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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including crop residue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

ABSTRACT: Bioenergy Harvesting Technologies to Supply Crop Residues...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

ABSTRACT: Bioenergy Harvesting Technologies to Supply Crop Residues In a Densified Large Square Bale Format ABSTRACT: Bioenergy Harvesting Technologies to Supply Crop Residues In a...

2

Cost Methodology for Biomass Feedstocks: Herbaceous Crops and Agricultural Residues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes a set of procedures and assumptions used to estimate production and logistics costs of bioenergy feedstocks from herbaceous crops and agricultural residues. The engineering-economic analysis discussed here is based on methodologies developed by the American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers (ASABE) and the American Agricultural Economics Association (AAEA). An engineering-economic analysis approach was chosen due to lack of historical cost data for bioenergy feedstocks. Instead, costs are calculated using assumptions for equipment performance, input prices, and yield data derived from equipment manufacturers, research literature, and/or standards. Cost estimates account for fixed and variable costs. Several examples of this costing methodology used to estimate feedstock logistics costs are included at the end of this report.

Turhollow Jr, Anthony F [ORNL; Webb, Erin [ORNL; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Trigeneration in a northern Chinese village using crop residues  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gasification of crop residues can provide modern energy carriers to rural areas at potentially at- tractive in rural areas of developing countries by the introduction of mod- ern, clean energy carriers (e.g., fluid the prospects for providing such energy carriers to a rural village in Jilin province, China: clean gas

4

Effect of crop residue harvest on long-term crop yield, soil erosion, and carbon balance: tradeoffs for a sustainable bioenergy feedstock  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Agricultural residues are a potential feedstock for bioenergy production, if residue harvest can be done sustainably. The relationship between crop residue harvest, soil erosion, crop yield and carbon balance was modeled with the Erosion Productivity Impact Calculator/ Environment Policy Integrated Climate (EPIC) using a factorial design. Four crop rotations (winter wheat [Triticum aestivum (L.)] – sunflower [Helianthus annuus]; spring wheat [Triticum aestivum (L.)] – canola [Brassica napus]; corn [Zea mays L.] – soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.]; and cotton [Gossypium hirsutum] – peanut [Arachis hypogaea]) were simulated at four US locations each, under different topographies (0-10% slope), and management practices [crop residue removal rates (0-75%), conservation practices (no till, contour cropping, strip cropping, terracing)].

Gregg, Jay S.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.

2010-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

5

Determine metrics and set targets for soil quality on agriculture residue and energy crop pathways  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There are three objectives for this project: 1) support OBP in meeting MYPP stated performance goals for the Sustainability Platform, 2) develop integrated feedstock production system designs that increase total productivity of the land, decrease delivered feedstock cost to the conversion facilities, and increase environmental performance of the production system, and 3) deliver to the bioenergy community robust datasets and flexible analysis tools for establishing sustainable and viable use of agricultural residues and dedicated energy crops. The key project outcome to date has been the development and deployment of a sustainable agricultural residue removal decision support framework. The modeling framework has been used to produce a revised national assessment of sustainable residue removal potential. The national assessment datasets are being used to update national resource assessment supply curves using POLYSIS. The residue removal modeling framework has also been enhanced to support high fidelity sub-field scale sustainable removal analyses. The framework has been deployed through a web application and a mobile application. The mobile application is being used extensively in the field with industry, research, and USDA NRCS partners to support and validate sustainable residue removal decisions. The results detailed in this report have set targets for increasing soil sustainability by focusing on primary soil quality indicators (total organic carbon and erosion) in two agricultural residue management pathways and a dedicated energy crop pathway. The two residue pathway targets were set to, 1) increase residue removal by 50% while maintaining soil quality, and 2) increase soil quality by 5% as measured by Soil Management Assessment Framework indicators. The energy crop pathway was set to increase soil quality by 10% using these same indicators. To demonstrate the feasibility and impact of each of these targets, seven case studies spanning the US are presented. The analysis has shown that the feedstock production systems are capable of simultaneously increasing productivity and soil sustainability.

Ian Bonner; David Muth

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Using a Decision Support System to Optimize Production of Agricultural Crop Residue Biofeedstock  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For several years the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has been developing a Decision Support System for Agriculture (DSS4Ag) which determines the economically optimum recipe of various fertilizers to apply at each site in a field to produce a crop, based on the existing soil fertility at each site, as well as historic production information and current prices of fertilizers and the forecast market price of the crop at harvest, for growing a crop such as wheat, potatoes, corn, or cotton. In support of the growing interest in agricultural crop residues as a bioenergy feedstock, we have extended the capability of the DSS4Ag to develop a variable-rate fertilizer recipe for the simultaneous economically optimum production of both grain and straw, and have been conducting field research to test this new DSS4Ag. In this paper we report the results of two years of field research testing and enhancing the DSS4Ag’s ability to economically optimize the fertilization for the simultaneous production of both grain and its straw, where the straw is an agricultural crop residue that can be used as a biofeedstock.

Reed L. Hoskinson; Ronald C. Rope; Raymond K. Fink

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

The Potential for Pennsylvania Crops as Biofuels Higher energy costs over the past few years have created opportunities for the use of crops and crop residues  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Potential for Pennsylvania Crops as Biofuels Higher energy costs over the past few years have Potential for Pennsylvania Crops as Biofuels 2 Soybeans Soybean acreage is on the increase in Pennsylvania

Lee, Dongwon

8

#include #include  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

process #12;#include #include pid_t pid = fork(); if (pid () failed */ } else if (pid == 0) { /* parent process */ } else { /* child process */ } #12;thread #12

Campbell, Andrew T.

9

#include #include  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#include #include //Rappels : "getpid()" permet d'obtenir son propre pid // "getppid()" renvoie le pid du père d'un processus int main (void) { pid_t pid_fils; pid_fils = fork(); if(pid_fils==-1) { printf("Erreur de création du processus fils\

Poinsot, Laurent

10

Sedimentary Rocks, Processes, and Environments Sediments are loose grains and chemical residues of earth materials, which include things such as  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sedimentary Rocks, Processes, and Environments Sediments are loose grains and chemical residues, and rust (oxidized iron). Formation of Sediments All sediments have a source or provenance, a place and sediments. Erosion and Transportation of Sediments Weathered materials are transported via wind, water

Li, X. Rong

11

Biomass Energy Crops: Massachusetts' Potential  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biomass Energy Crops: Massachusetts' Potential Prepared for: Massachusetts Division of Energy;#12;Executive Summary In Massachusetts, biomass energy has typically meant wood chips derived from the region's extensive forest cover. Yet nationally, biomass energy from dedicated energy crops and from crop residues

Schweik, Charles M.

12

Experiments with Fertilizers on Rotated and Non-Rotated Crops.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This is a report of experiments conducted over a period of 14 years to study the effect of fertilizers, manure, removal. of crop residues, and rota- tion on the yield of crops. The fertilizer treatments included superphos- phate; superphosphate and manure...; superphosphate and cottonseed meal; manure; rock phosphate; and rock phosphate and manure. Cotton and corn were grown continuously on the same land and in rotation with oats and cowpeas. The soil responded more readily to nitrogenous than to phosphatic fer...

Reynolds, E. B. (Elbert Brunner)

1928-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Sustainable Agricultural Residue Removal for Bioenergy: A Spatially Comprehensive National Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study provides a spatially comprehensive assessment of sustainable agricultural residue removal potential across the United States. Earlier assessments determining the quantity of agricultural residue that could be sustainably removed for bioenergy production at the regional and national scale faced a number of computational limitations. These limitations included the number of environmental factors, the number of land management scenarios, and the spatial fidelity and spatial extent of the assessment. This study utilizes integrated multi-factor environmental process modeling and high fidelity land use datasets to perform a spatially comprehensive assessment of sustainably removable agricultural residues across the conterminous United States. Soil type represents the base spatial unit for this study and is modeled using a national soil survey database at the 10 – 100 m scale. Current crop rotation practices are identified by processing land cover data available from the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service Cropland Data Layer database. Land management and residue removal scenarios are identified for each unique crop rotation and crop management zone. Estimates of county averages and state totals of sustainably available agricultural residues are provided. The results of the assessment show that in 2011 over 150 million metric tons of agricultural residues could have been sustainably removed across the United States. Projecting crop yields and land management practices to 2030, the assessment determines that over 207 million metric tons of agricultural residues will be able to be sustainably removed for bioenergy production at that time.

D. Muth, Jr.; K. M. Bryden; R. G. Nelson

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Radioactivity in food crops  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Published levels of radioactivity in food crops from 21 countries and 4 island chains of Oceania are listed. The tabulation includes more than 3000 examples of 100 different crops. Data are arranged alphabetically by food crop and geographical origin. The sampling date, nuclide measured, mean radioactivity, range of radioactivities, sample basis, number of samples analyzed, and bibliographic citation are given for each entry, when available. Analyses were reported most frequently for /sup 137/Cs, /sup 40/K, /sup 90/Sr, /sup 226/Ra, /sup 228/Ra, plutonium, uranium, total alpha, and total beta, but a few authors also reported data for /sup 241/Am, /sup 7/Be, /sup 60/Co, /sup 55/Fe, /sup 3/H, /sup 131/I, /sup 54/Mn, /sup 95/Nb, /sup 210/Pb, /sup 210/Po, /sup 106/Ru, /sup 125/Sb, /sup 228/Th, /sup 232/Th, and /sup 95/Zr. Based on the reported data it appears that radioactivity from alpha emitters in food crops is usually low, on the order of 0.1 Bq.g/sup -1/ (wet weight) or less. Reported values of beta radiation in a given crop generally appear to be several orders of magnitude greater than those of alpha emitters. The most striking aspect of the data is the great range of radioactivity reported for a given nuclide in similar food crops with different geographical origins.

Drury, J.S.; Baldauf, M.F.; Daniel, E.W.; Fore, C.S.; Uziel, M.S.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

An Integrated Model for Assessment of Sustainable Agricultural Residue Removal Limits for Bioenergy Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Agricultural residues have been identified as a significant potential resource for bioenergy production, but serious questions remain about the sustainability of harvesting residues. Agricultural residues play an important role in limiting soil erosion from wind and water and in maintaining soil organic carbon. Because of this, multiple factors must be considered when assessing sustainable residue harvest limits. Validated and accepted modeling tools for assessing these impacts include the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation Version 2 (RUSLE2), the Wind Erosion Prediction System (WEPS), and the Soil Conditioning Index. Currently, these models do not work together as a single integrated model. Rather, use of these models requires manual interaction and data transfer. As a result, it is currently not feasible to use these computational tools to perform detailed sustainable agricultural residue availability assessments across large spatial domains or to consider a broad range of land management practices. This paper presents an integrated modeling strategy that couples existing datasets with the RUSLE2 water erosion, WEPS wind erosion, and Soil Conditioning Index soil carbon modeling tools to create a single integrated residue removal modeling system. This enables the exploration of the detailed sustainable residue harvest scenarios needed to establish sustainable residue availability. Using this computational tool, an assessment study of residue availability for the state of Iowa was performed. This study included all soil types in the state of Iowa, four representative crop rotation schemes, variable crop yields, three tillage management methods, and five residue removal methods. The key conclusions of this study are that under current management practices and crop yields nearly 26.5 million Mg of agricultural residue are sustainably accessible in the state of Iowa, and that through the adoption of no till practices residue removal could sustainably approach 40 million Mg. However, when considering the economics and logistics of residue harvest, yields below 2.25 Mg ha-1 are generally considered to not be viable for a commercial bioenergy system. Applying this constraint, the total agricultural residue resource available in Iowa under current management practices is 19 million Mg. Previously published results have shown residue availability from 22 million Mg to over 50 million Mg in Iowa.

D. Muth; K. M. Bryden

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

E-Print Network 3.0 - agricultural residues Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Use in the United States Summary: , livestock commodities, agricultural residues, and bioenergy crops. Drawing on ORNL and APAC county... , developed and maintained at the...

17

Residuals, Sludge, and Composting (Maine)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Maine Department of Environmental Protection's Residuals, Sludge, and Composting program regulates the land application and post-processing of organic wastes, including sewage sludge, septage,...

18

Bioassays of weathered residues of several organic phosphorus insecticides  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

residues on fruit, forage crops, and animals. The effects of temperature, relative humid? ity, light, wind, and simulated rain on the residual toxicities of many of the chlorinated hydrocarbon insecticides used for the control of cotton insects were... humidity. Sunlight was found to be an important factor in reducing the residual effectiveness of dieldrin. Wind and simulated rain reduced the period of residual effectiveness of many of the compounds tested. These investigators have shown...

Hightower, Billie Gene

2013-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

19

Abstract People in developing countries mostly depend for their diet on special staple crops, so called orphan crops. These crops play a key role in food secu-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, including proven food or energy value and that the plant has been widely cultivated in the past83 Abstract People in developing countries mostly depend for their diet on special staple crops, so called orphan crops. These crops play a key role in food secu- rity since they are grown by many resource

Kuhlemeier, Cris

20

Wind Turbines Benefit Crops  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Ames Laboratory associate scientist Gene Takle talks about research into the effect of wind turbines on nearby crops. Preliminary results show the turbines may have a positive effect by cooling and drying the crops and assisting with carbon dioxide uptake.

Takle, Gene

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including crop residue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Irrigation of Forage Crops  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. ?Consumptive use of water by major crops in Texas.? Texas Board of Water Engineers. Irrigation of Forage Crops Juan Enciso, Dana Porter, Guy Fipps and Paul Colaizzi* 2 waterrequirementshelpdeterminehowmany acrescanbeirrigatedwithaparticularcanal orwellcapacity...

Enciso, Juan; Porter, Dana; Fipps, Guy; Colaizzi, Paul

2004-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

22

CROP & SOIL SCIENCES Soybean Breeding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CROP & SOIL SCIENCES Soybean Breeding Committee Membership Dr. Joseph Bouton - committee chair Dr. Brian Schwartz Department of Crop & Soil Sciences Department of Crop & Soil Sciences University & Soil Sciences Department of Crop & Soil Sciences University of Georgia University of Georgia Center

Arnold, Jonathan

23

CROP & SOIL SCIENCES Forage Breeding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CROP & SOIL SCIENCES Forage Breeding Committee Membership Dr. Joseph Bouton - committee chair Dr. Brian Schwartz Department of Crop & Soil Sciences Department of Crop & Soil Sciences University & Soil Sciences Department of Crop & Soil Sciences University of Georgia University of Georgia Center

Arnold, Jonathan

24

Alcohol production from agricultural and forestry residues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Technologies available for the production of ethanol from whole corn are reviewed. Particular emphasis is placed on the environmental aspects of the process, including land utilization and possible air and water pollutants. Suggestions are made for technological changes intended to improve the economics of the process as well as to reduce some of the pollution from by-product disposal. Ethanol may be derived from renewable cellulosic substances by either enzymatic or acid hydrolysis of cellulose to sugar, followed by conventional fermentation and distillation. The use of two agricultural residues - corn stover (field stalks remaining after harvest) and straw from wheat crops - is reviewed as a cellulosic feedstock. Two processes have been evaluated with regard to environmental impact - a two-stage acid process developed by G.T. Tsao of Purdue University and an enzymatic process based on the laboratory findings of C.R. Wilke of the University of California, Berkeley. The environmental residuals expected from the manufacture of methyl and ethyl alcohols from woody biomass are covered. The methanol is produced in a gasification process, whereas ethanol is produced by hydrolysis and fermentation processes similar to those used to derive ethanol from cellulosic materials.

Dale, L; Opilla, R; Surles, T

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Alcohol production from agricultural and forestry residues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A variety of carbohydrate sources can be used as raw material for the production of ethanol. Section 1 is a review of technologies available for the production of ethanol from whole corn. Particular emphasis is placed on the environmental aspects of the process, including land utilization and possible air and water pollutants. Suggestions are made for technological changes intended to improve the economics of the process as well as to reduce some of the pollution from by-product disposal. Ethanol may be derived from renewable cellulosic substances by either enzymatic or acid hydrolysis of cellulose to sugar, followed by conventional fermentation and distillation. Section 2 is a review of the use of two agricultural residues - corn stover (field stalks remaining after harvest) and straw from wheat crops - as a cellulosic feedstock. Two processes have been evaluated with regard to environmental impact - a two-stage acid process developed by G.T. Tsao of Purdue University and an enzymatic process based on the laboratory findings of C.R. Wilke of the University of California, Berkeley. Section 3 deals with the environmental residuals expected from the manufacture of methyl and ethyl alcohols from woody biomass. The methanol is produced in a gasification process, whereas ethanol is produced by hydrolysis and fermentation processes similar to those used to derive ethanol from cellulosic materials.

Opilla, R.; Dale, L.; Surles, T.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Fusion Residues  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss when and how the Verlinde dimensions of a rational conformal field theory can be expressed as correlation functions in a topological LG theory. It is seen that a necessary condition is that the RCFT fusion rules must exhibit an extra symmetry. We consider two particular perturbations of the Grassmannian superpotentials. The topological LG residues in one perturbation, introduced by Gepner, are shown to be a twisted version of the $SU(N)_k$ Verlinde dimensions. The residues in the other perturbation are the twisted Verlinde dimensions of another RCFT; these topological LG correlation functions are conjectured to be the correlation functions of the corresponding Grassmannian topological sigma model with a coupling in the action to instanton number.

Kenneth Intriligator

1991-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

27

Crop Revenue Coverage (CRC)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Crop Revenue Coverage guarantees a stated amount of revenue based on commodity futures prices. This publication explains how CRC works and gives examples based on harvest price scenarios....

Stokes, Kenneth; Barnaby, G. A. Art; Waller, Mark L.; Outlaw, Joe

2008-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

28

Transforms for prediction residuals in video coding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Typically the same transform, the 2-D Discrete Cosine Transform (DCT), is used to compress both image intensities in image coding and prediction residuals in video coding. Major prediction residuals include the motion ...

Kam??l?, Fatih

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Forage quality of Sorghum crop residues after grain harvest  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

's chemical composition (Fosket, 1994). Hemicellulose, cellulose, proteins and phenolic acids compose most of the growth in the primary phase. Lignin deposition is initiated during the secondary phase of cell wall growth (Jung, 1989). The digestibility... and biodegradability of cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin are of interest in ruminant nutrition and the evaluation of fibrous feeds. Cellulose degradability is highly variable, ranging &om 25'/o to 90'/o digestible. Hemicellulose tends to be more digestible...

Rhodes, Gregory Allen

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

agricultural crop residues: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5.2.1 Regional demand for energy ...85 5.2.2 Biomass feedstocks availability and cost ...85 5.2.3 Transportation and cost......

31

ABSTRACT: Bioenergy Harvesting Technologies to Supply Crop Residues In a  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustionImprovement3 Beryllium-Associated Worker2014DepartmentI325 8 (8-89) EFGDepartment ofABOUT

32

ABSTRACT: Bioenergy Harvesting Technologies to Supply Crop Residues In a  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review: Top Five EERE Blog Posts of 2014ReviewsndSIMPLEResponse to Smart GridDensified

33

CROP & SOIL SCIENCES Irrigation Specialist  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CROP & SOIL SCIENCES Irrigation Specialist Committee Membership Dr. John Beasley - committee chair Dr. Jared Whitaker Department of Crop & Soil Sciences Department of Crop & Soil Sciences University: (229) 386-7308 Fax: (912) 681-0376 Dr. Robert Carrow Dr. Mark Risse Department of Crop & Soil Sciences

Arnold, Jonathan

34

CROP & SOIL SCIENCES Quantitative Genomics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CROP & SOIL SCIENCES Quantitative Genomics Committee Membership Dr. Scott Jackson - committee chair Dr. Peng-Wah Chee Department of Crop & Soil Sciences Department of Crop & Soil Sciences University of Horticulture Department of Crop & Soil Sciences University of Georgia University of Georgia 2360 Rainwater Rd

Arnold, Jonathan

35

Smarter Cropping: Internet program helps farmers make decisions about crops  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Story by Kathy Wythe tx H2O | pg. 26 Smarter Cropping Internet program helps farmers make decisions about crops Along the coastal plains of Texas, farmers and crop managers are using the Internet to make more informed decisions about growing...

Wythe, Kathy

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Genetic Itnprovetnent of Solanaceous Crops  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

19 million ha in 2001 (FAO 2002). A potato crop produces, on average, more food energy and proteinReprint Genetic Itnprovetnent of Solanaceous Crops Volume I: Pot.ato Editors Maharaj K. Razdan. GRAFIUS Michigan State University) Depts. Crop & Soil Science and Entomology) East Lansing) MI48824

Douches, David S.

37

Weed Management in Pulse Crops  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

During At harvest #12;GoldSky ­ Crop Rotation · 9 Months: alfalfa, barley, canola, chickpea, dry bean PEA CAMELINA CANOLA BARLEY GOLDSKY Crop Rotation Study #12;GoldSky Crop Rotation Study ­ Herbicide #12;0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 Lentil Canola Camelina Barley Field Pea Oat VisualDamage(%) GoldSky 1

Maxwell, Bruce D.

38

SUMMARY OF CHANGES FOR THE CENTRAL AND SOUTHERN POTATO CROP PROVISIONS (09-0284)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SUMMARY OF CHANGES FOR THE CENTRAL AND SOUTHERN POTATO CROP PROVISIONS (09-0284) The following, New Mexico, it has been included in the Northern Potato Crop Provisions. Language has been added to allow the inclusion of other states or counties to the Central and Southern Potato Crop Provisions

Goodman, Robert M.

39

RESEARCH ARTICLE Increase in crop damage caused by wild boar (Sus scrofa L.)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RESEARCH ARTICLE Increase in crop damage caused by wild boar (Sus scrofa L.): the "refuge effect /Published online: 14 October 2011 Abstract The occurrence of crop damage by wild boars raised dramatically, including hunting, can play a relevant role in causing crop damage. We studied a Mediterranean area

Boyer, Edmond

40

Variable Crop Share Leases.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

)OC lAL45.7 173 1. 1224 Texas Agricultural Extension Service The Texas A&M University System Daniel C. Pfannstiel,Director colleg e Station, Texas / f , ' '~ :';,; ,,: ''': ~ " k , -~. _Variable _Crop Share _Leases ... Marvin... Sartin and Ray Sammons* Renting or leasing farmland is part of many modern farming operations and increases average farm size in U. S. agriculture. Economies of size are vitally import ant to farm operations as they strive to cope with the continuous...

Sartin, Marvin; Sammons, Ray

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including crop residue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Methods of separating particulate residue streams  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A particulate residue separator and a method for separating a particulate residue stream may include an air plenum borne by a harvesting device, and have a first, intake end and a second, exhaust end; first and second particulate residue air streams that are formed by the harvesting device and that travel, at least in part, along the air plenum and in a direction of the second, exhaust end; and a baffle assembly that is located in partially occluding relation relative to the air plenum and that substantially separates the first and second particulate residue air streams.

Hoskinson, Reed L. (Rigby, ID); Kenney, Kevin L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wright, Christopher T. (Idaho Falls, ID); Hess, J. Richard (Idaho Falls, ID)

2011-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

42

Particulate residue separators for harvesting devices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A particulate residue separator and a method for separating a particulate residue stream may include a plenum borne by a harvesting device, and have a first, intake end and a second, exhaust end; first and second particulate residue air streams which are formed by the harvesting device and which travel, at least in part, along the plenum and in a direction of the second, exhaust end; and a baffle assembly which is located in partially occluding relation relative to the plenum, and which substantially separates the first and second particulate residue air streams.

Hoskinson, Reed L.; Kenney, Kevin L.; Wright, Christopher T.; Hess, John R.

2010-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

43

Environmental and economic evaluation of energy recovery from agricultural and forestry residues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Four conversion methods and five residues are examined in this report, which describes six model systems: hydrolysis of corn residues, pyrolysis of corn residues, combustion of cotton-ginning residues, pyrolysis of wheat residues, fermentation of molasses, and combustion of pulp and papermill wastes. Estimates of material and energy flows for those systems are given per 10/sup 12/ Btu of recovered energy. Regional effects are incorporated by addressing the regionalized production of the residues. A national scope cannot be provided for every residue considered because of the biological and physical constraints of crop production. Thus, regionalization of the model systems to the primary production region for the crop from which the residue is obtained has been undertaken. The associated environmental consequences of residue utilization are then assessed for the production region. In addition, the environmental impacts of operating the model systems are examined by quantifying the residuals generated and the land, water, and material requirements per 10/sup 12/ Btu of energy generated. On the basis of estimates found in the literature, capital, operating, and maintenance cost estimates are given for the model systems. These data are also computed on the basis of 10/sup 12/ Btu of energy recovered. The cost, residual, material, land, and water data were then organized into a format acceptable for input into the SEAS data management program. The study indicates that the most serious environmental impacts arise from residue removal rather than from conversion.

None

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Forage Crops in Northwest Texas.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

...................... Preparing. Seeding and Cultivating the Land 18 I I Harvesting the Crop; Yield per Acre ............................ 18 I ! FORAGE CROPS AT AMARILLO ....................................... 18... are the disk harrow, the spike-toothed harrow, tne sled-cultivator. and the ordinary large shovel cultivator. In some portions of this territory from ten to twelve successive crops of sorghum have been grown on the same land; this, however, is not a common...

Conner, A. B. (Arthur Benjamin)

1908-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

HORTICULTURAL & FOREST CROPS 2014 Nursery Crops: Diseases 4-1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

chemicals available. Only chemicals registered by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) are recommended.1 - Common Diseases and Chemical Control Options Plant Disease Fungicide Rate/100 Gal Remarks Ajuga;HORTICULTURAL & FOREST CROPS 2014 4-2 Nursery Crops: Diseases Table 4.1 - Common Diseases and Chemical Control

Liskiewicz, Maciej

46

ATTRIBUTES OF A VIABLE LIGNOCELLULOSIC BIOFUEL FORAGE CROP Chad Martin, Renewable Energy Extension Specialist  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The production of energy from biomass feedstocks has received much attention across the U.S. in recent times. This is due in part because of the country’s desire for domestically produced energy, and to minimize carbon emissions and other greenhouse gases. Lignocellulosic biomass feedstocks can be categorized into woody feedstocks (e.g. dedicated fast growing trees for energy such as hybrid poplars and willows, wood residues, wood chips and mill wastes), agricultural crop residues (e.g. corn stover and wheat straw) and herbaceous energy crops (e.g. switchgrass and miscanthus) The imposing opportunity for

Klein Ileleji; Assistant Professor; Extension Engineer

47

Production Practices for Irrigated Crops on the High Plains.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Plains are shown and discussed in this bulletin. Under production requirements are considered the use of items such as irrigation water, seed, fertilizer, insecticides and other materials, as well as seasonal labor, custom work and other hired... services. Also included in the discussion are the usuaI field operations and the labor and power requirements for each crop. The requirements with both 2 and 4-row equip- ment are discussed for all row crops. Data for both sandy and heavy soils...

Bonnen, C. A.; McArthur, W. C.; Magee, A. C.; Hughes, W.F.

1953-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

The Environmental Impacts of Subsidized Crop Insurance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

May 1996): 428-438. Environmental Impacts of Subsidized CropPaper No. 912 THE ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS OF SUBSIDIZED CROPsuch copies. The Environmental Impacts of Subsidized Crop

LaFrance, Jeffrey T.; Shimshack, J. P.; Wu, S. Y.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Biodiesel is produced from a wide variety of oilseed crops. In Europe, canola is the major biodiesel crop while in the U.S. soybeans dominates. Montana State University and USDA researchers have  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technology Biodiesel is produced from a wide variety of oilseed crops. In Europe, canola is the major biodiesel crop while in the U.S. soybeans dominates. Montana State University and USDA researchers to work for a broad range of oilseed plants including biodiesel and cereal crops. Increased oil

Maxwell, Bruce D.

50

Assistant Professor Cropping Systems Specialist  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Assistant Professor Cropping Systems Specialist Department of Plant and Soil Sciences POSITION DESCRIPTION The Department of Plant and Soil Sciences, Oklahoma State University is seeking, implementing, and evaluating educational programs to meet the needs of producers for improving existing

Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

51

Crop Insurance Terms and Definitions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A&M System; and Extension Agricultural Economist, Kansas State University Agricultural Experiment Station and Cooperative Extension Service. The crop insurance industry is providing more and more risk management tools to help producers deal... for the insured crop. Coverage Levels and Price Elections Actual Production History (APH). A process used to determine production guarantees. Additional coverage. A level of coverage greater than catastrophic risk protection. Administrative fee. An amount...

Stokes, Kenneth; Waller, Mark L.; Outlaw, Joe; Barnaby, G. A. Art

2008-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

52

CROP & SOIL SCIENCES Extension Peanut Agronomist  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CROP & SOIL SCIENCES Extension Peanut Agronomist Committee Membership Dr. J. Michael Moore - committee chair Dr. Clint Waltz Department of Crop & Soil Sciences Department of Crop & Soil Sciences-7300 Fax: (229) 386-7308 Fax: (770) 412-4734 Dr. Eric Prostko Dr. Guy Collins Department of Crop & Soil

Arnold, Jonathan

53

CROP & SOIL SCIENCES Water Policy and Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CROP & SOIL SCIENCES Water Policy and Management Committee Membership Dr. David Radcliffe - committee chair Dr. George Vellidis Department of Crop & Soil Sciences Department of Crop & Soil Sciences & Soil Sciences Department of Crop & Soil Sciences University of Georgia University of Georgia Stripling

Arnold, Jonathan

54

CROP & SOIL SCIENCES Cotton Physiologist Tifton campus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CROP & SOIL SCIENCES Cotton Physiologist ­ Tifton campus Committee Membership Dr. Stanley Culpepper

Arnold, Jonathan

55

crop science, vol. 53, julyaugust 2013 www.crops.org 1 Alfalfa is widely cultivated throughout the world and is the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

crop science, vol. 53, july­august 2013 www.crops.org 1 ReseaRch Alfalfa is widely cultivated are a severe problem for alfalfa pro- duction in many parts of the world, including the southeastern United of Two Transgenes for Aluminum Tolerance in Alfalfa Rafael Reyno, Dong-Man Khu, Maria J. Monteros, Joseph

Parrott, Wayne

56

Non-Traditional Soil Additives: Can They Improve Crop Production?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

residues. 2) Mined mineral deposits that are unprocessed except for grinding. Again, the composi- tion residues, livestock manures and sewage sludge. Non- traditional soil conditioners include both organic potassium), and gypsum or sand. 3) Mined humates or humic acids. These are prehistoric organic deposits

Mukhtar, Saqib

57

Conservation tillage and cover cropping influence soil properties in San Joaquin Valley cotton-tomato crop  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

C) budget after 4 years of treatment* Nitrogen Crop CottonCottonCotton Cotton Tomato Tomato Tomato Tomato Carbon Crop Cotton

Veenstra, Jessica; Horwath, William; Mitchell, Jeffrey; Munk, Dan

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

EFFICACY AND TIMING OF FUNGICIDES, BACTERICIDES, AND BIOLOGICALS for DECIDUOUS TREE FRUIT, NUT, STRAWBERRY, AND VINE CROPS 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cane and leafspot Phomopsis fruit rot and dieback PowderyStrawberry Pome and stone fruit crops including almond;BIOLOGICALS for DECIDUOUS TREE FRUIT, NUT, STRAWBERRY, AND

Adaskaveg, James E; Gubler, W D; Michailides, Themis J.; Holtz, Brent A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Interdisciplinary Pest Management Potentials of Cover Cropping Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cover Crops: Cowpea, Sunn Hemp, and Velvetbean. HottscienceCover Crops: Cowpea, Sunn Hemp, and Velvetbean. Hottsciencethan grasses using sun hemp mulches. While cover cropping

Bachie, Oli Gurmu

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Internship Contract (Includes Practicum)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Internship Contract (Includes Practicum) Student's name-mail: _________________________________________ Internship Agency Contact Agency Name: ____________________________________ Address-mail: __________________________________________ Location of Internship, if different from Agency: ________________________________________________ Copies

Thaxton, Christopher S.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including crop residue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Pump apparatus including deconsolidator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A pump apparatus includes a particulate pump that defines a passage that extends from an inlet to an outlet. A duct is in flow communication with the outlet. The duct includes a deconsolidator configured to fragment particle agglomerates received from the passage.

Sonwane, Chandrashekhar; Saunders, Timothy; Fitzsimmons, Mark Andrew

2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

62

The role of short-rotation woody crops in sustainable development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One answer to increase wood production is by increasing management intensity on existing timberland, especially in plantation forests. Another is to convert land currently in agriculture to timberland. Short-rotation woody crops can be used in both cases. But, what are the environmental consequences? Short-rotation woody crops can provide a net improvement in environmental quality at both local and global scales. Conversion of agricultural land to short-rotation woody crops can provide the most environmental quality enhancement by reducing erosion, improving soil quality, decreasing runoff, improving groundwater quality, and providing better wildlife habitat. Forest products companies can use increased production from intensively managed short-rotation woody crop systems to offset decreased yield from the portion of their timberland that is managed less intensively, e.g. streamside management zones and other ecologically sensitive or unique areas. At the global scale, use of short-rotation woody crops for bioenergy is part of the solution to reduce greenhouse gases produced by burning fossil fuels. Incorporating short-rotation woody crops into the agricultural landscape also increases storage of carbon in the soil, thus reducing atmospheric concentrations. In addition, use of wood instead of alternatives such as steel, concrete, and plastics generally consumes less energy and produces less greenhouse gases. Cooperative research can be used to achieve energy, fiber, and environmental goals. This paper will highlight several examples of ongoing cooperative research projects that seek to enhance the environmental aspects of short-rotation woody crop systems. Government, industry, and academia are conducting research to study soil quality, use of mill residuals, nutrients in runoff and groundwater, and wildlife use of short-rotation woody crop systems in order to assure the role of short-rotation crops as a sustainable way of meeting society`s needs.

Shepard, J.P. [National Council of the Paper Industry for Air and Stream Improvement, Medford, MA (United States); Tolbert, V.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

63

Vegetable Crops Hotline index 2005 MANAGEMENT TIPS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Labeled for Row Middle Use in Vegetable Crops 446 Kudzu Turning Over New Leaves in Indiana Counties 447

Ginzel, Matthew

64

Agronomy and Crop Sciences Organizations Hiring Students in Agronomy and Crop Sciences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Services Inc. Commodity Solutions Inc. Crop King Crop Production Services Crop Quest, Inc. Crop Tech Nebraska Farm Business Inc. Nemaha County Coop North Central Co-op Overland Missions Pontiac Flying LLC The University of Georgia University of Arkansas University of California, Berkeley University of Illinois

65

Use the Acceptable Crop Price worksheet to determine breakeven prices for your crops. ACCEPTABLE PRICE WORKSHEET  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Use the Acceptable Crop Price worksheet to determine breakeven prices for your crops. ACCEPTABLE PRICE WORKSHEET Prepared by: David Bau - Regional Extension Educator, Agricultural Business Management (August 2012) CROP INCOME EXAMPLE YOUR FARM EXAMPLE YOUR FARM (A) Crop Acres 400 400 176 46 (C) Price

Netoff, Theoden

66

CROP & SOIL SCIENCES Small Grain Breeding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CROP & SOIL SCIENCES Small Grain Breeding Committee Membership Dr. Paul Raymer - committee chair Dr. Scott Jackson Department of Crop & Soil Sciences Department of Crop & Soil Sciences University & Soil Sciences Department of Horticulture University of Georgia University of Georgia 2360 Rainwater Rd

Arnold, Jonathan

67

SRC Residual fuel oils  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Coal solids (SRC) and distillate oils are combined to afford single-phase blends of residual oils which have utility as fuel oils substitutes. The components are combined on the basis of their respective polarities, that is, on the basis of their heteroatom content, to assure complete solubilization of SRC. The resulting composition is a fuel oil blend which retains its stability and homogeneity over the long term.

Tewari, Krishna C. (Whitehall, PA); Foster, Edward P. (Macungie, PA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Evaluating Crop-Share Leases.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-SHARE LEASES Marvin Sartin and Norman Brints* There are many approaches for evaluating a crop-share lease. The easiest and most commonly used method relies on history and tradition. Throughout most of Texas, share leases have tra ditionally been one...-third for grain and one-fourth for cotton. While such agreements continue, the economic factors governing farming operations have changed, thus creating a need for reexamin ing terms of share leases. An accepted approach to evaluating sharing arrangements...

