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Sample records for includes synthetic natural

  1. New Synthetic Methods for Hypericum Natural Products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Insik Jeon

    2006-12-12

    Organic chemistry has served as a solid foundation for interdisciplinary research areas, such as molecular biology and medicinal chemistry. An understanding of the biological activities and structural elucidations of natural products can lead to the development of clinically valuable therapeutic options. The advancements of modern synthetic methodologies allow for more elaborate and concise natural product syntheses. The theme of this study centers on the synthesis of natural products with particularly challenging structures and interesting biological activities. The synthetic expertise developed here will be applicable to analog syntheses and to other research problems.

  2. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in North Carolina (Including...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (Including Vehicle Fuel) (Million Cubic Feet) Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in North Carolina (Including Vehicle Fuel) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun...

  3. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    West Virginia (Million Cubic Feet) Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel through 1996) in West Virginia (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr...

  4. DOE Considers Natural Gas Utility Service Options: Proposal Includes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    30-mile Natural Gas Pipeline from Pasco to Hanford | Department of Energy Considers Natural Gas Utility Service Options: Proposal Includes 30-mile Natural Gas Pipeline from Pasco to Hanford DOE Considers Natural Gas Utility Service Options: Proposal Includes 30-mile Natural Gas Pipeline from Pasco to Hanford January 23, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Cameron Hardy, DOE , (509) 376-5365, Cameron.Hardy@rl.doe.gov RICHLAND, WASH. - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is considering

  5. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Texas (Including Vehicle...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Texas (Including Vehicle Fuel) (Million Cubic Feet) Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Texas (Including Vehicle Fuel) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug...

  6. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in New Mexico (Including Vehicle...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mexico (Including Vehicle Fuel) (Million Cubic Feet) Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in New Mexico (Including Vehicle Fuel) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul...

  7. U.S. Natural Gas Supplemental Gas - Synthetic Natural Gas (Million Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Feet) Synthetic Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet) U.S. Natural Gas Supplemental Gas - Synthetic Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 123,543 128,003 103,025 95,634 78,632 91,074 81,951 67,017 62,021 67,190 1990's 64,073 62,131 69,229 70,051 67,693 65,335 58,637 55,809 57,387 55,938 2000's 51,958 53,693 55,786 55,794 49,976 53,921 56,971 53,788 53,090 55,934 2010's 57,279 53,745 55,032 48,375 51,127 - = No Data

  8. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mexico (Million Cubic Feet) Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel through 1996) in New Mexico (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul...

  9. Percentage of Total Natural Gas Commercial Deliveries included in Prices

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    City Gate Price Residential Price Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices Commercial Price Percentage of Total Commercial Deliveries included in Prices Industrial Price Percentage of Total Industrial Deliveries included in Prices Electric Power Price Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Jul-15 Aug-15 Sep-15 Oct-15 Nov-15 Dec-15 View History U.S.

  10. Percentage of Total Natural Gas Industrial Deliveries included in Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Pipeline and Distribution Use Price City Gate Price Residential Price Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices Commercial Price Percentage of Total Commercial Deliveries included in Prices Industrial Price Percentage of Total Industrial Deliveries included in Prices Vehicle Fuel Price Electric Power Price Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2010

  11. Percentage of Total Natural Gas Industrial Deliveries included in Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    City Gate Price Residential Price Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices Commercial Price Percentage of Total Commercial Deliveries included in Prices Industrial Price Percentage of Total Industrial Deliveries included in Prices Electric Power Price Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Jul-15 Aug-15 Sep-15 Oct-15 Nov-15 Dec-15 View History U.S.

  12. Percentage of Total Natural Gas Residential Deliveries included in Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    City Gate Price Residential Price Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices Commercial Price Percentage of Total Commercial Deliveries included in Prices Industrial Price Percentage of Total Industrial Deliveries included in Prices Electric Power Price Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Jul-15 Aug-15 Sep-15 Oct-15 Nov-15 Dec-15 View History U.S.

  13. Analysis of Natural Graphite, Synthetic Graphite, and Thermosetting Resin Candidates for Use in Fuel Compact Matrix

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trammell, Michael P; Pappano, Peter J

    2011-09-01

    The AGR-1 and AGR-2 compacting process involved overcoating TRISO particles and compacting them in a steel die. The overcoating step is the process of applying matrix to the OPyC layer of TRISO particles in a rotating drum in order to build up an overcoat layer of desired thickness. The matrix used in overcoating is a mixture of natural graphite, synthetic graphite, and thermosetting resin in the ratio, by weight, of 64:16:20. A wet mixing process was used for AGR-1 and AGR-2, in that the graphites and resin were mixed in the presence of ethyl alcohol. The goal of the wet mixing process was to 'resinate' the graphite particles, or coat each individual graphite particle with a thin layer of resin. This matrix production process was similar to the German, Chinese, Japanese, and South African methods, which also use various amount of solvent during mixing. See Appendix 1 for information on these countries matrix production techniques. The resin used for AGR-1 and AGR-2 was provided by Hexion, specifically Hexion grade Durite SC1008. Durite SC1008 is a solvated (liquid) resole phenolic resin. A resole resin does not typically have a hardening agent added. The major constituent of SC1008 is phenol, with minor amounts of formaldehyde. Durite SC1008 is high viscosity, so additional ethyl alcohol was added during matrix production in order to reduce its viscosity and enhance graphite particle resination. The current compacting scale up plan departs from a wet mixing process. The matrix production method specified in the scale up plan is a co-grinding jet mill process where powdered phenolic resin and graphite are all fed into a jet mill at the same time. Because of the change in matrix production style, SC1008 cannot be used in the jet milling process because it is a liquid. The jet milling/mixing process requires that a suite of solid or powdered resins be investigated. The synthetic graphite used in AGR-1 and AGR-2 was provided by SGL Carbon, grade KRB2000. KRB2000 is a graphitized petroleum coke. The availability of KRB2000 is perhaps in question, so a replacement synthetic graphite may need to be identified. This report presents data on potential replacements for KRB2000.

  14. Integrated Operation of INL HYTEST System and High-Temperature Steam Electrolysis for Synthetic Natural Gas Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carl Marcel Stoots; Lee Shunn; James O'Brien

    2010-06-01

    The primary feedstock for synthetic fuel production is syngas, a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen. Current hydrogen production technologies rely upon fossil fuels and produce significant quantities of greenhouse gases as a byproduct. This is not a sustainable means of satisfying future hydrogen demands, given the current projections for conventional world oil production and future targets for carbon emissions. For the past six years, the Idaho National Laboratory has been investigating the use of high-temperature steam electrolysis (HTSE) to produce the hydrogen feedstock required for synthetic fuel production. High-temperature electrolysis water-splitting technology, combined with non-carbon-emitting energy sources, can provide a sustainable, environmentally-friendly means of large-scale hydrogen production. Additionally, laboratory facilities are being developed at the INL for testing hybrid energy systems composed of several tightly-coupled chemical processes (HYTEST program). The first such test involved the coupling of HTSE, CO2 separation membrane, reverse shift reaction, and methanation reaction to demonstrate synthetic natural gas production from a feedstock of water and either CO or a simulated flue gas containing CO2. This paper will introduce the initial HTSE and HYTEST testing facilities, overall coupling of the technologies, testing results, and future plans.

  15. Federal Perspective on Opportunities for Hydrogen and Natural Gas for Transportation„Including a Natural Gas Perspective

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Federal Perspective on Opportunities for Hydrogen and Natural Gas for Transportation Exploring the Intersection of Hydrogen Fuel Cell and Natural Gas Vehicles - Workshop American Gas Association, Washington, D.C. Fred Joseck Fuel Cell Technologies Office Office of Sustainable Transportation U.S. Department of Energy September 9, 2014 2 | Fuel Cell Technologies Office eere.energy.gov The Potential for Natural Gas in Transportation With ample NG resources available , four potential pathways to

  16. synthetic chemistry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    synthetic chemistry - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced

  17. Synthetic and Mechanistic Chemistry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Mechanistic Chemistry Security at center of chemical and mechanistic chemistry research at Lab Project Description Los Alamos scientists are using synthetic and mechanistic chemistry to address energy security and other emerging challenges, including global security and core weapons missions. Synthetic chemistry includes work in ligands for catalysts, fission-products separations for isotope delivery, and labeled substrates for reaction mechanisms. Other research addresses materials

  18. Federal Perspective on Opportunities for Hydrogen and Natural Gas for Transportation„Including a Hydrogen Perspective

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Transitioning the Transportation Sector: Exploring the Intersection of Hydrogen Fuel Cell and Natural Gas Vehicles Mark S. Smith Vehicle Technologies Office/ Clean Cities Team September 9, 2014 2 * Nearly 600,000 AFVs on the road in the US * Over 14,500 alternative fueling and charging stations * Long term goal of 2.5B gal/year by 2020 Alternative Fuel use during Clean Cities 20+ year history Nearly 6.5 Billion Gallons of Petroleum Reduction since 1993 3 Natural Gas dominates current alt-fuel

  19. Dissolution Kinetics of Synthetic and Natural Meta-Autunite Minerals, X??n????[(UO?)(PO?)]? ? xH?O, Under Acidic Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wellman, Dawn M.; Gunderson, Katie M.; Icenhower, Jonathan P.; Forrester, Steven W.

    2007-11-01

    Mass transport within the uranium geochemical cycle is impacted by the availability of phosphorous. In oxidizing environments, in which the uranyl ionic species is typically mobile, formation of sparingly soluble uranyl phosphate minerals exert a strong influence on uranium transport. Autunite group minerals have been identified as the long-term uranium controlling phases in many systems of geochemical interest. Anthropogenic operations related to uranium mining operations have created acidic environments, exposing uranyl phosphate minerals to low pH groundwaters. Investigations regarding the dissolution behavior of autunite group minerals under acidic conditions have not been reported; consequently, knowledge of the longevity of uranium controlling solids is incomplete. The purpose of this investigation was to: 1) quantify the dissolution kinetics of natural calcium and synthetic sodium meta-autunite, under acidic conditions, 2) measure the effect of temperature and pH on meta-autunite mineral dissolution, and 3) investigate the formation of secondary uranyl phosphate phases as long-term controls on uranium migration. Single-pass flow-through (SPFT) dissolution tests were conducted over the pH range of 2 to 5 and from 5 to 70C. Results presented here illustrate meta-autunite dissolution kinetics are strongly dependent on pH, but are relatively insensitive to temperature variations. In addition, the formation of secondary uranyl-phosphate phases such as, uranyl phosphate, (UO2)3(PO4)2 ? 4 H2O, may serve as a secondary phase limiting the migration of uranium in the environment.

  20. Synthetic fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    In January 1982, the Department of Energy guaranteed a loan for the construction and startup of the Great Plains project. On August 1, 1985, the partnership defaulted on the $1.54 billion loan, and DOE acquired control of, and then title to, the project. DOE continued to operate the plant, through the ANG Coal Gasification Company, and sell synthetic fuel. The DOE's ownership and divestiture of the plant is discussed.

  1. Synthetic guide star generation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Payne, Stephen A. (Castro Valley, CA) [Castro Valley, CA; Page, Ralph H. (Castro Valley, CA) [Castro Valley, CA; Ebbers, Christopher A. (Livermore, CA) [Livermore, CA; Beach, Raymond J. (Livermore, CA) [Livermore, CA

    2008-06-10

    A system for assisting in observing a celestial object and providing synthetic guide star generation. A lasing system provides radiation at a frequency at or near 938 nm and radiation at a frequency at or near 1583 nm. The lasing system includes a fiber laser operating between 880 nm and 960 nm and a fiber laser operating between 1524 nm and 1650 nm. A frequency-conversion system mixes the radiation and generates light at a frequency at or near 589 nm. A system directs the light at a frequency at or near 589 nm toward the celestial object and provides synthetic guide star generation.

  2. Synthetic guide star generation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Payne, Stephen A.; Page, Ralph H.; Ebbers, Christopher A.; Beach, Raymond J.

    2004-03-09

    A system for assisting in observing a celestial object and providing synthetic guide star generation. A lasing system provides radiation at a frequency at or near 938 nm and radiation at a frequency at or near 1583 nm. The lasing system includes a fiber laser operating between 880 nm and 960 nm and a fiber laser operating between 1524 nm and 1650 nm. A frequency-conversion system mixes the radiation and generates light at a frequency at or near 589 nm. A system directs the light at a frequency at or near 589 nm toward the celestial object and provides synthetic guide star generation.

  3. Sorption-Enhanced Synthetic Natural Gas (SNG) Production from Syngas. A Novel Process Combining CO Methanation, Water-Gas Shift, and CO2 Capture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lebarbier, Vanessa M.C.; Dagle, Robert A.; Kovarik, Libor; Albrecht, Karl O.; Li, Xiaohong S.; Li, Liyu; Taylor, Charles E.; Bao, Xinhe; Wang, Yong

    2013-07-08

    Synthetic natural gas (SNG) production from syngas is under investigation again due to the desire for less dependency from imports and the opportunity for increasing coal utilization and reducing green house gas emission. CO methanation is highly exothermic and substantial heat is liberated which can lead to process thermal imbalance and deactivation of the catalyst. As a result, conversion per pass is limited and substantial syngas recycle is employed in conventional processes. Furthermore, the conversion of syngas to SNG is typically performed at moderate temperatures (275 to 325C) to ensure high CH4 yields since this reaction is thermodynamically limited. In this study, the effectiveness of a novel integrated process for the SNG production from syngas at high temperature (i.e. 600?C) was investigated. This integrated process consists of combining a CO methanation nickel-based catalyst with a high temperature CO2 capture sorbent in a single reactor. Integration with CO2 separation eliminates the reverse-water-gas shift and the requirement for a separate water-gas shift (WGS) unit. Easing of thermodynamic constraint offers the opportunity of enhancing yield to CH4 at higher operating temperature (500-700C) which also favors methanation kinetics and improves the overall process efficiency due to exploitation of reaction heat at higher temperatures. Furthermore, simultaneous CO2 capture eliminates green house gas emission. In this work, sorption-enhanced CO methanation was demonstrated using a mixture of a 68% CaO/32% MgAl2O4 sorbent and a CO methanation catalyst (Ni/Al2O3, Ni/MgAl2O4, or Ni/SiC) utilizing a syngas ratio (H2/CO) of 1, gas-hour-space velocity (GHSV) of 22 000 hr-1, pressure of 1 bar and a temperature of 600oC. These conditions resulted in ~90% yield to methane, which was maintained until the sorbent became saturated with CO2. By contrast, without the use of sorbent, equilibrium yield to methane is only 22%. Cyclic stability of the methanation catalyst and durability of the sorbent were also studied in the multiple carbonation-decarbonation cycle studies proving the potential of this integrated process in a practical application.

  4. Synthetic substrates for enzyme analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bissell, E.R.; Mitchell, A.R.; Pearson, K.W.; Smith, R.E.

    1983-06-14

    Synthetic substrates are provided which may be represented as A-D. The A moiety includes an amino acid, polypeptide, or derivative. The D moiety includes 7-amino coumarin derivatives having an electron withdrawing substituent group at the 3 position carbon or fused between the 3 and 4 position carbons. No Drawings

  5. Synthetic substrates for enzyme analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bissell, Eugene R. (Alamo, CA); Mitchell, Alexander R. (Livermore, CA); Pearson, Karen W. (Livermore, CA); Smith, Robert E. (Livermore, CA)

    1983-01-01

    Synthetic substrates are provided which may be represented as A-D. The A moiety thereof includes an amino acid, polypeptide, or derivative thereof. The D moiety thereof includes 7-amino coumarin derivatives having an electron withdrawing substituent group at the 3 position carbon or fused between the 3 and 4 position carbons.

  6. Synthetic Biology: Engineering, Evolution and Design (SEED) Conference 2014

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voigt, Christopher

    2014-07-01

    SEED2014 focused on advances in the science and technology emerging from the field of synthetic biology. We broadly define this as technologies that accelerate the process of genetic engineering. It highlighted new tool development, as well as the application of these tools to diverse problems in biotechnology, including therapeutics, industrial chemicals and fuels, natural products, and agriculture. Systems spanned from in vitro experiments and viruses, through diverse bacteria, to eukaryotes (yeast, mammalian cells, plants).

  7. Synthetic and Mechanistic Chemistry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synthetic and Mechanistic Chemistry Synthetic and Mechanistic Chemistry Synthetic and mechanistic chemical sciences play an important role in Lab missions dedicated to energy security, emerging challenges, global security, and core weapons missions. Get Expertise Dave Thorn Chemistry Program Manager Email Josh Smith Chemistry Communications Email "Research into alternative forms of energy, of which biofuels is a key component, is one of the major national security imperatives of this

  8. Synthetic analogs of bacterial quorum sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Iyer, Rashi (Los Alamos, NM); Ganguly, Kumkum (Los Alamos, NM); Silks, Louis A. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2011-12-06

    Bacterial quorum-sensing molecule analogs having the following structures: ##STR00001## and methods of reducing bacterial pathogenicity, comprising providing a biological system comprising pathogenic bacteria which produce natural quorum-sensing molecule; providing a synthetic bacterial quorum-sensing molecule having the above structures and introducing the synthetic quorum-sensing molecule into the biological system comprising pathogenic bacteria. Further is provided a method of targeted delivery of an antibiotic, comprising providing a synthetic quorum-sensing molecule; chemically linking the synthetic quorum-sensing molecule to an antibiotic to produce a quorum-sensing molecule-antibiotic conjugate; and introducing the conjugate into a biological system comprising pathogenic bacteria susceptible to the antibiotic.

  9. Synthetic analogs of bacterial quorum sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Iyer, Rashi S.; Ganguly, Kumkum; Silks, Louis A.

    2013-01-08

    Bacterial quorum-sensing molecule analogs having the following structures: ##STR00001## and methods of reducing bacterial pathogenicity, comprising providing a biological system comprising pathogenic bacteria which produce natural quorum-sensing molecule; providing a synthetic bacterial quorum-sensing molecule having the above structures and introducing the synthetic quorum-sensing molecule into the biological system comprising pathogenic bacteria. Further is provided a method of targeted delivery of an antibiotic, comprising providing a synthetic quorum-sensing molecule; chemically linking the synthetic quorum-sensing molecule to an antibiotic to produce a quorum-sensing molecule-antibiotic conjugate; and introducing the conjugate into a biological system comprising pathogenic bacteria susceptible to the antibiotic.

  10. Synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pena, Louis A.; Zamora, Paul; Lin, Xinhua; Glass, John D.

    2007-01-23

    The invention provides synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs having at least one peptide chain that binds a heparin-binding growth factor receptor, covalently bound to a hydrophobic linker, which is in turn covalently bound to a non-signaling peptide that includes a heparin-binding domain. The synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs are useful as soluble biologics or as surface coatings for medical devices.

  11. Biodegradable synthetic bone composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, Gao; Zhao, Dacheng; Saiz, Eduardo; Tomsia, Antoni P.

    2013-01-01

    The invention provides for a biodegradable synthetic bone composition comprising a biodegradable hydrogel polymer scaffold comprising a plurality of hydrolytically unstable linkages, and an inorganic component; such as a biodegradable poly(hydroxyethylmethacrylate)/hydroxyapatite (pHEMA/HA) hydrogel composite possessing mineral content approximately that of human bone.

  12. Synthetic heparin-binding factor analogs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pena, Louis A.; Zamora, Paul O.; Lin, Xinhua; Glass, John D.

    2010-04-20

    The invention provides synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs having at least one peptide chain, and preferably two peptide chains branched from a dipeptide branch moiety composed of two trifunctional amino acid residues, which peptide chain or chains bind a heparin-binding growth factor receptor and are covalently bound to a non-signaling peptide that includes a heparin-binding domain, preferably by a linker, which may be a hydrophobic linker. The synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs are useful as pharmaceutical agents, soluble biologics or as surface coatings for medical devices.

  13. Synthetic and Mechanistic Chemistry publications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synthetic and Mechanistic Chemistry » Synthetic and Mechanistic Synthetic and Mechanistic publications Research into alternative forms of energy, especially energy security, is one of the major national security imperatives of this century. Get Expertise Dave Thorn Chemistry Program Manager Email Josh Smith Chemistry Communications Email "Research into alternative forms of energy, of which biofuels is a key component, is one of the major national security imperatives of this century.

  14. Emissions from Buses with DDC 6V92 Engines Using Synthetic Diesel Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Norton; Keith Vertin; Nigel N. Clark; Donald W. Lyons; Mridul Gautam; Stephen Goguen; James Eberhardt

    1999-05-03

    Synthetic diesel fuel can be made from a variety of feedstocks, including coal, natural gas and biomass. Synthetic diesel fuels can have very low sulfur and aromatic content, and excellent autoignition characteristics. Moreover, synthetic diesel fuels may also economically competitive with California diesel fuel if .roduced in large volumes. Previous engine laboratory and field tests using a heavy-duty chassis dynamometer indicate that synthetic diesel fuel made using the Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) catalytic conversion process is a promising alternative fuel, because it can be used in unmodified diesel engines, and can reduce exhaust emissions substantially. The objective of this study was a preliminary assessment of the emissions from older model transit operated on Mossgas synthetic diesel fuel. The study compared emissions from transit buses operating on Federal no. 2 Diesel fuel, Mossgas synthetic diesel (MGSD), and a 50/50 blend of the two fuels. The buses were equipped with unmodified Detroit Diesel 6V92 2-stroke diesel engines. Six 40-foot buses were tested. Three of the buses had recently rebuilt engines and were equipped with an oxidation catalytic converter. Vehicle emissions measurements were performed using West Virginia University's unique transportable chassis dynamometer. The emissions were measured over the Central Business District (CBD) driving cycle. The buses performed well on both neat and blended MGSD fuel. Three buses without catalytic converters were tested. Compared to their emissions when operating on Federal no. 2 diesel fuel, these buses emitted an average of 5% lower oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and 20% lower particulate matter (PM) when operating on neat MGSD fuel. Catalyst equipped buses emitted an average of 8% lower NOx and 31% lower PM when operating on MGSD than when operating on Federal no. 2 diesel fuel.

  15. SYNTHETIC SLING FAILURE - EVALUATIONS & RECOMMENDATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MACKEY TC; HENDERSON CS

    2009-10-26

    The information and evaluations provided in this report were compiled to address the recurring problem of synthetic sling failure. As safety is the number one priority in all work aspects, a solution must be devised to prevent accidents from occurring. A total of thirteen cases regarding synthetic sling failure were evaluated in order to determine their causes, effects, and preventative measures. From the collected data, it was found that all cases in which the synthetic sling contacted the edge of its load resulted in sling failure. It is required that adequate synthetic sling protection devices be used to protect slings in any lift where the sling comes in direct contact with the edge or corner of its load. However, there are no consensus codes or standards stating the type, material, or purpose of the type of protective device used to protect the sling from being cut. Numerous industry standards and codes provide vague descriptions on how to protect synthetic slings. Without a clear, concise statement of how to protect synthetic slings, it is common for inadequate materials and sling protection devices to be used in an attempt to meet the intent of these requirements. The use of an inadequate sling protection device is the main cause of synthetic sling failure in all researched cases. Commercial sling protection devices come in many shapes and sizes, and have a variety of names, as well as advertised uses. 'Abrasion pads' and 'wear protectors' are two different names for products with the same intended purpose. There is no distinguishable way to determine the extent of sling protection which these devices will provide, or what specific scenarios they are made for. This creates room for error in a field where error is unacceptable. This report provides a recommended action for hoisting and rigging activities which require synthetic slings to contact a load, as well as recommended changes to industry standards which will benefit overall industry safety.

  16. Synthetic nanotubes lay foundation for new technology: Artificial pores

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    mimic key features of natural pores | Argonne National Laboratory Synthetic nanotubes lay foundation for new technology: Artificial pores mimic key features of natural pores By Tona Kunz * July 17, 2012 Tweet EmailPrint Scientists have overcome key design hurdles to expand the potential uses of nanopores and nanotubes. The creation of smart nanotubes with selective mass transport opens up a wider range of applications for water purification, chemical separation and fighting disease.

  17. Differential Optical Synthetic Aperture Radar

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stappaerts, Eddy A. (San Ramon, CA)

    2005-04-12

    A new differential technique for forming optical images using a synthetic aperture is introduced. This differential technique utilizes a single aperture to obtain unique (N) phases that can be processed to produce a synthetic aperture image at points along a trajectory. This is accomplished by dividing the aperture into two equal "subapertures", each having a width that is less than the actual aperture, along the direction of flight. As the platform flies along a given trajectory, a source illuminates objects and the two subapertures are configured to collect return signals. The techniques of the invention is designed to cancel common-mode errors, trajectory deviations from a straight line, and laser phase noise to provide the set of resultant (N) phases that can produce an image having a spatial resolution corresponding to a synthetic aperture.

  18. Pump apparatus including deconsolidator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sonwane, Chandrashekhar; Saunders, Timothy; Fitzsimmons, Mark Andrew

    2014-10-07

    A pump apparatus includes a particulate pump that defines a passage that extends from an inlet to an outlet. A duct is in flow communication with the outlet. The duct includes a deconsolidator configured to fragment particle agglomerates received from the passage.

  19. Synthetic laser medium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stokowski, Stanley E. (Danville, CA)

    1989-01-01

    A laser medium is particularly useful in high average power solid state lasers. The laser medium includes a chormium dopant and preferably neodymium ions as codopant, and is primarily a gadolinium scandium gallium garnet, or an analog thereof. Divalent cations inhibit spiral morphology as large boules from which the laser medium is derived are grown, and a source of ions convertible between a trivalent state and a tetravalent state at a low ionization energy are in the laser medium to reduce an absorption coefficient at about one micron wavelength otherwise caused by the divalent cations. These divalent cations and convertible ions are dispersed in the laser medium. Preferred convertible ions are provided from titanium or cerium sources.

  20. Synthetic laser medium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stokowski, S.E.

    1987-10-20

    A laser medium is particularly useful in high average power solid state lasers. The laser medium includes a chromium dopant and preferably neodymium ions as codopant, and is primarily a gadolinium scandium gallium garnet, or an analog thereof. Divalent cations inhibit spiral morphology as large boules from which the laser medium is derived are grown, and a source of ions convertible between a trivalent state and a tetravalent state at a low ionization energy are in the laser medium to reduce an absorption coefficient at about one micron wavelength otherwise caused by the divalent cations. These divalent cations and convertible ions are dispersed in the laser medium. Preferred convertible ions are provided from titanium or cerium sources.

  1. Cameron synthetic fuels report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-06-01

    The increasing scarcity of conventional crude oil resources, as well as the sharply higher prices of crude oil, will generate increased interest in heavy oil, tar sands, and oil shale as potential substitutes. For all of these unconventional oil resources, extraction will be much more difficult, time consuming, and costly than for conventional crude oil. Although the inplace resources are vast and exist in many areas including the United States, the USSR, western Europe, Canada, and Latin America, probably only a small fraction of the inplace resources will prove to be economically extractable. These unconventional oil resources are now being developed in several locations around the world, and depending upon the exact definition probably account for less than 1 percent of current world oil supplies. The major current developments include: Canadian tar sands. Heavy oil production at Yarega in the Komi Autonomous Republic in the Soviet Union. The USSR also burns shale for power generation in Estonia. Venezuelan production of heavy oil in the Orinoco Heavy Oil Belt is currently about 15,000 b/d. Oil shale is likely to prove much less important than heavy oil and tar sands over the next 20 years. Further development of these unconventional resources is planned, and many projects are under way or under study. On the basis of current planning, world output of heavy oils and oil from tar sands and shale will be unlikely to exceed 2 million b/d by 1990, roughly five time today's level. However, both of these resources will require the development of new technologies for any large increases in output above what is now planned. The bulk of Canada's tar sands exists at great depths and will require the development of in situ processes for extraction. In the Orinoco, heavy metals contained in the oil make it difficult to refine with existing technology.

  2. Imaging synthetic aperture radar

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burns, Bryan L.; Cordaro, J. Thomas

    1997-01-01

    A linear-FM SAR imaging radar method and apparatus to produce a real-time image by first arranging the returned signals into a plurality of subaperture arrays, the columns of each subaperture array having samples of dechirped baseband pulses, and further including a processing of each subaperture array to obtain coarse-resolution in azimuth, then fine-resolution in range, and lastly, to combine the processed subapertures to obtain the final fine-resolution in azimuth. Greater efficiency is achieved because both the transmitted signal and a local oscillator signal mixed with the returned signal can be varied on a pulse-to-pulse basis as a function of radar motion. Moreover, a novel circuit can adjust the sampling location and the A/D sample rate of the combined dechirped baseband signal which greatly reduces processing time and hardware. The processing steps include implementing a window function, stabilizing either a central reference point and/or all other points of a subaperture with respect to doppler frequency and/or range as a function of radar motion, sorting and compressing the signals using a standard fourier transforms. The stabilization of each processing part is accomplished with vector multiplication using waveforms generated as a function of radar motion wherein these waveforms may be synthesized in integrated circuits. Stabilization of range migration as a function of doppler frequency by simple vector multiplication is a particularly useful feature of the invention; as is stabilization of azimuth migration by correcting for spatially varying phase errors prior to the application of an autofocus process.

  3. Micro/nanofabricated environments for synthetic biology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collier, Pat [ORNL; Simpson, Michael L [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    A better understanding of how confinement, crowding and reduced dimensionality modulate reactivity and reaction dynamics will aid in the rational and systematic discovery of functionality in complex biological systems. Artificial micro- and nanofabricated structures have helped elucidate the effects of nanoscale spatial confinement and segregation on biological behavior, particularly when integrated with microfluidics, through precise control in both space and time of diffusible signals and binding interactions. Examples of nanostructured interfaces for synthetic biology include the development of cell-like compartments for encapsulating biochemical reactions, nanostructured environments for fundamental studies of diffusion, molecular transport and biochemical reaction kinetics, and regulation of biomolecular interactions as functions of micro- and nanofabricated topological constraints.

  4. Synthetic LDL as targeted drug delivery vehicle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forte, Trudy M. (Berkeley, CA); Nikanjam, Mina (Richmond, CA)

    2012-08-28

    The present invention provides a synthetic LDL nanoparticle comprising a lipid moiety and a synthetic chimeric peptide so as to be capable of binding the LDL receptor. The synthetic LDL nanoparticle of the present invention is capable of incorporating and targeting therapeutics to cells expressing the LDL receptor for diseases associated with the expression of the LDL receptor such as central nervous system diseases. The invention further provides methods of using such synthetic LDL nanoparticles.

  5. Apparatus, systems, and methods for ultrasound synthetic aperature focusing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schuster, George J.; Crawford, Susan L.; Doctor, Steven R.; Harris, Robert V.

    2005-04-12

    One form of the present invention is a technique for interrogating a sample with ultrasound which includes: generating ultrasonic energy data corresponding to a volume of a sample and performing a synthetic aperture focusing technique on the ultrasonic energy data. The synthetic aperture focusing technique includes: defining a number of hyperbolic surfaces which extend through the volume at different depths and a corresponding number of multiple element accumulation vectors, performing a focused element calculation procedure for a group of vectors which are representative of the interior of a designated aperture, performing another focused element calculation procedure for vectors corresponding to the boundary of the aperture, and providing an image corresponding to features of the sample in accordance with the synthetic aperture focusing technique.

