Sample records for includes sewage treatment

  1. On-Site Sewage Treatment Alternatives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    -site Wastewater Treatment and Disposal Options, VCE publication 448-403, and Individual Homeowner & Small Community Wastewa- ter Treatment & Disposal Options, VCE publication 448-406. Figure 1. Many ruralOn-Site Sewage Treatment Alternatives C. Zipper,Extension specialist and associate professor

  2. E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced sewage treatment Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: , of confirm, the health of an on-lot sewage system. PSMA On-lot Wastewater Treatment Inspection Vs... F 168On-lot Sewage Disposal Resources Available Through the...

  3. Operation and Maintenance Manual for the Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norm Stanley

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Operation and Maintenance Manual lists operator and management responsibilities, permit standards, general operating procedures, maintenance requirements and monitoring methods for the Sewage Treatment Plant at the Central Facilities Area at the Idaho National Laboratory. The manual is required by the Municipal Wastewater Reuse Permit (LA-000141-03) the sewage treatment plant.

  4. ESTABoues, a decision tool to assess greenhouse gases of sewage sludge treatment and di

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    digestion, aerobic digestion, dewatering, al composting, drying) and sludge disposal route (land applicationORBIT2012 G ESTABoues, a decision tool to assess greenhouse gases of sewage sludge treatment and di-laure.reverdy@irstea.fr EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Sewage sludge production increases continuously reaching almost 20% (946 700 t 1 118 795

  5. SUSTAINABLE SEWAGE TREATMENT AND RE-USE IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walid Abdel-halim; Dirk Weichgrebe; K. -h. Rosenwinkel; Johan Verink

    technological knowledge and empirical Know-How of wastewater treatment processes and their implementation; also

  6. Management of sewage sludge and ash containing radioactive materials.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bachmaier, J. T.; Aiello, K.; Bastian, R. K.; Cheng, J.-J.; Chiu, W. A.; Goodman, J.; Hogan, R.; Jones, A. R.; Kamboj, S.; Lenhart, T.; Ott, W. R.; Rubin, A. B.; Salomon, S. N.; Schmidt, D. W.; Setlow, L. W.; Yu, C.; Wolbarst, A. B.; Environmental Science Division; Middlesex County Utilities Authority; U.S. EPA; N.J. Dept of Environmental Protection; NRC

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Approximately 50% of the seven to eight million metric tonnes of municipal sewage sludge produced annually in the US is reused. Beneficial uses of sewage sludge include agricultural land application, land reclamation, forestry, and various commercial applications. Excessive levels of contaminants, however, can limit the potential usefulness of land-applied sewage sludge. A recently completed study by a federal inter-agency committee has identified radioactive contaminants that could interfere with the safe reuse of sewage sludge. The study found that typical levels of radioactive materials in most municipal sewage sludge and incinerator ash do not present a health hazard to sewage treatment plant workers or to the general public. The inter-agency committee has developed recommendations for operators of sewage treatment plants for evaluating measured or estimated levels of radioactive material in sewage sludge and for determining whether actions to reduce potential exposures are appropriate.

  7. BEHAVIOR CANOLA (BRASSICA NAPUS) FOLLOWING A SEWAGE SLUDGE TREATMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    . INTRODUCTION In Tunisia, the amount of sludge produced by wastewater treatment stations is constantly waste water treatment stations, in other words, most of it is wastewater from domestic sources. The second type is obtained from the treatment of industrial wastewater or partly from industrial wastewater

  8. Recycled Water Reuse Permit Renewal Application for the Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mike Lewis

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This renewal application for a Recycled Water Reuse Permit is being submitted in accordance with the Idaho Administrative Procedures Act 58.01.17 “Recycled Water Rules” and the Municipal Wastewater Reuse Permit LA-000141-03 for continuing the operation of the Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant located at the Idaho National Laboratory. The permit expires March 16, 2015. The permit requires a renewal application to be submitted six months prior to the expiration date of the existing permit. For the Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant, the renewal application must be submitted by September 16, 2014. The information in this application is consistent with the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality’s Guidance for Reclamation and Reuse of Municipal and Industrial Wastewater and discussions with Idaho Department of Environmental Quality personnel.

  9. Sewage Treatment Plant (STP) Design/SPDES Permit Modifications Update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Peter D.

    Permit that was issued on June 9, 2009, which included more stringent water quality based effluent limits (NA) NA 2.3 pH (SU) 5.8-9.0 * 6.5-8.5 5.8-8.5 Total Suspended Solids (mg/l) 20 NA NA 20 Total.1 Temperature (°F) 90 NA NA --- Total Nitrogen, as N (mg/l) 10 NA 10 10 Total Nitrogen (lbs/day) 20 NA NA

  10. 2010 Annual Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mike lewis

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA-000141-03), for the wastewater land application site at Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant from November 1, 2009, through October 31, 2010. The report contains the following information: • Site description • Facility and system description • Permit required monitoring data and loading rates • Status of special compliance conditions • Discussion of the facility’s environmental impacts. During the 2010 permit year, approximately 2.2 million gallons of treated wastewater was land-applied to the irrigation area at Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment plant.

  11. 2011 Annual Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael G. Lewis

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Wastewater Reuse Permit (LA-000141-03), for the wastewater land application site at Idaho National Laboratory Site's Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant from November 1, 2010, through October 31, 2011. The report contains the following information: (1) Site description; (2) Facility and system description; (3) Permit required monitoring data and loading rates; (4) Status of special compliance conditions and activities; and (5) Discussion of the facility's environmental impacts. During the 2011 permit year, approximately 1.22 million gallons of treated wastewater was land-applied to the irrigation area at Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment plant.

  12. 2012 Annual Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Central facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mike Lewis

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA-000141-03), for the wastewater land application site at Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant from November 1, 2011, through October 31, 2012. The report contains the following information: • Site description • Facility and system description • Permit required monitoring data and loading rates • Status of compliance conditions and activities • Discussion of the facility’s environmental impacts. During the 2012 permit year, no wastewater was land-applied to the irrigation area of the Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant.

  13. The Development of a Guideline on the Sampling/Testing of Innovative/Alternative Disposal Technologies for Sewage Treatment and Disposal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhode Island, University of

    Technologies for Sewage Treatment and Disposal Principle Investigators Calvin P. C. Poon #12;Problem will be built in rural areas of Rhode Island. Many of the installations are the newly innovative will be specifically Most I/A ISDS technologies claim better treatment of the sewage which leads to their claim

  14. 2013 Annual Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mike Lewis

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA-000141-03), for the wastewater land application site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant from November 1, 2012, through October 31, 2013. The report contains, as applicable, the following information: • Site description • Facility and system description • Permit required monitoring data and loading rates • Status of compliance conditions and activities • Discussion of the facility’s environmental impacts. During the 2013 permit year, no wastewater was land-applied to the irrigation area of the Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant and therefore, no effluent flow volumes or samples were collected from wastewater sampling point WW-014102. However, soil samples were collected in October from soil monitoring unit SU-014101.

  15. Gille-STPA 35 1 Sewage on San Diego Beaches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gille, Sarah T.

    outflow pipe? (3) When plans were first made to address the heavy metals in Tijuana pollution on where sewage ends up? (2) One big issue for understanding sewage treatment has to do with heavy metals't dioxin or heavy metal a problem when Tijuana sewage is mixed with San Diego sewage in the Point Loma

  16. Sewage Sludge (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Sewage sludge utilization permits are required prior to the use, processing, and disposal of sewage sludge in Maryland.

  17. The effects of surfactant concentration on grease removal by air flotation in municipal sewage treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perry, Larry Eugene

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    systems, high grease loading contributes to the formation of scum blankets which reduce operating efficiency and may lead to expensive shut-down and clean-out operations. Normally, influent wastewater to biological treatment systems with oil and grease... are forcing engineers to take a closer look at specif1c aspects of wastewater treatment. One such aspect is that of remov1ng oil and grease from wastewater streams. The average ind1vidual is well aware of the effects of discharging oily substances...

  18. Effectiveness of irradiation in killing pathogens. [Treatment of sewage sludge for land application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yeager, J.G.; Ward, R.L.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    United States Environmental Protection Agency regulations include gamma ray irradiation of sludge as an approved Process to Further Reduce Pathogens (PFRP) prior to land application. Research at Sandia National Laboratories on pathogen inactivation in sludge by gamma irradiation has demonstrated that the 1 Mrad PFRP dose is capable, by itself, of eliminating bacterial, fungal, and parasitic pathogens from sludge. Gamma irradiation of sludge in conjunction with the required Processes to Significantly Reduce Pathogens (PSRP) should also eliminate the viral hazard from wastewater sludges.

