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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes steel works" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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1

FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF STEEL WELDED COVERPLATE INCLUDING COMPOSITE DOUBLERS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

With the increasing focus on welded bridge members resulting in crack initiation and propagation, there is a large demand for creative solutions. One of these solutions includes the application of composite doublers over the critical weld. In order...

Petri, Brad

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

2

Proposal for the award of a contract for civil-engineering and steel work for the construction of Building 245  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proposal for the award of a contract for civil-engineering and steel work for the construction of Building 245

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Proceedings of the IEA Working Group meeting on ferritic/martensitic steels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An IEA working group on ferritic/martensitic steels for fusion applications, consisting of researchers from Japan, European Union, USA, and Switzerland, met at the headquarters of the Joint European Torus, Culham, UK. At the meeting, preliminary data generated on the large heats of steels purchased for the IEA program and on other heats of steels were presented and discussed. Second purpose of the meeting was to continue planning and coordinating the collaborative test program in progress on reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels. The majority of this report consists of viewographs for the presentations.

Klueh, R.L.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

4

A new direct steel making process based upon the blast furnace (Including scrap processing with recovery of tramp elements)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Steel is produced from raw materials containing iron and alloying elements with direct elimination of oxygen and impurities in the blast furnace process. The blast furnace shaft is modified to take off load from the liquid bath and carbon is prevented from going into the liquid steel. In the gas purification system sulphur and CO{sub 2} removal facilities are included and purified reducing gases so obtained are combusted in the hearth with oxygen to produce heat for smelting. Scrap can be charged as raw material with the recovery of tramp elements with continuous production of liquid steel.

Nabi, G.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

5

Lab Safety/Hazardous Waste Training Persons (including faculty, staff and students) working in a lab and work-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lab Safety/Hazardous Waste Training Persons (including faculty, staff and students) working in a lab and work- ing with hazardous materials should receive annual training that address- es lab safety, and other safety topics spe- cific to their workplace. Personnel must be thoroughly familiar with waste

Tennessee, University of

6

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Iron and Steel: Work Plans  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation InInformation In closing,-- Energy, science,Links - TechnicalGHG InformationLinksWork

7

Simulating the Inelastic Seismic Behavior of Steel Braced Frames Including the Effects of Low-Cycle Fatigue  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

6 Studies of Steel Braced Frame Behavior 6.1 Brace3 Structural Steel Deterioration 3.1 Plastic behavior andv List of Figures Schematic steel building comprising braced

Huang, Yuli

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Microstructural study and densification analysis of hot work tool steel matrix composites reinforced with TiB{sub 2} particles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hot work tool steels are characterized by good toughness and high hot hardness but are less wear resistant than other tooling materials, such as high speed steel. Metal matrix composites show improved tribological behavior, but not much work has been done in the field of hot work tool steels. In this paper TiB{sub 2}-reinforced hot work tool steel matrix composites were produced by spark plasma sintering (SPS). Mechanical alloying (MA) was proposed as a suited process to improve the composite microstructure. Density measurements and microstructure confirmed that MA promotes sintering and produces a fine and homogeneous dispersion of reinforcing particles. X-ray diffraction patterns of the sintered composites highlighted the formation of equilibrium Fe{sub 2}B and TiC, as predicted by thermodynamic calculations using Thermo-Calcģ software. Scanning electron microscopy as well as scanning Kelvin probe force microscopy highlighted the reaction of the steel matrix with TiB{sub 2} particles, showing the formation of a reaction layer at the TiB{sub 2}-steel interface. Phase investigations pointed out that TiB{sub 2} is not chemically stable in steel matrix because of the presence of carbon even during short time SPS. - Highlights: ē TiB{sub 2} reinforced steel matrix composites were produced by spark plasma sintering. ē TiB{sub 2} was successfully dispersed in the steel matrix by mechanical alloying. ē Steel and TiB{sub 2} react during sintering forming equilibrium Fe{sub 2}B and TiC. ē The new phases were investigated by means of AFM, Volta potential and XRD analyses.

Fedrizzi, A., E-mail: anna.fedrizzi@ing.unitn.it [Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Trento, Via Mesiano 77, 38123 Trento (Italy); Pellizzari, M. [Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Trento, Via Mesiano 77, 38123 Trento (Italy); Zadra, M. [K4Sint, Start-up of the University of Trento, Viale Dante 300, 38057 Pergine Valsugana (Italy); Marin, E. [Department of Chemistry, Physics and Environment, University of Udine, Via Cotonificio 108, 33100 Udine (Italy)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

9

Microstructural and mechanical behavior of a duplex stainless steel under hot working conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the hot deformation of the duplex stainless steels, the complexity of the microstructure evolution and mechanical response is increased as compared with those of single-phase ferritic or austenitic stainless steels. In the present work, plane strain compression and torsion deformation modes have been used to analyze the microstructural evolution and the mechanical behavior of a duplex stainless steel in as-cast and wrought conditions, as a function of spatial phase distribution, the nature of interface, and the relative mechanical properties of both phases. The law of mixtures has been used to explain the different flow curves obtained when changing the phase distribution and/or the deformation mode. On deforming as-cast microstructures, the deformation partitions vary heterogeneously between both phases and some austenite areas act as hard nondeforming particles. Cracks have been observed to occur at the interface of such regions, from relatively low strains, for which the initial Kurdjumov-Sachs orientation relationship between ferrite and austenite is still present.

Iza-Mendia, A. [Centro de Estudios e Investigaciones Tecnicas de Gipuzkoa, San Sebastian (Spain). Dept. of Materials]|[Univ. of Navarra, San Sebastian (Spain); Pinol-Juez, A. [Centro de Estudios e Investigaciones Tecnicas de Gipuzkoa, San Sebastian (Spain). Dept. of Materials; Urcola, J.J.; Gutierrez, I. [Univ. of Navarra, San Sebastian (Spain)

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Proceedings of the IEA working group meeting on ferritic/martensitic steels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An International Energy Agency (IEA) working group consist- ng of researchers from Japan, the European Union (EU), and the United States, met at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) 16 February 1995 to continue planning a collaborative test program on reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels for fusion applications. Plates from a 5-ton, a 1-ton, and three 150 kg heats of reduced-activation martensitic steels have been melted and processed to 7.5- and 15-mm plates in Japan. Plates were delivered in 1994 to the three parties that will participate in the test program. A second 5-ton IEA heat of modified F82H steel was produced in Japan in late 1994, and it was processed into 15- and 25-mm plates, which are to be shipped in February, 1995. Weldments will be produced on plates from this heat, and they will be shipped in April, 1995. At the ORNL meeting, a detailed test program and schedule was presented by the EU representatives, and less detailed programs were presented by the Japanese and US representatives. Detailed program schedules are required from the latter two programs to complete the program planning stage. A meeting is planned for 19--20 September 1995 in Switzerland to continue the planning and coordination of the test program and to present the preliminary results obtained in the collaboration.

Klueh, R.L.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Coke oven gas treatment and by-product plant of Magnitogorsk Integrated Iron and Steel Works  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Magnitogorsk Integrated Iron and Steel Works, Russia, decided to erect a new coke oven gas treatment and by-product plant to replace the existing obsolete units and to improve the environmental conditions of the area. The paper deals with the technological concept and the design requirements. Commissioning is scheduled at the beginning of 1996. The paper describes H{sub 2}S and NH{sub 3} removal, sulfur recovery and ammonia destruction, primary gas cooling and electrostatic tar precipitation, and the distributed control system that will be installed.

Egorov, V.N.; Anikin, G.J. [Magnitogorsk Integrated Iron and Steel Works, (Russian Federation); Gross, M. [Krupp Koppers GmbH, Essen (Germany)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

#include #include  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

process #12;#include #include pid_t pid = fork(); if (pid () failed */ } else if (pid == 0) { /* parent process */ } else { /* child process */ } #12;thread #12

Campbell, Andrew T.

13

#include #include  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#include #include //Rappels : "getpid()" permet d'obtenir son propre pid // "getppid()" renvoie le pid du père d'un processus int main (void) { pid_t pid_fils; pid_fils = fork(); if(pid_fils==-1) { printf("Erreur de création du processus fils\

Poinsot, Laurent

14

Development of automatic operation system for coke oven machines at Yawata Works of Nippon Steel Corporation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The coke plant is a working environment involving heavy dust emissions, high heat and demanding physical labor. The labor-saving operation of the coke plant is an essential issue from the standpoints of not only improvement in working environment, but also reduction in fixed cost by enhancement of labor productivity. Under these circumstances, Nippon Steel has implemented the automation of coke oven machines. The first automatic operation system for coke oven machinery entered service at Oita Works in 1992, followed by the second system at the No. 5 coke oven battery of the coke plant at Yawata Works. The Yawata automatic operation system is characterized by the installation of coke oven machinery to push as many as 140 ovens per day within a short cycle time, such as a preliminary ascension pipe cap opening car and cycle time simulator by the manned operation of the pusher, which is advantageous from the standpoint of investment efficiency, and by the monitoring of other oven machines by the pusher. These measures helped to reduce the manpower requirement to 2 persons per shift from 4 persons per shift. The system entered commercial operation in March, 1994 and has been smoothly working with an average total automatic rate of 97%. Results from the startup to recent operation of the system are reported below.

Matsunaga, Masao; Uematsu, Hiroshi; Nakagawa, Yoji; Ishiharaguchi, Yuji

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Entomology Department safety training for new employees Anyone who works in a laboratory (including the Bohart Museum)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Entomology Department safety training for new employees Anyone who works in a laboratory (including safety manager of the space in which the employee is working. This includes required PPE. 3. Employees the Bohart Museum) 1. General training a. Employee completes the online UC Laboratory Safety Fundamentals

Ishida, Yuko

16

Manufacture of Alumina-Forming Austenitic Steel Alloys by Conventional Casting and Hot-Working Methods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Carpenter Technology Corporation (CarTech) participated in an in-kind cost share cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) effort under the auspices of the Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Technology Maturation Program to explore the feasibility for scale up of developmental ORNL alumina-forming austenitic (AFA) stainless steels by conventional casting and rolling techniques. CarTech successfully vacuum melted 301b heats of four AFA alloy compositions in the range of Fe-(20-25)Ni-(12-14)Cr-(3-4)Al-(l-2.5)Nb wt.% base. Conventional hot/cold rolling was used to produce 0.5-inch thick plate and 0.1-inch thick sheet product. ORNL subsequently successfully rolled the 0.1-inch sheet to 4 mil thick foil. Long-term oxidation studies of the plate form material were initiated at 650, 700, and 800 C in air with 10 volume percent water vapor. Preliminary results indicated that the alloys exhibit comparable (good) oxidation resistance to ORNL laboratory scale AFA alloy arc casting previously evaluated. The sheet and foil material will be used in ongoing evaluation efforts for oxidation and creep resistance under related CRADAs with two gas turbine engine manufacturers. This work will be directed to evaluation of AFA alloys for use in gas turbine recuperators to permit higher-temperature operating conditions for improved efficiencies and reduced environmental emissions. AFA alloy properties to date have been obtained from small laboratory scale arc-castings made at ORNL. The goal of the ORNL-CarTech CRADA was to establish the viability for producing plate, sheet and foil of the AFA alloys by conventional casting and hot working approaches as a first step towards scale up and commercialization of the AFA alloys. The AFA alloy produced under this effort will then be evaluated in related CRADAs with two gas turbine engine manufacturers for gas turbine recuperator applications.

Brady, M.P.; Yamamoto, Y.; Magee, J.H.

2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

17

Dr. Martha Monroe Dr. Monroe's work in conservation behavior includes understanding perceptions and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

discussions and workshops to improve public understanding of the possibility of using wood for electricity, social capital and education (Agrawal dissertation 2006), and using neighborhood groups to create. In the realm of environmental education and communication, Martha worked with co-authors Susan Jacobson

Hill, Jeffrey E.

18

John Henry was a steel-drivin man... John Henry worked on the railroad, he drove steel. This consisted of driv-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of men to build. One day, a man brought a steam engine to the tunnel and said it could drive steel better than any man. So, a contest was made between John Henry and the steam engine.. For twelve long hours, John Henry hammered and the steam engine drilled. At the end, the tape was brought in to measure

Rao, Satish

19

Ris-R-1244(EN) Tool Steels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-resistant steels 18 5.5 Hot-work steels 18 5.6 Cold-work steels 19 5.7 High-speed steels (HSSs) 20 Appendix 1 and chromium) furthermore some steel types contains cobalt, which respectively raises the temperature at which.1 Water-hardening steels 17 5.2 Low-alloy special purpose steels 17 5.3 Mould steels 18 5.4 Shock

20

Manufacture of Alumina-Forming Austenitic Stainless Steel Alloys by Conventional Casting and Hot-Working Methods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Carpenter Technology Corporation (CarTech) participated in an in-kind cost share cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) effort under the auspices of the Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Technology Maturation program to explore the feasibility for scale up of developmental ORNL alumina-forming austenitic (AFA) stainless steels by conventional casting and rolling techniques. CarTech successfully vacuum melted 30lb heats of four AFA alloy compositions in the range of Fe-(20-25)Ni-(12-14)Cr-(3-4)Al-(1-2.5)Nb wt.% base. Conventional hot/cold rolling was used to produce 0.5-inch thick plate and 0.1-inch thick sheet product. ORNL subsequently successfully rolled the 0.1-inch sheet to 4 mil thick foil. Long-term oxidation studies of the plate form material were initiated at 650, 700, and 800 C in air with 10 volume percent water vapor. Preliminary results indicated that the alloys exhibit comparable (good) oxidation resistance to ORNL laboratory scale AFA alloy arc casting previously evaluated. The sheet and foil material will be used in ongoing evaluation efforts for oxidation and creep resistance under related CRADAs with two gas turbine engine manufacturers. This work will be directed to evaluation of AFA alloys for use in gas turbine recuperators to permit higher-temperature operating conditions for improved efficiencies and reduced environmental emissions.

Brady, M.P.; Yamamoto, Y.; Magee, J.H. (Carpenter Technol. Corp.)

2009-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes steel works" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Reducing the impact of chemical releases: U.S. Steel Clairton Works` Early Warning Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Early Warning Plan (EWP) is a program designed to alert plant personnel to a release of contaminants to a receiving stream before it becomes significant enough to impinge on the environment or the public. It also provides a method of written documentation of any discharge of contaminants so that rapid corrective action can be taken. The EWP includes procedures for monitoring, rapid analytical turnaround, on-site analysis, statistical process control evaluation, and follow-up investigation. It is related to, but separate from other emergency response plans for the Clairton complex. The plant also uses a Spill Prevention, Control, and Countermeasure Plan (SPCC), an Environmental Emergency Response Plan (EERP), an Oil Pollution Act (OPA) Response Plan, and an EPA Facility Response Plan. Major spills and response activities are described in these other plans, but the EWP has served to concentrate on day-to-day plant operations. The paper discusses the driving forces behind the Plan, the EWP, and results of the program after nearly 10 years of operation.

York, R.G.; Hart, C.M.; Graeser, W.C.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

PHP Script Documentation for .include Pages in CODA Repositories To be able to make this work for you, your web server must be php-enabled. Please contact  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PHP Script Documentation for .include Pages in CODA Repositories To be able to make this work for you, your web server must be php-enabled. Please contact your web administrator about this. This PDF of the script preceding the ".include". To be able to make this work for you, your browser must have PHP scripts

Koch, Christof

23

Development of Next Generation Heating System for Scale Free Steel Reheating  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The work carried out under this project includes development and design of components, controls, and economic modeling tools that would enable the steel industry to reduce energy intensity through reduction of scale formation during the steel reheating process. Application of scale free reheating offers savings in energy used for production of steel that is lost as scale, and increase in product yield for the global steel industry. The technology can be applied to a new furnace application as well as retrofit design for conversion of existing steel reheating furnaces. The development work has resulted in the knowledge base that will enable the steel industry and steel forging industry us to reheat steel with 75% to 95% reduction in scale formation and associated energy savings during the reheating process. Scale reduction also results in additional energy savings associated with higher yield from reheat furnaces. Energy used for steel production ranges from 9 MM Btu/ton to 16.6 MM Btu/ton or the industry average of approximately 13 MM Btu/ton. Hence, reduction in scale at reheating stage would represent a substantial energy reduction for the steel industry. Potential energy savings for the US steel industry could be in excess of 25 Trillion Btu/year when the technology is applied to all reheating processes. The development work has resulted in new design of reheating process and the required burners and control systems that would allow use of this technology for steel reheating in steel as well as steel forging industries.

Dr. Arvind C. Thekdi

2011-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

24

Student Ownership of Work Created in Computer Science Classes and Ownership of software, including the source code, that students create as part of his or  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Student Ownership of Work Created in Computer Science Classes and Projects Ownership of software, including the source code, that students create as part of his or her MSU education activities a perpetual royaltyfree nonexclusive right to use the source code and make derivative works for educational

Dyer, Bill

25

Corrosion protection of steel in ammonia/water heat pumps  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Corrosion of steel surfaces in a heat pump is inhibited by adding a rare earth metal salt to the heat pump's ammonia/water working fluid. In preferred embodiments, the rare earth metal salt includes cerium, and the steel surfaces are cerated to enhance the corrosion-inhibiting effects.

Mansfeld, Florian B.; Sun, Zhaoli

2003-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

26

STOP: Always work safely around machines. Prepare for a safe job. A variety of machines are used in many campus shops including  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STOP: Always work safely around machines. Prepare for a safe job. A variety of machines are used in many campus shops including: · Drill presses · Table saws · Band saws · Grinders · Milling machines AACCCCIIDDEENNTTSS THINK: Machines may present real and significant hazards, such as physical entrapment, severe

Rose, Michael R.

27

Acknowledging the Input of Core Facilities A common question of labs when working with core facilities is how best to acknowledge or include as authors the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Acknowledging the Input of Core Facilities A common question of labs when working with core facilities is how best to acknowledge or include as authors the Core in the publication of results, the decision of inclusion on manuscripts or acknowledgement is up to the senior author (or PI

Richardson, David

28

DRIVER LICENSE NUMBER MUST BE INCLUDED ON RESUME All qualified applicants must submit a cover letter and resume detailing education and work  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DRIVER LICENSE NUMBER MUST BE INCLUDED ON RESUME All qualified applicants must submit a cover letter and resume detailing education and work experience to the City of Waterloo Human Resources Department, 715 Mulberry Street, Waterloo, Iowa 50703 or email employment@waterloo-ia.org. The resume must

Isaacs, Rufus

29

Ultrahigh carbon steels, Damascus steels, and superplasticity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The processing properties of ultrahigh carbon steels (UHCSs) have been studied at Stanford University over the past twenty years. These studies have shown that such steels (1 to 2.1% C) can be made superplastic at elevated temperature and can have remarkable mechanical properties at room temperature. It was the investigation of these UHCSs that eventually brought us to study the myths, magic, and metallurgy of ancient Damascus steels, which in fact, were also ultrahigh carbon steels. These steels were made in India as castings, known as wootz, possibly as far back as the time of Alexander the Great. The best swords are believed to have been forged in Persia from Indian wootz. This paper centers on recent work on superplastic UHCSs and on their relation to Damascus steels. 32 refs., 6 figs.

Sherby, O.D. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Wadsworth, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

DIVISION 05 METALS 05120 STRUCTURAL STEEL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STEEL A. Design Considerations 1. Testing and inspection will be required for structural steel work testing and inspection of structural steel work will be contracted for and paid for by the University, regardless of building class. The A/E must specify all testing and inspection of structural steel

31

Effect of cold working and isothermal aging on the precipitation of sigma phase in 2205 duplex stainless steel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A comprehensive understanding of the formation of the sigma phase resulting from the eutectoid reaction ({delta} {yields} {sigma} + {gamma}{sub 2}) is required. The kinetics necessary for the eutectoid reaction are closely related to the amount of plastic deformation in DSS. This work investigates the microstructural evolution of the {sigma} phase in a 22Cr-5Ni SAF 2205 DSS after subsequent plastic deformation and isothermal aging. The precipitation of the {sigma} phase resulted from the higher driving force for precipitating intermetallic compounds and the higher diffusion rate of their elements by cold-rolling, as well as the sufficient supply of molybdenum. The maximum amount of {sigma} phase precipitation remarkably increased with an increasing cold deformation, as compared with the non-cold-rolled materials. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The microstructural evolution of sigma phase has been characterized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The chemical compositions of sigma phases were analyzed using TEM-EDX. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of cold deformation on the precipitation of sigma phase was investigated.

Cho, Hoon-Sung [Radiology, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, MA 02129 (United States)] [Radiology, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, MA 02129 (United States); Lee, Kwangmin, E-mail: kmlee@jnu.ac.kr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Research Institute of Functional Surface Engineering, Chonnam National University, Gwangju 500-757 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Research Institute of Functional Surface Engineering, Chonnam National University, Gwangju 500-757 (Korea, Republic of)

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

32

DAMAGE MECHANISMS OF ULTRAHIGH STRENGTH STEELS IN BENDING APPLICATION TO A TRIP STEEL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 DAMAGE MECHANISMS OF ULTRAHIGH STRENGTH STEELS IN BENDING APPLICATION TO A TRIP STEEL D. Rèche 1, the present study aims at understanding damage mechanisms involved in bending of Ultra High Strength Steels (UHSSs). It focuses on a TRansformation Induced Plasticity (TRIP)-aided steel. This work is based

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

33

This list includes a sampling of volunteer opportunities and organizations working in the field of ed-ucation. These opportunities may be suitable for students majoring or interested in these areas. You  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

nights. Volunteers are required to have an interest in science and in working with young children and be a positive adult role model. Volunteers must be interested in working with diverse populations and buildThis list includes a sampling of volunteer opportunities and organizations working in the field

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

34

Doctoral Defense "CHARACTERIZATION OF THE CYCLIC BEHAVIOR OF CORRODED STEEL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Doctoral Defense "CHARACTERIZATION OF THE CYCLIC BEHAVIOR OF CORRODED STEEL BRIDGE BEARINGS Chair: Jason McCormick Professor, Civil & Environmental Engineering Steel bridge bearings are widely and accommodate movements between the superstructure and substructure. These bearings include steel rocker

Kamat, Vineet R.

35

Ferritic steel melt and FLiBe/steel experiment : melting ferritic steel.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In preparation for developing a Z-pinch IFE power plant, the interaction of ferritic steel with the coolant, FLiBe, must be explored. Sandia National Laboratories Fusion Technology Department was asked to drop molten ferritic steel and FLiBe in a vacuum system and determine the gas byproducts and ability to recycle the steel. We tried various methods of resistive heating of ferritic steel using available power supplies and easily obtained heaters. Although we could melt the steel, we could not cause a drop to fall. This report describes the various experiments that were performed and includes some suggestions and materials needed to be successful. Although the steel was easily melted, it was not possible to drip the molten steel into a FLiBe pool Levitation melting of the drop is likely to be more successful.

Troncosa, Kenneth P.; Smith, Brandon M.; Tanaka, Tina Joan

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

This list includes a sampling of volunteer opportunities and organizations working in the field of Art. These opportunities may be suitable for students majoring or interested in these areas. You  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

://www.colonialclub.org/volunteer/ Teach a craft or hobby to Adult Day Center participants. Must be interested in working with the frailThis list includes a sampling of volunteer opportunities and organizations working in the field of Art. These opportunities may be suitable for students majoring or interested in these areas. You can

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

37

This list includes a sampling of volunteer opportunities and organizations working in the field of agriculture. These opportunities may be suitable for students majoring or interested in these areas.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

important to our animals and their habitats. Depending on interest and availability, volunteers may workThis list includes a sampling of volunteer opportunities and organizations working in the field of agriculture. These opportunities may be suitable for students majoring or interested in these areas. You can

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

38

This list includes a sampling of volunteer opportuni es and organiza ons working in the field of agriculture. These opportuni es may be suitable for students majoring or interested in these areas. You can find full  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to our animals and their habitats. Depending on interest and availability, volunteers may work aloneThis list includes a sampling of volunteer opportuni es and organiza ons working in the field of agriculture. These opportuni es may be suitable for students majoring or interested in these areas. You can

Sheridan, Jennifer

39

This list includes a sampling of volunteer opportunities and organizations working in the field of business. These opportunities may be suitable for students majoring or interested in these areas.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This list includes a sampling of volunteer opportunities and organizations working in the field of business. These opportunities may be suitable for students majoring or interested in these areas. You can, and Education. This unique opportunity will pair you with someone who is currently working on a specific

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

40

This list includes a sampling of volunteer opportunities and organizations working in the environ-mental studies field. These opportunities may be suitable for students majoring or interested in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This list includes a sampling of volunteer opportunities and organizations working in the environ- mental studies field. These opportunities may be suitable for students majoring or interested restoration team members assist and work alongside the Arboretum's Filed Staff to carry out ecological resto

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes steel works" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

This list includes a sampling of volunteer opportunities and organizations working in the field of Spanish. These opportunities may be suitable for students majoring or interested in these areas. You  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This list includes a sampling of volunteer opportunities and organizations working in the field of Spanish. These opportunities may be suitable for students majoring or interested in these areas. You can to coming in and working with students to promote the importance of an education and making good choices

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

42

2169 steel waveform experiments.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In support of LLNL efforts to develop multiscale models of a variety of materials, we have performed a set of eight gas gun impact experiments on 2169 steel (21% Cr, 6% Ni, 9% Mn, balance predominantly Fe). These experiments provided carefully controlled shock, reshock and release velocimetry data, with initial shock stresses ranging from 10 to 50 GPa (particle velocities from 0.25 to 1.05 km/s). Both windowed and free-surface measurements were included in this experiment set to increase the utility of the data set, as were samples ranging in thickness from 1 to 5 mm. Target physical phenomena included the elastic/plastic transition (Hugoniot elastic limit), the Hugoniot, any phase transition phenomena, and the release path (windowed and free-surface). The Hugoniot was found to be nearly linear, with no indications of the Fe - phase transition. Releases were non-hysteretic, and relatively consistent between 3- and 5-mm-thick samples (the 3 mm samples giving slightly lower wavespeeds on release). Reshock tests with explosively welded impactors produced clean results; those with glue bonds showed transient releases prior to the arrival of the reshock, reducing their usefulness for deriving strength information. The free-surface samples, which were steps on a single piece of steel, showed lower wavespeeds for thin (1 mm) samples than for thicker (2 or 4 mm) samples. A configuration used for the last three shots allows release information to be determined from these free surface samples. The sample strength appears to increase with stress from ~1 GPa to ~ 3 GPa over this range, consistent with other recent work but about 40% above the Steinberg model.

Furnish, Michael David; Alexander, C. Scott; Reinhart, William Dodd; Brown, Justin L.

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Thanks go to Mumtaz Hussain and Dilip Parajuli for excellent research assistance.1 The limited amount of empirical work on transport costs include Sampson and Yeats (1976) and Pace2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

amount of empirical work on transport costs include Sampson and Yeats (1976) and Pace2 (1979) on OECD of labor was likely to develop first along sea coasts and navigable rivers, where transport costs were determinants of a country's development prospects? Though interest in transport costs has recently risen

44

This list includes a sampling of volunteer opportunities and organizations working in language tutor-ing. These opportunities may be suitable for students majoring or interested in cultural-related areas.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This list includes a sampling of volunteer opportunities and organizations working in language tutor- ing. These opportunities may be suitable for students majoring or interested in cultural://www.guts.wisc.edu/programs/fll_tutor_info.html Want to meet new people interested in your language, develop cross-cultural communication skills, have

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

45

Performance-Based Seismic Demand Assessment of Concentrically Braced Steel Frame Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Ductility Factors for Steel Frames De- signed According1980), Inelastic Buckling of Steel Struts Under Cyclic LoadBS 5950: Structural use of steel work in building. Part1

Chen, Chui-Hsin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Supporting steel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) and the American Iron and Steel Institute (AISI) have just completed a pilot program on the technical and economic viability of direct ironmaking by a process based on bath smelting. In this process, oxygen, prereduced iron ore pellets, coal, and flux are charged into a molten slag bath containing a high percentage of carbon. The carbon removes oxygen from the iron ore and generates carbon monoxide and liquid iron. Oxygen is then injected to burn some of the carbon monoxide gas before it leaves the smelting vessel. The partially combusted gas is sued to preheat and prereduced the ore before it is injected into the bath. There are several competing cokeless ironmaking processes in various stages of development around the world. A brief comparison of these processes provides a useful perspective with which to gauge the progress and objectives of the AISI-DOE research initiative. The principal competing foreign technologies include the Corex process, DIOS, HIsmelt, and Jupiter. The advantages of the direct ironmaking process examined by AISI-DOE were not sufficiently demonstrated to justify commercialization without further research. However, enough knowledge was gained from laboratory and pilot testing to teach researchers how to optimize the direct ironmaking process and to provide the foundation for future research. Researchers now better understand issues such as the dissolution of materials, reduction mechanisms and rates, slag foaming and control, the behavior of sulfur, dust generation, and the entire question of energy efficiency--including post combustion and the role of coal/volatile matter.

Badra, C. [International Trade Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Switch to duplex stainless steels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Duplex stainless steels contain approximately equal proportions of ferrite and austenite. These stainless steels have become an established material of construction in the chemical process industries (CPI). Duplexes offer benefits over austenitic stainless steels and carbon steels because of their higher strength, and good toughness and ductility, in combination with equivalent resistance to general corrosion, as well as better resistance to localized corrosion and stress corrosion cracking. Additionally, duplex materials have thermal-conductivity and thermal-expansion coefficients similar to those of ferritic materials, are tough at low (sub-zero) temperatures, and have a high resistance to erosion and abrasion. In some of the highly corrosive environments encountered in the CPI, the super duplex stainless steels offer cost-effective options not possible with the standard austenitic stainless steels. The initial applications were almost exclusively as heat exchanger tubing in water-cooled service. In recent times, duplex stainless steels have been used in the oil, gas, and chemical industries. Examples include service in sweet and mildly sour corrosive environments, on offshore platforms where weight savings can be realized, and as a replacement for standard austenitic stainless steel in chemical-processing plants.

Quik, J.M.A.; Geudeke, M.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

HYDROGEN EMBRITTLEMENT IN LOW CARBON STEEL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Many metals and alloys absorb hydrogen and diffusion of hydrogen under certain conditions can seriously weaken and produces embrittlement in steel. Hydrogen embrittlement is a type of metal deterioration that is related to stress corrosion cracking. Although steels are well known for their susceptibility to hydrogen embrittlement, the mechanism of transportation of hydrogen is not very clear in low carbon steels. Standard tensile steel specimens were hydrogenated from 1 to 5 hours and deformed by cold worked to 50%,60%,70 % 80 % and were investigated for mechanical properties.

Rafiq A. Siddiqui; Sabah A. Abdul-wahab; Tasneem Pervez; Sayyad Z. Qamar

49

Connection of modular steel beam precast slab units with cast-in-place closure pour slabs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

monolithic continuous deck. The effects of the cold joints and discontinuous steel details are the focus of the research work....

Brush, Natalie Camille

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

50

Superior Steel  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou areDowntown Site -Miami -NewPlantSteel Co -Sites ¬Ľ

51

Spot weldability of d-TRIP steel containing , K. Y. Lee2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the strong dual phase steels,10,11 is large when compared with interstitial free or bake hardening steels in Table 1 according to the common standards.21­25 A dual phase steel DP-78026 has in this work been-TRIP steel, designed to retain d-ferrite as a stable phase at all temperatures below melting. Fully

Cambridge, University of

52

Final Scientific Report - "Novel Steels for High Temperature Carburizing"  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This program was undertaken to develop a microalloy-modified grade of standard carburizing steel that can successfully exploit the high temperature carburizing capabilities of current commercial low pressure (i.e. 'vacuum') carburizing systems. Such steels can lower the amount of energy required for commercial carburizing operations by reducing the time required for deep-case carburizing operations. The specific technical objective of the work was to demonstrate a carburizing steel composition capable of maintaining a prior austenite grain size no larger than ASTM grain size number 5 after exposure to simulated carburizing conditions of 1050 C for 8 hr. Such thermal exposure should be adequate for producing carburized case depths up to about 2 mm. Such carburizing steels are expected to be attractive for use across a wide range of industries, including the petroleum, chemical, forest products, automotive, mining and industrial equipment industries. They have potential for reducing energy usage during low pressure carburizing by more than 25%, as well as reducing cycle times and process costs substantially. They also have potential for reducing greenhouse gas emissions from existing low pressure carburizing furnaces by more than 25%. High temperature carburizing can be done in most modern low pressure carburizing systems with no additional capital investment. Accordingly, implementing this technology on carburizing furnaces will provide a return on investment significantly greater than 10%. If disseminated throughout the domestic carburizing community, the technology has potential for saving on the order of 23 to 34 trillion BTU/year in industrial energy usage. Under the program, two compositions of microalloyed, coarsening-resistant low alloy carburizing steels were developed, produced and evaluated. After vacuum annealing at 1050oC for 8 hrs and high pressure gas quenching, both steels exhibited a prior austenite ASTM grain size number of 5.0 or finer. For comparison, a control alloy of similar composition but without the microalloy additions exhibited a duplex prior austenite grain size with grains ranging from ASTM grain size 3 down to ASTM grain size 1 after similar processing and thermal exposure. These results confirm the potential for using microalloy additions of Ti, B, Nb, Al, rare earths and/or N for austenite grain size control in Cr-Mo (i.e. 4000-series) low alloy carburizing steels. They also demonstrate that these microalloy additions will not compromise the processability of the steel; all three materials produced under the program could be hot worked readily using normal steel processing protocols. To fully realize the technical and commercial potential of these steels, there is a need to continue development work using larger-scale heats. These larger-scale heats are needed to provide adequate material for fatigue testing of quenched and tempered alloys, to conduct more complete investigations of potential alloy chemistries and to provide additional material for processing studies. It will also be beneficial to carefully review intellectual property issues associated with this family of steels, since existing Japanese patent literature suggests that significant microstructural and/or process characterization work may be needed on new materials to confirm that these materials fall outside existing patent claims.

McKimpson, Marvin G.; Liu, Tianjun; Maniruzzaman, Md

2012-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

53

ITP Steel: Steel Industry Marginal Opportunity Study September...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Bandwidth Study October 2004 ITP Steel: Energy Use in the U.S. Steel Industry: An Historical Perspective and Future Opportunities, September 2000 Steel Industry Technology Roadmap...

54

ITP Steel: Theoretical Minimum Energies to Produce Steel for...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Theoretical Minimum Energies to Produce Steel for Selected Conditions, March 2000 ITP Steel: Theoretical Minimum Energies to Produce Steel for Selected Conditions, March 2000...

55

A Computational-based Approach for the Design of Trip Steels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The purpose of this work is to optimize the chemical composition as well as the heat treatment for improving the mechanical performance of the TRIP steel by employing the theoretical models. TRIP steel consists of the microstructure with ferrite...

Li, Sheng-Yen

2013-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

56

Benefits of recycling galvanized steel scrap for recovery of high-quality steel and zinc metal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and Metal Recovery Industries, Inc. (MRII), in cost-sharing collaboration, have developed an electrolytic process to separate and recover steel and zinc from galvanized steel scrap. This work has been supported by the US DOE. An assessment of available dezinc technology was begun in 1987 which (1) screened process concepts for separating and recovering zinc and steel from galvanized ferrous scrap, (2) selected electrochemical stripping in hot caustic as the most promising process, (3) evaluated the technical and economic feasibility of the selected process on the basis of fundamental electrochemical studies, (4) experimentally verified the technical and economic feasibility of the process in a phased evaluation from bench-scale controlled experiments through batch tests of actual scrap up to six ton lots, and (5) concluded that the process has technical and economic merit and requires larger- scale evaluation in a continuous mode as the final phase of process development. This work has attracted worldwide interest. Preliminary economic analysis indicates that the cost of the recovered ferrous scrap would be about $150/ton (at a base cost of $110/ton for galvanized scrap), including credit for the co-product zinc. Concentrations of zinc, lead, cadmium and other coating constituents on loose scrap are reduced by a minimum of 98%, with zinc, in particular, reduced to below 0.1%. Removal efficiencies on baled scrap with bulk densities between 60 and 245 pounds per cubic foot range from 80 to 90%. About 1000 tons of galvanized scrap bales have been treated in batch operation at MRII in Hamilton, Ontario. A pilot plant for continuous treatment of 40 ton/day of loose scrap is being built by MRII in East Chicago, Indiana, with operation starting in early 1992. 9 refs.

Dudek, F.J.; Daniels, E.J. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Morgan, W.A. (Metal Recovery Industries, Inc., Hamilton, ON (Canada))

1991-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

57

Comminuting irradiated ferritic steel  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed is a method of comminuting irradiated ferritic steel by placing the steel in a solution of a compound selected from the group consisting of sulfamic acid, bisulfate, and mixtures thereof. The ferritic steel is used as cladding on nuclear fuel rods or other irradiated components.

Bauer, Roger E. (Kennewick, WA); Straalsund, Jerry L. (Kennewick, WA); Chin, Bryan A. (Auburn, AL)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Methods of forming steel  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In one aspect, the invention encompasses a method of forming a steel. A metallic glass is formed and at least a portion of the glass is converted to a crystalline steel material having a nanocrystalline scale grain size. In another aspect, the invention encompasses another method of forming a steel. A molten alloy is formed and cooled the alloy at a rate which forms a metallic glass. The metallic glass is devitrified to convert the glass to a crystalline steel material having a nanocrystalline scale grain size. In yet another aspect, the invention encompasses another method of forming a steel. A first metallic glass steel substrate is provided, and a molten alloy is formed over the first metallic glass steel substrate to heat and devitrify at least some of the underlying metallic glass of the substrate.

Branagan, Daniel J. (Iona, ID); Burch, Joseph V. (Shelley, ID)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Automated Steel Cleanliness Analysis Tool (ASCAT)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to develop the Automated Steel Cleanliness Analysis Tool (ASCATTM) to permit steelmakers to evaluate the quality of the steel through the analysis of individual inclusions. By characterizing individual inclusions, determinations can be made as to the cleanliness of the steel. Understanding the complicating effects of inclusions in the steelmaking process and on the resulting properties of steel allows the steel producer to increase throughput, better control the process, reduce remelts, and improve the quality of the product. The ASCAT (Figure 1) is a steel-smart inclusion analysis tool developed around a customized next-generation computer controlled scanning electron microscopy (NG-CCSEM) hardware platform that permits acquisition of inclusion size and composition data at a rate never before possible in SEM-based instruments. With built-in customized ''intelligent'' software, the inclusion data is automatically sorted into clusters representing different inclusion types to define the characteristics of a particular heat (Figure 2). The ASCAT represents an innovative new tool for the collection of statistically meaningful data on inclusions, and provides a means of understanding the complicated effects of inclusions in the steel making process and on the resulting properties of steel. Research conducted by RJLG with AISI (American Iron and Steel Institute) and SMA (Steel Manufactures of America) members indicates that the ASCAT has application in high-grade bar, sheet, plate, tin products, pipes, SBQ, tire cord, welding rod, and specialty steels and alloys where control of inclusions, whether natural or engineered, are crucial to their specification for a given end-use. Example applications include castability of calcium treated steel; interstitial free (IF) degasser grade slag conditioning practice; tundish clogging and erosion minimization; degasser circulation and optimization; quality assessment/steel cleanliness; slab, billet or bloom disposition; and alloy development. Additional benefits of ASCAT include the identification of inclusions that tend to clog nozzles or interact with refractory materials. Several papers outlining the benefits of the ASCAT have been presented and published in the literature. The paper entitled ''Inclusion Analysis to Predict Casting Behavior'' was awarded the American Iron and Steel Institute (AISI) Medal in 2004 for special merit and importance to the steel industry. The ASCAT represents a quantum leap in inclusion analysis and will allow steel producers to evaluate the quality of steel and implement appropriate process improvements. In terms of performance, the ASCAT (1) allows for accurate classification of inclusions by chemistry and morphological parameters, (2) can characterize hundreds of inclusions within minutes, (3) is easy to use (does not require experts), (4) is robust, and (5) has excellent image quality for conventional SEM investigations (e.g., the ASCAT can be utilized as a dual use instrument). In summary, the ASCAT will significantly advance the tools of the industry and addresses an urgent and broadly recognized need of the steel industry. Commercialization of the ASCAT will focus on (1) a sales strategy that leverages our Industry Partners; (2) use of ''technical selling'' through papers and seminars; (3) leveraging RJ Lee Group's consulting services, and packaging of the product with a extensive consulting and training program; (4) partnering with established SEM distributors; (5) establishing relationships with professional organizations associated with the steel industry; and (6) an individualized plant by plant direct sales program.

Gary Casuccio (RJ Lee Group); Michael Potter (RJ Lee Group); Fred Schwerer (RJ Lee Group); Dr. Richard J. Fruehan (Carnegie Mellon University); Dr. Scott Story (US Steel)

2005-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

60

Nickel-free duplex stainless steels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is well known that nitrogen-alloying in steel produces a variety of exceptional properties such as high strength, high ductility and, eventually, resistance to stress corrosion cracking. High-nitrogen steels (HNS), therefore, have recently been developed to enhance the strength and corrosion resistance of stainless steels. However, due to a low solubility of nitrogen in a liquid steel under atmospheric pressure, the production of such high-nitrogen alloys needs high-pressure facilities that cause an extra cost. A possible route of developing high-nitrogen alloys under atmospheric pressure is to choose a duplex microstructure, where the amount of austenite and ferrite phase is nearly equal. A much lower nitrogen content is needed to maintain a 50% austenite phase compared with the necessary addition of nitrogen to reach a 100% austenitic microstructure. In addition, duplex stainless steels (DSS) with 40--60% ferrite can significantly improve the SCC-resistance. The objective of this work was to develop a new group of nickel-free, high strength and corrosion resistant DSS. Nickel was completely replaced by nitrogen in order to enhance SCC resistance and reduce the alloying element cost. The microstructure, mechanical properties, corrosion resistance and cost analysis of new alloys are investigated in comparison with some commercial stainless steels.

