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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including climatic cooling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Alternatives to compressor cooling in California climates  

SciTech Connect

This review and discussion has been prepared for the California Institute for Energy Efficiency (CIEE) to examine research on alternatives to compressor cooling. The report focuses on strategies for eliminating compressors in California's transition climates -- moderately warm areas located between the cool coastal regions and the hot central regions. Many of these strategies could also help reduce compressor use in hotter climates. Compressor-driven cooling of residences in California's transition climate regions is an undesirable load for California's electric utilities because load factor is poor and usage is typically high during periods of system peak demand. We review a number of alternatives to compressors, including low-energy strategies: evaporative cooling, natural and induced ventilation, reflective coatings, shading with vegetation and improved glazing, thermal storage, and radiative cooling. Also included are two energy-intensive strategies: absorption cooling and desiccant cooling. Our literature survey leads us to conclude that many of these strategies, used either singly or in combination, are technically and economically feasible alternatives to compressor-driven cooling. 78 refs., 8 figs.

Feustel, H. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)); de Almeida, A. (Coimbra Univ. (Portugal). Dept. of Electrical Engineering); Blumstein, C. (California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Universitywide Energy Research Group)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Abstract Radiative Cooling in Hot Humid Climates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Passive radiative cooling of buildings has been an underachieving concept for decades. The few deployments have generally been in dry climates with low solar angles. The greatest need for cooling is in the tropics. The high humidity endemic to many of these regions severely limits the passive cooling available per radiative area. To wrest temperature relief from humid climates, not just nocturnal cooling but solar irradiance, both direct and indirect, must be addressed. This investigation explores the extent to which thermal radiation can be used to cool buildings in the tropics. It concludes that inexpensive materials could be fabricated into roof panels providing passive cooling day and night in tropical locations with an unobstructed view of sky.

Aubrey Jaffer

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Analysis of climatic conditions and preliminary assessment of alternative cooling strategies for houses in California transition climate zones  

SciTech Connect

This is a preliminary scoping study done as part of the {open_quotes}Alternatives to Compressive Cooling in California Transition Climates{close_quotes} project, which has the goal of demonstrating that houses in the transitional areas between the coast and the Central Valley of California do not require air-conditioning if they are properly designed and operated. The first part of this report analyzes the climate conditions within the transitional areas, with emphasis on design rather than seasonal conditions. Transitional climates are found to be milder but more variable than those further inland. The design temperatures under the most stringent design criteria, e.g. 0.1 % annual, are similar to those in the Valley, but significantly lower under more relaxed design criteria, e.g., 2% annual frequency. Transition climates also have large day-night temperature swings, indicating significant potential for night cooling, and wet-bulb depressions in excess of 25 F, indicating good potential for evaporative cooling. The second part of the report is a preliminary assessment using DOE-2 computer simulations of the effectiveness of alternative cooling and control strategies in improving indoor comfort conditions in two conventional Title-24 houses modeled in various transition climate locations. The cooling measures studied include increased insulation, light colors, low-emissivity glazing, window overhangs, and exposed floor slab. The control strategies studied include natural and mechanical ventilation, and direct and two-stage evaporative cooling. The results indicate the cooling strategies all have limited effectiveness, and need to be combined to produce significant improvements in indoor comfort. Natural and forced ventilation provide similar improvements in indoor conditions, but during peak cooling periods, these will still be above the comfort zone. Two-stage evaporative coolers can maintain indoor comfort at all hours, but not so direct evaporative coolers.

Huang, Y.J.; Zhang, H.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Mesoscale Climatic Simulation of Surface Air Temperature Cooling by Highly  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mesoscale Climatic Simulation of Surface Air Temperature Cooling by Highly Mesoscale Climatic Simulation of Surface Air Temperature Cooling by Highly Reflective Greenhouses in SE Spain Title Mesoscale Climatic Simulation of Surface Air Temperature Cooling by Highly Reflective Greenhouses in SE Spain Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2013 Authors Campra, Pablo, and Dev Millstein Journal Environmental Science & Technology Volume 47 Issue 21 Pagination 12284 - 12290 Date Published 11/2013 ISSN 0013-936X Keywords buildings, Heat Island Group Abstract A long-term local cooling trend in surface air temperature has been monitored at the largest concentration of reflective greenhouses in the world, at the Province of Almeria, SE Spain, associated with a dramatic increase in surface albedo in the area. The availability of reliable long-term climatic field data at this site offers a unique opportunity to test the skill of mesoscale meteorological models describing and predicting the impacts of land use change on local climate. Using the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) mesoscale model, we have run a sensitivity experiment to simulate the impact of the observed surface albedo change on monthly and annual surface air temperatures. The model output showed a mean annual cooling of 0.25 °C associated with a 0.09 albedo increase, and a reduction of 22.8 W m-2 of net incoming solar radiation at surface. Mean reduction of summer daily maximum temperatures was 0.49 °C, with the largest single-day decrease equal to 1.3 °C. WRF output was evaluated and compared with observations. A mean annual warm bias (MBE) of 0.42 °C was estimated. High correlation coefficients (R2 > 0.9) were found between modeled and observed values. This study has particular interest in the assessment of the potential for urban temperature cooling by cool roofs deployment projects, as well as in the evaluation of mesoscale climatic models performance.

5

Climatic indicators for estimating residential heating and cooling loads  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An extensive data base of residential energy use generated with the DOE-2.1A simulation code provides an opportunity for correlating building loads predicted by an hourly simulation model to commonly used climatic parameters such as heating and cooling degree-days, and to newer parameters such as insolation-days and latent enthalpy-days. The identification of reliable climatic parameters for estimating cooling loads and the incremental loads for individual building components, such as changing ceiling and wall R-values, infiltration rates or window areas is emphasized.

Huang, Y.J.; Ritschard, R.; Bull, J.; Chang, L.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Low energy cooling in multi-storey buildings for hot, arid climates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis discusses passive and low energy cooling strategies and systems in hot arid climates. The choice of a certain strategy, as well as determining the appropriate cooling schemes for such a context becomes of prime ...

Mostafa, Amira M

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Prototype solar heating and cooling systems, including potable hot water. Quarterly report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The progress made in the development, delivery and support of two prototype solar heating and cooling systems including potable hot water is reported. The system consists of the following subsystems: collector, auxiliary heating, potable hot water, storage, control, transport, and government-furnished site data acquisition. Included is a comparison of the proposed Solaron-Heat Pump and Solaron-Desiccant Heating and Cooling Systems, Installation Drawings, data on the Akron House at Akron, Ohio, and other program activities from July 1, 1977 through November 9, 1977.

Not Available

1977-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Prototype solar heating and cooling systems including potable hot water. Quarterly reports  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The activities conducted by Solaron Corporation from November 1977 through September 1978 are summarized and the progress made in the development, delivery and support of two prototype solar heating and cooling systems including potable hot water is covered. The system consists of the following subsystems: solar collector, auxiliary heating, potable hot water, storage, control, transport, and government-furnished site data acquisition.

Williamson, R.

1978-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Prototype solar heating and cooling systems including potable hot water. Quarterly reports, November 1976--June 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report covers the progress made in the development, delivery and support of two prototype solar heating and cooling systems including potable hot water. The system consists of the following subsystems: collector, auxiliary heating, potable hot water, storage, control, transport, and government-furnished site data acquisition.

Not Available

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

A passive cooling design for multifamily residences [sic] in hot, humid climates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

People living in hot, humid climates suffer either from extremely uncomfortable weather conditions or from the great cost of air-conditioning systems for maintaining comfort. Most of the available passive cooling techniques ...

Tang, Joseph C

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Evaluation of cooling performance of thermally activated building system with evaporative cooling source for typical United States climates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cooling (TABS) with a cooling tower providing chilled waterevaporative cooling (cooling tower) for radiant ceiling slabradiant cooling with a cooling tower providing chilled water

Feng, Jingjuan; Bauman, Fred

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Present Climatic Cooling and a Proposed Causative Mechanism  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Evidence has been presented and discussed to show a cooling trend over the Northern Hemisphere since around 1940, amounting to over 0.5C, due primarily to cooling at mid- and high latitudes. Some regions of the middle latitudes have actually ...

Ernest M. Agee

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

TY JOUR T1 Mesoscale Climatic Simulation of Surface Air Temperature Cooling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mesoscale Climatic Simulation of Surface Air Temperature Cooling Mesoscale Climatic Simulation of Surface Air Temperature Cooling by Highly Reflective Greenhouses in SE Spain JF Environmental Science Technology A1 Campra Pablo A1 Dev Millstein KW buildings KW Heat Island Group AB p span A long term local cooling trend in surface air temperature has been monitored at the largest concentration of reflective greenhouses in the world at the Province of Almeria SE Spain associated with a dramatic increase in surface albedo in the area The availability of reliable long term climatic field data at this site offers a unique opportunity to test the skill of mesoscale meteorological models describing and predicting the impacts of land use change on local climate Using the Weather Research and Forecast WRF mesoscale model we have run a

14

Radiant cooling in US office buildings: Towards eliminating the perception of climate-imposed barriers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Much attention is being given to improving the efficiency of air-conditioning systems through the promotion of more efficient cooling technologies. One such alternative, radiant cooling, is the subject of this thesis. Performance information from Western European buildings equipped with radiant cooling systems indicates that these systems not only reduce the building energy consumption but also provide additional economic and comfort-related benefits. Their potential in other markets such as the US has been largely overlooked due to lack of practical demonstration, and to the absence of simulation tools capable of predicting system performance in different climates. This thesis describes the development of RADCOOL, a simulation tool that models thermal and moisture-related effects in spaces equipped with radiant cooling systems. The thesis then conducts the first in-depth investigation of the climate-related aspects of the performance of radiant cooling systems in office buildings. The results of the investigation show that a building equipped with a radiant cooling system can be operated in any US climate with small risk of condensation. For the office space examined in the thesis, employing a radiant cooling system instead of a traditional all-air system can save on average 30% of the energy consumption and 27% of the peak power demand due to space conditioning. The savings potential is climate-dependent, and is larger in retrofitted buildings than in new construction. This thesis demonstrates the high performance potential of radiant cooling systems across a broad range of US climates. It further discusses the economics governing the US air-conditioning market and identifies the type of policy interventions and other measures that could encourage the adoption of radiant cooling in this market.

Stetiu, C.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Climate: monthly and annual average cooling degree days above...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

at one-degree resolution of the World from NASASSE

(Abstract):
Cooling Degree Days above 10 C (degree days)
The monthly accumulation of degrees when...

16

Regional climate consequences of large-scale cool roof and photovoltaic array deployment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

climate consequences of large-scale cool roof and photovoltaic array deployment climate consequences of large-scale cool roof and photovoltaic array deployment This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article. 2011 Environ. Res. Lett. 6 034001 (http://iopscience.iop.org/1748-9326/6/3/034001) Download details: IP Address: 98.204.49.123 The article was downloaded on 01/07/2011 at 12:38 Please note that terms and conditions apply. View the table of contents for this issue, or go to the journal homepage for more Home Search Collections Journals About Contact us My IOPscience IOP PUBLISHING ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH LETTERS Environ. Res. Lett. 6 (2011) 034001 (9pp) doi:10.1088/1748-9326/6/3/034001 Regional climate consequences of large-scale cool roof and photovoltaic array deployment Dev Millstein and Surabi Menon Lawrence

17

Technical and Economic Analysis of Solar Cooling Systems in a Hot and Humid Climate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The aim of this paper is to promote efficient and cost effective implementation of advanced solar cooling systems and techniques for the hot and humid climates cities in the United States. After an introduction of basic principles, the development history and recent progress in solar cooling technologies are reported. Nevertheless, the economics of solar energy systems are particularly complex with much inevitable uncertainty due to several factors. In this paper, a simplified comprehensive economic optimization model is developed to determine whether a particular solar system is economically advantageous for a particular project. This model explains and illustrates with simple, but realistic examples the use of life-cycle cost analysis and benefit-cost analysis to evaluate and compare the economic efficiency of the solar cooling system. Consequently, under appropriate conditions, solar or solar-assisted air conditioning systems may be reasonable alternatives to conventional air-conditioning systems in a hot and humid climate.

Moaveni, H.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Regional climate consequences of large-scale cool roof and photovoltaic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

climate consequences of large-scale cool roof and photovoltaic climate consequences of large-scale cool roof and photovoltaic array deployment Title Regional climate consequences of large-scale cool roof and photovoltaic array deployment Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2011 Authors Millstein, Dev, and Surabi Menon Journal Environmental Research Letters Volume 6 Start Page 1 Pagination 9 Date Published 07/2011 Keywords co2 offsets, cool roofs, photovoltaics, radiative forcing, urban environment Abstract Modifications to the surface albedo through the deployment of cool roofs and pavements (reflective materials) and photovoltaic arrays (low reflection) have the potential to change radiative forcing, surface temperatures, and regional weather patterns. In this work we investigate the regional climate and radiative effects of modifying surface albedo to mimic massive deployment of cool surfaces (roofs and pavements) and, separately, photovoltaic arrays across the United States. We use a fully coupled regional climate model, the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, to investigate feedbacks between surface albedo changes, surface temperature, precipitation and average cloud cover. With the adoption of cool roofs and pavements, domain-wide annual average outgoing radiation increased by 0.16 ± 0.03 W m-2 (mean ± 95% C.I.) and afternoon summertime temperature in urban locations was reduced by 0.11-0.53 "C, although some urban areas showed no statistically significant temperature changes. In response to increased urban albedo, some rural locations showed summer afternoon temperature increases of up to +0.27 "C and these regions were correlated with less cloud cover and lower precipitation. The emissions offset obtained by this increase in outgoing radiation is calculated to be 3.3 ± 0.5 Gt CO2 (mean ± 95% C.I.). The hypothetical solar arrays were designed to be able to produce one terawatt of peak energy and were located in the Mojave Desert of California. To simulate the arrays, the desert surface albedo was darkened, causing local afternoon temperature increases of up to +0.4 "C. Due to the solar arrays, local and regional wind patterns within a 300 km radius were affected. Statistically significant but lower magnitude changes to temperature and radiation could be seen across the domain due to the introduction of the solar arrays. The addition of photovoltaic arrays caused no significant change to summertime outgoing radiation when averaged over the full domain, as interannual variation across the continent obscured more consistent local forcing.

19

Regional climate consequences of large-scale cool roof and photovoltaic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

climate consequences of large-scale cool roof and photovoltaic climate consequences of large-scale cool roof and photovoltaic array deployment Title Regional climate consequences of large-scale cool roof and photovoltaic array deployment Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2011 Authors Millstein, Dev, and Surabi Menon Journal Environmental Research Letters Volume 6 Start Page 1 Pagination 9 Date Published 07/2011 Keywords co2 offsets, cool roof, photovoltaics, radiative forcing, urban environment Abstract Modifications to the surface albedo through the deployment of cool roofs and pavements (reflective materials) and photovoltaic arrays (low reflection) have the potential to change radiative forcing, surface temperatures, and regional weather patterns. In this work we investigate the regional climate and radiative effects of modifying surface albedo to mimic massive deployment of cool surfaces (roofs and pavements) and, separately, photovoltaic arrays across the United States. We use a fully coupled regional climate model, the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, to investigate feedbacks between surface albedo changes, surface temperature, precipitation and average cloud cover. With the adoption of cool roofs and pavements, domain-wide annual average outgoing radiation increased by 0.16 ± 0.03 W m-2 (mean ± 95% C.I.) and afternoon summertime temperature in urban locations was reduced by 0.11-0.53 "C, although some urban areas showed no statistically significant temperature changes. In response to increased urban albedo, some rural locations showed summer afternoon temperature increases of up to +0.27 "C and these regions were correlated with less cloud cover and lower precipitation. The emissions offset obtained by this increase in outgoing radiation is calculated to be 3.3 ± 0.5 Gt CO2 (mean ± 95% C.I.). The hypothetical solar arrays were designed to be able to produce one terawatt of peak energy and were located in the Mojave Desert of California. To simulate the arrays, the desert surface albedo was darkened, causing local afternoon temperature increases of up to +0.4 "C. Due to the solar arrays, local and regional wind patterns within a 300 km radius were affected. Statistically significant but lower magnitude changes to temperature and radiation could be seen across the domain due to the introduction of the solar arrays. The addition of photovoltaic arrays caused no significant change to summertime outgoing radiation when averaged over the full domain, as interannual variation across the continent obscured more consistent local forcing.

20

Evaluation of cooling performance of thermally activated building system with evaporative cooling source for typical United States climates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

have higher cooling capacity because the thermal resistancethe thermal comfort requirement unless the cooling capacitysurface cooling system and TABS systems THERMAL COMFORT

Feng, Jingjuan; Bauman, Fred

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including climatic cooling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Evaluation of cooling performance of thermally activated building system with evaporative cooling source for typical United States climates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

allows the use of alternative cooling sources, for example,allows the use of alternative cooling sources, for example,system, and alternative radiant cooling technology, i.e.

Feng, Jingjuan; Bauman, Fred

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

An Earth Outgoing Longwave Radiation Climate Model. Part II: Radiation with Clouds Included  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An Earth outgoing longwave radiation (OLWR) climate model was constructed for radiation budget studies. The model consists of the upward radiative transfer parameterization of Thompson and Warren, the cloud cover model of Sherr et al., and a ...

Shi-Keng Yang; G. Louis Smith; Fred L. Bartman

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Transient Climate Change Simulations with a Coupled AtmosphereOcean GCM Including the Tropospheric Sulfur Cycle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The time-dependent climate response to changing concentrations of greenhouse gases and sulfate aerosols is studied using a coupled general circulation model of the atmosphere and the ocean (ECHAM4/OPYC3). The concentrations of the well-mixed ...

E. Roeckner; L. Bengtsson; J. Feichter; J. Lelieveld; H. Rodhe

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Energy consumption and comfort analysis for different low-energy cooling systems in a mild climate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Additional energy savings could be achieved by installing cooling towers in order to obtain free cooling to the chilled water loop for much of the year. However, cooling towers are generally not used in the U1 Energy consumption and comfort analysis for different low- energy cooling systems in a mild

Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

25

Regional climate consequences of large-scale cool roof and photovoltai...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

roofs, photovoltaics, radiative forcing, urban environment Abstract Modifications to the surface albedo through the deployment of cool roofs and pavements (reflective materials)...

26

Regional climate consequences of large-scale cool roof and photovoltai...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

roof, photovoltaics, radiative forcing, urban environment Abstract Modifications to the surface albedo through the deployment of cool roofs and pavements (reflective materials) and...

27

Simulation study for an absorption solar cooling system operated under Taiwan climate.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In this thesis, solar energy is utilized as the driving energy for an absorption cooling system, and a TRNSYS computer code is employed to simulate (more)

Chiu, Yi-ying

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Case Study of Stratified Chilled Water Storage Utilization for Comfort and Process Cooling in a Hot, Humid Climate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The advantages of thermal storage are enhanced in hot and humid climates. Year-round cooling loads increase thermal storage operating cost savings. The absence of a long winter during which major maintenance tasks can be accomplished without compromising system reliability increases the importance of thermal storage as back-up capacity. In an industrial setting, operating cost savings due to thermal storage go directly to the bottom line of a manufacturing process and the avoidance of lost production due to process cooling outages can save millions of dollars per year. This paper presents a case study of chilled water storage use at the campus of a major US electronics manufacturer located in Dallas, TX. An overview of the system and its operation is followed by presentation of operating data taken during 1997.

Bahnfleth, W. P.; Musser, A.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

A novel personal cooling system for use by soldiers in hot climates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report focuses on the design, testing and fabrication of a lightweight personal, portable cooling system for use by soldiers beneath their Interceptor body armor. An alpha prototype was constructed and was used to ...

Gentile, Margaret H

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Climate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Climate simulation map Climate Global climate change processes and impacts research in EETD is aimed at understanding the factors-and the feedbacks among these factors-driving...

31

Cooling System Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cooling System Basics Cooling System Basics Cooling System Basics August 16, 2013 - 1:08pm Addthis Cooling technologies used in homes and buildings include ventilation, evaporative cooling, air conditioning, absorption cooling, and radiant cooling. Learn more about how these technologies work. Ventilation Ventilation allows air to move into and out of homes and buildings either by natural or mechanical means. Evaporative Cooling In dry climates, evaporative cooling or "swamp cooling" provides an experience like air conditioning, but with much lower energy use. An evaporative cooler uses the outside air's heat to evaporate water inside the cooler. The heat is drawn out of the air and the cooled air is blown into the space by the cooler's fan. Air Conditioning Air conditioners, which employ the same operating principles and basic

32

Cooling System Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cooling System Basics Cooling System Basics Cooling System Basics August 16, 2013 - 1:08pm Addthis Cooling technologies used in homes and buildings include ventilation, evaporative cooling, air conditioning, absorption cooling, and radiant cooling. Learn more about how these technologies work. Ventilation Ventilation allows air to move into and out of homes and buildings either by natural or mechanical means. Evaporative Cooling In dry climates, evaporative cooling or "swamp cooling" provides an experience like air conditioning, but with much lower energy use. An evaporative cooler uses the outside air's heat to evaporate water inside the cooler. The heat is drawn out of the air and the cooled air is blown into the space by the cooler's fan. Air Conditioning Air conditioners, which employ the same operating principles and basic

33

Fossil Fuel and Biomass Burning Effect on ClimateHeating or Cooling?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Emission from burning of fossil fuels and biomass (associated with deforestation) generates a radiative forcing on the atmosphere and a possible climate chaw. Emitted trace gases heat the atmosphere through their greenhouse effect, while ...

Yoram J. Kaufman; Robert S. Fraser; Robert L. Mahoney

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Climate: monthly and annual average cooling degree days above 10° C GIS  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

cooling degree days above 10° C GIS cooling degree days above 10° C GIS data at one-degree resolution of the World from NASA/SSE Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Cooling Degree Days above 10° C (degree days)The monthly accumulation of degrees when the daily mean temperature is above 10° C.NASA Surface meteorology and Solar Energy (SSE) Release 6.0 Data Set (Nov 2007)22-year Monthly Average & Annual Sum (July 1983 - June 2005)Parameter: Cooling Degree Days Above 10 degrees C (degree days)Internet: http://eosweb.larc.nasa.gov/sse/Note 1: SSE Methodology & Accuracy sections onlineNote 2: Lat/Lon values indicate the lower left corner of a 1x1 degree region. Negative values are south and west; positive values are north and east. Boundaries of the -90/-180 region are -90 to -89 (south) and -180 to -179 (west). The last region, 89/180,

35

The impact of humidity standards on energy efficient cooling in california  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fan and Cooling Energy Climate Zone 9 E Fan Energy B CoolingFan and Cooling Energy Climate Zone 9 Fan Energy B Cooling43. Fan and Cooling Energy Climate Zone 12 B F a n Energy B

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

climate | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

climate climate Dataset Summary Description The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Services (NESDIS), in conjunction with the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) publish monthly and annual climate data by state for the U.S., including, cooling degree days (total number of days per month and per year). The average values for each state are weighted by population, using 2000 Census data. The base temperature for this dataset is 65 degrees F. Source NOAA Date Released Unknown Date Updated June 24th, 2005 (9 years ago) Keywords climate cooling degree days NOAA Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon hcs_51_avg_cdd.xls (xls, 215.6 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

37

Artificial neural networks for predicting indoor temperature using roof passive cooling techniques in buildings in different climatic conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three passive cooling methods (e.g. roof pond, reflective roof cooling and using insulation over the roof) have been experimentally evaluated using an experimental test structure. The objective of this work is to train an artificial neural network (ANN) ... Keywords: Artificial neural network, Energy saving, India, Passive cooling, Thermal comfort

Shrikant Pandey; D. A. Hindoliya; Ritu Mod

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Coordinated Abrupt Weakening of the Eurasian and North African Monsoons in the 1960s and Links to Extratropical North Atlantic Cooling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Previous modeling and paleoclimate studies have suggested that cooling originating from the extratropical North Atlantic can abruptly weaken the Eurasian and North African monsoons. The climatic signature includes a widespread cooling over the ...

Y. Liu; J. C. H. Chiang

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

cooling degree days | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

cooling degree days cooling degree days Dataset Summary Description The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Services (NESDIS), in conjunction with the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) publish monthly and annual climate data by state for the U.S., including, cooling degree days (total number of days per month and per year). The average values for each state are weighted by population, using 2000 Census data. The base temperature for this dataset is 65 degrees F. Source NOAA Date Released Unknown Date Updated June 24th, 2005 (9 years ago) Keywords climate cooling degree days NOAA Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon hcs_51_avg_cdd.xls (xls, 215.6 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review

40

Proceedings: Cooling Tower and Advanced Cooling Systems Conference  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cooling towers and associated systems performance strongly affects availability and heat rate in fossil and nuclear power plants. Papers presented at EPRI's 1994 Cooling Tower and Advanced Cooling Systems Conference discuss research results, industry experience, and case histories of cooling tower problems and solutions. Specific topics include cooling tower upgrades and retrofits, cooling tower performance, cooling tower fouling, and dry and hybrid cooling systems.

1995-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including climatic cooling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Review of water, lighting, and cooling energy efficiency measures for low-income homes located in warm climates  

SciTech Connect

In support of the U.S. Department of Energy`s Weatherization Assistance Program, Oak Ridge National Laboratory has performed a literature review of weatherization measures applicable for homes located in warm climate regions. Sources for this information included: (1) documented engineering estimates, (2) vendor information, (3) reported performance from research and field tests, and (4) direct discussions with researchers, vendors, and field reporters. Estimated savings are extrapolated from reported energy savings and applied to the end-use energy consumption for low-income homes reported by the Energy Information Administration. Additionally, installation costs, savings-to-investment ratios, and parameters indicating performance sensitivity to issues such as occupancy, construction, client education, and maintenance requirements are presented. The report is comprised of two sections: (1) an overview of measure performance, and (2) an appendix. The overview of measures is in a tabular format, which allows for quick reference. More detailed discussions and references for each measure are presented in the Appendix and it is highly recommended that these be reviewed prior to measure selection.

Martin, M.A.; Gettings, M.B.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Cooling Systems | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

technologies used in homes and buildings include ventilation, evaporative cooling, air conditioning, absorption cooling, and radiant cooling. Learn more about how these...

43

Home Cooling | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cooling Cooling Home Cooling Ventilation Systems for Cooling Learn how to avoid heat buildup and keep your home cool with ventilation. Read more Cooling with a Whole House Fan A whole-house fan, in combination with other cooling systems, can meet all or most of your home cooling needs year round. Read more Although your first thought for cooling may be air conditioning, there are many alternatives that provide cooling with less energy use. You might also consider fans, evaporative coolers, or heat pumps as your primary means of cooling. In addition, a combination of proper insulation, energy-efficient windows and doors, daylighting, shading, and ventilation will usually keep homes cool with a low amount of energy use in all but the hottest climates. Although ventilation is not an effective cooling strategy in hot, humid

44

Climate Collections  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regional/Global > Climate Collections Regional/Global > Climate Collections Climate Collections Overview Climate encompasses the statistics of temperature, humidity, atmospheric pressure, wind, rainfall, atmospheric particle count, and numerous other meteorological elements in a given region over long periods of time. Climate can be contrasted to weather, which is the present condition of these same elements over periods up to two weeks. The climate collections project includes data sets containing measured and modeled values for variables such as temperature, precipitation, humidity, radiation, wind velocity, and cloud cover and include station measurements as well as gridded mean values. The ORNL DAAC Climate Collections Data archive includes 10 data products from the following categories:

45

Energy and economic assessment of desiccant cooling systems coupled with single glazed air and hybrid PV/thermal solar collectors for applications in hot and humid climate  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a detailed analysis of the energy and economic performance of desiccant cooling systems (DEC) equipped with both single glazed standard air and hybrid photovoltaic/thermal (PV/t) collectors for applications in hot and humid climates. The use of 'solar cogeneration' by means of PV/t hybrid collectors enables the simultaneous production of electricity and heat, which can be directly used by desiccant air handling units, thereby making it possible to achieve very energy savings. The present work shows the results of detailed simulations conducted for a set of desiccant cooling systems operating without any heat storage. System performance was investigated through hourly simulations for different systems and load combinations. Three configurations of DEC systems were considered: standard DEC, DEC with an integrated heat pump and DEC with an enthalpy wheel. Two kinds of building occupations were considered: office and lecture room. Moreover, three configurations of solar-assisted air handling units (AHU) equipped with desiccant wheels were considered and compared with standard AHUs, focusing on achievable primary energy savings. The relationship between the solar collector's area and the specific primary energy consumption for different system configurations and building occupation patterns is described. For both occupation patterns, sensitivity analysis on system performance was performed for different solar collector areas. Also, this work presents an economic assessment of the systems. The cost of conserved energy and the payback time were calculated, with and without public incentives for solar cooling systems. It is worth noting that the use of photovoltaics, and thus the exploitation of related available incentives in many European countries, could positively influence the spread of solar air cooling technologies (SAC). An outcome of this work is that SAC systems equipped with PV/t collectors are shown to have better performance in terms of primary energy saving than conventional systems fed by vapour compression chillers and coupled with PV cells. All SAC systems present good figures for primary energy consumption. The best performances are seen in systems with integrated heat pumps and small solar collector areas. The economics of these SAC systems at current equipment costs and energy prices are acceptable. They become more interesting in the case of public incentives of up to 30% of the investment cost (Simple Payback Time from 5 to 10 years) and doubled energy prices. (author)

Beccali, Marco; Finocchiaro, Pietro; Nocke, Bettina [Universita degli Studi di Palermo, Palermo (Italy)

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

46

Thermal Performance of Phase-Change Wallboard for Residential Cooling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 6 Thermal Performance of Phase-Change Wallboard for Residential Cooling Cooling residential buildings in milder climates contributes significantly to peak demand mainly because of poor load factors. Peak cooling load determines the size of equipment and the cooling source. Several measures reduce cooling-system size and allow the use of lower-energy cooling sources; they include incorporating exterior walls or other elements that effectively shelter interiors from outside heat and cold, and providing thermal mass, to cool interior spaces during the day by absorbing heat and warm them at night as the mass discharges its heat. Thermal mass features may be used for storage only or serve as structural elements. Concrete, steel, adobe, stone, and brick all satisfy requirements

47

Measure Guideline: Ventilation Cooling  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this measure guideline on ventilation cooling is to provide information on a cost-effective solution for reducing cooling system energy and demand in homes located in hot-dry and cold-dry climates. This guideline provides a prescriptive approach that outlines qualification criteria, selection considerations, and design and installation procedures.

Springer, D.; Dakin, B.; German, A.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Effectiveness of External Window Attachments Based on Daylight Utilization and Cooling Load Reduction for Small Office Buildings in Hot Humid Climates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study explored the effectiveness of selected external shading devices and glazing treatments used to minimize the total annual energy consumption in small office buildings in hot humid climates. The external shading devices included a permanent horizontal overhang and a light shelf. The selected types of glazing included clear, reflective, tinted, low-emissivity coating, and heat-mirror glass. One concern about using external window attachments is that while reducing the solar heat gains, they also reduce the amount of the daylight needed to supplement interior lighting. Therefore the objective of this study was to explore which strategy would give a balance between solar heat gain reduction and daylight utilization and result in the most energy savings in the building. Computer simulations using an hourly energy calculation model were conducted to predict the building's total energy consumption using each strategy. The economics of each strategy were analyzed with lifecycle costing techniques using the present value technique. Results show that properly designed overhangs that shade clear glazing are slightly more cost-effective than specialized low-e glazing systems. These results are unique for hot humid climates where winter heating is not an issue. On the contrary, when used in cold climates, external shading devices tend to increase the building's energy consumption.

Soebarto, V. I.; Degelman, L. O.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

FOCUS COOLING  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

www.datacenterdynamics.com www.datacenterdynamics.com FOCUS COOLING Issue 28, March/April 2013 LBNL'S NOVEL APPROACH TO COOLING Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and APC by Schneider Electric test a unique double-exchanger cooling system LBNL program manager Henry Coles says can cut energy use by half A s part of a demonstration sponsored by the California Energy Commission in support of the Silicon Valley Leadership Group's data center summit, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) collaborated with APC by Schneider Electric to demonstrate a novel prototype data center cooling device. The device was installed at an LBNL data center in Berkeley, California. It included two air-to-water heat exchangers. Unlike common single-heat-exchanger configurations, one of these was supplied with

50

Evolution of cool-roof standards in the United States  

SciTech Connect

Roofs that have high solar reflectance and high thermal emittance stay cool in the sun. A roof with lower thermal emittance but exceptionally high solar reflectance can also stay cool in the sun. Substituting a cool roof for a noncool roof decreases cooling-electricity use, cooling-power demand, and cooling-equipment capacity requirements, while slightly increasing heating-energy consumption. Cool roofs can also lower citywide ambient air temperature in summer, slowing ozone formation and increasing human comfort. Provisions for cool roofs in energy-efficiency standards can promote the building- and climate-appropriate use of cool roofing technologies. Cool-roof requirements are designed to reduce building energy use, while energy-neutral cool-roof credits permit the use of less energy-efficient components (e.g., larger windows) in a building that has energy-saving cool roofs. Both types of measures can reduce the life-cycle cost of a building (initial cost plus lifetime energy cost). Since 1999, several widely used building energy-efficiency standards, including ASHRAE 90.1, ASHRAE 90.2, the International Energy Conservation Code, and California's Title 24 have adopted cool-roof credits or requirements. This paper reviews the technical development of cool-roof provisions in the ASHRAE 90.1, ASHRAE 90.2, and California Title 24 standards, and discusses the treatment of cool roofs in other standards and energy-efficiency programs. The techniques used to develop the ASHRAE and Title 24 cool-roof provisions can be used as models to address cool roofs in building energy-efficiency standards worldwide.

Akbari, Hashem; Akbari, Hashem; Levinson, Ronnen

2008-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

51

Monitoring the Energy-Use Effects of Cool Roofs on California Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for all California climate zones. CTZ Jan. Feb. Mar. Apr.A/C: Albedo: ASTM: Climate Zone: Cooling energy: DAS: EnergyCalifornia Climate Zones. . 44

Akbari, Hashem; Levinson, Ronnen; Konopaki, Steve; Rainer, Leo

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

ANNUAL HEATING AND COOLING REQUIREMENTS AND DESIGN DAY PERFORMANCE FOR A RESIDENTIAL MODEL IN SIX CLIMATES: A COMPARISON OF NBSLD, BLAST 2, AND DOE-2.1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I-' O'l Annual Heating Requirements NBSLD BLAST DOE-2 (SWF)Cooling Requirements (10 6 Btu) Btu) I'" I NBSLD III DOE-2 (DOE-2.1 predictions of annual heating and cooling requirements

Carroll, William L.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

SOLERAS - Saudi University Solar Cooling Laboratories Project: King Faisal University. Design and analysis study. Volume 2. Appendixes I-VI  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Documents supporting the proposed construction of a passively cooled house at King Faisal University in Saudi Arabia are presented. The papers include the following topics: comfort measurements; cooling methods and strategies for hot/arid climates; ventilation design; solar hot water heaters; backup HVAC equipment specifications; and computer printouts for design review and analysis. (BCS)

Not Available

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Hydronic Radiant Cooling Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 Hydronic Radiant Cooling Systems Cooling nonresidential buildings in the U.S. contributes significantly to electrical power consumption and peak power demand. Part of the electrical energy used to cool buildings is drawn by fans transporting cool air through the ducts. The typical thermal cooling peak load component for California office buildings can be divided as follows: 31% for lighting, 13% for people, 14% for air transport, and 6% for equipment (in the graph below, these account for 62.5% of the electrical peak load, labeled "chiller"). Approximately 37% of the electrical peak power is required for air transport, and the remainder is necessary to operate the compressor. DOE-2 simulations for different California climates using the California

55

The Dynamics of Warm and Cold Climates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The atmospheric dynamics of five different climate simulations with the GISS GCM are compared to investigate the changes that occur as climate warms or cools. There are two ice age simulations, the current and doubled CO2 climates, and a ...

D. Rind

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Energy Basics: Absorption Cooling  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

cooling. Other potential heat sources include propane, solar-heated water, or geothermal-heated water. Although mainly used in industrial or commercial settings, absorption...

57

Integrated Chiller System Reduce Building Operation and Maintenance Costs in Cold Climates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although water-cooled chillers are more energy efficient than air-cooled chillers, a majority of chilled water systems use air-cooled chillers. In cold weather climates, air-cooled chillers are capable of functioning in low ambient temperatures with few operational concerns, where as water-cooled chiller systems must be equipped to prevent cooling tower freezing. The integrated chiller system attempts to take advantage of each chiller's strengths and eliminate any cold weather operational concerns. An integrated chiller system includes a cooling tower and air-cooled condenser. During the summer, both the cooling tower and air condenser can be operated. In cold weather, the cooling tower is drained and the air condenser is used to dissipate the heat of the cooling system. The integrated chiller system eliminates the water storage tank and frequent charging and discharging of the cooling tower system. It reduces the size of the mechanical room and simplifies the operation of the system. The integrated chiller system is most suitable in climates where the mechanical cooling is required on a short-term basis during cold weather periods. This paper presents the system configuration, system design, optimal control, and energy impact. An example is used to demonstrate the design concepts of the integrated chiller systems.

Sheets, N.; Liu, M.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Advanced Cooling Options for Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Alternative power plant cooling systems exist that offer significant opportunity for reducing the amount of water used in power plant cooling. These systems include direct dry cooling using air-cooled condensers, indirect dry cooling using air-cooled heat exchangers paired with water-cooled surface condensers, and a variety of hybrid systems incorporating both dry and wet cooling elements. The water savings afforded by the use of these systems, however, comes at a price in the form of more expensive ...

2013-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

59

Stochastic Cooling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Stochastic Cooling was invented by Simon van der Meer and was demonstrated at the CERN ISR and ICE (Initial Cooling Experiment). Operational systems were developed at Fermilab and CERN. A complete theory of cooling of unbunched beams was developed, and was applied at CERN and Fermilab. Several new and existing rings employ coasting beam cooling. Bunched beam cooling was demonstrated in ICE and has been observed in several rings designed for coasting beam cooling. High energy bunched beams have proven more difficult. Signal suppression was achieved in the Tevatron, though operational cooling was not pursued at Fermilab. Longitudinal cooling was achieved in the RHIC collider. More recently a vertical cooling system in RHIC cooled both transverse dimensions via betatron coupling.