  19. Case studies of sewage treatment with recovery of energy from methane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, C.A.; Webster, N.; Wander, J.

    1993-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In the Southeast, there are about 3,000 wastewater plants with a capacity of over one million gallons per day. Under this study, operating data and available financial information on a variety of technologies for large and small plans was documented for ten facilities. Studies were done on wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) with design capacities ranging from 9.5--120 million gallons per day. All of these WWTPs recover the gas produced in their anaerobic digesters and use at least part of it as fuel for boilers and/or internal combustion engines. The engines power generators, blowers, or pumps, and most are equipped with heat recovery systems. Based on the historical data provided by the participants in this study and from the authors` own technical analysis, methane recovery and utilization systems appear to be cost effective, although the degree of cost effectiveness varies widely. The types of energy recovery systems are not uniform among all the participants so that the cases in this limited survey are not precisely comparable to each other. Also, reliance on historical data and cost information generated from portions of total plant operations and estimates makes it difficult to complete analysis of specific variables. The fact remains, however, that regardless of the individual type(s) of digester gas energy recovery system in use, data from seven of the ten participants reflected annual savings ranging from $67,200 to more than $700,000. Further, Wander Associates current analysis reflects that nine of the ten realized annual savings ranging from $5,000 to more than $600,000.

  20. Estuaries Vol. 28, No. 5, p. 750~60 October 2005 Reversal of Eutrophication Following Sewage Treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mallin, Michael

    Estuaries Vol. 28, No. 5, p. 750~60 October 2005 Reversal of Eutrophication Following Sewage Eutrophication of estuarine systems has numer- ous deleterious consequences and is considered to be a widespread et al. 2000; Anderson et al. 2002). Causes of eutrophication vary- among regions and individual

  1. Anaerobic Digestion of Primary Sewage Effluent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anaerobic Digestion of Primary Sewage Effluent: Significant Energy Savings over Traditional Activated Sludge Treatment This report presents results for an anaerobic digestion system operated;Anaerobic Digestion of Primary Sewage Effluent Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Office

  2. State Waste Discharge Permit application, 100-N Sewage Lagoon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order negotiations (Ecology et al. 1994), the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, the US Environmental Protection Agency, and the Washington State Department of Ecology agreed that liquid effluent discharges to the ground on the Hanford Site which affect groundwater or have the potential to affect groundwater would be subject to permitting under the structure of Chapter 173--216 (or 173--218 where applicable) of the Washington Administrative Code, the State Waste Discharge Permit Program. As a result of this decision, the Washington State Department of Ecology and the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office entered into Consent Order No. DE 91NM-177, (Ecology and DOE-RL 1991). This document constitutes the State Waste Discharge Permit application for the 100-N Sewage Lagoon. Since the influent to the sewer lagoon is domestic waste water, the State Waste Discharge Permit application for Public Owned Treatment Works Discharges to Land was used. Although the 100-N Sewage Lagoon is not a Public Owned Treatment Works, the Public Owned Treatment Works application is more applicable than the application for industrial waste water. The 100-N Sewage Lagoon serves the 100-N Area and other Hanford Site areas by receiving domestic waste from two sources. A network of sanitary sewer piping and lift stations transfers domestic waste water from the 100-N Area buildings directly to the 100-N Sewage Lagoon. Waste is also received by trucks that transport domestic waste pumped from on site septic tanks and holding tanks. Three ponds comprise the 100-N Sewage Lagoon treatment system. These include a lined aeration pond and stabilization pond, as well as an unlined infiltration pond. Both piped-in and trucked-in domestic waste is discharged directly into the aeration pond.

  3. E-Print Network 3.0 - alkaline sludge treatment Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sciences Cooperative Extension Land Application of Sewage Summary: . These wastewater treatment solids are commonly referred to as sewage sludge. "Sewage sludge" or...

  4. #include #include

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campbell, Andrew T.

    process #12;#include #include pid_t pid = fork(); if (pid () failed */ } else if (pid == 0) { /* parent process */ } else { /* child process */ } #12;thread #12

  5. Interim Control Strategy for the Test Area North/Technical Support Facility Sewage Treatment Facility Disposal Pond - Two-year Update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. V. Street

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Idaho Cleanup Project has prepared this interim control strategy for the U.S. Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office pursuant to DOE Order 5400.5, Chapter 11.3e (1) to support continued discharges to the Test Area North/Technical Support Facility Sewage Treatment Facility Disposal Pond. In compliance with DOE Order 5400.5, a 2-year review of the Interim Control Strategy document has been completed. This submittal documents the required review of the April 2005 Interim Control Strategy. The Idaho Cleanup Project's recommendation is unchanged from the original recommendation. The Interim Control Strategy evaluates three alternatives: (1) re-route the discharge outlet to an uncontaminated area of the TSF-07; (2) construct a new discharge pond; or (3) no action based on justification for continued use. Evaluation of Alternatives 1 and 2 are based on the estimated cost and implementation timeframe weighed against either alternative's minimal increase in protection of workers, the public, and the environment. Evaluation of Alternative 3, continued use of the TSF-07 Disposal Pond under current effluent controls, is based on an analysis of four points: - Record of Decision controls will protect workers and the public - Risk of increased contamination is low - Discharge water will be eliminated in the foreseeable future - Risk of contamination spread is acceptable. The Idaho Cleanup Project recommends Alternative 3, no action other than continued implementation of existing controls and continued deactivation, decontamination, and dismantlement efforts at the Test Area North/Technical Support Facility.

  6. #include #include

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poinsot, Laurent

    #include #include //Rappels : "getpid()" permet d'obtenir son propre pid // "getppid()" renvoie le pid du père d'un processus int main (void) { pid_t pid_fils; pid_fils = fork(); if(pid_fils==-1) { printf("Erreur de création du processus fils\

  7. Removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from sewage sludge by anaerobic degradation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for treatment in EU, followed by spreading on land, which accounted for 37% of the sewage sludge produced allow recycling of nutrients. Hence, bioprocessed sewage sludge application on agricultural soilRemoval of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from sewage sludge by anaerobic degradation N

  8. E-Print Network 3.0 - aerobic granular sewage Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from... -lot sewage systems concern the soil. For the soil to properly renovate the treatment tank's effluent, two Source: Boyer, Elizabeth W. - School of Forest Resources,...

  9. Concentrations of Heavy Metals in Soil and Cassava Plant on Sewage Sludge Dump

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Igbozuruike, Chris Washington Ifeanyi Mr.; Opara-Nadi, Achilihu Oliver Prof; Okorie, Ikechukwu Kennedy DR

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    JM. (1989). Assessment of sludge regulation assumptions: AMunicipal Wasteland and Sludge on Land. Univ. of California,1998). Effects of sewage sludge pre-treatment on microbial

  10. International Best Practices for Pre-Processing and Co-Processing Municipal Solid Waste and Sewage Sludge in the Cement Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasanbeigi, Ali

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2008. “Utilization of sewage sludge in EU application of old2007. “Cost evaluation of sludge treatment options andwastewater treatment plant sludge treating leather tanning

  11. Spreading lagooned sewage sludge on farm land: A case history

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robson, C.M.; Sommers, L.E.

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the development of a project involving the application of approximately 265,000 cubic meters of lagooned sewage sludge from a metropolitan area on privately-owned farm land in an adjacent, rural county. The sludge application project was initiated to enable use of the land occupied by the lagoons for expansion of the sewage treatment plant. The procedures developed will be valuable to those proposing to practice land disposal of stabilized sludge as part of the Nation`s resource conservation program.

  12. Sewage sludge dewatering using flowing liquid metals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carlson, Larry W. (Oswego, IL)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for reducing the moisture content of a moist sewage sludge having a moisture content of about 50% to 80% and formed of small cellular micro-organism bodies having internally confined water is provided. A hot liquid metal is circulated in a circulation loop and the moist sewage sludge is injected in the circulation loop under conditions of temperature and pressure such that the confined water vaporizes and ruptures the cellular bodies. The vapor produced, the dried sludge, and the liquid metal are then separated. Preferably, the moist sewage sludge is injected into the hot liquid metal adjacent the upstream side of a venturi which serves to thoroughly mix the hot liquid metal and the moist sewage sludge. The venturi and the drying zone after the venturi are preferably vertically oriented. The dried sewage sludge recovered is available as a fuel and is preferably used for heating the hot liquid metal.