Wang, J.; Uggowitzer, P.J.; Magdowski, R.; Speidel, M.O. [ETH-Zentrum, Zurich (Switzerland). Inst. of Metallurgy] [ETH-Zentrum, Zurich (Switzerland). Inst. of Metallurgy

1998-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes steel works" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Direct utilization - recovery of minerals from coal fly ash. Fossil Energy Program. Technical progress report, 1 July 1984-30 September 1984 including summary of work for FY84  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The research discussed in this report deals with resource recovery from coal conversion solid wastes. Progress is reported on two methods (the HiChlor and Lime-Sinter processes) for extracting metal values from power plant fly ash. Preliminary work is also reported on a method of making cement from the residue of the lime-sinter process. In the HiChlor Process, metal oxides in the fly ash are converted to volatile chlorides by reaction with chlorine in the presence of a reductant. Several versions of this approach are being investigated. The Lime-Sinter Process utilizes a solid state reaction to selectively convert the alumina in fly ash to a soluble form. Fly ash is mixed with limestone and a suitable mineralizer (to reduce the temperature required for sintering and to enhance alumina recovery) and then sintered in a high temperature kiln. Alumina is recovered by leaching the resulting clinker. A complex relationship between the calcium, alumina, silica, and sulfur constituents in the feed mixture controls the formation and extraction of aluminate compounds. Alumina recovery levels are enhanced by promoting the formation of less-soluble calcium compounds and/or more-soluble aluminum compounds. A study is underway to determine the degree to which flue gas scrubber sludge can be used both as a limestone substitute and as a sulfur bearing mineralizer. Results show that 20 to 25% of the limestone can be provided by the scrubber sludges. 25 refs.,25 figs., 10 tabs.

Burnet, G.; Murtha, M.J.; Benson, J.D.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

int. j. prod. res., 2002, vol. 40, no. 1, 5570 Steel-making process scheduling using Lagrangian relaxation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

industries (Balakrishnan and Brown 1996). Iron and steel production includes sev- eral process phases (iron-making

Luh, Peter

63

Integration of Safety Culture Attributes into EFCOG Work Planning...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Work Planning and Control Guidance Document May 15, 2013 Presenters: Steele Coddington, NSTec, Las Vegas, and John McDonald, WRPS, Hanford Topics Covered: Integration of Safety...

64

Steel project fact sheet: Steel reheating for further processing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Steel reheating is an energy-intensive process requiring uniform temperature distribution within reheating furnaces. Historically, recuperators have ben used to preheat combustion air, thereby conserving energy. More recent innovations include oxygen enrichment and the use of regenerative burners, which provide higher preheat air temperatures than recuperators. These processes have limitations such as equipment deterioration, decreasing energy efficiency over time, high maintenance costs, and increased NO{sub x} emissions with increased air preheat temperature, unless special equipment is used. Praxair, Inc., supplier of oxygen and other industrial gases to the steel industry, proposes to introduce an innovative oxy-fuel burner technology (using 100% oxygen) to the steel reheating industry. Oxy-fuel combustion reduces or eliminates nitrogen in combustion air and substantially reduces waste heat carried out with flue gas. Based on technology currently used in the glass, hazardous waste, and aluminum industries, Praxair has developed and patented low temperature, oxy-fuel burners that can be used in high temperature industrial furnaces where temperature uniformity is critical and extremely low NO{sub x} emissions are desired. The technical goal of the project is to demonstrate the use of oxy-fuel burners in a slab reheat furnace while reducing energy consumption by 45% and NO{sub x} emissions by 90% within the converted furnace zones. Successful implementation of this technology also will eliminate the need to periodically replace recuperators and install NO{sub x} removal equipment.

NONE

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

STEEL: RECENT PUBLICATIONS HAMPSON, G. J., STEEL, R. J., BURGESS,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STEEL: RECENT PUBLICATIONS HAMPSON, G. J., STEEL, R. J., BURGESS, P. M. and R. W. DALRYMPLE, (in of Siliciclastic Shallow-Marine Stratigraphy. SEPM Spec. Publication 90. STEEL, R.J., CARVAJAL, C., PETTER, A. THOMAS P. GERBER, LINCOLN F. PRATSON, MATTHEW A.WOLINSKY, RON STEEL, JER√? MOHR, JOHN B. SWENSON CHRIS

Yang, Zong-Liang

66

Internship Contract (Includes Practicum)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Internship Contract (Includes Practicum) Student's name-mail: _________________________________________ Internship Agency Contact Agency Name: ____________________________________ Address-mail: __________________________________________ Location of Internship, if different from Agency: ________________________________________________ Copies

Thaxton, Christopher S.

67

BEHAVIOR OF CONCRETE BRIDGE DECKS REINFORCED WITH HIGH-STRENGTH AND HIGH CORROSION-RESISTANT STEEL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BEHAVIOR OF CONCRETE BRIDGE DECKS REINFORCED WITH HIGH- STRENGTH AND HIGH CORROSION-RESISTANT STEEL, high corrosion-resistant steel commercially known as Micro-composite Multi-structural Formable (MMFX) steel. The study included testing three full-scale bridge decks having a span-to-depth ratio of 12

68

Transmission electron microscopy of oxide development on 9Cr ODS steel in supercritical water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Transmission electron microscopy of oxide development on 9Cr ODS steel in supercritical water A strengthened ferritic steel alloys during exposure to 600 įC supercritical water for 2- and 4-weeks were cladding include austenitic stainless steels, solid solution and precipitation-hardened alloys, ferritic

Motta, Arthur T.

69

III.C. 3. A Delphi on the Future of the Steel and Ferroalloy Industries*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

204 III.C. 3. A Delphi on the Future of the Steel and Ferroalloy Industries* NANCY H. GOLDSTEIN for policy issues affecting the use of ferroalloys in steel making and certain other alloy production of the Delphi. The Steel and Ferroalloy Delphi included three rounds. The questions and exercises presented

Bieber, Michael

70

Pump apparatus including deconsolidator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A pump apparatus includes a particulate pump that defines a passage that extends from an inlet to an outlet. A duct is in flow communication with the outlet. The duct includes a deconsolidator configured to fragment particle agglomerates received from the passage.

Sonwane, Chandrashekhar; Saunders, Timothy; Fitzsimmons, Mark Andrew

2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

71

Process development of thin strip steel casting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An important new frontier is being opened in steel processing with the emergence of thin strip casting. Casting steel directly to thin strip has enormous benefits in energy savings by potentially eliminating the need for hot reduction in a hot strip mill. This has been the driving force for numerous current research efforts into the direct strip casting of steel. The US Department of Energy initiated a program to evaluate the development of thin strip casting in the steel industry. In earlier phases of this program, planar flow casting on an experimental caster was studied by a team of engineers from Westinghouse Electric corporation and Armco Inc. A subsequent research program was designed as a fundamental and developmental study of both planar and melt overflow casting processes. This study was arranged as several separate and distinct tasks which were often completed by different teams of researchers. An early task was to design and build a water model to study fluid flow through different designs of planar flow casting nozzles. Another important task was mathematically modeling of melt overflow casting process. A mathematical solidification model for the formation of the strip in the melt overflow process was written. A study of the material and conditioning of casting substrates was made on the small wheel caster using the melt overflow casting process. This report discusses work on the development of thin steel casting.

Sussman, R.C.; Williams, R.S.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Report on thermal aging effects on tensile properties of ferritic-martensitic steels.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides an update on the evaluation of thermal-aging induced degradation of tensile properties of advanced ferritic-martensitic steels. The report is the first deliverable (level 3) in FY11 (M3A11AN04030103), under the Work Package A-11AN040301, 'Advanced Alloy Testing' performed by Argonne National Laboratory, as part of Advanced Structural Materials Program for the Advanced Reactor Concepts. This work package supports the advanced structural materials development by providing tensile data on aged alloys and a mechanistic model, validated by experiments, with a predictive capability on long-term performance. The scope of work is to evaluate the effect of thermal aging on the tensile properties of advanced alloys such as ferritic-martensitic steels, mod.9Cr-1Mo, NF616, and advanced austenitic stainless steel, HT-UPS. The aging experiments have been conducted over a temperature of 550-750 C for various time periods to simulate the microstructural changes in the alloys as a function of time at temperature. In addition, a mechanistic model based on thermodynamics and kinetics has been used to address the changes in microstructure of the alloys as a function of time and temperature, which is developed in the companion work package at ANL. The focus of this project is advanced alloy testing and understanding the effects of long-term thermal aging on the tensile properties. Advanced materials examined in this project include ferritic-martensitic steels mod.9Cr-1Mo and NF616, and austenitic steel, HT-UPS. The report summarizes the tensile testing results of thermally-aged mod.9Cr-1Mo, NF616 H1 and NF616 H2 ferritic-martensitic steels. NF616 H1 and NF616 H2 experienced different thermal-mechanical treatments before thermal aging experiments. NF616 H1 was normalized and tempered, and NF616 H2 was normalized and tempered and cold-rolled. By examining these two heats, we evaluated the effects of thermal-mechanical treatments on material microstructures and associated mechanical properties during long-term aging at elevated temperatures. Thermal aging experiments at different temperatures and periods of time have been completed: 550 C for up to 5000 h, 600 C for up to 7500 h, and 650 C for more than 10,000 h. Tensile properties were measured on thermally aged specimens and aging effect on tensile behavior was assessed. Effects of thermal aging on deformation and failure mechanisms were investigated by using in-situ straining technique with simultaneous synchrotron XRD measurements.

Li, M.; Soppet, W.K.; Rink, D.L.; Listwan, J.T.; Natesan, K. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

2012-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

73

Buckling of circular steel cylindrical shells under different loading conditions†  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cylindrical shells are widely used in civil engineering. Examples include cooling towers, pipelines, nuclear containment vessels, steel silos and tanks for storage of bulk solids and liquids, and pressure vessels. The ...

Chen, Lei

2011-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

74

Auto/Steel Partnership: Advanced High-Strength Steel Research...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C. lm23heimbuch.pdf More Documents & Publications Overview: STEEL AutoSteel Partnership...

75

Welding type 347 stainless steel -- An interpretive report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Stainless steels fall into three major classifications: ferritic, austenitic and martensitic. Type 347 stainless steels are classified as austenitic, though, as well be described later, they may contain small amounts of ferrite as well. They are of the 18-8 chromium-nickel type with up to 1% niobium, an element once referred to as columbium. Type 347 stainless steel is the primary focus of this document. Similar stainless steels containing niobium will be included, such as Types 348 and 309Nb, as these are frequently encountered in certain applications in welded construction. Ferritic and duplex stainless steels, some of which may contain niobium, are not within the scope of this report. This report covers the following topics: applicable welding processes; composition; properties; ferrite potential effect of weld thermal cycle; post-weld heat treatments; cracks and microfissures; and industrial applications.

Thomas, R.D. Jr.; Messler, R.W. Jr.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Clean steels for fusion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fusion energy production has an inherent advantage over fission: a fuel supply with reduced long term radioactivity. One of the leading candidate materials for structural applications in a fusion reactor is a tungsten stabilized 9% chromium Martensitic steel. This alloy class is being considered because it offers the opportunity to maintain that advantage in the reactor structure as well as provide good high temperature strength and radiation induced swelling and embrittlement resistance. However, calculations indicate that to obtain acceptable radioactivity levels within 500 years after service, clean steel will be required because the niobium impurity levels must be kept below about 2 appm and nickel, molybdenum, nitrogen, copper, and aluminum must be intentionally restricted. International efforts are addressing the problems of clean steel production. Recently, a 5,000 kg heat was vacuum induction melted in Japan using high purity commercial raw materials giving niobium levels less than 0.7 appm. This paper reviews the need for reduced long term radioactivity, defines the advantageous properties of the tungsten stabilized Martensitic steel class, and describes the international efforts to produce acceptable clean steels.

Gelles, D.S.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

High productivity injection practices at Rouge Steel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Rouge Steel Company, located in Dearborn, Michigan, operates two blast furnaces. The smaller of the pair, ``B`` Furnace, has a hearth diameter of 20 feet and 12 tuyeres. It has averaged 2,290 NTHM (net ton of hot metal) per day of 8.2 NTHM per 100 cubic feet of working volume. ``C`` Furnace has a hearth diameter of 29 feet and 20 tuyeres. Both of these furnaces are single tap hole furnaces. Prior to its reline in 1991, ``C`` Furnace was producing at a rate of 3,300 NTHM/day or about 6.25 NTHM/100 cfwv. In November, 1994 it averaged 5,106 NTHM/day or 9.6 NTHM/100 cfwv. This paper discusses how the current production rates were achieved. Also, the areas that needed to be addressed as production increased will be described. These areas include casthouse arrangement and workload, hot metal ladle capacity, slag pot capacity and charging capability. Coupled with the high blast temperature capability, the furnace was provided with a new natural gas injection system that injected the gas through the blowpipes and a natural gas injection system to enrich the stove gas. Following the furnace reline, natural gas has been used in three ways: tuyere level control; combination injection; and stove gas enrichment. Coke consumption rate has also decreased per NTHM.

Barker, D.H.; Hegler, G.L.; Falls, C.E. [Rouge Steel Co., Dearborn, MI (United States)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Continuous steel production and apparatus  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A process for continuous refining of steel via multiple distinct reaction vessels for melting, oxidation, reduction, and refining for delivery of steel continuously to, for example, a tundish of a continuous caster system, and associated apparatus.

Peaslee, Kent D. (Rolla, MO); Peter, Jorg J. (McMinnville, OR); Robertson, David G. C. (Rolla, MO); Thomas, Brian G. (Champaign, IL); Zhang, Lifeng (Trondheim, NO)

2009-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

79

Accelerated corrosion of stainless steel in thiocyanate-containing solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is known that reduced sulfur compounds (such as thiocyanate and thiosulfate) can accelerate active corrosion of austenitic stainless steel in acid solutions, but before we started this project the mechanism of acceleration was largely unclear. This work combined electrochemical measurements and analysis using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photo-electron spectroscopy (XPS), which provided a comprehensive understanding of the catalytic effect of reduced sulfur species on the active corrosion of stainless steel. Both the behavior of the pure elements and the steel were studied and the work focused on the interaction between the pure elements of the steel, which is the least understood area. Upon completion of this work, several aspects are now much clearer. The main results from this work can be summarized as follows: The presence of low concentrations (around 0.1 mM) of thiocyanate or tetrathionate in dilute sulfuric acid greatly accelerates the anodic dissolution of chromium and nickel, but has an even stronger effect on stainless steels (iron-chromium-nickel alloys). Electrochemical measurements and surface analyses are in agreement with the suggestion that accelerated dissolution really results from suppressed passivation. Even well below the passivation potential, the electrochemical signature of passivation is evident in the electrode impedance; the electrode impedance shows clearly that this pre-passivation is suppressed in the presence of thiocyanate. For the stainless steels, remarkable changes in the morphology of the corroded metal surface and in the surface concentration of chromium support the suggestion that pre-passivation of stainless steels is suppressed because dissolution of chromium is accelerated. Surface analysis confirmed that adsorbed sulfur / sulfide forms on the metal surfaces upon exposure to solutions containing thiocyanate or thiosulfate. For pure nickel, and steels containing nickel (and residual copper), bulk sulfide (visible as a black corrosion product) forms during anodic dissolution. The sulfide is electronically conductive, and gives an increase of several orders of magnitude in the electrode capacitance; the sulfide also causes anodic activation to persist after the pure metals and steels were removed from the thiocyanate-containing electrolyte and transferred to a thiocyanate-free electrolyte. The main practical implications of this work are that low concentrations of reduced sulfur compounds strongly affect anodic dissolution of stainless steels, and that selecting steels with elevated concentrations of chromium, nickel or molybdenum would serve to limit the anodic dissolution rate in the presence of reduced sulfur compounds.

Pistorius, P Chris; Li, Wen

2012-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

80

Finite element modeling and experimental study of brittle fracture in tempered martensitic steels for thermonuclear fusion applications.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??In this work we have studied brittle fracture in high-chromium reduced activation tempered martensitic steels foreseen as structural materials for thermonuclear fusion reactors. Developing theÖ (more)

Mueller, Pablo Federico

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes steel works" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Decontamination of metals by melt refining/slagging. An annotated bibliography: Update on stainless steel and steel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The following presentation is an update to a previous annotation, i.e., WINCO-1138. The literature search and annotated review covers all metals used in the nuclear industries but the emphasis of this update is directed toward work performed on mild steels. As the number of nuclear installations undergoing decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) increases, current radioactive waste storage space is consumed and establishment of new waste storage areas becomes increasingly difficult, the problem of handling and storing radioactive scrap metal (RSM) gains increasing importance in the DOE Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Program. To alleviate present and future waste problems, Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co (LITCO) is managing a program for the recycling of RSM for beneficial use within the DOE complex. As part of that effort, Montana Tech has been awarded a contract to help optimize melting and refining technology for the recycling of stainless steel RSM. The scope of the Montana Tech program includes a literature survey, a decontaminating slag design study, small wide melting studies to determine optimum slag compositions for removal of radioactive contaminant surrogates, analysis of preferred melting techniques, and coordination of large scale melting demonstrations (100--2,000 lbs) to be conducted at selected facilities. The program will support recycling and decontaminating stainless steel RSM for use in waste canisters for Idaho Waste Immobilization Facility densified high level waste and Pit 9/RWMC boxes. This report is the result of the literature search conducted to establish a basis for experimental melt/slag program development. The program plan will be jointly developed by Montana Tech and LITCO.

Worchester, S.A.; Twidwell, L.G.; Paolini, D.J.; Weldon, T.A. [Montana Tech of the Univ., of Montana (United States); Mizia, R.E. [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Copyright 1999 E. Ashley Steel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

√? Copyright 1999 E. Ashley Steel #12;IN-STREAM FACTORS AFFECTING JUVENILE SALMONID MIGRATION E. Ashley Steel A dissertation submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor examined this copy of a doctoral dissertation by E. Ashley Steel and have found that it is complete

Washington at Seattle, University of

83

Nuclear containment steel liner corrosion workshop : final summary and recommendation report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the proceedings of an expert panel workshop conducted to evaluate the mechanisms of corrosion for the steel liner in nuclear containment buildings. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) sponsored this work which was conducted by Sandia National Laboratories. A workshop was conducted at the NRC Headquarters in Rockville, Maryland on September 2 and 3, 2010. Due to the safety function performed by the liner, the expert panel was assembled in order to address the full range of issues that may contribute to liner corrosion. This report is focused on corrosion that initiates from the outer surface of the liner, the surface that is in contact with the concrete containment building wall. Liner corrosion initiating on the outer diameter (OD) surface has been identified at several nuclear power plants, always associated with foreign material left embedded in the concrete. The potential contributing factors to liner corrosion were broken into five areas for discussion during the workshop. Those include nuclear power plant design and operation, corrosion of steel in contact with concrete, concrete aging and degradation, concrete/steel non-destructive examination (NDE), and concrete repair and corrosion mitigation. This report also includes the expert panel member's recommendations for future research.

Erler, Bryan A. (Erler Engineering Ltd., Chicago, IL); Weyers, Richard E. (Virginia Tech University, Blacksburg, VA); Sagues, Alberto (University of South Florida, Tampa, FL); Petti, Jason P.; Berke, Neal Steven (Tourney Consulting Group, LLC, Kalamazoo, MI); Naus, Dan J. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Iron and steel industry process model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The iron and steel industry process model depicts expected energy-consumption characteristics of the iron and steel industry and ancillary industries for the next 25 years by means of a process model of the major steps in steelmaking, from ore mining and scrap recycling to the final finishing of carbon, alloy, and stainless steel into steel products such as structural steel, slabs, plates, tubes, and bars. Two plant types are modeled: fully integrated mills and mini-mills. User-determined inputs into the model are as follows: projected energy and materials prices; projected costs of capacity expansion and replacement; energy-conserving options, both operating modes and investments; the internal rate of return required on investment; and projected demand for finished steel. Nominal input choices in the model for the inputs listed above are as follows: National Academy of Sciences Committee on Nuclear and Alternative Energy Systems Demand Panel nominal energy-price projections for oil, gas, distillates, residuals, and electricity and 1975 actual prices for materials; actual 1975 costs; new technologies added; 15% after taxes; and 1975 actual demand with 1.5%/y growth. The model reproduces the base-year (1975) actual performance of the industry; then, given the above nominal input choices, it projects modes of operation and capacity expansion that minimize the cost of meeting the given final demands for each of 5 years, each year being the midpoint of a 5-year interval. The output of the model includes the following: total energy use and intensity (Btu/ton) by type, by process, and by time period; energy conservation options chosen; utilization rates for existing capacity; capital-investment decisions for capacity expansion.

Sparrow, F.T.; Pilati, D.; Dougherty, T.; McBreen, E.; Juang, L.L.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Must we use ferritic steel in TBM?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mock-ups of DEMO breeding blankets, called Test Blanket Modules (TBMs), inserted and tested in ITER in dedicated equatorial ports directly facing the plasma, are expected to provide the first experimental answers on the necessary performance of the corresponding DEMO breeding blankets. Several DEMO breeding blanket designs have been studied and assessed in the last 20 years. At present, after considering various coolant and breeder combinations, all the TBM concepts proposed by the seven ITER Parties use Reduced-Activation Ferritic/Martensitic (RAFM) steel as the structural material. In order to perform valuable tests in ITER, the TBMs are expected to use the same structural material as corresponding DEMO blankets. However, due to the fact that this family of steels is ferromagnetic, their presence in the ITER vacuum vessel will create perturbations of the ITER magnetic fields that could reduce the quality of the plasma confinement during H-mode. As a consequence, a legitimate question has been raised on the necessity of using RAFM steel for TBMs structural material in ITER. By giving a short description of the main TBM testing objectives in ITER and assessing the consequences of not using such a material, this paper gives a comprehensive answer to this question. According to the working group author of the study, the use of RAFM steel as structural material for TBM is judged mandatory.

Salavy, Jean-Francois; Boccaccini, Lorenzo V.; Chaudhuri, Paritosh; Cho, Seungyon; Enoeda, Mikio; Giancarli, Luciano; Kurtz, Richard J.; Luo, Tian Y.; Rao, K. Bhanu Sankara; Wong, Clement

2010-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

86

Reaustenitisation from Bainite in Steels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.7 APPLICATIONS . . . 1.7.1 Ferrite-Martensite dual phase steels 1.7.2 Steels containing some retained austenite 1.7.3 Welding of steels . . . . . . . . . . 1.7.4 Initial austenite grain size . . . . . . . 1.8 TRANSFORMATION FROM AUSTENITE 1.8.1 Widmanstiitten... is important in the production of dual phase steels which have a final microstructure of ferrite and about 20% martensite. These steels have a good combination of strength and uniform ductility, and find applications in the automobile industry. When a fully...

Takahashi, Manabu

1993-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

87

Steel Success Story - Ironmaking: Quality and Supply Critical...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Steel Success Story - Ironmaking: Quality and Supply Critical to Steel Industry Steel Success Story - Ironmaking: Quality and Supply Critical to Steel Industry This factsheet...

88

Surface modified stainless steels for PEM fuel cell bipolar plates  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A nitridation treated stainless steel article (such as a bipolar plate for a proton exchange membrane fuel cell) having lower interfacial contact electrical resistance and better corrosion resistance than an untreated stainless steel article is disclosed. The treated stainless steel article has a surface layer including nitrogen-modified chromium-base oxide and precipitates of chromium nitride formed during nitridation wherein oxygen is present in the surface layer at a greater concentration than nitrogen. The surface layer may further include precipitates of titanium nitride and/or aluminum oxide. The surface layer in the treated article is chemically heterogeneous surface rather than a uniform or semi-uniform surface layer exclusively rich in chromium, titanium or aluminum. The precipitates of titanium nitride and/or aluminum oxide are formed by the nitriding treatment wherein titanium and/or aluminum in the stainless steel are segregated to the surface layer in forms that exhibit a low contact resistance and good corrosion resistance.

Brady, Michael P [Oak Ridge, TN; Wang, Heli [Littleton, CO; Turner, John A [Littleton, CO

2007-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

89

Design and analysis of prestressed composite steel beams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study experimentally and analytically examined the behavior of prestressed composite steel beams. Methods for analysis and design of the prestressed composite steel beams with constant and variable eccentricities based on the load and resistance factor design and the working stress design were formulated. Three specimens were tested under static and cyclic loadings to verify the proposed design methods. The results from the cyclic loadings were used to test the feasibility of the prestressed composite steel beams under actual loading conditions. Finite element models were developed to study the behavior of the prestressed composite steel beams and to ensure the validity of the proposed design methods. The modes of failure of the three specimens tested were crushing of concrete slabs and yielding of steel beams and prestressing tendons. The cyclic loads reduced the ultimate strength of the specimens tested by 7.8 percent. Overall, the proposed design methods for the load and resistance factor design and the working stress design adequately predicted the behavior of the prestressed composite steel beams.

Thammasila, D.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Measurement of intergranular attack in stainless steel using ultrasonic energy  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Ultrasonic test methods are used to measure the depth of intergranular attack (IGA) in a stainless steel specimen. The ultrasonic test methods include a pitch-catch surface wave technique and a through-wall pulse-echo technique. When used in combination, these techniques can establish the extent of IGA on both the front and back surfaces of a stainless steel specimen from measurements made on only one surface.

Mott, Gerry (Pittsburgh, PA); Attaar, Mustan (Monroeville, PA); Rishel, Rick D. (Monroeville, PA)

1989-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

91

9 Cr-- 1 Mo steel material for high temperature application  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

One or more embodiments relates to a high-temperature, titanium alloyed, 9 Cr-1 Mo steel exhibiting improved creep strength and oxidation resistance at service temperatures up to 650.degree. C. The 9 Cr-1 Mo steel has a tempered martensite microstructure and is comprised of both large (0.5-3 .mu.m) primary titanium carbides and small (5-50 nm) secondary titanium carbides in a ratio of. from about 1:1.5 to about 1.5:1. The 9 Cr-1 Mo steel may be fabricated using exemplary austenizing, rapid cooling, and tempering steps without subsequent hot working requirements. The 9 Cr-1 Mo steel exhibits improvements in total mass gain, yield strength, and time-to-rupture over ASTM P91 and ASTM P92 at the temperature and time conditions examined.

Jablonski, Paul D; Alman, David; Dogan, Omer; Holcomb, Gordon; Cowen, Christopher

2012-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

92

Developing Fatigue Pre-crack Procedure to Evaluate Fracture Toughness of Pipeline Steels Using Spiral Notch Torsion Test  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The spiral notch torsion test (SNTT) has been utilized to investigate the crack growth behavior of X52 steel base and welded materials used for hydrogen infrastructures. The X52 steel materials are received from a welded pipe using friction stir welding techniques. Finite element models were established to study the crack growth behavior of steel SNTT steel samples, which were assumed to be isotropic material. A series SNTT models were set up to cover various crack penetration cases, of which the ratios between crack depth to diameter (a/D ratio) ranging from 0.10 to 0.45. The evolution of compliance and energy release rates in the SNTT method have been investigated with different cases, including different geometries and materials. Indices of characteristic compliance and energy release rates have been proposed. Good agreement has been achieved between predictions from different cases in the same trend. These work shed lights on a successful protocol for SNTT application in wide range of structural materials. The further effort needed for compliance function development is to extend the current developed compliance function to the deep crack penetration arena, in the range of 0.55 to 0.85 to effectively determine fracture toughness for extremely tough materials.

Wang, Jy-An John [ORNL; Tan, Ting [ORNL; Jiang, Hao [ORNL; Zhang, Wei [ORNL; Feng, Zhili [ORNL

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Weldment for austenitic stainless steel and method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

For making defect-free welds for joining two austenitic stainless steel mers, using gas tungsten-arc welding, a thin foil-like iron member is placed between the two steel members to be joined, prior to making the weld, with the foil-like iron member having a higher melting point than the stainless steel members. When the weld is formed, there results a weld nugget comprising melted and then solidified portions of the joined members with small portions of the foil-like iron member projecting into the solidified weld nugget. The portions of the weld nugget proximate the small portions of the foil-like iron member which project into the weld nugget are relatively rich in iron. This causes these iron-rich nugget portions to display substantial delta ferrite during solidification of the weld nugget which eliminates weld defects which could otherwise occur. This is especially useful for joining austenitic steel members which, when just below the solidus temperature, include at most only a very minor proportion of delta ferrite.

Bagnall, Christopher (Hempfield, PA); McBride, Marvin A. (Hempfield, PA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

ITP Steel: Energy Use in the U.S. Steel Industry: An Historical...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Steel: Energy Use in the U.S. Steel Industry: An Historical Perspective and Future Opportunities, September 2000 ITP Steel: Energy Use in the U.S. Steel Industry: An Historical...

95

The morphology and formation mechanism of pearlite in steels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A number of morphological features of pearlite were revealed through scanning electron microscopy using deeply etched specimens. These include cementite branching, bridging, gaps, holes and curvature. The presence of cementite thin films or networks along the austenite grain boundaries in eutectoid steel and at the interface between pearlite and proeutectoid ferrite in hypoeutectoid steel is another characteristic of pearlite. Furthermore, ferrite thin films surrounding the proeutectoid cementite in hypereutectoid steels are also observed. Hence, it is considered that in hypoeutectoid steels the nucleus for pearlite is a film of cementite rather than the expected proeutectoid ferrite and, similarly, in hypereutectoid steels pearlite forms from a ferrite film rather than from proeutectoid cementite. Convergent beam Kikuchi line diffraction was used to accurately determine the orientation relationships between pearlitic constituents and parent austenite in a Hadfields steel. The results show that neither the pearlitic ferrite nor the cementite is crystallographically related to the austenite grain into which the pearlite was growing and to that into which it was not growing. In addition, a new orientation relationship between pearlitic cementite and ferrite in the Hadfield steel was also observed.

Zhang, M.-X., E-mail: Mingxing.Zhang@uq.edu.au [Division of Materials, School of Engineering, University of Queensland, St. Lucia, Queensland 4072 (Australia); Kelly, P.M. [Division of Materials, School of Engineering, University of Queensland, St. Lucia, Queensland 4072 (Australia)

2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

96

Sigma phase morphologies in cast and aged super duplex stainless steel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solution annealed and water quenched duplex and super duplex stainless steels are thermodynamically metastable systems at room temperature. These systems do not migrate spontaneously to a thermodynamically stable condition because an energy barrier separates the metastable and stable states. However, any heat input they receive, for example through isothermal treatment or through prolonged exposure to a voltaic arc in the welding process, cause them to reach a condition of stable equilibrium which, for super duplex stainless steels, means precipitation of intermetallic and carbide phases. These phases include the sigma phase, which is easily identified from its morphology, and its influence on the material's impact strength. The purpose of this work was to ascertain how 2-hour isothermal heat treatments at 920 deg. C and 980 deg. C affect the microstructure of ASTM A890/A890M GR 6A super duplex stainless steel. The sigma phase morphologies were found to be influenced by these two aging temperatures, with the material showing a predominantly lacy microstructure when heat treated at 920 deg. C and block-shaped when heat treated at 980 deg. C.

Martins, Marcelo, E-mail: marcelo.martins@sulzer.com [SULZER BRASIL S/A (Brazil); Sao Paulo Salesian University Center (UNISAL), Americana Division, Av. Eng. Joao Fernandes G. Molina, 905 - Distrito Industrial - 13.213-080 Jundiai-SP (Brazil); Casteletti, Luiz Carlos, E-mail: castelet@sc.usp.br [Department of Materials, Aeronautical and Automotive Engineering, Sao Carlos School of Engineering, University of Sao Paulo (USP), Av. Trabalhador Sao Carlense, 400 - 13.566-590 Sao Carlos - SP (Brazil)

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

97

Hot strength of creep resistant ferritic steels and relationship to creep rupture data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

strength, Ferritic steel, Creep rupture, Power plant, Energy Introduction There have been many studies in the design of power plant components. In recent work, the creep rupture life of such steels was factorised in which the hot strength of austenite has been modelled, primarily as an aid to the simulation of the hot

Cambridge, University of

98

Microbial Corrosion in Linepipe Steel Under the Influence of a Sulfate-Reducing Consortium Isolated  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Microbial Corrosion in Linepipe Steel Under the Influence of a Sulfate-Reducing Consortium Isolated) This work investigates microbiologically influenced corrosion of API 5L X52 linepipe steel by a sulfate the corrosion behavior. Through circuit modeling, EIS results were used to interpret the physicoelectric

99

Mechanical Properties, Thermal Stability and Radiation Damage of Ferritic Steels Processed by Thermal Mechanical Treatments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

into a material by extrusion through a channel of constant cross section that contains an abrupt angle. The work presented in this dissertation is an attempt to apply ECAE to reactor steels of interest-namely T91 and 12Cr ODS. T91 (modified 9Cr-1Mo steel...

Song, Miao

2014-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

100

AISI/DOE Technology Roadmap Program: Characterization of Fatigue and Crash Performance of New Generation High Strength Steels for Automotive Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A 2-year project (2001-2002) to generate fatigue and high strain data for a new generation of high strength steels (HSS) has been completed in December 2002. The project tested eleven steel grades, including Dual Phase (DP) steels, Transformation-Induced Plasticity (TRIP) steels, Bake Hardenable (BH) steels, and conventional High Strength Low Alloy (HSLA) steels. All of these steels are of great interest in automotive industry due to the potential benefit in weight reduction, improved fuel economy, enhanced crash energy management and total system cost savings. Fatigue behavior includes strain controlled fatigue data notch sensitivity for high strength steels. High strain rate behavior includes stress-strain data for strain rates from 0.001/s to 1000/s, which are considered the important strain rate ranges for crash event. The steels were tested in two phases, seven were tested in Phase 1 and the remaining steels were tested in Phase. In a addition to the fatigue data and high st rain rate data generated for the steels studied in the project, analyses of the testing results revealed that Advanced High Strength Steels (AHSS) exhibit significantly higher fatigue strength and crash energy absorption capability than conventional HSS. TRIP steels exhibit exceptionally better fatigue strength than steels of similar tensile strength but different microstructure, for conditions both with or without notches present

Brenda Yan; Dennis Urban

2003-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes steel works" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Wootz Damascus steel blades  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wootz Damascus steel blades contain surface patterns produced by bands of cementite particles which are generated in situ as the blades are forged from small ingots. A process for making these blades has recently been developed which involves making ingots in a gas-fired furnace followed by forging to blade shapes. This study presents a series of additional experiments which provide strong evidence that the mechanism responsible for the formation of the aligned cementite bands is similar to the mechanism that produces banded hypoeutectoid steels. That mechanism attributes the selective formation of ferrite bands to microsegregated alloying elements. The results of this study show that the cementite bands will form in ultraclean hypereutectoid steels (P and S levels <0.003 wt. %) by the addition of small amounts of carbide-forming elements V, Cr, and Ti at a combined level of <0.02 wt. %. The results present strong evidence that the cementite bands are formed by a selective coarsening of cementite particles during the thermal cycling of the forging process. The particle coarsening is induced to occur preferentially in the interdendritic regions of the alloys by the very small additions of the carbide-forming elements.

Verhoeven, J.D.; Gibson, E.D. [Ames Lab., IA (United States)] [Ames Lab., IA (United States); Pendray, A.H. [ABS Master Bladesmith, Williston, FL (United States)] [ABS Master Bladesmith, Williston, FL (United States)

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Machinability of a Stainless Steel by Electrochemical Discharge Microdrilling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Due to the chemical elements included in their structure for ensuring an increased resistance to the environment action, the stainless steels are characterized by a low machinability when classical machining methods are applied. For this reason, sometimes non-traditional machining methods are applied, one of these being the electrochemical discharge machining. To obtain microholes and to evaluate the machinability by electrochemical discharge microdrilling, test pieces of stainless steel were used for experimental research. The electrolyte was an aqueous solution of sodium silicate with different densities. A complete factorial plan was designed to highlight the influence of some input variables on the sizes of the considered machinability indexes (electrode tool wear, material removal rate, depth of the machined hole). By mathematically processing of experimental data, empirical functions were established both for stainless steel and carbon steel. Graphical representations were used to obtain more suggestive vision concerning the influence exerted by the considered input variables on the size of the machinability indexes.

Coteata, Margareta; Pop, Nicolae; Slatineanu, Laurentiu ['Gheorghe Asachi' Technical University of Iasi, Department of Machine Manufacturing Technology, Blvd. D Mangeron 59A, 700050 Iasi (Romania); Schulze, Hans-Peter [Otto-von-Guericke-University Magdeburg, Institute of Fundamental Electrical Engineering and EMC Universitaetsplatz 2, D-39106 Magdeburg (Germany); Besliu, Irina [University 'Stefan cel Mare' of Suceava, Department of Technologies and Management, Str. Universitatii, 13, 720 229 Suceava (Romania)

2011-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

103

Process for dezincing galvanized steel  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for removing zinc from galvanized steel. The galvanized steel is immersed in an electrolyte containing at least about 15% by weight of sodium or potassium hydroxide and having a temperature of at least about 75.degree. C. and the zinc is galvanically corroded from the surface of the galvanized steel. The material serving as the cathode is principally a material having a standard electrode potential which is intermediate of the standard electrode potentials of zinc and cadmium in the electrochemical series. The corrosion rate may be accelerated by (i) increasing the number density of corrosion sites in the galvanized steel by mechanically abrading or deforming the galvanized steel, (ii) heating the galvanized steel to form an alloy of zinc on the surface of the galvanized steel, (iii) mixing the galvanized steel with a material having a standard electrode potential which is intermediate of the standard electrode potentials of zinc and cadmium in the electrochemical series, or (iv) moving the galvanized steel relative to itself and to the electrolyte while immersed in the electrolyte.

Morgan, William A. (Hamilton, CA); Dudek, Frederick J. (Arlington Heights, IL); Daniels, Edward J. (Oak Lawn, IL)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Process for dezincing galvanized steel  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is described for removing zinc from galvanized steel. The galvanized steel is immersed in an electrolyte containing at least about 15% by weight of sodium or potassium hydroxide and having a temperature of at least about 75 C and the zinc is galvanically corroded from the surface of the galvanized steel. The material serving as the cathode is principally a material having a standard electrode potential which is intermediate of the standard electrode potentials of zinc and cadmium in the electrochemical series. The corrosion rate may be accelerated by (1) increasing the number density of corrosion sites in the galvanized steel by mechanically abrading or deforming the galvanized steel, (2) heating the galvanized steel to form an alloy of zinc on the surface of the galvanized steel, (3) mixing the galvanized steel with a material having a standard electrode potential which is intermediate of the standard electrode potentials of zinc and cadmium in the electrochemical series, or (4) moving the galvanized steel relative to itself and to the electrolyte while immersed in the electrolyte. 1 fig.

Morgan, W.A.; Dudek, F.J.; Daniels, E.J.

1998-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

105

Friction of wood on steel.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? This thesis deals with the experimental description of friction between steel and wood materials, specifically laminated veneer lumber (LVL) and pine wood with twoÖ (more)

Koubek, Radek

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Imagining Chivalry: Charles V's Suits of Steel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mail, German, 15 th century. Steel and brass. MetropolitanI. , Innsbruck, ca. 1512-14. Steel, gilded silver, velvet,Elector of Saxony, ca. 1555. Steel, copper alloy (brass),

Machado, Erin Jeannine

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Simulation of Dimensional Changes in Steel Casting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Simulation of Dimensional Changes in Steel Casting Shouzhu (Hans) Ou and Christoph Beckermann Pattern allowances in casting of steel are predicted using the casting simulation software MAGMASOFT to predict dimensional changes occurring during solidification and cooling of a steel casting

Beckermann, Christoph

108

Spider Silk: Sronger than Steel? Nature's Supermaterial  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

spider silk were as thick as a steel beam, it would be verysized and much heavier steel. In fact, it would take aboutstrength comparable to that of steel, about 1.5 gigapascals,

Powers, Alexander

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

High Mn austenitic stainless steel  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An austenitic stainless steel alloy includes, in weight percent: >4 to 15 Mn; 8 to 15 Ni; 14 to 16 Cr; 2.4 to 3 Al; 0.4 to 1 total of at least one of Nb and Ta; 0.05 to 0.2 C; 0.01 to 0.02 B; no more than 0.3 of combined Ti+V; up to 3 Mo; up to 3 Co; up to 1W; up to 3 Cu; up to 1 Si; up to 0.05 P; up to 1 total of at least one of Y, La, Ce, Hf, and Zr; less than 0.05 N; and base Fe, wherein the weight percent Fe is greater than the weight percent Ni, and wherein the alloy forms an external continuous scale including alumina, nanometer scale sized particles distributed throughout the microstructure, the particles including at least one of NbC and TaC, and a stable essentially single phase FCC austenitic matrix microstructure that is essentially delta-ferrite-free and essentially BCC-phase-free.

Yamamoto, Yukinori (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN; Santella, Michael L (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Brady, Michael P (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN; Maziasz, Philip J (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN; Liu, Chain-tsuan (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN

2010-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

110

Effects of corrosion on steel reinforcement.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Corroded steel in concrete is a structural issue that plaques concrete structures in coastal regions. Traditionally corroded steel strength is calculated from a distributed areaÖ (more)

Ostrofsky, David

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Phase Transformation in Cast Superaustenitic Stainless Steels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Superaustenitic stainless steels constitute a group of Fe-based alloys that are compositionally balanced to have a purely austenitic matrix and exhibit favorable pitting and crevice corrosion resistant properties and mechanical strength. However, intermetallic precipitates such as sigma and Laves can form during casting or exposure to high-temperature processing, which degrade the corrosion and mechanical properties of the material. The goal of this study was to accurately characterize the solid-solid phase transformations seen in cast superaustenitic stainless steels. Heat treatments were performed to understand the time and temperature ranges for intermetallic phase formations in alloys CN3MN and CK3MCuN. Microstructures were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and energy and wavelength dispersive spectroscopy (EDS, WDS). The equilibrium microstructures, composed primarily of sigma and Laves within purely austenitic matrices, showed slow transformation kinetics. Factors that determine the extent of transformation, including diffusion, nucleation, and growth, are discussed.

Nathaniel Steven Lee Phillips

2006-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

112

A steel trap | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered¬ČPNGExperience hands-onASTROPHYSICSHeResearchcharm thatA8 14theA newA3steel

113

The Behaviour of Multi-storey Composite Steel Framed Structures in Response to Compartment Fires†  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

For many years, the ability of highly redundant composite framed structure to resist the effect of a fire have been undervalued and misunderstood. A great deal of work on the behavior of composite steel-concrete structures ...

Lamont, Susan

114

Response of neutron-irradiated RPV steels to thermal annealing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the options to mitigate the effects of irradiation on reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) is to thermally anneal them to restore the fracture toughness properties that have been degraded by neutron irradiation. This paper summarizes experimental results of work performed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to study the annealing response of several irradiated RPV steels.

Iskander, S.K.; Sokolov, M.A.; Nanstad, R.K.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Hydrogen Embrittlement of Pipeline Steels: Causes and Remediation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrogen Embrittlement of Pipeline Steels: Causes and Remediation P. Sofronis, I. M. Robertson, D. D. Johnson University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Hydrogen Pipeline Working Group Workshop% · Contractor share: 25% · Barriers ­ Hydrogen embrittlement of pipelines and remediation (mixing with water

116

Method for reducing formation of electrically resistive layer on ferritic stainless steels  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of reducing the formation of electrically resistive scale on a an article comprising a silicon-containing ferritic stainless subjected to oxidizing conditions in service includes, prior to placing the article in service, subjecting the article to conditions under which silica, which includes silicon derived from the steel, forms on a surface of the steel. Optionally, at least a portion of the silica is removed from the surface to placing the article in service. A ferritic stainless steel alloy having a reduced tendency to form silica on at least a surface thereof also is provided. The steel includes a near-surface region that has been depleted of silicon relative to a remainder of the steel.