Blaskiewicz, M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Gas turbine cooling system  

SciTech Connect

A gas turbine engine (10) having a closed-loop cooling circuit (39) for transferring heat from the hot turbine section (16) to the compressed air (24) produced by the compressor section (12). The closed-loop cooling system (39) includes a heat exchanger (40) disposed in the flow path of the compressed air (24) between the outlet of the compressor section (12) and the inlet of the combustor (14). A cooling fluid (50) may be driven by a pump (52) located outside of the engine casing (53) or a pump (54) mounted on the rotor shaft (17). The cooling circuit (39) may include an orifice (60) for causing the cooling fluid (50) to change from a liquid state to a gaseous state, thereby increasing the heat transfer capacity of the cooling circuit (39).

Bancalari, Eduardo E. (Orlando, FL)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including climatic cooling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Status of cool roof standards in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

roofs (Table 5.5 of ASHRAE 90.2- Climate Zone Roof U-FactorASHRAE 2004a) tabulates thermal transmittance multipliers by U.S. climate zones (ASHRAE 2007). ceilings with attics wood frame steel frame climate conventional cool conventional cool zone

Akbari, Hashem; Levinson, Ronnen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Hydronic rooftop cooling systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A roof top cooling unit has an evaporative cooling section that includes at least one evaporative module that pre-cools ventilation air and water; a condenser; a water reservoir and pump that captures and re-circulates water within the evaporative modules; a fan that exhausts air from the building and the evaporative modules and systems that refill and drain the water reservoir. The cooling unit also has a refrigerant section that includes a compressor, an expansion device, evaporator and condenser heat exchangers, and connecting refrigerant piping. Supply air components include a blower, an air filter, a cooling and/or heating coil to condition air for supply to the building, and optional dampers that, in designs that supply less than 100% outdoor air to the building, control the mixture of return and ventilation air.

Bourne, Richard C. (Davis, CA); Lee, Brian Eric (Monterey, CA); Berman, Mark J. (Davis, CA)

2008-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

63

Vehicle Cooling Systems - Energy Innovation Portal  

Hydrogen and Fuel Cell; Hydropower, Wave and ... The cabin cooling system includes at least one fan to draw the hot air into the cooling duct at a ...

64

Coolerado 5 Ton RTU Performance: Western Cooling Challenge Results (Revised)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Western Cooling Efficiency Center (WCEC) developed a set of criteria for test conditions, minimum energy, and water use performance for prototype cooling equipment and identified these conditions as indicative of western state climates.

Kozubal, E.; Slayzak, S.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Carbon dioxide exchange in a cool-temperate evergreen coniferous ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This region belongs to a cool temperate zone under the influence of the Asian monsoon climate, and is characterized by mild, humid springs and autumns; hot,

66

State of the climate in 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Several large-scale climate patterns influenced climate conditions and weather patterns across the globe during 2010. The transition from a warm El Nio phase at the beginning of the year to a cool La Nia phase by July ...

Ganesan, Anita

67

Global Cool Cities Alliance | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Global Cool Cities Alliance Global Cool Cities Alliance Global Cool Cities Alliance The Department of Energy (DOE) is currently supporting the Global Cool Cities Alliance (GCCA), a non-profit organization that works with cities, regions, and national governments to speed the worldwide installation of cool roofs, pavements, and other surfaces. GCCA is dedicated to advancing policies and actions that increase the solar reflectance of our buildings and pavements as a cost-effective way to promote cool buildings, cool cities, and to mitigate the effects of climate change through global cooling. The alliance was launched in June of 2011. Cool reflective surfaces are an important near-term strategy for improving city sustainability by delivering significant benefits such as increased building efficiency and comfort, improved urban health, and heat

68

Turbine blade cooling  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A turbine rotor blade comprises a shank portion, a tip portion and an airfoil. The airfoil has a pressure side wall and a suction side wall that are interconnected by a plurality of partition sidewalls, defining an internal cooling passageway within the airfoil. The internal cooling passageway includes at least one radial outflow passageway to direct a cooling medium flow from the shank portion towards the tip portion and at least one radial inflow passageway to direct a cooling medium flow from the tip portion towards the shank portion. A number of mixing ribs are disposed on the partition sidewalls within the radial outflow passageways so as to enhance the thermal mixing of the cooling medium flow, thereby producing improved heat transfer over a broad range of the Buoyancy number.

Staub, Fred Wolf (Schenectady, NY); Willett, Fred Thomas (Niskayuna, NY)

1999-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

69

Turbine blade cooling  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A turbine rotor blade comprises a shank portion, a tip portion and an airfoil. The airfoil has a pressure side wall and a suction side wall that are interconnected by a plurality of partition sidewalls, defining an internal cooling passageway within the airfoil. The internal cooling passageway includes at least one radial outflow passageway to direct a cooling medium flow from the shank portion towards the tip portion and at least one radial inflow passageway to direct a cooling medium flow from the tip portion towards the shank portion. A number of mixing ribs are disposed on the partition sidewalls within the radial outflow passageways so as to enhance the thermal mixing of the cooling medium flow, thereby producing improved heat transfer over a broad range of the Buoyancy number.

Staub, Fred Wolf (Schenectady, NY); Willett, Fred Thomas (Niskayuna, NY)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Turbine blade cooling  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A turbine rotor blade comprises a shank portion, a tip portion and an airfoil. The airfoil has a pressure side wall and a suction side wall that are interconnected by a plurality of partition sidewalls, defining an internal cooling passageway within the airfoil. The internal cooling passageway includes at least one radial outflow passageway to direct a cooling medium flow from the shank portion towards the tip portion and at least one radial inflow passageway to direct a cooling medium flow from the tip portion towards the shank portion. A number of mixing ribs are disposed on the partition sidewalls within the radial outflow passageways so as to enhance the thermal mixing of the cooling medium flow, thereby producing improved heat transfer over a broad range of the Buoyancy number. 13 figs.

Staub, F.W.; Willett, F.T.

1999-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

71

Cool Roofs | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cool Roofs Cool Roofs Cool Roofs July 26, 2013 - 10:36am Addthis White painted roofs have been popular since ancient times in places like Greece. Similar technology can be easy to adapt to modern homes and other buildings. | Credit: ©iStockphoto/PhotoTalk White painted roofs have been popular since ancient times in places like Greece. Similar technology can be easy to adapt to modern homes and other buildings. | Credit: ©iStockphoto/PhotoTalk If you live in a hot climate, a cool roof can: Save you money on air conditioning Make your home more comfortable in hot weather How does it work? By making your roof more reflective, you reduce heat gain into your home. Check out these resources for more information. A cool roof is one that has been designed to reflect more sunlight and

72

Economic Evaluation of Alternative Cooling Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water use and conservation at electric power plants are becoming increasingly important siting issues. At most plants, the requirement for condensing exhaust steam from the steam turbine, generically known as power plant cooling, is the major use of water. Alternative cooling systems exist, including once-through cooling, wet-recirculating cooling, dry cooling, and hybrid (or wet/dry cooling), some of which offer significant opportunity for water conservation. These water savings normally, but perhaps no...

2012-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

73

Comparative performance of two types of evacuated tubular solar collectors in a residential heating and cooling system. Final report, October 1 1977-September 30 1978 (including 1974-1977 operating results comparisons)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two types of evacuated tubular solar collectors have been operated in space heating, cooling, and domestic hot water heating systems in Colorado State University Solar House I. An experimental collector from Corning Glass works supplied heat to the system from January 1977 through February 1978, and an experimental collector from the Phillips Research Laboratory, Aachen, which is currently in use, has been operating since August 1978. A flat absorber plate inside a single-walled glass tube is used in the Corning design, whereas heat is conducted through a single glass wall to an external heat exchanger plate in the Philips collector. The respective aperture areas are 50.0 m/sup 2/ and 44.7 m/sup 2/. Since system designs and conditions of operation were not identical, efficiencies and energy deliveries of the two evacuated tubular collectors should not be compared without recognition of these factors. But in comparison with conventional flat plate collectors, both types show substantially reduced heat losses and improved efficiency.

Loef, G.O.G.; Duff, W.S.

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

New and Underutilized Technology: Evaporative Pre-Cooling Systems |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Evaporative Pre-Cooling Systems Evaporative Pre-Cooling Systems New and Underutilized Technology: Evaporative Pre-Cooling Systems October 4, 2013 - 4:43pm Addthis The following information outlines key deployment considerations for evaporated pre-cooling systems within the Federal sector. Benefits Evaporative pre-cooling systems install ahead of the condenser to lower the condenser pressure. These systems can also work with an economizer. Evaporative pre-cooling reduces the requirement for energy intensive DX cooling. Application Evaporative pre-cooling systems are applicable in most building categories. Climate and Regional Considerations Evaporative pre-cooling systems are well suited in dry climates. Key Factors for Deployment Water usage needs to be taken into account in evaporative pre-cooling

75

New and Underutilized Technology: Evaporative Pre-Cooling Systems |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technology: Evaporative Pre-Cooling Systems Technology: Evaporative Pre-Cooling Systems New and Underutilized Technology: Evaporative Pre-Cooling Systems October 4, 2013 - 4:43pm Addthis The following information outlines key deployment considerations for evaporated pre-cooling systems within the Federal sector. Benefits Evaporative pre-cooling systems install ahead of the condenser to lower the condenser pressure. These systems can also work with an economizer. Evaporative pre-cooling reduces the requirement for energy intensive DX cooling. Application Evaporative pre-cooling systems are applicable in most building categories. Climate and Regional Considerations Evaporative pre-cooling systems are well suited in dry climates. Key Factors for Deployment Water usage needs to be taken into account in evaporative pre-cooling

76

WATER COOLED RETORT COVER  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A retort cover is designed for use in the production of magnesium metal by the condensation of vaporized metal on a collecting surface. The cover includes a condensing surface, insulating means adjacent to the condensing surface, ind a water-cooled means for the insulating means. The irrangement of insulation and the cooling means permits the magnesium to be condensed at a high temperature and in massive nonpyrophoric form. (AEC)

Ash, W.J.; Pozzi, J.F.

1962-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Cooled railplug  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The railplug is a plasma ignitor capable of injecting a high energy plasma jet into a combustion chamber of an internal combustion engine or continuous combustion system. An improved railplug is provided which has dual coaxial chambers (either internal or external to the center electrode) that provide for forced convective cooling of the electrodes using the normal pressure changes occurring in an internal combustion engine. This convective cooling reduces the temperature of the hot spot associated with the plasma initiation point, particularly in coaxial railplug configurations, and extends the useful life of the railplug. The convective cooling technique may also be employed in a railplug having parallel dual rails using dual, coaxial chambers.

Weldon, William F. (Austin, TX)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Climate and Architecture: The TVA Climatic Data Base  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The TVA Climatic Data Base (Finsen, 1980) is a graphic portrayal and analysis of the climatic elements and influences important to the building professions toward the resolution of climate responsive architectural design. The data base, including ...

Peter I. Finsen; Charles L. Bach; Robert C. Beebe

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Cooling arrangement for a tapered turbine blade  

SciTech Connect

A cooling arrangement (11) for a highly tapered gas turbine blade (10). The cooling arrangement (11) includes a pair of parallel triple-pass serpentine cooling circuits (80,82) formed in an inner radial portion (50) of the blade, and a respective pair of single radial channel cooling circuits (84,86) formed in an outer radial portion (52) of the blade (10), with each single radial channel receiving the cooling fluid discharged from a respective one of the triple-pass serpentine cooling circuit. The cooling arrangement advantageously provides a higher degree of cooling to the most highly stressed radially inner portion of the blade, while providing a lower degree of cooling to the less highly stressed radially outer portion of the blade. The cooling arrangement can be implemented with known casting techniques, thereby facilitating its use on highly tapered, highly twisted Row 4 industrial gas turbine blades that could not be cooled with prior art cooling arrangements.

Liang, George (Palm City, FL)

2010-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

80

Energy 101: Cool Roofs | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cool Roofs Cool Roofs Energy 101: Cool Roofs Addthis Description This edition of Energy 101 takes a look at how switching to a cool roof can save you money and benefit the environment. Duration 2:17 Topic Tax Credits, Rebates, Savings Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Credit Energy Department Video MR. : Maybe you've never given much thought about what color your roof is or what it's made of, but your roof could be costing you more money than you know to cool your home or office building, especially if you live in a warmer climate. Think about it this way: In the summertime, we wear light-colored clothes because they keep us cooler. Lighter clothes reflect rather than absorb the heat of the sun. It's the same with your roof. A cool roof is

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including climatic cooling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Ventilative cooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis evaluates the performance of daytime and nighttime passive ventilation cooling strategies for Beijing, Shanghai and Tokyo. A new simulation method for cross-ventilated wind driven airflow is presented . This ...

Graa, Guilherme Carrilho da, 1972-

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Evaporative Enhancement for Air Cooled Condensers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes research into condenser air evaporative pre-cooling technologies and the associated potential for energy and peak power savings. The interest in this project is evaluation of the specific application of evaporative cooling to the inlet air of condenser coils, particularly for large roof-top type air cooled chillers. While the technology is established and understood particularly well for hot, dry climates, this report is intended to also examine evaporative ...

2013-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

83

Climate Modeling with Spectral Elements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As an effort toward improving climate modelcomponent performance and accuracy, an atmospheric-component climate model has been developed, entitled the Spectral Element Atmospheric Climate Model and denoted as CAM_SEM. CAM_SEM includes a unique ...

Ferdinand Baer; Houjun Wang; Joseph J. Tribbia; Aim Fournier

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Laser Cooling and Cold Atomic Matter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laser Cooling and Cold Atomic Matter: to advance the understanding and applications of cold atomic matter, including ...

2012-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

85

Colorado State University program for developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating and cooling systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This program includes six tasks, including (1) a project measuring the performance of unique solar system components, (2) a project to develop a methodology for determining annual performance ratings of solar domestic hot water systems, (3) a project that will identify, analyze, design, build, and experimentally evaluate SDHW systems incorporating advanced concepts and components, (4) a liquid desiccant cooling system development project, (5) a project that will perform TRNSYS simulations to determine potential energy savings for desiccant cooling systems, especially in humid climates, and (6) a management task. The objectives and progress in each task are described.

Not Available

1993-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

86

Inclusion of cool roofs in nonresidential Title 24 prescriptive requirements  

SciTech Connect

Roofs that have high solar reflectance (high ability to reflect sunlight) and high thermal emittance (high ability to radiate heat) tend to stay cool in the sun. The same is true of low-emittance roofs with exceptionally high solar reflectance. Substituting a cool roof for a noncool roof tends to decrease cooling electricity use, cooling power demand, and cooling-equipment capacity requirements, while slightly increasing heating energy consumption. Cool roofs can also lower the ambient air temperature in summer, slowing ozone formation and increasing human comfort. DOE-2.1E building energy simulations indicate that use of a cool roofing material on a prototypical California nonresidential building with a low-sloped roof yields average annual cooling energy savings of approximately 300 kWh/1000 ft2 [3.2 kWh/m2], average annual natural gas deficits of 4.9 therm/1000 ft2 [5.6 MJ/m2], average source energy savings of 2.6 MBTU/1000 ft2 [30 MJ/m2], and average peak power demand savings of 0. 19 kW/1000 ft2 [2.1 W/m2]. The 15-year net present value (NPV) of energy savings averages $450/1000 ft2 [$4.90/m2] with time dependent valuation (TDV), and $370/1000 ft2 [$4.00/m2] without TDV. When cost savings from downsizing cooling equipment are included, the average total savings (15-year NPV + equipment savings) rises to $550/1000 ft2 [$5.90/m2] with TDV, and to $470/1000 ft2 [$5.00/m2] without TDV. Total savings range from 0.18 to 0.77 $/ft2 [1.90 to 8.30 $/m2] with TDV, and from 0.16 to 0.66 $/ft2 [1.70 to 7.10 $/m2] without TDV, across California's 16 climate zones. The typical cost premium for a cool roof is 0.00 to 0.20 $/ft2 [0.00 to 2.20 $/m2]. Cool roofs with premiums up to $0.20/ft2 [$2.20/m2] are expected to be cost effective in climate zones 2 through 16; those with premiums not exceeding $0.18/ft2 [$1.90/m2] are expected to be also cost effective in climate zone 1. Hence, this study recommends that the year-2005 California building energy efficiency code (Title 24, Pa rt 6 of the California Code of Regulations) for nonresidential buildings with low-sloped roofs include a cool-roof prescriptive requirement in all California climate zones. Buildings with roofs that do not meet prescriptive requirements may comply with the code via an ''overall-envelope'' approach (non-metal roofs only), or via a performance approach (all roof types).

Levinson, Ronnen; Akbari, Hashem; Konopacki, Steve; Bretz, Sarah

2002-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

87

Cooling Degree Days, by State (Weighted by Population, per 2000 Census) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cooling Degree Days, by State (Weighted by Population, per 2000 Census) Cooling Degree Days, by State (Weighted by Population, per 2000 Census) Dataset Summary Description The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Services (NESDIS), in conjunction with the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) publish monthly and annual climate data by state for the U.S., including, cooling degree days (total number of days per month and per year). The average values for each state are weighted by population, using 2000 Census data. The base temperature for this dataset is 65 degrees F. Included here are monthly and annual values averaged over several periods of time: 1931-2000, 1931-60, 1941-70, 1951-80, 1961-90, 1971-2000 (standard deviation is also provided). Detailed monthly climatic information (including cooling degree days) is available for the time period between 1895 and 2011, from NOAA (http://www7.ncdc.noaa.gov/CDO/CDODivisionalSelect.jsp#).

88

Definition: Water Cooling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Cooling Water Cooling Water cooling is commonly defined as a method of using water as a heat conduction to remove heat from an object, machine, or other substance by passing cold water over or through it. In energy generation, water cooling is typically used to cool steam back into water so it can be used again in the generation process.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Water cooling is a method of heat removal from components and industrial equipment. As opposed to air cooling, water is used as the heat conductor. Water cooling is commonly used for cooling automobile internal combustion engines and large industrial facilities such as steam electric power plants, hydroelectric generators, petroleum refineries and chemical plants. Other uses include cooling the barrels of machine guns, cooling of

89

Cooled railplug  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The railplug is a plasma ignitor capable of injecting a high energy plasma jet into a combustion chamber of an internal combustion engine or continuous combustion system. An improved railplug is provided which has dual coaxial chambers (either internal or external to the center electrode) that provide for forced convective cooling of the electrodes using the normal pressure changes occurring in an internal combustion engine. This convective cooling reduces the temperature of the hot spot associated with the plasma initiation point, particularly in coaxial railplug configurations, and extends the useful life of the railplug. The convective cooling technique may also be employed in a railplug having parallel dual rails using dual, coaxial chambers. 10 figs.

Weldon, W.F.

1996-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

90

Disaggregating Cooling Energy Use of Commercial Buildings Into Sensible and Latent Fractions From Whole-Building Monitored Data: Methodology and Advantages  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In hot and humid climates, where summers are both warm and humid, the latent cooling can be a significant portion of the total cooling load (as much as 40%). Typically the monitored data only includes whole-building heating and cooling energy use and total electric consumption. A method to disaggregate the latent cooling energy use from the measured whole-building heating and cooling energy use would be of particular interest. This paper presents such a method and discusses its benefits. It is shown that the overall heat transfer coefficient including the conduction, infiltration, and ventilation effects of a building, can be evaluated. Subsequently this enables the disaggregation of the total cooling energy use into sensible and latent cooling fractions. The benefits of such a method include: (i) better understanding of the sensible and latent fractions in the total cooling energy use of a building, and (ii) better regression models for energy analysis. In addition to the whole-building cooling and heating energy use and the ambient conditions, the required system parameters include: (i) cold deck supply temperature, (ii) hot deck supply temperature, (iii) mixed air temperature or ventilation rate, (iv) internal gains, and (v) total mass flow rate of the dual duct constant volume system. If continuous measurements of the system parameters are not available, then one-time measurements may be used to disaggregate the latent cooling energy use.

Katipamula, S.; Reddy, T. A.; Claridge, D. E.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Indirect passive cooling system for liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a passive cooling system. It is for liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors having a pool of liquid metal coolant with the heat generating fissionable fuel core substantially immersed in the pool of liquid metal coolant. The passive cooling system including a combination of spaced apart side-by-side partitions in generally concentric arrangement and providing for intermediate fluid circulation and heat transfer therebetween.

Hunsbedt, A.; Boardman, C.E.

1990-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

92

Experiment Study on Tower Cooling Energy-Saving Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the transition season periods the technology of tower cooling is used to cool the internal heat source region in the buildings, which is energy saving and environment friendly technology. To aim at climatic conditions of the transition season ... Keywords: towers cooling, experiments, fluence factors, energy saving

Ji Amin; He Li; Yue Zhiqiang; Jie Li; Gang Yin; Zhang Qinggang

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Energy 101: Cool Roofs | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cool Roofs Cool Roofs Energy 101: Cool Roofs Addthis Below is the text version for the Energy 101: Cool Roofs video. The video opens with "Energy 101: Cool Roofs." This is followed by images of residential rooftops. Maybe you've never given much thought about what color your roof is, or what it's made of. But your roof could be costing you more money than you know to cool your home or office building, especially if you live in a warmer climate. The video shows pedestrians walking on a city street. Think about it this way... in the summertime we wear light-colored clothes because they keep us cooler. Lighter colors reflect - rather than absorb - the heat of the sun. The video shows images of a white roof. It's the same with your roof. A cool roof is often light in color and made

94

Cooling tower waste reduction  

SciTech Connect

At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), the two main cooling tower systems (central and northwest) were upgraded during the summer of 1997 to reduce the generation of hazardous waste. In 1996, these two tower systems generated approximately 135,400 lbs (61,400 kg) of hazardous sludge, which is more than 90 percent of the hazardous waste for the site annually. At both, wet decks (cascade reservoirs) were covered to block sunlight. Covering the cascade reservoirs reduced the amount of chemical conditioners (e.g. algaecide and biocide), required and in turn the amount of waste generated was reduced. Additionally, at the northwest cooling tower system, a sand filtration system was installed to allow cyclical filtering and backflushing, and new pumps, piping, and spray nozzles were installed to increase agitation. the appurtenance upgrade increased the efficiency of the cooling towers. The sand filtration system at the northwest cooling tower system enables operators to continuously maintain the cooling tower water quality without taking the towers out of service. Operational costs (including waste handling and disposal) and maintenance activities are compared for the cooling towers before and after upgrades. Additionally, the effectiveness of the sand filter system in conjunction with the wet deck covers (northwest cooling tower system), versus the cascade reservoir covers alone (south cooling tower south) is discussed. the overall expected return on investment is calculated to be in excess of 250 percent. this upgrade has been incorporated into the 1998 DOE complex-wide water conservation project being led by Sandia National Laboratory/Albuquerque.

Coleman, S.J.; Celeste, J.; Chine, R.; Scott, C.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Study on Auto-DR and Pre-Cooling of Commercial Buildings with Thermal Mass in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in a hot California climate zone with the Demand Responsetested in this hot climate zone. Keywords: Pre-cooling;buildings in a hot climate zone in California, the use of

Yin, Rongxin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Passive containment cooling system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A passive containment cooling system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and a gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel and is vented to the drywell. An isolation pool is disposed above the GDCS pool and includes an isolation condenser therein. The condenser has an inlet line disposed in flow communication with the drywell for receiving the non-condensable gas along with any steam released therein following a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). The condenser also has an outlet line disposed in flow communication with the drywell for returning to the drywell both liquid condensate produced upon cooling of the steam and the non-condensable gas for reducing pressure within the containment vessel following the LOCA.

Billig, Paul F. (San Jose, CA); Cooke, Franklin E. (San Jose, CA); Fitch, James R. (San Jose, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Passive containment cooling system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A passive containment cooling system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and a gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel and is vented to the drywell. An isolation pool is disposed above the GDCS pool and includes an isolation condenser therein. The condenser has an inlet line disposed in flow communication with the drywell for receiving the non-condensable gas along with any steam released therein following a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). The condenser also has an outlet line disposed in flow communication with the drywell for returning to the drywell both liquid condensate produced upon cooling of the steam and the non-condensable gas for reducing pressure within the containment vessel following the LOCA. 1 figure.

Billig, P.F.; Cooke, F.E.; Fitch, J.R.

1994-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

98

Oriented spray-assisted cooling tower  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Apparatus useful for heat exchange by evaporative cooling when employed in conjunction with a conventional cooling tower. The arrangement includes a header pipe which is used to divert a portion of the water in the cooling tower supply conduit up stream of the cooling tower to a multiplicity of vertical pipes and spray nozzles which are evenly spaced external to the cooling tower so as to produce a uniform spray pattern oriented toward the central axis of the cooling tower and thereby induce an air flow into the cooling tower which is greater than otherwise achieved. By spraying the water to be cooled towards the cooling tower in a region external to the cooling tower in a manner such that the spray falls just short of the cooling tower basin, the spray does not interfere with the operation of the cooling tower, proper, and the-maximum increase in air velocity is achieved just above the cooling tower basin where it is most effective. The sprayed water lands on a concrete or asphalt apron which extends from the header pipe to the cooling tower basin and is gently sloped towards the cooling tower basin such that the sprayed water drains into the basin. By diverting a portion of the water to be cooled to a multiplicity of sprays external to the cooling tower, thermal performance is improved. 4 figs.

Bowman, C.F.

1995-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

99

Closed circuit steam cooled turbine shroud and method for steam cooling turbine shroud  

SciTech Connect

A turbine shroud cooling cavity is partitioned to define a plurality of cooling chambers for sequentially receiving cooling steam and impingement cooling of the radially inner wall of the shoud. An impingement baffle is provided in each cooling chamber for receiving the cooling media from a cooling media inlet in the case of the first chamber or from the immediately upstream chamber in the case of the second through fourth chambers and includes a plurality of impingement holes for effecting the impingement cooling of the shroud inner wall.

Burdgick, Steven Sebastian (Schenectady, NY); Sexton, Brendan Francis (Simpsonville, SC); Kellock, Iain Robertson (Simpsonville, SC)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Comparative study of different solar cooling systems for buildings in subtropical city  

SciTech Connect

In recent years, more and more attention has been paid on the application potential of solar cooling for buildings. Due to the fact that the efficiency of solar collectors is generally low at the time being, the effectiveness of solar cooling would be closely related to the availability of solar irradiation, climatic conditions and geographical location of a place. In this paper, five types of solar cooling systems were involved in a comparative study for subtropical city, which is commonly featured with long hot and humid summer. The solar cooling systems included the solar electric compression refrigeration, solar mechanical compression refrigeration, solar absorption refrigeration, solar adsorption refrigeration and solar solid desiccant cooling. Component-based simulation models of these systems were developed, and their performances were evaluated throughout a year. The key performance indicators are solar fraction, coefficient of performance, solar thermal gain, and primary energy consumption. In addition, different installation strategies and types of solar collectors were compared for each kind of solar cooling system. Through this comparative study, it was found that solar electric compression refrigeration and solar absorption refrigeration had the highest energy saving potential in the subtropical Hong Kong. The former is to make use of the solar electric gain, while the latter is to adopt the solar thermal gain. These two solar cooling systems would have even better performances through the continual advancement of the solar collectors. It will provide a promising application potential of solar cooling for buildings in the subtropical region. (author)

Fong, K.F.; Chow, T.T.; Lee, C.K.; Lin, Z.; Chan, L.S. [Division of Building Science and Technology, College of Science and Engineering, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China)

2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including climatic cooling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Passive cooling safety system for liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor having a passive cooling system for removing residual heat resulting from fuel decay during reactor shutdown. The passive cooling system comprises a plurality of partitions surrounding the reactor vessel in spaced apart relation forming intermediate areas for circulating heat transferring fluid which remove and carry away heat from the reactor vessel. The passive cooling system includes a closed primary fluid circuit through the partitions surrounding the reactor vessel and a partially adjoining secondary open fluid circuit for carrying transferred heat out into the atmosphere.

Hunsbedt, Anstein (Los Gatos, CA); Boardman, Charles E. (Saratoga, CA); Hui, Marvin M. (Sunnyvale, CA); Berglund, Robert C. (Saratoga, CA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Indirect passive cooling system for liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor having a passive cooling system for removing residual heat resulting from fuel decay during reactor shutdown. The passive cooling system comprises a plurality of partitions surrounding the reactor vessel in spaced apart relation forming intermediate areas for circulating heat transferring fluid which remove and carry away heat from the reactor vessel. The passive cooling system includes a closed primary fluid circuit through the partitions surrounding the reactor vessel and a partially adjoining secondary open fluid circuit for carrying transferred heat out into the atmosphere.

Hunsbedt, Anstein (Los Gatos, CA); Boardman, Charles E. (Saratoga, CA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Cool Roofs Are Ready to Save Energy, Cool Urban Heat Islands, and Help Slow Global Warming  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

roofing is the fastest growing sector roofing is the fastest growing sector of the building industry, as building owners and facility managers realize the immediate and long-term benefits of roofs that stay cool in the sun. Studies exploring the energy efficiency, cost-effectiveness, and sustainability of cool roofs show that in warm or hot climates, substituting a cool roof for a conventional roof can: * Reduce by up to 15% the annual air-

104

Monitoring the Energy-Use Effects of Cool Roofs on California Commercial Buildings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solar-reflective roofs stay cooler in the sun than solar-absorptive roofs. Such ''cool'' roofs achieve lower surface temperatures that reduce heat conduction into the building and the building's cooling load. The California Energy Commission has funded research in which Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) has measured the electricity use and peak demand in commercial buildings to document savings from implementing the Commission's Cool Roofs program. The study seeks to determine the savings achieved by cool roofs by monitoring the energy use of a carefully selected assortment of buildings participating in the Cool Roofs program. Measurements were needed because the peak savings resulting from the application of cool roofs on different types of buildings in the diverse California climate zones have not been well characterized to date. Only a few occupancy categories (e.g., office and retail buildings) have been monitored before this, and those were done under a limited number of climatic conditions. To help rectify this situation, LBNL was tasked to select the buildings to be monitored, measure roof performance before and after replacing a hot roof by a cool roof, and document both energy and peak demand savings resulting from installation of cool roofs. We monitored the effects of cool roofs on energy use and environmental parameters in six California buildings at three different sites: a retail store in Sacramento; an elementary school in San Marcos (near San Diego); and a 4-building cold storage facility in Reedley (near Fresno). The latter included a cold storage building, a conditioning and fruit-palletizing area, a conditioned packing area, and two unconditioned packing areas (counted as one building).

Akbari, Hashem; Levinson, Ronnen; Konopaki, Steve; Rainer, Leo

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

SIMULATING THE COOLING FLOW OF COOL-CORE CLUSTERS  

SciTech Connect

We carry out high-resolution adaptive mesh refinement simulations of a cool core cluster, resolving the flow from Mpc scales down to pc scales. We do not (yet) include any active galactic nucleus (AGN) heating, focusing instead on cooling in order to understand how gas reaches the supermassive black hole at the center of the cluster. We find that, as the gas cools, the cluster develops a very flat temperature profile, undergoing a cooling catastrophe only in the central 10-100 pc of the cluster. Outside of this region, the flow is smooth, with no local cooling instabilities, and naturally produces very little low-temperature gas (below a few keV), in agreement with observations. The gas cooling in the center of the cluster rapidly forms a thin accretion disk. The amount of cold gas produced at the very center grows rapidly until a reasonable estimate of the resulting AGN heating rate (assuming even a moderate accretion efficiency) would overwhelm cooling. We argue that this naturally produces a thermostat which links the cooling of gas out to 100 kpc with the cold gas accretion in the central 100 pc, potentially closing the loop between cooling and heating. Isotropic heat conduction does not affect the result significantly, but we show that including the potential well of the brightest cluster galaxy is necessary to obtain the correct result. Also, we found that the outcome is sensitive to resolution, requiring very high mass resolution to correctly reproduce the small transition radius.

Li Yuan; Bryan, Greg L. [Department of Astronomy, Pupin Physics Laboratories, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States)

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Multi-pass cooling for turbine airfoils  

SciTech Connect

An airfoil for a turbine vane of a gas turbine engine. The airfoil includes an outer wall having pressure and suction sides, and a radially extending cooling cavity located between the pressure and suction sides. A plurality of partitions extend radially through the cooling cavity to define a plurality of interconnected cooling channels located at successive chordal locations through the cooling cavity. The cooling channels define a serpentine flow path extending in the chordal direction. Further, the cooling channels include a plurality of interconnected chambers and the chambers define a serpentine path extending in the radial direction within the serpentine path extending in the chordal direction.

Liang, George (Palm City, FL)

2011-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

107

Desert dust and anthropogenic aerosol interactions in the Community Climate System Model coupled-carbon-climate model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coupled-carbon-climate simulations are an essential tool for predicting the impact of human activity onto the climate and biogeochemistry. Here we incorporate prognostic desert dust and anthropogenic aerosols into the CCSM3.1 coupled carbon-climate model and explore the resulting interactions with climate and biogeochemical dynamics through a series of transient anthropogenic simulations (20th and 21st centuries) and sensitivity studies. The inclusion of prognostic aerosols into this model has a small net global cooling effect on climate but does not significantly impact the globally averaged carbon cycle; we argue that this is likely to be because the CCSM3.1 model has a small climate feedback onto the carbon cycle. We propose a mechanism for including desert dust and anthropogenic aerosols into a simple carbon-climate feedback analysis to explain the results of our and previous studies. Inclusion of aerosols has statistically significant impacts on regional climate and biogeochemistry, in particular through the effects on the ocean nitrogen cycle and primary productivity of altered iron inputs from desert dust deposition.

Mahowald, Natalie [Cornell University; Rothenberg, D. [Cornell University; Lindsay, Keith [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR); Doney, Scott C. [Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution; Moore, Jefferson Keith [University of California, Irvine; Randerson, James T. [University of California, Irvine; Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Jones, C. D. [Hadley Center, Devon, England

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

A bottom-up engineering estimate of the aggregate heating and cooling loads of the entire U.S. building stock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

furnaces, chillers, and cooling towers, including the energyheating, chiller and cooling towers. Gas Plant Factors in

Huang, Yu Joe; Brodrick, Jim

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Performance analysis of hybrid liquid desiccant solar cooling system.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis investigates the coefficient of performance (COP) of a hybrid liquid desiccant solar cooling system. This hybrid cooling system includes three sections: 1) conventional (more)

Zhou, Zhipeng (Joe Zoe)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Using Cool Roofs to Reduce Energy Use, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, and Urban Heat-island Effects: Findings from an India Experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

program in Mexico City, and contacts in energy efficiencyenergy savings due to cool roofs for the median climate in Brazil, India, and Mexico ..energy savings due to cool roofs for the median climate in Brazil, India, and Mexico

Akbari, Hashem

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Inclusion of cool roofs in nonresidential Title 24 prescriptiverequirements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Roofs that have high solar reflectance (high ability toreflect sunlight) and high thermal emittance (high ability to radiateheat) tend to stay cool in the sun. The same is true of low-emittanceroofs with exceptionally high solar reflectance. Substituting a cool rooffor a non-cool roof tends to decrease cooling electricity use, coolingpower demand, and cooling-equipment capacity requirements, while slightlyincreasing heating energy consumption. Cool roofs can also lower citywideambient air temperature in summer, slowing ozone formation and increasinghuman comfort.DOE-2.1E building energy simulations indicate that use of acool roofing material on a prototypical California nonresidential (NR)building with a low-sloped roof yields average annual cooling energysavings of approximately 3.2 kW h/m2 (300 kW h/1000 ft2), average annualnatural gas deficits of 5.6 MJ/m2 (4.9 therm/1000 ft2), average annualsource energy savings of 30 MJ/m2 (2.6 MBTU/1000 ft2), and average peakpower demand savings of 2.1 W/m2 (0.19 kW/1000 ft2). The 15-year netpresent value (NPV) of energy savings averages $4.90/m2 ($450/1000 ft2)with time-dependent valuation (TDV), and $4.00/m2 ($370/1000 ft2) withoutTDV. When cost savings from downsizing cooling equipment are included,the average total savings (15-year NPV+equipment savings) rises to$5.90/m2 ($550/1000 ft2) with TDV, and to $5.00/m2 ($470/1000 ft2)without TDV.Total savings range from 1.90 to 8.30 $/m2 (0.18 0.77 $/ft2)with TDV, and from 1.70 to 7.10 $/m2 (0.16 0.66 $/ft2) without TDV,across California's 16 climate zones. The typical cost premium for a coolroof is 0.00 2.20 $/m2 (0.00 0.20 $/ft2). Cool roofs with premiums up to$2.20/m2 ($0.20/ft2) are expected to be cost effective in climate zones 216; those with premiums not exceeding $1.90/m2 ($0.18/ft2) are expectedto be also cost effective in climate zone 1. Hence, this study recommendsthat the year-2005 California building energy efficiency code (Title 24,Part 6 of the California Code of Regulations) for NR buildings withlow-sloped roofs include a cool-roof prescriptive requirement in allCalifornia climate zones. Buildings with roofs that do not meetprescriptive requirements may comply with the code via an"overall-envelope" approach (non-metal roofs only), or via a performanceapproach (all roof types).

Levinson, Ronnen; Akbari, Hashem; Konopacki, Steve; Bretz, Sarah

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Hybrid Wet/Dry Cooling for Power Plants (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation includes an overview of cooling options, an analysis of evaporative enhancement of air-cooled geothermal power plants, field measurements at a geothermal plant, a preliminary analysis of trough plant, and improvements to air-cooled condensers.

Kutscher, C.; Buys, A.; Gladden, C.

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Potential of solar cooling systems for peak demand reduction  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We investigated the technical feasibility of solar cooling for peak demand reduction using a building energy simulation program (DOE2.1D). The system studied was an absorption cooling system with a thermal coefficient of performance of 0.8 driven by a solar collector system with an efficiency of 50% with no thermal storage. The analysis for three different climates showed that, on the day with peak cooling load, about 17% of the peak load could be met satisfactorily with the solar-assisted cooling system without any thermal storage. A performance availability analysis indicated that the solar cooling system should be designed for lower amounts of available solar resources that coincide with the hours during which peak demand reduction is required. The analysis indicated that in dry climates, direct-normal concentrating collectors work well for solar cooling; however, in humid climates, collectors that absorb diffuse radiation work better.