Sartin, Marvin; Brints, Norman

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Sustainable System for Residual Hazards Management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hazardous, radioactive and other toxic substances have routinely been generated and subsequently disposed of in the shallow subsurface throughout the world. Many of today’s waste management techniques do not eliminate the problem, but rather only concentrate or contain the hazardous contaminants. Residual hazards result from the presence of hazardous and/or contaminated material that remains on-site following active operations or the completion of remedial actions. Residual hazards pose continued risk to humans and the environment and represent a significant and chronic problem that require continuous longterm management (i.e. >1000 years). To protect human health and safeguard the natural environment, a sustainable system is required for the proper management of residual hazards. A sustainable system for the management of residual hazards will require the integration of engineered, institutional and land-use controls to isolate residual contaminants and thus minimize the associated hazards. Engineered controls are physical modifications to the natural setting and ecosystem, including the site, facility, and/or the residual materials themselves, in order to reduce or eliminate the potential for exposure to contaminants of concern (COCs). Institutional controls are processes, instruments, and mechanisms designed to influence human behavior and activity. System failure can involve hazardous material escaping from the confinement because of system degradation (i.e., chronic or acute degradation) or by externalintrusion of the biosphere into the contaminated material because of the loss of institutional control. An ongoing analysis of contemporary and historic sites suggests that the significance of the loss of institutional controls is a critical pathway because decisions made during the operations/remedial action phase, as well as decisions made throughout the residual hazards management period, are key to the longterm success of the prescribed system. In fact, given that society has become more reliant on and confident of engineered controls, there may be a growing tendency to be even less concerned with institutional controls.

Kevin M. Kostelnik; James H. Clarke; Jerry L. Harbour

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Long-term tillage, cropping sequence, and nitrogen fertilization effects on soil carbon and nitrogen dynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Management practices that may increase soil organic matter (SOM) storage include conservation tillage, especially no till (NT), enhanced cropping intensity, and fertilization. My objectives were to evaluate management effects on labile [soil...

Dou, Fugen

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

71

Response of Peanuts to Irrigation Management at Different Crop Growth Stages  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for peanuts at different crop growth stages for the Spanish and the Florunner varieties. The yield of the two varieties was evaluated under seven different irrigation treatments including a "no stress" check treatment and a dryland treatment. Each treatment...

Howell, T. A.; McFarland, M. J.; Reddell, D. L.; Brown, K. W.; Newton, R. J.; Dahmen, P.

72

Field Guide to the Insects, Mites and Mollusks of Nursery, Floral and Greenhouse Crops  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This field guide provides excellent photo identification keys for numerous pests and beneficials found in nursery, greenhouse and floral crops. The text includes a physical description, examples of damage and information on the life cycle of each...

Gouge, Dawn H.; Smith, Kirk A.; Wilkerson, Don

2000-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

73

E-Print Network 3.0 - alaska including cultivated Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Flame cultivation can be effective in killing weeds, including those growing in the crop... cultivation varied from 4.11 per acre to 11.42, with an average of 7.14. This...

74

Cassava, a potential biofuel crop in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cassava, a potential biofuel crop in China Christer Janssoncassava; bioethanol; biofuel; metabolic engineering; Chinathe potentials of cassava in the biofuel sector and point to

Jansson, C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Environmental enhancement using short-rotation woody crops and perennial grasses as alternative agricultural crops  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Short-rotation woody crops and perennial grasses are grown as biomass feedstocks for energy and fiber. When replacing traditional row crops on similar lands, these alternative crops can provide multiple environmental benefits in addition to enhancing rural economies and providing valuable feedstock resources. The Department of Energy is supporting research to address how these crops can provide environmental benefits to soil, water and native wildlife species in addition to providing bioenergy feedstocks. Research is underway to address the potential for biomass crops to provide soil conservation and water quality improvements in crop settings. Replacement of traditional erosive row crops with biomass crops on marginal lands and establishment of biomass plantations as filter strips adjacent to streams and wetlands are being studied. The habitat value of different biomass crops for selected wildlife species is also under study. To date, these studies have shown that in comparison with row crops biomass plantings of both grass and tree crops increased biodiversity of birds; however, the habitat value of tree plantations is not equivalent to natural forests. The effects on native wildlife of establishing multiple plantations across a landscape are being studied. Combining findings on wildlife use of individual plantations with information on the cumulative effects of multiple plantations on wildlife populations can provide guidance for establishing and managing biomass crops to enhance biodiversity while providing biomass feedstocks. Data from site-specific environmental studies can provide input for evaluation of the probable effects of large-scale plantings at both landscape and regional levels of resolution.

Tolbert, V.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Schiller, A. [Oak Ridge Inst. for Science and Education, TN (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

76

FIELD AND FORAGE CROPS Bioenergy Crops Miscanthus giganteus and Panicum virgatum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for petroleum-based energy (Mil- liken et al. 2007). Cultivating these biofuel crops species, it is likely that biofuel crops, as grown for Ă?eld cultivation, will suffer reduced damage from of these biofuel crops are new to large-scale cultivation, it is unknown what interactions between current insect

DeLucia, Evan H.

77

EFFICACY AND TIMING OF FUNGICIDES,BACTERICIDES, AND BIOLOGICALS for DECIDUOUS TREE FRUIT, NUT, STRAWBERRY, AND VINE CROPS 2010 (rev. April 1, 2010)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cane and leafspot Phomopsis fruit rot and dieback PowderyStrawberry Pome and stone fruit crops including almond;BIOLOGICALS for DECIDUOUS TREE FRUIT, NUT, STRAWBERRY, AND

Adaskaveg, J E; Gubler, W D; Michailides, Themis J.; Holtz, Brent A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

CROP & SOIL SCIENCES Statewide Variety Testing Program Coordinator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CROP & SOIL SCIENCES Statewide Variety Testing Program Coordinator Committee Membership Dr. Jerry Johnson - committee chair Dr. Paul Raymer Department of Crop & Soil Sciences Department of Crop & Soil Department of Crop & Soil Sciences Department of Crop & Soil Sciences University of Georgia University

Arnold, Jonathan

79

Methods for generating or increasing revenues from crops  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides methods of doing business and providing services. For example, methods of increasing the revenue of crops are provided. To this end, the method includes the use of a nucleic acid sequences of plant centromeres. This will permit construction of stably inherited recombinant DNA constructs and mini chromosomes which can serve as vectors for the construction of transgenic plant and animal cells.

Copenhaver, Gregory P.; Keith, Kevin; Preuss, Daphne

2007-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

80

Residual Energy Spectrum of Solar Wind Turbulence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It has long been known that the energy in velocity and magnetic field fluctuations in the solar wind is not in equipartition. In this paper, we present an analysis of 5 years of Wind data at 1 AU to investigate the reason for this. The residual energy (difference between energy in velocity and magnetic field fluctuations) was calculated using both the standard magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) normalization for the magnetic field and a kinetic version, which includes temperature anisotropies and drifts between particle species. It was found that with the kinetic normalization, the fluctuations are closer to equipartition, with a mean normalized residual energy of sigma_r = -0.19 and mean Alfven ratio of r_A = 0.71. The spectrum of residual energy, in the kinetic normalization, was found to be steeper than both the velocity and magnetic field spectra, consistent with some recent MHD turbulence predictions and numerical simulations, having a spectral index close to -1.9. The local properties of residual energy and cros...

Chen, C H K; Salem, C S; Maruca, B A

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including crop residue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

HorTICULTUrAL & ForEST CroPS 2014 Commercial Small Fruit: Diseases and Insects 2-1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HorTICULTUrAL & ForEST CroPS 2014 Commercial Small Fruit: Diseases and Insects 2-1 Diseases in commercial small fruit crops is obtained only through the judicious use of pesticides combined with sound-picking), and resistant varieties. Organically approved tools listed in this guide for small fruit insect pests include

Liskiewicz, Maciej

82

Residuals in steel products -- Impacts on properties and measures to minimize them  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of major residual elements on the properties of steel products is summarized. Measures to minimize these elements are discussed including the pretreatment of raw materials, innovative refining processes and environmental issues. This paper addresses (1) scrap situation, (2) upper limit of residual concentrations acceptable for processing and product quality, (3) possible means to reduce the residuals, and (4) consideration on the practicable measures to solve the residuals problem in a systematic way. 52 refs.

Emi, Toshihiko [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Inst. for Advanced Materials Processing; Wijk, O. [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Process Metallurgy

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

83

Modeling Sustainable Agricultural Residue Removal at the Subfield Scale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study developed a computational strategy that utilizes data inputs from multiple spatial scales to investigate how variability within individual fields can impact sustainable residue removal for bioenergy production. Sustainable use of agricultural residues for bioenergy production requires consideration of the important role that residues play in limiting soil erosion and maintaining soil C, health, and productivity. Increased availability of subfield-scale data sets such as grain yield data, high-fidelity digital elevation models, and soil characteristic data provides an opportunity to investigate the impacts of subfield-scale variability on sustainable agricultural residue removal. Using three representative fields in Iowa, this study contrasted the results of current NRCS conservation management planning analysis with subfield-scale analysis for rake-and-bale removal of agricultural residue. The results of the comparison show that the field-average assumptions used in NRCS conservation management planning may lead to unsustainable residue removal decisions for significant portions of some fields. This highlights the need for additional research on subfield-scale sustainable agricultural residue removal including the development of real-time variable removal technologies for agricultural residue.

Muth, D.J.; McCorkle, D.S.; Koch, J.B.; Bryden, K.M.

2012-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

84

Developing an Integrated Model Framework for the Assessment of Sustainable Agricultural Residue Removal Limits for Bioenergy Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Agricultural residues have significant potential as a feedstock for bioenergy production, but removing these residues can have negative impacts on soil health. Models and datasets that can support decisions about sustainable agricultural residue removal are available; however, no tools currently exist capable of simultaneously addressing all environmental factors that can limit availability of residue. The VE-Suite model integration framework has been used to couple a set of environmental process models to support agricultural residue removal decisions. The RUSLE2, WEPS, and Soil Conditioning Index models have been integrated. A disparate set of databases providing the soils, climate, and management practice data required to run these models have also been integrated. The integrated system has been demonstrated for two example cases. First, an assessment using high spatial fidelity crop yield data has been run for a single farm. This analysis shows the significant variance in sustainably accessible residue across a single farm and crop year. A second example is an aggregate assessment of agricultural residues available in the state of Iowa. This implementation of the integrated systems model demonstrates the capability to run a vast range of scenarios required to represent a large geographic region.

David Muth, Jr.; Jared Abodeely; Richard Nelson; Douglas McCorkle; Joshua Koch; Kenneth Bryden

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

PETRO: Higher Productivity Crops for Biofuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

PETRO Project: The 10 projects that comprise ARPA-E’s PETRO Project, short for “Plants Engineered to Replace Oil,” aim to develop non-food crops that directly produce transportation fuel. These crops can help supply the transportation sector with agriculturally derived fuels that are cost-competitive with petroleum and do not affect U.S. food supply. PETRO aims to redirect the processes for energy and carbon dioxide (CO2) capture in plants toward fuel production. This would create dedicated energy crops that serve as a domestic alternative to petroleum-based fuels and deliver more energy per acre with less processing prior to the pump.

None

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Economics of biomass fuels for electricity production: a case study with crop residues  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

will play a major role in determining the future degree of bioelectricity production: the price of coal and the future price of carbon emissions. Using The Forest and Agricultural Sector Optimization Model—Green House Gas version (FASOMGHG) in a case study...

Maung, Thein Aye

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

87

ABSTRACT: Bioenergy Harvesting Technologies to Supply Crop Residues In a Densified Large Square Bale Format  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up from theDepartment(October-DecemberBasedToward a MoreA RisingA1AFrom AARP,ABB

88

Chemical Characterization of Individual Particles and Residuals...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Individual Particles and Residuals of Cloud Droplets and Ice Crystals Collected On Board Research Chemical Characterization of Individual Particles and Residuals of Cloud Droplets...

89

Mycotoxins in Feed and Food Crops.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

" , , ,., ":i: : ?. MYCOTOXINS IN FEED fu~D FOOD CROPS Prepared by James M. Armstrong, Extension Project Leader in Veterinary Medicine and Veterinarian (Livestock Health) John E. Bremer, Extension Agronomist Dennis B. Herd, Extension Beef Cattle...

Armstrong, James M.; Herb, Dennis B.; Bremer, John E.; Horne, C. Wendell; Thomas, William B.; Thornberry, Fred D.; Tripp, Leland D.; White, Thomas H.; Withers, Richard E.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Cassava, a potential biofuel crop in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as a means to produce novel biodiesel crops. We also don’tto oil Ethanol and biodiesel are the two major bio-basedin transportation. Compared to biodiesel, the net energy

Jansson, C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Modelling the UK perennial energy crop market   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biomass produced from perennial energy crops, Miscanthus and willow or poplar grown as short-rotation coppice, is expected to contribute to UK renewable energy targets and reduce the carbon intensity of energy production. ...

Alexander, Peter Mark William

2014-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

92

DISSOLUTION OF NEPTUNIUM OXIDE RESIDUES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the development of a dissolution flowsheet for neptunium (Np) oxide (NpO{sub 2}) residues (i.e., various NpO{sub 2} sources, HB-Line glovebox sweepings, and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) thermogravimetric analysis samples). Samples of each type of materials proposed for processing were dissolved in a closed laboratory apparatus and the rate and total quantity of off-gas were measured. Samples of the off-gas were also analyzed. The quantity and type of solids remaining (when visible) were determined after post-dissolution filtration of the solution. Recommended conditions for dissolution of the NpO{sub 2} residues are: Solution Matrix and Loading: {approx}50 g Np/L (750 g Np in 15 L of dissolver solution), using 8 M nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}), 0.025 M potassium fluoride (KF) at greater than 100 C for at least 3 hours. Off-gas: Analysis of the off-gas indicated nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}) and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) as the only identified components. No hydrogen (H{sub 2}) was detected. The molar ratio of off-gas produced per mole of Np dissolved ranged from 0.25 to 0.4 moles of gas per mole of Np dissolved. A peak off-gas rate of {approx}0.1 scfm/kg bulk oxide was observed. Residual Solids: Pure NpO{sub 2} dissolved with little or no residue with the proposed flowsheet but the NpCo and both sweepings samples left visible solid residue after dissolution. For the NpCo and Part II Sweepings samples the residue amounted to {approx}1% of the initial material, but for the Part I Sweepings sample, the residue amounted to {approx}8 % of the initial material. These residues contained primarily aluminum (Al) and silicon (Si) compounds that did not completely dissolve under the flowsheet conditions. The residues from both sweepings samples contained minor amounts of plutonium (Pu) particles. Overall, the undissolved Np and Pu particles in the residues were a very small fraction of the total solids.

Kyser, E

2009-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

93

Risk in agriculture : a study of crop yield distributions and crop insurance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Agriculture is a business fraught with risk. Crop production depends on climatic, geographical, biological, political, and economic factors, which introduce risks that are quantifiable given the appropriate mathematical ...

Gayam, Narsi Reddy

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Thin layer chromatography residue applicator sampler  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A thin layer chromatograph residue applicator sampler. The residue applicator sampler provides for rapid analysis of samples containing high explosives, chemical warfare, and other analyses of interest under field conditions. This satisfied the need for a field-deployable, small, hand-held, all-in-one device for efficient sampling, sample dissolution, and sample application to an analytical technique. The residue applicator sampler includes a sampling sponge that is resistant to most chemicals and is fastened via a plastic handle in a hermetically sealed tube containing a known amount of solvent. Upon use, the wetted sponge is removed from the sealed tube and used as a swiping device across an environmental sample. The sponge is then replaced in the hermetically sealed tube where the sample remains contained and dissolved in the solvent. A small pipette tip is removably contained in the hermetically sealed tube. The sponge is removed and placed into the pipette tip where a squeezing-out of the dissolved sample from the sponge into the pipette tip results in a droplet captured in a vial for later instrumental analysis, or applied directly to a thin layer chromatography plate for immediate analysis.

Nunes, Peter J. (Danville, CA); Kelly, Fredrick R. (Modesto, CA); Haas, Jeffrey S. (San Ramon, CA); Andresen, Brian D. (Livermore, CA)

2007-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

95

Residual stresses and stress corrosion cracking in pipe fittings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Residual stresses can play a key role in the SCC performance of susceptible materials in PWR primary water applications. Residual stresses are stresses stored within the metal that develop during deformation and persist in the absence of external forces or temperature gradients. Sources of residual stresses in pipe fittings include fabrication processes, installation and welding. There are a number of methods to characterize the magnitude and orientation of residual stresses. These include numerical analysis, chemical cracking tests, and measurement (e.g., X-ray diffraction, neutron diffraction, strain gage/hole drilling, strain gage/trepanning, strain gage/section and layer removal, and acoustics). This paper presents 400 C steam SCC test results demonstrating that residual stresses in as-fabricated Alloy 600 pipe fittings are sufficient to induce SCC. Residual stresses present in as-fabricated pipe fittings are characterized by chemical cracking tests (stainless steel fittings tested in boiling magnesium chloride solution) and by the sectioning and layer removal (SLR) technique.

Parrington, R.J.; Scott, J.J.; Torres, F.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Global Simulation of Bioenergy Crop Productivity: Analytical Framework and Case Study for Switchgrass  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A global energy crop productivity model that provides geospatially explicit quantitative details on biomass potential and factors affecting sustainability would be useful, but does not exist now. This study describes a modeling platform capable of meeting many challenges associated with global-scale agro-ecosystem modeling. We designed an analytical framework for bioenergy crops consisting of six major components: (i) standardized natural resources datasets, (ii) global field-trial data and crop management practices, (iii) simulation units and management scenarios, (iv) model calibration and validation, (v) high-performance computing (HPC) simulation, and (vi) simulation output processing and analysis. The HPC-Environmental Policy Integrated Climate (HPC-EPIC) model simulated a perennial bioenergy crop, switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.), estimating feedstock production potentials and effects across the globe. This modeling platform can assess soil C sequestration, net greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, nonpoint source pollution (e.g., nutrient and pesticide loss), and energy exchange with the atmosphere. It can be expanded to include additional bioenergy crops (e.g., miscanthus, energy cane, and agave) and food crops under different management scenarios. The platform and switchgrass field-trial dataset are available to support global analysis of biomass feedstock production potential and corresponding metrics of sustainability.

Kang, Shujiang [ORNL; Kline, Keith L [ORNL; Nair, S. Surendran [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Nichols, Dr Jeff A [ORNL; Post, Wilfred M [ORNL; Brandt, Craig C [ORNL; Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL; Wei, Yaxing [ORNL; Singh, Nagendra [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

REVIEW ARTICLE Models to support cropping plan and crop rotation decisions.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. To support farmers and efficiently allocate scarce resources, decision support models are developed. DecisionREVIEW ARTICLE Models to support cropping plan and crop rotation decisions. A review JĂ©rĂ´me Dury /Published online: 8 July 2011 # INRA and Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011 Abstract Farmers must

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

98

CropIrri: A DECISION SUPPORT SYSTEM FOR CROP IRRIGATION MANAGEMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: A field crop irrigation management decision-making system (CropIrri) was developed based on the soil water management model. The irrigation plan is made through predicating of soil water content in root zone-sowing and real-time irrigation management decision-making support, simulation of soil water dynamics in the root

99

Seasonality and Its Effects on Crop Markets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

consistent than the highs) and then rely on magnitude to predict the high. For example, a particular crop?s seasonal low may have occurred in October-November 80 percent of the time. The seasonal high was 12 to 15 percent above the seasonal low 75 percent... of the time. Based on this analysis, one would expect the seasonal low to come at harvest (in October or November) and the high to be 12 to 15 percent above the low. Of the two, timing is the more important for speculative purposes, whereas magnitude is often...

Tierney Jr., William I.; Waller, Mark L.; Amosson, Stephen H.

1999-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

100

E-Print Network 3.0 - arable crop protection Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

feedstock supplies from forestry, biomass crops like Miscanthus and short rotation coppice (SRC), arable... contribute to reduced loadings in NVZs. Cropping with arable crops...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including crop residue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Meals included in Conference Registrations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Meals included in Conference Registrations Meals included as part of the cost of a conference the most reasonable rates are obtained. Deluxe hotels and motels should be avoided. GSA rates have been for Georgia high cost areas. 75% of these amounts would be $21 for non- high cost areas and $27 for high cost

Arnold, Jonathan

102

Crop Rotations in the Brazos River Valley.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and California in- volving the modification of physical properties of soil by crops and management was made by Uhland (22) . He reported that (1) plants with deep and well-developed root systems, such as alfalfa and kudzu, may be cxpected to increase...

Whiteley, Eli L.; Hipp, Billy W.

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Features . . . Cover Crop Value to Cotton  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Features . . . Cotton Cover Crop Value to Cotton Cotton Price and Rotation 32:12 December 2008 #12;Cotton Price and Rotation Agronomy Notes Page 2 Cotton price has been low. Either peanut or soybean should be rotated with cotton, corn, or other grasses. However, with cotton

Watson, Craig A.

104

Estimating crop net primary production using inventory data and MODIS-derived parameters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

National estimates of spatially-resolved cropland net primary production (NPP) are needed for diagnostic and prognostic modeling of carbon sources, sinks, and net carbon flux. Cropland NPP estimates that correspond with existing cropland cover maps are needed to drive biogeochemical models at the local scale and over national and continental extents. Existing satellite-based NPP products tend to underestimate NPP on croplands. A new Agricultural Inventory-based Light Use Efficiency (AgI-LUE) framework was developed to estimate individual crop biophysical parameters for use in estimating crop-specific NPP. The method is documented here and evaluated for corn and soybean crops in Iowa and Illinois in years 2006 and 2007. The method includes a crop-specific enhanced vegetation index (EVI) from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), shortwave radiation data estimated using Mountain Climate Simulator (MTCLIM) algorithm and crop-specific LUE per county. The combined aforementioned variables were used to generate spatially-resolved, crop-specific NPP that correspond to the Cropland Data Layer (CDL) land cover product. The modeling framework represented well the gradient of NPP across Iowa and Illinois, and also well represented the difference in NPP between years 2006 and 2007. Average corn and soybean NPP from AgI-LUE was 980 g C m-2 yr-1 and 420 g C m-2 yr-1, respectively. This was 2.4 and 1.1 times higher, respectively, for corn and soybean compared to the MOD17A3 NPP product. Estimated gross primary productivity (GPP) derived from AgI-LUE were in close agreement with eddy flux tower estimates. The combination of new inputs and improved datasets enabled the development of spatially explicit and reliable NPP estimates for individual crops over large regional extents.

Bandaru, Varaprasad; West, Tristram O.; Ricciuto, Daniel M.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.

2013-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

105

Modeling, Optimization and Economic Evaluation of Residual Biomass Gasification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. .............................................................................. 7 Table 2. Components Used in Simulation. ...................................................................... 20 Table 3. Composition of Biomass Feedstock to Biorefinery. ......................................... 43 Table 4. Operating... for optimizing gasification plant design from an economic perspective. Specifically, the problem addressed in this work is stated as follows: Given are: ? A set of biomass feedstocks {i|i = 1,2,?,I } which includes fresh as well as residue biomass ? A set...

Georgeson, Adam

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

106

Aspects of Applied Biology 112, 2011 Biomass and Energy Crops IV  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, biomass yields, bioenergy Introduction The United States'Energy Independence and SecurityAct of 2007 (EISA; Fargione et al., 2008). Producing more corn-based ethanol may increase food prices due to changing market dynamics. Alternative bioenergy options include non-food biomass feedstock from perennial crops and more

Weiblen, George D

107

Profitability of Willow Biomass Crops Affected by Incentive Programs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cropping system is based on a single planting and multiple harvests using a coppice management system [5

Vermont, University of

108

REGULAR ARTICLE Microbial community assimilation of cover crop  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

microenvironments in alternative and conventional cropping systems Angela Y. Y. Kong & Johan Six Received: 4 October dur- ing the cover crop growing season in long-term conventional (annual synthetic fertilizer (annual composted manure and cover crop additions) maize-tomato sys- tems (Zea mays L.- Lycopersicum

109

Test of a solar crop dryer Danish Technological Institute  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Test of a solar crop dryer Danish Technological Institute Danish Institute of Agricultural Sciences Aidt Miljø A/S SEC-R-6 #12;Test of a solar crop dryer Søren �stergaard Jensen Danish Technological/S January 2001 #12;Preface The report describes the tests carried out on a solar crop dryer. The work

110

CliCrop: a Crop Water-Stress and Irrigation Demand Model for an Integrated Global Assessment Model Approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper describes the use of the CliCrop model in the context of climate change general assessment

Fant, C.A.

111

Sponsorship includes: Agriculture in the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sponsorship includes: · Agriculture in the Classroom · Douglas County Farm Bureau · Gifford Farm · University of Nebraska Agricultural Research and Development Center · University of Nebraska- Lincoln Awareness Coalition is to help youth, primarily from urban communities, become aware of agriculture

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

112

Management of high sulfur coal combustion residues, issues and practices: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Papers presented at the following sessions are included in this proceedings: (1) overview topic; (2) characterization of coal combustion residues; (3) environmental impacts of residues management; (4) materials handling and utilization, Part I; and (5) materials handling and utilization, Part II. Selected paper have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

Chugh, Y.P.; Beasley, G.A. [eds.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Recovery of gallium from aluminum industry residues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A procedure is proposed to recover gallium from flue dust aluminum residues produced in plants by using solid-phase extraction with a commercial polyether-type polyurethane foam (PUF). Gallium can be separated from high concentrations of aluminum, iron, nickel, titanium, vanadium, copper, zinc, sulfate, fluoride, and chloride by extraction with PUF from 3 M sulfuric acid and 3 M sodium chloride concentration medium with at least a 92% efficiency. Gallium backextraction was fast and quantitative with ethanol solution. In all recovery steps commercial-grade reagents could be used, including tap water. The recovered gallium was precipitated with sodium hydroxide solution, purified by dissolution and precipitation, calcinated, and the final oxide was 98.6% pure.

Carvalho, M.S.; Neto, K.C.M.; Nobrega, A.W.; Medeiros, J.A.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Method For Characterizing Residual Stress In Metals  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is provided for measuring the residual stress in metals. The method includes the steps of drilling one or more holes in a metal workpiece to a preselected depth and mounting one or more acoustic sensors on the metal workpiece and connecting the sensors to an electronic detecting and recording device. A liquid metal capable of penetrating into the metal workpiece placed at the bottom of the hole or holes. A recording is made over a period of time (typically within about two hours) of the magnitude and number of noise events which occur as the liquid metal penetrates into the metal workpiece. The magnitude and number of noise events are then correlated to the internal stress in the region of the workpiece at the bottom of the hole.

Jacobson, Loren A. (Santa Fe, NM); Michel, David J. (Alexandria, VA); Wyatt, Jeffrey R. (Burke, VA)

2002-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

115

Process to recycle shredder residue  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system and process for recycling shredder residue, in which separating any polyurethane foam materials are first separated. Then separate a fines fraction of less than about 1/4 inch leaving a plastics-rich fraction. Thereafter, the plastics rich fraction is sequentially contacted with a series of solvents beginning with one or more of hexane or an alcohol to remove automotive fluids; acetone to remove ABS; one or more of EDC, THF or a ketone having a boiling point of not greater than about 125.degree. C. to remove PVC; and one or more of xylene or toluene to remove polypropylene and polyethylene. The solvents are recovered and recycled.

Jody, Bassam J. (Chicago, IL); Daniels, Edward J. (Oak Lawn, IL); Bonsignore, Patrick V. (Channahon, IL)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Japanese Sugar Cane as a Forage Crop.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STAT10 N BULLETIN NO. 195 AUGUST, 1916 DIVISION OF AGRONOMY JAPANESE SUGAR CANE AS A FORAGE CROP BY A. H. LEIDIGH, B. S., Agronomist, IN CONSULTATION WITH G. T. McNESS, Superintendent, Substation No. 11, Nacogdoches, and H. H.... LAUDE, B. S., Superintendenr, Substation No. 4, Beaumont I POSTOFFICE: COLLEGE STATION, BRAZOS COUNTY, TEXAS AUSTIN, TEXAS VON BOECKMANN-JONES CO., PRINTERS 1916 AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE OF TEXAS W. B. BIZZELL, A. hq.. D. C. L...

Leidigh, A. H. (Arthur Henry); McNess, George Thomas; Laude, H. H. (Hilmer Henry)

1916-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Crop acreage estimators based on satellite imagery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

acreages have been pooled during the creation of the two data sets. Each data set refers to a particular part of the state of Texas. The two regions are shown in Figure 1. The partitioning is made according to crop reporting districts (CRD), which... studies are reported: (1) a comparison of sample behavior with theoretical asymptotic behavior, (2) an evaluation using CAMS data and fixed size sampling units of the improvement of the estimators under the new decision process over the old multinomial...

Vidart, Stephane

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Residual stress patterns in steel welds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Neutron strain scanning of residual stress is a valuable nondestructive tool for evaluation of residual stress in welds. The penetrating characteristic of neutrons permits mapping of strain patterns with a spatial resolution approaching 1mm at depths of 20mm in steels. While the overall patterns of the residual stress tensor in a weld are understood, the detailed patterns depend on welding process parameters and the effects of solid state transformation. The residual strain profiles in two multi-pass austenitic welds and a ferritic steel weld are presented. The stress-free lattice parameters within the fusion zone and the adjacent heat affected zone in the two austenitic welds show that the interpretation of residual stress from strains are affected by welding parameters. An interpretation of the residual strain pattern in the ferritic steel plate can be made using the strain measurements of a Gleeble test bar which has undergone the solid state austenite decomposition.

Spooner, S.; Hubbard, C.R.; Wang, X.L.; David, S.A.; Holden, T.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Root, J.H.; Swainson, I. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River, ON (Canada)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

119

Residual Toxicities of Insecticides to Cotton Insects.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the effects of simulated wind and rain on the residues. Tempera- ture and humidity conditions incident to the holding period were sufficient to destroy most of the residual toxicity of this material. Effect of Simulated Wind Among the chlorinated... hydrocarbon insecticides, there was little difference between the effects of simu- lated wind and rain on residual toxicities. However, it is likely that under field conditions the effects of rain would be more noticeable. Simulated wind was less damaging...

Hightower, B. G.; Gaines, J. C.

1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

SOIL QUALITY AND CROP Dick Wolkowski  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;WHAT IS SOIL QUALITY DEPENDS ON WHO YOU ARE: Farmer: Highly productive, sustainable media Soil test and pH "Artificial" drainage Residue management Microbial activity Salts #12;Soil biology factors into an index #12;Pennsylvania #12;A SOIL MANAGEMENT ASSESSMENT FRAMEWORK (Andrews et al., 2004

Balser, Teri C.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including crop residue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Top Crop Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExplorationUT-gTaguspark JumpDetective: TerminologyTolerableTop Crop Wind Farm

122

Characterization Report on Sand, Slag, and Crucible Residues and on Fluoride Residues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports on the chemical characterization of the sand, slag, and crucible (SS and C) residues and the fluoride residues that may be shipped from the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) to Savannah River Site (SRS).

Murray, A.M.

1999-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

123

Soil loss and leaching, habitat destruction, land and water demand in energy-crop monoculture: some quantitative limits  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The environmental impacts of growing biomass for energy, especially for liquid automotive fuels, are potentially large. They are sensitive to the low power production per unit area (high land requirement) and to net energy balances. Initial quantitative estimates were made for impacts per unit power within several classes of impacts, and conversely, for limits to power produced if one avoids worst-class impacts. The following types of biomass energy technologies are considered: ethanol and methanol from grains and residues (temperate zone); jojoba wax (semi-tropical); ethanol from sugar cane and root crops (tropics); and silviculture for methanol via gasification.

Gutschick, V.P.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Chengci Chen, Ph.D. Professor of Agronomy (Cropping Systems)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-based crop rotations. Agron. J. 104:215-224. Chen, C., G. Han, H. He, and M. Westcott. 2011. Yield, protein

Dyer, Bill

125

alley cropping system: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Markus 460 Organic and inorganic fertilization with and without microbial inoculants in peat-based substrate and hydroponic crop production. Open Access Theses and Dissertations...

126

alley cropping systems: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Markus 460 Organic and inorganic fertilization with and without microbial inoculants in peat-based substrate and hydroponic crop production. Open Access Theses and Dissertations...

127

Development and Deployment of a Short Rotation Woody Crops Harvesting...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

SRC Woody Crop Header Re-direct Destination: Demand for bioenergy sourced from woody biomass is projected to increase; however, the expansion and rapid deployment of short...

128

Weather-based forecasts of California crop yields  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Crop yield forecasts provide useful information to a range of users. Yields for several crops in California are currently forecast based on field surveys and farmer interviews, while for many crops official forecasts do not exist. As broad-scale crop yields are largely dependent on weather, measurements from existing meteorological stations have the potential to provide a reliable, timely, and cost-effective means to anticipate crop yields. We developed weather-based models of state-wide yields for 12 major California crops (wine grapes, lettuce, almonds, strawberries, table grapes, hay, oranges, cotton, tomatoes, walnuts, avocados, and pistachios), and tested their accuracy using cross-validation over the 1980-2003 period. Many crops were forecast with high accuracy, as judged by the percent of yield variation explained by the forecast, the number of yields with correctly predicted direction of yield change, or the number of yields with correctly predicted extreme yields. The most successfully modeled crop was almonds, with 81% of yield variance captured by the forecast. Predictions for most crops relied on weather measurements well before harvest time, allowing for lead times that were longer than existing procedures in many cases.

Lobell, D B; Cahill, K N; Field, C B

2005-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

129

Asymptotics for GARCH Squared Residual Correlations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Asymptotics for GARCH Squared Residual Correlations Istv'an Berkes \\Lambda A. R'enyi Institute a GARCH(p; q) model. Denoting by â?? r n (k); k â?? 1; these autocorrelations computed from a realization words and phrases: GARCH(p; q) sequence, quasi--maximum likelihood esti­ mator, squared residuals

Kokoszka, Piotr

130

University of Pittsburgh Residual Funds on  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University of Pittsburgh Residual Funds on FINANCIAL GUIDELINE Subject: Sponsored Projects I by the sponsor. Funds cannot be unilaterally retained by the University. Failure to return residual funds related funds on sponsored grants and contracts on the financial accounting records of the University

Sibille, Etienne

131

Data Conversion in Residue Number System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for direct conversion when interaction with the real analog world is required. We first develop two efficient schemes for direct analog-to-residue conversion. Another efficient scheme for direct residue analogique réel est nécessaire. Nous dévelopons deux systèmes efficaces pour la conversion directe du domaine

Zilic, Zeljko

132

Energy 101: Biofuels  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

Biomass is an organic renewable energy source that includes materials such as agriculture and forest residues, energy crops, and algae.

133

Pulp and paper mill fibrous residuals in excavatable flowable fill Y.-m. Chun, T.R. Naik, & R.N. Kraus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

biological treatment of wastewater. Fiber reclaim is composed of wood cellulose fibers and moisture mills Fibrous residuals from pulp and paper mills include wastewater-treatment residuals (also called sludge), fiber reclaim, and screening rejects. The basic components of the wastewater-treatment residuals

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

134

Conversion of geothermal waste to commercial products including silica  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for the treatment of geothermal residue includes contacting the pigmented amorphous silica-containing component with a depigmenting reagent one or more times to depigment the silica and produce a mixture containing depigmented amorphous silica and depigmenting reagent containing pigment material; separating the depigmented amorphous silica and from the depigmenting reagent to yield depigmented amorphous silica. Before or after the depigmenting contacting, the geothermal residue or depigmented silica can be treated with a metal solubilizing agent to produce another mixture containing pigmented or unpigmented amorphous silica-containing component and a solubilized metal-containing component; separating these components from each other to produce an amorphous silica product substantially devoid of metals and at least partially devoid of pigment. The amorphous silica product can be neutralized and thereafter dried at a temperature from about 25.degree. C. to 300.degree. C. The morphology of the silica product can be varied through the process conditions including sequence contacting steps, pH of depigmenting reagent, neutralization and drying conditions to tailor the amorphous silica for commercial use in products including filler for paint, paper, rubber and polymers, and chromatographic material.

Premuzic, Eugene T. (East Moriches, NY); Lin, Mow S. (Rocky Point, NY)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Experimental determination of residual stress by neutron diffraction in a boiling water reactor core shroud  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Residual strains in a 51 mm (2-inch) thick 304L stainless steel plate have been measured by neutron diffraction and interpreted in terms of residual stress. The plate, measuring (300 mm) in area, was removed from a 6m (20-ft.) diameter unirradiated boiling water reactor core shroud, and included a multiple-pass horizontal weld which joined two of the cylindrical shells which comprise the core shroud. Residual stress mapping was undertaken in the heat affected zone, concentrating on the outside half of the plate thickness. Variations in residual stresses with location appeared consistent with trends expected from finite element calculations, considering that a large fraction of the residual hoop stress was released upon removal of the plate from the core shroud cylinder.