  6. Synthetic thermoelectric materials comprising phononic crystals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    El-Kady, Ihab F; Olsson, Roy H; Hopkins, Patrick; Reinke, Charles; Kim, Bongsang

    2013-08-13

    Synthetic thermoelectric materials comprising phononic crystals can simultaneously have a large Seebeck coefficient, high electrical conductivity, and low thermal conductivity. Such synthetic thermoelectric materials can enable improved thermoelectric devices, such as thermoelectric generators and coolers, with improved performance. Such synthetic thermoelectric materials and devices can be fabricated using techniques that are compatible with standard microelectronics.

  7. Synthetic carbonaceous fuels and feedstocks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steinberg, Meyer (Huntington Station, NY)

    1980-01-01

    This invention relates to the use of a three compartment electrolytic cell in the production of synthetic carbonaceous fuels and chemical feedstocks such as gasoline, methane and methanol by electrolyzing an aqueous sodium carbonate/bicarbonate solution, obtained from scrubbing atmospheric carbon dioxide with an aqueous sodium hydroxide solution, whereby the hydrogen generated at the cathode and the carbon dioxide liberated in the center compartment are combined thermocatalytically into methanol and gasoline blends. The oxygen generated at the anode is preferably vented into the atmosphere, and the regenerated sodium hydroxide produced at the cathode is reused for scrubbing the CO.sub.2 from the atmosphere.

  8. Dual chain synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zamora, Paul O.; Pena, Louis A.; Lin, Xinhua

    2009-10-06

    The invention provides synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs having two peptide chains each branched from a branch moiety, such as trifunctional amino acid residues, the branch moieties separated by a first linker of from 3 to about 20 backbone atoms, which peptide chains bind a heparin-binding growth factor receptor and are covalently bound to a non-signaling peptide that includes a heparin-binding domain, preferably by a second linker, which may be a hydrophobic second linker. The synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs are useful as pharmaceutical agents, soluble biologics or as surface coatings for medical devices.

  9. Dual chain synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zamora, Paul O.; Pena, Louis A.; Lin, Xinhua

    2012-04-24

    The invention provides synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs having two peptide chains each branched from a branch moiety, such as trifunctional amino acid residues, the branch moieties separated by a first linker of from 3 to about 20 backbone atoms, which peptide chains bind a heparin-binding growth factor receptor and are covalently bound to a non-signaling peptide that includes a heparin-binding domain, preferably by a second linker, which may be a hydrophobic second linker. The synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs are useful as pharmaceutical agents, soluble biologics or as surface coatings for medical devices.

  10. Photoreactive synthetic regulator of protein function and methods of use thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Trauner, Dirk; Isacoff, Ehud Y; Kramer, Richard H; Banghart, Matthew R; Fortin, Doris L; Mourot, Alexandre

    2015-03-31

    The present disclosure provides a photoreactive synthetic regulator of protein function. The present disclosure further provides a light-regulated polypeptide that includes a subject synthetic regulator. Also provided are cells and membranes comprising a subject light-regulated polypeptide. The present disclosure further provides methods of modulating protein function, involving use of light.

  11. Synthetic Antimicrobial Oligomers Induce Composition-dependent...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    generated in antimicrobial-membrane interactions is an essential step to elucidating such molecular mechanisms and therefore to the pre dictive design of synthetic AMP analogs. ...

  12. Synthetic Aperture Radar Persistent Scatterer Interferometry...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    NA, 2010 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Synthetic Aperture Radar Persistent Scatterer Interferometry (PSInSAR)...

  13. Sandia National Laboratories: Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR)...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) Imagery The following is a selection of imagery available for your viewing, sorted by frequency band andor program. (Note: Resolutions are for...

  14. Synthetic Genomics Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Name: Synthetic Genomics Inc. Place: La Jolla, California Sector: Hydro, Hydrogen, Renewable Energy Product: California-based company planning to create new types of...

  15. NATURAL RESOURCES ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D.F. Fenster

    2000-12-11

    The purpose of this report is to summarize the scientific work that was performed to evaluate and assess the occurrence and economic potential of natural resources within the geologic setting of the Yucca Mountain area. The extent of the regional areas of investigation for each commodity differs and those areas are described in more detail in the major subsections of this report. Natural resource assessments have focused on an area defined as the ''conceptual controlled area'' because of the requirements contained in the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regulation, 10 CFR Part 60, to define long-term boundaries for potential radionuclide releases. New requirements (proposed 10 CFR Part 63 [Dyer 1999]) have obviated the need for defining such an area. However, for the purposes of this report, the area being discussed, in most cases, is the previously defined ''conceptual controlled area'', now renamed the ''natural resources site study area'' for this report (shown on Figure 1). Resource potential can be difficult to assess because it is dependent upon many factors, including economics (demand, supply, cost), the potential discovery of new uses for resources, or the potential discovery of synthetics to replace natural resource use. The evaluations summarized are based on present-day use and economic potential of the resources. The objective of this report is to summarize the existing reports and information for the Yucca Mountain area on: (1) Metallic mineral and mined energy resources (such as gold, silver, etc., including uranium); (2) Industrial rocks and minerals (such as sand, gravel, building stone, etc.); (3) Hydrocarbons (including oil, natural gas, tar sands, oil shales, and coal); and (4) Geothermal resources. Groundwater is present at the Yucca Mountain site at depths ranging from 500 to 750 m (about 1,600 to 2,500 ft) below the ground surface. Groundwater resources are not discussed in this report, but are planned to be included in the hydrology section of future revisions of the ''Yucca Mountain Site Description'' (CRWMS M&O 2000c).

  16. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 1,961 1,672 2,338 1970's 3,220 3,604 3,678 3,323 3,441 3,894 3,814 3,846 4,467 5,023 1980's 864...

  17. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Maine (Including Vehicle...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 6,290 5,716 6,572 2000's 43,971 94,569 100,659 69,973 85,478 61,088 63,541 62,430 69,202 69,497...

  18. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Alaska (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 12,927 11,677 12,492 10,557 9,618 8,588 9,860 10,185 9,784 11,290 11,926 13,523 2002 12,414 11,258 11,090 10,310 10,076 11,260 10,510 9,907 9,717 10,827 10,291 11,621 2003 9,731 8,407 9,561 9,112 8,639 8,518 8,461 8,717 8,895 10,027 9,481 10,141 2004 12,414 10,221 10,996 9,967 9,462 9,831 9,829 8,537 9,512 9,377 9,374 11,436 2005 11,592 10,185 10,627 9,847 9,809 9,712 10,596 10,360 10,325 10,740 11,792 11,516 2006

  19. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Arizona (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 19,804 23,088 21,742 19,153 21,113 17,703 18,312 16,919 14,352 14,127 12,164 19,204 2002 19,840 19,954 18,340 14,544 14,463 17,262 23,546 22,088 20,988 19,112 17,712 21,662 2003 20,639 18,895 21,753 16,848 14,559 16,858 28,981 30,940 25,278 24,409 16,317 18,043 2004 25,379 30,143 26,925 23,982 26,878 29,819 35,860 33,244 27,591 23,349 23,090 26,140 2005 24,400 22,209 17,591 20,779 22,660 23,609 35,036 34,587

  20. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Arkansas (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 26,139 20,654 21,940 16,528 13,819 12,558 14,779 16,061 15,014 18,239 19,675 22,233 2002 24,431 24,940 22,284 19,166 15,635 16,964 18,741 17,700 16,789 16,932 17,770 21,567 2003 27,116 27,256 22,904 18,625 17,603 17,849 18,208 18,467 15,282 16,402 16,960 20,603 2004 24,746 25,909 21,663 16,382 15,991 14,085 14,456 14,551 11,956 14,094 13,138 18,337 2005 22,386 19,719 19,170 15,597 14,643 15,315 16,703 17,392

  1. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in California (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 256,236 225,525 210,711 198,804 182,600 174,840 186,844 204,883 185,162 184,119 174,839 213,717 2002 223,346 185,421 206,416 162,875 156,501 163,505 194,816 189,345 177,933 177,028 170,370 208,568 2003 206,909 199,691 190,785 169,036 156,895 155,289 190,664 186,767 182,143 179,341 181,360 216,415 2004 225,305 217,935 193,344 178,944 167,463 166,916 190,886 192,642 188,814 186,336 205,784 235,615 2005 228,279

  2. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Delaware (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 5,014 4,742 5,389 3,439 2,924 3,276 3,324 4,609 4,923 5,078 3,908 3,419 2002 5,258 4,880 4,847 3,830 2,810 2,738 6,396 3,816 4,170 3,843 3,936 5,597 2003 6,397 5,499 5,102 3,399 2,081 2,433 3,570 3,550 2,728 2,949 3,547 4,833 2004 6,827 5,602 4,600 3,387 3,731 2,595 2,620 2,437 2,880 2,484 4,033 6,759 2005 6,870 5,543 5,427 2,696 2,517 2,866 3,287 3,735 2,652 2,870 3,515 4,876 2006 5,025 4,699 4,451 2,549 2,659

  3. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Florida (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 34,086 30,338 35,463 39,708 42,466 46,947 53,430 53,352 55,306 52,955 42,205 47,598 2002 50,177 41,302 50,453 55,845 56,767 62,343 67,197 70,144 65,136 64,259 47,600 45,144 2003 53,384 43,538 54,761 51,487 62,575 58,312 64,041 61,764 62,150 59,558 56,488 50,525 2004 50,877 49,866 51,687 53,442 62,663 69,628 72,443 70,540 70,259 66,961 50,122 53,169 2005 59,417 49,956 60,238 55,269 64,436 69,719 90,376 84,114

  4. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Georgia (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 49,414 34,292 35,867 25,368 20,633 20,544 24,229 26,863 21,857 25,679 23,983 34,450 2002 44,041 37,992 33,260 23,775 22,612 24,924 30,113 29,701 24,899 23,785 32,829 47,106 2003 56,470 43,704 31,355 30,232 21,920 20,512 23,789 26,828 21,628 22,981 26,920 45,508 2004 52,486 48,806 31,529 28,718 26,610 24,562 26,132 26,093 22,927 22,025 29,012 49,125 2005 47,756 39,503 39,085 25,191 23,198 26,957 31,619 33,089

  5. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Hawaii (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 253 237 247 243 237 244 242 227 226 220 217 225 2002 236 226 225 234 226 224 239 222 224 215 227 236 2003 251 236 234 229 226 218 224 218 223 218 216 239 2004 243 230 239 240 221 235 229 222 226 221 230 236 2005 242 225 240 240 245 238 224 225 226 218 229 240 2006 241 226 242 237 239 235 229 222 233 223 223 231 2007 259 226 229 232 234 244 241 218 223 244 256 244 2008 245 237 235 238 225 233 238 211 211 206 204

  6. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Idaho (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 9,061 8,656 6,890 5,799 4,539 3,728 4,106 4,145 4,609 5,611 7,528 8,984 2002 8,747 8,547 7,861 5,699 4,667 3,654 3,038 2,812 3,303 4,162 5,950 7,000 2003 7,519 7,632 7,150 5,498 4,487 3,443 4,268 3,399 3,902 3,977 6,312 7,657 2004 10,168 9,168 7,032 4,556 4,391 3,602 3,672 3,601 3,844 4,668 6,536 8,238 2005 9,355 8,465 6,757 6,168 3,946 3,381 3,511 3,614 3,733 4,635 6,142 9,403 2006 8,375 8,140 7,439 5,455 3,877

  7. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Indiana (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 77,275 61,840 57,608 37,045 27,762 26,685 25,473 29,184 25,697 34,650 39,146 51,997 2002 65,893 58,962 58,569 44,882 32,659 27,696 30,899 30,668 28,357 37,204 49,556 68,056 2003 80,534 70,155 52,368 35,903 31,266 25,652 24,580 26,666 27,072 34,914 46,556 64,253 2004 80,680 70,341 53,056 37,842 30,840 25,006 25,592 27,498 26,658 33,102 43,630 65,054 2005 72,775 58,428 61,390 39,473 30,697 28,897 28,628 29,602

  8. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Kansas (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 35,585 27,368 26,284 16,906 10,552 11,171 18,862 17,962 13,422 11,375 14,263 20,610 2002 28,513 25,068 25,566 17,348 13,424 13,947 18,253 20,062 15,937 13,007 21,946 26,371 2003 31,180 29,594 25,952 16,337 13,386 11,371 15,614 15,421 13,725 13,096 15,980 25,771 2004 30,087 29,036 21,955 15,496 13,148 12,282 11,912 13,013 13,177 13,809 15,207 23,992 2005 29,876 25,291 20,604 15,459 12,953 11,687 13,164 13,264

  9. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Kentucky (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 31,659 23,182 21,670 14,953 9,527 8,890 9,668 9,881 10,024 12,591 16,271 23,216 2002 26,131 24,533 23,241 14,879 12,317 11,623 13,804 10,869 11,129 14,628 21,069 27,646 2003 34,776 29,032 20,580 14,017 10,797 9,334 9,467 10,296 10,390 13,196 16,933 27,218 2004 32,640 27,566 21,630 15,771 12,331 11,249 10,810 11,428 10,883 13,355 17,689 27,203 2005 29,373 24,036 24,578 15,557 13,614 13,693 12,658 14,134 12,122

  10. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Louisiana (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 90,750 82,773 86,038 87,577 81,223 77,877 93,937 105,743 93,365 92,353 85,277 92,797 2002 102,807 96,945 102,315 94,281 91,511 97,058 107,870 109,348 97,986 94,054 96,857 102,289 2003 106,504 91,821 89,554 89,376 88,426 78,863 91,469 95,243 85,824 84,198 83,677 94,139 2004 101,114 98,005 96,851 86,763 89,143 89,075 96,344 98,583 93,156 94,397 89,577 99,046 2005 102,652 87,403 100,620 97,398 104,027 102,860 104,234

  11. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Maine (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 6,537 6,903 6,950 5,791 7,780 6,957 8,161 9,020 8,835 8,864 9,644 9,127 2002 9,857 10,737 9,131 9,186 10,030 9,602 7,965 10,909 8,186 10,974 12,161 11,924 2003 8,047 5,034 5,581 5,924 4,577 4,916 6,000 5,629 5,606 6,652 5,970 6,036 2004 7,095 8,049 7,635 7,137 6,496 6,314 6,648 7,333 6,100 7,027 7,786 7,858 2005 5,882 5,823 5,955 5,764 4,162 5,163 5,883 6,097 4,936 4,955 4,236 2,234 2006 3,888 4,850 5,239 4,090

  12. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Maryland (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 28,398 21,618 21,408 13,900 9,252 8,342 9,046 11,007 9,109 12,662 13,558 17,125 2002 24,221 22,802 20,670 12,534 8,846 8,846 10,514 12,842 10,157 12,911 20,408 28,827 2003 31,739 28,530 21,240 15,685 9,809 8,723 8,128 7,986 7,131 11,863 16,167 27,049 2004 33,576 27,062 20,558 14,623 9,867 8,560 7,704 8,271 7,535 11,725 16,222 26,279 2005 29,469 25,497 24,272 13,414 10,273 10,104 9,641 11,634 8,302 12,060 16,807

  13. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Michigan (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 133,140 112,047 111,301 76,191 48,707 41,686 43,845 44,577 40,142 59,283 71,352 92,053 2002 119,902 108,891 104,208 87,138 63,810 52,457 51,899 47,094 40,938 53,419 82,015 114,268 2003 140,545 133,702 114,085 80,651 53,258 37,279 35,261 42,115 32,744 49,901 69,659 99,067 2004 137,906 127,671 102,442 76,978 54,610 41,310 38,001 37,565 37,285 48,239 71,870 107,025 2005 133,079 112,812 108,608 72,884 50,886 47,768

  14. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Minnesota (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 49,278 47,192 40,209 25,541 15,943 13,524 13,674 14,855 14,705 22,582 25,778 38,517 2002 45,190 38,565 44,505 28,680 21,749 14,684 15,388 15,077 14,862 27,484 37,214 45,054 2003 53,794 50,612 39,189 26,415 18,135 12,708 14,981 15,594 14,570 22,649 35,945 46,332 2004 58,327 45,894 36,866 24,741 17,416 14,831 14,126 13,324 14,266 21,849 31,497 46,174 2005 56,027 41,821 38,832 22,877 17,882 17,797 17,093 17,307

  15. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Mississippi (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 26,479 16,635 19,646 21,739 20,948 20,348 30,696 31,715 28,537 28,525 24,653 28,356 2002 29,331 28,518 28,650 25,702 23,117 27,335 33,509 29,104 24,492 19,663 18,433 24,444 2003 29,743 24,826 20,395 19,195 18,492 16,946 17,613 19,394 16,780 14,228 16,133 21,577 2004 23,187 23,828 21,311 19,087 24,565 21,821 24,034 23,064 18,228 18,641 15,628 21,305 2005 23,881 20,984 23,827 18,047 21,247 24,690 29,577 32,966

  16. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Missouri (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 51,986 40,694 34,239 22,717 13,209 12,679 16,175 16,218 12,056 13,682 18,230 29,876 2002 39,936 35,157 34,198 24,362 15,624 13,116 15,351 13,593 11,804 14,038 22,945 32,834 2003 42,257 42,379 33,569 21,083 13,307 10,498 12,889 15,215 9,788 10,817 17,229 30,354 2004 41,477 43,268 30,344 20,642 15,737 12,404 12,556 11,676 12,399 11,977 16,704 31,367 2005 42,227 35,965 31,014 19,890 15,686 13,519 13,855 14,649 12,548

  17. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Montana (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 7,993 8,301 5,782 5,036 3,055 2,439 2,359 2,152 2,135 3,446 5,081 6,696 2002 7,738 6,859 7,247 5,853 4,084 2,965 2,265 2,298 2,711 4,300 5,929 6,147 2003 7,471 6,977 6,706 4,682 3,515 2,729 2,042 2,006 2,468 3,629 6,282 7,503 2004 8,787 6,926 5,508 3,906 3,279 2,725 2,154 2,098 2,533 3,912 5,268 6,895 2005 8,717 6,227 5,828 4,563 3,517 2,678 2,135 2,426 2,551 4,121 4,933 7,501 2006 7,064 7,060 7,344 4,972 3,562

  18. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Nebraska (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 17,481 15,747 13,983 11,129 7,094 5,429 8,556 6,368 5,506 5,854 10,730 11,012 2002 16,123 14,049 12,938 10,424 6,676 4,984 8,748 7,414 6,786 6,218 9,753 13,269 2003 15,675 15,319 13,354 8,644 6,232 4,472 7,653 7,469 5,904 6,758 8,775 13,011 2004 16,104 16,445 12,058 7,983 6,255 5,830 6,952 6,641 4,338 5,935 8,995 13,129 2005 17,242 14,641 11,440 8,360 6,579 5,853 7,874 8,028 6,345 6,081 8,200 13,733 2006 15,551

  19. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Nevada (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 19,952 19,433 17,795 12,312 12,723 11,650 12,329 14,023 12,067 12,854 12,525 17,842 2002 18,621 16,951 15,943 11,123 11,789 13,044 14,033 14,618 13,988 13,798 14,840 16,521 2003 17,053 15,548 15,238 12,410 12,410 13,355 17,113 17,666 15,088 14,301 14,598 18,798 2004 19,886 20,030 14,760 11,514 13,220 16,819 20,333 19,864 17,480 16,556 18,897 22,720 2005 23,220 21,494 17,907 16,239 13,790 15,823 20,156 20,490

  20. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in New Hampshire (Including Vehicle

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Fuel) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 3,171 3,309 2,951 2,280 1,441 1,134 1,003 888 1,182 1,589 1,904 2,520 2002 2,917 3,188 2,833 2,179 1,815 1,423 1,657 1,055 1,381 1,038 1,847 3,507 2003 6,844 6,457 5,490 3,772 3,085 2,034 3,900 5,640 4,166 4,643 3,574 4,515 2004 5,204 7,595 6,870 6,131 2,712 4,473 4,167 4,306 4,766 3,194 5,704 6,026 2005 6,958 7,545 6,875 5,691 6,049 5,824 5,780 6,010 4,491 4,069 5,173 5,988 2006 7,782 6,823 7,852 4,511

  1. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Ohio (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 136,340 110,078 102,451 66,525 41,541 34,864 34,025 32,667 33,129 48,517 59,935 87,118 2002 106,011 98,576 94,429 70,082 51,854 40,885 40,538 38,774 34,999 51,972 76,275 108,800 2003 140,436 123,688 99,629 65,861 43,326 32,959 33,810 37,562 32,918 52,253 65,617 103,846 2004 137,568 117,976 93,845 67,347 46,827 33,561 34,567 34,689 34,129 47,268 64,279 99,290 2005 122,404 107,459 105,183 63,669 47,239 37,221 35,833

  2. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Oklahoma (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 45,337 36,026 35,468 29,023 26,153 28,194 41,056 38,697 30,910 29,194 26,719 33,193 2002 42,957 42,546 40,981 36,989 28,784 31,741 39,440 43,092 34,007 26,058 27,197 34,574 2003 44,633 43,363 39,395 32,941 30,147 32,417 46,076 47,914 30,139 28,937 26,588 39,627 2004 44,286 47,720 40,198 35,528 36,608 33,843 39,855 38,791 36,056 30,069 25,036 35,444 2005 42,941 41,516 38,987 36,599 35,972 45,327 48,696 49,698

  3. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Oregon (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 21,689 25,019 21,080 18,224 15,822 14,891 14,036 15,541 15,102 16,822 18,239 22,097 2002 25,687 22,100 21,179 14,501 12,612 11,363 9,336 12,198 12,978 14,195 16,780 20,005 2003 23,496 19,260 18,102 13,784 12,066 11,146 16,560 16,275 17,015 16,463 19,222 21,940 2004 26,773 24,112 19,699 16,486 14,346 12,752 16,235 16,733 16,179 17,146 21,137 23,569 2005 25,874 23,392 21,951 20,274 11,452 11,481 14,502 16,348 15,706

  4. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Pennsylvania (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 96,012 79,547 77,363 52,992 33,092 26,098 25,208 27,662 29,499 38,457 46,614 63,083 2002 80,458 74,651 70,773 53,368 38,209 33,401 32,700 34,743 30,425 40,462 58,542 83,877 2003 101,975 96,176 79,246 53,759 36,015 29,095 30,298 32,640 26,799 39,895 47,467 78,054 2004 100,298 95,715 73,189 54,937 42,873 33,367 36,047 33,735 32,060 34,578 50,908 74,224 2005 90,958 84,388 85,058 50,137 38,196 34,547 36,133 37,648

  5. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in South Carolina (Including Vehicle

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Fuel) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 17,028 13,472 12,569 10,957 8,683 9,367 10,138 11,625 9,077 11,870 11,334 12,725 2002 20,494 17,611 16,270 14,448 14,921 14,889 16,325 15,616 11,675 10,993 12,221 16,164 2003 18,666 17,514 12,917 11,948 9,803 8,615 10,304 12,231 8,766 8,909 9,675 14,460 2004 19,029 19,575 14,664 11,619 12,602 10,686 12,311 13,363 11,234 9,815 10,497 15,861 2005 19,494 16,945 17,212 12,523 11,619 12,506 16,813 18,833 10,439

  6. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Tennessee (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 43,045 30,197 26,202 21,053 13,399 12,059 12,967 13,230 11,569 16,135 19,011 23,239 2002 37,019 31,272 27,242 19,932 14,058 12,918 12,293 12,439 11,103 13,432 20,337 31,833 2003 37,778 37,692 27,915 18,989 14,580 13,392 11,615 12,627 12,016 13,775 16,202 27,807 2004 34,375 33,788 24,928 18,001 14,262 11,211 10,988 11,553 11,041 11,874 13,718 24,756 2005 30,997 29,214 25,561 19,122 13,849 11,579 11,055 13,522

  7. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Utah (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 20,043 17,426 13,012 11,173 7,791 7,056 6,214 6,023 6,572 9,189 11,646 18,505 2002 19,727 17,659 15,165 8,453 7,113 5,260 5,915 6,481 7,591 11,589 13,814 16,447 2003 16,474 16,494 12,825 10,664 6,942 5,612 6,174 6,166 6,229 7,898 13,299 16,533 2004 21,414 17,627 10,247 9,033 6,775 5,344 6,398 5,617 6,456 8,714 13,097 17,058 2005 18,357 16,430 13,763 12,951 9,253 7,461 7,380 6,187 6,053 6,449 9,027 16,786 2006

  8. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Vermont (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 1,164 1,003 1,084 834 544 381 304 307 361 438 658 827 2002 1,127 1,149 960 808 575 428 330 336 348 485 803 1,003 2003 1,153 1,191 1,062 906 539 367 293 312 325 502 708 1,029 2004 1,154 1,381 1,072 829 517 421 331 342 365 479 769 1,011 2005 1,211 1,280 1,199 776 558 404 310 298 295 418 666 943 2006 1,112 1,063 1,190 745 501 415 318 318 347 481 658 893 2007 1,104 1,375 1,250 915 536 382 340 331 342 423 696 1,158

  9. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Virginia (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 34,325 27,001 23,081 15,728 11,714 10,937 14,866 15,873 15,145 14,257 21,748 23,733 2002 30,728 25,956 22,525 16,988 14,493 13,877 18,202 18,373 14,992 16,512 22,349 32,089 2003 39,589 32,153 25,608 18,114 15,312 12,832 14,519 15,084 11,238 15,259 21,050 32,921 2004 40,135 33,982 24,192 18,779 18,241 16,500 15,667 17,654 16,341 13,924 21,649 31,243 2005 37,448 31,508 31,147 18,853 12,905 18,009 23,552 25,949

  10. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Washington (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 31,231 31,904 29,422 27,137 23,855 18,345 18,349 16,283 15,107 23,527 30,172 37,445 2002 29,531 27,361 27,117 20,531 15,439 11,596 10,256 11,367 12,459 15,045 20,551 25,818 2003 27,912 26,079 26,003 19,269 14,939 11,471 15,334 15,006 15,698 18,116 25,119 27,774 2004 33,107 29,246 23,696 18,926 15,242 11,848 16,510 17,954 16,165 18,170 24,172 28,231 2005 32,764 27,001 24,695 21,951 14,060 13,150 16,232 18,247

  11. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in West Virginia (Including Vehicle

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Fuel) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 14,634 12,224 11,221 9,393 5,380 4,688 5,050 5,820 5,703 7,694 9,286 10,802 2002 12,686 11,546 11,965 8,927 7,125 5,425 5,123 5,557 4,801 6,781 10,011 12,951 2003 15,151 14,627 10,226 7,588 5,910 5,006 4,985 5,571 5,552 7,192 8,076 12,413 2004 14,651 15,031 11,525 9,338 5,321 4,737 4,621 4,572 4,754 5,775 6,898 10,999 2005 13,027 12,645 12,670 7,853 5,985 4,008 3,754 4,142 3,627 4,345 6,919 11,453 2006

  12. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Wisconsin (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 52,126 51,020 52,466 24,969 17,238 15,421 16,478 16,540 16,716 25,355 26,981 41,400 2002 49,850 43,815 48,646 31,946 24,278 16,100 16,531 15,795 16,659 28,429 39,330 49,912 2003 62,523 55,695 44,756 32,270 20,752 15,502 15,630 18,099 16,485 24,636 36,907 47,677 2004 65,038 48,498 41,599 27,544 21,106 15,420 15,949 14,951 16,063 23,268 33,602 56,693 2005 59,667 45,463 47,647 29,885 23,265 22,788 21,959 22,549

  13. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Wyoming (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 7,475 6,484 5,643 5,505 4,182 3,864 3,515 3,541 3,688 4,790 5,518 6,170 2002 6,844 5,846 6,319 5,737 5,034 4,070 4,980 4,124 4,599 6,126 7,421 8,523 2003 7,672 7,313 7,026 5,737 4,976 4,408 4,112 4,164 4,356 5,062 5,554 7,236 2004 7,555 7,180 6,077 5,400 4,775 4,216 4,064 4,187 4,024 5,032 6,153 6,963 2005 7,585 6,443 6,231 5,612 5,092 4,247 4,081 3,903 4,080 4,829 5,360 7,262 2006 7,304 6,824 6,957 5,389 4,762

  14. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    through 1996) in Alabama (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 3,434 3,514 3,395 2,369 1,720 1,215 1,673 1,117 1,189 1,382 1,955 3,507 1990 4,550 3,040 2,645 2,167 1,626 984 1,157 1,164 1,195 1,353 1,921 2,487 1991 3,334 3,576 2,761 1,886 1,332 1,149 1,128 1,052 1,093 1,311 2,120 2,968 1992 3,739 3,833 2,671 2,287 1,513 1,225 1,108 1,078 1,136 1,320 1,983 3,338 1993 3,532 3,599 3,655 2,569 1,551 1,179 1,084 1,070 1,111 1,259 2,073 3,041 1994 4,325

  15. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    through 1996) in Alaska (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 2,500 2,691 2,258 1,949 1,569 1,287 1,042 1,091 1,202 1,577 2,144 2,429 1990 2,447 2,584 2,429 1,809 1,456 1,134 1,061 1,077 1,148 1,554 2,106 2,818 1991 2,579 2,388 2,149 1,896 1,576 1,171 1,069 1,073 1,198 1,561 1,930 2,308 1992 2,414 2,372 2,319 1,935 1,597 1,206 1,084 1,013 1,252 1,790 1,928 2,390 1993 2,487 2,471 2,051 1,863 1,441 1,055 917 957 1,112 1,563 1,785 2,301 1994 2,367 2,156

  16. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    through 1996) in Arizona (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 3,945 3,572 2,845 2,275 1,994 1,951 1,805 1,579 1,597 1,634 2,296 3,108 1990 3,706 3,577 3,165 2,338 2,174 1,854 1,686 1,580 1,610 1,555 2,018 3,139 1991 3,716 3,091 2,935 2,785 2,039 1,637 1,669 1,722 1,375 1,609 1,941 3,077 1992 3,647 3,011 2,898 2,352 1,620 1,754 1,690 1,505 1,601 1,580 1,858 3,573 1993 3,422 2,954 3,056 2,408 1,851 2,035 1,654 1,601 1,521 1,551 2,100 3,416 1994 3,689

  17. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    through 1996) in Arkansas (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 3,919 4,336 3,961 2,180 1,261 1,357 1,019 1,007 1,096 1,245 1,948 3,942 1990 4,957 3,368 2,807 2,223 1,398 1,065 1,030 1,043 1,081 1,260 1,948 2,949 1991 5,034 4,043 2,848 1,778 1,211 1,027 998 1,023 1,045 1,184 2,497 3,297 1992 4,159 3,861 2,708 2,114 1,358 1,108 1,062 1,022 1,029 1,219 2,078 3,596 1993 4,757 4,174 3,999 2,923 1,540 1,078 1,013 1,047 1,126 1,389 2,480 3,473 1994 5,101

  18. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    through 1996) in California (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 28,465 29,564 21,880 18,656 19,249 21,469 15,319 17,351 19,452 19,856 21,665 26,192 1990 30,798 34,767 27,425 23,423 18,540 17,392 21,030 17,705 23,233 17,384 22,637 30,759 1991 31,793 23,911 26,128 28,375 21,468 20,003 22,080 16,547 23,307 26,510 20,109 27,379 1992 38,234 23,834 24,413 18,379 27,118 22,150 21,150 21,633 19,247 19,112 20,999 28,738 1993 27,151 31,334 21,654 18,276