Pesaran, A.A. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Neymark, J. [Neymark (Joel), Golden, CO (United States)

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

U.S. Climate Zone Map - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Climate Zone Map Note: Cooling degree-days (CDD) and heating degree-days (HDD) are explained in the glossary.

115

"Hot" for Warm Water Cooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

liquid cooling, dry cooler, cooling tower 1. INTRODUCTIONsolutions for cooling. Substituting cooling towers,hybrid cooling towers, or dry coolers that provide warmer

Coles, Henry

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Climate Action Plan (Manitoba, Canada)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Manitoba's Climate Action Plan centers around energy efficiency, although it includes mandates and initiatives for renewable sources of energy.

117

REACTOR COOLING  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor with provisions for selectively cooling the fuel elements is described. The reactor has a plurality of tubes extending throughout. Cylindrical fuel elements are disposed within the tubes and the coolant flows through the tubes and around the fuel elements. The fuel elements within the central portion of the reactor are provided with roughened surfaces of material. The fuel elements in the end portions of the tubes within the reactor are provlded with low conduction jackets and the fuel elements in the region between the central portion and the end portions are provided with smooth surfaces of high heat conduction material.

Quackenbush, C.F.

1959-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

118

Auxiliary Cooling Loads in Passively Cooled Buildings: An Experimental Research Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Currently accepted methods of passive cooling offset only sensible building loads. In the warm, humid southeastern gulf coast climates the latent building load can comprise 35% of the building load in the typical residence. As the sensible load on residences in these climates is reduced or offset by passive cooling techniques, this latent cooling load percentage increases rapidly. In such residences the auxiliary cooling load cannot be effectively met by conventional cooling equipment . The Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) is examining the auxiliary cooling requirements of residences in warm, humid climates. The study addresses both the thermal and moisture response of buildings. A total of eight wall systems, three frame wall types and five concrete block wall types are under test at the FSEC Passive Cooling Laboratory (PCL) in Cape Canaveral. Moisture studies involve examination of the absorption and desorption rates of building materials and furnishings and the development of improved moisture migration modeling techniques for inclusion in building energy analysis programs. TARP (Thermal Analysis Research program), developed at NBS by George Walton, and FLOAD, by FCHART Software, have been chosen as the analysis programs with which cooling examined.

Fairey, P.; Vieira, R.; Chandra, S.; Kerestecioglu, A.; Kalaghchy, S.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Absorption Cooling | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

it is also referred to as gas-fired cooling. Other potential heat sources include propane, solar-heated water, or geothermal-heated water. Although mainly used in industrial...

120

The estimation of base temperature for heating and cooling degree days for Korea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Korea, heating degree days (HDD) and cooling degree days (CDD) have been widely used as climatic indicators for the assessment of the impact of climate change, but arbitrary or customary base temperatures have been used for calculation of HDD ...

Kyoungmi Lee; Hee-Jeong Baek; ChunHo Cho

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including climatic cooling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Psychrometric Bin Analysis for Alternative Cooling Strategies in Data Centers  

SciTech Connect

Data centers are significant energy users and require continuous cooling to maintain high levels of computing performance. The majority of data centers have direct-expansion cooling which typically accounts for approximately 50% of the energy usage of data centers. However, using typical meteorological year 3 (TMY3) weather data and a simple psychometric bin analysis, alternative cooling strategies using a combination of economizer, evaporative, and supplemental DX cooling have been shown to be applicable in all climate zones in the United States. Average data center cooling energy savings across the U.S. was approximately 80%. Analysis of cooling energy savings is presented for various ASHRAE climate zones. The psychometric bin analysis is conducted for the ASHRAE recommended and allowable operating environment zones, as well as, a modified allowable operating environment. Control strategies are discussed. Finally, examples of energy efficient data centers using alternative cooling strategies are presented.

Metzger, I.; VanGeet, O.; Rockenbaugh, C.; Dean, J.; Kurnik, C.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Non-intrusive cooling system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A readily replaceable heat exchange cooling jacket for applying fluid to a system conduit pipe. The cooling jacket comprises at least two members, separable into upper and lower portions. A chamber is formed between the conduit pipe and cooling jacket once the members are positioned about the pipe. The upper portion includes a fluid spray means positioned above the pipe and the bottom portion includes a fluid removal means. The heat exchange cooling jacket is adaptable with a drain tank, a heat exchanger, a pump and other standard equipment to provide a system for removing heat from a pipe. A method to remove heat from a pipe, includes the steps of enclosing a portion of the pipe with a jacket to form a chamber between an outside surface of the pipe and the cooling jacket; spraying cooling fluid at low pressure from an upper portion of the cooling jacket, allowing the fluid to flow downwardly by gravity along the surface of the pipe toward a bottom portion of the chamber; and removing the fluid at the bottom portion of the chamber.

Morrison, Edward F. (Burnt Hills, NY); Bergman, John W. (Barrington, NH)

2001-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

123

"Renewable Energy Transition and International Climate Cooperation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

"Renewable Energy Transition and International Climate Cooperation: The German Experience" Jürgen at Urbana-Champaign. His research and teaching interests include: energy security, climate change

Sheridan, Jennifer

124

Control system for solar heating and cooling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A control system is being developed that will be capable of operating solar heating and cooling systems covering a wide range of configurations, and using different operating strategies that may be optimal for different climatic regions. To insure widespread applicability of the control system, it is being designed to allow for modification for operating with essentially all practical heating and cooling system configurations and control algorithms simply by interchange of replaceable modules in the circuitry. An experimental heating and cooling system, the main purpose of which is to allow testing and exercise of the controller, was designed so that it could be operated in these various configurations.

Wahlig, M.; Binnall, E.; Dols, C.; Graven, R.; Selph, F.; Shaw, R.; Simmons, M.

1975-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Estimating Historical Heating and Cooling Needs. Per Capita Degree Days  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Time series of approximate United States average annual per capita heating and cooling degree days for the years 18951983 are presented. The data reflect the combined effects of climate fluctuations and population shifts, and can be used in ...

M. W. Downton; T. R. Stewart; K. A. Miller

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Ventilation Systems for Cooling | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ventilation Systems for Cooling Ventilation Systems for Cooling Ventilation Systems for Cooling May 30, 2012 - 6:19pm Addthis Proper ventilation helps you save energy and money. | Photo courtesy of JD Hancock. Proper ventilation helps you save energy and money. | Photo courtesy of JD Hancock. Ventilation is the least expensive and most energy-efficient way to cool buildings. Ventilation works best when combined with methods to avoid heat buildup in your home. In some cases, natural ventilation will suffice for cooling, although it usually needs to be supplemented with spot ventilation, ceiling fans, and window fans. For large homes, homeowners might want to investigate whole house fans. Interior ventilation is ineffective in hot, humid climates where

127

Ventilation Systems for Cooling | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ventilation Systems for Cooling Ventilation Systems for Cooling Ventilation Systems for Cooling May 30, 2012 - 6:19pm Addthis Proper ventilation helps you save energy and money. | Photo courtesy of JD Hancock. Proper ventilation helps you save energy and money. | Photo courtesy of JD Hancock. Ventilation is the least expensive and most energy-efficient way to cool buildings. Ventilation works best when combined with methods to avoid heat buildup in your home. In some cases, natural ventilation will suffice for cooling, although it usually needs to be supplemented with spot ventilation, ceiling fans, and window fans. For large homes, homeowners might want to investigate whole house fans. Interior ventilation is ineffective in hot, humid climates where

128

Cooling circuit for a gas turbine bucket and tip shroud  

SciTech Connect

An open cooling circuit for a gas turbine bucket wherein the bucket has an airfoil portion, and a tip shroud, the cooling circuit including a plurality of radial cooling holes extending through the airfoil portion and communicating with an enlarged internal area within the tip shroud before exiting the tip shroud such that a cooling medium used to cool the airfoil portion is subsequently used to cool the tip shroud.

Willett, Fred Thomas (25 Long Creek Dr., Burnt Hills, NY 12027); Itzel, Gary Michael (12 Cider Mill Dr., Clifton Park, NY 12065); Stathopoulos, Dimitrios (11 Wyngate Rd., Glenmont, NY 12077); Plemmons, Larry Wayne (late of Hamilton, OH); Plemmons, Helen M. (2900 Long Ridge Trails, Hamilton, OH 45014); Lewis, Doyle C. (444 River Way, Greer, SC 29651)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Climate Drift in the CMIP3 Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Even in the absence of external forcing, climate models often exhibit long-term trends that cannot be attributed to natural variability. This so-called climate drift arises for various reasons including the following: perturbations to the climate ...

Alexander Sen Gupta; Les C. Muir; Jaclyn N. Brown; Steven J. Phipps; Paul J. Durack; Didier Monselesan; Susan E. Wijffels

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Absorption Cooling Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cooling Basics Cooling Basics Absorption Cooling Basics August 16, 2013 - 2:26pm Addthis Absorption coolers use heat rather than electricity as their energy source. Because natural gas is the most common heat source for absorption cooling, it is also referred to as gas-fired cooling. Other potential heat sources include propane, solar-heated water, or geothermal-heated water. Although mainly used in industrial or commercial settings, absorption coolers are commercially available for large residential homes. How Absorption Cooling Works An absorption cooling cycle relies on three basic principles: When a liquid is heated it boils (vaporizes) and when a gas is cooled it condenses Lowering the pressure above a liquid reduces its boiling point Heat flows from warmer to cooler surfaces.

131

RADIATIVE AND PASSIVE COOLING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at the 3rd Annual Solar Heating and Cooling R&D Contractors'been supported by the Solar Heating and Cooling Research andof Energy. 3rd Annual Solar Heating and Cooling R&D

Martin, M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Cooling with a Whole House Fan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cooling with a Whole House Fan Cooling with a Whole House Fan Cooling with a Whole House Fan May 30, 2012 - 6:54pm Addthis Whole house fan installed as part of a home retrofit project in California. | Photo courtesy of Lieko Earle, NREL. Whole house fan installed as part of a home retrofit project in California. | Photo courtesy of Lieko Earle, NREL. What does this mean for me? A whole-house fan may be sufficient to cool your house, at least for part of the year. In many climates, a whole-house fan can save you money and maintain comfort during the cooling season. How does it work? A whole-house fan works by pulling air in through windows and exhausting it through the attic and roof. Whole house cooling using a whole house fan can substitute for an air conditioner most of the year in most climates. Whole house fans combined

133

Energy Basics: Evaporative Cooling  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

absorbent material. Evaporative cooling uses evaporated water to naturally and energy-efficiently cool. How Evaporative Coolers Work There are two types of evaporative...

134

Engineering and cost analysis of a dry cooling system augmented with a thermal storage pond  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An engineering and cost study of the capacitive thermal storage pond added to a state-of-the-art dry cooling system is described. The purpose of the study was to assess the potential for reducing the cost of all-dry cooling for thermal electric power plants using a dry cooling system that includes a thermal storage pond. Using the modified BNW-I computer code, the effect of varying significant design parameters was investigated. The parametric study included studying the effects of varying turbine type, pond size, replacement energy costing, capacity penalty methodology, pond location with respect to the dry cooling tower, design temperature, and site location (meteorology). Incremental power production costs for dry cooling (i.e., the portion of the cost of bus-bar electricity from the plant which is attributable to the cost of building and operating the heat rejection system) with a thermal storage pond system were determined for meteorologies of both Wyodak, Wyoming and Phoenix, Arizona. For Wyodak the incremental cost of dry cooling with a thermal storage pond was 2.81 mills/kWh as compared to 2.55 mills/kWh for a system without a thermal storage pond. For Phoenix the incremental cost of dry cooling with a thermal storage pond was 3.66 mills/kWh as compared to 4.31 mills/kWh for a system without a thermal storage pond. If the use of a modified conventional turbine with the dry-cooled system is stipulated in order to stay with proven technology for large turbines, then results of this study show that in extremely hot climates the thermal storage pond can reduce the cost of dry cooling. If no cost penalty is assigned to high back pressure turbines and it can be used, then the thermal storage pond has no advantage in hot climates. However, collateral use of the pond for makeup or emergency cooling water storage may decreae the cost. (LCL)

Drost, M.K.; Allemann, R.T.

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Alternate Cooling Methods for Industrial Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cooling in industrial facilities has traditionally been performed by mechanical vapor compression units. While it remains the standard, recent concerns with the rising cost of electricity and environmental legislation restricting or outlawing CFC refrigerants has caused many plants to evaluate existing cooling methods. This paper presents case studies on alternate cooling methods used for space conditioning at several different industrial facilities. Methods discussed include direct and indirect evaporative, desiccant, and absorption cooling. Cooling effectiveness, operating cost and investment are also presented. Data for this evaluation was collected from clients served by Georgia Tech's Industrial Energy Extension Service, a state-sponsored energy conservation assistance program.

Brown, M.; Moore, D.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Climate Survey  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Operations Employee Operations Employee Climate Survey March 2009 Acknowledgements The Berkeley Lab Survey Team consisted of the following: Jim Krupnick, Sponsor Vera Potapenko, Project Lead Karen Ramorino, Project Manager Chris Paquette, MOR Associates Alexis Bywater, MOR Associates MOR Associates, an external consulting firm, acted as project manager for this effort, analyzing the data and preparing this report. MOR Associates specializes in continuous improve- ment, strategic thinking and leadership development. MOR Associates has conducted a number of large-scale surveys for organizations in higher education, including MIT, Stanford, the University of Chicago, and others. MOR Associates, Inc. 462 Main Street, Suite 300 Watertown, MA 02472 tel: 617.924.4501

137

Additional Climate Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Additional Climate Reports Print E-mail Additional Climate Reports Print E-mail Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Reports Internationally, many assessments have been produced to address important questions related to environmental issues such as ozone depletion, climate change, and the loss of biodiversity. Many of these assessments have provided the scientific basis for the elaboration of international agreements, including the Assessment Report Series from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). The IPCC is a scientific intergovernmental body set up by the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) and by the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP). IPCC assesses the scientific, technical and socio-economic information relevant for the understanding of the risk of human-induced climate change. Because of its intergovernmental nature, the IPCC is able to provide scientific technical and socio-economic information in a policy-relevant but policy neutral way to decision makers.

138

Cooling Energy and Cost Savings with Daylighting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cooling Energy and Cost Savings with Daylighting Cooling Energy and Cost Savings with Daylighting Title Cooling Energy and Cost Savings with Daylighting Publication Type Conference Paper LBNL Report Number LBL-19734 Year of Publication 1985 Authors Arasteh, Dariush K., Russell Johnson, Stephen E. Selkowitz, and Deborah J. Connell Conference Name 2nd Annual Symposium on Improving Building Energy Efficiency in Hot and Humid Climates Date Published 09/1985 Conference Location Texas A&M University Call Number LBL-19734 Abstract Fenestration performance in nonresidentialsbuildings in hot climates is often a large coolingsload liability. Proper fenestration design andsthe use of daylight-responsive dimming controls onselectric lights can, in addition to drasticallysreducing lighting energy, lower cooling loads,speak electrical demand, operating costs, chillerssizes, and first costs. Using the building energyssimulation programs DOE-2.1B and DOE-2.1C , wesfirst discuss lighting energy savings from daylighting.sThe effects of fenestration parametersson cooling loads, total energy use, peak demand,schiller sizes, and initial and operating costs aresalso discussed. The impact of daylighting, asscompared to electric lighting, on cooling requirementssis discussed as a function of glazingscharacteristics, location, and shading systems.

139

State of the Climate in 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several large-scale climate patterns influenced climate conditions and weather patterns across the globe during 2010. The transition from a warm El Nio phase at the beginning of the year to a cool La Nia phase by July contributed to many notable events, ...

J. Blunden; D. S. Arndt; M. O. Baringer

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

'Radio Wave Cooling' Offers New Twist on Laser Cooling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

'Radio Wave Cooling' Offers New Twist on Laser Cooling. From NIST Tech Beat: September 13, 2007. ...

2013-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including climatic cooling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

BNL | Climate, Environment and Bisoscience  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Climate, Environment, and Biosciences Climate, Environment, and Biosciences bioscience research Revealing Nature-from Microscopic to Atmospheric Scales With recognized expertise in plant sciences, imaging, and climate studies, Brookhaven Lab advances some of the most promising scientific methods of achieving a sustainable future. This cross-disciplinary research seeks to understand the relationships between climate change, sustainable energy initiatives, and the planet's natural ecosystems. As environmental and economic issues mount, this research will provide increasingly important guidance and opportunities for climate change management strategies, approaches to adaptation, and policy decisions. Building a Sustainable Future Major goals include: Significantly improving climate models based on high-quality data

142

Combined Climate and Carbon-Cycle Effects of Large-Scale Deforestation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The prevention of deforestation and promotion of afforestation have often been cited as strategies to slow global warming. Deforestation releases CO{sub 2} to the atmosphere, which exerts a warming influence on Earth's climate. However, biophysical effects of deforestation, which include changes in land surface albedo, evapotranspiration, and cloud cover also affect climate. Here we present results from several large-scale deforestation experiments performed with a three-dimensional coupled global carbon-cycle and climate model. These are the first such simulations performed using a fully three-dimensional model representing physical and biogeochemical interactions among land, atmosphere, and ocean. We find that global-scale deforestation has a net cooling influence on Earth's climate, since the warming carbon-cycle effects of deforestation are overwhelmed by the net cooling associated with changes in albedo and evapotranspiration. Latitude-specific deforestation experiments indicate that afforestation projects in the tropics would be clearly beneficial in mitigating global-scale warming, but would be counterproductive if implemented at high latitudes and would offer only marginal benefits in temperate regions. While these results question the efficacy of mid- and high-latitude afforestation projects for climate mitigation, forests remain environmentally valuable resources for many reasons unrelated to climate.

Bala, G; Caldeira, K; Wickett, M; Phillips, T J; Lobell, D B; Delire, C; Mirin, A

2006-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

143

Cooling for Parabolic Trough Power Plants: Overview (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation discusses water requirements for power generation and includes an analysis of wet/dry cooling.

Not Available

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Monitoring the energy-use effects of cool roofs on Californiacommercial buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solar-reflective roofs stay cooler in the sun than solar-absorptive roofs. Such 'cool' roofs achieve lower surface temperatures that reduce heat conduction into the building and the building's cooling load. We monitored the effects of cool roofs on energy use and environmental parameters in six California buildings at three different sites: a retail store in Sacramento; an elementary school in San Marcos (near San Diego); and a four-building cold storage facility in Reedley (near Fresno). The latter included a cold storage building, a conditioning and fruit-palletizing area, a conditioned packing area, and two unconditioned packing areas. Results showed that installing a cool roof reduced the daily peak roof surface temperature of each building by 33-42 K. In the retail store building in Sacramento, for the monitored period of 8 August-30 September 2002, the estimated savings in average air conditioning energy use was about 72 Wh/m{sup 2}/day (52%). On hot days when the afternoon temperature exceeded 38 C, the measured savings in average peak demand for peak hours (noon-5 p.m.) was about 10 W/m{sup 2} of conditioned area. In the school building in San Marcos, for the monitored period of 8 July-20 August 2002, the estimated savings in average air conditioning energy use was about 42-48 Wh/m{sup 2}/day (17-18%). On hot days, when the afternoon temperature exceeded 32 C, the measured savings in average peak demand for hours 10 a.m.-4 p.m. was about 5 W/m{sup 2} of conditioned area. In the cold storage facility in Reedley, for the monitored period of 11 July-14 September 2002, and 11 July-18 August 2003, the estimated savings in average chiller energy use was about 57-81 Wh/m{sup 2}/day (3-4%). On hot days when the afternoon temperature exceeded 38 C, the measured savings in average peak-period demand (average cooling-power demand during peak demand hours, typically noon-6 p.m.) was about 5-6 W/m{sup 2} of conditioned area. Using the measured data and calibrated simulations, we estimated savings for similar buildings installing cool roofs in retrofit applications for all 16 California climate zones. For similar retail stores in climate zones 2 and 4-16, installing a cool roof can save about 6-15 kWh/m{sup 2}/year of conditioned area. In climate zones 2-16, estimates of average peak demand savings for hours noon-5 p.m. range from 2.9 to 5.8 W/m{sup 2}. For similar school buildings in climate zones 2-16, installing a cool roof can save from 3 to 6 kWh/m{sup 2}/year of conditioned roof area. For all 16 climate zones estimates of average peak demand savings for hours noon-5 p.m. range from 2.6 to 3.8 W/m{sup 2}. In similar cold storage buildings in all 16 climate zones, installing a cool roof can save about 4.5-7.4 kWh/m{sup 2}/year of conditioned roof area. In all 16 climate zones, estimates of average peak demand savings for hours noon-5 p.m. range from 3.9 to 6.6 W/m{sup 2}.

Akbari, Hashem; Levinson, Ronnen; Rainer, Leo

2004-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

145

Colorado State University program for developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating and cooling systems. Project status report, March--November 1992  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This program includes six tasks, including (1) a project measuring the performance of unique solar system components, (2) a project to develop a methodology for determining annual performance ratings of solar domestic hot water systems, (3) a project that will identify, analyze, design, build, and experimentally evaluate SDHW systems incorporating advanced concepts and components, (4) a liquid desiccant cooling system development project, (5) a project that will perform TRNSYS simulations to determine potential energy savings for desiccant cooling systems, especially in humid climates, and (6) a management task. The objectives and progress in each task are described.

Not Available

1993-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

146

OCCUPATIONAL COOLING TOWERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HEALTH SCIENCES LIBRARY COOLING TOWERS EMPLOYEE HEALTH B C D F E CHILDREN'S ELEVATORS MEDICAL SCHOOL

Crews, Stephen

147

Comparative report: performance of active-solar space-cooling systems, 1981 cooling season  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report provides a detailed analysis of solar absorption cooling and solar Rankine cooling processes as represented by the National Solar Data Network (NSDN) systems. There is comprehensive data on four absorption chiller cooling systems and one Rankine cooling system. Three of these systems, including the Rankine system, demonstrated that solar cooling can be operated efficiently and provide energy savings. Good designs and operating procedures are discussed. Problems which reduce savings are identified. There is also a comparison of solar cooling by absorption, Rankine, and photovoltaic processes. Parameters and performance indices presented include overall system delivered loads, solar fraction of the load, coefficient of performance, energy collected and stored, and various subsystem efficiencies. The comparison of these factors has allowed evaluation of the relative performance of various systems. Analyses performed for which comparative data are provided include: energy savings and operating costs in terms of Btu; energy savings in terms of dollars; overall solar cooling efficiency and coefficient of performance; hourly building cooling loads; actual and long-term weather conditions; collector performance; collector area to tons of chiller cooling capacity; chiller performance; normalized building cooling loads per cooling degree-day and building area; and cooling solar fractions, design and measured.

Wetzel, P.; Pakkala, P.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Fans for Cooling | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fans for Cooling Fans for Cooling Fans for Cooling May 30, 2012 - 7:46pm Addthis Ceiling fans circulate air in a room to help keep occupants cool. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/jimkruger Ceiling fans circulate air in a room to help keep occupants cool. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/jimkruger What does this mean for me? You may be able to keep your home cool with energy-efficient and well-placed fans. Fans are less expensive to operate than air conditioners. Circulating fans include ceiling fans, table fans, floor fans, and fans mounted to poles or walls. These fans create a wind chill effect that will make you more comfortable in your home, even if it's also cooled by natural ventilation or air conditioning. Ceiling Fans Ceiling fans are considered the most effective of these types of fans,

149

Cavity cooling of a single atom  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

All conventional methods to laser-cool atoms rely on repeated cycles of optical pumping and spontaneous emission of a photon by the atom. Spontaneous emission in a random direction is the dissipative mechanism required to remove entropy from the atom. However, alternative cooling methods have been proposed for a single atom strongly coupled to a high-finesse cavity; the role of spontaneous emission is replaced by the escape of a photon from the cavity. Application of such cooling schemes would improve the performance of atom cavity systems for quantum information processing. Furthermore, as cavity cooling does not rely on spontaneous emission, it can be applied to systems that cannot be laser-cooled by conventional methods; these include molecules (which do not have a closed transition) and collective excitations of Bose condensates, which are destroyed by randomly directed recoil kicks. Here we demonstrate cavity cooling of single rubidium atoms stored in an intracavity dipole trap. The cooling mechanism res...

Maunz, P; Schuster, I; Syassen, N; Pinkse, P W H; Rempe, G

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

ION-BY-ION COOLING EFFICIENCIES  

SciTech Connect

We present ion-by-ion cooling efficiencies for low-density gas. We use Cloudy (version 10.00) to estimate the cooling efficiencies for each ion of the first 30 elements (H-Zn) individually. We present results for gas temperatures between 10{sup 4} and 10{sup 8} K, assuming low densities and optically thin conditions. When nonequilibrium ionization plays a significant role the ionization states deviate from those that obtain in collisional ionization equilibrium (CIE), and the local cooling efficiency at any given temperature depends on specific nonequilibrium ion fractions. The results presented here allow for an efficient estimate of the total cooling efficiency for any ionic composition. We also list the elemental cooling efficiencies assuming CIE conditions. These can be used to construct CIE cooling efficiencies for non-solar abundance ratios or to estimate the cooling due to elements not included in any nonequilibrium computation. All the computational results are listed in convenient online tables.

Gnat, Orly [Theoretical Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, MC 350-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States) and Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, 91904 Jerusalem (Israel); Ferland, Gary J., E-mail: orlyg@tapir.caltech.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States)

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Cooling apparatus and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device and method provide for cooling of a system having an energy source, one or more devices that actively consume energy, and one or more devices that generate heat. The device may include one or more thermoelectric coolers ("TECs") in conductive engagement with at least one of the heat-generating devices, and an energy diverter for diverting at least a portion of the energy from the energy source that is not consumed by the active energy-consuming devices to the TECs.

Mayes, James C. (Sugar Land, TX)

2009-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

152

Evaluation on Cooling Energy Load with Varied Envelope Design for High-Rise Residential Buildings in Malaysia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the development of the economy in the recent years, Malaysia is maintaining a high economic growth and therefore, its energy consumption increases dramatically. Residential buildings are characterized by being envelope-load dominated buildings, hence are greatly influenced by the outside climatic conditions. Due to the hot humid climate of Malaysia, air conditioning system accounts for more than 45% of the total electricity used in the residential sector which is required to remove substantial amount of gained heat due to poor thermal envelope performance. This paper uses Ecotect software to analyze the impact of building envelope design on energy cooling load for residential building in Penang, Malaysia, which include area ratio of window to floor, exterior wall thermal insulation, and several kinds of shading system. This paper describes an integrated passive design approach to reduce the cooling requirement for high-rise apartments through an improved building envelope design. Comparing with the other passive strategies investigated in this paper, the results indicated that exterior wall thermal insulation is the best strategy to decrease both annual cooling energy load and peak cooling load which achieved a reduction of 10.2% and 26.3% respectively. However, the other passive strategies applied also have some marginal effect on decreasing the cooling load.

Al-Tamimi, N.; Fadzil, S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Turbine inter-disk cavity cooling air compressor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A combustion turbine may have a cooling circuit for directing a cooling medium through the combustion turbine to cool various components of the combustion turbine. This cooling circuit may include a compressor, a combustor shell and a component of the combustion turbine to be cooled. This component may be a rotating blade of the combustion turbine. A pressure changing mechanism is disposed in the combustion turbine between the component to be cooled and the combustor shell. The cooling medium preferably flows from the compressor to the combustor shell, through a cooler, the component to the cooled and the pressure changing mechanism. After flowing through the pressure changing mechanism, the cooling medium is returned to the combustor shell. The pressure changing mechanism preferably changes the pressure of the cooling medium from a pressure at which it is exhausted from the component to be cooled to approximately that of the combustor shell.

Little, David Allen (Oviedo, FL)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Hybrid Cooling Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water consumption by power plants has become an increasingly contentious siting issue. In nearly all fossil-fired and nuclear plants, water for plant cooling is by far the greatest water requirement. Therefore, the use of water-conserving cooling systems such as dry or hybrid cooling is receiving increasing attention. This technology overview from the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) provides a brief introduction to hybrid cooling systems. As defined in the report, the term "hybrid cooling" refer...

2011-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

155

Cooling Plant Optimization Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Central cooling plants or district cooling systems account for 22 percent of energy costs for cooling commercial buildings. Improving the efficiency of central cooling plants will significantly impact peak demand and energy usage for both building owners and utilities. This guide identifies opportunities for optimizing a central cooling plant and provides a simplified optimization procedure. The guide focuses on plant optimization from the standpoint of minimizing energy costs and maximizing efficiencies...

1998-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

156

Achieving Climate Sustainability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is often assumed that climate change policies, including the Kyoto Protocol and the follow-on Copenhagen agreement now being negotiated, align well with sustainability's tenets. A closer look reveals this is not the case. First, they treat ...

William B. Gail

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Conductive Thermal Interaction in Evaporative Cooling Process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It has long been recognized that evaporative cooling is an effective and logical substitute for mechanical cooling in hot-arid climates. This paper explores the application of evaporative coolers to the hot-humid climates using a controlled temperature of the incoming water. With exploitation of the effect of the thermal conduction between cool underground water and entering air, the performance of an evaporative cooler can be enhanced and its use in hot and moderately humid climates should also be considered. Usually the dry-bulb depression performed by an evaporative cooler depends solely on the ambient wet-bulb temperature. The cool underground water in an evaporative cooler can cause not only adiabatic evaporation but also sensible heat transfer between water and entering air for thermal comfort. This hybrid system outperforms the two-stage evaporative cooler without employing a complicated heat exchanger (indirect system), if the temperature of underground water is lower than the ambient wet-bulb temperature. Several areas in the southern hot-humid parts of the U.S. meet this condition.

Kim, B. S.; Degelman, L. O.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Regional climate consequences of large-scale cool roof and photovoltaic array deployment This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reflection) have the potential to change radiative forcing, surface temperatures, and regional weather arrays across the United States. We use a fully coupled regional climate model, the Weather Research to be 3.3 ± 0.5 Gt CO2 (mean ± 95% C.I.). The hypothetical solar arrays were designed to be able

159

Simulation and analysis of district-heating and -cooling systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A computer simulation model, GEOCITY, was developed to study the design and economics of district heating and cooling systems. GEOCITY calculates the cost of district heating based on climate, population, energy source, and financing conditions. The principal input variables are minimum temperature, heating degree-days, population size and density, energy supply temperature and distance from load center, and the interest rate. For district cooling, maximum temperature and cooling degree-hours are required. From this input data the model designs the fluid transport and district heating systems. From this design, GEOCITY calculates the capital and operating costs for the entire system. GEOCITY was originally developed to simulate geothermal district heating systems and thus, in addition to the fluid transport and distribution models, it includes a reservoir model to simulate the production of geothermal energy from geothermal reservoirs. The reservoir model can be adapted to simulate the supply of hot water from any other energy source. GEOCITY has been used extensively and has been validated against other design and cost studies. GEOCITY designs the fluid transport and distribution facilities and then calculates the capital and operating costs for the entire system. GEOCITY can simulate nearly any financial and tax structure through varying the rates of return on equity and debt, the debt-equity ratios, and tax rates. Both private and municipal utility systems can be simulated.

Bloomster, C.H.; Fassbender, L.L.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Energy Efficient Electronics Cooling Project  

SciTech Connect

Parker Precision Cooling Business Unit was awarded a Department of Energy grant (DE-EE0000412) to support the DOE-ITP goal of reducing industrial energy intensity and GHG emissions. The project proposed by Precision Cooling was to accelerate the development of a cooling technology for high heat generating electronics components. These components are specifically related to power electronics found in power drives focused on the inverter, converter and transformer modules. The proposed cooling system was expected to simultaneously remove heat from all three of the major modules listed above, while remaining dielectric under all operating conditions. Development of the cooling system to meet specific customer's requirements and constraints not only required a robust system design, but also new components to support long system functionality. Components requiring further development and testing during this project included pumps, fluid couplings, cold plates and condensers. All four of these major categories of components are required in every Precision Cooling system. Not only was design a key area of focus, but the process for manufacturing these components had to be determined and proven through the system development.

Steve O'Shaughnessey; Tim Louvar; Mike Trumbower; Jessica Hunnicutt; Neil Myers

2012-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including climatic cooling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Cooling circuit for steam and air-cooled turbine nozzle stage  

SciTech Connect

The turbine vane segment includes inner and outer walls with a vane extending therebetween. The vane includes leading and trailing edge cavities and intermediate cavities. An impingement plate is spaced from the outer wall to impingement-cool the outer wall. Post-impingement cooling air flows through holes in the outer wall to form a thin air-cooling film along the outer wall. Cooling air is supplied an insert sleeve with openings in the leading edge cavity for impingement-cooling the leading edge. Holes through the leading edge afford thin-film cooling about the leading edge. Cooling air is provided the trailing edge cavity and passes through holes in the side walls of the vane for thin-film cooling of the trailing edge. Steam flows through a pair of intermediate cavities for impingement-cooling of the side walls. Post-impingement steam flows to the inner wall for impingement-cooling of the inner wall and returns the post-impingement cooling steam through inserts in other intermediate cavities for impingement-cooling the side walls of the vane.

Itzel, Gary Michael (Clifton Park, NY); Yu, Yufeng (Guilderland, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Cooling of Neutron Stars. Hadronic Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the cooling of isolated neutron stars. The main cooling regulators are introduced: EoS, thermal transport, heat capacity, neutrino and photon emissivity, superfluid nucleon gaps. Neutrino emissivity includes main processes. A strong impact of medium effects on the cooling rates is demonstrated. With taking into account of medium effects in reaction rates and in nucleon superfluid gaps modern experimental data can be well explained.

D. Blaschke; H. Grigorian; D. N. Voskresensky

2004-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

163

Liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor plant system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor having a passive cooling system for removing residual heat resulting for fuel decay during reactor shutdown, or heat produced during a mishap. The reactor system is enhanced with sealing means for excluding external air from contact with the liquid metal coolant leaking from the reactor vessel during an accident. The invention also includes a silo structure which resists attack by leaking liquid metal coolant, and an added unique cooling means.

Hunsbedt, Anstein (Los Gatos, CA); Boardman, Charles E. (Saratoga, CA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Emergency core cooling system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactor provided with an emergency core cooling system includes a reactor vessel which contains a reactor core comprising an array of fuel assemblies and a plurality of blanket assemblies. The reactor core is immersed in a pool of liquid metal coolant. The reactor also includes a primary coolant system comprising a pump and conduits for circulating liquid metal coolant to the reactor core and through the fuel and blanket assemblies of the core. A converging-diverging venturi nozzle with an intermediate throat section is provided in between the assemblies and the pump. The intermediate throat section of the nozzle is provided with at least one opening which is in fluid communication with the pool of liquid sodium. In normal operation, coolant flows from the pump through the nozzle to the assemblies with very little fluid flowing through the opening in the throat. However, when the pump is not running, residual heat in the core causes fluid from the pool to flow through the opening in the throat of the nozzle and outwardly through the nozzle to the assemblies, thus providing a means of removing decay heat.

Schenewerk, William E. (Sherman Oaks, CA); Glasgow, Lyle E. (Westlake Village, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Climate VISION: News Archive  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

News Archive News Archive Collapse all | Expand all 2007 November 30, 2007 USTR Schwab to Announce New Climate Initiatives for WTO, Including a New Environmental Goods and Services Agreement November 28, 2007 U.S. Energy Information Administration Anounces U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions Declined 1.5 Percent in 2006 November 20, 2007 Nobel Peace Prize for Research on Climate Change Awarded to U.S. Forest Service Scientists November 16, 2007 Our Changing Planet: The U.S. Climate Change Science Program for Fiscal Year 2008 Report Released October 18, 2007 U.S. DOE Issues Third U.S. Climate Change Science Program Report October 15, 2007 The Government of India Hosts the Second Asia-Pacific Partnership on Clean Development and Climate Ministerial Meeting Fall 2007 EPA's 2nd measurement campaign to evaluate the performance of installed PFC

166

VERSION 1, 23 NOVEMBER 2006 THEME 6: ENVIRONMENT (INCLUDING CLIMATE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- operation partner countries Development and testing of innovative concepts for integrated water/agriculture/energy initiative (Group on Earth Observation) which is endorsed by the large number of European countries technologies for maximising material and energy recovery/recycling of the organic (humid) fraction of municipal

Meju, Max

167

DOE Science Showcase - Cool roofs, cool research, at DOE | OSTI...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Accelerator returns cool roof documents from 6 DOE Databases Executive Order on Sustainability Secretary Chu Announces Steps to Implement One Cool Roof Cool Roofs Lead to Cooler...

168

Space Heating and Cooling  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A wide variety of technologies are available for heating and cooling homes and other buildings. In addition, many heating and cooling systems have certain supporting equipment in common, such as...

169

Cooling System Functions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...size Flow restrictions Heat exchanger size and design All of these factors must be considered. Every component in the cooling

170

Performance analysis of heat transfer processes from wet and dry surfaces : cooling towers and heat exchangers.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The objective of this work is to study the thermal and hydraulic performance of evaporatively cooled heat exchangers, including closed wet cooling towers, and dry (more)

Hasan, Ala Ali

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Performance Analysis of Heat Transfer Processes from Wet and Dry Surfaces: Cooling Towers and Heat Exchangers.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The objective of this work is to study the thermal and hydraulic performance of evaporatively cooled heat exchangers, including closed wet cooling towers, and dry (more)

Hasan, Ala Ali

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

An Analysis of the DER Adoption Climate in Japan Using Optimization Results for Prototype Buildings with U.S. Comparisons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

thermal loads (including absorption cooling), and a menu ofbuildings, optimization, absorption cooling 1. Introductionfor it [10]. absorption cooling potentially offers [11]. 3.

