarycult to measure variables of standing crop and net primary

  2. Immobilization of Rocky Flats graphite fines residues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudisill, T.S.; Marra, J.C.; Peeler, D.K.

    1999-07-01

    The Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) is developing an immobilization process for graphite fines residues generated during nuclear materials production activities at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Rocky Flats). The continued storage of this material has been identified as an item of concern. The residue was generated during the cleaning of graphite casting molds and potentially contains reactive plutonium metal. The average residue composition is 73 wt% graphite, 15 wt% calcium fluoride (CaF{sub 2}), and 12 wt% plutonium oxide (PuO{sub 2}). Approximately 950 kg of this material are currently stored at Rocky Flats. The strategy of the immobilization process is to microencapsulate the residue by mixing with a sodium borosilicate (NBS) glass frit and heating at nominally 700 C. The resulting waste form would be sent to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) for disposal. Since the PuO{sub 2} concentration in the residue averages 12 wt%, the immobilization process was required to meet the intent of safeguards termination criteria by limiting plutonium recoverability based on a test developed by Rocky Flats. The test required a plutonium recovery of less than 4 g/kg of waste form when a sample was leached using a nitric acid/CaF{sub 2} dissolution flowsheet. Immobilization experiments were performed using simulated graphite fines with cerium oxide (CeO{sub 2}) as a surrogate for PuO{sub 2} and with actual graphite fines residues. Small-scale surrogate experiments demonstrated that a 4:1 frit to residue ratio was adequate to prevent recovery of greater than 4 g/kg of cerium from simulated waste forms. Additional experiments investigated the impact of varying concentrations of CaF{sub 2} and the temperature/heating time cycle on the cerium recovery. Optimal processing conditions developed during these experiments were subsequently demonstrated at full-scale with surrogate materials and on a smaller scale using actual graphite fines.

  3. An analysis of producing ethanol and electric power from woody residues and agricultural crops in East Texas†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ismayilova, Rubaba Mammad

    2007-09-17

    ethanol production. The results were integrated into a comprehensive set of information that addresses the effects of biomass energy development in the region. The analysis indicates that none of the counties in East Texas have sufficient biomass...

  4. Functional Genomics of Drought Tolerance in Bioenergy Crops

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yin, Hengfu [ORNL; Chen, Rick [ORNL; Yang, Jun [ORNL; Weston, David [ORNL; Chen, Jay [ORNL; Muchero, Wellington [ORNL; Ye, Ning [ORNL; Tschaplinski, Timothy J [ORNL; Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL; Cheng, Zong-Ming [ORNL; Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL; Yang, Xiaohan [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    With the predicted trends in climate change, drought will increasingly impose a grand challenge to biomass production. Most of the bioenergy crops have some degree of drought susceptibility with low water-use efficiency (WUE). It is imperative to improve drought tolerance and WUE in bioenergy crops for sustainable biomass production in arid and semi-arid regions with minimal water input. Genetics and functional genomics can play a critical role in generating knowledge to inform and aid genetic improvement of drought tolerance in bioenergy crops. The molecular aspect of drought response has been extensively investigated in model plants like Arabidopsis, yet our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying drought tolerance in bioenergy crops are limited. Crops exhibit various responses to drought stress depending on species and genotype. A rational strategy for studying drought tolerance in bioenergy crops is to translate the knowledge from model plants and pinpoint the unique features associated with individual species and genotypes. In this review, we summarize the general knowledge about drought responsive pathways in plants, with a focus on the identification of commonality and specialty in drought responsive mechanisms among different species and/or genotypes. We describe the genomic resources developed for bioenergy crops and discuss genetic and epigenetic regulation of drought responses. We also examine comparative and evolutionary genomics to leverage the ever-increasing genomics resources and provide new insights beyond what has been known from studies on individual species. Finally, we outline future exploration of drought tolerance using the emerging new technologies.

  5. A LITERATURE REVIEW ON DURABILITY EVALUATION OF CRANKSHAFTS INCLUDING COMPARISONS OF COMPETING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fatemi, Ali

    such as residual stresses on fatigue behavior and methods of their production in crankshafts. The common crankshaft to their durability performance. This is followed by a discussion of durability assessment procedures used. The operating sources include oil absence, defective lubrication on journals, high operating oil temperature

  6. A range of soil amendments including diammonium phosphate fertilizer (DAP), municipal biosolids (BS), biosolids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Sally

    biosolids (BS), biosolids compost, and Al- and Fe-based water treatment residuals were tested on Pb-, Zn ranging from 35% (BS+Al, DAP 0.5%, DAP+Compost+Al) to 57% (Compost+Al). Plant Zn (Cynadon dactylon L for the first season, with the highest growth in the treatments that included compost and biosolids

  7. Disposal of Rocky Flats residues as waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dustin, D.F.; Sendelweck, V.S. . Rocky Flats Plant); Rivera, M.A. )

    1993-01-01

    Work is underway at the Rocky Flats Plant to evaluate alternatives for the removal of a large inventory of plutonium-contaminated residues from the plant. One alternative under consideration is to package the residues as transuranic wastes for ultimate shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Current waste acceptance criteria and transportation regulations require that approximately 1000 cubic yards of residues be repackaged to produce over 20,000 cubic yards of WIPP certified waste. The major regulatory drivers leading to this increase in waste volume are the fissile gram equivalent, surface radiation dose rate, and thermal power limits. In the interest of waste minimization, analyses have been conducted to determine, for each residue type, the controlling criterion leading to the volume increase, the impact of relaxing that criterion on subsequent waste volume, and the means by which rules changes may be implemented. The results of this study have identified the most appropriate changes to be proposed in regulatory requirements in order to minimize the costs of disposing of Rocky Flats residues as transuranic wastes.

  8. Disposal of Rocky Flats residues as waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dustin, D.F.; Sendelweck, V.S.; Rivera, M.A.

    1993-03-01

    Work is underway at the Rocky Flats Plant to evaluate alternatives for the removal of a large inventory of plutonium-contaminated residues from the plant. One alternative under consideration is to package the residues as transuranic wastes for ultimate shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Current waste acceptance criteria and transportation regulations require that approximately 1000 cubic yards of residues be repackaged to produce over 20,000 cubic yards of WIPP certified waste. The major regulatory drivers leading to this increase in waste volume are the fissile gram equivalent, surface radiation dose rate, and thermal power limits. In the interest of waste minimization, analyses have been conducted to determine, for each residue type, the controlling criterion leading to the volume increase, the impact of relaxing that criterion on subsequent waste volume, and the means by which rules changes may be implemented. The results of this study have identified the most appropriate changes to be proposed in regulatory requirements in order to minimize the costs of disposing of Rocky Flats residues as transuranic wastes.

  9. System and method for measuring residual stress

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prime, Michael B. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2002-01-01

    The present invention is a method and system for determining the residual stress within an elastic object. In the method, an elastic object is cut along a path having a known configuration. The cut creates a portion of the object having a new free surface. The free surface then deforms to a contour which is different from the path. Next, the contour is measured to determine how much deformation has occurred across the new free surface. Points defining the contour are collected in an empirical data set. The portion of the object is then modeled in a computer simulator. The points in the empirical data set are entered into the computer simulator. The computer simulator then calculates the residual stress along the path which caused the points within the object to move to the positions measured in the empirical data set. The calculated residual stress is then presented in a useful format to an analyst.

  10. MODELING PHOTOSYNTHESIS OF HETEROGENEOUS ROSE CROP CANOPIES IN THE GREENHOUSE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lieth, J. Heinrich

    MODELING PHOTOSYNTHESIS OF HETEROGENEOUS ROSE CROP CANOPIES IN THE GREENHOUSE Soo-Hyung Kim and J training system ("bent canopy") is widely used in greenhouse rose production. The bent canopy consists

  11. Crop Production Variability and U.S. Ethanol Mandates†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Jason P.

    2014-07-08

    . Second, the short-run economic impact of RFS relaxation alternatives is investigated using an optimization modeling framework where crop mix and livestock breeding herds are held fixed. Third, the long-run implications of RFS relaxation are investigated...

  12. Evaluation of low-residue soldering for military and commercial applications: A report from the Low-Residue Soldering Task Force

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iman, R.L.; Anderson, D.J.; Burress, R.V.

    1995-06-01

    The LRSTF combined the efforts of industry, military, and government to evaluate low-residue soldering processes for military and commercial applications. These processes were selected for evaluation because they provide a means for the military to support the presidential mandate while producing reliable hardware at a lower cost. This report presents the complete details and results of a testing program conducted by the LRSTF to evaluate low-residue soldering for printed wiring assemblies. A previous informal document provided details of the test plan used in this evaluation. Many of the details of that test plan are contained in this report. The test data are too massive to include in this report, however, these data are available on disk as Excel spreadsheets upon request. The main purpose of low-residue soldering is to eliminate waste streams during the manufacturing process.

  13. Manganese in Texas Soils and its Relation to Crops.†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlyle, E. C. (Elmer Cardinal)

    1931-01-01

    to applications of manganese sulfate. Twenty-one Texas soils have been tested for their response to manganese sulfate by means of pot experiments. No marked increase in the growth of crops was produced by manganese sulfate. On six of the soils manganese... of Procecture 9 .............................. Ifethod for Pot Experiments 10 Determination of ISlanganese in Crops ...................... 10 T)etermination of Acid-soluble 3langanese in Soil ............ 10 Determination of Total Illlanganese in Soil...

  14. Prices include compostable serviceware and linen tablecloths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    APPETIZERS Prices include compostable serviceware and linen tablecloths for the food tables.ucdavis.edu. BUTTERNUT SQUASH & BLACK BEAN ENCHILADAS #12;BUFFETS Prices include compostable serviceware and linen

  15. Sept/Oct 2010 ListProc Newsletter 2009 Honey Crop Prices: Queens and Almonds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishida, Yuko

    Proc Newsletter 2009 Honey Crop Prices: Queens and Almonds Yellowjacket Bait CSBA Convention Bee World Revived

  16. Guidelines for graduate students in Soil and Crop Sciences, Cornell University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawlowski, Wojtek

    1 Guidelines for graduate students in Soil and Crop Sciences, Cornell University Table of Contents and concentrations. About 33 faculty have been drawn together into the field of Soil and Crop Sciences by mutual, Field Crop Science, Soil Science, and Agronomy. The field of Soil and Crop Sciences is closely linked

  17. The National Nuclear Laboratory's Approach to Processing Mixed Wastes and Residues - 13080

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenwood, Howard; Docrat, Tahera; Allinson, Sarah J.; Coppersthwaite, Duncan P.; Sultan, Ruqayyah; May, Sarah [National Nuclear Laboratory, Springfields, Preston, UK, PR4 0XJ (United Kingdom)] [National Nuclear Laboratory, Springfields, Preston, UK, PR4 0XJ (United Kingdom)

    2013-07-01

    The National Nuclear Laboratory (NNL) treats a wide variety of materials produced as by-products of the nuclear fuel cycle, mostly from uranium purification and fuel manufacture but also including materials from uranium enrichment and from the decommissioning of obsolete plants. In the context of this paper, treatment is defined as recovery of uranium or other activity from residues, the recycle of uranium to the fuel cycle or preparation for long term storage and the final disposal or discharge to the environment of the remainder of the material. NNL's systematic but flexible approach to residue assessment and treatment is described in this paper. The approach typically comprises up to five main phases. The benefits of a systematic approach to waste and residue assessments and processing are described in this paper with examples used to illustrate each phase of work. Benefits include early identification of processing routes or processing issues and the avoidance of investment in inappropriate and costly plant or processes. (authors)

  18. Method for using global optimization to the estimation of surface-consistent residual statics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reister, David B. (Knoxville, TN); Barhen, Jacob (Oak Ridge, TN); Oblow, Edward M. (Knoxville, TN)

    2001-01-01

    An efficient method for generating residual statics corrections to compensate for surface-consistent static time shifts in stacked seismic traces. The method includes a step of framing the residual static corrections as a global optimization problem in a parameter space. The method also includes decoupling the global optimization problem involving all seismic traces into several one-dimensional problems. The method further utilizes a Stochastic Pijavskij Tunneling search to eliminate regions in the parameter space where a global minimum is unlikely to exist so that the global minimum may be quickly discovered. The method finds the residual statics corrections by maximizing the total stack power. The stack power is a measure of seismic energy transferred from energy sources to receivers.

  19. Reducing the negative human-health impacts of bioenergy crop emissions through region-specific crop selection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guenther, Alex

    An expected global increase in bioenergy-crop cultivation as an alternative to fossil fuels will have consequences on both global climate and local air quality through changes in biogenic emissions of volatile organic ...

  20. Residual Stresses in Weldments by Neutron Diffraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandara, Arosha

    Residual Stresses in Weldments by Neutron Diffraction Shanmukha Rao M, Jon James, Shirley Northover :- The neutron diffraction is determined from Bragg's law. When neutron propagate through crystal sample, Coherent, Incoherent and Absorption Scattering phenomena take place Weld MaterialsPlate materials Stress

  1. The Significance of Disordered Residues in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poonen, Bjorn

    RFs are significant in causing drug resistance in bacteria. 2. Protein interactions with a. common b. MoRF c. NonThe Significance of Disordered Residues in: 1) Bacterial Drug Resistance and 2) SNP Interactions #12;Outline 1. Introduction 2. Bacteria Methods 3. Bacteria Results 4. Disease Association Methods 5

  2. Chemical Stabilization of Hanford Tank Residual Waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cantrell, Kirk J.; Um, Wooyong; Williams, Benjamin D.; Bowden, Mark E.; Gartman, Brandy N.; Lukens, Wayne W.; Buck, Edgar C.; Mausolf, Edward J.

    2014-03-01

    Three different chemical treatment methods were tested for their ability to stabilize residual waste from Hanford tank C-202 for reducing contaminant release (Tc, Cr, and U in particular). The three treatment methods tested were lime addition [Ca(OH)2], an in-situ Ceramicrete waste form based on chemically bonded phosphate ceramics, and a ferrous iron/goethite treatment. These approaches rely on formation of insoluble forms of the contaminants of concern (lime addition and ceramicrete) and chemical reduction followed by co-precipitation (ferrous iron/goethite incorporation treatment). The results have demonstrated that release of the three most significant mobile contaminants of concern from tank residual wastes can be dramatically reduced after treatment compared to contact with simulated grout porewater without treatment. For uranium, all three treatments methods reduced the leachable uranium concentrations by well over three orders of magnitude. In the case of uranium and technetium, released concentrations were well below their respective MCLs for the wastes tested. For tank C-202 residual waste, chromium release concentrations were above the MCL but were considerably reduced relative to untreated tank waste. This innovative approach has the potential to revolutionize Hanfordís tank retrieval process, by allowing larger volumes of residual waste to be left in tanks while providing an acceptably low level of risk with respect to contaminant release that is protective of the environment and human health. Such an approach could enable DOE to realize significant cost savings through streamlined retrieval and closure operations.

  3. Data Conversion in Residue Number System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zilic, Zeljko

    ;2 Abstract This thesis tackles the problem of data conversion in the Residue Number System (RNS). The RNS has the use of RNS at the applications. In this thesis, we aim at developing efficient schemes for the conversion from the conventional representation to the RNS representation and vice versa. The conventional

  4. Historical Perspective on How and Why Switchgrass was Selected as a "Model" High-Potential Energy Crop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, Lynn L

    2007-11-01

    A review of several publications of the Biofuels Feedstock Development Program, and final reports from the herbaceous crop screening trials suggests that there were several technical and non-technical factors that influenced the decision to focus on one herbaceous "model" crop species. The screening trials funded by the U.S. Department of Energy in the late 1980's to early 1990's assessed a wide range of about 34 species with trials being conducted on a wide range of soil types in 31 different sites spread over seven states in crop producing regions of the U.S. While several species, including sorghums, reed canarygrass and other crops, were identified as having merit for further development, the majority of institutions involved in the herbaceous species screening studies identified switchgrass as having high priority for further development. Six of the seven institutions included switchgrass among the species recommended for further development in their region and all institutions recommended that perennial grasses be given high research priority. Reasons for the selection of switchgrass included the demonstration of relatively high, reliable productivity across a wide geographical range, suitability for marginal quality land, low water and nutrient requirements, and positive environmental attributes. Economic and environmental assessments by Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Biofuels Feedstock Development Program staff together with the screening project results, and funding limitations lead to making the decision to further develop only switchgrass as a "model" or "prototype" species in about 1990. This paper describes the conditions under which the herbaceous species were screened, summarizes results from those trials, discusses the various factors which influenced the selection of switchgrass, and provides a brief evaluation of switchgrass with respect to criteria that should be considered when selecting and developing a crop for biofuels and bioproducts.

  5. Immobilization of Rocky Flats Graphite Fines Residues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudisill, T. S.

    1998-11-06

    The Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) is developing an immobilization process for graphite fines residues generated during nuclear materials production activities at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Rocky Flats). The continued storage of this material has been identified as an item of concern. The residue was generated during the cleaning of graphite casting molds and potentially contains reactive plutonium metal. The average residue composition is 73 wt percent graphite, 15 wt percent calcium fluoride (CaF2), and 12 wt percent plutonium oxide (PuO2). Approximately 950 kilograms of this material are currently stored at Rocky Flats. The strategy of the immobilization process is to microencapsulate the residue by mixing with a sodium borosilicate (NBS) glass frit and heating at nominally 700 degrees C. The resulting waste form would be sent to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) for disposal. Since the PuO2 concentration in the residue averages 12 wt percent, the immobilization process was required to meet the intent of safeguards termination criteria by limiting plutonium recoverability based on a test developed by Rocky Flats. The test required a plutonium recovery of less than 4 g/kg of waste form when a sample was leached using a nitric acid/CaF2 dissolution flowsheet. Immobilization experiments were performed using simulated graphite fines with cerium oxide (CeO2) as a surrogate for PuO2 and with actual graphite fines residues. Small-scale surrogate experiments demonstrated that a 4:1 frit to residue ratio was adequate to prevent recovery of greater than 4 g/kg of cerium from simulated waste forms. Additional experiments investigated the impact of varying concentrations of CaF2 and the temperature/heating time cycle on the cerium recovery. Optimal processing conditions developed during these experiments were subsequently demonstrated at full-scale with surrogate materials and on a smaller scale using actual graphite fines.In general, the recovery of cerium from the full-scale waste forms was higher than for smaller scale experiments. The presence of CaF2 also caused a dramatic increase in cerium recovery not seen in the small-scale experiments. However, the results from experiments with actual graphite fines were encouraging. A 4:1 frit to residue ratio, a temperature of 700 degrees C, and a 2 hr heating time produced waste forms with plutonium recoveries of 4 plus/minus 1 g/kg. With an increase in the frit to residue ratio, waste forms fabricated at this scale should meet the Rocky Flats product specification. The scale-up of the waste form fabrication process to nominally 3 kg is expected to require a 5:1 to 6:1 frit to residue ratio and maintaining the waste form centerline temperature at 700 degrees C for 2 hr.

  6. Reducing the negative human-health impacts of bioenergy crop emissions through region-specific crop selection

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Porter, William C.; Rosenstiel, Todd N.; Guenther, Alex; Lamarque, Jean-Francois; Barsanti, Kelley

    2015-05-06

    An expected global increase in bioenergy-crop cultivation as an alternative to fossil fuels will have consequences on both global climate and local air quality through changes in biogenic emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). While greenhouse gas emissions may be reduced through the substitution of next-generation bioenergy crops such as eucalyptus, giant reed, and switchgrass for fossil fuels, the choice of species has important ramifications for human health, potentially reducing the benefits of conversion due to increases in ozone (O?) and fine particulate matter (PM???) levels as a result of large changes in biogenic emissions. Using the Community Earth Systemmore†ĽModel we simulate the conversion of marginal and underutilized croplands worldwide to bioenergy crops under varying future anthropogenic emissions scenarios. A conservative global replacement using high VOC-emitting crop profiles leads to modeled population-weighted O? increases of 5Ė27 ppb in India, 1Ė9 ppb in China, and 1Ė6 ppb in the United States, with peak PM??? increases of up to 2 ?gm?≥. We present a metric for the regional evaluation of candidate bioenergy crops, as well as results for the application of this metric to four representative emissions profiles using four replacement scales (10Ė100% maximum estimated available land). Finally, we assess the total health and climate impacts of biogenic emissions, finding that the negative consequences of using high-emitting crops could exceed 50% of the positive benefits of reduced fossil fuel emissions in value.ę†less

  7. Using Legumes to Enhance Sustainability of Sorghum Cropping Systems in the East Texas Pineywoods Ecoregion: Impacts on Soil Nitrogen, Soil Carbon, and Crop Yields†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neely, Clark B

    2013-05-03

    bicolor (L.) Moench], high-biomass sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench], and annual forage cropping systems. These studies quantified legume soil moisture usage and C and N contributions to the soil and subsequent crop yields in East Texas. Primary...

  8. Testing regression models with residuals as data by Xia Hua.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hua, Xia, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2010-01-01

    Abstract In polynomial regression ... . In this thesis, I developed a residual based test, the turning point test for residuals, which tests the hypothesis that the kth order polynomial regression holds with ... while the ...

  9. Computer aided analysis for residual stress measurement using ultrasonic techniques†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kypa, Jagan Mohan

    1999-01-01

    Critically refracted longitudinal (Lcr) waves have been investigated with a computerized data acquisition and analysis technique to evaluate residual stresses present in a residual stress reference standard. This measurement ...

  10. In-situ method for treating residual sodium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sherman, Steven R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Henslee, S. Paul (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2005-07-19

    A unique process for deactivating residual sodium in Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) systems which uses humidified (but not saturated) carbon dioxide at ambient temperature and pressure to convert residual sodium into solid sodium bicarbonate.

  11. FIXED PRICE RESIDUAL FUNDS POLICY Policy dated March 29, 1999

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weston, Ken

    FIXED PRICE RESIDUAL FUNDS POLICY Policy dated March 29, 1999 After completion of all deliverables in this process. May 1, 1999 Amendment to Policy ∑ The first $75,000 of the residual balance will be transferred

  12. 1-D Transforms for the Motion Compensation Residual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamisli, Fatih

    Transforms used in image coding are also commonly used to compress prediction residuals in video coding. Prediction residuals have different spatial characteristics from images, and it is useful to develop transforms that ...

  13. In-Situ Method for Treating Residual Sodium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sherman, Steven R.; Henslee, S. Paul

    2005-07-19

    A unique process for deactivating residual sodium in Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) systems which uses humidified (but not saturated) carbon dioxide at ambient temperature and pressure to convert residual sodium into solid sodium bicarbonate.

  14. Estimating Residual Solids Volume In Underground Storage Tanks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, Jason L.; Worthy, S. Jason; Martin, Bruce A.; Tihey, John R.

    2014-01-08

    The Savannah River Site liquid waste system consists of multiple facilities to safely receive and store legacy radioactive waste, treat, and permanently dispose waste. The large underground storage tanks and associated equipment, known as the 'tank farms', include a complex interconnected transfer system which includes underground transfer pipelines and ancillary equipment to direct the flow of waste. The waste in the tanks is present in three forms: supernatant, sludge, and salt. The supernatant is a multi-component aqueous mixture, while sludge is a gel-like substance which consists of insoluble solids and entrapped supernatant. The waste from these tanks is retrieved and treated as sludge or salt. The high level (radioactive) fraction of the waste is vitrified into a glass waste form, while the low-level waste is immobilized in a cementitious grout waste form called saltstone. Once the waste is retrieved and processed, the tanks are closed via removing the bulk of the waste, chemical cleaning, heel removal, stabilizing remaining residuals with tailored grout formulations and severing/sealing external penetrations. The comprehensive liquid waste disposition system, currently managed by Savannah River Remediation, consists of 1) safe storage and retrieval of the waste as it is prepared for permanent disposition; (2) definition of the waste processing techniques utilized to separate the high-level waste fraction/low-level waste fraction; (3) disposition of LLW in saltstone; (4) disposition of the HLW in glass; and (5) closure state of the facilities, including tanks. This paper focuses on determining the effectiveness of waste removal campaigns through monitoring the volume of residual solids in the waste tanks. Volume estimates of the residual solids are performed by creating a map of the residual solids on the waste tank bottom using video and still digital images. The map is then used to calculate the volume of solids remaining in the waste tank. The ability to accurately determine a volume is a function of the quantity and quality of the waste tank images. Currently, mapping is performed remotely with closed circuit video cameras and still photograph cameras due to the hazardous environment. There are two methods that can be used to create a solids volume map. These methods are: liquid transfer mapping / post transfer mapping and final residual solids mapping. The task is performed during a transfer because the liquid level (which is a known value determined by a level measurement device) is used as a landmark to indicate solids accumulation heights. The post transfer method is primarily utilized after the majority of waste has been removed. This method relies on video and still digital images of the waste tank after the liquid transfer is complete to obtain the relative height of solids across a waste tank in relation to known and usable landmarks within the waste tank (cooling coils, column base plates, etc.). In order to accurately monitor solids over time across various cleaning campaigns, and provide a technical basis to support final waste tank closure, a consistent methodology for volume determination has been developed and implemented at SRS.

  15. Estimation of uncertainty for contour method residual stress measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olson, Mitchell D.; DeWald, Adrian T.; Prime, Michael B.; Hill, Michael R.