  19. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    through 1996) in Colorado (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 10,522 10,845 9,208 6,135 4,160 3,082 2,328 2,119 2,303 3,232 5,441 8,102 1990 10,718 9,546 8,633 6,902 5,116 3,122 2,167 2,127 2,069 2,918 5,301 7,682 1991 12,120 9,991 7,910 6,328 4,849 2,826 2,180 2,040 2,087 3,017 6,096 9,494 1992 10,794 9,450 7,609 5,965 3,631 3,055 2,430 2,183 2,312 3,078 5,594 10,319 1993 11,775 10,132 9,435 6,499 4,292 3,119 2,445 2,357 3,012 3,108 6,080 9,396

  20. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    through 1996) in Connecticut (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 3,909 3,749 3,937 2,897 2,106 1,625 1,528 1,579 1,551 1,685 2,324 3,891 1990 4,318 3,869 3,369 3,009 1,743 1,483 1,358 1,315 1,352 1,603 2,456 3,534 1991 4,341 3,973 3,566 2,352 1,462 1,030 995 1,020 884 1,423 2,396 3,396 1992 4,417 4,374 3,940 2,941 1,779 1,149 1,046 1,061 1,075 1,562 2,623 3,871 1993 4,666 4,995 4,461 3,038 1,583 1,161 1,122 1,070 1,121 1,789 2,896 3,525 1994 5,882

  1. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    through 1996) in Delaware (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 632 605 624 398 249 166 128 133 144 182 294 630 1990 784 530 530 419 239 174 139 138 136 163 309 480 1991 677 653 579 414 237 161 146 142 145 203 354 541 1992 744 755 686 537 308 198 166 152 162 240 395 622 1993 739 818 858 574 284 140 165 155 155 229 412 666 1994 945 1,076 856 510 259 209 157 156 172 221 345 554 1995 829 935 854 527 341 223 182 168 205 209 417 851 1996 1,099 1,181 885

  2. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    through 1996) in Florida (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 3,493 3,435 3,545 3,083 2,670 2,570 2,525 2,369 2,484 2,444 2,868 3,620 1990 4,101 3,305 3,246 3,026 2,860 2,673 2,584 2,497 2,483 2,521 3,285 3,725 1991 3,875 3,770 3,782 3,363 2,978 2,674 2,845 2,708 2,998 2,798 3,519 3,954 1992 4,408 4,364 3,856 3,741 3,382 3,085 2,976 2,881 2,849 2,954 3,317 3,914 1993 3,951 4,078 4,088 3,871 3,362 3,085 2,919 2,830 2,887 2,983 3,336 3,760 1994 4,619

  3. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    through 1996) in Georgia (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 7,127 7,499 5,163 3,921 2,982 2,340 2,411 2,360 2,589 3,475 4,834 8,389 1990 8,162 5,935 5,172 3,960 2,844 2,498 2,359 2,535 2,416 3,098 4,228 6,280 1991 7,680 6,782 5,905 3,348 2,820 2,387 2,381 2,482 2,346 3,082 5,153 6,670 1992 8,066 6,952 5,778 4,381 3,103 2,596 2,536 2,503 2,462 3,201 4,640 7,642 1993 7,627 7,915 7,796 4,837 3,069 2,544 2,570 2,481 2,440 3,312 5,214 7,719 1994 9,543

  4. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    through 1996) in Hawaii (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 187 178 174 175 181 175 182 173 175 179 172 177 1990 190 188 188 180 181 188 195 180 180 183 184 185 1991 192 177 169 187 173 173 187 172 179 177 178 185 1992 190 180 174 183 177 184 174 173 178 168 178 184 1993 185 190 179 177 168 183 174 170 168 173 183 172 1994 195 176 190 185 181 184 177 178 184 177 189 185 1995 200 180 185 183 185 188 186 178 179 179 178 177 1996 200 192 184 190 172

  5. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    through 1996) in Idaho (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 1,567 1,575 1,160 692 409 355 301 249 321 435 785 1,176 1990 1,313 1,283 1,000 610 479 389 293 280 292 459 822 1,315 1991 1,848 1,291 956 822 623 405 316 304 329 424 942 1,321 1992 1,543 1,167 834 643 447 343 345 330 369 465 889 1,557 1993 1,806 1,673 1,294 828 566 387 383 360 381 507 947 1,543 1994 1,510 1,457 1,121 771 480 377 374 306 357 571 1,098 1,667 1995 1,754 1,319 1,154 951 708 487

  6. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    through 1996) in Illinois (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 27,838 29,591 25,963 15,899 9,308 5,975 5,445 4,862 6,177 11,093 20,173 33,847 1990 30,713 25,802 22,068 17,635 10,676 6,785 7,008 7,341 7,970 15,118 19,910 29,245 1991 35,376 26,327 22,768 13,059 8,214 5,162 6,031 5,693 7,979 11,574 23,098 28,563 1992 30,506 26,501 23,400 17,598 8,872 4,907 5,811 6,025 6,618 12,394 22,757 31,575 1993 33,166 29,686 27,677 17,598 7,744 5,101 5,879 5,644

  7. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    through 1996) in Indiana (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 11,170 11,376 9,613 5,768 3,297 1,904 1,579 1,659 2,217 3,850 7,577 13,614 1990 11,991 9,374 7,958 6,087 3,191 1,963 1,658 1,860 1,991 4,087 6,640 10,462 1991 13,081 10,656 8,567 4,535 2,546 1,648 1,613 1,710 2,358 3,614 7,821 10,233 1992 12,060 10,265 8,437 6,172 3,400 2,004 1,811 1,955 2,131 4,253 8,135 12,097 1993 12,941 12,125 10,972 6,557 2,866 2,100 1,819 1,838 2,442 4,559 8,381

  8. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    through 1996) in Iowa (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 7,372 7,466 6,928 4,133 2,216 1,380 1,190 1,234 1,247 179 3,738 7,110 1990 8,087 6,374 5,719 4,261 2,409 1,602 1,226 1,204 1,302 2,087 3,726 5,955 1991 9,237 6,828 5,412 3,305 1,993 1,308 1,090 1,198 1,308 2,482 5,287 7,167 1992 7,145 6,709 4,949 3,883 1,877 1,427 1,100 1,257 1,433 2,645 5,843 7,827 1993 8,688 7,779 6,773 4,316 2,029 1,481 1,214 1,214 1,637 2,869 5,694 6,642 1994 9,353 8,260

  9. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    through 1996) in Kansas (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 7,155 7,697 6,870 5,433 3,660 2,547 3,366 4,812 3,081 2,785 4,386 6,763 1990 8,061 6,230 5,114 4,800 3,112 2,848 4,906 4,462 3,836 2,893 3,877 5,907 1991 10,250 7,397 5,694 4,278 3,082 2,657 4,321 3,994 2,629 2,656 6,075 5,538 1992 6,844 5,862 4,372 4,571 3,736 2,814 3,609 3,462 3,132 3,162 4,867 7,543 1993 8,768 7,385 7,019 4,938 2,840 2,559 3,348 3,324 2,395 2,469 4,413 6,565 1994 8,139

  10. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    through 1996) in Kentucky (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 5,139 5,507 4,546 2,840 1,766 1,167 1,099 991 1,147 954 3,327 6,648 1990 5,355 4,280 3,496 2,702 1,576 1,129 1,037 1,077 1,025 2,050 3,194 4,884 1991 6,313 5,098 3,647 1,925 1,198 1,029 941 991 1,338 1,862 4,197 5,161 1992 6,191 4,758 3,874 2,612 1,600 1,132 1,066 1,158 1,209 2,237 4,064 5,519 1993 5,878 5,863 5,207 2,934 1,330 1,449 1,029 1,060 1,220 2,417 3,997 5,433 1994 8,181 6,018

  11. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    through 1996) in Louisiana (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 3,399 3,365 3,462 2,362 1,790 1,479 1,399 1,340 1,433 1,568 2,035 3,524 1990 4,528 2,757 2,490 2,135 1,628 1,499 1,361 1,238 1,275 1,487 2,082 2,491 1991 3,639 3,555 2,713 1,974 1,539 1,418 1,504 1,253 1,229 1,440 2,347 2,842 1992 4,060 4,003 2,743 2,367 1,769 1,564 1,556 1,431 1,508 1,577 2,295 3,574 1993 3,260 3,207 3,075 2,376 1,742 1,454 1,267 1,277 1,290 1,346 2,091 2,771 1994 3,925

  12. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    through 1996) in Maine (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 229 226 221 160 106 63 51 50 60 96 128 269 1990 268 227 211 175 108 70 52 47 62 83 157 219 1991 282 265 236 180 101 73 65 65 59 103 152 278 1992 322 318 315 229 157 80 79 52 67 116 188 285 1993 356 364 291 192 107 80 71 67 77 166 224 316 1994 458 364 302 181 128 79 63 71 84 135 207 309 1995 350 373 288 211 128 77 70 71 86 129 254 389 1996 413 386 356 208 132 82 74 75 78 172 280 310 1997 433

  13. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    through 1996) in Maryland (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 3,976 3,700 4,247 2,586 1,701 1,154 968 941 978 1,220 1,801 3,647 1990 4,168 3,115 3,057 2,477 1,557 1,131 1,049 961 1,016 1,095 1,686 2,738 1991 5,709 5,334 4,545 3,320 2,108 1,602 1,545 1,465 1,486 2,289 3,582 5,132 1992 6,323 6,382 5,073 3,807 2,391 1,784 1,553 1,586 1,615 2,491 3,895 5,565 1993 6,273 6,568 6,232 3,772 2,110 1,861 1,507 1,567 1,700 2,231 3,898 5,915 1994 8,122 6,354

  14. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    through 1996) in Massachusetts (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 7,394 6,984 7,234 5,392 3,703 2,150 1,726 1,894 1,799 2,720 3,647 6,864 1990 8,247 6,548 6,367 5,235 3,381 2,491 2,009 2,040 1,906 2,416 4,275 5,704 1991 7,617 7,579 6,948 5,504 3,772 2,466 2,435 2,188 1,939 2,666 4,048 6,027 1992 8,184 8,736 8,217 7,049 4,450 2,768 3,072 2,884 2,753 3,776 5,530 6,933 1993 8,556 9,118 9,026 6,491 4,195 3,184 2,692 2,802 2,766 3,878 5,622 7,098 1994

  15. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    through 1996) in Michigan (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 26,553 25,448 24,717 16,375 10,150 5,954 4,570 4,467 5,047 8,855 15,776 28,269 1990 26,939 22,780 20,870 15,431 9,230 5,638 4,610 4,865 5,117 8,592 14,122 21,237 1991 29,054 24,902 21,321 14,617 9,583 5,601 4,916 4,508 5,510 9,450 12,966 23,131 1992 26,677 24,979 22,443 17,769 10,406 5,883 4,981 4,964 5,431 9,760 16,298 24,211 1993 28,122 27,427 25,623 18,238 9,009 5,968 5,035 4,140 5,767

  16. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    through 1996) in Minnesota (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 13,112 13,607 11,411 6,916 3,980 2,416 2,112 2,011 2,475 4,718 8,764 13,661 1990 12,696 11,412 9,846 6,734 4,032 2,369 2,100 2,060 2,342 4,865 7,491 12,066 1991 15,649 11,426 10,026 6,092 4,220 2,541 2,315 2,304 2,930 5,399 10,392 12,580 1992 13,000 11,075 10,134 7,517 3,602 2,467 2,244 2,296 2,631 5,092 9,526 12,795 1993 14,685 12,874 11,396 7,267 3,588 2,549 2,190 2,207 2,952 5,614

  17. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    through 1996) in Mississippi (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 2,372 2,502 2,411 1,407 947 739 718 701 754 939 1,350 2,727 1990 3,199 2,007 1,675 1,541 1,070 884 819 818 841 1,137 1,508 2,050 1991 2,704 2,572 1,977 1,291 901 875 806 834 865 989 1,721 2,208 1992 2,817 2,595 1,758 1,473 994 888 885 867 847 942 1,489 2,387 1993 2,663 2,583 2,559 1,756 1,108 925 904 864 843 985 1,710 2,298 1994 3,417 2,993 2,136 1,456 1,012 942 992 973 1,000 1,050

  18. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    through 1996) in Missouri (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 10,118 10,280 9,192 5,246 2,799 2,359 1,829 1,780 2,021 2,798 4,716 9,903 1990 11,634 7,979 6,849 5,622 3,309 2,310 2,034 1,971 2,083 2,863 4,811 7,921 1991 12,748 9,932 7,479 4,261 2,760 2,181 1,853 1,896 2,056 2,689 6,471 8,864 1992 10,201 9,060 6,835 5,601 3,144 2,547 1,849 1,993 2,024 2,728 5,335 9,646 1993 12,062 10,467 10,336 6,750 3,580 2,266 2,066 1,959 2,222 2,864 5,974 9,124

  19. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    through 1996) in Montana (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 2,029 1,923 1,841 1,208 687 478 330 381 442 806 1,235 1,781 1990 1,912 1,705 1,402 998 766 487 323 348 347 782 1,206 1,889 1991 2,425 1,435 1,450 1,053 843 431 357 341 438 724 1,559 1,790 1992 1,726 1,464 1,099 930 568 377 365 331 523 810 1,271 2,095 1993 2,465 1,705 1,741 1,137 682 434 437 416 535 819 1,508 1,999 1994 1,844 1,936 1,465 1,100 699 452 362 348 423 860 1,447 2,043 1995 2,085

  20. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    through 1996) in Nebraska (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 4,202 4,825 4,252 2,505 1,648 1,757 3,381 4,240 1,634 2,109 2,602 4,196 1990 4,765 4,019 3,355 2,799 1,480 1,325 4,837 2,596 2,333 2,334 2,552 4,094 1991 5,452 4,111 3,382 2,193 1,771 1,779 5,675 4,406 1,961 2,056 3,468 4,037 1992 4,332 3,760 2,970 2,411 1,781 1,330 2,366 2,393 1,710 2,508 3,988 4,941 1993 5,784 3,806 4,611 3,119 1,629 1,388 1,324 1,828 1,333 2,164 3,495 4,263 1994 5,469

  1. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    through 1996) in Nevada (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 2,156 2,125 1,533 1,100 1,004 890 790 805 811 954 1,257 1,690 1990 1,959 1,963 1,740 1,185 1,006 970 879 782 701 1,157 1,026 1,705 1991 2,447 1,839 1,739 1,593 1,333 1,121 947 1,005 761 1,104 1,095 1,976 1992 2,327 1,873 1,725 1,335 1,012 945 1,015 824 872 982 1,022 2,170 1993 2,271 2,110 2,016 1,314 1,341 1,052 919 939 909 1,047 1,421 2,211 1994 2,334 2,277 1,995 1,456 1,300 1,136 995 909

  2. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    through 1996) in New Hampshire (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 842 753 771 551 339 188 154 140 176 248 393 817 1990 899 803 618 518 307 221 153 153 170 265 380 585 1991 795 798 672 484 291 186 155 156 173 256 420 643 1992 911 931 762 629 376 208 179 169 174 295 515 715 1993 993 973 911 611 294 204 177 171 186 332 522 770 1994 1,261 1,097 863 581 347 229 173 166 206 305 442 743 1995 978 999 864 632 369 227 188 166 197 285 620 989 1996 1,163 1,129

  3. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    through 1996) in New Jersey (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 16,826 15,506 15,624 10,928 7,587 5,087 4,881 4,520 4,638 6,297 9,150 16,342 1990 17,876 14,489 14,442 11,796 7,342 5,460 4,941 4,929 5,323 5,758 9,225 14,011 1991 17,874 16,614 14,732 11,900 6,767 5,198 5,844 3,856 5,261 7,210 9,914 16,069 1992 17,638 18,398 16,759 14,066 8,392 5,294 5,240 4,981 5,462 7,164 11,027 16,470 1993 17,585 19,550 18,731 13,012 7,025 5,134 5,844 3,819 5,149

  4. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    through 1996) in North Carolina (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 4,784 4,016 4,367 3,046 2,022 1,568 1,475 1,454 1,534 1,843 2,639 4,396 1990 5,379 3,690 3,400 2,747 1,820 1,445 1,394 1,480 1,596 1,795 2,715 3,817 1991 4,947 4,647 3,990 2,629 1,928 1,677 1,613 1,679 1,789 2,052 3,200 4,162 1992 5,169 5,066 3,983 3,296 2,205 1,733 1,591 1,607 1,679 2,138 3,010 4,941 1993 5,866 5,566 5,426 3,602 1,988 1,532 1,437 1,539 1,674 2,067 3,379 3,292 1994

  5. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    through 1996) in North Dakota (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 1,789 1,669 1,514 1,027 508 335 269 238 340 464 951 1,506 1990 1,666 1,457 1,243 1,048 616 383 315 298 370 561 916 1,363 1991 1,917 1,394 1,253 847 629 320 302 314 348 633 1,241 1,535 1992 1,489 1,380 1,082 937 529 298 279 262 363 576 1,015 1,549 1993 1,911 1,477 1,339 925 477 347 317 294 381 629 1,068 1,478 1994 2,016 1,812 1,339 932 526 302 284 288 315 530 1,241 1,198 1995 1,807

  6. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    through 1996) in Ohio (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 23,636 24,435 21,187 13,360 8,237 3,927 3,565 3,735 4,397 8,946 15,949 30,143 1990 25,317 19,642 20,361 13,373 7,446 4,838 3,975 4,165 4,240 7,272 13,757 19,190 1991 26,286 24,481 20,157 11,779 6,341 3,971 3,703 3,933 4,196 8,065 15,488 21,940 1992 26,321 24,820 20,215 15,893 7,455 5,016 4,291 4,260 4,418 9,092 15,094 23,770 1993 25,230 26,706 25,531 15,019 6,359 5,221 3,939 3,860 4,492 9,636

  7. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    through 1996) in Oklahoma (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 6,069 7,033 6,197 2,868 1,601 1,279 1,180 1,097 1,241 1,528 2,542 5,873 1990 7,587 5,618 4,176 3,424 2,281 1,519 1,312 1,355 1,235 1,613 2,520 4,567 1991 8,702 6,014 4,265 2,489 1,702 1,330 1,290 1,279 1,299 1,590 3,974 5,653 1992 6,180 5,310 3,653 2,956 1,785 1,540 1,407 1,292 1,240 1,449 2,608 5,771 1993 7,076 6,147 5,910 3,743 2,057 1,439 1,324 1,432 1,345 1,544 3,424 5,327 1994 6,644

  8. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    through 1996) in Oregon (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 2,884 3,283 2,761 1,724 1,140 989 823 804 882 972 1,624 2,363 1990 2,984 3,031 2,562 1,550 1,268 1,157 821 769 823 1,050 1,697 2,737 1991 4,074 2,764 2,407 2,048 1,610 1,274 902 812 855 927 1,898 2,758 1992 3,231 2,465 1,925 1,542 1,171 884 784 782 863 1,105 1,652 3,166 1993 4,148 3,370 2,880 1,927 1,448 1,010 915 840 934 1,099 1,918 3,557 1994 3,388 3,166 2,480 1,836 1,234 1,078 865 801

  9. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    through 1996) in Pennsylvania (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 19,310 18,682 16,972 11,988 8,259 4,646 4,270 4,158 4,375 7,181 11,582 20,997 1990 20,743 16,421 15,166 12,483 6,828 5,134 4,387 4,567 5,054 6,676 11,644 16,571 1991 21,026 18,276 16,026 10,882 5,835 4,162 3,760 3,859 4,580 7,438 12,251 17,451 1992 21,204 19,482 17,679 12,210 6,793 4,520 4,046 4,132 4,579 8,439 12,784 18,385 1993 19,394 21,239 19,875 11,914 5,793 4,510 3,547 3,718

  10. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    through 1996) in Rhode Island (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 1,032 979 1,003 855 565 457 471 518 560 657 654 1,014 1990 1,195 903 893 857 577 244 413 365 508 587 763 774 1991 1,089 979 864 605 667 414 538 540 555 628 496 895 1992 1,076 1,128 1,103 1,047 676 498 448 479 411 609 654 951 1993 1,140 1,359 1,325 907 429 330 273 364 243 503 1,008 1,324 1994 1,919 1,974 1,626 1,092 653 542 343 599 384 569 1,010 1,338 1995 1,077 1,679 1,883 1,353 901

  11. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    through 1996) in South Carolina (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 2,176 1,936 2,098 1,489 1,094 891 908 808 866 970 1,324 1,964 1990 2,455 1,649 1,576 1,262 1,040 846 836 830 872 965 1,315 1,749 1991 2,199 2,076 1,746 1,143 908 818 810 859 875 952 1,492 1,917 1992 2,276 2,158 1,745 1,436 1,068 944 820 882 875 1,006 1,345 2,089 1993 2,268 2,155 2,200 1,507 1,007 877 832 840 846 947 1,463 2,070 1994 2,845 2,472 1,910 1,174 1,027 1,342 913 949 947

  12. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    through 1996) in South Dakota (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 1,339 1,454 1,253 776 413 276 203 197 255 434 851 1,374 1990 1,398 1,234 1,064 769 537 306 230 223 239 459 825 1,269 1991 1,723 1,243 1,076 713 543 303 263 251 309 588 1,176 1,286 1992 1,314 1,174 1,007 828 460 303 291 284 324 558 1,104 1,476 1993 1,847 1,496 1,344 995 531 342 315 291 392 632 1,083 1,429 1994 1,738 1,695 1,285 846 524 347 239 322 329 531 946 1,472 1995 1,619 1,491

  13. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    through 1996) in Tennessee (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 6,960 6,840 6,382 4,054 2,529 1,916 1,802 1,659 1,843 2,355 3,769 7,404 1990 8,672 5,800 4,578 3,811 2,474 1,988 1,652 1,791 1,597 2,276 3,426 5,490 1991 7,499 7,400 5,761 3,131 2,231 1,829 1,640 1,708 1,837 2,454 4,304 6,158 1992 7,343 6,834 5,069 4,205 2,436 2,016 1,838 1,681 1,933 2,368 3,963 6,846 1993 7,296 7,526 7,354 4,605 2,613 1,992 1,884 1,811 1,992 2,565 4,648 6,470 1994 9,690

  14. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    through 1996) in Texas (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 21,163 22,930 20,215 15,779 11,310 10,731 12,786 11,350 9,367 10,345 12,823 23,871 1990 21,376 16,323 17,118 14,054 12,299 14,204 14,184 11,592 9,448 9,571 12,192 19,981 1991 26,377 18,723 16,796 15,181 11,439 10,763 12,769 11,125 8,843 11,156 17,192 20,608 1992 22,907 19,049 15,866 14,174 12,557 10,879 13,768 12,966 11,356 11,672 17,386 22,093 1993 21,489 18,444 16,162 14,455 12,175 12,943

  15. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    through 1996) in Utah (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 3,283 3,376 2,280 1,227 653 472 357 346 390 522 1,313 2,304 1990 2,864 2,779 2,272 1,203 860 581 373 364 374 629 1,382 2,540 1991 4,055 3,108 2,282 1,771 1,316 668 405 375 407 551 1,634 2,704 1992 3,330 2,952 1,866 1,155 642 457 410 372 405 545 1,329 3,120 1993 3,922 3,682 2,988 1,839 1,248 707 597 594 606 946 2,023 3,436 1994 3,929 3,846 2,665 2,037 962 814 820 787 882 1,883 3,542 4,335 1995

  16. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    through 1996) in Vermont (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 315 300 283 199 105 66 57 57 73 130 189 307 1990 338 288 269 196 116 68 46 62 84 127 195 261 1991 335 311 259 187 105 61 55 58 82 133 188 284 1992 366 354 320 231 118 75 79 75 77 144 211 269 1993 347 368 350 199 124 80 62 67 83 143 235 324 1994 476 455 341 269 150 90 65 69 88 144 187 334 1995 388 406 352 277 140 89 70 72 95 130 242 410 1996 458 445 381 279 153 97 67 69 90 162 276 348 1997

  17. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    through 1996) in Virginia (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 6,164 6,056 5,721 4,051 2,446 2,129 1,866 1,485 1,985 2,192 3,612 6,474 1990 6,162 5,181 5,100 4,541 2,412 1,831 1,802 1,772 1,671 2,233 3,251 5,081 1991 6,667 5,956 5,270 3,581 2,481 2,159 1,867 2,057 1,860 2,625 3,855 5,701 1992 7,072 6,690 5,985 4,523 3,289 2,271 2,085 2,055 1,903 3,275 4,714 6,895 1993 7,432 7,800 7,347 4,850 2,842 2,177 1,987 2,033 2,106 3,073 4,355 6,877 1994 8,677

  18. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    through 1996) in Washington (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 5,343 5,561 5,424 3,672 2,194 1,851 1,671 1,548 1,357 2,083 3,366 4,433 1990 5,136 5,666 4,496 3,289 2,728 1,951 1,639 1,476 1,575 2,249 3,444 5,071 1991 6,279 5,277 4,597 4,047 3,025 2,400 1,831 1,635 1,689 2,099 3,802 5,057 1992 5,564 4,840 3,855 3,179 2,343 1,830 1,575 1,514 1,734 2,240 3,418 5,709 1993 7,058 5,670 5,157 3,785 2,774 1,905 1,801 1,750 1,829 2,236 3,639 6,016 1994

  19. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    through 1996) in Wisconsin (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 10,596 10,988 10,169 6,662 3,882 2,012 1,562 1,499 1,718 3,437 6,386 11,183 1990 11,878 9,411 8,746 5,436 3,701 2,130 1,686 1,617 1,786 3,865 6,030 10,074 1991 13,062 10,137 8,785 5,471 3,084 1,643 1,853 1,415 2,229 4,335 8,565 10,938 1992 11,235 10,037 9,113 6,870 3,632 1,986 1,759 1,615 1,954 4,108 7,918 11,087 1993 12,658 11,647 10,442 7,011 3,438 2,418 1,843 1,719 2,326 4,637 7,976

  20. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    through 1996) in Wyoming (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 1,357 1,414 1,111 852 521 368 285 233 268 396 724 1,022 1990 1,305 1,199 1,085 822 628 410 247 234 241 378 759 1,132 1991 1,639 1,249 996 830 680 362 272 248 269 449 873 1,233 1992 1,404 1,078 821 668 438 309 264 269 287 439 760 1,271 1993 1,631 1,376 1,262 882 639 400 362 389 378 667 874 1,407 1994 1,351 1,412 1,065 869 544 369 291 270 308 550 915 1,287 1995 1,671 1,247 1,217 987 873 594

  1. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    through 1996) in the District of Columbia (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 2,133 2,021 2,066 1,635 999 803 692 763 712 775 1,090 2,052 1990 1,986 1,857 1,789 1,384 951 699 514 572 721 574 836 1,589 1991 2,204 2,308 2,131 1,381 1,063 784 705 794 689 658 1,071 1,764 1992 2,300 2,256 2,132 1,774 1,056 764 718 673 653 753 1,103 1,921 1993 2,352 2,438 2,166 1,550 1,150 731 664 703 684 841 1,040 1,909 1994 2,303 1,865 1,483 1,588 979 815 753 692 740

  2. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    through 1996) in the U.S. (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1930's 80,707 86,491 87,367 85,577 91,261 100,187 111,623 117,390 114,296 118,334 1940's 134,644 144,844 183,603 204,793 220,747 230,099 241,802 285,213 323,054 347,818 1950's 387,838 464,309 515,669 530,650 584,957 629,219 716,871 775,916 871,774 975,107 1960's 1,020,222 1,076,849 1,206,668 1,267,783 1,374,717 1,443,648 1,622,740 1,958,970 2,075,736 2,253,206 1970's

  3. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 1,715 1,610 1,607 1,548 1,328 1,858 1,883 2,019 2,049 2,129 1990's 2,223 2,148 2,144 2,123 2,200...

  4. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    through 1996) in the U.S. (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1973 392,315 394,281 310,799 231,943 174,258 135,165 107,728 105,681 103,831 126,540 216,762 297,734 1974 406,440 335,562 301,588 243,041 165,233 128,032 109,694 107,828 106,510 143,295 199,514 308,879 1975 346,998 345,520 312,362 289,341 164,629 119,960 107,077 104,332 106,655 133,055 179,518 298,845 1976 405,483 364,339 285,912 221,383 169,209 129,058 112,070 113,174 113,284 145,824 252,710

  5. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Illinois (Including Vehicle...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 151,699 132,638 117,186 62,934 46,113 39,615 44,463 46,777 41,870 67,167 74,519 115,418 2002 131,434 119,430 122,242...

  6. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Kansas (Including Vehicle...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 252,275 259,783 240,248 2000's 253,037 224,367 239,449 227,436 213,122 206,537 217,981 246,094...

  7. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 37,141 46,232 54,062 1970's 52,632 56,246 61,286 52,674 53,461 51,705 57,310 51,815 64,532...

  8. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Tennessee (Including Vehicle...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 259,790 262,598 263,607 2000's 256,821 242,184 243,955 244,484 220,602 221,088 212,864 211,020 219,535 204,990...

  9. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 1,715 1,610 1,607 1,548 1,328 1,858 1,883 2,019 2,049 2,129 1990's 2,223 2,148 2,144 2,123 2,200 2,199...