Zhou, Nan; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan; Gao, Weijun; Nishida, Masaru

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Microsoft PowerPoint - Cool Roofs_090804  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

for: for: Quarterly Facilities and Infrastructure Meeting Presented by: The Office of Engineering and Construction Management Content Excerpted From Presentation of: Bob Schmidt - NNSA Kansas City Plant Cool Roofs - An Overview August 4, 2009 2 *The terms "white roof" and "cool roof" are often mistakenly used interchangeably. A white roof is not necessarily a cool roof and a cool roof is not necessarily white. *"Cool Roofs" come in many style as defined by industry standard and can include: Metal Single ply Modified bitumen Acrylic coated White Roof vs. Cool Roof 3 Solar reflectance alone can significantly influence surface temperature, with the white stripe on the brick wall about 5 to 10° F (3-5° C) cooler than the surrounding, darker

174

Cooling load estimation methods  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Ongoing research on quantifying the cooling loads in residential buildings, particularly buildings with passive solar heating systems, is described. Correlations are described that permit auxiliary cooling estimates from monthly average insolation and weather data. The objective of the research is to develop a simple analysis method, useful early in design, to estimate the annual cooling energy required of a given building.

McFarland, R.D.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Cooling Water System Optimization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

During summer months, many manufacturing plants have to cut back in rates because the cooling water system is not providing sufficient cooling to support higher production rates. There are many low/no-cost techniques available to improve tower performance. To understand the importance of the optimization techniques, cooling tower theory will be discussed first.

Aegerter, R.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Stochastic cooling in RHIC  

SciTech Connect

After the success of longitudinal stochastic cooling of bunched heavy ion beam in RHIC, transverse stochastic cooling in the vertical plane of Yellow ring was installed and is being commissioned with proton beam. This report presents the status of the effort and gives an estimate, based on simulation, of the RHIC luminosity with stochastic cooling in all planes.

Brennan,J.M.; Blaskiewicz, M. M.; Severino, F.

2009-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

177

Natural Cooling Retrofit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Substantial numbers of existing plants and buildings are found to depend solely upon Mechanical Cooling even though Natural Cooling techniques could be employed utilizing ambient air. Most of these facilities were constructed without Natural Cooling capability due to 'first cost' budget constraints when the cost and availability of energy were of little concern.

Fenster, L. C.; Grantier, A. J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Quantum noise in photothermal cooling  

SciTech Connect

We study the problem of cooling a mechanical oscillator using the photothermal (bolometric) force. Contrary to previous attempts to model this system, we take into account the noise effects due to the granular nature of photon absorption. We achieve this by developing a Langevin formalism for the motion of the cantilever, valid in the bad-cavity limit, which includes both photon absorption shot noise and the noise due to radiation pressure. This allows us to tackle the cooling problem down to the noise-dominated regime and to find reasonable estimates for the lowest achievable phonon occupation in the cantilever.

De Liberato, Simone [Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Lambert, Neill [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, Wako-shi, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Nori, Franco [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, Wako-shi, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Physics Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

179

Turbine stator vane segment having internal cooling circuits  

SciTech Connect

A turbine stator vane includes outer and inner walls each having outer and inner chambers and a vane extending between the outer and inner walls. The vane includes first, second, third, fourth and fifth cavities for flowing a cooling medium. The cooling medium enters the outer chamber of the outer wall, flows through an impingement plate for impingement cooling of the outer band wall defining in part the hot gas path and through openings in the first, second and fourth cavities for flow radially inwardly, cooling the vane. The spent cooling medium flows into the inner wall and inner chamber for flow through an impingement plate radially outwardly to cool the inner wall. The spent cooling medium flows through the third cavity for egress from the turbine vane segment from the outer wall. The first, second or third cavities contain inserts having impingement openings for impingement cooling of the vane walls. The fifth cavity provides air cooling for the trailing edge.

Jones, Raymond Joseph (Oxford, MA); Burns, James Lee (Schenectady, NY); Bojappa, Parvangada Ganapathy (Simpsonville, SC); Jones, Schotsch Margaret (Greer, SC)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Development of a Humid Climate Definition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The role of humidity in indoor air quality has become of increasing concern in recent years. High indoor humidities can result in microbial growth on building surfaces, resulting in poor indoor air quality, as well as damage to the building and its contents. In addition to the IAQ impacts, high indoor humidity can cause occupant discomfort. The public review draft of ASHRAE Standard 62-1989R included requirements for installation of dehumidification controls in buildings with mechanical cooling located in humid climates. The draft standard included a definition of humid climate: where, during the warmest six consecutive months of a typical year, the wetbulb temperature is 19C (67F) or higher for 3500 hours or more, or 23C (73F) or higher for 1750 hours or more. This definition is that used in the 1993 ASHRAE Handbook of Fundamentals to define the humid climate region. The only areas in the continental United States which meet these criteria are close to the Gulf coast, all of Florida, and along the Atlantic coast as far north as southern North Carolina While it is clear that buildings in this humid climate region need to be carefully designed with regard to humidity control, it is also clear that buildings in other areas have an equal need for humidity control. The work described in this paper examines a number of potential indicators of "humid climate" and correlates them with the prevalence of indoor humidity problems in three building types. The FSEC 2.3 energy simulation computer program (Kerestecioglu et al. 1989) was used to simulate the three building types, using weather from 10 cities in the southeastern U.S. The FSEC software was selected because it is capable of accurately modeling moisture transfer within the building space and the dehumidification performance of cooling coils at part-load conditions, and predicting resulting humidity levels. The buildings modeled were a retail store (similar to a K-Mart or Wal-Mart), a large office building, and a fast food restaurant. Existing building models were employed for this study with ventilation rates in accordance with ASHRAE Standard 62-1989. The HVAC systems used were typical for these building types, without any special humidity control measures. The selected indicators of humidity problems are the number of hours per year with space humidity above 60% RH and the number of occupied hours with space humidity above 60% RH. TMY2 weather data (NREL 1995) for 10 cities was used for the annual building energy simulations. TMY2 data was also used to calculate a number of potential humid climate parameters for the same 10 cities. These included: the number of hours and the wetbulb-degree hours above 3 different wetbulb temperatures, the number of hours and grain-hours above 4 different humidity ratios, and the sensible, latent and total Ventilation Load Index (VLI). The VLI is the load (latent, sensible or total) generated by bringing one cfm of outdoor air to space neutral conditions over the course of one year (Hamman, et al. 1997). The ability of each climate parameter to predict indoor humidity problems was analyzed and compared. Implications of using the selected parameters to define a humid climate will be discussed

Hedrick, R. L.; Shirey, D. B.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including climatic cooling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Advanced Thermo-Adsorptive Battery: Advanced Thermo-Adsorptive Battery Climate Control System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

HEATS Project: MIT is developing a low-cost, compact, high-capacity, advanced thermoadsorptive battery (ATB) for effective climate control of EVs. The ATB provides both heating and cooling by taking advantage of the materials ability to adsorb a significant amount of water. This efficient battery system design could offer up as much as a 30% increase in driving range compared to current EV climate control technology. The ATB provides high-capacity thermal storage with little-to-no electrical power consumption. The ATB is also looking to explore the possibility of shifting peak electricity loads for cooling and heating in a variety of other applications, including commercial and residential buildings, data centers, and telecom facilities.

None

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

182

A Successful Cool Storage Rate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Houston Lighting & Power (HL&P) initiated design and development of its commercial cool storage program as part of an integrated resource planning process with a targeted 225 MW of demand reduction through DSM. Houston's extensive commercial air conditioning load, which is highly coincident with HL&P's system peak, provided a large market for cool storage technologies. Initial market research made it very clear that a special cool storage rate was required to successfully market the technology. Development of the rate required an integrated, multidepartment effort and extensive use of DSManager, an integrated resource planning model. An experimental version of the rate was initially implemented as part of the initial phase of the cool storage program. A permanent rate, incorporating lessons learned from the experimental rate, was then developed for the long term implementation of the program. The permanent rate went through a lengthy regulatory approval process which included intervention by a local natural gas distribution company. The end result is a very successful cool storage program with 52 projects and 31 megawatts of demand reduction in the first three and one-half years of program implementation.

Ahrens, A. C.; Sobey, T. M.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Cooling water distribution system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A passive containment cooling system for a nuclear reactor containment vessel. Disclosed is a cooling water distribution system for introducing cooling water by gravity uniformly over the outer surface of a steel containment vessel using an interconnected series of radial guide elements, a plurality of circumferential collector elements and collector boxes to collect and feed the cooling water into distribution channels extending along the curved surface of the steel containment vessel. The cooling water is uniformly distributed over the curved surface by a plurality of weirs in the distribution channels.

Orr, Richard (Pittsburgh, PA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Pollution Impact on Cool Roof Efficacy Research Project | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Emerging Technologies » Pollution Impact on Cool Roof Efficacy Emerging Technologies » Pollution Impact on Cool Roof Efficacy Research Project Pollution Impact on Cool Roof Efficacy Research Project The Department of Energy (DOE) is currently determining how pollution impacts the efficacy of cool roofs. The project specifically is focusing on the efficacy of white roofs in Northern India. The first phase of the project will take physical measurements to characterize the cooling and climate effects of white roofs. Results from this project will provide important guidance to policymakers and planners as they decide where cool roofs would have the greatest benefits. Project Description The project involves the development of advanced surfaces and next-generation materials to improve solar reflectance of roofs; the ability to reflect the visible, infrared and ultraviolet wavelengths of the

185

Cooling air recycling for gas turbine transition duct end frame and related method  

SciTech Connect

A method of cooling a transition duct end frame in a gas turbine includes the steps of a) directing cooling air into the end frame from a region external of the transition duct and the impingement cooling sleeve; and b) redirecting the cooling air from the end frame into the annulus between the transition duct and the impingement cooling sleeve.

Cromer, Robert Harold (Johnstown, NY); Bechtel, William Theodore (Scotia, NY); Sutcu, Maz (Niskayuna, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Climate Indices  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Indices Indices Climate Indices Climate indices are diagnostic tools used to describe the state of the climate system and monitor climate. They are most often represented with a time series, where each point in time corresponds to one index value. An index can be constructed to describe almost any atmospheric event; as such, they are myriad. Therefore, CDIAC provides these links to other web sites to help guide users to the most widely used climate indices, which in many cases are updated monthly. Data Set Website/Name NOAA's Climate Prediction Center, Monitoring and Data Index Page NOAA's Earth Systems Research Laboratory, Monthly Atmospheric and Ocean Time Series Page (plot, analyze, and compare time series) The Monthly Teleconnection Indices Page from NOAA's National

187

Climate Science Overview  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Home > Climate Science Overview. NIST Greenhouse Gas Measurements and Climate Research Program Overview. Earth's climate is ...

2010-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

188

SOLERAS solar cooling project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In view of the increasing demand for cooling in both the United States and Saudi Arabia, solar cooling systems are being considered as serious alternatives to the energy intensive conventional systems, especially when confronted with rising fossil fuel costs. Saudi Arabia and the hot, southern regions of the United States, having abundant sunshine and high cooling demand, are obvious candidates for solar active cooling systems and passive cooling design. Solar active cooling has yet to be shown to be either technologically mature or economically feasible, but efforts have been, and are presently being made within the United States National Solar Cooling Program to develop reliable systems which can compete economically with conventional cooling systems. Currently, the program is funding research and development projects in the areas of absorption, Rankine, dessicant, and advanced technologies. Saudi Arabia has a long and successful tradition of building cooling using passive architectural designs. Combining these past achievements with a program of research and development in both active and passive solar cooling should permit an early economical introduction of entirely solar cooled buildings to Saudi Arabia and the southern United States.

Corcoleotes, G.; Williamson, J.S.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

GAS COOLED NUCLEAR REACTORS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas-cooled nuclear reactor consisting of a graphite reacting core and reflector structure supported in a containing vessel is described. A gas sealing means is included for sealing between the walls of the graphite structure and containing vessel to prevent the gas coolant by-passing the reacting core. The reacting core is a multi-sided right prismatic structure having a pair of parallel slots around its periphery. The containing vessel is cylindrical and has a rib on its internal surface which supports two continuous ring shaped flexible web members with their radially innermost ends in sealing engagement within the radially outermost portion of the slots. The core structure is supported on ball bearings. This design permits thermal expansion of the core stracture and vessel while maintainirg a peripheral seal between the tvo elements.

Long, E.; Rodwell, W.

1958-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

190

CoolEarth formerly Cool Earth Solar | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CoolEarth formerly Cool Earth Solar CoolEarth formerly Cool Earth Solar Jump to: navigation, search Name CoolEarth (formerly Cool Earth Solar) Place Livermore, California Zip 94550 Product CoolEarth is a concentrated PV developer using inflatable concentrators to focus light onto triple-junction cells. References CoolEarth (formerly Cool Earth Solar)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. CoolEarth (formerly Cool Earth Solar) is a company located in Livermore, California . References ↑ "CoolEarth (formerly Cool Earth Solar)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=CoolEarth_formerly_Cool_Earth_Solar&oldid=343892" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations

191

Climate & Environmental Sciences | More Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Climate & Environment Climate & Environment SHARE Climate and Environmental Sciences Climate and environmental scientists at ORNL conduct research, develop technology and perform analyses to understand and predict how environmental systems respond to global and regional changes - including climate change, environmental stress and energy production and use. By integrating field and laboratory methods with new theory, modeling, data systems and policy analysis, we develop solutions to complex environmental challenges. ORNL has an increasing programmatic focus on climate change and subsurface biogeochemical research. Current priorities in the area of climate and environmental research are focused on understanding biogeochemical cycling in terrestrial ecosystems by creating new databases and models to inform

192

Climate & Environmental Sciences | More Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Climate & Environment Climate & Environment SHARE Climate and Environmental Sciences Climate and environmental scientists at ORNL conduct research, develop technology and perform analyses to understand and predict how environmental systems respond to global and regional changes - including climate change, environmental stress and energy production and use. By integrating field and laboratory methods with new theory, modeling, data systems and policy analysis, we develop solutions to complex environmental challenges. ORNL has an increasing programmatic focus on climate change and subsurface biogeochemical research. Current priorities in the area of climate and environmental research are focused on understanding biogeochemical cycling in terrestrial ecosystems by creating new databases and models to inform

193

Climate & Environment | More Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Climate & Environment Climate & Environment SHARE Climate and Environment Climate and environmental scientists at ORNL conduct research, develop technology and perform analyses to understand and predict how environmental systems respond to global and regional changes - including climate change, environmental stress and energy production and use. By integrating field and laboratory methods with new theory, modeling, data systems and policy analysis, we develop solutions to complex environmental challenges. ORNL has an increasing programmatic focus on climate change and subsurface biogeochemical research. Current priorities in the area of climate and environmental research are focused on understanding biogeochemical cycling in terrestrial ecosystems by creating new databases and models to inform

194

Cavity cooling of a single atom  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

All conventional methods to laser-cool atoms rely on repeated cycles of optical pumping and spontaneous emission of a photon by the atom. Spontaneous emission in a random direction is the dissipative mechanism required to remove entropy from the atom. However, alternative cooling methods have been proposed for a single atom strongly coupled to a high-finesse cavity; the role of spontaneous emission is replaced by the escape of a photon from the cavity. Application of such cooling schemes would improve the performance of atom cavity systems for quantum information processing. Furthermore, as cavity cooling does not rely on spontaneous emission, it can be applied to systems that cannot be laser-cooled by conventional methods; these include molecules (which do not have a closed transition) and collective excitations of Bose condensates, which are destroyed by randomly directed recoil kicks. Here we demonstrate cavity cooling of single rubidium atoms stored in an intracavity dipole trap. The cooling mechanism results in extended storage times and improved localization of atoms. We estimate that the observed cooling rate is at least five times larger than that produced by free-space cooling methods, for comparable excitation of the atom.

P. Maunz; T. Puppe; I. Schuster; N. Syassen; P. W. H. Pinkse; G. Rempe

2004-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

195

Stochastic cooling in RHIC  

SciTech Connect

The full 6-dimensional [x,x'; y,y'; z,z'] stochastic cooling system for RHIC was completed and operational for the FY12 Uranium-Uranium collider run. Cooling enhances the integrated luminosity of the Uranium collisions by a factor of 5, primarily by reducing the transverse emittances but also by cooling in the longitudinal plane to preserve the bunch length. The components have been deployed incrementally over the past several runs, beginning with longitudinal cooling, then cooling in the vertical planes but multiplexed between the Yellow and Blue rings, next cooling both rings simultaneously in vertical (the horizontal plane was cooled by betatron coupling), and now simultaneous horizontal cooling has been commissioned. The system operated between 5 and 9 GHz and with 3 x 10{sup 8} Uranium ions per bunch and produces a cooling half-time of approximately 20 minutes. The ultimate emittance is determined by the balance between cooling and emittance growth from Intra-Beam Scattering. Specific details of the apparatus and mathematical techniques for calculating its performance have been published elsewhere. Here we report on: the method of operation, results with beam, and comparison of results to simulations.

Brennan J. M.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Mernick, K.

2012-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

196

Residential Dehumidification Systems Research for Hot-Humid Climates: September 1, 2001 -- December 30, 2003  

SciTech Connect

Twenty homes were tested and monitored in the hot-humid climate of Houston, Texas, U.S.A., to evaluate the humidity control performance and operating cost of six different integrated dehumidification and ventilation systems that could be applied by production homebuilders. Temperature and relative humidity were monitored at four living-space locations and in the conditioned attic where the space-conditioning equipment and air-distribution ducts were located. Equipment operational time was monitored for heating, cooling, dehumidification, and ventilation. Results showed that energy efficiency measures, combined with controlled mechanical ventilation, change the sensible and latent cooling load fractions such that dehumidification separate from the cooling system is required to maintain indoor relative humidity below 60% throughout the year. The system providing the best overall value, including humidity control, first cost, and operating cost, involved a standard dehumidifier located in a hall closet with a louvered door and central-fan-integrated supply ventilation with fan cycling.

Rudd, A. F.; Lstiburek, J. W.; Eng, P.; Ueno, K.

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Design and Operating Guidelines Manual for Cooling-Water Treatment - Treatment of Recirculated Cooling Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This preliminary manual was developed to provide a systematic procedure for evaluating candidate strategies for the treatment of recirculated cooling water. It presents (1) a means of selecting optimal treatment methods and facilities on the basis of technical and economic considerations, and (2) guidelines for proper cooling-water system operation. Descriptions of, and user's manuals for, the cooling-system process and chemical equilibrium computer simulation models are included.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Parametric Study of Turbine Blade Internal Cooling and Film Cooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas turbine engines are extensively used in the aviation and power generation industries. They are used as topping cycles in combined cycle power plants, or as stand alone power generation units. Gains in thermodynamic efficiency can be realized by increasing the turbine inlet temperatures. Since modern turbine inlet temperatures exceed the melting point of the constituent superalloys, it is necessary to provide an aggressive cooling system. Relatively cool air, ducted from the compressor of the engine is used to remove heat from the hot turbine blade. This air flows through passages in the hollow blade (internal cooling), and is also ejected onto the surface of the blade to form an insulating film (film cooling). Modern land-based gas turbine engines use high Reynolds number internal flow to cool their internal passages. The first part of this study focuses on experiments pertaining to passages with Reynolds numbers of up to 400,000. Common turbulator designs (45degree parallel sharp-edged and round-edged) ribs are studied. Older correlations are found to require corrections in order to be valid in the high Reynolds number parameter space. The effect of rotation on heat transfer in a typical three-pass serpentine channel is studied using a computational model with near-wall refinement. Results from this computational study indicate that the hub experiences abnormally high heat transfer under rotation. An experimental study is conducted at Buoyancy numbers similar to an actual engine on a wedge shaped model trailing edge, roughened with pin-fins and equipped with slot ejection. Results show an asymmetery between the leading and trailing surfaces due to rotation - a difference which is subdued due to the provision of pin-fins. Film cooling effectiveness is measured by the PSP mass transfer analogy technique in two different configurations: a flat plate and a typical high pressure turbine blade. Parameters studied include a step immediately upstream of a row of holes; the Strouhal number (quantifying rotor-stator interaction) and coolant to mainstream density ratio. Results show a deterioration in film cooling effectiveness with on increasing the Strouhal number. Using a coolant with a higher density results in higher film cooling effectiveness.

Rallabandi, Akhilesh P.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

EnergyPlus vs DOE-2: The Effect of Ground Coupling on Heating and Cooling Energy Consumption of a Slab-On-Grade Code House in a Cold Climate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For low-rise buildings, the heat loss through the ground coupled floor is a significant load component. Studies showed that the current simulation tools give dissimilar results for the ground coupled heat transfer (GCHT) in slab-on-grade constructions. This paper extends the previous comparative work by comparing EnergyPlus and DOE-2.1e results for GCHT based on a slab-ongrade code house in a cold climate. Three GCHT models were used in the study. These models were Winkelmanns (2002) model in DOE-2.1e, Winkelmanns model in EnergyPlus and EnergyPlus with its GCHT calculator utility, Slab.

Andolsun, S.; Culp, C.; Haberl, J.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Global Climate Change Links  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Climate Change Links Global Climate Change Links This page provides links to web pages that we at CDIAC feel do a responsible job of presenting information and discussion pertinent to the science behind the global climate change ("global warming") debate. These sites include those on both sides of the debate; some asserting that global warming is a clear and present danger, and others that might be labeled global warming "skeptics." Some of these sites don't take a position per se; they exist to offer the public objective scientific information and results on our present understanding of the climate system. The list is not intended to be comprehensive, by any means. We hope it will be especially helpful for those who may be just beginning their research into global

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including climatic cooling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

African Climate Change: Taking the Shorter Route  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerous factors are associated with poverty and underdevelopment in Africa, including climate variability. Rainfall, and climate more generally, are implicated directly in the United Nations Millennium Development Goals to eradicate extreme ...

Richard Washington; Gillian Kay; Mike Harrison; Declan Conway; Emily Black; Andrew Challinor; David Grimes; Richard Jones; Andy Morse; Martin Todd

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

The Community Climate System Model, Version 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Community Climate System Model, version 2 (CCSM2) is briefly described. A 1000-yr control simulation of the present day climate has been completed without flux adjustments. Minor modifications were made at year 350, which included all five ...

Jeffrey T. Kiehl; Peter R. Gent

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Passive containment cooling system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A containment cooling system utilizes a naturally induced air flow and a gravity flow of water over the containment shell which encloses a reactor core to cool reactor core decay heat in two stages. When core decay heat is greatest, the water and air flow combine to provide adequate evaporative cooling as heat from within the containment is transferred to the water flowing over the same. The water is heated by heat transfer and then evaporated and removed by the air flow. After an initial period of about three to four days when core decay heat is greatest, air flow alone is sufficient to cool the containment.

Conway, Lawrence E. (Robinson Township, Allegheny County, PA); Stewart, William A. (Penn Hills Township, Allegheny County, PA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Power electronics cooling apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A semiconductor cooling arrangement wherein a semiconductor is affixed to a thermally and electrically conducting carrier such as by brazing. The coefficient of thermal expansion of the semiconductor and carrier are closely matched to one another so that during operation they will not be overstressed mechanically due to thermal cycling. Electrical connection is made to the semiconductor and carrier, and a porous metal heat exchanger is thermally connected to the carrier. The heat exchanger is positioned within an electrically insulating cooling assembly having cooling oil flowing therethrough. The arrangement is particularly well adapted for the cooling of high power switching elements in a power bridge.

Sanger, Philip Albert (Monroeville, PA); Lindberg, Frank A. (Baltimore, MD); Garcen, Walter (Glen Burnie, MD)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Energy Basics: Cooling Systems  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

or "swamp cooling" provides an experience like air conditioning, but with much lower energy use. An evaporative cooler uses the outside air's heat to evaporate water inside the...

206

Process Cooling Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cooling towers have been on the scene for more than 50 years. It is because they have proven to be an economic choice for waste heat dissipation. But it seems, for some reason, that after installation very little attention is paid to the cooling-tower and its effect on plant operating efficiency and production. This paper will describe the value of working with a cooling tower specialist to establish the physical and thermal potential of an existing cooling tower. It also demonstrates that a repair and thermal upgrade project to improve efficiency will have a better than average return on investment.

McCann, C. J.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Marine low cloud sensitivity to an idealized climate change: The CGILS LES intercomparison  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

low low cloud sensitivity to an idealized climate change: The CGILS LES intercomparison Peter N. Blossey, 1 Christopher S. Bretherton, 1 Minghua Zhang, 2 Anning Cheng, 3 Satoshi Endo, 4 Thijs Heus, 5 Yangang Liu, 4 Adrian P. Lock, 6 Stephan R. de Roode, 7 and Kuan-Man Xu 8 Received 31 July 2012; revised 4 February 2013; accepted 20 February 2013. [1] Subtropical marine low cloud sensitivity to an idealized climate change is com- pared in six large-eddy simulation (LES) models as part of CGILS. July cloud cover is simulated at three locations over the subtropical northeast Pacific Ocean, which are typified by cold sea surface temperatures (SSTs) under well-mixed stratocumulus, cool SSTs under decoupled stratocumulus, and shallow cumulus clouds overlying warmer SSTs. The idealized climate change includes a uniform 2 K SST increase with corre- sponding moist-adiabatic warming aloft and

208

The state of the art in hadron beam cooling  

SciTech Connect

Cooling of hadron beams (including heavy-ions) is a powerful technique by which accelerator facilities around the world achieve the necessary beam brightness for their physics research. In this paper, we will give an overview of the latest developments in hadron beam cooling, for which high energy electron cooling at Fermilab's Recycler ring and bunched beam stochastic cooling at Brookhaven National Laboratory's RHIC facility represent two recent major accomplishments. Novel ideas in the field will also be introduced.

Prost, L.R.; Derwent, P.; /Fermilab

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Floating power optimization studies for the cooling system of a geothermal power plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The floating power concept was studied for a geothermal power plant as a method of increasing the plant efficiency and decreasing the cost of geothermal power. The stored cooling concept was studied as a method of reducing the power fluctuations of the floating power concept. The studies include parametric and optimization studies for a variety of different types of cooling systems including wet and dry cooling towers, direct and indirect cooling systems, forced and natural draft cooling towers, and cooling ponds. The studies use an indirect forced draft wet cooling tower cooling system as a base case design for comparison purposes.

Shaffer, C.J.

1977-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Cavity cooling of a single atom  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

All conventional methods to laser-cool atoms rely on repeated cycles of optical pumping and spontaneous emission of a photon by the atom. Spontaneous emission in a random direction is the dissipative mechanism required to remove entropy from the atom. However, alternative cooling methods have been proposed1, 2 for a single atom strongly coupled to a high-finesse cavity; the role of spontaneous emission is replaced by the escape of a photon from the cavity. Application of such cooling schemes would improve the performance of atom cavity systems for quantum information processing3, 4. Furthermore, as cavity cooling does not rely on spontaneous emission, it can be applied to systems that cannot be laser-cooled by conventional methods; these include molecules2 (which do not have a closed transition) and collective excitations of

P. Maunz; I. Schuster; N. Syassen; P. W. H. Pinkse; G. Rempe

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Cooling system for a nuclear reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cooling system for a gas-cooled nuclear reactor is disclosed which includes at least one primary cooling loop adapted to pass coolant gas from the reactor core and an associated steam generator through a duct system having a main circulator therein, and at least one auxiliary cooling loop having communication with the reactor core and adapted to selectively pass coolant gas through an auxiliary heat exchanger and circulator. The main and auxiliary circulators are installed in a common vertical cavity in the reactor vessel, and a common return duct communicates with the reactor core and intersects the common cavity at a junction at which is located a flow diverter valve operative to effect coolant flow through either the primary or auxiliary cooling loops.

Amtmann, Hans H. (Rancho Santa Fe, CA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Reducing home heating and cooling costs  

SciTech Connect

This report is in response to a request from the House Committee on Energy and Commerce that the Energy Information Administration (EIA) undertake a neutral, unbiased analysis of the cost, safety, and health and environmental effects of the three major heating fuels: heating oil, natural gas, and electricity. The Committee also asked EIA to examine the role of conservation in the choice of heating and cooling fuel. To accommodate a wide audience, EIA decided to respond to the Committee`s request in the context of a report on reducing home heating and cooling costs. Accordingly, this report discusses ways to weatherize the home, compares the features of the three major heating and cooling fuels, and comments on the types of heating and cooling systems on the market. The report also includes a worksheet and supporting tables that will help in the selection of a heating and/or cooling system.

Not Available

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Impact of Freshwater Release in the North Atlantic under Different Climate Conditions in an OAGCM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The response of climate to freshwater input in the North Atlantic (NA) has raised a lot of concern about the issue of climate stability since the discovery of abrupt coolings during the last glacial period. Such coolings have usually been related ...

Didier Swingedouw; Juliette Mignot; Pascale Braconnot; Eloi Mosquet; Masa Kageyama; Ramdane Alkama

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Acoustic cooling engine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An acoustic cooling engine with improved thermal performance and reduced internal losses comprises a compressible fluid contained in a resonant pressure vessel. The fluid has a substantial thermal expansion coefficient and is capable of supporting an acoustic standing wave. A thermodynamic element has first and second ends and is located in the resonant pressure vessel in thermal communication with the fluid. The thermal response of the thermodynamic element to the acoustic standing wave pumps heat from the second end to the first end. The thermodynamic element permits substantial flow of the fluid through the thermodynamic element. An acoustic driver cyclically drives the fluid with an acoustic standing wave. The driver is at a location of maximum acoustic impedance in the resonant pressure vessel and proximate the first end of the thermodynamic element. A hot heat exchanger is adjacent to and in thermal communication with the first end of the thermodynamic element. The hot heat exchanger conducts heat from the first end to portions of the resonant pressure vessel proximate the hot heat exchanger. The hot heat exchanger permits substantial flow of the fluid through the hot heat exchanger. The resonant pressure vessel can include a housing less than one quarter wavelength in length coupled to a reservoir. The housing can include a reduced diameter portion communicating with the reservoir. The frequency of the acoustic driver can be continuously controlled so as to maintain resonance.

Hofler, Thomas J. (Los Alamos, NM); Wheatley, John C. (Los Alamos, NM); Swift, Gregory W. (Santa Fe, NM); Migliori, Albert (Santa Fe, NM)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Cooling circuit for and method of cooling a gas turbine bucket  

SciTech Connect

A closed internal cooling circuit for a gas turbine bucket includes axial supply and return passages in the dovetail of the bucket. A first radial outward supply passage provides cooling medium to and along a passageway adjacent the leading edge and then through serpentine arranged passageways within the airfoil to a chamber adjacent the airfoil tip. A second radial passage crosses over the radial return passage for supplying cooling medium to and along a pair of passageways along the trailing edge of the airfoil section. The last passageway of the serpentine passageways and the pair of passageways communicate one with the other in the chamber for returning spent cooling medium radially inwardly along divided return passageways to the return passage. In this manner, both the leading and trailing edges are cooled using the highest pressure, lowest temperature cooling medium.

Jacala, Ariel C. P. (Simpsonville, SC)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Gas hydrate cool storage system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention presented relates to the development of a process utilizing a gas hydrate as a cool storage medium for alleviating electric load demands during peak usage periods. Several objectives of the invention are mentioned concerning the formation of the gas hydrate as storage material in a thermal energy storage system within a heat pump cycle system. The gas hydrate was formed using a refrigerant in water and an example with R-12 refrigerant is included. (BCS)

Ternes, M.P.; Kedl, R.J.

1984-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

217

Liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors with passive cooling system  

SciTech Connect

A liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor having a passive cooling system for removing residual heat resulting from fuel decay during reactor shutdown. The passive cooling system comprises a plurality of cooling medium flow circuits which cooperate to remove and carry heat away from the fuel core upon loss of the normal cooling flow circuit to areas external thereto.

Hunsbedt, Anstein (Los Gatos, CA); Fanning, Alan W. (San Jose, CA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Preliminary Analysis of Energy Consumption for Cool Roofing Measures  

SciTech Connect

The spread of cool roofing has been more than prolific over the last decade. Driven by public demand and by government initiatives cool roofing has been a recognized low cost method to reduce energy demand by reflecting sunlight away from structures and back in to the atmosphere. While much of the country can benefit from the use of cool coatings it remains to be seen whether the energy savings described are appropriate in cooler climates. By use of commonly available calculators one can analyze the potential energy savings based on environmental conditions and construction practices.

Mellot, Joe [The Garland Company; Sanyal, Jibonananda [ORNL; New, Joshua Ryan [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Simulations of sizing and comfort improvements for residential forced-air heating and cooling systems  

SciTech Connect

In many parts of North America residential HVAC systems are installed outside conditioned space. This leads to significant energy losses and poor occupant comfort due to conduction and air leakage losses from the air distribution ducts. In addition, cooling equipment performance is sensitive to air flow and refrigerant charge that have been found to be far from manufacturers specifications in most systems. The simulation techniques discussed in this report were developed in an effort to provide guidance on the savings potentials and comfort gains that can be achieved by improving ducts (sealing air leaks) and equipment (correct air-flow and refrigerant charge). The simulations include the complex air flow and thermal interactions between duct systems, their surroundings and the conditioned space. They also include cooling equipment response to air flow and refrigerant charge effects. Another key aspect of the simulations is that they are dynamic to account for cyclic losses from the HVAC system and the effect of cycle length on energy and comfort performance. To field test the effect of changes to residential HVAC systems requires extensive measurements to be made for several months for each condition tested. This level of testing is often impractical due to cost and time limitations. Therefore the Energy Performance of Buildings Group at LBNL developed a computer simulation tool that models residential HVAC system performance. This simulation tool has been used to answer questions about equipment downsizing, duct improvements, control strategies and climate variation so that recommendations can be made for changes in residential construction and HVAC installation techniques that would save energy, reduce peak demand and result in more comfortable homes. Although this study focuses on California climates, the simulation tool could easily be applied to other climates. This report summarizes the simulation tool and discusses the significant developments that allow the use of this tool to perform detailed residential HVAC system simulations. The simulations have been verified by comparison to measured results in several houses over a wide range of weather conditions and HVAC system performance. After the verification was completed, more than 350 cooling and 450 heating simulations were performed. These simulations covered a range of HVAC system performance parameters and California climate conditions (that range from hot dry deserts to cold mountain regions). The results of the simulations were used to show the large increases in HVAC system performance that can be attained by improving the HVAC duct distribution systems and by better sizing of residential HVAC equipment. The simulations demonstrated that improved systems can deliver improved heating or cooling to the conditioned space, maintain equal or better comfort while reducing peak demand and the installed equipment capacity (and therefore capital costs).

Walker, I.S.; Degenetais, G.; Siegel, J.A.

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Cool Storage Technology Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is a fact that avoiding load growth is cheaper than constructing new power plants. Cool storage technologies offer one method for strategically stemming the impact of future peak demand growth. This guide provides a comprehensive resource for understanding and evaluating cool storage technologies.

2000-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including climatic cooling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Cooling Tower Technology Conference  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cooling towers and associated systems cause significant loss of availability and heat rate degradation in both nuclear and fossil-fired power plants. Twenty-one papers presented at a 2003 conference in Charleston, South Carolina discussed industrial experience and provided case histories of cooling tower problems and solutions.

2003-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

222

Cooling of superconducting devices by liquid storage and refrigeration unit  

SciTech Connect

A system is disclosed for cooling superconducting devices. The system includes a cryogen cooling system configured to be coupled to the superconducting device and to supply cryogen to the device. The system also includes a cryogen storage system configured to supply cryogen to the device. The system further includes flow control valving configured to selectively isolate the cryogen cooling system from the device, thereby directing a flow of cryogen to the device from the cryogen storage system.

Laskaris, Evangelos Trifon; Urbahn, John Arthur; Steinbach, Albert Eugene

2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

223

Solar Desiccant Cooling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Solar Desiccant Cooling Solar Desiccant Cooling Speaker(s): Paul Bourdoukan Date: December 6, 2007 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Ashok Gadgil The development of HVAC systems is a real challenge regarding its environmental impact. An innovative technique operating only by means of water and solar energy, is desiccant cooling. The principle is evaporative cooling with the introduction of a dehumidification unit, the desiccant wheel to control the humidity levels. The regeneration of the desiccant wheel requires a preheated airstream. A solar installation is a very interesting option for providing the preheated airstream. In France, at the University of La Rochelle, and at the National Institute of Solar Energy (INES), the investigation of the solar desiccant cooling technique has been

224

Water cooled steam jet  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A water cooled steam jet for transferring fluid and preventing vapor lock, or vaporization of the fluid being transferred, has a venturi nozzle and a cooling jacket. The venturi nozzle produces a high velocity flow which creates a vacuum to draw fluid from a source of fluid. The venturi nozzle has a converging section connected to a source of steam, a diffuser section attached to an outlet and a throat portion disposed therebetween. The cooling jacket surrounds the venturi nozzle and a suction tube through which the fluid is being drawn into the venturi nozzle. Coolant flows through the cooling jacket. The cooling jacket dissipates heat generated by the venturi nozzle to prevent vapor lock.

Wagner, Jr., Edward P. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Cool Roof Colored Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cool Roof Colored Materials Cool Roof Colored Materials Speaker(s): Hashem Akbari Date: May 29, 2003 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Raising roof reflectivity from an existing 10-20% to about 60% can reduce cooling-energy use in buildings in excess of 20%. Cool roofs also result in a lower ambient temperature that further decreases the need for air conditioning and retards smog formation. Reflective roofing products currently available in the market are typically used for low-sloped roofs. For the residential buildings with steep-sloped roofs, non-white (colored) cool roofing products are generally not available and most consumers prefer colors other than white. In this collaborative project LBNL and ORNL are working with the roofing industry to develop and produce reflective, colored roofing products and make yhrm a market reality within three to

226

Cool Magnetic Molecules  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cool Magnetic Molecules Cool Magnetic Molecules Cool Magnetic Molecules Print Wednesday, 25 May 2011 00:00 Certain materials are known to heat up or cool down when they are exposed to a changing magnetic field. This is known as the magnetocaloric effect. All magnetic materials exhibit this effect, but in most cases, it is too small to be technologically useful. Recently, however, the search for special molecules with a surprisingly large capacity to keep cool has heated up, driven by environmental and cost considerations as well as by recent improvements in our ability to design, assemble, and probe the structure and chemistry of small molecules. An international collaboration of researchers from Spain, Scotland, and the U.S. has utilized ALS Beamline 11.3.1 (small-molecule crystallography) to characterize the design of such "molecular coolers." The work targets the synthesis of molecular cluster compounds containing many unpaired electrons ("nanomagnets") for applications involving enhanced magnetic refrigeration at very low temperatures.