Rakowski, James M.

2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

117

Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Options in ISEEM Global Energy Model: 2010-2050 Scenario Analysis for Least-Cost Carbon Reduction in Iron and Steel Sector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of the modeling work carried out in this project was to quantify long-term scenarios for the future emission reduction potentials in the iron and steel sector. The main focus of the project is to examine the impacts of carbon reduction options in the U.S. iron and steel sector under a set of selected scenarios. In order to advance the understanding of carbon emission reduction potential on the national and global scales, and to evaluate the regional impacts of potential U.S. mitigation strategies (e.g., commodity and carbon trading), we also included and examined the carbon reduction scenarios in Chinaís and Indiaís iron and steel sectors in this project. For this purpose, a new bottom-up energy modeling framework, the Industrial Sector Energy Efficiency Modeling (ISEEM), (Karali et al. 2012) was used to provide detailed annual projections starting from 2010 through 2050. We used the ISEEM modeling framework to carry out detailed analysis, on a country-by-country basis, for the U.S., Chinaís, and Indiaís iron and steel sectors. The ISEEM model applicable to iron and steel section, called ISEEM-IS, is developed to estimate and evaluate carbon emissions scenarios under several alternative mitigation options - including policies (e.g., carbon caps), commodity trading, and carbon trading. The projections will help us to better understand emission reduction potentials with technological and economic implications. The database for input of ISEEM-IS model consists of data and information compiled from various resources such as World Steel Association (WSA), the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), China Steel Year Books, India Bureau of Mines (IBM), Energy Information Administration (EIA), and recent LBNL studies on bottom-up techno-economic analysis of energy efficiency measures in the iron and steel sector of the U.S., China, and India, including long-term steel production in China. In the ISEEM-IS model, production technology and manufacturing details are represented, in addition to the extensive data compiled from recent studies on bottom-up representation of efficiency measures for the sector. We also defined various mitigation scenarios including long-term production trends to project country-specific production, energy use, trading, carbon emissions, and costs of mitigation. Such analyses can provide useful information to assist policy-makers when considering and shaping future emissions mitigation strategies and policies. The technical objective is to analyze the costs of production and CO{sub 2} emission reduction in the U.S, China, and Indiaís iron and steel sectors under different emission reduction scenarios, using the ISEEM-IS as a cost optimization model. The scenarios included in this project correspond to various CO{sub 2} emission reduction targets for the iron and steel sector under different strategies such as simple CO{sub 2} emission caps (e.g., specific reduction goals), emission reduction via commodity trading, and emission reduction via carbon trading.

Karali, Nihan; Xu, Tengfang; Sathaye, Jayant

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

lectric Motors are used to drive tools and machines of all sizes. They move huge pots of molten steel in steel mills; they run mixers in the kitchen and drills in the garage.You may have used model cars or trains  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of molten steel in steel mills; they run mixers in the kitchen and drills in the garage.You may have usedIon 7 - tEstIng tHE ElEctrIc Motor Testing conditions. Electric motors move huge pots of molten steel in steel mills. #12;How a Magnet Works T ie or tape some thread or fine string to one of the magnets

Weston, Ken

119

Final Report, Volume 5, Data Package for ASTM A923 Supporting Inclusion of A890-5 Super Duplex Stainless Steel (Cast Equivalent of 2507)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volume 5 is the Data Package for the evaluation of Super Duplex Stainless Steel Castings prepared at the end of work comprised in volumes 3 and 4. The document deals with the various evaluation methods used in the work documented in volume 3 and 4. This document covers materials regarding evaluation of the A890-5A material in terms of inclusion in ASTM A923. The various tests which were conducted on the A890-5A material are included in this document.

Hariharan, Vasudevan; Lundin, Carl, W.

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

120

Final Report, Volume 5, Data Package for ASTM A923 Supporting Inclusion of A890-5A Super Duplex Stainless Steel ( Cast Equivalent of 2507)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volume 5 is the Data Package for the evaluation of Super Duplex Stainless Steel Castings prepared at the end of work comprised in volumes 3 and 4. The document deals with the various evaluation methods used in the work documented in volume 3 and 4. This document covers materials regarding evaluation of the A890-5A material in terms of inclusion in ASTM A923. The various tests which were conducted on the A890-5A material are included in this document.

Hariharan, Vasudevan; Lundin, Carl, D.

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes steel works" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Preliminary study of niobium alloy contamination by transport through helium. [Nb-1Zr; Sm-Co; Hiperco 50 steel; alumina  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Preliminary tests were conducted to determine if interstitial element transport through a circulating helium working fluid was a potential problem in Brayton and Stirling space power systems. Test specimens exposed to a thermal gradient for up to 3000 h included Nb-1%Zr, a Sm-Co alloy, Hiperco 50 steel, and alumina to simulate various engine components of the Brayton and Stirling systems. Results indicate that helium transport of interstitial contaminants can be minimized over a 7-y life with monometallic Nb-1%Zr design. Exposure with other materials indicated a potential for interstitial contaminant transport.

Scheuermann, C.M.; Moore, T.J.; Wheeler, D.R.

1987-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

122

Cast Stainless Steel Ferrite and Grain Structure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In-service inspection requirements dictate that piping welds in the primary pressure boundary of light-water reactors be subject to a volumetric examination based on the rules contained within the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section XI. The purpose of the inspection is the reliable detection and accurate sizing of service-induced degradation and/or material flaws introduced during fabrication. The volumetric inspection is usually carried out using ultrasonic testing (UT) methods. However, the varied metallurgical macrostructures and microstructures of cast austenitic stainless steel piping and fittings, including statically cast stainless steel and centrifugally cast stainless steel (CCSS), introduce significant variations in the propagation and attenuation of ultrasonic energy. These variations complicate interpretation of the UT responses and may compromise the reliability of UT inspection. A review of the literature indicated that a correlation may exist between the microstructure and the delta ferrite content of the casting alloy. This paper discusses the results of a recent study where the goal was to determine if a correlation existed between measured and/or calculated ferrite content and grain structure in CCSS pipe.

Ruud, Clayton O.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Meyer, Ryan M.; Mathews, Royce; Diaz, Aaron A.; Anderson, Michael T.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Steel Innovations Conference 2013 Christchurch, New Zealand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Steel Innovations Conference 2013 Christchurch, New Zealand 21-22 February 2013 SEISMIC BEHAVIOR OF CONCRETE-FILLED STEEL SANDWICH WALLS AND CONCRETE-FILLED STEEL TUBE COLUMNS M. Bruneau 1 , Y. Alzeni 2 , P. Fouché 2 ABSTRACT Concrete-Filled Steel Plate Sandwich Walls (CFSP Sandwich Walls) can provide a cost

Bruneau, Michel

124

Remedial investigation work plan for Bear Creek Valley Operable Unit 1 (S-3 Ponds, Boneyard/Burnyard, Oil Landfarm, Sanitary Landfill 1, and the Burial Grounds, including Oil Retention Ponds 1 and 2) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 1, Main text  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The intent and scope of the work plan are to assemble all data necessary to facilitate selection of remediation alternatives for the sites in Bear Creek Valley Operable Unit 1 (BCV OU 1) such that the risk to human health and the environment is reduced to acceptable levels based on agreements with regulators. The ultimate goal is to develop a final Record Of Decision (ROD) for all of the OUs in BCV, including the integrator OU. However, the initial aim of the source OUs is to develop a ROD for interim measures. For source OUs such as BCV OU 1, data acquisition will not be carried out in a single event, but will be carried out in three stages that accommodate the schedule for developing a ROD for interim measures and the final site-wide ROD. The three stages are as follows: Stage 1, Assemble sufficient data to support decisions such as the need for removal actions, whether to continue with the remedial investigation (RI) process, or whether no further action is required. If the decision is made to continue the RI/FS process, then: Stage 2, Assemble sufficient data to allow for a ROD for interim measures that reduce risks to the human health and the environment. Stage 3, Provide input from the source OU that allows a final ROD to be issued for all OUs in the BCV hydrologic regime. One goal of the RI work plan will be to ensure that sampling operations required for the initial stage are not repeated at later stages. The overall goals of this RI are to define the nature and extent of contamination so that the impact of leachate, surface water runoff, and sediment from the OU I sites on the integrator OU can be evaluated, the risk to human health and the environment can be defined, and the general physical characteristics of the subsurface can be determined such that remedial alternatives can be screened.

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Effects of thermal annealing and reirradiation on toughness of reactor pressure vessel steels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the options to mitigate the effects of irradiation on reactor pressure vessels (RPV) is to thermally anneal them to restore the toughness properties that have been degraded by neutron irradiation. This paper summarizes recent experimental results from work performed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to study the annealing response, or {open_quotes}recovery,{close_quotes} of several irradiated RPV steels; it also includes recent results from both ORNL and the Russian Research Center-Kurchatov Institute (RRC-KI) on a cooperative program of irradiation, annealing and reirradiation of both U.S. and Russian RPV steels. The cooperative program was conducted under the auspices of Working Group 3, U.S./Russia Joint Coordinating Committee for Civilian Nuclear Reactor Safety (JCCCNRS). The materials investigated are an RPV plate and various submerged-arc welds, with tensile, Charpy impact toughness, and fracture toughness results variously determined. Experimental results are compared with applicable prediction guidelines, while observed differences in annealing responses and reirradiation rates are discussed.

Nanstad, R.K.; Iskander, S.K.; Sokolov, M.A. [and others

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

126

Effects of thermal annealing and reirradiation on toughness of reactor pressure vessel steels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the options to mitigate the effects of irradiation on reactor pressure vessels (RPV) is to thermally anneal them to restore the toughness properties that have been degraded by neutron irradiation. This paper summarizes recent experimental results from work performed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to study the annealing response, or {open_quotes}recovery,{close_quotes} of several irradiated RPV steels; it also includes recent results from both ORNL and the Russian Research Center-Kurchatov Institute (RRC-KI) on a cooperative program of irradiation, annealing and reirradiation of both U.S. and Russian RPV steels. The cooperative program was conducted under the auspices of Working Group 3, U.S./Russia Joint Coordinating Committee for Civilian Nuclear Reactor Safety (JCCCNRS). The materials investigated are an RPV plate and various submerged-arc welds, with tensile, Charpy impact toughness, and fracture toughness results variously determined. Experimental results are compared with applicable prediction guidelines, while observed differences in annealing responses and reirradiation rates are discussed.

Nanstad, R.K.; Iskander, S.K.; Sokolov, M.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Toolbox Safety Talk Welding & Metal Work Safety  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Toolbox Safety Talk Welding & Metal Work Safety Environmental Health & Safety Facilities Safety or harmful emission giving metals. Welding Safety When welding outside of a designated welding booth, ensure injury. Avoid welding on materials such as galvanized or stainless steel in order to minimize toxic fume

Pawlowski, Wojtek

128

Working Paper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Jul 2, 2010 ... Working Paper. Branch and Bound Algorithms for ...... interest when evaluating the performance. First, each derived subproblem means usage†...

2010-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

129

Structural integrity assessment of type 201LN stainless steel cryogenic pressure vessels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code Committee approved the Code Case 2123 in 1992 which allows the use of Type 201LN stainless steel in the construction of ASME Section VIII, Division 1 and Division 2 pressure vessels for -320{degrees}F applications. Type 201LN stainless steel is a nitrogen strengthened modified version of ASTM A240, Type 201 stainless steel with a restricted chemistry. The Code allowable design stresses for Type 201LN for Division 1 vessels are approximately 27% higher than Type 304 stainless steel and equal to that of the 5 Ni and 9 Ni steels. This paper discusses the important features of the Code Case 2123 and the structural integrity assessment of Type 201LN stainless steel cryogenic vessels. Tensile, Charpy-V-notch and fracture properties have been obtained on several heats of this steel including weldments. A linear-elastic fracture mechanics analysis has been conducted to assess the expected fracture mode and the fracture-critical crack sizes. The results have been compared with Type 304 stainless steel, 5 Ni and 9 Ni steel vessels.

Rana, M.D.; Zawierucha, R. [Praxair, Inc., Tonawanda, NY (United States)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Auto/Steel Partnership: AHSS Stamping, Strain Rate Characterization...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AHSS Stamping, Strain Rate Characterization, Sheet Steel Fatigue, AHSS Joining AutoSteel Partnership: AHSS Stamping, Strain Rate Characterization, Sheet Steel Fatigue, AHSS...

131

THE DEVELOPMENT OF MICROSTRUCTURE IN DUPLEX STAINLESS STEEL WELDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE DEVELOPMENT OF MICROSTRUCTURE IN DUPLEX STAINLESS STEEL WELDS by Naseem Issa Abdallah Haddad;The Development of Microstructure in Duplex Stainless Steel Welds Abstract Duplex stainless steels

Cambridge, University of

132

Nonlinear seismic response analysis of steel-concrete composite frames  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

formulation of nonlinear steel- concrete composite beam ele-Behaviour of Composite Steel and Concrete Struc- turalE. (2001). ďAnalysis of steel-concrete composite frames with

Barbato, Michele

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Great Lakes Steel -- PCI facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper discusses the planning, design, and start-up of the 90 tph PCI facility for National Steel`s Great Lakes Steel Division in River Rouge, MI. This project is owned and operated by Edison Energy Services, and was implemented on a fast-track basis by Raytheon Engineers and Constructors, Babcock Material Handling, and Babcock and Wilcox. This paper presents important process issues, basic design criteria, an the challenges of engineering and building a state-of-the-art PCI facility in two existing plants. Pulverized coal is prepared at the River Rouge Power Plant of Detroit Edison, is pneumatically conveyed 6,000 feet to a storage silo at Great Lakes Steel, and is injected into three blast furnaces.

Eichinger, F.T. [BMH Claudius Peters AG, Buxtehude (Germany); Dake, S.H.; Wagner, E.D.; Brown, G.S. [Raytheon Engineers and Constructors, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

134

Iron and Steel Energy Intensities  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

If you are having trouble, call 202-586-8800 for help. Home > >Energy Users > Energy Efficiency Page > Iron and Steel Energy Intensities First Use of Energy Blue Bullet First Use...

135

Corrosion of austenitic and ferritic-martensitic steels exposed to supercritical carbon dioxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO{sub 2}) is a potential coolant for advanced nuclear reactors. The corrosion behavior of austenitic steels (alloys 800H and AL-6XN) and ferritic-martensitic (FM) steels (F91 and HCM12A) exposed to S-CO{sub 2} at 650 C and 20.7 MPa is presented in this work. Oxidation was identified as the primary corrosion phenomenon. Alloy 800H had oxidation resistance superior to AL-6XN. The FM steels were less corrosion resistant than the austenitic steels, which developed thick oxide scales that tended to exfoliate. Detailed microstructure characterization suggests the effect of alloying elements such as Al, Mo, Cr, and Ni on the oxidation of the steels.

Tan, Lizhen [ORNL; Anderson, Mark [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Taylor, D [Bechtel Marine Propulsion Corporation; Allen, Todd R. [University of Wisconsin, Madison

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Applications and experiences with super duplex stainless steel in wet FGD scrubber systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper presents the properties of the author`s company`s proprietary super duplex stainless steel. Work is presented showing the development of a more realistic laboratory solution representing typical limestone slurries found in real flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. The importance of additions of metal ions such as Fe{sup 3+} and Mn{sup 2+} as well as partially oxidized sulfur species is demonstrated. Results are presented comparing the crevice corrosion resistance of super duplex stainless steel in these slurries with other commonly used wrought and cast stainless steels, for both simulated anthracite and lignite type slurries. Data from loop tests on the erosion resistance of a range of alloys in simulated FGD slurries is presented. The results clearly show the superior resistance of super duplex stainless steel to both crevice corrosion and erosion in FGD slurries. Finally the experiences in UK FGD systems with both cast and wrought super duplex stainless steel are presented.

Francis, R.; Byrne, G.; Warburton, G.; Hebdon, S. [Weir Materials Ltd., Manchester (United Kingdom)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

137

SOLID STATE JOINING OF MAGNESIUM TO STEEL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Friction stir welding and ultrasonic welding techniques were applied to join automotive magnesium alloys to steel sheet. The effect of tooling and process parameters on the post-weld microstructure, texture and mechanical properties was investigated. Static and dynamic loading were utilized to investigate the joint strength of both cast and wrought magnesium alloys including their susceptibility and degradation under corrosive media. The conditions required to produce joint strengths in excess of 75% of the base metal strength were determined, and the effects of surface coatings, tooling and weld parameters on weld properties are presented.

Jana, Saumyadeep; Hovanski, Yuri; Pilli, Siva Prasad; Field, David P.; Yu, Hao; Pan, Tsung-Yu; Santella, M. L.

2012-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

138

Meals included in Conference Registrations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Meals included in Conference Registrations Meals included as part of the cost of a conference the most reasonable rates are obtained. Deluxe hotels and motels should be avoided. GSA rates have been for Georgia high cost areas. 75% of these amounts would be $21 for non- high cost areas and $27 for high cost

Arnold, Jonathan

139

A Fracture Criterion for the Notch Strength of High Strength Steels in the Presence of Hydrogen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that the presence of lattice hydrogen increases the susceptibility to hydrogen embrittlement whereas trapped. Keywords: Hydrogen embrittlement, Hydrogen trapping, Weakest link statistics. 1. Introduction Steels, when failure. Consequently, the adverse effects of hydrogen embrittlement must be included in engineer- ing

Fleck, Norman A.

140

2012 ACCOMPLISHMENTS - TRITIUM AGING STUDIES ON STAINLESS STEELS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the research and development accomplishments during FY12 for the tritium effects on materials program. The tritium effects on materials program is designed to measure the long-term effects of tritium and its radioactive decay product, helium-3, on the structural properties of forged stainless steels which are used as the materials of construction for tritium reservoirs. The FY12 R&D accomplishments include: (1) Fabricated and Thermally-Charged 150 Forged Stainless Steel Samples with Tritium for Future Aging Studies; (2) Developed an Experimental Plan for Measuring Cracking Thresholds of Tritium-Charged-and-Aged Steels in High Pressure Hydrogen Gas; (3) Calculated Sample Tritium Contents For Laboratory Inventory Requirements and Environmental Release Estimates; (4) Published report on ďCracking Thresholds and Fracture Toughness Properties of Tritium-Charged-and-Aged Stainless SteelsĒ; and, (5) Published report on ďThe Effects of Hydrogen, Tritium, and Heat Treatment on the Deformation and Fracture Toughness Properties of Stainless SteelsĒ. These accomplishments are highlighted here and references given to additional reports for more detailed information.

Morgan, M.

2013-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes steel works" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Saturation in ``nonmagnetic'' stainless steel C. Weber and J. Fajansa)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Saturation in ``nonmagnetic'' stainless steel C. Weber and J. Fajansa) Department of Physics July 1998 Scientific equipment often uses ``nonmagnetic'' stainless steel, relying on the steel's nonmagnetic behavior to leave external magnetic fields unaltered. However, stainless steel's permeability can

Fajans, Joel

142

A Comparison of Iron and Steel Production Energy Use and Energy Intensity in China and the U.S.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Production of iron and steel is an energy-intensive manufacturing process. In 2006, the iron and steel industry accounted for 13.6% and 1.4% of primary energy consumption in China and the U.S., respectively (U.S. DOE/EIA, 2010a; Zhang et al., 2010). The energy efficiency of steel production has a direct impact on overall energy consumption and related carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. The goal of this study is to develop a methodology for making an accurate comparison of the energy intensity (energy use per unit of steel produced) of steel production. The methodology is applied to the steel industry in China and the U.S. The methodology addresses issues related to boundary definitions, conversion factors, and indicators in order to develop a common framework for comparing steel industry energy use. This study uses a bottom-up, physical-based method to compare the energy intensity of China and U.S. crude steel production in 2006. This year was chosen in order to maximize the availability of comparable steel-sector data. However, data published in China and the U.S. are not always consistent in terms of analytical scope, conversion factors, and information on adoption of energy-saving technologies. This study is primarily based on published annual data from the China Iron & Steel Association and National Bureau of Statistics in China and the Energy Information Agency in the U.S. This report found that the energy intensity of steel production is lower in the United States than China primarily due to structural differences in the steel industry in these two countries. In order to understand the differences in energy intensity of steel production in both countries, this report identified key determinants of sector energy use in both countries. Five determinants analyzed in this report include: share of electric arc furnaces in total steel production, sector penetration of energy-efficiency technologies, scale of production equipment, fuel shares in the iron and steel industry, and final steel product mix in both countries. The share of lower energy intensity electric arc furnace production in each country was a key determinant of total steel sector energy efficiency. Overall steel sector structure, in terms of average plant vintage and production capacity, is also an important variable though data were not available to quantify this in a scenario. The methodology developed in this report, along with the accompanying quantitative and qualitative analyses, provides a foundation for comparative international assessment of steel sector energy intensity.

Hasanbeigi, Ali; Price, Lynn; Aden, Nathaniel; Chunxia, Zhang; Xiuping, Li; Fangqin, Shangguan

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

143

Going To Work: Work Relationships  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

One of a worker's top goals should be to develop good relationships with coworkers and supervisers. This publication discusses five general rules for building good relationships at work and offers advice on handling criticism....

Hoffman, Rosemarie

2000-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

144

STEEL STRUCTURES FOR BUILDING IN CHINA PROF. HE MINGXUAN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STEEL STRUCTURES FOR BUILDING IN CHINA PROF. HE MINGXUAN VICE-PRESIDENT OF CHINA STEEL CONSTRUCTION SOCIETY CHIEF ENGINEER OF BAOSTEEL CONSTRUCTION CO., LTD JULY 6, 2012 LONDON #12;1. STEEL AND STEEL STRUCTURES IN CHINA 2. SOME PROJECTS OF STEEL STRUCTURES FOR HIGH- RISE BUILDINGS IN CHINA #12;STEEL

Cambridge, University of

145

Work Plan  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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146

Working Copy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered energy consumption byAbout PrintableBlenderWhatFellowsWood and4213WorkWork

147

Sponsorship includes: Agriculture in the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sponsorship includes: · Agriculture in the Classroom · Douglas County Farm Bureau · Gifford Farm · University of Nebraska Agricultural Research and Development Center · University of Nebraska- Lincoln Awareness Coalition is to help youth, primarily from urban communities, become aware of agriculture

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

148

Behavior of Scaled Steel-Concrete Composite Girders and Steel Monopole Towers Strengthened with CFRP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Behavior of Scaled Steel-Concrete Composite Girders and Steel Monopole Towers Strengthened with CFRP DAVID SCHNERCH AND SAMI RIZKALLA Cost-effective rehabilitation and/or strengthening of steel. The current research program makes use of new high modulus types of carbon fiber for strengthening steel

149

STUDENT STEEL BRIDGE COMPETITION The mission of the Student Steel Bridge Competition (SSBC) is to supplement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 STUDENT STEEL BRIDGE COMPETITION 2012 RULES #12;2 MISSION The mission of the Student Steel Bridge in a steel structure that meets client specifications and optimizes performance and economy. The SSBC are stimulated to innovate, practice professionalism, and use structural steel efficiently. WELCOME ASCE and AISC

Duchowski, Andrew T.

150

European developments in the application of structural austenitic and duplex stainless steels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Stainless steel is increasingly being specified for structural applications. Principally, this is due to the aesthetic appeal of the material, no need for surface protection, durability, and the growing awareness, and use, of Life Cycle Cost analysis for assessing costs over the longer term, However, use of stainless steel in the U.K. offshore oil and gas platforms for fire and blast walls, has highlighted valuable properties of stainless steel that may be unfamiliar to structural designers. It is the purpose of this paper to demonstrate these properties. Additionally, new design guidance has become available in Europe as a result of a 4 year research program into the structural use of stainless steel. The ``Design Manual for Structural Stainless Steel`` was issued by Euro Inox and the Nickel Development Institute in 1994. This new manual will be outlined in this paper together with its influence on new European Building Standards and new European material standards for structural stainless steel. Currently in preparation, these include high strength grades with significantly higher strength than structural carbon steels. Finally, this paper will address the use of stainless steel for the reinforcement of concrete structures.

Cochrane, D.J. [Nickel Development Inst., Sidcup (United Kingdom)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

151

Feasibility analysis of recycling radioactive scrap steel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to: (1) establish a conceptual design that integrates commercial steel mill technology with radioactive scrap metal (RSM) processing to produce carbon and stainless steel sheet and plate at a grade suitable for fabricating into radioactive waste containers; (2) determine the economic feasibility of building a micro-mill in the Western US to process 30,000 tons of RSM per year from both DOE and the nuclear utilities; and (3) provide recommendations for implementation. For purposes of defining the project, it is divided into phases: economic feasibility and conceptual design; preliminary design; detail design; construction; and operation. This study comprises the bulk of Phase 1. It is divided into four sections. Section 1 provides the reader with a complete overview extracting pertinent data, recommendations and conclusions from the remainder of the report. Section 2 defines the variables that impact the design requirements. These data form the baseline to create a preliminary conceptual design that is technically sound, economically viable, and capitalizes on economies of scale. Priorities governing the design activities are: (1) minimizing worker exposure to radionuclide hazards, (2) maximizing worker safety, (3) minimizing environmental contamination, (4) minimizing secondary wastes, and (5) establishing engineering controls to insure that the plant will be granted a license in the state selected for operation. Section 3 provides details of the preliminary conceptual design that was selected. The cost of project construction is estimated and the personnel needed to support the steel-making operation and radiological and environmental control are identified. Section 4 identifies the operational costs and supports the economic feasibility analysis. A detailed discussion of the resulting conclusions and recommendations is included in this section.

Nichols, F. [Manufacturing Sciences Corp., Woodland, WA (United States); Balhiser, B. [MSE, Inc., Butte, MT (United States); Cignetti, N. [Cignetti Associates, North Canton, OH (United States)] [and others

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Recovery Act: Waste Energy Project at AK Steel Corporation Middletown  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2008, Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. (ďAir ProductsĒ) began development of a project to beneficially utilize waste blast furnace ďtopgasĒ generated in the course of the iron-making process at AK Steel Corporationís Middletown, Ohio works. In early 2010, Air Products was awarded DOE Assistance Agreement DE-EE002736 to further develop and build the combined-cycle power generation facility. In June 2012, Air Products and AK Steel Corporation terminated work when it was determined that the project would not be economically viable at that time nor in the foreseeable future. The project would have achieved the FOA-0000044 Statement of Project Objectives by demonstrating, at a commercial scale, the technology to capture, treat, and convert blast furnace topgas into electric power and thermal energy.

Joyce, Jeffrey

2012-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

153

Model for corrosion of carbon steel in lithium bromide absorption refrigeration systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A comprehensive model has been developed for the computation of corrosion rates of carbon steels in the presence of lithium bromide (LiBr)-based brines that are used as working fluids for absorption refrigeration cycles. The model combines a thermophysical module that provides realistic speciation of aqueous systems with an electrochemical module for partial cathodic and anodic processes on the metal surface. The electrochemical module includes the absorption of halides, which strongly influences the corrosion process. Also, the model takes into account the formation of passive films and their interactions with solution species. The model has been verified by comparing calculated corrosion rates with laboratory data for carbon steels in LiBr solutions. Good agreement between calculated and experimental corrosion rates has been obtained. In particular, the model is capable of reproducing effects of pH-adjusting components and selected inhibitors on the rates of general corrosion. The model has been incorporated into a program that makes it possible to analyze effects of various conditions such as temperature, pressure, solution composition, or flow velocity on corrosion rates.

Anderko, A.; Young, R.D.

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Microstructural characteristics and corrosion behavior of a super duplex stainless steel casting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The machining of super duplex stainless steel castings is usually complicated by the difficulty involved in maintaining the dimensional tolerances required for given applications. Internal stresses originating from the solidification process and from subsequent heat treatments reach levels that exceed the material's yield strength, promoting plastic strain. Stress relief heat treatments at 520 deg. C for 2 h are an interesting option to solve this problem, but because these materials present a thermodynamically metastable condition, a few precautions should be taken. The main objective of this work was to demonstrate that, after solution annealing at 1130 deg. C and water quenching, stress relief at 520 deg. C for 2 h did not alter the duplex microstructure or impair the pitting corrosion resistance of ASTM A890/A890M Grade 6A steel. This finding was confirmed by microstructural characterization techniques, including light optical and scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Corrosion potential measurements in synthetic sea water containing 20,000 ppm of chloride ions were also conducted at three temperatures: 5 deg. C, 25 deg. C and 60 deg. C.

Martins, Marcelo [Industrial Manager of SULZER BRASIL S/A and Professor of the Sao Paulo Salesian University Center (UNISAL), Americana Division, SP (Brazil)], E-mail: marcelo.martins@sulzer.com; Casteletti, Luiz Carlos [Department of Materials, Aeronautical and Automotive Engineering, Sao Carlos School of Engineering, University of Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Carlos, SP Brazil (Brazil)

2009-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

155

Multi analysis of the effect of grain size on the dynamic behavior of microalloyed steels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study presents some aspects of multiscale analysis and modeling of variously structured materials behavior in quasi-static and dynamic loading conditions. The investigation was performed for two different materials of common application: high strength microalloyed steel (HSLA, X65), and as a reference more ductile material, Ti-IF steel. The MaxStrain technique and one pass hot rolling processes were used to produce ultrafine-grained and coarse-grained materials. The efficiency and inhomogeneity of microstructure refinement were examined because of their important role in work hardening and the initiation and growth of fracture under tensile stresses. It is shown that the combination of microstructures characterized by their different features contributes to the dynamic behavior and final properties of the product. In particular, the role of solute segregation at grain boundaries as well as precipitation of carbonitrides in coarse and ultrafine-grained structures is assessed. The predicted mechanical response of ultrafine-grained structures, using modified KHL model is in reasonable agreement with the experiments. This is a result of proper representation of the role of dislocation structure and the grain boundary and their multiscale effects included in this model.

Zurek, Anna K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Muszka, K [AGH; Majta, J [AGH; Wielgus, M [AGH

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Fermilab at Work | Work Resources  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicyFeasibility ofSmall Works:OklahomaatWayneFermilab NowLab LifeWork

157

Measuring the Magnetic Flux Density in the CMS Steel Yoke  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is a general purpose detector, designed to run at the highest luminosity at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Its distinctive features include a 4 T superconducting solenoid with 6-m-diameter by 12.5-m-length free bore, enclosed inside a 10000-ton return yoke made of construction steel. The return yoke consists of five dodecagonal three-layered barrel wheels and four end-cap disks at each end comprised of steel blocks up to 620 mm thick, which serve as the absorber plates of the muon detection system. Accurate characterization of the magnetic field everywhere in the CMS detector is required. To measure the field in and around the steel, a system of 22 flux-loops and 82 3-D Hall sensors is installed on the return yoke blocks. Fast discharges of the solenoid (190 s time-constant) made during the CMS magnet surface commissioning test at the solenoid central fields of 2.64, 3.16, 3.68 and 4.01 T were used to induce voltages in the flux-loops. The voltages are measured on-line and integrated off-line to obtain the magnetic flux in the steel yoke close to the muon chambers at full excitations of the solenoid. The 3-D Hall sensors installed on the steel-air interfaces give supplementary information on the components of magnetic field and permit to estimate the remanent field in steel to be added to the magnetic flux density obtained by the voltages integration. A TOSCA 3-D model of the CMS magnet is developed to describe the magnetic field everywhere outside the tracking volume measured with the field-mapping machine. The results of the measurements and calculations are presented, compared and discussed.

V. I. Klyukhin; N. Amapane; A. Ball; B. Curť; A. Gaddi; H. Gerwig; A. Hervť; M. Mulders; R. Loveless

2012-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

158

Cleavage-like fracture of austenite in duplex stainless steel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nitrogen alloying of stainless steel has proved to be extremely successful for mechanical and corrosion properties. For duplex stainless steel, which appears to be very promising for industrial application, the beneficial influence of nitrogen has also been established for contents of about 0.2 wt-%. Duplex structures are found in many alloys and systems as, for instance, in Cu- and Ti-alloys and in stainless steel. They all are characterized by a mixture of similar amounts of two phases whose plastic behaviors are different from one another. In the case of duplex stainless steel the matrix phase is usually ferrite. However, by increasing the nitrogen content and therefore the stability of austenite, it is shown in the present work that austenite can also become the matrix. Because the partition coefficient of nitrogen between [alpha] and [gamma] is large, it is also possible to harden the [gamma] phase more than [alpha]. The question this paper attempts to answer is whether or not nitrogen alloying can exchange the roles of the [alpha] and the [gamma] phases with respect to mechanical properties.

Foct, J. (Univ. de Lille (France)); Akdut, N. (Inst. fuer Metallkunde und Metallphysik, Aachen (Germany))

1993-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

159

Workshop High Performance Steels 11-12 June 2009 Thursday 11th  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FREng, FRS, FNAE Tata Steel Professor of Metallurgy Cambridge University http://www.msm.cam in mechanical metallurgy, R&D, Sandvik Materials Technology, PhD, Docent Work: material research (responsible processing Lars NylŲf lars.nylof@sandvik.com Title: Senior research engineer in physical metallurgy Work

Cambridge, University of

160

Cast CF8C-Plus Stainless Steel for Turbocharger Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) project is to provide the critical test data needed to qualify CF8C-Plus cast stainless steel for commercial production and use for turbocharger housings with upgraded performance and durability relative to standard commercial cast irons or stainless steels. The turbocharger technologies include, but are not limited to, heavy-duty highway diesel engines, and passenger vehicle diesel and gasoline engines. This CRADA provides additional critical high-temperature mechanical properties testing and data analysis needed to quality the new CF8C-Plus steels for turbocharger housing applications.

Maziasz, P.J.; Shyam, A.; Evans, N.D.; Pattabiraman, K. (Honeywell Turbo Technologies

2010-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

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161

Lessons Learned at the Nevada National Security Site Implementing the EFCOG Activity-level Work Planning and Control Guide  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Slide Presentation by Steele Coddington, Work Planning Manager, National Security Technologies, Nevada National Security Site. Lessons Learned Implementing Work Planning & Control. 6 Step Process for improving WP&C.

162

60 Years of duplex stainless steel applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper the history of wrought duplex stainless steel development and applications is described. Ferritic-austenitic stainless steels were introduced only a few decades after stainless steels were developed. The paper gives details from the first duplex stainless steels in the 1930`s to the super duplex stainless steel development during the 1980`s. During the years much effort has been devoted to production and welding metallurgy as well as corrosion research of the duplex stainless steels. Therefore, duplex stainless steels are to-day established in a wide product range. Numerous important applications are exemplified. In most cases the selection of a duplex steel has been a result of the combination high strength excellent corrosion resistance. In the pulp and paper industry the most interesting use is as vessel material in digesters. For chemical process industry, the duplex steels are currently used in heat exchangers. The largest application of duplex steels exists in the oil and gas/offshore industry. Hundreds of kms of pipelines are installed and are still being installed. An increased use of duplex steels is foreseen in areas where the strength is of prime importance.

Olsson, J.; Liljas, M. [Avesta Sheffield AB, Avesta (Sweden)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

163

Heat treated 9 Cr-1 Mo steel material for high temperature application  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention relates to a composition and heat treatment for a high-temperature, titanium alloyed, 9 Cr-1 Mo steel exhibiting improved creep strength and oxidation resistance at service temperatures up to 650.degree. C. The novel combination of composition and heat treatment produces a heat treated material containing both large primary titanium carbides and small secondary titanium carbides. The primary titanium carbides contribute to creep strength while the secondary titanium carbides act to maintain a higher level of chromium in the finished steel for increased oxidation resistance, and strengthen the steel by impeding the movement of dislocations through the crystal structure. The heat treated material provides improved performance at comparable cost to commonly used high-temperature steels such as ASTM P91 and ASTM P92, and requires heat treatment consisting solely of austenization, rapid cooling, tempering, and final cooling, avoiding the need for any hot-working in the austenite temperature range.

Jablonski, Paul D.; Alman, David; Dogan, Omer; Holcomb, Gordon; Cowen, Christopher

2012-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

164

Energy use and carbon dioxide emissions from steel production in China  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1996, China manufactured just over 100 Mt of steel and became the world s largest steel producer. Official Chinese energy consumption statistics for the steel industry include activities not directly associated with the production of steel, double-count some coal-based energy consumption, and do not cover the entire Chinese steelmaking industry. In this paper, we make adjustments to the reported statistical data in order to provide energy use values for steel production in China that are comparable to statistics used internationally. We find that for 1996, official statistics need to be reduced by 1365 PJ to account for non-steel production activities and double-counting. Official statistics also need to be increased by 415 PJ in order to include steelmaking energy use of small plants not included in official statistics. This leads to an overall reduction of 950 PJ for steelmaking in China in 1996. Thus, the official final energy use value of 4018 PJ drops to 3067 PJ. In primary energy terms, the official primary energy use value of 4555 PJ is reduced to 3582 PJ when these adjustments are made.

Price, Lynn; Sinton, Jonathan; Worrell, Ernst; Phylipsen, Dian; Xiulian, Hu; Ji, Li

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Sulfide stress cracking resistance of superduplex stainless steels in oil and gas field simulated environments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The need to improve stress corrosion cracking resistance in H{sub 2}S/CO{sub 2}/Cl{sup {minus}}, at reasonably low prices and good mechanical properties, has led in the last decade to develop a plethora of superduplex stainless steels for sour oilfield environments application. The outstanding performance of superduplex stainless steels to SSC corrosion is diminished with the increase of chloride concentration and H{sub 2}S partial pressure. In this work the performance of superduplex steel in very harsh oilfield simulated environments (H{sub 2}S up to 20 psi (155 kPa), NaCl 25% and 80 C) were verified, Experimental work was carried out on two grades of superduplex steel seamless tubes, UNS S32760 (80ksi, 560 MPa), as the most commonly used, and UNS S39277, characterized by high strength in the annealed state (90 ksi, 630 MPa). The resistance to sulfide stress cracking (SSC) of duplex and superduplex stainless steels was evaluated in H{sub 2}S/CO{sub 2}/Cl{sup {minus}} bottom hole simulated environments. SSC threshold was determined by means of C-ring (constant strain) testing method. The results were utilized to draw engineering diagrams of superduplex UNS S39277 and UNS S32760. Duplex 22%Cr steel was considered as reference material. SSC resistance of duplex steel was strictly correlated to the acidity of the solution. Critical H{sub 2}S partial pressure in high chloride environments with addition of a buffering agent such as NaHCO{sub 3} is shifted towards higher values. Superduplex steel represents a suitable candidate for the use in the deep high pressure wells with H{sub 2}S partial pressure up to 5 psi (35kPa) and 20% NaCl.

Scoppio, L.; Barteri, M.; Leali, C. [Centro Sviluppo Materiali S.p.A., Rome (Italy); [Dalmine S.p.A., Bergamo (Italy)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

166

ThyssenKrupp Steel USA Timo Faath, Bruce Wilkinson  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ThyssenKrupp Steel USA Timo Faath, Bruce Wilkinson May 15th, 2013 1 ThyssenKrupp Steel USA ThyssenKrupp Steel USA MSE Symposium ­ Atlanta GA Timo Faath and Bruce Wilkinson May 15th 2013 #12;ThyssenKrupp Steel USA Timo Faath, Bruce Wilkinson May 15th, 2013 2 o ThyssenKrupp Steel USA o Automotive Industry

Li, Mo

167

Arch 334 -Steel Fall 2012 Course Information Architecture 334  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Arch 334 - Steel Fall 2012 Course Information Architecture 334 Fall 2012 Steel Design Instructor with an understanding of the behavior of steel members and the structures that comprise them. In order to accomplish, about material behavior issues specific to steel structures, about how to design structural steel

Heller, Barbara

168

Wrought Cr--W--V bainitic/ferritic steel compositions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high-strength, high-toughness steel alloy includes, generally, about 2.5% to about 4% chromium, about 1.5% to about 3.5% tungsten, about 0.1% to about 0.5% vanadium, and about 0.05% to 0.25% carbon with the balance iron, wherein the percentages are by total weight of the composition, wherein the alloy is heated to an austenitizing temperature and then cooled to produce an austenite transformation product.

Klueh, Ronald L.; Maziasz, Philip J.; Sikka, Vinod Kumar; Santella, Michael L.; Babu, Sudarsanam Suresh; Jawad, Maan H.

2006-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

169

Attack polish for nickel-base alloys and stainless steels  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A chemical attack polish and polishing procedure for use on metal surfaces such as nickel base alloys and stainless steels is described. The chemical attack polich comprises FeNO/sub 3/, concentrated CH/sub 3/COOH, concentrated H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and H/sub 2/O. The polishing procedure includes saturating a polishing cloth with the chemical attack polish and submicron abrasive particles and buffing the metal surface.

Not Available

1980-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

170

Method of polishing nickel-base alloys and stainless steels  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A chemical attack polish and polishing procedure for use on metal surfaces such as nickel base alloys and stainless steels. The chemical attack polish comprises Fe(NO.sub.3).sub.3, concentrated CH.sub.3 COOH, concentrated H.sub.2 SO.sub.4 and H.sub.2 O. The polishing procedure includes saturating a polishing cloth with the chemical attack polish and submicron abrasive particles and buffing the metal surface.

Steeves, Arthur F. (Schenectady, NY); Buono, Donald P. (Schenectady, NY)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Attack polish for nickel-base alloys and stainless steels  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A chemical attack polish and polishing procedure for use on metal surfaces such as nickel base alloys and stainless steels. The chemical attack polish comprises Fe(NO.sub.3).sub.3, concentrated CH.sub.3 COOH, concentrated H.sub.2 SO.sub.4 and H.sub.2 O. The polishing procedure includes saturating a polishing cloth with the chemical attack polish and submicron abrasive particles and buffing the metal surface.

Steeves, Arthur F. (Schenectady, NY); Buono, Donald P. (Schenectady, NY)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Silicon carbide tritium permeation barrier for steel structural components.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chemical vapor deposited (CVD) silicon carbide (SiC) has superior resistance to tritium permeation even after irradiation. Prior work has shown Ultrametfoam to be forgiving when bonded to substrates with large CTE differences. The technical objectives are: (1) Evaluate foams of vanadium, niobium and molybdenum metals and SiC for CTE mitigation between a dense SiC barrier and steel structure; (2) Thermostructural modeling of SiC TPB/Ultramet foam/ferritic steel architecture; (3) Evaluate deuterium permeation of chemical vapor deposited (CVD) SiC; (4) D testing involved construction of a new higher temperature (> 1000 C) permeation testing system and development of improved sealing techniques; (5) Fabricate prototype tube similar to that shown with dimensions of 7cm {theta} and 35cm long; and (6) Tritium and hermeticity testing of prototype tube.