  13. Author's personal copy Modelling and automation of water and wastewater treatment processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Jeppsson, 2006), including sewage systems and surrounding land use. From the methodological viewpoint on the applications of modelling and automation to water and wastewater treatment processes. The session, under sludge processes, to which unconventional and innovative control strategies were applied. But there were

  14. Greenhouse gases emissions accounting for typical sewage sludge digestion with energy utilization and residue land application in China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niu Dongjie, E-mail: niudongjie@tongji.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Yangtze Aquatic Environment, Ministry of Education, College of Environmental Science and Engineering of Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); UNEP-Tongji Institute of Environment for Sustainable Development, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); Huang Hui [Key Laboratory of Yangtze Aquatic Environment, Ministry of Education, College of Environmental Science and Engineering of Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); Dai Xiaohu [Key Laboratory of Yangtze Aquatic Environment, Ministry of Education, College of Environmental Science and Engineering of Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); National Engineering Research Center for Urban Pollution Control, Shanghai 200092 (China); Zhao Youcai [Key Laboratory of Yangtze Aquatic Environment, Ministry of Education, College of Environmental Science and Engineering of Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China)

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer GHGs emissions from sludge digestion + residue land use in China were calculated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The AD unit contributes more than 97% of total biogenic GHGs emissions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AD with methane recovery is attractive for sludge GHGs emissions reduction. - Abstract: About 20 million tonnes of sludge (with 80% moisture content) is discharged by the sewage treatment plants per year in China, which, if not treated properly, can be a significant source of greenhouse gases (GHGs) emissions. Anaerobic digestion is a conventional sewage sludge treatment method and will continue to be one of the main technologies in the following years. This research has taken into consideration GHGs emissions from typical processes of sludge thickening + anaerobic digestion + dewatering + residue land application in China. Fossil CO{sub 2}, biogenic CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4,} and avoided CO{sub 2} as the main objects is discussed respectively. The results show that the total CO{sub 2}-eq is about 1133 kg/t DM (including the biogenic CO{sub 2}), while the net CO{sub 2}-eq is about 372 kg/t DM (excluding the biogenic CO{sub 2}). An anaerobic digestion unit as the main GHGs emission source occupies more than 91% CO{sub 2}-eq of the whole process. The use of biogas is important for achieving carbon dioxide emission reductions, which could reach about 24% of the total CO{sub 2}-eq reduction.

  15. Central Facilities Area Sewage Lagoon Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark R. Cole

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Central Facilities Area (CFA), located in Butte County, Idaho, at the Idaho National Laboratory has an existing wastewater system to collect and treat sanitary wastewater and non-contact cooling water from the facility. The existing treatment facility consists of three cells: Cell #1 has a surface area of 1.7 acres, Cell #2 has a surface area of 10.3 acres, and Cell #3 has a surface area of 0.5 acres. If flows exceed the evaporative capacity of the cells, wastewater is discharged to a 73.5-acre land application site that uses a center-pivot irrigation sprinkler system. As flows at CFA have decreased in recent years, the amount of wastewater discharged to the land application site has decreased from 13.64 million gallons in 2004 to no discharge in 2012 and 2013. In addition to the decreasing need for land application, approximately 7.7 MG of supplemental water was added to the system in 2013 to maintain a water level and prevent the clay soil liners in the cells from drying out and “cracking.” The Idaho National Laboratory is concerned that the sewage lagoons and land application site may be oversized for current and future flows. A further concern is the sustainability of the large volumes of supplemental water that are added to the system according to current operational practices. Therefore, this study was initiated to evaluate the system capacity, operational practices, and potential improvement alternatives, as warranted.

  16. IMPACT OF HEAVY METALS IN SEWAGE SLUDGE ON SOIL AND PLANTS (COLZA and WHEAT)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    IMPACT OF HEAVY METALS IN SEWAGE SLUDGE ON SOIL AND PLANTS (COLZA and WHEAT) Najla LASSOUED1@emse.fr Abstract We are testing the impact of heavy metals in sludge from urban and industrial wastewater treatment> Cu> Ni> Co> Cd The contents of heavy metals in the sludge is made very high and exceed European

  17. Sewage sludge application effects on runoff water quality in a semiarid grassland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris-Pierce, R.L.; Redente, E.F.; Barbarick, K.A. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the concerns of land application of sewage sludge (also referred to as biosolids) to rangeland is its effect on the amount and quality of runoff water. In this study, we applied three treatments consisting of 0, 22, and 41 Mg ha{sup -1} of municipal sewage sludge to Larim gravelly sandy loam (Ustollic Argiustoll) and Altvan sandy loam (Aridic Argiustoll) soils in paired plots on two slope gradients (8 and 15%). We used a one-time application of simulated rainfall for 30 min at a rate of 100 mm h{sup -1} and collected and analyzed the runoff. Results are described. 22 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  18. Guidance for writing permits for the use or disposal of sewage sludge. Draft report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Section 405(d) of the Clean Water Act (CWA) directs the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to develop regulations containing guidelines for the use and disposal of sewage sludge. On February 19th, 1993, EPA published final regulations at 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 503 as the culmination of a major effort to develop technical standards in response to Section 405(d). These regulations govern three sewage sludge use and disposal practices: land application, surface disposal, and incineration. A key element in EPA's implementation of the Part 503 regulations is educating Agency and State personnel about these new requirements. Although the regulations are generally directly enforceable against all persons involved in the use and disposal of sewage sludge, they will also be implemented through permits issued to treatment works treating domestic sewage as defined in 40 CFR 122.22. Thus, the primary focus of the manual is to assist permit writers in incorporating the Part 503 requirements into permits; it serves as an update to the Guidance for Writing Case-by-Case Permit Conditions for Municipal Sewage Sludge (PB91-145508/HDM).

  19. Modeling of the reburning process using sewage sludge-derived syngas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Werle, Sebastian, E-mail: sebastian.werle@polsl.pl [Institute of Thermal Technology, Silesian University of Technology at Gliwice, 44-100 Gliwice, Konarskiego 22 (Poland)

    2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gasification provides an attractive method for sewage sludges treatment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gasification generates a fuel gas (syngas) which can be used as a reburning fuel. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Reburning potential of sewage sludge gasification gases was defined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Numerical simulation of co-combustion of syngases in coal fired boiler has been done. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Calculation shows that analysed syngases can provide higher than 80% reduction of NO{sub x}. - Abstract: Gasification of sewage sludge can provide clean and effective reburning fuel for combustion applications. The motivation of this work was to define the reburning potential of the sewage sludge gasification gas (syngas). A numerical simulation of the co-combustion process of syngas in a hard coal-fired boiler was done. All calculations were performed using the Chemkin programme and a plug-flow reactor model was used. The calculations were modelled using the GRI-Mech 2.11 mechanism. The highest conversions for nitric oxide (NO) were obtained at temperatures of approximately 1000-1200 K. The combustion of hard coal with sewage sludge-derived syngas reduces NO emissions. The highest reduction efficiency (>90%) was achieved when the molar flow ratio of the syngas was 15%. Calculations show that the analysed syngas can provide better results than advanced reburning (connected with ammonia injection), which is more complicated process.

  20. Land application of sewage sludge: A guide for land appliers on the requirements of the federal standards for the use or disposal of sewage sludge, 40 CFR part 503

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency promulgated a regulation at 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 503 to ensure that sewage sludge is used or disposed of in a way that protects human health and the environment. Part 503 imposes requirements for the land application, surface disposal, and incineration of sewage sludge. The manual focuses on land application, providing guidance to land appliers of sewage sludge. The purpose of the document is to provide the land applier with sufficient guidance to comply fully with all applicable Part 503 requirements. The guidance is structured to first provide a general understanding of the Rule and its underlying principles, including definitions of sewage sludge, land application, and an explanation of who under the Rule is considered a land applier.

  1. Mutagenic potential of plants grown on a soil amended with mutagenic municipal sewage sludge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fiedler, Daniel Alain

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and industrial firms contributing to this system, The sludge from the Houston, Texas, Sims Bayou treatment plant was aerobically digested, chemically precipitated with ferric chloride (FeC13) and flash dried in a C. E. Raymond cage mill flash dryer... the edible crop by flaking off of dried sludge or washing off with precipitation and allows for plant regrowth and pathogen die off. CHEMICALS Chemicals entering a wastewater treatment plant will become constituents of sewage sludge unless volatilized...