  10. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Alabama (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 293,981 299,146 299,872 2000's 315,202 299,631 343,913 316,665 350,734 323,143 358,141 385,209 369,750 418,677 2010's 496,051 558,116 622,359 573,981 599,473 640,707

  11. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Alaska (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 149,171 147,435 150,062 2000's 150,745 132,441 129,292 109,707 120,974 127,140 113,933 99,281 87,677 81,335 2010's 80,794 88,178 87,404 75,926 70,960 70,027

  12. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Arizona (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 116,058 138,724 146,471 2000's 184,542 218,613 230,493 254,720 333,746 304,004 337,429 372,536 376,961 348,877 2010's 315,448 275,627 319,685 319,450 294,459 336,19

  13. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Arkansas (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 241,664 247,908 241,648 2000's 240,672 217,765 233,046 237,428 205,480 202,946 221,378 214,298 221,983 230,488 2010's 256,102 266,194 278,304 263,281 249,549 270,209

  14. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in California (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 2,049,536 2,228,414 2,264,158 2000's 2,434,770 2,400,993 2,218,923 2,218,715 2,353,823 2,196,741 2,248,988 2,327,205 2,330,514 2,256,380 2010's 2,196,086 2,096,279 2,337,017 2,352,421 2,265,431 2,257,216

  15. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Colorado (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 272,530 289,945 288,147 2000's 321,784 412,773 404,873 377,794 378,894 405,509 383,452 435,360 426,034 420,500 2010's 396,083 345,663 327,108 361,779 367,021 NA

  16. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Delaware (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 46,499 40,794 55,968 2000's 48,325 50,090 52,167 46,143 48,019 46,863 43,172 48,139 48,144 50,126 2010's 54,685 79,251 100,630 95,008 99,736 99,543

  17. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Florida (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 514,038 497,685 550,157 2000's 532,297 534,331 676,854 679,179 722,326 767,566 877,977 905,828 932,172 1,044,872 2010's 1,131,142 1,199,247 1,306,024 1,207,573 1,221,666 NA

  18. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Georgia (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 363,402 360,973 328,730 2000's 408,209 343,698 375,567 372,492 388,751 406,852 414,377 435,919 419,057 456,082 2010's 521,557 512,466 605,262 617,310 645,253 683,796

  19. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Hawaii (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 2,894 2,654 3,115 2000's 2,841 2,818 2,734 2,732 2,772 2,793 2,782 2,848 2,700 2,605 2010's 2,625 2,616 2,687 2,853 2,927 2,929

  20. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Idaho (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 63,483 63,781 66,160 2000's 66,758 73,723 65,510 65,329 69,572 69,202 69,202 74,395 81,646 78,166 2010's 75,647 77,343 83,274 98,843 87,647 NA

  1. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Illinois (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 1,062,536 944,170 992,865 2000's 1,017,283 940,691 1,036,615 987,964 941,964 958,727 883,080 954,100 987,137 931,329 2010's 942,205 960,018 910,611 1,024,851 1,062,377 NA

  2. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Indiana (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 545,839 514,407 549,639 2000's 564,919 494,706 533,754 520,352 519,785 524,415 489,881 528,655 544,202 500,135 2010's 564,904 619,977 642,209 664,817 703,637 712,946

  3. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Iowa (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 243,181 223,287 222,943 2000's 224,299 215,348 215,482 220,263 216,625 229,717 225,929 280,954 311,672 301,340 2010's 300,033 296,098 285,038 314,742 317,784 NA

  4. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Kentucky (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 202,620 187,054 199,511 2000's 208,848 191,608 211,950 206,134 212,666 222,249 200,361 214,546 207,837 189,023 2010's 211,993 204,380 210,584 216,451 241,151 249,968

  5. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Louisiana (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 1,361,995 1,313,827 1,267,668 2000's 1,286,353 1,069,808 1,193,418 1,079,213 1,132,186 1,121,178 1,074,563 1,124,310 1,089,351 1,044,149 2010's 1,207,599 1,244,752 1,336,521 1,267,795 1,325,708 1,361,733

  6. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Maine (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 6,290 5,716 6,572 2000's 43,971 94,569 100,659 69,973 85,478 61,088 63,541 62,430 69,202 69,497 2010's 75,821 69,291 67,504 63,247 59,362

  7. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Maryland (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 208,890 185,583 193,142 2000's 208,894 175,611 193,766 194,280 192,242 200,336 179,949 198,715 193,613 193,988 2010's 205,688 187,921 201,550 193,232 201,199 205,407

  8. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Massachusetts (Including Vehicle

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Fuel) (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 400,273 356,942 342,136 2000's 340,923 345,916 388,972 402,003 370,777 376,257 369,166 406,968 405,562 394,759 2010's 428,471 444,537 412,637 418,241 412,268 434,781

  9. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Michigan (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 958,506 846,478 919,922 2000's 926,633 874,578 926,299 888,584 881,257 875,492 767,509 762,502 748,655 703,346 2010's 713,533 745,769 761,544 787,603 824,527 NA

  10. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Minnesota (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 334,583 310,419 322,572 2000's 340,988 321,867 348,523 351,009 339,407 345,573 332,257 368,428 407,767 381,577 2010's 407,503 405,547 409,421 456,247 460,653

  11. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Mississippi (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 206,845 201,303 271,218 2000's 266,008 298,296 312,317 235,345 254,727 274,431 278,563 328,487 316,214 325,132 2010's 399,073 401,561 440,741 393,161 390,396 NA

  12. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Missouri (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 275,838 253,157 259,054 2000's 277,206 281,875 273,073 259,526 260,708 265,485 250,290 269,825 288,847 260,976 2010's 274,361 265,534 250,902 271,341 290,421 271,116

  13. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Montana (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 54,138 54,093 55,129 2000's 57,725 54,529 58,451 56,074 54,066 55,200 60,602 60,869 64,240 66,613 2010's 60,517 68,113 61,963 68,410 71,435 NA

  14. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Nebraska (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 128,092 127,840 118,536 2000's 123,791 118,933 117,427 113,320 110,725 114,402 125,202 145,253 160,685 156,161 2010's 161,284 162,219 150,961 166,233 165,620 149,107

  15. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Nevada (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 131,463 147,747 153,880 2000's 188,288 175,966 175,739 184,152 212,723 224,919 246,865 251,425 261,579 272,543 2010's 256,256 245,807 267,242 268,008 247,182 NA

  16. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in New Hampshire (Including Vehicle

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Fuel) (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 20,824 19,105 20,311 2000's 24,918 23,374 24,841 54,122 61,150 70,463 62,530 62,115 71,170 59,937 2010's 60,131 69,776 72,004 53,961 56,936

  17. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Ohio (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 877,039 792,617 823,448 2000's 871,444 787,719 813,735 832,563 812,084 811,759 729,264 791,733 780,187 723,471 2010's 767,704 808,509 832,437 901,087 982,855 949,86

  18. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Oklahoma (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 459,508 490,070 456,573 2000's 450,596 400,740 429,152 443,139 444,514 487,723 528,236 563,474 590,997 566,176 2010's 582,389 559,215 587,287 539,056 508,363 544,200

  19. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Oregon (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 172,588 216,058 224,767 2000's 213,063 218,632 193,006 205,415 225,263 225,277 214,346 242,371 261,105 240,765 2010's 232,900 194,336 211,232 236,276 216,365 233,52

  20. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Pennsylvania (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 664,782 609,779 648,194 2000's 659,042 596,041 632,035 651,938 662,513 656,097 625,944 711,945 705,284 755,938 2010's 811,209 866,775 918,490 959,041 1,042,647 1,078,193

  1. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in South Carolina (Including Vehicle

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Fuel) (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 150,978 156,295 159,338 2000's 156,975 138,866 181,648 143,833 161,283 169,605 172,514 173,092 167,473 188,081 2010's 216,783 226,089 241,434 229,768 229,454

  2. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Texas (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 3,732,807 3,809,430 3,658,039 2000's 4,073,007 3,917,933 3,966,512 3,747,467 3,595,474 3,154,632 3,068,002 3,133,456 3,128,339 2,947,542 2010's 3,185,011 3,305,730 3,377,217 3,350,645 3,415,789 3,589,91

  3. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Utah (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 137,700 139,522 133,518 2000's 137,213 135,123 135,699 125,899 128,441 130,286 152,283 183,237 192,281 182,187 2010's 185,228 184,581 178,941 199,684 198,278 187,45

  4. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Vermont (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 8,052 7,726 8,025 2000's 10,411 7,906 8,353 8,386 8,672 8,358 8,041 8,851 8,609 8,621 2010's 8,428 8,558 8,077 9,512 10,554 NA

  5. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Virginia (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 240,244 252,233 267,269 2000's 258,975 228,670 247,351 254,008 268,674 292,043 264,954 309,866 286,497 304,266 2010's 359,208 352,281 392,255 401,623 404,939 NA

  6. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Washington (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 247,530 281,143 279,656 2000's 280,617 303,060 227,360 243,072 253,663 256,580 256,842 265,211 291,535 302,930 2010's 278,139 257,945 255,356 308,148 298,088

  7. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in West Virginia (Including Vehicle

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Fuel) (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 119,976 105,099 104,219 2000's 106,057 102,110 103,119 102,567 98,525 90,436 85,507 88,317 84,485 75,475 2010's 79,432 77,189 74,459 80,393 86,978

  8. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Wisconsin (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 396,107 363,738 376,409 2000's 389,543 356,915 381,498 391,185 380,014 406,550 369,353 395,519 406,723 385,418 2010's 369,924 391,128 400,876 439,741 458,999 454,450

  9. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Wyoming (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 70,792 77,652 60,593 2000's 63,384 60,385 69,633 67,627 65,639 64,753 65,487 67,693 66,472 61,774 2010's 67,736 70,862 73,690 74,597 73,096 72,765

  10. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Alabama (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 30,401 34,749 37,275 1970's 36,254 36,657 37,389 33,126 35,349 33,439 34,450 34,303 29,649 36,717 1980's 28,525 26,860 25,876 26,665 27,567 25,836 25,128 22,384 25,562 26,469 1990's 24,287 23,711 25,232 25,723 25,526 26,228 29,000 32,360 25,705 27,581 2000's 25,580 26,391 25,011 25,356 26,456 25,046 24,396 23,420 25,217 24,293 2010's 27,071 25,144 21,551 25,324

  11. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Alaska (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 2,722 4,713 11,018 1970's 12,519 14,256 16,011 12,277 13,106 14,415 14,191 14,564 15,208 15,862 1980's 16,513 16,149 24,232 24,693 24,654 20,344 20,874 20,224 20,842 21,738 1990's 21,622 20,897 21,299 20,003 20,698 24,979 27,315 26,908 27,079 27,667 2000's 26,485 15,849 15,691 17,270 18,373 16,903 18,544 18,756 17,025 16,620 2010's 15,920 19,399 19,898 18,694

  12. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Arizona (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 23,335 23,389 24,501 1970's 22,705 25,604 26,905 31,812 32,742 32,638 36,763 34,076 29,581 26,971 1980's 27,487 26,742 26,085 24,612 25,309 25,360 24,081 27,669 28,299 28,600 1990's 28,401 27,597 27,089 27,568 29,187 28,210 28,987 30,132 31,788 31,301 2000's 32,138 31,121 31,705 32,292 33,159 31,888 32,792 32,694 32,516 32,196 2010's 31,945 32,633 31,530 32,890

  13. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Arkansas (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 35,295 37,886 39,962 1970's 39,169 30,832 32,457 33,789 31,040 33,291 34,011 33,913 34,612 33,442 1980's 30,690 28,282 29,438 27,739 28,995 26,731 24,949 24,603 27,457 27,271 1990's 25,129 25,986 25,314 28,998 27,407 27,409 31,006 29,441 28,062 27,898 2000's 33,180 32,031 32,928 31,746 29,821 31,521 31,286 32,187 36,924 36,373 2010's 40,232 39,986 41,435 47,636

  14. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in California (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 184,630 189,903 206,861 1970's 209,945 239,685 231,536 232,774 228,988 240,239 219,840 227,543 221,441 258,490 1980's 258,151 236,910 236,202 215,918 191,838 205,044 182,794 212,904 248,397 259,118 1990's 285,090 287,608 285,008 250,283 261,989 278,761 235,068 253,923 282,153 244,701 2000's 246,439 245,795 238,308 232,912 231,597 233,082 244,432 251,024 251,045

  15. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Colorado (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 39,942 47,287 52,256 1970's 59,081 62,805 63,154 69,844 68,322 76,288 75,959 72,597 71,422 74,831 1980's 66,952 58,913 66,991 64,615 71,890 68,975 61,620 64,355 68,515 67,477 1990's 66,290 68,938 66,420 71,647 65,870 66,639 68,914 69,074 63,132 59,346 2000's 60,874 65,011 66,939 62,616 61,956 62,099 59,851 63,231 65,806 62,441 2010's 57,658 55,843 51,795 58,787

  16. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Delaware (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 1,968 2,084 2,526 1970's 2,804 3,010 3,205 3,093 3,169 2,964 3,078 2,815 3,005 2,842 1980's 3,246 3,783 3,577 3,428 3,827 3,412 3,514 3,741 4,041 4,184 1990's 4,042 4,253 4,965 5,195 5,459 5,743 6,694 6,608 5,590 6,119 2000's 5,125 5,680 7,477 8,437 8,465 8,383 8,134 8,628 8,868 11,684 2010's 12,193 10,478 10,034 11,170 11,882 11,189

  17. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Florida (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 22,501 21,890 24,721 1970's 26,914 25,478 23,243 24,315 22,527 31,745 39,681 41,236 35,386 36,638 1980's 30,182 33,702 29,788 29,228 30,481 30,674 35,829 37,492 37,834 35,105 1990's 36,306 39,264 41,727 41,151 39,935 40,383 41,810 36,700 37,659 36,269 2000's 47,904 49,286 55,803 54,283 56,321 57,690 50,625 51,097 50,901 50,371 2010's 54,065 53,532 54,659 59,971

  18. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Georgia (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 30,202 36,034 39,020 1970's 38,726 41,881 44,992 47,253 44,317 49,438 46,351 55,268 60,266 62,437 1980's 58,763 57,139 54,718 56,280 55,909 51,519 50,405 54,592 55,963 53,089 1990's 49,486 51,036 53,861 57,525 54,051 56,536 61,377 57,220 55,419 43,581 2000's 58,793 50,645 48,631 50,273 55,047 52,902 48,137 48,591 51,518 53,627 2010's 60,153 56,602 51,918 57,195

  19. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Idaho (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 4,972 6,374 6,613 1970's 5,851 8,232 10,712 9,387 8,040 12,177 8,742 8,405 5,503 6,923 1980's 5,756 5,422 5,729 5,758 8,493 8,999 8,543 7,618 8,252 9,024 1990's 8,535 9,582 8,932 10,675 10,088 10,360 11,506 11,433 11,676 12,618 2000's 13,414 13,623 13,592 12,019 12,995 13,231 13,573 14,274 16,333 15,740 2010's 15,033 16,855 15,838 18,485 16,963 16,171

  20. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Illinois (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 175,281 174,565 189,006 1970's 193,434 210,424 224,488 218,530 216,114 215,718 246,659 243,686 251,895 237,199 1980's 228,178 223,427 218,751 204,834 232,170 213,528 204,979 191,047 215,257 196,171 1990's 200,267 193,844 196,964 203,157 197,558 203,802 218,054 202,850 174,687 188,520 2000's 201,768 189,160 204,570 211,710 204,039 201,882 196,361 203,368 222,382

  1. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Indiana (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 58,273 60,661 72,414 1970's 77,550 77,984 85,302 76,835 75,887 70,501 67,481 63,224 70,083 74,231 1980's 70,048 71,178 71,900 65,409 71,819 69,641 64,821 64,903 71,709 73,625 1990's 67,223 68,383 72,720 78,047 75,819 82,726 87,456 81,753 73,117 73,643 2000's 90,378 78,479 82,427 87,225 84,883 76,217 71,081 75,562 84,858 78,764 2010's 75,883 75,995 66,663 82,596

  2. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Iowa (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 45,118 48,034 52,700 1970's 57,266 59,138 61,623 63,350 64,052 66,915 64,734 60,519 49,200 58,308 1980's 50,588 46,804 51,536 46,854 48,104 47,643 43,709 38,057 44,955 46,142 1990's 43,953 46,615 46,095 50,337 47,922 50,325 54,571 50,191 43,027 44,895 2000's 45,609 45,892 46,423 48,081 46,068 45,152 43,424 46,367 56,099 56,698 2010's 51,674 51,875 43,767 56,592

  3. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Kentucky (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 32,313 36,089 41,934 1970's 42,461 42,352 42,843 45,797 42,320 38,497 57,203 50,170 46,647 40,509 1980's 39,359 36,379 35,260 34,111 36,138 33,758 32,666 33,298 35,718 36,148 1990's 31,806 33,700 35,419 37,817 36,744 38,610 40,972 38,627 32,464 35,798 2000's 38,669 35,255 35,942 38,212 36,989 36,894 32,590 34,386 37,167 35,438 2010's 36,818 34,592 30,771 37,422

  4. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Louisiana (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 51,062 56,937 54,010 1970's 70,321 67,515 66,331 59,518 58,097 50,662 43,567 44,563 65,300 115,743 1980's 39,996 39,507 33,729 34,906 33,088 30,228 27,985 27,845 27,475 27,156 1990's 24,937 25,452 28,445 25,157 24,184 23,833 25,746 25,613 24,042 24,559 2000's 25,687 24,604 25,540 25,161 24,700 25,085 22,240 23,863 22,869 23,672 2010's 27,009 25,925 26,294 28,875

  5. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Maine (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 1,961 1,672 2,338 1970's 3,220 3,604 3,678 3,323 3,441 3,894 3,814 3,846 4,467 5,023 1980's 864 1,043 1,192 1,124 1,124 1,139 1,214 1,250 1,461 1,660 1990's 1,678 1,860 2,209 2,311 2,381 2,426 2,566 2,713 2,456 2,547 2000's 2,770 2,642 5,167 4,781 4,811 4,792 4,701 5,749 5,878 5,541 2010's 5,830 6,593 7,313 8,146 9,030 9,795

  6. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Maryland (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 28,154 30,419 34,674 1970's 37,529 40,988 43,950 42,953 43,080 37,466 42,422 40,532 39,821 47,326 1980's 28,576 32,055 30,871 30,758 25,299 24,134 23,816 25,544 25,879 26,920 1990's 24,051 38,117 42,464 43,635 44,136 46,874 45,842 49,802 57,370 58,103 2000's 55,669 59,802 63,999 70,557 70,195 69,718 62,868 70,852 70,411 69,119 2010's 67,555 67,505 64,146 71,145

  7. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Massachusetts (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 24,737 25,396 29,821 1970's 35,356 36,994 36,778 39,288 37,384 37,812 37,763 40,598 45,657 46,701 1980's 53,462 50,131 61,286 39,640 41,271 41,382 43,661 46,522 48,915 51,508 1990's 50,618 53,188 64,352 65,429 84,534 82,270 96,187 105,813 90,092 65,136 2000's 63,793 61,677 64,763 62,590 56,879 56,665 52,283 61,504 72,303 71,546 2010's 72,053 81,068 73,040

  8. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Michigan (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 107,796 117,124 130,062 1970's 132,708 146,217 159,970 180,274 189,192 181,949 178,220 131,266 142,935 182,316 1980's 190,268 174,722 170,269 159,916 160,952 157,758 135,592 185,956 167,900 176,182 1990's 159,429 165,558 173,802 180,230 183,068 194,078 201,390 192,258 163,368 179,351 2000's 186,800 173,734 176,010 186,129 175,190 174,625 153,896 163,740 172,108

  9. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Minnesota (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 63,740 65,536 70,232 1970's 76,585 76,441 79,987 80,219 90,412 89,651 76,981 67,839 81,121 60,509 1980's 63,780 66,755 74,309 70,713 75,175 77,020 74,478 65,923 79,989 85,183 1990's 78,015 85,875 82,381 86,629 83,933 90,658 98,537 92,232 82,345 88,061 2000's 95,358 93,844 104,387 101,446 96,541 95,916 87,170 91,275 99,526 96,218 2010's 89,963 94,360 83,174

  10. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Mississippi (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 16,547 18,297 17,667 1970's 23,846 25,853 24,604 23,701 25,504 23,922 20,214 19,304 21,312 27,224 1980's 20,886 19,267 17,213 17,158 17,860 16,591 16,891 17,922 18,108 17,568 1990's 17,548 17,743 17,942 19,199 19,232 19,904 22,225 22,070 21,358 20,208 2000's 21,673 21,585 21,221 22,933 22,130 20,882 19,425 20,774 20,181 19,095 2010's 21,179 20,247 17,834

  11. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Missouri (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 82,524 79,821 79,019 1970's 87,644 89,534 97,506 91,038 90,291 90,719 98,435 93,323 98,680 94,629 1980's 76,054 68,455 69,913 66,106 67,218 60,345 61,890 58,205 63,839 63,039 1990's 59,387 63,191 60,963 69,670 66,196 65,086 72,802 69,829 61,995 63,100 2000's 62,673 64,924 61,897 61,516 61,755 60,369 56,722 59,224 64,993 61,433 2010's 61,194 62,304 54,736 64,522

  12. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Montana (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 15,516 13,651 16,593 1970's 18,564 18,109 19,151 19,143 16,602 18,654 17,831 16,706 17,766 17,396 1980's 14,265 13,725 15,987 13,534 14,256 14,820 12,536 10,989 12,041 13,141 1990's 12,164 12,846 11,557 13,880 12,981 13,489 14,823 13,911 12,952 12,088 2000's 13,533 13,245 14,704 15,119 13,407 13,136 13,181 13,223 14,340 23,575 2010's 20,459 22,336 19,205 20,971

  13. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Nebraska (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 41,443 41,765 46,041 1970's 46,824 47,261 45,518 38,690 42,298 43,117 48,713 46,989 40,736 43,507 1980's 43,356 40,612 43,022 39,055 41,900 39,404 36,357 34,205 39,388 37,351 1990's 36,489 40,291 34,490 34,745 38,946 40,044 40,833 33,853 28,911 27,586 2000's 28,907 27,792 28,185 28,368 29,858 27,401 28,087 30,067 34,813 31,790 2010's 31,993 32,115 26,503 32,214

  14. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Nevada (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 6,164 6,997 8,204 1970's 9,633 11,014 12,755 13,144 14,078 14,965 18,389 17,436 19,940 19,638 1980's 10,207 8,294 8,449 11,758 12,012 12,232 11,451 13,747 14,879 15,116 1990's 15,073 16,960 16,101 17,549 18,694 18,703 20,421 21,958 23,314 22,710 2000's 25,586 22,912 22,685 24,099 26,862 26,552 28,046 28,224 28,920 29,531 2010's 29,475 30,763 28,991 31,211 29,105

  15. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in New Hampshire (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 4,116 4,376 4,414 4,437 4,100 4,955 4,438 4,601 5,034 5,371 1990's 5,073 5,028 5,862 6,142 6,412 6,514 7,099 7,489 6,808 7,214 2000's 8,323 7,349 8,768 9,673 8,943 9,844 8,494 9,360 10,043 9,935 2010's 8,406 8,890 8,130 9,204 9,412 9,32

  16. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in New Jersey (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 28,656 32,546 34,510 1970's 55,953 60,230 62,917 61,846 58,210 53,346 90,463 53,896 48,005 52,314 1980's 60,481 74,627 78,750 79,624 83,906 83,467 85,775 94,459 101,325 117,385 1990's 115,591 121,240 130,891 128,942 132,008 138,965 150,432 168,760 146,653 163,759 2000's 158,543 131,417 146,176 159,647 168,768 169,857 152,501 168,778 168,574 180,404 2010's

  17. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in New Mexico (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 27,447 30,713 28,680 1970's 33,035 33,760 32,354 25,569 25,221 22,800 33,708 25,476 25,706 26,371 1980's 24,505 20,446 21,715 22,413 22,947 16,733 20,642 19,939 31,032 28,459 1990's 23,694 24,993 27,884 27,898 24,964 23,934 26,466 27,403 27,206 27,103 2000's 27,009 27,133 25,476 23,745 25,458 24,186 23,404 24,876 25,183 24,701 2010's 25,155 25,035 24,898 26,790

  18. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in North Dakota (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 6,059 7,072 7,444 1970's 8,315 9,059 9,874 9,875 11,528 12,425 12,202 11,234 11,845 12,044 1980's 11,026 9,419 11,361 9,828 9,961 10,118 9,084 7,908 9,827 10,609 1990's 10,236 10,732 9,759 10,642 10,783 11,644 12,150 10,870 10,082 10,023 2000's 11,060 10,456 11,675 10,952 10,473 9,903 9,355 10,296 11,101 10,987 2010's 10,302 10,973 10,364 13,236 13,999 12,334

  19. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Ohio (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 153,376 165,414 175,372 1970's 183,412 189,791 208,068 196,663 192,497 169,357 179,392 149,011 172,429 158,117 1980's 166,210 161,110 157,664 143,568 155,350 143,311 139,119 146,983 158,790 161,516 1990's 143,503 150,339 160,645 164,044 166,798 175,160 189,966 183,838 156,630 167,573 2000's 177,917 172,555 163,274 179,611 170,240 166,693 146,930 160,580 167,070

  20. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Oregon (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 6,961 7,874 9,965 1970's 11,360 13,563 14,530 13,722 13,401 15,896 13,995 10,861 12,124 13,820 1980's 15,171 14,922 16,330 15,143 17,012 19,043 16,843 16,718 18,406 20,249 1990's 20,449 22,328 19,570 24,047 22,960 22,419 25,597 25,465 25,986 28,510 2000's 28,589 27,884 27,714 26,110 26,214 27,631 27,844 29,007 30,444 29,744 2010's 27,246 30,359 28,805 30,566 28,377

  1. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Pennsylvania (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 82,702 87,620 95,720 1970's 99,339 110,014 122,518 116,265 102,495 98,991 124,517 111,885 110,620 111,498 1980's 118,462 128,561 125,557 115,222 126,211 115,329 114,442 114,800 127,382 132,421 1990's 125,673 125,546 134,254 131,776 138,473 143,735 154,642 144,084 130,996 143,256 2000's 145,319 136,468 136,202 149,458 142,608 144,971 130,328 145,852 144,603

  2. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Rhode Island (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 3,142 3,416 3,850 1970's 5,064 4,530 4,734 4,648 4,397 4,233 2,895 3,019 4,783 6,169 1980's 6,751 6,867 7,156 6,976 7,466 7,590 6,718 9,395 8,352 8,767 1990's 8,071 8,269 9,080 9,205 12,049 12,064 12,298 12,303 11,477 11,804 2000's 12,974 12,808 11,468 11,391 11,289 11,043 9,950 11,247 10,843 10,725 2010's 10,458 10,843 10,090 11,633 13,178 11,734

  3. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in South Carolina (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 8,840 10,544 12,938 1970's 13,850 14,371 14,137 16,053 14,820 17,202 35,062 32,117 24,681 17,943 1980's 22,885 19,436 15,560 16,548 16,635 15,270 15,894 17,195 17,472 16,525 1990's 15,394 15,796 16,644 17,014 17,870 18,868 20,328 19,560 19,828 20,566 2000's 22,105 20,743 21,029 22,365 22,255 22,048 20,691 20,927 22,283 21,953 2010's 24,119 22,113 21,416

  4. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in South Dakota (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 10,444 10,723 11,201 1970's 11,361 10,592 11,204 10,568 11,671 11,488 15,344 14,786 13,547 9,951 1980's 8,507 8,188 9,384 8,651 9,128 9,987 9,166 8,199 8,396 8,826 1990's 8,555 9,473 9,122 10,696 10,274 10,685 11,598 10,422 9,264 9,564 2000's 10,119 9,711 10,258 10,375 9,958 9,819 9,525 10,337 11,362 11,563 2010's 11,025 11,101 9,330 12,151 12,310 10,497

  5. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Tennessee (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 34,380 38,325 41,069 1970's 42,720 44,062 45,704 45,974 44,651 42,488 38,244 35,127 30,917 42,714 1980's 44,048 42,686 38,697 42,903 46,544 43,399 42,589 44,144 45,852 47,513 1990's 43,552 45,953 46,532 50,754 50,760 51,235 58,497 55,117 52,394 52,572 2000's 53,365 53,010 53,710 56,576 54,201 54,264 51,537 51,056 54,094 51,879 2010's 56,194 52,156 44,928 53,888

  6. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Texas (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 139,727 139,442 140,854 1970's 146,090 142,423 141,128 155,070 134,418 116,749 135,452 158,683 168,946 233,758 1980's 168,513 157,199 189,447 157,481 165,700 151,774 146,972 156,509 175,368 182,670 1990's 172,333 180,973 184,673 175,988 180,232 209,584 178,549 216,333 169,610 171,714 2000's 190,453 171,847 226,274 218,565 192,901 159,972 147,366 161,255 167,129

  7. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Utah (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 6,905 8,114 9,443 1970's 10,180 8,504 7,933 8,997 5,806 6,055 14,681 9,661 8,430 6 1980's 330 343 21,831 7,986 8,569 8,505 4,636 14,811 17,911 16,522 1990's 16,220 19,276 16,584 22,588 26,501 26,825 29,543 31,129 30,955 30,361 2000's 31,282 30,917 33,501 30,994 31,156 34,447 34,051 34,447 37,612 37,024 2010's 38,461 40,444 35,363 41,398 38,156 35,552

  8. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Vermont (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 828 831 853 856 1,467 1,575 1,688 1,833 1,941 2,081 1990's 2,049 2,058 2,319 2,382 2,669 2,672 2,825 3,051 2,979 2,309 2000's 2,595 2,473 2,470 2,757 2,724 2,610 2,374 2,631 2,495 2,483 2010's 2,384 2,479 2,314 4,748 4,830 NA

  9. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Virginia (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 22,756 24,594 27,155 1970's 30,090 34,672 34,176 37,632 35,281 32,358 34,887 34,685 43,064 33,946 1980's 38,467 35,255 38,157 38,457 34,825 33,975 35,453 39,401 42,013 44,181 1990's 41,038 44,077 50,757 52,880 52,944 56,948 59,262 61,895 58,283 61,516 2000's 66,098 59,809 62,699 64,004 64,518 65,838 62,352 66,444 67,006 67,709 2010's 68,911 64,282 60,217 68,126

  10. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Washington (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 15,133 16,244 17,166 1970's 18,490 20,612 23,254 32,333 33,221 31,988 31,652 29,946 25,330 33,369 1980's 30,754 28,629 30,559 28,728 32,371 35,459 32,022 32,366 36,674 38,502 1990's 38,671 41,738 37,800 43,620 42,982 42,568 48,139 46,686 45,561 50,735 2000's 50,462 57,160 46,455 47,845 48,455 49,745 51,292 53,689 56,205 55,697 2010's 51,335 56,487 53,420 55,805

  11. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in West Virginia (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 18,511 20,402 21,534 1970's 21,678 23,106 26,654 25,854 24,586 24,776 20,462 19,556 22,501 22,337 1980's 21,980 22,191 20,548 18,771 18,780 17,224 15,995 16,792 22,416 23,258 1990's 21,391 21,043 24,419 24,381 24,979 25,872 28,025 25,913 24,986 27,301 2000's 26,167 27,737 24,729 26,681 25,177 25,084 23,477 22,633 25,299 23,761 2010's 24,907 24,094 22,634

  12. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Wisconsin (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 33,610 36,067 52,315 1970's 54,555 47,662 43,753 55,012 65,705 67,485 57,702 61,280 77,890 80,756 1980's 77,107 68,075 69,694 68,020 70,230 72,803 55,275 57,750 66,939 70,090 1990's 66,339 71,516 71,314 77,079 78,609 84,888 93,816 88,729 81,316 81,689 2000's 81,139 76,095 85,811 87,131 82,187 86,086 86,342 89,016 97,137 91,459 2010's 82,204 87,040 76,949 99,434

  13. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Wyoming (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 10,865 11,637 14,069 1970's 14,026 14,072 17,287 13,206 13,241 10,253 9,152 8,767 8,100 8,211 1980's 4,980 4,511 10,098 9,182 9,431 9,139 8,045 8,443 8,700 8,551 1990's 8,440 9,101 8,009 10,268 9,231 9,833 9,721 10,754 10,414 9,838 2000's 9,752 9,535 10,414 9,986 9,916 9,184 9,500 9,442 10,180 10,372 2010's 11,153 11,680 10,482 12,013 12,188 12,498

  14. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in the District of Columbia (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 13,752 14,993 15,881 15,945 11,680 11,921 11,934 13,999 15,012 15,741 1990's 13,473 15,550 16,103 16,229 14,742 17,035 16,347 18,012 16,862 17,837 2000's 17,728 16,546 18,332 17,098 17,384 17,683 17,107 19,297 18,411 18,705 2010's 18,547 16,892 15,363 17,234 17,498 15,793

  15. Percentage of Total Natural Gas Commercial Deliveries included in Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    77.5 67.3 65.2 65.8 65.8 65.3 1987-2015 Alabama 79.3 78.9 76.2 76.6 78.4 77.6 1990-2015 Alaska 87.7 88.6 94.9 94.5 94.5 98.2 1990-2015 Arizona 88.7 87.8 86.6 85.5 84.4 83.8 1990-2015 Arkansas 55.6 51.5 40.2 43.7 45.5 42.5 1990-2015 California 54.1 54.3 50.0 49.9 48.4 50.0 1990-2015 Colorado 94.6 93.8 92.2 94.7 94.5 NA 1990-2015 Connecticut 65.4 65.4 65.1 57.9 67.2 NA 1990-2015 Delaware 49.8 53.4 43.7 45.0 46.2 45.7 1990-2015 District of Columbia 100.0 16.9 17.9 19.1 19.9 21.4 1990-2015 Florida

  16. Percentage of Total Natural Gas Residential Deliveries included in Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    97.4 96.3 95.8 95.7 95.5 95.7 1989-2015 Alabama 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 99.0 1989-2015 Alaska 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1989-2015 Arizona 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1989-2015 Arkansas 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1989-2015 California 98.5 98.3 97.5 96.1 94.8 94.9 1989-2015 Colorado 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 NA 1989-2015 Connecticut 97.3 96.8 96.7 95.3 95.9 NA 1989-2015 Delaware 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1989-2015 District of Columbia 75.5 75.0 73.9

  17. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Connecticut (Including...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 142,216 130,664 149,294 2000's 156,692 143,330 175,072 150,692 159,259 164,740 169,504 175,820...