Causey, Rion A. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Garde, Joseph Maurico; Buchenauer, Dean A. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Calderoni, Pattrick (Idaho National Laboratory); Holschuh, Thomas, Jr.; Youchison, Dennis Lee; Wright, Matt; Kolasinski, Robert D. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA)

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

MICROSTRUCTURE AND MECHANICAL PROPERTY PERFORMANCE OF COMMERCIAL GRADE API PIPELINE STEELS IN HIGH PRESSURE GASEOUS HYDROGEN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The continued growth of the world s developing countries has placed an ever increasing demand on traditional fossil fuel energy sources. This development has lead to increasing research and development of alternative energy sources. Hydrogen gas is one of the potential alternative energy sources under development. Currently the most economical method of transporting large quantities of hydrogen gas is through steel pipelines. It is well known that hydrogen embrittlement has the potential to degrade steel s mechanical properties when hydrogen migrates into the steel matrix. Consequently, the current pipeline infrastructure used in hydrogen transport is typically operated in a conservative fashion. This operational practice is not conducive to economical movement of significant volumes of hydrogen gas as an alternative to fossil fuels. The degradation of the mechanical properties of steels in hydrogen service is known to depend on the microstructure of the steel. Understanding the levels of mechanical property degradation of a given microstructure when exposed to hydrogen gas under pressure can be used to evaluate the suitability of the existing pipeline infrastructure for hydrogen service and guide alloy and microstructure design for new hydrogen pipeline infrastructure. To this end, the 2 Copyright 2010 by ASME microstructures of relevant steels and their mechanical properties in relevant gaseous hydrogen environments must be fully characterized to establish suitability for transporting hydrogen. A project to evaluate four commercially available pipeline steels alloy/microstructure performance in the presences of gaseous hydrogen has been funded by the US Department of Energy along with the private sector. The microstructures of four pipeline steels were characterized and then tensile testing was conducted in gaseous hydrogen and helium at pressures of 800, 1600 and 3000 psi. Based on measurements of reduction of area, two of the four steels that performed the best across the pressure range were selected for evaluation of fracture and fatigue performance in gaseous hydrogen at 800 and 3000 psi. This paper will describe the work performed on four commercially available pipeline steels in the presence of gaseous hydrogen at pressures relevant for transport in pipelines. Microstructures and mechanical property performances will be compared. In addition, recommendations for future work related to gaining a better understanding of steel pipeline performance in hydrogen service will be discussed.

Stalheim, Mr. Douglas [DGS Metallurgical Solutions Inc; Boggess, Todd [Secat; San Marchi, Chris [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); Jansto, Steven [Reference Metals Company; Somerday, Dr. B [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); Muralidharan, Govindarajan [ORNL; Sofronis, Prof. Petros [University of Illinois

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Duplex stainless steel: From specialty to commodity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Important applications of duplex stainless steel in the oil and chemical industry date from the seventies. Duplex stainless steel is attractive because it combines high mechanical strength, about the same as for carbon steel, and good corrosion resistance particularly against chloride stress corrosion cracking up to about 100 C. This paper highlights a number of examples that are typical for the potential as well as the problems associated with this type of material.

Quick, J.M.A.; Geudeke, M. [Shell Internationale Petroleum Mij. B.V., The Hague (Netherlands)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

175

Technical Letter Report Assessment of Ultrasonic Phased Array Testing for Cast Austenitic Stainless Steel Pressurizer Surge Line Piping Welds and Thick Section Primary System Cast Piping Welds JCN N6398, Task 2A  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research is being conducted for the NRC at PNNL to assess the effectiveness and reliability of advanced NDE methods for the inspection of LWR components. The scope of this research encompasses primary system pressure boundary materials including cast austenitic stainless steels (CASS), dissimilar metal welds (DMWs), piping with corrosion-resistant cladding, weld overlays, and far-side examinations of austenitic piping welds. A primary objective of this work is to evaluate various NDE methods to assess their ability to detect, localize, and size cracks in coarse-grained steel components. This interim technical letter report (TLR) provides a synopsis of recent investigations at PNNL aimed at evaluating the capabilities of phased-array (PA) ultrasonic testing (UT) methods as applied to the inspection of CASS welds in nuclear reactor piping. A description of progress, recent developments and interim results are provided.

Diaz, Aaron A.; Denslow, Kayte M.; Cinson, Anthony D.; Morra, Marino; Crawford, Susan L.; Prowant, Matthew S.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Anderson, Michael T.

2008-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

176

Phase Transformations in Cast Duplex Stainless Steels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Duplex stainless steels (DSS) constitute both ferrite and austenite as a matrix. Such a microstructure confers a high corrosion resistance with favorable mechanical properties. However, intermetallic phases such as {sigma} and {chi} can also form during casting or high-temperature processing and can degrade the properties of the DSS. This research was initiated to develop time-temperature-transformation (TTT) and continuous-cooling-transformation (CCT) diagrams of two types of cast duplex stainless steels, CD3MN (Fe-22Cr-5Ni-Mo-N) and CD3MWCuN (Fe-25Cr-7Ni-Mo-W-Cu-N), in order to understand the time and temperature ranges for intermetallic phase formation. The alloys were heat treated isothermally or under controlled cooling conditions and then characterized using conventional metallographic methods that included tint etching, and also using electron microscopy (SEM, TEM) and wavelength dispersive spectroscopy (WDS). The kinetics of intermetallic-phase ({sigma} + {chi}) formation were analyzed using the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (MA) equation in the case of isothermal transformations and a modified form of this equation in the case of continuous cooling transformations. The rate of intermetallic-phase formation was found to be much faster in CD3MWCuN than CD3MN due mainly to differences in the major alloying contents such as Cr, Ni and Mo. To examine in more detail the effects of these elements of the phase stabilities; a series of eight steel castings was designed with the Cr, Ni and Mo contents systematically varied with respect to the nominal composition of CD3MN. The effects of varying the contents of alloying additions on the formation of intermetallic phases were also studied computationally using the commercial thermodynamic software package, Thermo-Calc. In general, {sigma} was stabilized with increasing Cr addition and {chi} by increasing Mo addition. However, a delicate balance among Ni and other minor elements such as N and Si also exists. Phase equilibria in DSS can be affected by local composition fluctuations in the cast alloy. This may cause discrepancy between thermodynamic prediction and experimental observation.

Yoon-Jun Kim

2004-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

177

AC corrosion on cathodically protected steel.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? This report deals with the effect of alternating current on cathodically protected steel. AC corrosion has become relevant in the offshore industry due toÖ (more)

Torstensen, Andreas

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Biaxial restraint of axially loaded steel cores.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The results from the testing of six short steel specimens are presented in this thesis to represent a portion of a full scale specimen ofÖ (more)

Raddon, Brett Jay

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Laser Brazing of Magnesium to Steel Sheet.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The ability to effectively join magnesium alloys to steel will facilitate increased application and use of Mg alloys in the automotive and aerospace industries whereÖ (more)

Nasiri, Ali Mohamad

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

PROTON INDUCED SWELLING IN TYPE 316 STAINLESS STEEL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

an Austenitic Stainless Steel, USAEC Report ORNL-4580, Oakin Austenitic Stainless Steel, Ref. 5, p. 142. D. I. R.Irradiated 304 Stainless Steel, Ref. 5, p. 499. Table 1.

Srivastava, A.K.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes steel works" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Mag-Foot: a steel bridge inspection robot  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A legged robot that moves across a steel structure is developed for steel bridge inspection. Powerful permanent magnets imbedded in each foot allow the robot to hang from a steel ceiling powerlessly. Although the magnets ...

Asada, Harry

182

Spheroidisation of Hypereutectoid State of Nanostructured Bainitic Steel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spheroidisation of Hypereutectoid State of Nanostructured Bainitic Steel D. Luoa , M.J. Peeta , S can be achieved using this method. Keywords: nanostructured bainite, hypereutectoid steel, spheroidisation, cementite, softening heat treatments 1. Introduction Strong steels sometimes need to be formed

Cambridge, University of

183

Blast damage mitigation of steel structures from near- contact charges  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Depth 6.5 in. 6.5 in. 3 in. .625 in. 1.5 in. Material SteelSteelAluminum Steel Polyurethane Weight 472 lb 472 lb 73 lb 45 lb

Wolfson, Janet Crumrine

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

MICROSTRUCTURE AND PROPERTIES OF DUAL PHASE STEELS CONTAINING FINE PRECIPITATES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Properties of Dual-Phase Steels, R. A. Kot and J. W.of Niobium Microalloyed Dual- Phase Steel, MetallurgicalAND PROPERTIES OF DUAL PHASE STEELS CONTAINING FINE

Gau, J.S.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

FERRITE STRUCTURE AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF LOW ALLOY DUPLEX STEELS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Properties of Dual-Phase Steels, R. A. Kot and J. W.Formable HSLA and Dual Phase Steels, A. T. Davenport, ed. ,Formable HSLA and Dual Phase Steels, A. T. Davenport, ed. ,

Hoel, R.H.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Procedures in Modules (1) Including all procedures within modules  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Procedures in Modules (1) Including all procedures within modules works very well in almost all designing these if possible #12;Procedures in Modules (2) These are very much like internal procedures Works very well in almost all programs Everything accessible in the module can also be used in the procedure

187

ITP Steel: Steel Industry Energy Bandwidth Study October 2004  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensionalthe U.S. Department ofIOWA1999)Bandwidth forDepartmentSteel

188

Development of Steel Fastener Nano-Ceramic Coatings for Corrosion...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Steel Fastener Nano-Ceramic Coatings for Corrosion Protection of Magnesium Parts (AMD-704) Development of Steel Fastener Nano-Ceramic Coatings for Corrosion Protection of Magnesium...

189

Nonlinear seismic response analysis of steel-concrete composite frames  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of nonlinear steel- concrete composite beam ele- ment. ĒTests and analysis of composite beams with incom- pleteElementary Behaviour of Composite Steel and Concrete Struc-

Barbato, Michele

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Friction of Steel Sliding Under Boundary Lubrication Regime in...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Friction of Steel Sliding Under Boundary Lubrication Regime in Commercial Gear Oils at Elevated Temperatures Friction of Steel Sliding Under Boundary Lubrication Regime in...

191

annealed stainless steels: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: of stainless steel container materials is a potential problem for long-term radioactive waste storage-to-failure of relevant stainless steels in the annealed...

192

Development of 3rd Generation Advanced High Strength Steels ...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3rd Generation Advanced High Strength Steels (AHSS) with an Integrated Experimental and Simulation Approach Development of 3rd Generation Advanced High Strength Steels (AHSS) with...

193

Lightweight Sealed Steel Fuel Tanks for Advanced Hybrid Electric...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Sealed Steel Fuel Tanks for Advanced Hybrid Electric Vehicles Lightweight Sealed Steel Fuel Tanks for Advanced Hybrid Electric Vehicles 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and...

194

Aluminium Electroplating on Steel from a Fused Bromide Electrolyte  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A quaternary bromide bath (LiBr-KBr-CsBr-AlBr3) was used to electro-coat aluminium on steel substrates. The electrolyte was prepared by the addition of AlBr3 into the eutectic LiBr-KBr-CsBr melt. A smooth, thick, adherent and shiny aluminium coating could be obtained with 80 wt.% AlBr3 in the ternary melt. The SEM photographs of the coated surfaces suggest the formation of thick and dense coatings with good aluminium coverage. Both salt immersion and open circuit potential measurement suggest that the coatings did display good corrosion-resistance behavior. Annealing of the coated surfaces, prior to corrosion tests, suggested the robustness of the metallic aluminium coating in preventing the corrosion of the steel surfaces. Studies also indicated that the quaternary bromide plating bath can potentially provide a better aluminium coating on both ferrous and non-ferrous metals, including complex surfaces/geometries.

Prabhat Tripathy; Laura Wurth; Eric Dufek; Toni Y. Gutknecht; Natalie Gese; Paula Hahn; Steven Frank; Guy Fredrickson; J Stephen Herring

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

STAINLESS STEEL INTERACTIONS WITH SALT CONTAINING PLUTONIUM OXIDES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Salt containing plutonium oxide materials are treated, packaged and stored within nested, stainless steel containers based on requirements established in the DOE 3013 Standard. The moisture limit for the stored materials is less than 0.5 weight %. Surveillance activities which are conducted to assess the condition of the containers and assure continuing 3013 container integrity include the destructive examination of a select number of containers to determine whether corrosion attack has occurred as a result of stainless steel interactions with salt containing plutonium oxides. To date, some corrosion has been observed on the innermost containers, however, no corrosion has been noted on the outer containers and the integrity of the 3013 container systems is not expected to be compromised over a 50 year storage lifetime.

Nelson, Z.; Chandler, G.; Dunn, K.; Stefek, T.; Summer, M.

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Residual Stress Determination for A Ferritic Steel Weld Plate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of this experiment is to demonstrate the capability of neutron diffraction technique to reproducibly map residual strains in a ferritic steel weld. The objective includes the identification of corrections for variations in metal composition due to the welding process which produces changes in lattice parameter that are not due to mechanical effects. The second objective is to develop and demonstrate a best practice for neutron diffraction strain mapping of steel welds. The appropriate coordinate system for the measurement of a weld, which is strongly distorted from planar geometry, has to be defined. The coordinate system is important in determining the procedures for mounting and positioning of the weld so that mapping details, especially in regions of high gradients, can be conveniently inter-compared between laboratories.

Wang, D.-Q.; Hubbard, C.R.; Spooner, S.

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Evaluation of Oxidation and Hydrogen Permeation of Al Containing Duplex Stainless Steels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As the National Hydrogen Economy continues to develop and evolve the need for structural materials that can resist hydrogen assisted degradation will become critical. To date austenitic stainless steel materials have been shown to be mildly susceptible to hydrogen attack which results in lower mechanical and fracture strengths. As a result, hydrogen permeation barrier coatings are typically applied to these steel to retard hydrogen ingress. The focal point of the reported work was to evaluate the potential for intentional alloying of commercial 300-series stainless steels to promote hydrogen permeation resistant oxide scales. Previous research on the Cr- and Fe-oxide scales inherent to 300-series stainless steels has proven to be inconsistent in effecting permeation resistance. The approach undertaken in this research was to add aluminum to the 300-series stainless steels in an attempt to promote a pure Al-oxide or and Al-rich oxide scale. Aloxide had been previously demonstrated to be an effective hydrogen permeation barrier. Results for 304L and 347H alloys doped with Al in concentration from 0.5-3.0 wt% with respect to oxidation kinetic studies, cyclic oxidation and characterization of the oxide scale chemistry are reported herein. Gaseous hydrogen permeation testing of the Al-doped alloys in both the unoxidized and oxidized (600 C, 30 mins) conditions are reported. A critical finding from this work is that at concentration as low as 0.5 wt% Al, the Al stabilizes the ferrite phase in these steels thus producing duplex austenitic-ferritic microstructures. As the Al-content increases the amount of measured ferrite increases thus resulting in hydrogen permeabilities more closely resembling ferritic steels.

Adams, Thad M.; Korinko, Paul; Duncan, Andrew

2005-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

198

acids composition including: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

MEASURE BOND BETWEEN COMPOSITE AND STEEL GIRDERS???..5 1.3 USE OF COMPOSITE MATERIALS TO PREVENT CRACK PROPOGATION???.9 1.4 CFRP OVERLAY...

199

Thermal performance of steel-framed walls. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In wall construction, highly conductive members spaced along the wall, which allow higher heat transfer than that through less conductive areas, are referred to as thermal bridges. Thermal bridges in walls tend to increase heat loss and, under certain adverse conditions, can cause dust streaking (``ghosting``) on interior walls over studs due to temperature differentials, as well as condensation in and on walls. Although such adverse conditions can be easily avoided by proper thermal design of wall systems, these effects have not been well understood and thermal data has been lacking. Therefore, the present study was initiated to provide (1) a better understanding of the thermal behavior of steel-framed walls, (2) a set of R-values for typical wall constructions, and (3) information that could be used to develop improved methods of predicting R-values. An improved method for estimating R-value would allow an equitable comparison of thermal performance with other construction types and materials. This would increase the number of alternative materials for walls available to designers, thus allowing them to choose the optimum choice for construction. Twenty-three wall samples were tested in a calibrated hot box (ASTM C9761) to measure the thermal performance of steel-framed wall systems. The tests included an array of stud frame configurations, exterior sheathing and fiberglass batt insulations. Other studies have not included the use of insulating sheathing, which reduces the extent of the thermal bridges and improves total thermal performance. The purpose of the project was to provide measured R-values for commonly used steel-framed wall configurations and to improve R-value estimating methods. Test results were compared to R-value estimates using the parallel path method, the isothermal planes method and the ASHRAE Zone method. The comparison showed that the known procedures do not fully account for the three-dimensional effects created by steel framing in a wall.

Barbour, E. [NAHB Research Center, Inc., Upper Marlboro, MD (United States); Goodrow, J. [Holometrix, Inc., Bedford, MA (United States); Kosny, J.; Christian, J.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1994-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

200

Steel Winds | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExplorationUT-g GrantAtlas (PACA RegionSpringviewNameGeothermal FacilitySteamboatSteel

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes steel works" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

A recycling process for dezincing steel scrap  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In response to the several-fold increase in consumption of galvanized steel in the last decade and the problems associated with refurnacing larger quantities of galvanized steel scrap, a process is being developed to separate and recover the steel and zinc from galvanized ferrous scrap. The zinc is dissolved from the scrap in hot caustic using anodic assistance and is electrowon as dendritic powder. The process is effective for zinc, lead, aluminum, and cadmium removal on loose and baled scrap and on all types of galvanized steel. The process has been pilot tested for batch treatment of 1,000 tons of mostly baled scrap. A pilot plant to continuously treat loose scrap is under construction. Use of degalvanized steel scrap decreases raw materials and environmental compliance costs to steel- and iron-makers, may enable integrated steel producers to recycle furnace dusts to the sinter plant, and may enable EAF production of flat products without use of DRI or pig iron. Recycling the components of galvanized steel scrap saves primary energy, decreases zinc imports, and adds value to the scrap.

Dudek, F.J.; Daniels, E.J. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Morgan, W.A.; Kellner, A.W.; Harrison, J. (Metal Recovery Industries, Inc., Hamilton, ON (Canada))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

A recycling process for dezincing steel scrap  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In response to the several-fold increase in consumption of galvanized steel in the last decade and the problems associated with refurnacing larger quantities of galvanized steel scrap, a process is being developed to separate and recover the steel and zinc from galvanized ferrous scrap. The zinc is dissolved from the scrap in hot caustic using anodic assistance and is electrowon as dendritic powder. The process is effective for zinc, lead, aluminum, and cadmium removal on loose and baled scrap and on all types of galvanized steel. The process has been pilot tested for batch treatment of 1,000 tons of mostly baled scrap. A pilot plant to continuously treat loose scrap is under construction. Use of degalvanized steel scrap decreases raw materials and environmental compliance costs to steel- and iron-makers, may enable integrated steel producers to recycle furnace dusts to the sinter plant, and may enable EAF production of flat products without use of DRI or pig iron. Recycling the components of galvanized steel scrap saves primary energy, decreases zinc imports, and adds value to the scrap.

Dudek, F.J.; Daniels, E.J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Morgan, W.A.; Kellner, A.W.; Harrison, J. [Metal Recovery Industries, Inc., Hamilton, ON (Canada)

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Method for welding chromium molybdenum steels  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Chromium-molybdenum steels exhibit a weakening after welding in an area adjacent to the weld. This invention is an improved method for welding to eliminate the weakness by subjecting normalized steel to a partial temper prior to welding and subsequently fully tempering the welded article for optimum strength and ductility.

Sikka, Vinod K. (Clinton, TN)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Controlled powder morphology experiments in megabar 304 stainless steel compaction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experiments with controlled morphology including shape, size, and size distribution were made on 304L stainless steel powders. These experiments involved not only the powder variables but pressure variables of 0.08 to 1.0 Mbar. Also included are measured container strain on the material ranging from 1.5% to 26%. Using a new strain controllable design it was possible to seperate and control, independently, strain and pressure. Results indicate that powder morphology, size distribution, packing density are among the pertinent parameters in predicting compaction of these powders.

Staudhammer, K.P.; Johnson, K.A.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Interaction between stainless steel and plutonium metal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Long-term storage of excess plutonium is of great concern in the U.S. as well as abroad. The current accepted configuration involves intimate contact between the stored material and an iron-bearing container such as stainless steel. While many safety scenario studies have been conducted and used in the acceptance of stainless steel containers, little information is available on the physical interaction at elevated temperatures between certain forms of stored material and the container itself. The bulk of the safety studies has focused on the ability of a package to keep the primary stainless steel containment below the plutonium-iron eutectic temperature of approximately 410 C. However, the interactions of plutonium metal with stainless steel have been of continuing interest. This paper reports on a scoping study investigating the interaction between stainless steel and plutonium metal in a pseudo diffusion couple at temperatures above the eutectic melt-point.

Dunwoody, John T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mason, Richard E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Freibert, Franz J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Willson, Stephen P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Veirs, Douglas K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Worl, Laura A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Archuleta, Alonso [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Conger, Donald J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

1. Introduction Fluid flow in continuous casting of steel is of great inter-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-phase fluid flow owing to the simulation kinematic viscosity of steel and water, the flow pattern itself and entrainment of the mold slag, · transient fluctuations and waves in the top surface level, and their effect, such as intermixing during a grade change and segregation. Extensive past work has employed physical water models

Thomas, Brian G.

207

Determination of Fire Induced Collapse Mechanisms of Multi-Storey Steel Framed Structures†  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for several hours (WTC-7). Owners of high-rise buildings are seeking assurance that integrity can be maintained during similar elevated temperature situations. This work is part of a much larger study to evaluate the performance of high-rise steel...

Jowsey, Allan; Torero, Jose L; Usmani, Asif; Lane, Barbara; Lamont, Susan

208

Effectiveness of advanced coating systems for mitigating blast effects on steel components  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effectiveness of advanced coating systems for mitigating blast effects on steel components C. Chen1 of this work is to study the effectiveness of an advanced coating material, polyurea, as a blast mitigation. Effects of thicknesses and locations of the polyurea on the blast mitigation are also studied

209

Mechanism of collapse of tall steel moment frame buildings under earthquake excitation Swaminathan Krishnan1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Classical energy balance analysis shows that only long- period excitation imparts energy to tall buildings significant story-overlap, typically separated by just one story. It is shown that a simple work-energy tall steel buildings in the 1985 Mexico City earthquake, there has been sustained interest

Krishnan, Swaminathan

210

Apparatus and process for ultrasonic seam welding stainless steel foils  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ultrasonic seam welding apparatus having a head which is rotated to form contact, preferably rolling contact, between a metallurgically inert coated surface of the head and an outside foil of a plurality of layered foils or work materials. The head is vibrated at an ultrasonic frequency, preferably along a longitudinal axis of the head. The head is constructed to transmit vibration through a contacting surface of the head into each of the layered foils. The contacting surface of the head is preferably coated with aluminum oxide to prevent the head from becoming welded to layered stainless steel foils.

Leigh, Richard W. (New York, NY)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

MICROSTRUCTURAL EXAMINATION OF LOW ACTIVATION FERRITIC STEELS FOLLOWING IRRADIATION IN ORR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Microstructural examinations are reported for a series of low activation steels containing Mn following irradiation in the Oak Ridge Reactor at 330 and 400 degrees C to approximately 10 dpa. Alloy compositions included 2Cr, 9Cr and 12Cr steels with V to 1.5 percent and W to 1.0 percent. Results include compositional changes in precipitates and microstructural changes as a function of composition and irradiation temperature. It is concluded that temperatures in ORR are on the order of 50 degrees C higher than anticipated.

Gelles, David S.

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Utility Security & Resiliency: Working Together  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentationógiven at the Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) Fall 2008 meetingódiscusses Edison Electric Institute (EEI), including its key security objectives, key activities, cybersecurity activities, and spare transformer equipment program (STEP).

213

The performance of a surface-applied corrosion inhibitor for the carbon steel in saturated Ca(OH){sub 2} solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the present work, the performance of an amino alcohol based surface applied inhibitor was studied by the electrochemical techniques in saturated Ca(OH){sub 2} solutions. The surface morphology of the carbon steel was observed by scanning electron microscope, and the energy diffraction spectrum was also tested. Results showed that the inhibitor used in this work demonstrated obvious inhibition efficiency on the carbon steel in saturated Ca(OH){sub 2} solutions. The inhibition mechanism of the inhibitor lies in the quick adsorption of the active component on carbon steel surface.

Zheng, Haibing [Qingdao Technological University, Qingdao 266033 (China)] [Qingdao Technological University, Qingdao 266033 (China); Li, Weihua, E-mail: liweihua@qdio.ac.cn [Qingdao Technological University, Qingdao 266033 (China) [Qingdao Technological University, Qingdao 266033 (China); Institute of Oceanology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Qingdao 266071 (China); Ma, Fubin [Institute of Oceanology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Qingdao 266071 (China)] [Institute of Oceanology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Qingdao 266071 (China); Kong, Qinglin [University of Melbourne, Melbourne 3010 (Australia)] [University of Melbourne, Melbourne 3010 (Australia)

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

214

Working Group Report: Sensors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sensors play a key role in detecting both charged particles and photons for all three frontiers in Particle Physics. The signals from an individual sensor that can be used include ionization deposited, phonons created, or light emitted from excitations of the material. The individual sensors are then typically arrayed for detection of individual particles or groups of particles. Mounting of new, ever higher performance experiments, often depend on advances in sensors in a range of performance characteristics. These performance metrics can include position resolution for passing particles, time resolution on particles impacting the sensor, and overall rate capabilities. In addition the feasible detector area and cost frequently provides a limit to what can be built and therefore is often another area where improvements are important. Finally, radiation tolerance is becoming a requirement in a broad array of devices. We present a status report on a broad category of sensors, including challenges for the future and work in progress to solve those challenges.

Artuso, M.; et al.,

2013-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

215

Measuring the Magnetic Flux Density in the CMS Steel Yoke  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is a general purpose detector, designed to run at the highest luminosity at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Its distinctive features include a 4 T superconducting solenoid with 6-m-diameter by 12.5-m-length free bore, enclosed inside a 10000-ton return yoke made of construction steel. The return yoke consists of five dodecagonal three-layered barrel wheels and four end-cap disks at each end comprised of steel blocks up to 620 mm thick, which serve as the absorber plates of the muon detection system. Accurate characterization of the magnetic field everywhere in the CMS detector is required. To measure the field in and around the steel, a system of 22 flux-loops and 82 3-D Hall sensors is installed on the return yoke blocks. Fast discharges of the solenoid (190 s time-constant) made during the CMS magnet surface commissioning test at the solenoid central fields of 2.64, 3.16, 3.68 and 4.01 T were used to induce voltages in the flux-loops. The voltages are measured on-line a...

Klyukhin, V I; Ball, A; Curť, B; Gaddi, A; Gerwig, H; Hervť, A; Mulders, M; Loveless, R

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

STEEL PLATE SHEAR WALL BUILDINGS: DESIGN REQUIREMENTS AND RESEARCH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STEEL PLATE SHEAR WALL BUILDINGS: DESIGN REQUIREMENTS AND RESEARCH Michel Bruneau, P.E. 1 Dr. Bruneau is conducting research on the seismic evaluation and retrofit of existing steel bridges, steel of this research, and has co- authored the book "Ductile Design of Steel Structures" published in 1997 by Mc

Bruneau, Michel

217

Fatigue Behaviour of Magnesium to Steel Dissimilar Friction Stir Lap Joints  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A short study has been conducted to assess the performance of friction stir welded Mg/steel joints under dynamic loads. The major mode of failure was found to be top Mg sheet fracture. Crack initiation is noted to have taken place at the Mg/steel interface. The fatigue life of the joints is found to be significantly different than the fatigue data of the Mg alloy obtained from the literature. The reasons behind such a difference have been examined in this work.

Jana, Saumyadeep; Hovanski, Yuri

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Summary of current research interests Much of our work includes the morphological characterisation of human  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Bailey T, Zhang J, Knupp C, Cheetham ME, Greenwood J, Luthert PJ. Modulation of Sub-RPE deposits in vitro-related macular degeneration. Prog Ret Eye Res (2001) 20: 705-732. Chong NHV, Alexander RA, Waters L, Barnett KC in hereditary retinal degeneration. IOVS (1999) 40: 1298-1305 Bailey A, Luthert P, Dean A, Harding B, Janota I

Saunders, Mark

219

CEBAF energy upgrade program including re-work of CEBAF cavities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Jefferson Lab, is planning an upgrade of the CEBAF accelerator from a maximum energy of 6 GeV to 12 GeV and from 3 to 4 experimental halls. This paper will discuss the plans for upgrading the energy of the machine which requires improvements of the existing Super Conducting Radio Frequency (SRF) cryomodules and the additions of ten newly designed high performance SRF cryomodules.

Joseph Preble

2008-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

220

Tritiated Water Interaction with Stainless Steel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experiments conducted to study tritium permeation of stainless steel at ambient and elevated temperatures revealed that HT converts relatively quickly to HTO. Further, the HTO partial pressure contributes essentially equally with elemental tritium gas in driving permeation through the stainless steel. Such permeation appears to be due to dissociation of the water molecule on the hot stainless steel surface. There is an equilibrium concentration of HTO vapor above adsorbed gas on the walls of the experimental apparatus evident from freezing transients. The uptake process of tritium from the carrier gas involves both surface adsorption and isotopic exchange with surface bound water.

Glen R. Longhurst

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes steel works" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Assessing the effect of cement-steel interface on well casing corrosion in aqueous CO2 environments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

CO{sub 2} leakage is a critical safety concern for geologic storage. In wellbore environments, important leakage paths include the rock-cement and cement-casing interfaces. If the cement-casing interface is filled with escaping CO{sub 2}, the well casing directly contacts the CO{sub 2}. This can cause severe corrosion in the presence of water. This paper studies the effect of steel-cement interface gaps, ranging from 1 mm to 0 um, on casing corrosion. Corrosion kinetics were measured employing electrochemical techniques including linear polarization resistance, open circuit potential and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The experimental results showed that the corrosion of steel is not significant where the gap between steel and cement is small ({le} 100 {micro}m). Corrosion rates are controlled by the diffusion of corrosive species (H{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and H{sup +}) along the interface. In contrast, steel corrosion is severe in a broad gap where the corrosion process is limited only by the reaction kinetics of steel and corrosive species. The threshold leading to severe corrosion in terms of the cement-steel interface size (100 {micro}m) was determined. Our research clarifies a corrosion scenario at the cement-steel interface. Casing steel corrosion is initiated when attacked by corrosive species at the cement-steel interface. For relatively tight interfaces, this results in a slow thinning of the casing and expansion of the interface width. If the gap increases beyond the critical threshold size, the corrosion rate increases significantly, and a potentially damaging cycle of corrosion and interface expansion is developed.

Han, Jiabin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Carey, James W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Zhang, Jinsuo [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Prices include compostable serviceware and linen tablecloths  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

APPETIZERS Prices include compostable serviceware and linen tablecloths for the food tables.ucdavis.edu. BUTTERNUT SQUASH & BLACK BEAN ENCHILADAS #12;BUFFETS Prices include compostable serviceware and linen

California at Davis, University of

223

Effects of metallurgical variables on swelling of modified 316 and higher Ni austenitic stainless steels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effects of solute elements and cold-work on swelling in modified 316 and higher Ni advanced austenitic stainless steels developed for FBR core material were investigated together with the posted model alloys. The Si, P, B, Ti, Nb modified and cold-worked steels exhibited an improved swelling resistance. In the temperature range between 400 and 500 C, the swelling was suppressed significantly by an addition of 0.8 wt% Si. The beneficial effect of Si appears to be reduced in the steels without Ti and Nb tending to form {gamma}{prime} precipitates. In the temperature range between 500 and 600 C, a needle-like phosphide precipitates played an important role in suppressing void growth. Additions of Ti and/or Nb were found to stabilize the phosphide phase and extended the swelling incubation period. In the improved austenitic steels, the synergistic effect of cold-working and P, B, Ti, Nb additions act beneficially to stabilize the dislocation structure and to form finely dispersed precipitates during irradiation.

Shibahara, Itaru; Akasaka, Naoaki; Onose, Shoji [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

224

Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 82-309-1630, Inland Steel, East Chicago, Indiana  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Environmental and breathing-zone samples were analyzed for polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and coal-tar-pitch volatiles at the Inland Steel Company, East Chicago, Indiana in November, 1982 and September, 1984. The evaluation was requested because of concern about employee exposures during maintenance of the coke battery precipitator at the number 2 facility. Four former employees were interviewed. The cyclohexane soluble fraction of coal-tar-pitch volatiles ranged from 0.232 to 0.668 mg/m/sup 3/. The OSHA standard is 0.15mg/m/sup 3/. Naphthalene concentrations up to 0.107mg/m/sup 3/ were detected. The OSHA standard for naphthalene is 50mg/m/sup 3/. Other PAHs detected included phenanthrene, fluorene and acenaphthene. The employees reported experiencing local skin, eye, ear, nose, and throat irritation while working on the coke battery precipitator in the past. Personal protective measures such as wearing safety boots, barrier creams on exposed skin surfaces, and showering and changing clothes before leaving the facility were implemented. The authors conclude that a potential health hazard from PAHs and coal-tar-pitch volatiles is being adequately addressed by the facility. Recommendations include continuing the present personal protective measures and providing emergency rescue training.

Almaguer, D.; Orris, P.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Microstructural Characterization of 6061 Aluminum to 304L Stainless Steel Inertia Welds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

'Microstructural characterization of 6061-T6 aluminum-to-Type 304L stainless steel inertia welds provided a technical basis to conclude that transition joints fabricated from such welds should satisfactorily contain helium/hydrogen gas mixtures. This conclusion is based on the lack of semi-continuous alignments of particles and/or inclusions at, or near, the aluminum-to-stainless steel interface. These dissimilar metal transition joints play a key role in the operation of an accelerator driven, spallation neutron source designed for the production of tritium. The Accelerator Production of Tritium system will produce tritium through neutron interactions with 3He gas contained in water-cooled, 6061-T6 aluminum pressure tubes. Current design concepts include thousands of thin-walled pressure tubes distributed throughout a number of aluminum-clad, lead-filled, blanket modules. The aluminum pressure tubes are connected to a tritium extraction and purification system through a stainless steel manifold. The transition from aluminum to stainless steel is made via transition joints machined from the aluminum-to-stainless steel inertia welds. The paper describes the baseline microstructural characterization of the welds, including optical, scanning and transmission electron microscopy and uses that characterization to evaluate potential gas leakage across the weld.'

Dunn, K.A.

1999-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

226

Microstructural characterization in dissimilar friction stir welding between 304 stainless steel and st37 steel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the present study, 3 mm-thick plates of 304 stainless steel and st37 steel were welded together by friction stir welding at a welding speed of 50 mm/min and tool rotational speed of 400 and 800 rpm. X-ray diffraction test was carried out to study the phases which might be formed in the welds. Metallographic examinations, and tensile and microhardness tests were used to analyze the microstructure and mechanical properties of the joint. Four different zones were found in the weld area except the base metals. In the stir zone of the 304 stainless steel, a refined grain structure with some features of dynamic recrystallization was evidenced. A thermomechanically-affected zone was characterized on the 304 steel side with features of dynamic recovery. In the other side of the stir zone, the hot deformation of the st37 steel in the austenite region produced small austenite grains and these grains transformed to fine ferrite and pearlite and some products of displacive transformations such as Widmanstatten ferrite and martensite by cooling the material after friction stir welding. The heat-affected zone in the st37 steel side showed partially and fully refined microstructures like fusion welding processes. The recrystallization in the 304 steel and the transformations in the st37 steel enhanced the hardness of the weld area and therefore, improved the tensile properties of the joint. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FSW produced sound welds between st37 low carbon steel and 304 stainless steel. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The SZ of the st37 steel contained some products of allotropic transformation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The material in the SZ of the 304 steel showed features of dynamic recrystallization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The finer microstructure in the SZ increased the hardness and tensile strength.

Jafarzadegan, M. [Department of Materials Eng., Tarbiat Modares University, P.O. Box: 14115-143, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of) [Department of Materials Eng., Tarbiat Modares University, P.O. Box: 14115-143, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding Production Technology, School of Materials Science and Eng., Harbin Institute of Technology, P.O. Box: 150001, Harbin (China); Feng, A.H. [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding Production Technology, School of Materials Science and Eng., Harbin Institute of Technology, P.O. Box: 150001, Harbin (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding Production Technology, School of Materials Science and Eng., Harbin Institute of Technology, P.O. Box: 150001, Harbin (China); Abdollah-zadeh, A., E-mail: zadeh@modares.ac.ir [Department of Materials Eng., Tarbiat Modares University, P.O. Box: 14115-143, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Saeid, T. [Advanced Materials Research Center, Sahand University of Technology, P.O. Box: 51335-1996, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Advanced Materials Research Center, Sahand University of Technology, P.O. Box: 51335-1996, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shen, J. [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding Production Technology, School of Materials Science and Eng., Harbin Institute of Technology, P.O. Box: 150001, Harbin (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding Production Technology, School of Materials Science and Eng., Harbin Institute of Technology, P.O. Box: 150001, Harbin (China); Assadi, H. [Department of Materials Eng., Tarbiat Modares University, P.O. Box: 14115-143, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Materials Eng., Tarbiat Modares University, P.O. Box: 14115-143, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

227

Final Report, Volume 3, Guidance Document for the Evaluation of Cast Super Duplex Stainless Steel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volume 3 comprises of the Development of Qualification Standards for Cast Super Duplex Stainless Steel (A890-5A) which is equivalent to wrought 2507. The objective of this work was to determine the suitability of ASTM A923 Standard Test methods for Detecting Detrimental Intermetallic Phase in Duplex Austenitic-Ferritic Stainless Steels for 25 Cr Cast Super Duplex Stainless Steels (ASTM A890-5A). The various tests which were carried out were ASTM A923 Test Method A, B and C (Sodium Hydroxide Etch Test, Charpy Impact Test and Ferric Chloride Corrosion Test), ferrite measurement using Feritscope{reg_sign}, ASTM E562 Manual Point Count Method and X-Ray Diffraction, hardness measurement using Rockwell B and C and microstructural analysis using SEM and EDS.

Hariharan, Vasudevan; Lundin, Carl, D.

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

228

NanoComposite Stainless Steel Powder Technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been investigating a new class of Fe-based amorphous material stemming from a DARPA, Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency initiative in structural amorphous metals. Further engineering of the original SAM materials such as chemistry modifications and manufacturing processes, has led to the development of a class of Fe based amorphous materials that upon processing, devitrify into a nearly homogeneous distribution of nano sized complex metal carbides and borides. The powder material is produced through the gas atomization process and subsequently utilized by several methods; laser fusing as a coating to existing components or bulk consolidated into new components through various powder metallurgy techniques (vacuum hot pressing, Dynaforge, and hot isostatic pressing). The unique fine scale distribution of microstructural features yields a material with high hardness and wear resistance compared to material produced through conventional processing techniques such as casting while maintaining adequate fracture toughness. Several compositions have been examined including those specifically designed for high hardness and wear resistance and a composition specifically tailored to devitrify into an austenitic matrix (similar to a stainless steel) which poses improved corrosion behavior.

DeHoff, R.; Glasgow, C. (MesoCoat, Inc.)

2012-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

229

ITP Steel: Energy and Environmental Profile fo the U.S. Iron...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Energies to Produce Steel for Selected Conditions, March 2000 ITP Steel: Steel Industry Marginal Opportunity Study September 2005 Ironmaking Process Alternatives Screening Study...

230

A Comparison of Iron and Steel Production Energy Intensity in China and the U.S  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Iron and Steel Production Energy Use and Energy Intensityof Iron and Steel Production Energy Intensity in China andof Iron and Steel Production Energy Intensity in China and

Price, Lynn

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

E-Print Network 3.0 - alloy steels etudes Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in the matrix and at welds Minor alloying element additions to pipeline steels to improve hydrogen embrittlement... Steels AlloysSteels ... Source: DOE Office of Energy Efficiency...

232

E-Print Network 3.0 - alloy steel standard Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

4 Ris-R-1244(EN) Tool Steels Summary: deformation. Tool steels are alloyed with carbide forming elements (Typically: vanadium, tungsten, molybdenum... steel strongly de-...

233

Beam Energy Scaling on Ion-Induced Electron Yield from K+ Impact on Stainless Steel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

K + Impact on Stainless Steel Michel Kireeff Covo Lawrence+ ions hit the stainless steel target with energy up to 400energies hitting stainless steel target obtained from

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

THE EROSION BEHAVIOR OF STEEL AS A FUNCTION OF MICROSTRUCTURE ON SOLID PARTICLE EROSION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the spheroidized 1075 steel by rolling prior to erosionAbrasive Wear Resistance of Steels. A Review, ~Jear, FIGUREelectron micrographs of 1075 steel in the coarse pearlite,

Levy, Alan V.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Testing and analysis of structural steel columns subjected to blast loads  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Blast Simulator Testing of Steel Columns and Components. ĒTesting of Structural Steel Columns. Ē 8 th Internationaland Analysis of Structural Steel Columns Subjected to Blast

Stewart, Lauren K.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

A direct displacement-based design of low-rise seismic resistant steel moment frames  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Bending Resistance of Steel Beams. Ē J. Struct. Div. ,in the Design of Steel Structures. Ē Engineering715- American Institute of Steel Construction (AISC) (2001).