    2014-12-03

    This paper describes a methodology for the estimation of measurement uncertainty for the contour method, where the contour method is an experimental technique for measuring a two-dimensional map of residual stress over a plane. Random error sources including the error arising from noise in displacement measurements and the smoothing of the displacement surfaces are accounted for in the uncertainty analysis. The output is a two-dimensional, spatially varying uncertainty estimate such that every point on the cross-section where residual stress is determined has a corresponding uncertainty value. Both numerical and physical experiments are reported, which are used to support the usefulness of the proposed uncertainty estimator. The uncertainty estimator shows the contour method to have larger uncertainty near the perimeter of the measurement plane. For the experiments, which were performed on a quenched aluminum bar with a cross section of 51 ◊ 76 mm, the estimated uncertainty was approximately 5 MPa (?/E = 7 ∑ 10??) over the majority of the cross-section, with localized areas of higher uncertainty, up to 10 MPa (?/E = 14 ∑ 10??).

  16. Estimation of uncertainty for contour method residual stress measurements

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Olson, Mitchell D.; DeWald, Adrian T.; Prime, Michael B.; Hill, Michael R.

    2014-12-03

    This paper describes a methodology for the estimation of measurement uncertainty for the contour method, where the contour method is an experimental technique for measuring a two-dimensional map of residual stress over a plane. Random error sources including the error arising from noise in displacement measurements and the smoothing of the displacement surfaces are accounted for in the uncertainty analysis. The output is a two-dimensional, spatially varying uncertainty estimate such that every point on the cross-section where residual stress is determined has a corresponding uncertainty value. Both numerical and physical experiments are reported, which are used to support the usefulnessmore†Ľof the proposed uncertainty estimator. The uncertainty estimator shows the contour method to have larger uncertainty near the perimeter of the measurement plane. For the experiments, which were performed on a quenched aluminum bar with a cross section of 51 ◊ 76 mm, the estimated uncertainty was approximately 5 MPa (?/E = 7 ∑ 10??) over the majority of the cross-section, with localized areas of higher uncertainty, up to 10 MPa (?/E = 14 ∑ 10??).ę†less

  17. Cementation of residue ion exchange resins at Rocky Flats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dustin, D.F.; Beckman, T.D.; Madore, C.M.

    1998-03-03

    Ion exchange resins have been used to purify nitric acid solutions of plutonium at Rocky Flats since the 1950s. Spent ion exchange resins were retained for eventual recovery of residual plutonium, typically by incineration followed by the aqueous extraction of plutonium from the resultant ash. The elimination of incineration as a recovery process in the late 1980s and the absence of a suitable alternative process for plutonium recovery from resins led to a situation where spent ion exchange resins were simply placed into temporary storage. This report describes the method that Rocky Flats is currently using to stabilize residue ion exchange resins. The objective of the resin stabilization program is: (1) to ensure their safety during interim storage at the site, and (2) to prepare them for ultimate shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in New Mexico. Included in the discussion is a description of the safety concerns associated with ion exchange resins, alternatives considered for their stabilization, the selection of the preferred treatment method, the means of implementing the preferred option, and the progress to date.

  18. Deleterious activity of cultivated grasses (Poaceae) and residues on soilborne fungal, nematode and weed pests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stapleton, James J.; Summers, Charles G.; Mitchell, Jeffrey P.; Prather, Timothy S.

    2010-01-01

    on wheat seedlings. Crop Science, 35, 1652Ė1656. Burgos, N.system with cover crops. Weed Science, 44, 355Ė361. Cheema,

  19. Principle of Least Squares Regression Equations Residuals Correlation and Regression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watkins, Joseph C.

    Principle of Least Squares Regression Equations Residuals Topic 3 Correlation and Regression Linear Regression I 1 / 15 #12;Principle of Least Squares Regression Equations Residuals Outline Principle of Least Squares Regression Equations Residuals 2 / 15 #12;Principle of Least Squares Regression Equations

  20. Summary of the engineering assessment of radioactive sands and residues, Lowman Site, Lowman, Idaho

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1981-09-01

    Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc. has reevaluated the Lowman site in order to revise the December 1977 engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive sands and residues at Lowman, Idaho. This engineering assessment has included the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of radioactive sands and residues and radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigations of site hydrology and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas released from the 191,000 tons of radioactive sands, residues, and contaminated soils at the Lowman site constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown radioactive sands and external gamma radiation also are factors.

  1. INTERFACE RESIDUAL STRESSES IN DENTAL ZIRCONIA USING LAUE MICRO-DIFFRACTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bale, H. A.; Tamura, N.; Coelho, P.G.; Hanan, J. C.

    2009-01-01

    Due to their aesthetic value and high compressive strength, dentists have recently employed ceramics for restoration materials. Among the ceramic materials, zirconia provides high toughness and crack resistant characteristics. Residual stresses develop in processing due to factors including grain anisotropy and thermal coefficient mismatch. In the present study, polychromatic X-ray (Laue) micro-diffraction provided grain orientation and residual stresses on a clinically relevant zirconia model ceramic disk. A 0.5 mm x 0.024 mm region on zirconia was examined on a 500 nm scale for residual stresses using a focused poly-chromatic synchrotron X-ray beam. Large stresses ranging from - to + 1GPa were observed at some grains. On average, the method suggests a relatively small compressive stress at the surface between 47 and 75 MPa depending on direction.

  2. Technoeconomic Comparison of Biofuels: Ethanol, Methanol, and Gasoline from Gasification of Woody Residues (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tarud, J.; Phillips, S.

    2011-08-01

    This presentation provides a technoeconomic comparison of three biofuels - ethanol, methanol, and gasoline - produced by gasification of woody biomass residues. The presentation includes a brief discussion of the three fuels evaluated; discussion of equivalent feedstock and front end processes; discussion of back end processes for each fuel; process comparisons of efficiencies, yields, and water usage; and economic assumptions and results, including a plant gate price (PGP) for each fuel.

  3. INSTRUMENTATION, INCLUDING NUCLEAR AND PARTICLE DETECTORS; RADIATION

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    interval technical basis document Chiaro, P.J. Jr. 44 INSTRUMENTATION, INCLUDING NUCLEAR AND PARTICLE DETECTORS; RADIATION DETECTORS; RADIATION MONITORS; DOSEMETERS;...

  4. Stabilization of Rocky Flats combustible residues contaminated with plutonium metal and organic solvents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowen, S.M.; Cisneros, M.R.; Jacobson, L.L.; Schroeder, N.C.; Ames, R.L.

    1998-09-30

    This report describes tests on a proposed flowsheet designed to stabilize combustible residues that were generated at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) during the machining of plutonium metal. Combustible residues are essentially laboratory trash contaminated with halogenated organic solvents and plutonium metal. The proposed flowsheet, designed by RFETS, follows a glovebox procedure that includes (1) the sorting and shredding of materials, (2) a low temperature thermal desorption of solvents from the combustible materials, (3) an oxidation of plutonium metal with steam, and (4) packaging of the stabilized residues. The role of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in this study was to determine parameters for the low temperature thermal desorption and steam oxidation steps. Thermal desorption of carbon tetrachloride (CCl{sub 4}) was examined using a heated air stream on a Rocky Flats combustible residue surrogate contaminated with CCl{sub 4}. Three types of plutonium metal were oxidized with steam in a LANL glovebox to determine the effectiveness of this procedure for residue stabilization. The results from these LANL experiments are used to recommend parameters for the proposed RFETS stabilization flowsheet.

  5. Description of the prototype diagnostic residual gas analyzer for ITER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Younkin, T. R.; Biewer, T. M.; Klepper, C. C.; Marcus, C.

    2014-11-15

    The diagnostic residual gas analyzer (DRGA) system to be used during ITER tokamak operation is being designed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to measure fuel ratios (deuterium and tritium), fusion ash (helium), and impurities in the plasma. The eventual purpose of this instrument is for machine protection, basic control, and physics on ITER. Prototyping is ongoing to optimize the hardware setup and measurement capabilities. The DRGA prototype is comprised of a vacuum system and measurement technologies that will overlap to meet ITER measurement requirements. Three technologies included in this diagnostic are a quadrupole mass spectrometer, an ion trap mass spectrometer, and an optical penning gauge that are designed to document relative and absolute gas concentrations.

  6. Evaluation of agricultural residues for paper manufacture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alcaide, L.J.; Baldovin, F.L.; Herranz, J.L.F. (Univ. of Cordoba (Spain))

    1993-03-01

    Five agricultural residues-olive tree fellings, wheat straw, sunflower stalks, vine shoots, and cotton stalks-were evaluated for use as raw materials for paper manufacture. The untreated raw materials and their pulps were tested for hot-water solubles, 1%-NaOH solubles, alcohol-benzene extractables, ash, holocellulose, lignin, [alpha]-cellulose, and pentosans. Handsheets were tested for breaking length, stretch, burst index, and tear index. The results showed wheat straw to be the most promising material. Vine shoots showed the least promise.

  7. Course may include: Research in Education

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Course may include: Research in Education Statistics in Education Theories of Educational Admin Policy Analysis Sociological Aspects of Education Approaches to Literacy Development Information and Communication Technologies Issues in Education Final Project Seminar Master of Education Educational

  8. Reclaimed Water as an Alternative Water Source for Crop Irrigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Etxeberria, Edgardo

    Reclaimed Water as an Alternative Water Source for Crop Irrigation Lawrence R. Parsons1 University Francisco, CA 94114 Robert Holden Monterey Regional Water Pollution Control Agency, 5 Harris Court, Building D, Monterey, CA 93940 David W. York York Water Circle, 3158 S. Fulmer Circle, Tallahassee, FL 32303

  9. Effect of alkalinity in irrigation water on selected greenhouse crops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valdez Aguilar, Luis Alonso

    2005-11-01

    Effect of Alkalinity in Irrigation Water on Selected Greenhouse Crops. (August 2004) Luis Alonso Valdez Aguilar, B.S., Universidad Aut??noma de Nuevo Le??n, Mexico; M.S., Universidad Aut??noma Chapingo, Mexico Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. David...

  10. Purpose-designed Crop Plants for Biofuels BIOENERGY PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Purpose-designed Crop Plants for Biofuels BIOENERGY PROGRAM The Texas AgriLife Research Center for the biofuels industry. This program recognizes that the ideal combination of traits required for an economically and energetically sustainable biofuels industry does not yet exist in a single plant spe- cies

  11. Editor's Choice Editor's Choice: Crop Genome Plasticity and Its Relevance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parrott, Wayne

    . The term GE is preferred over the term "genetically modified" (commonly referred to as GMEditor's Choice Editor's Choice: Crop Genome Plasticity and Its Relevance to Food and Feed Safety of Genetically Engineered Breeding Stacks1 Genetically engineered (GE) stacks, combinations of two or more single

  12. HORTICULTURAL & FOREST CROPS 2012 Table of Contents 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    HORTICULTURAL & FOREST CROPS 2012 Table of Contents 1 1 Regulations and Basic Information SafeQuantitiesofLiquidMaterials(EmulsifiableConcentrates,Etc.)for .......... 1-29 Various Quantities of Water Table 1.8 - Pounds of Active Ingredients per Gallon, Pounds per

  13. HORTICULTURAL & FOREST CROPS 2011 Table of Contents 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    HORTICULTURAL & FOREST CROPS 2011 Table of Contents 1 1 Regulations and Basic Information SafeQuantitiesofLiquidMaterials(EmulsifiableConcentrates,Etc.)for .......... 1-30 Various Quantities of Water Table 1.8 - Pounds of Active Ingredients per Gallon, Pounds per

  14. Emergy Analysis of Sugarcane (energy crop) Water Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    diagrams Energy & Material Flow Data Emergy computations Analysis 5. Case Study #12;12Annual Southwest and Material Flow data #12;EmergyEvaluationTable 15 Unit Solar Solar Data EMERGY* EMERGY Note Item Unit (unitsEmergy Analysis of Sugarcane (energy crop) Water Management HENDRY COUNTY SUSTAINABLE BIOFUELS

  15. Emulating maize yields from global gridded crop models using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emulating maize yields from global gridded crop models using statistical estimates Elodie Blanc and Benjamin Sultan Report No. 279 March 2015 #12;The MIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global from two established MIT research centers: the Center for Global Change Science (CGCS) and the Center

  16. Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

    2014-11-25

    A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material, such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

  17. Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

    2013-02-19

    A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

  18. Scientists, growers assess trade-offs in use of tillage, cover crops and compost

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2003-01-01

    depth depth depth depth compost was added two times perConv. crops were present. Compost was ap- Main effect Fof tillage, cover crops and compost Louise E. Jackson Irenee

  19. cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Raikhel, Natasha V. (Okemos, MI); Broekaert, Willem F. (Dilbeek, BE); Chua, Nam-Hai (Scarsdale, NY); Kush, Anil (New York, NY)

    1999-05-04

    A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74-79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli.

  20. cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Raikhel, N.V.; Broekaert, W.F.; Chua, N.H.; Kush, A.

    1999-05-04

    A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74--79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli. 12 figs.

  1. cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Raikhel, N.V.; Broekaert, W.F.; Chua, N.H.; Kush, A.

    1995-03-21

    A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1,018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74--79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli. 11 figures.

  2. CDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Raikhel, Natasha V. (Okemos, MI); Broekaert, Willem F. (Dilbeek, BE); Chua, Nam-Hai (Scarsdale, NY); Kush, Anil (New York, NY)

    1995-03-21

    A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74-79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli.

  3. Effects of No-Till on Yields as Influenced by Crop and Environmental Factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toliver, Dustin K.; Larson, James A.; Roberts, Roland K.; English, B.C.; De La Torre Ugarte, D. G.; West, Tristram O.

    2012-02-07

    Th is research evaluated diff erences in yields and associated downside risk from using no-till and tillage practices. Yields from 442 paired tillage experiments across the United States were evaluated with respect to six crops and environmental factors including geographic location, annual precipitation, soil texture, and time since conversion from tillage to no-till. Results indicated that mean yields for sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench] and wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) with no-till were greater than with tillage. In addition, no-till tended to produce similar or greater mean yields than tillage for crops grown on loamy soils in the Southern Seaboard and Mississippi Portal regions. A warmer and more humid climate and warmer soils in these regions relative to the Heartland, Basin and Range, and Fruitful Rim regions appear to favor no-till on loamy soils. With the exception of corn (Zea mays L.) and cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) in the Southern Seaboard region, no-till performed poorly on sandy soils. Crops grown in the Southern Seaboard were less likely to have lower no-till yields than tillage yields on loamy soils and thus had lower downside yield risk than other farm resource regions. Consistent with mean yield results, soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] and wheat grown on sandy soils in the Southern Seaboard region using no-till had larger downside yield risks than when produced with no-till on loamy soils. Th e key fi ndings of this study support the hypothesis that soil and climate factors impact no-till yields relative to tillage yields and may be an important factor infl uencing risk and expected return and the adoption of the practice by farmers.

  4. OUTLOOK: Specialty crops and methyl bromide alternatives: Taking stock after 7 years

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Browne, Greg T

    2013-01-01

    finding alternatives to Outlook Specialty crops and methylNumber 3 Steve Fennimore Outlook Non-fumigant approaches to

  5. Effect of Organic Farming on Soil Fertility , Yield and Quality of Crops in the Tropics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhaskaran, Usha Pankajam; Krishna, Devi

    2009-01-01

    manures by the farmers in Kerala, the most southern State ofvegetable crops grown in Kerala, cowpea occupies a prime

  6. The impact of mineral fertilizers on the carbon footprint of crop production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brentrup, Frank

    2009-01-01

    of food, feed and bio-energy. Intensive crop production withfor food, feed and bio-energy. The agricultural contribution

  7. Quantum Residual Correlation: Interpreting through State Merging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Indranil Chakrabarty; Abhishek Deshpande; Sourav Chatterjee

    2015-03-03

    In this brief report we revisit the concept of "quantum dissension", which was introduced as a natural extension of quantum discord for three qubit system. Here we bring in new expression for quantum dissensions and more interestingly we name one such expression as \\textit{residual correlation}. The basic objective behind the introduction of such a quantity is to capture the extra amount of correlation generated by doing measurement in a correlated system from a situation where we do not bring in a correlated system in the measurement process. Apart from this we also present an operational interpretation of this correlation in context of state merging. Remarkably, we find that for three qubit system if one discards relevant prior information, the change in the cost of state merging ( merging the quantum information of two parties into one) is captured by the \\textit{residual correlation}. In addition to that we found that this quantity can be negative for mixed states. This indeed opens up a new dimension in the tripartite scenario where we can observe situations where there is a decrease in the cost of state merging on discarding relevant prior information. We claim that this result establishes a re conceptualization of information processing tasks in tripartite situations where we can use suitable measurement and states to bring down the cost of the protocol.

  8. Morphing of Geometric Composites via Residual Swelling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matteo Pezzulla; Steven A. Shillig; Paola Nardinocchi; Douglas P. Holmes

    2015-05-30

    Understanding and controlling the shape of thin, soft objects has been the focus of significant research efforts among physicists, biologists, and engineers in the last decade. These studies aim to utilize advanced materials in novel, adaptive ways such as fabricating smart actuators or mimicking living tissues. Here, we present the controlled growth--like morphing of 2D sheets into 3D shapes by preparing geometric composite structures that deform by residual swelling. The morphing of these geometric composites is dictated by both swelling and geometry, with diffusion controlling the swelling-induced actuation, and geometric confinement dictating the structure's deformed shape. Building on a simple mechanical analog, we present an analytical model that quantitatively describes how the Gaussian and mean curvatures of a thin disk are affected by the interplay among geometry, mechanics, and swelling. This model is in excellent agreement with our experiments and numerics. We show that the dynamics of residual swelling is dictated by a competition between two characteristic diffusive length scales governed by geometry. Our results provide the first 2D analog of Timoshenko's classical formula for the thermal bending of bimetallic beams - our generalization explains how the Gaussian curvature of a 2D geometric composite is affected by geometry and elasticity. The understanding conferred by these results suggests that the controlled shaping of geometric composites may provide a simple complement to traditional manufacturing techniques.

  9. Promoting policy development and an EU Action Plan for the Woody Energy Crops Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Promoting policy development and an EU Action Plan for the Woody Energy Crops Sector Kevin Lindegaard, Crops for Energy Ltd #12;What are short rotation plantations (SRPs)? ∑ Woody crops grown at close, Germany, Poland, Belgium Industry Public bodies Research Institutions Joint Action Plan Common Strategies

  10. CROP SCIENCE, VOL. 51, SEPTEMBEROCTOBER 2011 2219 The normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CROP SCIENCE, VOL. 51, SEPTEMBER≠OCTOBER 2011 2219 RESEARCH The normalized difference vegetation.2135/cropsci2010.12.0729 Published online 6 July 2011. © Crop Science Society of America | 5585 Guilford Rd, reflectance at 661 nm; R935, reflectance at 935 nm. Published in Crop Sci. 51:2219≠2227 (2011). doi: 10

  11. CROP SCIENCE, VOL. 51, JANUARYFEBRUARY 2011 323 Turfgrass quality is evaluated by integrating factors of can-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CROP SCIENCE, VOL. 51, JANUARY≠FEBRUARY 2011 323 RESEARCH Turfgrass quality is evaluated: 10.2135/cropsci2010.05.0296 Published online 15 Nov. 2010. © Crop Science Society of America | 5585 area index; NDVI, normalized difference vegetation index. Published in Crop Sci. 51:323≠332 (2011). doi

  12. Collection Policy: SOIL, CROP AND ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES Subject Scope | Priority Tables | Other policies . . .

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angenent, Lars T.

    Collection Policy: SOIL, CROP AND ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES Subject Scope | Priority Tables | Other. Research is tending away from classical agronomy to the science of soil, crop, air. More emphasis is on the environment, less on agriculture. 1.3 Graduate program The Field of Soil, Crop and Atmospheric Sciences offers

  13. Reply to Brush et al.: Wake-up call for crop conservation science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ross-Ibarra, Jeffrey

    LETTER Reply to Brush et al.: Wake-up call for crop conservation science We strongly concur is increasing evidence that small-scale farmers throughout the world, and especially in areas of crop domestication and diversity, continue to maintain a diverse set of crop varieties" (3) and "after thirty years

  14. CROP SCIENCE, VOL. 52, MAYJUNE 2012 1209 Cereal cyst nematode (CCN) describes a group of closely

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pappu, Hanu R.

    CROP SCIENCE, VOL. 52, MAY≠JUNE 2012 1209 RESEARCH Cereal cyst nematode (CCN) describes a group, Institute of Crop Sciences, Shanxi Acad- emy of Agricultural Sciences, Taiyuan 030032, China; T.D. Murray:1209≠1217 (2012). doi: 10.2135/cropsci2011.11.0591 © Crop Science Society of America | 5585 Guilford Rd., Madison

  15. Impacts of land use change due to biofuel crops on carbon balance, bioenergy production, and agricultural

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhuang, Qianlai

    Impacts of land use change due to biofuel crops on carbon balance, bioenergy production that biofuel crops have much higher net pri- mary production (NPP) than soybean and wheat crops. When food). Global biofuel production has increased dramatically in the last decade, especially in United States

  16. A LIDAR-based crop height measurement system for Miscanthus giganteus Lei Zhang, Tony E. Grift

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G stem densities. The results showed an average error of 5.08% with a maximum error of 8% and a minimum of bioenergy crop performance. Field crops such as corn and soybean are harvested for their seeds, and various flow measurements. However, in the case of bioenergy crops, the complete above ground plant

  17. Industrial Crops and Products 33 (2011) 504513 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    online 5 January 2011 Keywords: Bioenergy Energy crops Specific energy consumption Mechanical size sizes after comminution were found inversely proportional to the bulk densities of all four energy crops crops. The bulk densities for 4-mm and smaller Miscanthus and switchgrass particles were higher than

  18. Scramjet including integrated inlet and combustor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kutschenreuter, P.H. Jr.; Blanton, J.C.

    1992-02-04

    This patent describes a scramjet engine. It comprises: a first surface including an aft facing step; a cowl including: a leading edge and a trailing edge; an upper surface and a lower surface extending between the leading edge and the trailing edge; the cowl upper surface being spaced from and generally parallel to the first surface to define an integrated inlet-combustor therebetween having an inlet for receiving and channeling into the inlet-combustor supersonic inlet airflow; means for injecting fuel into the inlet-combustor at the step for mixing with the supersonic inlet airflow for generating supersonic combustion gases; and further including a spaced pari of sidewalls extending between the first surface to the cowl upper surface and wherein the integrated inlet-combustor is generally rectangular and defined by the sidewall pair, the first surface and the cowl upper surface.

  19. The global gridded crop model intercomparison: Data and modeling protocols for Phase 1 (v1.0)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, J.; MŁller, C.; Deryng, D.; Chryssanthacopoulos, J.; Boote, K. J.; BŁchner, M.; Foster, I.; Glotter, M.; Heinke, J.; Iizumi, T.; Izaurralde, R. C.; Mueller, N. D.; Ray, D. K.; Rosenzweig, C.; Ruane, A. C.; Sheffield, J.

    2015-02-11

    We present protocols and input data for Phase 1 of the Global Gridded Crop Model Intercomparison, a project of the Agricultural Model Intercomparison and Improvement Project (AgMIP). The project consist of global simulations of yields, phenologies, and many land-surface fluxes using 12Ė15 modeling groups for many crops, climate forcing data sets, and scenarios over the historical period from 1948 to 2012. The primary outcomes of the project include (1) a detailed comparison of the major differences and similarities among global models commonly used for large-scale climate impact assessment, (2) an evaluation of model and ensemble hindcasting skill, (3) quantification of key uncertainties from climate input data, model choice, and other sources, and (4) a multi-model analysis of the agricultural impacts of large-scale climate extremes from the historical record.

  20. The global gridded crop model intercomparison: Data and modeling protocols for Phase 1 (v1.0)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Elliott, J.; MŁller, C.; Deryng, D.; Chryssanthacopoulos, J.; Boote, K. J.; BŁchner, M.; Foster, I.; Glotter, M.; Heinke, J.; Iizumi, T.; et al

    2015-02-11

    We present protocols and input data for Phase 1 of the Global Gridded Crop Model Intercomparison, a project of the Agricultural Model Intercomparison and Improvement Project (AgMIP). The project consist of global simulations of yields, phenologies, and many land-surface fluxes using 12Ė15 modeling groups for many crops, climate forcing data sets, and scenarios over the historical period from 1948 to 2012. The primary outcomes of the project include (1) a detailed comparison of the major differences and similarities among global models commonly used for large-scale climate impact assessment, (2) an evaluation of model and ensemble hindcasting skill, (3) quantification ofmore†Ľkey uncertainties from climate input data, model choice, and other sources, and (4) a multi-model analysis of the agricultural impacts of large-scale climate extremes from the historical record.ę†less

  1. Electric Power Monthly, August 1990. [Glossary included

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-11-29

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly summaries of electric utility statistics at the national, Census division, and State level. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data includes generation by energy source (coal, oil, gas, hydroelectric, and nuclear); generation by region; consumption of fossil fuels for power generation; sales of electric power, cost data; and unusual occurrences. A glossary is included.

  2. MOTIVATION INCLUDED OR EXCLUDED FROM Mihaela Cocea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cocea, Mihaela

    MOTIVATION ­ INCLUDED OR EXCLUDED FROM E-LEARNING Mihaela Cocea National College of Ireland Mayor, Dublin 1, Ireland sweibelzahl@ncirl.ie ABSTRACT The learners' motivation has an impact on the quality-Learning, motivation has been mainly considered in terms of instructional design. Research in this direction suggests

  3. Energy Consumption of Personal Computing Including Portable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Namboodiri, Vinod

    processing unit (CPU) processing power and capacity of mass storage devices doubles every 18 months. Such growth in both processing and storage capabilities fuels the production of ever more powerful portableEnergy Consumption of Personal Computing Including Portable Communication Devices Pavel Somavat1

  4. Course may include: Research in Education

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Development Information and Communication Technologies Issues in Education Final Project Seminar Master, the Final Project Seminar. This graduate program will allow you to develop your skills and knowledgeCourse may include: Research in Education Qualitative Methods in Educational Research Fundamentals

  5. Communication in automation, including networking and wireless

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antsaklis, Panos

    Communication in automation, including networking and wireless Nicholas Kottenstette and Panos J and networking in automation is given. Digital communication fundamentals are reviewed and networked control are presented. 1 Introduction 1.1 Why communication is necessary in automated systems Automated systems use

  6. Bioassays of weathered residues of several organic phosphorus insecticides†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hightower, Billie Gene

    1959-01-01

    at high temperatures on the residual toxicities of Gut hi on, Sevin, and toxaphene to the boll weevil, Anthonomus grandis Boh........................ . . . . ........ 3^ 3? The effects of simulated wind on the residual toxicities of Guthion, dieldrin..., and toxaphene dusts to the boll weevil, Anthonomus grandis Boh. 36 The effects of high temperatures on the residual toxicities of methyl parathion, malathion, and toxaphene to the boll weevil, Anthonomus grandis Boh...................... 3$ 5. The effects...