  18. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Connecticut (Including...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 18,442 15,861 16,485 10,646 7,197 7,730 7,420 9,010 11,276 11,370 12,345 15,400 2002 19,009 18,410 17,585 13,782 12,805...

  19. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 8,109 11,224 12,435 1970's 14,500 16,073 17,005 15,420 16,247 15,928 16,694 16,813 16,940 16,830...

  20. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in North Carolina (Including...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 208,369 207,427 210,606 2000's 226,543 200,542 229,338 212,534 219,814 225,423 218,379 232,374...

  1. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 17,100 20,624 24,524 1970's 21,532 26,331 24,200 23,044 21,002 21,615 20,042 18,303 20,366...

  2. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in New York (Including Vehicle...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 1,315,909 1,224,520 1,265,646 2000's 1,236,734 1,166,162 1,190,745 1,093,319 1,090,023 1,069,062...

  3. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 122,050 122,885 128,282 1970's 139,498 145,458 147,326 142,736 136,332 128,273 143,530 130,898...

  4. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Alabama (Including Vehicle...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 36,984 28,384 27,217 23,714 21,027 21,010 22,537 23,488 21,619 24,186 23,647 25,742 2002 36,559 33,467 32,355 26,061 23,580 27,901...

  5. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Massachusetts (Including...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 45,181 40,868 39,690 30,815 23,495 19,798 19,305 23,154 22,753 24,627 24,646 31,456 2002 44,559 40,420 40,295 29,989 27,757 25,316 23,254...

  6. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    24,630 25,344 18,494 12,079 8,747 8,382 8,305 8,812 11,741 16,631 27,650 1990 24,659 23,697 22,939 17,706 11,586 10,272 9,602 9,683 10,261 12,661 17,210 24,715 1991 28,442...

  7. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Colorado (Including Vehicle...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 57,089 50,447 49,042 41,157 30,506 23,904 22,403 22,033 19,905 22,672 30,231 42,797 2002 47,541 44,713 45,909 30,319 24,230...

  8. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Iowa (Including Vehicle...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    14,476 16,865 23,400 2002 28,527 25,072 25,693 18,706 13,413 10,076 9,731 9,815 10,403 14,561 22,219 27,225 2003 31,445 32,450 25,482 16,870 12,421 10,288 9,892 10,030 10,550...

  9. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 38,459 42,751 41,151 1970's 43,921 41,978 43,852 40,403 41,074 41,806 44,862 48,253 45,729 52,036 1980's 47,135 40,833 45,664 44,177 44,423...

  10. Power generation method including membrane separation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Union City, CA)

    2000-01-01

    A method for generating electric power, such as at, or close to, natural gas fields. The method includes conditioning natural gas containing C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons and/or acid gas by means of a membrane separation step. This step creates a leaner, sweeter, drier gas, which is then used as combustion fuel to run a turbine, which is in turn used for power generation.

  11. Lighting system with thermal management system having point contact synthetic jets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Arik, Mehmet; Weaver, Stanton Earl; Kuenzler, Glenn Howard; Wolfe, Jr., Charles Franklin; Sharma, Rajdeep

    2013-12-10

    Lighting system having unique configurations are provided. For instance, the lighting system may include a light source, a thermal management system and driver electronics, each contained within a housing structure. The light source is configured to provide illumination visible through an opening in the housing structure. The thermal management system includes a plurality of synthetic jets. The synthetic jets are arranged within the lighting system such that they are secured at contact points.

  12. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Sources & Uses Petroleum & Other Liquids Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas...

  13. Pentavalent Uranium Chemistry - Synthetic Pursuit Of A Rare Oxidation State

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graves, Christopher R; Kiplinger, Jaqueline L

    2009-01-01

    This feature article presents a comprehensive overview of pentavalent uranium systems in non-aqueous solution with a focus on the various synthetic avenues employed to access this unusual and very important oxidation state. Selected characterization data and theoretical aspects are also included. The purpose is to provide a perspective on this rapidly evolving field and identify new possibilities for future developments in pentavalent uranium chemistry.

  14. CO2 Removal using a Synthetic Analogue of Carbonic Anhydrase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harry Cordatos

    2010-09-14

    Project attempts to develop a synthetic analogue for carbonic anhydrase and incorporate it in a membrane for separation of CO2 from coal power plant flue gas. Conference poster presents result of first 9 months of project progress including concept, basic system architecture and membrane properties target, results of molecular modeling for analogue - CO2 interaction, and next steps of testing analogue resistance to flue gas contaminants.

  15. Large Hybrid Energy Systems for Making Low CO2 Load-Following Power and Synthetic Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert S. Cherry; Richard D. Boardman; Steven Aumeier

    2012-02-01

    Hybrid energy systems using nuclear heat sources can economically produce load-following electrical power by exploiting the surplus generation capacity available at night or seasonally to make synthetic fuel. Vehicle fuel is the only current energy use large enough to absorb all the energy capacity that might be diverted from the power industry, and its ease of storage obviates problems with discontinuous synfuel production. The potential benefits and challenges of synfuels integration are illustrated by the production of methanol from natural gas (as a source of carbon) using steam from a light water nuclear power reactor which is assumed to be available in accord with a year's worth of power demand data. Methanol's synthesis process is easily adapted to using 300 C heat from a light water reactor and this simple compound can be further processed into gasoline, biodiesel, or dimethyl ether, fuels which can be used with the current vehicle fleet. A supplemental feed to the methanol process of natural gas (for energy) allows operation at constant full rate when the nuclear heat is being used to produce electrical power. The higher capital costs of such a system are offset by a lower cost of heat and power production from a large base load type of plant and by reduced costs associated with much lower CO2 emissions. Other less tangible economic benefits of this and similar hybrid systems include better use of natural resource for fuels and greater energy services security from the domestic production of vehicle fuel.

  16. Performance limits for maritime Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Performance limits for maritime Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar (ISAR). Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Performance limits for maritime Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar...

  17. Synthetic CO.sub.2 acceptor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lancet, Michael S. (Pittsburgh, PA); Curran, George P. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1981-08-18

    A synthetic CO.sub.2 acceptor consisting essentially of at least one compound selected from the group consisting of calcium oxide and calcium carbonate supported in a refractory carrier matrix, the carrier having the general formula Ca.sub.5 (SiO.sub.4).sub.2 CO.sub.3. A method for producing the synthetic CO.sub.2 acceptor is also disclosed.

  18. Holographic imaging of natural-fiber-containing materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bunch, Kyle J [Richland, WA; Tucker, Brian J [Pasco, WA; Severtsen, Ronald H [Richland, WA; Hall, Thomas E [Kennewick, WA; McMakin, Douglas L [Richland, WA; Lechelt, Wayne M [West Richland, WA; Griffin, Jeffrey W [Kennewick, WA; Sheen, David M [Richland, WA

    2010-12-21

    The present invention includes methods and apparatuses for imaging material properties in natural-fiber-containing materials. In particular, the images can provide quantified measures of localized moisture content. Embodiments of the invention utilize an array of antennas and at least one transceiver to collect amplitude and phase data from radiation interacting with the natural-fiber-containing materials. The antennas and the transceivers are configured to transmit and receive electromagnetic radiation at one or more frequencies, which are between 50 MHz and 1 THz. A conveyance system passes the natural-fiber-containing materials through a field of view of the array of antennas. A computing device is configured to apply a synthetic imaging algorithm to construct a three-dimensional image of the natural-fiber-containing materials that provides a quantified measure of localized moisture content. The image and the quantified measure are both based on the amplitude data, the phase data, or both.

  19. Electric power monthly, September 1990. [Glossary included

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-12-17

    The purpose of this report is to provide energy decision makers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues. The power plants considered include coal, petroleum, natural gas, hydroelectric, and nuclear power plants. Data are presented for power generation, fuel consumption, fuel receipts and cost, sales of electricity, and unusual occurrences at power plants. Data are compared at the national, Census division, and state levels. 4 figs., 52 tabs. (CK)

  20. MHK technology developments include current

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    technology developments include current energy conversion (CEC) devices, for example, hydrokinetic turbines that extract power from water currents (riverine, tidal, and ocean) and wave energy conversion (WEC) devices that extract power from wave motion. Sandia's MHK research leverages decades of experience in engineering, design, and analysis of wind power technologies, and its vast research complex, including high- performance computing (HPC), advanced materials and coatings, nondestructive

  1. Immobilization of radioiodine in synthetic boracite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Babad, H.; Strachan, D.M.

    1982-09-23

    A nuclear waste storage product is disclosed in which radioiodine is incorporated in a synthetic boracite. The boracite may be prepared by reacting a transition metal iodide with an alkali horate under mild hydrothermal conditions, drying the reaction product, and then hot pressing.

  2. Coal based synthetic fuel technology assessment guides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-09-01

    Seventeen synthetic fuel processes are described in detail and compared on a uniform basis. This work was supported by the Energy Information Administration for the purpose of technology assessment of the processes, their efficiency, the capitalized and operating cost of plants of similar size, possible constraints, possible siting problems, regional effects, pollution control, etc. (LTN)

  3. Newmark-Hall synthetic history development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aramayo, G.A.

    1990-11-01

    The methodology used to develop synthetic acceleration time histories with spectral content that envelopes the Newmark-Hall spectra is described. Six acceleration time histories are developed for two conditions of foundation and 3 critical damping factors. The target spectra corresponds to the mediam centered probability level.

  4. Natural gas annual 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-11-01

    The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1995 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1991 to 1995 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level.

  5. Microtubule-based nanomaterials: Exploiting nature's dynamic biopolymers

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bachand, George D.; Stevens, Mark J.; Spoerke, Erik David

    2015-04-09

    For more than a decade now, biomolecular systems have served as an inspiration for the development of synthetic nanomaterials and systems that are capable of reproducing many of unique and emergent behaviors of living systems. In addition, one intriguing element of such systems may be found in a specialized class of proteins known as biomolecular motors that are capable of performing useful work across multiple length scales through the efficient conversion of chemical energy. Microtubule (MT) filaments may be considered within this context as their dynamic assembly and disassembly dissipate energy, and perform work within the cell. MTs are onemore » of three cytoskeletal filaments in eukaryotic cells, and play critical roles in a range of cellular processes including mitosis and vesicular trafficking. Based on their function, physical attributes, and unique dynamics, MTs also serve as a powerful archetype of a supramolecular filament that underlies and drives multiscale emergent behaviors. In this review, we briefly summarize recent efforts to generate hybrid and composite nanomaterials using MTs as biomolecular scaffolds, as well as computational and synthetic approaches to develop synthetic one-dimensional nanostructures that display the enviable attributes of the natural filaments.« less

  6. Microtubule-based nanomaterials: Exploiting nature's dynamic biopolymers.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bachand, George D.; Stevens, Mark J.; Spoerke, Erik David

    2015-04-09

    For more than a decade now, biomolecular systems have served as an inspiration for the development of synthetic nanomaterials and systems that are capable of reproducing many of unique and emergent behaviors of living systems. In addition, one intriguing element of such systems may be found in a specialized class of proteins known as biomolecular motors that are capable of performing useful work across multiple length scales through the efficient conversion of chemical energy. Microtubule (MT) filaments may be considered within this context as their dynamic assembly and disassembly dissipate energy, and perform work within the cell. MTs are one of three cytoskeletal filaments in eukaryotic cells, and play critical roles in a range of cellular processes including mitosis and vesicular trafficking. Based on their function, physical attributes, and unique dynamics, MTs also serve as a powerful archetype of a supramolecular filament that underlies and drives multiscale emergent behaviors. In this review, we briefly summarize recent efforts to generate hybrid and composite nanomaterials using MTs as biomolecular scaffolds, as well as computational and synthetic approaches to develop synthetic one-dimensional nanostructures that display the enviable attributes of the natural filaments. Biotechnol. Bioeng.

  7. Natural gas dehydration apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wijmans, Johannes G; Ng, Alvin; Mairal, Anurag P

    2006-11-07

    A process and corresponding apparatus for dehydrating gas, especially natural gas. The process includes an absorption step and a membrane pervaporation step to regenerate the liquid sorbent.

  8. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    requested by Secretary of Energy Spencer Abraham in an effort to enhance natural gas market information and efficiency. Survey respondents would include all operators of...

  9. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    data to EIA. The number of companies reporting increased by 3 from 2008, to include Alon USA, Chalmette Refining LLC, and Western Refining, Inc. Natural Gas Transportation Update...

  10. Interpretation of Synthetic Aperture Radar measurements of ocean currents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rufenach, C.L.; Shuchman, R.A.; Lyzenga, D.R.

    1983-02-28

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) experiments hae been performed over the last few years to measure ocean currents inferred from shifts in the Doppler spectral peak. Interpretations of aircraft SAR measurements, when compared with limited surface values, tend to underestimate the currents by about 25%. A theory is developed that modifies the classical Doppler expression showing that the radar measurements are dependent on the radar processor (system) bandwidth and the received signal bandwidth. Measured bandwidths give a correction that increases the inferred current values by about 25%, bringing the measurements into good agreement. This new correction lends credence to the theory and increases the potential for application of SAR systems to future ocean current measurements. SAR measurements should include the determination of processor and signal bandwidths such that this correction can be applied.

  11. Wisconsin Supplemental Supplies of Natural Gas

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Synthetic 1980-1998 Propane-Air

  12. Innovative regulatory approach for synthetic-based muds.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veil, J. A.

    1998-10-22

    The oil and gas industry has historically used water-based muds (WBMs) and oil-based muds (OBMs) in offshore drilling operations. WBMs are less expensive and are widely used. Both the WBMs and the associated drill cuttings maybe discharged from the platform to the sea provided that U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) discharge limitations are met. In some wells, however, difficult drilling conditions may force a switch from a WBM to an OBM. Neither the OBM nor the associated drill cuttings may be discharged. The OBM is hauled to shore, where it is processed for reuse, while the associated cuttings are injected in a disposal well at the platform or hauled to shore to a disposal facility. Both of these options are expensive. Synthetic-based muds (SBMs) are drilling fluids that use synthetic organic chemicals as base fluids. SBMs were developed to replace OBMs in difficult drilling situations. SBMs are more expensive than OBMs; however, they have superior environmental properties that may permit the cuttings to be discharged on-site. Like OBMs, SBMs are hauled ashore for processing and reuse after the well is drilled. The existing national effluent limitations guidelines (ELGs) for the offshore industry do not include requirements for SBM-cuttings since SBMs were not commonly in use at the time the ELGs were adopted. In late 1997, EPA announced that it would modify the offshore ELGs to include requirements for discharges of cuttings drilled with SBMs. For the first time in the history of the ELG program, EPA is following an innovative presumptive rulemaking process that will lead to development of draft regulations in one year rather than the 4- to 6-year period usually needed. With direction from the federal government to stakeholders concerning information needs for the regulatory development the industry has established several working groups to collect new scientific information on SBMs. This paper describes the presumptive rulemaking process and summarizes the findings of the work groups to date.

  13. Natural gas monthly, July 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-07-01

    This document presents information pertaining to the natural gas industry. Data are included on production, consumption, distribution, and pipeline activities.

  14. A model for improving microbial biofuel production using a synthetic

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    feedback loop (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect A model for improving microbial biofuel production using a synthetic feedback loop Citation Details In-Document Search Title: A model for improving microbial biofuel production using a synthetic feedback loop Cells use feedback to implement a diverse range of regulatory functions. Building synthetic feedback control systems may yield insight into the roles that feedback can play in regulation since it can be introduced independently of native

  15. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Synthetic Solutions for

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Correcting Voltage Fade in LMR-NMC Cathodes | Department of Energy Synthetic Solutions for Correcting Voltage Fade in LMR-NMC Cathodes Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Synthetic Solutions for Correcting Voltage Fade in LMR-NMC Cathodes Presentation given by Argonne National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about synthetic solutions for correcting voltage fade in LMR-NMC

  16. Synthetic biology and crop engineering | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Synthetic biology and crop engineering Synthetic biology and crop engineering Breakout Session 2: Frontiers and Horizons Session 2-A: Synthetic Biology and the Promise of Biofuels Jonathan Burbaum, Program Director, Department of Energy, Office of Science, ARPA-E PDF icon b13_burbaum_2-a.pdf More Documents & Publications EIS-0481: Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0481: Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0481: Notice of Intent to Prepare a Programmatic

  17. Synthetic magnetoelectric coupling in a nanocomposite multiferroic

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jain, P.; Wang, Q.; Roldan, M.; Glavic, A.; Lauter, V.; Urban, C.; Bi, Z.; Ahmed, T.; Zhu, J.; Varela, M.; et al

    2015-03-13

    Given the paucity of single phase multiferroic materials (with large ferromagnetic moment), composite systems seem an attractive solution to realize magnetoelectric coupling between ferromagnetic and ferroelectric order parameters. Despite having antiferromagnetic order, BiFeO₃ (BFO) has nevertheless been a key material due to excellent ferroelectric properties at room temperature. We studied a superlattice composed of 8 repetitions of 6 unit cells of La₀.₇Sr₀.₃MnO₃ (LSMO) grown on 5 unit cells of BFO. Significant net uncompensated magnetization in BFO, an insulating superlattice, is demonstrated using polarized neutron reflectometry. Remarkably, the magnetization enables magnetic field to change the dielectric properties of the superlattice, whichmore » we cite as an example of synthetic magnetoelectric coupling. Importantly, controlled creation of magnetic moment in BFO is a much needed path toward design and implementation of integrated oxide devices for next generation magnetoelectric data storage platforms.« less

  18. Inversion of synthetic aperture radar interferograms for sources...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Inversion of synthetic aperture radar interferograms for sources of production-related subsidence at the Dixie Valley geothermal field Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference...

  19. Synthetic Information and Decision Informatics for Complex Systems...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dynamics & Simulation Science Laboratory SALISHAN 2010 Tackling Big Data: HPC Approaches to Informatics Synthetic Information and Decision Informatics for Complex Socially-Coupled...

  20. New synthetic strategy for porous molecular materials towards gas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    separation | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy Technologies | Blandine Jerome New synthetic strategy for porous molecular materials towards gas separation

  1. A versatile synthetic route for the preparation of titanium metal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    metal-organic frameworks Citation Details In-Document Search Title: A versatile synthetic route for the preparation of titanium metal-organic frameworks Exploitation of new ...

  2. Environmental data energy technology characterizations: synthetic fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-04-01

    Environmental Data Energy Technology Characterizations are publications which are intended to provide policy analysts and technical analysts with basic environmental data associated with key energy technologies. This publication provides documentation on synthetic fuels (coal-derived and oil shale). The transformation of the energy in coal and oil shale into a more useful form is described in this publication in terms of major activity areas in the synthetic fuel cycles, that is, in terms of activities which produce either an energy product or a fuel leading to the production of an energy product in a different form. The activities discussed in this document are coal liquefaction, coal gasification, in-situ gasification, and oil shales. These activities represent both well-documented and advanced activity areas. The former activities are characterized in terms of actual operating data with allowance for future modification where appropriate. Emissions are assumed to conform to environmental standards. The advanced activity areas examined are those like coal liquefaction and in-situ retorting of oil shale. For these areas, data from pilot or demonstration plants were used where available; otherwise, engineering studies provided the data. The organization of the chapters in this volume is designed to support the tabular presentation in the summary volume. Each chapter begins with a brief description of the activity under consideration. The standard characteristics, size, availability, mode of functioning and place in the fuel cycle are presented. Next, major legislative and/or technological factors influencing the commercial operation of the activity are offered. Discussions of resources consumed, residuals produced, and economics follow. To aid in comparing and linking the different activity areas, data for each area are normalized to 10/sup 12/ Btu of energy output from the activity.

  3. Natural gas annual 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-10-01

    The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1997 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1993 to 1997 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level. 27 figs., 109 tabs.

  4. Motion Measurement for Synthetic Aperture Radar.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doerry, Armin W.

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) measures radar soundings from a set of locations typically along the flight path of a radar platform vehicle. Optimal focusing requires precise knowledge of the sounding source locations in 3 - D space with respect to the target scene. Even data driven focusing techniques (i.e. autofocus) requires some degree of initial fidelity in the measurements of the motion of the radar. These requirements may be quite stringent especially for fine resolution, long ranges, and low velocities. The principal instrument for measuring motion is typically an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU), but these instruments have inherent limi ted precision and accuracy. The question is %22How good does an IMU need to be for a SAR across its performance space?%22 This report analytically relates IMU specifications to parametric requirements for SAR. - 4 - Acknowledgements Th e preparation of this report is the result of a n unfunded research and development activity . Although this report is an independent effort, it draws heavily from limited - release documentation generated under a CRADA with General Atomics - Aeronautical System, Inc. (GA - ASI), and under the Joint DoD/DOE Munitions Program Memorandum of Understanding. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi - program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of En ergy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE - AC04 - 94AL85000.

  5. Synthetic biological membrane with self organizing properties

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Firestone, Millicent A.; Tiede, David M.

    2003-01-01

    A mixture is provided which manifests a gel phase at a temperature higher than that in which the mixture manifests a liquid phase. The mixture is a combination of a lipid, a polymer-grafted phospholipid and a surfactant. It is biomimetic in nature and changes phases when subjected to one or a plurality of environmental stimuli.

  6. Computational optimization of synthetic water channels.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rogers, David Michael; Rempe, Susan L. B.

    2012-12-01

    Membranes for liquid and gas separations and ion transport are critical to water purification, osmotic energy generation, fuel cells, batteries, supercapacitors, and catalysis. Often these membranes lack pore uniformity and robustness under operating conditions, which can lead to a decrease in performance. The lack of uniformity means that many pores are non-functional. Traditional membranes overcome these limitations by using thick membrane materials that impede transport and selectivity, which results in decreased performance and increased operating costs. For example, limitations in membrane performance demand high applied pressures to deionize water using reverse osmosis. In contrast, cellular membranes combine high flux and selective transport using membrane-bound protein channels operating at small pressure differences. Pore size and chemistry in the cellular channels is defined uniformly and with sub-nanometer precision through protein folding. The thickness of these cellular membranes is limited to that of the cellular membrane bilayer, about 4 nm thick, which enhances transport. Pores in the cellular membranes are robust under operating conditions in the body. Recent efforts to mimic cellular water channels for efficient water deionization produced a significant advance in membrane function. The novel biomimetic design achieved a 10-fold increase in membrane permeability to water flow compared to commercial membranes and still maintained high salt rejection. Despite this success, there is a lack of understanding about why this membrane performs so well. To address this lack of knowledge, we used highperformance computing to interrogate the structural and chemical environments experienced by water and electrolytes in the newly created biomimetic membranes. We also compared the solvation environments between the biomimetic membrane and cellular water channels. These results will help inform future efforts to optimize and tune the performance of synthetic biomimetic membranes for applications in water purification, energy, and catalysis.

  7. Natural gas monthly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-05-01

    This document highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Data presented include volume and price, production, consumption, underground storage, and interstate pipeline activities.

  8. Synthetic muscle experiment will likely return to Earth in March |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Princeton Plasma Physics Lab Synthetic muscle experiment will likely return to Earth in March By Jeanne Jackson DeVoe October 26, 2015 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook A photo taken by Astronaut Scott Kelly of a sample of the synthetic muscle experiment floating in the International Space Station. (Photo by Scott Kelly, Courtesy of NASA ) A photo taken by Astronaut Scott Kelly of a sample of the synthetic muscle experiment floating in the International Space Station. Gallery: A

  9. Synthetic fuels and the environment: an environmental and regulatory impacts analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-06-01

    Since July 1979 when DOE/EV-0044 report Environmental Analysis of Synthetic Liquid fuels was published the synthetic fuels program proposals of the Administration have undergone significant modifications. The program year for which the development goal of 1.5 million barrels per day is to be reached has been changed from 1990 to 1995. The program plan is now proposed to have two stages to ensure, among other things, better environmental protection: an initial stage emphasizing applied research and development (R and D), including environmental research, followed by a second stage that would accelerate deployment of those synthetic fuel technologies then judged most ready for rapid deployment and economic operation within the environmental protection requirements. These program changes have significantly expanded the scope of technologies to be considered in this environmental analysis and have increased the likelihood that accelerated environmental R and D efforts will be successful in solving principal environmental and worker safety concerns for most technologies prior to the initiation of the second stage of the accelerated deployment plan. Information is presented under the following section headings: summary; study description; the technologies and their environmental concerns (including, coal liquefaction and gasification, oil shale production, biomass and urban waste conversion); regulatory and institutional analyses; and environmental impacts analysis (including air and water quaility analyses, impacts of carbon dioxide and acid rain, water availability, solid and hazardous wastes, coal mining environmental impacts, transportation issues, community growth and change, and regional impacts). Additional information is presented in seventeen appendixes. (JGB)

  10. Synthesis of Polycyclic Natural Products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuan Hoang Nguyen

    2003-05-31

    With the continuous advancements in molecular biology and modern medicine, organic synthesis has become vital to the support and extension of those discoveries. The isolations of new natural products allow for the understanding of their biological activities and therapeutic value. Organic synthesis is employed to aid in the determination of the relationship between structure and function of these natural products. The development of synthetic methodologies in the course of total syntheses is imperative for the expansion of this highly interdisciplinary field of science. In addition to the practical applications of total syntheses, the structural complexity of natural products represents a worthwhile challenge in itself. The pursuit of concise and efficient syntheses of complex molecules is both gratifying and enjoyable.

  11. Formulation of cracking catalyst based on zeolite and natural clays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aliev, R.R.; Lupina, M.I.

    1995-11-01

    Domestically manufactured cracking catalysts are based on a synthetic amorphous aluminosilicate matrix and Y zeolite. A multistage {open_quotes}gel{close_quotes} technology is used in manufacturing the catalysts. The process includes mixing solutions of sodium silicate and acidic aluminum sulfate, forming, syneresis, and activation of the beaded gel. In the manufacture of bead catalysts, the next steps in the process are washing, drying, and calcining; in the manufacture of microbead catalysts, the next steps are dispersion and formation of a hydrogel slurry, spray-drying, and calcining. The Y zeolite is either introduced into the alumina-silica sol in the stage of forming the beads, or introduced in the dispersion stage. With the aim of developing an active and selective cracking catalyst based on Y zeolite and natural clays, with improved physicomechanical properties, the authors carried out a series of studies, obtaining results that are set forth in the present article.

  12. Topic A Note: Includes STEPS Subtopic

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Topic A Note: Includes STEPS Subtopic 33 Total Projects Developing and Enhancing Workforce Training Programs

  13. Synthetic muscle developed with PPPL scientists' help launches | Princeton

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plasma Physics Lab muscle developed with PPPL scientists' help launches By Jeanne Jackson DeVoe April 8, 2015 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook Lenore Rasmussen examines a titanium coupon used in her synthetic muscle being treated in an oxygen plasma at PPPL. (Photo by Elle Starkman/PPPL Office of Communications) Lenore Rasmussen examines a titanium coupon used in her synthetic muscle being treated in an oxygen plasma at PPPL. Gallery: Lenore Rasmussen was one of several

  14. Synthetic muscle developed with PPPL scientists' help ready for launch |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Princeton Plasma Physics Lab Synthetic muscle developed with PPPL scientists' help ready for launch By Jeanne Jackson DeVoe April 8, 2015 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook Gallery: The Dragon spacecraft in orbit. Photo courtesy of NASA) (Photo by Photo courtesy of NASA) The Dragon spacecraft in orbit. Photo courtesy of NASA) The synthetic muscle material before it was packed for transport to the International Space Station. ( Photo courtesy of NASA ) (Photo by Photo courtesy of

  15. Copy of Synthetic Biology of Novel Thermophilic Bacteria for Enhanced

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Production of Ethanol from 5-Carbon Sugars (LDRD %23 105944). (Conference) | SciTech Connect Copy of Synthetic Biology of Novel Thermophilic Bacteria for Enhanced Production of Ethanol from 5-Carbon Sugars (LDRD %23 105944). Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Copy of Synthetic Biology of Novel Thermophilic Bacteria for Enhanced Production of Ethanol from 5-Carbon Sugars (LDRD %23 105944). Abstract not provided. Authors: Reichmuth, David ; Kozina, Carol L. ; Sale, Kenneth L. ;

  16. Designer synthetic media for studying microbial-catalyzed biofuel

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    production (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Designer synthetic media for studying microbial-catalyzed biofuel production Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Designer synthetic media for studying microbial-catalyzed biofuel production Background: The fermentation inhibition of yeast or bacteria by lignocellulose-derived degradation products, during hexose/pentose co-fermentation, is a major bottleneck for cost-effective lignocellulosic biorefineries. To engineer microbial strains

  17. Designer synthetic media for studying microbial-catalyzed biofuel

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    production (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Designer synthetic media for studying microbial-catalyzed biofuel production Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Designer synthetic media for studying microbial-catalyzed biofuel production × You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech Connect. This site is a product of DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) and is provided as a public service. Visit OSTI to utilize additional

  18. Development of a removable conformal coating through the synthetic

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    incorporation of Diels-Adler thermally reversible adducts into an epoxy resin. (Conference) | SciTech Connect Conference: Development of a removable conformal coating through the synthetic incorporation of Diels-Adler thermally reversible adducts into an epoxy resin. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Development of a removable conformal coating through the synthetic incorporation of Diels-Adler thermally reversible adducts into an epoxy resin. An epoxy-based conformal coating with a

  19. A hybrid synthetic pathway for butanol production by a hyperthermophilic

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    microbe (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect A hybrid synthetic pathway for butanol production by a hyperthermophilic microbe Citation Details In-Document Search Title: A hybrid synthetic pathway for butanol production by a hyperthermophilic microbe Authors: Keller, Matthew W. ; Lipscomb, Gina L. ; Loder, Andrew J. ; Schut, Gerrit J. ; Kelly, Robert M. ; Adams, Michael W.W. Publication Date: 2015-01-01 OSTI Identifier: 1233934 Grant/Contract Number: AR0000081 Type: Publisher's Accepted

  20. Application of Synthetic Diesel Fuels | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Synthetic Diesel Fuels Application of Synthetic Diesel Fuels 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations and Posters PDF icon 2005_deer_schaberg.pdf More Documents & Publications Effect of GTL Diesel Fuels on Emissions and Engine Performance The Potential of GTL Diesel to Meet Future Exhaust Emission Limits Performance Characteristics of Coal-to-Liquids (CTL) Diesel in a 50-State Emissions Compliant Passenger Car

  1. Intramolecular hydrogen bonding as a synthetic tool to induce chemical

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    selectivity in acid catalyzed porphyrin synthesis Intramolecular hydrogen bonding as a synthetic tool to induce chemical selectivity in acid catalyzed porphyrin synthesis Authors: Megiatto, J. D., Patterson, D., Sherman, B. D., Moore, T. A., Gust, D., and Moore, A. L. Title: Intramolecular hydrogen bonding as a synthetic tool to induce chemical selectivity in acid catalyzed porphyrin synthesis Source: Chemical Communications Year: 2012 Volume: 48 Pages: 4558-4560 ABSTRACT: A straightforward

  2. Synthetic Biology of Novel Thermophilic Bacteria for Enhanced Production of

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Ethanol from 5-Carbon Sugars (LDRD %23 105944). (Conference) | SciTech Connect Synthetic Biology of Novel Thermophilic Bacteria for Enhanced Production of Ethanol from 5-Carbon Sugars (LDRD %23 105944). Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Synthetic Biology of Novel Thermophilic Bacteria for Enhanced Production of Ethanol from 5-Carbon Sugars (LDRD %23 105944). Abstract not provided. Authors: Sapra, Rajat ; Reichmuth, David ; Kozina, Carol L. ; Sale, Kenneth L. ; Keasling, Jay ; Tang,

  3. Synthetic environment employing a craft for providing user perspective reference

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maples, Creve (Albuquerque, NM); Peterson, Craig A. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1997-10-21

    A multi-dimensional user oriented synthetic environment system allows application programs to be programmed and accessed with input/output device independent, generic functional commands which are a distillation of the actual functions performed by any application program. A shared memory structure allows the translation of device specific commands to device independent, generic functional commands. Complete flexibility of the mapping of synthetic environment data to the user is thereby allowed. Accordingly, synthetic environment data may be provided to the user on parallel user information processing channels allowing the subcognitive mind to act as a filter, eliminating irrelevant information and allowing the processing of increase amounts of data by the user. The user is further provided with a craft surrounding the user within the synthetic environment, which craft, imparts important visual referential an motion parallax cues, enabling the user to better appreciate distances and directions within the synthetic environment. Display of this craft in close proximity to the user's point of perspective may be accomplished without substantially degrading the image resolution of the displayed portions of the synthetic environment.