Harris, John L.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Cyclic behavior and design of steel columns subjected to large drift  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Bending Resistance of Steel Beams,Ē Journal of the2007). ďBolted Flange Plate Steel Moment Connections forSeismic Upgrade of a 15-Story Steel Moment Frame Building Ė

Newell, James David

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Mechanical properties and microstructures of dual phase steels containing silicon, aluminum and molybdenum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AND MICROSTRUCTURES OF DUAL PHASE STEELS CONTAINING SILICON,and Microstructures of Dual Phase Steels Containing Silicon,microstructures of selected dual-phase steels in which the

Neill, Thomas John O'

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

EFFECTS OF MORPHOLOGY ON THE MECHANICAL BEHAVIOR OF DUAL PHASE Fe/Si/C STEELS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and ductility in dual phase steels. However, it seems thatmechanical behavior of dual phase steels. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTSL INTRODUCTION Dual phase steels whose structures consist of

Kim, N.J.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Development of a carburizing stainless steel alloy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new carburizing stainless steel alloy that resists corrosion, heat, and fatigue has been developed for bearing and gear applications. Pyrowear 675 Stainless alloy is vacuum induction melted and vacuum arc remelted (VIM/VAR) for aircraft-quality cleanliness. Test results show that it has corrosion resistance similar to that of AISI Type 440-C stainless, and its rolling fatigue resistance is superior to that of AISI M50 (UNS K88165). In contrast to alloy gear steels and Type 440C, Pyrowear 675 maintains case hardness of HRC 60 at operating temperatures up to 200 C (400 F). Impact and fracture toughness are superior to that of other stainless bearing steels, which typically are relatively brittle and can break under severe service. Toughness is also comparable or superior to conventional noncorrosion-resistant carburizing bearing steels, such as SAE Types 8620 and 9310.

Wert, D.E. (Carpenter Technology Corp., Reading, PA (United States))

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes steel works" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Undergraduate Research: Cory Tamler By: Bruce Steele  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Undergraduate Research: Cory Tamler By: Bruce Steele Physics Today's "10 Most Beautiful Experiments--a staged reading--of Not Eureka was held March 29 in the Pittsburgh Playwrights Theatre downtown at 542

Jiang, Huiqiang

242

Case hardenable nickel-cobalt steel  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An advanced secondary hardening carburized Ni--Co steel achieves an improved case hardness of about 68-69 Rc together with nominal core hardness of about 50 Rc.

Qian, Yana (Sunnyvale, CA); Olson, Gregory B. (Evanston, IL)

2012-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

243

Light Steel Framing: Improving the Integral Design†  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Light Steel Framing has been extensively used in cold climate countries due to its good thermal and structural behaviour. Improved thermal behaviour results in positive environmental impact essential for sustainable ...

Amundarain, Aitor; Torero, Jose L; Usmani, Asif; Al-Remal, Ahmad M

2006-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

244

Lightweight Steel Solutions for Automotive Industry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recently, improvement in fuel efficiency and safety has become the biggest issue in worldwide automotive industry. Although the regulation of environment and safety has been tightened up more and more, the majority of vehicle bodies are still manufactured from stamped steel components. This means that the optimized steel solutions enable to demonstrate its ability to reduce body weight with high crashworthiness performance instead of expensive light weight materials such as Al, Mg and composites. To provide the innovative steel solutions for automotive industry, POSCO has developed AHSS and its application technologies, which is directly connected to EVI activities. EVI is a technical cooperation program with customer covering all stages of new car project from design to mass production. Integrated light weight solutions through new forming technologies such as TWB, hydroforming and HPF are continuously developed and provided for EVI activities. This paper will discuss the detailed status of these technologies especially light weight steel solutions based on innovative technologies.

Lee, Hong Woo; Kim, Gyosung; Park, Sung Ho [Technical Research Laboratories, POSCO, 699, Gumho-dong, Gwangyang-si, Jeonnam, 545-090 (Korea, Republic of)

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

245

Use of duplex stainless steel castings in control valves  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Duplex stainless steels have enjoyed rapidly increasing popularity in recent years. For numerous reasons the availability of these alloys in the cast form has lagged behind the availability of the wrought form. Commercial demand for control valves in these alloys has driven development of needed information to move into production. A systematic approach was used to develop specifications, suppliers and weld procedures. Corrosion, stress corrosion cracking (SCC), sulfide stress cracking (SSC) and hardness results are also presented for several alloys including; CD3MN (UNS J92205), CD4MCu (UNS J93370) and CD7MCuN (cast UNS S32550).

Gossett, J.L. [Fisher Controls International, Inc., Marshalltown, IA (United States)

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Oxidation resistant high creep strength austenitic stainless steel  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An austenitic stainless steel displaying high temperature oxidation and creep resistance has a composition that includes in weight percent 15 to 21 Ni, 10 to 15 Cr, 2 to 3.5 Al, 0.1 to 1 Nb, and 0.05 to 0.15 C, and that is free of or has very low levels of N, Ti and V. The alloy forms an external continuous alumina protective scale to provide a high oxidation resistance at temperatures of 700 to 800.degree. C. and forms NbC nanocarbides and a stable essentially single phase fcc austenitic matrix microstructure to give high strength and high creep resistance at these temperatures.

Brady, Michael P.; Pint, Bruce A.; Liu, Chain-Tsuan; Maziasz, Philip J.; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Lu, Zhao P.

2010-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

247

Estimation of fracture toughness of cast stainless steels during thermal aging in LWR systems - Revison 1.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents a revision of the procedure and correlations presented earlier in NUREG/CR-4513, ANL-90/42 (June 1991) for predicting the change in mechanical properties of cast stainless steel components due to thermal aging during service in light water reactors at 280-330 C (535-625 F). The correlations presented in this report are based on an expanded data base and have been optimized with mechanical-property data on cast stainless steels aged up to {approx}58,000 h at 290-350 C (554-633 F). The correlations for estimating the change in tensile stress, including the Ramberg/Osgood parameters for strain hardening, are also described. The fracture toughness J-R curve, tensile stress, and Charpy-impact energy of aged cast stainless steels are estimated from known material information. Mechanical properties of a specific cast stainless steel are estimated from the extent and kinetics of thermal embrittlement. Embrittlement of cast stainless steels is characterized in terms of room-temperature Charpy-impact energy. The extent or degree of thermal embrittlement at 'saturation,' i.e., the minimum impact energy that can be achieved for a material after long-term aging, is determined from the chemical composition of the steel. Charpy-impact energy as a function of time and temperature of reactor service is estimated from the kinetics of thermal embrittlement, which are also determined from the chemical composition. The initial impact energy of the unaged steel is required for these estimations. Initial tensile flow stress is needed for estimating the flow stress of the aged material. The fracture toughness J-R curve for the material is then obtained by correlating room-temperature Charpy-impact energy with fracture toughness parameters. The values of JIC are determined from the estimated J-R curve and flow stress. A common 'predicted lower-bound' J-R curve for cast stainless steels of unknown chemical composition is also defined for a given grade of steel, range of ferrite content, and temperature. Examples of estimating mechanical properties of cast stainless steel components during reactor service are presented.

Chopra, O. K.; Energy Technology

1994-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

248

Irradiation Assisted Grain Boundary Segregation in Steels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The understanding of radiation-induced grain boundary segregation (RIS) has considerably improved over the past decade. New models have been introduced and much effort has been devoted to obtaining comprehensive information on segregation from the literature. Analytical techniques have also improved so that chemical analysis of layers 1 nm thick is almost routine. This invited paper will review the major methods used currently for RIS prediction: namely, Rate Theory, Inverse Kirkendall, and Solute Drag approaches. A summary is made of the available data on phosphorus RIS in reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels. This will be discussed in the light of the predictions of the various models in an effort to show which models are the most reliable and easy to use for forecasting P segregation behaviour in steels. A consequence of RIS in RPV steels is a radiation induced shift in the ductile to brittle transition temperature (DBTT). It will be shown how it is possible to relate radiation-induced P segregation levels to DBTT shift. Examples of this exercise will be given for RPV steels and for ferritic steels being considered for first wall fusion applications. Cr RIS in high alloy stainless steels and associated irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) will be briefly discussed. (authors)

Lu, Zheng; Faulkner, Roy G. [IPTME, Loughborough University, Loughborough, Leics (United Kingdom)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Development of Steel Foam Materials and Structures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the past few years there has been a growing interest in lightweight metal foams. Demands for weight reduction, improved fuel efficiency, and increased passenger safety in automobiles now has manufacturers seriously considering the use of metal foams, in contrast to a few years ago, when the same materials would have been ruled out for technical or economical reasons. The objective of this program was to advance the development and use of steel foam materials, by demonstrating the advantages of these novel lightweight materials in selected generic applications. Progress was made in defining materials and process parameters; characterization of physical and mechanical properties; and fabrication and testing of generic steel foam-filled shapes with compositions from 2.5 wt.% to 0.7 wt.% carbon. A means of producing steel foam shapes with uniform long range porosity levels of 50 to 60 percent was demonstrated and verified with NDE methods. Steel foam integrated beams, cylinders and plates were mechanically tested and demonstrated advantages in bend stiffness, bend resistance, and crush energy absorption. Methods of joining by welding, adhesive bonding, and mechanical fastening were investigated. It is important to keep in mind that steel foam is a conventional material in an unconventional form. A substantial amount of physical and mechanical properties are presented throughout the report and in a properties database at the end of the report to support designer's in applying steel foam in unconventional ways.

Kenneth Kremer; Anthony Liszkiewicz; James Adkins

2004-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

250

FEA Simulations of Magnets with Grain Oriented Steel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the potential successors of the Large Hadron Collider is a Muon Col- lider. Muons are short-lived particles, which therefore require fast acceleration. One potential avenue is a very fast cycling cyclotron, where the bending is sup- plied by a combination of fixed-field superconducting magnets and fast ramping normal conducting iron-cored coils. Due to the high ramping rate (around 1 kHz) eddy current and hysteresis losses are a concern. One way to overcome these is by using grain-oriented soft-iron, which promises superior magnetic properties in the direction of the grains. This note summarizes efforts to include the anisotropic material properties of grain-oriented steel in finite element analysis to predict the behaviour of the dipole magnets for this accelerator. It was found that including anisotropic material properties has a detrimental effect on model convergence. During this study it was not possible to include grain oriented steel with an accuracy necessary to study the field quality of a dipole magnet.

Witte H.

2012-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

251

Effect of debonded interfaces on corrosion of mild steel composites in supercritical CO2-saturated brines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2} is a proposed method to limit greenhouse gas emissions and has been the subject of many studies in the last decade. Wellbore systems achieve isolation of the storage reservoir through a combination of steel (generally carbon steel) and Portland cement. CO{sub 2} leakage along the steel-cement interface has the potential to accelerate corrosion. We conduct experiments to assess the corrosion risk at cement-steel interface under in situ wellbore conditions. Wellbore interfaces were simulated by assemblies constructed of J55 mild steel and Portland class G (Epoxy was used in this study to separate) cement and corrosion was investigated in supercritical CO{sub 2} saturated brines, (NaCl = 1 wt%) at T = 50 C, pCO{sub 2} = 1200 psi with interface gap size = 100 {micro}m and {infinity} (open surface). The experiments were carried out in a high-pressure, 1.8 L autoclave. The corrosion kinetics were measured employing electrochemical techniques including linear polarization resistance and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy techniques. The corrosion scales were analyzed using secondary electron microscopy, back scattering electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction. Corrosion rates decreased as time with or without interface gap. In this case corrosion rates are controlled by scale protectivity through the interface gap. Scaled steel corrosion rates were two orders of magnitude less compared with fresh steel. The corrosion scale is pseudo crystalline at the open interface. Well-crystallized scale was observed at interface gap sizes 100 {micro}m. All corrosion scales were composed of iron carbonates.

John, Han [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Carey, James W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Zhang, Jinsuo [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

252

Improved Criteria for Acceptable Yield Point Elongation in Surface Critical Steels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Yield point elongation (YPE) is considered undesirable in surface critical applications where steel is formed since "strain lines" or Luders bands are created during forming. This project will examine in detail the formation of luders bands in industrially relevant strain states including the influence of substrate properties and coatings on Luders appearance. Mechanical testing and surface profilometry were the primary methods of investigation.

Dr. David Matlock; Dr. John Speer

2007-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

253

Shear Punch Properties of Low Activation Ferritic Steels Following Irradiation in ORR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Shear punch post-irradiation test results are reported for a series of low activation steels containing Mn following irradiation in the Oak Ridge Reactor at 330 and 400 degrees centigrade to {approx}10 dpa. Alloy compositions included 2Cr, 9Cr and 12Cr steels with V to 1.5% and W to 1.0%. Comparison of results with tensile test results showed good correlations with previously observed trends except where disks were improperly manufactured because they were too thin or because engraving was faulty.

Ermi, Ruby M.; Hamilton, Margaret L.; Gelles, David S.; Ermi, August M.

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Coating thickness measurement by XRF in vacuum strip steel metallizing plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Devised for use in vacuum equipment of PVD strip steel coaters is a multichannel counting technique for the continuous XRF measurement of the coating thickness. This XRF coating thickness gage is used in a batch-type strip steel coater. It measures the thickness of single-side, double-side and alloy coatings (element contents included). The new XRF method operates without etalons. It is also possible to measure adjacent elements in the periodic law of chemical elements without difficulty. With only minor deviations from the nominal value the new XRF measuring system allows to keep the coating thickness practically constant.

Wenzel, D. [Von Ardenne Anlagentechnik GmbH, Dresden (Germany); Esche, H.J.; Pilz, J. [Amtec AnalysenmeBtechnik GmbH, Leipzig (Germany)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

255

221-U Facility concrete and reinforcing steel evaluations specification for the canyon disposition initiative (CDI)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This describes a test program to establish the in-situ material properties of the reinforced concrete in Building 221-U for comparison to the original design specifications. Field sampling and laboratory testing of concrete and reinforcing steel structural materials in Building 221-U for design verification will be undertaken. Forty seven samples are to be taken from radiologically clean exterior walls of the canyon. Laboratory testing program includes unconfined compressive strength of concrete cores, tensile strength of reinforcing steel, and petrographic examinations of concrete cores taken from walls below existing grade.

Baxter, J.T.

1998-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

256

Effects of loading mode on the critical cracking potential of duplex ([alpha] + [gamma]) stainless steel in a hot chloride solution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the common characteristics in stress corrosion cracking (SCC) between austenitic and ferritic stainless steels in chloride environments is that cracking occurs at potentials noble to a critical value which has been designated as the critical cracking potential, E[sub cc]. For austenitic stainless steels, E[sub cc] is insensitive to prior cold work with or without the generation of martensite and has been interpreted as the minimum potential for crack propagation. On the other hand, for low interstitial ferritic stainless steels., E[sub cc] is extremely sensitive to microstructural variations induced by small amounts of cold work or grain coarsening. It has been demonstrated that E[sub cc] for the low interstitial ferritic stainless steels, when it is measured at constant load, is that for crack initiation and is determined by the competing rates of generation of a new surface by slip induced film breakdown and repassivation. However, the physical and/or electrochemical meaning for E[sub cc] of duplex stainless steels has not yet been studied. It is the purpose of this work to determine if E[sub cc] for duplex stainless is a potential for crack initiation or one for crack propagation in a hot chloride environment and to examine the effects of loading modes on the E[sub cc] of these alloys.

Kwon, Hyuk Sang (Korea Advanced Inst. of Science and Tech., Taejon (Korea, Republic of))

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

White(etching!matter!in!bearing!steel! Part1:!Controlled(cracking!of!52100!steel!  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

! 1! White(etching!matter!in!bearing!steel! Part1:!Controlled(cracking!of!52100!steel! ! W!phenomena!such!as!the!appearance!of!"white(etching!areas"!or!"white(etching! cracks",!crack!particular!kind!of!microstructural!damage!in!the!form!of!regions!of!the! structure,! which! appear! white! in

Cambridge, University of

258

White-etching matter in bearing steel Part 2: Distinguishing cause and eect in bearing steel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

White-etching matter in bearing steel Part 2: Distinguishing cause and eect in bearing steel through a mechanism called "white-structure flaking", has triggered many studies of microstructural damage associated with "white-etching ar- eas" created during rolling contact fatigue, although whether

Cambridge, University of

259

Prevention of crevice corrosion in duplex SS flanges using carbon steel bolts with cathodic protection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Achieving reliable long-term performance of high strength bolts for flange connections in subsea service is a critical issue for the offshore industry. Viable bolting materials with high strength that are not susceptible to embrittlement or galvanic corrosion when the flanges are made of stainless steels are limited. A laboratory study was performed to determine the viability of using B7 carbon steel stud bolts and 316 stainless steel (SS) seal rings in a Duplex SS flange for subsea service The laboratory test system used full size commercial flanges, bolts and seal rings to simulate electrochemical conditions that will occur in crevices associated with carbon steel bolts in a Duplex SS flange and with the use of a 316 stainless steel seal ring in a Duplex SS flange. The flange systems were instrumented to enable monitoring of current densities and potentials at precise locations within the crevices throughout the tests as test parameters were changed. Test parameters included cathodic protection level, temperature, and sealing the outer flange gap. Cathodic protection was provided by remote aluminum sacrificial anodes to achieve potentials typical for a sub sea manifold. Both electrochemical data and examination of the components at the end of the 164 day exposure indicated that sufficient cathodic protection occurred in the crevices to provide long term corrosion control to all of the components involved. The capability to use B7 bolts rather than high alloy bolts enables a significant project savings.

Thomason, W.H.; Ivie, R.G.; Marlow, J.A.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Corrosion of Ferritic Steels in High Temperature Molten Salt Coolants for Nuclear Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Corrosion of ferritic steels in high temperature molten fluoride salts may limit the life of advanced reactors, including some hybrid systems that are now under consideration. In some cases, the steel may be protected through galvanic coupling with other less noble materials with special neutronic properties such a beryllium. This paper reports the development of a model for predicting corrosion rates for various ferritic steels, with and without oxide dispersion strengthening, in FLiBe (Li{sub 2}BeF{sub 4}) and FLiNaK (Li-Na-K-F) coolants at temperatures up to 800 C. Mixed potential theory is used to account for the protection of steel by beryllium, Tafel kinetics are used to predict rates of dissolution as a function of temperature and potential, and the thinning of the mass-transfer boundary layer with increasing Reynolds number is accounted for with dimensionless correlations. The model also accounts for the deceleration of corrosion as the coolants become saturated with dissolved chromium and iron. This paper also reports electrochemical impedance spectroscopy of steels at their corrosion potentials in high-temperature molten salt environments, with the complex impedance spectra interpreted in terms of the interfacial charge transfer resistance and capacitance, as well as the electrolyte conductivity. Such in situ measurement techniques provide valuable insight into the degradation of materials under realistic conditions.

Farmer, J; El-Dasher, B; de Caro, M S; Ferreira, J

2008-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes steel works" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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261

Brazing open cell reticulated copper foam to stainless steel tubing with vacuum furnace brazed gold/indium alloy plating  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of fabricating a heat exchanger includes brush electroplating plated layers for a brazing alloy onto a stainless steel tube in thin layers, over a nickel strike having a 1.3 .mu.m thickness. The resultant Au-18 In composition may be applied as a first layer of indium, 1.47 .mu.m thick, and a second layer of gold, 2.54 .mu.m thick. The order of plating helps control brazing erosion. Excessive amounts of brazing material are avoided by controlling the electroplating process. The reticulated copper foam rings are interference fit to the stainless steel tube, and in contact with the plated layers. The copper foam rings, the plated layers for brazing alloy, and the stainless steel tube are heated and cooled in a vacuum furnace at controlled rates, forming a bond of the copper foam rings to the stainless steel tube that improves heat transfer between the tube and the copper foam.

Howard, Stanley R. (Windsor, SC); Korinko, Paul S. (Aiken, SC)

2008-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

262

Aging and Embrittlement of High Fluence Stainless Steels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Irradiation of austenitic stainless steels results in the formation of dislocation loops, stacking fault tetrahedral, Ni-Si clusters and radiation-induced segregation (RIS). Of these features, it is the formation of precipitates which is most likely to impact the mechanical integrity at high dose. Unlike dislocation loops and RIS, precipitates exhibit an incubation period that can extend from 10 to 46 dpa, above which the cluster composition changes and a separate phase, (G-phase) forms. Both neutron and heavy ion irradiation showed that these clusters develop slowly and continue to evolve beyond 100 dpa. Overall, this work shows that the irradiated microstructure features produced by heavy ion irradiation are remarkably comparable in nature to those produced by neutron irradiation at much lower dose rates. The use of a temperature shift to account for the higher damage rate in heavy ion irradiation results in a fairly good match in the dislocation loop microstructure and the precipitate microstructure in austenitic stainless steels. Both irradiations also show segregation of the same elements and in the same directions, but to achieve comparable magnitudes, heavy ion irradiation must be conducted at a much higher temperature than that which produces a match with loops and precipitates. First-principles modeling has confirmed that the formation of Ni-Si precipitates under irradiation is likely caused by supersaturation of solute to defect sinks caused by highly correlated diffusion of Ni and Si. Thus, the formation and evolution of Ni-Si precipitates at high dose in austenitic stainless steels containing Si is inevitable.

Was, gary; Jiao, Zhijie; der ven, Anton Van; Bruemmer, Stephen; Edwards, Dan

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

263

FY 1994 Annual Work Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In accordance with the Inspector General`s Strategic Planning Policy directive, the Office of Inspector General (OIG) annually updates its Strategic Plan with budgetary and program guidance for the next fiscal year. The program guidance identifies and establishes priorities for OIG coverage of important DOE issues and operations, provides the basis for assigning OIG resources, and is the source for issues covered in Assistant Inspectors General annual work plans. The Office of the Assistant Inspector General for Audits (AIGA) publishes an Annual Work Plan in September of each year. The plan includes the OIG program guidance and shows the commitment of resources necessary to accomplish the assigned work and meet our goals. The program guidance provides the framework within which the AIGA work will be planned and accomplished. Audits included in this plan are designed to help insure that the requirements of our stakeholders have been considered and blended into a well balanced audit program.

Not Available

1993-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

264

THE SENSITIVITY OF CARBON STEELS' SUSCEPTIBILITY TO LOCALIZED CORROSION TO THE PH OF NITRATE BASED NUCLEAR WASTES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford tank reservation contains approximately 50 million gallons of liquid legacy radioactive waste from cold war weapons production, which is stored in 177 underground storage tanks. The tanks will be in use until waste processing operations are completed. The wastes tend to be high pH (over 10) and nitrate based. Under these alkaline conditions carbon steels tend to be passive and undergo relatively slow uniform corrosion. However, the presence of nitrate and other aggressive species, can lead to pitting and stress corrosion cracking. This work is a continuation of previous work that investigated the propensity of steels to suffer pitting and stress corrosion cracking in various waste simulants. The focus of this work is an investigation of the sensitivity of the steels' pitting and stress corrosion cracking susceptibility tosimulant pH. Previous work demonstrated that wastes that are high in aggressive nitrate and low in inhibitory nitrite are susceptible to localized corrosion. However, the previous work involved wastes with pH 12 or higher. The current work involves wastes with lower pH of 10 or 11. It is expected that at these lower pHs that a higher nitrite-to-nitrate ratio will be necessary to ensure tank integrity. This experimental work involved both electrochemical testing, and slow strain rate testing at either the free corrosion potential or under anodic polarization. The results of the current work will be discussed, and compared to work previously presented.

BOOMER KD

2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

265

Development of Next Generation Heating System for Scale Free Steel Reheating  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Teh report describes methods of reheating of steel billets and slabs for hot rolling or forging without forming steel scale.

Dr. Arvind C. Thekdi

2006-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

266

Radiological Work Planning and Procedures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Each facility is tasked with maintaining personnel radiation exposure as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). A continued effort is required to meet this goal by developing and implementing improvements to technical work documents (TWDs) and work performance. A review of selected TWDs from most facilities shows there is a need to incorporate more radiological control requirements into the TWD. The Radioactive Work Permit (RWP) provides a mechanism to place some of the requirements but does not provide all the information needed by the worker as he/she is accomplishing the steps of the TWD. Requiring the engineers, planners and procedure writers to put the radiological control requirements in the work steps would be very easy if all personnel had a strong background in radiological work planning and radiological controls. Unfortunately, many of these personnel do not have the background necessary to include these requirements without assistance by the Radiological Control organization at each facility. In add...

Kurtz, J E

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Laminar inclusions of duplex stainless steels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Duplex Stainless Steel have been utilized in the offshore petrochemical industries for over twenty years. The steels are normally manufactured to produce a 50:50 duplex austenitic and ferritic microstructure. The microstructure yields the benefits of high strength, corrosion resistance and low thermal expansion. While constructing a high pressure header box for an air cooled heat exchanger, linear indications were observed along the weld preparation faces. These laminations were parallel to the plate surfaces, reminiscent to oxide inclusions found in carbon steel plates manufactured 20 years ago. Concern over premature failure at the highly stressed corner joints resulted in the rejection of the plates. A metallurgical investigation followed. From scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray, the indications were shown to be rich in Cr, Mn and Si. The inclusions occurred during steel manufacturing and were most likely due to incorrect removal of oxides at the top of the ingot and/or the exclusion of a secondary remelting process. New plates were ordered with tighter production controls on steel processing. The plates were ultrasonically inspected prior to fabrication and no further problems were discovered.

Hudson, M.E. [Fluor Daniel Canada Inc., Calgary, Alberta (Canada)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

268

Dislocation substructure in fatigued duplex stainless steel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cyclic plastic straining of crystalline materials results in the formation of specific dislocation structures. Considerable progress in mapping and understanding internal dislocation structures has been achieved by studying single crystal behavior: however, most structural materials have a polycrystalline structure and investigations of polycrystals in comparison to single crystal behavior of simple metals prove to be very useful in understanding more complex materials. There are some classes of materials, however, with complicated structure which do not have a direct equivalent in single crystalline form. Moreover, the specific dimensions and shapes of individual crystallites play an important role both in the cyclic stress-strain response of these materials and in the formation of their interior structure in cyclic straining. Austenitic-ferritic duplex stainless steel, which is a kind of a natural composite, is a material of this type. The widespread interest in the application of duplex steels is caused by approximately doubled mechanical properties and equal corrosion properties, when compared with classical austenitic stainless steels. Fatigue resistance of these steels as well as the surface damage evolution in cyclic straining have been studied; however, much less is known about the internal substructure development in cyclic straining. In this study the dislocation arrangement in ferritic and austenitic grains of the austenitic-ferritic duplex steel alloyed with nitrogen and cyclically strained with two strain amplitudes, is reported and compared to the dislocation arrangement found in single and polycrystals of austenitic and ferritic materials of a similar composition and with the surface relief produced in cyclic plastic straining.

Polak, J. (Ecole Centrale de Lille, Villeneuve d'Ascq (France). Lab. de Mecanique de Lille Inst. of Physical Metallurgy, Brno (Czechoslovakia). Academy of Sciences); Degallaix, S. (Ecole Centrale de Lille, Villeneuve d'Ascq (France). Lab. de Mecanique de Lille); Kruml, T. (Inst. of Physical Metallurgy, Brno (Czechoslovakia). Academy of Sciences)

1993-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

269

Precipitation in 9Ni-12Cr-2Cu maraging steels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two maraging steels with the compositions 9Ni-12Cr-2Cu-4Mo (wt%) and 9Ni-12Cr-2Cu and with small additions of Al and Ti were investigated using atom probe field ion microscopy. Tomographic atom probe investigations were performed to clarify the spatial distribution of elements in and close to the precipitates. Materials heat treated at 475 C for 5, 25 min, 1, 2, 4 and 400 h were analyzed. Precipitates in the Mo-rich material were observed already after 5 min of aging, while in the material without MO, precipitation started later. In both materials precipitation begins with the formation of Cu-rich particles which work as nucleation sites for a Ni-rich phase of type Ni{sub 3}(Ti,Al). A Mo-rich phase was detected in the Mo-rich steel after 2 h of aging. The distribution of alloying elements in the precipitates, their role in the precipitation process, and the mechanism of hardening in the two materials are discussed.

Stiller, K.; Haettestrand, M. [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Physics] [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Physics; Danoix, F. [Univ. de Rouen, Mont Saint Aignan (France). Lab. de Microscopie Ionique] [Univ. de Rouen, Mont Saint Aignan (France). Lab. de Microscopie Ionique

1998-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

270

Nitrogen containing shielding gases for GTAW duplex stainless steels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The duplex stainless steel are alloys characterized as consisting of two phases; austenite and ferrite. As such, they combine the benefits of both phases i.e. good ductility and general corrosion resistance of austenite, but with improved stress corrosion cracking resistance and strength associate with ferrite. Carefully controlled manufacturing techniques are employed to produce this combination in roughly equal proportions to ensure optimum properties. The range of duplex alloys studied in this work covered both the standard grade (2205) and the latest generation of super duplex (2507) alloys; typical compositions are shown in Table 1. Although the standard duplex is the most commonly available and widely used, super duplexes, which are characterized by higher chromium, nickel, molybdenum and nitrogen contents, have even better corrosion properties and are finding increasing applications in the offshore industry. To benefit from the superior properties of duplex, it is vital that these alloys can be welded effectively and that the properties of the welded joint match those of the parent weld. The objective of the current investigation was to study the effect of nitrogen, in both the shielding and purge gas, on the weld metal nitrogen content, microstructure and corrosion resistance, with the eventual aim of recommending an effective shielding gas mixture for duplex stainless steels.

Creffield, G.K.; Cole, M.H.; Paciej, R.; Huang, W.; Urmston, S. [BOC Ltd., London (United Kingdom)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

271

Electrodynamics in Iron and Steel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In order to calculate the reflected EM fields at low amplitudes in iron and steel, more must be understood about the nature of long wavelength excitations in these metals. A bulk piece of iron is a very complex material with microstructure, a split band structure, magnetic domains and crystallographic textures that affect domain orientation. Probing iron and other bulk ferromagnetic materials with weak reflected and transmitted inductive low frequency fields is an easy operation to perform but the responses are difficult to interpret because of the complexity and variety of the structures affected by the fields. First starting with a simple single coil induction measurement and classical EM calculation to show the error is grossly under estimating the measured response. Extending this experiment to measuring the transmission of the induced fields allows the extraction of three dispersion curves which define these internal fields. One dispersion curve yielded an exceedingly small effective mass of 1.8 10^{-39}kg (1.3 10^{-9} m_e) for those spin waves. There is a second distinct dispersion curve more representative of the density function of a zero momentum bound state rather than a propagating wave. The third dispersion curve describes a magneto-elastic coupling to a very long wave length propagating mode. These experiments taken together display the characteristics of a high temperature Bose-Einstein like condensation that can be initiated by pumping two different states. A weak time dependent field drives the formation of coupled J=0 spin wave pairs with the reduced effective mass reflecting the increased size of the coherent state. These field can dominate induction measurements well past the Curie temperature.

John Paul Wallace

2009-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

272

Net Taxable Gasoline Gallons (Including Aviation Gasoline)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Net Taxable Gasoline Gallons (Including Aviation Gasoline) Period 2000 2001 (2) 2002 2003 2004 "gross" to "net" , was deemed impractical. (5) This report replaces the Gross Taxable Gasoline Gallons (Including Aviation Gasoline) report which will not be produced after December 2002. (6) The November 2007

273

Ferritic-martensitic steel subjected to equal channel angular extrusion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modified 9Cr-1Mo ferritic-martensitic steel (T91) has been extensively investigated as a structural material for GenIV nuclear reactors and Accelerator Driven Transmutation systems. One attractive characteristic of this steel in these applications...

Foley, David Christopher

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

274

Friction Stir Spot Welding of Advanced High Strength Steels ...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Stir Spot Welding of Advanced High Strength Steels (AHSS) Friction Stir Spot Welding of Advanced High Strength Steels (AHSS) Presentation from the U.S. DOE Office of Vehicle...

275

advanced ferritic steel: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

behavior of ferrite and dual phase steels Engineering Websites Summary: and dual phase steels C.F. Kuang a,n , J. Li b , S.G. Zhang a , J. Wang b , H.F. Liu b , A.A....

276

advanced ferritic steels: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

behavior of ferrite and dual phase steels Engineering Websites Summary: and dual phase steels C.F. Kuang a,n , J. Li b , S.G. Zhang a , J. Wang b , H.F. Liu b , A.A....

277

First Structural Steel Erected at NSLS-II  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Ten steel columns were incorporated into the ever-growing framework for the National Synchrotron Light Source II last week, the first structural steel erected for the future 400,000-square-foot facility.

None

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

278

Cartwright on Causality: Methods, Metaphysics, and Modularity Daniel Steel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cartwright on Causality: Methods, Metaphysics, and Modularity Daniel Steel Department of Philosophy 503 S Kedzie Hall Michigan State University East Lansing, MI 48824-1032 USA Email: steel@msu.edu #12

Steel, Daniel

279

Inductive Rules, Background Knowledge, and Skepticism Daniel Steel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Inductive Rules, Background Knowledge, and Skepticism Daniel Steel Department of Philosophy 503 S. Kedzie Hall Michigan State University East Lansing, MI 48823-1032 Email: steel@msu.edu #12;Abstract

Steel, Daniel

280

G odel's legacy in set theory John R. Steel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gň? odel's legacy in set theory John R. Steel University of California, Berkeley August 2006 1 #12 generalizes the theory of L, has been developed. (Silver, Kunen, Mitchell, Dodd, Jensen, Martin, Steel, Woodin

Koellner, Peter

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes steel works" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Must a Bayesian Accept the Likelihood Principle? Daniel Steel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Must a Bayesian Accept the Likelihood Principle? Daniel Steel Department of Philosophy 503 S. Kedzie Hall Michigan State University East Lansing, MI 48824-1032 Email: steel@msu.edu #12;1 1

Fitelson, Branden

282

Analytical modeling of composite steel-concrete frame systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of reinforced concrete or composite steel shapes encased in reinforced concrete (SRC), structural steel beams, and composite beam-column joints. To facilitate the modeling of inelastic deformations in joint regions, a panel element capable of representing joint...

Atahan, Ali Osman

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

austenitic steel tp: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

problem, namely, learning to control a steel mill. By applying BOXES to a model of a skinpass mill (a type of steel mill), we find that the BOXES algorithm can be made Sammut,...

284

activation austenitic steels: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

problem, namely, learning to control a steel mill. By applying BOXES to a model of a skinpass mill (a type of steel mill), we find that the BOXES algorithm can be made Sammut,...

285

austenitic stainless steel: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

problem, namely, learning to control a steel mill. By applying BOXES to a model of a skinpass mill (a type of steel mill), we find that the BOXES algorithm can be made Sammut,...

286

austenitic steels approche: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

problem, namely, learning to control a steel mill. By applying BOXES to a model of a skinpass mill (a type of steel mill), we find that the BOXES algorithm can be made Sammut,...

287

alloy steel: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

control a steel mill. By applying BOXES to a model of a skinpass mill (a type of steel mill), we find that the BOXES algorithm can be made Sammut, Claude 357 Flexural...

288

austenitic steels wirkung: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

problem, namely, learning to control a steel mill. By applying BOXES to a model of a skinpass mill (a type of steel mill), we find that the BOXES algorithm can be made Sammut,...

289

activation ferritic steels: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

problem, namely, learning to control a steel mill. By applying BOXES to a model of a skinpass mill (a type of steel mill), we find that the BOXES algorithm can be made Sammut,...

290

activation ferritic steel: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

problem, namely, learning to control a steel mill. By applying BOXES to a model of a skinpass mill (a type of steel mill), we find that the BOXES algorithm can be made Sammut,...

291

austenitic stainless steels: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

problem, namely, learning to control a steel mill. By applying BOXES to a model of a skinpass mill (a type of steel mill), we find that the BOXES algorithm can be made Sammut,...

292

austenitic steel irradiated: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

problem, namely, learning to control a steel mill. By applying BOXES to a model of a skinpass mill (a type of steel mill), we find that the BOXES algorithm can be made Sammut,...

293

austenitic steels amorcage: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

problem, namely, learning to control a steel mill. By applying BOXES to a model of a skinpass mill (a type of steel mill), we find that the BOXES algorithm can be made Sammut,...

294

austenitic steels: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

problem, namely, learning to control a steel mill. By applying BOXES to a model of a skinpass mill (a type of steel mill), we find that the BOXES algorithm can be made Sammut,...

295

austenitic steels irradiated: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

problem, namely, learning to control a steel mill. By applying BOXES to a model of a skinpass mill (a type of steel mill), we find that the BOXES algorithm can be made Sammut,...

296

Factory Brings Solar Energy Jobs to Former Steel Town | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Factory Brings Solar Energy Jobs to Former Steel Town Factory Brings Solar Energy Jobs to Former Steel Town August 24, 2010 - 4:09pm Addthis An aerial view of AE Polysilicon's...

297

Transformation induced plasticity assisted steels: stress or strain affected martensitic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Transformation induced plasticity assisted steels: stress or strain affected martensitic transformation? S. Chatterjee and H. K. D. H. Bhadeshia* Transformation induced plasticity (TRIP) assisted steels contain a small quantity of carbon enriched retained austenite, which transforms into martensite during

Cambridge, University of

298

Material property evaluations of bimetallic welds, stainless steel saw fusion lines, and materials affected by dynamic strain aging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pipe fracture analyses can often reasonably predict the behavior of flawed piping. However, there are material applications with uncertainties in fracture behavior. This paper summarizes work on three such cases. First, the fracture behavior of bimetallic welds are discussed. The purpose of the study was to determine if current fracture analyses can predict the response of pipe with flaws in bimetallic welds. The weld joined sections of A516 Grade 70 carbon steel to F316 stainless steel. The crack was along the carbon steel base metal to Inconel 182 weld metal fusion line. Material properties from tensile and C(T) specimens were used to predict large pipe response. The major conclusion from the work is that fracture behavior of the weld could be evaluated with reasonable accuracy using properties of the carbon steel pipe and conventional J-estimation analyses. However, results may not be generally true for all bimetallic welds. Second, the toughness of austenitic steel submerged-arc weld (SAW) fusion lines is discussed. During large-scale pipe tests with flaws in the center of the SAW, the crack tended to grow into the fusion line. The fracture toughness of the base metal, the SAW, and the fusion line were determined and compared. The major conclusion reached is that although the fusion line had a higher initiation toughness than the weld metal, the fusion-line J-R curve reached a steady-state value while the SAW J-R curve increased. Last, carbon steel fracture experiments containing circumferential flaws with periods of unstable crack jumps during steady ductile tearing are discussed. These instabilities are believed to be due to dynamic strain aging (DSA). The paper discusses DSA, a screening criteria developed to predict DSA, and the ability of the current J-based methodologies to assess the effect of these crack instabilities. The effect of loading rate on the strength and toughness of several different carbon steel pipes at LWR temperatures is also discussed.

Rudland, D.; Scott, P.; Marschall, C.; Wilkowski, G. [Battelle Memorial Institute, Columbus, OH (United States)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Review: [Untitled] Reviewed Work(s)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Review: [Untitled] Reviewed Work(s): Dodonæus in Japan: Translation and the Scientific Mind to leading academic journals and scholarly literature from around the world. The Archive is supported-for-profit organization with a mission to help the scholarly community take advantage of advances in technology. For more

Elman, Benjamin

300

QEP WORKING GROUP CHARGES Assessment Working Group  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and a framework that details timelines, leadership, resource allocation, and an assessment plan that is clearlyQEP WORKING GROUP CHARGES Assessment Working Group The topic of the QEP should fit should be supported by a thorough understanding of the institutional context and by assessment data

Liu, Paul

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes steel works" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Residual stress patterns in steel welds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Neutron strain scanning of residual stress is a valuable nondestructive tool for evaluation of residual stress in welds. The penetrating characteristic of neutrons permits mapping of strain patterns with a spatial resolution approaching 1mm at depths of 20mm in steels. While the overall patterns of the residual stress tensor in a weld are understood, the detailed patterns depend on welding process parameters and the effects of solid state transformation. The residual strain profiles in two multi-pass austenitic welds and a ferritic steel weld are presented. The stress-free lattice parameters within the fusion zone and the adjacent heat affected zone in the two austenitic welds show that the interpretation of residual stress from strains are affected by welding parameters. An interpretation of the residual strain pattern in the ferritic steel plate can be made using the strain measurements of a Gleeble test bar which has undergone the solid state austenite decomposition.

Spooner, S.; Hubbard, C.R.; Wang, X.L.; David, S.A.; Holden, T.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Root, J.H.; Swainson, I. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River, ON (Canada)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

302

Thermophysical properties of stainless steel foils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Evacuated panel superinsulations with very high center-of-panel thermal resistances are being developed for use in refrigerators/freezers. Attainment of high resistances relies upon the maintenance of low vacuum levels by the use of stainless steel vacuum jackets. However, the metal jackets also present a path for heat conduction around the high resistance fillers. This paper presents results of a study of the impact of metal vacuum jackets on the overall thermal performance of vacuum superinsulations when incorporated into the walls and doors of refrigerators/freezers. Results are presented on measurements of the thermophysical properties of several types and thicknesses of stainless steel foils that were being considered for application in superinsulations. A direct electrical heating method was used for simultaneous measurements of the electrical resistivity, total hemispherical emittance, and thermal conductivity of the foils. Results are also presented on simulations of the energy usage of refrigerators/freezers containing stainless-steel-clad vacuum superinsulations.

Wilkes, K.E.; Strizak, J.P.; Weaver, F.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Besser, J.E.; Smith, D.L. [Aladdin Industries, Inc. (United States)

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Enhanced Incluison Removal from Steel in the Tundish  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to develop an effective chemical filtering system for significantly reducing the content of inclusion particles in the steel melts exiting the tundish for continuous casting. This project combined a multi-process approach that aimed to make significant progress towards an "inclusion free" steel by incorporating several interdependent concepts to reduce the content of inclusions in the molten steel exiting the tundish for the caster. The goal is to produce "cleaner" steel.

R.C. Bradt; M.A.R. Sharif

2009-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

304

Enhanced Inclusion Removal from Steel in the Tundish  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to develop an effective chemical filtering system for significantly reducing the content of inclusion particles in the steel melts exiting the tundish for continuous casting. This project combined a multi-process approach that aimed to make significant progress towards an "inclusion free" steel by incorporating several interdependent concepts to reduce the content of inclusions in the molten steel exiting the tundish for the caster. The goal is to produce "cleaner" steel.

R. C. Bradt; M.A.R. Sharif

2009-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

305

The anisotropic fatigue behaviour of forged steel ETIENNE PESSARDa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. This variation has been reported as being 35% for 42CrMo4 steel [7] and 15% for a duplex stainless steel [4] From in the matrix. For instance, Mateo and L√ľtjering [3-4] showed that for a duplex stainless steel and an aluminium(¬į)/D(0¬į) Mateo Duplex Stainless Steel Yield Stress= 610MPa L√ľtjering Al 7475 Yield Stress= 450MPa

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

306

Corrosion of carbon steels, stainless steels, and titanium in aqueous lithium bromide solution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Effects of lithium bromide (LiBr) concentration, pH, temperature, exposure time, and the action of some inhibitors on corrosion of several carbon (C) steels, stainless steels (SS), and a titanium (Ti) alloy were studied. Corrosion rates were determined by the polarization resistance method and compared to rates determined by weight-loss measurements. Pitting potentials (E[sub p]) were evaluated in neutral LiBr solution and with different inhibitors. Pit density and average pit depth depended on the metal tested, with lowest values for Ti, the next lowest values for type 316 SS (UNS S31600), and the highest values for UNS G41350 tempered steel.