  2. Energy recovery from sewage sludge by means of fluidised bed gasification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gross, Bodo [IZES gGmbH, Altenkesseler Strasse 17, D-66115 Saarbruecken (Germany); Eder, Christian [CET, Christian Eder Technology, Eduard-Didion Strasse, D-66539 Neunkirchen (Germany); Grziwa, Peter [BISANZ Anlagenbau GmbH, Scheidter Strasse 2, D-66123 Saarbruecken (Germany); Horst, Juri [IZES gGmbH, Altenkesseler Strasse 17, D-66115 Saarbruecken (Germany)], E-mail: horst@izes.de; Kimmerle, Klaus [IZES gGmbH, Altenkesseler Strasse 17, D-66115 Saarbruecken (Germany)

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Because of its potential harmful impact on the environment, disposal of sewage sludge is becoming a major problem all over the world. Today the available disposal measures are at the crossroads. One alternative would be to continue its usage as fertiliser or to abandon it. Due to the discussions about soil contamination caused by sewage sludge, some countries have already prohibited its application in agriculture. In these countries, thermal treatment is now presenting the most common alternative. This report describes two suitable methods to directly convert sewage sludge into useful energy on-site at the wastewater treatment plant. Both processes consist mainly of four devices: dewatering and drying of the sewage sludge, gasification by means of fluidised bed technology (followed by a gas cleaning step) and production of useful energy via CHP units as the final step. The process described first (ETVS-Process) is using a high pressure technique for the initial dewatering and a fluidised bed technology utilising waste heat from the overall process for drying. In the second process (NTVS-Process) in addition to the waste heat, solar radiation is utilised. The subsequent measures - gasification, gas cleaning and electric and thermal power generation - are identical in both processes. The ETVS-Process and the NTVS-Process are self-sustaining in terms of energy use; actually a surplus of heat and electricity is generated in both processes.

  3. Sewage sludge dewatering using flowing liquid metals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carlson, L.W.

    1985-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates generally to the dewatering of sludge, and more particularly to the dewatering of a sewage sludge having a moisture content of about 50 to 80% in the form of small cellular micro-organism bodies having internally confined water.

  4. Designed ecosystem services: application of ecological principles in wastewater treatment engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graham, David W.; Smith, Val H.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    treatment processes around the world. (a) Sewage stabilization ponds in Brazil. (b) Complex lagoon and stabilization pond treatment system in France. (c) Anaerobic digesters in England. (d) Trickling bio-filter bed (viewed from the side) in Canada. (e...) Conventional wastewater treatment plant digestion in the US, including primary treatment, secondary treatment, secondary clarifiers, and solids. (a) C ou rte sy of TP Cu rti s (b) C ou rte sy of Ec os ite ® (a) (b) (c) (d) (e) DW Graham and VH Smith...

  5. Designed ecosystem services: application of ecological principles in wastewater treatment engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graham, David W.; Smith, Val H.

    2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    treatment processes around the world. (a) Sewage stabilization ponds in Brazil. (b) Complex lagoon and stabilization pond treatment system in France. (c) Anaerobic digesters in England. (d) Trickling bio-filter bed (viewed from the side) in Canada. (e...) Conventional wastewater treatment plant digestion in the US, including primary treatment, secondary treatment, secondary clarifiers, and solids. (a) C ou rte sy of TP Cu rti s (b) C ou rte sy of Ec os ite ® (a) (b) (c) (d) (e) DW Graham and VH Smith...

  6. Survivorship of meadow voles, Microtus pennsylvanicus, from sewage sludge-treated fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maly, M.S.

    1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A long-term field study was begun in 1977 at Miami University to evaluate the effects of land application of sewage sludge on experimental old-field communities. The effects of sludge application on toxic metal concentrations in meadow vole (Microtus pennsylvanicus) organs during the first two years of the study have been reported. During the first two years of sludge application, no detrimental effects were observed in vole survivorship as a result of sludge treatment.

  7. Preference of the green peach aphid, Myzus persicae, for plants grown in sewage sludges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Culliney, T.W.; Pimentel, D.

    1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since passage of the Clean Water Act in the 1970s, disposal of the millions of tonnes of sewage sludge generated annually has become a major concern of municipalities throughout the United States. With the range of other disposal options having narrowed in recent years, application of sludge to land is increasingly viewed as a practical and economical means to recycle this waste material. However, sludges from large cities with industries may be contaminated with various toxic chemicals, including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), other organic chemicals, such as pesticides, and heavy metals. Sludge application to land thus has the potential adversely to affect biota and the functioning of terrestrial ecosystems. The authors previously demonstrated marked reductions in fecundity and survival of green peach aphids, Myzus persicae, on collard plants, Brassica oleracea var. sabellica, growing in soil treated with chemically contaminated sludge as compared to aphids on plants growing either in soil treated with uncontaminated sludge of soil conventionally fertilized. Reduced plant growth and increased restlessness in aphids in the contaminated sludge treatment were also observed. The purpose of the present study was to examine more closely the influence of sludge contaminants on aphid settling behavior as indicated by differential preference of M. persicae for leaves of its collard host grown under different soil conditions.

  8. Effect of Microbial Activity on Trace Element Release from Sewage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    Effect of Microbial Activity on Trace Element Release from Sewage Sludge S H A B N A M Q U R E S H in mobilization of trace elements from land-applied wastewater sludge is not well-defined. Our study examined-effective management alternative. Unfor- tunately, sewage sludge also contains potentially toxic trace elements

  9. Growth of chrysanthemums in sewage sludge amended media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlutt, Edward Frederick

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of seedlings of Lironden- d ~tl' 'f, L. d C fl d, L. g t tt screened compost (224 metric tons/ha) made from degested sewage sludge and woodchips. However, Kirkham and Emino (50) found with increasing rates of liquid sewage sludge (50 ml...

  10. Review article The use of urban sewage sludge on pastures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Review article The use of urban sewage sludge on pastures: the cysticercosis threat Jacques appears to be one of the major pathological threats when sewage sludge is used to fertilise cattle highly prevalent) and Asia (Taenia saginata-like are prevalent). The processing of sludge and the delay

  11. The Composition of Fertilizing Value of Sewage Sludge.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

    1932-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to be definitely shed (5, 8, 12) ; so the work on the availability of nitrogen in sewage here reported has been directed chiefly to that in digested sludge. r EXPERIMENTS TO ESTIMATE THE AVAILABILITY OF NITROGEN IN SEWAGE SLUDGES efficiency of the nitrogen... case it was better than that of cottonseed meal, whi other cases is was nearly as good. The average of all the experimenl digested sewage sludge, gives an availability of 19 for its nitrogen colny with 100 for nitrate of soda, and 47 for cottonseed...

  12. Sewage sludge drying by energy recovery from OFMSW composting: Preliminary feasibility evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rada, Elena Cristina; Ragazzi, Marco; Villotti, Stefano [University of Trento, Department of Civil, Environmental and Mechanical Engineering, via Mesiano 77, I-38123 Trento (Italy); Torretta, Vincenzo, E-mail: vincenzo.torretta@uninsubria.it [Insubria University of Varese, Department of Biotechnologies and Life Sciences, Via G.B. Vico 46, I-21100 Varese (Italy)

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: • The aim is to support the drying of sewage sludge, using a solar greenhouse. • The system allows the exploitation of heat available from OFMSW aerobic process. • Another aim is to face the problem of OFMSW treatment, in particular food waste. • Energy and mass balances are presented for a case study. - Abstract: In this paper an original energy recovery method from composting is analyzed. The integrated system exploits the heat available from the aerobic biochemical process in order to support the drying of sewage sludge, using a specific solar greenhouse. The aim is to tackle the problem of organic waste treatment, with specific regard to food waste. This is done by optimizing the energy consumption of the aerobic process of composting, using the heat produced to solve a second important waste management problem such as the sewage waste treatment. Energy and mass balances are presented in a preliminary feasibility study. Referring to a composting plant with a capacity of 15,000 t/y of food waste, the estimation of the power from recovered heat for the entire plant resulted about 42 kW. The results demonstrated that the energy recoverable can cover part of the heat necessary for the treatment of sludge generated by the population served by the composting plant (in terms of food waste and green waste collection). The addition of a renewable source such as solar energy could cover the residual energy demand. The approach is presented in detail in order for it to be replicated in other case studies or at full scale applications.