227

New and Underutilized Technology: Multi-stage Indirect Evaporative Cooling  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Multi-stage Indirect Evaporative Multi-stage Indirect Evaporative Cooling New and Underutilized Technology: Multi-stage Indirect Evaporative Cooling October 4, 2013 - 4:33pm Addthis The following information outlines key deployment considerations for multi-stage evaporative cooling within the Federal sector. Benefits Multi-stage indirect evaporative cooling is an advanced evaporative cooler that can lower air temperatures without adding moisture. These systems evaporate water in a secondary (or working) airstream, which is discharged in multiple stages. No water or humidity is added to the primary (or product) airstream in the process. Application Multi-stage indirect evaporative cooling is applicable in office, research and development, service, and school applications. Climate and Regional Considerations

228

Habitable Climates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

According to the standard liquid-water definition, the Earth is only partially habitable. We reconsider planetary habitability in the framework of energy-balance models, the simplest seasonal models in physical climatology, to assess the spatial and temporal habitability of Earth-like planets. We quantify the degree of climatic habitability of our models with several metrics of fractional habitability. Previous evaluations of habitable zones may have omitted important climatic conditions by focusing on close Solar System analogies. For example, we find that model pseudo-Earths with different rotation rates or different land-ocean fractions have fractional habitabilities that differ significantly from that of the Earth itself. Furthermore, the stability of a planet's climate against albedo-feedback snowball events strongly impacts its habitability. Therefore, issues of climate dynamics may be central in assessing the habitability of discovered terrestrial exoplanets, especially if astronomical forcing conditions are different from the moderate Solar System cases.

David S. Spiegel; Kristen Menou; Caleb A. Scharf

2007-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

229

Cooling load differences between radiant and air systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

M. Filippi, B.W. Olesen, Solar radiation and cooling loaddependant upon solar radiation, ASHRAE Transactions, (2006)heat gains also included solar radiation through windows. G3

Feng, Jingjuan Dove; Schiavon, Stefano; Bauman, Fred

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Passive cooling system for a vehicle - Energy Innovation Portal  

The passive cooling system includes one or more heat pipes (112) having an evaporator section ... Building Energy Efficiency; ... Solar Thermal; Startup America;

231

Wet cooling towers: rule-of-thumb design and simulation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A survey of wet cooling tower literature was performed to develop a simplified method of cooling tower design and simulation for use in power plant cycle optimization. The theory of heat exchange in wet cooling towers is briefly summarized. The Merkel equation (the fundamental equation of heat transfer in wet cooling towers) is presented and discussed. The cooling tower fill constant (Ka) is defined and values derived. A rule-of-thumb method for the optimized design of cooling towers is presented. The rule-of-thumb design method provides information useful in power plant cycle optimization, including tower dimensions, water consumption rate, exit air temperature, power requirements and construction cost. In addition, a method for simulation of cooling tower performance at various operating conditions is presented. This information is also useful in power plant cycle evaluation. Using the information presented, it will be possible to incorporate wet cooling tower design and simulation into a procedure to evaluate and optimize power plant cycles.

Leeper, S.A.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Climate change 2007 - mitigation of climate change  

SciTech Connect

This volume of the Fourth Assessment Report (AR4) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) provides a comprehensive, state-of-the-art and worldwide overview of scientific knowledge related to the mitigation of climate change. It includes a detailed assessment of costs and potentials of mitigation technologies and practices, implementation barriers, and policy options for the sectors: energy supply, transport, buildings, industry, agriculture, forestry and waste management. It links sustainable development policies with climate change practices. This volume will again be the standard reference for all those concerned with climate change. Contents: Foreword; Preface; Summary for policymakers; Technical Summary; 1. Introduction; 2. Framing issues; 3. Issues related to mitigation in the long term context; 4. Energy supply; 5. Transport and its infrastructure; 6. Residential and commercial buildings; 7. Industry; 8. Agriculture; 9. Forestry; 10. Waste management; 11. Mitigation from a cross sectoral perspective; 12. Sustainable development and mitigation; 13. Policies, instruments and co-operative agreements. 300 figs., 50 tabs., 3 annexes.

Metz, B.; Davidson, O.; Bosch, P.; Dave, R.; Meyer, L. (eds.)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

NREL Climate Activities | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Activities Activities Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Climate Activities at NREL Name Climate Activities at NREL Agency/Company /Organization National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sector Energy Topics Background analysis Website http://www.nrel.gov/internatio References NREL[1] This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. NREL plays a leading role with international climate and clean energy initiatives that achieve large greenhouse gas (GHG) reductions through accelerated renewable energy (RE) and energy efficiency (EE) use. These include: Low Carbon Communities of the Americas Climate Technology Initiative Integrated Environmental Strategies Program Intergovernmental Panel of Climate Change Secretariat for the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate

234

TROPOSPHERIC AEROSOLS: THE WILD CARD IN RADIATIVE FORCING OF CLIMATE CHANGE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

forcings of climate change over the industrial period. Cooling forcings of tens of watts per square meter Understanding 2 1 0 1 2 3 Radiativeforcing(Wattspersquaremetre) CoolingWarming The global mean radiative forcing scattering -- Cooling influence Light absorption -- Warming influence, depending on surface Indirect Effects

Schwartz, Stephen E.

235

Climate Data Online (CDO) | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Climate Data Online (CDO) Climate Data Online (CDO) Agriculture Community Menu DATA APPS EVENTS DEVELOPER STATISTICS COLLABORATE ABOUT Agriculture You are here Data.gov » Communities » Agriculture » Data Climate Data Online (CDO) Dataset Summary Description Climate Data online or CDO provides access to climate data products through a simple, searchable online web mapping service. Users can find a variety of NCDC products via CDO including the Global Historical Climatology Network-Daily and the new 1981-2010 Annual, Monthly and Daily 30-year Normals. Tags {"climate data","climatological data","weather data",temperature,precipitation,drought,wind,dewpoint,satellite,hurricane,storm,snow,"climate center","climate research","NCDC National Climatic Data Center","natural resources",environment,water,air,soil,"weather "}

236

NREL Climate Activities | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Climate Activities Climate Activities (Redirected from Climate Activities at NREL) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Climate Activities at NREL Name Climate Activities at NREL Agency/Company /Organization National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sector Energy Topics Background analysis Website http://www.nrel.gov/internatio References NREL[1] This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. NREL plays a leading role with international climate and clean energy initiatives that achieve large greenhouse gas (GHG) reductions through accelerated renewable energy (RE) and energy efficiency (EE) use. These include: Low Carbon Communities of the Americas Climate Technology Initiative Integrated Environmental Strategies Program Intergovernmental Panel of Climate Change Secretariat for the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate

237

Dew Point Evaporative Comfort Cooling: Report and Summary Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The project objective was to demonstrate the capabilities of the high-performance multi-staged IEC technology and its ability to enhance energy efficiency and interior comfort in dry climates, while substantially reducing electric-peak demand. The project was designed to test 24 cooling units in five commercial building types at Fort Carson Army Base in Colorado Springs, Colorado.

Dean, J.; Herrmann, L.; Kozubal, E.; Geiger, J.; Eastment, M.; Slayzak, S.

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Evaporative Cooling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Evaporative Cooling Evaporative Cooling (Redirected from Hybrid Cooling) Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Evaporative Cooling: An evaporative cooler is a device that cools air through the evaporation of water. Evaporative cooling works by employing water's large enthalpy of vaporization. The temperature of dry air can be dropped significantly through the phase transition of liquid water to water vapor (evaporation), which can cool air using much less energy than refrigeration. Evaporative cooling requires a water source, and must continually consume water to operate. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Evaporative Cooling Evaporative Cooling Tower Diagram of Evaporative Cooling Tower Evaporative cooling technologies take advantage of both air and water to extract heat from a power plant. By utilizing both water and air one can

239

Vortex-augmented cooling tower - windmill combination  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cooling tower for cooling large quantities of effluent water from a production facility by utilizing natural wind forces includes the use of a series of helically directed air inlet passages extending outwardly from the base of the tower to introduce air from any direction in a swirling vortical pattern while the force of the draft created in the tower makes it possible to place conventional power generating windmills in the air passage to provide power as a by-product.

McAllister, J.E. Jr.

1982-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

240

Gas turbine bucket with impingement cooled platform  

SciTech Connect

In a turbine bucket having an airfoil portion and a root portion, with a substantially planar platform at an interface between the airfoil portion and root portion, a platform cooling arrangement including at least one bore in the root portion and at least one impingement cooling tube seated in the bore, the tube extending beyond the bore with an outlet in close proximity to a targeted area on an underside of the platform.

Jones, Raphael Durand (Guilderland, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including climatic cooling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Update: Cooling tower and spray pond technology  

SciTech Connect

The 9th Cooling Tower and Spray Pond Symposium, under the auspices of the International Association for Hydraulic Research, took place at the von Karman Institute for Fluid Dynamics, Belgium, in September 1994. Technical topics discussed included cooling system design, performance, operation, environmental effects, modeling and components. Symposium proceedings will not be published. However, information of primary interest to staffs of power plants in the United States is summarized in this article.

Bartz, J.A.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

What's so cool about Curiosity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What's so cool about Curiosity? What's so cool about Curiosity? Curiosity, the Mars Science Laboratory, is the largest and most complicated device we have ever landed on a planet other than Earth.  About the size of a small SUV -- ten feet long (not including the arm), nine feet wide and seven feet tall  900 kilograms (2,000 pounds) (Spirit and Opportunity, earlier research vehicles sent to Mars were 384 pounds)  Uses aerobraking, parachute, retro rockets and skycrane concepts to land gently (Spirit and Opportunity used aerobraking, parachutes and airbags that bounced them to the surface) Curiosity carries three instruments from Los Alamos National Laboratory.  The Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator supplies electricity and heat to the rover

243

Tips: Passive Solar Heating and Cooling | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Passive Solar Heating and Cooling Passive Solar Heating and Cooling Tips: Passive Solar Heating and Cooling April 24, 2012 - 4:18pm Addthis Tips: Passive Solar Heating and Cooling Using passive solar design to heat and cool your home can be both environmentally friendly and cost effective. In many cases, your heating costs can be reduced to less than half the cost of heating a typical home. Passive solar design can also help lower your cooling costs. Passive solar cooling techniques include carefully designed overhangs and using reflective coatings on windows, exterior walls, and roofs. Newer techniques include placing large, insulated windows on south-facing walls and putting thermal mass, such as a concrete slab floor or a heat-absorbing wall, close to the windows. A passive solar house requires careful design and siting, which vary by

244

Tips: Passive Solar Heating and Cooling | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tips: Passive Solar Heating and Cooling Tips: Passive Solar Heating and Cooling Tips: Passive Solar Heating and Cooling April 24, 2012 - 4:18pm Addthis Tips: Passive Solar Heating and Cooling Using passive solar design to heat and cool your home can be both environmentally friendly and cost effective. In many cases, your heating costs can be reduced to less than half the cost of heating a typical home. Passive solar design can also help lower your cooling costs. Passive solar cooling techniques include carefully designed overhangs and using reflective coatings on windows, exterior walls, and roofs. Newer techniques include placing large, insulated windows on south-facing walls and putting thermal mass, such as a concrete slab floor or a heat-absorbing wall, close to the windows. A passive solar house requires careful design and siting, which vary by

245

Overview: Home Cooling Systems | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

than earlier models. Dehumidifying heat pipes can help an air conditioner remove humidity and more efficiently cool the air. Radiant Cooling Radiant cooling cools a floor or...

246

Effects of Material Moisture Adsorption and Desorption on Building Cooling Loads  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Moisture adsorption and desorption (MAD) by internal building materials and furnishings can be significant in buildings. For many building cooling strategies, MAD may have overriding effects on building cooling loads. For example, natural ventilation of buildings in hot, humid climates has been shown to induce higher latent loads and higher room relative humidities during periods following the ventilation.

Fairey, P.; Kosar, D.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Heat pump system with selective space cooling  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reversible heat pump provides multiple heating and cooling modes and includes a compressor, an evaporator and heat exchanger all interconnected and charged with refrigerant fluid. The heat exchanger includes tanks connected in series to the water supply and a condenser feed line with heat transfer sections connected in counterflow relationship. The heat pump has an accumulator and suction line for the refrigerant fluid upstream of the compressor. Sub-cool transfer tubes associated with the accumulator/suction line reclaim a portion of the heat from the heat exchanger. A reversing valve switches between heating/cooling modes. A first bypass is operative to direct the refrigerant fluid around the sub-cool transfer tubes in the space cooling only mode and during which an expansion valve is utilized upstream of the evaporator/indoor coil. A second bypass is provided around the expansion valve. A programmable microprocessor activates the first bypass in the cooling only mode and deactivates the second bypass, and vice-versa in the multiple heating modes for said heat exchanger. In the heating modes, the evaporator may include an auxiliary outdoor coil for direct supplemental heat dissipation into ambient air. In the multiple heating modes, the condensed refrigerant fluid is regulated by a flow control valve. 4 figs.

Pendergrass, J.C.

1997-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

248

Heat pump system with selective space cooling  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reversible heat pump provides multiple heating and cooling modes and includes a compressor, an evaporator and heat exchanger all interconnected and charged with refrigerant fluid. The heat exchanger includes tanks connected in series to the water supply and a condenser feed line with heat transfer sections connected in counterflow relationship. The heat pump has an accumulator and suction line for the refrigerant fluid upstream of the compressor. Sub-cool transfer tubes associated with the accumulator/suction line reclaim a portion of the heat from the heat exchanger. A reversing valve switches between heating/cooling modes. A first bypass is operative to direct the refrigerant fluid around the sub-cool transfer tubes in the space cooling only mode and during which an expansion valve is utilized upstream of the evaporator/indoor coil. A second bypass is provided around the expansion valve. A programmable microprocessor activates the first bypass in the cooling only mode and deactivates the second bypass, and vice-versa in the multiple heating modes for said heat exchanger. In the heating modes, the evaporator may include an auxiliary outdoor coil for direct supplemental heat dissipation into ambient air. In the multiple heating modes, the condensed refrigerant fluid is regulated by a flow control valve.

Pendergrass, Joseph C. (Gainesville, GA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Climate Zone 5A | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Zone 5A Zone 5A Jump to: navigation, search A type of climate defined in the ASHRAE 169-2006 standard consisting of Climate Zone Number 5 and Climate Zone Subtype A. Climate Zone 5A is defined as Cool- Humid with IP Units 5400 < HDD65ºF ≤ 7200 and SI Units 3000 < HDD18ºC ≤ 4000 . The following places are categorized as class 5A climate zones: Adair County, Iowa Adair County, Missouri Adams County, Illinois Adams County, Indiana Adams County, Iowa Adams County, Nebraska Adams County, Pennsylvania Albany County, New York Allegan County, Michigan Alleghany County, North Carolina Allegheny County, Pennsylvania Allen County, Indiana Allen County, Ohio Andrew County, Missouri Antelope County, Nebraska Appanoose County, Iowa Armstrong County, Pennsylvania Arthur County, Nebraska

250

Passive solar energy: climate-adaptive architecture  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Passive solar, climate adaptive architecture uses the following concepts: conservation, sun angles, glass, and thermal mass (passive heating and cooling). Specific measures of these concepts are briefly discussed. Passive solar water heating systems discussed are breadbox and thermosyphon water heaters. (MCW)

Baccei, B.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

LBNL's Novel Approach to Cooling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

systems department, chilled water, cooling water tower, double exchanger cooling, dual heat exchanger, high tech and industrial systems group, inrow, lawrence berkeley national...

252

Cool Roofs and Heat Islands  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(510) 486-7494 Links Heat Island Group The Cool Colors Project Batteries and Fuel Cells Buildings Energy Efficiency Applications Commercial Buildings Cool Roofs and...

253

Building Technologies Office: Cold Climate Heat Pump Research Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cold Climate Heat Pump Cold Climate Heat Pump Research Project to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Cold Climate Heat Pump Research Project on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Cold Climate Heat Pump Research Project on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Cold Climate Heat Pump Research Project on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Cold Climate Heat Pump Research Project on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Cold Climate Heat Pump Research Project on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Cold Climate Heat Pump Research Project on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner with DOE Activities Appliances Research Building Envelope Research Windows, Skylights, & Doors Research Space Heating & Cooling Research

254

Climate System Response to External Forcings and Climate Change Projections in CCSM4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results are presented from experiments performed with the Community Climate System Model, version 4 (CCSM4) for the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 (CMIP5). These include multiple ensemble members of twentieth-century climate with ...

Gerald A. Meehl; Warren M. Washington; Julie M. Arblaster; Aixue Hu; Haiyan Teng; Claudia Tebaldi; Benjamin N. Sanderson; Jean-Francois Lamarque; Andrew Conley; Warren G. Strand; James B. White III

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Potential of Evaporative Cooling Systems for Buildings in India  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evaporative cooling potential for building in various climatic zones in India is investigated. Maintainable indoor conditions are obtained from the load - capacity analysis for the prevailing ambient conditions. For the assumed activity level, clothing and air velocity, the predicted mean vote (PMV), predicted percentage dissatisfied (PPD), and cumulative dissatisfaction levels for each month are estimated. Time - air condition contours of ambient, supply air and indoor air are plotted on a psychrometric chart for different cities in India like Ahmadabad, Jodhpur, Nagpur and New Delhi representing different climatic conditions of India. While satisfactorily comfort can be achieved at cool and dry weather conditions by evaporative cooling system throughout the year, some discomfort prevailed for few months around July at hot and dry/humid weather conditions. The results are also quantified in terms of PMV, PPD and their cumulative factors; PMV-hour and PPD-hour.

Maiya, M. P.; Vijay, S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Optimization of Cooling Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A cooling water system can be optimized by operation at the highest possible cycles of concentration without risking sealing and fouling on heat exchanger surfaces. The way to optimize will be shown, with a number of examples of new systems.

Matson, J.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

RADIATIVE AND PASSIVE COOLING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Passive Cooling Marlo Martin and Paul Berdahl SeptemberNTIS. 3. P. Berdahl and M. Martin, "The Resource for Radia-1978) p. 684. 4. M. Martin and P. Berdahl, "Description of a

Martin, M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Cool Magnetic Molecules  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cool Magnetic Molecules Print Cool Magnetic Molecules Print Certain materials are known to heat up or cool down when they are exposed to a changing magnetic field. This is known as the magnetocaloric effect. All magnetic materials exhibit this effect, but in most cases, it is too small to be technologically useful. Recently, however, the search for special molecules with a surprisingly large capacity to keep cool has heated up, driven by environmental and cost considerations as well as by recent improvements in our ability to design, assemble, and probe the structure and chemistry of small molecules. An international collaboration of researchers from Spain, Scotland, and the U.S. has utilized ALS Beamline 11.3.1 (small-molecule crystallography) to characterize the design of such "molecular coolers." The work targets the synthesis of molecular cluster compounds containing many unpaired electrons ("nanomagnets") for applications involving enhanced magnetic refrigeration at very low temperatures.

259

Cool Magnetic Molecules  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cool Magnetic Molecules Print Cool Magnetic Molecules Print Certain materials are known to heat up or cool down when they are exposed to a changing magnetic field. This is known as the magnetocaloric effect. All magnetic materials exhibit this effect, but in most cases, it is too small to be technologically useful. Recently, however, the search for special molecules with a surprisingly large capacity to keep cool has heated up, driven by environmental and cost considerations as well as by recent improvements in our ability to design, assemble, and probe the structure and chemistry of small molecules. An international collaboration of researchers from Spain, Scotland, and the U.S. has utilized ALS Beamline 11.3.1 (small-molecule crystallography) to characterize the design of such "molecular coolers." The work targets the synthesis of molecular cluster compounds containing many unpaired electrons ("nanomagnets") for applications involving enhanced magnetic refrigeration at very low temperatures.

260

Cool Magnetic Molecules  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cool Magnetic Molecules Print Cool Magnetic Molecules Print Certain materials are known to heat up or cool down when they are exposed to a changing magnetic field. This is known as the magnetocaloric effect. All magnetic materials exhibit this effect, but in most cases, it is too small to be technologically useful. Recently, however, the search for special molecules with a surprisingly large capacity to keep cool has heated up, driven by environmental and cost considerations as well as by recent improvements in our ability to design, assemble, and probe the structure and chemistry of small molecules. An international collaboration of researchers from Spain, Scotland, and the U.S. has utilized ALS Beamline 11.3.1 (small-molecule crystallography) to characterize the design of such "molecular coolers." The work targets the synthesis of molecular cluster compounds containing many unpaired electrons ("nanomagnets") for applications involving enhanced magnetic refrigeration at very low temperatures.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including climatic cooling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Cool Magnetic Molecules  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cool Magnetic Molecules Print Cool Magnetic Molecules Print Certain materials are known to heat up or cool down when they are exposed to a changing magnetic field. This is known as the magnetocaloric effect. All magnetic materials exhibit this effect, but in most cases, it is too small to be technologically useful. Recently, however, the search for special molecules with a surprisingly large capacity to keep cool has heated up, driven by environmental and cost considerations as well as by recent improvements in our ability to design, assemble, and probe the structure and chemistry of small molecules. An international collaboration of researchers from Spain, Scotland, and the U.S. has utilized ALS Beamline 11.3.1 (small-molecule crystallography) to characterize the design of such "molecular coolers." The work targets the synthesis of molecular cluster compounds containing many unpaired electrons ("nanomagnets") for applications involving enhanced magnetic refrigeration at very low temperatures.

262

Stimulated radiative laser cooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Building a refrigerator based on the conversion of heat into optical energy is an ongoing engineering challenge. Under well-defined conditions, spontaneous anti-Stokes fluorescence of a dopant material in a host matrix is capable of lowering the host temperature. The fluorescence is conveying away a part of the thermal energy stored in the vibrational oscillations of the host lattice. In particular, applying this principle to the cooling of (solid-state) lasers opens up many potential device applications, especially in the domain of high-power lasers. In this paper, an alternative optical cooling scheme is outlined, leading to radiative cooling of solid-state lasers. It is based on converting the thermal energy stored in the host, into optical energy by means of a stimulated nonlinear process, rather than a spontaneous process. This should lead to better cooling efficiencies and a higher potential of applying the principle for device applications.

Muys, Peter

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Sisyphus Cooling of Lithium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Laser cooling to sub-Doppler temperatures by optical molasses is thought to be inhibited in atoms with unresolved, near-degenerate hyperfine structure in the excited state. We demonstrate that such cooling is possible in one to three dimensions, not only near the standard D2 line for laser cooling, but over a range extending to the D1 line. Via a combination of Sisyphus cooling followed by adiabatic expansion, we reach temperatures as low as 40 \\mu K, which corresponds to atomic velocities a factor of 2.6 above the limit imposed by a single photon recoil. Our method requires modest laser power at a frequency within reach of standard frequency locking methods. It is largely insensitive to laser power, polarization and detuning, magnetic fields, and initial hyperfine populations. Our results suggest that optical molasses should be possible with all alkali species.

Paul Hamilton; Geena Kim; Trinity Joshi; Biswaroop Mukherjee; Daniel Tiarks; Holger Mller

2013-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

264

Cool Magnetic Molecules  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cool Magnetic Molecules Print Cool Magnetic Molecules Print Certain materials are known to heat up or cool down when they are exposed to a changing magnetic field. This is known as the magnetocaloric effect. All magnetic materials exhibit this effect, but in most cases, it is too small to be technologically useful. Recently, however, the search for special molecules with a surprisingly large capacity to keep cool has heated up, driven by environmental and cost considerations as well as by recent improvements in our ability to design, assemble, and probe the structure and chemistry of small molecules. An international collaboration of researchers from Spain, Scotland, and the U.S. has utilized ALS Beamline 11.3.1 (small-molecule crystallography) to characterize the design of such "molecular coolers." The work targets the synthesis of molecular cluster compounds containing many unpaired electrons ("nanomagnets") for applications involving enhanced magnetic refrigeration at very low temperatures.

265

Status of cool roof standards in the United States  

SciTech Connect

Since 1999, several widely used building energy efficiency standards, including ASHRAE 90.1, ASHRAE 90.2, the International Energy Conservation Code, and California's Title 24 have adopted cool roof credits or requirements. We review the technical development of cool roof provisions in the ASHRAE 90.1, ASHRAE 90.2, and California Title 24 standards, and discuss the treatment of cool roofs in other standards and energy-efficiency programs. The techniques used to develop the ASHRAE and Title 24 cool roof provisions can be used as models to address cool roofs in building energy standards worldwide.

Akbari, Hashem; Levinson, Ronnen

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Potential Refrigerants for Power Electronics Cooling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the past, automotive refrigerants have conventionally been used solely for the purpose of air conditioning. However, with the development of hybrid-electric vehicles and the incorporation of power electronics (PEs) into the automobile, automotive refrigerants are taking on a new role. Unfortunately, PEs have lifetimes and functionalities that are highly dependent on temperature and as a result thermal control plays an important role in the performance of PEs. Typically, PEs are placed in the engine compartment where the internal combustion engine (ICE) already produces substantial heat. Along with the ICE heat, the additional thermal energy produced by PEs themselves forces designers to use different cooling methods to prevent overheating. Generally, heat sinks and separate cooling loops are used to maintain the temperature. Disturbingly, the thermal control system can consume one third of the total volume and may weigh more than the PEs [1]. Hence, other avenues have been sought to cool PEs, including submerging PEs in automobile refrigerants to take advantage of two-phase cooling. The objective of this report is to explore the different automotive refrigerants presently available that could be used for PE cooling. Evaluation of the refrigerants will be done by comparing environmental effects and some thermo-physical properties important to two-phase cooling, specifically measuring the dielectric strengths of potential candidates. Results of this report will be used to assess the different candidates with good potential for future use in PE cooling.

Starke, M.R.

2005-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

267

Refrigerant directly cooled capacitors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a direct contact refrigerant cooling system using a refrigerant floating loop having a refrigerant and refrigeration devices. The cooling system has at least one hermetic container disposed in the refrigerant floating loop. The hermetic container has at least one electronic component selected from the group consisting of capacitors, power electronic switches and gating signal module. The refrigerant is in direct contact with the electronic component.

Hsu, John S. (Oak Ridge, TN); Seiber, Larry E. (Oak Ridge, TN); Marlino, Laura D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Ayers, Curtis W. (Kingston, TN)

2007-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

268

Laser cooling of solids  

SciTech Connect

We present an overview of solid-state optical refrigeration also known as laser cooling in solids by fluorescence upconversion. The idea of cooling a solid-state optical material by simply shining a laser beam onto it may sound counter intuitive but is rapidly becoming a promising technology for future cryocooler. We chart the evolution of this science in rare-earth doped solids and semiconductors.

Epstein, Richard I [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sheik-bahae, Mansoor [UNM

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Climate and the Tropical Oceans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An attempt is made to determine the role of the ocean in establishing the mean tropical climate and its sensitivity to radiative perturbations. A simple two-box energy balance model is developed that includes ocean heat transports as an ...

Amy Clement; Richard Seager

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Significance Tests in Climate Science  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A large fraction of papers in the climate literature includes erroneous uses of significance tests. A Bayesian analysis is presented to highlight the meaning of significance tests and why typical misuse occurs. The significance statistic is not a ...

Maarten H. P. Ambaum

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Climate Data Operators (CDO)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Climate Climate Data Operators (CDO) Climate Data Operators (CDO) Description and Overview CDO is a large tool set for working on climate data. NetCDF 3/4, GRIB including SZIP compression, EXTRA, SERVICE and IEG are supported as IO-formats. Apart from that cdo can be used to analyse any kind gridded data not related to climate science. CDO has very small memory requirements and can process files larger than the physical memory. How to Use CDO module load cdo cdo [Options] Operators ... Further Information CDO Online Documentation Availability Package Platform Category Version Module Install Date Date Made Default cdo carver libraries/ I/O 1.4.1 cdo/1.4.1 2012-01-13 2012-01-13 cdo carver libraries/ I/O 1.4.6 cdo/1.4.6 2012-05-24 2012-05-25 cdo carver libraries/ I/O 1.6.1 cdo/1.6.1 2013-07-02

272

Commercial Building HVAC Energy Usage in Semi-Tropical Climates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The design of heating and cooling equipment in semi-tropical climates presents some design considerations and limitations not so prevalent in temperate climates. In some cases, the heating season may be non-existent for all practical purposes. Another consideration is the high ventilation loads due to cooling the moist air prevalent in semi-tropical climates. This paper describes a computer program which assesses all the pertinent variables which comprise the annual heating and cooling energy requirements for commercial buildings. It is then suggested that this computer program would be valuable in determining the changes one could expect in annual energy usage by varying certain building design parameters. Secondly, a small office building actually constructed in Central Florida in which the author designed the Heating and Cooling HVAC system is described. Tradeoffs are presented showing the effects of changes in these building design parameters.

Worbs, H. E.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Details of U.S. Climate Zones:  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Details of U.S. Climate Zones Details of U.S. Climate Zones Details of U.S. Climate Zones: The CBECS climate zones are groups of climate divisions, as defined by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), which are regions within a state that are as climatically homogeneous as possible. Each NOAA climate division is placed into one of five CBECS climate zones based on its 30-year average heating degree-days (HDD) and cooling degree-days (CDD) for the period 1971 through 2000. (These climate zones have been updated for the 2003 CBECS. All previous CBECS used averages for the 45-year period from 1931 through 1975.) A HDD is a measure of how cold a location was over a period of time, relative to a base temperature (in CBECS, 65 degrees Fahrenheit). The heating degree-day is the difference between that day's average temperature and 65 degrees if the daily average is less than 65; it is zero if the daily average temperature is greater than or equal to 65. For example, if the average temperature for a given day is 40 degrees, then the heating degree-days for that single day equal 25. Heating degree-days for a year are the sum of the daily heating degree-days that year.

274

Feasibility of a hybrid cooling system in a thermal power plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The feasibility of introducing a hybrid cooling system in a thermal power plant is investigated with an aim to reduce water use with a minimum impact on plant performance. A number of cooling systems have been modelled including existing evaporative ... Keywords: cooling, hybrid cooling, power station, sustainable water consumption

C. R. Williams; M. G. Rasul

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Cooling system for superconducting magnet  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cooling system is configured to control the flow of a refrigerant by controlling the rate at which the refrigerant is heated, thereby providing an efficient and reliable approach to cooling a load (e.g., magnets, rotors). The cooling system includes a conduit circuit connected to the load and within which a refrigerant circulates; a heat exchanger, connected within the conduit circuit and disposed remotely from the load; a first and a second reservoir, each connected within the conduit, each holding at least a portion of the refrigerant; a heater configured to independently heat the first and second reservoirs. In a first mode, the heater heats the first reservoir, thereby causing the refrigerant to flow from the first reservoir through the load and heat exchanger, via the conduit circuit and into the second reservoir. In a second mode, the heater heats the second reservoir to cause the refrigerant to flow from the second reservoir through the load and heat exchanger via the conduit circuit and into the first reservoir. 3 figs.

Gamble, B.B.; Sidi-Yekhlef, A.

1998-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

276

Cooling system for superconducting magnet  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cooling system is configured to control the flow of a refrigerant by controlling the rate at which the refrigerant is heated, thereby providing an efficient and reliable approach to cooling a load (e.g., magnets, rotors). The cooling system includes a conduit circuit connected to the load and within which a refrigerant circulates; a heat exchanger, connected within the conduit circuit and disposed remotely from the load; a first and a second reservoir, each connected within the conduit, each holding at least a portion of the refrigerant; a heater configured to independently heat the first and second reservoirs. In a first mode, the heater heats the first reservoir, thereby causing the refrigerant to flow from the first reservoir through the load and heat exchanger, via the conduit circuit and into the second reservoir. In a second mode, the heater heats the second reservoir to cause the refrigerant to flow from the second reservoir through the load and heat exchanger via the conduit circuit and into the first reservoir.

Gamble, Bruce B. (Wellesley, MA); Sidi-Yekhlef, Ahmed (Framingham, MA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Development of an Integrated Residential Heating, Ventilation, Cooling, and Dehumidification System for Residences  

SciTech Connect

The Need and the Opportunity Codes such as ASHRAE 90.2 and IECC, and programs such as Energy Star and Builders Challenge, are causing new homes to be built to higher performance standards. As a result sensible cooling loads in new homes are going down, but indoor air quality prerogatives are causing ventilation rates and moisture loads to increase in humid climates. Conventional air conditioners are unable to provide the low sensible heat ratios that are needed to efficiently cool and dehumidify homes since dehumidification potential is strongly correlated with cooling system operating hours. The project team saw an opportunity to develop a system that is at least as effective as a conventional air conditioner plus dehumidifier, removes moisture without increasing the sensible load, reduces equipment cost by integrating components, and simplifies installation. Project Overview Prime contractor Davis Energy Group led a team in developing an Integrated Heating, Ventilation, Cooling, and Dehumidification (I-HVCD) system under the DOE SBIR program. Phase I and II SBIR project activities ran from July 2003 through December 2007. Tasks included: (1) Mechanical Design and Prototyping; (2) Controls Development; (3) Laboratory and Field Testing; and (4) Commercialization Activities Technology Description. Key components of the prototype I-HVCD system include an evaporator coil assembly, return and outdoor air damper, and controls. These are used in conjunction with conventional components that include a variable speed air handler or furnace, and a two-stage condensing unit. I-HVCD controls enable the system to operate in three distinct cooling modes to respond to indoor temperature and relative humidity (RH) levels. When sensible cooling loads are high, the system operates similar to a conventional system but varies supply airflow in response to indoor RH. In the second mode airflow is further reduced, and the reheat coil adds heat to the supply air. In the third mode, the reheat coil adds additional heat to maintain the supply air temperature close to the return air temperature (100% latent cooling). Project Outcomes Key Phase II objectives were to develop a pre-production version of the system and to demonstrate its performance in an actual house. The system was first tested in the laboratory and subsequently underwent field-testing at a new house in Gainesville, Florida. Field testing began in 2006 with monitoring of a 'conventional best practices' system that included a two stage air conditioner and Energy Star dehumidifier. In September 2007, the I-HVCD components were installed for testing. Both systems maintained uniform indoor temperatures, but indoor RH control was considerably better with the I-HVCD system. The daily variation from average indoor humidity conditions was less than 2% for the I-HVCD vs. 5-7% for the base case system. Data showed that the energy use of the two systems was comparable. Preliminary installed cost estimates suggest that production costs for the current I-HVCD integrated design would likely be lower than for competing systems that include a high efficiency air conditioner, dehumidifier, and fresh air ventilation system. Project Benefits This project verified that the I-HVCD refrigeration compacts are compact (for easy installation and retrofit) and can be installed with air conditioning equipment from a variety of manufacturers. Project results confirmed that the system can provide precise indoor temperature and RH control under a variety of climate conditions. The I-HVCD integrated approach offers numerous benefits including integrated control, easier installation, and reduced equipment maintenance needs. Work completed under this project represents a significant step towards product commercialization. Improved indoor RH control and fresh air ventilation are system attributes that will become increasingly important in the years ahead as building envelopes improve and sensible cooling loads continue to fall. Technologies like I-HVCD will be instrumental in meeting goals set by Building America

Hoeschele, M.A.; D.A. Springer

2008-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

278

Development of an Integrated Residential Heating, Ventilation, Cooling, and Dehumidification System for Residences  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Need and the Opportunity Codes such as ASHRAE 90.2 and IECC, and programs such as Energy Star and Builders Challenge, are causing new homes to be built to higher performance standards. As a result sensible cooling loads in new homes are going down, but indoor air quality prerogatives are causing ventilation rates and moisture loads to increase in humid climates. Conventional air conditioners are unable to provide the low sensible heat ratios that are needed to efficiently cool and dehumidify homes since dehumidification potential is strongly correlated with cooling system operating hours. The project team saw an opportunity to develop a system that is at least as effective as a conventional air conditioner plus dehumidifier, removes moisture without increasing the sensible load, reduces equipment cost by integrating components, and simplifies installation. Project Overview Prime contractor Davis Energy Group led a team in developing an Integrated Heating, Ventilation, Cooling, and Dehumidification (I-HVCD) system under the DOE SBIR program. Phase I and II SBIR project activities ran from July 2003 through December 2007. Tasks included: (1) Mechanical Design and Prototyping; (2) Controls Development; (3) Laboratory and Field Testing; and (4) Commercialization Activities Technology Description. Key components of the prototype I-HVCD system include an evaporator coil assembly, return and outdoor air damper, and controls. These are used in conjunction with conventional components that include a variable speed air handler or furnace, and a two-stage condensing unit. I-HVCD controls enable the system to operate in three distinct cooling modes to respond to indoor temperature and relative humidity (RH) levels. When sensible cooling loads are high, the system operates similar to a conventional system but varies supply airflow in response to indoor RH. In the second mode airflow is further reduced, and the reheat coil adds heat to the supply air. In the third mode, the reheat coil adds additional heat to maintain the supply air temperature close to the return air temperature (100% latent cooling). Project Outcomes Key Phase II objectives were to develop a pre-production version of the system and to demonstrate its performance in an actual house. The system was first tested in the laboratory and subsequently underwent field-testing at a new house in Gainesville, Florida. Field testing began in 2006 with monitoring of a 'conventional best practices' system that included a two stage air conditioner and Energy Star dehumidifier. In September 2007, the I-HVCD components were installed for testing. Both systems maintained uniform indoor temperatures, but indoor RH control was considerably better with the I-HVCD system. The daily variation from average indoor humidity conditions was less than 2% for the I-HVCD vs. 5-7% for the base case system. Data showed that the energy use of the two systems was comparable. Preliminary installed cost estimates suggest that production costs for the current I-HVCD integrated design would likely be lower than for competing systems that include a high efficiency air conditioner, dehumidifier, and fresh air ventilation system. Project Benefits This project verified that the I-HVCD refrigeration compacts are compact (for easy installation and retrofit) and can be installed with air conditioning equipment from a variety of manufacturers. Project results confirmed that the system can provide precise indoor temperature and RH control under a variety of climate conditions. The I-HVCD integrated approach offers numerous benefits including integrated control, easier installation, and reduced equipment maintenance needs. Work completed under this project represents a significant step towards product commercialization. Improved indoor RH control and fresh air ventilation are system attributes that will become increasingly important in the years ahead as building envelopes improve and sensible cooling loads continue to fall. Technologies like I-HVCD will be instrumental in meeting goals set by Building America

Hoeschele, M.A.; D.A. Springer

2008-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

279

Gas-cooled nuclear reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas-cooled nuclear reactor includes a central core located in the lower portion of a prestressed concrete reactor vessel. Primary coolant gas flows upward through the core and into four overlying heat-exchangers wherein stream is generated. During normal operation, the return flow of coolant is between the core and the vessel sidewall to a pair of motor-driven circulators located at about the bottom of the concrete pressure vessel. The circulators repressurize the gas coolant and return it back to the core through passageways in the underlying core structure. If during emergency conditions the primary circulators are no longer functioning, the decay heat is effectively removed from the core by means of natural convection circulation. The hot gas rising through the core exits the top of the shroud of the heat-exchangers and flows radially outward to the sidewall of the concrete pressure vessel. A metal liner covers the entire inside concrete surfaces of the concrete pressure vessel, and cooling tubes are welded to the exterior or concrete side of the metal liner. The gas coolant is in direct contact with the interior surface of the metal liner and transfers its heat through the metal liner to the liquid coolant flowing through the cooling tubes. The cooler gas is more dense and creates a downward convection flow in the region between the core and the sidewall until it reaches the bottom of the concrete pressure vessel when it flows radially inward and up into the core for another pass. Water is forced to flow through the cooling tubes to absorb heat from the core at a sufficient rate to remove enough of the decay heat created in the core to prevent overheating of the core or the vessel.