Payzant, A.; Spooner, S.; Zhu, Xiaojing; Hubbard, C.R. [and others

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Short-rotation woody-crops program. Quarterly progress report for period ending August 31, 1981  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress of twenty-one projects in the Short Rotation Woody Crops Program is summarized for the period June 1 through August 31, 1981. Individual quarterly reports included from each of the projects discuss accomplishments within specific project objectives and identify recent papers and publications resulting from the research. The major program activities are species screening and genetic selection, stand establishment and cultural treatment, and harvest, collection, transportation, and storage.

Cushman, J.H.; Ranney, J.W.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

October 2009 Minnesota Crop Cost & Return Guide for 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

funding was provided by the state of Minnesota's ReInvest in Minnesota Clean Energy Program. #12, spring wheat, sugar beets, and alfalfa hay) as well as potential energy crops (grassland crops, hybrid National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) regions and for Minnesota as a whole (see Figure 1

Minnesota, University of

138

November 2010 Minnesota Crop Cost & Return Guide for 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

funding was provided by the state of Minnesota's ReInvest in Minnesota Clean Energy Program. #12, and alfalfa hay) as well as potential energy crops (grassland crops, hybrid poplar trees, willow trees using the Bureau of Labor Statistics producer price index and the USDANASS index of prices paid

Minnesota, University of

139

Translational genomics of Vegetable Crops Las Vegas, NV  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Translational genomics of Vegetable Crops Las Vegas, NV July 21, 2005 David Francis and Allen Van Deynze At the recent ASHS meetings in Las Vegas, a workshop "Translational Genomics of Vegetable Crops interventions" (Minna and Gazdar, 1996). In applied plant science, "translational genomics" implies

Douches, David S.

140

ECONOMIC IMPACT OF SPECIALTY CROP PRODUCTION AND PROCESSING IN WISCONSIN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 ECONOMIC IMPACT OF SPECIALTY CROP PRODUCTION AND PROCESSING IN WISCONSIN Ashleigh Arledge Keene Applied Economics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI October 2010 Production and processing of which is exported to Asia. ECONOMIC IMPACT OF SPECIALTY CROPS Production and processing of Wisconsin

Radeloff, Volker C.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including crop residue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Energy Crops and their Implications on Surface Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Crops and their Implications on Surface Energy and Water Balance Yang Song Rahul Barman Phenological differences Variation in water and thermal energy consumption #12;Objectives Examine potential crops on energy and water balance Temporal and spatial patterns of · Evapotranspiration · Radiation

Jain, Atul K.

142

Water footprint assessment of crop production in Shaanxi, China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;i Water footprint assessment of crop production in Shaanxi, China Bachelor Thesis Civil, Yangling, China Keywords: Agricultural crops, water footprint, Shaanxi province, CROPWAT #12;ii #12;iii ABSTRACT The water footprint, introduced by professor A.Y. Hoekstra, is an indicator of freshwater use

Vellekoop, Michel

143

Introducing the Canadian Crop Yield Forecaster Aston Chipanshi1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for crop yield forecasting and risk analysis. Using the Census Agriculture Region (CAR) as the unit Climate Decision Support and Adaptation, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, 1011, Innovation Blvd, Saskatoon, SK S7V 1B7, Canada The Canadian Crop Yield Forecaster (CCYF) is a statistical modelling tool

Miami, University of

144

Bioenergy crop productivity and potential climate change mitigation from marginal lands in the United States: An  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bioenergy crop productivity and potential climate change mitigation from marginal lands bioenergy crops grown on marginal lands in the United States. Two broadly tested cellulosic crops June 2014 Introduction Bioenergy, an important renewable energy produced from biological materials

Zhuang, Qianlai

145

May 27, 1996 Paul Gepts 1 The Crop of the DayThe Crop of the Day  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

://monsterbit.com/touch/greentea.html: Touchstone - Green tea http://newcrop.hort.purdue.edu/hort/newcrops/Crops/Tea: New Crops (Purdue U.): Tea million lbs. ­ green: 12 ­ oolong: 2 ­ jasmine: 0.5 Biggest suppliers? Argentina (33% of black tea), China. Three types of tea derived from Camellia sinensis: green, black, and oolong tea. ­ For green tea, leaves

Gepts, Paul

146

Residual stress in nanocrystalline nickel tungsten electrodeposits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Characterizing the residual stress of thick nanocrystalline electrodeposits poses several unique challenges due to their fine grain structure, thickness distribution, and matte surface. We employ a three-dimensional ...

Ziebell, Tiffany D. (Tiffany Dawn)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

SAR impulse response with residual chirps.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Linear Frequency-Modulated (LFM) chirp is a function with unit amplitude and quadratic phase characteristic. In a focused Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) image, a residual chirp is undesired for targets of interest, as it coarsens the manifested resolution. However, for undesired spurious signals, a residual chirp is often advantageous because it spreads the energy and thereby diminishes its peak value. In either case, a good understanding of the effects of a residual LFM chirp on a SAR Impulse Response (IPR) is required to facilitate system analysis and design. This report presents an analysis of the effects of a residual chirp on the IPR. As reference, there is a rich body of publications on various aspects of LFM chirps. A quick search reveals a plethora of articles, going back to the early 1950s. We mention here purely as trivia one of the earlier analysis papers on this waveform by Klauder, et al.

Doerry, Armin Walter

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

E-Print Network 3.0 - annual traditional crops Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

What Will Change Supply... Demand of Biofuels? Traditional Crops Perennials Changing Markets Higher Market Values More Land Use 12... cropping land area of 3.7 billion...

149

E-Print Network 3.0 - affecting lilium crops Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Energy 29 Cover Crops for Conservation Tillage Systems Summary: -third) and side- dressing (two-thirds). Cover crops also may be affected by the same chemical and physical...

150

Lignin and carbon transformation in roots of maize and mixed perennial biofuel crops.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Perennial species are being explored as biofuel crops alternative to maize. In this study, fertilized and unfertilized mixed perennial prairie crops were compared with a… (more)

Rivas, Fritzie

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Mobilisation of arsenic from bauxite residue (red mud) affected soils: Effect of pH and redox conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). Typically, it comprises residual iron oxides, quartz, sodium aluminosilicates, titanium dioxide, calciumMobilisation of arsenic from bauxite residue (red mud) affected soils: Effect of pH and redox elements, including arsenic. Aerobic and anaer- obic batch experiments were prepared using soils from near

Burke, Ian

152

An analysis of producing ethanol and electric power from woody residues and agricultural crops in East Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are also investigated. The research analyzes the key indicators involved with economic costs and benefits, environmental and social impacts. The bioenergy production possibilities considered here were biofeedstock supported electric power and cellulosic...

Ismayilova, Rubaba Mammad

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

153

Functional Genomics of Drought Tolerance in Bioenergy Crops  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the predicted trends in climate change, drought will increasingly impose a grand challenge to biomass production. Most of the bioenergy crops have some degree of drought susceptibility with low water-use efficiency (WUE). It is imperative to improve drought tolerance and WUE in bioenergy crops for sustainable biomass production in arid and semi-arid regions with minimal water input. Genetics and functional genomics can play a critical role in generating knowledge to inform and aid genetic improvement of drought tolerance in bioenergy crops. The molecular aspect of drought response has been extensively investigated in model plants like Arabidopsis, yet our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying drought tolerance in bioenergy crops are limited. Crops exhibit various responses to drought stress depending on species and genotype. A rational strategy for studying drought tolerance in bioenergy crops is to translate the knowledge from model plants and pinpoint the unique features associated with individual species and genotypes. In this review, we summarize the general knowledge about drought responsive pathways in plants, with a focus on the identification of commonality and specialty in drought responsive mechanisms among different species and/or genotypes. We describe the genomic resources developed for bioenergy crops and discuss genetic and epigenetic regulation of drought responses. We also examine comparative and evolutionary genomics to leverage the ever-increasing genomics resources and provide new insights beyond what has been known from studies on individual species. Finally, we outline future exploration of drought tolerance using the emerging new technologies.

Yin, Hengfu [ORNL; Chen, Rick [ORNL; Yang, Jun [ORNL; Weston, David [ORNL; Chen, Jay [ORNL; Muchero, Wellington [ORNL; Ye, Ning [ORNL; Tschaplinski, Timothy J [ORNL; Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL; Cheng, Zong-Ming [ORNL; Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL; Yang, Xiaohan [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Development of a farm-firm modelling system for evaluation of herbaceous energy crops. Final project report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A complete analysis is performed to simulate biomass production incorporated into a realistic whole farm situation, including or replacing a typical crop mix. Representative farms are constructed to accommodate such simulation. Four management systems are simulated for each firm, with each simulation depicting a different crop mix and/or use of different farming technologies and production methods. The first simulation was a base farm plan in which the operator would maintain the historical crop mix for the area, participate in all price support programs, and not participate in either a conservative reserve or a biomass production program. In the second simulation, the operator would again maintain the historical crop mix, would not participate in a conservation reserve or biomass production program, and would be ineligible to participate in any price support system. The third simulation introduced the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) and included participation in all price support programs. The fourth simulation introduced a biomass crop production enterprise (switchgrass) as an alternative to enrolling highly erodible cropland in the CRP and allowed participation in price support programs. Simulations were made for three farms, two in West Tennessee and on in South Georgia. Results indicate that erosion is likely to be reduced more by the diversion of cropland to permanent vegetative cover on farms similar to the more highly erodible West Tennessee farms than on the less erodible Tift County, Georgia farm. Equivalent reductions in erosion rates result from entering highly erodible cropland in the CRP and from production of switchgrass as a biomass energy crop. Both switchgrass and CRP farm plans result in decreased net returns from the base plan, although the biomass farm plans are, in general, more profitable than the CRP plans.

English, B.C.; Alexander, R.R.; Loewen, K.H.; Coady, S.A.; Cole, G.V.; Goodman, W.R. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Agricultural Economics and Rural Sociology

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Canopy hot-spot as crop identifier  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Illuminating any reflective rough or structured surface by a directional light source results in an angular reflectance distribution that shows a narrow peak in the direction of retro-reflection. This is called the Heiligenschein or hot-spot of vegetation canopies and is caused by mutual shading of leaves. The angular intensity distribution of the hot-spot, its brightness and slope, are therefore indicators of the plant's geometry. We propose the use of hot-spot characteristics as crop identifiers in satellite remote sensing because the canopy hot-spot carries information about plant stand architecture that is more distinctive for different plant species than, for instance, their spectral reflectance characteristics. A simple three-dimensional Monte Carlo/ray tracing model and an analytic two-dimensional model are developed to estimate the angular distribution of the hot-spot as a function of the size of the plant leaves. The results show that the brightness-distribution and slope of the hot-spot change distinctively for different leaf sizes indicating a much more peaked maximum for the smaller leaves.

Gerstl, S.A.W.; Simmer, C.; Powers, B.J.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Using sludge on land raises more than crops  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Applying sludge to croplands has been one solution to the dilemma of accumulating sewage. At the present time, approximately 25 percent of all sludge disposal programs are conducted as land application, specifically land reclamation and agricultural utilization. The application of sludge to croplands is developing from a small and scattered program into a large-scaled program because of the prohibition of ocean dumping of sludge, increased costs for incineration of sludge and its pollution control, and an increasing national production of over 280 million tons/yr of wet sludge. Agricultural utilization of sewage sludge has several notable benefits including the recycling of essential and trace nutrients, improvement of marginal soil with organic matter, increased crop yield, and direct costs comparable to commercial fertilizers. However, cropland utilization of sewage sludge may involve risks if proper management is not followed. Besides the risk of metal contamination of soil and plants which has received considerable notoriety, the overall environmental impact of sludge application programs must also consider the public health hazards of nitrate (Ntheta/sub 3/) pollution and the spread of pathogenic (disease-causing) organisms, and any odor nuisance which may be associated with these programs.

Gerardi, M.H.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Engineering Enzymes in Energy Crops: Conditionally Activated Enzymes Expressed in Cellulosic Energy Crops  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Enzymes are required to break plant biomass down into the fermentable sugars that are used to create biofuel. Currently, costly enzymes must be added to the biofuel production process. Engineering crops to already contain these enzymes will reduce costs and produce biomass that is more easily digested. In fact, enzyme costs alone account for $0.50-$0.75/gallon of the cost of a biomass-derived biofuel like ethanol. Agrivida is genetically engineering plants to contain high concentrations of enzymes that break down cell walls. These enzymes can be “switched on” after harvest so they won’t damage the plant while it’s growing.

None

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

158

Reducing crop injury from soil-applied herbicides  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the rotational crop can be seeded Labeled Rotation Restriction Herbicide Peas, Lentils, Chickpeas Canola, Mustard ­ Oilseeds = canola, flax, sunflower, camelina ­ Pulses = pea, lentil, chickpea, fenugreek ­ Cereals = spring

Maxwell, Bruce D.

159

BY HOW MUCH CAN RESIDUAL MINIMIZATION ACCELERATE THE CONVERGENCE OF ORTHOGONAL RESIDUAL METHODS?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Examples of such pairs are the conjugate gradient (CG) and the conjugate residual (CR) methods, the full-minimal residual (QMR) methods. Also the pairs consisting of the (bi)conjugate gradient squared (CGS, iterative method, Krylov space method, conjugate gradient method, biconjugate gradient method, CG, CGNE

Gutknecht, Martin H.

160

Optimal Cropping Strategies Considering Risk: Texas Trans-Pecos.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

trials. The EPIC (Erosion Productivity Impact Calculator) generalized crop growth model, originally developed by the U.S. Department of Agricul ture (Williams et al., 1984a), was used to develop yield distribu tions for selected row crops and various... ous facets of this study. Their contributions added greatly to the depth and scope of this effort. Numerous other individuals contributed valuable time and energy. James (Jimmy) Williams of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Blacklands Research...

Ellis, John R.; Lacewell, Ronald D.; Moore, Jaroy; Richardson, James

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including crop residue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Prices include compostable serviceware and linen tablecloths  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

APPETIZERS Prices include compostable serviceware and linen tablecloths for the food tables.ucdavis.edu. BUTTERNUT SQUASH & BLACK BEAN ENCHILADAS #12;BUFFETS Prices include compostable serviceware and linen

California at Davis, University of

162

FLIGHTLESS GIANT CANADA GOOSE DEPREDATION ABATEMENT AND DIGESTIBILITY OF SELECTED CROPS IN SOUTH DAKOTA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FLIGHTLESS GIANT CANADA GOOSE DEPREDATION ABATEMENT AND DIGESTIBILITY OF SELECTED CROPS IN SOUTH DEPREDATION ABATEMENT AND DIGESTIBILITY OF SELECTED CROPS IN SOUTH DAKOTA This thesis is approved DEPREDATION ABATEMENT AND DIGESTIBILITY OF SELECTED CROPS IN SOUTH DAKOTA Christopher J. Flann 1999 v Crop

163

Residual oil conversion in Ashland FCC Units  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ashland Petroleum Company is a production-poor refining and marketing company. A company must have refining flexibility to compete in today's crude and marketing situation. Ashland has adopted a dual approach to achieving the required refining flexibility: development and construction of the RCC process, and development of techniques to practice residual oil conversion in Ashland FCC units. This paper discusses the operating techniques Ashland has used to allow residual oil conversion to be practiced in their present day FCC's and shows some of the yields which have been achieved.

Barger, D.F.; Miller, C.B.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Residual dust charges in discharge afterglow  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An on-ground measurement of dust-particle residual charges in the afterglow of a dusty plasma was performed in a rf discharge. An upward thermophoretic force was used to balance the gravitational force. It was found that positively charged, negatively charged, and neutral dust particles coexisted for more than 1 min after the discharge was switched off. The mean residual charge for 200-nm-radius particles was measured. The dust particle mean charge is about -5e at a pressure of 1.2 mbar and about -3e at a pressure of 0.4 mbar.

Coueedel, L.; Mikikian, M.; Boufendi, L.; Samarian, A. A. [GREMI - Groupe de Recherches sur l'Energetique des Milieux Ionises, CNRS/Universite d'Orleans, 14 rue d'Issoudun, 45067 Orleans Cedex 2 (France); School of Physics A28, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

165

Integrating Cover Crops into Strip-Till Cropping Systems in a Semi-Arid Environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Jensen and Schjoerring, 2001). Accumulation of soil organic matter can increase soil organic C (West and Post, 2002). Therefore, establishment and preservation of leguminous residue can also increase carbon sequestration (Reeves, 1997) along with nutrient availability... ingredient a.e. Acid equivalents CP Crude protein DM Dry matter g Gram ha Hectare kg Kilogram MAP Mean annual precipitation MAT Mean annual temperature NDF Neutral detergent fiber NO3-N Nitrate-nitrogen SOC Soil organic carbon vii...

Noland, Reagan Lee

2014-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

166

Using Legumes to Enhance Sustainability of Sorghum Cropping Systems in the East Texas Pineywoods Ecoregion: Impacts on Soil Nitrogen, Soil Carbon, and Crop Yields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

bicolor (L.) Moench], high-biomass sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench], and annual forage cropping systems. These studies quantified legume soil moisture usage and C and N contributions to the soil and subsequent crop yields in East Texas. Primary...

Neely, Clark B

2013-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

167

Automatic Methods for Predicting Functionally Important Residues  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pazos and Alfonso Valencia* Protein Design Group National Center for Biotechnology, Cantoblanco Madrid of protein families into subfamilies in the search for those positions that could have some functional families, testing the statistical meaning of the Tree-determinant residues predicted by three different

Pazos, Florencio

168

Chemical Stabilization of Hanford Tank Residual Waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three different chemical treatment methods were tested for their ability to stabilize residual waste from Hanford tank C-202 for reducing contaminant release (Tc, Cr, and U in particular). The three treatment methods tested were lime addition [Ca(OH)2], an in-situ Ceramicrete waste form based on chemically bonded phosphate ceramics, and a ferrous iron/goethite treatment. These approaches rely on formation of insoluble forms of the contaminants of concern (lime addition and ceramicrete) and chemical reduction followed by co-precipitation (ferrous iron/goethite incorporation treatment). The results have demonstrated that release of the three most significant mobile contaminants of concern from tank residual wastes can be dramatically reduced after treatment compared to contact with simulated grout porewater without treatment. For uranium, all three treatments methods reduced the leachable uranium concentrations by well over three orders of magnitude. In the case of uranium and technetium, released concentrations were well below their respective MCLs for the wastes tested. For tank C-202 residual waste, chromium release concentrations were above the MCL but were considerably reduced relative to untreated tank waste. This innovative approach has the potential to revolutionize Hanford’s tank retrieval process, by allowing larger volumes of residual waste to be left in tanks while providing an acceptably low level of risk with respect to contaminant release that is protective of the environment and human health. Such an approach could enable DOE to realize significant cost savings through streamlined retrieval and closure operations.

Cantrell, Kirk J.; Um, Wooyong; Williams, Benjamin D.; Bowden, Mark E.; Gartman, Brandy N.; Lukens, Wayne W.; Buck, Edgar C.; Mausolf, Edward J.

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Climate impacts on agriculture: Implications for crop production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Changes in temperature, CO2, and precipitation under the scenarios of climate change for the next 30 years present a challenge to crop production. This review focuses on the impact of temperature, CO2, and ozone on agronomic crops and the implications for crop production. Understanding these implications for agricultural crops is critical for developing cropping systems resilient to stresses induced by climate change. There is variation among crops in their response to CO2, temperature, and precipitation changes and, with the regional differences in predicted climate, a situation is created in which the responses will be further complicated. For example, the temperature effects on soybean could potentially cause yield reductions of 2.4% in the South but an increase of 1.7% in the Midwest. The frequency of years when temperatures exceed thresholds for damage during critical growth stages is likely to increase for some crops and regions. The increase in CO2 contributes significantly to enhanced plant growth and improved water use efficiency; however, there may be a downscaling of these positive impacts due to higher temperatures plants will experience during their growth cycle. A challenge is to understand the interactions of the changing climatic parameters because of the interactions among temperature, CO2, and precipitation on plant growth and development and also on the biotic stresses of weeds, insects, and diseases. Agronomists will have to consider the variations in temperature and precipitation as part of the production system if they are to ensure the food security required by an ever increasing population.

Hatfield, Jerry L.; Boote, Kenneth J.; Kimball, B. A.; Ziska, Lewis A.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Ort, Don; Thomson, Allison M.; Wolfe, David W.

2011-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

170

Evaluation of low-residue soldering for military and commercial applications: A report from the Low-Residue Soldering Task Force  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The LRSTF combined the efforts of industry, military, and government to evaluate low-residue soldering processes for military and commercial applications. These processes were selected for evaluation because they provide a means for the military to support the presidential mandate while producing reliable hardware at a lower cost. This report presents the complete details and results of a testing program conducted by the LRSTF to evaluate low-residue soldering for printed wiring assemblies. A previous informal document provided details of the test plan used in this evaluation. Many of the details of that test plan are contained in this report. The test data are too massive to include in this report, however, these data are available on disk as Excel spreadsheets upon request. The main purpose of low-residue soldering is to eliminate waste streams during the manufacturing process.

Iman, R.L.; Anderson, D.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Burress, R.V. [SEHO (United States)] [and others

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Molybdenum uptake by forage crops grown on sewage sludge -- Amended soils in the field and greenhouse  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Molybdenum (Mo) is a plant-available element in soils that can adversely affect the health of farm animals. There is a need for more information on its uptake into forage crops from waste materials, such as sewage sludge, applied to agricultural land. Field and greenhouse experiments with several crops grown on long-term sewage sludge-amended soils as well as soils recently amended with dewatered (DW) and alkaline-stabilized (ALK) sludges indicated that Mo supplied from sludge is readily taken up by legumes in particular. Excessive uptake into red clover (Trifolium pratense L.) was seen in a soil that had been heavily amended with sewage sludge 20 yr earlier, where the soil contained about 3 mg Mo/kg soil, three times the background soil concentration. The greenhouse and field studies indicated that Mo can have a long residual availability in sludge-amended soils. The effect of sludge application was to decrease Cu to Mo ratios in legume forages, canola (Brassica napus var. napus) and soybeans [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] below the recommended limit of 2:1 for ruminant diets, a consequence of high bioavailability of Mo and low uptake of Cu added in sludge. Molybdenum uptake coefficients (UCs) for ALK sludge were higher than for DW sludge, presumably due to the greater solubility of Mo measured in the more alkaline sludges and soils. Based on these UCs, it is tentatively recommended that cumulative Mo loadings on forages grown on nonacid soils should not exceed 1.0 kg/ha from ALK sludge or 4.0 kg/ha from DW sludge.

McBride, M.B.; Richards, B.K.; Steenhuis, T.; Spiers, G.

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Method for using global optimization to the estimation of surface-consistent residual statics  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An efficient method for generating residual statics corrections to compensate for surface-consistent static time shifts in stacked seismic traces. The method includes a step of framing the residual static corrections as a global optimization problem in a parameter space. The method also includes decoupling the global optimization problem involving all seismic traces into several one-dimensional problems. The method further utilizes a Stochastic Pijavskij Tunneling search to eliminate regions in the parameter space where a global minimum is unlikely to exist so that the global minimum may be quickly discovered. The method finds the residual statics corrections by maximizing the total stack power. The stack power is a measure of seismic energy transferred from energy sources to receivers.

Reister, David B. (Knoxville, TN); Barhen, Jacob (Oak Ridge, TN); Oblow, Edward M. (Knoxville, TN)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

The National Nuclear Laboratory's Approach to Processing Mixed Wastes and Residues - 13080  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Nuclear Laboratory (NNL) treats a wide variety of materials produced as by-products of the nuclear fuel cycle, mostly from uranium purification and fuel manufacture but also including materials from uranium enrichment and from the decommissioning of obsolete plants. In the context of this paper, treatment is defined as recovery of uranium or other activity from residues, the recycle of uranium to the fuel cycle or preparation for long term storage and the final disposal or discharge to the environment of the remainder of the material. NNL's systematic but flexible approach to residue assessment and treatment is described in this paper. The approach typically comprises up to five main phases. The benefits of a systematic approach to waste and residue assessments and processing are described in this paper with examples used to illustrate each phase of work. Benefits include early identification of processing routes or processing issues and the avoidance of investment in inappropriate and costly plant or processes. (authors)

Greenwood, Howard; Docrat, Tahera; Allinson, Sarah J.; Coppersthwaite, Duncan P.; Sultan, Ruqayyah; May, Sarah [National Nuclear Laboratory, Springfields, Preston, UK, PR4 0XJ (United Kingdom)] [National Nuclear Laboratory, Springfields, Preston, UK, PR4 0XJ (United Kingdom)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Crop Management Factors: What is Important?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Various management factors, including specific practices and the persistence of those practices over time, can greatly influence farm profitability. Some of those factors are managing for high yield or low production cost, as well as adoption...

Kastens, Terry L.; Dhuyvetter, Kevin C.; Nivens, Heather; Klinefelter, Danny A.

1999-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

175

A Practical Model for Mobile, Residual, and Entrapped NAPL in...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

A Practical Model for Mobile, Residual, and Entrapped NAPL in Water-Wet Porous Media. A Practical Model for Mobile, Residual, and Entrapped NAPL in Water-Wet Porous Media....

176

In-situ method for treating residual sodium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A unique process for deactivating residual sodium in Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) systems which uses humidified (but not saturated) carbon dioxide at ambient temperature and pressure to convert residual sodium into solid sodium bicarbonate.

Sherman, Steven R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Henslee, S. Paul (Idaho Falls, ID)

2005-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

177

Testing regression models with residuals as data by Xia Hua.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract In polynomial regression ... . In this thesis, I developed a residual based test, the turning point test for residuals, which tests the hypothesis that the kth order polynomial regression holds with ... while the ...

Hua, Xia, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

NEURAL NETWORK RESIDUAL STOCHASTIC COSIMULATION FOR ENVIRONMENTAL DATA ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on radioactive soil contamination from the Chernobyl fallout. Introduction The problem of analysing environmentalNEURAL NETWORK RESIDUAL STOCHASTIC COSIMULATION FOR ENVIRONMENTAL DATA ANALYSIS V. Demyanov, M original method of stochastic simulation of environmental data -- Neural Network Residual Sequential

179

In-Situ Method for Treating Residual Sodium  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A unique process for deactivating residual sodium in Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) systems which uses humidified (but not saturated) carbon dioxide at ambient temperature and pressure to convert residual sodium into solid sodium bicarbonate.

Sherman, Steven R.; Henslee, S. Paul

2005-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

180

1-D Transforms for the Motion Compensation Residual  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Transforms used in image coding are also commonly used to compress prediction residuals in video coding. Prediction residuals have different spatial characteristics from images, and it is useful to develop transforms that ...

Kamisli, Fatih

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including crop residue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Estimating Residual Solids Volume In Underground Storage Tanks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site liquid waste system consists of multiple facilities to safely receive and store legacy radioactive waste, treat, and permanently dispose waste. The large underground storage tanks and associated equipment, known as the 'tank farms', include a complex interconnected transfer system which includes underground transfer pipelines and ancillary equipment to direct the flow of waste. The waste in the tanks is present in three forms: supernatant, sludge, and salt. The supernatant is a multi-component aqueous mixture, while sludge is a gel-like substance which consists of insoluble solids and entrapped supernatant. The waste from these tanks is retrieved and treated as sludge or salt. The high level (radioactive) fraction of the waste is vitrified into a glass waste form, while the low-level waste is immobilized in a cementitious grout waste form called saltstone. Once the waste is retrieved and processed, the tanks are closed via removing the bulk of the waste, chemical cleaning, heel removal, stabilizing remaining residuals with tailored grout formulations and severing/sealing external penetrations. The comprehensive liquid waste disposition system, currently managed by Savannah River Remediation, consists of 1) safe storage and retrieval of the waste as it is prepared for permanent disposition; (2) definition of the waste processing techniques utilized to separate the high-level waste fraction/low-level waste fraction; (3) disposition of LLW in saltstone; (4) disposition of the HLW in glass; and (5) closure state of the facilities, including tanks. This paper focuses on determining the effectiveness of waste removal campaigns through monitoring the volume of residual solids in the waste tanks. Volume estimates of the residual solids are performed by creating a map of the residual solids on the waste tank bottom using video and still digital images. The map is then used to calculate the volume of solids remaining in the waste tank. The ability to accurately determine a volume is a function of the quantity and quality of the waste tank images. Currently, mapping is performed remotely with closed circuit video cameras and still photograph cameras due to the hazardous environment. There are two methods that can be used to create a solids volume map. These methods are: liquid transfer mapping / post transfer mapping and final residual solids mapping. The task is performed during a transfer because the liquid level (which is a known value determined by a level measurement device) is used as a landmark to indicate solids accumulation heights. The post transfer method is primarily utilized after the majority of waste has been removed. This method relies on video and still digital images of the waste tank after the liquid transfer is complete to obtain the relative height of solids across a waste tank in relation to known and usable landmarks within the waste tank (cooling coils, column base plates, etc.). In order to accurately monitor solids over time across various cleaning campaigns, and provide a technical basis to support final waste tank closure, a consistent methodology for volume determination has been developed and implemented at SRS.

Clark, Jason L.; Worthy, S. Jason; Martin, Bruce A.; Tihey, John R.

2014-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

182

Net Taxable Gasoline Gallons (Including Aviation Gasoline)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Net Taxable Gasoline Gallons (Including Aviation Gasoline) Period 2000 2001 (2) 2002 2003 2004 "gross" to "net" , was deemed impractical. (5) This report replaces the Gross Taxable Gasoline Gallons (Including Aviation Gasoline) report which will not be produced after December 2002. (6) The November 2007

183

RESIDUAL STRESS AND YOUNG'S MODULUS MEASUREMENT OF CAPACITIVE MICROMACHINED ULTRASONIC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

deposition technique yields residual stress of around 100 MPa and Young's modulus of around 300 GPa. Keywords's modulus, Poisson's ratio, and residual stress of the deposited thin films. In this paper, we propose a newRESIDUAL STRESS AND YOUNG'S MODULUS MEASUREMENT OF CAPACITIVE MICROMACHINED ULTRASONIC TRANSDUCER

Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T. "Pierre"

184

SUPERLAYER RESIDUAL STRESS EFFECT ON THE INDENTATION ADHESION MEASUREMENTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as a function of film thickness and residual stress. These films were sputter deposited onto thermally oxidized deposition parameters were controlled to produce either a compressive residual stress of 1 GPa or a tensile in a study of compressive and tensile residual stresses created during sputter deposition of tungsten

Volinsky, Alex A.

185

Welding residual stresses in ferritic power plant steels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REVIEW Welding residual stresses in ferritic power plant steels J. A. Francis*1 , H. K. D. H require therefore, an accounting of residual stresses, which often are introduced during welding. To do in the estimation of welding residual stresses in austenitic stainless steels. The progress has been less convincing

Cambridge, University of

186

2008 GRASS ENERGY CROPS INFORMATION SHEET #1 Introduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 2008 GRASS ENERGY CROPS INFORMATION SHEET #1 Introduction The purpose of this information sheet are considering planting perennial grasses for energy uses, either on their own or rented land. The bioenergy-disciplinary renewable energy research effort supported by the New York Farm Viability Institute (NYFVI), Cornell

Pawlowski, Wojtek

187

Advanced Cover Cropping -Concepts and Application Friday, March 16, 2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Conservation Association 689 River Road, Charlestown, NH Please join us for a free farmer-to-farmer educational. This workshop will feature Dr. Eric Sideman from the Maine Organic Farmers & Gardeners' Association (MOFGA) presenting on the principles of effective crop rotations. This will be followed by two local farmers, Pooh

New Hampshire, University of

188

Purpose-designed Crop Plants for Biofuels BIOENERGY PROGRAM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Purpose-designed Crop Plants for Biofuels BIOENERGY PROGRAM The Texas AgriLife Research Center for the biofuels industry. This program recognizes that the ideal combination of traits required for an economically and energetically sustainable biofuels industry does not yet exist in a single plant spe- cies

189

Crop Production Variability and U.S. Ethanol Mandates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

projection model – Iowa State University and the University of Missouri FASOM Forest and Agricultural Sector Optimization Model GAMS General Algebraic Modeling System GDP Gross Domestic Product GHG Greenhouse Gas NASS National Agricultural Statistics... Figure 11. 2015 U.S. corn price given 2012 drought sensitivity to marginal decreases in crop ethanol mandates ............................................................... 65 Figure 12. An empirical distribution of yearly corn production...

Jones, Jason P.

2014-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

190

Less Acres and Variable Yield Mark Ohio's Crops  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of that production was over $2 billion. In 2003 the top producing counties were: Corn Soybean Wheat Hay 1. Darke 1 recommendations for soybeans, corn, wheat, and alfalfa are also printed separately (Tri-State Fertilizer are available at county Extension of- fices and are also available on the Internet at the Ohio Agronomic Crops

Jones, Michelle

191

Miscanthus: A Promising Biomass Crop EMILY A. HEATON,*,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University, Ames, IA, USA { Energy Biosciences Institute, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL, USA { Department of Crop Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL, USA Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana

David, Mark B.

192

Control Strategies for Late Blight in the Alaska Potato Crop  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Control Strategies for Late Blight in the Alaska Potato Crop PMC-00339 Late blight is a devastating disease of both tomatoes and potatoes that is occasionally found in Alaska. There is no "cure" for the disease and there are very few re- sistant varieties of potatoes, so disease management strategies

Wagner, Diane

193

LIBERTY TOLERANT COTTON: WEED CONTROL AND CROP TOLERANCE Brent Burns  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LIBERTY TOLERANT COTTON: WEED CONTROL AND CROP TOLERANCE Brent Burns Texas Tech University Lubbock Acres planted with herbicide-tolerant cotton varieties have steadily increased since their introduction in 1995. Recently, the bar gene was introduced into Coker 312 cotton plants for tolerance to Liberty

Mukhtar, Saqib

194

EE Regional Technology Roadmap Includes comparison  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EE Regional Technology Roadmap Includes comparison against 6th Power Plan (Update cyclically Data Clearinghouse BPA/RTF NEEA/Regional Programs Group Update Regional EE Technology Roadmap Lighting

195

DIDACTICAL HOLOGRAPHIC EXHIBIT INCLUDING (HOLOGRAPHIC TELEVISION)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DIDACTICAL HOLOGRAPHIC EXHIBIT INCLUDING HoloTV (HOLOGRAPHIC TELEVISION) José J. Lunazzi , DanielCampinasSPBrasil Abstract: Our Institute of Physics exposes since 1980 didactical exhibitions of holography in Brazil where

de Aguiar, Marcus A. M.

196

Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material, such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

197

Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

198

LCA Applied to Perennial Cropping Systems: a Review Focused on the Farm Stage C. Bessou 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, grape fruit, Jatropha oil, kiwi fruit, palm oil, olive, pear, and sugarcane. These papers were with a comprehensive inventory of crop managements and field emissions over several years. · Conclusions: According crops, agroforestry, agricultural inventory, critical review, methodological development

Boyer, Edmond

199

Research and adoption of biotechnology strategies could improve California fruit and nut crops  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Production for Selected Fruit and Tree Nuts, by State,production of top 10 woody fruit and nut crops, 2010. Cropsfor top 10 California woody fruit and nut crops, 2010 Grape*

Haroldsen, Victor M; Paulino, Gabriel; Chi-ham, Cecilia; Bennett, Alan B

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

CROP SCIENCE, VOL. 51, JANUARYFEBRUARY 2011 323 Turfgrass quality is evaluated by integrating factors of can-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

area index; NDVI, normalized difference vegetation index. Published in Crop Sci. 51:323­332 (2011). doiCROP SCIENCE, VOL. 51, JANUARY­FEBRUARY 2011 323 RESEARCH Turfgrass quality is evaluated

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including crop residue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Comparison of chemically-enhanced phytoextraction by arable crops and short rotation coppice with  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Comparison of chemically-enhanced phytoextraction by arable crops and short rotation coppice biomass arable crops, and the use of short rotation coppice species (McGrath et al., 2001). Although much

Crout, Neil

202

Ashot Minasyan SQ-universality and residual properties. . . -slide #1 The SQ-universality and residual properties of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ashot Minasyan SQ-universality and residual properties. . . - slide #1 The SQ-universality Main Results Ashot Minasyan SQ-universality and residual properties. . . - slide #2 SQ-universality and residual properties. . . - slide #2 SQ-universality A group G is called SQ-universal if any countable group

Minasyan, Ashot

203

Technoeconomic Comparison of Biofuels: Ethanol, Methanol, and Gasoline from Gasification of Woody Residues (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation provides a technoeconomic comparison of three biofuels - ethanol, methanol, and gasoline - produced by gasification of woody biomass residues. The presentation includes a brief discussion of the three fuels evaluated; discussion of equivalent feedstock and front end processes; discussion of back end processes for each fuel; process comparisons of efficiencies, yields, and water usage; and economic assumptions and results, including a plant gate price (PGP) for each fuel.