Guinon, J.L.; Garcia-Anton, J.; Perez-Herranz, V. (Univ. Politecnica de Valencia (Spain). Dept. de Ingenieria Quimica y Nuclear); Lacoste, G. (ENSIGC, Toulouse (France))

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Corrosion Phenomena of Eurofeer Steel in Pb-17Li Stationary Flow at Magnetic Field  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Search of new energy sources draws the increasing attention to use for this purpose of reactors. In the Europe some years the program EUROATOM uniting scientific of the many countries for the decision of constructive problems at designing of fusion reactors operates. One of the main things in this program is the problem of liquid metals breeder blanket behaviour. Structural material of blanket should meet high requirements because of extreme operating conditions. Therefore the knowledge of the effect of metals flow velocity, temperatures and also a neutron irradiation and a magnetic field on the corrosion processes are necessary. At the moment the eutectic lead -lithium (Pb-17Li) is considered as the most suitable tritium breeder material. In turn as a structural material have been tested both many austenitic and ferritic-martensitic steels. As the optimum variant is considered steel EUROFER 97, which corrosion rate in liquid Pb-17Li eutectic is the least. However, these results have been received without taking into account influence of a strong magnetic field. At the same time, this influence should be essential, as because of change of hydrodynamics of a liquid metal flow, and because of interaction of a magnetic field with a ferromagnetic steel. It has been shown that the magnetic field leads to increase of corrosion rate for austenitic (316L) and martensitic (1,4914) steels. Experimental data for EUROFER 97, and also a theoretical substantiation of the phenomenon are absent, that creates essential difficulties for forecasting working capacity of blanket construction. The aim of presented work were the theoretical and experimental investigations of magnetic field influence on the corrosion of EUROFER 97 steel exposed to flowing Pb-17Li in specific designed loop. (authors)

Platacis, E.; Bucenieks, I.; Muktepavela, F.; Shishko, A. [University of Latvia, Riga (Latvia)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Investigation of distortional buckling of cold-formed steel sections  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Investigation of distortional buckling of cold-formed steel sections Researcher: Chong Ren Supervisors: Dr Long-yuan Li Dr Jian Yang Aims and Objectives Thin-walled, cold-formed steel sections considered to be the most popular products and account for a substantial proportion of cold-formed steel

Birmingham, University of

309

Modeling of Reoxidation Inclusion Formation During Filling of Steel Castings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Modeling of Reoxidation Inclusion Formation During Filling of Steel Castings Kent D. Carlson cycle of inclusions during the filling of steel castings. There are two ways that inclusions can the final location and characteristics of reoxidation inclusions in steel castings. Carlson, K

Beckermann, Christoph

310

Prediction of Reoxidation Inclusion Composition in Casting of Steel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Prediction of Reoxidation Inclusion Composition in Casting of Steel Liang Wang and Christoph ABSTRACT A model is developed to calculate the composition of reoxidation inclusions in steel casting. It is assumed that oxygen is continually absorbed by the steel during pouring. The software package Thermo

Beckermann, Christoph

311

Effect of Shrinkage on Service Performance of Steel Castings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effect of Shrinkage on Service Performance of Steel Castings Richard Hardin and Christoph An overview of the objectives and progress made by the "Integrated Design of Steel Castings for Service service performance of steel castings with porosity are reviewed. Structural performance predictions

Beckermann, Christoph

312

Simulation of Convection and Macrosegregation in a Large Steel Ingot  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Simulation of Convection and Macrosegregation in a Large Steel Ingot J.P. GU and C. BECKERMANN Melt convection and macrosegregation in casting of a large steel ingot are numerically simulated. The simulation is based on a previously developed model for multicomponent steel solidification with melt convection

Beckermann, Christoph

313

HOW MUCH INFLUENCE DOES CONSTRUCTION HAVE ON CURVED STEEL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HOW MUCH INFLUENCE DOES CONSTRUCTION HAVE ON CURVED STEEL BRIDGES? RESULTS FROM EXPERIMENTAL UNIVERSITY IBC-00-58 Keywords: curved, steel, girder, bridge, construction, erection, fabrication, testing and analytical research program to study curved steel bridge behavior. The program centered on testing a series

314

Simulation of Reoxidation Inclusion Formation in Steel Casting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Simulation of Reoxidation Inclusion Formation in Steel Casting Antonio J. Melendez, Kent D. Carlson the formation of reoxidation inclusions in carbon and low-alloy steel castings. A model is developed are conducted using radiographs of cast steel weld plates. The limit of resolution in the radiographs is about 1

Beckermann, Christoph

315

1D subsurface electromagnetic fields excited by energized steel casing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1D subsurface electromagnetic fields excited by energized steel casing Wei Yang1 , Carlos Torres the possibility of enabling steel-cased wells as galvanic sources to detect and quantify spatial variations of electrical conductivity in the subsurface. The study assumes a vertical steel-cased well that penetrates

Torres-Verdín, Carlos

316

Prediction of Reoxidation Inclusion Composition in Casting of Steel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Prediction of Reoxidation Inclusion Composition in Casting of Steel LIANG WANG and CHRISTOPH pouring of steel castings. The software package Thermo-Calc is used to obtain the inclusion phase fractions and compositions as a function of the temperature and oxygen content of the steel. Oxygen

Beckermann, Christoph

317

CE 4990 -Construction Scheduling Week 1: Steel Frame Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CE 4990 - Construction Scheduling Week 1: Steel Frame Project Fall 2011 January 13, 2012 Introduction You are a construction manager for a project to build a steel frame for an office building1 of 964 pre-fabricated structural steel members will be used in the construction. The standard bay size

Mukherjee, Amlan

318

Water Modeling of Steel Flow, Air Entrainment and Filtration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water Modeling of Steel Flow, Air Entrainment and Filtration Christoph Beckermann Associate Beckermann, C., "Water Modeling of Steel Flow, Air Entrainment and Filtration," in Proceedings of the 46th, 1992. #12;Abstract This paper presents an analysis of water modeling of steel pouring to study (1) air

Beckermann, Christoph

319

Model coupling friction and adhesion for steel-concrete interfaces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Model coupling friction and adhesion for steel- concrete interfaces Michel Raous Laboratoire de: In this paper the interface behaviour between steel and concrete, during pull out tests, is numerically a variable friction coefficient in order to simulate the behaviour of the steel-concrete interface during

Boyer, Edmond

320

Reuse of steel and aluminium without melting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-of-life metal components that could be reused for each product, the catalogue formed the basis of a set of semi-structured interviews with industrial experts. The results suggest that approximately 30% of steel and aluminium used in current products could... Allwood J.M., Cullen J.M., Cooper D.R., Milford R.L., Patel A.C.H., Carruth M.A., McBrien M., 2010. Conserving our metal energy: avoiding melting steel and aluminium scrap to save energy and carbon. University of Cambridge, ISBN 978-0-903428-30-9 Allwood...

Cooper, Daniel

2014-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes steel works" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Skin friction for steel piles in sand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SkiN FRICTION FOR STEZL PIIZS IN SAND A Theeia by I. H. Sulaiman Submittei io the graduate College of t, he Texan AAB Univen-ity in Ixantial fulfil. ment of bhe zequiremenbu for the degree of NASTZR 0F SCISNCZ May 196'7 bsrjor Subject...: Civil Engineering SKIN FRICTION FOR STEEL PILES IN SAND A Thesis by I. H. Sulaiman Approved as to style and content by: Chairman of C mmittee Head of Department Memb Member 111 Skin Friction For Steel Piles in Sand (May 1967) Ibr shim Hikmat...

Sulaiman, Ibrahim Hikmat

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

322

Steel Industry Technology Roadmap | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage ¬Ľ SearchEnergyDepartmentScopingOverviewFranklinStatusJ.R. Simplot DonSteelSteel

323

The Signifance of Retained Austenite in Steels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Introduction 90 2. Experimental Method and Techniques 91 3. Results and Discussion 92 4. Summary 94 VIII. An Analysis o£ the Mechanical Properties and Microstructure o£ a High-Silicon Dual-Phase Steel 1. Introduction 2. De£ormation Models 3. Experimental... £ects such that the extent o£ twinning was the greatest when adjacent martensite units had twin-related lattices. The thermodynamics o£ dislocated martensites have been briefly examined, The inhomogeneous de£ormation behaviour o£ dual-phase steels has been analysed in terms...

Bhadeshia, H K D H

1980-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

324

Low Temperature Surface Carburization of Stainless Steels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Low-temperature colossal supersaturation (LTCSS) is a novel surface hardening method for carburization of austenitic stainless steels (SS) without the precipitation of carbides. The formation of carbides is kinetically suppressed, enabling extremely high or colossal carbon supersaturation. As a result, surface carbon concentrations in excess of 12 at. % are routinely achieved. This treatment increases the surface hardness by a factor of four to five, improving resistance to wear, corrosion, and fatigue, with significant retained ductility. LTCSS is a diffusional surface hardening process that provides a uniform and conformal hardened gradient surface with no risk of delamination or peeling. The treatment retains the austenitic phase and is completely non-magnetic. In addition, because parts are treated at low temperature, they do not distort or change dimensions. During this treatment, carbon diffusion proceeds into the metal at temperatures that constrain substitutional diffusion or mobility between the metal alloy elements. Though immobilized and unable to assemble to form carbides, chromium and similar alloying elements nonetheless draw enormous amounts of carbon into their interstitial spaces. The carbon in the interstitial spaces of the alloy crystals makes the surface harder than ever achieved before by more conventional heat treating or diffusion process. The carbon solid solution manifests a Vickers hardness often exceeding 1000 HV (equivalent to 70 HRC). This project objective was to extend the LTCSS treatment to other austenitic alloys, and to quantify improvements in fatigue, corrosion, and wear resistance. Highlights from the research include the following: ē Extension of the applicability of the LTCSS process to a broad range of austenitic and duplex grades of steels ē Demonstration of LTCSS ability for a variety of different component shapes and sizes ē Detailed microstructural characterization of LTCSS-treated samples of 316L and other alloys ē Thermodynamic modeling to explain the high degree of carbon solubility possible in austenitic grades under the LTCSS process and experimental validation of model results ē Corrosion testing to determine the corrosion resistance improvement possible from the LTCSS process ē Erosion testing to determine the erosion resistance improvement possible from the LTCSS process ē Wear testing to quantify the wear resistance improvement possible from the LTCSS process ē Fatigue testing for quantifying the extent of improvement from the LTCSS process ē Component treating and testing under simulated and in-line commercial operations XRD verified expanded austenite lattice, with no evidence of carbide precipitation. Carbon concentration profiles via Auger and electron dispersion spectroscopy (EDS) showed carbon levels in excess of 12 at. % in treated, type 316 SS. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of pulled-to-failure treated tensile specimens showed slip bands and no de-cohesion of the treated layer, verifying that the layer remains ductile. Compressive stresses in excess of 2 GPa (300 ksi) have been calculated at the surface of the case. Phase diagram (CALPHAD) (ThermoCalc) and Wagner dilute solution thermodynamic models were developed that calculate the solubility of carbon in austenite as a function of alloying content for the process time and temperature. Several commercial alloys have been modeled, and the model has been used to design experimental alloys with enhanced affinity for carbon solubility at treatment temperatures. Four experimental alloys were melted, rolled, and manufactured into test specimens, and the LTCSS treatment indicated successfully enhanced results and validated the predictions based on thermodynamic modeling. Electrochemical polarization curves show a 600 to 800 mV increase in pitting potential in treated (900-1000 mV) versus non-treated (200-300 mV) type 316 in chloride solutions. Treated 316L showed crevice-corrosion behavior similar to that of Ti-6Al-4V and Hastelloy C22. Cavitation tests showed significant increases in cavitatio

Collins, Sunniva R.; Heuer, Arthur H.; Sikka, Vinod K.

2007-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

325

EE Regional Technology Roadmap Includes comparison  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EE Regional Technology Roadmap Includes comparison against 6th Power Plan (Update cyclically Data Clearinghouse BPA/RTF NEEA/Regional Programs Group Update Regional EE Technology Roadmap Lighting

326

DIDACTICAL HOLOGRAPHIC EXHIBIT INCLUDING (HOLOGRAPHIC TELEVISION)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DIDACTICAL HOLOGRAPHIC EXHIBIT INCLUDING HoloTV (HOLOGRAPHIC TELEVISION) José J. Lunazzi , DanielCampinasSPBrasil Abstract: Our Institute of Physics exposes since 1980 didactical exhibitions of holography in Brazil where

de Aguiar, Marcus A. M.

327

High temperature oxidation behavior of austenitic stainless steel AISI 304 in steam of nanofluids contain nanoparticle ZrO2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to evaluate high temperature oxidation behavior of austenitic stainless steel SS 304 in steam of nanofluids contain nanoparticle ZrO{sub 2}. The oxidation was performed at high temperatures ranging from 600 to 800įC. The oxidation time was 60 minutes. After oxidation the surface of the samples was analyzed by different methods including, optical microscope, scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). X-ray diffraction examination show that the oxide scale formed during oxidation of stainless steel AISI 304 alloys is dominated by iron oxide, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Minor element such as Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} is also appeared in the diffraction pattern. Characterization by optical microscope showed that cross section microstructure of stainless steel changed after oxidized with the oxide scale on the surface stainless steels. SEM and x-ray diffraction examination show that the oxide of ZrO{sub 2} appeared on the surface of stainless steel. Kinetic rate of oxidation of austenite stainless steel AISI 304 showed that increasing oxidation temperature and time will increase oxidation rate.

Prajitno, Djoko Hadi, E-mail: djokohp@batan.go.id; Syarif, Dani Gustaman, E-mail: djokohp@batan.go.id [Research Center for Nuclear Materials and Radiometry, Jl. Tamansari 71, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia)

2014-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

328

Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material, such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

329

Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

330

Effects Of Milling On Surface Integrity Of Low-Carbon Steel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work measured the effect of milling parameters on the surface integrity of low-carbon alloy steel. The Variance Analysis showed that only depth of cut did not influence on the workpiece roughness and the Pearson's Coefficient indicated that cutting speed was more influent than tool feed. All cutting parameters introduced tensile residual stress in workpiece surface. The chip formation mechanism depended specially on cutting speed and influenced on the roughness and residual stress of workpiece.

Rodrigues, Alessandro Roger; Matsumoto, Hidekasu; Yamakami, Wyser Jose; Tokimatsu, Ruis Camargo; Menezes, Miguel Angelo; Suyama, Daniel Iwao; Norcino, Adriana Bruno; Vendrame, Saimon [UNESP-Univ Estatual Paulista, Engineering Faculty of Ilha Solteira, Av. Brasil Centro, 56-Zip Code 15.385-000-Ilha Solteira, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

2011-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

331

working with industry Engineering and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of interests including: · laser physics · semiconductor optoelectronics · photonics in manufacturing · solar · micromechanics and condition monitoring · renewable energy modelling · carbon capture and storage Our institute to applied systems. We have a wide ranging programme of current work with many industrial companies in key

Painter, Kevin

332

" Rotating, In Plane Magnetization and Magneto-Optic Imaging of Cracks in Thick-Section Steel Under Stainless-Steel Cladding".  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The nondestructive inspection (NDI) of thick-section steel nuclear reactor pressure vessels (RPV'S) is rendered difficult by rough stainless steel cladding. Because the cladding condition is poorly known in most RPV's, an NDI technique that is unaffected by cladding roughness would be a major advance. Magneto-optic imaging is one such technique. The purpose of this project was to develop a novel method to induce rotating, in-plane magnetization, and to combine this capability with magneto-optic imaging to produce a self-contained inspection system. Imaging of cracks under thick cladding (0.250 inches) was demonstrated using a system capable, in principle, of performing robotic inspections, both inside & outside a typical boiling water reactor (BWR) RPV. This report, together publications listed, constitutes a comprehensive account of this work.

Gerald Fitzpatrick & Richard Skaugset

2000-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

333

Forsterite film formation and grain growth in 3% Si steel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The forsterite film in 3% Si steel is formed by a solid state reaction of the annealing separator, MgO, with SiO[sub 2] that results from the reduction of the fayalite layer in the hydrogen atmosphere in the high temperature anneal. In this work, secondary recrystallization was about complete at 1,000 C. After that temperature tertiary recrystallization can occur if the boundary drag of the second phase particles can be overcome. Addition of phosphates to the annealing separator affects the morphology of the forsterite film and can have an important effect on tertiary recrystallization by affecting the rate of decrease of the boundary-drag and/or the surface energy relationship.

Cunha, M.A.; Cesar, M.G.M.M. (Cia Acos Especiais Itabira, Timoteo (Brazil))

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Crevice and pitting corrosion behavior of stainless steels in seawater  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pitting and crevice corrosion tests in natural seawater were performed on a series of stainless steels (i.e., S31603, N08904, S32304, S31803, S32520, N08925 and S31266) in order to determine their resistance to these types of localized corrosion. Open circuit potential (OCP) measurements for these alloys show for short exposure times an ennoblement in the OCP. After a certain time, occasional fall and rise in the OCP values was observed, which can be related to nucleation and repassivation of pits and/or crevices on the metal surface. Analysis of the electrochemical behavior and microscopic observations shows that only S31603 and S32304 alloys were susceptible to crevice and pitting corrosion, whereas the remaining alloys exhibited good resistance. Pitting potentials determined by the potentiodynamic technique also show S3 1603 and S32304 are susceptible to pitting corrosion under the experimental conditions used in this work.

Zaragoza-Ayala, A.E.; Orozco-Cruz, R. [Univ. Autonoma de Campeche (Mexico). Programa de Corrosion del Golfo de Mexico

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Multistructural examination of low activation ferritic steels following irradiation in ORR at 330 and 400 degrees C to ~ 10 dpa  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Microstructural examinations are reported for a series of low activation steels containing Mn following irradiation in the Oak Ridge Reactor at 330 and 400 C to {approx}10 dpa. Alloy compositions included 2% Cr, 9% Cr and 12% Cr steels with V to 1.5% and W to 1.0%. Results include compositional changes in precipitates and microstructural changes as a function of composition and irradiation temperature. It is concluded that temperatures in ORR are on the order of 50 C higher than anticipated.

Gelles, David S.

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Friction Stir Welding of Mild Steel -Tool Durability and Steel Microstructure , H. K. D. H. Bhadeshia2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1" " Friction Stir Welding of Mild Steel - Tool Durability and Steel Microstructure A. De1 , H. K in the context of welding difficult aluminium alloys. We now apply this scheme to the friction stir welding and the consequences on the physical metallurgy of the steel. Introduction Friction stir welding (FSW) of aluminium

Cambridge, University of

337

Sensitivity of ultrasonic nonlinearity to irradiated, annealed, and re-irradiated microstructure changes in RPV steels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The planned life extension of nuclear reactors throughout the US and abroad will cause reactor vessel and internals materials to be exposed to more neutron irradiation than was originally intended. A nondestructive evaluation (NDE) method to monitor radiation damage would enable safe and cost-effective continued operation of nuclear reactors. Radiation damage in reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels causes microstructural changes that leave the material in an embrittled state. Nonlinear ultrasound is an NDE technique quantified by the measurable acoustic nonlinearity parameter, which is sensitive to microstructural changes in metallic materials such as dislocations, precipitates and their combinations. Recent research has demonstrated the sensitivity of the acoustic nonlinearity parameter to increasing neutron fluence in representative RPV steels. The current work considers nonlinear ultrasonic experiments conducted on similar RPV steel samples that had a combination of irradiation, annealing, re-irradiation, and/or re-annealing to a total neutron fluence of 0.5 5 1019 n/cm2 (E > 1 MeV) at an irradiation temperature of 290 C. The acoustic nonlinearity parameter generally increased with increasing neutron fluence, and consistently decreased from the irradiated to the annealed state over different levels of neutron fluence. Results of the measured acoustic nonlinearity parameter are compared with those from previous measurements on other RPV steel samples. This comprehensive set of results illustrates the dependence of the measured acoustic nonlinearity parameter on neutron fluence, material composition, irradiation temperature and annealing.

Matlack, Katie [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta] [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta; Kim, J-Y. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta] [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta; Wall, J.J. [Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI)] [Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI); Jacobs, L.J. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta] [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta; Sokolov, Mikhail A [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

STUDY OF AGING EFFECTS IN 2205 DUPLEX STAINLESS STEEL USING THERMOELECTRIC POWER MEASUREMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermoelectric power (TEP) measurements have been used as an effective method for evaluating the metallurgical state of various alloys. In the steel industry, some fabrication processes promote phase transformation and second phase precipitations which affect the material properties. Assessment of mechanical properties is critical in order to ensure quality of components. This work was conducted in order to evaluate the influence of the aging state of 2205 duplex stainless steel on TEP values. Commercial 2205 duplex steel was isothermally aged at 650 deg. C 700 deg. C and 900 deg. C at different aging times. TEP measurement technique was applied as a non destructive assessment technique to characterize the aging kinetics of the aged 2205 duplex stainless steel, hardness Rockwell (RC) and Charpy impact test were preformed to observe the effect of aging time on the specimens. Metallographic analysis was used to monitor phase transformation and sigma phase precipitation caused by the spinodal decomposition process of ferrite into secondary austenite and sigma phase. Results indicate that that the TEP is sensitive to gradual microstructural changes produced by the aging treatments.

Lara, N.; Ruiz, A.; Carreon, H.; Medina, A. [NDE Group, Instituto de Investigaciones Metalurgicas, UMSNH (Mexico); Sanchez, A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, UMSNH (Mexico)

2010-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

339

Qualification of large diameter duplex stainless steel girth welds intended for low temperature service  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

British Gas recently had a requirement to fabricate some UNS31803 duplex stainless steel pipework for an offshore topsides process plant. The pipework had a maximum diameter of 600mm, with a corresponding wall thickness of 18mm, and it was designed to operate at a minimum temperature of {minus}40 C. There is a lack of published toughness data for girth welds in duplex stainless steel at this thickness and minimum design temperature. Additionally, toughness requirements for girth welds in current pipework and pressure vessel codes are based on experience with carbon steels. As a result, a program of work has been carried out to study the Charpy, CTOD and wide plate toughness of girth welds in 22%Cr duplex stainless steel pipework. The welds were produced using a typical gas tungsten arc/gas metal arc pipework fabrication procedure. In addition, non-destructive evaluation trials have been carried out on a deliberately defective weld using radiography and ultrasonics. It was demonstrated that double wall single image {gamma}-radiography, single wall single image and panoramic X-radiography, and conventional shear wave ultrasonics were all able to detect planar root defects varying from 3 to 7mm in depth. There was good agreement between the sizes recorded by ultrasonics and those measured from macrosections. Small scale mechanical tests demonstrated that welds with overmatching tensile properties, and low temperature toughness properties which were acceptable to specification, could be produced. Wide plate tests demonstrated that defect size calculations from BS PD7493 were conservative.

Prosser, K.; Robinson, A.G.; Rogers, P.F.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

340

Reduced-activation austenitic stainless steels: The Fe--Mn--Cr--C system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nickel-free manganese-stabilized steels are being developed for fusion-reactor applications. As the first part of this effort, the austenite-stable region in the Fe--Mn--Cr--C system was determined. Results indicated that the Schaeffler diagram developed for Fe--Ni--Cr--C alloys cannot be used to predict the constituents expected for high-manganese steels. This is true because manganese is not as strong an austenite stabilizer relative to delta-ferrite formation as predicted by the diagram, but it is a stronger austenite stabilizer relative to martensite than predicted. Therefore, the austenite-stable region for Ne--Mn--Cr--C alloys occurs at lower chromium and hugher combinations of manganese and carbon than predicted by the Schaeffler diagram. Development of a manganese-stabilized stainless steel should be possible in the composition range of 20 to 25% Mn, 10 to 15% Cr, and 0.01 to 0.25%C. Tensile behavior of an Fe--20%Mn--12%Cr--0.25%C alloy was determined. The strength and ductility of this possible base composition was comparable to type 316 stainless steel in both the solution-annealed and cold-worked condition.

Klueh, R.L.; Maziasz, P.J.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes steel works" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

CLEAN CAST STEEL TECHNOLOGY: DETERMINATION OF TRANSFORMATION DIAGRAMS FOR DUPLEX STAINLESS STEEL.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Duplex stainless steels (DSS) constitute both ferrite and austenite as a matrix. Such a microstructure confers a high corrosion resistance with favorable mechanical properties. However, intermetallic phases such as sigma (√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬Į√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬Ā√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬≥) and chi (√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬Į√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬Ā√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬£) can also form during casting or high-temperature processing and can degrade the properties of the DSS. This research was initiated to develop time-temperature-transformation (TTT) and continuous-cooling- transformation (CCT) diagrams of two types of cast duplex stainless steels, CD3MN (Fe 22Cr-5Ni-Mo-N) and CD3MWCuN (Fe-25Cr-7Ni-Mo-W-Cu-N), in order to understand the time and temperature ranges for intermetallic phase formation. The alloys were heat treated isothermally or under controlled cooling conditions and then characterized using conventional metallographic methods that included tint etching, and also using electron microscopy (SEM, TEM) and wavelength dispersive spectroscopy (WDS). The kinetics of intermetallic-phase (√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬Į√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬Ā√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬≥ + √?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬Į√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬Ā√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬£) formation were analyzed using the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (JMA) equation in the case of isothermal transformations and a modified form of this equation in the case of continuous cooling transformations, The rate of intermetallic-phase formation was found to be much faster in CD3MWCuN than CD3MN due mainly to differences in the major alloying contents such as Cr, Ni and Mo. To examine in more detail the effects of these elements of the phase stabilities, a series of eight steel castings was designed with the Cr, Ni and Mo contents systematically varied with respect to the nominal composition of CD3MN. The effects of varying the contents of alloying additions on the formation of intermetallic phases were also studied computationally using the commercial thermodynamic software package, Thermo-Calc. In general, √?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬Į√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬Ā√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬≥ was stabilized with increasing Cr addition and by increasing Mo addition. However, a delicate balance among Ni and other minor elements such as N and Si also exists. Phase equilibria in DSS can be affected by local composition fluctuations in the cast alloy. This may cause discrepancy between thermodynamic prediction and experimental observation.

Chumbley. L., S.

2005-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

342

Recycling of electric arc furnace dust: Jorgensen steel facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is an evaluation of the Ek Glassification(TM) Process to recycle and convert K061-listed waste (Electric Arc Furnace or EAF dust) and other byproducts of the steel-making industry into usable products. The Process holds potential for replacing the need for expensive disposal costs associated with the listed waste with the generation of marketable products. The products include colored glass and glass-ceramics; ceramic glazes, colorants, and fillers; roofing granules and sandblasting grit; and materials for Portland cement production. Field testing of the technology was conducted by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) in early July of 1991 at the Earle M. Jorgensen Steel Co. (EMJ) plant in Seattle, Washington, and both technical and economic aspects of the technology were examined. TCLP testing of the product determined that leachability characteristics of metals in the product meet treatment standards for K061-listed waste. The Process was also shown to be economically viable, based on capital and operating cost estimates, and profit and revenue forecasts for a 21,000 ton-per-year operation. Although this effort showed that the technology holds promise, regulatory compliance should be evaluated on the basis of the actual hardware configuration and operating procedures along with the leachability of the specific product formulations to be used.

Jackson, T.W.; Chapman, J.S.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

The corrosion of some stainless steels in a marine mud  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report presents the results for three alloys: carbon steel, 316L stainless steel and a proprietary super duplex stainless steel (UNS S32760), exposed in a marine mud off the south coast of England for 5 years. Analysis of the mud showed it to be very aggressive using a corrosion index developed at the University of Manchester. Carbon steel showed a typical corrosion rate for microbial attack with pits up to 0.64mm deep. The 316L stainless steel had extensive broad, shallow attack with a few, deeper pits. The Z100 parent pipe and weldments showed no evidence of corrosion attack.

Francis, R.; Byrne, G. [Weir Materials and Foundries Park Works, Manchester (United Kingdom); Campbell, H.S. [Univ. of Surrey (United Kingdom). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Scramjet including integrated inlet and combustor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes a scramjet engine. It comprises: a first surface including an aft facing step; a cowl including: a leading edge and a trailing edge; an upper surface and a lower surface extending between the leading edge and the trailing edge; the cowl upper surface being spaced from and generally parallel to the first surface to define an integrated inlet-combustor therebetween having an inlet for receiving and channeling into the inlet-combustor supersonic inlet airflow; means for injecting fuel into the inlet-combustor at the step for mixing with the supersonic inlet airflow for generating supersonic combustion gases; and further including a spaced pari of sidewalls extending between the first surface to the cowl upper surface and wherein the integrated inlet-combustor is generally rectangular and defined by the sidewall pair, the first surface and the cowl upper surface.

Kutschenreuter, P.H. Jr.; Blanton, J.C.

1992-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

345

A comparison of dilatometry and in-situ neutron diffraction in tracking bulk phase transformations in a martensitic stainless steel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Phase transformations in the 17-4PH martensitic stainless steel have been studied using different in-situ techniques, including dilatometry and high resolution neutron diffraction. Neutron diffraction patterns were quantitatively processed using the Rietveld refinement method, allowing the determination of the temperature-dependence of martensite (??, bcc) and austenite (?, fcc) phase fractions and lattice parameters on heating to 1000 įC and then cooling to room temperature. It is demonstrated in this work that dilatometry doesn't permit an accurate determination of the end temperature (Ac3) of the ?? ? ? transformation which occurs upon heating to high temperature. The analysis of neutron diffraction data has shown that the respective volumes of the two phases become very close to each other at high temperature, thus making the dilatometric technique almost insensitive in that temperature range. However, there is a very good agreement between neutron diffraction and dilatometry at lower temperature. The martensitic transformation occurring upon cooling has been analysed using the KoistinenĖMarburger equation. The thermal expansion coefficients of the two phases have been determined in addition. A comparison of the results obtained in this work with data from literature is presented. - Highlights: ē Martensite is still present at very high temperature (> 930 įC) upon heating. ē The end of austenitisation cannot be accurately monitored by dilatometry. ē The martensite and austenite volumes become similar at high temperature (> ? 850 įC)

Christien, F., E-mail: frederic.christien@univ-nantes.fr [Institut des Matťriaux Jean Rouxel (IMN), Universitť de Nantes, CNRS, Rue Christian Pauc, BP 50609, 44306 Nantes Cedex 3 (France); Telling, M.T.F. [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford (United Kingdom); Knight, K.S. [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Department of Earth Sciences, The Natural History Museum, Cromwell Road, London (United Kingdom)

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

346

Final Report, Volume 1, Metallurgical Evaluation of Cast Duplex Stainless Steels and their Weldments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Duplex stainless steels (DSS) are being specified for chloride containing environments due to their enhanced pitting and stress corrosion cracking resistance. They exhibit improved corrosion performance over the austenitic stainless steels. Duplex stainless steels also offer improved strength properties and are available in various wrought and cast forms. Selected grades of duplex stainless steel castings and their welds, in comparison with their wrought counterparts, were evaluated, regarding corrosion performance and mechanical properties and weldability. Multiple heats of cast duplex stainless steel were evaluated in the as-cast, solution annealed (SA) static cast and SA centrifugal cast conditions, while their wrought counterparts were characterized in the SA condition and in the form of as-rolled plate. Welding, including extensive assessment of autogenous welds and a preliminary study of composite welds (shielded metal arc weld (SMAW)), was performed. The evaluations included critical pitting temperature (CPT) testing, intergranular corrosion (IGC) testing, ASTM A923 (Methods A, B and C), Charpy impact testing, weldability testing (ASTM A494), ferrite measurement and microstructural evaluations. In the study, the corrosion performances of DSS castings were characterized and assessed, including the wrought counterparts for comparison. The evaluation filled the pore of lack of data for cast duplex stainless steels compared to wrought materials. A database of the pitting corrosion and IGC behavior of cast and wrought materials was generated for a greater depth of understanding for the behavior of cast duplex stainless steel. In addition, improved evaluation methods for DSS castings were developed according to ASTM A923, A262, G48 and A494. The study revealed that when properly heat treated according to the specification, (1) DSS castings have equal or better pitting and intergranular corrosion resistance than their wrought counterparts; (2) Welding reduces the pitting and intergranular corrosion resistance for both the wrought and cast duplex alloys; (3) Castings generally have better toughness than their wrought counterparts in the temperature range of √?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬Ę√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?80√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬įC to +20√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬įC; (4) All shield metal arc (SMA) test welds in DSS castings, with recommended or over matching filler metal, indicate that welding is not a significant factor when considering DSS applications.

Wen, Songqing; Lundin, Carl, W.; Batten, Greg, W.

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

347

Final Report, Volume 1, Metallurgical Evaluation of Cast Duplex Stainless Steels and their Weldments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Duplex stainless steels (DSS) are being specified for chloride containing environments due to their enhanced pitting and stress corrosion cracking resistance. They exhibit improved corrosion performance over the austenitic stainless steels. Duplex stainless steels also offer improved strength properties and are available in various wrought and cast forms. Selected grades of duplex stainless steel castings and their welds, in comparison with their wrought counterparts, were evaluated, regarding corrosion performance and mechanical properties and weldability. Multiple heats of cast duplex stainless steel were evaluated in the as-cast, solution annealed (SA) static cast and SA centrifugal cast conditions, while their wrought counterparts were characterized in the SA condition and in the form of as-rolled plate. Welding, including extensive assessment of autogenous welds and a preliminary study of composite welds (shielded metal arc weld (SMAW)), was performed. The evaluations included critical pitting temperature (CPT) testing, intergranular corrosion (IGC) testing, ASTM A923 (Methods A, B and C), Charpy impact testing, weldability testing (ASTM A494), ferrite measurement and microstructural evaluations. In the study, the corrosion performances of DSS castings were characterized and assessed, including the wrought counterparts for comparison. The evaluation filled the pore of lack of data for cast duplex stainless steels compared to wrought materials. A database of the pitting corrosion and IGC behavior of cast and wrought materials was generated for a greater depth of understanding for the behavior of cast duplex stainless steel. In addition, improved evaluation methods for DSS castings were developed according to ASTM A923, A262, G48 and A494. The study revealed that when properly heat treated according to the specification, (1) DSS castings have equal or better pitting and intergranular corrosion resistance than their wrought counterparts; (2) Welding reduces the pitting and intergranular corrosion resistance for both the wrought and cast duplex alloys; (3) Castings generally have better toughness than their wrought counterparts in the temperature range of -80 C to +20 C; (4) All shield metal arc (SMA) test welds in DSS castings, with recommended or over matching filler metal, indicate that welding is not a significant factor when considering DSS applications.

Wen, Songqing; Lundin, Carl, W.; Batten, Greg, W.

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

348

Long-term embrittlement of cast duplex stainless steels in LWR systems. Semiannual report, April--September 1992: Volume 7, No. 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This progress report summarizes work performed by Argonne National Laboratory on longterm thermal embrittlement of cast duplex stainless steels in LWR systems during the six months from April--September 1992. A procedure and correlations are presented for predicting Charpy-impact energy, tensile flow stress, fracture toughness J-R curve, tearing modulus, and J{sub IC} of aged cast stainless steels from known material information. The ``saturation`` impact strength and fracture toughness of a specific cast stainless steel, i.e., the minimum value that would be achieved for the material after long-term service, is estimated from the chemical composition of the steel. Mechanical properties as a function of time and temperature of reactor service are estimated from impact energy and flow stress of the unaged material and the kinetics of embrittlement, which are also determined from chemical composition. The J{sub IC} values are determined from the estimated J-R curve and flow stress. Examples of estimating mechanical properties of cast stainless steel components during reactor service are presented. A common ``lower-bound`` J-R curve for cast stainless steels of unknown chemical composition is also defined for a given grade of steel, ferrite content, and temperature.

Chopra, O.K. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Electric Power Monthly, August 1990. [Glossary included  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly summaries of electric utility statistics at the national, Census division, and State level. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data includes generation by energy source (coal, oil, gas, hydroelectric, and nuclear); generation by region; consumption of fossil fuels for power generation; sales of electric power, cost data; and unusual occurrences. A glossary is included.

Not Available

1990-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

350

Transformation texture of allotriomorphic ferrite in steel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Transformation texture of allotriomorphic ferrite in steel D. W. Kim1 , R. S. Qin1 and H. K. D. H into that of the product is mathematically defined. This is not the case when the ferrite forms by a reconstructive mechanism. The allotriomorphic ferrite nucleates heterogeneously at austenite grain boundaries, and although

Cambridge, University of

351

Modelling of Simultaneous Transformations in Steels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

submitted for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy Univesity of Professor H. K. D. H. Bhadeshia in the Department of Materi- als Science and Metallurgy, University in the proceedings of the conference on New Development on Metallurgy and Applications of High Strength Steels

Cambridge, University of

352

Selection of Processes for Welding Steel Rails  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

...._ _) Selection of Processes for Welding Steel Rails by N.S. Tsai* and T.W. Eagar* ABSTRACT 421 The advantages and limitations ofseveral conventional and prospective rail welding processes are reviewed with emphasis on the heat input rate, on joint preparation, on post weld grinding and on resultant metallurgical

Eagar, Thomas W.

353

Carbide Precipitation in Steel Weld Metals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbide Precipitation in Steel Weld Metals www.msm.cam.ac.uk/phase-trans #12 diffusion into austenite Carbon diffusion into austenite and carbide precipitation in ferrite Carbide precipitation from austenite CASE 2: elimination of carbides #12;#12;#12;0.110.090.070.050.03 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1

Cambridge, University of

354

The Steel Market Today And Tomorrow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a liability as a benefit. Mature Industry Many observers suggest that the metals industry is based on old straddled the traditional metals industries, as well as the newer "high technol- ogy'' industries, the claim problems have been solved." For example, the scrap rate for the steel industry is extremely low, esp~ dally

Eagar, Thomas W.

355

Avoid stainless steel failures in FGD systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Preventing pitting and localized corrosion is the key to success where low maintenance and high reliability are rime considerations in flue-gas desulfurization (FGD) designs. Knowing when to use a stainless steel, and when not to, is crucial. Operating parameters and environmental factors greatly affect alloy performance, especially pH, temperature, and chloride and oxygen levels. Failures of stainless steels can be avoided by understanding their limits in light of these variables. This article will focus on the capabilities of Types 316L, 317L, 317LM, 317LMN, 904L, and 6% Mo stainless steels and their applications, as well as provide details on unique combination of mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of the 22% Cr duplex and 25% Cr super-duplex stainless steels in acid chloride systems. Guidelines will be presented on methods to prevent intergranular corrosion, stress corrosion cracking, and pitting and crevice corrosion, and what process steps can be taken to assure reasonable performance of marginal alloy selections. Emphasis will be on the lime/limestone wet scrubbing process and the quencher/absorber.

Mills, J.P.; Schillmoller, C.M.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

The effect of iron dilution on strength of nickel/steel and Monel/steel welds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The weld strength, as a function of iron content, for nickel/steel and Monel/steel welds was determined. Samples were prepared using a Gas Metal Arc (GMAW) automatic process to weld steel plate together with nickel or Monel to produce a range of iron contents typical of weld compositions. Tensile specimens of each iron content were tested to obtain strength and ductility measurements for that weld composition. Data indicate that at iron contents of less than 20% iron in a nickel/steel weld, the weld fails at the weld interface, due to a lack of fusion. Between 20% and 35% iron, the highest iron dilution that could be achieved in a nickel weld, the welds were stronger than the steel base metal. This indicates that a minimum amount of iron dilution (20%) is necessary for good fusion and optimum strength. On the other hand for Monel/steel welds, test results showed that the welds had good strength and integrity between 10% and 27% iron in the weld. Above 35% iron, the welds have less strength and are more brittle. The 35% iron content also corresponds to the iron dilution in Monel welds that has been shown to produce an increase in corrosion rate. This indicates that the iron dilution in Monel welds should be kept below 35% iron to maximize both the strength and corrosion resistance. 2 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

Fout, S.L.; Wamsley, S.D.

1983-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

357

Mechanical Behavior and Microstructural Development of Low-Carbon Steel and Microcomposite Steel Reinforcement Bars Deformed under Quasi-Static and Dynamic Shear Loading  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

pp. 66Ė77. 44. G. Krauss: Steels: Processing, Structure, andConf. Super High Strength Steels, AIM, Rome, Italy, 2005,cation for Epoxy-Coated Steel Reinforcing Bars,íí Annual

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Crack stability analysis of low alloy steel primary coolant pipe  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At present, cast duplex stainless steel has been used for the primary coolant piping of PWRs in Japan and joints of dissimilar material have been applied for welding to reactor vessels and steam generators. For the primary coolant piping of the next APWR plants, application of low alloy steel that results in designing main loops with the same material is being studied. It means that there is no need to weld low alloy steel with stainless steel and that makes it possible to reduce the welding length. Attenuation of Ultra Sonic Wave Intensity is lower for low alloy steel than for stainless steel and they have advantageous inspection characteristics. In addition to that, the thermal expansion rate is smaller for low alloy steel than for stainless steel. In consideration of the above features of low alloy steel, the overall reliability of primary coolant piping is expected to be improved. Therefore, for the evaluation of crack stability of low alloy steel piping to be applied for primary loops, elastic-plastic future mechanics analysis was performed by means of a three-dimensioned FEM. The evaluation results for the low alloy steel pipings show that cracks will not grow into unstable fractures under maximum design load conditions, even when such a circumferential crack is assumed to be 6 times the size of the wall thickness.

Tanaka, T.; Kameyama, M. [Kansai Electric Power Company, Osaka (Japan); Urabe, Y. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Takasago (Japan)] [and others

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Energy Consumption of Personal Computing Including Portable  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Consumption of Personal Computing Including Portable Communication Devices Pavel Somavat1 consumption, questions are being asked about the energy contribution of computing equipment. Al- though studies have documented the share of energy consumption by this type of equipment over the years, research

Namboodiri, Vinod

360

Communication in automation, including networking and wireless  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Communication in automation, including networking and wireless Nicholas Kottenstette and Panos J and networking in automation is given. Digital communication fundamentals are reviewed and networked control are presented. 1 Introduction 1.1 Why communication is necessary in automated systems Automated systems use

Antsaklis, Panos

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes steel works" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Radiological Work Planning and Procedure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Each facility is tasked with maintaining personnel radiation exposure as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). A continued effort is required to meet this goal by developing and implementing improvements to technical work documents (TWDs) and work performance. A review of selected TWDs from most facilities shows there is a need to incorporate more radiological control requirements into the TWD. The Radioactive Work Permit (RWP) provides a mechanism to place some of the requirements but does not provide all the information needed by the worker as he/she is accomplishing the steps of the TWD. Requiring the engineers, planners and procedure writers to put the radiological control requirements in the work steps would be very easy if all personnel had a strong background in radiological work planning and radiological controls. Unfortunately, many of these personnel do not have the background necessary to include these requirements without assistance by the Radiological Control organization at each facility. In addition, there seems to be confusion as to what should be and what should not be included in the TWD.