Peinado, Charles O. (La Jolla, CA); Koutz, Stanley L. (San Diego, CA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Climate Consultant  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

climate data in dozens of ways useful to architects, builders, contractors, and homeowners, including temperatures, humidity, wind velocity, sky cover, and solar radiation in...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including climatic cooling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Yahoo! Compute Coop (YCC): A Next-Generation Passive Cooling Design for Data Centers  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Yahoo! Compute Coop (YCC) project is to research, design, build and implement a greenfield "efficient data factory" and to specifically demonstrate that the YCC concept is feasible for large facilities housing tens of thousands of heat-producing computing servers. The project scope for the Yahoo! Compute Coop technology includes: - Analyzing and implementing ways in which to drastically decrease energy consumption and waste output. - Analyzing the laws of thermodynamics and implementing naturally occurring environmental effects in order to maximize the "free-cooling" for large data center facilities. "Free cooling" is the direct usage of outside air to cool the servers vs. traditional "mechanical cooling" which is supplied by chillers or other Dx units. - Redesigning and simplifying building materials and methods. - Shortening and simplifying build-to-operate schedules while at the same time reducing initial build and operating costs. Selected for its favorable climate, the greenfield project site is located in Lockport, NY. Construction on the 9.0 MW critical load data center facility began in May 2009, with the fully operational facility deployed in September 2010. The relatively low initial build cost, compatibility with current server and network models, and the efficient use of power and water are all key features that make it a highly compatible and globally implementable design innovation for the data center industry. Yahoo! Compute Coop technology is designed to achieve 99.98% uptime availability. This integrated building design allows for free cooling 99% of the year via the building?¢????s unique shape and orientation, as well as server physical configuration.

Robison, AD; Page, Christina; Lytle, Bob

2011-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

282

Climate VISION: News - Bush Administration Launches "Climate...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Will Address Challenge of Climate Change WASHINGTON, D.C., - Today, the Department of Energy, on behalf of the Administration, launched the President's "Climate VISION"...

283

Application: Cold Climate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

*. Bookmark and Share. Application: Cold Climate. Fire Suppression in Cold Climates: A Technical Review.. Catchpole, DV; 2000. ...

2011-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

284

Comparative report: performance of active solar space cooling systems, 1982 cooling season  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report provides a detailed analysis of solar absorption cooling and solar Rankine cooling processes as represented by the National Solar Data Network (NSDN) systems. Five solar cooling systems were monitored in 1982; four of these have absorption chillers and one has a Rankine engine. Of the four absorption chillers, two are directly solar fired and two are boiler fired using solar energy as the preheat to the boiler. The composite data for the five sites covers the period from September 1981 through December 1982. There are 36 site months of data covered in the report. These are all commercial systems with buildings ranging in size from 5000 to 84,000 square feet. There are three evacuated-tube, one flat-plate, and one linear concentrating collector systems. Analyses performed for which comparative data is provided include: Energy savings and operating costs in terms of Btu; Overall solar cooling efficiency and coefficient of performance; Hourly building cooling loads; Actual and long-term weather conditions; Collector performance; Chiller performance; Normalized building cooling loads per cooling degree-day and building area; and Cooling solar fractions, design and measured. Conclusions and lessons learned from the comparative analysis are presented.

Logee, T.; Kendall, P.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Best Management Practice: Single-Pass Cooling Equipment | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Single-Pass Cooling Equipment Single-Pass Cooling Equipment Best Management Practice: Single-Pass Cooling Equipment October 8, 2013 - 9:37am Addthis Single-pass or once-through cooling systems provide an opportunity for significant water savings. In these systems, water is circulated once through a piece of equipment and is then disposed down the drain. Types of equipment that typically use single-pass cooling include CAT scanners, degreasers, hydraulic equipment, condensers, air compressors, welding machines, vacuum pumps, ice machines, x-ray equipment, and air conditioners. To remove the same heat load, single-pass systems use 40 times more water than a cooling tower operated at five cycles of concentration. To maximize water savings, single-pass cooling equipment should be either modified to

286

Gas-cooled reactors  

SciTech Connect

Experience to date with operation of high-temperature gas-cooled reactors has been quite favorable. Despite problems in completion of construction and startup, three high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) units have operated well. The Windscale Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactor (AGR) in the United Kingdom has had an excellent operating history, and initial operation of commercial AGRs shows them to be satisfactory. The latter reactors provide direct experience in scale-up from the Windscale experiment to fullscale commercial units. The Colorado Fort St. Vrain 330-MWe prototype helium-cooled HTGR is now in the approach-to-power phase while the 300-MWe Pebble Bed THTR prototype in the Federal Republic of Germany is scheduled for completion of construction by late 1978. THTR will be the first nuclear power plant which uses a dry cooling tower. Fuel reprocessing and refabrication have been developed in the laboratory and are now entering a pilot-plant scale development. Several commercial HTGR power station orders were placed in the U.S. prior to 1975 with similar plans for stations in the FRG. However, the combined effects of inflation, reduced electric power demand, regulatory uncertainties, and pricing problems led to cancellation of the 12 reactors which were in various stages of planning, design, and licensing.

Schulten, R.; Trauger, D.B.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Cooling Towers, The Debottleneckers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Power generating plants and petro-chemical works are always expanding. An on-going problem is to identify and de-bottle neck restricting conditions of growth. The cooling tower is a highly visible piece of equipment. Most industrial crossflow units are large structures, Illustration 1. Big budget money and engineering time goes into gleaming stainless steel equipment and exotic process apparatus, the poor cooling tower is the ignored orphan of the system. Knowledgeable Engineers, however, are now looking into the function of the cooling tower, which is to produce colder water- and question the quality of water discharged from that simple appearing box. These cross-flow structures are quite large, ranging up to 60 feet tall with as many as 6 or more cells in a row. With cells up to 42 feet long so immense in aspect, with fans rotating, operators assume, just by appearances, that all is well, and usually pay no attention to the quality of cold water returning from the cooling tower. The boxes look sturdy, but the function of the cooling tower is repeated ignored production of water as cold as possible.

Burger, R.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Air Cooling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cooling Cooling Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Air Cooling: Air cooling is commonly defined as rejecting heat from an object by flowing air over the surface of the object, through means of convection. Air cooling requires that the air must be cooler than the object or surface from which it is expected to remove heat. This is due to the second law of thermodynamics, which states that heat will only move spontaneously from a hot reservoir (the heat sink) to a cold reservoir (the air). Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Air Cooling Air Cooling Diagram of Air Cooled Condenser designed by GEA Heat Exchangers Ltd. (http://www.gea-btt.com.cn/opencms/opencms/bttc/en/Products/Air_Cooled_Condenser.html) Air cooling is limited on ambient temperatures and typically require a

289

Water Cooling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cooling: Cooling: Water cooling is commonly defined as a method of using water as a heat conduction to remove heat from an object, machine, or other substance by passing cold water over or through it. In energy generation, water cooling is typically used to cool steam back into water so it can be used again in the generation process. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Water Cooling Typical water cooled condenser used for condensing steam Water or liquid cooling is the most efficient cooling method and requires the smallest footprint when cold water is readily available. When used in power generation the steam/vapor that exits the turbine is condensed back into water and reused by means of a heat exchanger. Water cooling requires a water resource that is cold enough to bring steam, typically

290

Evaporative Cooling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Evaporative Cooling: Evaporative Cooling: An evaporative cooler is a device that cools air through the evaporation of water. Evaporative cooling works by employing water's large enthalpy of vaporization. The temperature of dry air can be dropped significantly through the phase transition of liquid water to water vapor (evaporation), which can cool air using much less energy than refrigeration. Evaporative cooling requires a water source, and must continually consume water to operate. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Evaporative Cooling Evaporative Cooling Tower Diagram of Evaporative Cooling Tower Evaporative cooling technologies take advantage of both air and water to extract heat from a power plant. By utilizing both water and air one can reduce the amount of water required for a power plant as well as reduce the

291

Efficient cooling: Making it happen  

SciTech Connect

This article presents a series of solutions that can help everyone to some basic questions about air conditioning: what`s the best way to size a residential air conditioner? to what extent do air conditioners tend to be oversized? how can energy research and programs help promote optimal sizing of cooling systems? Topics covered include the following: defining the debate over sizing of air conditioners; methods for sizing; evaluating simple {open_quotes}rules of thumb{close_quotes}; working with HVAC contractors; creating consumer demand for proper sizing. 1 fig. 1 tab.

Sherman, C.; Hildebrandt, E. [Sacramento Municipal Utility District, CA (United States)

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Clean Air-Cool Planet Community Toolkit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Clean Air-Cool Planet Community Toolkit Clean Air-Cool Planet Community Toolkit Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Clean Air-Cool Planet Community Toolkit Agency/Company /Organization: Clean Air-Cool Planet Partner: Jeffrey H. Taylor and Associates Inc. Sector: Climate Focus Area: Energy Efficiency, Buildings, - Landfill Gas, - Waste to Energy, - Solar PV, Wind, Transportation, Agriculture, People and Policy, Food Supply, - Materials, Offsets and Certificates, Greenhouse Gas Phase: Bring the Right People Together, Determine Baseline, Get Feedback, Develop Finance and Implement Projects, Create Early Successes Resource Type: Guide/manual, Case studies/examples, Templates User Interface: Website Website: www.cleanair-coolplanet.org/for_communities/toolkit_home.php

293

Estimating Energy Efficiency Impacts Using Climate Wise "Wise Rules"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Climate Wise is an industrial energy efficiency program sponsored by the U.S. EPA, and supported by the U.S. DOE, working in partnership with more than 400 industrial companies, representing approximately than 11 percent of U.S. industrial energy use. Climate Wise provides technical assistance in the form of efficiency check-lists, handbooks, and one-on-one support through a toll-free Wise Line to help partners identify efficiency measures and quantify project impacts. Climate Wise has developed the Wise Rules for Industrial Efficiency (Wise Rules Tool Kit) to provide partners with ''Wise Rules" for estimating potential energy, cost, and greenhouse gas emissions savings from key industrial energy efficiency measures. The Tool Kit includes information on the following end-uses: boilers, steam systems, furnaces, process heating, waste heat recovery, cogeneration, compressed air systems, and process cooling. This paper provides an overview of the Wise Rules Tool Kit and presents excerpts from the document and sample Wise Rules.

Milmoe, P. H.; Winkelman, S. R.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

cooling | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

cooling cooling Dataset Summary Description The following data-set is for a benchmark residential home for all TMY3 locations across all utilities in the US. The data is indexed by utility service provider which is described by its "unique" EIA ID ( Source National Renewable Energy Laboratory Date Released April 05th, 2012 (2 years ago) Date Updated April 06th, 2012 (2 years ago) Keywords AC apartment CFL coffeemaker Computer cooling cost demand Dishwasher Dryer Furnace gas HVAC Incandescent Laptop load Microwave model NREL Residential television tmy3 URDB Data text/csv icon Residential Cost Data for Common Household Items (csv, 14.5 MiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL)

295

Coupled Aerosol-ChemistryClimate Twentieth-Century Transient Model Investigation: Trends in Short-Lived Species and Climate Responses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors simulate transient twentieth-century climate in the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) GCM, with aerosol and ozone chemistry fully coupled to one another and to climate including a full dynamic ocean. Aerosols include sulfate, ...

Dorothy Koch; Susanne E. Bauer; Anthony Del Genio; Greg Faluvegi; Joseph R. McConnell; Surabi Menon; Ronald L. Miller; David Rind; Reto Ruedy; Gavin A. Schmidt; Drew Shindell

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Survey of absorption cooling technology in solar applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A comprehensive survey of the current state of the absorption cooling technology has been conducted. This survey discusses the basic and applied absorption cooling/heating technology, analyses the current state of the art including the discussion of limitations and possible solutions, identifies areas where promising developments are indicated, lists the current products and activities of the absorption industry, and presents the current RD and D efforts of the U.S. government. The main subjects covered in the survey are as follows: Principles of absorption cooling technology (NH/sub 3/-H/sub 2/O cycle and H/sub 2/O-LiBr Cycle), Adaptation of absorption cooling technology for solar cooling applications, Thermal performance of absorption cooling units, Comparison of NH/sub 3/-H/sub 2/O absorption with H/sub 2/O-LiBr absorption, Commercially available solar absorption units, General trends of the absorption cooling industry toward solar application, Absorption cooling system performance in actual installations, Limitations of absorption cooling technology, Solar-powered absorption heat pumps, and U.S. ERDA activities relating to solar absorption cooling. The treatment of the subjects is intended to be basic and comprehensive in order that the general readers may understand the current aspects of absorption technology in solar cooling applications. 36 references.

Auh, P C

1977-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Evaluating climate models: Should we use weather or climate observations?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Calling the numerical models that we use for simulations of climate change 'climate models' is a bit of a misnomer. These 'general circulation models' (GCMs, AKA global climate models) and their cousins the 'regional climate models' (RCMs) are actually physically-based weather simulators. That is, these models simulate, either globally or locally, daily weather patterns in response to some change in forcing or boundary condition. These simulated weather patterns are then aggregated into climate statistics, very much as we aggregate observations into 'real climate statistics'. Traditionally, the output of GCMs has been evaluated using climate statistics, as opposed to their ability to simulate realistic daily weather observations. At the coarse global scale this may be a reasonable approach, however, as RCM's downscale to increasingly higher resolutions, the conjunction between weather and climate becomes more problematic. We present results from a series of present-day climate simulations using the WRF ARW for domains that cover North America, much of Latin America, and South Asia. The basic domains are at a 12 km resolution, but several inner domains at 4 km have also been simulated. These include regions of complex topography in Mexico, Colombia, Peru, and Sri Lanka, as well as a region of low topography and fairly homogeneous land surface type (the U.S. Great Plains). Model evaluations are performed using standard climate analyses (e.g., reanalyses; NCDC data) but also using time series of daily station observations. Preliminary results suggest little difference in the assessment of long-term mean quantities, but the variability on seasonal and interannual timescales is better described. Furthermore, the value-added by using daily weather observations as an evaluation tool increases with the model resolution.

Oglesby, Robert J [ORNL; Erickson III, David J [ORNL

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Chicago Climate Action Plan | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Action Plan Action Plan Jump to: navigation, search Name Chicago Climate Action Plan Agency/Company /Organization City of Chicago Focus Area Buildings, Energy Efficiency - Central Plant, Greenhouse Gas, Other, Non-renewable Energy, Transportation, Renewable Energy Phase Prepare a Plan Topics Low emission development planning Resource Type Case studies/examples Availability Free Website http://www.chicagoclimateactio Locality Chicago, IL References Chicago Climate Action Plan[1] Overview Chicago's Climate Action Plan addresses both mitigation of and adaptation to climate change and encompasses the entire city (rather than only City operations). The plan contains a high-level overview of Chicago's climate action initiatives, including 26 mitigation strategies and nine adaptation

299

Turbomachine rotor with improved cooling  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas turbine rotor has an essentially closed loop cooling air scheme in which cooling air drawn from the compressor discharge air that is supplied to the combustion chamber is further compressed, cooled, and then directed to the aft end of the turbine rotor. Downstream seal rings attached to the downstream face of each rotor disc direct the cooling air over the downstream disc face, thereby cooling it, and then to cooling air passages formed in the rotating blades. Upstream seal rings attached to the upstream face of each disc direct the heated cooling air away from the blade root while keeping the disc thermally isolated from the heated cooling air. From each upstream seal ring, the heated cooling air flows through passages in the upstream discs and is then combined and returned to the combustion chamber from which it was drawn. 5 figs.

Hultgren, K.G.; McLaurin, L.D.; Bertsch, O.L.; Lowe, P.E.

1998-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

300

Turbomachine rotor with improved cooling  

SciTech Connect

A gas turbine rotor has an essentially closed loop cooling air scheme in which cooling air drawn from the compressor discharge air that is supplied to the combustion chamber is further compressed, cooled, and then directed to the aft end of the turbine rotor. Downstream seal rings attached to the downstream face of each rotor disc direct the cooling air over the downstream disc face, thereby cooling it, and then to cooling air passages formed in the rotating blades. Upstream seal rings attached to the upstream face of each disc direct the heated cooling air away from the blade root while keeping the disc thermally isolated from the heated cooling air. From each upstream seal ring, the heated cooling air flows through passages in the upstream discs and is then combined and returned to the combustion chamber from which it was drawn.

Hultgren, Kent Goran (Winter Park, FL); McLaurin, Leroy Dixon (Winter Springs, FL); Bertsch, Oran Leroy (Titusville, FL); Lowe, Perry Eugene (Oviedo, FL)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including climatic cooling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Emerging Technologies for Efficient Data Centers: Uninterruptible Power Supply Eco Mode, Liquid Cooling, and Evaporative Cooling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes research in emerging technologies that improve data center energy efficiency, including evaporative cooling, liquid cooling, and high-efficiency eco mode operation of the uninterruptible power supply. The report describes the efficiency gains of these technologies and their impact on total data center energy use. It also identifies market barriers for each technology and potential next steps to promote adoption of these efficient technologies.

2013-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

302

Five solar cooling projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The jointly funded $100 million five-year international agreement (SOLERAS) between Saudi Arabia and the United States was undertaken to promote the development of solar energy technologies of interest to both nations. Five engineering field tests of active solar cooling systems funded under the SOLERAS agreement for installation and operation in the U.S. southwest are described.

Davis, R.E.; Williamson, J.S.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Passive Cooling System for a Vehicle  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A passive cooling system for a vehicle (114) transfers heat from an overheated internal component, for example, an instrument panel (100), to an external portion (116) of the vehicle (114), for example, a side body panel (126). The passive cooling system includes one or more heat pipes (112) having an evaporator section (118) embedded in the overheated internal component and a condenser section (120) at the external portion (116) of the vehicle (114). The evaporator (118) and condenser (120) sections are in fluid communication. The passive cooling system may also include a thermally conductive film (140) for thermally connecting the evaporator sections (118) of the heat pipes (112) to each other and to the instrument panel (100).

Hendricks, T. J.; Thoensen, T.

2005-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

304

Internal cooling in a semiconductor laser diode  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AbstractA thermal model of a diode laser structure is developed which includes a bipolar thermoelectric term not included in previous models. It is shown that heterostructure band offsets can be chosen so that there are thermoelectric cooling sources near the active region; this method of cooling is internal to the device itself, as opposed to temperature stabilization schemes which employ an external cooler. A novel laser structure is proposed that is capable of internal cooling in the Ga1 In As Sb1 GaSb material system with = 2 64 m. Index TermsElectrothermal effects, lasers, laser thermal factors, photothermal effects, semiconductor lasers, thermionic emission, thermionic energy conversion, thermoelectric devices, thermoelectric energy conversion, thermoelectricity. Fig. 1. Band structure and thermoelectric heat source distribution for (a) and (b) conventional SCH, and (c) and (d) ICICLE.

K. P. Pipe; R. J. Ram; A. Shakouri

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Helical Muon Beam Cooling Channel Engineering Design  

SciTech Connect

The Helical Cooling Channel (HCC), a novel technique for six-dimensional (6D) ionization cooling of muon beams, has shown considerable promise based on analytic and simulation studies. However, the implementation of this revolutionary method of muon cooling requires new techniques for the integration of hydrogen-pressurized, high-power RF cavities into the low-temperature superconducting magnets of the HCC. We present the progress toward a conceptual design for the integration of 805 MHz RF cavities into a 10 T Nb{sub 3}Sn based HCC test section. We include discussions on the pressure and thermal barriers needed within the cryostat to maintain operation of the magnet at 4.2 K while operating the RF and energy absorber at a higher temperature. Additionally, we include progress on the Nb{sub 3}Sn helical solenoid design.

Kashikhin, V.S.; Lopes, M.L.; Romanov, G.V.; Tartaglia, M.A.; Yonehara, K.; Yu, M.; Zlobin, A.V.; /Fermilab; Flanagan, G.; Johnson, R.P.; Kazakevich, G.M.; Marhauser, F.; /MUONS Inc., Batavia

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Establish feasibility for providing passive cooling with solar updraft and evaporative downdraft chimneys  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Natural draft towers can be used for cooling and ventilating structures. From an operational perspective, the downdraft evaporatively cooled tower is preferred for a dry climate. Solar chimneys, when used alone, tend to require an excessively large solar collector area when appreciable quantities of air must be moved. When used in combination with a downdraft tower, the roof and attic of buildings may assist the solar chimney and their use becomes more attractive. Both a frame building and a greenhouse were successfully cooled during this program. The economics of the downdraft tower compare favorably with conventional evaporative cooling for some application.

Cunningham, W.A.; Mignon, G.V.; Thompson, T.L.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Establish feasibility for providing passive cooling with solar updraft and evaporate downdraft chimneys  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Natural draft towers can be used for cooling and ventilating structures. From an operational perspective, the downdraft evaporatively cooled tower is preferred for a dry climate. Solar chimneys, when used alone, tend to require an excessively large solar collector area when appreciable quantities of air must be moved. When used in combination with a downdraft tower, the roof and attic of buildings may assist the solar chimney and their use becomes more attractive. Both a frame building and a greenhouse were successfully cooled during this program. The economics of the downdraft tower compare favorably with conventional evaporative cooling for some applications.

Cunningham, W.A.; Mignon, G.V.; Thompson, T.L.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

World Bank-Climate Change Knowledge Portal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Portal Portal Jump to: navigation, search Logo: World Bank-Climate Change Knowledge Portal Name World Bank-Climate Change Knowledge Portal Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Climate Resource Type Maps, Training materials, Lessons learned/best practices Website http://sdwebx.worldbank.org/cl References World Bank-Climate Change Knowledge Portal[1] Abstract The WB Climate Change Portal is intended to provide quick and readily accessible climate and climate-related data to policy makers and development practitioners. World Bank-Climate Change Knowledge Portal Screenshot "The WB Climate Change Portal is intended to provide quick and readily accessible climate and climate-related data to policy makers and development practitioners. The site also includes a mapping visualization tool (webGIS) that displays

309

Cooling Towers- Energy Conservation Strategies Understanding Cooling Towers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cooling towers are energy conservation devices that Management, more often than not, historically overlooks in the survey of strategies for plant operating efficiencies. The utilization of the colder water off the cooling tower is the money maker!

Smith, M.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

GeoEngineering Assessment & Research The climate cooling potential of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, particularly ammonia (redistribution of N from animal agriculture) · biochar and retention of phosphorus, the larger the sampling scale). Johannes Lehmann: Biochar and associated P retention is an active area implemented in PA) (e.g. converting animal manure into biochar, making it more easily shippable). Biochar

Polz, Martin

311

Program on Technology Innovation: Tradeoffs Between Once-Through Cooling and Closed-Cycle Cooling for Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has been investigating a number of energy-related water topics that include the implications of retrofitting existing once-through generating stations with closed-cycle cooling, the cost and benefits of closed-cycle cooling, the impacts of impingement and entrainment, alternative fish protection technologies, water use in the electric power generation sector, and advanced power plant cooling technologies.

2012-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

312

Dynamic Model of Facial Cooling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent modifications to windchill forecasting have motivated the development of a rate-of-tissue-cooling model for the purpose of predicting facial cooling times. The model assumes a hollow cylindrical geometry with a fixed internal boundary ...

Peter Tikuisis; Randall J. Osczevski

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Solar heating and cooling demonstration project summaries  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Brief descriptive overviews are presented of the design and operating characteristics of all commercial and Federal residential solar heating and cooling systems and of the structures themselves. Also included are available pictures of the buildings and simplified solar system diagrams. A list of non-Federal residential installations is provided.

Not Available

1978-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION STAFF COOLING WATER MANAGEMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

maintenance includes having effective drift eliminators, periodically cleaning the system if appropriate, minimization of process leads into the cooling system that provide nutrients for bacteria, maintenance management plan shall describe how the system will be returned to normal microbial control following an upset

315

Covered Product Category: Cool Roof Products  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

FEMP provides acquisition guidance across a variety of product categories, including cool roof products, which are an ENERGY STAR-qualified product category. Federal laws and executive orders mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law.

316

President Obama Announces His Climate Action Plan  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

President Obama Announces His Climate Action Plan Print E-mail President Obama Announces His Climate Action Plan Print E-mail President Obama Announces His Climate Action Plan Monday, July 1, 2013 On Tuesday, June 25, in a speech at Georgetown University, President Obama announced his comprehensive plan for steady, responsible action to cut carbon pollution, prepare the Nation for the impacts of climate change, and lead international efforts to address climate change as a global challenge. The Plan builds on significant progress made during the Administration's first term on all of these fronts, including those based on the ongoing scientific work of USGCRP's 13 member-agencies, the Interagency Climate Change Adaptation Task Force in which USGCRP participates, and USGCRP's National Climate Assessment team.

317

Gas turbine bucket cooling circuit and related process  

SciTech Connect

A turbine bucket includes an airfoil portion having leading and trailing edges; at least one radially extending cooling passage within the airfoil portion, the airfoil portion joined to a platform at a radially inner end of the airfoil portion; a dovetail mounting portion enclosing a cooling medium supply passage; and, a crossover passage in fluid communication with the cooling medium supply passage and with at least one radially extending cooling passage, the crossover passage having a portion extending along and substantially parallel to an underside surface of the platform.

Lewis, Doyle C. (Greer, SC); Barb, Kevin Joseph (Halfmoon, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

HEPTAFLUOROPROPANE WITH WATER SPRAY COOLING ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

HEPTAFLUOROPROPANE WITH WATER SPRAY COOLING SYSTEM AS A TOTAL ... and evaluation studies on active and passive fire protection ...

2011-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

319

Paleogene cooling (55-30 MA) as inferred from oxygen isotope variation within mollusc shells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Paleogene cooling (c. 50-30 Ma) started sometime in the early-middle Eocene. This was a time when high-latitude and deep-sea temperatures were significantly warmer than today. This cooling culminated during the earliest Oligocene marked by the sudden appearance of a major continental glacier on Antarctica. We examine this cooling trend by analyzing oxygen isotope variation within mollusc shells from the Gulf Coastal Plain of the southern U.S. Our records show a secular cooling trend of mean annual temperature (MAT) in the Mississippi Embayment from an early Eocene tropical climate (26-27 ?C), with a seasonal temperature range (seasonality) of ~6 ?C, to an Oligocene paratropical climate (22-23?C) with an seasonality of ~8 ?C. These temperature records agree well with terrestrial climate proxies. This secular cooling trend, combined with sea-level change, was likely one of the major causes of molluscan turnover in the Mississippi Embayment to cool-tolerant taxa along the Paleogene cooling. Winter temperatures steadily decreased from the middle Eocene to early Oligocene. This contrasts with the sudden winter cooling at Eocene-Oligocene boundary proposed by Ivany et al. (2000). We examined seasonal temperature distribution of the modern marine shelf of the present northern U.S. Gulf Coast. A deeper water temperature model fits well with isotopic temperature profiles derived from fossils shells of the Red Bluff and Yazoo Formations shells, consistent with the paleobathymetry estimates inferred from independent proxies. This reveals that depth effect is one of the major factors controlling seasonality recorded in mollusc shells, resulting in decreasing MAT estimates when temperature stratification exists as in the present ocean. Warm Eocene low-latitude temperatures derived from molluscan oxygen isotope data agree with computer modeling results incorporating higher greenhouse gas concentrations. This supports the contention that the major reason for warm earth climate is elevated concentration of the greenhouse gases, giving a new insight for future climate response to anthropogenic CO? increase.

Kobashi, Takuro

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

AIR COOLED NEUTRONIC REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor of the air-cooled, graphite moderated type is described. The active core consists of a cubicle mass of graphite, approximately 25 feet in each dimension, having horizontal channels of square cross section extending between two of the opposite faces, a plurality of cylindrical uranium slugs disposed in end to end abutting relationship within said channels providing a space in the channels through which air may be circulated, and a cadmium control rod extending within a channel provided in the moderator. Suitable shielding is provlded around the core, as are also provided a fuel element loading and discharge means, and a means to circulate air through the coolant channels through the fuel charels to cool the reactor.

Fermi, E.; Szilard, L.

1958-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including climatic cooling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Climatic Change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration has been proposed as a key component in technological portfolios for managing anthropogenic climate change, since it may provide a faster and cheaper route to significant reductions in atmospheric CO2 concentrations than abating CO2 production. However, CO2 sequestration is not a perfect substitute for CO2 abatement because CO2 may leak back into the atmosphere (thus imposing future climate change impacts) and because CO2 sequestration requires energy (thus producing more CO2 and depleting fossil fuel resources earlier). Here we use analytical and numerical models to assess the economic efficiency of CO2 sequestration and analyze the optimal timing and extent of CO2 sequestration. The economic efficiency factor of CO2 sequestration can be expressed as the ratio of the marginal net benefits of sequestering CO2 and avoiding CO2 emissions. We derive an analytical solution for this efficiency factor for a simplified case in which we account for CO2 leakage, discounting, the additional fossil fuel requirement of CO2 sequestration, and the growth rate of carbon taxes. In this analytical model, the economic efficiency of CO2 sequestration decreases as the CO2 tax growth rate, leakage rates and energy requirements for CO2 sequestration increase.

Klaus Keller; David Mcinerney; David F. Bradford

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Temperature and cooling management in computing systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

72 5.1.2 Memory thermal and cooling model . . . . . . . . 75Energy, Thermal and Cooling Management . . . . . . . .Conclusion . . Chapter 4 Thermal and Cooling Management in

Ayoub, Raid

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Guide to Minimizing Compress-based Cooling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

cooling (direct or indirect), or various liquid cooled solutions. In addition to weather data, the Green Grid organization has developed a free cooling map tool to aid in...

324

Conduction cooled tube supports  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In boilers, process tubes are suspended by means of support studs that are in thermal contact with and attached to the metal roof casing of the boiler and the upper bend portions of the process tubes. The support studs are sufficiently short that when the boiler is in use, the support studs are cooled by conduction of heat to the process tubes and the roof casing thereby maintaining the temperature of the stud so that it does not exceed 1400.degree. F.

Worley, Arthur C. (Mt. Tabor, NJ); Becht, IV, Charles (Morristown, NJ)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Cooling your home naturally  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet describes some alternatives to air conditioning which are common sense suggestions and low-cost retrofit options to cool a house. It first describes how to reflect heat away from roofs, walls, and windows. Blocking heat by using insulation or shading are described. The publication then discusses removing built-up heat, reducing heat-generating sources, and saving energy by selecting energy efficient retrofit appliances. A resource list is provided for further information.

NONE

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

SCINTILLATION DETECTOR COOLING SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect

A well logging apparatus for irradiating earth formations with neutrons and recording the gamma rays emitted therefrom is designed which hss a scintillation decay time of less than 3 x 10/sup -8/ sec and hence may be used with more intense neutron sources. The scintillation crystal is an unactivated NaI crystal maintained at liquid N/sub 2/ temperature. The apparatus with the cooling system is described in detail. (D.L.C.)

George, W.D.; Jones, S.B.; Yule, H.P.

1962-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

327

Special Property Assessment for Renewable Heating and Cooling Systems |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Special Property Assessment for Renewable Heating and Cooling Special Property Assessment for Renewable Heating and Cooling Systems Special Property Assessment for Renewable Heating and Cooling Systems < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Solar Heating Program Info State Maryland Program Type Property Tax Incentive Rebate Amount Eligible property is assessed at no more than the value of a conventional system Provider Department of Assessments and Taxation Title 8 of Maryland's property tax code includes a state-wide special assessment for solar and geothermal heating and cooling systems. Under this provision, such systems are to be assessed at not more than the value of a conventional system for property tax purposes if no conventional system

328

Open Cooling Water Chemistry Guideline  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

State-of-the-art chemistry programs help to ensure the continued operation of open cooling water systems while mitigating corrosion and fouling mechanisms. This document, Open Cooling Water Chemistry Guideline, prepared by a committee of industry experts, reflects field and laboratory data on corrosion and fouling issues of open cooling systems.BackgroundService Water System Chemical Addition Guideline (Electric Power Research Institute ...

2012-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

329

Proceedings: Cooling Tower Technology Conference  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cooling towers and associated systems performance strongly affect availability and heat rate in fossil and nuclear power plants. Twenty-two papers presented at the 1997 Cooling Tower Technology Conference discuss research results, industry experience, and case histories of cooling tower problems and solutions.

1997-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

330

Conduction cooling: multicrate fastbus hardware  

SciTech Connect

Described is a new and novel approach for cooling nuclear instrumentation modules via heat conduction. The simplicity of liquid cooled crates and ease of thermal management with conduction cooled modules are described. While this system was developed primarily for the higher power levels expected with Fastbus electronics, it has many general applications.

Makowiecki, D.; Sims, W.; Larsen, R.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Liquid metal reactor air cooling baffle  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A baffle is provided between a relatively hot containment vessel and a relatively cold silo for enhancing air cooling performance. The baffle includes a perforate inner wall positionable outside the containment vessel to define an inner flow riser therebetween, and an imperforate outer wall positionable outside the inner wall to define an outer flow riser therebetween. Apertures in the inner wall allow thermal radiation to pass laterally therethrough to the outer wall, with cooling air flowing upwardly through the inner and outer risers for removing heat.

Hunsbedt, Anstein (Los Gatos, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Space cooling demands from office plug loads  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Undersizing space cooling systems for office buildings can result in uncomfortable and angry tenants on peak cooling days. However, oversizing wastes money because more capacity is installed than is needed, and oversized systems have a lower energy efficiency which makes operating costs higher than necessary. Oversizing can adversely affect comfort as well, because oversized systems may provide poor humidity control and large temperature variations. Correct system sizing requires estimating building heat loads accurately. This paper discusses the heat load generated by the plug load, which includes any electrical equipment that is plugged into outlets.

Komor, P.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Minimal Cooling of Neutron Stars: A New Paradigm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new classification of neutron star cooling scenarios, involving either ``minimal'' cooling or ``enhanced'' cooling is proposed. The minimal cooling scenario replaces and extends the so-called standard cooling scenario to include neutrino emission from the Cooper pair breaking and formation process. This emission dominates that due to the modified Urca process for temperatures close to the critical temperature for superfluid pairing. Minimal cooling is distinguished from enhanced cooling by the absence of neutrino emission from any direct Urca process, due either to nucleons or to exotica. Within the minimal cooling scenario, theoretical cooling models can be considered to be a four parameter family involving the equation of state of dense matter, superfluid properties of dense matter, the composition of the neutron star envelope, and the mass of the neutron star. Consequences of minimal cooling are explored through extensive variations of these parameters. Results are compared with the inferred properties of thermally-emitting neutron stars in order to ascertain if enhanced cooling occurs in any of them. All stars for which thermal emissions have been clearly detected are at least marginally consistent with the lack of enhanced cooling. The two pulsars PSR 0833-45 (Vela) and PSR 1706-44 would require enhanced cooling in case their ages and/or temperatures are on the lower side of their estimated values whereas the four stars PSR 0656+14, PSR 1055-52, Geminga, and RX J0720.4-3125 may require some source of internal heating in case their age and/or luminosity are on the upper side of their estimated values. The new upper limits on the thermal luminosity of PSR J0205+6449 and RX J0007.0+7302 are indicative of the occurrence of some enhanced neutrino emission beyond the minimal scenario.

Dany Page; James M. Lattimer; Madappa Prakash; Andrew W. Steiner

2004-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

334

Philosophy of Climate Science  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of climate simulations in scientific assessments of climate change and in the formulation of climatechange scenarios has been contested for, among others, methodological reasons. The "philosophy of climate science"encompasses discussions ...

Arthur C. Petersen

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Study Climate and Global Change  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What We Study How We Study Prepare The Nation For Change Assess the U.S. Climate Make Our Science Accessible Link Climate Change & Health Provide Data and Tools Coordinate Internationally Study Climate and Global Change Print E-mail Deforestation What is global change? "Global change" refers to changes in the global environment that may alter the capacity of the Earth to sustain life. This includes alterations in: Climate Land productivity Oceans or other water resources Atmospheric chemistry Ecological systems Demographic and socioeconomic trends What is global change research? According to the Global Change Research Act of 1990, "Global change research" refers to the study, monitoring, assessment, prediction, and information management activities used to describe and understand the:

336

Cooling system for a gas turbine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A plurality of arcuate circumferentially spaced supply and return manifold segments are arranged on the rim of a rotor for respectively receiving and distributing cooling steam through exit ports for distribution to first and second-stage buckets and receiving spent cooling steam from the first and second-stage buckets through inlet ports for transmission to axially extending return passages. Each of the supply and return manifold segments has a retention system for precluding substantial axial, radial and circumferential displacement relative to the rotor. The segments also include guide vanes for minimizing pressure losses in the supply and return of the cooling steam. The segments lie substantially equal distances from the centerline of the rotor and crossover tubes extend through each of the segments for communicating steam between the axially adjacent buckets of the first and second stages, respectively.