Tarud, J.; Phillips, S.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Description of the prototype diagnostic residual gas analyzer for ITER  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The diagnostic residual gas analyzer (DRGA) system to be used during ITER tokamak operation is being designed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to measure fuel ratios (deuterium and tritium), fusion ash (helium), and impurities in the plasma. The eventual purpose of this instrument is for machine protection, basic control, and physics on ITER. Prototyping is ongoing to optimize the hardware setup and measurement capabilities. The DRGA prototype is comprised of a vacuum system and measurement technologies that will overlap to meet ITER measurement requirements. Three technologies included in this diagnostic are a quadrupole mass spectrometer, an ion trap mass spectrometer, and an optical penning gauge that are designed to document relative and absolute gas concentrations.

Younkin, T. R., E-mail: tyounkin@gatech.edu [Fusion and Materials for Nuclear Systems Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6169 (United States); Georgia Institute of Technology, Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering – Nuclear and Radiological Engineering Program, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Biewer, T. M.; Klepper, C. C.; Marcus, C. [Fusion and Materials for Nuclear Systems Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6169 (United States)

2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

205

Residual Stress Determination for A Ferritic Steel Weld Plate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of this experiment is to demonstrate the capability of neutron diffraction technique to reproducibly map residual strains in a ferritic steel weld. The objective includes the identification of corrections for variations in metal composition due to the welding process which produces changes in lattice parameter that are not due to mechanical effects. The second objective is to develop and demonstrate a best practice for neutron diffraction strain mapping of steel welds. The appropriate coordinate system for the measurement of a weld, which is strongly distorted from planar geometry, has to be defined. The coordinate system is important in determining the procedures for mounting and positioning of the weld so that mapping details, especially in regions of high gradients, can be conveniently inter-compared between laboratories.

Wang, D.-Q.; Hubbard, C.R.; Spooner, S.

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Evaluation of filter media for clarification of partially dissolved residues containing plutonium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A common process in the chemical industry employs the leaching of a desirable component from an insoluble substrate, followed by filtration to produce a clarified solution of the desirable component and a discardable residue. The work described here involved evaluating sintered metal filter media for separating dissolved plutonium from undissolved residues generated at various locations owned by the Department of Energy throughout the United States. The work was performed during a six-week assignment at the Savannah River Laboratory as part of a high school science enrichment program conducted in the summer of 1989. The leach step used included dissolving the plutonium-containing solids in a solution of nitric-hydrofluoric acid. To simulate the partial solubility of the actual plutonium-containing residues, a non-radioactive power plant flyash was used. 6 refs., 14 figs., 1 tab.

Foley, E.S.

1989-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

207

Effects of No-Till on Yields as Influenced by Crop and Environmental Factors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Th is research evaluated diff erences in yields and associated downside risk from using no-till and tillage practices. Yields from 442 paired tillage experiments across the United States were evaluated with respect to six crops and environmental factors including geographic location, annual precipitation, soil texture, and time since conversion from tillage to no-till. Results indicated that mean yields for sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench] and wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) with no-till were greater than with tillage. In addition, no-till tended to produce similar or greater mean yields than tillage for crops grown on loamy soils in the Southern Seaboard and Mississippi Portal regions. A warmer and more humid climate and warmer soils in these regions relative to the Heartland, Basin and Range, and Fruitful Rim regions appear to favor no-till on loamy soils. With the exception of corn (Zea mays L.) and cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) in the Southern Seaboard region, no-till performed poorly on sandy soils. Crops grown in the Southern Seaboard were less likely to have lower no-till yields than tillage yields on loamy soils and thus had lower downside yield risk than other farm resource regions. Consistent with mean yield results, soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] and wheat grown on sandy soils in the Southern Seaboard region using no-till had larger downside yield risks than when produced with no-till on loamy soils. Th e key fi ndings of this study support the hypothesis that soil and climate factors impact no-till yields relative to tillage yields and may be an important factor infl uencing risk and expected return and the adoption of the practice by farmers.

Toliver, Dustin K.; Larson, James A.; Roberts, Roland K.; English, B.C.; De La Torre Ugarte, D. G.; West, Tristram O.

2012-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

208

Economies of size and other factors influencing costs and returns on major U.S. crop farms with implications for debt repayment capacity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ECONOFIIES OF STEP AND OTHER PACTOP+ INFIUENCII1C COSTS AND RETUPoNS ON ILK. IOR U. S. CROP FARMS NITH IMPLICATIONS FOR DEBT REPAYMENT CAPACITY A Thesis Sandra Kay McDonald Submitted to the Graduate Col. lege of Texas A&M University.... S. Crop Farms with Implications For Debt Repayment Capacity (August 1978) Sandra Kay McDonald, B. S. , Texas A&M University Chairman of Advisory Committee: Peter J. Barry This study analyzes several classification variables, including , co...

McDonald, Sandra Kay

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

August 15, 2003 Crop conditions: Peach harvest is underway across the state, generally with good crops being re-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-fighting capabilities. The new "dietary guidance state- ment" unveiled last month informs consumers that "diets ric across the state, generally with good crops being re- ported. Early apple varieties are being harvested, with Gala harvest underway now in southern areas of the state. Early varieties of grapes are being harvested

Ginzel, Matthew

210

Age-Dependent Demographic Rates of the Bioenergy Crop Miscanthus 3 giganteus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- generation biofuels, or from the biomass crops, referred to as second-generation biofuels, cellulosic renewable energy production (Genovesi 2011; Raghu et al. 2006). Biofuels, produced from crops, are a source biofuels or bioen- ergy crops (Jessup 2009). Because of their high yields and cellulose content, perennial

Sims, Gerald K.

211

Crop & Soil Science Seminar Series Mondays at 4:00 pm in Ag Life Sciences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Crop & Soil Science Seminar Series Fall 2013 Mondays at 4:00 pm in Ag Life Sciences 4000 September 30 NO SEMINAR October 7 Dan Sullivan Crop & Soil Science Dept. "Phosphorus: Now and Then" October 14/CSSA/SSSA meetings) November 11 Chris Klatt Crop & Soil Science Dept. "Tracking Microbial Use of C and N

Tullos, Desiree

212

Introduction The bioenergy industry is pursuing low-input crops to be  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Introduction The bioenergy industry is pursuing low-input crops to be grown on marginal lands the unintentional introduction and spread of potentially invasive species. Background Information The bioenergy- generation bioenergy crops are grown specifically for biomass pro- duction. Therefore, bioenergy crops

Liskiewicz, Maciej

213

An integrated biogeochemical and economic analysis of bioenergy crops in the Midwestern United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-specific economic analysis of breakeven prices of bioenergy crop production to assess the biophysical and economicAn integrated biogeochemical and economic analysis of bioenergy crops in the Midwestern United potential of biofuel production in the Midwestern United States. The bioenergy crops considered

Jain, Atul K.

214

Scramjet including integrated inlet and combustor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes a scramjet engine. It comprises: a first surface including an aft facing step; a cowl including: a leading edge and a trailing edge; an upper surface and a lower surface extending between the leading edge and the trailing edge; the cowl upper surface being spaced from and generally parallel to the first surface to define an integrated inlet-combustor therebetween having an inlet for receiving and channeling into the inlet-combustor supersonic inlet airflow; means for injecting fuel into the inlet-combustor at the step for mixing with the supersonic inlet airflow for generating supersonic combustion gases; and further including a spaced pari of sidewalls extending between the first surface to the cowl upper surface and wherein the integrated inlet-combustor is generally rectangular and defined by the sidewall pair, the first surface and the cowl upper surface.

Kutschenreuter, P.H. Jr.; Blanton, J.C.

1992-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

215

cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74-79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli.

Raikhel, Natasha V. (Okemos, MI); Broekaert, Willem F. (Dilbeek, BE); Chua, Nam-Hai (Scarsdale, NY); Kush, Anil (New York, NY)

1999-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

216

CDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74-79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli.

Raikhel, Natasha V. (Okemos, MI); Broekaert, Willem F. (Dilbeek, BE); Chua, Nam-Hai (Scarsdale, NY); Kush, Anil (New York, NY)

1995-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

217

cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74--79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli. 12 figs.

Raikhel, N.V.; Broekaert, W.F.; Chua, N.H.; Kush, A.

1999-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

218

cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1,018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74--79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli. 11 figures.

Raikhel, N.V.; Broekaert, W.F.; Chua, N.H.; Kush, A.

1995-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

219

Electric Power Monthly, August 1990. [Glossary included  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly summaries of electric utility statistics at the national, Census division, and State level. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data includes generation by energy source (coal, oil, gas, hydroelectric, and nuclear); generation by region; consumption of fossil fuels for power generation; sales of electric power, cost data; and unusual occurrences. A glossary is included.

Not Available

1990-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

220

Combination process for upgrading residual oils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes a method for upgrading high boiling residual portions of crude oils comprising metal contaminants, porphyrins, asphaltenes and high molecular weight multi-ring hydrocarbon material. It comprises: charging a high boiling residual portion of crude oil admixed with diluent in contact with suspended upflowing substantially inert fluidizable solids particulate material at an elevated thermal visbreaking temperature in a riser contact zone for a time sufficient to recover therefrom a vaporous hydrocarbon product higher boiling than gasoline partially decarbonized and demetallized to a lower contaminating metals level, quenching the vaporous product of thermal visbreaking below its dew point after separation from solids, charging quenched thermally modified high boiling hydrocarbon product with a crystalline zeolite cracking catalyst under cracking conditions for a hydrocarbon residence time in a riser cracking zone; recovering a hydrocarbon conversion product; separating a combined C{sub 4} minus wet gas product stream of the visbreaking and zeolite catalyst cracking operating to recover a C{sub 3}-C{sub 4} rich fraction separately from a C{sub 2} minus dry gas product fraction, and regenerating the crystalline zeolite contcontaining catalyst.

Busch, L.E.; Walters, P.W.; Zandona, O.

1990-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including crop residue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Energy Consumption of Personal Computing Including Portable  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Consumption of Personal Computing Including Portable Communication Devices Pavel Somavat1 consumption, questions are being asked about the energy contribution of computing equipment. Al- though studies have documented the share of energy consumption by this type of equipment over the years, research

Namboodiri, Vinod

222

Communication in automation, including networking and wireless  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Communication in automation, including networking and wireless Nicholas Kottenstette and Panos J and networking in automation is given. Digital communication fundamentals are reviewed and networked control are presented. 1 Introduction 1.1 Why communication is necessary in automated systems Automated systems use

Antsaklis, Panos

223

Combustion turbine deposition observations from residual and simulated residual oil studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Burning residual oil in utility combustion turbines and the consequent deposition on blades and vanes may adversely affect reliability and operation. Corrosion and deposition data for combustion turbine materials have been obtained through dynamic testing in pressurized passages. The deposition produced by the 1900/sup 0/F (1038/sup 0/C) combustion gases from a simulated and a real residual oil on cooled Udimet 500 surfaces is described. Higher deposition rates for the doped fuel than for the real residual oil raised questions of whether true simulation with this approach can be achieved. Particles 4-8..mu.. m in diameter predominated in the gas stream, with some fraction in the 0.1-12 ..mu.. m range. Deposition rates seemed to be influenced by thermophoretic delivery of small molten particles, tentatively identified as magnesium pyro and metavanadates and free vanadium pentoxide, which may act to bond the larger solid particles arriving by inertial impaction to turbine surfaces. Estimated maintenance intervals for current utility turbines operating with washed and treated residual oil agreed well with field experience.

Whitlow, G.A.; Cohn, A.; Lee, S.Y.; Mulik, P.R.; Sherlock, T.P.; Wenglarz, R.A.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Subterranean barriers including at least one weld  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A subterranean barrier and method for forming same are disclosed, the barrier including a plurality of casing strings wherein at least one casing string of the plurality of casing strings may be affixed to at least another adjacent casing string of the plurality of casing strings through at least one weld, at least one adhesive joint, or both. A method and system for nondestructively inspecting a subterranean barrier is disclosed. For instance, a radiographic signal may be emitted from within a casing string toward an adjacent casing string and the radiographic signal may be detected from within the adjacent casing string. A method of repairing a barrier including removing at least a portion of a casing string and welding a repair element within the casing string is disclosed. A method of selectively heating at least one casing string forming at least a portion of a subterranean barrier is disclosed.

Nickelson, Reva A.; Sloan, Paul A.; Richardson, John G.; Walsh, Stephanie; Kostelnik, Kevin M.

2007-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

225

Completion strategy includes clay and precipitate control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article describes the conditions which are necessary for a successful oil well completion in the Mississippi and Cherokee zones of South Central Kansas. Topics considered include paraffin precipitation, clay swelling and migration, and iron precipitation. Clays in these zones are sensitive to water-base treating fluids and tend to swell and migrate to the well bore, thereby causing permeability damage. The presence of iron in the Mississippi and Cherokee formations has been indicated by cuttings, core samples, and connate water samples.

Sandy, T.; Gardner, G.R.

1985-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

226

Power generation method including membrane separation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for generating electric power, such as at, or close to, natural gas fields. The method includes conditioning natural gas containing C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons and/or acid gas by means of a membrane separation step. This step creates a leaner, sweeter, drier gas, which is then used as combustion fuel to run a turbine, which is in turn used for power generation.

Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Union City, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Rotor assembly including superconducting magnetic coil  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Superconducting coils and methods of manufacture include a superconductor tape wound concentrically about and disposed along an axis of the coil to define an opening having a dimension which gradually decreases, in the direction along the axis, from a first end to a second end of the coil. Each turn of the superconductor tape has a broad surface maintained substantially parallel to the axis of the coil.

Snitchler, Gregory L. (Shrewsbury, MA); Gamble, Bruce B. (Wellesley, MA); Voccio, John P. (Somerville, MA)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Nuclear reactor shield including magnesium oxide  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improvement in nuclear reactor shielding of a type used in reactor applications involving significant amounts of fast neutron flux, the reactor shielding including means providing structural support, neutron moderator material, neutron absorber material and other components as described below, wherein at least a portion of the neutron moderator material is magnesium in the form of magnesium oxide either alone or in combination with other moderator materials such as graphite and iron.

Rouse, Carl A. (Del Mar, CA); Simnad, Massoud T. (La Jolla, CA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Electric power monthly, September 1990. [Glossary included  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide energy decision makers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues. The power plants considered include coal, petroleum, natural gas, hydroelectric, and nuclear power plants. Data are presented for power generation, fuel consumption, fuel receipts and cost, sales of electricity, and unusual occurrences at power plants. Data are compared at the national, Census division, and state levels. 4 figs., 52 tabs. (CK)

Not Available

1990-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

230

Would the heat of an oil pipeline buried 4 feet underground affect ground or surface water temperature or the roots of typical Nebraska crops like corn, soybeans, alfalfa? Would  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

temperature or the roots of typical Nebraska crops like corn, soybeans, alfalfa? Would crop yield likely

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

231

Regional Uptake and Release of Crop Carbon in the United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carbon fixed by agricultural crops in the US creates regional CO2 sinks where it is harvested and regional CO2 sources where it is released back to the atmosphere. The quantity and location of these fluxes differ depending on the annual supply and demand of crop commodities. Data on the harvest of crop biomass, storage, import and export, and on the use of biomass for food, feed, fiber, and fuel were compiled to estimate an annual crop carbon budget for 2000 to 2008. Net sources of CO2 associated with the consumption of crop commodities occurred in the Eastern Uplands, Southern Seaboard, and Fruitful Rim regions. Net sinks associated with the production of crop commodities occurred in the Heartland, Northern Crescent, Northern Great Plains, and Mississippi Portal regions. The national crop carbon budget was balanced to within 0.7 to 6.6% yr-1 during the period of this analysis.

West, Tristram O.; Bandaru, Varaprasad; Brandt, Craig C.; Schuh, A.E.; Ogle, S.M.

2011-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

232

Biomass fuel from woody crops for electric power generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses the biologic, environmental, economic, and operational issues associated with growing wood crops in managed plantations. Information on plantation productivity, environmental issues and impacts, and costs is drawn from DOE`s Biofuels Feedstock Development as well as commercial operations in the US and elsewhere. The particular experiences of three countries--Brazil, the Philippines, and Hawaii (US)--are discussed in considerable detail.

Perlack, R.D.; Wright, L.L.; Huston, M.A.; Schramm, W.E.

1995-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

233

Process converts incineration slag into stabilized residue  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During 1973 and 1974, EMC-Services designed and built a physico-chemical treatment plant in Hombourg, in France's Alsatian region. The plant is still in operation. Since then, EMC-Services has developed substantial experience in environmental projects, becoming one of the top companies internationally with experience and practice in designing, building and operating hazardous waste treatment plants. EMC-Services operates in France in Salaise, Strasbourg, Mitry-Mory, and Saint-Vulbas, where eight incinerators treat solid, liquid, highly halogenated and nonhazardous industrial waste. The incinerators, built or updated by EMC-Services, have a total capacity of about 200,000 tons per year. In the new process, incineration of special industrial wastes produces non-volatilized solid residue or slag, which is sent for disposal, in compliance with regulations, to special disposal plants. Future European regulations will incorporate landfilling criteria requiring such slag to be stabilized.

Thauront, J.; Deneux-Mustin, S. (EMC-Services, Paris (France)); Durecu, S. (EMC-Services, Vandoeuvre-Les Nancy (France)); Fraysse, G. (EMC-Services, Saint-Vulbas (France)); Berthelin, J. (Centre de Pedologie Biologique, Vandoeuvre-Les Nancy (France))

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

active site residue: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in human transferrin and Tyr Oksana Lockridge 2008-01-01 140 RESEARCH ARTICLE Benefits of organic residues and chemical fertilizer Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: RESEARCH...

235

active site residues: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in human transferrin and Tyr Oksana Lockridge 2008-01-01 140 RESEARCH ARTICLE Benefits of organic residues and chemical fertilizer Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: RESEARCH...

236

Table 19. U.S. Refiner Residual Fuel Oil Prices  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Prices," source for backcast estimates prior to January 1983. 19. U.S. Refiner Residual Fuel Oil Prices 36 Energy Information Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual 1996...

237

Table 19. U.S. Refiner Residual Fuel Oil Prices  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Prices," source for backcast estimates prior to January 1983. 19. U.S. Refiner Residual Fuel Oil Prices 36 Energy Information Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual 1997...

238

Residual Stresses for Structural Analysis and Fatigue Life Prediction...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Stresses for Structural Analysis and Fatigue Life Prediction in Vehicle Components: Success stories from the High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML) User Program Residual...

239

Wet Gasification of Ethanol Residue: A Preliminary Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A preliminary technoeconomic assessment has been made of several options for the application of catalytic hydrothermal gasification (wet gasification) to ethanol processing residues.

Brown, Michael D.; Elliott, Douglas C.

2008-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

240

Disappearance of fusionlike residues and the nuclear equation of state  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The cross sections for massive residues from {sup 40}Ca+{sup 40}Ca and {sup 40}Ar+{sup 27}Al collisions were calculated with an improved Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck equation. The calculated residue cross sections decrease with incident energy, an effect which does not appear related to the residue excitation energy. Larger residue cross sections result from calculations with larger in-medium nucleon-nucleon cross sections or with equations of state which are less attractive at subnuclear density. This dual sensitivity may be eliminated by measurements of observables associated with the coincident light particles.

Xu, H.M.; Lynch, W.G.; Danielewicz, P.; Bertsch, G.F. (National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (USA) Department of Physics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (USA))

1990-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including crop residue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

acetamido trideoxyhexose residue: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The macroscopic stress evolution is connected to a length scale of residual liquefaction displayed by microscopic mean-squared displacements. The theory describes this...

242

autophosphorylated residues required: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

though no flow is present. The macroscopic stress evolution is connected to a length scale of residual liquefaction displayed by microscopic mean-squared displacements. The...

243

abradable coating residual: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The macroscopic stress evolution is connected to a length scale of residual liquefaction displayed by microscopic mean-squared displacements. The theory describes this...

244

Water dynamics clue to key residues in protein folding  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A computational method independent of experimental protein structure information is proposed to recognize key residues in protein folding, from the study of hydration water dynamics. Based on all-atom molecular dynamics simulation, two key residues are recognized with distinct water dynamical behavior in a folding process of the Trp-cage protein. The identified key residues are shown to play an essential role in both 3D structure and hydrophobic-induced collapse. With observations on hydration water dynamics around key residues, a dynamical pathway of folding can be interpreted.

Gao, Meng [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)] [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Zhu, Huaiqiu, E-mail: hqzhu@pku.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)] [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Yao, Xin-Qiu [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China) [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Department of Biophysics, Kyoto University, Sakyo Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); She, Zhen-Su, E-mail: she@pku.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)] [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

2010-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

245

Current biofuel feedstock crops such as corn lead to large environmental losses of N through nitrate leaching and N2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

219 Current biofuel feedstock crops such as corn lead to large environmental losses of N through biofuel crops established on a rich Mollisol soil. Reduced Nitrogen Losses after Conversion of Row Crop Agriculture to Perennial Biofuel Crops Candice M. Smith, Mark B. david,* Corey A. Mitchell, Michael d. Masters

DeLucia, Evan H.

246

Optical panel system including stackable waveguides  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An optical panel system including stackable waveguides is provided. The optical panel system displays a projected light image and comprises a plurality of planar optical waveguides in a stacked state. The optical panel system further comprises a support system that aligns and supports the waveguides in the stacked state. In one embodiment, the support system comprises at least one rod, wherein each waveguide contains at least one hole, and wherein each rod is positioned through a corresponding hole in each waveguide. In another embodiment, the support system comprises at least two opposing edge structures having the waveguides positioned therebetween, wherein each opposing edge structure contains a mating surface, wherein opposite edges of each waveguide contain mating surfaces which are complementary to the mating surfaces of the opposing edge structures, and wherein each mating surface of the opposing edge structures engages a corresponding complementary mating surface of the opposite edges of each waveguide.

DeSanto, Leonard (Dunkirk, MD); Veligdan, James T. (Manorville, NY)

2007-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

247

Thermovoltaic semiconductor device including a plasma filter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A thermovoltaic energy conversion device and related method for converting thermal energy into an electrical potential. An interference filter is provided on a semiconductor thermovoltaic cell to pre-filter black body radiation. The semiconductor thermovoltaic cell includes a P/N junction supported on a substrate which converts incident thermal energy below the semiconductor junction band gap into electrical potential. The semiconductor substrate is doped to provide a plasma filter which reflects back energy having a wavelength which is above the band gap and which is ineffectively filtered by the interference filter, through the P/N junction to the source of radiation thereby avoiding parasitic absorption of the unusable portion of the thermal radiation energy.

Baldasaro, Paul F. (Clifton Park, NY)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Critical point anomalies include expansion shock waves  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

From first-principle fluid dynamics, complemented by a rigorous state equation accounting for critical anomalies, we discovered that expansion shock waves may occur in the vicinity of the liquid-vapor critical point in the two-phase region. Due to universality of near-critical thermodynamics, the result is valid for any common pure fluid in which molecular interactions are only short-range, namely, for so-called 3-dimensional Ising-like systems, and under the assumption of thermodynamic equilibrium. In addition to rarefaction shock waves, diverse non-classical effects are admissible, including composite compressive shock-fan-shock waves, due to the change of sign of the fundamental derivative of gasdynamics.

Nannan, N. R., E-mail: ryan.nannan@uvs.edu [Mechanical Engineering Discipline, Anton de Kom University of Suriname, Leysweg 86, PO Box 9212, Paramaribo, Suriname and Process and Energy Department, Delft University of Technology, Leeghwaterstraat 44, 2628 CA Delft (Netherlands); Guardone, A., E-mail: alberto.guardone@polimi.it [Department of Aerospace Science and Technology, Politecnico di Milano, Via La Masa 34, 20156 Milano (Italy); Colonna, P., E-mail: p.colonna@tudelft.nl [Propulsion and Power, Delft University of Technology, Kluyverweg 1, 2629 HS Delft (Netherlands)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

249

Optical panel system including stackable waveguides  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An optical panel system including stackable waveguides is provided. The optical panel system displays a projected light image and comprises a plurality of planar optical waveguides in a stacked state. The optical panel system further comprises a support system that aligns and supports the waveguides in the stacked state. In one embodiment, the support system comprises at least one rod, wherein each waveguide contains at least one hole, and wherein each rod is positioned through a corresponding hole in each waveguide. In another embodiment, the support system comprises at least two opposing edge structures having the waveguides positioned therebetween, wherein each opposing edge structure contains a mating surface, wherein opposite edges of each waveguide contain mating surfaces which are complementary to the mating surfaces of the opposing edge structures, and wherein each mating surface of the opposing edge structures engages a corresponding complementary mating surface of the opposite edges of each waveguide.

DeSanto, Leonard; Veligdan, James T.

2007-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

250

Department of Soil and Crop Sciences Honors Program The Department of Soil and Crop Sciences (SCSC) Honors Program is designed for highly-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Department of Soil and Crop Sciences Honors Program The Department of Soil and Crop Sciences (SCSC programs, Plant and Environmental Soil Science (PSSC), or Turfgrass Science (TGSC), to enhance learning the distinction of Plant and Environmental Soil Science Honors, or Turfgrass Science Honors. Admission

Behmer, Spencer T.

251

EIS-0481: Engineered High Energy Crop Programs Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Draft PEIS: Public Comment Period Ends 03/17/15This Programmatic EIS (PEIS) will evaluate the potential environmental impacts of implementing one or more programs to catalyze the deployment of engineered high energy crops (EHEC). A main component of the proposed EHEC programs would be providing financial assistance to funding recipients, such as research institutions, independent contract growers, or commercial entities, for field trials to evaluate the performance of EHECs. Confined field trials may range in size and could include development-scale (up to 5 acres), pilot-scale (up to 250 acres), or demonstration-scale (up to 15,000 acres). This PEIS will assess the potential environmental impacts of such confined field trials in the southeastern United States. DOE’s proposed action under this PEIS will be limited to the states of Alabama, Florida (excluding the Everglades/Southern Florida coastal plain ecoregion), Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Virginia.

252

EIS-0481: Test Engineered High Energy Crop Programs Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement, Southeastern United States  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Programmatic EIS (PEIS) will evaluate the potential environmental impacts of implementing one or more programs to catalyze the deployment of engineered high energy crops (EHECs). A main component of the proposed EHEC programs would be providing financial assistance to funding recipients, such as research institutions, independent contract growers, or commercial entities, for field trials to evaluate the performance of EHECs. Confined field trials may range in size and could include development-scale (up to 5 acres), pilot-scale (up to 250 acres), or demonstration-scale (up to 15,000 acres). This PEIS will assess the potential environmental impacts of such confined field trials in the southeastern United States. DOE’s proposed action under this PEIS will be limited to the states of Alabama, Florida (excluding the Everglades/Southern Florida coastal plain ecoregion), Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Virginia.

253

Models of Procyon A including seismic constraints  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Detailed models of Procyon A based on new asteroseismic measurements by Eggenberger et al (2004) have been computed using the Geneva evolution code including shellular rotation and atomic diffusion. By combining all non-asteroseismic observables now available for Procyon A with these seismological data, we find that the observed mean large spacing of 55.5 +- 0.5 uHz favours a mass of 1.497 M_sol for Procyon A. We also determine the following global parameters of Procyon A: an age of t=1.72 +- 0.30 Gyr, an initial helium mass fraction Y_i=0.290 +- 0.010, a nearly solar initial metallicity (Z/X)_i=0.0234 +- 0.0015 and a mixing-length parameter alpha=1.75 +- 0.40. Moreover, we show that the effects of rotation on the inner structure of the star may be revealed by asteroseismic observations if frequencies can be determined with a high precision. Existing seismological data of Procyon A are unfortunately not accurate enough to really test these differences in the input physics of our models.

P. Eggenberger; F. Carrier; F. Bouchy

2005-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

254

A simulation-based soil and water resource evaluation for ratoon cropping grain sorghum in the central blacklands of Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ure 1. Grain yield cumulative probability distributions for the simulated ratoon cropped-plant crop and for the single cropped-plant crop, from 1939-1978, Temple, Texas. Field Capacity = 15 cm. 2. Grain yield cumulative probability distributions... initial values of soil water, from 1939-1978, Temple, Texas. Field Capacity = 20 cm. 63 LIST OF TABLES Table 1. Simulation Series I. Comparison of the Hydrologic Components and Crop Yields for Forty Years (1939-1978). 2. Simulation Series II...

Stinson, David Lawrence

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Recovery of fissile materials from plutonium residues, miscellaneous spent nuclear fuel, and uranium fissile wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new process is proposed that converts complex feeds containing fissile materials into a chemical form that allows the use of existing technologies (such as PUREX and ion exchange) to recover the fissile materials and convert the resultant wastes to glass. Potential feed materials include (1) plutonium scrap and residue, (2) miscellaneous spent nuclear fuel, and (3) uranium fissile wastes. The initial feed materials may contain mixtures of metals, ceramics, amorphous solids, halides, and organics. 14 refs., 4 figs.

Forsberg, C.W.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

End-of-life vehicle recycling : state of the art of resource recovery from shredder residue.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Each year, more than 50 million vehicles reach the end of their service life throughout the world. More than 95% of these vehicles enter a comprehensive recycling infrastructure that includes auto parts recyclers/dismantlers, remanufacturers, and material recyclers (shredders). Today, about 75% of automotive materials are profitably recycled via (1) parts reuse and parts and components remanufacturing and (2) ultimately by the scrap processing (shredding) industry. The process by which the scrap processors recover metal scrap from automobiles involves shredding the obsolete automobiles, along with other obsolete metal-containing products (such as white goods, industrial scrap, and demolition debris), and recovering the metals from the shredded material. The single largest source of recycled ferrous scrap for the iron and steel industry is obsolete automobiles. The non-metallic fraction that remains after the metals are recovered from the shredded materials (about 25% of the weight of the vehicle)--commonly called shredder residue--is disposed of in landfills. Over the past 10 to 15 years, a significant amount of research and development has been undertaken to enhance the recycle rate of end-of-life vehicles (ELVs), including enhancing dismantling techniques and improving remanufacturing operations. However, most of the effort has focused on developing technology to recover materials, such as polymers, from shredder residue. To make future vehicles more energy efficient, more lighter-weight materials--primarily polymers and polymer composites--will be used in manufacturing these vehicles. These materials increase the percentage of shredder residue that must be disposed of, compared with the percentage of metals. Therefore, as the complexity of automotive materials and systems increases, new technologies will be required to sustain and maximize the ultimate recycling of these materials and systems at end-of-life. Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne), in cooperation with the Vehicle Recycling Partnership (VRP) and the American Plastics Council (APC), is working to develop technology for recycling materials from shredder residue. Several other organizations worldwide are also working on developing technology for recycling shredder residue. Without a commercially viable shredder industry, our nation may face greater environmental challenges and a decreased supply of quality scrap and be forced to turn to primary ores for the production of finished metals. This document presents a review of the state of the art in shredder residue recycling. Available technologies and emerging technologies for the recycling of materials from shredder residue are discussed.

Jody, B. J.; Daniels, E. J.; Energy Systems

2007-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

257

SOLID PHASE MICROEXTRACTION SAMPLING OF FIRE DEBRIS RESIDUES IN THE PRESENCE OF RADIONUCLIDE SURROGATE METALS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) Laboratory currently does not have on site facilities for handling radioactive evidentiary materials and there are no established FBI methods or procedures for decontaminating highly radioactive fire debris (FD) evidence while maintaining evidentiary value. One experimental method for the isolation of FD residue from radionuclide metals involves using solid phase microextraction (SPME) fibers to remove the residues of interest. Due to their high affinity for organics, SPME fibers should have little affinity for most (radioactive) metals. The focus of this research was to develop an examination protocol that was applicable to safe work in facilities where high radiation doses are shielded from the workers (as in radioactive shielded cells or ''hot cells''). We also examined the affinity of stable radionuclide surrogate metals (Co, Ir, Re, Ni, Ba, Cs, Nb, Zr and Nd) for sorption by the SPME fibers. This was done under exposure conditions that favor the uptake of FD residues under conditions that will provide little contact between the SPME and the FD material (such as charred carpet or wood that contains commonly-used accelerants). Our results from mass spectrometric analyses indicate that SPME fibers show promise for use in the room temperature head space uptake of organic FD residue (namely, diesel fuel oil, kerosene, gasoline and paint thinner) with subsequent analysis by gas chromatography (GC) with mass spectrometric (MS) detection. No inorganic forms of ignitable fluids were included in this study.

Duff, M; Keisha Martin, K; S Crump, S

2007-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

258

Phase Chemistry of Tank Sludge Residual Components  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has millions of gallons of high level nuclear waste stored in underground tanks at Hanford, Washington and Savannah River, South Carolina. These tanks will eventually be emptied and decommissioned. This will leave a residue of sludge adhering to the interior tank surfaces that may contaminate nearby groundwaters with radionuclides and RCRA metals. Performance assessment (PA) calculations must be carried out prior to closing the tanks. This requires developing radionuclide release models from the sludges so that the PA calculations can be based on credible source terms. These efforts continued to be hindered by uncertainties regarding the actual nature of the tank contents and the distribution of radionuclides among the various phases. In particular, it is of vital importance to know what radionuclides are associated with solid sludge components. Experimentation on actual tank sludges can be difficult, dangerous and prohibitively expensive. The research funded under this grant for the past three years was intended to provide a cost-effective method for developing the needed radionuclide release models using non-radioactive artificial sludges. Insights gained from this work will also have more immediate applications in understanding the processes responsible for heel development in the tanks and in developing effective technologies for removing wastes from the tanks.

J.L. Krumhansl

2002-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

259

Rapid Protein Structure Detection and Assignment using Residual Dipolar Couplings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rapid Protein Structure Detection and Assignment using Residual Dipolar Couplings Michael A substructures by exploiting the orientational constraint of residual dipolar coupling (RDC). PEPMORPH reverses: We have tested PEPMORPH on a variety of real proteins deposited in the Protein Data Base (PDB), using

260

Computing Symmetrized Weight Enumerators for Lifted Quadratic Residue Codes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Computing Symmetrized Weight Enumerators for Lifted Quadratic Residue Codes I. M. Duursma Dept for the computation of structural parameters for ring-linear codes. This article therefore presents a method to eĂ?ciently compute weight enumerators of linear codes over primary integer residue rings. For the lifted QR-codes

Duursma, Iwan M.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including crop residue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Minimization of welding residual stress and distortion in large structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Minimization of welding residual stress and distortion in large structures P. Michaleris at Champaign Urbana, Urbana, IL Abstract Welding distortion in large structures is usually caused by buckling due to the residual stress. In cases where the design is fixed and minimum weld size requirements

Michaleris, Panagiotis

262

Residual Energy-Aware Cooperative Transmission (REACT) in Wireless Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Residual Energy-Aware Cooperative Transmission (REACT) in Wireless Networks Erwu Liu, Qinqing Zhang the lifetime of the network and we call the selection method a residual energy-aware cooperative transmission- works, where energy efficiency is a critical design consideration. We assume that multiple relay nodes

Leung, Kin K.

263

RESIDUAL STRESS EFFECTS IN FRACTURE OF COMPOSITES AND ADHESIVES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RESIDUAL STRESS EFFECTS IN FRACTURE OF COMPOSITES AND ADHESIVES JOHN A. NAIRN ABSTRACT Because composites and adhesive joints are made from different phases with different thermal expansion coefficients, they inevitably develop residual thermal stresses. When designing composites or adhesive joints, it is important

Nairn, John A.

264

ReproducedfromCropScience.PublishedbyCropScienceSocietyofAmerica.Allcopyrightsreserved. PLANT GENETIC RESOURCES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of break- crossing yellow-seeded bean cultivars from Mexico withing down crude oil (U.S. Supreme Court pur- the cultivar itself. To check the origin of Enola, we fingerprinted a chased in Mexico in 1994 traditional bean cultivars among yellow-seeded beans from Mexico, including Azufrado Peru- grown principally

Gepts, Paul

265

Conversion of direct process high-boiling residue to monosilanes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for the production of monosilanes from the high-boiling residue resulting from the reaction of hydrogen chloride with silicon metalloid in a process typically referred to as the "direct process." The process comprises contacting a high-boiling residue resulting from the reaction of hydrogen chloride and silicon metalloid, with hydrogen gas in the presence of a catalytic amount of aluminum trichloride effective in promoting conversion of the high-boiling residue to monosilanes. The present process results in conversion of the high-boiling residue to monosilanes. At least a portion of the aluminum trichloride catalyst required for conduct of the process may be formed in situ during conduct of the direct process and isolation of the high-boiling residue.