  7. Wet Gasification of Ethanol Residue: A Preliminary Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Michael D.; Elliott, Douglas C.

    2008-09-22

    A preliminary technoeconomic assessment has been made of several options for the application of catalytic hydrothermal gasification (wet gasification) to ethanol processing residues.

  8. Water dynamics clue to key residues in protein folding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Meng [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)] [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Zhu, Huaiqiu, E-mail: hqzhu@pku.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)] [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Yao, Xin-Qiu [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China) [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Department of Biophysics, Kyoto University, Sakyo Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); She, Zhen-Su, E-mail: she@pku.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)] [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2010-01-29

    A computational method independent of experimental protein structure information is proposed to recognize key residues in protein folding, from the study of hydration water dynamics. Based on all-atom molecular dynamics simulation, two key residues are recognized with distinct water dynamical behavior in a folding process of the Trp-cage protein. The identified key residues are shown to play an essential role in both 3D structure and hydrophobic-induced collapse. With observations on hydration water dynamics around key residues, a dynamical pathway of folding can be interpreted.

  9. Comparison of residual stresses in Inconel 718 simple parts made...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    melting and direct laser metal sintering Residual stress profiles were mapped using neutron diffraction in two simple prism builds of Inconel 718: one fabricated with electron...

  10. Residual orientation in micro-injection molded parts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Healy, John; Edward, Graham H.; Knott, Robert B. (Monash); (ANSTO)

    2008-06-30

    The residual orientation following micro-injection molding of small rectangular plates with linear polyethylene has been examined using small-angle neutron scattering, and small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering. The effect of changing the molding conditions has been examined, and the residual chain orientation has been compared to the residual orientation of the crystallites as a function of position in the sample. This study has found that, for micromoldings, the orientation of the crystallites decreases with increasing injection speed and increasing mold thickness. The combined data suggest that the majority of the orientation present comes from oriented crystal growth rather than residual chain orientation.

  11. Residual Stresses for Structural Analysis and Fatigue Life Prediction...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in Vehicle Components: Success stories from the High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML) User Program Residual Stresses for Structural Analysis and Fatigue Life Prediction in...

  12. Residual Stress Measurements in Side Bonded Resistance Welds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PAUL, KORINKO

    2005-04-18

    Resistance upset welding is used to attach small diameter machined tubes to small gas vessels. Recently there has been interest in determining the level of residual stresses caused by this attachment method and its influence on environmental interactions. A test program was initiated to determine the residual stresses present due to welding using the nominal weld parameters and varying the interference between the foot and the counter bore. In this paper, the residual stress measurement technique is described, the welding conditions are provided, and the residual stress due to welding at the nominal conditions are presented.

  13. Catalyst deactivation model for residual oil hydrodesulfurization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takatsuka, T.; Higasino, S.; Hirohama, S. [Chiyoda Corporation, Yokohama (Japan)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    Hydrodesulfurization process plays a dominant role in the modern refineries to upgrade residual oil either by removing heterogeneous atoms or by hydrocracking the bottom to distillates products. The practical model is proposed to predict a catalyst life which is the most concern in the process. The catalyst is deactivated in the early stage of the operation by coke deposition on the catalyst active site. The ultimate catalyst life is determined by pore mouth plugging depending on its metal capacity. The phenomena are mathematically described by losses of catalyst surface area and effective diffusivity of feedstock molecules in catalyst pore. The model parameters were collected through the pilot plant tests with different types of catalysts and feedstocks.

  14. Subterranean barriers including at least one weld

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nickelson, Reva A.; Sloan, Paul A.; Richardson, John G.; Walsh, Stephanie; Kostelnik, Kevin M.

    2007-01-09

    A subterranean barrier and method for forming same are disclosed, the barrier including a plurality of casing strings wherein at least one casing string of the plurality of casing strings may be affixed to at least another adjacent casing string of the plurality of casing strings through at least one weld, at least one adhesive joint, or both. A method and system for nondestructively inspecting a subterranean barrier is disclosed. For instance, a radiographic signal may be emitted from within a casing string toward an adjacent casing string and the radiographic signal may be detected from within the adjacent casing string. A method of repairing a barrier including removing at least a portion of a casing string and welding a repair element within the casing string is disclosed. A method of selectively heating at least one casing string forming at least a portion of a subterranean barrier is disclosed.

  15. Photoactive devices including porphyrinoids with coordinating additives

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forrest, Stephen R; Zimmerman, Jeramy; Yu, Eric K; Thompson, Mark E; Trinh, Cong; Whited, Matthew; Diev, Vlacheslav

    2015-05-12

    Coordinating additives are included in porphyrinoid-based materials to promote intermolecular organization and improve one or more photoelectric characteristics of the materials. The coordinating additives are selected from fullerene compounds and organic compounds having free electron pairs. Combinations of different coordinating additives can be used to tailor the characteristic properties of such porphyrinoid-based materials, including porphyrin oligomers. Bidentate ligands are one type of coordinating additive that can form coordination bonds with a central metal ion of two different porphyrinoid compounds to promote porphyrinoid alignment and/or pi-stacking. The coordinating additives can shift the absorption spectrum of a photoactive material toward higher wavelengths, increase the external quantum efficiency of the material, or both.

  16. Power generation method including membrane separation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Union City, CA)

    2000-01-01

    A method for generating electric power, such as at, or close to, natural gas fields. The method includes conditioning natural gas containing C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons and/or acid gas by means of a membrane separation step. This step creates a leaner, sweeter, drier gas, which is then used as combustion fuel to run a turbine, which is in turn used for power generation.

  17. Rotor assembly including superconducting magnetic coil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Snitchler, Gregory L. (Shrewsbury, MA); Gamble, Bruce B. (Wellesley, MA); Voccio, John P. (Somerville, MA)

    2003-01-01

    Superconducting coils and methods of manufacture include a superconductor tape wound concentrically about and disposed along an axis of the coil to define an opening having a dimension which gradually decreases, in the direction along the axis, from a first end to a second end of the coil. Each turn of the superconductor tape has a broad surface maintained substantially parallel to the axis of the coil.

  18. Nuclear reactor shield including magnesium oxide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rouse, Carl A. (Del Mar, CA); Simnad, Massoud T. (La Jolla, CA)

    1981-01-01

    An improvement in nuclear reactor shielding of a type used in reactor applications involving significant amounts of fast neutron flux, the reactor shielding including means providing structural support, neutron moderator material, neutron absorber material and other components as described below, wherein at least a portion of the neutron moderator material is magnesium in the form of magnesium oxide either alone or in combination with other moderator materials such as graphite and iron.

  19. Electric power monthly, September 1990. [Glossary included

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-12-17

    The purpose of this report is to provide energy decision makers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues. The power plants considered include coal, petroleum, natural gas, hydroelectric, and nuclear power plants. Data are presented for power generation, fuel consumption, fuel receipts and cost, sales of electricity, and unusual occurrences at power plants. Data are compared at the national, Census division, and state levels. 4 figs., 52 tabs. (CK)

  20. Regional Uptake and Release of Crop Carbon in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    West, Tristram O.; Bandaru, Varaprasad; Brandt, Craig C.; Schuh, A.E.; Ogle, S.M.

    2011-08-03

    Carbon fixed by agricultural crops in the US creates regional CO2 sinks where it is harvested and regional CO2 sources where it is released back to the atmosphere. The quantity and location of these fluxes differ depending on the annual supply and demand of crop commodities. Data on the harvest of crop biomass, storage, import and export, and on the use of biomass for food, feed, fiber, and fuel were compiled to estimate an annual crop carbon budget for 2000 to 2008. Net sources of CO2 associated with the consumption of crop commodities occurred in the Eastern Uplands, Southern Seaboard, and Fruitful Rim regions. Net sinks associated with the production of crop commodities occurred in the Heartland, Northern Crescent, Northern Great Plains, and Mississippi Portal regions. The national crop carbon budget was balanced to within 0.7 to 6.6% yr-1 during the period of this analysis.

  1. End-of-life vehicle recycling : state of the art of resource recovery from shredder residue.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jody, B. J.; Daniels, E. J.; Energy Systems

    2007-03-21

    Each year, more than 50 million vehicles reach the end of their service life throughout the world. More than 95% of these vehicles enter a comprehensive recycling infrastructure that includes auto parts recyclers/dismantlers, remanufacturers, and material recyclers (shredders). Today, about 75% of automotive materials are profitably recycled via (1) parts reuse and parts and components remanufacturing and (2) ultimately by the scrap processing (shredding) industry. The process by which the scrap processors recover metal scrap from automobiles involves shredding the obsolete automobiles, along with other obsolete metal-containing products (such as white goods, industrial scrap, and demolition debris), and recovering the metals from the shredded material. The single largest source of recycled ferrous scrap for the iron and steel industry is obsolete automobiles. The non-metallic fraction that remains after the metals are recovered from the shredded materials (about 25% of the weight of the vehicle)--commonly called shredder residue--is disposed of in landfills. Over the past 10 to 15 years, a significant amount of research and development has been undertaken to enhance the recycle rate of end-of-life vehicles (ELVs), including enhancing dismantling techniques and improving remanufacturing operations. However, most of the effort has focused on developing technology to recover materials, such as polymers, from shredder residue. To make future vehicles more energy efficient, more lighter-weight materials--primarily polymers and polymer composites--will be used in manufacturing these vehicles. These materials increase the percentage of shredder residue that must be disposed of, compared with the percentage of metals. Therefore, as the complexity of automotive materials and systems increases, new technologies will be required to sustain and maximize the ultimate recycling of these materials and systems at end-of-life. Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne), in cooperation with the Vehicle Recycling Partnership (VRP) and the American Plastics Council (APC), is working to develop technology for recycling materials from shredder residue. Several other organizations worldwide are also working on developing technology for recycling shredder residue. Without a commercially viable shredder industry, our nation may face greater environmental challenges and a decreased supply of quality scrap and be forced to turn to primary ores for the production of finished metals. This document presents a review of the state of the art in shredder residue recycling. Available technologies and emerging technologies for the recycling of materials from shredder residue are discussed.

  2. Biomass fuel from woody crops for electric power generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perlack, R.D.; Wright, L.L.; Huston, M.A.; Schramm, W.E.

    1995-06-22

    This report discusses the biologic, environmental, economic, and operational issues associated with growing wood crops in managed plantations. Information on plantation productivity, environmental issues and impacts, and costs is drawn from DOE`s Biofuels Feedstock Development as well as commercial operations in the US and elsewhere. The particular experiences of three countries--Brazil, the Philippines, and Hawaii (US)--are discussed in considerable detail.

  3. SOLID PHASE MICROEXTRACTION SAMPLING OF FIRE DEBRIS RESIDUES IN THE PRESENCE OF RADIONUCLIDE SURROGATE METALS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duff, M; Keisha Martin, K; S Crump, S

    2007-03-23

    The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) Laboratory currently does not have on site facilities for handling radioactive evidentiary materials and there are no established FBI methods or procedures for decontaminating highly radioactive fire debris (FD) evidence while maintaining evidentiary value. One experimental method for the isolation of FD residue from radionuclide metals involves using solid phase microextraction (SPME) fibers to remove the residues of interest. Due to their high affinity for organics, SPME fibers should have little affinity for most (radioactive) metals. The focus of this research was to develop an examination protocol that was applicable to safe work in facilities where high radiation doses are shielded from the workers (as in radioactive shielded cells or ''hot cells''). We also examined the affinity of stable radionuclide surrogate metals (Co, Ir, Re, Ni, Ba, Cs, Nb, Zr and Nd) for sorption by the SPME fibers. This was done under exposure conditions that favor the uptake of FD residues under conditions that will provide little contact between the SPME and the FD material (such as charred carpet or wood that contains commonly-used accelerants). Our results from mass spectrometric analyses indicate that SPME fibers show promise for use in the room temperature head space uptake of organic FD residue (namely, diesel fuel oil, kerosene, gasoline and paint thinner) with subsequent analysis by gas chromatography (GC) with mass spectrometric (MS) detection. No inorganic forms of ignitable fluids were included in this study.

  4. Current biofuel feedstock crops such as corn lead to large environmental losses of N through nitrate leaching and N2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David, Mark B.

    219 Current biofuel feedstock crops such as corn lead to large environmental losses of N through biofuel crops established on a rich Mollisol soil. Reduced Nitrogen Losses after Conversion of Row Crop Agriculture to Perennial Biofuel Crops Candice M. Smith, Mark B. david,* Corey A. Mitchell, Michael d. Masters

  5. Accurate, objective, reliable, and timely predictions of crop yield over large areas are critical to helping ensure the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liang, Shunlin

    /export plans and prices. Development of objective mathematical models of crop yield prediction using remote

  6. Original article Residues in wax and honey after Apilife VARģ

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universitť de

    Original article Residues in wax and honey after Apilife VARģ treatment Stefan Bogdanov Anton and foundation were exposed to the air during storage. © Inra/DIB/AGIB/Elsevier, Paris honey / wax / residue to accumulation of these substances in beeswax and less so in honey [1, 17]. The accumulation in wax depends

  7. Minimization of welding residual stress and distortion in large structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michaleris, Panagiotis

    1 Minimization of welding residual stress and distortion in large structures P. Michaleris at Champaign Urbana, Urbana, IL Abstract Welding distortion in large structures is usually caused by buckling due to the residual stress. In cases where the design is fixed and minimum weld size requirements

  8. Thermoacoustic method for relaxation of residual stresses in welded joints

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koshovyi, V.V.; Pakhn`o, M.I.; Tsykhan, O.I.

    1995-01-01

    We propose a thermoacoustic method for the relaxation of residual stresses in welded joints, present a block diagram of a generator of local thermoacoustic pulses designed for implementation of this method, and describe our experiment aimed at relaxation of residual tensile stresses.

  9. Residual Energy-Aware Cooperative Transmission (REACT) in Wireless Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leung, Kin K.

    Residual Energy-Aware Cooperative Transmission (REACT) in Wireless Networks Erwu Liu, Qinqing Zhang in the network can cooper- ate their transmissions of information to gain energy savings in a distributed network the lifetime of the network and we call the selection method a residual energy-aware cooperative transmission

  10. Parallel FPGA Implementation of RSA with Residue Number Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    Multiplication based on Residue Num- ber Systems. Thanks to RNS, we develop a design able to perform an RSA propose a new DPA countermeasure in the framework of RNS. It is only (slightly) memory consuming (1]. That is the reason why Residue Number Systems (RNS for short) can be very useful. RNS have the main advantage of fast

  11. Modular Arithmetic Implementation with the Residue Number System (RNS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sousa, Leonel

    Modular Arithmetic Implementation with the Residue Number System (RNS) Samuel Ant„o and Leonel are the addition/subtraction, multiplication and reduction as well as the conversion of Residue Number System (RNS discussed in the following. 1 RNS Forward/Reverse Conversions Forward conversion corresponds

  12. Parallel FPGA Implementation of RSA with Residue Number Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    Multiplication based on Residue Num≠ ber Systems. Thanks to RNS, we develop a design able to perform an RSA propose a new DPA countermeasure in the framework of RNS. It is only (slightly) memory consuming (1]. That is the reason why Residue Number Systems (RNS for short) can be very useful. RNS have the main advantage of fast

  13. Identification of family-determining residues in PHD fingers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geman, Donald

    -evolution in their sequences. We measure the degree to which fixing the amino acid type at one position modifies the frequencies of amino acids at other positions. We then detect those position/amino acid combinations classify PHD fingers into different groups based on the analysis of residueresidue co

  14. Optical panel system including stackable waveguides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DeSanto, Leonard (Dunkirk, MD); Veligdan, James T. (Manorville, NY)

    2007-11-20

    An optical panel system including stackable waveguides is provided. The optical panel system displays a projected light image and comprises a plurality of planar optical waveguides in a stacked state. The optical panel system further comprises a support system that aligns and supports the waveguides in the stacked state. In one embodiment, the support system comprises at least one rod, wherein each waveguide contains at least one hole, and wherein each rod is positioned through a corresponding hole in each waveguide. In another embodiment, the support system comprises at least two opposing edge structures having the waveguides positioned therebetween, wherein each opposing edge structure contains a mating surface, wherein opposite edges of each waveguide contain mating surfaces which are complementary to the mating surfaces of the opposing edge structures, and wherein each mating surface of the opposing edge structures engages a corresponding complementary mating surface of the opposite edges of each waveguide.

  15. Thermovoltaic semiconductor device including a plasma filter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baldasaro, Paul F. (Clifton Park, NY)

    1999-01-01

    A thermovoltaic energy conversion device and related method for converting thermal energy into an electrical potential. An interference filter is provided on a semiconductor thermovoltaic cell to pre-filter black body radiation. The semiconductor thermovoltaic cell includes a P/N junction supported on a substrate which converts incident thermal energy below the semiconductor junction band gap into electrical potential. The semiconductor substrate is doped to provide a plasma filter which reflects back energy having a wavelength which is above the band gap and which is ineffectively filtered by the interference filter, through the P/N junction to the source of radiation thereby avoiding parasitic absorption of the unusable portion of the thermal radiation energy.

  16. Simple Model of Membrane Proteins Including Solvent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. L. Pagan; A. Shiryayev; T. P. Connor; J. D. Gunton

    2006-03-04

    We report a numerical simulation for the phase diagram of a simple two dimensional model, similar to one proposed by Noro and Frenkel [J. Chem. Phys. \\textbf{114}, 2477 (2001)] for membrane proteins, but one that includes the role of the solvent. We first use Gibbs ensemble Monte Caro simulations to determine the phase behavior of particles interacting via a square-well potential in two dimensions for various values of the interaction range. A phenomenological model for the solute-solvent interactions is then studied to understand how the fluid-fluid coexistence curve is modified by solute-solvent interactions. It is shown that such a model can yield systems with liquid-liquid phase separation curves that have both upper and lower critical points, as well as closed loop phase diagrams, as is the case with the corresponding three dimensional model.

  17. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    that includes materials such as agriculture and forest residues, energy crops, and algae. http:energy.goveerevideosenergy-101-biofuels Video Energy 101: Algae-to-Fuel One...

  18. Conversion of direct process high-boiling residue to monosilanes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brinson, Jonathan Ashley (Vale of Glamorgan, GB); Crum, Bruce Robert (Madison, IN); Jarvis, Jr., Robert Frank (Midland, MI)

    2000-01-01

    A process for the production of monosilanes from the high-boiling residue resulting from the reaction of hydrogen chloride with silicon metalloid in a process typically referred to as the "direct process." The process comprises contacting a high-boiling residue resulting from the reaction of hydrogen chloride and silicon metalloid, with hydrogen gas in the presence of a catalytic amount of aluminum trichloride effective in promoting conversion of the high-boiling residue to monosilanes. The present process results in conversion of the high-boiling residue to monosilanes. At least a portion of the aluminum trichloride catalyst required for conduct of the process may be formed in situ during conduct of the direct process and isolation of the high-boiling residue.

  19. Hyperspectral remote sensing analysis of short rotation woody crops grown with controlled nutrient and irrigation treatments.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Im, Jungho; Jensen, John R.; Coleman, Mark; Nelson, Eric

    2009-04-01

    Abstract - Hyperspectral remote sensing research was conducted to document the biophysical and biochemical characteristics of controlled forest plots subjected to various nutrient and irrigation treatments. The experimental plots were located on the Savannah River Site near Aiken, SC. AISA hyperspectral imagery were analysed using three approaches, including: (1) normalized difference vegetation index based simple linear regression (NSLR), (2) partial least squares regression (PLSR) and (3) machine-learning regression trees (MLRT) to predict the biophysical and biochemical characteristics of the crops (leaf area index, stem biomass and five leaf nutrients concentrations). The calibration and cross-validation results were compared between the three techniques. The PLSR approach generally resulted in good predictive performance. The MLRT approach appeared to be a useful method to predict characteristics in a complex environment (i.e. many tree species and numerous fertilization and/or irrigation treatments) due to its powerful adaptability.

  20. A Residue Approach to the Finite Field Arithmetics 1/23 A Residue Approach to the Finite Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    as integers. Residue Number System RNS base: a set of coprime numbers (m1, ..., mk ) RNS representation: (a1 of order (f (m)) then in RNS the complexities become (f (log m)). #12;A Residue Approach to the Finite ), we obtain a similar representation as RNS. Operations are made independently on each A(ei ) (like

  1. Engine lubrication circuit including two pumps

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lane, William H.

    2006-10-03

    A lubrication pump coupled to the engine is sized such that the it can supply the engine with a predetermined flow volume as soon as the engine reaches a peak torque engine speed. In engines that operate predominately at speeds above the peak torque engine speed, the lubrication pump is often producing lubrication fluid in excess of the predetermined flow volume that is bypassed back to a lubrication fluid source. This arguably results in wasted power. In order to more efficiently lubricate an engine, a lubrication circuit includes a lubrication pump and a variable delivery pump. The lubrication pump is operably coupled to the engine, and the variable delivery pump is in communication with a pump output controller that is operable to vary a lubrication fluid output from the variable delivery pump as a function of at least one of engine speed and lubrication flow volume or system pressure. Thus, the lubrication pump can be sized to produce the predetermined flow volume at a speed range at which the engine predominately operates while the variable delivery pump can supplement lubrication fluid delivery from the lubrication pump at engine speeds below the predominant engine speed range.

  2. End-of-life vehicle recycling : state of the art of resource recovery from shredder residue.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jody, B. J.; Daniels, E. J.; Duranceau, C. M.; Pomykala, J. A.; Spangenberger, J. S.

    2011-02-22

    Each year, more than 25 million vehicles reach the end of their service life throughout the world, and this number is rising rapidly because the number of vehicles on the roads is rapidly increasing. In the United States, more than 95% of the 10-15 million scrapped vehicles annually enter a comprehensive recycling infrastructure that includes auto parts recyclers/dismantlers, remanufacturers, and material recyclers (shredders). Today, over 75% of automotive materials, primarily the metals, are profitably recycled via (1) parts reuse and parts and components remanufacturing and (2) ultimately by the scrap processing (shredding) industry. The process by which the scrap processors recover metal scrap from automobiles involves shredding the obsolete automobile hulks, along with other obsolete metal-containing products (such as white goods, industrial scrap, and demolition debris), and recovering the metals from the shredded material. The single largest source of recycled ferrous scrap for the iron and steel industry is obsolete automobiles. The non-metallic fraction that remains after the metals are recovered from the shredded materials - commonly called shredder residue - constitutes about 25% of the weight of the vehicle, and it is disposed of in landfills. This practice is not environmentally friendly, wastes valuable resources, and may become uneconomical. Therefore, it is not sustainable. Over the past 15-20 years, a significant amount of research and development has been undertaken to enhance the recycle rate of end-of-life vehicles, including enhancing dismantling techniques and improving remanufacturing operations. However, most of the effort has been focused on developing technology to separate and recover non-metallic materials, such as polymers, from shredder residue. To make future vehicles more energy efficient, more lightweighting materials - primarily polymers, polymer composites, high-strength steels, and aluminum - will be used in manufacturing these vehicles. Many of these materials increase the percentage of shredder residue that must be disposed of, compared with the percentage of metals that are recovered. In addition, the number of hybrid vehicles and electric vehicles on the road is rapidly increasing. This trend will also introduce new materials for disposal at the end of their useful lives, including batteries. Therefore, as the complexity of automotive materials and systems increases, new technologies will be required to sustain and maximize the ultimate recycling of these materials and systems. Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne), the Vehicle Recycling Partnership, LLC. (VRP) of the United States Council for Automotive Research, LLC. (USCAR), and the American Chemistry Council-Plastics Division (ACC-PD) are working to develop technology for recovering materials from end-of-life vehicles, including separating and recovering polymers and residual metals from shredder residue. Several other organizations worldwide are also working on developing technology for recycling materials from shredder residue. Without a commercially viable shredder industry, our nation and the world will most likely face greater environmental challenges and a decreased supply of quality scrap, and thereby be forced to turn to primary ores for the production of finished metals. This will result in increased energy consumption and increased damage to the environment, including increased greenhouse gas emissions. The recycling of polymers, other organics, and residual metals in shredder residue saves the equivalent of over 23 million barrels of oil annually. This results in a 12-million-ton reduction in greenhouse gas emissions. This document presents a review of the state-of-the-art in the recycling of automotive materials.

  3. EIS-0109: Long-Term Management of the Existing Radioactive Wastes and Residues at the Niagara Falls Storage Site

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy developed this statement to evaluate the environmental impacts of several alternatives for management and control of the radioactive wastes and residues at the Niagara Falls Storage Site, including a no action alternative, an alternative to manage wastes on site, and two off-site management alternatives.

  4. Recovery of flexible polyurethane foam from shredder residue.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniels, E. J.; Jody, b. J.