  13. Specification of CuCrZr Alloy Properties after Various Thermo-Mechanical Treatments and Design Allowables including Neutron Irradiation Effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barabash, Vladimir [ITER Organization, Saint Paul Lez Durance, France] [ITER Organization, Saint Paul Lez Durance, France; Kalinin, G. M. [RDIPE, P.O. Box 788, 101000 Moscow, Russia] [RDIPE, P.O. Box 788, 101000 Moscow, Russia; Fabritsiev, Sergei A. [D.V. Efremov Scientific Research Institute, St. Petersburg, Russia] [D.V. Efremov Scientific Research Institute, St. Petersburg, Russia; Zinkle, Steven J [ORNL] [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Precipitation hardened CuCrZr alloy is a promising heat sink and functional material for various applica- tions in ITER, for example the first wall, blanket electrical attachment, divertor, and heating systems. Three types of thermo-mechanical treatment were identified as most promising for the various applica- tions in ITER: solution annealing, cold working and ageing; solution annealing and ageing; solution annealing and ageing at non-optimal condition due to specific manufacturing processes for engineer- ing-scale components. The available data for these three types of treatments were assessed and mini- mum tensile properties were determined based on recommendation of Structural Design Criteria for the ITER In-vessel Components. The available data for these heat treatments were analyzed for assess- ment of neutron irradiation effect. Using the definitions of the ITER Structural Design Criteria the design allowable stress intensity values are proposed for CuCrZr alloy after various heat treatments.

  14. Comparative assessment of municipal sewage sludge incineration, gasification and pyrolysis for a sustainable sludge-to-energy management in Greece

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samolada, M.C. [Dept. Secretariat of Environmental and Urban Planning – Decentralized Area Macedonian Thrace, Taki Oikonomidi 1, 54008 Thessaloniki (Greece); Zabaniotou, A.A., E-mail: azampani@auth.gr [Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Dept. of Chemical Engineering, University Box 455, University Campus, 541 24 Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: • The high output of MSS highlights the need for alternative routes of valorization. • Evaluation of 3 sludge-to-energy valorisation methods through SWOT analysis. • Pyrolysis is an energy and material recovery process resulting to ‘zero waste’. • Identification of challenges and barriers for MSS pyrolysis in Greece was investigated. • Adopters of pyrolysis systems face the challenge of finding new product markets. - Abstract: For a sustainable municipal sewage sludge management, not only the available technology, but also other parameters, such as policy regulations and socio-economic issues should be taken in account. In this study, the current status of both European and Greek Legislation on waste management, with a special insight in municipal sewage sludge, is presented. A SWOT analysis was further developed for comparison of pyrolysis with incineration and gasification and results are presented. Pyrolysis seems to be the optimal thermochemical treatment option compared to incineration and gasification. Sewage sludge pyrolysis is favorable for energy savings, material recovery and high added materials production, providing a ‘zero waste’ solution. Finally, identification of challenges and barriers for sewage sludge pyrolysis deployment in Greece was investigated.

  15. Montana Domestic Sewage Treatment Lagoons General Permit Fact Sheet | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 -Energieprojekte3 Climate Zone Subtype A. PlacesEnergyProgram JumpEnergyEnergy

  16. Montana Domestic Sewage Treatment Lagoons General Permit Information | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 -Energieprojekte3 Climate Zone Subtype A. PlacesEnergyProgram JumpEnergyEnergyEnergy

  17. Montana Domestic Sewage Treatment Lagoons General Permit | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 -Energieprojekte3 Climate Zone Subtype A. PlacesEnergyProgram

  18. Montana Notice of Intent: Domestic Sewage Treatment Lagoons General Permit

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 -Energieprojekte3 Climate Zone Subtype A.Information Conservation Service(MDEQ

  19. Montana Notice of Intent: Domestic Sewage Treatment Lagoons General Permit

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 -Energieprojekte3 Climate Zone Subtype A.Information Conservation

  20. Rules and Regulations for Sewage Sludge Management (Rhode Island)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of these rules and regulations is to ensure that sewage sludge that is treated, land applied, disposed, distributed, stockpiled or transported in the State of Rhode Island is done so in...

  1. Sandis irradiator for dried sewage solids. Final safety analysis report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morris, M.

    1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Analyses of the hazards associated with the operation of the Sandia irradiator for dried sewage solids, as well as methods and design considerations to minimize these hazards, are presented in accordance with DOE directives.

  2. Landfarming of municipal sewage sludge at Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tischler, M.L.; Pergler, C.; Wilson, M.; Mabry, D.; Stephenson, M.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The City of Oak Ridge, Tennessee, has been applying municipal sanitary sludge to 9 sites comprising 90 ha on the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) since 1983. Approximately 13,000,000 L are applied annually by spraying sludge (2 to 3% solids) under pressure from a tanker. Under an ongoing monitoring program, both the sludge and the soil in the application areas are analyzed for organic, inorganic, and radioactive parameters on a regular basis. Organic pollutants are analyzed in sludge on a semiannual basis and in the soil application areas on an annual basis. Inorganic parameters are analyzed daily (e.g., pH, total solids) or monthly (e.g., nitrogen, manganese) in sludge and annually in soil in application areas. Radionuclides (Co-60, Cs-137, I-131, Be-7, K-40, Ra-228, U-235, U-238) are scanned daily during application by the sewage treatment plant and analyzed weekly in composite sludge samples and annually in soil. Additionally, data on radioactive body burden for maximally exposed workers who apply the sludge show no detectable exposures. This monitoring program is comprehensive and is one of the few in the United States that analyzes radionuclides. Results from the monitoring program show heavy metals and radionuclides are not accumulating to levels in the soil application areas.

  3. Preparing sewage sludge for land application or surface disposal: A guide for preparers of sewage sludge on the monitoring, record keeping, and reporting requirements of the federal standards for the use of disposal of sewage sludge, 40 CFR part 503

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The document focuses on the monitoring, recordkeeping, and reporting requirements that apply to persons who prepare sewage sludge or a material derived from sewage sludge. It defines persons who prepare sewage sludge and then summarizes their general responsibilities. USEPA promulgated at 40 CFR Part 503 Phase 1 of the risk-based regulations that govern the final use or disposal of sewage sludge. The intent of the Federal program is to ensure that the use or disposal of sewage sludge occurs in a way that protects both human health and the environment. The Part 503 regulation establishes general requirements, pollutant limits, operational standards, and management practices, as well as monitoring, recordkeeping, and reporting requirements. These requirements apply to sewage sludge that is land applied, placed on a surface disposal site, or incinerated in a sewage sludge-only incinerator.

  4. Biosolids are the solids produced during municipal wastewater treatment. Composts are made from a variety of organic materials, including both urban and agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    ISSUE Biosolids are the solids produced during municipal wastewater treatment. Composts are made and compost users need information on the product's proper use, safety, and benefits. Furthermore, biosolids and compost producers need up-to-date information on making and marketing their products, as well

  5. Use of nutrients of sewage sludge in the initial development of Copaifera langsdorffii

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sampaio, Thalita Fernanda; Guerrini, Iraê Amaral; Croce, Ciro; de Toledo, Maria Angélica; Morales, Marina

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    under the 20 t ha -1 of sludge rate. Figure 1: CopaibaSupl. K) and sewage sludge doses (2.5, 5, 10, 15 e 20 t ha -dm Fe Mn Zn Table 2: Sewage sludge chemical characteristics.

  6. Impacts on groundwater due to land application of sewage sludge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Higgins, A.J.

    1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The project was designed to demonstrate the potential benefits of utilizing sewage sludge as a soil conditioner and fertilizer on Sassafras sandy loam soil. Aerobically digested, liquid sewage sludge was applied to the soil at rates of 0, 22.4, and 44.8 Mg of dry solids/ha for three consecutive years between 1978 and 1981. Groundwater, soil, and crop contamination levels were monitored to establish the maximum sewage solids loading rate that could be applied without causing environmental deterioration. The results indicate that application of 22.4 Mg of dry solids/ha of sludge is the upper limit to ensure protection of the groundwater quality on the site studied. Application rates at or slightly below 22.4 Mg of dry solids/ha are sufficient for providing plant nutrients for the dent corn and rye cropping system utilized in the study.