KURTZ, J.E.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Corrosion of steel reinforcement in concrete. Corrosion of mild steel bars in concrete and its effect on steel-concrete bond strength.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This thesis reports on the research outcome of corrosion mechanism and corrosion rate of mild steel in different environments (saline, alkaline solutions and concrete media)Ö (more)

Abosrra, L. R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Effect of Magnetic Field on The Friction and Wear Displayed by The Scratch of Oil Lubricated Steel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract ó The present work discusses the effect of magnetic field on the friction and wear of steel scratched by TiC insert. The steel was lubricated by oil and dispersed by iron, copper and aluminium powders as well as polymeric powders such as high density polyethylene (PE), polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and polyamide (PA6). Molybdenum disulphide (MoS 2) and graphite (C) were added to the oil as dispersant. Paraffin oil was used as lubricant. Friction coefficient and wear of the tested composites were investigated using a tribometer designed and manufactured for that purpose. It was found that application of induction magnetic field decreased friction coefficient. The decrease was significant for oil lubricated steel and oil dispersed by aluminium, copper, PMMA and PA6 + 10 wt. % C, while addition of iron, PE and MoS 2 particles showed slight friction decrease. At no magnetic field friction coefficient for oil dispersed by aluminium and copper particles showed values lower than that observed for oil dispersed by iron particles. The lowest values of friction coefficient were displayed by oil dispersed by PE particles. Magnetic field caused significant wear increase for oil lubricated steel, where aluminium, copper and PA6 + C particles displayed relatively higher wear, while addition of iron, PE, PMMA and MoS 2 particles showed slight wear increase. At no magnetic field wear decreased due to the action of aluminium particles which formed a continuous layer on the steel surface and consequently decreased wear. Wear of oil lubricated steel dispersed by PE particles displayed relatively low values. Magnetic field showed no significant change on wear of the steel surface. Index Term-- Induction, magnetic field, scratch, friction coefficient, wear, iron, copper, aluminium polymethyl methacrylate, polyethylene, polyamide, molybdenum disulphide, paraffin oil. I.

unknown authors

364

Team work: Construction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Team work: Construction Management The Division of Engineering Technology in an construction technology area, an associate degree in construction science, or college- level course work equivalent to an associate degree in construction related area

Berdichevsky, Victor

365

Subterranean barriers including at least one weld  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A subterranean barrier and method for forming same are disclosed, the barrier including a plurality of casing strings wherein at least one casing string of the plurality of casing strings may be affixed to at least another adjacent casing string of the plurality of casing strings through at least one weld, at least one adhesive joint, or both. A method and system for nondestructively inspecting a subterranean barrier is disclosed. For instance, a radiographic signal may be emitted from within a casing string toward an adjacent casing string and the radiographic signal may be detected from within the adjacent casing string. A method of repairing a barrier including removing at least a portion of a casing string and welding a repair element within the casing string is disclosed. A method of selectively heating at least one casing string forming at least a portion of a subterranean barrier is disclosed.

Nickelson, Reva A.; Sloan, Paul A.; Richardson, John G.; Walsh, Stephanie; Kostelnik, Kevin M.

2007-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

366

Completion strategy includes clay and precipitate control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article describes the conditions which are necessary for a successful oil well completion in the Mississippi and Cherokee zones of South Central Kansas. Topics considered include paraffin precipitation, clay swelling and migration, and iron precipitation. Clays in these zones are sensitive to water-base treating fluids and tend to swell and migrate to the well bore, thereby causing permeability damage. The presence of iron in the Mississippi and Cherokee formations has been indicated by cuttings, core samples, and connate water samples.

Sandy, T.; Gardner, G.R.

1985-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

367

Power generation method including membrane separation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for generating electric power, such as at, or close to, natural gas fields. The method includes conditioning natural gas containing C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons and/or acid gas by means of a membrane separation step. This step creates a leaner, sweeter, drier gas, which is then used as combustion fuel to run a turbine, which is in turn used for power generation.

Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Union City, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Rotor assembly including superconducting magnetic coil  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Superconducting coils and methods of manufacture include a superconductor tape wound concentrically about and disposed along an axis of the coil to define an opening having a dimension which gradually decreases, in the direction along the axis, from a first end to a second end of the coil. Each turn of the superconductor tape has a broad surface maintained substantially parallel to the axis of the coil.

Snitchler, Gregory L. (Shrewsbury, MA); Gamble, Bruce B. (Wellesley, MA); Voccio, John P. (Somerville, MA)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Nuclear reactor shield including magnesium oxide  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improvement in nuclear reactor shielding of a type used in reactor applications involving significant amounts of fast neutron flux, the reactor shielding including means providing structural support, neutron moderator material, neutron absorber material and other components as described below, wherein at least a portion of the neutron moderator material is magnesium in the form of magnesium oxide either alone or in combination with other moderator materials such as graphite and iron.

Rouse, Carl A. (Del Mar, CA); Simnad, Massoud T. (La Jolla, CA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Electric power monthly, September 1990. [Glossary included  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide energy decision makers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues. The power plants considered include coal, petroleum, natural gas, hydroelectric, and nuclear power plants. Data are presented for power generation, fuel consumption, fuel receipts and cost, sales of electricity, and unusual occurrences at power plants. Data are compared at the national, Census division, and state levels. 4 figs., 52 tabs. (CK)

Not Available

1990-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

371

Interagency Sustainability Working Group  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Interagency Sustainability Working Group (ISWG) is the coordinating body for sustainable buildings in the federal government.

372

SOCIOLOGICAL WORK ON ENERGY: THE OPPORTUNITY AND SOME PRESCRIPTIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The opportunity for sociological work on energy is demonstrated by a critical review of several bodies ofnon-sociological work on energy. Included in this review is the crisis genre, the energy primer, the political economy of energy, the work...

Lacy, Michael G.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Work Permit # 51012MZ5 Work Order# '  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Confined Space· 0 Ergonomics· 0 Material Handling o ,Beryllium· 0 Electrical 0 Hydraulic o Safety Harness o Electrical Working Hot o Electrical Noise 0 Potential to Cause aFalse Alarm o QiCombustible Gas o IHSurvey Dosimeter o LockoutITagout o Spill potential o Self-reading Pencil Dosimeter o Impair Fire Protection

Homes, Christopher C.

374

A Comparison of Iron and Steel Production Energy Use and Energy Intensity in China and the U.S.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Iron and Steel Production Energy Use and Energy Intensityof Iron and Steel Production Energy Use and Energy Intensitycomparisons of steel production energy efficiency and CO 2

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Performance of steel-polymer and ceramic-polymer layered composites and concrete under high strain rate loadings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Performance of Steel-Polyurea Bi-layers Subjected to Impul-Performance of Steel-Polymer-Steel Sandwich Structures Sub- jected to Impulsive

Samiee, Ahsan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Microscale investigation of the corrosion performances of low-carbon and stainless steels in highly alkaline concretes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FILM FORMED ON DUPLEX STAINLESS STEEL IN HIGHLY ALKALINEouter-layer. On duplex stainless steel (UNS S32101), theto corrosion. Finally, duplex stainless steels contain both

Itty, Pierre-Adrien

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Fabrication procedure effects on fatigue resistance of rib -to-deck welded joints of steel orthotropic bridge decks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

details of orthotropic steel deck. Ē Proc. , Internationalnew approaches to fatigue evaluation of steel bridges. ĒInternational Journal of Steel Structures, KSSC, Vol. 6, No.

Sim, Hyoung-Bo

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Micromechanisms of ductile fracturing of DH-36 steel plates under impulsive loads and influence of polyurea reinforcing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of ductile fracturing of DH-36 steel plates under impulsiveductile fracturing of DH-36 steel plates subjected to blast-microstructure of the deformed steel samples also revealed

Amini, M. R.; Nemat-Nasser, S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Standard Test Method for Measurement of Hydrogen Embrittlement Threshold in Steel by the Incremental Step Loading Technique  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1.1 This test method establishes a procedure to measure the susceptibility of steel to a time-delayed failure such as that caused by hydrogen. It does so by measuring the threshold for the onset of subcritical crack growth using standard fracture mechanics specimens, irregular-shaped specimens such as notched round bars, or actual product such as fasteners (2) (threaded or unthreaded) springs or components as identified in SAE J78, J81, and J1237. 1.2 This test method is used to evaluate quantitatively: 1.2.1 The relative susceptibility of steels of different composition or a steel with different heat treatments; 1.2.2 The effect of residual hydrogen in the steel as a result of processing, such as melting, thermal mechanical working, surface treatments, coatings, and electroplating; 1.2.3 The effect of hydrogen introduced into the steel caused by external environmental sources of hydrogen, such as fluids and cleaners maintenance chemicals, petrochemical products, and galvanic coupling in an aqueous enviro...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Overview (FUPWG) (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fact sheet overview of the Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG), including group objectives, activities, and services.

Not Available

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes steel works" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Nuclear plant irradiated steel handbook  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This reference handbook presents selected information extracted from the EPRI reactor surveillance program database, which contains the results from surveillance program reports on 57 plants and 116 capsules. Tabulated data includes radiation induced temperature shifts, capsule irradiation conditions and statistical features of the Charpy V-notch curves. General information on the surveillance materials is provided and the Charpy V-notch energy results are presented graphically.

Oldfield, W.; Oldfield, F.M.; Lombrozo, P.M.; McConnell, P.

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

JOURNAL OF STRUCTURAL ENGINEERING / OCTOBER 2000 / 1113 SEISMIC RESPONSE OF EXTERIOR RC COLUMN-TO-STEEL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

JOURNAL OF STRUCTURAL ENGINEERING / OCTOBER 2000 / 1113 SEISMIC RESPONSE OF EXTERIOR RC COLUMN-TO-STEEL: The inelastic cyclic response of hybrid connections consisting of RC columns and steel beams (RCS) is studied of the steel beams, steel band plates or cover plates surrounding the joint region, steel fiber concrete

Parra-Montesinos, Gustavo J.

383

Interview: LaborWorks@NeighborWorks Provides Vermont Contractors...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Interview: LaborWorks@NeighborWorks Provides Vermont Contractors With Help When They Need It Interview: LaborWorks@NeighborWorks Provides Vermont Contractors With Help When They...

384

Residuals in steel products -- Impacts on properties and measures to minimize them  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of major residual elements on the properties of steel products is summarized. Measures to minimize these elements are discussed including the pretreatment of raw materials, innovative refining processes and environmental issues. This paper addresses (1) scrap situation, (2) upper limit of residual concentrations acceptable for processing and product quality, (3) possible means to reduce the residuals, and (4) consideration on the practicable measures to solve the residuals problem in a systematic way. 52 refs.

Emi, Toshihiko [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Inst. for Advanced Materials Processing; Wijk, O. [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Process Metallurgy

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

385

Steel Creek fish: L-Lake/Steel Creek Biological Monitoring Program, January 1986--December 1987  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fish samples were collected from Steel Creek during 1986 and 1987 following the impoundment of the headwaters of the stream to form L-Lake, a cooling reservoir for L-Reactor which began operating late in 1985. Electrofishing and ichthyoplankton sample stations were located throughout the creek. Fykenetting sample stations were located in the creek mouth and just above the Steel Creek swamp. Larval fish and fish eggs were collected with 0.5 m plankton nets. Multivariate analysis of the electrofishing data suggested that the fish assemblages in Steel Creek exhibited structural differences associated with proximity to L-Lake, and habitat gradients of current velocity, depth, and canopy cover. The Steel Creek corridor, a lotic reach beginning at the base of the L-Lake embankment was dominated by stream species and bluegill. The delta/swamp, formed where Steel Creek enters the Savannah River floodplain, was dominated by fishes characteristic of slow flowing waters and heavily vegetated habitats. The large channel draining the swamp supported many of the species found in the swamp plus riverine and anadromous forms.

Paller, M.H.; Heuer, J.H.; Kissick, L.A.

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Steel Creek fish, L-Lake/Steel Creek Biological Monitoring Program, January 1986--December 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site (SRS) encompasses 300 sq mi of the Atlantic Coastal plain in west-central South Carolina. The Savannah River forms the western boundary of the site. Five major tributaries of the Savannah River -- Upper Three Runs Creek, Four Mile Creek, Pen Branch, Steel Creek, and Lower Three Runs Creek -- drain the site. All but Upper Three Runs Creek receive, or in the past received, thermal effluents from nuclear production reactors. In 1985, L Lake, a 400-hectare cooling reservoir, was built on the upper reaches of Steel Creek to receive effluent from the restart of L-Reactor, and protect the lower reaches from thermal impacts. The lake has an average width of approximately 600 m and extends along the Steel Creek valley approximately 7000 m from the dam to the headwaters. Water level is maintained at a normal pool elevation of 58 m above mean sea level by overflow into a vertical intake tower that has multilevel discharge gates. The intake tower is connected to a horizontal conduit that passes through the dam and releases water into Steel Creek. The Steel Creek Biological Monitoring Program was designed to meet environmental regulatory requirements associated with the restart of L-Reactor and complements the Biological Monitoring Program for L Lake. This extensive program was implemented to address portions of Section 316(a) of the Clean Water Act. The Department of Energy (DOE) must demonstrate that the operation of L-Reactor will not significantly alter the established aquatic ecosystems.

Sayers, R.E. Jr.; Mealing, H.G. III [Normandeau Associates, Inc., New Ellenton, SC (United States)

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Microstructure/property relationships in dissimilar welds between duplex stainless steels and carbon steels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The metallurgical characteristics, toughness and corrosion resistance of dissimilar welds between duplex stainless steel Alloy 2205 and carbon steel A36 have been evaluated. Both duplex stainless steel ER2209 and Ni-based Alloy 625 filler metals were used to join this combination using a multipass, gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process. Defect-free welds were made with each filler metal. The toughness of both the 625 and 2209 deposits were acceptable, regardless of heat input. A narrow martensitic region with high hardness was observed along the A36/2209 fusion boundary. A similar region was not observed in welds made with the 625 filler metal. The corrosion resistance of the welds made with 2209 filler metal improved with increasing heat input, probably due to higher levels of austenite and reduced chromium nitride precipitation. Welds made with 625 exhibited severe attack in the root pass, while the bulk of the weld was resistant. This investigation has shown that both filler metals can be used to joint carbon steel to duplex stainless steels, but that special precautions may be necessary in corrosive environments.

Barnhouse, E.J. [Weirton Steel Corp., WV (United States); Lippold, J.C. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

PUREX facility preclosure work plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This preclosure work plan presents a description of the PUREX Facility, the history of the waste managed, and addresses transition phase activities that position the PUREX Facility into a safe and environmentally secure configuration. For purposes of this documentation, the PUREX Facility does not include the PUREX Storage Tunnels (DOE/RL-90/24). Information concerning solid waste management units is discussed in the Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application, General Information Portion (DOE/RL-91-28, Appendix 2D).

Engelmann, R.H.

1997-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

389

Optimization of ferrous burden high temperature properties to meet blast furnace requirements in British Steel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The high temperature properties of ferrous burden materials have long been an important consideration in the operation of British Steel blast furnaces. Previous research presented at this conference has shown that the behavior of materials in the lower stack and bosh can have a significant effect on furnace permeability and stability of operation. However, with increasing levels of hydrocarbon injection via the tuyeres, the reduction conditions inside British Steel blast furnaces have significantly altered over recent years. This paper focuses on the further work that has been undertaken to study the effect on ferrous burden high temperatures properties of the widely differing reduction regimes which can be experienced in today`s blast furnaces. The implications of the findings, and how they have been used in optimizing blast furnace operation and burden quality, are discussed.

Bergstrand, R.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

390

Using electroless nickel to coat reinforcing steel in chloride contaminated concrete  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work is a study of the behavior of steel rebar coated by electroless nickel in chloride-contaminated concrete. The steel rebars were coated in an electroless nickel bath for 1, 2 and 3 hours. They were then subjected to heat treatment at 400 C for periods of 1, 2 and 3 hours. The nickel-coated rebars were embedded in concrete samples with NaCl concentrations at 0.00; 0.10; 0.15 and 0.20 %, based on concrete weight. Their behavior was evaluated by measurement of potentials, polarization resistance, potentiodynamic polarization curves, electrical resistance and visual inspection. Corrosion rates were less than 0.01 {micro}A/cm{sup 2} after 40 months` testing.

Sanchez, M.A.; Parra, L.A.; Perez, O.A.; Rincon, O. de [Univ. del Zulia, Maracaibo (Venezuela)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

391

Superfluid helium testing of a stainless steel to titanium piping transition joint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Stainless steel-to-titanium bimetallic transitions have been fabricated with an explosively bonded joint. This novel joining technique was conducted by the Russian Federal Nuclear Center, working under contract for the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research. These bimetallic transitions are being considered for use in future superconducting radio-frequency cavity cryomodule assemblies. This application requires cryogenic testing to demonstrate that this transition joint remains leak-tight when sealing superfluid helium. To simulate a titanium cavity vessel connection to a stainless steel service pipe, bimetallic transition joints were paired together to fabricate piping assemblies. These piping assemblies were then tested in superfluid helium conditions at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory test facilities. The transition joint test program will be described. Fabrication experience and test results will be presented.

Soyars, W.; /Fermilab; Basti, A.; Bedeschi, F.; /INFN, Pisa; Budagov, J.; /Dubna, JINR; Foley, M.; Harms, E.; Klebaner, A.; Nagaitsev, S.; /Fermilab; Sabirov, B.; Dubna, JINR

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Effect of Fluid Flow on Inclusion Coarsening in Low-Alloy Steel Welds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oxide inclusions form in welds because of deoxidation reactions in the weld pool. These inclusions control the weld microstructure development. Thermodynamic and kinetic calculation of oxidation reaction can describe inclusion characteristics such as number density, size, and composition. Experimental work has shown that fluid-flow velocity gradients in the weld pool can accelerate inclusion growth by collision and coalescence. Moreover, fluid flow in welds can transport inclusions to different temperature regions that may lead to repeated dissolution and growth of inclusions. These phenomena are being studied with the help of computational coupled heat transfer, fluid-flow, thermodynamic, and kinetic models. The results show that the inclusion formation in steel welds can be described as a function of the welding processes, process parameters, and steel composition.

Babu, S.S.; David, S.A.; DebRoy, T.; Hong, T.

1998-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

393

Internal friction study of decomposition kinetics of SAF 2507 type duplex stainless steel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the last decade, super duplex stainless steels (DSSs) with increased nitrogen content have been an object of intensive studies. Present work is devoted to the study of the peculiarities of {delta}-ferrite decomposition in SAF 2507 type duplex steel, and redistribution of nitrogen between ferrite and austenite phases in a wide temperature range by means of internal fraction (IF). Unlike local methods of electron microscopy or engineering methods of hardness or impact toughness testing, which give basically information on the formation of brittle intermetallic phases, the internal friction technique allows to study the state of solid solution and kinetics of changes in the relative amounts of ferrite and austenite phases during thermal treatment.

Smuk, O.; Smuk, S.; Hanninen, H. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology (Finland). Lab. of Engineering Materials] [Helsinki Univ. of Technology (Finland). Lab. of Engineering Materials; Jagodzinski, Yu.; Tarasenko, O. [National Academy of Sciences, Kiev (Ukraine). Inst. for Metal Physics] [National Academy of Sciences, Kiev (Ukraine). Inst. for Metal Physics

1999-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

394

Superfluid helium testing of a stainless steel to titanium piping transition joint  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stainless steel-to-titanium bimetallic transitions have been fabricated with an explosively bonded joint. This novel joining technique was conducted by the Russian Federal Nuclear Center, working under contract for the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research. These bimetallic transitions are being considered for use in future superconducting radio-frequency cavity cryomodule assemblies. This application requires cryogenic testing to demonstrate that this transition joint remains leak-tight when sealing superfluid helium. To simulate a titanium cavity vessel connection to a stainless steel service pipe, bimetallic transition joints were paired together to fabricate piping assemblies. These piping assemblies were then tested in superfluid helium conditions at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory test facilities. The transition joint test program will be described. Fabrication experience and test results will be presented.

Soyars, W; Bedeschi, F; Budagov, J; Foley, M; Harms, E; Klebaner, A; Nagaitsev, S; Sabirov, B; 10.1063/1.3422408

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Innovative residential floor construction: Structural evaluation of steel joists with pre-formed web openings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since 1992, the US Department of Housing and Urban Development has sponsored numerous studies to identify, evaluate, and implement innovative structural materials, such as cold-formed steel (CFS), in the residential market. The use of CFS is still very limited, partly because steel is not being effectively integrated into conventional home construction. One of the major barriers to the use of CFS floor joists is the impact it has on placement of large waste drains and ductwork installed in floor systems. This report provides an overview of tests conducted by the NAHB to integrate these systems with CFS. A brief literature review of relevant work followed by a detailed overview of the experimental and analytical approach are also provided. The report recommends adoption of the research findings in residential and commercial applications.

Elhajj, N.R.

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Optical panel system including stackable waveguides  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An optical panel system including stackable waveguides is provided. The optical panel system displays a projected light image and comprises a plurality of planar optical waveguides in a stacked state. The optical panel system further comprises a support system that aligns and supports the waveguides in the stacked state. In one embodiment, the support system comprises at least one rod, wherein each waveguide contains at least one hole, and wherein each rod is positioned through a corresponding hole in each waveguide. In another embodiment, the support system comprises at least two opposing edge structures having the waveguides positioned therebetween, wherein each opposing edge structure contains a mating surface, wherein opposite edges of each waveguide contain mating surfaces which are complementary to the mating surfaces of the opposing edge structures, and wherein each mating surface of the opposing edge structures engages a corresponding complementary mating surface of the opposite edges of each waveguide.

DeSanto, Leonard (Dunkirk, MD); Veligdan, James T. (Manorville, NY)

2007-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

397

Thermovoltaic semiconductor device including a plasma filter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A thermovoltaic energy conversion device and related method for converting thermal energy into an electrical potential. An interference filter is provided on a semiconductor thermovoltaic cell to pre-filter black body radiation. The semiconductor thermovoltaic cell includes a P/N junction supported on a substrate which converts incident thermal energy below the semiconductor junction band gap into electrical potential. The semiconductor substrate is doped to provide a plasma filter which reflects back energy having a wavelength which is above the band gap and which is ineffectively filtered by the interference filter, through the P/N junction to the source of radiation thereby avoiding parasitic absorption of the unusable portion of the thermal radiation energy.

Baldasaro, Paul F. (Clifton Park, NY)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Critical point anomalies include expansion shock waves  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

From first-principle fluid dynamics, complemented by a rigorous state equation accounting for critical anomalies, we discovered that expansion shock waves may occur in the vicinity of the liquid-vapor critical point in the two-phase region. Due to universality of near-critical thermodynamics, the result is valid for any common pure fluid in which molecular interactions are only short-range, namely, for so-called 3-dimensional Ising-like systems, and under the assumption of thermodynamic equilibrium. In addition to rarefaction shock waves, diverse non-classical effects are admissible, including composite compressive shock-fan-shock waves, due to the change of sign of the fundamental derivative of gasdynamics.

Nannan, N. R., E-mail: ryan.nannan@uvs.edu [Mechanical Engineering Discipline, Anton de Kom University of Suriname, Leysweg 86, PO Box 9212, Paramaribo, Suriname and Process and Energy Department, Delft University of Technology, Leeghwaterstraat 44, 2628 CA Delft (Netherlands); Guardone, A., E-mail: alberto.guardone@polimi.it [Department of Aerospace Science and Technology, Politecnico di Milano, Via La Masa 34, 20156 Milano (Italy); Colonna, P., E-mail: p.colonna@tudelft.nl [Propulsion and Power, Delft University of Technology, Kluyverweg 1, 2629 HS Delft (Netherlands)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

399

Optical panel system including stackable waveguides  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An optical panel system including stackable waveguides is provided. The optical panel system displays a projected light image and comprises a plurality of planar optical waveguides in a stacked state. The optical panel system further comprises a support system that aligns and supports the waveguides in the stacked state. In one embodiment, the support system comprises at least one rod, wherein each waveguide contains at least one hole, and wherein each rod is positioned through a corresponding hole in each waveguide. In another embodiment, the support system comprises at least two opposing edge structures having the waveguides positioned therebetween, wherein each opposing edge structure contains a mating surface, wherein opposite edges of each waveguide contain mating surfaces which are complementary to the mating surfaces of the opposing edge structures, and wherein each mating surface of the opposing edge structures engages a corresponding complementary mating surface of the opposite edges of each waveguide.

DeSanto, Leonard; Veligdan, James T.

2007-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

400

Development of Bottom-up Representation of Industrial Energy Efficiency Technologies in Integrated Assessment Models for the Iron and Steel Sector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Adoption of efficient end-use technologies is one of the key measures for reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. With the working of energy programs and policies on carbon regulation, how to effectively analyze and manage the costs associated with GHG reductions become extremely important for the industry and policy makers around the world. Energy-climate (EC) models are often used for analyzing the costs of reducing GHG emissions (e.g., carbon emission) for various emission-reduction measures, because an accurate estimation of these costs is critical for identifying and choosing optimal emission reduction measures, and for developing related policy options to accelerate market adoption and technology implementation. However, accuracies of assessing of GHG-emission reduction costs by taking into account the adoption of energy efficiency technologies will depend on how well these end-use technologies are represented in integrated assessment models (IAM) and other energy-climate models. In this report, we first conduct brief overview on different representations of end-use technologies (mitigation measures) in various energy-climate models, followed by problem statements, and a description of the basic concepts of quantifying the cost of conserved energy including integrating non-regrets options. A non-regrets option is defined as a GHG reduction option that is cost effective, without considering their additional benefits related to reducing GHG emissions. Based upon these, we develop information on costs of mitigation measures and technological change. These serve as the basis for collating the data on energy savings and costs for their future use in integrated assessment models. In addition to descriptions of the iron and steel making processes, and the mitigation measures identified in this study, the report includes tabulated databases on costs of measure implementation, energy savings, carbon-emission reduction, and lifetimes. The cost curve data on mitigation measures are available over time, which allows an estimation of technological change over a decade-long historical period. In particular, the report will describe new treatment of technological change in energy-climate modeling for this industry sector, i.e., assessing the changes in costs and energy-savings potentials via comparing 1994 and 2002 conservation supply curves. In this study, we compared the same set of mitigation measures for both 1994 and 2002 -- no additional mitigation measure for year 2002 was included due to unavailability of such data. Therefore, the estimated potentials in total energy savings and carbon reduction would most likely be more conservative for year 2002 in this study. Based upon the cost curves, the rate of change in the savings potential at a given cost can be evaluated and be used to estimate future rates of change that can be the input for energy-climate models. Through characterizing energy-efficiency technology costs and improvement potentials, we have developed and presented energy cost curves for energy efficiency measures applicable to the U.S. iron and steel industry for the years 1994 and 2002. The cost curves can change significantly under various scenarios: the baseline year, discount rate, energy intensity, production, industry structure (e.g., integrated versus secondary steel making and number of plants), efficiency (or mitigation) measures, share of iron and steel production to which the individual measures can be applied, and inclusion of other non-energy benefits. Inclusion of other non-energy benefits from implementing mitigation measures can reduce the costs of conserved energy significantly. In addition, costs of conserved energy (CCE) for individual mitigation measures increase with the increases in discount rates, resulting in a general increase in total cost of mitigation measures for implementation and operation with a higher discount rate. In 1994, integrated steel mills in the U.S. produced 55.

Xu, T.T.; Sathaye, J.; Galitsky, C.

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes steel works" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Broadening Industry Governance to Include Nonproliferation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As industry is the first line of defense in detecting and thwarting illicit trade networks, the engagement of the private sector is critical to any government effort to strengthen existing mechanisms to protect goods and services throughout the supply chain. This study builds on previous PNNL work to continue to evaluate means for greater industry engagement to complement and strengthen existing governmental efforts to detect and stem the trade of illicit goods and to protect and secure goods that could be used in making a weapon of mass destruction. Specifically, the study evaluates the concept of Industry Self Regulation, defined as a systematic voluntary program undertaken by an industry or by individual companies to anticipate, implement, supplement, or substitute for regulatory requirements in a given field, generally through the adoption of best practices. Through a series of interviews with companies with a past history of non-compliance, trade associations and NGOs, the authors identify gaps in the existing regulatory infrastructure, drivers for a self regulation approach and the form such an approach might take, as well as obstacles to be overcome. The authors conclude that it is at the intersection of industry, government, and security thatóthrough collaborative meansóthe effectiveness of the international nonproliferation systemócan be most effectively strengthened to the mutual benefit of both government and the private sector. Industry has a critical stake in the success of this regime, and has the potential to act as an integrating force that brings together the existing mechanisms of the global nonproliferation regime: export controls, physical protection, and safeguards. The authors conclude that industry compliance is not enough; rather, nonproliferation must become a central tenant of a companyís corporate culture and be viewed as an integral component of corporate social responsibility (CSR).

Hund, Gretchen; Seward, Amy M.

2008-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

402

Integrating Steel Production with Mineral Carbon Sequestration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of the project were (i) to develop a combination iron oxide production and carbon sequestration plant that will use serpentine ores as the source of iron and the extraction tailings as the storage element for CO2 disposal, (ii) the identification of locations within the US where this process may be implemented and (iii) to create a standardized process to characterize the serpentine deposits in terms of carbon disposal capacity and iron and steel production capacity. The first objective was not accomplished. The research failed to identify a technique to accelerate direct aqueous mineral carbonation, the limiting step in the integration of steel production and carbon sequestration. Objective (ii) was accomplished. It was found that the sequestration potential of the ultramafic resource surfaces in the US and Puerto Rico is approximately 4,647 Gt of CO2 or over 500 years of current US production of CO2. Lastly, a computer model was developed to investigate the impact of various system parameters (recoveries and efficiencies and capacities of different system components) and serpentinite quality as well as incorporation of CO2 from sources outside the steel industry.

Klaus Lackner; Paul Doby; Tuncel Yegulalp; Samuel Krevor; Christopher Graves

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

EAF steel producers and the K061 dilemma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The scrap based steel producers in the United States generate an estimated 650,000 tons of electric arc furnace (EAF) dust annually which is classified as hazardous waste, K061. These scrap based producers commonly referred to as mini-mills represented 39% of the steel produced in 1994. Based upon the EAF plants being installed or planned today, it is a reasonable projection to anticipate 50% of the steel produced in the United States will be by EAF`S. Using a straight line projection of percent of steel produced to tonnage of EAF dust generated, this will result in 833,000 tons of dust being generated upon the completion of these new EAF producing plants, presumably by the year 2000. Because the United States is a capitalistic economy, a steel producer is in business to make a profit therefore dust management becomes a very important variable in the cost of making steel.

Prichard, L.C.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

404

The performance of duplex stainless steels in chemical environments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The process industries have used 300 series stainless steels for many years where the corrosion resistance of carbon steel is inadequate. Where stainless steels have proved inadequate there has been a tendency to utilize high nickel alloys, with a greatly increased cost. The present paper reviews the different grades of duplex stainless steel and shows how their superior corrosion and stress corrosion cracking resistance, plus their high strength, can be utilized to provide cost effective alternatives to the high nickel alloys. The use of alternative design codes to take advantages of the properties of duplex alloys is discussed. Data is presented to show the resistance of duplex stainless steels to a variety of chemical environments. The use of duplex stainless steels and the reason for their selection in a number of applications is reviewed.

Francis, R. [Weir Materials Ltd., Manchester (United Kingdom). Park Works

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

405

Work Area Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

POLICY X.X.X. Volume V, Information Technology. Chapter 6, Acceptable Safety Work Locations. Issuing Office: Department of Mathematics. Responsible†...

2005-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

406

INL @ work: Archaeologist  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

INL @ work features jobs performed at the lab. For more information about INL careers, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

Lowrey, Dino

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

407

INL @ work: Archaeologist  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

INL @ work features jobs performed at the lab. For more information about INL careers, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

Lowrey, Dino

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Models of Procyon A including seismic constraints  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Detailed models of Procyon A based on new asteroseismic measurements by Eggenberger et al (2004) have been computed using the Geneva evolution code including shellular rotation and atomic diffusion. By combining all non-asteroseismic observables now available for Procyon A with these seismological data, we find that the observed mean large spacing of 55.5 +- 0.5 uHz favours a mass of 1.497 M_sol for Procyon A. We also determine the following global parameters of Procyon A: an age of t=1.72 +- 0.30 Gyr, an initial helium mass fraction Y_i=0.290 +- 0.010, a nearly solar initial metallicity (Z/X)_i=0.0234 +- 0.0015 and a mixing-length parameter alpha=1.75 +- 0.40. Moreover, we show that the effects of rotation on the inner structure of the star may be revealed by asteroseismic observations if frequencies can be determined with a high precision. Existing seismological data of Procyon A are unfortunately not accurate enough to really test these differences in the input physics of our models.

P. Eggenberger; F. Carrier; F. Bouchy

2005-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

409

Seepage Model for PA Including Dift Collapse  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document the predictions and analysis performed using the Seepage Model for Performance Assessment (PA) and the Disturbed Drift Seepage Submodel for both the Topopah Spring middle nonlithophysal and lower lithophysal lithostratigraphic units at Yucca Mountain. These results will be used by PA to develop the probability distribution of water seepage into waste-emplacement drifts at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as part of the evaluation of the long term performance of the potential repository. This AMR is in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Flow and Transport Process Model Report'' (CRWMS M&O 2000 [153447]). This purpose is accomplished by performing numerical simulations with stochastic representations of hydrological properties, using the Seepage Model for PA, and evaluating the effects of an alternative drift geometry representing a partially collapsed drift using the Disturbed Drift Seepage Submodel. Seepage of water into waste-emplacement drifts is considered one of the principal factors having the greatest impact of long-term safety of the repository system (CRWMS M&O 2000 [153225], Table 4-1). This AMR supports the analysis and simulation that are used by PA to develop the probability distribution of water seepage into drift, and is therefore a model of primary (Level 1) importance (AP-3.15Q, ''Managing Technical Product Inputs''). The intended purpose of the Seepage Model for PA is to support: (1) PA; (2) Abstraction of Drift-Scale Seepage; and (3) Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Flow and Transport Process Model Report (PMR). Seepage into drifts is evaluated by applying numerical models with stochastic representations of hydrological properties and performing flow simulations with multiple realizations of the permeability field around the drift. The Seepage Model for PA uses the distribution of permeabilities derived from air injection testing in niches and in the cross drift to stochastically simulate the 3D flow of water in the fractured host rock (in the vicinity of potential emplacement drifts) under ambient conditions. The Disturbed Drift Seepage Submodel evaluates the impact of the partial collapse of a drift on seepage. Drainage in rock below the emplacement drift is also evaluated.

G. Li; C. Tsang

2000-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

410

Safety analysis report for packaging (onsite) steel drum  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) provides the analyses and evaluations necessary to demonstrate that the steel drum packaging system meets the transportation safety requirements of HNF-PRO-154, Responsibilities and Procedures for all Hazardous Material Shipments, for an onsite packaging containing Type B quantities of solid and liquid radioactive materials. The basic component of the steel drum packaging system is the 208 L (55-gal) steel drum.

McCormick, W.A.

1998-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

411

Characterization of thermal aging of duplex stainless steel by SQUID  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermal aging is a growing concern for long-term-aged duplex stainless steel piping in nuclear power plants. Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) was used for the detection of thermal aging of SUS329 rolled duplex stainless steel and SCS16 cast duplex stainless steel. It was found that the SQUID output signal pattern in the presence of AC magnetic field applied to the specimen was sensitive to the changes in electromagnetic properties due to thermal aging.

Isobe, Y.; Kamimura, A.; Aoki, K.; Nakayasu, F. [Nuclear Fuel Industries, Ltd., Osaka (Japan)

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

a537 carbon steel: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

T300: C strength 4340 steel, carbon-carbon composite, and Carbon-Silicon Carbide composite were tested to examine materials. MATERIALS AND DESIRED DATA Carbon-Carbon...

413

Friction Stir Spot Welding of Advanced High Strength Steels II...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

II Friction Stir Spot Welding of Advanced High Strength Steels II 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation...

414

activation martensitic steels: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

modeling and experimental study of brittle fracture in tempered martensitic steels for thermonuclear fusion applications. Open Access Theses and Dissertations Summary: ??In this...

415

activation martensitic steel: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

modeling and experimental study of brittle fracture in tempered martensitic steels for thermonuclear fusion applications. Open Access Theses and Dissertations Summary: ??In this...

416

ITP Steel: Hydrogen and Nitrogen Control in Ladle and Casting...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Hydrogen and Nitrogen Control in Ladle and Casting Operations ITP Steel: Hydrogen and Nitrogen Control in Ladle and Casting Operations castingops.pdf More Documents & Publications...

417

automotive sheet steels: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and 90, elongated Paris-Sud XI, Universit de 88 Spot weldability of TRIP assisted steels with high carbon and aluminium contents Materials Science Websites Summary:...

418

alloy coated steels: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

y-dend rites. (Note: primary y Cambridge, University of 2 Estimation of Atmospheric Corrosion of High-Strength, Low-Alloy Steels Engineering Websites Summary: Estimation of...

419

alloy coated steel: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

y-dend rites. (Note: primary y Cambridge, University of 2 Estimation of Atmospheric Corrosion of High-Strength, Low-Alloy Steels Engineering Websites Summary: Estimation of...

420

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Sutton Steele and Steele Co - TX 09  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou areDowntown Site - MO 02Sutton Steele and Steele Co

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes steel works" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

A MOSSBAUER STUDY OF AUSTENITE STABILITY AND IMPACT FRACTURE IN Fe - 6 Ni STEEL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IMPACT FRACTURE IN Fe-6Ni STEEL Brent Thomas Fultz Materialscommercial cryogenic alloy steel was studied with regard toThe Experiments Fe-6Ni-lMn steel plate was received from the

Fultz, Brent

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Optimal inspection scheduling with alternative fatigue reliability formulations for steel bridges  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optimal inspection scheduling with alternative fatigue reliability formulations for steel bridges H, USA Keywords: steel bridges, structural reliability, fatigue, optimal inspection, fracture, plate girder, box girder ABSTRACT: A reliability-based method for inspection scheduling of steel bridges

Manuel, Lance

423

People of Steel: The Support of a Town during the Homestead Strike  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the riot between the steel strikers and the Pinkertons afterNovember 19, 1892. People of Steel 126 The position you1892, between the Carnegie Steel Company, Limited, and the

Partida, Jason

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Identification, Model Updating, and Response Prediction of an Instrumented 15-Story Steel-Frame Building  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A. , 1998. Ductile Design of Steel Structure, McGraw Hill,monitoring of the steel-frame UCLA Factor Building,an Instrumented 15-Story Steel-Frame Building Derek Skolnik,

Skolnik, Derek; Lei, Ying; Yu, Eunjong; Wallace, J W

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

THE EFFECT OF SILICON ON THE ENVIRONMENTAL CRACKING BEHAVIOR OF A HIGH STRENGTH STEEL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Low-Alloy, High-Strength Steel, Advanced Research ProjectsTests of High Strength Steels, BISRA Report September 1971.Cracking in High Strength Steels and in Titanium and

Cedeno, M.H.C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

WELDABILITY OF GRAIN-REFINED Fe-12Ni-0.25Ti STEEL FOR CRYOGENIC APPLICATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Cryogenic Nickel Steels, WRC Bull, 205, May, 1975.REFINED Fe-12Ni-0.25Ti STEEL FOR CRYOGENIC APPLICATIONS D.E.REFINED Fe-12Ni-0.25Ti STEEL FOR CRYOGENIC APPLICATIONS D.

Morris Jr., J.W.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Effect of polyurea on dynamic response and fracture resistance of steel plates under impulsive loads  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the dynamic response of steel plates, 2006 SEM AnnualPenetration protection of steel plates with polyurea layer,the post-failure motion of steel plates subjected to blast

Amini, Mahmoud Reza

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Propagating Waves Recorded in the Steel, Moment-Frame Factor Building During Earthquakes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

studies of damage to tall steel moment-frame buildings inan instrumented 15-story steel- frame building, EarthquakePropagating Waves in the Steel, Moment-Frame Factor Building

Kohler, Monica; Heaton, Thomas H.; Samuel C. Bradford

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

DESIGN OF DUAL PHASE Fe/Mn/C STEEL FOR LOW TEMPERATURE APPLICATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Properties of Dual- Phase Steels, R. A. Kot and J. \\4.Properties of Dual Phase Steels, R. A. Kot and J. W. ~lorrisand Hardenability in Steels, Symp. ASt~. ~. Garvey, Trans.

Kim, Nack-Joon

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

MICROSTRUCTURE AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF AISI 4340 STEEL MODIFIED WITH ALUMINUM AND SILICON  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1968), G, Thomas. Iron and Steel Int, 46. 451 (1973), G,Containing High-Strength Steels, Cobalt Monograph Series, A.Strength Structural j Steels," ASTM Spec, Tech, PubL 498,

Bhat, M.S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

E-Print Network 3.0 - austenitic cast steels Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

diagrams for the two steels received from POSCO Summary: heat treatment, such that the steel can never become fully austenitic at any temperature. The steel... into a mixture of...

432

A Comparison of Iron and Steel Production Energy Intensity in China and the U.S  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

pdf Association for Iron and Steel Technology (AIST). 2010a.American BOF Roundup. Iron & Steel Technology. November.for Iron and Steel Technology (AIST). 2010b. 2010 EAF

Price, Lynn

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

DESIGN OF DUAL PHASE Fe/Mn/C STEEL FOR LOW TEMPERATURE APPLICATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Properties of Dual- Phase Steels, R. A. Kot and J. \\4.and Properties of Dual Phase Steels, R. A. Kot and J. W. ~Formable HSLA and Dual- Phase Steels, A. T. Davenport, ed. ,

Kim, Nack-Joon

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

MICROSTRUCTURE AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF 0.1C STEEL WITH Nb  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Properties of Dual-Phase Steels, R. A. Kot and J. W.and Prooerties of Dual-Phase Steels, R. A. Kot and J. W.Prooerties of Vanadium Dual Phase Steel and Cold Pressing

Gau, Jing-Sheng

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

CARBON ATOM DISTRIBUTION IN A DUAL PHASE STEEL: AN ATOM PROBE STUDY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ATOM DISTRIBUTION IN A DUAL PHASE STEEL: AN ATOM PROBE STUDY~4720 1 U.S.A. IntroductioE. Dual Phase steels are currentlymartensite-austenite dual phase steel, although the results

Barnard, S.J.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Work Authorization System  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

It establishes a work authorization and control process for work performed by designated management and operating (M&O), management and integrating (M&I), environmental restoration management contracts (ERMC) and other contracts determined by the Procurement Executive (hereafter referred to as M&O contractors). Cancels DOE O 5700.7C. Canceled by DOE O 412.1A.