    1999-06-29

    Argonne National Laboratory has developed a patented, continuous process for the recovery of flexible polyurethane foam (PUF) from auto shredder residue (ASR). To test the process, Argonne researchers conceived of, designed, and built a continuous foam washing and drying system that was pilot-tested at a shredder facility for six months. Economic analysis of the process, using manufacturers' quotes and operating data from Argonne's pilot plant, indicates a payback of less than two years for a plant producing about 1,000 ton/yr of foam. Samples of clean foam were shipped to three major foam reprocessors; all three indicated that the quality of the PUF recovered by the Argonne process met their requirements. Tests of the recovered foam by an independent testing laboratory showed that the recycled foam met the specifications for several automotive applications, including carpet padding, headliner, and sound-suppression support materials. Recovery of foam reduces the mass and the volume of material going to the landfill by about 5% and 30%, respectively. Annually, recovery will save about 1.2 x 10{sup 12} Btu of energy, cut the amount of solid waste being landfilled by about 150,000 tons, and eliminate the emission of about 250 tons of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into the air.

  5. MINIMIZING WASTE AND COST IN DISPOSITION OF LEGACY RESIDUES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. BALKEY; M. ROBINSON

    2001-05-01

    Research is being conducted at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) which is directed toward development of a quantitative basis for disposition of actinide-bearing process residues (both legacy residues and residues generated from ongoing programmatic operations). This research is focused in two directions: (1) identifying minimum negative consequence (waste, dose, cost) dispositions working within regulatory safeguards termination criteria, and (2) evaluating logistics/consequences of across-the-board residue discards such as authorized at Rocky Flats under a safeguards termination variance. The first approach emphasizes Laboratory commitments to environmental stewardship, worker safety, and fiscal responsibility. This approach has been described as the Plutonium Disposition Methodology (PDM) in deference to direction provided by DOE Albuquerque. The second approach is born of the need to expedite removal of residues from storage for programmatic and reasons and residue storage safety concerns. Any disposition path selected must preserve the legal distinction between residues as Special Nuclear Material (SNM) and discardable materials as waste in order to insure the continuing viability of Laboratory plutonium processing facilities for national security operations.

  6. Estimates of the stratospheric residual circulation using the downward control principle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenlof, K.H.; Holton, J.R. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    1993-06-20

    The transformed Eulerian-mean momentum and continuity equations are used to calculate the residual mean meridional circulations for the lower stratosphere and troposphere. Momentum and temperature fluxes required for the computation are estimated from U.K. Meterological Office (UKMO) analyzed geopotential heights. National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) CCM2 model output is used to assess the errors associated with the calculation. The model comparisons showed that the method works reasonably well for solstice seasons, but is inadequate for equinox seasons. In addition, it is found that some parameterization of gravity wave drag needs to be included with the planetary wave forcing to accurately estimate the residual mean circulation using this method. 24 refs., 10 figs., 5 tabs.

  7. Transgenic crops get a test in the wild

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cherfas, J.

    1991-02-22

    A novel British research program called PROSAMO - Planned Release of Selected and Modified Organisms - has just produced its first batch of results on the ecological behavior of a genetically manipulated variety of oil seed rape (known to Americans as canola). As expected, the preliminary data indicate that these plants do not outgrow their competitors in the wild, nor is there any evidence that they pass on their foreign genes to other species. PROSAMO is moving on to test other crops with other foreign genes. If these results are as reassuring, scientists around the world will have solid evidence with which to soothe fears.

  8. Biomass Crop Assistance Program (BCAP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowaWisconsin:Pontiac Biomass Facility Jump to:Biola, California:CombustionCrop

  9. D1 Fuel Crops Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePower VenturesInformation9) Wind Farm JumpAlum|Cyclone PowerD1 Fuel Crops

  10. Ionic liquids, electrolyte solutions including the ionic liquids, and energy storage devices including the ionic liquids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gering, Kevin L.; Harrup, Mason K.; Rollins, Harry W.

    2015-12-08

    An ionic liquid including a phosphazene compound that has a plurality of phosphorus-nitrogen units and at least one pendant group bonded to each phosphorus atom of the plurality of phosphorus-nitrogen units. One pendant group of the at least one pendant group comprises a positively charged pendant group. Additional embodiments of ionic liquids are disclosed, as are electrolyte solutions and energy storage devices including the embodiments of the ionic liquid.

  11. The impact of mineral fertilizers on the carbon footprint of crop production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brentrup, Frank

    2009-01-01

    the GHG emissions (ďcarbon footprintĒ) of crop production inMaterials and methods Ė ďcarbon footprintĒ calculation basedLCA) principles A carbon footprint is ďthe total set of

  12. Modeling Poplar Growth as a Short Rotation Woody Crop for Biofuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Quinn James

    2014-01-01

    a Short Rotation Woody Crop for Biofuels Q. J. Hart 1,? , O.for cellulosic derived biofuels. The ability to accuratelycrops for bioenergy and biofuels applications. In vitro

  13. Toxic hazards of the industrial atmospheric pollutant sulphur dioxide on tree crops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rani, B Dr.

    2009-01-01

    and Khan, 1984). In Kerala State, though atmosphericperennial tree crop of Kerala, which plays a major role inat Trivandrum district of Kerala State, concerned with the

  14. Tension wood holds clues to higher fuel yields from biomass crops...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tension wood holds clues to higher fuel yields from biomass crops October 25, 2011 Poplar stems (left) respond to bending stress by producing tension wood, which has...

  15. Biomass crops can be used for biological disinfestation and remediation of soils and water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stapleton, James J; Banuelos, Gary

    2009-01-01

    liquid biofuels from biomass: The writings on the walls. Newreduced feed intake. Biomass crop sustainability flexibilityMC, et al. 2009. Cali- fornia biomass resources, potentials,

  16. Toxic hazards of the industrial atmospheric pollutant sulphur dioxide on tree crops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rani, B Dr.

    2009-01-01

    of industrial activity. Coconut (Cocos nucifera L. ), theon tree crops such as coconut. The study aims at elucidatingnut characters of the coconut palm. MATERIALS AND METHODS

  17. The impact of mineral fertilizers on the carbon footprint of crop production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brentrup, Frank

    2009-01-01

    emissions in fertiliser production. IFS (The InternationalImpact of Agricultural Crop Production using the Life CycleN fertilizer rates in cereal production. Europ. J. Agronomy

  18. Switchgrass is a promising, high-yielding crop for California biofuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    both as forage and as a biofuel crop, switchgrass may bepanic grass grown as a biofuel in southern England. Bioresfor switchgrass for biofuel systems. Biomass Bioenergy 30:

  19. A methodology for estimating the residual contamination contribution to the source term in a spent-fuel transport cask

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanders, T.L. ); Jordan, H. . Rocky Flats Plant); Pasupathi, V. ); Mings, W.J. ); Reardon, P.C. )

    1991-09-01

    This report describes the ranges of the residual contamination that may build up in spent-fuel transport casks. These contamination ranges are calculated based on data taken from published reports and from previously unpublished data supplied by cask transporters. The data involve dose rate measurements, interior smear surveys, and analyses of water flushed out of cask cavities during decontamination operations. A methodology has been developed to estimate the effect of residual contamination on spent-fuel cask containment requirements. Factors in estimating the maximum permissible leak rates include the form of the residual contamination; possible release modes; internal gas-borne depletion; and the temperature, pressure, and vibration characteristics of the cask during transport under normal and accident conditions. 12 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs.

  20. An urban infill : a residual site in Boston

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Savvides, Andreas L. (Andreas Loucas)

    1996-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with the treatment of residual sites in the context of the urban environment and in particular with the wounds inflicted by the passage of the Massachusetts Turnpike through the city of Boston. The ...

  1. Residual zonal flows in tokamaks and stellarators at arbitrary wavelengths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monreal, P; SŠnchez, E; Parra, F I; Bustos, A; KŲnies, A; Kleiber, R; GŲrler, T

    2015-01-01

    In the linear collisionless limit, a zonal potential perturbation in a toroidal plasma relaxes, in general, to a non-zero residual value. Expressions for the residual value in tokamak and stellarator geometries, and for arbitrary wavelengths, are derived. These expressions involve averages over the lowest order particle trajectories, that typically cannot be evaluated analytically. In this work, an efficient numerical method for the evaluation of such expressions is reported. It is shown that this method is faster than direct gyrokinetic simulations. Calculations of the residual value in stellarators are provided for much shorter wavelengths than previously available in the literature. Electrons must be treated kinetically in stellarators because, unlike in tokamaks, kinetic electrons modify the residual value even at long wavelengths. This effect, that had already been predicted theoretically, is confirmed by gyrokinetic simulations.

  2. Asphalt landscape after all : residual suburban surface as public infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Connor, Joseph Michael, M. Arch. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2011-01-01

    The thesis proposes a hybridized commercial retail strip inserted into a residual suburban condition as a manner of investigating the latent potential of suburban logic, both its constituent elements and its formal rules ...

  3. RetroFILL : residual spaces as urban infill

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kobel, Marika

    2010-01-01

    In any city there are small slivers and chunks of awkward spaces - in between buildings, occupying edge conditions, not large enough to warrant many forms of traditional use - which can be termed residual. These areas of ...

  4. Residual stress in electrodeposited nanocrystalline nickel-tungsten coatings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ziebell, Tiffany D.

    Characterizing the residual stress of thick nanocrystalline electrodeposits poses several unique challenges due to their fine grain structure, thickness distribution, and matte surface. We use a three-dimensional ...

  5. Modeling, Optimization and Economic Evaluation of Residual Biomass Gasification†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Georgeson, Adam

    2012-02-14

    and product options are available for gasification along with combinations thereof. The objective of this work is to create a systematic method for optimizing the design of a residual biomass gasification unit. In detail, this work involves development...

  6. The determination of thru-thickness residual bending stresses†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rinehart, Adam James

    2000-01-01

    In order to understand the fatigue behavior of dents in pressurized pipelines it is necessary to understand the residual stresses that result from cyclic plastic bending. Three approaches are taken here in studying a beam cross section: a discrete...

  7. Residue disposal from waste-to-energy facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walsh, P.; O'Leary, P.; Cross, F.

    1987-05-01

    When considering a waste-to-energy project, some local officials believe that waste-to-energy is a complete alternative to landfilling. While these projects can reduce waste volume substantially, the process will still produce residues that must be properly handled in order to protect the environment. All systems produce fly ash and bottom ash, and some systems also produce wastewater. This article discusses alternative methods for addressing these residue control problems.

  8. Method for residual stress relief and retained austenite destabilization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ludtka, Gerard M.

    2004-08-10

    A method using of a magnetic field to affect residual stress relief or phase transformations in a metallic material is disclosed. In a first aspect of the method, residual stress relief of a material is achieved at ambient temperatures by placing the material in a magnetic field. In a second aspect of the method, retained austenite stabilization is reversed in a ferrous alloy by applying a magnetic field to the alloy at ambient temperatures.

  9. An investigation of residual stress in welded joints†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moffat, William Hugh

    1951-01-01

    . flummery and Conclusions VII. '-. &uggested Procedure for I"uture Investigation 18 o i' VIII. ? . Ppendix IX. Bibliography LIST OP EIGURES Ro. Title Page 1. 'welded Plates snd Gptical Gage Used by Soulton and Martin ~ ~ 6 2. Dr. Rao~s Method... AN INVESTIGATION OF RESIDUAL STRESS IN WELDED JOINTS INTRODUCTION The object of the research reported in this paper was to investigate the magnitude of transverse and longi- tudial residual stress in a welded Joint. These are the stresses in a direction...

  10. 2632 WWW.CROPS.ORG CROP SCIENCE, VOL. 50, NOVEMBERDECEMBER 2010 Seashore paspalum is a warm-season turfgrass that is adapted

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parrott, Wayne

    , Univ. of Georgia, Griffin Campus, 1109 Experiment St., Griffin, GA 30223. This research was supported Genetics and Genomics and Dep. of Crop and Soil Sciences, Univ. of Georgia, 111 Riverbend Rd., Athens, GA

  11. Electron residual energy due to stochastic heating in field-ionized plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khalilzadeh, Elnaz; Jahanpanah, Jafar; Chakhmachi, Amir; Yazdani, Elnaz

    2015-01-01

    The electron residual energy originated from the stochastic heating in under-dense field-ionized plasma is here investigated. The optical response of plasma is initially modeled by using the concept of two counter-propagating electromagnetic waves. The solution of motion equation of a single electron indicates that by including the ionization, the electron with higher residual energy compared to the case without ionization could be obtained. In agreement with chaotic nature of the motion, it is found that the electron residual energy will significantly be changed by applying a minor change to the initial conditions. Extensive kinetic 1D-3V particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations have been performed in order to resolve full plasma reactions. In this way, two different regimes of plasma behavior are observed by varying the pulse length. The results indicate that the amplitude of scattered fields in sufficient long pulse length is high enough to act as a second counter-propagating wave for triggering the stochastic e...

  12. Hydrocracking kinetics of Gudao residue in the presence of dispersed-phase Mo catalyst

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Chenguang; Zhou, Jiashun; Que, Guohe; Liang, Wenjie; Zhu, Yajie [Univ. of Petroleum, Dongying (China)

    1993-12-31

    The kinetics of the catalytic hydrocracking of Gudao vacuum residue in the presence of dispersed-phase Mo catalyst was studied over the temperature range of 390-435{degrees}C. in a batch autoclave. The change of the weight percentages of the six pseudocomponents, i.e., coke (benzene insolubles), cracked volatiles (480{degrees}C{minus}) and the four fractions (saturates, aromatics, resins and asphaltenes) of the 480{degrees}C{sup +} residue, were determined as a function of reaction time. A complex reaction network of the above six pseudocomponents was proposed, which included the first order reactions with respect to the majority of pseudocomponents except the condensation of asphaltenes (i.e., coke formation) ascribed to the second order reaction. The reaction rate constants and the activation energies were calculated using the complex method. The results indicated that there was a good agreement between the model prediction and the experimental product distribution. This suggested that the kinetics model was reasonable for the hydrocracking of Gudao residue in the presence of dispersed-phase Mo catalyst.

  13. Manual for implementing residual radioactive material guidelines using RESRAD, Version 5.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, C.; Zielen, A.J.; Cheng, J.J.

    1993-09-01

    This manual presents information for implementing US Department of Energy (DOE) guidelines for residual radioactive material. It describes the analysis and models used to derive site-specific guidelines for allowable residual concentrations of radionuclides in soil and the design and use of the RESRAD computer code for calculating doses, risks, and guideline values. It also describes procedures for implementing DOE policy for reducing residual radioactivity to levels that are as low as reasonably achievable. Two new pathways, radon inhalation and soil ingestion, have been added to RESRAD. Twenty-seven new radionuclides have also been added, and the cutoff half-life for associated radionuclides has been reduced to six months. Other major improvements to the RESRAD code include the ability to run sensitivity analyses, the addition of graphical output, user-specified dose factors, updated databases, an improved groundwater transport model, optional input of a groundwater concentration and a solubility constant, special models for tritium and carbon-14, calculation of cancer incidence risk, and the use of a mouse with menus.

  14. Residual Stress In Sheet Metal Parts Made By Incremental Forming Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanaka, Shigekazu; Nakamura, Tamotsu; Hayakawa, Kunio; Nakamura, Hideo; Motomura, Kazuo

    2007-05-17

    Incremental sheet metal forming, which uses a CNC forming stylus, is new flexible forming process not requiring the use of any expensive dies. We have applied the incremental forming process to dental prosthesis. This new process, however, posed difficult problems. After removing the outer portion of the incremental formed sheet metal part, the inner part is distorted. In this paper, the residual stress in the sheet metal part obtained by incremental forward stretch forming operations has been examined. Numerical simulations were conducted for solid elements. When small rigid ball slides on the metal sheet with a certain vertical feed, tension residual stress is produced in the upper layer of the sheet and compression stress in the lower. Then, the resultant moments throughout the sheet cause negative spring-back when the outer portion is removed. A systematic study of the behavior was conducted in this paper. Parameters considered included the tool radius and the vertical tool feed rate. The tip radius of forming stylus has a significant influence on the residual stress. The smaller radius of forming stylus, the larger bending force becomes. And new process with double forming styluses is examined to reduce the bending force.

  15. DISPOSAL OF TRU WASTE FROM THE PLUTONIUM FINISHING PLANT IN PIPE OVERPACK CONTAINERS TO WIPP INCLUDING NEW SECURITY REQUIREMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hopkins, A.M.; Sutter, C.; Hulse, G.; Teal, J.

    2003-02-27

    The Department of Energy is responsible for the safe management and cleanup of the DOE complex. As part of the cleanup and closure of the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) located on the Hanford site, the nuclear material inventory was reviewed to determine the appropriate disposition path. Based on the nuclear material characteristics, the material was designated for stabilization and packaging for long term storage and transfer to the Savannah River Site or, a decision for discard was made. The discarded material was designated as waste material and slated for disposal to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Prior to preparing any residue wastes for disposal at the WIPP, several major activities need to be completed. As detailed a processing history as possible of the material including origin of the waste must be researched and documented. A technical basis for termination of safeguards on the material must be prepared and approved. Utilizing process knowledge and processing history, the material must be characterized, sampling requirements determined, acceptable knowledge package and waste designation completed prior to disposal. All of these activities involve several organizations including the contractor, DOE, state representatives and other regulators such as EPA. At PFP, a process has been developed for meeting the many, varied requirements and successfully used to prepare several residue waste streams including Rocky Flats incinerator ash, Hanford incinerator ash and Sand, Slag and Crucible (SS&C) material for disposal. These waste residues are packed into Pipe Overpack Containers for shipment to the WIPP.

  16. Reducing New Hampshire Crop Losses to a Serious Invasive Insect Dr. Alan Eaton, UNH Cooperative Extension

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    Reducing New Hampshire Crop Losses to a Serious Invasive Insect Dr. Alan Eaton, UNH Cooperative Extension February 2015 Spotted Wing Drosophila (SWD) is a Chinese insect that reached New Hampshire in 2011 that it occurred here, it caused $1.516 million in crop loss in New Hampshire. The UNH Cooperative Extension IPM

  17. THE POTENTIAL FOR MICRO-ALGAE AND OTHER "MICRO-CROPS" TO PRODUCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, Paul N.

    THE POTENTIAL FOR MICRO-ALGAE AND OTHER "MICRO-CROPS" TO PRODUCE SUSTAINABLE BIOFUELS A REVIEW INTRODUCTION Biofuel derived from algae and other micro-crops has been proposed as an environmentally benign transportation fuel. Algae can be cultivated on low productivity lands using low quality water. Interest in algae

  18. Biomass resource potential for selected crops in Hawaii. [Koa haole (giant leucaena); napier and guinea grass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seki, A.

    1982-06-01

    The biomass crops selected for review were koa haole (giant leucaena), napier and guinea grass, and eucalyptus (saligna, grandis, and globulus). The islands examined were Hawaii, Kauai, Maui, and Molokai. The potential land acreage for growing these crops was estimated grossly. As anticipated, the island of Hawaii had the largest land potential with eucalyptus having the greatest potential land acreage.

  19. REVIEW PAPER Strategies for reducing the carbon footprint of field crops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universitť de

    REVIEW PAPER Strategies for reducing the carbon footprint of field crops for semiarid areas emission. To provide the potential solution, we estimated the carbon footprint [i.e., the total amount the effect of crop sequences on the carbon footprint of durum wheat. Key strategies for reducing the carbon

  20. 24 Crops & Soils magazine | NovemberDecember 2013 As the last of the corn and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isaacs, Rufus

    24 Crops & Soils magazine | November≠December 2013 As the last of the corn and soybean harvest crop rotation, disease-resistant hybrid selection, optimum planting timing, and post-harvest tillage." Other claims sug- gested strobilurins improve efficient use of water and nitrogen, and improve stalk

  1. South Carolina Pest Management Handbook for Field Crops -2015 WEED CONTROL IN PEANUT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    South Carolina Pest Management Handbook for Field Crops - 2015 158 WEED CONTROL IN PEANUT Mike;South Carolina Pest Management Handbook for Field Crops - 2015 159 Preplant/Burndown Herbicides for Weed, wild radish, or Carolina geranium. GLYPHOSATE can also be tank-mixed with VALOR or AIM to improve

  2. South Carolina Pest Management Handbook for Field Crops -2015 COTTON NEMATODE CONTROL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    South Carolina Pest Management Handbook for Field Crops - 2015 117 COTTON NEMATODE CONTROL John D it and will need to check that specific label for rules and restrictions. #12;South Carolina Pest Management Handbook for Field Crops - 2015 118 FUMIGANT, GRANULAR, AND LIQUID NEMATICIDES AVAILABLE IN SOUTH CAROLINA

  3. South Carolina Pest Management Handbook for Field Crops -2015 COTTON DISEASE CONTROL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    South Carolina Pest Management Handbook for Field Crops - 2015 111 COTTON DISEASE CONTROL John D the label. Do not use treated seed for feed or food. #12;South Carolina Pest Management Handbook for Field by commercial seed treaters. #12;South Carolina Pest Management Handbook for Field Crops - 2015 113 AVAILABLE

  4. Influence of habitat and landscape perenniality on insect natural enemies in three candidate biofuel crops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landis, Doug

    biofuel crops Ben P. Werling a, , Timothy D. Meehan b , Claudio Gratton b , Douglas A. Landis April 2011 Accepted 22 June 2011 Available online 28 June 2011 Keywords: Biofuels Biodiversity Biological control Land use change a b s t r a c t Cultivation of biofuel crops could change agricultural

  5. Migration, isolation and hybridization in island crop populations: the case of Madagascar rice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Purugganan, Michael D.

    Migration, isolation and hybridization in island crop populations: the case of Madagascar rice and Center for Genomics and Systems Biology, 1009 Silver, 100 Washington Square East, New York University or Asian rice is one of the key domesticated crop species in the world. The island of Madagascar off

  6. PhD Graduate Research Assistantship: Horticultural Science/Crop Quality Position Summary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    , plastic mulches need to be disposed of at the end of the growing season. Biodegradable plastic mulches biodegradable plastic mulches degrade in soil and what their effect is on crop yield and quality. Field experiments will be conducted to investigate the effects of biodegradable plastic mulches on crop yield

  7. Implications of Three Biofuel Crops for Beneficial Arthropods in Agricultural Landscapes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landis, Doug

    Implications of Three Biofuel Crops for Beneficial Arthropods in Agricultural Landscapes Mary A Science+Business Media, LLC. 2010 Abstract Production of biofuel feedstocks in agricultural landscapes and generalist natural enemies in three model biofuel crops: corn, switch- grass, and mixed prairie, we tested

  8. Residual stress within nanoscale metallic multilayer systems during thermal cycling

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Economy, David Ross; Cordill, Megan Jo; Payzant, E. Andrew; Kennedy, Marian S.

    2015-09-21

    Projected applications for nanoscale metallic multilayers will include wide temperature ranges. Since film residual stress has been known to alter system reliability, stress development within new film structures with high interfacial densities should be characterized to identify potential long-term performance barriers. To understand factors contributing to thermal stress evolution within nanoscale metallic multilayers, stress in Cu/Nb systems adhered to Si substrates was calculated from curvature measurements collected during cycling between 25 įC and 400 įC. Additionally, stress within each type of component layers was calculated from shifts in the primary peak position from in-situ heated X-ray diffraction. The effects ofmore†Ľboth film architecture (layer thickness) and layer order in metallic multilayers were tracked and compared with monolithic Cu and Nb films. Analysis indicated that the thermoelastic slope of nanoscale metallic multilayer films depends on thermal expansion mismatch, elastic modulus of the components, and also interfacial density. The layer thickness (i.e. interfacial density) affected thermoelastic slope magnitude while layer order had minimal impact on stress responses after the initial thermal cycle. When comparing stress responses of monolithic Cu and Nb films to those of the Cu/Nb systems, the nanoscale metallic multilayers show a similar increase in stress above 200 įC to the Nb monolithic films, indicating that Nb components play a larger role in stress development than Cu. Local stress calculations from X-ray diffraction peak shifts collected during heating reveal that the component layers within a multilayer film respond similarly to their monolithic counterparts.ę†less

  9. Fluidized bed gasification of agricultural residue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groves, John David

    1979-01-01

    at the operat- ing conditions used. The experimental data were also used to develop an empirical model based on temperature, fuel to air ratio, and their interactions. Cotton gin wastes were gasified with air to provide a fuel gas suitable for use... system include material balances for each of the components, process operating conditions, and applicable equilibrium relationships. Gumz (1950) applied these meth- ods to estimate the equilibrium gas composition from a fixed bed coal gasifier...

  10. In situ recovery from residually heated sections in a hydrocarbon containing formation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Karanikas, John Michael (Houston, TX); Ryan, Robert Charles (Houston, TX)

    2010-12-14

    Methods of treating a tar sands formation is described herein. The methods may include providing heat to a first section of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from a plurality of heaters located in the first section of the formation. Heat is transferred from the heaters so that at least a first section of the formation reaches a selected temperature. At least a portion of residual heat from the first section transfers from the first section to a second section of the formation. At least a portion of hydrocarbons in the second section are mobilized by providing a solvation fluid and/or a pressurizing fluid to the second section of the formation.