  4. Natural Gas Regulation | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Natural Gas Regulation Natural Gas Regulation Natural Gas Regulation The Natural Gas Act of 1938, as amended, requires any person who wishes to import and/or export natural gas, (including liquefied natural gas, compressed natural gas, compressed gas liquids, etc.) from or to a foreign country must first obtain an authorization from the Department of Energy. The authorizations are granted by the Office of Regulation and International Engagement, Division of Natural Gas Regulation. DOE grants two

  5. Synthetic fuels handbook: properties, process and performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Speight, J.

    2008-07-01

    The handbook is a comprehensive guide to the benefits and trade-offs of numerous alternative fuels, presenting expert analyses of the different properties, processes, and performance characteristics of each fuel. It discusses the concept systems and technology involved in the production of fuels on both industrial and individual scales. Chapters 5 and 7 are of special interest to the coal industry. Contents: Chapter 1. Fuel Sources - Conventional and Non-conventional; Chapter 2. Natural Gas; Chapter 3. Fuels From Petroleum and Heavy Oil; Chapter 4. Fuels From Tar Sand Bitumen; Chapter 5. Fuels From Coal; Chapter 6. Fuels From Oil Shale; Chapter 7. Fuels From Synthesis Gas; Chapter 8. Fuels From Biomass; Chapter 9. Fuels From Crops; Chapter 10. Fuels From Wood; Chapter 11. Fuels From Domestic and Industrial Waste; Chapter 12. Landfill Gas. 3 apps.

  6. INSTRUMENTATION, INCLUDING NUCLEAR AND PARTICLE DETECTORS; RADIATION

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    interval technical basis document Chiaro, P.J. Jr. 44 INSTRUMENTATION, INCLUDING NUCLEAR AND PARTICLE DETECTORS; RADIATION DETECTORS; RADIATION MONITORS; DOSEMETERS;...

  7. Natural Gas Modernization Clearinghouse | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Modernization Clearinghouse Natural Gas Modernization Clearinghouse Overview This Natural Gas Modernization Clearinghouse provides information about the implications of natural gas infrastructure modernization, including strategies and technologies that increase public safety, improve efficiency and environmental performance and enhance natural gas deliverability. Specific topic areas include information on measuring and reducing methane emissions, technology research and development, job

  8. Tennessee Supplemental Supplies of Natural Gas

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Synthetic 1980-2003 Propane-Air 1980-2004

  9. Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

    2014-11-25

    A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material, such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

  10. Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

    2013-02-19

    A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

  11. Communications circuit including a linear quadratic estimator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ferguson, Dennis D.

    2015-07-07

    A circuit includes a linear quadratic estimator (LQE) configured to receive a plurality of measurements a signal. The LQE is configured to weight the measurements based on their respective uncertainties to produce weighted averages. The circuit further includes a controller coupled to the LQE and configured to selectively adjust at least one data link parameter associated with a communication channel in response to receiving the weighted averages.

  12. Intentionally Including - Engaging Minorities in Physics Careers |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy Intentionally Including - Engaging Minorities in Physics Careers Intentionally Including - Engaging Minorities in Physics Careers April 24, 2013 - 4:37pm Addthis Joining Director Dot Harris (second from left) were Marlene Kaplan, the Deputy Director of Education and director of EPP, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Claudia Rankins, a Program Officer with the National Science Foundation and Jim Stith, the past Vice-President of the American Institute of

  13. Kapitza problem for the magnetic moments of synthetic antiferromagnetic systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dzhezherya, Yu. I.; Demishev, K. O.; Korenivskii, V. N.

    2012-08-15

    The dynamics of magnetization in synthetic antiferromagnetic systems with the magnetic dipole coupling in a rapidly oscillating field has been examined. It has been revealed that the system can behave similar to the Kapitza pendulum. It has been shown that an alternating magnetic field can be efficiently used to control the magnetic state of a cell of a synthetic antiferromagnet. Analytical relations have been obtained between the parameters of such an antiferromagnet and an external magnetic field at which certain quasistationary states are implemented.

  14. Scramjet including integrated inlet and combustor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kutschenreuter, P.H. Jr.; Blanton, J.C.

    1992-02-04

    This patent describes a scramjet engine. It comprises: a first surface including an aft facing step; a cowl including: a leading edge and a trailing edge; an upper surface and a lower surface extending between the leading edge and the trailing edge; the cowl upper surface being spaced from and generally parallel to the first surface to define an integrated inlet-combustor therebetween having an inlet for receiving and channeling into the inlet-combustor supersonic inlet airflow; means for injecting fuel into the inlet-combustor at the step for mixing with the supersonic inlet airflow for generating supersonic combustion gases; and further including a spaced pari of sidewalls extending between the first surface to the cowl upper surface and wherein the integrated inlet-combustor is generally rectangular and defined by the sidewall pair, the first surface and the cowl upper surface.

  15. Electric Power Monthly, August 1990. [Glossary included

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-11-29

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly summaries of electric utility statistics at the national, Census division, and State level. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data includes generation by energy source (coal, oil, gas, hydroelectric, and nuclear); generation by region; consumption of fossil fuels for power generation; sales of electric power, cost data; and unusual occurrences. A glossary is included.

  16. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in New Jersey (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 79,986 68,763 70,125 50,543 32,523 31,342 30,182 34,881 28,906 36,822 42,533 54,282 2002 72,928 65,857 60,240 47,158 36,702 34,685 39,001 38,755 34,515 35,116 53,058 78,844 2003 86,899 82,946 70,961 52,763 38,335 30,506 34,444 34,047 29,057 34,046 45,854 71,131 2004 87,227 84,410 64,483 52,496 39,871 33,708 33,345 34,799 31,379 32,916 52,729 71,562 2005 82,164 79,445 75,959 48,550 33,360 32,116 36,629 37,974

  17. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in New York (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 135,000 121,033 117,080 87,191 75,087 78,246 82,949 95,148 84,785 85,317 85,604 117,809 2002 130,795 125,601 121,522 96,684 77,319 74,903 86,308 87,878 74,748 77,281 106,098 130,678 2003 145,176 150,464 132,321 96,357 69,848 57,468 66,369 71,177 61,893 63,566 74,370 103,175 2004 143,310 146,400 118,918 96,553 76,708 61,518 59,080 60,352 63,530 61,753 84,337 116,290 2005 131,102 130,863 130,581 94,151 72,115 68,850

  18. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in North Dakota (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 4,834 5,238 3,535 3,807 2,613 2,533 1,360 2,387 1,944 3,013 3,065 4,459 2002 5,661 4,458 5,166 3,571 2,897 2,629 1,967 1,963 1,988 3,550 3,908 4,743 2003 5,308 4,986 4,115 2,464 2,072 1,511 1,109 963 1,664 2,336 3,871 6,879 2004 5,976 4,565 4,243 2,998 2,087 1,270 1,207 1,858 2,219 2,970 3,638 4,990 2005 5,232 4,001 3,696 1,946 1,836 1,412 1,270 1,148 1,611 2,646 3,372 4,268 2006 3,774 4,128 3,685 2,658 2,395

  19. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Rhode Island (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 9,425 8,875 9,886 7,566 7,317 6,419 6,971 7,536 7,493 7,652 6,918 9,231 2002 10,511 8,745 7,848 6,823 6,244 5,757 5,873 5,748 5,630 5,720 8,981 9,553 2003 9,510 10,141 9,429 5,721 4,332 4,902 5,830 5,423 4,891 4,709 6,468 6,670 2004 9,122 9,552 6,607 6,373 5,874 5,299 4,296 4,885 3,594 3,675 6,015 6,955 2005 8,403 8,917 7,847 7,729 6,062 6,293 5,990 6,010 4,836 5,169 5,246 7,434 2006 8,207 6,737 7,405 5,579 5,935

  20. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in South Dakota (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 4,302 4,607 4,228 2,845 1,940 1,381 1,492 1,496 1,058 1,661 2,126 3,617 2002 4,603 4,036 4,766 3,060 2,078 1,454 1,619 1,300 1,471 2,623 3,873 4,121 2003 5,421 5,156 4,455 2,953 1,928 1,710 1,882 1,675 1,591 2,054 3,715 4,455 2004 5,515 4,940 3,584 2,439 1,808 1,650 1,686 1,576 1,638 1,998 3,307 4,743 2005 5,319 4,504 3,722 3,219 2,207 2,079 1,880 1,845 1,562 1,943 3,073 4,906 2006 4,013 4,348 3,843 2,535 1,775

  1. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in the District of Columbia (Including

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Vehicle Fuel) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 5,440 4,546 4,141 3,185 1,654 1,252 1,226 905 1,087 1,231 2,088 2,737 2002 4,830 4,239 3,718 2,066 1,544 1,155 1,149 1,164 1,202 2,189 3,889 5,436 2003 5,818 4,995 3,621 2,478 1,550 1,112 1,094 1,240 844 1,963 2,691 4,848 2004 6,285 4,650 3,323 2,349 1,239 1,067 985 1,168 1,066 1,895 2,937 4,696 2005 5,419 4,311 4,308 1,880 1,539 1,133 1,217 1,100 1,124 1,628 2,941 4,935 2006 4,198 4,285 3,486 1,795

  2. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in New Jersey (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 713,603 676,918 711,514 2000's 602,377 561,182 597,158 611,357 619,339 601,154 546,250 617,451 613,019 619,112 2010's 649,099 655,088 647,457 676,688 757,130 NA

  3. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in New Mexico (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 130,234 133,745 131,611 2000's 139,812 144,176 119,828 117,794 112,886 123,731 127,858 137,670 146,860 143,089 2010's 148,181 153,464 151,602 156,581 152,942 NA

  4. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in North Dakota (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 42,862 40,819 38,206 2000's 36,499 38,854 42,569 37,361 38,112 32,441 33,305 39,114 43,858 38,187 2010's 44,603 50,214 46,639 53,469 54,307 55,321

  5. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Rhode Island (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 116,871 130,415 117,758 2000's 88,124 95,326 87,472 78,074 72,301 80,070 76,401 87,150 88,391 91,843 2010's 92,642 99,452 94,452 84,450 85,849 90,20

  6. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in South Dakota (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 32,294 29,390 28,910 2000's 30,667 30,766 35,018 37,011 34,900 36,259 34,809 47,675 60,026 62,376 2010's 66,195 66,320 62,969 74,182 73,917 73,755

  7. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in the District of Columbia (Including

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Vehicle Fuel) (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 33,860 30,153 32,037 2000's 33,225 29,567 32,656 32,345 31,762 31,598 28,585 32,728 31,678 33,000 2010's 33,038 31,159 27,493 31,309 32,751 29,15

  8. Synthetic fuels summary. [1850 to 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conta, Lewis D.; Fiedler, Harry H.; Hill, Richard F.; Ksander, Yuri; Parker, Harry W.; Reilly, Matthew J.; Roger, Kenneth A.; Cooke, Charles E.; Novak, Robert; Booker, John D.; Gouse, S. William; Joyce, Thomas J.; Knudsen, Christian W.; Yancik, Joseph J.

    1981-03-01

    This report examines the federal government's experience in synfuels, the market potential of synfuels, the US energy resources base, and the numerous technologies available. Technologies and energy resources are reviewed and compared to provide the facts needed to understand existing energy-related problems. This introductory manual is an overview of synfuel technologies, and markets. It is not meant to be the sole source of information on which multi-billion dollar investment decisions for specific synfuel plants would be based. The report, published originally in August 1980, has been revised to incorporate appropriate corrections and clarifications. The intent behind these revisions is to present the best technical and programmatic information available as of the original publication date, August 1980. The original report included certain information about the relative costs of selected synfuels technologies. Economics are especially sensitive to recent events and updated information, and it would possibly be misleading to restate the original cost data in this report. It was felt that the original cost data needed major updating and reconciliation due to differences in project scope, basic assumptions, and costing methodologies. ESCOE believes that reliable economic comparisons require timely data and a recognition of any major differences in scope or methodology. Therefore, ESCOE, in a separate task, is undertaking an updated commercial scale economic comparison of selected synfuel processes, on a normalized basis. The results of this task will be published as a separate ESCOE report.

  9. Synthetic aperture design for increased SAR image rate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bielek, Timothy P.; Thompson, Douglas G.; Walker, Bruce C.

    2009-03-03

    High resolution SAR images of a target scene at near video rates can be produced by using overlapped, but nevertheless, full-size synthetic apertures. The SAR images, which respectively correspond to the apertures, can be analyzed in sequence to permit detection of movement in the target scene.

  10. Subterranean barriers including at least one weld

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nickelson, Reva A.; Sloan, Paul A.; Richardson, John G.; Walsh, Stephanie; Kostelnik, Kevin M.

    2007-01-09

    A subterranean barrier and method for forming same are disclosed, the barrier including a plurality of casing strings wherein at least one casing string of the plurality of casing strings may be affixed to at least another adjacent casing string of the plurality of casing strings through at least one weld, at least one adhesive joint, or both. A method and system for nondestructively inspecting a subterranean barrier is disclosed. For instance, a radiographic signal may be emitted from within a casing string toward an adjacent casing string and the radiographic signal may be detected from within the adjacent casing string. A method of repairing a barrier including removing at least a portion of a casing string and welding a repair element within the casing string is disclosed. A method of selectively heating at least one casing string forming at least a portion of a subterranean barrier is disclosed.

  11. Photoactive devices including porphyrinoids with coordinating additives

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forrest, Stephen R; Zimmerman, Jeramy; Yu, Eric K; Thompson, Mark E; Trinh, Cong; Whited, Matthew; Diev, Vlacheslav

    2015-05-12

    Coordinating additives are included in porphyrinoid-based materials to promote intermolecular organization and improve one or more photoelectric characteristics of the materials. The coordinating additives are selected from fullerene compounds and organic compounds having free electron pairs. Combinations of different coordinating additives can be used to tailor the characteristic properties of such porphyrinoid-based materials, including porphyrin oligomers. Bidentate ligands are one type of coordinating additive that can form coordination bonds with a central metal ion of two different porphyrinoid compounds to promote porphyrinoid alignment and/or pi-stacking. The coordinating additives can shift the absorption spectrum of a photoactive material toward higher wavelengths, increase the external quantum efficiency of the material, or both.

  12. Synthetic Biology and the U.S. Biotechnology Regulatory System: Challenges and Options

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carter, Sarah R.; Rodemeyer, Michael; Garfinkel, Michele S.; Friedman, Robert M

    2014-05-01

    Synthetic Biology and the U.S. Biotechnology Regulatory System: Challenges and Options Sarah R. Carter, Ph.D., J. Craig Venter Institute; Michael Rodemeyer, J.D., University of Virginia; Michele S. Garfinkel, Ph.D., EMBO; Robert M. Friedman, Ph.D., J. Craig Venter Institute In recent years, a range of genetic engineering techniques referred to as synthetic biology has significantly expanded the tool kit available to scientists and engineers, providing them with far greater capabilities to engineer organisms than previous techniques allowed. The field of synthetic biology includes the relatively new ability to synthesize long pieces of DNA from chemicals, as well as improved methods for genetic manipulation and design of genetic pathways to achieve more precise control of biological systems. These advances will help usher in a new generation of genetically engineered microbes, plants, and animals. The JCVI Policy Center team, along with researchers at the University of Virginia and EMBO, examined how well the current U.S. regulatory system for genetically engineered products will handle the near-term introduction of organisms engineered using synthetic biology. In particular, the focus was on those organisms intended to be used or grown directly in the environment, outside of a contained facility. The study concludes that the U.S. regulatory agencies have adequate legal authority to address most, but not all, potential environmental, health and safety concerns posed by these organisms. Such near-term products are likely to represent incremental changes rather than a marked departure from previous genetically engineered organisms. However, the study also identified two key challenges for the regulatory system, which are detailed in the report. First, USDAs authority over genetically engineered plants depends on the use of an older engineering technique that is no longer necessary for many applications. The shift to synthetic biology and other newer genetic engineering techniques will leave many engineered plants without any pre-market regulatory review. Second, the number and diversity of engineered microbes for commercial use will increase in the near future, challenging EPAs resources, expertise, and perhaps authority to regulate them. For each of these challenges, the report sets out a series of options, including an analysis of the advantages and disadvantages of each option from a variety of perspectives, for policy makers to consider. Policy responses will depend on the trade-offs chosen among competing considerations. This report, funded by the Department of Energy with additional funds from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, is the result of a two-year process that included interviews, commissioned background papers, discussions, and two workshops that sought input from a wide range of experts, including U.S. federal agency regulators, legal and science policy experts, representatives from the biotechnology industry, and non-governmental organizations. This cross-section of views informed this report, but the conclusions are solely those of the authors. An Executive Summary, full Report, and background papers are available at: http://www.jcvi.org/cms/research/projects/synthetic-biology-and-the-us-biotechnology-regulatory-system/overview/

  13. Nuclear reactor shield including magnesium oxide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rouse, Carl A. (Del Mar, CA); Simnad, Massoud T. (La Jolla, CA)

    1981-01-01

    An improvement in nuclear reactor shielding of a type used in reactor applications involving significant amounts of fast neutron flux, the reactor shielding including means providing structural support, neutron moderator material, neutron absorber material and other components as described below, wherein at least a portion of the neutron moderator material is magnesium in the form of magnesium oxide either alone or in combination with other moderator materials such as graphite and iron.

  14. Rotor assembly including superconducting magnetic coil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Snitchler, Gregory L. (Shrewsbury, MA); Gamble, Bruce B. (Wellesley, MA); Voccio, John P. (Somerville, MA)

    2003-01-01

    Superconducting coils and methods of manufacture include a superconductor tape wound concentrically about and disposed along an axis of the coil to define an opening having a dimension which gradually decreases, in the direction along the axis, from a first end to a second end of the coil. Each turn of the superconductor tape has a broad surface maintained substantially parallel to the axis of the coil.

  15. Natural resources law handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    This book covers legal topics ranging from ownership-related issues (including disposition, use and management of privately and publicly-owned lands, resources, minerals and waters) to the protection and maintenance of our nation's natural resources. It contains chapters on oil and gas resources, coal resources, and minerals and mining.

  16. Natural Gas Exports from Iran

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2012-01-01

    This assessment of the natural gas sector in Iran, with a focus on Iran’s natural gas exports, was prepared pursuant to section 505 (a) of the Iran Threat Reduction and Syria Human Rights Act of 2012 (Public Law No: 112-158). As requested, it includes: (1) an assessment of exports of natural gas from Iran; (2) an identification of the countries that purchase the most natural gas from Iran; (3) an assessment of alternative supplies of natural gas available to those countries; (4) an assessment of the impact a reduction in exports of natural gas from Iran would have on global natural gas supplies and the price of natural gas, especially in countries identified under number (2); and (5) such other information as the Administrator considers appropriate.

  17. Natural Gas Exports from Iran

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2012-01-01

    This assessment of the natural gas sector in Iran, with a focus on Irans natural gas exports, was prepared pursuant to section 505 (a) of the Iran Threat Reduction and Syria Human Rights Act of 2012 (Public Law No: 112-158). As requested, it includes: (1) an assessment of exports of natural gas from Iran; (2) an identification of the countries that purchase the most natural gas from Iran; (3) an assessment of alternative supplies of natural gas available to those countries; (4) an assessment of the impact a reduction in exports of natural gas from Iran would have on global natural gas supplies and the price of natural gas, especially in countries identified under number (2); and (5) such other information as the Administrator considers appropriate.

  18. Composite material including nanocrystals and methods of making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bawendi, Moungi G.; Sundar, Vikram C.

    2008-02-05

    Temperature-sensing compositions can include an inorganic material, such as a semiconductor nanocrystal. The nanocrystal can be a dependable and accurate indicator of temperature. The intensity of emission of the nanocrystal varies with temperature and can be highly sensitive to surface temperature. The nanocrystals can be processed with a binder to form a matrix, which can be varied by altering the chemical nature of the surface of the nanocrystal. A nanocrystal with a compatibilizing outer layer can be incorporated into a coating formulation and retain its temperature sensitive emissive properties

  19. Composite material including nanocrystals and methods of making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bawendi, Moungi G.; Sundar, Vikram C.

    2010-04-06

    Temperature-sensing compositions can include an inorganic material, such as a semiconductor nanocrystal. The nanocrystal can be a dependable and accurate indicator of temperature. The intensity of emission of the nanocrystal varies with temperature and can be highly sensitive to surface temperature. The nanocrystals can be processed with a binder to form a matrix, which can be varied by altering the chemical nature of the surface of the nanocrystal. A nanocrystal with a compatibilizing outer layer can be incorporated into a coating formulation and retain its temperature sensitive emissive properties.

  20. Natural Gas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear Energy Nuclear

  1. Synthetic Catalysts for CO2 Storage: Catalytic Improvement of Solvent Capture Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-08-15

    IMPACCT Project: LLNL is designing a process to pull CO2 out of the exhaust gas of coal-fired power plants so it can be transported, stored, or utilized elsewhere. Human lungs rely on an enzyme known as carbonic anhydrase to help separate CO2 from our blood and tissue as part of the normal breathing process. LLNL is designing a synthetic catalyst with the same function as this enzyme. The catalyst can be used to quickly capture CO2 from coal exhaust, just as the natural enzyme does in our lungs. LLNL is also developing a method of encapsulating chemical solvents in permeable microspheres that will greatly increase the speed of binding of CO2. The goal of the project is an industry-ready chemical vehicle that can withstand the harsh environments found in exhaust gas and enable new, simple process designs requiring less capital investment.

  2. Optical panel system including stackable waveguides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DeSanto, Leonard; Veligdan, James T.

    2007-03-06

    An optical panel system including stackable waveguides is provided. The optical panel system displays a projected light image and comprises a plurality of planar optical waveguides in a stacked state. The optical panel system further comprises a support system that aligns and supports the waveguides in the stacked state. In one embodiment, the support system comprises at least one rod, wherein each waveguide contains at least one hole, and wherein each rod is positioned through a corresponding hole in each waveguide. In another embodiment, the support system comprises at least two opposing edge structures having the waveguides positioned therebetween, wherein each opposing edge structure contains a mating surface, wherein opposite edges of each waveguide contain mating surfaces which are complementary to the mating surfaces of the opposing edge structures, and wherein each mating surface of the opposing edge structures engages a corresponding complementary mating surface of the opposite edges of each waveguide.

  3. Optical panel system including stackable waveguides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DeSanto, Leonard (Dunkirk, MD); Veligdan, James T. (Manorville, NY)

    2007-11-20

    An optical panel system including stackable waveguides is provided. The optical panel system displays a projected light image and comprises a plurality of planar optical waveguides in a stacked state. The optical panel system further comprises a support system that aligns and supports the waveguides in the stacked state. In one embodiment, the support system comprises at least one rod, wherein each waveguide contains at least one hole, and wherein each rod is positioned through a corresponding hole in each waveguide. In another embodiment, the support system comprises at least two opposing edge structures having the waveguides positioned therebetween, wherein each opposing edge structure contains a mating surface, wherein opposite edges of each waveguide contain mating surfaces which are complementary to the mating surfaces of the opposing edge structures, and wherein each mating surface of the opposing edge structures engages a corresponding complementary mating surface of the opposite edges of each waveguide.

  4. Thermovoltaic semiconductor device including a plasma filter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baldasaro, Paul F. (Clifton Park, NY)

    1999-01-01

    A thermovoltaic energy conversion device and related method for converting thermal energy into an electrical potential. An interference filter is provided on a semiconductor thermovoltaic cell to pre-filter black body radiation. The semiconductor thermovoltaic cell includes a P/N junction supported on a substrate which converts incident thermal energy below the semiconductor junction band gap into electrical potential. The semiconductor substrate is doped to provide a plasma filter which reflects back energy having a wavelength which is above the band gap and which is ineffectively filtered by the interference filter, through the P/N junction to the source of radiation thereby avoiding parasitic absorption of the unusable portion of the thermal radiation energy.

  5. Drapery assembly including insulated drapery liner

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cukierski, Gwendolyn (Ithaca, NY)

    1983-01-01

    A drapery assembly is disclosed for covering a framed wall opening, the assembly including drapery panels hung on a horizontal traverse rod, the rod having a pair of master slides and means for displacing the master slides between open and closed positions. A pair of insulating liner panels are positioned behind the drapery, the remote side edges of the liner panels being connected with the side portions of the opening frame, and the adjacent side edges of the liner panels being connected with a pair of vertically arranged center support members adapted for sliding movement longitudinally of a horizontal track member secured to the upper horizontal portion of the opening frame. Pivotally arranged brackets connect the center support members with the master slides of the traverse rod whereby movement of the master slides to effect opening and closing of the drapery panels effects simultaneous opening and closing of the liner panels.

  6. US crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids reserves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-10-05

    This report presents estimates of proved reserves of crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids as of December 31, 1989, and production volumes for the year 1989 for the total United States and for selected states and state sub-divisions. Estimates are presented for the following four categories of natural gas: total gas (wet after lease separation), its two major components (nonassociated and associated-dissolved gas), and total dry gas (wet gas adjusted for the removal of liquids at natural gas processing plants). In addition, two components of natural gas liquids, lease condensate and natural gas plant liquids, have their reserves and production reported separately. Also included is information on indicated additional crude oil reserves and crude oil, natural gas, and lease condensate reserves in nonproducing reservoirs. 28 refs., 9 figs., 15 tabs.

  7. Renewable Energy from Synthetic Biology (LBNL Science at the Theater)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Keasling, Jay

    2011-04-28

    Jay Keasling, co-leader of Berkeley Lab's Helios Project, is a groundbreaking researcher in the new scientific field of synthetic biology. In Helios, he directs the biology program, incorporating a range of approaches to increasing the efficacy and economy of plants and cellulose-degrading microbes to make solar-based fuels. He is a UC Berkeley professor of Chemical and Bioengineering, and founder of Amyris Biotechnologies, a company that was honored as a Technology Pioneer for 2006 by the World Economic Forum. Keasling has succeeded in using synthetic biology to develop a yeast-based production scheme for precursors of the antimalarial drug artemisinin in work funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

  8. Synthetic aperture integration (SAI) algorithm for SAR imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chambers, David H; Mast, Jeffrey E; Paglieroni, David W; Beer, N. Reginald

    2013-07-09

    A method and system for detecting the presence of subsurface objects within a medium is provided. In some embodiments, the imaging and detection system operates in a multistatic mode to collect radar return signals generated by an array of transceiver antenna pairs that is positioned across the surface and that travels down the surface. The imaging and detection system pre-processes the return signal to suppress certain undesirable effects. The imaging and detection system then generates synthetic aperture radar images from real aperture radar images generated from the pre-processed return signal. The imaging and detection system then post-processes the synthetic aperture radar images to improve detection of subsurface objects. The imaging and detection system identifies peaks in the energy levels of the post-processed image frame, which indicates the presence of a subsurface object.

  9. Engine lubrication circuit including two pumps

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lane, William H.

    2006-10-03

    A lubrication pump coupled to the engine is sized such that the it can supply the engine with a predetermined flow volume as soon as the engine reaches a peak torque engine speed. In engines that operate predominately at speeds above the peak torque engine speed, the lubrication pump is often producing lubrication fluid in excess of the predetermined flow volume that is bypassed back to a lubrication fluid source. This arguably results in wasted power. In order to more efficiently lubricate an engine, a lubrication circuit includes a lubrication pump and a variable delivery pump. The lubrication pump is operably coupled to the engine, and the variable delivery pump is in communication with a pump output controller that is operable to vary a lubrication fluid output from the variable delivery pump as a function of at least one of engine speed and lubrication flow volume or system pressure. Thus, the lubrication pump can be sized to produce the predetermined flow volume at a speed range at which the engine predominately operates while the variable delivery pump can supplement lubrication fluid delivery from the lubrication pump at engine speeds below the predominant engine speed range.