Wilson, Ian David (Mauldin, SC); Salamah, Samir Armando (Niskayuna, NY); Bylina, Noel Jacob (Niskayuna, NY)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Guide to efficient unitary cooling equipment  

SciTech Connect

The universe of unitary cooling equipment is a large one; these systems are used in nearly forty percent of the residential and commercial buildings in the United States. Unitary cooling equipment is made up of off-the-shelf units: factory-assembled single or split systems, including air-source heat pumps and air conditioners. The efficiency of this class of cooling equipment has increased steadily in recent years, driven primarily by government standards. Although most of the units have efficiencies near the minimum federal standards, a significant number of models beat the standards by 10 to 30 percent. However, the larger the system, the narrower the range of efficiencies available and the fewer models available in the most efficient categories. For the buyer and the utility, this report reveals where to get efficiency information on current products, and a recommended purchasing process. It also examines the ratings, standards, and programs that can expand the number of high-efficiency models available.

Gregerson, J.; George, K.L.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Survey of Climate Data Mining  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Global climate change has been a discussion topic for years, finally culminating as a significant problem and a national defense issue according to the 2010 Quadrennial Defense Review. From weather to ecological data, the planet is continuously being monitored by researchers collecting spatio-temporal climate data. With the immense amount of data collected, the challenge is making sense of the data by building models and studying the climatic events that deviate and correlate to the models. Data mining is now being used for this research and has four related problems: preprocessing data, applying data mining techniques to build models and outlier/anomaly detection, evaluation techniques and methods, and data visualization. This survey paper will present a broad survey of these issues by first discussing preprocessing techniques to remove variation and other data quality issues, including a discussion on the two types of outliers: undesirable outliers and outliers that represent interesting climate events. Next this paper will discuss common data mining techniques for building models, including association analysis, clustering, and ICA, and discovering interesting outlier/anomalies using techniques including classification, clustering, and wavelet analysis. Third, evaluation techniques will be covered through descriptions and examples. Finally, issues and techniques for climate data visualization will be discussed including

Jason W. Powell

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Table HC9.4 Space Heating Characteristics by Climate Zone, 2005  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

areas, determined according to the 30-year average (1971-2000) of the annual heating and cooling degree-days. A household is assigned to a climate zone according to the 30-year...

340

"Table HC9.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Climate Zone...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

areas, determined according to the 30-year average (1971-2000) of the annual heating and cooling degree-days. A household is assigned to a climate zone according to the 30-year...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including climatic cooling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

"Table HC9.5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Climate Zone...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

areas, determined according to the 30-year average (1971-2000) of the annual heating and cooling degree-days. A household is assigned to a climate zone according to the 30-year...

342

Changing climate  

SciTech Connect

This article reviews a book written by a committee of the National Research Council. The book discussed the Greenhouse Effect which is a warming of the earth's atmosphere caused by the doubling of the atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration. The excess carbon dioxide is pollution derived from the burning of fossil fuels. The report suggested that the warming of the atmosphere would cause thawing of the polar regions which in turn would cause a rise in sea levels and flooding of the coastal lowlands. In addition to the flooding, the report predicted climate changes that would effect the productivity of croplands in the west. The authors of the report stressed that there was no way to avoid this warming of the earth. They suggested that people should start preparing for the inevitable.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Climate Action Plan (Kentucky)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Commonwealth of Kentucky established the Kentucky Climate Action Plan Council (KCAPC) process to identify opportunities for Kentucky to respond to the challenge of global climate change while...

344

SEAB Climate Action Plan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A presentation on the Climate Action Plan presented by Dr. Jonathan Pershing, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Climate Change at the U.S. Department of Energy.

345

Single family heating and cooling requirements: Assumptions, methods, and summary results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The research has created a data base of hourly building loads using a state-of-the-art building simulation code (DOE-2.ID) for 8 prototypes, representing pre-1940s to 1990s building practices, in 16 US climates. The report describes the assumed modeling inputs and building operations, defines the building prototypes and selection of base cities, compares the simulation results to both surveyed and measured data sources, and discusses the results. The full data base with hourly space conditioning, water heating, and non-HVAC electricity consumption is available from GRI. In addition, the estimated loads on a per square foot basis are included as well as the peak heating and cooling loads.

Ritschard, R.L.; Hanford, J.W.; Sezgen, A.O. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Climate Analysis Indicators Tool (CAIT) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Climate Analysis Indicators Tool (CAIT) Climate Analysis Indicators Tool (CAIT) (Redirected from Climate Analysis Indicators Tool) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: WRI Climate Analysis Indicators Tool Agency/Company /Organization: World Resources Institute Sector: Climate, Energy, Land Topics: GHG inventory Resource Type: Dataset, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Website: cait.wri.org/ Language: English WRI Climate Analysis Indicators Tool Screenshot References: Climate Analysis Indicators Tool[1] CAIT is the Climate Analysis Indicators Tool -- an information and analysis tool on global climate change. It provides a comprehensive and comparable database of greenhouse gas emissions data (including all major sources and sinks) and other climate-relevant indicators. CAIT can be used to analyze a

347

Climate Analysis Indicators Tool (CAIT) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Climate Analysis Indicators Tool (CAIT) Climate Analysis Indicators Tool (CAIT) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: WRI Climate Analysis Indicators Tool Agency/Company /Organization: World Resources Institute Sector: Climate, Energy, Land Topics: GHG inventory Resource Type: Dataset, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Website: cait.wri.org/ Language: English WRI Climate Analysis Indicators Tool Screenshot References: Climate Analysis Indicators Tool[1] CAIT is the Climate Analysis Indicators Tool -- an information and analysis tool on global climate change. It provides a comprehensive and comparable database of greenhouse gas emissions data (including all major sources and sinks) and other climate-relevant indicators. CAIT can be used to analyze a wide range of climate-related data questions and to help support future

348

Modeled Impact of Anthropogenic Land Cover Change on Climate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Equilibrium experiments with the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratorys climate model are used to investigate the impact of anthropogenic land cover change on climate. Regions of altered land cover include large portions of Europe, India, ...

Kirsten L. Findell; Elena Shevliakova; P. C. D. Milly; Ronald J. Stouffer

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Influence of the Laurentian Great Lakes on Regional Climate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The influence of the Laurentian Great Lakes on climate is assessed by comparing two decade-long simulations, with the lakes either included or excluded, using the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics Regional Climate Model, ...

Michael Notaro; Kathleen Holman; Azar Zarrin; Elody Fluck; Steve Vavrus; Val Bennington

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Issues and Uncertainties Affecting Metrics for Aviation Impacts on Climate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Metrics such as radiative forcing and global warming potential have proven to be useful tools in climate policyrelated studies, including evaluation of the effects of aviation on climate, to relate different emissions to one another in order to ...

Don Wuebbles; Piers Forster; Helen Rogers; Redina Herman

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Impact of Climate on Energy Sector in Economic Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Assessments of economic conditions by region or sector attempt to include relevant climatic variability through residual adjustment techniques. There is no direct consideration of climatic fluctuations. Three recent severe winters combined with ...

Henry E. Warren; Sharon K. LeDuc

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Reactor core isolation cooling system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reactor core isolation cooling system includes a reactor pressure vessel containing a reactor core, a drywell vessel, a containment vessel, and an isolation pool containing an isolation condenser. A turbine is operatively joined to the pressure vessel outlet steamline and powers a pump operatively joined to the pressure vessel feedwater line. In operation, steam from the pressure vessel powers the turbine which in turn powers the pump to pump makeup water from a pool to the feedwater line into the pressure vessel for maintaining water level over the reactor core. Steam discharged from the turbine is channeled to the isolation condenser and is condensed therein. The resulting heat is discharged into the isolation pool and vented to the atmosphere outside the containment vessel for removing heat therefrom. 1 figure.

Cooke, F.E.

1992-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

353

Reactor core isolation cooling system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reactor core isolation cooling system includes a reactor pressure vessel containing a reactor core, a drywell vessel, a containment vessel, and an isolation pool containing an isolation condenser. A turbine is operatively joined to the pressure vessel outlet steamline and powers a pump operatively joined to the pressure vessel feedwater line. In operation, steam from the pressure vessel powers the turbine which in turn powers the pump to pump makeup water from a pool to the feedwater line into the pressure vessel for maintaining water level over the reactor core. Steam discharged from the turbine is channeled to the isolation condenser and is condensed therein. The resulting heat is discharged into the isolation pool and vented to the atmosphere outside the containment vessel for removing heat therefrom.

Cooke, Franklin E. (San Jose, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Passive cooling system for top entry liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a passive cooling system for liquid metal cooled, top entry loop nuclear fission reactors. It comprises: a liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor plant; a passive cooling system; and a secondary passive cooling system.

Boardman, C.E.; Hunsbedt, A.; Hui, M.M.

1992-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

355

A research program on radiative, chemical, and dynamical feedback progresses influencing the carbon dioxide and trace gases climate effects: Annual progress report, September 1, 1986--July 15, 1989  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the up-to-date progress. The program includes two tasks: atmospheric radiation and climatic effects and their objective is to link quantitatively the radiation forcing changes and the climate responses caused by increasing greenhouse gases. Here, the objective and approach are described. We investigate the combined atmospheric radiation characteristics of the greenhouse gases (H/sub 2/O, CO/sub 2/, CH/sub 4/, N/sub 2/O, CFCs, and O/sub 3/), aerosols and clouds. Since the climatic effect of increasing atmospheric greenhouse gases is initiated by perturabtion to the longwave thermal radiation, it is critical to understand better the radiation characteristics of the greenhouse gases and their relationship to radiatively-important aerosols and clouds; the latter reflect solar radiation (a cooling of the surface) and provide a greenhouse effect (a warming to the surface). Therefore, aerosol and cloud particles are an integral part of the radiation field in the atmosphere. 9 refs.

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Evaluation of ammonia as a working fluid for a wet/dry-cooled binary geothermal plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The concepts considered in this study involve various arrangments of the binary geothermal power cycle with advanced dry cooling schemes. Brief descriptions of the binary cycle and advanced cooling schemes are included. Also included are descriptions of the base case concept and the ammonia working fluid concept. Performance and cost estimates were developed for a wet-cooled isobutane cycle plant, wet/dry cooled isobutane cycle plant, wet-cooled ammonia cycle plant, and a wet/dry cooled ammonia cycle plant. The performance and cost estimates were calculated using the GEOCOST computer code developed at PNL. Inputs for GEOCOST were calculated based on the Heber sites. The characteristics of the wet/dry cooling system were determined using the BNWGEO computer code developed at PNL. Results of the cooling system analysis are presented, followed by results of the geothermal plant analysis. Conclusions and comments also are included.

Drost, M.K.; Huber, H.D.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Compact Solid State Cooling Systems: Compact MEMS Electrocaloric Module  

SciTech Connect

BEETIT Project: UCLA is developing a novel solid-state cooling technology to translate a recent scientific discovery of the so-called giant electrocaloric effect into commercially viable compact cooling systems. Traditional air conditioners use noisy, vapor compression systems that include a polluting liquid refrigerant to circulate within the air conditioner, absorb heat, and pump the heat out into the environment. Electrocaloric materials achieve the same result by heating up when placed within an electric field and cooling down when removedeffectively pumping heat out from a cooler to warmer environment. This electrocaloric-based solid state cooling system is quiet and does not use liquid refrigerants. The innovation includes developing nano-structured materials and reliable interfaces for heat exchange. With these innovations and advances in micro/nano-scale manufacturing technologies pioneered by semiconductor companies, UCLA is aiming to extend the performance/reliability of the cooling module.

None

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Optimal sequencing of a cooling tower with multiple cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper evaluates the energy savings potential of multi-cell cooling tower optimal sequencing control methods. Annual tower fan energy usage is calculated for a counter-flow tower with multiple variable-speed fans. Effectiveness-NTU tower model is employed to predict the cooling tower performance at various conditions. Natural convection when the fan is off is accounted by using an assumed airflow rate. The energy savings at five cities representing different typical climates are studied using typical meteorological year data. The results show that, if the tower capacity can be increased by 50% and 100% by running extra tower cells, the annual total fan power usage can be reduced by 44% and 61%, respectively. A cumulative saving percent curve is generated to help estimate the annual total savings percent when extra cooling tower capacity is available during only part of a year.

Zhang, Z.; Liu, J.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Introduction of a Cooling Fan Efficiency Index  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with four cooling fans of different designs available on thedesign, installation, and use, the performance of cooling fans

Schiavon, Stefano; Melikov, Arsen

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Cooling thermal storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article gives some overall guidelines for successful operation of cooling thermal storage installations. Electric utilities use rates and other incentives to encourage thermal storage, which not only reduces their system peaks but also transfers a portion of their load from expensive daytime inefficient peaking plants to less expensive nighttime base load high efficiency coal and nuclear plants. There are hundreds of thermal storage installations around the country. Some of these are very successful; others have failed to achieve all of their predicted benefits because application considerations were not properly addressed.

Gatley, D.P.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including climatic cooling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Superconducting magnet cooling system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device is provided for cooling a conductor to the superconducting state. The conductor is positioned within an inner conduit through which is flowing a supercooled liquid coolant in physical contact with the conductor. The inner conduit is positioned within an outer conduit so that an annular open space is formed therebetween. Through the annular space is flowing coolant in the boiling liquid state. Heat generated by the conductor is transferred by convection within the supercooled liquid coolant to the inner wall of the inner conduit and then is removed by the boiling liquid coolant, making the heat removal from the conductor relatively independent of conductor length.

Vander Arend, Peter C. (Center Valley, PA); Fowler, William B. (St. Charles, IL)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Cooled, temperature controlled electrometer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cooled, temperature controlled electrometer for the measurement of small currents. The device employs a thermal transfer system to remove heat from the electrometer circuit and its environment and dissipate it to the external environment by means of a heat sink. The operation of the thermal transfer system is governed by a temperature regulation circuit which activates the thermal transfer system when the temperature of the electrometer circuit and its environment exceeds a level previously inputted to the external variable temperature control circuit. The variable temperature control circuit functions as subpart of the temperature control circuit. To provide temperature stability and uniformity, the electrometer circuit is enclosed by an insulated housing.

Morgan, John P. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Evaporative Roof Cooling - A Simple Solution to Cut Cooling Costs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since the "Energy Crisis" Evaporative Roof Cooling Systems have gained increased acceptance as a cost effective method to reduce the high cost of air conditioning. Documented case histories in retrofit installations show direct energy savings and paybacks from twelve to thirty months. The main operating cost of an Evaporative Roof Cooling System is water. One thousand gallons of water, completely evaporated, will produce over 700 tons of cooling capability. Water usage seldom averages over 100 gallons per 1000 ft^2 of roof area per day or 10 oz. of water per 100 ft^2 every six minutes. Roof Cooling Systems, when planned in new construction, return 1-1/2 times the investment the first year in equipment savings and operating costs. Roof sprays are a low cost cooling solution for warehouses, distribution centers and light manufacturing or assembly areas with light internal loads. See text "Flywheel Cooling."

Abernethy, D.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Spray Cooling Enhancement of Air-Cooled Condensers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dry cooling of power plants may be an attractive alternative to wet cooling, particularly where water conservation and environmental protection pose critical siting issues. However, dry cooling technology may be unable to maintain design plant output during the hottest periods of the year, which are often periods of peak system demand. This studycosponsored by EPRI, the California Energy Commission, and Crockett Cogeneration Co.evaluated the use of a low-pressure spray enhancement system to...

2003-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

365

Special Property Assessment for Renewable Heating & Cooling Systems  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Title 8 of Marylands property tax code includes a state-wide special assessment for solar and geothermal heating and cooling systems. Under this provision, such systems are to be assessed at not...

366

Status of cool roof standards in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cool roofs save energy. ASHRAE Transactions 104(1B):783-788.2000. Updates on revision to ASHRAE Standard 90.2: includingSSP90.1 for Reflective Roofs. ASHRAE Transactions, 104(1B),

Akbari, Hashem; Levinson, Ronnen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Water-Cooled Ice Machines, Purchasing Specifications for Energy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ice Makers. b) Measured in accordance with ARI Standard 810-2003. Does not include condenser water use. Buying Energy-Efficient Water-Cooled Ice Machines Several types of...

368

X-ray Absorption Due to Cold Gas in Cluster Cooling Cores  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have calculated the emergent X-ray properties for models of cluster cooling flows including the effects of accumulated cooled material. The opacity of this cooled gas can reduce the overall X-ray luminosity of the cooling flow, and values of Mdot based on these luminosities can underestimate the true value by factors of ~2. We find that accumulated cooled material can produce emergent surface brightness profiles much like those observed even for nearly homogeneous gas distributions. Consequently, much more of the gas may be cooling below X-ray emitting temperatures in the central regions of cooling flows (r cooling flows may have been underestimated. We show that distributed absorption in cooling flows produces a number of observable effects in the spectrum which may allow it to be differentiated from absorption due to gas in our Galaxy. Th...

Wise, M W; Wise, Michael W.; Sarazin, Craig L.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

High field solenoids for muon cooling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The proposed cooling system for the muon collider will consist of a 200 meter long line of alternating field straight solenoids interspersed with bent solenoids. The muons are cooled in all directions using a 400 mm long section liquid hydrogen at high field. The muons are accelerated in the forward direction by about 900 mm long, 805 MHz RF cavities in a gradient field that goes from 6 T to -6 T in about 300 mm. The high field section in the channel starts out at an induction of about 2 T in the hydrogen. As the muons proceed down the cooling channel, the induction in the liquid hydrogen section increases to inductions as high as 30 T. The diameter of the liquid hydrogen section starts at 750 mm when the induction is 2 T. As the induction in the cooling section goes up, the diameter of the liquid hydrogen section decreases. When the high field induction is 30 T, the diameter of the liquid hydrogen section is about 80 mm. When the high field solenoid induction is below 8.5 T or 9T, niobium titanium coils are proposed for generating .the magnetic field. Above 8.5 T or 9 T to about 20 T, graded niobium tin and niobium titanium coils would be used at temperatures down to 1.8 K. Above 20 T, a graded bybrid magnet system is proposed, where the high field magnet section (above 20 T) is either a conventional water cooled coil section or a water cooled Bitter type coil. Two types of superconducting coils have been studied. They include; epoxy impregnated intrinsically stable coils, and cable in conduit conductor (CICC) coils with helium in the conduit.

Green, M.A.; Eyssa, Y.; Kenny, S.; Miller, J.R.; Prestemon, S.

1999-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

370

Climate & Environmental Sciences | Clean Energy | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Climate Change Science Institute Earth and Aquatic Sciences Ecosystem Science Environmental Data Science and Systems Energy, Water and Ecosystem Engineering Human Health Risk and Environmental Analysis Renewable Energy Systems Manufacturing Fossil Energy Sensors & Measurement Sustainable Electricity Systems Biology Transportation Clean Energy Home | Science & Discovery | Clean Energy | Research Areas | Climate & Environment SHARE Climate and Environmental Sciences Scientists Scott Brooks and Carrie Miller collect water quality data, East Fork Poplar Creek, November 15, 2012. Sampling site for mercury. Climate and environmental scientists at ORNL conduct research, develop technology and perform analyses to understand and predict how environmental systems respond to global and regional changes - including

371

A Hierarchical Evaluation of Regional Climate Simulations  

SciTech Connect

Global climate models (GCMs) are the primary tools for predicting the evolution of the climate system. Through decades of development, GCMs have demonstrated useful skill in simulating climate at continental to global scales. However, large uncertainties remain in projecting climate change at regional scales, which limit our ability to inform decisions on climate change adaptation and mitigation. To bridge this gap, different modeling approaches including nested regional climate models (RCMs), global stretch-grid models, and global high-resolution atmospheric models have been used to provide regional climate simulations (Leung et al. 2003). In previous efforts to evaluate these approaches, isolating their relative merits was not possible because factors such as dynamical frameworks, physics parameterizations, and model resolutions were not systematically constrained. With advances in high performance computing, it is now feasible to run coupled atmosphere-ocean GCMs at horizontal resolution comparable to what RCMs use today. Global models with local refinement using unstructured grids have become available for modeling regional climate (e.g., Rauscher et al. 2012; Ringler et al. 2013). While they offer opportunities to improve climate simulations, significant efforts are needed to test their veracity for regional-scale climate simulations.

Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Ringler, Todd; Collins, William D.; Taylor, Mark; Ashfaq, Moetasim

2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

372

Atmospheric carbon dioxide and the climate record  

SciTech Connect

This paper is an attempt to provide a summary review of conclusions from previous studies on this subject. Subject headings include: conceptualization of the greenhouse effect, the climatic effect of doubled CO/sub 2/, interpretation of the climatic record, diagnosis of apparent and possible model deficiencies, and the palaeoclimatic record.

Ellsaesser, H.W.

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Climate Zone Number 5 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

5 5 Jump to: navigation, search A type of climate defined in the ASHRAE 169-2006 standard. Climate Zone Number 5 is defined as Cool- Humid(5A) with IP Units 5400 < HDD65ºF ≤ 7200 and SI Units 3000 < HDD18ºC ≤ 4000 Dry(5B) with IP Units 5400 < HDD65ºF ≤ 7200 and SI Units 3000 < HDD18ºC ≤ 4000 Marine(5C) with IP Units 5400 < HDD65ºF ≤ 7200 and SI Units 3000 < HDD18ºC ≤ 4000 . The following places are categorized as class 5 climate zones: Ada County, Idaho Adair County, Iowa Adair County, Missouri Adams County, Colorado Adams County, Illinois Adams County, Indiana Adams County, Iowa Adams County, Nebraska Adams County, Pennsylvania Adams County, Washington Albany County, New York Allegan County, Michigan Alleghany County, North Carolina

374

A climatic thermostat making Earth habitable  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The mean surface temperature on Earth and other planets with atmospheres is determined by the radiative balance between the non-reflected incoming solar radiation and the outgoing long-wave black-body radiation from the atmosphere. The surface temperature is higher than the black-body temperature due to the greenhouse warming. Balancing the ice-albedo cooling and the greenhouse warming gives rise to two stable climate states. A cold climate state with a completelyice-covered planet, called Snowball Earth, and a warm state similar to our present climate where greenhouse warming prevents the total glacition. The warm state has dominated Earth in most of its geological history despite a 30 % fainter young Sun. The warming could have been controlled by a greenhouse thermostat operating by temperature control of the weathering process depleting the atmosphere from $CO_2$. This temperature control has permitted life to evolve as early as the end of the heavy bombartment 4 billion years ago.

Peter D. Ditlevsen

2005-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

375

Beam cooling: Principles and achievements  

SciTech Connect

After a discussion of Liouville's theorem, and its implications for beam cooling, a brief description is given of each of the various methods of beam cooling: stochastic, electron, radiation, laser, ionization, etc. For each, we present the type of particle for which it is appropriate, its range of applicability, and the currently achieved degree of cooling. For each method we also discuss the present applications and, also, possible future developments and further applications.

Mohl, Dieter; Sessler, Andrew M.

2003-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

376

Variable area fuel cell cooling  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel cell arrangement having cooling fluid flow passages which vary in surface area from the inlet to the outlet of the passages. A smaller surface area is provided at the passage inlet, which increases toward the passage outlet, so as to provide more uniform cooling of the entire fuel cell. The cooling passages can also be spaced from one another in an uneven fashion.

Kothmann, Richard E. (Churchill Borough, PA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

InterTechnology Corporation technology summary, solar heating and cooling. National Solar Demonstration Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A summary of systems technology for solar-thermal heating and cooling of buildings is given. Solar collectors, control systems for solar heating and cooling, selective surfaces, thermal energy storage, solar-assisted heat pumps, and solar-powered cooling systems are discussed in detail. Also, an ITC specification for a solar control system is included. (WHK)

None

1976-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Muon Cooling R&D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

International efforts are under way to design and test a muon ionization cooling channel. The present R&D program is described, and future plans outlined.

Steve Geer

2001-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

379

"Hot" for Warm Water Cooling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Published 112011 Conference Location Seattle, WA Call Number LBNL-5128E Abstract Liquid cooling is key to reducing energy consumption for this generation of supercomputers and...

380

Influence of Cooling on Distortion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 11   Factors that influence the cooling intensity of liquid quenchants...the vapor pressure is, the more difficult the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including climatic cooling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Laser Cooling of Trapped Ions.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... period, so it can be assumed to give an in- stantaneous impulse to the ... In sympathetic laser cooling, two different ion species are loaded into a trap. ...

2002-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

382

Theory of Semiconductor Laser Cooling .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Recently laser cooling of semiconductors has received renewed attention, with the hope that a semiconductor cooler might be able to achieve cryogenic temperatures. In order (more)

Rupper, Greg

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Thermally activated miniaturized cooling system.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A comprehensive study of a miniaturized thermally activated cooling system was conducted. This study represents the first work to conceptualize, design, fabricate and successfully test (more)

Determan, Matthew Delos

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Direct cooled power electronics substrate  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The disclosure describes directly cooling a three-dimensional, direct metallization (DM) layer in a power electronics device. To enable sufficient cooling, coolant flow channels are formed within the ceramic substrate. The direct metallization layer (typically copper) may be bonded to the ceramic substrate, and semiconductor chips (such as IGBT and diodes) may be soldered or sintered onto the direct metallization layer to form a power electronics module. Multiple modules may be attached to cooling headers that provide in-flow and out-flow of coolant through the channels in the ceramic substrate. The modules and cooling header assembly are preferably sized to fit inside the core of a toroidal shaped capacitor.

Wiles, Randy H. (Powell, TN), Wereszczak, Andrew A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Ayers, Curtis W. (Kingston, TN); Lowe, Kirk T. (Knoxville, TN)

2010-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

385

Measured Cooling Performance of Two-story Homes in Dallas, Texas; Insulated Concrete Form Versus Frame Construction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Four occupied homes near Dallas, Texas were monitored to compare heating and cooling energy use. Two homes were built with typical wood frame construction, the other two with insulated concrete form (ICF) construction. Remote data loggers collected average hourly indoor and outdoor temperature, relative humidity, furnace runtime fraction, total building electrical energy and HVAC energy use. The loggers recorded data from November 1999 through August 2000. Results show that insulated concrete form construction can reduce cooling energy use 17 to 19% in two-story homes in the north Texas climate. Two adjustments to the measured data were made to compensate for differences between the homes: (1) cooling energy use was normalized to remove the impact of miscellaneous energy use that introduces heat into the home (e.g. lights & appliances), and (2) duct leakage differences simulated in a DOE2-based software reduced the measured savings for ICF construction by 4%. Other differences noted between the homes that were not quantified included occupant impacts, exterior wall color (or absorptance) and an attic radiant barrier absent in one of the homes.

Chasar, D.; Moyer, N.; Rudd, A. F.; Parker, D.; Chandra, S.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Film cooling for a closed loop cooled airfoil  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Turbine stator vane segments have radially inner and outer walls with vanes extending therebetween. The inner and outer walls are compartmentalized and have impingement plates. Steam flowing into the outer wall plenum passes through the impingement plate for impingement cooling of the outer wall upper surface. The spent impingement steam flows into cavities of the vane having inserts for impingement cooling the walls of the vane. The steam passes into the inner wall and through the impingement plate for impingement cooling of the inner wall surface and for return through return cavities having inserts for impingement cooling of the vane surfaces. At least one film cooling hole is defined through a wall of at least one of the cavities for flow communication between an interior of the cavity and an exterior of the vane. The film cooling hole(s) are defined adjacent a potential low LCF life region, so that cooling medium that bleeds out through the film cooling hole(s) reduces a thermal gradient in a vicinity thereof, thereby the increase the LCF life of that region.

Burdgick, Steven Sebastian (Schenectady, NY); Yu, Yufeng Phillip (Simpsonville, SC); Itzel, Gary Michael (Simpsonville, SC)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Forests and Climate Change Toolbox | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Forests and Climate Change Toolbox Forests and Climate Change Toolbox Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Forests and Climate Change Toolbox Agency/Company /Organization: Center for International Forestry Research Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry Topics: Implementation, Policies/deployment programs, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Presentation, Publications Website: www.cifor.cgiar.org/fctoolbox/ Forests and Climate Change Toolbox Screenshot References: CIFOR Toolbox[1] Summary "This Forests and Climate Change Toolbox has been developed to build understanding and technical proficiency on issues of climate change and forests including mitigation, adaptation, carbon accounting and markets, and biofuels." References ↑ "CIFOR Toolbox" Retrieved from

388

Maryvale Terrace: geothermal residential district space heating and cooling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A preliminary study of the technical and economic feasibility of installing a geothermal district heating and cooling system is analyzed for the Maryvale Terrace residential subdevelopment in Phoenix, Arizona, consisting of 557 residential houses. The design heating load was estimated to be 16.77 million Btu/h and the design cooling load was estimated to be 14.65 million Btu/h. Average annual energy use for the development was estimated to be 5870 million Btu/y and 14,650 million Btu/y for heating and cooling, respectively. Competing fuels are natural gas for heating and electricity for cooling. A geothermal resource is assumed to exist beneath the site at a depth of 6000 feet. Five production wells producing 1000 gpm each of 220/sup 0/F geothermal fluid are required. Total estimated cost for installing the system is $5,079,300. First year system operations cost (including debt service) is $974,361. The average annual geothermal heating and cooling cost per home is estimated to be $1750 as compared to a conventional system annual cost of $1145. Further, the cost of geothermal heating and cooling is estimated to be $47.50 per million Btu when debt service is included and $6.14 per million Btu when only operating costs are included. Operating (or fuel) costs for conventional heating and cooling are estimated to be $15.55 per million Btu.

White, D.H.; Goldstone, L.A.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

The Thermodynamic and Cost Benefits of Floating Cooling Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Historically, a fixed cooling concept is used in the design of evaporative heat rejection systems for process and power plants. In the fixed cooling mode, a plant is designed for maximum output at the design summer wet bulb temperature. The application of a floating cooling concept to evaporative heat rejection systems can have significant impact on improving plant performance. The floating cooling concept refers to the optimization of yearly plant output and energy consumption by taking advantage of seasonal wet bulb temperature fluctuations. The maximum plant output occurs at the average winter wet bulb temperature. Floating cooling is especially suited to base load power plants located in regions with large daily and seasonal wet bulb temperature variations. An example for a geothermal power plant is included in this paper.

Svoboda, K. J.; Klooster, H. J.; Johnnie, D. H., Jr.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Thermal performance of phase change wallboard for residential cooling application  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cooling of residential California buildings contributes significantly to electrical consumption and peak power demand mainly due to very poor load factors in milder climates. Thermal mass can be utilized to reduce the peak-power demand, downsize the cooling systems, and/or switch to low-energy cooling sources. Large thermal storage devices have been used in the past to overcome the shortcomings of alternative cooling sources, or to avoid high demand charges. The manufacturing of phase change material (PCM) implemented in gypsum board, plaster or other wall-covering material, would permit the thermal storage to become part of the building structure. PCMs have two important advantages as storage media: they can offer an order-of-magnitude increase in thermal storage capacity, and their discharge is almost isothermal. This allows the storage of high amounts of energy without significantly changing the temperature of the room envelope. As heat storage takes place inside the building, where the loads occur, rather than externally, additional transport energy is not required. RADCOOL, a thermal building simulation program based on the finite difference approach, was used to numerically evaluate the latent storage performance of treated wallboard. Extended storage capacity obtained by using double PCM-wallboard is able to keep the room temperatures close to the upper comfort limits without using mechanical cooling. Simulation results for a living room with high internal loads and weather data for Sunnyvale, California, show significant reduction of room air temperature when heat can be stored in PCM-treated wallboards.

Feustel, H.E.; Stetiu, C.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Simulations and economic analyses of desiccant cooling systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The progress to date in the development and analysis of computer simulations of solar-powered desiccant cooling using an axial-flow disc-type dehumidifier wheel, solar-powered space heating, and electrically driven, standard vapor-compression air-conditioning systems for residential use is documented. Computer simulations for both solar and conventional heating and cooling systems were performed for 12-month heating and cooling seasons. Annual thermal performance and the resulting life cycle costs for both types of systems were analyzed and compared. The heating/cooling season simulations were run for five U.S. cities representing a wide range of climatic conditions and insolation. With the informaion resulting from these simulations, the optimum air-conditioning system was chosen to maximize the conservation of fossil fuels and minimize operating costs. Because of the increasing use of residential air conditioning employing electrically driven vapor-compression coolers, the five locations were studied to determine if it would be beneficial (in terms of both economics and fossil fuel displacement) to displace fossil-fuel-powered vapor-compression coolers and natural gas space heaters with solar-powered heating and desiccant cooling systems.

Shelpuk, B. C.; Hooker, D. W.; Jorgensen, G. J.; Bingham, C. E.

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Turbine engine component with cooling passages  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A component for use in a turbine engine including a first member and a second member associated with the first member. The second member includes a plurality of connecting elements extending therefrom. The connecting elements include securing portions at ends thereof that are received in corresponding cavities formed in the first member to attach the second member to the first member. The connecting elements are constructed to space apart a first surface of the second member from a first surface of the first member such that at least one cooling passage is formed between adjacent connecting elements and the first surface of the second member and the first surface of the first member.

Arrell, Douglas J. (Oviedo, FL); James, Allister W. (Orlando, FL)

2012-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

393

COOLING AND HEATING FUNCTIONS OF PHOTOIONIZED GAS  

SciTech Connect

Cooling and heating functions of cosmic gas are crucial ingredients for any study of gas dynamics and thermodynamics in the interstellar and intergalactic media. As such, they have been studied extensively in the past under the assumption of collisional ionization equilibrium. However, for a wide range of applications, the local radiation field introduces a non-negligible, often dominant, modification to the cooling and heating functions. In the most general case, these modifications cannot be described in simple terms and would require a detailed calculation with a large set of chemical species using a radiative transfer code (the well-known code Cloudy, for example). We show, however, that for a sufficiently general variation in the spectral shape and intensity of the incident radiation field, the cooling and heating functions can be approximated as depending only on several photoionization rates, which can be thought of as representative samples of the overall radiation field. This dependence is easy to tabulate and implement in cosmological or galactic-scale simulations, thus economically accounting for an important but rarely included factor in the evolution of cosmic gas. We also show a few examples where the radiation environment has a large effect, the most spectacular of which is a quasar that suppresses gas cooling in its host halo without any mechanical or non-radiative thermal feedback.

Gnedin, Nickolay Y. [Particle Astrophysics Center, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Hollon, Nicholas, E-mail: gnedin@fnal.gov [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

394

Advanced Open-Cycle Desiccant Cooling System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The concept of staged regeneration as means of improving the desiccant cooling system performance is the subject of investigation in this study. In the staged regeneration, the regeneration section of desiccant dehumidifier is divided into two parts and only the latter fraction is subjected to the desorption air stream which has been heated to the desired regeneration temperature. In the present work, the mathematical model describing the heat and mass transfer processes that occur during sorption of moisture in the desiccnnt dehumidifier includes both the gas-side (film) and solid-side resistances for heat and mass transports. The moisture diffusion in the desiccant material is expressed by gas-phase diffusion and surface diffusion. Effects of several parameters on the performance of desiccant cooling system with staged regeneration are investigated and the results of present model are compared with those of the lumped-resistance model. Results of this study show that coefficient of perfomnnce of the desiccant cooling system can be substantially improved by using the staged regeneration concept. There is an optimum stage fraction and optimum cycle time for given system parmeters and operating conditions. The results also indicate that the cooling system performance is higher than that predicted by the lumped-resistance model.

Ko, Y. J.; Charoensupaya, D.; Lavan, Z.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Formulating Climate Change Scenarios to Inform Climate - Resilient...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Formulating Climate Change Scenarios to Inform Climate - Resilient Development Strategies Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Formulating Climate Change Scenarios to...

396

Eight evacuated collector installations. Interim report for the IEA task on the performance of solar heating, cooling and hot water systems using evacuated collectors  

SciTech Connect

The cooperative IEA task on evacuated collector systems includes the following research and development projects: solar heated and cooled single family residences in Japan and the USA, a solar heated single family residence in the Netherlands, a solar heated multi-family unit in West Germany, a solar test facility in the United Kingdom, solar heated and cooled offices in Australia, a solar heated and cooled laboratory in Italy, an industrial process heat application in Canada, a solar heated and cooled university building in the USA and district heating systems in Sweden and Switzerland. The task covers the important evacuated collector applications. The same collectors are used in several installations and nearly all currently available evacuated collectors are used in at least one installation. Exchange of performance results within the task has been greatly enhanced by adoption of a mandatory highly prescriptive common reporting structure. Detailed unambiguous performance comparisons are made which would otherwise be difficult or impractical. This report, the first in a series of reports that will be published through 1986, describes the system and climate at eight of the installations and illustrates and compares seasonal, monthly, daily and hourly performance of the installations in Japan, Sweden, the USA and West Germany.

Duff, W.S.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

User's Guide to Cooling Systems Data Base  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A bibliographical computerized data base related to cooling system impacts on aquatic environments were compiled by the Information Center Complex at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Atomic Industrial Forum, Inc. (AIF). The data base covers four major subject areas: thermal effects, chemical effects, impingement, and entrainment. The ORNL portion of the project covers published literature, including government and university reports, conference proceedings, and trade journals. The AIF portion...

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Management of Non-Cooling Water Releases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report assesses the efficacy and cost of water management practices that can be used by power companies to address non-cooling water and stormwater release issues with respect to siting, design, and operation of facilities, including generating stations, substations, and rights-of-way in urban and rural settings. The report will be of value to environmental and generation managers within power companies, as well as regulators, water resource managers, and environmentalists.

2008-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

399

Passively cooled direct drive wind turbine  

SciTech Connect

A wind turbine is provided that passively cools an electrical generator. The wind turbine includes a plurality of fins arranged peripherally around a generator house. Each of the fins being oriented at an angle greater than zero degrees to allow parallel flow of air over the fin. The fin is further tapered to allow a constant portion of the fin to extend beyond the air stream boundary layer. Turbulence initiators on the nose cone further enhance heat transfer at the fins.