  11. Absorbing Aerosol Index (AAI) The residue method for the detection of aerosols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graaf, Martin de

    and calculation Main sensitivities of residue Problems with the residue Conclusions and outlook #12;#12;o = 380 scattering and absorption #12;#12;#12;Nadir View Solar zenith angle = 45o Residue = 3.5 Rayleigh atmosphere View Solar zenith angle = 45o Residue = -1.0 Rayleigh atmosphere, As = 0.16 Scattering aerosol layer

  12. Fault-Tolerant Linear Convolution Using Residue Number M.G.Parker,M.Benaissa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, Matthew Geoffrey

    This paper proposes a Fault-Tolerant Linear Convolution architecture using Residue Number Systems (RNS) and Polynomial Residue Number Systems (PRNS). The RNS and PRNS are both given error-detection capability Residue Number Systems (RNS) [4]. A RNS performs computation over a number of independent residue channels

  13. Strengthening, Crack Arrest And Multiple Cracking In Brittle Materials Using Residual Stresses.

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Green, David J. (State College, PA); Sglavo, Vincenzo M. (Roncegno, IT); Tandon, Rajan (Fremont, CA)

    2003-02-11

    Embodiments include a method for forming a glass which displays visible cracking prior to failure when subjected to predetermined stress level that is greater than a predetermined minimum stress level and less than a failure stress level. The method includes determining a critical flaw size in the glass and introducing a residual stress profile to the glass so that a plurality of visible cracks are formed prior to failure when the glass is subjected to a stress that is greater than the minimum stress level and lower than the critical stress. One method for forming the residual stress profile includes performing a first ion exchange so that a first plurality of ions of a first element in the glass are exchanged with a second plurality of ions of a second element that have a larger volume than the first ions. A second ion exchange is also performed so that a plurality of the second ions in the glass are exchanged back to ions of the first element.

  14. Measuring depth profiles of residual stress with Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Enloe, W.S.; Sparks, R.G.; Paesler, M.A.

    1988-12-01

    Knowledge of the variation of residual stress is a very important factor in understanding the properties of machined surfaces. The nature of the residual stress can determine a part`s susceptibility to wear deformation, and cracking. Raman spectroscopy is known to be a very useful technique for measuring residual stress in many materials. These measurements are routinely made with a lateral resolution of 1{mu}m and an accuracy of 0.1 kbar. The variation of stress with depth; however, has not received much attention in the past. A novel technique has been developed that allows quantitative measurement of the variation of the residual stress with depth with an accuracy of 10nm in the z direction. Qualitative techniques for determining whether the stress is varying with depth are presented. It is also demonstrated that when the stress is changing over the volume sampled, errors can be introduced if the variation of the stress with depth is ignored. Computer aided data analysis is used to determine the depth dependence of the residual stress.

  15. Slab retreat and active shortening along the central-northern The interpretation of CROP seismic profiles, integrated with the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    linea sismica a riflessione CROP M-15 e la rielaborazione dei dati geologici e geofi- sici disponibili

  16. Impact of Climate Change on Irrigation Water Availability, Crop Water Requirements and Soil Salinity in the SJV, CA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopmans, Jan W; Maurer, Edwin P

    2008-01-01

    many crops suffer heat stress beyond an optimal temperaturecrop growth due to heat stress and therefore a pronounced

  17. The Texas crop and livestock reporting service's data accumulation technique for cotton and an investigation into its reliability†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gallant, Francis Xavier

    1971-01-01

    Texas Crop and Livestock Reporting Service Acreage and Production of Crops--1970. . . . . . 13 IV Farm Strata. 1969 Survey 14 16 VI Crop Reporter Questionnaire 20 VII Census Bureau Cotton Ginnings. . 23 CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION: THE EXISTENCE... figures of Table I are derived from independent estimates of acreage planted, harvested, and total cotton production. The preliminary acreage planted and harvested figures are primarily the result of two sample surveys. These are the June Crop Survey...

  18. Impact of Climate Change on Irrigation Water Availability, Crop Water Requirements and Soil Salinity in the SJV, CA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopmans, Jan W; Maurer, Edwin P

    2008-01-01

    on Irrigation Water Availability, Crop Water Requirementsreduced surface water availability can be managed byrequirement and water availability (surface water and

  19. Essays on the Impact of Climate Change and Building Codes on Energy Consumption and the Impact of Ozone on Crop Yield

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aroonruengsawat, Anin

    2010-01-01

    14 Impact of ozone on crop yield15 Data 15.1 OzoneEstimated effect of mean ozone on crop yields. . . . . . .

  20. CROP SCIENCE, VOL. 49, MARCHAPRIL 2009 589 The primary turf species used for golf course putting green

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hsiang, Tom

    CROP SCIENCE, VOL. 49, MARCH≠APRIL 2009 589 RESEARCH The primary turf species used for golf course.2135/cropsci2008.06.0303 © Crop Science Society of America 677 S. Segoe Rd., Madison, WI 53711 USA All rights. Laberge, Soils and Crops Research and Development Centre, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, 2560 Hochelaga

  1. Fig 1. Willow biomass crops resprouting in the spring after being harvested the previous winter at the end of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Fig 1. Willow biomass crops resprouting in the spring after being harvested the previous winter BACKGROUND Research and development of shrub willows as biomass crops has been occurring since the mid to planting is an essential step in the biological and economic success of willow biomass crops. Typically

  2. Residual strain mapping of Roman styli from Iulia Concordia, Italy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salvemini, Filomena, E-mail: floriana.salvemini@fi.isc.cnr.it [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi, Sesto Fiorentino, FI (Italy); Universitŗ degli Studi di Firenze, Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra (Italy); Grazzi, Francesco [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi, Sesto Fiorentino, FI (Italy); Angelini, Ivana [Universitŗ degli Studi di Padova, Dipartimento di Geoscienze (Italy); Davydov, Vadim; Vontobel, Peter [Paul Scherrer Institut, SINQ Spallation Neutron Source, Villigen (Switzerland); Vigoni, Alberto [Dedalo s.n.c., Vicolo dei Conti 6, I-35122 Padua (Italy); Artioli, Gilberto [Universitŗ degli Studi di Padova, Dipartimento di Geoscienze (Italy); Zoppi, Marco [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi, Sesto Fiorentino, FI (Italy)

    2014-05-01

    Iulia Concordia is an important Roman settlement known for the production of iron objects and weapons during the Roman Empire. A huge number of well-preserved styli were found in the past century in the bed of an old channel. In order to shed light about the production processes used by Roman for stylus manufacturing, a neutron diffraction residual strain analysis was performed on the POLDI materials science diffractometer at the Paul Scherrer Institut in Switzerland. Here, we present results from our investigation conducted on 11 samples, allowing to define, in a non-invasive way, the residual strain map related to the ancient Roman working techniques. - Highlights: ē We examined 11 Roman styli from the settlement of Iulia Concordia, Italy. ē We performed a neutron diffraction residual strain analysis on POLDI at PSI (CH). ē We identified the production processes used by Roman for stylus manufacturing. ē We clarified the way and direction of working applied for different classes of styli.

  3. A fast minimal residual solver for overlap fermions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Artan Borici; Alban Allkoci

    2006-02-09

    Computing quark propagators with overlap fermions requires the solution of a shifted unitary linear system. Jagels and Reichel have shown that for such systems it is possible to construct a minimal residual algorithm by short recurrences. The J\\"ulich-Wuppertal group have found this algorithm to be the fastest among overlap solvers. In this paper we present a three-term recurrence for the Arnoldi unitary process. Using the new recurrence we construct a minimal residual solver which is the fastest among all Krylov subspace algorithms considered so far for the overlap inversion.

  4. Wood residuals find big uses in small pieces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glenn, J.

    1996-12-01

    With a history of finding economic uses for leftovers, the wood industry explores sustainable options for creating higher value products. Years ago, companies saw the use - any use - of residues as a sound, economic business practice. Today, many companies are looking to go beyond low value products such as mulch, animal bedding and fuel, and market to higher value end users. Additionally, with so much material from the primary industries already accounted for, consumers of wood residue are in need of additional supply from sources such as secondary mills (furniture manufacturers, etc.), as wells as the C&D and MSW streams. This paper discusses these products and markets.

  5. A Residual Mass Ballistic Testing Method to Compare Armor Materials or Components (Residual Mass Ballistic Testing Method)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benjamin Langhorst; Thomas M Lillo; Henry S Chu

    2014-05-01

    A statistics based ballistic test method is presented for use when comparing multiple groups of test articles of unknown relative ballistic perforation resistance. The method is intended to be more efficient than many traditional methods for research and development testing. To establish the validity of the method, it is employed in this study to compare test groups of known relative ballistic performance. Multiple groups of test articles were perforated using consistent projectiles and impact conditions. Test groups were made of rolled homogeneous armor (RHA) plates and differed in thickness. After perforation, each residual projectile was captured behind the target and its mass was measured. The residual masses measured for each test group were analyzed to provide ballistic performance rankings with associated confidence levels. When compared to traditional V50 methods, the residual mass (RM) method was found to require fewer test events and be more tolerant of variations in impact conditions.

  6. Solid waste management of coal conversion residuals from a commercial-size facility: environmental engineering aspects. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bern, J.; Neufeld, R. D.; Shapiro, M. A.

    1980-11-30

    Major residuals generated by the conversion process and its auxiliary operations include: (a) coal preparation wastes; (b) gasifier ash; (c) liquefaction solids-char; (d) tail gas or flue gas desulfurization sludge; (e) boiler flyash and bottom ash; (f) raw water treatment sludge, and; (g) biosludges from process wastewater treatment. Recovered sulfur may also require disposal management. Potential environmental and health impacts from each of the residues are described on the basis of characterization of the waste in the perspective of water quality degradation. Coal gasification and liquefaction systems are described in great detail with respect to their associated residuals. Management options are listed with the conclusion that land disposal of the major residual streams is the only viable choice. On-site versus off-site disposal is analyzed with the selection of on-site operations to reduce political, social and institutional pressures, and to optimize the costs of the system. Mechanisms for prevention of leachate generation are described, and various disposal site designs are outlined. It is concluded that co-disposal feasibility of some waste streams must be established in order to make the most preferred solid waste management system feasible. Capacity requirements for the disposal operation were calculated for a 50,000 bbl/day coal liquefaction plant or 250 million SCF/day gasification operation.

  7. Development of computer program ENMASK for prediction of residual environmental masking-noise spectra, from any three independent environmental parameters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, Y.-S.; Liebich, R. E.; Chun, K. C.

    2000-03-31

    Residual environmental sound can mask intrusive4 (unwanted) sound. It is a factor that can affect noise impacts and must be considered both in noise-impact studies and in noise-mitigation designs. Models for quantitative prediction of sensation level (audibility) and psychological effects of intrusive noise require an input with 1/3 octave-band spectral resolution of environmental masking noise. However, the majority of published residual environmental masking-noise data are given with either octave-band frequency resolution or only single A-weighted decibel values. A model has been developed that enables estimation of 1/3 octave-band residual environmental masking-noise spectra and relates certain environmental parameters to A-weighted sound level. This model provides a correlation among three environmental conditions: measured residual A-weighted sound-pressure level, proximity to a major roadway, and population density. Cited field-study data were used to compute the most probable 1/3 octave-band sound-pressure spectrum corresponding to any selected one of these three inputs. In turn, such spectra can be used as an input to models for prediction of noise impacts. This paper discusses specific algorithms included in the newly developed computer program ENMASK. In addition, the relative audibility of the environmental masking-noise spectra at different A-weighted sound levels is discussed, which is determined by using the methodology of program ENAUDIBL.

  8. Leptonic Dirac CP Violation Predictions from Residual Discrete Symmetries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Girardi, I; Stuart, Alexander J; Titov, A V

    2015-01-01

    Assuming that the observed pattern of 3-neutrino mixing is related to the existence of a (lepton) flavour symmetry, corresponding to a non-Abelian discrete symmetry group $G_f$, and that $G_f$ is broken to specific residual symmetries $G_e$ and $G_\

  9. Leptonic Dirac CP Violation Predictions from Residual Discrete Symmetries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. Girardi; S. T. Petcov; Alexander J. Stuart; A. V. Titov

    2015-09-08

    Assuming that the observed pattern of 3-neutrino mixing is related to the existence of a (lepton) flavour symmetry, corresponding to a non-Abelian discrete symmetry group $G_f$, and that $G_f$ is broken to specific residual symmetries $G_e$ and $G_\

  10. Technology for treatment of salt residue stored at NPPs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kobelev, A.P.; Savkin, A.E.; Sinjakin, O.G.; Kachalova, E.A.; Sorokoletova, A.N.; Nechaev, V.R. [SUE Moscow SIA Radon (Russian Federation)

    2007-07-01

    At Moscow SIA 'Radon', three (3) options for NPP salt residue treatment were developed and tested. Option 1 consists of dissolving the salt residue and subsequent treatment by ozonization, separation of the deposits formed from ozonization and selective cleaning by ferrocyanide sorbents. Option 2 consists of fusion of the salt residue, addition of glass-forming additives and melting of borosilicate glass in a melter such as a 'cold crucible'. Option 3 consists of dissolving the salt residue, oxidation of the solution obtained, removal of radionuclides by collectors and the separate handling of formed deposits and the solution. The deposits containing more than 99 % of the activity are directed to vitrification and the solution is directed either to a concentrates dryer or to cementation. The vitrified waste product is placed in repository for solid radioactive waste storage and the solidified product from the solution goes to an industrial waste disposal site or a repository specially developed at NPP sites for 'exempt waste' products by IAEA classification. (authors)

  11. PRTAD: A DATABASE FOR PROTEIN RESIDUE TORSION ANGLE DISTRIBUTIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PRTAD: A DATABASE FOR PROTEIN RESIDUE TORSION ANGLE DISTRIBUTIONS By Xiaoyong Sun Di Wu Robert­0436 Phone: 612-624-6066 Fax: 612-626-7370 URL: http://www.ima.umn.edu #12;PRTAD: A Database for Protein@iastate.edu Abstract PRTAD is a dedicated database and structural bioinformatics system for protein analysis

  12. COMMUNICATION Are Residues in a Protein Folding Nucleus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dai, Yang

    COMMUNICATION Are Residues in a Protein Folding Nucleus Evolutionarily Conserved? Yan Yuan Tseng is the hallmark of life. It is important to understand how protein folding and evolution influence each other in protein folding nucleus as measured by experi- mental f-value and selection pressure as measured by v

  13. Effective Reverse Conversion in Residue Number System Processors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    propose effective Residue Number System (RNS) to Weighted Number System conversion techniques with k being the num- ber of moduli. First, we introduce an RNS to MRC technique, which ad- dresses in an RNS to MRC with an asymptotic complexity, in terms of arithmetic operations, in the order of O

  14. A PROBABILISTIC FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF RESIDUAL STRESS FORMATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grujicic, Mica

    A PROBABILISTIC FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF RESIDUAL STRESS FORMATION IN SHRINK-FIT CERAMIC shrink fitting of the jacket over the lining is studied using a probabilistic finite element analysis structural analysis approach, known as the Advanced Mean Value (AMV) method, is used which enables

  15. ROBUST RESIDUAL VIBRATION SUPPRESSION USING IIR DIGITAL FILTERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mavroidis, Constantinos

    ROBUST RESIDUAL VIBRATION SUPPRESSION USING IIR DIGITAL FILTERS D. Economou a , C. Mavroidis b and I. Antoniadis a a National Technical University of Athens Department of Mechanical Engineering, 9 Rutgers University, The State University of New Jersey, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

  16. Residual Reconstruction for Block-Based Compressed Sensing of Video

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fowler, James E.

    -sensing reconstruction for still images is adapted to video. Incorporating reconstruction from a residual arising from thresholding within the framework introduced in [2]. The term block-based CS (BCS) sampling with smooth] revealed that BCS-SPL reconstruction usually offers at least the same quality of recovery as does other

  17. Removal of residual particulate matter from filter media

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Almlie, Jay C; Miller, Stanley J

    2014-11-11

    A method for removing residual filter cakes that remain adhered to a filter after typical particulate removal methodologies have been employed, such as pulse-jet filter element cleaning, for all cleanable filters used for air pollution control, dust control, or powder control.

  18. PeriodicitiesinSequenceResidueHydropathyandtheImplicationsonProteinFolds Nancy Zhang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brutlag, Doug

    1 PeriodicitiesinSequenceResidueHydropathyandtheImplicationsonProteinFolds Nancy Zhang March, 2000 algorithms is that there are hidden variables effecting the protein folding mechanism and explain why it is crucial to a protein's fold. In section III, I will explain how the Fourier transform

  19. Power Lines and Crops Can Be Good Neighbors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-08-01

    Two of the Pacific Northwestís greatest economic assets are its wealth of agriculture and its clean and reliable electricity fueled largely by hydropower. Sometimes the two intersect. Transmission lines carrying electricity to the regionís farms, businesses and homes must, of necessity, span large areas where people grow crops and orchards. To ensure a safe and reliable flow of electricity across these expanses, trees and other vegetation must be managed to certain standards. At the same time, the Bonneville Power Administration ó which owns and operates three-quarters of the regionís high-voltage transmission ó recognizes the importance of our regionís agricultural bounty. We are committed to working with individuals and agricultural communities to facilitate ongoing land-use activities in transmission rights-of-way as long as those uses are compatible with transmission safety and reliability standards. Our goal with vegetation management is to keep you and your property safe while protecting the reliability of our regionís electricity system. By working together, BPA and landowners can protect the system and public safety.

  20. Nuclear Arms Control R&D Consortium includes Los Alamos

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Arms Control R&D Consortium includes Los Alamos Nuclear Arms Control R&D Consortium includes Los Alamos A consortium led by the University of Michigan that includes LANL as...

  1. Newport News in Review, ch. 47, segment includes TEDF groundbreaking...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    https:www.jlab.orgnewsarticlesnewport-news-review-ch-47-segment-includes-tedf-groundbreaking-event Newport News in Review, ch. 47, segment includes TEDF groundbreaking event...

  2. Solar Energy Education. Reader, Part II. Sun story. [Includes...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Part II. Sun story. Includes glossary Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Solar Energy Education. Reader, Part II. Sun story. Includes glossary You are...

  3. Microfluidic devices and methods including porous polymer monoliths...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    devices and methods including porous polymer monoliths Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Microfluidic devices and methods including porous polymer monoliths Microfluidic...

  4. No-tillage and high-residue practices reduce soil water evaporation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01

    P, Brown L, Hirschi M. 2000. Water erosion. In: Conservationeffects on evaporation, soil water content, and yield offor Computing Crop Water Requirements. FAO Irrigation and

  5. Projecting net incomes for Texas crop producers: an application of probabilistic forecasting†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eggerman, Christopher Ryan

    2006-10-30

    Agricultural policy changes directly affect the economic viability of Texas crop producers because government payments make up a significant portion of their net farm income (NFI). NFI projections benefit producers, ...

  6. Crop water stress under climate change uncertainty : global policy and regional risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gueneau, Arthur

    2012-01-01

    Fourty percent of all crops grown in the world today are grown using irrigation, and shifting precipitation patterns due to climate change are viewed as a major threat to food security. This thesis examines, in the framework ...

  7. Evaluation of Salmonella disinfection strategies for pre-slaughter broiler crop decontamination†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barnhart, Eric Thomas

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of the following studies was to evaluate selected potential decontamination methods for ability to reduce the incidence of Salmonella recovery from broiler crops during pre-slaughter feed withdrawal. The efficacy of prolonged lactose...

  8. Multisensor Fusion of Ground-based and Airborne Remote Sensing Data for Crop Condition Assessment†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Huihui

    2012-02-14

    provide applicators with guidance equipment configurations that can result in herbicide savings and optimized applications in other crops. The main focus of this research was to apply sensor fusion technology to ground-based and airborne imagery data...

  9. Establishing Crop Acreage Flexibility Restraints for Subregions of the Texas High Plains†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Condra, G. D.; Lacewell, R. D.

    1977-01-01

    Cropping pattern shifts in many aggregate linear programming (LP) models need to be constrained due to institutional, marketing machinery, and price uncertainty factors. The purpose of this study was to estimate constraints which are referred...

  10. Organic farming practices for rice under diversified cropping systems in humid tropics.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Varughese, Kuruvilla Dr; Rani, B Dr; Abraham, Suja; John, Jacob Dr; M, Vijayan Dr

    2009-01-01

    HTM (accessed on 15-1- KAU (Kerala Agricultural University).Crops. (2002) 12 th edition, Kerala Agricultural University,humid tropical regions of Kerala there is a reduction in

  11. Novel enabling technologies of gene isolation and plant transformation for improved crop protection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Torok, Tamas

    2013-02-04

    Meeting the needs of agricultural producers requires the continued development of improved transgenic crop protection products. The completed project focused on developing novel enabling technologies of gene discovery and plant transformation to facilitate the generation of such products.

  12. Analysis of MODIS 250 m NDVI Using Different Time-Series Data for Crop Type Separability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Eunmok

    2014-08-31

    The primary objectives of this research were to: (1) investigate the use of different compositing periods of NDVI values of time-series MODIS 250 m data for distinguishing major crop types on the central Great Plains of ...

  13. Crop Protection 26 (2007) 894902 Integrated approaches to understanding and managing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neher, Deborah A.

    2007-01-01

    . Dudeke a College of Agriculture and Natural Resources, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824) in question, (ii) the effects of past and current crop production system practices on nematode behaviour

  14. Residual Stresses in 21-6-9 Stainless Steel Warm Forgings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Everhart, Wesley A.; Lee, Jordan D.; Broecker, Daniel J.; Bartow, John P.; McQueen, Jamie M.; Switzner, Nathan T.; Neidt, Tod M.; Sisneros, Thomas A.; Brown, Donald W.

    2012-11-14

    Forging residual stresses are detrimental to the production and performance of derived machined parts due to machining distortions, corrosion drivers and fatigue crack drivers. Residual strains in a 21-6-9 stainless steel warm High Energy Rate Forging (HERF) were measured via neutron diffraction. The finite element analysis (FEA) method was used to predict the residual stresses that occur during forging and water quenching. The experimentally measured residual strains were used to calibrate simulations of the three-dimensional residual stress state of the forging. ABAQUS simulation tools predicted residual strains that tend to match with experimental results when varying yield strength is considered.

  15. Crop and vegetative growth impact on water infiltration into gulf coast soils†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peirce, Dwayne Jack

    1985-01-01

    CROP AND VEGETATIVE GROWTH IMPACT ON WATER INFILTRATION INTO GULF COAST SOILS A Thesis by DWAYNE JACK PEIRCE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AIM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE December 1985 Major Subject: Soil Science CROP AND VEGETATIVE GROWTH IMPACT ON WATER INFILTRATION INTO GULF COAST SOILS A Thesis by DWAYNE JACK PEIRCE Approved as to style and content by: L. R. ossner (Chairman of Committee) M. J. Mc...

  16. The Effect of Cropping Upon the Active Potash of the Soil.†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

    1924-01-01

    and the active potash lost from the soil, calculated from Table 3, is ,722 -L .016. This is a high correlation and shows a high relation between the pat- ash removed by crops and the 'active potash lost by soils. The correlation between the butter production... EXPEWMENT s r: ATION AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE OF %'EXAS W. B. BIZZELL, President -- -- BULLETIN NO. 325 SEPTEMBER, 1924 DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY EFFECT OF CROPPING UPON THE ACTIVE POTASH OF THE SOIL B. YOUNGBLOOD, DIRECTOR COLLEGE STATION...

  17. Copyright 2014 -Copyright Information, Privacy Statement, and Terms of Use American Society of Agronomy | Crop Science Society of America | Soil Science Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    of Agronomy | Crop Science Society of America | Soil Science Society of America 5585 Guilford Road | Madison

  18. Copyright 2012 -Copyright Information, Privacy Statement, and Terms of Use American Society of Agronomy | Crop Science Society of America | Soil Science Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    of Agronomy | Crop Science Society of America | Soil Science Society of America 5585 Guilford Road | Madison

  19. GM Crops Are Not Containable: so what? E. Ann Clark, Plant Agriculture, University of Guelph (eaclark@uoguelph.ca) 2005 E. Ann Clark

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, E. Ann

    GM Crops Are Not Containable: so what? E. Ann Clark, Plant Agriculture, University of Guelph years of commercial experience with GM crops allow us to explore two theses: 1. that the premise that GM field crops can co-exist without contaminating weedy relatives as well as non-GM crops is inconsistent

  20. A National Assessment of Promising Areas for Switchgrass, Hybrid Poplar, or Willow Energy Crop Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graham, R.L.; Walsh, M.E.

    1999-02-01

    The objective of this paper is to systematically assess the cropland acreage that could support energy crops and the expected farm gate and delivered prices of energy crops. The assessment is based on output from two modeling approaches: (1) the Oak Ridge County-Level Energy Crop (ORECCL) database (1996 version) and (2) the Oak Ridge Integrated Bioenergy Analysis System (ORIBAS). The former provides county-level estimates of suitable acres, yields, and farmgate prices of energy crops (switchgrass, hybrid poplar, willow) for all fifty states. The latter estimates delivered feedstock prices and quantities within a state at a fine resolution (1 km2) and considers the interplay between transportation costs, farmgate prices, cropland density, and facility demand. It can be used to look at any type of feedstock given the appropriate input parameters. For the purposes of this assessment, ORIBAS has been used to estimate farmgate and delivered switchgrass prices in 11 states (AL, FL, GA, IA, M N, MO, ND, NE, SC, SD, and TN). Because the potential for energy crop production can be considered from several perspectives, and is evolving as policies, economics and our basic understanding of energy crop yields and production costs change, this assessment should be viewed as a snapshot in time.

  1. Potential producers and their attitudes toward adoption of biomass crops in central Florida

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rahmani, M.; Hodges, A.W.; Stricker, J.A.