Brinson, Jonathan Ashley (Vale of Glamorgan, GB); Crum, Bruce Robert (Madison, IN); Jarvis, Jr., Robert Frank (Midland, MI)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Installing a Subsurface Drip Irrigation System for Row Crops  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The manifold can be placed at the soil surface or buried. B-6151 7/04 Installing a Subsurface Drip Irrigation System for Row Crops Juan Enciso* *Assistant Professor and Extension Agricultural Engineer, The Texas A&M University System. Figure 1. Typical layout... of a drip irrigation system. Main Field block Flushing valve Valve Flushing manifold Water source Supplying manifold Lateral Tape injection The injector consists of a roll that holds the tape and a shank that opens the soil to bury the tape (Figs. 3...

Enciso, Juan

2004-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

267

Forage Crops: Alfalfa, Peanuts, Velvet Beans, Millet, Rape  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is dry the seed should be covered not less than one inch. Utah and Kansas furnish the bulk of our commercial crop of alfalfa seed. Well-matured seed will retain their germinating power without showing any perceptible degree of deterioration for a... of alfalfa contained 635,- 400 plants per acre (15 to the square foot) and another ten years old contaied 326,793 (12 to the square foot) plants per acre, and still another which con- tained 139,392 (3 to the square foot) plants per acre. These fields...

Pittuck, B. C.

1903-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Transgenic crops get a test in the wild  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A novel British research program called PROSAMO - Planned Release of Selected and Modified Organisms - has just produced its first batch of results on the ecological behavior of a genetically manipulated variety of oil seed rape (known to Americans as canola). As expected, the preliminary data indicate that these plants do not outgrow their competitors in the wild, nor is there any evidence that they pass on their foreign genes to other species. PROSAMO is moving on to test other crops with other foreign genes. If these results are as reassuring, scientists around the world will have solid evidence with which to soothe fears.

Cherfas, J.

1991-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

269

Top Crop Wind Farm (Phase II) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExplorationUT-gTaguspark JumpDetective: TerminologyTolerableTop Crop Wind Farm (Phase

270

Biomass Crop Assistance Program (BCAP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarre BiomassTHIS PAGE IS UNDER(Redirected from -CombustionCrop

271

D1 Fuel Crops Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentratingRenewable Solutions LLC JumpCrow Lake Wind JumpCuttings Analysis AtCycloceanCrops Ltd

272

E-Print Network 3.0 - alley cropping Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Pulp, Hybrid Poplar and Willows) Biomass... and Renewable Energy Hybrid Poplar BMP's Energy producing crops Alternative Perennial ... Source: Minnesota, University of -...

273

E-Print Network 3.0 - aestivum cropping system Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sites Distances between sites 0881 0882 crop 0880 area "ha system... with reduced chemical inputs "integrated farming system where winter oilseed rape "Brassica napus...

274

Biomass crops can be used for biological disinfestation and remediation of soils and water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

liquid biofuels from biomass: The writings on the walls. Newreduced feed intake. Biomass crop sustainability flexibilityMC, et al. 2009. Cali- fornia biomass resources, potentials,

Stapleton, James J; Banuelos, Gary

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Modeling Poplar Growth as a Short Rotation Woody Crop for Biofuels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a Short Rotation Woody Crop for Biofuels Q. J. Hart 1,? , O.for cellulosic derived biofuels. The ability to accuratelycrops for bioenergy and biofuels applications. In vitro

Hart, Quinn James

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Sustainable Food & Bioenergy Systems Program-Sustainable Crop Production Option 2014-2015 Catalog  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sustainable Food & Bioenergy Systems Program- Sustainable Crop Production Option 2014-2015 Catalog SFBS 146 Intro to Sustainable Food & Bioenergy Systems ................................ S

Dyer, Bill

277

The impact of mineral fertilizers on the carbon footprint of crop production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the GHG emissions (“carbon footprint”) of crop production inMaterials and methods – “carbon footprint” calculation basedLCA) principles A carbon footprint is “the total set of

Brentrup, Frank

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

E-Print Network 3.0 - andean crop mirabilis Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

contains... an estimated 1500 species (Bohs, 2007), in- cludes three major food crops: potato (S. tuberosum L.), tomato (S... and are widely distributed in two regions in South...

279

Switchgrass is a promising, high-yielding crop for California biofuel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

both as forage and as a biofuel crop, switchgrass may bepanic grass grown as a biofuel in southern England. Bioresfor switchgrass for biofuel systems. Biomass Bioenergy 30:

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

E-Print Network 3.0 - alternative cropping systems Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Soil Sciences, Pennsylvania State University Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology 14 Gaze-Based Interaction for Semi-Automatic Photo Cropping Summary: photographers...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including crop residue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Recovery of flexible polyurethane foam from shredder residue.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Argonne National Laboratory has developed a patented, continuous process for the recovery of flexible polyurethane foam (PUF) from auto shredder residue (ASR). To test the process, Argonne researchers conceived of, designed, and built a continuous foam washing and drying system that was pilot-tested at a shredder facility for six months. Economic analysis of the process, using manufacturers' quotes and operating data from Argonne's pilot plant, indicates a payback of less than two years for a plant producing about 1,000 ton/yr of foam. Samples of clean foam were shipped to three major foam reprocessors; all three indicated that the quality of the PUF recovered by the Argonne process met their requirements. Tests of the recovered foam by an independent testing laboratory showed that the recycled foam met the specifications for several automotive applications, including carpet padding, headliner, and sound-suppression support materials. Recovery of foam reduces the mass and the volume of material going to the landfill by about 5% and 30%, respectively. Annually, recovery will save about 1.2 x 10{sup 12} Btu of energy, cut the amount of solid waste being landfilled by about 150,000 tons, and eliminate the emission of about 250 tons of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into the air.

Daniels, E. J.; Jody, b. J.

1999-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

282

Section One, Bioenergy Technologies Office Multi-Year Program...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

derived from plant- and algae- based material that includes agricultural residues, forest resources, perennial grasses, woody energy crops, algae, municipal solid waste,...

283

End-of-life vehicle recycling : state of the art of resource recovery from shredder residue.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Each year, more than 25 million vehicles reach the end of their service life throughout the world, and this number is rising rapidly because the number of vehicles on the roads is rapidly increasing. In the United States, more than 95% of the 10-15 million scrapped vehicles annually enter a comprehensive recycling infrastructure that includes auto parts recyclers/dismantlers, remanufacturers, and material recyclers (shredders). Today, over 75% of automotive materials, primarily the metals, are profitably recycled via (1) parts reuse and parts and components remanufacturing and (2) ultimately by the scrap processing (shredding) industry. The process by which the scrap processors recover metal scrap from automobiles involves shredding the obsolete automobile hulks, along with other obsolete metal-containing products (such as white goods, industrial scrap, and demolition debris), and recovering the metals from the shredded material. The single largest source of recycled ferrous scrap for the iron and steel industry is obsolete automobiles. The non-metallic fraction that remains after the metals are recovered from the shredded materials - commonly called shredder residue - constitutes about 25% of the weight of the vehicle, and it is disposed of in landfills. This practice is not environmentally friendly, wastes valuable resources, and may become uneconomical. Therefore, it is not sustainable. Over the past 15-20 years, a significant amount of research and development has been undertaken to enhance the recycle rate of end-of-life vehicles, including enhancing dismantling techniques and improving remanufacturing operations. However, most of the effort has been focused on developing technology to separate and recover non-metallic materials, such as polymers, from shredder residue. To make future vehicles more energy efficient, more lightweighting materials - primarily polymers, polymer composites, high-strength steels, and aluminum - will be used in manufacturing these vehicles. Many of these materials increase the percentage of shredder residue that must be disposed of, compared with the percentage of metals that are recovered. In addition, the number of hybrid vehicles and electric vehicles on the road is rapidly increasing. This trend will also introduce new materials for disposal at the end of their useful lives, including batteries. Therefore, as the complexity of automotive materials and systems increases, new technologies will be required to sustain and maximize the ultimate recycling of these materials and systems. Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne), the Vehicle Recycling Partnership, LLC. (VRP) of the United States Council for Automotive Research, LLC. (USCAR), and the American Chemistry Council-Plastics Division (ACC-PD) are working to develop technology for recovering materials from end-of-life vehicles, including separating and recovering polymers and residual metals from shredder residue. Several other organizations worldwide are also working on developing technology for recycling materials from shredder residue. Without a commercially viable shredder industry, our nation and the world will most likely face greater environmental challenges and a decreased supply of quality scrap, and thereby be forced to turn to primary ores for the production of finished metals. This will result in increased energy consumption and increased damage to the environment, including increased greenhouse gas emissions. The recycling of polymers, other organics, and residual metals in shredder residue saves the equivalent of over 23 million barrels of oil annually. This results in a 12-million-ton reduction in greenhouse gas emissions. This document presents a review of the state-of-the-art in the recycling of automotive materials.

Jody, B. J.; Daniels, E. J.; Duranceau, C. M.; Pomykala, J. A.; Spangenberger, J. S. (Energy Systems)

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

284

Microbial Diversity-Based Novel Crop Protection Products  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Extremophilic microorganisms are adapted to survive in ecological niches with high temperatures, extremes of pH, high salt concentrations, high pressure, radiation, etc. Extremophiles produce unique biocatalysts and natural products that function under extreme conditions comparab le to those prevailing in various industrial processes. Therefore, there is burgeoning interest in bioprospecting for extremophiles with potential immediate use in agriculture, the food, chemical, and pharm aceutical industries, and environmental biotechnology. Over the years, several thousand extremophilic bacteria, archaea, and filamentous fungi were collected at extreme environmental sites in the USA, the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone surrounding the faeild nuclear power plant in Ukraine, in and around Lake Baikal in Siberia, and at geothermal sites on the Kamchatka peninsula in Russia. These organisms were cultured under proprietary conditions, and the cell- free supernatants were screened for biological activities against plant pathogenic fungi and major crop damaging insects. Promising peptide lead molecules were isolated, characterized, and sequenced. Relatively high hit rates characterized the tested fermentation broths. Of the 26,000 samples screened, over thousand contained biological activity of interest. A fair number of microorganisms expressed broad- spectrum antifungal or insecticidal activity. Two- dozen broadly antifungal peptides (AFPs) are alr eady patent protected, and many more tens are under further investigation. Tapping the gene pool of extremophilic microorganisms to provide novel ways of crop protection proved a successful strategy.

Pioneer Hi-Bred International Inc.; DuPont Experimental Station; Yalpani, Ronald Flannagan, Rafael Herrmann, James Presnail, Tamas Torok, and Nasser; Herrmann, Rafael; Presnail, James; Torok, Tamas; Yalpani, Nasser

2007-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

285

DDT RESIDUES IN SEAWATER AND PARTICULATE MATTER IN THE CALIFORNIA CURRENT SYSTEM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DDT RESIDUES IN SEAWATER AND PARTICULATE MATTER IN THE CALIFORNIA CURRENT SYSTEM JAMES L. COX in the California current system were analyzed for DDT residues. DDT residue concentrations in whole seawater are discussed in relation to mechanisms of land-sea DDT residue transfer. DDT residue concentrations

286

The cost of silage harvest and transport systems for herbaceous crops  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Some of the highest yielding herbaceous biomass crops are thick-stemmed species such as energy cane (Saccharum ssp.), Napiergrass (Pennisetum purpureum), and forage sorghum (Sorghum bicolor). Their relatively high moisture content necessitates they be handled and stored as silage rather than hay bales or modules. This paper presents estimated costs of harvesting and transporting herbaceous crops as silage. Costs are based on an engineering-economic approach. Equipment costs are estimated by combining per-hour costs with the hours required to complete the operation. Harvest includes severing, chopping, and blowing stalks into a wagon or track. For 50% moisture content, in-field costs using trucks in the field (options 0 and 1) are $3.72-$5.99/dry Mg ($3.37-$5.43/dt) for a farmer and $3.09-$3.64/dry Mg ($2.81- $3.30/dt) for custom operators. However, slopes and wet field conditions may not permit trucks to enter the field. Direct-cut harvest systems using wagons to haul silage to trucks waiting at the field edge (option 2) are $8.52-$11.94/dry Mg ($7.73-$10.83/dt) for farmers and $7.20-$7.36/dry Mg ($6.53-$6.68/dt) for custom operators. Based on four round trips per 8-hour day, 50% and 70% moisture silage, truck transport costs are $8.37/dry Mg ($ 7.60/dt) and $13.98/dry Mg ($12.68/dt), respectively. Lower yields, lower hours of machine use, or a higher discount rate result in higher costs.

Turhollow, A.; Downing, M.; Butler, J.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

287

EIS-0109: Long-Term Management of the Existing Radioactive Wastes and Residues at the Niagara Falls Storage Site  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy developed this statement to evaluate the environmental impacts of several alternatives for management and control of the radioactive wastes and residues at the Niagara Falls Storage Site, including a no action alternative, an alternative to manage wastes on-site, and two off-site management alternatives.

288

Evaluation of improved materials for stationary diesel engines operating on residual and coal based fuels. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experimental results to date from an on-going research program on improved materials for stationary diesel engines using residual or coal-based fuels are presented with little discussion of conclusions about these results. Information is included on ring and liner wear, fuel oil qualities, ceramic materials, coatings, test procedures and equipment, and tribology test results. (LCL)

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

A manual for implementing residual radioactive material guidelines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This manual presents information for implementing US Department of Energy (DOE) guidelines for residual radioactive material at sites identified by the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) and the Surplus Facilities Management Program (SFMP). It describes the analysis and models used to derive site-specific guidelines for allowable residual concentrations of radionuclides in soil and the design and use of the RESRAD computer code for calculating guideline values. It also describes procedures for implementing DOE policy for reducing residual radioactivity to levels that are as low as reasonably achievable. 36 refs., 16 figs, 22 tabs.

Gilbert, T.L.; Yu, C.; Yuan, Y.C.; Zielen, A.J.; Jusko, M.J.; Wallo, A. III

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Asphalt landscape after all : residual suburban surface as public infrastructure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The thesis proposes a hybridized commercial retail strip inserted into a residual suburban condition as a manner of investigating the latent potential of suburban logic, both its constituent elements and its formal rules ...

O'Connor, Joseph Michael, M. Arch. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Residual stress in electrodeposited nanocrystalline nickel-tungsten coatings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Characterizing the residual stress of thick nanocrystalline electrodeposits poses several unique challenges due to their fine grain structure, thickness distribution, and matte surface. We use a three-dimensional ...

Ziebell, Tiffany D.

292

FIXED PRICE RESIDUAL FUNDS POLICY Policy dated March 29, 1999  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FIXED PRICE RESIDUAL FUNDS POLICY Policy dated March 29, 1999 After completion of all deliverables required under a fixed-price award, after costs in fulfilling the requirements of the award have been

Weston, Ken

293

Minimizing High Spatial Frequency Residual in Active Space Telescope Mirrors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Miller June 2008 SSL # 4-08 #12;#12;Minimizing High Spatial Frequency Residual in Active Space Telescope Mirrors Thomas Gray, David W. Miller June 2008 SSL # 4-08 This work is based on the unaltered text

294

An urban infill : a residual site in Boston  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis is concerned with the treatment of residual sites in the context of the urban environment and in particular with the wounds inflicted by the passage of the Massachusetts Turnpike through the city of Boston. The ...

Savvides, Andreas L. (Andreas Loucas)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

RetroFILL : residual spaces as urban infill  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In any city there are small slivers and chunks of awkward spaces - in between buildings, occupying edge conditions, not large enough to warrant many forms of traditional use - which can be termed residual. These areas of ...

Kobel, Marika

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Residual dust charges in an afterglow plasma , M. Mikikian  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

plasma was performed in a rf discharge. An upward thermophoretic force was used to balance]. For the study concerning residual charges, the top electrode was cooled. An upward thermophoretic force

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

297

RELATIVE RESIDUAL BOUNDS FOR INDEFINITE SINGULAR HERMITIAN MATRICES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

residual bounds, indefinite Hermitian matrix, eigen- values, perturbation theory, relative perturbations. These theorems are proper generalization of results on a semi-definite Hermitian matrix SIAM Journal on Matrix

Truhar, Ninoslav

298

The physical status of Miller clay after nine years of crop rotations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by crops and management was made by Uhland (24). A report from his work shows 1) plants with deep and well devel- oped root systems such as alfalfa and kudzu may be expected to increase porosity and permeability and to improve soil structure, 2) crop...

Hipp, Billy Wayne

1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

A L G A E 11 disease follows, wiping out entire crops. The primary  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for reducing their impacts on both agriculture and natural ecosystems. This should involve careful screening or containment of invaders, and increased crop and landscape diversity, which can improve biotic resistance of the American agricultural landscape: Assessing the national risk of crop pest and disease spread. BioScience 59

Smith, Jennifer E.

300

The Effect of Cropping Upon the Active Potash of the Soil.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-efficient of correlation (r) between the potash removed by the crops and the active potash lost from the soil, calculated from Table 3, is ,722 -L .016. This is a high correlation and shows a high relation between the pat- ash removed by crops and the 'active potash...

Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

1924-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including crop residue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

THE POTENTIAL FOR MICRO-ALGAE AND OTHER "MICRO-CROPS" TO PRODUCE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE POTENTIAL FOR MICRO-ALGAE AND OTHER "MICRO-CROPS" TO PRODUCE SUSTAINABLE BIOFUELS A REVIEW INTRODUCTION Biofuel derived from algae and other micro-crops has been proposed as an environmentally benign transportation fuel. Algae can be cultivated on low productivity lands using low quality water. Interest in algae

Edwards, Paul N.

302

Evaluating Trees as Energy Crops in Napa Dean R. Donaldson and Richard B. Standiford2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the interest in growing trees as an energy crop in Napa County has come from individuals owning small farms in California, June 14-16, 1983, Sacramento, California. 2 Farm Advisor (Napa County) and ForestryEvaluating Trees as Energy Crops in Napa County1 Dean R. Donaldson and Richard B. Standiford2

Standiford, Richard B.

303

Bioenergy crop greenhouse gas mitigation potential under a range of management practices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bioenergy crop greenhouse gas mitigation potential under a range of management practices T A R A W been proposed as viable bioenergy crops because of their potential to yield harvest- able biomass-senescence harvests are a more effective means than maximizing yield potential. Keywords: bioenergy, feedstocks, GHG

DeLucia, Evan H.

304

Specialty Crop Profile: Anthony Bratsch, Extension Specialist, Vegetables and Small Fruit  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Specialty Crop Profile: Pawpaw Anthony Bratsch, Extension Specialist, Vegetables and Small Fruit Introduction Pawpaw (Asimina spp.) is a native fruit crop that is in the beginning phases of domestication.S. The pawpaw is the largest edible tree fruit native to the United States. It is the only temperate member

Liskiewicz, Maciej

305

Implications of Three Biofuel Crops for Beneficial Arthropods in Agricultural Landscapes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Implications of Three Biofuel Crops for Beneficial Arthropods in Agricultural Landscapes Mary A Science+Business Media, LLC. 2010 Abstract Production of biofuel feedstocks in agricultural landscapes and generalist natural enemies in three model biofuel crops: corn, switch- grass, and mixed prairie, we tested

Landis, Doug

306

2 SPRAY OILS--BEYOND 2000 Modern use of petroleum-derived oils as agricultural crop  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2 SPRAY OILS--BEYOND 2000 Abstract Modern use of petroleum-derived oils as agricultural crop among oils of common origin and manufacture. The importance of the emulsifier used with the oil of these products. Introduction Petroleum oils have been in use as crop protectants for over a hundred years

Agnello, Arthur M.

307

Intraspecific interference in forage crops. Biolo-gical density and its implication in the predic-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Italy SUMMARY From a series of experiments on intraspecific interference in such forage crops as lucerne inter- ference in such forage crops as lucerne (Medicago sativa L.) (ROTIL1, 1975, 1979 ; ROTILI plant, as well as for a population of plants, the optimal growing conditions correspond to biological

Boyer, Edmond

308

REVIEW PAPER Strategies for reducing the carbon footprint of field crops  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REVIEW PAPER Strategies for reducing the carbon footprint of field crops for semiarid areas emission. To provide the potential solution, we estimated the carbon footprint [i.e., the total amount the effect of crop sequences on the carbon footprint of durum wheat. Key strategies for reducing the carbon

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

309

Tea Oil Camellia: a New Edible Oil Crop for the United States John M. Ruter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Tea Oil Camellia: a New Edible Oil Crop for the United States© John M. Ruter The University@uga.edu INTRODUCTION Camellia oleifera has been cultivated in China as a source of edible oil. oleifera as a commercial oil seed crop for the southeast (Ruter, 2002). Considerable research is being

Radcliffe, David

310

Influence of habitat and landscape perenniality on insect natural enemies in three candidate biofuel crops  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

biofuel crops Ben P. Werling a, , Timothy D. Meehan b , Claudio Gratton b , Douglas A. Landis April 2011 Accepted 22 June 2011 Available online 28 June 2011 Keywords: Biofuels Biodiversity Biological control Land use change a b s t r a c t Cultivation of biofuel crops could change agricultural

Landis, Doug

311

MOVEMENT OF FEMALE WHITE-TAILED DEER: EFFECTS OF CLIMATE AND INTENSIVE ROW-CROP AGRICULTURE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1099 MOVEMENT OF FEMALE WHITE-TAILED DEER: EFFECTS OF CLIMATE AND INTENSIVE ROW-CROP AGRICULTURE in intensively (>80%) cultivated areas. From January 2001 to August 2002, we monitored movements of 77 (61 adult of seasonal migration, whereas crop emergence and harvest had minimal effects. Four deer (8%) dispersed a mean

312

agronomie: agriculture and environment Nitrogen uptake capacities of maize and sorghum crops  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

agronomie: agriculture and environment Nitrogen uptake capacities of maize and sorghum crops became limiting. Drought reduced nitrogen availability in the soil for both crops. Maize was more sensitive to this restriction in nitrogen nutrition, and in addition to the direct effect of a water deficit

Boyer, Edmond

313

Predicting Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Soil Carbon from Changing Pasture to an Energy Crop  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Predicting Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Soil Carbon from Changing Pasture to an Energy Crop 4493 g CO2 eq?m22 over 15 years of energy cane production. Cultivation of energy cane on former pasture Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Soil Carbon from Changing Pasture to an Energy Crop. PLoS ONE 8(8): e72019. doi

DeLucia, Evan H.

314

Assessment of the broadleaf crops leaf area index product from the Terra MODIS instrument  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the cultivated area (52%). The major con- centrations of this biome class are in Asia (39%), North America (22Assessment of the broadleaf crops leaf area index product from the Terra MODIS instrument Bin Tan a) and fraction vegetation absorbed photosynthetically active radiation (FPAR) products for broadleaf crops

Myneni, Ranga B.

315

Global Environmental Change 12 (2002) 197202 Increased crop damage in the US from excess precipitation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Global Environmental Change 12 (2002) 197­202 Increased crop damage in the US from excess Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, MS 90-4000, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA d Environmental Defense, 18 Tremont Street and worldwide have caused great damage to crop production. If the frequency of these weather extremes were

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

GEOCHEMICAL TESTING AND MODEL DEVELOPMENT - RESIDUAL TANK WASTE TEST PLAN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Test Plan describes the testing and chemical analyses release rate studies on tank residual samples collected following the retrieval of waste from the tank. This work will provide the data required to develop a contaminant release model for the tank residuals from both sludge and salt cake single-shell tanks. The data are intended for use in the long-term performance assessment and conceptual model development.

CANTRELL KJ; CONNELLY MP

2010-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

317

Characterization of flue gas residues from municipal solid waste combustors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solid residues recovered from treatment of flue gas resulting from the combustion of municipal solid waste (MSW) are of particular concern because of ever-increasing worldwide production rates and their concentrations of potentially hazardous transition elements and heavy metals. Three main residue types have been studied in this study: electrostatic precipitator ashes, wet filter cakes, and semidry scrubber residues. Using a large number of residues from two French MSW combustion (MSWC) facilities, the aim of this work is to determine their chemistry and mineralogy in order to shed light on their potential toxicity. The authors find that pollutant concentrations are dependent not only on the composition of MSW but also on the size of particles and flue gas treatment process. Using a procedure based on leaching, grain-size, density, and magnetic separations, the authors present a detailed description of the mineralogy of MSWC solid residues. These residues consist of a very heterogeneous assemblage of glasses, metals, and other crystals in which polluting elements are distributed. The results of this characterization will therefore help to contribute to the development of adequate waste management strategies.

Forestier, L.L. [CRPG-CNRS, Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France)] [CRPG-CNRS, Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); [ENSG, Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Libourel, G. [CRPG-CNRS, Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France)] [CRPG-CNRS, Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); [Univ. H. Poincare, Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France)

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Opportunities and Challenges for Nondestructive Residual Stress Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For a long time, nondestructive residual stress assessment has been one of the greatest opportunities as well as one of the greatest challenges for the NDE community, and probably it will remain so in the foreseeable future. The most critical issue associated with nondestructive residual stress assessment seems to be that of selectivity. Numerous NDE methods have been found to be sufficiently sensitive to the presence of residual stress, but unfortunately also rather sensitive to other spurious variations that usually accompany residual stresses, such as anisotropic texture, microstructural inhomogeneity, plastic deformation, etc., which could interfere with, or even overshadow, the elastic strain caused by the sought residual stress. The only sufficiently selective NDE method that is more or less immune from these spurious effects is X-ray diffraction measurement, which however does not have the required penetration depth in most applications unless high-energy neutron radiation is used. It is timely for the community to sit back and ask where we are in this important area. This paper presents an overview of the various indirect techniques that have been used to measure residual stress in the past. It is shown that traditional techniques have a number of limitations, which have spurred several recent research programs. Some of the new techniques that are presently being examined in the NDE community are reviewed and the current status of these research efforts is assessed.

Nagy, P. B. [Department of Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio 45221-0070 (United States)

2006-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

319

SO/sub 2/ dose-response sensitivity classification data for crops and natural vegetation species  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the past several years studies have been made on the interaction of sulfur dioxide (SO/sub 2/) and vegetation by performing field research and by developing analytical procedures for applying field observation data to energy impact assessments. As a result of this work, numerous reports have been prepared on crop-pollutant interactions, such as dose-response data; on the applications of such data to screening approaches for identifying crops at risk; and on models that predict crop yield reductions from point source emissions of SO/sub 2/. Data that were used for these studies, such as the crop-at-risk screening procedure, are presented in this report. Maps are also presented that show the national distribution of SO/sub 2/-sensitive crops and natural vegetation.

Irving, P.M.; Ballou, S.W.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

A methodology for estimating the residual contamination contribution to the source term in a spent-fuel transport cask  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the ranges of the residual contamination that may build up in spent-fuel transport casks. These contamination ranges are calculated based on data taken from published reports and from previously unpublished data supplied by cask transporters. The data involve dose rate measurements, interior smear surveys, and analyses of water flushed out of cask cavities during decontamination operations. A methodology has been developed to estimate the effect of residual contamination on spent-fuel cask containment requirements. Factors in estimating the maximum permissible leak rates include the form of the residual contamination; possible release modes; internal gas-borne depletion; and the temperature, pressure, and vibration characteristics of the cask during transport under normal and accident conditions. 12 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs.

Sanders, T.L. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Jordan, H. (EG and G Rocky Flats, Inc., Golden, CO (United States). Rocky Flats Plant); Pasupathi, V. (Battelle, Columbus, OH (United States)); Mings, W.J. (USDOE Idaho Field Office, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)); Reardon, P.C. (GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States))

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including crop residue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Incinerator residue in bituminous base construction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for use of the material in a bituminous base. Preliminary investigation on the optimum mix design included Hveem stability, Marshall stability and Durability tests, A test section consisting of the experimental hot-mixed pavement, littercrete, and a... for flexural fatigue tests, Hveem and Marshall stabilities, thermal expansion, direct tension, splitting tensile and Schmidt tests. Four in. (10. 2 cm. ) diameter cores were taken after compaction (before traffic) and after six months in service. Samples...

Haynes, Joseph Anthony

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

E-Print Network 3.0 - assess residue contributions Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Waste Incinerators in England and Summary: . To assess the risks to health from ash and air pollution control residues, the Agency assessed the risks... Solid Residues from...

323

E-Print Network 3.0 - acceptable residual magnetic Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

residual limb. A small Neodymium-Iron-Boron magnet... of a small permanent magnet into the distal residual ... Source: Peshkin, Michael A.- Department of Mechanical...

324

Hanford tank residual waste – contaminant source terms and release models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Residual waste is expected to be left in 177 underground storage tanks after closure at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Hanford Site in Washington State (USA). In the long term, the residual wastes represent a potential source of contamination to the subsurface environment. Residual materials that cannot be completely removed during the tank closure process are being studied to identify and characterize the solid phases and estimate the release of contaminants from these solids to water that might enter the closed tanks in the future. As of the end of 2009, residual waste from five tanks has been evaluated. Residual wastes from adjacent tanks C-202 and C-203 have high U concentrations of 24 and 59 wt%, respectively, while residual wastes from nearby tanks C-103 and C-106 have low U concentrations of 0.4 and 0.03 wt%, respectively. Aluminum concentrations are high (8.2 to 29.1 wt%) in some tanks (C-103, C-106, and S-112) and relatively low (<1.5 wt%) in other tanks (C-202 and C-203). Gibbsite is a common mineral in tanks with high Al concentrations, while non-crystalline U-Na-C-O-P±H phases are common in the U-rich residual wastes from tanks C-202 and C-203. Iron oxides/hydroxides have been identified in all residual waste samples studied to date. Contaminant release from the residual wastes was studied by conducting batch leach tests using distilled deionized water, a Ca(OH)2-saturated solution, or a CaCO3-saturated water. Uranium release concentrations are highly dependent on waste and leachant compositions with dissolved U concentrations one or two orders of magnitude higher in the tests with high U residual wastes, and also higher when leached with the CaCO3-saturated solution than with the Ca(OH)2-saturated solution. Technetium leachability is not as strongly dependent on the concentration of Tc in the waste, and it appears to be slightly more leachable by the Ca(OH)2-saturated solution than by the CaCO3-saturated solution. In general, Tc is much less leachable (<10 wt% of the available mass in the waste) than previously predicted. This may be due to the coprecipitation of trace concentrations of Tc in relatively insoluble phases such as Fe oxide/hydroxide solids.

Deutsch, William J.; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Krupka, Kenneth M.; Lindberg, Michael J.; Serne, R. Jeffrey

2011-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

325

Manual for implementing residual radioactive material guidelines using RESRAD, Version 5.0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This manual presents information for implementing US Department of Energy (DOE) guidelines for residual radioactive material. It describes the analysis and models used to derive site-specific guidelines for allowable residual concentrations of radionuclides in soil and the design and use of the RESRAD computer code for calculating doses, risks, and guideline values. It also describes procedures for implementing DOE policy for reducing residual radioactivity to levels that are as low as reasonably achievable. Two new pathways, radon inhalation and soil ingestion, have been added to RESRAD. Twenty-seven new radionuclides have also been added, and the cutoff half-life for associated radionuclides has been reduced to six months. Other major improvements to the RESRAD code include the ability to run sensitivity analyses, the addition of graphical output, user-specified dose factors, updated databases, an improved groundwater transport model, optional input of a groundwater concentration and a solubility constant, special models for tritium and carbon-14, calculation of cancer incidence risk, and the use of a mouse with menus.

Yu, C.; Zielen, A.J.; Cheng, J.J. [and others

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Isomer residual ratio of odd-odd isotope {sup 180}Ta in supernova nucleosynthsis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The nucleosynthesis of {sup 180}Ta has remained an unsolved problem and as its origin many nucleosynthesis mechanisms have been proposed. This isotope has the unique feature that the naturally occurring abundance of {sup 180}Ta is actually a meta-stable isomer (half-life of >=10{sup 15} yr), while the ground state is a 1{sup +} unstable state which beta-decays with a half-life of only 8.15 hr. We have made a new time-dependent calculation of {sup 180}Ta meta-stable isomer residual ratio after supernova neutrino-induced reactions. This residual isomer ratio is crucial for understanding the production and survival of this naturally occurring rare isotope. We have constructed a new model under temperature evolution after type II supernova explosion. We include the explicit linking between the isomer and all known excited states and found that the residual ratio is insensitive to astrophysical parameters such as neutrino energy spectrum, explosion energy, decay time constant. We find that the explicit time evolution of the synthesis of {sup 180}Ta avoids the overproduction relative to {sup 138}La for a neutrino process neutrino temperature of 4 MeV.

Hayakawa, Takehito [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Kizugawa, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Kajino, Toshitaka [National Astronomical Observatory, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Chiba, Satoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-11 (Japan); Mathews, Grant [Enter for Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States)

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Through Energy Crops in the U.S. With Implications for Asian-Pacific Countries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

into energy crop production will most likely carry this price through increased purchasing cost and all energy the production of energy crops and other agricultural mitigation strategies. This analysis estimates the economicGreenhouse Gas Mitigation Through Energy Crops in the U.S. With Implications for Asian

McCarl, Bruce A.

328

CO2 fluxes of transitional bioenergy crops: effect of land conversion during the first year of cultivation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CO2 fluxes of transitional bioenergy crops: effect of land conversion during the first year of Environmental Sciences, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606, USA, wGreat Lakes Bioenergy Research Center be invoked in the first year by conversion of grasslands to biofuel crops. Keywords: bioenergy crops, carbon

Chen, Jiquan

329

Each cotton season presents it own unique challenges. Crop management decisions are largely based on current conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Each cotton season presents it own unique challenges. Crop management decisions are largely based of the early growth and development of a cotton crop can provide an objective gauge to evaluate this crop's progress, regardless of the season's challenges. Compared to most plants, cotton's early season growth

Mukhtar, Saqib

330

Photo Credit: Mike Kuhman Sign-up for the USDA Crop Disaster Program anticipated in March 2005  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, a problem with sign- up dates for the Noninsured Crop Disaster Assistance Program was addressed. The USDA by damaging weather. The Crop Disaster Program, or CDP, is fully funded under this legislation the Noninsured Crop Disaster Assistance Program, or NAP. However, these assistance programs are different

Florida, University of

331

Measuring depth profiles of residual stress with Raman spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Knowledge of the variation of residual stress is a very important factor in understanding the properties of machined surfaces. The nature of the residual stress can determine a part`s susceptibility to wear deformation, and cracking. Raman spectroscopy is known to be a very useful technique for measuring residual stress in many materials. These measurements are routinely made with a lateral resolution of 1{mu}m and an accuracy of 0.1 kbar. The variation of stress with depth; however, has not received much attention in the past. A novel technique has been developed that allows quantitative measurement of the variation of the residual stress with depth with an accuracy of 10nm in the z direction. Qualitative techniques for determining whether the stress is varying with depth are presented. It is also demonstrated that when the stress is changing over the volume sampled, errors can be introduced if the variation of the stress with depth is ignored. Computer aided data analysis is used to determine the depth dependence of the residual stress.

Enloe, W.S.; Sparks, R.G.; Paesler, M.A.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Catalytic Hydrothermal Gasification of Lignin-Rich Biorefinery Residues and Algae Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the results of the work performed by PNNL using feedstock materials provided by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, KL Energy and Lignol lignocellulosic ethanol pilot plants. Test results with algae feedstocks provided by Genifuel, which provided in-kind cost share to the project, are also included. The work conducted during this project involved developing and demonstrating on the bench-scale process technology at PNNL for catalytic hydrothermal gasification of lignin-rich biorefinery residues and algae. A technoeconomic assessment evaluated the use of the technology for energy recovery in a lignocellulosic ethanol plant.

Elliott, Douglas C.; Neuenschwander, Gary G.; Hart, Todd R.; Rotness, Leslie J.; Zacher, Alan H.; Santosa, Daniel M.; Valkenburt, Corinne; Jones, Susanne B.; Tjokro Rahardjo, Sandra A.

2009-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

333

Strengthening, Crack Arrest And Multiple Cracking In Brittle Materials Using Residual Stresses.  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Embodiments include a method for forming a glass which displays visible cracking prior to failure when subjected to predetermined stress level that is greater than a predetermined minimum stress level and less than a failure stress level. The method includes determining a critical flaw size in the glass and introducing a residual stress profile to the glass so that a plurality of visible cracks are formed prior to failure when the glass is subjected to a stress that is greater than the minimum stress level and lower than the critical stress. One method for forming the residual stress profile includes performing a first ion exchange so that a first plurality of ions of a first element in the glass are exchanged with a second plurality of ions of a second element that have a larger volume than the first ions. A second ion exchange is also performed so that a plurality of the second ions in the glass are exchanged back to ions of the first element.