  7. Assessing nitrogen losses after sewage sludge spreading: A method based on simulation models and spreader

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Assessing nitrogen losses after sewage sludge spreading: A method based on simulation models performances. We define 45 sewage sludge spreading scenarios covering a wide range of situations in France. Several models are used to (i) assess nitrogen losses due to sewage sludge spreading and (ii) calculate

  8. Theoretical modeling of UV-Vis absorption and emission spectra in liquid state systems including vibrational and conformational effects: Explicit treatment of the vibronic transitions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D’Abramo, Marco [Supercomputing Applications and Innovation, CINECA, Via dei Tizii, 6, 00185 Rome (Italy) [Supercomputing Applications and Innovation, CINECA, Via dei Tizii, 6, 00185 Rome (Italy); Dipartimento di Chimica, Universitá Sapienza, P.le Aldo Moro, 5, 00185, Rome (Italy); Aschi, Massimiliano [Department of Physical and Chemical Sciences, University of Aquila, via Vetoio (Coppito 1), 67010 Aquila (Italy)] [Department of Physical and Chemical Sciences, University of Aquila, via Vetoio (Coppito 1), 67010 Aquila (Italy); Amadei, Andrea, E-mail: andrea.amadei@uniroma2.it [Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Chimiche Universita’ di Roma, Tor Vergata, via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, I-00133 Roma (Italy)] [Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Chimiche Universita’ di Roma, Tor Vergata, via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, I-00133 Roma (Italy)

    2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Here, we extend a recently introduced theoretical-computational procedure [M. D’Alessandro, M. Aschi, C. Mazzuca, A. Palleschi, and A. Amadei, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 114102 (2013)] to include quantum vibrational transitions in modelling electronic spectra of atomic molecular systems in condensed phase. The method is based on the combination of Molecular Dynamics simulations and quantum chemical calculations within the Perturbed Matrix Method approach. The main aim of the presented approach is to reproduce as much as possible the spectral line shape which results from a subtle combination of environmental and intrinsic (chromophore) mechanical-dynamical features. As a case study, we were able to model the low energy UV-vis transitions of pyrene in liquid acetonitrile in good agreement with the experimental data.

  9. Forest land application of sewage sludge on the Savannah River Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, C.E. (comp.)

    1989-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1980, a sewage sludge application study was initiated on the Savannah River Plant to evaluate the effects of sludge additions on nutrient cycling processes in loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) forest ecosystems and to determine whether or not such additions beneficially enhance forest productivity. Sewage sludge, either as a liquid anaerobic sludge at 0, 402, or 804 kg N/ha (360 and 720 lb/ac) containing approximately 7% N (oven dry) or a solid aerobic material at 632 kg N/ha (560 lb/ac) with approximately 1.3% N (oven dry), was applied to 1-, 3-, 8-, and 28-year-old loblolly pine stands on sandy and clayey upper coastal plain soils. A total of 525,000 gallons of liquid sludge and 560 tons of solid sludge was applied on 11.6 hectares (28.7 acres) of loblolly pine forest plots. Sludge additions were monitored to determine availability and movement so that potential impacts could be evaluated on water quality, nutrient and heavy metal cycling, soil and forest floor, understory vegetation, tree foliage, stand growth, biomass production, and wood quality. This study concluded that using liquid sludge at rates of 400 kg N/ha or less as a silvicultural treatment to fertilize pulp and sawtimber loblolly pine stands resulted in increased forest productivity without environmental or wood quality degradation. Application recommendations for stand age and loading rates for management purposes are addressed.

  10. Urban Sewage Delivery Heat Transfer System (2): Heat Transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, C.; Wu, R.; Li, X.; Li, G.; Zhuang, Z.; Sun, D.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The thimble delivery heat-transfer (TDHT) system is one of the primary modes to utilize the energy of urban sewage. Using the efficiency-number of transfer units method ( ), the heat-transfer efficiencies of the parallel-flow and reverse-flow TDTH...

  11. APPLICATION OF SEWAGE SLUDGES AND COMPOSTS BPG NOTE 6

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the nutrients without resulting in damage to the tree stand. Soil pH will be affected by the application or increase pH · Most immobilise metal contamination · Act as slow release fertiliser (nitrogen and phosphorus NOTE 6 PAGE 2 Applications of sewage sludges and composts Forestry Tree growth on nutrient

  12. The long-term and the short-term at a cropping municipal sewage sludge disposal facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Welby, C.W. (North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States). Dept. of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences)

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The City of Raleigh, NC, chose land application of municipal sewage sludge as a means of reducing pollution to the Neuse River. The Neuse River Waste Water Treatment Plant (NRWWTP) is located in the Piedmont Province of North Carolina. The soils at the facility are derived largely from the Rolesville Granite. Sewage sludge is applied to over 640 acres of cropland, owned in fee or leased. In making the policy decision for use of the sludge land application method 20 or so years ago, the City had to evaluate the potential for heavy metal accumulation in the soils and plants as well as the potential for ground-water contamination from the nitrate-nitrogen. The city also had to make a policy decision about limiting the discharge of heavy metals to the sewer system. Study of data from monitoring wells demonstrate that well position is a key in determining whether or not nitrate-nitrogen contamination is detected. Data from a three-year study suggest that nitrate-nitrogen moves fairly rapidly t the water table, although significant buildup in nitrogen-nitrogen may take a number of years. Evidence exists suggesting that the time between application of sewage sludge and an increase of nitrate-nitrogen at the water table may be on the order of nine months to a year. It is apparent that in the case of municipal sewage sludge application one can anticipate some nitrate-nitrogen buildup and that the public policy on drinking water standards must recognize this fact.

  13. Application of sewage sludge to non-agricultural ecosystems: Impacts of nitrogen on forests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Efroymson, R.A.; Tharp, M.L.; Luxmoore, R.J.; Sample, B.E.; Barnthouse, L.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Daniel, F.B. [Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Clean Water Act (CWA) of 1977 directed EPA to establish standards for use and disposal of sewage sludge (biosolids). This report is part of a larger study evaluating nutrient and contaminant impacts associated with the land application of biosolids in non-agricultural ecosystems. Ecological risk assessments rarely focus on nutrients as stressors. The nutrient components of municipal sewage sludge may impact tree community composition, growth and production, habitat and forage quality for wildlife, and nutrient cycling. The focus here is on three forest ecosystems: northwestern Douglas-fir forest (Pack Forest, WA), southeastern loblolly pine plantation (Athens, GA), and eastern deciduous forest (Hubbard Brook, NH). A model called LINKAGES has been developed at ORNL to examine the relationships between nitrogen cycling and long-term forest stand dynamics, limited by climate and soil water status. Plant-available nitrogen from biosolids is added in several application scenarios and compared to the no-amendment case. All changes are noted, even if they may be viewed as benefits rather than risks. Model outputs include: above-ground biomass, individual species biomass, net above-ground production, leaf litter, evapotranspiration, available nitrogen, and dead trunks. The changes in plant community composition and production are dependent on the rate, frequency, and duration of sludge application and on the age of the stand at the time of application. Model outputs are compared to empirical studies of forests where biosolids have been applied.

  14. Oxygen-enriched multiple-hearth sewage sludge incineration demonstration. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oxygen-enhanced multiple-hearth sludge incineration was the focus of a five-month joint study by Praxair and the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority. Testing and demonstration were conducted in Rochester NY, at Monroe County`s Frank E. Van Lare Sewage Treatment Plant. A simple retrofit of high-momentum oxygen lances created a convection hearth in which convective heat and mass transfer with the drying sludge were greatly enhanced, while hearth temperatures were moderated by the wet sludge to prevent overheating. Based on the results of short- and long-term controlled tests discussed in this report, oxygen enhancement of multiple-hearth sludge incinerators can be economically viable, with a savings between $30 and $60 per hour at Van Lare based upon increased sludge throughput and reduced fuel consumption.

  15. Application of Municipal Sewage Sludge to Forest and Degraded Land

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D.H. Marx, C. R. Berry, and P. P. Kormanik

    1995-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper summarizes research done over a decade at the Savannah River Site and elsewhere in the South evaluating the benefits of land application of municipal wastes. Studies have demonstrated that degraded lands, ranging from borrow pits to mine spoils can be successfully revegetated using a mixture of composed municipal sewage sludge and other amendments. The studies have demonstrated a practical approach to land application and restoration.

  16. Soil solution chemistry of a fly ash-, poultry litter-, and sewage sludge-amended soil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, B.P.; Miller, W.P.