    1996-12-31

    A recent study by the University of Florida, Center for Biomass Programs (1996) showed that biomass crops have potential as a new agricultural commodity in central Florida. Both herbaceous and woody biomass crops have high yields, and weather and soil conditions are favorable. In the Polk County area over 40,371 ha (100,000 A) of phosphate-mined land and about 161,486 ha (400,000 A) of pastureland may be available for biomass production at low opportunity cost. Phosphate land is owned by a few mining companies while pastureland is owned by or rented to cattlemen. Infrastructure for large-scale crop production, such as in the Midwest United States, does not presently exist in central Florida. Personal interviews were conducted with phosphate company managers and a mail survey was conducted with 940 landowners, with at least 16 ha (40 A) of agricultural land. Data were gathered related to decision making factors in growing biomass and other new crops. Results suggested that economic factors, particularly availability of an established market and an assured high return per acre were considered the most important factors. Lack of familiarity with new crops was an important barrier to their adoption. Potential net returns and production costs were considered the most important information needed to make decisions about growing biomass crops.

  2. Genetic diversity in chestnuts of Kashmir valley Efficient managing practices require an understanding of the root distribution of crop in walnut (Juglans regia)-crop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xi, Weimin

    variation of roots for soybean (Glycine max) and peanut (Arachis hypogaea) grown with walnut trees. Crop. The RLD of intercropped peanut primarily located in the 0-10 cm soil layer, reaching the average of 52 peanut was achieved in the 10-20 cm soil layer. The RLDs of both intercropped soybean and peanut

  3. ,"U.S. Total Sales of Residual Fuel Oil by End Use"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    to Oil Company Consumers (Thousand Gallons)","U.S. Residual Fuel Oil SalesDeliveries to Electric Utility Consumers (Thousand Gallons)","U.S. Residual Fuel Oil SalesDeliveries to...

  4. Ma,BonzongoandGao/UniversityofFlorida Characterization and Leachability of Coal Combustion Residues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    Ma,BonzongoandGao/UniversityofFlorida Characterization and Leachability of Coal Combustion Residues an important solid waste in Florida, i.e., coal combustion residues (CCR) detailed in #2-4 of the current

  5. Evaluation of residual stress gradients in ductile cast iron using critical refracted longitudinal (Lcr) wave technique†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pfluger, Ron Atlan

    1995-01-01

    Critically refracted longitudinal (LCR) waves have been investigated as a possible technique for the evaluation of the residual stress gradients present in ductile iron castings. Residual stresses are likely to develop in ductile cast iron during...

  6. Techniques for identifying long-range residue correlations in the fifth binding module of LDLR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Jennifer W

    2006-01-01

    The study of correlations between residues in distal regions of a protein structure may provide insights into the mechanism of protein folding. Such long-range correlations may exist between distant residues that are ...

  7. Making Photosynthetic Biofuel Renewable: Recovering Phosphorus from Residual Biomass J. M. Gifford and P. Westerhoff

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    Making Photosynthetic Biofuel Renewable: Recovering Phosphorus from Residual Biomass J. M. Gifford to global warming. Biofuel from phototrophic microbes like algae and bacteria provides a viable substitute improves biofuel sustainability by refining phosphorus recycling. Biomass Production Residual Biomass

  8. Hubble Residuals of Nearby SN Ia Are Correlated with Host Galaxy...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Hubble Residuals of Nearby SN Ia Are Correlated with Host Galaxy Masses Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Hubble Residuals of Nearby SN Ia Are Correlated...

  9. Viscosity stabilization of SRC residual oil. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tewari, K.C.

    1984-05-01

    The use of SRC residual oils for No. 6 Fuel Oil substitutes has been proposed. The oils exhibit viscosity characteristics at elevated temperatures that allow this substitution with only minor modifications to the existing fuel oil infrastructure. However, loss of low-boiling materials causes an increase in the viscosity of the residual oils that is greater than expected from concentration changes. A process has been developed that minimizes the loss of volatiles and thus maintains the viscosity of these materials. The use of an additive (water, phenol, or an SRC light oil cut rich in low-boiling phenols in amounts up to 2.0 wt %) accomplishes this and hence stabilizes the pumping and atomizing characteristics for an extended period. During the course of the work, the components of the volatiles lost were identified and the viscosity change due to this loss was quantified. 3 references, 6 figures, 9 tables.

  10. The impact of including water constraints on food production within a CGE framework

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Jonathan (Jonathan Early)

    2011-01-01

    This research explores the long-term relationship between water resources, irrigated land use change and crop production within a computable general equilibrium modeling framework. The modeling approach is developed on a ...

  11. Crops reap benefits of Pantex irrigation system | National Nuclear...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Upgrades to the current three 100-acre tracts also are being implemented, including installation of more robust piping, higher-capacity pumps and new wastewater filter banks....

  12. Determining the release of radionuclides from tank waste residual solids. FY2015 report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, William D.; Hobbs, David T.

    2015-09-11

    Methodology development for pore water leaching studies has been continued to support Savannah River Site High Level Waste tank closure efforts. For FY2015, the primary goal of this testing was the achievement of target pH and Eh values for pore water solutions representative of local groundwater in the presence of grout or grout-representative (CaCO3 or FeS) solids as well as waste surrogate solids representative of residual solids expected to be present in a closed tank. For oxidizing conditions representative of a closed tank after aging, a focus was placed on using solid phases believed to be controlling pH and Eh at equilibrium conditions. For three pore water conditions (shown below), the target pH values were achieved to within 0.5 pH units. Tank 18 residual surrogate solids leaching studies were conducted over an Eh range of approximately 630 mV. Significantly higher Eh values were achieved for the oxidizing conditions (ORII and ORIII) than were previously observed. For the ORII condition, the target Eh value was nearly achieved (within 50 mV). However, Eh values observed for the ORIII condition were approximately 160 mV less positive than the target. Eh values observed for the RRII condition were approximately 370 mV less negative than the target. Achievement of more positive and more negative Eh values is believed to require the addition of non-representative oxidants and reductants, respectively. Plutonium and uranium concentrations measured during Tank 18 residual surrogate solids leaching studies under these conditions (shown below) followed the general trends predicted for plutonium and uranium oxide phases, assuming equilibrium with dissolved oxygen. The highest plutonium and uranium concentrations were observed for the ORIII condition and the lowest concentrations were observed for the RRII condition. Based on these results, it is recommended that these test methodologies be used to conduct leaching studies with actual Tank 18 residual solids material. Actual waste testing will include leaching evaluations of technetium and neptunium, as well as plutonium and uranium.

  13. Type Ia supernova Hubble residuals and host-galaxy properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, A. G.; Aldering, G.; Aragon, C.; Bailey, S.; Fakhouri, H. K. [Physics Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Antilogus, P.; Bongard, S.; Canto, A.; Cellier-Holzem, F.; Fleury, M.; Guy, J. [Laboratoire de Physique Nuclťaire et des Hautes …nergies, Universitť Pierre et Marie Curie Paris 6, Universitť Paris Diderot Paris 7, CNRS-IN2P3, 4 place Jussieu, F-75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Baltay, C. [Department of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06250-8121 (United States); Buton, C.; Feindt, U.; Greskovic, P.; Kowalski, M. [Physikalisches Institut, Universitšt Bonn, NuŖallee 12, D-53115 Bonn (Germany); Childress, M. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2611 (Australia); Chotard, N.; Copin, Y.; Gangler, E. [Universitť de Lyon, F-69622 Lyon (France); Universitť de Lyon 1, Villeurbanne (France); CNRS/IN2P3, Institut de Physique Nuclťaire de Lyon (France); and others

    2014-03-20

    Kim et al. introduced a new methodology for determining peak-brightness absolute magnitudes of type Ia supernovae from multi-band light curves. We examine the relation between their parameterization of light curves and Hubble residuals, based on photometry synthesized from the Nearby Supernova Factory spectrophotometric time series, with global host-galaxy properties. The K13 Hubble residual step with host mass is 0.013 Ī 0.031 mag for a supernova subsample with data coverage corresponding to the K13 training; at <<1?, the step is not significant and lower than previous measurements. Relaxing the data coverage requirement of the Hubble residual step with the host mass is 0.045 Ī 0.026 mag for the larger sample; a calculation using the modes of the distributions, less sensitive to outliers, yields a step of 0.019 mag. The analysis of this article uses K13 inferred luminosities, as distinguished from previous works that use magnitude corrections as a function of SALT2 color and stretch parameters: steps at >2? significance are found in SALT2 Hubble residuals in samples split by the values of their K13 x(1) and x(2) light-curve parameters. x(1) affects the light-curve width and color around peak (similar to the ?m {sub 15} and stretch parameters), and x(2) affects colors, the near-UV light-curve width, and the light-curve decline 20-30 days after peak brightness. The novel light-curve analysis, increased parameter set, and magnitude corrections of K13 may be capturing features of SN Ia diversity arising from progenitor stellar evolution.

  14. Applications of RESRAD family of computer codes to sites contaminated with radioactive residues.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, C.; Kamboj, S.; Cheng, J.-J.; LePoire, D.; Gnanapragasam, E.; Zielen, A.; Williams, W. A.; Wallo, A.; Peterson, H.

    1999-10-21

    The RESIL4D family of computer codes was developed to provide a scientifically defensible answer to the question ''How clean is clean?'' and to provide useful tools for evaluating human health risk at sites contaminated with radioactive residues. The RESRAD codes include (1) RESRAD for soil contaminated with radionuclides; (2) RESRAD-BUILD for buildings contaminated with radionuclides; (3) RESRAD-CHEM for soil contaminated with hazardous chemicals; (4) RESRAD-BASELINE for baseline risk assessment with measured media concentrations of both radionuclides and chemicals; (5) RESRAD-ECORISK for ecological risk assessment; (6) RESRAD-RECYCLE for recycle and reuse of radiologically contaminated metals and equipment; and (7) RESRAD-OFFSITE for off-site receptor radiological dose assessment. Four of these seven codes (RESRAD, RESRAD-BUILD, RESRAD-RECYCLE, and RESRAD-OFFSITE) also have uncertainty analysis capabilities that allow the user to input distributions of parameters. RESRAD has been widely used in the United States and abroad and approved by many federal and state agencies. Experience has shown that the RESRAD codes are useful tools for evaluating sites contaminated with radioactive residues. The use of RESRAD codes has resulted in significant savings in cleanup cost. Analysis of 19 site-specific uranium guidelines is discussed in the paper.

  15. Spatial autocorrelation approaches to testing residuals from least squares regression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yanguang

    2015-01-01

    In statistics, the Durbin-Watson test is always employed to detect the presence of serial correlation of residuals from a least squares regression analysis. However, the Durbin-Watson statistic is only suitable for ordered time or spatial series. If the variables comprise cross-sectional data coming from spatial random sampling, the Durbin-Watson will be ineffectual because the value of Durbin-Watson's statistic depends on the sequences of data point arrangement. Based on the ideas from spatial autocorrelation, this paper presents two new statistics for testing serial correlation of residuals from least squares regression based on spatial samples. By analogy with the new form of Moran's index, an autocorrelation coefficient is defined with a standardized residual vector and a normalized spatial weight matrix. Then on the analogy of the Durbin-Watson statistic, a serial correlation index is constructed. As a case, the two statistics are applied to the spatial sample of 29 China's regions. These results show th...

  16. Residual ferroelectricity in barium strontium titanate thin film tunable dielectrics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garten, L. M., E-mail: lmg309@psu.edu; Trolier-McKinstry, S. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Materials Research Institute, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Lam, P.; Harris, D.; Maria, J.-P. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27607 (United States)

    2014-07-28

    Loss reduction is critical to develop Ba{sub 1?x}Sr{sub x}TiO{sub 3} thin film tunable microwave dielectric components and dielectric energy storage devices. The presence of ferroelectricity, and hence the domain wall contributions to dielectric loss, will degrade the tunable performance in the microwave region. In this work, residual ferroelectricityóa persistent ferroelectric response above the global phase transition temperatureówas characterized in tunable dielectrics using Rayleigh analysis. Chemical solution deposited Ba{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3}TiO{sub 3} films, with relative tunabilities of 86% over 250?kV/cm at 100?kHz, demonstrated residual ferroelectricity 65?įC above the ostensible paraelectric transition temperature. Frequency dispersion observed in the dielectric temperature response was consistent with the presence of nanopolar regions as one source of residual ferroelectricity. The application of AC electric field for the Rayleigh analysis of these samples led to a doubling of the dielectric loss for fields over 10?kV/cm at room temperature.

  17. The effect of magnetic flutter on residual flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terry, P. W.; Pueschel, M. J.; Carmody, D. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Nevins, W. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

    2013-11-15

    The hypothesis that stochastic magnetic fields disrupt zonal flows associated with ion temperature gradient turbulence saturation is investigated analytically with a residual flow calculation in the presence of magnetic flutter. The calculation starts from the time-asymptotic zero-beta residual flow of Rosenbluth and Hinton [Phys. Rev. Lett. 80, 724 (1998)] with the sudden application of an externally imposed, fixed magnetic field perturbation. The short-time electron response from radial charge loss due to magnetic flutter is calculated from the appropriate gyrokinetic equation. The potential evolution has quadratic behavior, with a zero crossing at finite time. The crossing time and its parametric dependencies are compared with numerical results from a gyrokinetic simulation of residual flow in the presence of magnetic flutter. The numerical and analytical results are in good agreement and support the hypothesis that the high-beta runaway of numerical simulations is a result of the disabling of zonal flows by finite-beta charge losses associated with magnetic flutter.

  18. Washing of Rocky Flats Combustible Residues (Conducted March - May 1995)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mary E. Barr; Ann R. Schake; David A. Romero; Gordon D. Jarvinen

    1999-03-01

    The scope of this project is to determine the feasibility of washing plutonium-containing combustible residues using ultrasonic disruption as a method for dislodging particulate. Removal of plutonium particulate and, to a lesser extent, solubilized plutonium from the organic substrate should substantially reduce potential fire, explosion or radioactive release hazards due to radiolytic hydrogen generation or high flammability. Tests were conducted on polypropylene filters which were used as pre-filters in the rich-residue ion-exchange process at the Los Alamos Plutonium Facility. These filters are similar to the Ful-Flo{reg_sign} cartridges used at Rocky Flats that make up a substantial fraction of the combustible residues with the highest hazard rating. Batch experiments were run on crushed filter material in order to determine the amount of Pu removed by stirring, stirring and sonication, and stirring and sonication with the introduction of Pu-chelating water-soluble polymers or surfactants. Significantly more Pu is removed using sonication and sonication with chelators than is removed with mechanical stirring alone.

  19. Title IX & Discrimination Complaint Form (including sexual harassment)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Lawrence R.

    Title IX & Discrimination Complaint Form (including sexual harassment) Office of Diversity. Although the university cannot commit to keeping a complaint of discrimination confidential the process for filing or investigating complaints of discrimination (including sexual harassment). Note

  20. Explosion at Louisa (including Morrison Old) Colliery, Durham†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yates, R.

    MINISTRY OF FUEL AND POWER - EXPLOSION AT LOUISA (including MORRISON OLD) COLLIERY, DURHAM REPORT On the Causes of, and Circumstances attending, the Explosion which occurred at Louisa (including Morrison Old) Colliery, ...

  1. The effect of various cropping systems upon organic matter, total nitrogen, cation exchange capacity, exchangeable cations, conductivity and reaction†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mannan, Mohammad Abdul

    1958-01-01

    of organic matter, total nitrogen, cation exchange capacity, exchangeable sodium, potassium and magnesium, conductivity and pH were made from the samples of seven different crop- ping systems. These cropping systems were started in January of 1950... significant variation in concentration of exchangeable sodium with depth. Exchan sable Potassium The exchangeable potassium content of the plots under various cropping systems ranged from 0. 96 to 1. 22 m. e. /100 gms in the surface layer, from 0. 57 to 0...

  2. Benefits of supplementing an industrial waste anaerobic digester with energy crops for increased biogas production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nges, Ivo Achu, E-mail: Nges.Ivo_Achu@biotek.lu.se [Department of Biotechnology, Lund University, P.O. Box 124, SE 221 00 Lund (Sweden); Escobar, Federico; Fu Xinmei; Bjoernsson, Lovisa [Department of Biotechnology, Lund University, P.O. Box 124, SE 221 00 Lund (Sweden)

    2012-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study demonstrates the feasibility of co-digestion food industrial waste with energy crops. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Laboratory batch co-digestion led to improved methane yield and carbon to nitrogen ratio as compared to mono-digestion of industrial waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Co-digestion was also seen as a means of degrading energy crops with nutrients addition as crops are poor in nutrients. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Batch co-digestion methane yields were used to predict co-digestion methane yield in full scale operation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It was concluded that co-digestion led an over all economically viable process and ensured a constant supply of feedstock. - Abstract: Currently, there is increasing competition for waste as feedstock for the growing number of biogas plants. This has led to fluctuation in feedstock supply and biogas plants being operated below maximum capacity. The feasibility of supplementing a protein/lipid-rich industrial waste (pig manure, slaughterhouse waste, food processing and poultry waste) mesophilic anaerobic digester with carbohydrate-rich energy crops (hemp, maize and triticale) was therefore studied in laboratory scale batch and continuous stirred tank reactors (CSTR) with a view to scale-up to a commercial biogas process. Co-digesting industrial waste and crops led to significant improvement in methane yield per ton of feedstock and carbon-to-nitrogen ratio as compared to digestion of the industrial waste alone. Biogas production from crops in combination with industrial waste also avoids the need for micronutrients normally required in crop digestion. The batch co-digestion methane yields were used to predict co-digestion methane yield in full scale operation. This was done based on the ratio of methane yields observed for laboratory batch and CSTR experiments compared to full scale CSTR digestion of industrial waste. The economy of crop-based biogas production is limited under Swedish conditions; therefore, adding crops to existing industrial waste digestion could be a viable alternative to ensure a constant/reliable supply of feedstock to the anaerobic digester.

  3. Opportunities for Energy Crop Production Based on Subfield Scale Distribution of Profitability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ian Bonner; Kara Cafferty; David Muth Jr.; Mark Tomer

    2014-10-01

    Incorporation of dedicated herbaceous energy crops into row crop landscapes is a promising means to supply an expanding biofuel industry while increasing biomass yields, benefiting soil and water quality, and increasing biodiversity. Despite these positive traits energy crops remain largely unaccepted due to concerns over their practicality and cost of implementation. This paper presents a case study on Hardin County, Iowa to demonstrate how subfield decision making can be used to target candidate areas for conversion to energy crop production. The strategy presented integrates switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) into subfield landscape positions where corn (Zea mays L.) grain is modeled to operate at a net economic loss. The results of this analysis show that switchgrass integration has the potential to increase sustainable biomass production from 48 to 99% (depending on the rigor of conservation practices applied to corn stover collection) while also improving field level profitability. Candidate land area is highly sensitive to grain price (0.18 to 0.26 US$ kg-1) and dependent on the acceptable net profit for corn production (ranging from 0 to -1,000 US$ ha-1). This work presents the case that switchgrass can be economically implemented into row crop production landscapes when management decisions are applied at a subfield scale and compete against areas of the field operating at a negative net profit.

  4. Results from intercropping fast-growing trees and food crops at Morogoro, Tanzania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Redhead, J.F.

    1992-12-31

    In Morogoro, Tanzania, agroforestry trials were set up to investigate intercropping with primarily eucalypt species. The climate in the region is very similar to Kolar, Karnataka State, India. Three crops-sorghum, bean and maize-were grown annually under Eucalyptus tereticornis at 2.5 m x 2.5 m for three years with a range of weeding practices. Plots that were intercropped with beans showed best results. Shading by the eucalypts after three years resulted in negligible crop yields in all treatments. Three tree spacings of E. camaldulensis (3 m x 3 m, 4 m x 4 m, and 5 m x 5 m) were combined with the intercropping of beans and maize. Beans gave satisfactory yields at all spacings, but the maize showed significantly depressed yields at 3 m x 3 m at 4 m x 4 m, but was similar to pure maize crop at 5 m x 5 m spacing. Overall the extra revenue from a food crop in the first and second year of tree growth increases the return from the land. The short rotation of fast growing trees depleted the soil of nutrients and, as with other crops, the fertility would have to be maintained by applying fertilizer.

  5. Hemicellulolytic organisms in the particle-associated microbiota of the hoatzin crop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Godoy-Vitorino, Filipa; Malfatti, Stephanie; Garcia-Amado, Maria A.; Dominguez-Bello, Maria Gloria; Hugenholtz, Phillip; Tringe, Susannah

    2011-05-31

    The hoatzin (Opisthocomus hoazin) is a South American herbivorous bird, that has an enlarged crop analogous to the rumen, where foregut microbes degrade the otherwise indigestible plant materials, providing energy to the host. The crop harbors an impressive array of microorganisms with potentially novel cellulolytic enzymes. Thie study describes the composition ofthe particle-associated microbiota in the hoatzin crop, combining a survey of 16S rRNA genes in 7 adult birds and metagenome sequencing of two animals. The pyrotag survey demonstrates that Prevotellaceae, are the most abundant and ubiquitous taxa, suggesting that the degradation of hemicellulose is an important activity in the crop. Nonetheless, preliminary results from the metagnome of the particle-associated microbiota of two adult birds show that the crop microbiome contains a high number of genes encoding cellulases (such as GH5) more abundant than those of the termite gut, as well as genes encoding hemicellulases. These preliminary results show that the carbohydate-active enzyme genes in the cropmetagenome could be a source of biochemical catalysts able to deconstruct plant biomass.

  6. Global Simulation of Bioenergy Crop Productivity: Analytical framework and Case Study for Switchgrass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nair, S. Surendran [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)] [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Nichols, Jeff A. {Cyber Sciences} [ORNL; Post, Wilfred M [ORNL] [ORNL; Wang, Dali [ORNL] [ORNL; Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL] [ORNL; Kline, Keith L [ORNL] [ORNL; Wei, Yaxing [ORNL] [ORNL; Singh, Nagendra [ORNL] [ORNL; Kang, Shujiang [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Contemporary global assessments of the deployment potential and sustainability aspects of biofuel crops lack quantitative details. This paper describes an analytical framework capable of meeting the challenges associated with global scale agro-ecosystem modeling. We designed a modeling platform for bioenergy crops, consisting of five major components: (i) standardized global natural resources and management data sets, (ii) global simulation unit and management scenarios, (iii) model calibration and validation, (iv) high-performance computing (HPC) modeling, and (v) simulation output processing and analysis. A case study with the HPC- Environmental Policy Integrated Climate model (HPC-EPIC) to simulate a perennial bioenergy crop, switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) and global biomass feedstock analysis on grassland demonstrates the application of this platform. The results illustrate biomass feedstock variability of switchgrass and provide insights on how the modeling platform can be expanded to better assess sustainable production criteria and other biomass crops. Feedstock potentials on global grasslands and within different countries are also shown. Future efforts involve developing databases of productivity, implementing global simulations for other bioenergy crops (e.g. miscanthus, energycane and agave), and assessing environmental impacts under various management regimes. We anticipated this platform will provide an exemplary tool and assessment data for international communities to conduct global analysis of biofuel biomass feedstocks and sustainability.

  7. Efficacy and Timing of Fungicides, Bactericides, and Biologicals for Decidous Tree Fruit, Nut, Strawberry, and Vine Crops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adaskaveg, Jim; Gubler, Doug; Michailides, Themis; Holtz, Brent

    2008-01-01

    Tables for Fruit, Nut, Strawberry, and Vine Cropsó2008Phomopsis sp. Host(s) Pistachio Almond Strawberry Almond,peach, strawberry Grapevine Grapevine Strawberry Grapevine

  8. Non-Traditional Soil Additives: Can They Improve Crop Production?†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McFarland, Mark L.; Stichler, Charles; Lemon, Robert G.

    2002-06-26

    Non-traditional soil additives include soil conditioners such as organic materials and minerals, soil activators that claim to stimulate soil microbes or inoculate soil with new beneficial organisms, and wetting agents that may be marketed...

  9. Method to control residual stress in a film structure and a system thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Parthum, Sr., Michael J. (Rochester, NY)

    2008-12-30

    A method for controlling residual stress in a structure in a MEMS device and a structure thereof includes selecting a total thickness and an overall equivalent stress for the structure. A thickness for each of at least one set of alternating first and second layers is determined to control an internal stress with respect to a neutral axis for each of the at least alternating first and second layers and to form the structure based on the selected total thickness and the selected overall equivalent stress. Each of the at least alternating first and second layers is deposited to the determined thickness for each of the at least alternating first and second layers to form the structure.

  10. What To Include In The Whistleblower Complaint? | National Nuclear...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home About Us Our Operations Management and Budget Whistleblower Program What To Include In The Whistleblower Complaint?...

  11. Introduction to Small-Scale Photovoltaic Systems (Including RETScreen...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Introduction to Small-Scale Photovoltaic Systems (Including RETScreen Case Study) (Webinar) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Introduction to Small-Scale...

  12. Including Retro-Commissioning in Federal Energy Savings Performance...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    More Documents & Publications Including Retro-Commissioning in Federal Energy Savings Performance Contracts Enabling Mass-Scale Financing for Federal Energy, Water, and...

  13. Numerical simulations for low energy nuclear reactions including...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Numerical simulations for low energy nuclear reactions including direct channels to validate statistical models Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Numerical simulations for...

  14. U-182: Microsoft Windows Includes Some Invalid Certificates

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The operating system includes some invalid intermediate certificates. The vulnerability is due to the certificate authorities and not the operating system itself.

  15. Tuberous legumes: preliminary evaluation of tropical Australian and introduced species as fuel crops

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saxon, E.C.

    1981-04-01

    The evaluation of native and introduced legumes with starch-storing roots or tubers was undertaken to test whether plants traditionally collected as food by Australian aborigines might have a role in the development of crops for liquid fuel production (by fermentation of carbohydrates to ethanol). Tuberous-rooted legumes from overseas were planted at the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization, division of Tropical Crops and Pastures, Kimberley Research Station, Western Australia (15/sup 0/39'S, 128/sup 0/42'E) in December 1974, March 1978 and February 1979. Roots from the latter plantings were harvested in June 1979. Native plant material was collected during visits to aboriginal communities in the Kimberleys between April and June 1979. The native and introduced specimens were analyzed for fermentable carbohydrate and protein content. Several native plants appear more promising than introduced species as liquid fuel crops.