Green, David J. (State College, PA); Sglavo, Vincenzo M. (Roncegno, IT); Tandon, Rajan (Fremont, CA)

2003-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

334

DDT residues in human milk samples from Delhi, India  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The widespread use of DDT in India has resulted in increased levels of the insecticide in the ecosystem and, therefore, the potential possible health hazards has been voiced. DDT-residues excreted in milk have been reported from different parts of the world; however, very few reports did appear from India. In fact, there is no report on DDT-content in human milk from Delhi area where higher levels of DDT and BHC in human adipose tissues and blood have already been reported. Higher bioaccumulation of DDT might reflect the higher excretion of residues in milk. The authors have, therefore, attempted a systematic study to monitor DDT-residues in human milk samples collected from various hospitals of Delhi (India).

Zaidi, S.S.A.; Bhatnagar, V.K.; Banerjee, B.D.; Balakrishnan, G.; Shah, M.P.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Wave induced residual pore-water pressures in sandbeds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Subject: Ocean Engineering WAVE INDUCED RESIDUAL PORE-WATER PRESSURES IN SANDBEDS A Thesis by Jack W. Deyries Approved as to style and content by: J. B. Her bich (Chairman of Committee) Y. K. Lou (Member) W. A. Dunlap (Member) R. O. Reid (Member...-Water Pressure . . . . . 43 Development of Residual Pore-Mater Pressure 46 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 Wave Height Recording Pore-Water Pressure Recording Permeability of Sand Permeability of Glass Beads Wave Form (least steep) Wave Form (middle steepness...

DeVries, Jack Walter

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Power Lines and Crops Can Be Good Neighbors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two of the Pacific Northwest’s greatest economic assets are its wealth of agriculture and its clean and reliable electricity fueled largely by hydropower. Sometimes the two intersect. Transmission lines carrying electricity to the region’s farms, businesses and homes must, of necessity, span large areas where people grow crops and orchards. To ensure a safe and reliable flow of electricity across these expanses, trees and other vegetation must be managed to certain standards. At the same time, the Bonneville Power Administration — which owns and operates three-quarters of the region’s high-voltage transmission — recognizes the importance of our region’s agricultural bounty. We are committed to working with individuals and agricultural communities to facilitate ongoing land-use activities in transmission rights-of-way as long as those uses are compatible with transmission safety and reliability standards. Our goal with vegetation management is to keep you and your property safe while protecting the reliability of our region’s electricity system. By working together, BPA and landowners can protect the system and public safety.

none,

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

A Residual Mass Ballistic Testing Method to Compare Armor Materials or Components (Residual Mass Ballistic Testing Method)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A statistics based ballistic test method is presented for use when comparing multiple groups of test articles of unknown relative ballistic perforation resistance. The method is intended to be more efficient than many traditional methods for research and development testing. To establish the validity of the method, it is employed in this study to compare test groups of known relative ballistic performance. Multiple groups of test articles were perforated using consistent projectiles and impact conditions. Test groups were made of rolled homogeneous armor (RHA) plates and differed in thickness. After perforation, each residual projectile was captured behind the target and its mass was measured. The residual masses measured for each test group were analyzed to provide ballistic performance rankings with associated confidence levels. When compared to traditional V50 methods, the residual mass (RM) method was found to require fewer test events and be more tolerant of variations in impact conditions.

Benjamin Langhorst; Thomas M Lillo; Henry S Chu

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Establishing Crop Acreage Flexibility Restraints for Subregions of the Texas High Plains  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cropping pattern shifts in many aggregate linear programming (LP) models need to be constrained due to institutional, marketing machinery, and price uncertainty factors. The purpose of this study was to estimate constraints which are referred...

Condra, G. D.; Lacewell, R. D.

339

Climate change effects on winter chill for fruit crops in Germany  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dormancy release in deciduous fruit trees. Hortic Rev 7:239–effects on winter chill for fruit crops in Germany Abstracteffects of climate change on fruit production in Germany,

Luedeling, Eike; Blanke, Michael; Gebauer, Jens

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

South Carolina Pest Management Handbook for Field Crops -2013 TOBACCO HARVEST MANAGEMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

South Carolina Pest Management Handbook for Field Crops - 2013 265 TOBACCO HARVEST MANAGEMENT ahead to determine if chemical will cause yellowing. Mix in 40-60 gal water/A and apply at 40-60 psi

Stuart, Steven J.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including crop residue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Crop water stress under climate change uncertainty : global policy and regional risk  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fourty percent of all crops grown in the world today are grown using irrigation, and shifting precipitation patterns due to climate change are viewed as a major threat to food security. This thesis examines, in the framework ...

Gueneau, Arthur

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Collection Policy: SOIL, CROP AND ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES Subject Scope | Priority Tables | Other policies . . .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. q Microclimatology. q Air pollution. q Atmospheric modeling. q The Engineering Library hasCollection Policy: SOIL, CROP AND ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES Subject Scope | Priority Tables | Other; atmospheric phenomena, prediction, modeling; geographical information systems; soil survey; microbial

Angenent, Lars T.

343

Effects of Oilseed Meals on the Germination, Growth, and Survival of Crop and Weed Species  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oilseed crops are being widely evaluated for potential biodiesel production. Seed meal (SM) remaining after extracting oil may have use as a bioherbicide or organic fertilizer. Brassicaceae SM often contains glucosinolates that can hydrolyze...

Rothlisberger, Katie Lynn

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

344

Climate change effects on winter chill for fruit crops in Germany  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

chill for fruit crops in Germany Abstract To quantify thechange on fruit production in Germany, this study aimed atof typical winter chill in Germany around 2010, as well as

Luedeling, Eike; Blanke, Michael; Gebauer, Jens

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Miscanthus: A Review of European Experience with a Novel Energy Crop  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Miscanthus is a tall perennial grass which has been evaluated in Europe over the past 5-10 years as a new bioenergy crop. The sustained European interest in miscanthus suggests that this novel energy crop deserves serious investigation as a possible candidate biofuel crop for the US alongside switchgrass. To date, no agronomic trials or trial results for miscanthus are known from the conterminous US, so its performance under US conditions is virtually unknown. Speculating from European data, under typical agricultural practices over large areas, an average of about 8t/ha (3t/acre dry weight) may be expected at harvest time. As with most of the new bioenergy crops, there seems to be a steep ''learning curve.'' Establishment costs appear to be fairly high at present (a wide range is reported from different European countries), although these may be expected to fall as improved management techniques are developed.

Scurlock, J.M.O.

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Physiological Effects of Saline Water on Two Economically Important Horticultural Crops in South Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Citrus and watermelons are valuable economic crops worldwide, contributing approximately $120 million combined each year in Texas alone. Both citrus and watermelons are sensitive to saline conditions, which can be problematic in the Lower Rio...

Simpson, Catherine Ross

2013-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

347

Multisensor Fusion of Ground-based and Airborne Remote Sensing Data for Crop Condition Assessment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

provide applicators with guidance equipment configurations that can result in herbicide savings and optimized applications in other crops. The main focus of this research was to apply sensor fusion technology to ground-based and airborne imagery data...

Zhang, Huihui

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

348

Novel enabling technologies of gene isolation and plant transformation for improved crop protection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Meeting the needs of agricultural producers requires the continued development of improved transgenic crop protection products. The completed project focused on developing novel enabling technologies of gene discovery and plant transformation to facilitate the generation of such products.

Torok, Tamas

2013-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

349

Multi-Attribute Modelling of Economic and Ecological Impacts of Agricultural Innovations on Cropping Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on Cropping Systems Sara SCATASTA, Department of Environmental and Resources Economics, Environmental Management, Centre for European Economic Research, ZEW, Germany Justus WESSELER Environmental and Natural Resources Economics Group, Department of Social Science, Wageningen University, The Netherlands Matty DEMONT

Bohanec, Marko

350

[Article 1 of 7: Motivates and Includes the Consumer  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and include the consumer exist. Some examples include advanced two-way metering (AMI), demand response (DR), and distributed energy resources (DER). A common misconception is...

351

A History of Small Grain Crops in Texas: Wheat, Oats, Barley, Rye 1582-1976.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that the production in Texas increased from 41,729 in 1850 to 2,500,000 bushels in 1880. The Texas Almanac (1 10) records that Denton and Wilbarger Counties each produced 2 million bushels in * 1904. Farther south in Central Texas, settlement and crop...) records that Denton and Wilbarger Counties each produced 2 million bushels in * 1904. Farther south in Central Texas, settlement and crop production also were rapidly expanding (Tyler, 1 16). The Tennessee Colony settled at Nashville, below Waco...

Atkins, Irvin Milburn

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Effect of Potassium on Uptake of 137Cs in Food Crops Grown on Coral Soils: Annual Crops at Bikini Atoll  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1954 a radioactive plume from the thermonuclear device code named BRAVO contaminated the principal residential islands, Eneu and Bikini, of Bikini Atoll (11{sup o} 36 minutes N; 165{sup o} 22 minutes E), now part of the Republic of the Marshall Islands. The resulting soil radioactivity diminished greatly over the three decades before the studies discussed below began. By that time the shorter-lived isotopes had all but disappeared, but strontium-90 ({sup 90}Sr), and cesium-137, ({sup 137}Cs) were reduced by only one half-life. Minute amounts of the long-lived isotopes, plutonium-239+240 ({sup 239+240}Pu) and americium-241 ({sup 241}Am), were present in soil, but were found to be inconsequential in the food chain of humans and land animals. Rather, extensive studies demonstrated that the major concern for human health was {sup 137}Cs in the terrestrial food chain (Robison et al., 1983; Robison et al., 1997). The following papers document results from several studies between 1986 and 1997 aimed at minimizing the {sup 137}Cs content of annual food crops. The existing literature on radiocesium in soils and plant uptake is largely a consequence of two events: the worldwide fallout of 1952-58, and the fallout from Chernobyl. The resulting studies have, for the most part, dealt either with soils containing some amount of silicate clays and often with appreciable K, or with the short-term development of plants in nutrient cultures.

Stone, E R; Robinson, W

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Computer aided analysis for residual stress measurement using ultrasonic techniques  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to detect travel-times with a precision of 0. l nanoseconds and an accuracy of less than 2.5 nanoseconds. A residual stress reference standard developed for previous research was used as the sample to measure travel-times. The sample was designed...

Kypa, Jagan Mohan

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Removal of residual particulate matter from filter media  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for removing residual filter cakes that remain adhered to a filter after typical particulate removal methodologies have been employed, such as pulse-jet filter element cleaning, for all cleanable filters used for air pollution control, dust control, or powder control.

Almlie, Jay C; Miller, Stanley J

2014-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

355

PROPERTIES OF RESIDUALS FOR SPATIAL POINT PROCESSES A. BADDELEY,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PROPERTIES OF RESIDUALS FOR SPATIAL POINT PROCESSES A. BADDELEY, University of Western Australia J. MŘLLER, University of Aalborg A.G. PAKES, University of Western Australia Abstract For any point process & Statistics M019, University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Nedlands WA 6009, Australia Postal

Baddeley, Adrian

356

COMMUNICATION Are Residues in a Protein Folding Nucleus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COMMUNICATION Are Residues in a Protein Folding Nucleus Evolutionarily Conserved? Yan Yuan Tseng is the hallmark of life. It is important to understand how protein folding and evolution influence each other in protein folding nucleus as measured by experi- mental f-value and selection pressure as measured by v

Dai, Yang

357

AIAA-2001-0025 SPECTRUM FATIGUE LIFETIME AND RESIDUAL STRENGTH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on a typical fiberglass laminate configuration turbine blade fiberglass material has been undertaken under at various fractions of the lifetime turbine blade materials.. are consistent with the residual strength of fiberglass spectrum have been studied. Data have been obtained for materials produce results that may

358

Ammonia volatilization from soils with surface rice straw residue  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

rice residue and related factors on NH3 volatilization from an acid Beaumont clay (pH 5.4) and an alkaline Lake Charles clay (pH 7.4). The treatments in the greenhouse and lab consisted of all possible combinations of the following variables: surface...

Barghassa, Peyam

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Potential producers and their attitudes toward adoption of biomass crops in central Florida  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A recent study by the University of Florida, Center for Biomass Programs (1996) showed that biomass crops have potential as a new agricultural commodity in central Florida. Both herbaceous and woody biomass crops have high yields, and weather and soil conditions are favorable. In the Polk County area over 40,371 ha (100,000 A) of phosphate-mined land and about 161,486 ha (400,000 A) of pastureland may be available for biomass production at low opportunity cost. Phosphate land is owned by a few mining companies while pastureland is owned by or rented to cattlemen. Infrastructure for large-scale crop production, such as in the Midwest United States, does not presently exist in central Florida. Personal interviews were conducted with phosphate company managers and a mail survey was conducted with 940 landowners, with at least 16 ha (40 A) of agricultural land. Data were gathered related to decision making factors in growing biomass and other new crops. Results suggested that economic factors, particularly availability of an established market and an assured high return per acre were considered the most important factors. Lack of familiarity with new crops was an important barrier to their adoption. Potential net returns and production costs were considered the most important information needed to make decisions about growing biomass crops.

Rahmani, M.; Hodges, A.W. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Stricker, J.A. [Univ. of Florida, Bartow, FL (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

360

Sorption characteristics of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in aluminum smelter residues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High temperature carbon oxidation in primary aluminum smelters results in the release of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) into the environment. The main source of PAH are the anodes, which are composed of petroleum coke (black carbon, BC) and coal tar pitch. To elucidate the dominant carbonaceous phase controlling the environmental fate of PAH in aluminum smelter residues (coke BC and/or coal tar), the sorptive behavior of PAHs has been determined, using passive samplers and infinite-sink desorption methods. Samples directly from the wet scrubber were studied as well as ones from an adjacent 20-year old storage lagoon and roof dust from the smelter. Carbon-normalized distribution coefficients of native PAHs were 2 orders of magnitude higher than expected based on amorphous organic carbon (AOC)/water partitioning, which is in the same order of magnitude as reported literature values for soots and charcoals. Sorption isotherms of laboratory-spiked deuterated phenanthrene showed strong (about 100 times stronger than AOC) but nonetheless linear sorption in both fresh and aged aluminum smelter residues. The absence of nonlinear behavior typical for adsorption to BC indicates that PAH sorption in aluminum smelter residues is dominated by absorption into the semi-solid coal tar pitch matrix. Desorption experiments using Tenax showed that fresh smelter residues had a relatively large rapidly desorbing fraction of PAH (35-50%), whereas this fraction was strongly reduced (11-16%) in the lagoon and roof dust material. Weathering of the coal tar residue and/or redistribution of PAH between coal tar and BC phases could explain the reduced availability in aged samples. 38 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

Gijs D. Breedveld; Emilien Pelletier; Richard St. Louis; Gerard Cornelissen [Norwegian Geotechnical Institute, Oslo (Norway)

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including crop residue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Solid waste management of coal conversion residuals from a commercial-size facility: environmental engineering aspects. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Major residuals generated by the conversion process and its auxiliary operations include: (a) coal preparation wastes; (b) gasifier ash; (c) liquefaction solids-char; (d) tail gas or flue gas desulfurization sludge; (e) boiler flyash and bottom ash; (f) raw water treatment sludge, and; (g) biosludges from process wastewater treatment. Recovered sulfur may also require disposal management. Potential environmental and health impacts from each of the residues are described on the basis of characterization of the waste in the perspective of water quality degradation. Coal gasification and liquefaction systems are described in great detail with respect to their associated residuals. Management options are listed with the conclusion that land disposal of the major residual streams is the only viable choice. On-site versus off-site disposal is analyzed with the selection of on-site operations to reduce political, social and institutional pressures, and to optimize the costs of the system. Mechanisms for prevention of leachate generation are described, and various disposal site designs are outlined. It is concluded that co-disposal feasibility of some waste streams must be established in order to make the most preferred solid waste management system feasible. Capacity requirements for the disposal operation were calculated for a 50,000 bbl/day coal liquefaction plant or 250 million SCF/day gasification operation.

Bern, J.; Neufeld, R. D.; Shapiro, M. A.

1980-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

362

Rocky Mountain NP, Colorado Nitrogen emissions from a variety of human made sources, including ammonia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and gas production, wastewater treatment plants, landfills, fertilized crops, and livestock production comes into RMNP from both urban and rural areas in Colorado as well as from other states. Agricultural

MacDonald, Lee

363

The impact of including water constraints on food production within a CGE framework  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This research explores the long-term relationship between water resources, irrigated land use change and crop production within a computable general equilibrium modeling framework. The modeling approach is developed on a ...

Baker, Jonathan (Jonathan Early)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Biomarkers Core Lab Price List Does NOT Include  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

v3102014 Biomarkers Core Lab Price List Does NOT Include Kit Cost PURCHASED by INVESTIGATOR/1/2013 Page 1 of 5 #12;Biomarkers Core Lab Price List Does NOT Include Kit Cost PURCHASED by INVESTIGATOR

Grishok, Alla

365

Derivation of uranium residual radioactive material guidelines for the Shpack site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Residual radioactive material guidelines for uranium were derived for the Shpack site in Norton, Massachusetts. This site has been identified for remedial action under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The uranium guidelines were derived on the basis of the requirement that the 50-year committed effective dose equivalent to a hypothetical individual who lives or works in the immediate vicinity of the Shpack site should not exceed a dose of 100 mrem/yr following decontamination. The DOE residual radioactive material guideline computer code, RESRAD, which implements the methodology described in the DOE manual for implementing residual radioactive material guidelines, was used in this evaluation. Three potential scenarios were considered for the site; the scenarios vary with regard to time spent at the site, sources of water used, and sources of food consumed. The results of the evaluation indicate that the basic dose limit of 100 mrem/yr will not be exceeded for uranium (including uranium-234, uranium-235, and uranium-238) within 1000 years, provided that the soil concentration of combined uranium (uranium-234 and uranium-238) at the Shpack site does not exceed the following levels: 2500 pCi/g for Scenario A (recreationist: the expected scenario); 1100 pCi/g for Scenario B (industrial worker: a plausible scenario); and 53 pCi/g for Scenario C (resident farmer using a well water as the only water source: a possible but unlikely scenario). The uranium guidelines derived in this report apply to the combined activity concentration of uranium-234 and uranium-238 and were calculated on the basis of a dose of 100 mrem/yr. In setting the actual uranium guidelines for the Shpack site, DOE will apply the as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) policy to the decision-making process, along with other factors, such as whether a particular scenario is reasonable and appropriate. 8 refs., 2 figs., 8 tabs.

Cheng, J.J.; Yu, C.; Monette, F.; Jones, L.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

The Tully-Fisher Relation and Its Residuals for a Broadly Selected Sample of Galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We measure the relation between galaxy luminosity and disk circular velocity (the Tully-Fisher [TF] relation), in the g, r, i, and z-bands, for a broadly selected sample of galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, with the goal of providing well defined observational constraints for theoretical models of galaxy formation. The input sample of 234 galaxies has a roughly flat distribution of absolute magnitudes in the range -18.5 > Mr > -22, and our only morphological selection is an axis-ratio cut b/a < 0.6 to allow accurate inclination corrections. Long-slit spectroscopy yields usable H-alpha rotation curves for 162 galaxies. Observational errors, including distance errors due to peculiar velocities, are small compared to the intrinsic scatter of the TF relation. The slope of the forward TF relation steepens from -5.5 +/- 0.2 mag/log(km/s) in the g-band to -6.6 +/- 0.2 mag/log(km/s) in the z-band. The intrinsic scatter is approximately 0.4 mag in all bands. The scatter is not dominated by rare outliers or by any particular class of galaxies, though it drops slightly, to 0.36 mag, if we restrict the sample to nearly bulgeless systems. Correlations of TF residuals with other galaxy properties are weak: bluer galaxies are significantly brighter than average in the g-band but only marginally brighter in the i-band; more concentrated galaxies are slightly fainter than average; and the TF residual is virtually independent of half-light radius, contrary to the trend expected for gravitationally dominant disks. The observed residual correlations do not account for most of the intrinsic scatter, implying that this scatter is instead driven largely by variations in the ratio of dark to luminous matter within the disk galaxy population.

James Pizagno; Francisco Prada; David H. Weinberg; Hans-Walter Rix; Richard W. Pogge; Eva K. Grebel; Daniel Harbeck; Michael Blanton; J. Brinkmann; James E. Gunn

2007-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

367

Including Retro-Commissioning in Federal Energy Savings Performance Contracts  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Guidance document on the importance of (and steps to) including retro-commissioning in Federal energy savings performance contracts (ESPCs).

368

Structural group analysis of residues from Athabasca bitumen  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Although the processability of bitumen from tar sand is dependent on its chemical composition, the details of this relationship are poorly understood. In this study, residue fractions from Athabasca bitumen (topped at different temperatures) and hydrocracker and coker residues were analyzed in detail. Separated class fractions were subjected to elemental analysis, NMR and IR spectroscopy, and potentiometric titration. These data were combined mathematically to obtain a structural profile of each oil. This analysis defines the structural changes in asphaltene precipitates due to distillation and processing, as well as the quantitative changes in the overall structural composition of the oil. Hydrocarbon structures such as paraffinic chains and naphthenes show definite trends with distillation and processing.

Gray, M.R.; Choi, J.H.K.; Egiebor, N.O. (Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Chemical Engineering); Kirchen, R.P.; Sanford, E.C. (Syncrude Canada Ltd., Edmonton, AB (Canada))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Hydroconversion of heavy oils. [Residue of tar sand bitumen distillation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method is described for hydroconversion of feedstocks consisting essentially of at least one heavy hydrocarbon oil selected from the group consisting of residue of petroleum oil distillation and the residue of tar sand bitumen distillation to enhance the recovery of 350/sup 0/-650/sup 0/F boiling product fraction. The method comprises treating such feed stock with hydrogen at superatmospheric pressure and in the presence of finely divided active hydrogenation catalyst in consecutive reaction stages. An initial reaction stage is carried out at a temperature in the range of 780/sup 0/-825/sup 0/F, and a subsequent reaction stage is directly carried out after the initial reaction stage at a higher temperature in the range of 800/sup 0/F-860/sup 0/F, the temperature of the subsequent reaction stage being at least 20/sup 0/F higher than that of the initial reaction stage.

Garg, D.

1986-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

370

Residual stresses in dielectrics caused by metallization lines and pads  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Residual stresses in dielectrics and semiconductors induced by metal lines, pads and vias can have detrimental effects on the performance of devices and electronic packages. Analytical and numerical calculations of these stresses have been performed for two purposes. (1) To illustrate how these stresses relate to the residual stress in the metallization and its geometry; (2) to calibrate a piezo-spectroscopic method for measuring these stresses with high spatial resolution. The results of the calculations have been presented using non-dimensional parameters that both facilitate scaling and provide connections to the stresses in the metal, with or without yielding. Preliminary experimental results obtained for Au/Ge eutectic pads illustrate the potential of the method and the role of the stress analysis.

He, M.Y.; Lipkin, J.; Clarke, D.R. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States). Materials Dept.] [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States). Materials Dept.; Evans, A.G. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States). Div. of Applied Sciences] [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States). Div. of Applied Sciences; Tenhover, M. [Carborundum Co., Niagara Falls, NY (United States)] [Carborundum Co., Niagara Falls, NY (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

The Dissolution of Desicooler Residues in H-Canyon Dissolvers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of dissolution and characterization studies has been performed to determine if FB-Line residues stored in desicooler containers will dissolve using a modified H-Canyon processing flowsheet. Samples of desicooler materials were used to evaluate dissolving characteristics in the low-molar nitric acid solutions used in H-Canyon dissolvers. The selection for the H-Canyon dissolution of desicooler residues was based on their high-enriched uranium content and trace levels of plutonium. Test results showed that almost all of the enriched uranium will dissolve from the desicooler materials after extended boiling in one molar nitric acid solutions. The residue that contained uranium after completion of the extended boiling cycle consisted of brown solids that had agglomerated into large pieces and were floating on top of the dissolver solution. Addition of tenth molar fluoride to a three molar nitric acid solution containing boron did not dissolve remaining uranium from the brown solids. Only after boiling in an eight molar nitric acid-tenth molar fluoride solution without boron did remaining uranium and aluminum dissolve from the brown solids. The amount of uranium associated with brown solids would be approximately 1.4 percent of the total uranium content of the desicooler materials. The brown solids that remain in the First Uranium Cycle feed will accumulate at the organic/aqueous interface during solvent extraction operations. Most of the undissolved white residue that remained after extended boiling was aluminum oxide containing additional trace quantities of impurities. However, the presence of mercury used in H-Canyon dissolvers should complete the dissolution of these aluminum compounds.

Gray, J.H.

2003-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

372

Combustion of textile residues in a packed bed  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Textile is one of the main components in the municipal waste which is to be diverted from landfill for material and energy recovery. As an initial investigation for energy recovery from textile residues, the combustion of cotton fabrics with a minor fraction of polyester was investigated in a packed bed combustor for air flow rates ranging from 117 to 1638 kg/m{sup 2} h (0.027-0.371 m/s). Tests were also carried out in order to evaluate the co-combustion of textile residues with two segregated waste materials: waste wood and cardboard. Textile residues showed different combustion characteristics when compared to typical waste materials at low air flow rates below 819 kg/m{sup 2} h (0.186 m/s). The ignition front propagated fast along the air channels randomly formed between packed textile particles while leaving a large amount of unignited material above. This resulted in irregular behaviour of the temperature profile, ignition rate and the percentage of weight loss in the ignition propagation stage. A slow smouldering burn-out stage followed the ignition propagation stage. At air flow rates of 1200-1600 kg/m{sup 2} h (0.272-0.363 m/s), the bed had a maximum burning rate of about 240 kg/m{sup 2} h consuming most of the combustibles in the ignition propagation stage. More uniform combustion with an increased burning rate was achieved when textile residues were co-burned with cardboard that had a similar bulk density. (author)

Ryu, Changkook; Phan, Anh N.; Sharifi, Vida N.; Swithenbank, Jim [Sheffield University Waste Incineration Centre (SUWIC), Department of Chemical and Process Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom)

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

373

The effect of magnetic flutter on residual flow  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The hypothesis that stochastic magnetic fields disrupt zonal flows associated with ion temperature gradient turbulence saturation is investigated analytically with a residual flow calculation in the presence of magnetic flutter. The calculation starts from the time-asymptotic zero-beta residual flow of Rosenbluth and Hinton [Phys. Rev. Lett. 80, 724 (1998)] with the sudden application of an externally imposed, fixed magnetic field perturbation. The short-time electron response from radial charge loss due to magnetic flutter is calculated from the appropriate gyrokinetic equation. The potential evolution has quadratic behavior, with a zero crossing at finite time. The crossing time and its parametric dependencies are compared with numerical results from a gyrokinetic simulation of residual flow in the presence of magnetic flutter. The numerical and analytical results are in good agreement and support the hypothesis that the high-beta runaway of numerical simulations is a result of the disabling of zonal flows by finite-beta charge losses associated with magnetic flutter.

Terry, P. W.; Pueschel, M. J.; Carmody, D. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Nevins, W. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

374

Residual Stress Evaluation within a Crimped Splice Connector Assembly  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In power transmission, connectors play an important role in the efficiency and reliability of the system. Due to the increase of power demand and lack of new infrastructure, existing overhead power transmission lines often need to operate at temperatures higher than the original design criteria. However, this had led to the accelerated aging and degradation of splice connectors, which has been manifested by the formation of hot-spots that have been revealed by infrared imaging during inspection of transmission lines operating at elevated temperatures. The implications of connector aging is two-fold: (1) significant increase in resistivity of the splice connector (i.e., less efficient transmission of electricity) and (2) significant reduction in the connector clamping strength, which ultimately results in separation of the power transmission line at the joint. Therefore, the splice connector has become the weakest link in the electric power transmission infrastructure. The compressive residual stresses induced by the crimping process within the splice provide the clamping forces to secure the conductor and therefore, the determination of the state of residual stresses in splice connectors is a necessary requirement to provide an accurate estimate of their service lifetime. This paper presents a protocol of utilizing finite-element analysis and neutron scattering experiments for evaluating the residual stress fields within a crimped single-stage splice connector assembly.

Wang, Jy-An John [ORNL; An, Ke [ORNL; Lara-Curzio, Edgar [ORNL; Hubbard, Camden R [ORNL; King Jr, Thomas J [ORNL; Graziano, Joe [Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA); Chan, John [Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Global Simulation of Bioenergy Crop Productivity: Analytical framework and Case Study for Switchgrass  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Contemporary global assessments of the deployment potential and sustainability aspects of biofuel crops lack quantitative details. This paper describes an analytical framework capable of meeting the challenges associated with global scale agro-ecosystem modeling. We designed a modeling platform for bioenergy crops, consisting of five major components: (i) standardized global natural resources and management data sets, (ii) global simulation unit and management scenarios, (iii) model calibration and validation, (iv) high-performance computing (HPC) modeling, and (v) simulation output processing and analysis. A case study with the HPC- Environmental Policy Integrated Climate model (HPC-EPIC) to simulate a perennial bioenergy crop, switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) and global biomass feedstock analysis on grassland demonstrates the application of this platform. The results illustrate biomass feedstock variability of switchgrass and provide insights on how the modeling platform can be expanded to better assess sustainable production criteria and other biomass crops. Feedstock potentials on global grasslands and within different countries are also shown. Future efforts involve developing databases of productivity, implementing global simulations for other bioenergy crops (e.g. miscanthus, energycane and agave), and assessing environmental impacts under various management regimes. We anticipated this platform will provide an exemplary tool and assessment data for international communities to conduct global analysis of biofuel biomass feedstocks and sustainability.

Nair, S. Surendran [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)] [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Nichols, Jeff A. {Cyber Sciences} [ORNL; Post, Wilfred M [ORNL] [ORNL; Wang, Dali [ORNL] [ORNL; Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL] [ORNL; Kline, Keith L [ORNL] [ORNL; Wei, Yaxing [ORNL] [ORNL; Singh, Nagendra [ORNL] [ORNL; Kang, Shujiang [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Opportunities for Energy Crop Production Based on Subfield Scale Distribution of Profitability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Incorporation of dedicated herbaceous energy crops into row crop landscapes is a promising means to supply an expanding biofuel industry while increasing biomass yields, benefiting soil and water quality, and increasing biodiversity. Despite these positive traits energy crops remain largely unaccepted due to concerns over their practicality and cost of implementation. This paper presents a case study on Hardin County, Iowa to demonstrate how subfield decision making can be used to target candidate areas for conversion to energy crop production. The strategy presented integrates switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) into subfield landscape positions where corn (Zea mays L.) grain is modeled to operate at a net economic loss. The results of this analysis show that switchgrass integration has the potential to increase sustainable biomass production from 48 to 99% (depending on the rigor of conservation practices applied to corn stover collection) while also improving field level profitability. Candidate land area is highly sensitive to grain price (0.18 to 0.26 US$ kg-1) and dependent on the acceptable net profit for corn production (ranging from 0 to -1,000 US$ ha-1). This work presents the case that switchgrass can be economically implemented into row crop production landscapes when management decisions are applied at a subfield scale and compete against areas of the field operating at a negative net profit.

Ian Bonner; Kara Cafferty; David Muth Jr.; Mark Tomer

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

THE METHOD OF CONJUGATE RESIDUALS FOR SOLVING THE GALERKIN EQUATIONS ASSOCIATED WITH SYMMETRIC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

kind integral equations, conjugate gradient type methods, Galerkin method, regularization schemesTHE METHOD OF CONJUGATE RESIDUALS FOR SOLVING THE GALERKIN EQUATIONS ASSOCIATED WITH SYMMETRIC, the method of conjugate residuals is consid- ered. An a posteriori stopping rule is introduced

Plato, Robert

378

Making Photosynthetic Biofuel Renewable: Recovering Phosphorus from Residual Biomass J. M. Gifford and P. Westerhoff  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Making Photosynthetic Biofuel Renewable: Recovering Phosphorus from Residual Biomass J. M. Gifford to global warming. Biofuel from phototrophic microbes like algae and bacteria provides a viable substitute improves biofuel sustainability by refining phosphorus recycling. Biomass Production Residual Biomass

Hall, Sharon J.

379

E-Print Network 3.0 - aspartic acid residues Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Scott1 and Barry LStoddard 2* Summary: -links are each consistent with a parallel coiled coil structure, residues 1-36 of the aspartate receptor were... residues 23-180 of the...

380

E-Print Network 3.0 - acid residues involved Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

contacts, however... acid residues with small side-chains (Gly, Ala, Ser, Cys) allow tight helix packing by mediating strong... ) amino acid residues. We propose the use of the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including crop residue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

E-Print Network 3.0 - air-pollution-control residues leaching...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

leaching Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: air-pollution-control residues leaching Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Solid Residues from...

382

Fresh Way to Cut Combustion, Crop and Air Heating Costs Avoids Million BTU Purchases: Inventions and Innovation Combustion Success Story  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Success story written for the Inventions and Innovation Program about a new space heating method that uses solar energy to heat incoming combustion, crop, and ventilation air.

Wogsland, J.

2001-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

383

Regulating the Regulators: The Increased Role for the Federal Judiciary in Monitoring the Debate over Genetically Modified Crops  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

crops: soy, corn, and canola. 5 1 In 1996, three millionall soy, corn, cotton, and canola sold in the United States

Denton, Blake

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Crop and pasture response to climate change Francesco N. Tubiello*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and pasture plant species response to climate change. Topics include plant response to elevated CO2 will take place in developing countries, most of it in sub-Saharan Africa and Latin America (2, 4), while

385

Non-Traditional Soil Additives: Can They Improve Crop Production?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Non-traditional soil additives include soil conditioners such as organic materials and minerals, soil activators that claim to stimulate soil microbes or inoculate soil with new beneficial organisms, and wetting agents that may be marketed...

McFarland, Mark L.; Stichler, Charles; Lemon, Robert G.

2002-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

386

ASSESSMENT OF RESIDUAL STRESSES IN SRS AND HANFORD 3013 INNER AND CONVENIENCE CANS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chloride stress corrosion cracking (SCC) is a plausible corrosion mechanism for the stainless steel 3013 containers during their lifetime for plutonium material storage if sufficient electrolyte is present within the container. Contributing factors for SCC, such as fabrication and welding residual stresses, are present in the 3013 cans. Convenience and inner cans from both Hanford and SRS are made by a flow form process, which cold works the stainless steel during fabrication. Additionally, the inner cans also are sealed at the can top with a closure weld to the sealing plug. Only SRS and Hanford were tested since moisture levels were significant for SCC. As part of the 3013 corrosion plan for FY09, testing in a boiling magnesium chloride solution was performed on actual 3013 convenience and inner cans to determine if the residual stresses were sufficient for the initiation and propagation of SCC. Additional testing in a 40% calcium chloride solution was also performed on 304L stainless steel SCC coupons, i.e. stressed teardrop-shaped samples (teardrops), and an inner can welded top to provide comparative results and to assess the effect of residual stresses in a less aggressive environment. The testing performed under this task consisted of 3013 inner and convenience cans and 304L teardrops exposed to a boiling magnesium chloride solutions per ASTM G36 and a 40% calcium chloride solution at 100 C following the guidance of ASTM G123. Cracking occurred in all can types including the inner can bottom and welded top and the bottoms of the SRS and Hanford convenience cans when exposed to the boiling magnesium chloride solution at 155 C. Cracking occurred at different times indicative of the residual stress levels in the cans. 304L teardrops cracked in the shortest time interval and therefore provide a conservative estimate for can performance. Testing in a 40% calcium chloride solution at 100 C demonstrated that cracking occurs in a less aggressive environment but at significantly longer times than in the boiling magnesium chloride. Vapor space cracking was also found to occur in the inner can welded top exposed over the boiling magnesium chloride solution and on 304L teardrops exposed over a hot calcium chloride solution.

Mickalonis, J.