  10. Kinetically tuned dimensional augmentation as a versatile synthetic route

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    towards robust metal-organic frameworks | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy Technologies | Blandine Jerome Kinetically tuned dimensional augmentation as a versatile synthetic route towards robust metal-organic frameworks Previous Next List Dawei Feng, Kecheng Wang, Zhangwen Wei, Ying-Pin Chen, Cory M. Simon, Ravi K. Arvapally, Richard L. Martin, Mathieu Bosch, Tian-Fu Liu, Stephen Fordham, Daqiang Yuan, Mohammad A. Omary, Maciej Haranczyk, Berend Smit & Hong-Cai Zhou,

  11. Sandia National Laboratories: Pathfinder Airborne ISR and Synthetic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Aperture Radar (SAR) Systems Pathfinder Airborne ISR Systems What is SAR? Areas of Expertise Images VideoSAR Publications Facebook Twitter YouTube Flickr RSS Pathfinder Airborne ISR Systems Pathfinder Airborne ISR and Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) Systems Tactical Eyes for the Warfighter Tactical Eyes for the Warfighter Actionable Intelligence for the Decision Maker Actionable Intelligence for the Decision Maker All Weather, Persistent, Optical Like All Weather, Persistent, Optical Like

  12. Method and apparatus for removing heat from electronic devices using synthetic jets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sharma, Rajdeep; Weaver, Stanton Earl; Seeley, Charles Erklin; Arik, Mehmet; Icoz, Tunc; Wolfe Jr, Charles Franklin; Utturkar, Yogen Vishwas

    2015-12-01

    An apparatus for removing heat comprises a heat sink having a cavity, and a synthetic jet stack comprising at least one synthetic jet mounted within the cavity. At least one rod and at least one engaging structure to provide a rigid positioning of the at least one synthetic jet with respect to the at least one rod. The synthetic jet comprises at least one orifice through which a fluid is ejected.

  13. Method and apparatus for removing heat from electronic devices using synthetic jets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sharma, Rajdeep; Weaver, Stanton Earl; Seeley, Charles Erklin; Arik, Mehmet; Icoz, Tunc; Wolfe, Jr., Charles Franklin; Utturkar, Yogen Vishwas

    2015-11-24

    An apparatus for removing heat comprises a heat sink having a cavity, and a synthetic jet stack comprising at least one synthetic jet mounted within the cavity. At least one rod and at least one engaging structure to provide a rigid positioning of the at least one synthetic jet with respect to the at least one rod. The synthetic jet comprises at least one orifice through which a fluid is ejected.

  14. Method and apparatus for removing heat from electronic devices using synthetic jets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sharma, Rajdeep; Weaver, Jr., Stanton Earl; Seeley, Charles Erklin; Arik, Mehmet; Icoz, Tunc; Wolfe, Jr., Charles Franklin; Utturkar, Yogen Vishwas

    2014-04-15

    An apparatus for removing heat comprises a heat sink having a cavity, and a synthetic jet stack comprising at least one synthetic jet mounted within the cavity. At least one rod and at least one engaging structure to provide a rigid positioning of the at least one synthetic jet with respect to the at least one rod. The synthetic jet comprises at least one orifice through which a fluid is ejected.

  15. Natural gas monthly, July 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-10-03

    This report highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. A glossary is included. 7 figs., 33 tabs.

  16. Method for producing and regenerating a synthetic CO.sub.2 acceptor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lancet, Michael S. (Pittsburgh, PA); Curran, George P. (Pittsburgh, PA); Gorin, Everett (San Rafael, CA)

    1982-01-01

    A method for producing a synthetic CO.sub.2 acceptor by feeding a mixture of finely divided silica and at least one finely divided calcium compound selected from the group consisting of calcium oxide and calcium carbonate to a fluidized bed; operating the fluidized bed at suitable conditions to produce pellets of synthetic CO.sub.2 acceptor and recovering the pellets of synthetic CO.sub.2 acceptor from the fluidized bed. Optionally, spent synthetic CO.sub.2 acceptor can be charged to the fluidized bed to produce regenerated pellets of synthetic CO.sub.2 acceptor.

  17. Method for producing and regenerating a synthetic CO[sub 2] acceptor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lancet, M. S.; Curran, G. P.; Gorin, E.

    1982-05-18

    A method is described for producing a synthetic CO[sub 2] acceptor by feeding a mixture of finely divided silica and at least one finely divided calcium compound selected from the group consisting of calcium oxide and calcium carbonate to a fluidized bed; operating the fluidized bed at suitable conditions to produce pellets of synthetic CO[sub 2] acceptor and recovering the pellets of synthetic CO[sub 2] acceptor from the fluidized bed. Optionally, spent synthetic CO[sub 2] acceptor can be charged to the fluidized bed to produce regenerated pellets of synthetic CO[sub 2] acceptor. 1 fig.

  18. Transformation and Crystallization Energetics of Synthetic and Biogenic Amorphous Calcium Carbonate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Radha, A. V.; Forbes, Tori Z.; Killian, Christopher E.; Gilbert, P.U.P.A; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2010-01-01

    Amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) is a metastable phase often observed during low temperature inorganic synthesis and biomineralization. ACC transforms with aging or heating into a less hydrated form, and with time crystallizes to calcite or aragonite. The energetics of transformation and crystallization of synthetic and biogenic (extracted from California purple sea urchin larval spicules, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus) ACC were studied using isothermal acid solution calorimetry and differential scanning calorimetry. Transformation and crystallization of ACC can follow an energetically downhill sequence: more metastable hydrated ACC ? less metastable hydrated ACC?anhydrous ACC ~ biogenic anhydrous ACC?vaterite ? aragonite ? calcite. In a given reaction sequence, not all these phases need to occur. The transformations involve a series of ordering, dehydration, and crystallization processes, each lowering the enthalpy (and free energy) of the system, with crystallization of the dehydrated amorphous material lowering the enthalpy the most. ACC is much more metastable with respect to calcite than the crystalline polymorphs vaterite or aragonite. The anhydrous ACC is less metastable than the hydrated, implying that the structural reorganization during dehydration is exothermic and irreversible. Dehydrated synthetic and anhydrous biogenic ACC are similar in enthalpy. The transformation sequence observed in biomineralization could be mainly energetically driven; the first phase deposited is hydrated ACC, which then converts to anhydrous ACC, and finally crystallizes to calcite. The initial formation of ACC may be a first step in the precipitation of calcite under a wide variety of conditions, including geological CO? sequestration.

  19. Ionic liquids, electrolyte solutions including the ionic liquids, and energy storage devices including the ionic liquids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gering, Kevin L.; Harrup, Mason K.; Rollins, Harry W.

    2015-12-08

    An ionic liquid including a phosphazene compound that has a plurality of phosphorus-nitrogen units and at least one pendant group bonded to each phosphorus atom of the plurality of phosphorus-nitrogen units. One pendant group of the at least one pendant group comprises a positively charged pendant group. Additional embodiments of ionic liquids are disclosed, as are electrolyte solutions and energy storage devices including the embodiments of the ionic liquid.

  20. Apodized RFI filtering of synthetic aperture radar images

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2014-02-01

    Fine resolution Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) systems necessarily require wide bandwidths that often overlap spectrum utilized by other wireless services. These other emitters pose a source of Radio Frequency Interference (RFI) to the SAR echo signals that degrades SAR image quality. Filtering, or excising, the offending spectral contaminants will mitigate the interference, but at a cost of often degrading the SAR image in other ways, notably by raising offensive sidelobe levels. This report proposes borrowing an idea from nonlinear sidelobe apodization techniques to suppress interference without the attendant increase in sidelobe levels. The simple post-processing technique is termed Apodized RFI Filtering (ARF).

  1. Synthetic aperture radar images with composite azimuth resolution

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bielek, Timothy P; Bickel, Douglas L

    2015-03-31

    A synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image is produced by using all phase histories of a set of phase histories to produce a first pixel array having a first azimuth resolution, and using less than all phase histories of the set to produce a second pixel array having a second azimuth resolution that is coarser than the first azimuth resolution. The first and second pixel arrays are combined to produce a third pixel array defining a desired SAR image that shows distinct shadows of moving objects while preserving detail in stationary background clutter.

  2. Phase correction system for automatic focusing of synthetic aperture radar

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Eichel, Paul H. (Albuquerque, NM); Ghiglia, Dennis C. (Placitas, NM); Jakowatz, Jr., Charles V. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1990-01-01

    A phase gradient autofocus system for use in synthetic aperture imaging accurately compensates for arbitrary phase errors in each imaged frame by locating highlighted areas and determining the phase disturbance or image spread associated with each of these highlight areas. An estimate of the image spread for each highlighted area in a line in the case of one dimensional processing or in a sector, in the case of two-dimensional processing, is determined. The phase error is determined using phase gradient processing. The phase error is then removed from the uncorrected image and the process is iteratively performed to substantially eliminate phase errors which can degrade the image.

  3. Heat distribution by natural convection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balcomb, J.D.

    1985-01-01

    Natural convection can provide adequate heat distribution in many situations that arise in buildings. This is appropriate, for example, in passive solar buildings where some rooms tend to be more strongly solar heated than others. Natural convection can also be used to reduce the number of auxiliary heating units required in a building. Natural airflow and heat transport through doorways and other internal building apertures are predictable and can be accounted for in the design. The nature of natural convection is described, and a design chart is presented appropriate to a simple, single-doorway situation. Experimental results are summarized based on the monitoring of 15 passive solar buildings which employ a wide variety of geometrical configurations including natural convective loops.

  4. ,"Natural Gas Consumption",,,"Natural Gas Expenditures"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Census Division, 1999" ,"Natural Gas Consumption",,,"Natural Gas Expenditures" ,"per Building (thousand cubic feet)","per Square Foot (cubic feet)","per Worker (thousand cubic...

  5. Human immunodeficiency virus contains an epitope immunoreactive with thymosin. cap alpha. /sub 1/ and the 30-amino acid synthetic p17 group-specific antigen peptide HGP-30

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naylor, P.H.; Naylor, C.W.; Badamchian, M.; Wada, S.; Goldstein, A.L.; Wang, S.S.; Sun, D.K.; Thornton, A.H.; Sarin, P.S.

    1987-05-01

    The authors have reported that an antiserum prepared against thymosin ..cap alpha../sub 1/ (which shares a region of homology with the p17 protein of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)-associated human immunodeficiency virus) effectively neutralized the AIDs virus and prevented its replication in H9 cells. Using HPLC and immunoblot analysis, they have identified from a clone B, type III human T-lymphotropic virus (HTLV-IIIB) extracts a protein with a molecular weight of 17,000 that is immunoreactive with thymosin ..cap alpha../sub 1/. In contrast, no immunoreactivity was found in retroviral extracts from a number of nonhuman species including feline, bovine, simian, gibbon, and murine retroviruses. Heterologous antiserum prepared against a 30-amino acid synthetic peptide analogue (HGP-30) does not cross-react with thymosin ..cap alpha../sub 1/ but does react specifically with the p17 protein of the AIDS virus in a manner identical to that seen with an HTLV-IIIB p17-specific monoclonal antibody. The demonstration that this synthetic analogue is immunogenic and that antibodies to HGP-30 cross-react not only with synthetic peptide but also with the HTLV-IIIB p17 viral protein provides an additional, and potentially more specific, candidate for development of a synthetic peptide vaccine for AIDS. In addition, the p17 synthetic peptide (HGP-3) may prove to be useful in a diagnostic assay for the detection of AIDS virus infection in seronegative individuals.

  6. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    natural gas demand, thereby contributing to larger net injections of natural gas into storage. Other Market Trends: EIA Releases The Natural Gas Annual 2006: The Energy...

  7. New Natural Gas Storage and Transportation Capabilities Utilizing Rapid Methane Hydrate Formation Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, T.D.; Taylor, C.E.; Bernardo, M.

    2010-01-01

    Natural gas (methane as the major component) is a vital fossil fuel for the United States and around the world. One of the problems with some of this natural gas is that it is in remote areas where there is little or no local use for the gas. Nearly 50 percent worldwide natural gas reserves of ~6,254.4 trillion ft3 (tcf) is considered as stranded gas, with 36 percent or ~86 tcf of the U.S natural gas reserves totaling ~239 tcf, as stranded gas [1] [2]. The worldwide total does not include the new estimates by U.S. Geological Survey of 1,669 tcf of natural gas north of the Arctic Circle, [3] and the U.S. ~200,000 tcf of natural gas or methane hydrates, most of which are stranded gas reserves. Domestically and globally there is a need for newer and more economic storage, transportation and processing capabilities to deliver the natural gas to markets. In order to bring this resource to market, one of several expensive methods must be used: 1. Construction and operation of a natural gas pipeline 2. Construction of a storage and compression facility to compress the natural gas (CNG) at 3,000 to 3,600 psi, increasing its energy density to a point where it is more economical to ship, or 3. Construction of a cryogenic liquefaction facility to produce LNG, (requiring cryogenic temperatures at <-161 C) and construction of a cryogenic receiving port. Each of these options for the transport requires large capital investment along with elaborate safety systems. The Department of Energy's Office of Research and Development Laboratories at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is investigating new and novel approaches for rapid and continuous formation and production of synthetic NGHs. These synthetic hydrates can store up to 164 times their volume in gas while being maintained at 1 atmosphere and between -10 to -20C for several weeks. Owing to these properties, new process for the economic storage and transportation of these synthetic hydrates could be envisioned for stranded gas reserves. The recent experiments and their results from the testing within NETL's 15-Liter Hydrate Cell Facility exhibit promising results. Introduction of water at the desired temperature and pressure through an NETL designed nozzle into a temperature controlled methane environment within the 15-Liter Hydrate Cell allowed for instantaneous formation of methane hydrates. The instantaneous and continuous hydrate formation process was repeated over several days while varying the flow rate of water, its' temperature, and the overall temperature of the methane environment. These results clearly indicated that hydrates formed immediately after the methane and water left the nozzle at temperatures above the freezing point of water throughout the range of operating conditions. [1] Oil and Gas Journal Vol. 160.48, Dec 22, 2008. [2] http://www.eia.doe.gov/oiaf/servicerpt/natgas/chapter3.html and http://www.eia.doe.gov/oiaf/servicerpt/natgas/pdf/tbl7.pdf [3] U.S. Geological Survey, Circum-Arctic Resource Appraisal: Estimates of Undiscovered Oil and Gas North of the Arctic Circle, May 2008.

  8. Environmentally based siting assessment for synthetic-liquid-fuels facilities. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-01-01

    A detailed assessment of the major environmental constraints to siting a synthetic fuels industry and the results of that assessment are used to determine on a regional basis the potential for development of such an industry with minimal environmental conflicts. Secondly, the ability to mitigate some of the constraining impacts through alternative institutional arrangements, especially in areas that are judged to have a low development potential is also assessed. Limitations of the study are delineated, but specifically, the study is limited geographically to well-defined boundaries that include the prime coal and oil shale resource areas. The critical factors used in developing the framework are air quality, water availability, socioeconomic capacity, ecological sensitivity, environmental health, and the management of Federally owned lands. (MCW)

  9. Natural gas dehydration process and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wijmans, Johannes G.; Ng, Alvin; Mairal, Anurag P.

    2004-09-14

    A process and corresponding apparatus for dehydrating gas, especially natural gas. The process includes an absorption step and a membrane pervaporation step to regenerate the liquid sorbent.

  10. Arkansas Natural Gas Company Hosts Tour With U.S. Deputy Secretary...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    range of natural gas development - from drilling to producing to transporting - and the ... natural gas operations included a drilling site, producing natural gas wells, a ...

  11. Natural Gas Basics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NREL Clean Cities

    2010-04-01

    Fact sheet answers questions about natural gas production and use in transportation. Natural gas vehicles are also described.

  12. A versatile synthetic route for the preparation of titanium metal-organic

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    frameworks (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect A versatile synthetic route for the preparation of titanium metal-organic frameworks Citation Details In-Document Search Title: A versatile synthetic route for the preparation of titanium metal-organic frameworks Exploitation of new titanium metal-organic frameworks (Ti-MOFs) with high crystallinity has been attracting great attention due to their vast application potential in photocatalysis. Herein a versatile synthetic strategy, namely, High

  13. Quercetin as natural stabilizing agent for bio-polymer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morici, Elisabetta; Arrigo, Rossella; Dintcheva, Nadka Tzankova

    2014-05-15

    The introduction of antioxidants in polymers is the main way to prevent or delay the degradation process. In particular natural antioxidants receive attention in the food industry also because of their presumed safety. In this work bio-polymers, i.e. a commercial starch-based polymer (Mater-Bi) and a bio-polyester (PLA), and a bio-polyether (PEO) were additivated with quercetin, a natural flavonoid antioxidants, in order to formulate bio-based films for ecosustainable packaging and outdoor applications. The photo-oxidation behavior of unstabilized and quercetin stabilized films was analyzed and compared with the behavior of films additivated with a commercial synthetic light stabilizer. The quercetin is able to slow down the photo-degradation rate of all bio-polymeric films investigated in similar way to the synthetic stabilizer.

  14. Time-frequency analysis of synthetic aperture radar signals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnston, B.

    1996-08-01

    Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) has become an important tool for remote sensing of the environment. SAR is a set of digital signal processing algorithms that are used to focus the signal returned to the radar because radar systems in themselves cannot produce the high resolution images required in remote sensing applications. To reconstruct an image, several parameters must be estimated and the quality of output image depends on the degree of accuracy of these parameters. In this thesis, we derive the fundamental SAR algorithms and concentrate on the estimation of one of its critical parameters. We show that the common technique for estimating this particular parameter can sometimes lead to erroneous results and reduced quality images. We also employ time-frequency analysis techniques to examine variations in the radar signals caused by platform motion and show how these results can be used to improve output image quality.

  15. Moving receive beam method and apparatus for synthetic aperture radar

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kare, Jordin T. (San Ramon, CA)

    2001-01-01

    A method and apparatus for improving the performance of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) systems by reducing the effect of "edge losses" associated with nonuniform receiver antenna gain. By moving the receiver antenna pattern in synchrony with the apparent motion of the transmitted pulse along the ground, the maximum available receiver antenna gain can be used at all times. Also, the receiver antenna gain for range-ambiguous return signals may be reduced, in some cases, by a large factor. The beam motion can be implemented by real-time adjustment of phase shifters in an electronically-steered phased-array antenna or by electronic switching of feed horns in a reflector antenna system.

  16. SB6.0: The 6th International meeting on Synthetic Biology, July 9-11, 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kahl, Linda J.

    2015-04-23

    The Synthetic Biology conference series (SBx.0) is the preeminent academic meeting in synthetic biology. Organized by the BioBricks Foundation, the SBx.0 conference series brings together leading researchers, students, industry executives, and policy makers from around the world to share, consider, debate, and plan efforts to make biology easier to engineer. Historically held every two years, the SBx.0 conferences are held in alternating locations in the United States, Europe, and Asia to encourage global participation and collaboration so that the ramifications of synthetic biology research and development are most likely to be safe ethical, and beneficial. On 9-11 July 2013, the 6th installment of the synthetic biology conference series (SB6.0) was held on the campus of Imperial College London (http://sb6.biobricks.org). The SB6.0 conference was attended by over 700 people, and many more were able to participate via video digital conference (http://sb6.biobricks.org/digital-conference/). Over the course of three days, the SB6.0 conference agenda included plenary sessions, workshops, and poster presentations covering topics ranging from the infrastructure needs arising when Systematic Engineering Meets Biological Complexity and design-led considerations for Connecting People and Technologies to discussions on Engineering Biology for New Materials, Assessing Risk and Managing Biocontainment, and New Directions for Energy and Sustainability. The $10,150 grant awarded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DE-SC0010233) to the BioBricks Foundation was used to provide partial reimbursement for the travel expenses of leading researchers from the United States to speak at the SB6.0 conference. A total of $9,450 was used to reimburse U.S. speakers for actual expenses related to the SB6.0 conference, including airfare (economy or coach only), ground transportation, hotel, and registration fees. In addition, $700 of the grant was used to offset direct administrative costs associated with selecting speakers (preparing announcements, evaluating abstract submissions) and handling travel arrangements. Leading U.S. researchers selected to speak at the SB6.0 conference included: Adam Arkin, Ph.D. Division Director of the Physical Biosciences Division at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and Professor in the Department of Bioengineering at UC Berkeley Jay Keasling, Ph.D. Professor in the Department of Bioengineering at Berkeley, Senior Faculty Scientist and Associate Laboratory Director of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and Chief Executive Officer of the Joint BioEnergy Institute. Debra Mathews, Ph.D. Assistant Director for Science Programs for the Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics, Assistant Professor in the Department of Pediatrics, and Affiliate Faculty in the McKusick-Nathans Institute of Genetic Medicine, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. Richard Murray, Ph.D. Thomas E. and Doris Everhart Professor of Control & Dynamical Systems and Bioengineering at Caltech. Sarah Richardson, Ph.D. Distinguished Postdoctoral Fellow in Genomics at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute. and others (for a complete listing of speakers presenting at the SB6.0 conference see http://sb6.biobricks.org/speakers/) The SB6.0 conference was the largest synthetic biology conference to date, and highlights of the SB6.0 conference have been published in a special issue of ACS Synthetic Biology (http://pubs.acs.org/toc/asbcd6/3/3). The BioBricks Foundation appreciates the support of the U.S. Department of Energy in helping to make this most influential and important conference in the field of synthetic biology a success.

  17. Findings and recommendations of the advisory panel on synthetic fuels. Advisory panel on synthetic fuels. Report for the Committee on Science and Technology, US House of Representatives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    In a report to the US House of Representatives Committee on Science and Technology, the Advisory Panel defines the most critical energy problem facing the US: obtaining a sufficient supply of liquid hydrocarbons for transportation fuel and for other applications where substitution would be difficult, costly, and time-consuming. Any substantial contribution from synthetic fuels must involve the use of coal, oil shale, and biomass, with the raw materials coming from as many different regions of the country as possible. The panel makes recommendations regarding (1) the emphasis of the Department of Energy's synthetic-fuel demonstration program, (2) implementation of a synthetic-fuel production program, and (3) mitigation of the environmental and socioeconomic impacts of synthetic-fuel production. The panel specifically maintains that federal assistance to commercial-scale projects should be available on a competitive basis to those organizations willing to take substantial marketing risks.

  18. Alabama Supplemental Supplies of Natural Gas

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Synthetic 1980-2003 Propane-Air 1980-2003 Biomass 1993-2003

  19. Transport of synthetic colloids through single saturated fractures: A literature review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reimus, P.W.

    1995-07-01

    Colloids having the same surface charge sign as the bulk of the geologic media in a groundwater system may be able to travel through the system faster than soluble species because they will follow fluid streamlines more closely and they should have less tendency to diffuse into pores or dead spaces in the media than soluble species. Synthetic colloids with uniform, controlled properties may be ideal for serving as {open_quotes}worst-case{close_quotes} tracers that provide lower-bound estimates of contaminant travel times in hydrologic systems. This report discusses a review of the literature pertaining to colloid transport in single saturated natural fractures. After a brief background discussion to put the literature review in perspective, the phenomenon of colloid transport in saturated fractures is divided into three major topics, each of which is reviewed in detail: (1) saturated fluid flow through fractures; (2) colloid transport by convection, diffusion, and force fields; and (3) colloid interactions with surfaces. It is suggested that these phenomena be accounted for in colloid transport models by using (1) lubrication theory to describe water flow through fractures, (2) particle tracking methods to describe colloid transport in fractures, and (3) a kinetic boundary layer approximation to describe colloid interactions with fracture walls. These methods offer better computational efficiency and better experimental accessibility to model parameters than rigorously solving the complete governing equations.

  20. Molecular Interactions of Plutonium(VI) with SyntheticManganese...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    We chose to study the influence of manganese as a minor component in goethite, because goethite rarely exists as a pure phase in nature. Manganese X-ray absorption near-edge ...

  1. Molecular Interactions of Plutonium(VI) with SyntheticManganese...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    A paper copy of this document is also available for sale to the public from the National ... a minor component in goethite, because goethite rarely exists as a pure phase in nature. ...

  2. Next Generation Natural Gas Vehicle Activity: Natural Gas Engine and Vehicle Research & Development (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2003-09-01

    This fact sheet describes the status of the Next Generation Natural Gas Vehicle (NGNGV) activity, including goals, R&D progress, NGV implementation, and the transition to hydrogen.

  3. Recent Advances on Carbon Nanospheres: Synthetic Routes and Applications

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, Pengfei; Qiao, Zhenan; Dai, Sheng

    2015-04-02

    Carbon-based materials are the most popular material types in both fundamental research and industrial applications, partly because of their well-controlled nano-morphologies. In the past two decades, we have witnessed a number of breakthroughs in carbon research: fullerenes, carbon nanotubes, and more recently graphene. Nowadays, carbon nanospheres are attracting more and more attention worldwide due to their excellent performance in various fields: drug delivery, heterogeneous catalysis, encapsulation of support and electrode materials. Actually, spherical carbon is an old material, whereas controlling carbon spheres in the nanometer range is a recent story. In the past 5 years, it has become possible tomore »precisely control the particle size, surface area, pore size, chemical composition, and dispersity of carbon nanospheres. Toward this end, a number of synthetic strategies are emerging, such as hydrothermal carbonization of biomass-based resources, extended Stöber synthesis, and organic–organic self-assembly via different binding methods. In this feature article, we summarize recent routes for carbon nanospheres and briefly touch on their applications to shed light on the potential of this field. Throughout this article, a special emphasis is placed on the possible modulation of spherical structures at the nanoscale, and we wish to inspire many more designs and applications of carbon nanostructures in the near future.« less

  4. Lynx: A High-Resolution Synthetic Aperture Radar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doerry, A.W.; Hensley, W.H.; Pace, F.; Stence, J.; Tsunoda, S.I.; Walker, B.C.; Woodring, M.

    1999-03-08

    Lynx is a high resolution, synthetic aperture radar (SAR) that has been designed and built by Sandia National Laboratories in collaboration with General Atomics (GA). Although Lynx may be operated on a wide variety of manned and unmanned platforms, it is primarily intended to be fielded on unmanned aerial vehicles. In particular, it may be operated on the Predator, I-GNAT, or Prowler II platforms manufactured by GA Aeronautical Systems, Inc. The Lynx production weight is less than 120 lb. and has a slant range of 30 km (in 4 mm/hr rain). It has operator selectable resolution and is capable of 0.1 m resolution in spotlight mode and 0.3 m resolution in stripmap mode. In ground moving target indicator mode, the minimum detectable velocity is 6 knots with a minimum target cross-section of 10 dBsm. In coherent change detection mode, Lynx makes registered, complex image comparisons either of 0.1 m resolution (minimum) spotlight images or of 0.3 m resolution (minimum) strip images. The Lynx user interface features a view manager that allows it to pan and zoom like a video camera. Lynx was developed under corporate finding from GA and will be manufactured by GA for both military and commercial applications. The Lynx system architecture will be presented and some of its unique features will be described. Imagery at the finest resolutions in both spotlight and strip modes have been obtained and will also be presented.

  5. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6, 2009 Next Release: August 13, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, August 5, 2009) Natural...

  6. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    , 2008 Next Release: July 10, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview Since Wednesday, June 25, natural gas spot prices...

  7. Historical Natural Gas Annual

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    6 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

  8. Historical Natural Gas Annual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

  9. Historical Natural Gas Annual

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    8 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

  10. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    cooling demand for natural gas. Meanwhile, it became increasingly clear that Hurricane Frances likely would not pose a significant threat to natural gas production in the Gulf of...

  11. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    of natural gas vehicles. The Department of Energys Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy reports that there were 841 compressed natural gas (CNG) fuel stations and 41...

  12. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    wide array of affiliates in all sectors of the energy market. Along with the changing nature of the energy affiliates, the changing nature of the transmission providers themselves...

  13. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    5, 2009 Next Release: July 2, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, June 24, 2009) Natural gas...

  14. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Next Release: Thursday, May 19, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, May 11, 2011) Natural...

  15. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Release: Thursday, April 28, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, April 20, 2011) Natural...

  16. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Release: Thursday, August 26, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, August 18, 2010) Natural...

  17. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2008 Next Release: November 6, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the week ending Wednesday, October 29) Natural gas...

  18. NETL: Natural Gas Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Natural Gas Resources Useful for heating, manufacturing, and as chemical feedstock, natural gas has the added benefit of producing fewer greenhouse gas emissions than other fossil...

  19. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    9, 2008 Next Release: June 26, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview Since Wednesday, June 11, natural gas spot prices...

  20. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Weekly Underground Natural Gas Storage Report. The sample change occurred over a transition period that began with the release of the Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (WNGSR)...

  1. Natural Gas Applications

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Gas Applications. If you need assistance viewing this page, please call (202) 586-8800. Energy Information Administration Home Page Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Applications...

  2. Natural gas 1995: Issues and trends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-11-01

    Natural Gas 1995: Issues and Trends addresses current issues affecting the natural gas industry and markets. Highlights of recent trends include: Natural gas wellhead prices generally declined throughout 1994 and for 1995 averages 22% below the year-earlier level; Seasonal patterns of natural gas production and wellhead prices have been significantly reduced during the past three year; Natural gas production rose 15% from 1985 through 1994, reaching 18.8 trillion cubic feet; Increasing amounts of natural gas have been imported; Since 1985, lower costs of producing and transporting natural gas have benefitted consumers; Consumers may see additional benefits as States examine regulatory changes aimed at increasing efficiency; and, The electric industry is being restructured in a fashion similar to the recent restructuring of the natural gas industry.

  3. Nuclear Arms Control R&D Consortium includes Los Alamos

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Arms Control R&D Consortium includes Los Alamos Nuclear Arms Control R&D Consortium includes Los Alamos A consortium led by the University of Michigan that includes LANL as ...

  4. [Article 1 of 7: Motivates and Includes the Consumer]

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    team Energy Central series on the Seven Principal Characteristics of the Modern Grid [Article 6 of 7: Research on the Characteristics of a Smart Grid by the NETL Modern Grid Strategy team Operates Resiliently against Attack and Natural Disaster Last month we presented the fifth principal characteristic of a Smart Grid, "Power Quality for the Digital Economy." This month we present the sixth characteristic, "Operates Resiliently against Attack and Natural Disaster." This

  5. Trends and challenges when including microstructure in materials...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Trends and challenges when including microstructure in materials modeling: Examples of ... Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Trends and challenges when including ...

  6. Newport News in Review, ch. 47, segment includes TEDF groundbreaking...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    https:www.jlab.orgnewsarticlesnewport-news-review-ch-47-segment-includes-tedf-groundbreaking-event Newport News in Review, ch. 47, segment includes TEDF groundbreaking event...

  7. FEMP Expands ESPC ENABLE Program to Include More Energy Conservation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Expands ESPC ENABLE Program to Include More Energy Conservation Measures FEMP Expands ESPC ENABLE Program to Include More Energy Conservation Measures November 13, 2013 - 12:00am...

  8. Property:Number of Plants included in Capacity Estimate | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Plants included in Capacity Estimate Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Number of Plants included in Capacity Estimate Property Type Number Retrieved from "http:...

  9. Property:Number of Plants Included in Planned Estimate | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Number of Plants Included in Planned Estimate Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Number of Plants Included in Planned Estimate Property Type String Description Number of...

  10. Microfluidic devices and methods including porous polymer monoliths...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Patent: Microfluidic devices and methods including porous polymer monoliths Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Microfluidic devices and methods including porous polymer ...

  11. Solar Energy Education. Reader, Part II. Sun story. [Includes...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reader, Part II. Sun story. Includes glossary Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Solar Energy Education. Reader, Part II. Sun story. Includes glossary You are ...