    2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mixing coal fly ash (FA) with organic wastes to provide balanced soil amendments offers a potential viable use of this industrial by-product. When such materials are land-applied to supply nutrients for agronomic crops, trace element contaminant solubility must be evaluated. In this study, major and trace element soil solution concentrations arising from application of fly ash, organic wastes, and mixtures of the two were compared in a laboratory incubation. Two fly ashes, broiler poultry litter (PL), municipal sewage sludge (SS), and mixtures of FA with either PL or SS were mixed with a Cecil sandy loam (fine, kaolinitic, thermic Typic Kanhapludult) at rates of 32.3, 8.1, and 16.1 g kg{sup {minus}1} soil for FA, PL, and SS, respectively. Treatments were incubated at 22 C at 17% moisture content and soil solution was periodically extracted by centrifugation over 33 d. Initial soil solution concentrations of As, Mo, Se, and Cu were significantly greater in FA/OL treatments than the respective FA-only treatments. For Cu, increased solution concentrations were attributable to increased loading rates in FA/PL mixtures. Solution Cu concentrations were strongly correlated with dissolved C (R{sup 2} > 0.96) in all PL treatments. Significant interactive effects for solution Mo and Se concentrations were observed for the FA/PL and may have resulted from the increased pH and competing anion concentrations of these treatments. Solution As concentrations showed a significant interactive effect for one FA/PL mixture. For the individual treatments, As was more soluble in the Pl treatment than either FA treatment. Except for soluble Se from on FA/SS mixture, trace element solubility in the FA/SS mixtures was not significantly different than the respective FA-only treatment.

  17. Estimation of E. coli Concentrations from Failing On-Site Wastewater Treatment Facilities (OWTS) Using GIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virani, Afreen Shiraz

    2014-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Failing Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems (OWTSs) have been identified as a significant threat to water quality, discharging significant amounts of inadequately treated sewage effluents. When developing a Watershed Protection Plan (WPP), OWTS has...

  18. GIS Datasets Specific to the US (These do not include VENTYX, PLATTS or HSIP data.) I. Boundary Files

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Biomass 1. By county 2. Sub county 3. Biodiesel facilities 4. Power Plants 5. Ethanol Plants 6. Pulp. Sewage Treatment Plants d. Landfills iii. Geothermal 1. Hydrothermal wells 2. EGS potential 3/TMY Sites 2. Latitude Tilt (PV) 3. Direct Normal (CSP) 4. Global Horizontal 5. EW 1axis tracker 6

  19. Analysis of Energy and Soft Dirt in an Urban Untreated Sewage Source Heat Pump System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qian, J.; Sun, D.; Li, X.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    When using urban untreated sewage as a cool and heat source of heat pump, it is unavoidable to form soft dirt. Based on the method of exergy, an analysis is given of the impact the dirt growth of a tube-shell sewage heat exchanger will have...

  20. Microbial acidification and pH effects on trace element release from sewage sludge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    Microbial acidification and pH effects on trace element release from sewage sludge Shabnam Qureshia; Trace metals; Mobilization; Land application 1. Introduction Trace elements in land-applied wastewater sludge (sewage biosolids) are potentially phyto- or zoo-toxic if present in sufficient concentration

  1. Biohydrogen production from oil palm frond juice and sewage sludge by a metabolically engineered

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Thomas K.

    Biohydrogen production from oil palm frond juice and sewage sludge by a metabolically engineered Accepted 16 June 2013 Available online 13 July 2013 Keywords: Biohydrogen Escherichia coli Oil palm frond from oil palm frond (OPF) juice and sewage sludge as substrates. Substrate improvement was accomplished

  2. Activated carbon and biochar amendments decrease pore-water concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in sewage sludge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lehmann, Johannes

    hydrocarbons (PAHs) in sewage sludge Patryk Oleszczuk a,b, , Sarah E. Hale a , Johannes Lehmann c , Gerard Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons Bioavailability Sewage sludge a b s t r a c t The aim of the research of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in sewage sludge. Two different biochars (MSB and PMW) and two ACs

  3. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Pantex Sewage Reservoir - TX 03

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou are herePAOsborne Co - OH 34Pantex Sewage Reservoir

  4. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 232: Area 25 Sewage Lagoons, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    US Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office

    1999-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report (CADD/CR) has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 232, Area 25 Sewage Lagoons, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Located at the Nevada Test Site in Nevada, approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, CAU 232 is comprised of Corrective Action Site 25-03-01, Sewage Lagoon. This CADD/CR identifies and rationalizes the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's (DOE/NV's) recommendation that no corrective action is deemed necessary for CAU 232. The Corrective Action Decision Document and Closure Report have been combined into one report because sample data collected during the July 1999 corrective action investigation (CAI) activities disclosed no evidence of contamination at the site. Contaminants of potential concern (COPCs) addressed during the CAI included total volatile organic compounds, total semivolatile organic compounds, total Resource Conservation and Recovery Act metals, total pesticides, total herbicides, total petroleum hydrocarbons (gasoline and diesel/oil range), polychlorinated biphenyls, isotopic uranium, isotopic plutonium, strontium-90, and gamma-emitting radionuclides. The data confirmed that none of the COPCs identified exceeded preliminary action levels outlined in the CAIP; therefore, no corrective actions were necessary for CAU 232. After the CAI, best management practice activities were completed and included installation of a fence and signs to limit access to the lagoons, cementing Manhole No. 2 and the diverter box, and closing off influent and effluent ends of the sewage lagoon piping. As a result of the CAI, the DOE/NV recommended that: (1) no further actions were required; (2) no Corrective Action Plan would be required; and (3) no use restrictions were required to be placed on the CAU.

  5. Availability and distribution of heavy metals, nitrogen, and phosphorus from sewage sludge in the plant-soil-water continuum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rappaport, B.D.; Scott, J.D.; Martens, D.C.; Reneau, R.B.; Simpson, T.W.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research was conducted during 1984 and 1985 to determine Cd, Cu, N, Ni, P, and Zn availabilities to barley (Hordeum vulgare) and corn (Zea mays) grown on four sludge-amended soils. An aerobically digested sewage sludge, which was dewatered for approximately 2 years on sandbeds, was obtained from a sewage-treatment plant with major industrial inputs. A 14-day anaerobic N incubation study indicated that mineralization of sludge organic N varied from 9.2% at the 42 Mg ha(-1) sludge rate to 4.2% at the 210 Mg ha(-1) rate. This relatively low percentage of N mineralized from the sludge may reflect the inhibitory effects of the high sludge-metal levels on N transformations and the changes in sludge composition during long-term dewatering on sandbeds. Sludge application increased crop yields, except where the amounts of N mineralized from the sludge was inadequate to supply the N requirement of the crop. Crop yields were not decreased by either metal phytotoxity or P deficiency on the four sludge-amended soils.

  6. Urban Sewage Delivery Heat Transfer System (1): Flow Resistance and Energy Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, C.; Wu, R.; Li, G.; Li, X.; Huang, L.; Sun, D.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The thimble delivery heat-transfer (TDHT) system is one of the primary modes to utilize the energy of urban sewage. Given the schematic diagram of TDHT system, introducing the definition of equivalent fouling roughness height, and using the Niklaus...

  7. College of Agricultural Sciences Agricultural Research and Cooperative Extension Land Application of Sewage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaye, Jason P.

    College of Agricultural Sciences · Agricultural Research and Cooperative Extension Land Application of Sewage Sludge in Pennsylvania Effects of Biosolids on Soil and Crop Quality ENVIRONME NTAL· ISSUES land application of biosolids represents a beneficial reuse alternative to landfill disposal

  8. Case Study - The Challenge: Saving Energy at a Sewage Lift Station...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    With a total implementation cost of 16,000, the project yielded a simple payback of 5.4 years. Case Study - The Challenge: Saving Energy at a Sewage Lift Station Through Pump...