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Applications of RESRAD family of computer codes to sites contaminated with radioactive residues.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The RESIL4D family of computer codes was developed to provide a scientifically defensible answer to the question ''How clean is clean?'' and to provide useful tools for evaluating human health risk at sites contaminated with radioactive residues. The RESRAD codes include (1) RESRAD for soil contaminated with radionuclides; (2) RESRAD-BUILD for buildings contaminated with radionuclides; (3) RESRAD-CHEM for soil contaminated with hazardous chemicals; (4) RESRAD-BASELINE for baseline risk assessment with measured media concentrations of both radionuclides and chemicals; (5) RESRAD-ECORISK for ecological risk assessment; (6) RESRAD-RECYCLE for recycle and reuse of radiologically contaminated metals and equipment; and (7) RESRAD-OFFSITE for off-site receptor radiological dose assessment. Four of these seven codes (RESRAD, RESRAD-BUILD, RESRAD-RECYCLE, and RESRAD-OFFSITE) also have uncertainty analysis capabilities that allow the user to input distributions of parameters. RESRAD has been widely used in the United States and abroad and approved by many federal and state agencies. Experience has shown that the RESRAD codes are useful tools for evaluating sites contaminated with radioactive residues. The use of RESRAD codes has resulted in significant savings in cleanup cost. Analysis of 19 site-specific uranium guidelines is discussed in the paper.

Yu, C.; Kamboj, S.; Cheng, J.-J.; LePoire, D.; Gnanapragasam, E.; Zielen, A.; Williams, W. A.; Wallo, A.; Peterson, H.

1999-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

388

Residual-oil-saturation-technology test, Bell Creek Field, Montana. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A field test was conducted of the technology available to measure residual oil saturation following waterflood secondary oil recovery processes. The test was conducted in a new well drilled solely for that purpose, located immediately northwest of the Bell Creek Micellar Polymer Pilot. The area where the test was conducted was originally drilled during 1968, produced by primary until late 1970, and was under line drive waterflood secondary recovery until early 1976, when the area was shut in at waterflood depletion. This report presents the results of tests conducted to determine waterflood residual oil saturation in the Muddy Sandstone reservoir. The engineering techniques used to determine the magnitude and distribution of the remaining oil saturation included both pressure and sidewall cores, conventional well logs (Dual Laterolog - Micro Spherically Focused Log, Dual Induction Log - Spherically Focused Log, Borehole Compensated Sonic Log, Formation Compensated Density-Compensated Neutron Log), Carbon-Oxygen Logs, Dielectric Logs, Nuclear Magnetism Log, Thermal Decay Time Logs, and a Partitioning Tracer Test.

Not Available

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Burning Forest Residues231 Corstorphine Road www.forestry.gov.uk  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, for disposal of coppice, to reduce specific weeds and to aid land use conversion. BURNING RESIDUES: TYPES

390

Residual Stress Relaxation and Microstructure in ZnO Thin Films Istem Ozena  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to be eliminated during deposition. Introduction In this study, the decay of the residual stressesResidual Stress Relaxation and Microstructure in ZnO Thin Films Istem Ozena and Mehmet Ali Gulgunb. a istem@sabanciuniv.edu b m-gulgun@sabanciuniv.edu Keywords: ZnO, thin films, residual stress

Yanikoglu, Berrin

391

NONLINEAR SAW PROPAGATION IN THIN-FILM SYSTEMS WITH RESIDUAL STRESS* R. E. Kumon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

harmonics. I. INTRODUCTION AND MOTIVATION The thin-film deposition process can create large residualNONLINEAR SAW PROPAGATION IN THIN-FILM SYSTEMS WITH RESIDUAL STRESS* R. E. Kumon National Institute is the residual stress. The effective elas- tic constants and density are given by Ceff ijkl = Cijkl(1 - eres

392

Microstructure, residual stress, and fracture of sputtered TiN films Liqiang Zhang a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Microstructure, residual stress, and fracture of sputtered TiN films Liqiang Zhang a , Huisheng Keywords: TiN films Residual stress Hardness Fracture toughness Morphology, structure, residual stress, hardness, and fracture toughness of magnetron sputtered titanium nitride (TiN) thin films, deposited at 300

Volinsky, Alex A.

393

Using mobile distributed pyrolysis facilities to deliver a forest residue resource for bio-fuel production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

reduces the energy content of forest residues delivered to a bio-fuel facility as mobile facilities use by bio-oil, bio-slurry and torrefied wood is 45%, 65% and 87% of the initial forest residue energyUsing mobile distributed pyrolysis facilities to deliver a forest residue resource for bio

Victoria, University of

394

Prediction of Protein Interaction Sites From Sequence Profile and Residue Neighbor List  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Prediction of Protein Interaction Sites From Sequence Profile and Residue Neighbor List Huan Protein­protein interaction sites are predicted from a neural network with sequence profiles correctly predicted residues account for 65% of the 11,805 residues making up the 129 interfaces. The main

Weston, Ken

395

analysis including plasma: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Assembly 2010 Space Plasmas in the Solar System, including Planetary Magnetospheres (D) Solar Variability, Cosmic Rays and Climate (D21) GEOMAGNETIC ACTIVITY AT HIGH-LATITUDE:...

396

Energy Department Expands Gas Gouging Reporting System to Include...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Washington, DC - Energy Secretary Samuel W. Bodman announced today that the Department of Energy has expanded its gas gouging reporting system to include a toll-free telephone...

397

PLOT: A UNIX PROGRAM FOR INCLUDING GRAPHICS IN DOCUMENTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

simple, easy-to-read graphics language designed specificallyPROGRAM FOR INCLUDING GRAPHICS IN DOCUMENTS Pavel Curtismeanings as in the GRAFPAC graphics system. Definl. ~ tions

Curtis, Pavel

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

U-182: Microsoft Windows Includes Some Invalid Certificates  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The operating system includes some invalid intermediate certificates. The vulnerability is due to the certificate authorities and not the operating system itself.

399

The effect of irrigated cropping systems on certain soil physical properties of Willacy fine sandy loam  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

By SHIRAJ HOSSAIH KHAH Approved a to style and content by: g. Cha n of Cosssittee H of the Depa ent of Agronoay / August 1958 Thanks are due to Dr. M. E. Bloodworth, Associate Professor, and Dr. H. H. Hampton, Professor of Agronomy, of the A. 6 M... percolatioa rate of water in centineters per hour in 0-6, 6-12, and 12-18 inch saturated field cores as influenced by different cropping systens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . , ~ . 22 4. Average bulk density of field cores under different cropping systens...

Khan, Shiraj Hossain

1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Energy Transitions: A Systems Approach Including Marcellus Shale Gas Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Transitions: A Systems Approach Including Marcellus Shale Gas Development A Report Transitions: A Systems Approach Including Marcellus Shale Gas Development Executive Summary In the 21st the Marcellus shale In addition to the specific questions identified for the case of Marcellus shale gas in New

Angenent, Lars T.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including crop residue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Articles which include chevron film cooling holes, and related processes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An article is described, including an inner surface which can be exposed to a first fluid; an inlet; and an outer surface spaced from the inner surface, which can be exposed to a hotter second fluid. The article further includes at least one row or other pattern of passage holes. Each passage hole includes an inlet bore extending through the substrate from the inlet at the inner surface to a passage hole-exit proximate to the outer surface, with the inlet bore terminating in a chevron outlet adjacent the hole-exit. The chevron outlet includes a pair of wing troughs having a common surface region between them. The common surface region includes a valley which is adjacent the hole-exit; and a plateau adjacent the valley. The article can be an airfoil. Related methods for preparing the passage holes are also described.

Bunker, Ronald Scott; Lacy, Benjamin Paul

2014-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

402

African Crop Science Journal, Vol. 22, No. 1, pp. 59 -67 ISSN 1021-9730/2014 $4.00 Printed in Uganda. All rights reserved 2014, African Crop Science Society  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Uganda. All rights reserved © 2014, African Crop Science Society MORPHOLOGICAL DIVERSITY OF TROPICAL, Makerere University, P. O. Box 7062, Kampala, Uganda 1 National Crops Resources Research Institute, Namulonge, P. O. Box 7081, Kampala, Uganda 2 University of California, Department of Plant Sciences/MS1

Gepts, Paul

403

Biodiesel is produced from a wide variety of oilseed crops. In Europe, canola is the major biodiesel crop while in the U.S. soybeans dominate. Montana State University researchers have developed a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technology Biodiesel is produced from a wide variety of oilseed crops. In Europe, canola is the major biodiesel crop while in the U.S. soybeans dominate. Montana State University researchers have plants used for biodiesel. Seed oil content increases are induced by puroindoline genes which promote

Maxwell, Bruce D.

404

Effects of Irrigating with Treated Oil and Gas Product Water on Crop Biomass and Soil Permeability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Demonstrating effective treatment technologies and beneficial uses for oil and gas produced water is essential for producers who must meet environmental standards and deal with high costs associated with produced water management. Proven, effective produced-water treatment technologies coupled with comprehensive data regarding blending ratios for productive long-term irrigation will improve the state-of-knowledge surrounding produced-water management. Effective produced-water management scenarios such as cost-effective treatment and irrigation will discourage discharge practices that result in legal battles between stakeholder entities. The goal of this work is to determine the optimal blending ratio required for irrigating crops with CBNG and conventional oil and gas produced water treated by ion exchange (IX), reverse osmosis (RO), or electro-dialysis reversal (EDR) in order to maintain the long term physical integrity of soils and to achieve normal crop production. The soils treated with CBNG produced water were characterized with significantly lower SAR values compared to those impacted with conventional oil and gas produced water. The CBNG produced water treated with RO at the 100% treatment level was significantly different from the untreated produced water, while the 25%, 50% and 75% water treatment levels were not significantly different from the untreated water. Conventional oil and gas produced water treated with EDR and RO showed comparable SAR results for the water treatment technologies. There was no significant difference between the 100% treated produced water and the control (river water). The EDR water treatment resulted with differences at each level of treatment, which were similar to RO treated conventional oil and gas water. The 100% treated water had SAR values significantly lower than the 75% and 50% treatments, which were similar (not significantly different). The results of the greenhouse irrigation study found the differences in biomass production between each soil were significant for Western Wheatgrass and Alfafla. The Sheridan sandy loam soil resulted in the highest production for western wheatgrass and alfalfa while the X-ranch sandy loam had the lowest production rate for both plants. Plant production levels resulting from untreated CBNG produced water were significantly higher compared to untreated conventional oil and gas produced water. However, few differences were found between water treatments. The biomass produced from the greenhouse study was analyzed for elemental composition and for forage value. Elemental composition indentified several interesting findings. Some of the biomass was characterized with seemly high boron and sodium levels. High levels of boron found in some of the biomass was unexpected and may indicate that alfalfa and western wheatgrass plants may have been impacted by either soil or irrigation water containing high boron levels. Plants irrigated with water treated using EDR technology appeared to contain higher levels of boron with increased levels of treatment. Forage evaluations were conducted using near infrared reflectance spectroscopy. The data collected show small differences, generally less than 10%, between produced water treatments including the no treatment and 100% treatment conditions for each plant species studied. The forage value of alfalfa and western wheatgrass did not show significant tendencies dependent on soil, the amount of produced water treatment, or treatment technology.

Terry Brown; Jeffrey Morris; Patrick Richards; Joel Mason

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

405

Ion Mobility Separation of Isomeric Phosphopeptides from a Protein with Variant Modification of Adjacent Residues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS), and particularly differential IMS or field asymmetric waveform IMS (FAIMS), was recently shown capable of separating post-translationally modified peptides with variant PTM localization. However, that work was limited to a model peptide with serine phosphorylation on fairly distant alternative sites. Here, we demonstrate that FAIMS (coupled to ESI/MS) can broadly baseline-resolve variant phosphopeptides from a biologically modified human protein, including those involving phosphorylation of different residues and adjacent sites that existing MS/MS methods are most challenged to distinguish. Singly and doubly phosphorylated variants can be resolved equally well and identified without dissociation, based on accurate separation properties. The results are unchanged over a range of infusion solvent pH, hence present approach should work in conjunction with chromatographic separations using a mobile phase gradient.

Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.; Singer, David; Smith, Richard D.; Hoffmann, Ralf

2011-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

406

Demonstration of a computer model for residual radioactive material guidelines, RESRAD  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A computer model was developed to calculate residual radioactive material guidelines for the US Department of Energy (DOE). This model, called RESRAD, can be run on IBM or IBM-compatible microcomputer. Seven potential exposure pathways from contaminated soil are analyzed, including external radiation exposure and internal radiation exposure from inhalation and food digestion. The RESRAD code has been applied to several DOE sites to derive soil cleanup guidelines. The experience gained indicates that a comprehensive set of site-specific hydrogeologic and geochemical input parameters must be used for a realistic pathway analysis. The RESRAD code is a useful tool; it is easy to run and very user-friendly. 6 refs., 12 figs.

Yu, C.; Yuan, Y.C.; Zielen, A.J.; Wallo, A. III (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA); USDOE, Washington, DC (USA))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Submillimeter residual losses in high-{Tc} superconductors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bolometry was used obtain accurate submillimeter residual loss data for epitaxial films of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} (YBCO), Tl{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 10}, Tl{sub 2}CaBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 2}O{sub 8} (TCBCO), and Ba{sub 0.6}K{sub 0.4}BiO{sub 3} (BKBO). We were able to fit the absorptivity measured for Nb films to an Eliashberg strong coupling calculation; excellent agreement resulted between parameters from best fits and measured Residual Resistivity Ratio. Microwave surface resistance measurements made on the same YBCO and TCBCO films are in excellent agreement with submillimeter measurements. Absorptivities for all YBCO films studied are qualitatively similar, increasing smoothly with frequency, with no gap-like features below the well known absorption edge at 450 cm{sup {minus}1}. Losses in YBCO films were fit to a weakly coupled grain model for the a-b plane conductivity. Strong phonon structure was observed in TCBCO films between 60 and 700 cm{sup {minus}1} (2 THz and 23 THz); these losses could not be fitted to the simple weakly coupled grain model, in contrast to the case for other high-{Tc} superconductors where phonon structure observed in ceramics are is absent in epitaxial oriented films and crystals because of electronic screening due to high conductivity of a-b planes. Absorptivity data for the BKBO films all show a strong absorption onset near the BCS tunneling gap of 3.5 k{sub B}{Tc}. Comparison with strong coupling Eliashberg predictions and of a Kramers-Kronig analysis indicate that the absorption onset is consistent with a superconducting energy gap. Effects of magnetic field on residual losses in YBCO films show a resonant absorption feature in vicinity of predicted

Miller, D.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Cleaning residual NaK in the fast flux test facility fuel storage cooling system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), located on the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Reservation, is a liquid metal-cooled test reactor. The FFTF was constructed to support the U.S. Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor Program. The bulk of the alkali metal (sodium and NaK) has been drained and will be stored onsite prior to final disposition. Residual NaK needed to be removed from the pipes, pumps, heat exchangers, tanks, and vessels in the Fuel Storage Facility (FSF) cooling system. The cooling system was drained in 2004 leaving residual NaK in the pipes and equipment. The estimated residual NaK volume was 76 liters in the storage tank, 1.9 liters in the expansion tank, and 19-39 liters in the heat transfer loop. The residual NaK volume in the remainder of the system was expected to be very small, consisting of films, droplets, and very small pools. The NaK in the FSF Cooling System was not radiologically contaminated. The portions of the cooling system to be cleaned were divided into four groups: 1. The storage tank, filter, pump, and associated piping; 2. The heat exchanger, expansion tank, and associated piping; 3. Argon supply piping; 4. In-vessel heat transfer loop. The cleaning was contracted to Creative Engineers, Inc. (CEI) and they used their superheated steam process to clean the cooling system. It has been concluded that during the modification activities (prior to CEI coming onsite) to prepare the NaK Cooling System for cleaning, tank T-914 was pressurized relative to the In-Vessel NaK Cooler and NaK was pushed from the tank back into the Cooler and that on November 6, 2005, when the gas purge through the In-Vessel NaK Cooler was increased from 141.6 slm to 283.2 slm, NaK was forced from the In-Vessel NaK Cooler and it contacted water in the vent line and/or scrubber. The gases from the reaction then traveled back through the vent line coating the internal surface of the vent line with NaK and NaK reaction products. The hot gases also exited the scrubber through the stack and due to the temperature of the gas, the hydrogen auto ignited when it mixed with the oxygen in the air. There was no damage to equipment, no injuries, and no significant release of hazardous material. Even though the FSF Cooling System is the only system at FFTF that contains residual NaK, there are lessons to be learned from this event that can be applied to future residual sodium removal activities. The lessons learned are: - Before cleaning equipment containing residual alkali metal the volume of alkali metal in the equipment should be minimized to the extent practical. As much as possible, reconfirm the amount and location of the alkali metal immediately prior to cleaning, especially if additional evolutions have been performed or significant time has passed. This is especially true for small diameter pipe (<20.3 centimeters diameter) that is being cleaned in place since gas flow is more likely to move the alkali metal. Potential confirmation methods could include visual inspection (difficult in all-metal systems), nondestructive examination (e.g., ultrasonic measurements) and repeating previous evolutions used to drain the system. Also, expect to find alkali metal in places it would not reasonably be expected to be. - Staff with an intimate knowledge of the plant equipment and the bulk alkali metal draining activities is critical to being able to confirm the amount and locations of the alkali metal residuals and to safely clean the residuals. - Minimize the potential for movement of alkali metal during cleaning or limit the distance and locations into which alkali metal can move. - Recognize that when working with alkali metal reactions, occasional pops and bangs are to be anticipated. - Pre-plan emergency responses to unplanned events to assure responses planned for an operating reactor are appropriate for the deactivation phase.

Burke, T.M.; Church, W.R. [Fluor Hanford, PO Box 1000, Richland, Washington, 99352 (United States); Hodgson, K.M. [Fluor Government Group, PO Box 1050, Richland, Washington, 99352 (United States)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

409

Residual stresses in bakelite models induced by quenching  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and the bellows was extended to six inobes. Lifter proper focusing and using a Kodachrome type 4 film, separate piotures were made at openings f8, fll, f16, and f22 in order to provide for a suitable spread of exposure. Sodium vapor was used as the source... for determining the residual stresses or the elastic redistribution of stresses that occurs after the prototype has undergone some plastio deformation or heat treatment. The creep characteristics of bakelite, BT-61-893, become appreciable with temperatures...

Jarvi, Ray Victor

1952-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Radon transform on a space over a residue class ring  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The functions on a space of dimension N over the residue class ring Z{sub n} modulo n that are invariant with respect to the group GL(N,Z{sub n}) form a commutative convolution algebra. We describe the structure of this algebra and find the eigenvectors and eigenvalues of the operators of multiplication by elements of this algebra. The results thus obtained are applied to solve the inverse problem for the hyperplane Radon transform on Z{sup N}{sub n}. Bibliography: 2 titles.

Molchanov, Vladimir F [Tambov State University, Tambov (Russian Federation)

2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

411

The conserved glycine residues in the transmembrane domain of the Semliki Forest virus fusion protein are not required for assembly and fusion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The alphavirus Semliki Forest virus (SFV) infects cells via a low pH-triggered fusion reaction mediated by the viral E1 protein. Both the E1 fusion peptide and transmembrane (TM) domain are essential for membrane fusion, but the functional requirements for the TM domain are poorly understood. Here we explored the role of the five TM domain glycine residues, including the highly conserved glycine pair at E1 residues 415/416. SFV mutants with alanine substitutions for individual or all five glycine residues (5G/A) showed growth kinetics and fusion pH dependence similar to those of wild-type SFV. Mutants with increasing substitution of glycine residues showed an increasingly more stringent requirement for cholesterol during fusion. The 5G/A mutant showed decreased fusion kinetics and extent in fluorescent lipid mixing assays. TM domain glycine residues thus are not required for efficient SFV fusion or assembly but can cause subtle effects on the properties of membrane fusion.

Liao Maofu [Department of Cell Biology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, NY 10461 (United States); Kielian, Margaret [Department of Cell Biology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, NY 10461 (United States)]. E-mail: kielian@aecom.yu.edu

2005-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

412

Turbomachine injection nozzle including a coolant delivery system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An injection nozzle for a turbomachine includes a main body having a first end portion that extends to a second end portion defining an exterior wall having an outer surface. A plurality of fluid delivery tubes extend through the main body. Each of the plurality of fluid delivery tubes includes a first fluid inlet for receiving a first fluid, a second fluid inlet for receiving a second fluid and an outlet. The injection nozzle further includes a coolant delivery system arranged within the main body. The coolant delivery system guides a coolant along at least one of a portion of the exterior wall and around the plurality of fluid delivery tubes.

Zuo, Baifang (Simpsonville, SC)

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

413

Evaluating the potential use of winter cover crops in cornsoybean systems for sustainable co-production of food and fuel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in displacement of grain crops with dedicated bioenergy crops such as switch grass, miscanthus, and hybrid poplar. Meeting the ambitious goals that have been set for bioenergy production without impacting food production, specifically that by displacing food production it will lead to higher food prices, increased incidence

Minnesota, University of

414

Application for CALS-CCE 2013 Summer Internship Title of project: Development of willow bioenergy crop outreach and educational materials.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the key informational points. The student will learn a great deal about perennial energy crop cultivation crop outreach and educational materials. Worksite location (CCE association or associations where and intended outcomes (no more than 5-10 sentences): There is great potential for expanded cultivation of shrub

Keinan, Alon

415

Including costs of supply chain risk in strategic sourcing decisions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cost evaluations do not always include the costs associated with risks when organizations make strategic sourcing decisions. This research was conducted to establish and quantify the impact of risks and risk-related costs ...

Jain, Avani

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF STEEL WELDED COVERPLATE INCLUDING COMPOSITE DOUBLERS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

With the increasing focus on welded bridge members resulting in crack initiation and propagation, there is a large demand for creative solutions. One of these solutions includes the application of composite doublers over the critical weld. In order...

Petri, Brad

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

417

atlantic region including: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

R: L. Tossey, T. Beeson, Parks, B. TruittTNC, UD MPEO staff 2 Climate scenarios of sea level rise for the northeast Atlantic Ocean: a study including the effects of ocean...

418

T-603: Mac OS X Includes Some Invalid Comodo Certificates  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The operating system includes some invalid certificates. The vulnerability is due to the invalid certificates and not the operating system itself. Other browsers, applications, and operating systems are affected.

419

Limited Personal Use of Government Office Equipment including Information Technology  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The Order establishes requirements and assigns responsibilities for employees' limited personal use of Government resources (office equipment and other resources including information technology) within DOE, including NNSA. The Order is required to provide guidance on appropriate and inappropriate uses of Government resources. This Order was certified 04/23/2009 as accurate and continues to be relevant and appropriate for use by the Department. Certified 4-23-09. No cancellation.

2005-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

420

Quarry residuals RI/FS scoping document. [Weldon Spring quarry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to serve as a planning tool for the implementation of the Quarry Residual Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) process and to provide direct input to revising and updating the 1988 Work Plan for the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project (WSSRAP) Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study-Environmental Impact Statement for the Weldon Spring Site (RI/FS-EIS) (Peterson et al. 1988) for this effort. The scoping process is intended to outline the tasks necessary to develop and implement activities in compliance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act-National Environmental Policy Act (CERCLA-NEPA) process from detailed planning through the appropriate decision document. In addition to scoping the entire process, this document will serve as the primary tool for planning and accomplishing all activities to be developed in the Quarry Residual RI/FS Work Plan. Subsequent tasks are difficult to plan at this time. 10 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

Not Available

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including crop residue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

October 23, 2007 Artificial Chromosome Poised to Pump Up GM Crops with Extra Genes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of multigene "stacks" may help biofuel plants and other crops reach their potential A new method for creating and whistles such as better drought resistance, easier refinement into biofuels or even the ability spent thousands of years breeding plants for agriculture, but biofuels need much more work to reach

Copenhaver, Gregory P.

422

Characterization of forest crops with a range of nutrient and water treatments using AISA Hyperspectral Imagery.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research examined the utility of Airborne Imaging Spectrometer for Applications (AISA) hyperspectral imagery for estimating the biomass of three forest crops---sycamore, sweetgum and loblolly pine--planted in experimental plots with a range of fertilization and irrigation treatments on the Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina.

Gong, Binglei; Im, Jungho; Jensen, John, R.; Coleman, Mark; Rhee, Jinyoung; Nelson, Eric

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Runoff irrigation of crops with contrasting root and shoot development in northern Kenya: water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

after a heavy storm is guided into levelled basins. The standing water is allowed to infiltrate deep, the root distribution may change according to the water supply; little is known about water and rootRunoff irrigation of crops with contrasting root and shoot development in northern Kenya: water

Lehmann, Johannes

424

Solutions for elephant Loxodonta africana crop raiding in northern Botswana: moving away from symptomatic approaches  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solutions for elephant Loxodonta africana crop raiding in northern Botswana: moving away from Conflict between people and elephants in Africa is widespread yet many solutions target the symptoms of the problem need to be examined. Here we examine factors underlying spatial use by elephants and people along

Pretoria, University of

425

Early detection of oil-induced stress in crops using spectral and thermal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

such as drought, herbicide application, and volatile hydrocarbon and heavy metal pollution cause changes Zealand, Blenheim, P.O. Box 331, New Zealand Abstract. Oil pollution is a major source of environmental of crops for the early detection of stress caused by oil pollution. In a glasshouse, pot-grown maize

Blackburn, Alan

426

Robotics in Crop Production Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering, University of Illinois at  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Robotics in Crop Production Tony Grift Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering such as harvesting of citrus fruits, grapes, and raisins. An important part of Automation is the use of robots. Robotics in agriculture is not a new concept; in controlled environments (green houses), it has a his- tory

427

HumanWildlife Interactions 5(2):315320, Fall 2011 Canada goose crop damage abatement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Human­Wildlife Interactions 5(2):315­320, Fall 2011 Canada goose crop damage abatement in South% in 2006 and 80% in 2007, but the timing was important. Fields where abatement practices were applied early in the growing season had less damage than fields where they were applied later. Abatement practices that were

428

An experimental study of intraspecific competition within several forage crops (1).  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

., tall fescue Festuca arundinacea Schreb., lucerne Medicago sativa L. and red clover Trifolium pratense L. Departures from this general rule are discussed. Additional key-words : Cocksfoot, tall fescue, lucerne, red crops (lucerne, red clover, cocksfoot, tall fescue). This program was oriented towards two distinct

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

429

Crop Protection 24 (2005) 961970 Evaluation of potato late blight management utilizing host plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Crop Protection 24 (2005) 961­970 Evaluation of potato late blight management utilizing host plant contact fungicide fluazinam to control foliar potato late blight (Phytophthora infestans). Potato. and was either partially effective or ineffective in the susceptible cvs.. The study demonstrates that potato cvs

Douches, David S.

430

A System Dynamics Study of Carbon Cycling and Electricity Generation from Energy Crops  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Information Administration analyzed the implications of the bill and found that under such a policy renewable energy will increase, with the strongest response coming from biomass energy. Dedicated energy crops, an electric reliability organization for the western United States, Canada and Mexico. (This and other

Ford, Andrew

431

HorticulturAl & Forest crops 2014 Author Contact List 8-1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HorticulturAl & Forest crops 2014 Author Contact List 8-1 Asaro, Christopher Virginia Department science Virginia tech (0331) Blacksburg, VA 24061 (540) 231-5757 Bergh, J. Christopher Alson H. smith Jr pesticide programs Virginia tech (0409) Blacksburg, VA 24061 (540) 231-6543 Yoder, Keith S. Alson H. smith

Liskiewicz, Maciej

432

Introduction The dwarf sour cherry (Prunus cerasus L.) is an experimental and innovative crop  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Introduction The dwarf sour cherry (Prunus cerasus L.) is an experimental and innovative crop and flavour, increased cold hardiness, and a dwarf-size plant that make orchard maintenance and mechanized harvesting easier. Growers and fruit processors are showing keen interest as more acreage is being planted

Saskatchewan, University of

433

Grazing Strategies for Beef Production Escalating energy costs and alternative cropping systems for biofuels production have  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Grazing Strategies for Beef Production Escalating energy costs and alternative cropping systems with pasture-feedlot manage-· ment alternatives. Assess economic implications of beef production using an array character- istics of beef that may provide an alternative lean-to-fat composition for consum- ers. http

434

1 Alfalfa Insect Control Recommendations --E-220-WE-220-W Field Crops  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Alfalfa Insect Control Recommendations -- E-220-WE-220-W Field Crops Department of Entomology Read and Follow ALL Label Rate, Application, and Use Directions ALFALFA INSECT CONTROL RECOMMENDATIONS This publication is intended to aid pest managers in treating pest infestations in alfalfa during the growing. Pest

Ginzel, Matthew

435

Linkages among climate change, crop yields and MexicoUS cross-border migration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Linkages among climate change, crop yields and Mexico­US cross-border migration Shuaizhang Fenga assumed, with other factors held constant, by approximately the year 2080, climate change is estimated perspective given that many regions, espe- cially developing countries, are expected to experience significant

Oppenheimer, Michael

436

crop science, vol. 51, septemberoctober 2011 Along-term challenge faced by upland cotton (Gossypium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

crop science, vol. 51, september­october 2011 ReseaRch Along-term challenge faced by upland cotton by a fundamental shift in the cotton fiber market from a primarily domestically con- sumed product to one in which nearly two-thirds of the U.S. cot- ton is now exported. Since the international cotton fiber market

Chee, Peng W.

437

1900 CROP SCIENCE, VOL. 44, NOVEMBERDECEMBER 2004 Reducing the Genetic Vulnerability of Cotton  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1900 CROP SCIENCE, VOL. 44, NOVEMBER­DECEMBER 2004 Reducing the Genetic Vulnerability of Cotton. Lloyd May, and C. Wayne Smith change in cotton yields has steadily declined since 1985. The u.s. cotton (Gossypium spp.) production system By 1998, absolute cotton yields (not just the rate ofexemplifies

Chee, Peng W.

438

South Carolina Pest Management Handbook for Field Crops -2013 WEED CONTROL IN COTTON  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

South Carolina Pest Management Handbook for Field Crops - 2013 63 WEED CONTROL IN COTTON Mike Marshall, Extension Weed Specialist Preplant Burndown Herbicides for Weed Management in Cotton Herbicide is required before cotton planting. In general, CLARITY is less effective than 2,4-D LVE on cutleaf

Stuart, Steven J.

439

South Carolina Pest Management Handbook for Field Crops -2014 WEED CONTROL IN COTTON  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

South Carolina Pest Management Handbook for Field Crops - 2014 70 WEED CONTROL IN COTTON Mike Marshall, Extension Weed Specialist Preplant Burndown Herbicides for Weed Management in Cotton Herbicide is required before cotton planting. In general, CLARITY is less effective than 2,4-D LVE on cutleaf

Duchowski, Andrew T.

440

Price vs. weather shock hedging for cash crops: ex ante evaluation for cotton  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Price vs. weather shock hedging for cash crops: ex ante evaluation for cotton producers in Cameroon, we assess the risk mitigation capac- ity of weather index-based insurance for cotton farmers. We. Second, in accordance with the existing agronomical literature we find that the length of the cotton

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including crop residue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Assessing the individual contributions of variations in temperature, solar radiation and precipitation to crop yield  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Short Title:15 Contributions, Temperature, Solar radiation, Precipitation, Crop yield16 Page 1 of 41 The results showed that year-to-year variations in temperature, solar radiation and precipitation28 in solar radiation showed the strongest isolated impact on simulated yields.34 Its decrease caused

Robertson, Andrew W.

442

Predicting the net carbon exchanges of crop rotations in Europe with an agro-ecosystem model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Predicting the net carbon exchanges of crop rotations in Europe with an agro-ecosystem model S.Lehuger@art.admin.ch. Fax: (+41) 44 377 72 01. Phone: (+41) 44 377 75 13. hal-00414342,version2-1Sep2010 #12;Abstract Carbon and measuring land-atmosphere carbon exchanges from arable lands are important tasks to predict the influence

Boyer, Edmond

443

Effect of a Legume Cover Crop on Carbon Storage and Erosion in an Ultisol under Maize  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

143 CHAPTER 10 Effect of a Legume Cover Crop on Carbon Storage and Erosion in an Ultisol under...........................................................................................145 10.2.3 Carbon and Nitrogen Determination, and Other Analyses......................................145 10.2.4 Determinations of Runoff, Soil Losses, and Eroded Carbon

444

Derivation of residual radioactive material guidelines for uranium in soil at the Middlesex Sampling Plant Site, Middlesex, New Jersey  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Residual radioactive material guidelines for uranium in soil were derived for the Middlesex Sampling Plant (MSP) site in Middlesex, New Jersey. This site has been designated for remedial action under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) of the US Department of Energy. The site became contaminated from operations conducted in support of the Manhattan Engineer District (MED) and the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) between 1943 and 1967. Activities conducted at the site included sampling, storage, and shipment of uranium, thorium, and beryllium ores and residues. Uranium guidelines for single radioisotopes and total uranium were derived on the basis of the requirement that the 50-year committed effective dose equivalent to a hypothetical individual living or working in the immediate vicinity of the MSP site should not exceed a dose of 30 mrem/yr following remedial action for the current-use and likely future-use scenarios or a dose of 100 mrem/yr for less likely future-use scenarios. The RESRAD computer code, which implements the methodology described in the DOE manual for establishing residual radioactive material guidelines, was used in this evaluation. Four scenarios were considered for the site. These scenarios vary regarding future land use at the site, sources of water used, and sources of food consumed.

Dunning, D.E. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment Div.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Workshop Report on Atomic Bomb Dosimetry--Residual Radiation Exposure: Recent Research and Suggestions for Future Studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There is a need for accurate dosimetry for studies of health effects in the Japanese atomic bomb survivors because of the important role that these studies play in worldwide radiation protection standards. International experts have developed dosimetry systems, such as the Dosimetry System 2002 (DS02), which assess the initial radiation exposure to gamma rays and neutrons but only briefly consider the possibility of some minimal contribution to the total body dose by residual radiation exposure. In recognition of the need for an up-to-date review of the topic of residual radiation exposure in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, recently reported studies were reviewed at a technical session at the 57th Annual Meeting of the Health Physics Society in Sacramento, California, 22-26 July 2012. A one-day workshop was also held to provide time for detailed discussion of these newer studies and to evaluate their potential use in clarifying the residual radiation exposures to the atomic-bomb survivors at Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Suggestions for possible future studies are also included in this workshop report.

none,

2013-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

446

cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hev ein sequence  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74-79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli.

Raikhel, Natasha V. (Okemos, MI); Broekaert, Willem F. (Dilbeek, BE); Chua, Nam-Hai (Scarsdale, NY); Kush, Anil (New York, NY)

2000-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

447

A Multi-Factor Analysis of Sustainable Agricultural Residue Removal Potential  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Agricultural residues have significant potential as a near term source of cellulosic biomass for bioenergy production, but sustainable removal of agricultural residues requires consideration of the critical roles that residues play in the agronomic system. Previous work has developed an integrated model to evaluate sustainable agricultural residue removal potential considering soil erosion, soil organic carbon, greenhouse gas emission, and long-term yield impacts of residue removal practices. The integrated model couples the environmental process models WEPS, RUSLE2, SCI, and DAYCENT. This study uses the integrated model to investigate the impact of interval removal practices in Boone County, Iowa, US. Residue removal of 4.5 Mg/ha was performed annually, bi-annually, and tri-annually and were compared to no residue removal. The study is performed at the soil type scale using a national soil survey database assuming a continuous corn rotation with reduced tillage. Results are aggregated across soil types to provide county level estimates of soil organic carbon changes and individual soil type soil organic matter content if interval residue removal were implemented. Results show interval residue removal is possible while improving soil organic matter. Implementation of interval removal practices provide greater increases in soil organic matter while still providing substantial residue for bioenergy production.

Jared Abodeely; David Muth; Paul Adler; Eleanor Campbell; Kenneth Mark Bryden

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Thin film solar cell including a spatially modulated intrinsic layer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

One or more thin film solar cells in which the intrinsic layer of substantially amorphous semiconductor alloy material thereof includes at least a first band gap portion and a narrower band gap portion. The band gap of the intrinsic layer is spatially graded through a portion of the bulk thickness, said graded portion including a region removed from the intrinsic layer-dopant layer interfaces. The band gap of the intrinsic layer is always less than the band gap of the doped layers. The gradation of the intrinsic layer is effected such that the open circuit voltage and/or the fill factor of the one or plural solar cell structure is enhanced.

Guha, Subhendu (Troy, MI); Yang, Chi-Chung (Troy, MI); Ovshinsky, Stanford R. (Bloomfield Hills, MI)

1989-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

449

Solar Energy Education. Renewable energy: a background text. [Includes glossary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Some of the most common forms of renewable energy are presented in this textbook for students. The topics include solar energy, wind power hydroelectric power, biomass ocean thermal energy, and tidal and geothermal energy. The main emphasis of the text is on the sun and the solar energy that it yields. Discussions on the sun's composition and the relationship between the earth, sun and atmosphere are provided. Insolation, active and passive solar systems, and solar collectors are the subtopics included under solar energy. (BCS)

Not Available

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Methods of producing adsorption media including a metal oxide  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods of producing a metal oxide are disclosed. The method comprises dissolving a metal salt in a reaction solvent to form a metal salt/reaction solvent solution. The metal salt is converted to a metal oxide and a caustic solution is added to the metal oxide/reaction solvent solution to adjust the pH of the metal oxide/reaction solvent solution to less than approximately 7.0. The metal oxide is precipitated and recovered. A method of producing adsorption media including the metal oxide is also disclosed, as is a precursor of an active component including particles of a metal oxide.