  12. Prevention of Harassment (Including Sexual Harassment) and Retaliation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Prevention of Harassment (Including Sexual Harassment) and Retaliation Policy Statement Prevention of Harassment (Including Sexual Harassment) and Retaliation Policy Statement DOE...

  13. Mimicking Nature - A Step Towards Artificial Photosynthesis| U.S. DOE

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Office of Science (SC) Mimicking Nature - A Step Towards Artificial Photosynthesis Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) EFRCs Home Centers Research Science Highlights Highlight Archives News & Events Publications History Contact BES Home 05.03.12 Mimicking Nature - A Step Towards Artificial Photosynthesis Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page Scientific Achievement Built a synthetic light harvesting antenna which mimics those found in photosynthetic bacteria Significance and

  14. EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Natural Gas Transmission...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Transmission Path Diagram About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 20072008 with selected updates Natural Gas Transmission Path Natural...

  15. INFLUENCE OF NATURAL AND SYNTHETIC ORGANIC LIGANDS ON THE STABILITY AND MOBILITY OF REDUCED TC(IV)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nathalie A. Wall; Baohua Gu

    2012-12-20

    The primary objectives were (1) to quantify the interactions of organic ligands with Tc(IV) through the generation of thermodynamic (complexation) and kinetic parameters needed to assess and predict the mobility of reduced Tc(IV) at DOE contaminated sites; and (2) to determine the impact of organic ligands on the mobility and fate of reduced Tc(IV) under field geochemical conditions.

  16. The Elephant in the Room: Dealing with Carbon Emissions from Synthetic Transportation Fuels Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parker, Graham B.; Dahowski, Robert T.

    2007-07-11

    Carbon dioxide (CO2), produced by conversion of hydrocarbons to energy, primarily via fossil fuel combustion, is one of the most ubiquitous and significant greenhouse gases (GHGs). Concerns over climate change precipitated by rising atmospheric GHG concentrations have prompted many industrialized nations to begin adopting limits on emissions to inhibit increases in atmospheric CO2 levels. The United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change states as a key goal the stabilization of atmospheric CO2 at a level that prevents dangerous anthropogenic interference with the planets climate systems. This will require sharply reducing emissions growth rates in developing nations, and reducing CO2 emissions in the industrialized world to half current rates in the next 50 years. And ultimately, stabilization will require that annual emissions drop to almost zero.Recently, there has been interest in producing synthetic transportation fuels via coal-to-liquids (CTL) production, particularly in countries where there is an abundant supply of domestic coal, including the United States. This paper provides an overview of the current state of CTL technologies and deployment, a discussion of costs and technical requirements for mitigating the CO2 impacts associated with a CTL facility, and the challenges facing the CTL industry as it moves toward maturity.

  17. Designer synthetic media for studying microbial-catalyzed biofuel production

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tang, Xiaoyu; da Costa Sousa, Leonardo; Jin, Mingjie; Chundawat, Shishir; Chambliss, Charles; Lau, Ming W; Xiao, Zeyi; Dale, Bruce E; Balan, Venkatesh

    2015-01-01

    Background: The fermentation inhibition of yeast or bacteria by lignocellulose-derived degradation products, during hexose/pentose co-fermentation, is a major bottleneck for cost-effective lignocellulosic biorefineries. To engineer microbial strains for improved performance, it is critical to understand the mechanisms of inhibition that affect fermentative organisms in the presence of major components of a lignocellulosic hydrolysate. The development of a synthetic lignocellulosic hydrolysate (SH) media with a composition similar to the actual biomass hydrolysate will be an important advancement to facilitate these studies. In this work, we characterized the nutrients and plant-derived decomposition products present in AFEX™ pretreated corn stover hydrolysate (ACH). Themore » SH was formulated based on the ACH composition and was further used to evaluate the inhibitory effects of various families of decomposition products during Saccharomyces cerevisiae 424A (LNH-ST) fermentation. Results: The ACH contained high levels of nitrogenous compounds, notably amides, pyrazines, and imidazoles. In contrast, a relatively low content of furans and aromatic and aliphatic acids were found in the ACH. Though most of the families of decomposition products were inhibitory to xylose fermentation, due to their abundance, the nitrogenous compounds showed the most inhibition. From these compounds, amides (products of the ammonolysis reaction) contributed the most to the reduction of the fermentation performance. However, this result is associated to a concentration effect, as the corresponding carboxylic acids (products of hydrolysis) promoted greater inhibition when present at the same molar concentration as the amides. Due to its complexity, the formulated SH did not perfectly match the fermentation profile of the actual hydrolysate, especially the growth curve. However, the SH formulation was effective for studying the inhibitory effect of various compounds on yeast fermentation. Conclusions: The formulation of SHs is an important advancement for future multi-omics studies and for better understanding the mechanisms of fermentation inhibition in lignocellulosic hydrolysates. The SH formulated in this work was instrumental for defining the most important inhibitors in the ACH. Major AFEX decomposition products are less inhibitory to yeast fermentation than the products of dilute acid or steam explosion pretreatments; thus, ACH is readily fermentable by yeast without any detoxification.« less

  18. Designer synthetic media for studying microbial-catalyzed biofuel production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, Xiaoyu [Biogas Inst. of Ministry of Agriculture, Chengdu (China); da Costa Sousa, Leonardo [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States); Jin, Mingjie [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States); Chundawat, Shishir [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States); State Univ. of New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Chambliss, Charles [Baylor Univ., Waco, TX (United States); Lau, Ming W [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States); Xiao, Zeyi [Sichuan Univ., Chengdu (China); Dale, Bruce E [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States); Balan, Venkatesh [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Background: The fermentation inhibition of yeast or bacteria by lignocellulose-derived degradation products, during hexose/pentose co-fermentation, is a major bottleneck for cost-effective lignocellulosic biorefineries. To engineer microbial strains for improved performance, it is critical to understand the mechanisms of inhibition that affect fermentative organisms in the presence of major components of a lignocellulosic hydrolysate. The development of a synthetic lignocellulosic hydrolysate (SH) media with a composition similar to the actual biomass hydrolysate will be an important advancement to facilitate these studies. In this work, we characterized the nutrients and plant-derived decomposition products present in AFEX pretreated corn stover hydrolysate (ACH). The SH was formulated based on the ACH composition and was further used to evaluate the inhibitory effects of various families of decomposition products during Saccharomyces cerevisiae 424A (LNH-ST) fermentation. Results: The ACH contained high levels of nitrogenous compounds, notably amides, pyrazines, and imidazoles. In contrast, a relatively low content of furans and aromatic and aliphatic acids were found in the ACH. Though most of the families of decomposition products were inhibitory to xylose fermentation, due to their abundance, the nitrogenous compounds showed the most inhibition. From these compounds, amides (products of the ammonolysis reaction) contributed the most to the reduction of the fermentation performance. However, this result is associated to a concentration effect, as the corresponding carboxylic acids (products of hydrolysis) promoted greater inhibition when present at the same molar concentration as the amides. Due to its complexity, the formulated SH did not perfectly match the fermentation profile of the actual hydrolysate, especially the growth curve. However, the SH formulation was effective for studying the inhibitory effect of various compounds on yeast fermentation. Conclusions: The formulation of SHs is an important advancement for future multi-omics studies and for better understanding the mechanisms of fermentation inhibition in lignocellulosic hydrolysates. The SH formulated in this work was instrumental for defining the most important inhibitors in the ACH. Major AFEX decomposition products are less inhibitory to yeast fermentation than the products of dilute acid or steam explosion pretreatments; thus, ACH is readily fermentable by yeast without any detoxification.

  19. Synthetic Coal Slag Infiltration into Varying Refractory Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaneko, Tetsuya K.; Thomas, Hugh; Bennett, James P.; Sridhar, Seetharaman

    2012-10-01

    The infiltrations of synthetic coal slag into 99%Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 85%Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}15%SiO{sub 2}, and 90%Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}10%Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} refractories with a temperature gradient induced along the penetration direction were compared to one another. The infiltrating slag was synthesized with a composition that is representative of an average of the ash contents from U S coal feedstock. Experiments were conducted with a hot-face temperature of 1450C in a CO/CO{sub 2} atmosphere. Minimal penetration was observed in the 90%Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}10%Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} material because interactions between the refractory and the slag produced a protective layer of FeCr{sub 2}O{sub 4}, which impeded slag flow into the bulk of the refractory. After 5 h, the 99%Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} sample exhibited an average penetration of 12.7 mm whereas the 85%Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}15%SiO{sub 2} sample showed 3.8 mm. Slag infiltrated into the 99%Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and 85%Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}15%SiO{sub 2} refractory systems by dissolving the respective refractories' matrix materials, which consist of fine Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles and an amorphous alumino-silicate phase. Due to enrichment in SiO{sub 2}, a network-former, infiltration into the 85%Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}15%SiO{sub 2} system yielded a higher viscosity slag and hence, a shallower penetration depth. The results suggest that slag infiltration can be limited by interactions with the refractory through the formation of either a solid layer that physically impedes fluid flow or a more viscous slag that retards infiltration.

  20. Perpendicular magnetic tunnel junctions with double barrier and single or synthetic antiferromagnetic storage layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cuchet, La; Rodmacq, Bernard; Auffret, Stphane; Sousa, Ricardo C.; Prejbeanu, Ioan L.; Dieny, Bernard

    2015-06-21

    The magnetic properties of double tunnel junctions with perpendicular anisotropy were investigated. Two synthetic antiferromagnetic references are used, while the middle storage magnetic layer can be either a single ferromagnetic or a synthetic antiferromagnetic FeCoB-based layer, with a critical thickness as large as 3.0?nm. Among the different achievable magnetic configurations in zero field, those with either antiparallel references, and single ferromagnetic storage layer, or parallel references, and synthetic antiferromagnetic storage layer, are of particular interest since they allow increasing the efficiency of spin transfer torque writing and the thermal stability of the stored information as compared to single tunnel junctions. The latter configuration can be preferred when stray fields would favour a parallel orientation of the reference layers. In this case, the synthetic antiferromagnetic storage layer is also less sensitive to residual stray fields.

  1. System and method for forming synthetic protein crystals to determine the conformational structure by crystallography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Craig, G.D.; Glass, R.; Rupp, B.

    1997-01-28

    A method is disclosed for forming synthetic crystals of proteins in a carrier fluid by use of the dipole moments of protein macromolecules that self-align in the Helmholtz layer adjacent to an electrode. The voltage gradients of such layers easily exceed 10{sup 6}V/m. The synthetic protein crystals are subjected to x-ray crystallography to determine the conformational structure of the protein involved. 2 figs.

  2. System and method for forming synthetic protein crystals to determine the conformational structure by crystallography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Craig, George D.; Glass, Robert; Rupp, Bernhard

    1997-01-01

    A method for forming synthetic crystals of proteins in a carrier fluid by use of the dipole moments of protein macromolecules that self-align in the Helmholtz layer adjacent to an electrode. The voltage gradients of such layers easily exceed 10.sup.6 V/m. The synthetic protein crystals are subjected to x-ray crystallography to determine the conformational structure of the protein involved.

  3. Process for gasification using a synthetic CO.sub.2 acceptor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lancet, Michael S. (Pittsburgh, PA); Curran, George P. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1980-01-01

    A gasification process is disclosed using a synthetic CO.sub.2 acceptor consisting essentially of at least one compound selected from the group consisting of calcium oxide and calcium carbonate supported in a refractory carrier matrix, the carrier having the general formula Ca.sub.5 (SiO.sub.4).sub.2 CO.sub.3. A method for producing the synthetic CO.sub.2 acceptor is also disclosed.

  4. Synthetic Design Microorganisms for Lignin Fuels and Chemicals Presentation for BETO 2015 Project Peer Review

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Synthetic Design Microorganisms for Lignin Fuels and Chemicals 3/26/2015 Synthetic Biology Joshua S. Yuan Associate Professor and Director Texas A&M University This presentation does contain proprietary information 1 Project Goal: Design of Microorganisms for Lignin Fuel * The proposed research aims to address one of the most challenging issues in biofuel production: the utilization of lignin for fungible fuels. * Project Outcome: A viable biological platform for conversion of lignin into

  5. Global Natural Gas Market Trends, 2. edition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2007-07-15

    The report provides an overview of major trends occurring in the natural gas industry and includes a concise look at the drivers behind recent rapid growth in gas usage and the challenges faced in meeting that growth. Topics covered include: an overview of Natural Gas including its history, the current market environment, and its future market potential; an analysis of the overarching trends that are driving a need for change in the Natural Gas industry; a description of new technologies being developed to increase production of Natural Gas; an evaluation of the potential of unconventional Natural Gas sources to supply the market; a review of new transportation methods to get Natural Gas from producing to consuming countries; a description of new storage technologies to support the increasing demand for peak gas; an analysis of the coming changes in global Natural Gas flows; an evaluation of new applications for Natural Gas and their impact on market sectors; and, an overview of Natural Gas trading concepts and recent changes in financial markets.

  6. Interactions of Jet Fuels with Nitrile O-Rings: Petroleum-Derived versus Synthetic Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gormley, R.J.; Link, D.D.; Baltrus, J.P.; Zandhuis, P.H.

    2008-01-01

    A transition from petroleum-derived jet fuels to blends with Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) fuels, and ultimately fully synthetic hydro-isomerized F-T fuels has raised concern about the fate of plasticizers in nitrile-butadiene rubber o-rings that are contacted by the fuels as this transition occurs. The partitioning of plasticizers and fuel molecules between nitrile o-rings and petroleum-derived, synthetic, and additized-synthetic jet fuels has been measured. Thermal desorption of o-rings soaked in the various jet fuels followed by gas chromatographic analysis with a mass spectrometric detector showed many of the plasticizer and stabilizer compounds were removed from the o-rings regardless of the contact fuel. Fuel molecules were observed to migrate into the o-rings for the petroleum-derived fuel as did both the fuel and additive for a synthetic F-T jet fuel additized with benzyl alcohol, but less for the unadditized synthetic fuel. The specific compounds or classes of compounds involved in the partitioning were identified and a semiquantitative comparison of relative partitioning of the compounds of interest was made. The results provide another step forward in improving the confidence level of using additized, fuIly synthetic jet fuel in the place of petroleum-derived fueL

  7. Interactions of Jet Fuels with Nitrile O-Rings: Petroleum-Derived versus Synthetic Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gormley, R.J.; Link, D.D.; Baltrus, J.P.; Zandhuis, P.H.

    2009-01-01

    A transition from petroleum-derived jet fuels to blends with Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) fuels, and ultimately fully synthetic hydro-isomerized F-T fuels has raised concern about the fate of plasticizers in nitrile-butadiene rubber a-rings that are contacted by the fuels as this transition occurs. The partitioning of plasticizers and fuel molecules between nitrile a-rings and petroleum-derived, synthetic, and additized-synthetic jet fuels has been measured. Thermal desorption of o-rings soaked in the various jet fuels followed by gas chromatographic analysis with a mass spectrometric detector showed many of the plasticizer and stabilizer compounds were removed from the o-rings regardless of the contact fuel. Fuel molecules were observed to migrate into the o-rings for the petroleum-derived fuel as did both the fuel and additive for a synthetic F-T jet fuel additized with benzyl alcohol, but less for the unadditized synthetic fuel. The specific compounds or classes of compounds involved in the partitioning were identified and a semiquantitative comparison of relative partitioning of the compounds of interest was made. The results provide another step forward in improving the confidence level of using additized, fully synthetic jet fuel in the place of petroleum-derived fuel.

  8. Example Retro-Commissioning Scope of Work to Include Services...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Retro-Commissioning Scope of Work to Include Services as Part of an ESPC Investment-Grade Audit Example Retro-Commissioning Scope of Work to Include Services as Part of an ESPC...

  9. SWS Online Tool now includes Multifamily Content, plus a How...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SWS Online Tool now includes Multifamily Content, plus a How-To Webinar SWS Online Tool now includes Multifamily Content, plus a How-To Webinar This announcement contains...

  10. EIA - Natural Gas Publications

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    these data from 2005 to 2009 are presented for each State. (12282010) U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Proved Reserves: 2009 National and State...

  11. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the August 2011 natural gas contract price also lost ground over the week, closing at 4.217 per MMBtu on Wednesday. The natural gas rotary rig...

  12. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the August 2011 natural gas contract price also lost ground over the week, closing at 4.315 per MMBtu on Wednesday. The natural gas rotary rig...

  13. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    of natural gas into storage. However, shut-in natural gas production in the Gulf of Mexico reduced available current supplies, and so limited net injections during the report...

  14. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    a high degree of price volatility seems inherent in natural gas markets because of the nature of the commodity. However, the annual volatility during 1994 and 2006 does not exhibit...

  15. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    heating-related demand for natural gas that limited the size of the net addition to storage. The economic incentives for storing natural gas for next winter are considerably...

  16. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    The report provides an overview of U.S. international trade in 2008 as well as historical data on natural gas imports and exports. Net natural gas imports accounted for only 13...

  17. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    next heating season. Net injections reported in today's release of EIA's Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report brought natural gas storage supplies to 2,163 Bcf as of Friday, June 1,...

  18. Natural gas annual 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-09-01

    This document provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience. The 1996 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas from it`s production to it`s end use.

  19. Natural Phenomena Hazards Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Natural Phenomena Hazards Program develops and maintains state-of-the-art program standards and guidance for DOE facilities exposed to natural phenomena hazards (NPHs).

  20. President's FY 2017 Budget Includes $878 Million for Fossil Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Programs | Department of Energy President's FY 2017 Budget Includes $878 Million for Fossil Energy Programs President's FY 2017 Budget Includes $878 Million for Fossil Energy Programs February 9, 2016 - 2:33pm Addthis President Obama's Fiscal Year (FY) 2017 Budget includes a programmatic level of $878 million for the Office of Fossil Energy (FE), including the use of $240 million in prior year funds, to advance technologies related to the reliable, efficient, affordable and environmentally

  1. Natural Gas Pipeline and System Expansions

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1997-01-01

    This special report examines recent expansions to the North American natural gas pipeline network and the nature and type of proposed pipeline projects announced or approved for construction during the next several years in the United States. It includes those projects in Canada and Mexico that tie in with U.S. markets or projects.

  2. Arctic Oil and Natural Gas Potential

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines the discovered and undiscovered Arctic oil and natural gas resource base with respect to their location and concentration. The paper also discusses the cost and impediments to developing Arctic oil and natural gas resources, including those issues associated with environmental habitats and political boundaries.

  3. Quantitative Analysis of Biofuel Sustainability, Including Land Use Change

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    GHG Emissions | Department of Energy Quantitative Analysis of Biofuel Sustainability, Including Land Use Change GHG Emissions Quantitative Analysis of Biofuel Sustainability, Including Land Use Change GHG Emissions Plenary V: Biofuels and Sustainability: Acknowledging Challenges and Confronting Misconceptions Quantitative Analysis of Biofuel Sustainability, Including Land Use Change GHG Emissions Jennifer B. Dunn, Energy Systems and Sustainability Analyst, Argonne National Laboratory PDF

  4. Procedure for matching synfuel users with potential suppliers. Appendix B. Proposed and ongoing synthetic fuel production projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1981-08-07

    To assist the Department of Energy, Office of Fuels Conversion (OFC), in implementing the synthetic fuel exemption under the Powerplant and Industrial Fuel Use Act (FUA) of 1978, Resource Consulting Group, Inc. (RCG), has developed a procedure for matching prospective users and producers of synthetic fuel. The matching procedure, which involves a hierarchical screening process, is designed to assist OFC in: locating a supplier for a firm that wishes to obtain a synthetic fuel exemption; determining whether the fuel supplier proposed by a petitioner is technically and economically capable of meeting the petitioner's needs; and assisting the Synthetic Fuels Corporation or a synthetic fuel supplier in evaluating potential markets for synthetic fuel production. A data base is provided in this appendix on proposed and ongoing synthetic fuel production projects to be used in applying the screening procedure. The data base encompasses a total of 212 projects in the seven production technologies.

  5. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    . Home | Petroleum | Gasoline | Diesel | Propane | Natural Gas | Electricity | Coal | Nuclear Renewables | Alternative Fuels | Prices | States | International | Country Analysis...

  6. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585 . Home | Petroleum | Gasoline | Diesel | Propane | Natural Gas | Electricity | Coal | Nuclear Renewables | Alternative Fuels |...

  7. Natural gas 1996 - issues and trends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-12-01

    This publication presents a summary of the latest data and information relating to the U.S. natural gas industry, including prices, production, transmission, consumption, and financial aspects of the industry.

  8. Connecticut Supplemental Supplies of Natural Gas

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1 0 0 0 0 0 1967-2014 Synthetic 1980-2005 Propane-Air 1 1980-2009

  9. U.S. crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids reserves 1997 annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, John H.; Grape, Steven G.; Green, Rhonda S.

    1998-12-01

    This report presents estimates of proved reserves of crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids as of December 31, 1997, as well as production volumes for the US and selected States and State subdivisions for the year 1997. Estimates are presented for the following four categories of natural gas: total gas (wet after lease separation), nonassociated gas and associated-dissolved gas (which are the two major types of wet natural gas), and total dry gas (wet gas adjusted for the removal of liquids at natural gas processing plants). In addition, reserve estimates for two types of natural gas liquids, lease condensate and natural gas plant liquids, are presented. Also included is information on indicated additional crude oil reserves and crude oil, natural gas, and lease condensate reserves in nonproducing reservoirs. A discussion of notable oil and gas exploration and development activities during 1997 is provided. 21 figs., 16 tabs.

  10. Natural gas 1998: Issues and trends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-06-01

    Natural Gas 1998: Issues and Trends provides a summary of the latest data and information relating to the US natural gas industry, including prices, production, transmission, consumption, and the financial and environmental aspects of the industry. The report consists of seven chapters and five appendices. Chapter 1 presents a summary of various data trends and key issues in today`s natural gas industry and examines some of the emerging trends. Chapters 2 through 7 focus on specific areas or segments of the industry, highlighting some of the issues associated with the impact of natural gas operations on the environment. 57 figs., 18 tabs.

  11. Microfluidic devices and methods including porous polymer monoliths

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Patent) | SciTech Connect Patent: Microfluidic devices and methods including porous polymer monoliths Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Microfluidic devices and methods including porous polymer monoliths Microfluidic devices and methods including porous polymer monoliths are described. Polymerization techniques may be used to generate porous polymer monoliths having pores defined by a liquid component of a fluid mixture. The fluid mixture may contain iniferters and the resulting

  12. DOE Releases Request for Information on Critical Materials, Including Fuel

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Cell Platinum Group Metal Catalysts | Department of Energy Request for Information on Critical Materials, Including Fuel Cell Platinum Group Metal Catalysts DOE Releases Request for Information on Critical Materials, Including Fuel Cell Platinum Group Metal Catalysts February 17, 2016 - 3:03pm Addthis The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has released a Request for Information (RFI) on critical materials in the energy sector, including fuel cell platinum group metal catalysts. The RFI is

  13. Including Retro-Commissioning in Federal Energy Savings Performance

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Contracts | Department of Energy Including Retro-Commissioning in Federal Energy Savings Performance Contracts Including Retro-Commissioning in Federal Energy Savings Performance Contracts Document describes guidance on the importance of (and steps to) including retro-commissioning in federal energy savings performance contracts (ESPCs). PDF icon 11_2_includingretrocommissioning.pdf More Documents & Publications Enabling Mass-Scale Financing for Federal Energy, Water, and Sustainability

  14. A Roadmap to Success: Hiring, Retaining, and Including People with

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Disabilities | Department of Energy A Roadmap to Success: Hiring, Retaining, and Including People with Disabilities A Roadmap to Success: Hiring, Retaining, and Including People with Disabilities January 20, 2016 9:00PM to 9:59PM MST Course Title and Description: "A Roadmap to Success: Hiring, Retaining and Including People with Disabilities" was released by OPM in connection with the 24th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). This course offers basic

  15. Introduction to Small-Scale Photovoltaic Systems (Including RETScreen...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Photovoltaic Systems (Including RETScreen Case Study) (Webinar) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Introduction to Small-Scale Photovoltaic Systems...

  16. Search for Earth-like planets includes LANL star analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    their interiors. Consortium team members at Los Alamos include Joyce Ann Guzik, Paul Bradley, Arthur N. Cox, and Kim Simmons. They will help interpret the stellar oscillation...

  17. Introduction to Small-Scale Wind Energy Systems (Including RETScreen...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Case Study) (Webinar) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Introduction to Small-Scale Wind Energy Systems (Including RETScreen Case Study) (Webinar) Focus...

  18. Numerical simulations for low energy nuclear reactions including...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Numerical simulations for low energy nuclear reactions including direct channels to validate statistical models Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Numerical simulations for...

  19. Systematic expansion of porous crystals to include large molecules | Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy Technologies | Blandine Jerome Systematic expansion of porous crystals to include large molecules

  20. METHOD OF FABRICATING ELECTRODES INCLUDING HIGH-CAPACITY, BINDER...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wind Energy Partners (27) Visual Patent Search Success Stories Find More Like This Return to Search METHOD OF FABRICATING ELECTRODES INCLUDING HIGH-CAPACITY, BINDER-FREE ANODES ...

  1. Energy Department Expands Gas Gouging Reporting System to Include...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Washington, DC - Energy Secretary Samuel W. Bodman announced today that the Department of Energy has expanded its gas gouging reporting system to include a toll-free telephone ...

  2. U-182: Microsoft Windows Includes Some Invalid Certificates

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The operating system includes some invalid intermediate certificates. The vulnerability is due to the certificate authorities and not the operating system itself.

  3. EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Natural Gas Import/Export Locations

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    List Pipelines > Import/Export Location List About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 2007/2008 with selected updates Currently, there are 58 locations at which natural gas can be exported or imported into the United States, including 9 LNG (liquefied natural gas) facilities in the continental United States and Alaska (There is a tenth U.S. LNG import facility located in Puerto Rico). At 28 of these locations natural gas or LNG currently can only

  4. Natural gas annual 1992: Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-22

    This document provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and education institutions. The 1992 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production top its end use. Tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1988 to 1992 are given for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level. Volume 2 of this report presents State-level historical data.

  5. EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Combined Natural Gas Transportation

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Maps Combined Natural Gas Transportation Maps About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 2007/2008 with selected updates U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline Network Map of U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline Network Major Natural Gas Supply Basins Relative to Natural Gas Pipeline Transportation Corridors Map of Major Natural Gas Supply Basins Relative to Natural Gas Pipeline Transportation Corridors see related text enlarge see related text enlarge U.S. Regional Breakdown

  6. Solar Energy Education. Reader, Part II. Sun story. [Includes glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-05-01

    Magazine articles which focus on the subject of solar energy are presented. The booklet prepared is the second of a four part series of the Solar Energy Reader. Excerpts from the magazines include the history of solar energy, mythology and tales, and selected poetry on the sun. A glossary of energy related terms is included. (BCS)

  7. Prevention of Harassment (Including Sexual Harassment) and Retaliation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Policy Statement | Department of Energy Prevention of Harassment (Including Sexual Harassment) and Retaliation Policy Statement Prevention of Harassment (Including Sexual Harassment) and Retaliation Policy Statement DOE Policy for Preventing Harassment in the Workplace PDF icon Harassment Policy July 2011.pdf More Documents & Publications Policy Statement on Equal Employment Opportunity, Harassment and Retaliation Policy Statement on Equal Employment Opportunity, Harassment, and

  8. Microfluidic devices and methods including porous polymer monoliths

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hatch, Anson V.; Sommer, Gregory j.; Singh, Anup K.; Wang, Ying-Chih; Abhyankar, Vinay

    2015-12-01

    Microfluidic devices and methods including porous polymer monoliths are described. Polymerization techniques may be used to generate porous polymer monoliths having pores defined by a liquid component of a fluid mixture. The fluid mixture may contain iniferters and the resulting porous polymer monolith may include surfaces terminated with iniferter species. Capture molecules may then be grafted to the monolith pores.

  9. Microfluidic devices and methods including porous polymer monoliths

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hatch, Anson V; Sommer, Gregory J; Singh, Anup K; Wang, Ying-Chih; Abhyankar, Vinay V

    2014-04-22

    Microfluidic devices and methods including porous polymer monoliths are described. Polymerization techniques may be used to generate porous polymer monoliths having pores defined by a liquid component of a fluid mixture. The fluid mixture may contain iniferters and the resulting porous polymer monolith may include surfaces terminated with iniferter species. Capture molecules may then be grafted to the monolith pores.

  10. EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Natural Gas Pipeline Mileage...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mileage by State About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 20072008 with selected updates Estimated Natural Gas Pipeline Mileage in the...

  11. Articles which include chevron film cooling holes, and related processes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bunker, Ronald Scott; Lacy, Benjamin Paul

    2014-12-09

    An article is described, including an inner surface which can be exposed to a first fluid; an inlet; and an outer surface spaced from the inner surface, which can be exposed to a hotter second fluid. The article further includes at least one row or other pattern of passage holes. Each passage hole includes an inlet bore extending through the substrate from the inlet at the inner surface to a passage hole-exit proximate to the outer surface, with the inlet bore terminating in a chevron outlet adjacent the hole-exit. The chevron outlet includes a pair of wing troughs having a common surface region between them. The common surface region includes a valley which is adjacent the hole-exit; and a plateau adjacent the valley. The article can be an airfoil. Related methods for preparing the passage holes are also described.

  12. Fingerprints of anthropogenic and natural variability in global-mean surface temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wallace, J.M.; Zhang, Yuan

    1997-11-01

    This paper presents an analysis designed to detect greenhouse warming by distinguishing between temperature rises induced by increasing atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases and those induced by background variability that are present without changes in atmospheric composition. The strategy is based on the surface temperature field. At each observation time, the projection of the anomalous temperature field on the presumed anthropogenic fingerprint is removed in order to obtain a temperature deviation field; i.e., the temperature anomalies in the phase space orthogonal to the anthropogenic fingerprint, which are presumed to be entirely natural. The time series of the expansion coefficients of the fingerprint a(t) is then regressed on this temperature deviation field to identify the axis in the orthogonal phase space along which the variations are most strongly correlated, and an index n(t) of the temporal variations along that axis is generated. The index a(t) is then regressed upon n(t) and the resulting least squares fit is regarded as the component of a(t) that can be ascribed to natural causes. The analysis was performed for monthly global surface temperature anomaly fields for the period 1900-95. Results indicate that two well defined patterns of natural variability contribute to variations in global mean temperature: the synthetic cold ocean-warm land (COWL) pattern and the El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO). In domains that include surface air temperature over Eurasia and North America, the COWL pattern tends to be dominant. The ENSO signature emerges as the pattern most strongly linearly correlated with global sea surface temperature and with tropospheric layer-averaged temperatures. 24 refs., 3 figs.

  13. Turbomachine injection nozzle including a coolant delivery system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zuo, Baifang (Simpsonville, SC)

    2012-02-14

    An injection nozzle for a turbomachine includes a main body having a first end portion that extends to a second end portion defining an exterior wall having an outer surface. A plurality of fluid delivery tubes extend through the main body. Each of the plurality of fluid delivery tubes includes a first fluid inlet for receiving a first fluid, a second fluid inlet for receiving a second fluid and an outlet. The injection nozzle further includes a coolant delivery system arranged within the main body. The coolant delivery system guides a coolant along at least one of a portion of the exterior wall and around the plurality of fluid delivery tubes.

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