  16. Workshop Report on Atomic Bomb Dosimetry--Residual Radiation Exposure: Recent Research and Suggestions for Future Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-06-06

    There is a need for accurate dosimetry for studies of health effects in the Japanese atomic bomb survivors because of the important role that these studies play in worldwide radiation protection standards. International experts have developed dosimetry systems, such as the Dosimetry System 2002 (DS02), which assess the initial radiation exposure to gamma rays and neutrons but only briefly consider the possibility of some minimal contribution to the total body dose by residual radiation exposure. In recognition of the need for an up-to-date review of the topic of residual radiation exposure in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, recently reported studies were reviewed at a technical session at the 57th Annual Meeting of the Health Physics Society in Sacramento, California, 22-26 July 2012. A one-day workshop was also held to provide time for detailed discussion of these newer studies and to evaluate their potential use in clarifying the residual radiation exposures to the atomic-bomb survivors at Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Suggestions for possible future studies are also included in this workshop report.

  17. Definite Integrals, Some Involving Residue Theory Evaluated by Maple Code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowman, Kimiko o [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    The calculus of residue is applied to evaluate certain integrals in the range (-{infinity} to {infinity}) using the Maple symbolic code. These integrals are of the form {integral}{sub -{infinity}}{sup {infinity}} cos(x)/[(x{sup 2} + a{sup 2})(x{sup 2} + b{sup 2}) (x{sup 2} + c{sup 2})]dx and similar extensions. The Maple code is also applied to expressions in maximum likelihood estimator moments when sampling from the negative binomial distribution. In general the Maple code approach to the integrals gives correct answers to specified decimal places, but the symbolic result may be extremely long and complex.

  18. PSERC 97-12 "Thermal Unit Commitment Including

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PSERC 97-12 "Thermal Unit Commitment Including Optimal AC Power Flow Constraints" Carlos Murillo-562-3966. #12;Thermal Unit Commitment Including Optimal AC Power Flow Constraints Carlos Murillo S anchez Robert a new algorithm for unit commitment that employs a Lagrange relaxation technique with a new augmentation

  19. Summer Conference Participant Registration Fee: $200 Includes the following

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    Summer Conference Participant Registration Fee: $200 Includes the following: Lodging for Wednesday on Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday Brunch on Saturday Summer Conference T-shirt Class materials Congress Only only (although they are encouraged to attend the entire conference). This fee includes the following

  20. Solar Energy Education. Reader, Part II. Sun story. [Includes glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-05-01

    Magazine articles which focus on the subject of solar energy are presented. The booklet prepared is the second of a four part series of the Solar Energy Reader. Excerpts from the magazines include the history of solar energy, mythology and tales, and selected poetry on the sun. A glossary of energy related terms is included. (BCS)

  1. Energy Transitions: A Systems Approach Including Marcellus Shale Gas Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Tsuhan

    Energy Transitions: A Systems Approach Including Marcellus Shale Gas Development A Report Transitions: A Systems Approach Including Marcellus Shale Gas Development Executive Summary In the 21st the Marcellus shale In addition to the specific questions identified for the case of Marcellus shale gas in New

  2. Influence of rainfall on the retention of sludge trace metals by the leaves of forage crops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Stephen Grady

    1977-01-01

    INFLUENCE OF RAINFALL ON THE RETENTION OF SLUDGE TRACE METALS BY THE LEAVES OF FORAGE CROPS A Thesis STEPHEN GRADY JONES Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1977 Major Subject: Soil Science INFLUENCE OF RAINFALL ON THE RETENTION OF SLUDGE TRACE MFTALS BY THE LEAVES OF FORAGE CROPS A Thesis by STEPHEN GRADY JONES Approved a to style and content by: 1 (Chairman of Committee...

  3. Articles which include chevron film cooling holes, and related processes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bunker, Ronald Scott; Lacy, Benjamin Paul

    2014-12-09

    An article is described, including an inner surface which can be exposed to a first fluid; an inlet; and an outer surface spaced from the inner surface, which can be exposed to a hotter second fluid. The article further includes at least one row or other pattern of passage holes. Each passage hole includes an inlet bore extending through the substrate from the inlet at the inner surface to a passage hole-exit proximate to the outer surface, with the inlet bore terminating in a chevron outlet adjacent the hole-exit. The chevron outlet includes a pair of wing troughs having a common surface region between them. The common surface region includes a valley which is adjacent the hole-exit; and a plateau adjacent the valley. The article can be an airfoil. Related methods for preparing the passage holes are also described.

  4. Biodiesel is produced from a wide variety of oilseed crops. In Europe, canola is the major biodiesel crop while in the U.S. soybeans dominate. Montana State University researchers have developed a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Rick L.

    Technology Biodiesel is produced from a wide variety of oilseed crops. In Europe, canola is the major biodiesel crop while in the U.S. soybeans dominate. Montana State University researchers have plants used for biodiesel. Seed oil content increases are induced by puroindoline genes which promote

  5. Separation of metallic residues from the dissolution of a high-burnup BWR fuel using nitrogen trifluoride

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McNamara, Bruce K.; Buck, Edgar C.; Soderquist, Chuck Z.; Smith, Frances N.; Mausolf, Edward J.; Scheele, Randall D.

    2014-02-10

    Nitrogen trifluoride (NF3) was used to fluorinate the metallic residue from the dissolution of a high burnup, boiling water reactor fuel (?70 MWd/kgU). The metallic residue included the noble metal phase (containing ruthenium, rhodium, palladium, technetium, and molybdenum), and smaller amounts of zirconium, selenium, tellurium, and silver. Exposing the noble metal phase to 10% NF3 in argon between 400 and 550?C, removed molybdenum and technetium near 400?C as their volatile fluorides, and ruthenium near 500?C as its volatile fluoride. The events were thermally and temporally distinct and the conditions specified are a recipe to separate these transition metals from each other and from the noble metal phase nonvolatile residue. Depletion of the volatile fluorides resulted in substantial exothermicity. Thermal excursion behavior was recorded under non-adiabatic, isothermal conditions that typically minimize heat release. Physical characterization of the metallic noble phase and its thermal behavior are consistent with high kinetic velocity reactions encouraged by the nanoparticulate phase or perhaps catalytic influences of the mixed platinum metals with nearly pure phase structure. Post-fluorination, only two phases were present in the residual nonvolatile fraction. These were identified as a nano-crystalline, metallic palladium cubic phase and a hexagonal rhodium trifluoride (RhF3) phase. The two phases were distinct as the sub-Ķm crystallites of metallic palladium were in contrast to the RhF3 phase, which grew from the parent nano-crystalline noble-metal phase during fluorination, to acicular crystals exceeding 20-Ķm in length.

  6. Effects of Irrigating with Treated Oil and Gas Product Water on Crop Biomass and Soil Permeability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terry Brown; Jeffrey Morris; Patrick Richards; Joel Mason

    2010-09-30

    Demonstrating effective treatment technologies and beneficial uses for oil and gas produced water is essential for producers who must meet environmental standards and deal with high costs associated with produced water management. Proven, effective produced-water treatment technologies coupled with comprehensive data regarding blending ratios for productive long-term irrigation will improve the state-of-knowledge surrounding produced-water management. Effective produced-water management scenarios such as cost-effective treatment and irrigation will discourage discharge practices that result in legal battles between stakeholder entities. The goal of this work is to determine the optimal blending ratio required for irrigating crops with CBNG and conventional oil and gas produced water treated by ion exchange (IX), reverse osmosis (RO), or electro-dialysis reversal (EDR) in order to maintain the long term physical integrity of soils and to achieve normal crop production. The soils treated with CBNG produced water were characterized with significantly lower SAR values compared to those impacted with conventional oil and gas produced water. The CBNG produced water treated with RO at the 100% treatment level was significantly different from the untreated produced water, while the 25%, 50% and 75% water treatment levels were not significantly different from the untreated water. Conventional oil and gas produced water treated with EDR and RO showed comparable SAR results for the water treatment technologies. There was no significant difference between the 100% treated produced water and the control (river water). The EDR water treatment resulted with differences at each level of treatment, which were similar to RO treated conventional oil and gas water. The 100% treated water had SAR values significantly lower than the 75% and 50% treatments, which were similar (not significantly different). The results of the greenhouse irrigation study found the differences in biomass production between each soil were significant for Western Wheatgrass and Alfafla. The Sheridan sandy loam soil resulted in the highest production for western wheatgrass and alfalfa while the X-ranch sandy loam had the lowest production rate for both plants. Plant production levels resulting from untreated CBNG produced water were significantly higher compared to untreated conventional oil and gas produced water. However, few differences were found between water treatments. The biomass produced from the greenhouse study was analyzed for elemental composition and for forage value. Elemental composition indentified several interesting findings. Some of the biomass was characterized with seemly high boron and sodium levels. High levels of boron found in some of the biomass was unexpected and may indicate that alfalfa and western wheatgrass plants may have been impacted by either soil or irrigation water containing high boron levels. Plants irrigated with water treated using EDR technology appeared to contain higher levels of boron with increased levels of treatment. Forage evaluations were conducted using near infrared reflectance spectroscopy. The data collected show small differences, generally less than 10%, between produced water treatments including the no treatment and 100% treatment conditions for each plant species studied. The forage value of alfalfa and western wheatgrass did not show significant tendencies dependent on soil, the amount of produced water treatment, or treatment technology.

  7. Alternative cooling resource for removing the residual heat of reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, H. C.; Lee, J. H.; Lee, D. S.; Jung, C. Y.; Choi, K. Y. [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd., 260 Naa-ri Yangnam-myeon Gyeongju-si, Gyeonasangbuk-do, 780-815 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-07-01

    The Recirculated Cooling Water (RCW) system of a Candu reactor is a closed cooling system which delivers demineralized water to coolers and components in the Service Building, the Reactor Building, and the Turbine Building and the recirculated cooling water is designed to be cooled by the Raw Service Water (RSW). During the period of scheduled outage, the RCW system provides cooling water to the heat exchangers of the Shutdown Cooling System (SDCS) in order to remove the residual heat of the reactor, so the RCW heat exchangers have to operate at all times. This makes it very hard to replace the inlet and outlet valves of the RCW heat exchangers because the replacement work requires the isolation of the RCW. A task force was formed to prepare a plan to substitute the recirculated water with the chilled water system in order to cool the SDCS heat exchangers. A verification test conducted in 2007 proved that alternative cooling was possible for the removal of the residual heat of the reactor and in 2008 the replacement of inlet and outlet valves of the RCW heat exchangers for both Wolsong unit 3 and 4 were successfully completed. (authors)

  8. A Multi-Factor Analysis of Sustainable Agricultural Residue Removal Potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jared Abodeely; David Muth; Paul Adler; Eleanor Campbell; Kenneth Mark Bryden

    2012-10-01

    Agricultural residues have significant potential as a near term source of cellulosic biomass for bioenergy production, but sustainable removal of agricultural residues requires consideration of the critical roles that residues play in the agronomic system. Previous work has developed an integrated model to evaluate sustainable agricultural residue removal potential considering soil erosion, soil organic carbon, greenhouse gas emission, and long-term yield impacts of residue removal practices. The integrated model couples the environmental process models WEPS, RUSLE2, SCI, and DAYCENT. This study uses the integrated model to investigate the impact of interval removal practices in Boone County, Iowa, US. Residue removal of 4.5 Mg/ha was performed annually, bi-annually, and tri-annually and were compared to no residue removal. The study is performed at the soil type scale using a national soil survey database assuming a continuous corn rotation with reduced tillage. Results are aggregated across soil types to provide county level estimates of soil organic carbon changes and individual soil type soil organic matter content if interval residue removal were implemented. Results show interval residue removal is possible while improving soil organic matter. Implementation of interval removal practices provide greater increases in soil organic matter while still providing substantial residue for bioenergy production.

  9. Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Through Energy Crops in the U.S. With Implications for Asian-Pacific Countries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarl, Bruce A.

    Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Through Energy Crops in the U.S. With Implications for Asian&M University Seniority of authorship is shared November 2001 #12;Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Through Energy Crops in greenhouse gas (GHG) emission mitigation efforts has increased in recent years. While the original text

  10. Part 4: Conclusion "Growing biofuel crops is a considerably long-term investment. We need to frame the food vs.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ." and the following outcomes - "(1) Strategic partnerships for the research, development, testing, and deployment of renewable biofuels technologies and production of biomass crops; (2) Evaluation of Hawaii's potential/or crops, conversion of biomass to useable fuels, distribution infrastructure, and end user markets. Each

  11. Metal contamination of soils and crops affected by the Chenzhou lead/zinc mine spill (Hunan, China)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mailhes, Corinne

    Metal contamination of soils and crops affected by the Chenzhou lead/zinc mine spill (Hunan, China polluted with As, Cd, Zn, Pb and Cu. The contamination levels were in the order of GYBNSZYNJTC showing heavily contaminated than seeds or fruits. Ipomoea was the most severely contaminated crop

  12. Industrial Crops and Products 43 (2013) 802811 Contents lists available at SciVerse ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khan, Saad A.

    2013-01-01

    and environmental and waste management concerns due to non-biodegradability of conventional plastics have thusIndustrial Crops and Products 43 (2013) 802≠811 Contents lists available at SciVerse ScienceDirect Industrial Crops and Products journal homepage: www.elsevier.com/locate/indcrop Production

  13. Application of food and feed safety assessment principles to evaluate transgenic approaches to gene modulation in crops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parrott, Wayne

    Article history: Received 18 August 2009 Accepted 12 April 2010 Keywords: Genetically modified crop (GM such as transcription factors (TF) that modify the expression of endogenous plant genes. To date, the food and feed safety of genetically modified (GM) crops has been assessed by the application of a set

  14. Biernbaum, Production Costs, HRT 322, 1998, pg 1 Greenhouse Crop Production: Counting the Costs and Making Cents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isaacs, Rufus

    Biernbaum, Production Costs, HRT 322, 1998, pg 1 Greenhouse Crop Production: Counting the Costs are the cost of production and the profitability of a crop calculated? What are variable and fixed costs? What of production and the income generated from sales meets your personal goal. A financial prospectus or estimate

  15. Including Retro-Commissioning in Federal Energy Savings Performance...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    the cost of the survey. Developing a detailed scope of work and a fixed price for this work is important to eliminate risk to the Agency and the ESCo. Including a detailed scope...

  16. T-603: Mac OS X Includes Some Invalid Comodo Certificates

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The operating system includes some invalid certificates. The vulnerability is due to the invalid certificates and not the operating system itself. Other browsers, applications, and operating systems are affected.

  17. FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF STEEL WELDED COVERPLATE INCLUDING COMPOSITE DOUBLERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petri, Brad

    2008-05-15

    With the increasing focus on welded bridge members resulting in crack initiation and propagation, there is a large demand for creative solutions. One of these solutions includes the application of composite doublers over ...

  18. Title 16 USC 818 Public Lands Included in Project - Reservation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of Lands From Entry Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: Title 16 USC 818 Public Lands Included in Project...

  19. Including costs of supply chain risk in strategic sourcing decisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jain, Avani

    2009-01-01

    Cost evaluations do not always include the costs associated with risks when organizations make strategic sourcing decisions. This research was conducted to establish and quantify the impact of risks and risk-related costs ...

  20. Hybrid powertrain system including smooth shifting automated transmission

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beaty, Kevin D.; Nellums, Richard A.

    2006-10-24

    A powertrain system is provided that includes a prime mover and a change-gear transmission having an input, at least two gear ratios, and an output. The powertrain system also includes a power shunt configured to route power applied to the transmission by one of the input and the output to the other one of the input and the output. A transmission system and a method for facilitating shifting of a transmission system are also provided.

  1. Limited Personal Use of Government Office Equipment including Information Technology

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2005-01-07

    The Order establishes requirements and assigns responsibilities for employees' limited personal use of Government resources (office equipment and other resources including information technology) within DOE, including NNSA. The Order is required to provide guidance on appropriate and inappropriate uses of Government resources. This Order was certified 04/23/2009 as accurate and continues to be relevant and appropriate for use by the Department. Certified 4-23-09. No cancellation.

  2. cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hev ein sequence

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Raikhel, Natasha V. (Okemos, MI); Broekaert, Willem F. (Dilbeek, BE); Chua, Nam-Hai (Scarsdale, NY); Kush, Anil (New York, NY)

    2000-07-04

    A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74-79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli.

  3. Single-well experimental design for studying residual trapping of superciritcal carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Y.; Freifeld, B.; Finsterle, S.; Leahy, M.; Ennis-King, J.; Paterson, L.; Dance, T.

    2010-06-15

    The objective of our research is to design a single-well injection-withdrawal test to evaluate residual phase trapping at potential CO{sub 2} geological storage sites. Given the significant depths targeted for CO{sub 2} storage and the resulting high costs associated with drilling to those depths, it is attractive to develop a single-well test that can provide data to assess reservoir properties and reduce uncertainties in the appraisal phase of site investigation. The main challenges in a single-well test design include (1) difficulty in quantifying the amount of CO{sub 2} that has dissolved into brine or migrated away from the borehole; (2) non-uniqueness and uncertainty in the estimate of the residual gas saturation (S{sub gr}) due to correlations among various parameters; and (3) the potential biased S{sub gr} estimate due to unaccounted heterogeneity of the geological medium. To address each of these challenges, we propose (1) to use a physical-based model to simulation test sequence and inverse modeling to analyze data information content and to quantify uncertainty; (2) to jointly use multiple data types generated from different kinds of tests to constrain the Sgr estimate; and (3) to reduce the sensitivity of the designed tests to geological heterogeneity by conducting the same test sequence in both a water-saturated system and a system with residual gas saturation. To perform the design calculation, we build a synthetic model and conduct a formal analysis for sensitivity and uncertain quantification. Both parametric uncertainty and geological uncertainty are considered in the analysis. Results show (1) uncertainty in the estimation of Sgr can be reduced by jointly using multiple data types and repeated tests; and (2) geological uncertainty is essential and needs to be accounted for in the estimation of S{sub gr} and its uncertainty. The proposed methodology is applied to the design of a CO{sub 2} injection test at CO2CRC's Otway Project Site, Victoria, Australia.

  4. Role of a cysteine residue in the active site of ERK and the MAPKK family

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ohori, Makoto [Astellas Pharma Inc., Tokodai 5-2-3, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 300-2698 (Japan); Kinoshita, Takayoshi [Department of Biological Science, Graduate School of Science, Osaka Prefecture University, Gakuencho 1-1, Sakai, Osaka 599-8531 (Japan); Yoshimura, Seiji [Astellas Pharma Inc., Tokodai 5-2-3, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 300-2698 (Japan); Warizaya, Masaichi [Astellas Pharma Inc., Tokodai 5-2-3, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 300-2698 (Japan); Nakajima, Hidenori [Astellas Pharma Inc., Tokodai 5-2-3, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 300-2698 (Japan)]. E-mail: hidenori.nakajima@jp.astellas.com; Miyake, Hiroshi [Astellas Pharma Inc., Tokodai 5-2-3, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 300-2698 (Japan)

    2007-02-16

    Kinases of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades, including extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK), represent likely targets for pharmacological intervention in proliferative diseases. Here, we report that FR148083 inhibits ERK2 enzyme activity and TGF{beta}-induced AP-1-dependent luciferase expression with respective IC{sub 50} values of 0.08 and 0.05 {mu}M. FR265083 (1'-2' dihydro form) and FR263574 (1'-2' and 7'-8' tetrahydro form) exhibited 5.5-fold less and no activity, respectively, indicating that both the {alpha},{beta}-unsaturated ketone and the conformation of the lactone ring contribute to this inhibitory activity. The X-ray crystal structure of the ERK2/FR148083 complex revealed that the compound binds to the ATP binding site of ERK2, involving a covalent bond to S{gamma} of ERK2 Cys166, hydrogen bonds with the backbone NH of Met108, N{zeta} of Lys114, backbone C=O of Ser153, N{delta}2 of Asn154, and hydrophobic interactions with the side chains of Ile31, Val39, Ala52, and Leu156. The covalent bond motif in the ERK2/FR148083 complex assures that the inhibitor has high activity for ERK2 and no activity for other MAPKs such as JNK1 and p38MAPK{alpha}/{beta}/{gamma}/{delta} which have leucine residues at the site corresponding to Cys166 in ERK2. On the other hand, MEK1 and MKK7, kinases of the MAPKK family which also can be inhibited by FR148083, contain a cysteine residue corresponding to Cys166 of ERK2. The covalent binding to the common cysteine residue in the ATP-binding site is therefore likely to play a crucial role in the inhibitory activity for these MAP kinases. These findings on the molecular recognition mechanisms of FR148083 for kinases with Cys166 should provide a novel strategy for the pharmacological intervention of MAPK cascades.

  5. A preliminary assessment of the state of harvest and collection technology for forest residues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Webb, Erin; Perlack, Robert D; Blackwelder, D. Brad; Muth, David J.; Hess, J. Richard

    2008-08-01

    To meet the 'Twenty in Ten Initiative' goals set in the 2007 State of the Union address, forest resources will be needed as feedstocks for lignocellulosic ethanol production. It has been estimated that 368 million dry tons can be produced annually in the U.S. from logging residues and fuel treatment thinnings. Currently, very little of this woody biomass is used for energy production due to the costs and difficulty in collecting and transporting this material. However, minimizing biomass costs (including harvest, handling, transport, storage, and processing costs) delivered to the refinery is necessary to develop a sustainable cellulosic ethanol industry. Achieving this goal requires a fresh look at conventional timber harvesting operations to identify ways of efficiently integrating energy wood collection and developing cost-effective technologies to harvest small-diameter trees. In conventional whole-tree logging operations, entire trees are felled and skidded from the stump to the landing. The residues (also called slash), consisting of tops and limbs, accumulate at the landing when trees are delimbed. This slash can be ground at the landing with a mobile grinder or transported to another central location with a stationary grinder. The ground material is transported via chip vans, or possibly large roll on/off containers, to the user facility. Cut-to-length harvesting systems are gaining popularity in some locations. In these operations, specialized harvesters that can fall, delimb, and cut logs to length are used. The small diameter tops and limbs accumulate along the machine's track. It can be left in the forest to dry or removed soon after harvest while logs are extracted. Removing slash during the same operation as the wood has been shown to be more efficient. However, leaving residue in the forest to dry reduces moisture content, which improves grinder performance, reduces dry matter loss during storage, and inhibits colonization of fungi that produce harmful spores. In recent years, new machines that are specially designed for collection of small diameter wood have been developed in the U.S. and Europe. Residue bundlers and balers improve transportation and handling efficiency by densifying the material and packaging it so that it can be handled with conventional equipment. An experimental integrated harvester/grinder can fall small diameter trees and feed them into a grinder. The ground material is collected in a bin that can be dumped into a chip van. The harvester head is also capable of delimbing and bucking (cut into sections) small timber to be used for pulp and posts. Limitations of these new technologies are their large capital costs and complexity, leading to high maintenance costs and the need for highly trained operators. To ensure that quality feedstock materials consistently enter the mouth of the refinery, the uniform format supply system concept proposes that feedstock diversity be managed at harvest, much like the current grain supply system. This allows for standardization of key infrastructure components and facilitation of a biomass commodity system. Challenges in achieving a uniform woody biomass supply include, but are not limited to, developing machines for efficient harvest of small-diameter trees in a range of topographies and conditions, developing machines and operating plans for grinding biomass as near to the stump as possible, developing cost-effective drying strategies to reduce losses and mold growth during wood chip storage, and quantifying environmental impacts of slash removal and fuel thinnings to aid landowner decisions and policy development.

  6. Improving Crop Yield and Water Productivity by Ecological Sanitation and Water Harvesting in South Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wehrli, Bernhard

    Improving Crop Yield and Water Productivity by Ecological Sanitation and Water Harvesting in South and fertility constraints in rain- fed smallholder agriculture in South Africa, namely in situ water harvesting, is to use water harvesting and conservation technologies (WH).9 The principal hydrological functions of WH

  7. CROPS AND SOILS RESEARCH PAPER The effects of treatments with selected pesticides on viability and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CROPS AND SOILS RESEARCH PAPER The effects of treatments with selected pesticides on viability of the present study was to evaluate the effect of pesticidal seed treatments of maize (Zea mays L.) on seed consisted of water-treated seeds. None of the pesticides reduced the standard germination under laboratory

  8. Robotics in Crop Production Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering, University of Illinois at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robotics in Crop Production Tony Grift Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering such as harvesting of citrus fruits, grapes, and raisins. An important part of Automation is the use of robots. Robotics in agriculture is not a new concept; in controlled environments (green houses), it has a his- tory

  9. Predicting and mitigating the net greenhouse gas emissions of crop rotations in Western Europe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    balance; Agro-ecosystem model; CERES-EGC; Bayesian calibration; Green- house gases; Nitrous oxidePredicting and mitigating the net greenhouse gas emissions of crop rotations in Western Europe gases (GHG) con- tributing to net greenhouse gas balance of agro-ecosystems. Evaluating the impact

  10. South Carolina Pest Management Handbook for Field Crops -2015 AQUATIC WEED CONTROL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    South Carolina Pest Management Handbook for Field Crops - 2015 301 AQUATIC WEED CONTROL Cory Heaton and the National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES). Aquatic pesticide applicators may be required to submit a Notice of Intent (NOI), practice Integrated Pest Management (IPM), and develop a Pesticide

  11. 2 SPRAY OILS--BEYOND 2000 Modern use of petroleum-derived oils as agricultural crop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agnello, Arthur M.