Mann, Nicholas R; Tranter, Troy J

2014-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

451

Biomass Potentials from California Forest and Shrublands Including Fuel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biomass Potentials from California Forest and Shrublands Including Fuel Reduction Potentials-04-004 February 2005 Revised: October 2005 Arnold Schwarzenegger, Governor, State of California #12;Biomass Tiangco, CEC Bryan M. Jenkins, University of California #12;Biomass Potentials from California Forest

452

Project Management Business Process Project Delivery Processes Includes VE Budget  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project Management Business Process Project Delivery Processes Includes VE Budget Schedule Activities that do/could feed into PMBP LEGEND VE Cost Avoidance Program Coverage Document Results (Before, could use the value methodology to facilitate after action review. The project manager is responsible

US Army Corps of Engineers

453

DISTINCTIONS The unique combination of factors which distinguish Berea includes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

throughout Appala- chia. SUSTAINABLE CAMPUS FEATURES The College environment demonstrates sustainable living and enhances student learning. Recently renovated historical buildings and residence halls include sustain, Washington Monthly ranked Berea the #1 liberal arts college in the nation Listed as a "Best Buy" college

Baltisberger, Jay H.

454

Free Energy Efficiency Kit includes CFL light bulbs,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Free Energy Efficiency Kit Kit includes CFL light bulbs, spray foam, low-flow shower head, and more! Building Science 101 Presentation BPI Certified Building Professionals will present home energy efficiency for discounted energy assessments. FREE HOME ENERGY EFFICIENCY SEMINAR N e w R i ver L i g ht & Pow e r a n d W

Rose, Annkatrin

455

Area of cooperation includes: Joint research and development on  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technologies August 2, 2006: HCL Technologies Ltd (HCL), India's leading global IT services company, has signed projects that are using this technology currently such as BioGrid in Japan, National Grid Service in UKArea of cooperation includes: · Joint research and development on Grid computing technologies

Buyya, Rajkumar

456

Energy Transitions: A Systems Approach Including Marcellus Shale Gas Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Transitions: A Systems Approach Including Marcellus Shale Gas Development A Report Engineering) W. VA #12;Energy Transitions: A Systems Approach August 2011 version Page 2 Energy Transitions sources globally, some very strong short-term drivers of energy transitions reflect rising concerns over

Walter, M.Todd

457

Procedures in Modules (1) Including all procedures within modules  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Procedures in Modules (1) Including all procedures within modules works very well in almost all designing these if possible #12;Procedures in Modules (2) These are very much like internal procedures Works very well in almost all programs Everything accessible in the module can also be used in the procedure

458

FORUMA Hamilton Spectator Town Hall Event SPEAKERS INCLUDE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

R001990104 OPEN FORUMA Hamilton Spectator Town Hall Event SPEAKERS INCLUDE: STEVE BUIST, Spectator, former chairman of Hamilton-Wentworth region and now president and CEO of the Hamilton Community Foundation. DR. CHRIS MACKIE, Hamilton's associate medical officer of health. MARK CHAMBERLAIN, president

Thompson, Michael

459

DO NOT INCLUDE: flatten cardboard staples, tape & envelope windows ok  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/ bottles Metal items other than cans/foil Napkins Paper towels Plastic bags Plastic films Plastic utensilsDO NOT INCLUDE: flatten cardboard staples, tape & envelope windows ok Aerosol cans Books Bottle, PDAs, inkjet cartridges, CFL bulbs (cushioned, sealed in plastic) computers, printers, printer

Wolfe, Patrick J.

460

cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1,018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids.

Raikhel, N.V.; Broekaert, W.F.; Namhai Chua; Kush, A.

1993-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including crop residue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

ASTRO-F/FIS observing simulation including detector characteristics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ASTRO-F/FIS observing simulation including detector characteristics Woong-Seob Jeong a,*, Soojong instruments, the far-infrared surveyor (FIS) will map the entire sky in four bands using short wavelength (SW- oped a suite of software with an aim to simulate the FIS observations (Jeong et al., 2000, 2003, 2004

Pak, Soojong

462

ASTRO-F/FIS Observing Simulation Including Detector Characteristics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ASTRO-F/FIS Observing Simulation Including Detector Characteristics Woong-Seob Jeong1, Soojong Pak1 simulations to examined the detector characteristics on the FIS instrument (Far- Infrared Surveyor) images narrow and wide bands using a short wavelength (SW) and long wavelength (LW) detector array. The FIS (Far

Lee, Hyung Mok

463

Methods of Purchasing Purchasing methods include the different  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

" purchases must be reviewed and approved by the Controller's Office. This may result in the end user beingMethods of Purchasing Purchasing methods include the different processes of ordering goods and/or services, and encumbering funds. #12;Method of Purchase Field Purchase Orders (FPO) Accepted

464

Including Blind Students in Computer Science Through Access to Graphs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Including Blind Students in Computer Science Through Access to Graphs Suzanne Balik, Sean Mealin SKetching tool, GSK, to provide blind and sighted people with a means to create, examine, and share graphs (node-link diagrams) in real-time. GSK proved very effective for one blind computer science student

Young, R. Michael

465

HTS Conductor Design Issues Including Quench and Stability,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/background · Stability and protection are crucial issues for HTS tapes and coils applied to electric power devices. ­Both for the economic argument for HTS AC applications like cables and transformers. · Conductor design is importantHTS Conductor Design Issues Including Quench and Stability, AC Losses, and Fault Currents M. J

466

Bayesian hierarchical reconstruction of protein profiles including a digestion model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bayesian hierarchical reconstruction of protein profiles including a digestion model Pierre to recover the protein biomarkers content in a robust way. We will focus on the digestion step since and each branch to a molecular processing such as digestion, ionisation and LC-MS separation

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

467

GRADUATE STUDIES IN BUILDING TECHNOLOGY AN INTERDISCIPLINARY PROGRAM INCLUDING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-growing economies in other parts of the world, there is a growing demand for practical, sustainable building designs as the broader architectural design and construction processes. Likely careers of graduates are in the building1 GRADUATE STUDIES IN BUILDING TECHNOLOGY AN INTERDISCIPLINARY PROGRAM INCLUDING DEPARTMENT

Reif, Rafael

468

Requirements: A minimum of 15 PSYC credits, including  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

» Three other 2000-3000-level PSYC courses (any area) No more than 3 credits of PSYC 3889 or 3999 canRequirements: A minimum of 15 PSYC credits, including: » One Area I course » One Area II course) ___2100 (Principles of Research in Psychology) Area I. Social, Developmental, Clinical, & Industrial

Alpay, S. Pamir

469

Single-well experimental design for studying residual trapping of superciritcal carbon dioxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of our research is to design a single-well injection-withdrawal test to evaluate residual phase trapping at potential CO{sub 2} geological storage sites. Given the significant depths targeted for CO{sub 2} storage and the resulting high costs associated with drilling to those depths, it is attractive to develop a single-well test that can provide data to assess reservoir properties and reduce uncertainties in the appraisal phase of site investigation. The main challenges in a single-well test design include (1) difficulty in quantifying the amount of CO{sub 2} that has dissolved into brine or migrated away from the borehole; (2) non-uniqueness and uncertainty in the estimate of the residual gas saturation (S{sub gr}) due to correlations among various parameters; and (3) the potential biased S{sub gr} estimate due to unaccounted heterogeneity of the geological medium. To address each of these challenges, we propose (1) to use a physical-based model to simulation test sequence and inverse modeling to analyze data information content and to quantify uncertainty; (2) to jointly use multiple data types generated from different kinds of tests to constrain the Sgr estimate; and (3) to reduce the sensitivity of the designed tests to geological heterogeneity by conducting the same test sequence in both a water-saturated system and a system with residual gas saturation. To perform the design calculation, we build a synthetic model and conduct a formal analysis for sensitivity and uncertain quantification. Both parametric uncertainty and geological uncertainty are considered in the analysis. Results show (1) uncertainty in the estimation of Sgr can be reduced by jointly using multiple data types and repeated tests; and (2) geological uncertainty is essential and needs to be accounted for in the estimation of S{sub gr} and its uncertainty. The proposed methodology is applied to the design of a CO{sub 2} injection test at CO2CRC's Otway Project Site, Victoria, Australia.

Zhang, Y.; Freifeld, B.; Finsterle, S.; Leahy, M.; Ennis-King, J.; Paterson, L.; Dance, T.

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

470

A preliminary assessment of the state of harvest and collection technology for forest residues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To meet the 'Twenty in Ten Initiative' goals set in the 2007 State of the Union address, forest resources will be needed as feedstocks for lignocellulosic ethanol production. It has been estimated that 368 million dry tons can be produced annually in the U.S. from logging residues and fuel treatment thinnings. Currently, very little of this woody biomass is used for energy production due to the costs and difficulty in collecting and transporting this material. However, minimizing biomass costs (including harvest, handling, transport, storage, and processing costs) delivered to the refinery is necessary to develop a sustainable cellulosic ethanol industry. Achieving this goal requires a fresh look at conventional timber harvesting operations to identify ways of efficiently integrating energy wood collection and developing cost-effective technologies to harvest small-diameter trees. In conventional whole-tree logging operations, entire trees are felled and skidded from the stump to the landing. The residues (also called slash), consisting of tops and limbs, accumulate at the landing when trees are delimbed. This slash can be ground at the landing with a mobile grinder or transported to another central location with a stationary grinder. The ground material is transported via chip vans, or possibly large roll on/off containers, to the user facility. Cut-to-length harvesting systems are gaining popularity in some locations. In these operations, specialized harvesters that can fall, delimb, and cut logs to length are used. The small diameter tops and limbs accumulate along the machine's track. It can be left in the forest to dry or removed soon after harvest while logs are extracted. Removing slash during the same operation as the wood has been shown to be more efficient. However, leaving residue in the forest to dry reduces moisture content, which improves grinder performance, reduces dry matter loss during storage, and inhibits colonization of fungi that produce harmful spores. In recent years, new machines that are specially designed for collection of small diameter wood have been developed in the U.S. and Europe. Residue bundlers and balers improve transportation and handling efficiency by densifying the material and packaging it so that it can be handled with conventional equipment. An experimental integrated harvester/grinder can fall small diameter trees and feed them into a grinder. The ground material is collected in a bin that can be dumped into a chip van. The harvester head is also capable of delimbing and bucking (cut into sections) small timber to be used for pulp and posts. Limitations of these new technologies are their large capital costs and complexity, leading to high maintenance costs and the need for highly trained operators. To ensure that quality feedstock materials consistently enter the mouth of the refinery, the uniform format supply system concept proposes that feedstock diversity be managed at harvest, much like the current grain supply system. This allows for standardization of key infrastructure components and facilitation of a biomass commodity system. Challenges in achieving a uniform woody biomass supply include, but are not limited to, developing machines for efficient harvest of small-diameter trees in a range of topographies and conditions, developing machines and operating plans for grinding biomass as near to the stump as possible, developing cost-effective drying strategies to reduce losses and mold growth during wood chip storage, and quantifying environmental impacts of slash removal and fuel thinnings to aid landowner decisions and policy development.

Webb, Erin [ORNL; Perlack, Robert D [ORNL; Blackwelder, D. Brad [Idaho National Laboratory (INL); Muth, David J. [Idaho National Laboratory (INL); Hess, J. Richard [Idaho National Laboratory (INL)

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Quantification of residual stress from photonic signatures of fused silica  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A commercially available grey-field polariscope (GFP) instrument for photoelastic examination is used to assess impact damage inflicted upon the outer-most pane of Space Shuttle windows made from fused silica. A method and apparatus for calibration of the stress-optic coefficient using four-point bending is discussed. The results are validated on known material (acrylic) and are found to agree with literature values to within 6%. The calibration procedure is then applied to fused-silica specimens and the stress-optic coefficient is determined to be 2.43 ± 0.54 × 10{sup ?12} Pa{sup ?1}. Fused silica specimens containing impacts artificially made at NASA’s Hypervelocity Impact Technology Facility (HIT-F), to simulate damage typical during space flight, are examined. The damage sites are cored from fused silica window carcasses and examined with the GFP. The calibrated GFP measurements of residual stress patterns surrounding the damage sites are presented.

Cramer, K. Elliott; Yost, William T. [NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA 23681 (United States); Hayward, Maurice [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA 23185 (United States)

2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

472

Evaluation of the residue from microset on various metal surfaces.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fast-curing impression materials are sometimes used to cast negative-mold replications of physical defects on material surfaces. The negative-mold impressions can then be used for further measurements to record the nature of the defect. These impression materials have been designed to cure quickly, and with very low adhesion, so that they can be easily removed from the surface leaving little residual contamination. Unfortunately, some contaminant is retained by the substrate material. This investigation seeks to identify the composition and quantity of the remaining material upon removal of Microset Synthetic Rubber Replicating Compound from several material surfaces. Coe-Flex was used as a relative comparison to Microset. On fifteen different substrate materials the Microset leaves no visible trace of contaminant, however, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy shows evidence of a thin silicone-based contaminant film of approximately 2 nm thickness.

Brumbach, Michael Todd

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Residue temperatures in intermediate energy nucleus-nucleus collisions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With an improved Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck (BUU) model, we have investigated the reaction dynamics leading to the thermal freeezout for [sup 40]Ar+[sup 124]Sn collisions. Several criteria are assessed for defining the proper thermal freezout time which separates preequilibrium processes from equilbrium processes. One of these criteria, the time dependence of the thermal excitation energy, provides consistent results for defining the thermal freezeout. The other two criteria, the emission rate of nucleons and the quadrupole moment of the momentum distributions, do not consistently provide accurate freezeout times due to the existence of long time scale collective vibrations. The predicted values for the excitation energies and temperatures, obtained assuming Fermi gas level densities, are quite sensitive to the equation of state and the impact parameter. Surprisingly, both the thermal excitation energies and the residue temperatures, in the limit of a large ensemble of parallel collisions, show little sensitivity to the in-medium nucleon-nucleon cross section.

Xu, H.M.; Lynch, W.G.; Danielewicz, P. (National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory and Department of Physics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States) Cyclotron Institute, Texas A M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States))

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Residual energy in magnetohydrodynamic turbulence and in the solar wind  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent observations indicate that kinetic and magnetic energies are not in equipartition in the solar wind turbulence. Rather, magnetic fluctuations are more energetic and have somewhat steeper energy spectrum compared to the velocity fluctuations. This leads to the presence of the so-called residual energy E_r=E_v-E_b in the inertial interval of turbulence. This puzzling effect is addressed in the present paper in the framework of weak turbulence theory. Using a simple model of weakly colliding Alfv\\'en waves, we demonstrate that the kinetic-magnetic equipartition indeed gets broken as a result of nonlinear interaction of Alfv\\'en waves. We establish that magnetic energy is indeed generated more efficiently as a result of these interactions, which proposes an explanation for the solar wind observations.

Stanislav Boldyrev; Jean Carlos Perez; Vladimir Zhdankin

2011-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

475

Radiological Modeling for Determination of Derived Concentration Levels of an Area with Uranium Residual Material - 13533  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As a result of a pilot project developed at the old Spanish 'Junta de Energia Nuclear' to extract uranium from ores, tailings materials were generated. Most of these residual materials were sent back to different uranium mines, but a small amount of it was mixed with conventional building materials and deposited near the old plant until the surrounding ground was flattened. The affected land is included in an area under institutional control and used as recreational area. At the time of processing, uranium isotopes were separated but other radionuclides of the uranium decay series as Th-230, Ra-226 and daughters remain in the residue. Recently, the analyses of samples taken at different ground's depths confirmed their presence. This paper presents the methodology used to calculate the derived concentration level to ensure that the reference dose level of 0.1 mSv y-1 used as radiological criteria. In this study, a radiological impact assessment was performed modeling the area as recreational scenario. The modelization study was carried out with the code RESRAD considering as exposure pathways, external irradiation, inadvertent ingestion of soil, inhalation of resuspended particles, and inhalation of radon (Rn-222). As result was concluded that, if the concentration of Ra-226 in the first 15 cm of soil is lower than, 0.34 Bq g{sup -1}, the dose would not exceed the reference dose. Applying this value as a derived concentration level and comparing with the results of measurements on the ground, some areas with a concentration of activity slightly higher than latter were found. In these zones the remediation proposal has been to cover with a layer of 15 cm of clean material. This action represents a reduction of 85% of the dose and ensures compliance with the reference dose. (authors)

Perez-Sanchez, Danyl [CIEMAT, Avenida Complutense 40, 28040, Madrid (Spain)] [CIEMAT, Avenida Complutense 40, 28040, Madrid (Spain)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Social aspects include following applicable laws and international treaties; using open and transparent  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

costs' influencing supply, demand, and prices and the possibility of the distortion of markets in climate conditions. Bioenergy choices can also have direct influences on local land-use changes as well the potential of bioenergy crops spreading genetically modified organisms, invasive species, or nonnative

477

An observational study of the potential for human exposures to pet-borne diazinon residues following lawn applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study examined the potential for pet dogs to be an important pathway for transporting diazinon residues into homes and onto its occupants following residential lawn applications. The primary objectives were to investigate the potential exposures of occupants and their pet dogs to diazinon after an application to turf at their residences and to determine if personal contacts between occupants and their pet dogs resulted in measurable exposures. It was conducted from April to August 2001 before the Agency phased out all residential uses of diazinon in December 2004. Six families and their pet dogs were recruited into the study. Monitoring was conducted at pre-, 1, 2, 4, and 8 days post-application of a commercial, granular formulation of diazinon to the lawn by the homeowner. Environmental samples collected included soil, indoor air, carpet dust, and transferable residues from lawns and floors. Samples collected from the pet dogs consisted of paw wipes, fur clippings, and transferable residues from the fur by a technician or child wearing a cotton glove(s). First morning void (FMV) urine samples were collected from each child and his/her parent on each sampling day. Diazinon was analyzed in all samples, except urine, by GC-MS. The metabolite 2-isopropyl-4-methyl-6-hydroxypyrimidine (IMPy) was analyzed in the urine samples by HPLC-MS/MS. Mean airborne residues of diazinon on day 1 post-application were at least six times higher in both the living rooms (235{+-}267 ng/m{sup 3}) and children's bedrooms (179{+-}246 ng/m{sup 3}) than at pre-application. Mean loadings of diazinon in carpet dust samples were at least 20 times greater on days 2, 4, and 8 post-application than mean loadings (0.03{+-}0.04 ng/cm{sup 2}) at pre-application. The pet dogs had over 900 times higher mean loadings of diazinon residues on their paws on day 1 post-application (88.1{+-}100.1 ng/cm{sup 2}) compared to mean loadings (<0.09 ng/cm{sup 2}) at pre-application. The mean diazinon loadings on the fur clippings were at least 14 times higher on days 1, 2, 4, and 8 post-application than mean loadings (0.8{+-}0.4 ng/cm{sup 2}) at pre-application. For transferable residues from dog fur, the mean loadings of diazinon on the technician's cotton glove samples were the lowest before application (0.04{+-}0.08 ng/cm{sup 2}) and the highest on day 1 post-application (10.4{+-}23.9 ng/cm{sup 2}) of diazinon to turf. Urinary IMPy concentrations for the participants ranged from <0.3 to 5.5 ng/mL before application and <0.3-12.5 ng/mL after application of diazinon. The mean urinary IMPy concentrations for children or adults were not statistically different (p>0.05) at pre-application compared to post-application of diazinon to turf. The results showed that the participants and their pet dogs were likely exposed to low levels of diazinon residues from several sources (i.e., air, dust, and soil), through several pathways and routes, after lawn applications at these residences. Lastly, the pet dog appears to be an important pathway for the transfer and translocation of diazinon residues inside the homes and likely exposed occupants through personal contacts (i.e., petting)

Morgan, Marsha K. [USEPA, National Exposure Research Laboratory, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States)], E-mail: morgan.marsha@epa.gov; Stout, Daniel M.; Jones, Paul A. [USEPA, National Exposure Research Laboratory, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Barr, Dana B. [National Center for Environmental Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA (United States)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

478

Multi-processor including data flow accelerator module  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An accelerator module for a data flow computer includes an intelligent memory. The module is added to a multiprocessor arrangement and uses a shared tagged memory architecture in the data flow computer. The intelligent memory module assigns locations for holding data values in correspondence with arcs leading to a node in a data dependency graph. Each primitive computation is associated with a corresponding memory cell, including a number of slots for operands needed to execute a primitive computation, a primitive identifying pointer, and linking slots for distributing the result of the cell computation to other cells requiring that result as an operand. Circuitry is provided for utilizing tag bits to determine automatically when all operands required by a processor are available and for scheduling the primitive for execution in a queue. Each memory cell of the module may be associated with any of the primitives, and the particular primitive to be executed by the processor associated with the cell is identified by providing an index, such as the cell number for the primitive, to the primitive lookup table of starting addresses. The module thus serves to perform functions previously performed by a number of sections of data flow architectures and coexists with conventional shared memory therein. A multiprocessing system including the module operates in a hybrid mode, wherein the same processing modules are used to perform some processing in a sequential mode, under immediate control of an operating system, while performing other processing in a data flow mode.

Davidson, George S. (Albuquerque, NM); Pierce, Paul E. (Albuquerque, NM)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

E-Print Network 3.0 - automobile shredder residue Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: automobile shredder residue Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 NASHVILLE INCINERATOR PERFORMANCE TESTS...

480

Neutron scattering residual stress measurements on gray cast iron brake discs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Neutron diffraction was used to investigate the effects of a heat treatment designed to remove internal residual stresses in brake discs. It is believed that residual stresses may change the rate of deformation of the discs during severe braking conditions when the disc temperature is increased significantly. Neutron diffraction was used to map out residual strain distributions in a production disc before and after a stress-relieving heat treatment. Results from these neutron diffraction experiments show that some residual strains were reduced by as much as 400 microstrain by stress relieving. 5 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

Spooner, S.; Payzant, E.A.; Hubbard, C.R. [and others

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including crop residue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Table 42. Residual Fuel Oil Prices by PAD District and State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1999 203 Table 42. Residual Fuel Oil Prices by PAD District and State (Cents per Gallon Excluding Taxes) - Continued...

482

Table 42. Residual Fuel Oil Prices by PAD District and State  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1998 203 Table 42. Residual Fuel Oil Prices by PAD District and State (Cents per Gallon Excluding Taxes) - Continued...

483

Table A3. Refiner/Reseller Prices of Distillate and Residual...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Marketing Annual 1999 441 Table A3. RefinerReseller Prices of Distillate and Residual Fuel Oils, by PAD District, 1983-Present (Cents per Gallon Excluding Taxes) - Continued...

484

Table 42. Residual Fuel Oil Prices by PAD District and State  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Information Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual 1995 245 Table 42. Residual Fuel Oil Prices by PAD District and State (Cents per Gallon Excluding Taxes) - Continued...

485

E-Print Network 3.0 - acs residual ischemic Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Search Sample search results for: acs residual ischemic Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Brain Research 961 (2003) 2231 www.elsevier.comlocatebrainres Summary: further...

486

E-Print Network 3.0 - acid residues required Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Engineering, Columbia University Collection: Engineering ; Biology and Medicine 13 Protein folding with stochastic L-systems Gemma Danks1 Summary: 70 amino acid residues to 1000s...

487

E-Print Network 3.0 - acid residues determine Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Engineering, Columbia University Collection: Engineering ; Biology and Medicine 14 Protein folding with stochastic L-systems Gemma Danks1 Summary: 70 amino acid residues to 1000s...

488

alters less-conserved residues: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The macroscopic stress evolution is connected to a length scale of residual liquefaction displayed by microscopic mean-squared displacements. The theory describes this...

489

Allowable Residual Contamination Levels in soil for decommissioning the Shippingport Atomic Power Station site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of decommissioning the Shippingport Atomic Power Station, a fundamental concern is the determination of Allowable Residual Contamination Levels (ARCL) for radionuclides in the soil at the site. The ARCL method described in this report is based on a scenario/exposure-pathway analysis and compliance with an annual dose limit for unrestricted use of the land after decommissioning. In addition to naturally occurring radionuclides and fallout from weapons testing, soil contamination could potentially come from five other sources. These include operation of the Shippingport Station as a pressurized water reactor, operations of the Shippingport Station as a light-water breeder, operation of the nearby Beaver Valley reactors, releases during decommissioning, and operation of other nearby industries, including the Bruce-Mansfield coal-fired power plants. ARCL values are presented for 29 individual radionculides and a worksheet is provided so that ARCL values can be determined for any mixture of the individual radionuclides for any annual dose limit selected. In addition, a worksheet is provided for calculating present time soil concentration value that will decay to the ARCL values after any selected period of time, such as would occur during a period of restricted access. The ARCL results are presented for both unconfined (surface) and confined (subsurface) soil contamination. The ARCL method and results described in this report provide a flexible means of determining unrestricted-use site release conditions after decommissioning the Shippingport Atomic Power Station.

Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Napier, B.A.; Soldat, J.K.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

A coke oven model including thermal decomposition kinetics of tar  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new one-dimensional coke oven model has been developed for simulating the amount and the characteristics of by-products such as tar and gas as well as coke. This model consists of both heat transfer and chemical kinetics including thermal decomposition of coal and tar. The chemical kinetics constants are obtained by estimation based on the results of experiments conducted to investigate the thermal decomposition of both coal and tar. The calculation results using the new model are in good agreement with experimental ones.

Munekane, Fuminori; Yamaguchi, Yukio [Mitsubishi Chemical Corp., Yokohama (Japan); Tanioka, Seiichi [Mitsubishi Chemical Corp., Sakaide (Japan)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

491

Composite armor, armor system and vehicle including armor system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Composite armor panels are disclosed. Each panel comprises a plurality of functional layers comprising at least an outermost layer, an intermediate layer and a base layer. An armor system incorporating armor panels is also disclosed. Armor panels are mounted on carriages movably secured to adjacent rails of a rail system. Each panel may be moved on its associated rail and into partially overlapping relationship with another panel on an adjacent rail for protection against incoming ordnance from various directions. The rail system may be configured as at least a part of a ring, and be disposed about a hatch on a vehicle. Vehicles including an armor system are also disclosed.

Chu, Henry S.; Jones, Warren F.; Lacy, Jeffrey M.; Thinnes, Gary L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a pu GOVERNMENT RIGHTS This application was funded under Department of Energy Contract DE-AC02-76ER01338. The U.S. Government has certain rights under this application and any patent issuing thereon.

Raikhel, Natasha V. (Okemos, MI); Broekaert, Willem F. (Dilbeek, BE); Chua, Nam-Hai (Scarsdale, NY); Kush, Anil (New York, NY)

1993-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

493

Effect of soil acidity factors on yields and foliar composition of tropical root crops  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tropical root crops, a major source of food for subsistence farmers, varied in their sensitivity to soil acidity factors. Tolerance to soil acidity is an important characteristic of crops for the humid tropics where soils are often very acid and lime-scarce and expensive. Experiments on two Ultisols and an Oxisol showed that three tropical root crops differed markedly in sensitivity to soil acicity factors. Yams (Dioscorea alata L.) were very sensitive to soil acidity with yields on a Ultisol decreasing from 70% of maximum when Al saturation of the effective cation exchange capacity of the soil was 10 to 25% of maximum when Al saturation was 40%. On the other hand, cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) was very tolerant to high levels of soil acidity, yielding about 85% of maximum with 60% Al saturation. Taniers (Xanthosoma sp.) were intermediate between yams and cassava in their tolerance to soil acidity yielding about 60% of maximum with 50% Al saturation of the soil. Foliar composition of cassava was not affected by soil acidity levels and that of yams and taniers was also unaffected except for Ca content which decreased with decreasing soil pH and increasing Al saturation.Response of these tropical root crops to soil acidity components was far more striking on Ultisols than on the Oxisol. For yams, soils should be limed to about pH 5.5 with essentially no exhangeable Al/sup 3 +/ present whereas high yields of taniers can be obtained at about pH 4.8 with 20% exchangeable Al/sup 3 +/ and of cassava at pH as low as 4.5 with 60% exchangeable Al/sup 3 +/.

Abruna-Rodriguez, F.; Vicente-Chandler, J.I. Rivera, E.; Rodriguez, J.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Cogeneration handbook for the petroleum refining industry. [Glossary included  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Handbook deals only with industrial cogeneration, that is, simultaneous production of both heat and electricity at the industrial plant site. The cogenerator has the option of either selling all cogenerated power to the utility while simultaneously purchasing power to satisfy his plant demand, or directly supplying the plant demand with cogenerated power, thus displacing utility-supplied power. This Handbook provides the refinery plant manager or company energy coordinator with a framework for making a preliminary assessment of the feasibility and viability of cogeneration at a particular plant. The handbook is intended to provide an understanding of the potential of several standardized cogeneration systems, as well as their limitations. However, because the decision to cogenerate is very site specific, the handbook cannot provide all of the answers. It does attempt, however, to bring to light the major issues that should be addressed in the decision-making process. The decision of whether to cogenerate involves several considerations, including technical, economic, environmental, legal, and regulatory issues. Each of these issues is addressed separately in this handbook. In addition, a chapter is included on preparing a three-phase work statement, which is needed to guide the design of a cogeneration system. 39 figures, 37 tables.

Not Available

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

Community Assessment Tool for Public Health Emergencies Including Pandemic Influenza  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Community Assessment Tool (CAT) for Public Health Emergencies Including Pandemic Influenza (hereafter referred to as the CAT) was developed as a result of feedback received from several communities. These communities participated in workshops focused on influenza pandemic planning and response. The 2008 through 2011 workshops were sponsored by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Feedback during those workshops indicated the need for a tool that a community can use to assess its readiness for a disaster - readiness from a total healthcare perspective, not just hospitals, but the whole healthcare system. The CAT intends to do just that - help strengthen existing preparedness plans by allowing the healthcare system and other agencies to work together during an influenza pandemic. It helps reveal each core agency partners (sectors) capabilities and resources, and highlights cases of the same vendors being used for resource supplies (e.g., personal protective equipment [PPE] and oxygen) by the partners (e.g., public health departments, clinics, or hospitals). The CAT also addresses gaps in the community's capabilities or potential shortages in resources. This tool has been reviewed by a variety of key subject matter experts from federal, state, and local agencies and organizations. It also has been piloted with various communities that consist of different population sizes, to include large urban to small rural communities.

ORAU's Oak Ridge Institute for Science Education (HCTT-CHE)

2011-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

496

POST-OPERATIONAL TREATMENT OF RESIDUAL NA COOLLANT IN EBR-2 USING CARBONATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At the end of 2002, the Experimental Breeder Reactor Two (EBR-II) facility became a U.S. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) permitted site, and the RCRA permit1 compelled further treatment of the residual sodium in order to convert it into a less reactive chemical form and remove the by-products from the facility, so that a state of RCRA 'closure' for the facility may be achieved (42 U.S.C. 6901-6992k, 2002). In response to this regulatory driver, and in recognition of project budgetary and safety constraints, it was decided to treat the residual sodium in the EBR-II primary and secondary sodium systems using a process known as 'carbonation.' In early EBR-II post-operation documentation, this process is also called 'passivation.' In the carbonation process (Sherman and Henslee, 2005), the system containing residual sodium is flushed with humidified carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). The water vapor in the flush gas reacts with residual sodium to form sodium hydroxide (NaOH), and the CO{sub 2} in the flush gas reacts with the newly formed NaOH to make sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO{sub 3}). Hydrogen gas (H{sub 2}) is produced as a by-product. The chemical reactions occur at the exposed surface of the residual sodium. The NaHCO{sub 3} layer that forms is porous, and humidified carbon dioxide can penetrate the NaHCO{sub 3} layer to continue reacting residual sodium underneath. The rate of reaction is controlled by the thickness of the NaHCO{sub 3} surface layer, the moisture input rate, and the residual sodium exposed surface area. At the end of carbonation, approximately 780 liters of residual sodium in the EBR-II primary tank ({approx}70% of original inventory), and just under 190 liters of residual sodium in the EBR-II secondary sodium system ({approx}50% of original inventory), were converted into NaHCO{sub 3}. No bare surfaces of residual sodium remained after treatment, and all remaining residual sodium deposits are covered by a layer of NaHCO{sub 3}. From a safety standpoint, the inventory of residual sodium in these systems was greatly reduced by using the carbonation process. From a regulatory standpoint, the process was not able to achieve deactivation of all residual sodium, and other more aggressive measures will be needed if the remaining residual sodium must also be deactivated to meet the requirements of the existing environmental permit. This chapter provides a project history and technical summary of the carbonation of EBR-II residual sodium. Options for future treatment are also discussed.

Sherman, S.; Knight, C.

2011-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

497

The influence of quench sensitivity on residual stresses in the aluminium alloys 7010 and 7075  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The most critical stage in the heat treatment of high strength aluminium alloys is the rapid cooling necessary to form a supersaturated solid solution. A disadvantage of quenching is that the thermal gradients can be sufficient to cause inhomogeneous plastic deformation which in turn leads to the development of large residual stresses. Two 215 mm thick rectilinear forgings have been made from 7000 series alloys with widely different quench sensitivity to determine if solute loss in the form of precipitation during quenching can significantly affect residual stress magnitudes. The forgings were heat treated and immersion quenched using cold water to produce large magnitude residual stresses. The through thickness residual stresses were measured by neutron diffraction and incremental deep hole drilling. The distribution of residual stresses was found to be similar for both alloys varying from highly triaxial and tensile in the interior, to a state of biaxial compression in the surface. The 7010 forging exhibited larger tensile stresses in the interior. The microstructural variation from surface to centre for both forgings was determined using optical and transmission electron microscopy. These observations were used to confirm the origin of the hardness variation measured through the forging thickness. When the microstructural changes were accounted for in the through thickness lattice parameter, the residual stresses in the two forgings were found to be very similar. Solute loss in the 7075 forging appeared to have no significant effect on the residual stress magnitudes when compared to 7010. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Through thickness residual stress measurements made on large Al alloy forgings. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Residual stress characterised using neutron diffraction and deep hole drilling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Biaxial compressive surface and triaxial subsurface residual stresses. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quench sensitivity of 7075 promotes significant microstructural differences to 7010. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer When precipitation is accounted for, residual stress in both forgings are similar.

Robinson, J.S., E-mail: jeremy.robinson@ul.ie [Materials and Surface Science Institute, University of Limerick (Ireland); Tanner, D.A. [Materials and Surface Science Institute, University of Limerick (Ireland); Truman, C.E. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Bristol (United Kingdom); Paradowska, A.M. [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot (United Kingdom); Wimpory, R.C. [Helmholtz Centre Berlin for Materials and Energy, Hahn Meitner Platz 1, Berlin (Germany)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

498

Evaluation of sweet sorghum as a potential ethanol crop in Mississippi  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Petroleum prices have made alternative fuel crops a viable option for ethanol production. Sweet sorghum [Sorghum bicolor] is a non-food crop that may produce large quantities of ethanol with minimal inputs. Eleven cultivars were planted in 2008 and 2009 as a half-season crop. Four-row plots 6.9 m by 0.5 m, were monitored bimonthly for ���°Brix, height, and sugar accumulation. Yield and extractable sap were taken at the end of season. Stalk yield was greatest for the cultivar Sugar Top (4945 kg ha-1) and lowest for Simon (1054 kg ha-1). Dale ranked highest ethanol output (807 L ha-1) while Simon (123 L ha-1) is the lowest. All cultivars peak Brix accumulation occurs in early October. Individual sugar concentrations indicated sucrose is the predominant sugar with glucose and fructose levels dependent on cultivar. Supplemental ethanol in fermented wort was the best preservative tested to halt degradation of sorghum wort.

Horton, David Scott

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

Effectiveness of rock wall terraces on soil conservation and crop performance in a southern Honduras steepland farming system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The effect that rock wall terraces have on soil and water conservation and crop production was studied on a steepland farm in southern Honduras during the 1995 growing season. The research compared a site with 10 year old rock terraces...

Sierra, Hector Enrique

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

The Dynamics of Irrigated Perennial Crop Production With Applications to the Murray-Darling Basin of Australia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the annual crops, the lack of other water sources such asgroundwater, and the lack of inter-regional water trade inlarge water shocks combined with a lack of adaptation

Franklin, Bradley

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z