1999-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

437

Work Authorization System  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To establish a work authorization and control process for work performed by designated site and facility management contractors, and other contractors as determined by the procurement executive, consistent with the budget execution and program evaluation requirements of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Planning, Programming, Budgeting, and Evaluation process. Cancels DOE O 412.1.

2005-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

438

Work Authorization System  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To establish a work authorization and control process for work performed by designated site and facility management contractors, and other contractors as determined by the procurement executive, consistent with the budget execution and program evaluation requirements of the Department of Energy's Planning, Programming, Budgeting, and Evaluation process. Admin Chg 1, dated 5-21-2014, cancels DOE O 412.1A.

2005-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

439

Control of SOx emission in tail gas of the Claus Plant at Kwangyang Steel Works  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pilot and/or laboratory studies were conducted in order to find methods for reducing the SOx emission in the Claus tail gas of the cokes unit. The TGT process which is based on the complete hydrogenation of the sulfur-containing compounds (SO{sub 2}, S) into H{sub 2}S and returning to the COG main line can reduce the SOx emission to zero. In case the return to the COG main is impossible, the SPOR process (Sulfur removal based on Partial Oxidation and Reduction) can be successfully applied to reduce the SOx emission.

Kang, H.S.; Park, J.W.; Hyun, H.D. [POSCO, Cheonnam (Korea, Republic of). Kwangyang Works; Lee, D.S. [RIST, Pohang (Korea, Republic of). Div. of Environmental Catalysis; Paik, S.C. [POSTECH, Pohang (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Chung, J.S. [RIST, Pohang (Korea, Republic of). Div. of Environmental Catalysis; [POSTECH, Pohang (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Probabilistic modeling of the corrosion of steel structures in marine water-development works  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Considering that corrosion takes place as a random process over time, a a probabilistic approach was utilized in this paper. The corrosion of metallic sheet piling employed in the fascia wall of a bulwerk is considered as an example. A stochastic model is constructed on the base of a modified Weibull distribution function with consideration of parameters of the corrosion process as a function of time. One of the factors defining the corrosion rate of the sheet piling is the degree of access of a section of the wall to the zone of variable water level, or the underwater zone. The type of corrosion-continuous or local-is another factor. The accuracy of corrosion prediction in the underwater zone is higher than that in the zone of variable water level.

Bekker, A. T.; Lyubimov, V. S.; Kovalenko, R. G.; Aleksandrov, A. V.

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes steel works" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Financial Policy and Procedures for Reimbursable Work  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The directive establishes Department-wide financial policy and procedural guidance applicable to performing reimbursable work for other Federal agencies and with non-Federal Government entities, including foreign and commercial entities, State, and political subdivisions.

1988-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

442

Editorial Resources in Work and Welfare†  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper collates information on the top English-language publishing outlets in the field of work and welfare, including peer-reviewed journals and book series with large academic publishers. It is intended as a bookshelf resource for scholars...

PUDIACwowe

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Stirling engine with air working fluid  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A Stirling engine capable of utilizing air as a working fluid which includes a compact heat exchange module which includes heating tube units, regenerator and cooler positioned about the combustion chamber. This arrangement has the purpose and effect of allowing the construction of an efficient, high-speed, high power-density engine without the use of difficult to seal light gases as working fluids.

Corey, John A. (North Troy, NY)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Stirling engine with air working fluid  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Stirling engine capable of utilizing air as a working fluid which includes a compact heat exchange module which includes heating tube units, regenerator and cooler positioned about the combustion chamber. This arrangement has the purpose and effect of allowing the construction of an efficient, high-speed, high power-density engine without the use of difficult to seal light gases as working fluids.

Corey, J. A.

1985-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

445

THE USE OF MICROSTRUCTURE CONTROL TO TOUGHEN FERRITIC STEELS FOR CRYOGENIC USE. II. Fe-Mn STEELS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

steels in current use at LNG temperatures and below containtemperature to below LNG temperature. The resulting alloysis suitable for use to below LNG temperature in the grain-

Hwang, S.K.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Assessment of Crack Detection in Heavy-Walled Cast Stainless Steel Piping Welds Using Advanced Low-Frequency Ultrasonic Methods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Studies conducted at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in Richland, Washington, have focused on assessing the effectiveness and reliability of novel approaches to nondestructive examination (NDE) for inspecting coarse-grained, cast stainless steel reactor components. The primary objective of this work is to provide information to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission on the effectiveness and reliability of advanced NDE methods as related to the inservice inspection of safety-related components in pressurized water reactors (PWRs). This report provides progress, recent developments, and results from an assessment of low frequency ultrasonic testing (UT) for detection of inside surface-breaking cracks in cast stainless steel reactor piping weldments as applied from the outside surface of the components. Vintage centrifugally cast stainless steel piping segments were examined to assess the capability of low-frequency UT to adequately penetrate challenging microstructures and determine acoustic propagation limitations or conditions that may interfere with reliable flaw detection. In addition, welded specimens containing mechanical and thermal fatigue cracks were examined. The specimens were fabricated using vintage centrifugally cast and statically cast stainless steel materials, which are typical of configurations installed in PWR primary coolant circuits. Ultrasonic studies on the vintage centrifugally cast stainless steel piping segments were conducted with a 400-kHz synthetic aperture focusing technique and phased array technology applied at 500 kHz, 750 kHz, and 1.0 MHz. Flaw detection and characterization on the welded specimens was performed with the phased array method operating at the frequencies stated above. This report documents the methodologies used and provides results from laboratory studies to assess baseline material noise, crack detection, and length-sizing capability for low-frequency UT in cast stainless steel piping.

Anderson, Michael T.; Crawford, Susan L.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Denslow, Kayte M.; Diaz, Aaron A.; Doctor, Steven R.

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced bar steels Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

El-Hacha Summary: environments. Keywords: Durability; prestressed concrete; beam; carbon fiber reinforced polymer bars; steel... prestressed with steel wires. The experimental...

448

E-Print Network 3.0 - a 285 steel Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Engineering 8 A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF THE WETTABILITY OF STEEL, CARBON, AND POLYETHYLENE FIBERS BY WATER Summary: A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF THE WETTABILITY OF STEEL, CARBON,...

449

Quantitative evaluation of general corrosion of Type 304 stainless steel in subcritical and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantitative evaluation of general corrosion of Type 304 stainless steel in subcritical the corrosion rate of Type 304 stainless steel (SS) in subcritical and supercritical environments. The EN

Benning, Liane G.

450

Work with Biological Materials  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered energy consumption byAbout PrintableBlenderWhatFellowsWood and4213WorkWork withWork

451

Spot welding of steel and aluminum using insert sheet  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Automobile industries have been increasingly interested in the use of aluminum and thus joining of steel and aluminum becomes of importance. The joining of the two types of metal raises a problem of brittle welds caused by the formation of intermetallic compounds. The authors solved the problem by using an insert sheet. This paper deals with the resistance spot welding of steel and aluminum sheets using insert sheets. The insert sheet used in the present development was a steel/aluminum clad sheet of the 0.8 mm thickness with 50% steel and 50% aluminum. The clad sheet was produced by warm rolling of steel and aluminum with a direct resistance heating process. Steel to be warm rolled was of EDDQ of the 0.4 mm thickness and aluminum was of JIS A1050 of 0.6 mm thickness. The mechanical properties of the insert clad sheets were in between those of the steel sheets and the aluminum sheets, while the clad sheets showed much better formability than the aluminum sheets. Resistance spot welding was conducted for 0.8 mm thick EDDQ steel sheets and 1.0 mm thick aluminum alloy (AL-5.5%Mg) sheets under the welding force of 1.96 kN, welding current ranging between 4.2 and 20.1 kA, and welding time from 0.5 to 10 cycles. The steel was spot welded to the steel side of the insert sheet while the aluminum was welded to the aluminum side. What the authors investigated were the applicable welding current range, nugget diameter, tensile shear strength, U-tension strength, and macro- and microstructures. In conclusion, steel sheets can be spot welded to aluminum sheets without difficulty by using clad sheets as insert materials while the strength level of the dissimilar metal spot welds is close to that of aluminum joints.

Oikawa, H.; Saito, T.; Yoshimura, T. [and others

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

452

Irradiation effects on base metal and welds of 9Cr-1Mo (EM10) martensitic steel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

9Cr martensitic steels are being developed for core components (wrapper tubes) of fast breeder reactors as well as for fusion reactor structures. Here, the effects of fast neutron irradiation on the mechanical behavior of base metal and welds of 9Cr-1Mo (EM10) martensitic steel have been studied. Two types of weldments have been produced by TIG and electron beam techniques. Half of samples have been post-weld heat treated to produce a stress-relieved structure. The irradiation has been conducted in the Phenix reactor to doses of 63--65 dpa in the temperature range 450--459 C. The characterization of the welds, before and after irradiation, includes metallographic observations, hardness measurements, tensile and Charpy tests. It is shown that the mechanical properties of the welds after irradiation are in general similar to the characteristics obtained on the base metal, which is little affected by neutron irradiation.

Alamo, A.; Seran, J.L.; Rabouille, O.; Brachet, J.C.; Maillard, A.; Touron, H.; Royer, J. [CEA Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

453

Ultrasonic inspection of austenitic stainless steel welds with artificially produced stress corrosion cracks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Austenitic stainless steel welds and nickel alloy welds, which are widely used in nuclear power plants, present major challenges for ultrasonic inspection due to the grain structure in the weld. Large grains in combination with the elastic anisotropy of the material lead to increased scattering and affect sound wave propagation in the weld. This results in a reduced signal-to-noise ratio, and complicates the interpretation of signals and the localization of defects. Mechanized ultrasonic inspection was applied to study austenitic stainless steel test blocks with different types of flaws, including inter-granular stress corrosion cracks (IGSCC). The results show that cracks located in the heat affected zone of the weld are easily detected when inspection from both sides of the weld is possible. In cases of limited accessibility, when ultrasonic inspection can be carried out only from one side of a weld, it may be difficult to distinguish between signals from scattering in the weld and signals from cracks.

Dugan, Sandra; Wagner, Sabine [Materials Testing Institute University of Stuttgart (MPA), Pfaffenwaldring 32, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

454

Using Phased Array Ultrasonic Testing in Lieu of Radiography for Acceptance of Carbon Steel Piping Welds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is conducting studies for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to assess the capability, effectiveness, and reliability of ultrasonic testing (UT) as a replacement method for radiographic testing (RT) for volumetric examination of nuclear power plant (NPP) components. This particular study focused on evaluating the use of UT on carbon steel plate welds. Welding fabrication flaws included a combination of planar and volumetric types, e.g., incomplete fusion, lack of penetration, cracks, porosity, and slag inclusions. The examinations were conducted using phased-array (PA) UT techniques applied primarily for detection and flaw type characterization. This paper will discuss the results of using UT in lieu of RT for detection and classification of fabrication flaws in carbon steel plate welds.

Moran, Traci L.; Anderson, Michael T.; Cinson, Anthony D.; Crawford, Susan L.; Nove, Carol A.

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Construction work process management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-related activities. The study addresses relationships between selected TQM concepts (TQM tools, training, process focus, and teamwork) and work process management, defined in terms of planning, control, and improvement. The investigation was performed in two...

Soares, Jorge Barbosa

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Clean Energy Works (Oregon)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Clean Energy Works began in 2009 as a pilot program run by the City of Portland. In 2010, the US department of Energy awarded $20 million to create a statewide nonprofit to expand the program...

457

How Fusion Energy Works  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Fusion energy is the energy source of the sun and all of the stars. As part of How Energy Works, we'll cover everything from fuel sources to plasma physics and beyond.

458

Energy Assessments under the Top 10,000 Program - A Case Study for a Steel Mill in China  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the largest energy-savings programs for the Chinese industrial sector was the Top-1,000 Program, which targeted the 1,000 largest industrial enterprises in China. This program was launched in 2006, implemented through 2010, and covered 33% of national energy usage. Because of the success of the Top-1000 initiative, the program has now been expanded to the Top-10,000 program in the 12th Five-Year Plan period (2011-2015). The Top-10,000 program covers roughly 15,000 industrial enterprises, or about two-thirds of China s total energy consumption. Implementing energy audit systems and conducting industrial energy efficiency assessments are key requirements of the Top-10,000 program. Previous research done by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) has shown that there is a significant potential for improvement in energy assessment practices and applications in China. Issues such as lack of long term policy mechanisms, insufficient motivation for industrial enterprises, limited technical scope of energy assessments, and lack of systematic standardization have been identified. Through the support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. State Department (with additional co-funding from the Energy Foundation China), LBNL, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the Institute for Sustainable Communities (ISC), and DOE Energy Experts worked collaboratively with Chinese local organizations and conducted a series of industrial energy efficiency assessment demonstrations in selected Chinese industrial plants. The project aimed to not only introduce standardized methodologies and tools for energy assessments, but also to bring the systems approach for energy system analysis to the Top 10,000 enterprises. Through the project, five energy system assessments were conducted, and more than 300 Chinese experts from local energy conservation centers, universities, research organizations, energy service companies, and plant engineers were trained. This paper begins by introducing China s national energy intensity and carbon intensity reduction targets. Then, this paper explains the development of Top 10,000 program, including program requirements, the method for target allocation, key supporting policies, as well as challenges in implementing the program. By focusing on a process heating energy system assessment conducted in a Chinese steel mill, this paper presents an example of an energy system assessment conducted on steel reheating furnaces, including overall energy efficiency levels, areas of heat loss, and the potential for energy savings. In addition, the paper provides energy-savings recommendations that were identified during the assessment, as well as potential energy and energy costs savings. To conclude, this paper presents key findings that could further improve the Top 10,000 program by implementing a systems approach for energy assessments.

Lu, Hongyou [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Price, Lynn [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Nimbalkar, Sachin U [ORNL; Thekdi, Arvind [E3M Inc; Degroot, Matthew [Institute for Sustainable Communitities; Shi, Jun [Shaanxi Province Energy Conservation and Supervision Center, China

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Fermilab: Science at Work  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Six days. Three frontiers. One amazing lab. From 2010 to 2012, a film crew followed a group of scientists at the Department of Energy's Fermilab and filmed them at work and at home. This 40-minute documentary shows the diversity of the people, research and work at Fermilab. Viewers catch a true behind-the-scenes look of the United States' premier particle physics laboratory while scientists explain why their research is important to them and the world.

Brendan Casey; Herman White; Craig Hogan; Denton Morris; Mary Convery; Bonnie Fleming; Deborah Harris; Dave Schmitz; Brenna Flaugher; Aron Soha

2013-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

460

Fermilab: Science at Work  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Six days. Three frontiers. One amazing lab. From 2010 to 2012, a film crew followed a group of scientists at the Department of Energy's Fermilab and filmed them at work and at home. This 40-minute documentary shows the diversity of the people, research and work at Fermilab. Viewers catch a true behind-the-scenes look of the United States' premier particle physics laboratory while scientists explain why their research is important to them and the world.

Brendan Casey; Herman White; Craig Hogan; Denton Morris; Mary Convery; Bonnie Fleming; Deborah Harris; Dave Schmitz; Brenna Flaugher; Aron Soha

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes steel works" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Fireside carburization of stainless steel furnace tubes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Most heavy Venezuelan crudes are recognized for having a high total acid number (TAN) that is usually associated with a high tendency to produce naphthenic acid corrosion. To resist this type of corrosion in vacuum heaters, 9Cr-1Mo steel and stainless steels containing molybdenum are usually recommended. In 1993 the original 5Cr-1/2Mo roof tubes of the furnace in a vacuum unit were replaced by stainless steel 316Ti to minimize tube replacement and increase heater reliability. Unexpectedly, some of the new tubes failed after only three years of service, and just one year after undergoing the last turnaround inspection. The damage occurred in the form of deep holes and perforations, starting from the outside tube surface on the fireside. Coke build-up occurred due to severe operating conditions, overheating the tubes on the fireside, above 675 C (1250 F). Metallographic and Scanning Electron Microscopic (SEM) examination revealed internal and external carburization of the material due to the presence of coke and combustion ashes, respectively. The increase in the skin metal temperature facilitated the diffusion of carbon from these carbon-rich deposits into the low carbon content material (0.023 O/O).Depletion of chromium at the grain boundaries due to the massive formation of chromium carbides, resulted in a severe intergranular corrosion attack by molten salts rich in vanadium and sulfur due to asphalt burning. Normal operating practice demands the use of steam for the heater tubes to control coke build-up. This practice had been first reduced and then eliminated, during the past two years prior to the failure, because of economic incentives. This paper describes the root cause analysis conducted to account for these premature tube failures.

Mirabal, E.; Molina, C. [PDVSA-Refineria Isla, Curayao (Netherlands); Mayorga, A.; Hau, J.L. [PDVSA-Intevep, Caracas (Venezuela)

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Final Report, Volume 3, Guidance Document for the Evaluation of Cast Super Duplex Stainless Steel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volume 3 is comprised of the Development of Qualification Standards for Cast Super Duplex Stainless Steel (A890-5A) which is equivalent to wrought 2507. The objective of this work was to determine the suitability of ASTM A923 √?¬?√?¬Ę√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?Standard Test methods for Detecting Detrimental Intermetallic Phase in Duplex Austenitic-Ferritic Stainless Steels√?¬?√?¬Ę√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬Ě for 25 Cr Cast Super Duplex Stainless Steels (ASTM A890-5A). The various tests which were carried out were ASTM A923 Test Method A, B and C (Sodium Hydroxide Etch Test, Charpy Impact Test and Ferric Chloride Corrosion Test), ferrite measurement using Feritscope√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬ģ, ASTM E562 Manual Point Count Method and X-Ray Diffraction, hardness measurement using Rockwell B and C and microstructural analysis using SEM and EDS.

Hariharan, Vasudevan; Lundin, Carl, W.

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

463

A simplified LBB evaluation procedure for austenitic and ferritic steel piping  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The NRC previously has approved application of LBB analysis as a means to demonstrate that the probability of pipe rupture was extremely low so that dynamic loads associated with postulated pipe break could be excluded from the design basis (1). The purpose of this work was to: (1) define simplified procedures that can be used by the NRC to compute allowable lengths for circumferential throughwall cracks and assess margin against pipe fracture, and (2) verify the accuracy of the simplified procedures by comparison with available experimental data for piping having circumferential throughwall flaws. The development of the procedures was performed using techniques similar to those employed to develop ASME Code flaw evaluation procedures. The procedures described in this report are applicable to pipe and pipe fittings with: (1) wrought austenitic steel (Ni-Cr-Fe alloy) having a specified minimum yield strength less than 45 ksi, and gas metal-arc, submerged arc and shielded metal-arc austentic welds, and (2) seamless or welded wrought carbon steel having a minimum yield strength not greater than 40 ksi, and associated weld materials. The procedures can be used for cast austenitic steel when adequate information is available to place the cast material toughness into one of the categories identified later in this report for austenitic wrought and weld materials.

Gamble, R.M.; Wichman, K.R.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Analysis of local warm forming of high strength steel using near infrared ray energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The automotive industry has been pressed to satisfy more rigorous fuel efficiency requirements to promote energy conservation, safety features and cost containment. To satisfy this need, high strength steel has been developed and used for many different vehicle parts. The use of high strength steels, however, requires careful analysis and creativity in order to accommodate its relatively high springback behavior. An innovative method, called local warm forming with near infrared ray, has been developed to help promote the use of high strength steels in sheet metal forming. For this method, local regions of the work piece are heated using infrared ray energy, thereby promoting the reduction of springback behavior. In this research, a V-bend test is conducted with DP980. After springback, the bend angles for specimens without local heating are compared to those with local heating. Numerical analysis has been performed using the commercial program, DEFORM-2D. This analysis is carried out with the purpose of understanding how changes to the local stress distribution will affect the springback during the unloading process. The results between experimental and computational approaches are evaluated to assure the accuracy of the simulation. Subsequent numerical simulation studies are performed to explore best practices with respect to thermal boundary conditions, timing, and applicability to the production environment.

Yang, W. H., E-mail: whyang21@hyundai.com [Hyundai Motor Company, 700 Yeompo-ro, Buk-Gu, Ulsan, 683-791 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, K., E-mail: klee@deform.co.kr [Solution Lab, 502, 102, Dunsan-daero 117 beon-gil, Seo-Gu, Daejeon, 302-834 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, E. H., E-mail: mtgs2@kaist.ac.kr, E-mail: dyyang@kaist.ac.kr; Yang, D. Y., E-mail: mtgs2@kaist.ac.kr, E-mail: dyyang@kaist.ac.kr [KAIST, Science Town291, Daehak-ro, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

465

Simulation of Distortion and Residual Stress Development During Heat Treatment of Steel Castings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Heat treatment and associated processing, such as quenching, are critical during high strength steel casting production. These processes must be managed closely to prevent thermal and residual stresses that may result in distortion, cracking (particularly after machining), re-work, and weld repair. The risk of casting distortion limits aggressive quenching that can be beneficial to the process and yield an improved outcome. As a result of these distortions, adjustments must be made to the casting or pattern design, or tie bars must be added. Straightening castings after heat treatments can be both time-consuming and expensive. Residual stresses may reduce a casting√?¬?√?¬Ę√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?s overall service performance, possibly resulting in catastrophic failure. Stress relieving may help, but expends additional energy in the process. Casting software is very limited in predicting distortions during heat treatment, so corrective measures most often involve a tedious trial-and-error procedure. An extensive review of existing heat treatment residual stress and distortion modeling revealed that it is vital to predict the phase transformations and microstructure of the steel along with the thermal stress development during heat treatment. After reviewing the state-of-the-art in heat treatment residual stress and distortion modeling, an existing commercial code was selected because of its advanced capabilities in predicting phase transformations, the evolving microstructure and related properties along with thermal stress development during heat treatment. However, this software was developed for small parts created from forgings or machined stock, and not for steel castings. Therefore, its predictive capabilities for heat treatment of steel castings were investigated. Available experimental steel casting heat treatment data was determined to be of insufficient detail and breadth, and so new heat treatment experiments were designed and performed, casting and heat treating modified versions of the Navy-C ring (a classical test shape for heat treatment experiments) for several carbon and low alloy steels in order to generate data necessary to validate the code. The predicted distortions were in reasonable agreement with the experimentally measured values. However, the final distortions in the castings were small, making it difficult to determine how accurate the predictions truly are. It is recommended that further validation of the software be performed with the aid of additional experiments with large production steel castings that experience significant heat treatment distortions. It is apparent from this research that the mechanical properties of the bonded sand used for cores and sand molds are key in producing accurate stress simulation results. Because of this, experiments were performed to determine the temperature-dependent elastic modulus of a resin-bonded sand commonly utilized in the steel casting industry. The elastic modulus was seen to vary significantly with heating and cooling rates. Also, the retained room temperature elastic modulus after heating was seen to degrade significantly when the sand was heated above 125√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬įC. The elastic modulus curves developed in this work can readily be utilized in casting simulation software. Additional experiments with higher heating rates are recommended to determine the behavior of the elastic modulus in the sand close to the mold-metal interface. The commercial heat treatment residual stress and distortion code, once fully validated, is expected to result in an estimated energy savings of 2.15 trillion BTU√?¬?√?¬Ę√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?s/year. Along with these energy savings, reduction of scrap and improvement in casting yield will result in a reduction of the environmental emissions associated with the melting and pouring of the metal which will be saved as a result of this technology.

Christoph Beckermann; Kent Carlson

2011-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

466

Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Maintaining the integrity of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) in a light-water-cooled nuclear power plant is crucial in preventing and controlling severe accidents that have the potential for major contamination release. Because the RPV is the only key safety-related component of the plant for which a redundant backup system does not exist, it is imperative to fully understand the degree of irradiation-induced degradation of the RPV's fracture resistance that occurs during service. For this reason, the Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation (HSSI) Program has been established.

Rosseel, T.M.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Gas Atomization of Stainless Steel - Slow Motion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Stainless steel liquid atomized by supersonic argon gas into a spray of droplets at ~1800ļC. Atomization of metal requires high pressure gas and specialized chambers for cooling and collecting the powders without contamination. The critical step for morphological control is the impingement of the gas on the melt stream. The video is a black and white high speed video of a liquid metal stream being atomized by high pressure gas. This material was atomized at the Ames Laboratory's Materials Preparation Center http://www.mpc.ameslab.gov

None

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Automated inspection of hot steel slabs  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The disclosure relates to a real time digital image enhancement system for performing the image enhancement segmentation processing required for a real time automated system for detecting and classifying surface imperfections in hot steel slabs. The system provides for simultaneous execution of edge detection processing and intensity threshold processing in parallel on the same image data produced by a sensor device such as a scanning camera. The results of each process are utilized to validate the results of the other process and a resulting image is generated that contains only corresponding segmentation that is produced by both processes.

Martin, Ronald J. (Burnsville, MN)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Automated inspection of hot steel slabs  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The disclosure relates to a real time digital image enhancement system for performing the image enhancement segmentation processing required for a real time automated system for detecting and classifying surface imperfections in hot steel slabs. The system provides for simultaneous execution of edge detection processing and intensity threshold processing in parallel on the same image data produced by a sensor device such as a scanning camera. The results of each process are utilized to validate the results of the other process and a resulting image is generated that contains only corresponding segmentation that is produced by both processes. 5 figs.

Martin, R.J.

1985-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

470

Method for machining steel with diamond tools  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is directed to a method for machine optical quality finishes and contour accuracies of workpieces of carbon-containing metals such as steel with diamond tooling. The wear rate of the diamond tooling is significantly reduced by saturating the atmosphere at the interface of the workpiece and the diamond tool with a gaseous hydrocarbon during the machining operation. The presence of the gaseous hydrocarbon effectively eliminates the deterioration of the diamond tool by inhibiting or preventing the conversion of the diamond carbon to graphite carbon at the point of contact between the cutting tool and the workpiece.

Casstevens, J.M.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Method for machining steel with diamond tools  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is directed to a method for machining optical quality inishes and contour accuracies of workpieces of carbon-containing metals such as steel with diamond tooling. The wear rate of the diamond tooling is significantly reduced by saturating the atmosphere at the interface of the workpiece and the diamond tool with a gaseous hydrocarbon during the machining operation. The presence of the gaseous hydrocarbon effectively eliminates the deterioration of the diamond tool by inhibiting or preventing the conversion of the diamond carbon to graphite carbon at the point of contact between the cutting tool and the workpiece.

Casstevens, John M. (Greenville, TX)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Microstructure of Super-duplex Stainless Steels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.1 Introduction 24 3.2 The Fe-Cr-Ni System . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 3.3 The Alloying Elements in Duplex Stainless Steels 33 3.4 Chromium and Nickel Equivalents . . . . . . . 42 3.5 The Effect of Creq/Nieq Ratio on Equilibrium Volume Fraction of Austenite 43 3... / Austenite Balance 6.1 Introduction . 6.2 Thermodynamic Calculations . . . . . 6.3 Equilibrium Isothermal Heat Treatments 6.4 Effect of Ferrite/ Austenite Balance on Hardness 6.5 Equilibrium Partitioning of Alloying Elements 6.6 Precipitation of Cr2N 6...

Sharafi, Shahriar

1993-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

473

Steel Industry Profile | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage ¬Ľ SearchEnergyDepartmentScopingOverviewFranklinStatusJ.R. Simplot DonSteel

474

Cinematography of Resistance Spot Welding of Galvanized Steel Sheet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cinematography of Resistance Spot Welding of Galvanized Steel Sheet Preweld and postweld current modifications on the resistance spot welding of galvanized steel sheet ·are analyzed using high phenomena through· out the weld process are discussed. In addition. the duration of current modifi· cation

Eagar, Thomas W.

475

Welding residual stresses in ferritic power plant steels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REVIEW Welding residual stresses in ferritic power plant steels J. A. Francis*1 , H. K. D. H require therefore, an accounting of residual stresses, which often are introduced during welding. To do in the estimation of welding residual stresses in austenitic stainless steels. The progress has been less convincing

Cambridge, University of

476

DESIGN PHILOSOPHY FOR STEEL STRUCTURES IN MODERATE SEISMIC REGIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DESIGN PHILOSOPHY FOR STEEL STRUCTURES IN MODERATE SEISMIC REGIONS E.M. Hines1 and L.A. Fahnestock2 ABSTRACT The authors propose a design philosophy for steel buildings in moderate seismic regions that draws to the continued development and validation of this philosophy. Introduction Recent widespread adoption

Hines, Eric

477

Plastic strain due to twinning in austenitic TWIP steels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Plastic strain due to twinning in austenitic TWIP steels B. Qin and H. K. D. H. Bhadeshia* Twinning induced plasticity steels are austenitic alloys in which mechanical twinning is a prominent deformation, Twinning, Twinning induced plasticity, Automobiles Introduction Mechanical twinning is a plastic

Cambridge, University of

478

Sigma phase formation kinetics in stainless steel laminate composites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Stainless steel laminate composites were made to simulate weld microstructures. The use of laminates with variations in chemical composition allows for one dimensional analysis of phase transformation associated with the more complex three-dimensional solidification experience of weld metal. Alternate layers of austenitic (304L and 316L) and ferritic (Ebrite) stainless steels allowed for the study of sigma phase formation at the austenite-ferrite interface in duplex stainless steel. Two austenitic stainless steels, 304L (18.5Cr-9.2Ni-0.3Mo) and 316L (16.2Cr-10.1Ni-2.6Mo), and one ferritic stainless steel, Ebrite (26.3Cr-0Ni-1.0Mo) were received in the form of sheet which was laboratory cold rolled to a final thickness of 0.25 mm (0.030 in.). Laminate composites were prepared by laboratory hot rolling a vacuum encapsulated compact of alternating layers of the ferrite steel with either 304L or 316L stainless steel sheets. Laminate composite specimens, which simulate duplex austenite-ferrite weld metal structure, were used to establish the kinetics of nucleation and growth of sigma phase. The factors affecting sigma phase formation were identified. The effects of time, temperature, and transport of chromium and nickel were evaluated and used to establish a model for sigma phase formation in the austenite-ferrite interfacial region. Information useful for designing stainless steel welding consumables to be used for high temperature service was determined.

Wenmen, D.W.; Olson, D.L.; Matlock, D.K. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)] [and others

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

479

CLEAVAGE FRACTURE MICROMECHANISMS RELATED TO WPS EFFECT IN RPV STEEL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CLEAVAGE FRACTURE MICROMECHANISMS RELATED TO WPS EFFECT IN RPV STEEL S. R. Bordet1 , B. Tanguy1 , S by warm pre-stress (WPS) on the cleavage fracture micromechanisms of a 18MND5 (A533B) reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steel. In this purpose, different WPS fracture test results obtained on compact tensile (CT

Boyer, Edmond

480

Steamside Oxidation Behavior of Experimental 9%Cr Steels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reducing emissions and increasing economic competitiveness require more efficient steam power plants that utilize fossil fuels. One of the major challenges in designing these plants is the availability of materials that can stand the supercritical and ultra-supercritical steam conditions at a competitive cost. There are several programs around the world developing new ferritic and austenitic steels for superheater and reheater tubes exposed to the advanced steam conditions. The new steels must possess properties better than current steels in terms of creep strength, steamside oxidation resistance, fireside corrosion resistance, and thermal fatigue resistance. This paper introduces a series of experimental 9%Cr steels containing Cu, Co, and Ti. Stability of the phases in the new steels is discussed and compared to the phases in the commercially available materials. The steels were tested under both the dry and moist conditions at 650ļC for their cyclical oxidation resistance. Results of oxidation tests are presented. Under the moist conditions, the experimental steels exhibited significantly less mass gain compared to the commercial P91 steel. Microstructural characterization of the scale revealed different oxide compositions.

Dogan, O.N.; Holcomb, G.R.; Alman, D.E.; Jablonski, P.D.

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes steel works" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Wrought stainless steel compositions having engineered microstructures for improved heat resistance  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A wrought stainless steel alloy composition includes 12% to 25% Cr, 8% to 25% Ni, 0.05% to 1% Nb, 0.05% to 10% Mn, 0.02% to 0.15% C, 0.02% to 0.5% N, with the balance iron, the composition having the capability of developing an engineered microstructure at a temperature above 550.degree. C. The engineered microstructure includes an austenite matrix having therein a dispersion of intragranular NbC precipitates in a concentration in the range of 10.sup.10 to 10.sup.17 precipitates per cm.sup.3.

Maziasz, Philip J [Oak Ridge, TN; Swindeman, Robert W [Oak Ridge, TN; Pint, Bruce A [Knoxville, TN; Santella, Michael L [Knoxville, TN; More, Karren L [Knoxville, TN

2007-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

482

Mobile machine hazardous working zone warning system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A warning system is provided for a mobile working machine to alert an individual of a potentially dangerous condition in the event the individual strays into a hazardous working zone of the machine. The warning system includes a transmitter mounted on the machine and operable to generate a uniform magnetic field projecting beyond an outer periphery of the machine in defining a hazardous working zone around the machine during operation. A receiver, carried by the individual and activated by the magnetic field, provides an alarm signal to alert the individual when he enters the hazardous working zone of the machine. 3 figs.

Schiffbauer, W.H.; Ganoe, C.W.

1999-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

483

Mobile machine hazardous working zone warning system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A warning system is provided for a mobile working machine to alert an individual of a potentially dangerous condition in the event the individual strays into a hazardous working zone of the machine. The warning system includes a transmitter mounted on the machine and operable to generate a uniform magnetic field projecting beyond an outer periphery of the machine in defining a hazardous working zone around the machine during operation thereof. A receiver, carried by the individual and activated by the magnetic field, provides an alarm signal to alert the individual when he enters the hazardous working zone of the machine.

Schiffbauer, William H. (Connellsville, PA); Ganoe, Carl W. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Materials corrosion in ammonia/solid heat pump working media  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Salt/ammonia complexes will undergo thermal cycles during use as working media for heat pumps. The interaction between container materials and complexes under thermal cyclic conditions was assessed to screen possible containment materials. Aluminum alloys 3003, 1100, and 6063 and carbon steel A214 were tested against possible heat pump working media SrCl{sub 2}/NH{sub 3}, CaBr{sub 2}/NH{sub 3}, and CaCl{sub 2}/NH{sub 3}. None of the containment materials showed susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking. While all the materials demonstrated excellent general corrosion resistance to SrCl{sub 2}/NH{sub 3}, only A214 displayed good general corrosion resistance to CaCl{sub 2}/NH{sub 3}. The complex CaBr{sub 2}/NH{sub 3} was found to be subject to thermal cyclic instability and should not be used as a heat pump working medium.

Wilson, D.F.; Howell, M.; DeVan, J.H.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Trails Working Group  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in December 2003, includes representatives from local citizen hiking groups, Los Alamos County, Forest Service, Park Service, Los Alamos National Laboratory and the NNSA...

486

Early Detection of Steel Rebar Corrosion by Acoustic Emission Monitoring Early Detection of Steel Rebar Corrosion by Acoustic Emission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Early Detection of Steel Rebar Corrosion by Acoustic Emission Monitoring Early Detection of Steel Rebar Corrosion by Acoustic Emission Monitoring Alan D. Zdunek and David Prine BIRL Industrial Research, Evanston, IL 60201 Paper No. 547 presented at CORROSION95, the NACE International Annual Conference

487

Cast alumina forming austenitic stainless steels  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An austenitic stainless steel alloy consisting essentially of, in terms of weight percent ranges 0.15-0.5C; 8-37Ni; 10-25Cr; 2.5-5Al; greater than 0.6, up to 2.5 total of at least one element selected from the group consisting of Nb and Ta; up to 3Mo; up to 3Co; up to 1W; up to 3Cu; up to 15Mn; up to 2Si; up to 0.15B; up to 0.05P; up to 1 total of at least one element selected from the group consisting of Y, La, Ce, Hf, and Zr; <0.3Ti+V; <0.03N; and, balance Fe, where the weight percent Fe is greater than the weight percent Ni, and wherein the alloy forms an external continuous scale comprising alumina, and a stable essentially single phase FCC austenitic matrix microstructure, the austenitic matrix being essentially delta-ferrite free and essentially BCC-phase-free. A method of making austenitic stainless steel alloys is also disclosed.

Muralidharan, Govindarajan; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Brady, Michael P

2013-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

488

Heat Treatment Procedure Qualification for Steel Castings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The science of heat treatment has been well studied and is the basis from which existing specifications and practices for the heat treatment of steel castings have been developed. Although these existing specifications address the general needs of steel castings to be heat-treated, they do not take into account the variability in the parameters that govern the processes. The need for a heat treatment qualification procedure that accounts for this variability during heat treatment is an important step toward heat treatment quality assurance. The variability in temperatures within a heat treatment furnace is one such variable that a foundry has to contend with in its day-to-day activity. Though specifications indicate the temperatures at which a particular heat treatment has to be conducted, heat treatment specifications do not adequately account for all aspects of heat treatment quality assurance. The heat treatment qualification procedure will comprise of a robust set of rules and guidelines that ensure that foundries will still be able to operate within the set of constraints imposed on them by non-deterministic elements within the processes.

Professor Robert C. Voigt

2003-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

489

Effects of helium content of microstructural development in Type 316 stainless steel under neutron irradiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work investigated the sensitivity of microstructural evolution, particularly precipitate development, to increased helium content during thermal aging and during neutron irradiation. Helium (110 at. ppM) was cold preinjected into solution annealed (SA) DO-heat type 316 stainess steel (316) via cyclotron irradiation. These specimens were then exposed side by side with uninjected samples. Continuous helium generation was increased considerably relative to EBR-II irradiation by irradiation in HFIR. Data were obtained from quantitative analytical electron microscopy (AEM) in thin foils and on extraction replicas. 480 refs., 86 figs., 19 tabs.

Maziasz, P.J.

1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Modeling of Late Blooming Phases and Precipitation Kinetics in Aging Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) Steels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The principle work at the atomic scale is to develop a predictive quantitative model for the microstructure evolution of RPV steels under thermal aging and neutron radiation. We have developed an AKMC method for the precipitation kinetics in bcc-Fe, with Cu, Ni, Mn and Si being the alloying elements. In addition, we used MD simulations to provide input parameters (if not available in literature). MMC simulations were also carried out to explore the possible segregation/precipitation morphologies at the lattice defects. First we briefly describe each of the simulation algorithms, then will present our results.

Yongfeng Zhang; Pritam Chakraborty; S. Bulent Biner

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Resistance Spot Welding of Aluminum Alloy to Steel with Transition Material - From Process to Performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper summarizes work to date on resistance spot welding (RSW) of aluminum alloy to mild steel from process development to performance evaluation. A cold-rolled strip material is introduced as a transition material to aid the resistance welding process. The optimal welding parameters and electrode selections were established using a combination of experimental and analytical approaches. The mechanical behaviors of welded samples was evaluated using static and dynamic strength tests and cyclic fatigue tests. A statistical analysis was also performed to analyze the effect of different failure modes on the sample's peak load and energy absorption.

Sun, Xin; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.; Shao, H; Kimchi, Menachem; Menachem Kimchi and Wanda Newman

2004-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

492

Parametric Studies Of Weld Quality Of Tungsten Inert Gas Arc Welding Of Stainless Steel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Effect of current and gas flow rate on quality of weld in tungsten inter gas arc welding of austenitic stainless steel has been studied in the present work through experiments and analyses. Butt welded joints have been made by using several levels of current and gas flow rate. The quality of the weld has been evaluated in terms of ultimate and breaking strengths of the welded specimens. The observed data have been interpreted, discussed and analyzed by using Grey--Taguchi methodology. Optimum parametric setting has been predicted and validated as well.

Kumar Pal, Pradip; Nandi, Goutam; Ghosh, Nabendu [Mechanical Engineering Department, Jadavpur University, Kolkata-700032 (India)

2011-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

493

Work with Biological Materials  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered energy consumption byAbout PrintableBlenderWhatFellowsWood and4213WorkWork with

494

Working With Us | NREL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert SouthwestTechnologies | Blandine Jerome Careers at WIPPCompletesWork/LifeWorking

495

Characteristics of steel slag under different cooling conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Four types of steel slags, a ladle slag, a BOF (basic oxygen furnace) slag and two different EAF (electric arc furnace) slags, were characterized and modified by semi-rapid cooling in crucibles and rapid cooling by water granulation. The aim of this work was to investigate the effect of different cooling conditions on the properties of glassy slags with respect to their leaching and volume stability. Optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope and a standard test leaching (prEN 12457-2/3) have been used for the investigation. The results show that the disintegrated ladle slag was made volume stable by water granulation, which consisted of 98% glass. However EAF slag 1, EAF slag 2 and the BOF slag formed 17%, 1% and 1% glass, respectively. The leaching test showed that the glass-containing matrix did not prevent leaching of minor elements from the modified slags. The solubility of chromium, molybdenum and vanadium varied in the different modifications, probably due to their presence in different minerals and their different distributions.

Tossavainen, M. [Division of Mineral Processing, Lulea University of Technology, SE-971 87 Lulea (Sweden); Engstrom, F. [Division of Process Metallurgy, Lulea University of Technology, SE-971 87 Lulea (Sweden)], E-mail: Fredrik.i.engstrom@ltu.se; Yang, Q.; Menad, N.; Lidstrom Larsson, M.; Bjorkman, B. [Division of Process Metallurgy, Lulea University of Technology, SE-971 87 Lulea (Sweden)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Recent developments in blast furnace process control within British Steel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

British Steel generally operates seven blast furnaces on four integrated works. All furnaces have been equipped with comprehensive instrumentation and data logging computers over the past eight years. The four Scunthorpe furnaces practice coal injection up to 170 kg/tHM (340 lb/THM), the remainder injecting oil at up to 100 kg/tHM (200 lb/THM). Distribution control is effected by Paul Wurth Bell-Less Tops on six of the seven furnaces, and Movable Throat Armour with bells on the remaining one. All have at least one sub burden probe. The blast furnace operator has a vast quantity of data and signals to consider and evaluate when attempting to achieve the objective of providing a consistent supply of hot metal. Techniques have been, and are being, developed to assist the operator to interpret large numbers of signals. A simple operator guidance system has been developed to provide advice, based on current operating procedures and interpreted data. Further development will involve the use of a sophisticated Expert System software shell.

Warren, P.W. [British Steel Technical, Middlesbrough (United Kingdom). Teesside Labs.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z