Costin, Daniel P. (Chelsea, VT)

2008-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

400

Link Climate Change and Human Health  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Make Our Science Accessible Make Our Science Accessible Link Climate Change & Health Provide Data and Tools Coordinate Internationally Link Climate Change and Human Health Print E-mail Health News Check out the latest climate change and human health news and announcements in our Health News Feed. Climate change poses unique challenges to human health. Unlike health threats caused by a particular toxin or disease pathogen, there are many ways that climate change can lead to potentially harmful health effects. Direct health impacts may include increased illnesses and deaths from extreme heat events, injuries and deaths from extreme weather events, and respiratory illnesses due to changes in air quality Indirect health impacts include illnesses and deaths that may arise from

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including climatic cooling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Enhanced heat transfer surface for cast-in-bump-covered cooling surfaces and methods of enhancing heat transfer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An annular turbine shroud separates a hot gas path from a cooling plenum containing a cooling medium. Bumps are cast in the surface on the cooling side of the shroud. A surface coating overlies the cooling side surface of the shroud, including the bumps, and contains cooling enhancement material. The surface area ratio of the cooling side of the shroud with the bumps and coating is in excess of a surface area ratio of the cooling side surface with bumps without the coating to afford increased heat transfer across the element relative to the heat transfer across the element without the coating.

Chiu, Rong-Shi Paul (Glenmont, NY); Hasz, Wayne Charles (Pownal, VT); Johnson, Robert Alan (Simpsonville, SC); Lee, Ching-Pang (Cincinnati, OH); Abuaf, Nesim (Lincoln City, OR)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

A daily weather generator for use in climate change studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the development of a weather generator for use in climate impact assessments of agricultural and water system management. The generator produces internally consistent series of meteorological variables including: rainfall, temperature, humidity, ... Keywords: Climate change, Climate scenario, Rainfall model, Stochastic, Weather generator

C. G. Kilsby; P. D. Jones; A. Burton; A. C. Ford; H. J. Fowler; C. Harpham; P. James; A. Smith; R. L. Wilby

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Transient Climate Simulations with the HadGEM1 Climate Model: Causes of Past Warming and Future Climate Change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ability of climate models to simulate large-scale temperature changes during the twentieth century when they include both anthropogenic and natural forcings and their inability to account for warming over the last 50 yr when they exclude ...

Peter A. Stott; Gareth S. Jones; Jason A. Lowe; Peter Thorne; Chris Durman; Timothy C. Johns; Jean-Claude Thelen

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Temperature initiated passive cooling system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A passive cooling system for cooling an enclosure only when the enclosure temperature exceeds a maximum standby temperature comprises a passive heat transfer loop containing heat transfer fluid having a particular thermodynamic critical point temperature just above the maximum standby temperature. An upper portion of the heat transfer loop is insulated to prevent two phase operation below the maximum standby temperature.

Forsberg, Charles W. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Temperature initiated passive cooling system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A passive cooling system for cooling an enclosure only when the enclosure temperature exceeds a maximum standby temperature comprises a passive heat transfer loop containing heat transfer fluid having a particular thermodynamic critical point temperature just above the maximum standby temperature. An upper portion of the heat transfer loop is insulated to prevent two phase operation below the maximum standby temperature. 1 fig.

Forsberg, C.W.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Mixed-mode simulations for climate feasibility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

across all 16 California climate zones. Quantify the largerspan all 16 official CA climate zones with system sizing andClimate analysis For each climate zone: Quantitative climate

Borgeson, Sam; Brager, Gail; Coffey, Brian; Haves, Phil

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Deep-Time Climates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... power supplies, and stopping the pumps needed to cool nuclear ... at household, organizational, community, and regional levels ...

2011-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

408

CDIAC Climate Reconstruction Data Sets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Climate Reconstructions CDIAC Climate Holdings Containing Climate Reconstruction Data Data Set Name Investigators Data TypeFormat Period of Record Historic isotopic temperature...

409

Eos Climate | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Eos Climate Jump to: navigation, search Name Eos Climate Place South San Francisco, California Zip 94080 Product California-based firm focused on developing climate change...

410

Climate Change | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Science & Innovation Climate Change Climate Change Learn about the effects climate change can have on our energy supplies and infrastructure and explore a...

411

Cryostat including heater to heat a target  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cryostat is provided which comprises a vacuum vessel; a target disposed within the vacuum vessel; a heat sink disposed within the vacuum vesssel for absorbing heat from the detector; a cooling mechanism for cooling the heat sink; a cryoabsorption mechanism for cryoabsorbing residual gas within the vacuum vessel; and a heater for maintaining the target above a temperature at which the residual gas is cryoabsorbed in the course of cryoabsorption of the residual gas by the cryoabsorption mechanism.

Pehl, Richard H. (Berkeley, CA); Madden, Norman W. (Livermore, CA); Malone, Donald F. (Oakland, CA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Cryostat including heater to heat a target  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cryostat is provided which comprises a vacuum vessel; a target disposed within the vacuum vessel; a heat sink disposed within the vacuum vessel for absorbing heat from the detector; a cooling mechanism for cooling the heat sink; a cryoabsorption mechanism for cryoabsorbing residual gas within the vacuum vessel; and a heater for maintaining the target above a temperature at which the residual gas is cryoabsorbed in the course of cryoabsorption of the residual gas by the cryoabsorption mechanism. 2 figs.

Pehl, R.H.; Madden, N.W.; Malone, D.F.

1990-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

413

Laser cooling to quantum degeneracy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) in a gas of strontium atoms, using laser cooling as the only cooling mechanism. The condensate is formed within a sample that is continuously Doppler cooled to below 1\\muK on a narrow-linewidth transition. The critical phase-space density for BEC is reached in a central region of the sample, in which atoms are rendered transparent for laser cooling photons. The density in this region is enhanced by an additional dipole trap potential. Thermal equilibrium between the gas in this central region and the surrounding laser cooled part of the cloud is established by elastic collisions. Condensates of up to 10^5 atoms can be repeatedly formed on a timescale of 100ms, with prospects for the generation of a continuous atom laser.

Stellmer, Simon; Grimm, Rudolf; Schreck, Florian

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Keeping cool in the job  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Describes cooling garments used at nuclear plants to keep workers cooler for longer periods of time, safeguard health, boost efficiency, and elevate morale. Examines 2 cooling concepts tested by EPRI in laboratory and field conditions: using circulating liquids for cooling (represented by 2 commercially available personal cooling systems); and using frozen water for cooling (represented by 2 prototype garments recently developed by EPRI). Explains that pipes and pressure vessels inside nuclear power plants give off significant amounts of waste heat, with temperatures reaching up to 55C (131F)-not very comfortable for maintenance workers who are swathed in radiation protection gear and doing repair work. Finds that the frozen-water concept may considerably extend working time in the power plant. Concludes that the right research can overcome heat, humidity, and close quarters which conspire to make maintenance work in power plants a tough task.

Lihach, N.; O'Brien, J.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Wind turbine generators having wind assisted cooling systems and cooling methods  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A wind generator includes: a nacelle; a hub carried by the nacelle and including at least a pair of wind turbine blades; and an electricity producing generator including a stator and a rotor carried by the nacelle. The rotor is connected to the hub and rotatable in response to wind acting on the blades to rotate the rotor relative to the stator to generate electricity. A cooling system is carried by the nacelle and includes at least one ambient air inlet port opening through a surface of the nacelle downstream of the hub and blades, and a duct for flowing air from the inlet port in a generally upstream direction toward the hub and in cooling relation to the stator.

Bagepalli, Bharat (Niskayuna, NY); Barnes, Gary R. (Delanson, NY); Gadre, Aniruddha D. (Rexford, NY); Jansen, Patrick L. (Scotia, NY); Bouchard, Jr., Charles G. (Schenectady, NY); Jarczynski, Emil D. (Scotia, NY); Garg, Jivtesh (Cambridge, MA)

2008-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

416

Appendix F Cultural Resources, Including  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Appendix F Appendix F Cultural Resources, Including Section 106 Consultation STATE OF CALIFORNIA - THE RESOURCES AGENCY EDMUND G. BROWN, JR., Governor OFFICE OF HISTORIC PRESERVATION DEPARTMENT OF PARKS AND RECREATION 1725 23 rd Street, Suite 100 SACRAMENTO, CA 95816-7100 (916) 445-7000 Fax: (916) 445-7053 calshpo@parks.ca.gov www.ohp.parks.ca.gov June 14, 2011 Reply in Reference To: DOE110407A Angela Colamaria Loan Programs Office Environmental Compliance Division Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave SW, LP-10 Washington, DC 20585 Re: Topaz Solar Farm, San Luis Obispo County, California Dear Ms. Colamaria: Thank you for seeking my consultation regarding the above noted undertaking. Pursuant to 36 CFR Part 800 (as amended 8-05-04) regulations implementing Section

417

Film cooling air pocket in a closed loop cooled airfoil  

SciTech Connect

Turbine stator vane segments have radially inner and outer walls with vanes extending between them. The inner and outer walls are compartmentalized and have impingement plates. Steam flowing into the outer wall plenum passes through the impingement plate for impingement cooling of the outer wall upper surface. The spent impingement steam flows into cavities of the vane having inserts for impingement cooling the walls of the vane. The steam passes into the inner wall and through the impingement plate for impingement cooling of the inner wall surface and for return through return cavities having inserts for impingement cooling of the vane surfaces. To provide for air film cooing of select portions of the airfoil outer surface, at least one air pocket is defined on a wall of at least one of the cavities. Each air pocket is substantially closed with respect to the cooling medium in the cavity and cooling air pumped to the air pocket flows through outlet apertures in the wall of the airfoil to cool the same.

Yu, Yufeng Phillip (Simpsonville, SC); Itzel, Gary Michael (Simpsonville, SC); Osgood, Sarah Jane (East Thetford, VT); Bagepalli, Radhakrishna (Schenectady, NY); Webbon, Waylon Willard (Greenville, SC); Burdgick, Steven Sebastian (Schenectady, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Climate Instability and Public Health  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Climate Instability and Public Health Climate Instability and Public Health Speaker(s): Paul Epstein Date: August 7, 2003 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Evan Mills Climate restricts the range of infectious diseases, while weather affects the timing and intensity of outbreaks. The ranges of several key diseases or their vectors are changing, along with shifts in plant communities and the retreat of alpine glaciers. In addition, extreme weather events associated with warming create conditions conducive to "clusters" of disease outbreaks. The rapid spread of West Nile virus in the Americas is related, paradoxically, to drought and its impact on wildlife (230 species of animals, 138 species of birds) could alter the ratios of predator birds to their prey (including rodents) and thus have implications for human

419

Renewable Energy and Climate Change  

SciTech Connect

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change issued the Special Report on Renewable Energy Sources and Climate Change Mitigation (SRREN) at http://srren.ipcc-wg3.de/ (May 2011 electronic version; printed form ISBN 978-1-107-60710-1, 2012). More than 130 scientists contributed to the report.* The SRREN assessed existing literature on the future potential of renewable energy for the mitigation of climate change within a portfolio of mitigation options including energy conservation and efficiency, fossil fuel switching, RE, nuclear and carbon capture and storage (CCS). It covers the six most important renewable energy technologies - bioenergy, direct solar, geothermal, hydropower, ocean and wind, as well as their integration into present and future energy systems. It also takes into consideration the environmental and social consequences associated with these technologies, the cost and strategies to overcome technical as well as non-technical obstacles to their application and diffusion.

Chum, H. L.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACTS ON CALIFORNIA VEGETATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACTS ON CALIFORNIA VEGETATION: PHYSIOLOGY, LIFE HISTORY, AND ECOSYSTEM many ecosystem services, including carbon storage, soil retention, and water cycling. One in dominant vegetation, often termed state change, will occur. The complex nature of state change requires

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including climatic cooling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Optimizing Crop Insurance under Climate Variability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper studies the selection of optimal crop insurance under climate variability and fluctuating market prices. A model was designed to minimize farmers expected losses (including insurance costs) while using the conditional-value-at-risk ...

Juan Liu; Chunhua Men; Victor E. Cabrera; Stan Uryasev; Clyde W. Fraisse

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Interactive Cloud Formation and Climatic Temperature Perturbations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A one-dimensional climate model with an interactive cloud formation program is developed to investigate its effects on temperature perturbations due to various radiative forcings including doubling of CO2, a 2% increase of the solar constant and ...

Kuo-Nan Liou; S. C. S. Ou; P. J. Lu

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Chemistry implications of climate change  

SciTech Connect

Since preindustrial times, the concentrations of a number of key greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), methane (CH{sub 4}) and the nitric oxides (N{sub 2}O) have increased. Additionally, the concentrations of anthropogenic aerosols have also increased during the same time period. Increasing concentrations of greenhouse gases are expected to increase temperature, while the aerosols tend to have a net cooling effect. Taking both of these effects into account, the current best scientific estimate is that the global average surface temperature is expected to increase by 2{degrees}C between the years 1990 to 2100. A climate change if this magnitude will both directly and indirectly impact atmospheric chemistry. For example, many important tropospheric reactions have a temperature dependence (either Arrhenius or otherwise). Thus, if temperature increase, reaction rates will also increase.

Atherton, C.S.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Coupled chemistry/climate issues  

SciTech Connect

Driven by both natural and anthropogenic causes, the distributions of trace chemical species in the atmosphere has altered the natural state of the chemical distribution and, the authors believe, the climate system. A clear example of this change and its effect on climate is through tropospheric ozone. Evidence shows that over the last decade tropospheric ozone has increased, probably caused by increasing concentrations and emissions of CH{sub 4}, CO, NO{sub x}, and NMHCs (nonmethane hydrocarbons). Tropospheric ozone is photochemically produced when nitrogen oxides react in the presence of carbon monoxide, methane, non-methane hydrocarbons and sunlight. The chemistry of ozone and NO{sub x} is also closely associated with the hydroxyl radical (OH), which governs the atmospheric lifetime of a number of species, including CH{sub 4} and chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), which are major greenhouse gases and which affect the chemical balance of the stratosphere. Increases in the concentrations of CO and CH{sub 4} can lead to decreased concentrations of OH and a positive feedback on the atmospheric lifetimes of CO and methane. The same would occur for other greenhouse gases and for some of the important reactions which form aerosols in the troposphere. This would further enhance the concentrations of the gases and accelerate the radiative effects from these greenhouse species, strongly affecting climate and the accurate prediction of climate. It is believed that warmer climates will also increase the amount of water in the atmosphere, thereby providing another chemistry feedback on OH.

Rotman, D.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States). Global Climate Research Div.; Wuebbles, D.J. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Performance of a hotel chilled water plant with cool storage  

SciTech Connect

A comprehensive monitoring suite was installed at a large convention hotel located in San Francisco, CA. The instrumentation was used for a research project to evaluate the effectiveness of electricity price based controls that automate response to real time pricing and to characterize the operation and performance of the hotel's chilled water plant that included a newly installed ice cool storage system. The hotel operates under real-time electricity rates. To date, over four years of data have been collected. Data included electricity use for all chillers, secondary coolant, chilled water, condenser pumps, and the cooling tower fans. Thermal flow data were also collected for the storage system, ice chiller, direct cooling chillers, and chilled water load loops. This paper (1) describes the chilled water plant, (2) defines the performance measurement objectives for the project, (3) discusses operational experience with the plant, focusing on the cool storage system, (4) analyzes chilled water plant and cool storage system operation by examining the charge/discharge heat flow data, and (5) evaluates how well the plant as a whole and the cool storage system specifically met cooling loads of the facility, and how this affected their use.

Gillespie, K.L.; Blanc, S.L.; Parker, S.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

New Cool Roof Coatings and Affordable Cool Color Asphalt  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

New Cool Roof Coatings and New Cool Roof Coatings and Affordable Cool Color Asphalt Shingles Meng-Dawn Cheng Oak Ridge National Laboratory chengmd@ornl.gov; 865-241-5918 April 4, 2013 PM: Andre Desjarlais PI: Meng-Dawn Cheng, Ph.D. David Graham, Ph.D. Sue Carroll Steve Allman Dawn Klingeman Susan Pfiffner, Ph.D. (FY12) Karen Cheng (FY12) Partner: Joe Rokowski (Dow) Roof Testing Facility at ORNL Building Technologies Research and Integration Center 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov * Building accounted for 41% of the US energy consumption in 2010 greater than either transportation (28%) or industry (31%).

427

New Cool Roof Coatings and Affordable Cool Color Asphalt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Cool Roof Coatings and New Cool Roof Coatings and Affordable Cool Color Asphalt Shingles Meng-Dawn Cheng Oak Ridge National Laboratory chengmd@ornl.gov; 865-241-5918 April 4, 2013 PM: Andre Desjarlais PI: Meng-Dawn Cheng, Ph.D. David Graham, Ph.D. Sue Carroll Steve Allman Dawn Klingeman Susan Pfiffner, Ph.D. (FY12) Karen Cheng (FY12) Partner: Joe Rokowski (Dow) Roof Testing Facility at ORNL Building Technologies Research and Integration Center 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov * Building accounted for 41% of the US energy consumption in 2010 greater than either transportation (28%) or industry (31%).

428

cooling degree-days - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Alternative Fuels. Includes hydropower, solar, wind, geothermal, biomass and ethanol. ... Cooling degree-days. There are no record(s) that match your search criteria.

429

THE STIRLING ENGINE: THERMODYNAMICS AND APPLICATIONS IN COMBINED COOLING, HEATING, AND POWER SYSTEMS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The goal of this study is to assess the potential of the Stirling engine in alternative energy applications including combined cooling, heating, and power (more)

Harrod, James C

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Effects of Cooling Rate on Microstructure in En-Ac43000 Gravity ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chillers of different dimensions and materials, including water cooled ones, were placed at one side of the casting in order to obtain mono-dimensional heat flux...

431

Countries Gasoline Prices Including Taxes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Countries (U.S. dollars per gallon, including taxes) Countries (U.S. dollars per gallon, including taxes) Date Belgium France Germany Italy Netherlands UK US 01/13/14 7.83 7.76 7.90 8.91 8.76 8.11 3.68 01/06/14 8.00 7.78 7.94 8.92 8.74 8.09 3.69 12/30/13 NA NA NA NA NA NA 3.68 12/23/13 NA NA NA NA NA NA 3.63 12/16/13 7.86 7.79 8.05 9.00 8.78 8.08 3.61 12/9/13 7.95 7.81 8.14 8.99 8.80 8.12 3.63 12/2/13 7.91 7.68 8.07 8.85 8.68 8.08 3.64 11/25/13 7.69 7.61 8.07 8.77 8.63 7.97 3.65 11/18/13 7.99 7.54 8.00 8.70 8.57 7.92 3.57 11/11/13 7.63 7.44 7.79 8.63 8.46 7.85 3.55 11/4/13 7.70 7.51 7.98 8.70 8.59 7.86 3.61 10/28/13 8.02 7.74 8.08 8.96 8.79 8.04 3.64 10/21/13 7.91 7.71 8.11 8.94 8.80 8.05 3.70 10/14/13 7.88 7.62 8.05 8.87 8.74 7.97 3.69

432

Technical Evaluation of Side Stream Filtration for Cooling Towers  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cooling Towers (photo from Pacific Cooling Towers (photo from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory) * Scaling: Scaling is the precipitation of dissolved mineral components that have become saturated in solution, which can lower efficiency of the system. * Fouling: Fouling occurs when suspended particles or biologic growth forms an insulating film on heat transfer surfaces. Common foulants include organic matter, process oils, and silt, which can also lower system performance. * Microbiological Activity: Microbiological activity refers to microorganisms that live and grow in the cooling system that can contribute

433

Technical Evaluation of Side Stream Filtration for Cooling Towers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cooling Towers (photo from Pacific Cooling Towers (photo from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory) * Scaling: Scaling is the precipitation of dissolved mineral components that have become saturated in solution, which can lower efficiency of the system. * Fouling: Fouling occurs when suspended particles or biologic growth forms an insulating film on heat transfer surfaces. Common foulants include organic matter, process oils, and silt, which can also lower system performance. * Microbiological Activity: Microbiological activity refers to microorganisms that live and grow in the cooling system that can contribute

434

Preliminary design package for prototype solar heating and cooling systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A summary is presented of the preliminary analysis and design activity on solar heating and cooling systems. The analysis was made without site specific data other than weather; therefore, the results indicate performance expected under these special conditions. Major items in this report include a market analysis, design approaches, trade studies and other special data required to evaluate the preliminary analysis and design. The program calls for the development and delivery of eight prototype solar heating and cooling systems for installation and operational test. Two heating and six heating and cooling units will be delivered for Single Family Residences (SFR), Multiple-Family Residences (MFR), and commerical applications.

Not Available

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

A Free Cooling Based Chilled Water System at Kingston  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In efforts to reduce operating costs, the IBM site at Kingston, New York incorporated the energy saving concept of 'free cooling' (direct cooling of chilled water with condenser water) with the expansion of the site chilled water system. Free cooling was employed to satisfy the winter chilled water load of approximately 3000 tons resulting in electrical savings of up to 70% in the winter with wet bulb temperatures below 38 oF. Other energy efficient features included variable speed pumping, high efficiency motors and chillers with reduced entering condenser water limits. This paper will describe the various possible operating modes and their associated savings using computer simulation techniques.

Jansen, P. R.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Coherent electron cooling proof of principle instrumentation design  

SciTech Connect

The goal of the Coherent Electron Cooling Proof-of-Principle (CeC PoP) experiment being designed at RHIC is to demonstrate longitudinal (energy spread) cooling before the expected CD-2 for eRHIC. The scope of the experiment is to longitudinally cool a single bunch of 40 GeV/u gold ions in RHIC. This paper will describe the instrumentation systems proposed to meet the diagnostics challenges. These include measurements of beam intensity, emittance, energy spread, bunch length, position, orbit stability, and transverse and temporal alignment of electron and ion beams.

Gassner D. M.; Litvinenko, V.; Michnoff, R.; Miller, T.; Minty, M.; Pinayev, I.

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

437

Predictive pre-cooling control for low lift radiant cooling using building thermal mass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Low lift cooling systems (LLCS) hold the potential for significant energy savings relative to conventional cooling systems. An LLCS is a cooling system which leverages existing HVAC technologies to provide low energy cooling ...

Gayeski, Nicholas (Nicholas Thomas)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Commercial Cooling Par Engineering: Proposed Penalty (2013-CE-5312) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Proposed Penalty (2013-CE-5312) Proposed Penalty (2013-CE-5312) Commercial Cooling Par Engineering: Proposed Penalty (2013-CE-5312) January 31, 2013 DOE alleged in a Notice of Proposed Civil Penalty that Commercial Cooling Par Engineering failed to certify walk-in cooler or freezer components as compliant with the energy conservation standards. DOE regulations require a manufacturer (which includes importers) to submit reports certifying that its products have been tested and meet the applicable energy conservation standards. This civil penalty notice advises the company of the potential penalties and DOE's administrative process, including the company's right to a hearing. Commercial Cooling Par Engineering: Proposed Penalty (2013-CE-5312) More Documents & Publications Commercial Cooling Par Engineering: Order (2013-CE-5312)

439

Design Considerations for Economically Competitive Sodium Cooled Fast Reactors  

SciTech Connect

The technological viability of sodium cooled fast reactors (SFR) has been established by various experimental and prototype (demonstration) reactors such as EBR-II, FFTF, Phnix, JOYO, BN-600 etc. However, the economic competitiveness of SFR has not been proven yet. The perceived high cost premium of SFRs over LWRs has been the primary impediment to the commercial expansion of SFR technologies. In this paper, cost reduction options are discussed for advanced SFR designs. These include a hybrid loop-pool design to optimize the primary system, multiple reheat and intercooling helium Brayton cycle for the power conversion system and the potential for suppression of intermediate heat transport system. The design options for the fully passive decay heat removal systems are also thoroughly examined. These include direct reactor auxiliary cooling system (DRACS), reactor vessel auxiliary cooling system (RVACS) and the newly proposed pool reactor auxiliary cooling system (PRACS) in the context of the hybrid loop-pool design.

Hongbin Zhang; Haihua Zhao

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Attribution of the Seasonality and Regionality in Climate Trends over the United States during 19502000  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The observed climate trends over the United States during 19502000 exhibit distinct seasonality and regionality. The surface air temperature exhibits a warming trend during winter, spring, and early summer and a modest countrywide cooling trend ...

Hailan Wang; Siegfried Schubert; Max Suarez; Junye Chen; Martin Hoerling; Arun Kumar; Philip Pegion

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including climatic cooling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Linking Weather and Climate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Historically, the atmospheric sciences have tended to treat problems of weather and climate separately. The real physical system, however, is a continuum, with short-term (minutes to days) weather fluctuations influencing climate variations and ...

Randall M. Dole

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

The Climate Policy Dilemma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Climate policy poses a dilemma for environmental economists. The economic argument for stringent GHG abatement is far from clear. There is disagreement among both climate scientists and economists over the likelihood of ...

Pindyck, Robert S.

443

Climate Action Plan (Delaware)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Delaware Climate Change Action Plan (DCCAP) was prepared with funding from the Delaware State Energy Office and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agencys State and Local Climate Change Program...

444

Stochastic cooling in muon colliders  

SciTech Connect

Analysis of muon production techniques for high energy colliders indicates the need for rapid and effective beam cooling in order that one achieve luminosities > 10{sup 30} cm{sup {minus}2}s{sup {minus}1} as required for high energy physics experiments. This paper considers stochastic cooling to increase the phase space density of the muons in the collider. Even at muon energies greater than 100 GeV, the number of muons per bunch must be limited to {approximately}10{sup 3} for the cooling rate to be less than the muon lifetime. With such a small number of muons per bunch, the final beam emittance implied by the luminosity requirement is well below the thermodynamic limit for beam electronics at practical temperatures. Rapid bunch stacking after the cooling process can raise the number of muons per bunch to a level consistent with both the luminosity goals and with practical temperatures for the stochastic cooling electronics. A major advantage of our stochastic cooling/stacking scheme over scenarios that employ only ionization cooling is that the power on the production target can be reduced below 1 MW.

Barletta, W.A.; Sessler, A.M.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

SOLERAS - Saudi University Solar Cooling Laboratories Project: University of Petroleum and Minerals. Solar cooling system. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides details of the proposed solar cooling laboratory, including descriptions of the building and design conditions; the collector/storage subsystem; the Rankine cycle engine subsystem; instrumentation and data acquisition; and an implementation plan. Appendices of relevant data including computer programs for building load and engine system calculations and descriptions of equipment are included.

Not Available

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

SOLERAS program. Engineering field test of a solar cooling system. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A solar-powered air conditioning system was designed, constructed, and installed at a Phoenix, Arizona site whose climatic conditions approximate those of Saudi Arabia. The nominal 18 ton capacity Rankine cycle chiller system with hot and cold storage and conventional fan/coil delivery units was operated for two cooling seasons and met its design objectives.

Not Available

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Climate Science Measurements Portal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... comparability and for international acceptance of measurement results and insights concerning climatic ... Global Warming and Greenhouse Gases ...

2012-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

448

CONTROL SYSTEM FOR SOLAR HEATING and COOLING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

l U CONTROL SYSTEM FOR SOLAR HEATING AND COOLING* M.Wahlig,be capable of operating solar heating and cooling systemsand now transferred to ERDA, on solar heating and cooling of

Dols, C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Evaluation of the cooling fan efficiency index.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

between the cooling effect (measured with a thermal manikin)output is the body cooling effect [5]. Thermal manikins withThermal manikins can be used to measure the fan cooling

Schiavon, Stefano; Melikov, Arsen

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Introduction of a Cooling Fan Efficiency Index  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the cooling effect measured with the thermal manikin andThe mea- sured cooling effect with the thermal manikin isby a thermal manikin to quantify the cooling effects of air

Schiavon, Stefano; Melikov, Arsen

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

MUCOOL: Ionization Cooling R&D  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laboratory MUCOOL Muon Ionization Cooling R&D Welcome to the muon ionization cooling experimental R&D page. The MuCool collaboration has been formed to pursue the development of a...

452

Development of a Very Dense Liquid Cooled Compute Platform  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project was to design and develop a prototype very energy efficient high density compute platform with 100% pumped refrigerant liquid cooling using commodity components and high volume manufacturing techniques. Testing at SLAC has indicated that we achieved a DCIE of 0.93 against our original goal of 0.85. This number includes both cooling and power supply and was achieved employing some of the highest wattage processors available.

Hughes, Phillip N.; Lipp, Robert J.

2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

453

Interaction of lighting, heating, and cooling systems in buildings  

SciTech Connect

The interaction of building lighting and HVAC systems, and the effects on cooling load and lighting system performance, are being evaluated using a full-scale test facility at the National Institute of Standards and Technology. The results from a number of test configurations are described, including lighting system efficiency and cooling load due to lighting. The effect of lighting and HVAC system design and operation on performance is evaluated. Design considerations are discussed.

Treado, S.J.; Bean, J.W.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Vortex-augmented cooling tower-windmill combination  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cooling tower for cooling large quantities of effluent water from a production facility by utilizing natural wind forces includes the use of a series of helically directed air inlet passages extending outwardly from the base of the tower to introduce air from any direction in a swirling vortical pattern while the force of the draft created in the tower makes it possible to place conventional power generating windmills in the air passages to provide power as a by-product.

McAllister, Jr., John E. (Aiken, SC)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Thermal and flow design of helium-cooled reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This book continues the American Nuclear Society's series of monographs on nuclear science and technology. Chapters of the book include information on the first-generation gas-cooled reactors; HTGR reactor developments; reactor core heat transfer; mechanical problems related to the primary coolant circuit; HTGR design bases; core thermal design; gas turbines; process heat HTGR reactors; GCFR reactor thermal hydraulics; and gas cooling of fusion reactors.

Melese, G.; Katz, R.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

AN OVERVIEW OF BUILDING AMERICA INDUSTRIALIZED HOUSING PARTNERSHIP (BAIHP) ACTIVITIES IN HOT-HUMID CLIMATES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BAIHP (www.baihp.org ) conducts systems research and technical assistance activities for new housing. Hot-humid climate efforts described here include: Systems research : NightCool A hybrid cooling and dehumidification strategy employing radiative cooling and desiccant materials. Interior Duct Systems in Manufactured Houses Tests are ongoing in an occupied prototype home in Alabama and the FSEC manufactured housing lab. Ventilation and Dehumidification A new strategy has been developed to hook up a whole-house dehumidifier so that it only runs when the air conditioning compressor is off. Plug Load Reduction Whole house feedback devices and security system based plug load reductions are being evaluated in prototype homes. Solar and Conventional Domestic Hot Water (DHW) Testing A test facility is being constructed to conduct side by side testing of three active and passive solar, two gas and two electric DHW systems. Technical assistance was provided on the design, construction and evaluation of four near zero energy homes and over 300 highly energy efficient production homes in subdivisions during 2007 and 2008.

Chandra, S.; Parker, D.; Sherwin, J.; Colon, C.; Fonorow, K.; Stroer, D.; Martin, E.; McIlvaine, J.; Chasar, D.; Moyer, N.; Thomas-Rees, S.; Hoak, D.; Beal, D.; Gil, C.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Statistical Descriptors of Climate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An adequate description of climate is required to meet the informational needs of planners and policy-makers who use climate as a factor in their decision-making processes. Because normals have become firmly entrenched as a descriptor of climate, ...

Nathaniel B. Guttman

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

International Governance of Climate Engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar Radiation Management Governance Initiative conference); Daniel Bodansky, Governing Climate Engineering: Scenarios for Analysis (Harvard Project on Climate Agreements,

Parson, Edward; Ernst, Lia

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

IEP - Water-Energy Interface: Cooling Water Intake Structures  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The types of cooling water systems to be evaluated are: Wet Cooling Tower - The condenser is cooled with water recirculated to a mechanical draft cooling tower. Because there...

460

Thermally Activated Cooling: A Regional Approach for Estimating Building Adoption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Distributed Generation, Absorption Cooling, Space Cooling,use heat to drive an absorption cooling cycle, and the heatlargest drivers for absorption cooling technology adoption

Edwards, Jennifer L.; Marnay, Chris

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "including climatic cooling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Performance study of a thermal-envelope house: Phase II. Cooling performance. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The thermal envelope house is shown to perform much better than conventional houses without mechanical refrigeration and better than one would expect from most passively cooled houses in the hot-humid climate of Georgia. Peak temperatures inside the house were 8 to 15/sup 0/F below peak ambient temperatures. Peak inside temperature measured during the test period was 80/sup 0/F with an outside ambient peak of 93/sup 0/F. Air flow rates within the envelope were less than 1 ft/sec even when the attic fan was operating. The earth cooling tubes provided noticeable sensible cooling to the house. Exit temperatures from the cooling tubes were between 72 to 76/sup 0/F, depending upon the air velocity through the tubes. The thermal chimney performed poorly as an air mover, especially when used to induce flow through the earth cooling tubes. The performance of the earth cooling tube could be improved by using the attic fan to increase the air flow through the cooling tubes and to insure it flowed in the cooling tube, through the envelope and out the thermal chimney. Being an exhaust fan, the attic fan created a negative pressure in the house. While this increased air flow through the cooling tubes, it also increased air infiltration through the building shell, thus increasing load. The humidity level within the living space remains relatively high year-round due to low rates of air infiltration and water vapor transmission through the building skin. The problem is aggravated during the summer by the introduction of cool moist air from the cooling tubes to the envelope and frequently to the inner space. While the cooling tubes are able to reduce the sensible load, and they are incapable of significantly reducing humidity or latent loads. This results in relatively comfortable air temperatures but uncomfortable humidities within the living space.

Akridge, J.M.; Benton, C.C.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Using Weather Data and Climate Model Output in Economic Analyses of Climate Change  

SciTech Connect

Economists are increasingly using weather data and climate model output in analyses of the economic impacts of climate change. This article introduces a set of weather data sets and climate models that are frequently used, discusses the most common mistakes economists make in using these products, and identifies ways to avoid these pitfalls. We first provide an introduction to weather data, including a summary of the types of datasets available, and then discuss five common pitfalls that empirical researchers should be aware of when using historical weather data as explanatory variables in econometric applications. We then provide a brief overview of climate models and discuss two common and significant errors often made by economists when climate model output is used to simulate the future impacts of climate change on an economic outcome of interest.

Auffhammer, Maximilian [University of California at Berkeley; Hsiang, Solomon M. [Princeton University; Schlenker, Wolfram [Columbia University; Sobel, Adam H. [Columbia University

2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

463

Climate Literacy and Energy Awareness Network (CLEAN)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Energy Awareness Network (CLEAN) Print E-mail and Energy Awareness Network (CLEAN) Print E-mail Explore the Climate Literacy and Energy Awareness Network (CLEAN) for a reviewed collection of educational resources and learn how you can build your students' understanding of climate science, climate change, and energy awareness. Use the CLEAN website to: Teach Climate Literacy and Energy Awareness Find out how to develop climate literacy and energy awareness in our students. A set of essential principles frame the key science and teaching strategies. Learn more about these principles and how they can inform your teaching. Browse Reviewed Educational Resources This growing collection of teaching activities includes materials for middle and high school students as well as undergraduate classrooms. Learn how we select materials that are both scientifically sound and pedagogically effective.

464

Cool roofs could save money, save planet  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cool roofs could save money, save planet Title Cool roofs could save money, save planet Publication Type Broadcast Year of Publication 2009 Authors Akbari, Hashem, and Arthur H....

465

Temperature and cooling management in computing systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

78 5.2 Combined Energy, Thermal and CoolingOne reason for thermal and energy variations betweenWe propose a combined energy, thermal and cooling management

Ayoub, Raid

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

A New Homogenized Climate Division Precipitation Dataset for Analysis of Climate Variability and Climate Change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new homogeneous climate division monthly precipitation dataset [based on full network estimated precipitation (FNEP)] was created as an alternative to the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) climate division dataset. These alternative climate ...

D. Brent McRoberts; John W. Nielsen-Gammon

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Cooling Technologies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technologies Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Power Plant Cooling Technologies Cooling Technologies Cooling tower at Steamboat Springs geothermal power plant in Steamboat Springs, NV. Power generation facilities that rely on thermal sources as their energy inputs such as Coal, Natural Gas, Geothermal, Concentrates Solar Power, and Nuclear require cooling technologies to reject the heat that is created. The second law of thermodynamics states: "No process can convert heat absorbed from a reservoir at one temperature directly into work without also rejecting heat to a cooler reservoir. That is, no heat engine is 100% efficient"[1] In the context of power generation from thermal energy, this means that any heat that is created must be rejected. Heat is most commonly rejected in

468

Multi-Photon Laser Cooling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... used traditional cooling beams at 852 nm in the x-y plane, but replaced the usual two beams along z with lasers at 795 nm. This laser only couples ...

2011-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

469

Success Stories: Cool Color Roofs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

instead of absorbing, solar heat. So the question for scientists interested in increasing energy efficiency is, can one make a roof that is both cool and dark? Hashem Akbari, Paul...

470

Convective Cooling of Lightning Channels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report experimental data which trace the time development of electric discharge channels in air and which demonstrate the turbulent cooling of such channels. These data provide qualitative confirmation of the model proposed and used by Hill, ...

J. M. Picone; J. P. Boris; J. R. Greig; M. Raleigh; R. F. Fernsler

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Energy Savers: Cool Summer Tips  

SciTech Connect

A tri-fold brochure addressing energy-saving tips for homeowners ranging from low- or no-cost suggestions to higher cost suggestions for longer-term savings. Cooling, windows, weatherizing, and landscaping are addressed.

Miller, M.

2001-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

472

Cooling Systems | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

heat is drawn out of the air and the cooled air is blown into the space by the cooler's fan. Air Conditioning Air conditioners, which employ the same operating principles and...

473

Advance in MEIC cooling studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cooling of ion beams is essential for achieving a high luminosity for MEIC at Jefferson Lab. In this paper, we present the design concept of the electron cooling system for MEIC. In the design, two facilities are required for supporting a multi-staged cooling scheme; one is a 2 MeV DC cooler in the ion pre-booster; the other is a high electron energy (up to 55 MeV) ERL-circulator cooler in the collider ring. The simulation studies of beam dynamics in an ERL-circulator cooler are summarized and followed by a report on technology development for this cooler. We also discuss two proposed experiments for demonstrating high energy cooling with a bunched electron beam and the ERL-circulator cooler.