    2 SPRAY OILS--BEYOND 2000 Abstract Modern use of petroleum-derived oils as agricultural crop,buttheseweretoophytotoxic.Eventually, researchersconcentratedondistillatesintherangebetween kerosene and lubricating oils.Three basic classes of carbon structures present in petroleum oils (aromatics and other un- saturated components) in oils that were removable with sulfuric acid; the remainder

  12. South Carolina Pest Management Handbook for Field Crops -2014 TOBACCO HARVEST MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    South Carolina Pest Management Handbook for Field Crops - 2014 278 TOBACCO HARVEST MANAGEMENT occurring process that must occur before the tobacco is harvested. Tobacco should be harvested in three ahead to determine if chemical will cause yellowing. Mix in 40-60 gal water/A and apply at 40-60 psi

  13. South Carolina Pest Management Handbook for Field Crops -2015 TOBACCO HARVEST MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    South Carolina Pest Management Handbook for Field Crops - 2015 282 TOBACCO HARVEST MANAGEMENT occurring process that must occur before the tobacco is harvested. Tobacco should be harvested in three ahead to determine if chemical will cause yellowing. Mix in 40-60 gal water/A and apply at 40-60 psi

  14. Cropping Sequence Effect of Pea and Pea Management on Spring Wheat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Rick L.

    and harvest timing affected both soil N and PASW; a drought from 2 June to 5 July made water the key limiting harvest management on soil N contribution in no-till systems. For example, pea forage could provide crops in no-till systems. Specifically, the goal was to measure the effects of pea harvest timing

  15. South Carolina Pest Management Handbook for Field Crops -2015 COTTON INSECT MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    South Carolina Pest Management Handbook for Field Crops - 2015 97 COTTON INSECT MANAGEMENT Jeremy K in South Carolina. Hundreds of species of insects may be found in cotton, but only a limited number growers in South Carolina have planted cotton varieties protected from tobacco budworm and bollworm

  16. South Carolina Pest Management Handbook for Field Crops -2015 PEANUT NEMATODE CONTROL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    South Carolina Pest Management Handbook for Field Crops - 2015 197 PEANUT NEMATODE CONTROL Jay W nematodes have been a relatively minor problem on peanuts in South Carolina. Peanut root-knot (race 1. Sting nematode is rarely found in peanut fields in South Carolina but when observed damage can be severe

  17. South Carolina Pest Management Handbook for Field Crops -2015 SOYBEAN DISEASE CONTROL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    South Carolina Pest Management Handbook for Field Crops - 2015 259 SOYBEAN DISEASE CONTROL John D years. Soybean Rust is active in South Carolina primarily after mid-August in most years. Soybean South Carolina Soybean Production Guide for information on accurate identification of diseases based

  18. South Carolina Pest Management Handbook for Field Crops -2015 CORN INSECT CONTROL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    South Carolina Pest Management Handbook for Field Crops - 2015 48 CORN INSECT CONTROL Francis in each field where corn is to be planted. Major insect pests of corn in South Carolina. Insect and Bt11, vip protein Vip3A and cry protein Cry1Ab). #12;South Carolina Pest Management Handbook

  19. CROPS AND SOILS RESEARCH PAPER Improved weather-based late blight risk management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douches, David S.

    CROPS AND SOILS RESEARCH PAPER Improved weather-based late blight risk management: comparing models of weather data. Although many new digital weather and forecast datasets are gridded data, the current improvements made to an artificial neuralnetwork for forecasting weather-based potato late blight (Phytophthora

  20. Modeling Field-level Irrigation Demands with Changing Weather and Crop Choices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MardanDoost, Babak

    2015-05-31

    . The presented water budget model is capable of estimate daily water demand over space and time under predicted climate and land-use change. The model-predicted irrigation demand was developed based on crop-specific evapotranspiration, weather data, and with 2007...

  1. Communication by Plant Growth Regulators in Roots and Shoots of Horticultural Crops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burns, Jacqueline K.

    Communication by Plant Growth Regulators in Roots and Shoots of Horticultural Crops Anish Malladi, and distribution of PGRs communicate developmental, stress-related, or environmental cues that alter growth. Short-distance communication involves changes in biosynthesis or metabolic conversion, whereas longer-distance communication

  2. Applications of Copulas to Analysis of Efficiency of Weather Derivatives as Primary Crop Insurance Instruments†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Filonov, Vitaly

    2012-10-19

    insurance. It is also a matter of common knowledge that weather is an important production factor and at the same time one of the greatest sources of risk in agriculture. Hence introduction of crop insurance contracts, based on weather indexes, might be a...

  3. Winter crop sensitivity to inter-annual climate variability in central India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeFries, Ruth S.

    Winter crop sensitivity to inter-annual climate variability in central India Pinki Mondal & Meha Dordrecht 2014 Abstract India is predicted to be one of the most vulnerable agricultural regions to future variability in a local market and subsistence-based agricultural system in central India, a data

  4. Crop rotation and soil temperature influence the community structure of Aspergillus flavus in soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cotty, Peter J.

    June 2010 Available online 14 July 2010 Keywords: Maize Cottonseed Biocontrol Population structure a b the strain L isolates. The S strain has been implicated as the primary causal agent of several contamination, the main causal agent of aflatoxin contami- nation, frequently infects several agricultural crops

  5. Linkages among climate change, crop yields and MexicoUS cross-border migration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oppenheimer, Michael

    Linkages among climate change, crop yields and Mexico≠US cross-border migration Shuaizhang Fenga change is expected to cause mass human migration, in- cluding immigration across international borders, and people's migration responses by using an instrumental variables approach. Our method allows us

  6. South Carolina Pest Management Handbook for Field Crops -2015 SOYBEAN NEMATODE CONTROL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    South Carolina Pest Management Handbook for Field Crops - 2015 264 SOYBEAN NEMATODE CONTROL John D for more in-depth information on nematode management. NEMATICIDES AVAILABLE FOR CONTROLLING SOYBEAN Pesticide & Temik Brand 15G Lock'n Load Aldicarb Pesticide Aldicarb 3.0 - 5.0 lbs. Apply granules in a 6 ≠ 8

  7. Evaluation of Flax and Other Cool-Season Oilseed Crops for Yield and Adaptation in Texas†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Darapuneni, Murali

    2012-10-19

    of study. Thanks also go to my friends and colleagues and the department faculty and staff for making my time at Texas A&M University a great experience. I also want to extend my gratitude to the Chevron Technology Ventures for providing funding... ................................................................................................... ix LIST OF TABLES .................................................................................................... x CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION AND LITERATURE REVIEWÖÖÖÖÖÖ.. 1 1.1 Important biodiesel crops...

  8. Effect of a Legume Cover Crop on Carbon Storage and Erosion in an Ultisol under Maize

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    143 CHAPTER 10 Effect of a Legume Cover Crop on Carbon Storage and Erosion in an Ultisol under...........................................................................................145 10.2.3 Carbon and Nitrogen Determination, and Other Analyses......................................145 10.2.4 Determinations of Runoff, Soil Losses, and Eroded Carbon

  9. Predicting the net carbon exchanges of crop rotations in Europe with an agro-ecosystem model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Predicting the net carbon exchanges of crop rotations in Europe with an agro-ecosystem model S.Lehuger@art.admin.ch. Fax: (+41) 44 377 72 01. Phone: (+41) 44 377 75 13. hal-00414342,version2-1Sep2010 #12;Abstract Carbon and measuring land-atmosphere carbon exchanges from arable lands are important tasks to predict the influence

  10. Predicting Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Soil Carbon from Changing Pasture to an Energy Crop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeLucia, Evan H.

    Predicting Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Soil Carbon from Changing Pasture to an Energy Crop biogeochemical cycles and global greenhouse gas budgets. Energy cane (Saccharum officinarum L.) is a sugarcane changing land from grazed pasture to energy cane would affect greenhouse gas (CO2, CH4 and N2O) fluxes

  11. Bioenergy crop greenhouse gas mitigation potential under a range of management practices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeLucia, Evan H.

    Bioenergy crop greenhouse gas mitigation potential under a range of management practices T A R A W on marginal lands annually without displacing food and to contribute to greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction an important renewable energy source for replacement of fossil fuels, but is of questionable greenhouse gas

  12. South Carolina Pest Management Handbook for Field Crops -2015 PEANUT INSECT MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    South Carolina Pest Management Handbook for Field Crops - 2015 178 PEANUT INSECT MANAGEMENT J. W. Chapin, Extension Peanut Specialist Emeritus See the following tables for insect control recommendations and yield loss from both direct feeding and virus transmission (tomato spotted wilt). All commercial peanuts

  13. South Carolina Pest Management Handbook for Field Crops -2015 PEANUT DISEASE MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    South Carolina Pest Management Handbook for Field Crops - 2015 184 PEANUT DISEASE MANAGEMENT Jay W. Chapin, Extension Peanut Specialist Emeritus Seedling Diseases: All peanut seed should be treated to peanuts by thrips, primarily tobacco thrips. TSWV reduces yield and causes shriveled, misshapen pods. All

  14. A System Dynamics Study of Carbon Cycling and Electricity Generation from Energy Crops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ford, Andrew

    Energy Information Administration GHG Green House Gasses GORCAM Graz-Oak Ridge Carbon Accounting Model1 A System Dynamics Study of Carbon Cycling and Electricity Generation from Energy Crops Hilary calling for a cap-and- trade program, was reintroduced in the United States Senate this year. The Energy

  15. On the regulation of spatial externalities: coexistence between GM and conventional crops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -mediated gene flow is one of the main concerns associated with the introduc- tion of genetically modified (GM of genetically modified (GM) and conventional crops in the EU is permitted by the principle that farmers should in conventional food and feed. As GM material can mix with conventional material (through pollen dispersal

  16. South Carolina Pest Management Handbook for Field Crops -2015 TOBACCO DISEASE MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    South Carolina Pest Management Handbook for Field Crops - 2015 293 TOBACCO DISEASE MANAGEMENT Bruce and potentially devastating diseases of tobacco can best be managed through a combination of control methods. It is urged that growers identify disease problems in their fields and follow disease management suggestions

  17. Simulating crop phenology in the Community Land Model and its impact on energy and carbon fluxes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    , regional, and global scales. However, the evaluation of crop models that can be coupled to Earth system al., 2012; Levis et al., 2012]. Since CLM is part of the Earth system model framework management are required. The Community Land Model (CLM) is the land surface scheme of the Community Earth

  18. Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa -2011 File A1-20

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, Michael D.

    Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa - 2011 File A1-20 T heestimatedcostsofcorn the annual Iowa Farm Business Association record summaries, production and costs data from the Departments of selected agricultural coop- eratives and other input suppliers around the state. These costs estimates

  19. Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa -2010 File A1-20

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, Michael D.

    Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa - 2010 File A1-20 T heestimatedcostsofcorn Farm Business Association record summaries, production and costs data from the De- partments. Thesecostsestimatesarerepresentativeofaveragecosts for farms in Iowa. Very large or small farms may have lower or higher fixed costs per acre. Due

  20. Morphology and fitness components of wild 3 crop F1 hybrids of Sorghum bicolor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snow, Allison A.

    : implications for survival and introgression of crop genes in the wild pool Asfaw Adugna* and Endashaw Bekele and Huckabay, 1967) and in many cases, both occur in overlapping regions (Hooftman et al., 2007; Adugna and Burke, 2006). Wild and weedy sorghum populations exhibit great diversity (Adugna et al., 2012) and may

  1. Water and energy footprints of bioenergy crop production on marginal lands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jiquan

    of Zoology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824, USA Abstract Water and energy demandsWater and energy footprints of bioenergy crop production on marginal lands A . K . B H A R D WA J and S . K . H A M I LT O N *w} *Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center, Michigan State University, East

  2. Aspects of Applied Biology 112, 2011 Biomass and Energy Crops IV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    Aspects of Applied Biology 112, 2011 Biomass and Energy Crops IV 147 By JACOB M JUNGERS, JARED J Program (CRP), may provide acreage and economic incentives for cellulosic energy production. Improving, biomass yields, bioenergy Introduction The United States'Energy Independence and SecurityAct of 2007 (EISA

  3. Facile residue analysis of recent and prehistoric cook-stones using handheld Raman spectrometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Short, Laura; Cao, Bin; Sinyukov, Alexander M; Joshi, Amitabh; Scully, Rob; Sanders, Virgil; Voronine, Dmitri V

    2013-01-01

    We performed food residue analysis of cook-stones from experimental and prehistoric earth ovens using a handheld Raman spectrometry. Progress in modern optical technology provides a facile means of rapid non-destructive identification of residue artifacts from archaeological sites. For this study spectral signatures were obtained on sotol (Dasylirion spp.) experimentally baked in an earth oven as well as sotol residue on an experimentally used processing tool. Inulin was the major residue component. The portable handheld Raman spectrometer also detected traces of inulin on boiling stones used to boil commercially obtained inulin. The Raman spectra of inulin and sotol may be useful as signatures of wild plant residues in archaeology. Spectroscopic analysis of millennia-old cook-stones from prehistoric archaeological sites in Fort Hood, TX revealed the presence of residues whose further identification requires improvement of current optical methods.

  4. Finite element residual stress analysis of induction heating bended ferritic steel piping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kima, Jong Sung; Kim, Kyoung-Soo; Oh, Young-Jin; Chang, Hyung-Young; Park, Heung-Bae

    2014-10-06

    Recently, there is a trend to apply the piping bended by induction heating process to nuclear power plants. Residual stress can be generated due to thermo-mechanical mechanism during the induction heating bending process. It is well-known that the residual stress has important effect on crack initiation and growth. The previous studies have focused on the thickness variation. In part, some studies were performed for residual stress evaluation of the austenitic stainless steel piping bended by induction heating. It is difficult to find the residual stresses of the ferritic steel piping bended by the induction heating. The study assessed the residual stresses of induction heating bended ferriticsteel piping via finite element analysis. As a result, it was identified that high residual stresses are generated on local outersurface region of the induction heating bended ferritic piping.

  5. Radiological Modeling for Determination of Derived Concentration Levels of an Area with Uranium Residual Material - 13533

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perez-Sanchez, Danyl [CIEMAT, Avenida Complutense 40, 28040, Madrid (Spain)] [CIEMAT, Avenida Complutense 40, 28040, Madrid (Spain)

    2013-07-01

    As a result of a pilot project developed at the old Spanish 'Junta de Energia Nuclear' to extract uranium from ores, tailings materials were generated. Most of these residual materials were sent back to different uranium mines, but a small amount of it was mixed with conventional building materials and deposited near the old plant until the surrounding ground was flattened. The affected land is included in an area under institutional control and used as recreational area. At the time of processing, uranium isotopes were separated but other radionuclides of the uranium decay series as Th-230, Ra-226 and daughters remain in the residue. Recently, the analyses of samples taken at different ground's depths confirmed their presence. This paper presents the methodology used to calculate the derived concentration level to ensure that the reference dose level of 0.1 mSv y-1 used as radiological criteria. In this study, a radiological impact assessment was performed modeling the area as recreational scenario. The modelization study was carried out with the code RESRAD considering as exposure pathways, external irradiation, inadvertent ingestion of soil, inhalation of resuspended particles, and inhalation of radon (Rn-222). As result was concluded that, if the concentration of Ra-226 in the first 15 cm of soil is lower than, 0.34 Bq g{sup -1}, the dose would not exceed the reference dose. Applying this value as a derived concentration level and comparing with the results of measurements on the ground, some areas with a concentration of activity slightly higher than latter were found. In these zones the remediation proposal has been to cover with a layer of 15 cm of clean material. This action represents a reduction of 85% of the dose and ensures compliance with the reference dose. (authors)

  6. COATINGS FOR PROTECTION OF EQUIPMENT FOR BIOCHEMICAL PROCESSING OF GEOTHERMAL RESIDUES: PROGRESS REPORT FY 97

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ALLAN,M.L.

    1997-11-01

    Thermal sprayed ethylene methacrylic acid (EMAA) and ethylene tetrafluoroethylene (ETFE), spray-and-bake ETFE and polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) and brushable ceramic-epoxy coatings were evaluated for corrosion protection in a biochemical process to treat geothermal residues. The findings are also relevant to other moderate temperature brine environments where corrosion is a problem. Coupon, Atlas cell, peel strength, cathodic disbondment and abrasion tests were performed in aggressive environments including geothermal sludge, hypersaline brine and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (Thiobadus ferrooxidans) to determine suitability for protecting storage tanks and reaction vessels. It was found that all of the coatings were resistant to chemical attack and biodegradation at the test temperature of 55 C. The EMAA coatings protected 316L stainless steel from corrosion in coupon tests. However, corrosion of mild steel substrates thermal sprayed with EMAA and ETFE occurred in Atlas cell tests that simulated a lined reactor operating environment and this resulted in decreased adhesive strength. Peel tests to measure residual adhesion revealed that failure mode was dependent on exposure conditions. Long-term tests on the durability of ceramic-epoxy coatings in brine and bacteria are ongoing. Initial indications are that this coating has suitable characteristics. Abrasion tests showed that the ceramic-epoxy had good resistance to the abrasive effects of sludge. Thermal sprayed EMAA coatings also displayed abrasion resistance. Cathodic disbondment tests in brine at room temperature indicated that EMAA coatings are resistant to disbondment at applied potentials of {minus}780 to {minus}1,070 mV SCE for the test conditions and duration. Slight disbondment of one specimen occurred at a potential of {minus}1,500 mV SCE. The EMAA may be suited to use in conjunction with cathodic protection although further long-term, higher temperature testing would be needed.

  7. Coatings for protection of equipment for biochemical processing of geothermal residues: Progress report FY`97

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allan, M.L.

    1997-11-01

    Thermal sprayed ethylene methacrylic acid (EMAA) and ethylene tetrafluoroethylene (ETFE), spray-and-bake ETFE and polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) and brushable ceramic-epoxy coatings were evaluated for corrosion protection in a biochemical process to treat geothermal residues. Coupon, Atlas cell, peel strength, cathodic disbondment and abrasion tests were performed in aggressive environments including geothermal sludge, hypersaline brine and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (Thiobacillus ferrooxidans) to determine suitability for protecting storage tanks and reaction vessels. It was found that all of the coatings were resistant to chemical attack and biodegradation at the test temperature of 55 C. The EMAA coatings protected 316L stainless steel from corrosion in coupon tests. However, corrosion of mild steel substrates thermal sprayed with EMAA and ETFE occurred in Atlas cell tests that simulated a lined reactor operating environment and this resulted in decreased adhesive strength. Peel tests to measure residual adhesion revealed that failure mode was dependent on exposure conditions. Abrasion tests showed that the ceramic-epoxy had good resistance to the abrasive effects of sludge. Thermal sprayed EMAA coatings also displayed abrasion resistance. Cathodic disbondment tests in brine at room temperature indicated that EMAA coatings are resistant to disbondment at applied potentials of {minus}780 to {minus}1,070 mV SCE for the test conditions and duration. Slight disbondment of one specimen occurred at a potential of {minus}1,500 mV SCE. The EMAA may be suited to use in conjunction with cathodic protection although further long-term, higher temperature testing would be needed.

  8. Single-well experimental design for studying residual trapping of superciritcal carbon dioxide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Y.

    2010-01-01

    break- through curve (BTC) is measured. Tracer breakthrough1) compar- ison of the BTC from the fully watersaturated system and the BTC from the residual gas ?eld;

  9. The effects of drainage and amendments on the physical and chemical properties of bauxite residue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Thomas Lee

    1987-01-01

    on the properties of the residue were studied. The objective was to improve the properties of the residue before adding it to sandy soils. The CEC increased with pH, as would be expected with variable-charge minerals, and the adsorption of phosphate decreased...), or into the ocean (Baseden, 1976). Baseden (1976) reported that seawater could be mixed with the residue, reducing the pH of the residue by precipitating Ca and Ng carbonates. The resulting supernatant solution was then pumped into the ocean. This method...

  10. Table A3. Refiner/Reseller Prices of Distillate and Residual...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1999 441 Table A3. RefinerReseller Prices of Distillate and Residual Fuel Oils, by PAD District, 1983-Present (Cents per Gallon...

  11. Table 42. Residual Fuel Oil Prices by PAD District and State

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1999 203 Table 42. Residual Fuel Oil Prices by PAD District and State (Cents per Gallon Excluding Taxes) - Continued...

  12. Table 42. Residual Fuel Oil Prices by PAD District and State

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1998 203 Table 42. Residual Fuel Oil Prices by PAD District and State (Cents per Gallon Excluding Taxes) - Continued...

  13. Residual-energy-applications program: support and integration report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-11-01

    The proposed government-owned EAST Facility at the Savannah River Plant in Aiken, South Carolina, would provide capabilities for development and confidence testing of industrial heat pumps, high temperature bottoming cycles, low temperature Rankine cycle power generation systems, and absorption chillers. This work is one component of the Residual Energy Applications Program (REAP). Other documents provide initial considerations concerning the heat pump and power generation systems to be tested at EAST, policy, objectives and guidelines for operation of the facility, a preliminary conceptual design, and environmental data. This report describes support and integration activities that were performed during the contract year. The various elements that impact on the EAST Facility are discussed and an assessment of the EAST Facility mission is given. The report concludes with proposed milestones, schedules, and costs for design, construction, and operation of the facility.

  14. Erk phosphorylates threonine 42 residue of ribosomal protein S3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Hag Dong [Laboratory of Biochemistry, School of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, and BioInstitute, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae Yung [Department of Biology, Mokpo National University, Chonnam 534-729 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Joon [Laboratory of Biochemistry, School of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, and BioInstitute, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of)]. E-mail: joonkim@korea.ac.kr

    2005-07-22

    The ribosomal protein S3 (rpS3) is involved in ribosome biogenesis as a member of ribosomal small subunit and also plays a role in the repair of damaged DNA. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk), a MAP kinase, is known to play important roles in the regulation of cell growth, differentiation, and apoptosis. In this study, the sequence analysis of rpS3 protein revealed that this protein has a putative FXFP motif which is believed to be an Erk binding site. Indeed, the motif was demonstrated as an Erk binding site by co-immunoprecipitation. In addition to this, it was revealed that Erk specifically phosphorylated Thr 42 residue of rpS3 in vitro and in vivo using the various mutants of rpS3. Taken together, rpS3 appears to be phosphorylated by activated Erk in proliferating cells, resulting in the decreased interaction between two proteins.

  15. Residual energy in magnetohydrodynamic turbulence and in the solar wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanislav Boldyrev; Jean Carlos Perez; Vladimir Zhdankin

    2011-08-30

    Recent observations indicate that kinetic and magnetic energies are not in equipartition in the solar wind turbulence. Rather, magnetic fluctuations are more energetic and have somewhat steeper energy spectrum compared to the velocity fluctuations. This leads to the presence of the so-called residual energy E_r=E_v-E_b in the inertial interval of turbulence. This puzzling effect is addressed in the present paper in the framework of weak turbulence theory. Using a simple model of weakly colliding Alfv\\'en waves, we demonstrate that the kinetic-magnetic equipartition indeed gets broken as a result of nonlinear interaction of Alfv\\'en waves. We establish that magnetic energy is indeed generated more efficiently as a result of these interactions, which proposes an explanation for the solar wind observations.

  16. Methods of producing adsorption media including a metal oxide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mann, Nicholas R; Tranter, Troy J

    2014-03-04

    Methods of producing a metal oxide are disclosed. The method comprises dissolving a metal salt in a reaction solvent to form a metal salt/reaction solvent solution. The metal salt is converted to a metal oxide and a caustic solution is added to the metal oxide/reaction solvent solution to adjust the pH of the metal oxide/reaction solvent solution to less than approximately 7.0. The metal oxide is precipitated and recovered. A method of producing adsorption media including the metal oxide is also disclosed, as is a precursor of an active component including particles of a metal oxide.

  17. Thin film solar cell including a spatially modulated intrinsic layer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Guha, Subhendu (Troy, MI); Yang, Chi-Chung (Troy, MI); Ovshinsky, Stanford R. (Bloomfield Hills, MI)

    1989-03-28

    One or more thin film solar cells in which the intrinsic layer of substantially amorphous semiconductor alloy material thereof includes at least a first band gap portion and a narrower band gap portion. The band gap of the intrinsic layer is spatially graded through a portion of the bulk thickness, said graded portion including a region removed from the intrinsic layer-dopant layer interfaces. The band gap of the intrinsic layer is always less than the band gap of the doped layers. The gradation of the intrinsic layer is effected such that the open circuit voltage and/or the fill factor of the one or plural solar cell structure is enhanced.

  18. Solar Energy Education. Renewable energy: a background text. [Includes glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    Some of the most common forms of renewable energy are presented in this textbook for students. The topics include solar energy, wind power hydroelectric power, biomass ocean thermal energy, and tidal and geothermal energy. The main emphasis of the text is on the sun and the solar energy that it yields. Discussions on the sun's composition and the relationship between the earth, sun and atmosphere are provided. Insolation, active and passive solar systems, and solar collectors are the subtopics included under solar energy. (BCS)

  19. Copyright 2014 -Copyright Information, Privacy Statement, and Terms of Use American Society of Agronomy | Crop Science Society of America | Soil Science Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    of Agronomy | Crop Science Society of America | Soil Science Society of America 5585 Guilford Road | Madison, exchangeable, nonexchangeable, and mineral. It has often been observed that crops do not respond, coupled with, lack of increases in crop yield. This presentation will present an historical perspective

  20. Biomass Potentials from California Forest and Shrublands Including Fuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biomass Potentials from California Forest and Shrublands Including Fuel Reduction Potentials-04-004 February 2005 Revised: October 2005 Arnold Schwarzenegger, Governor, State of California #12;Biomass Tiangco, CEC Bryan M. Jenkins, University of California #12;Biomass Potentials from California Forest