  9. Internship Contract (Includes Practicum)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thaxton, Christopher S.

    Internship Contract (Includes Practicum) Student's name-mail: _________________________________________ Internship Agency Contact Agency Name: ____________________________________ Address-mail: __________________________________________ Location of Internship, if different from Agency: ________________________________________________ Copies

  10. Soil solution chemistry of sewage-sludge incinerator ash and phosphate fertilizer amended soil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bierman, P.M.; Rosen, C.J.; Bloom, P.R.; Nater, E.A. [Univ. of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN (United States)

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The chemical composition of the soil provides useful information on the feasibility of amending agricultural land with municipal and industrial waste, because the soil solution is the medium for most soil chemical reactions, the mobile phase in soils, and the medium for mineral adsorption by plant roots. The soil solutions studies in this research were from plots in a 4-yr field experiment conducted to evaluate the effects of the trace metals and P in sewage-sludge incinerator ash. Treatments compared ash with equivalent P rates from triple-superphosphate fertilizer and a control receiving no P application. Ash and phosphate fertilizer were applied annually at rates of 35, 70, and 140 kg citrate-soluble P ha{sup -1}. Cumulative ash applications during 4 yr amounted to 3.6, 7.2, and 14.4 Mg ash ha{sup -1}. Soil solutions were obtained by centrifugation-immiscible liquid displacement using a fluorocarbon displacing agent. Following chemical analysis, a chemical speciation model was used to determine possible solubility-controlling minerals for trace metals and P, and correlations between solution composition and plant uptake were analyzed. 37 refs., 5 tabs.

  11. Sewage sludge as an amendment for calcareous bauxite mine spoils reclamation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brofas, G.; Michopoulos, P.; Alifragis, D.

    2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dried aerobically digested sewage sludge applied at seven rates (0, 10, 20, 40, 60, 80, and 120 Mg ha{sup {minus}1}) in a field experiment on calcareous bauxite mine spoils significantly increased the available water capacity, concentrations of organic matter, total N, extractable P (Olsen), exchangeable Mg{sup 2+}, and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA)-extractable Cu, Mn, Zn, and Pb of mine spoils. Total N and extractable P concentrations decreased with time after sludge application. The DTPA-extractable Cu concentration was high 4 yr after application at sludge rates of 80 and 120 Mg Ha{sup {minus}1}. Extractable Cu and Zn concentrations correlated significantly and positively with Cu and Zn concentrations in burnet (Sanguisorba minor subsp. minor) and fiddleneck (Phacelia tanacetifolia Benth) tissue. Sludge application depressed plant Mn uptake. Plant biomass, plant density, and foliar cover significantly increased with treatment rates in the first and fourth growing seasons but decreased with time. Fiddleneck and burnet were the species favored by the high rate of sludge application.

  12. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 230: Area 22 Sewage Lagoons and Corrective Action Unit 320: Area 22 Desert Rock Airport Strainer Box Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. S. Tobiason

    2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Closure Report (CR) describes the remediation activities performed and the results of verification sampling conducted at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 230, Area 22 Sewage Lagoons and CAU 320, Area 22 Desert Rock Airport Strainer Box. The CAU is currently listed in Appendix III of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996). The CAU is located in Area 22 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) (Figure 1) and consists of the following Corrective Action Sites (CASs): 22-03-01- Sewage Lagoon (CAU 230); and 22-99-01- Strainer Box (CAU 320). Included with CAS 22-99-01 is a buried Imhoff tank and a sludge bed. These CAUs will be collectively referred to in this plan as the Area 22 Sewage Lagoons site. Site characterization activities were done during September 1999. Characterization of the manholes associated with the septic system leading to the Imhoff tank was done during March 2000. The results of the characterization presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) indicated that only the sludge bed (CAS 22-99-01) contained constituents of concern (COC) above action levels and required remediation (U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office [DOE/NV], 2000a).

  13. K-Area and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Sites groundwater monitoring report, Third quarter 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, C.Y.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During third quarter 1992, the three wells at the K-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (KSS wells) and the three wells at the Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Site (PSS wells) were sampled for analyses required each quarter or annually by South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Construction Permit 13,173 and for base-neutral/acid semivolatile constituents. None of the analytical results exceeded standards.

  14. The determination of settling velocities for sewage sludge disposed at 106-Mile Site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hernandez, Daniel Saul

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE DBTERMZNATZON OF SETTLING VELOCZTZES FOR SEWAGE SLUDGE DZSPOSED AT 106-MILE SITE A Thesis by DANIEL SAUL HERNANDEZ Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1991 Major Subject: Civil Engineering THB DETERMZNATZON OF SBTTLZNG VELOCZTZES FOR SEWAGE SLUDGE DZSPOSBD AT 106-MZLE SZTB A Thesis by DANIEL SAUL HERNANDEZ Approved as to style and content by: James S. Bonner '(Chair...

  15. Pump apparatus including deconsolidator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sonwane, Chandrashekhar; Saunders, Timothy; Fitzsimmons, Mark Andrew

    2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A pump apparatus includes a particulate pump that defines a passage that extends from an inlet to an outlet. A duct is in flow communication with the outlet. The duct includes a deconsolidator configured to fragment particle agglomerates received from the passage.

  16. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 230: Area 22 Sewage Lagoons and Corrective Action Unit 320: Area 22 Desert Rock Air port Strainer Box, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office

    1999-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operation Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 230/320 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 230 consists of Corrective Action Site (CAS) 22-03-01, Sewage Lagoon; while CAU 320 consists of CAS 22-99-01, Strainer Box. These CAUs are referred to as CAU 230/320 or the Sewage Lagoons Site. The Sewage Lagoons Site also includes an Imhoff tank, sludge bed, and associated buried sewer piping. Located in Area 22, the site was used between 1951 to 1958 for disposal of sanitary sewage effluent from the historic Camp Desert Rock Facility at the Nevada Test Site in Nevada. Based on site history, the contaminants of potential concern include volatile organic compounds (VOCs), semivolatile organic compounds, total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH), and radionuclides. Vertical migration is estimated to be less than 12 feet below ground surface, and lateral migration is limited to the soil immediately adjacent to or within areas of concern. The proposed investigation will involve a combination of field screening for VOCs and TPH using the direct-push method and excavation using a backhoe to gather soil samples for analysis. Gamma spectroscopy will also be conducted for waste management purposes. Sampling locations will be biased to suspected worst-case areas including the nearby sludge bed, sewage lagoon inlet(s) and outlet(s), disturbed soil surrounding the lagoons, surface drainage channel south of the lagoons, and the area near the Imhoff tank. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

  17. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 230: Area 22 Sewage Lagoons and Corrective Action Unit 320: Area 22 Desert Rock Airport Strainer Box, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    US DOE/Nevada Operations Office

    1999-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operation Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 230/320 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 230 consists of Corrective Action Site (CAS) 22-03-01, Sewage Lagoon; while CAU 320 consists of CAS 22-99-01, Strainer Box. These CAUs are referred to as CAU 230/320 or the Sewage Lagoons Site. The Sewage Lagoons Site also includes an Imhoff tank, sludge bed, and associated buried sewer piping. Located in Area 22, the site was used between 1951 to 1958 for disposal of sanitary sewage effluent from the historic Camp Desert Rock Facility at the Nevada Test Site in Nevada. Based on site history, the contaminants of potential concern include volatile organic compounds (VOCs), semivolatile organic compounds, total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH), and radionuclides. Vertical migration is estimated to be less than 12 feet below ground surface, and lateral migration is limited to the soil immediately adjacent to or within areas of concern. The proposed investigation will involve a combination of field screening for VOCs and TPH using the direct-push method and excavation using a backhoe to gather soil samples for analysis. Gamma spectroscopy will also be conducted for waste management purposes. Sampling locations will be biased to suspected worst-case areas including the nearby sludge bed, sewage lagoon inlet(s) and outlet(s), disturbed soil surrounding the lagoons, surface drainage channel south of the lagoons, and the area near the Imhoff tank. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

  18. I N F O R M A T I O N N O T E Use of Sewage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of sludge to land. Fourthly, sewage sludge is only one of several types of organic waste now being produced1 I N F O R M A T I O N N O T E Use of Sewage Sludges and Composts in Forestry J A N U A R Y 2 0 0 saw a large national research campaign to investigate the potential benefits of using sewage sludges

  19. Volatile organic compound losses from sewage sludge-amended soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, S.C.; Jones, K.C.

    1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) applied to soil in sludge have been assumed to disappear quickly and completely. The VOC behavior in sludge-amended soils has been studied previously only in laboratory systems where the sludged soil has been spiked with compounds of interest. Behavior in these systems may not necessarily represent compound behavior in field soils to which contaminated sludge is added. A series of laboratory microcosm experiments were designed therefore to investigate the behavior of toluene, ethyl benzene, o-, m-, and p-xylene applied to soil in contaminated sludge, and factors influencing loss processes. The VOC loss from sludge-amended soil was well described by a simple one step pseudo-first-order model but in certain soils was better described by a two step first-order model. Volatilization was the predominant loss process. Rates of loss depended on sludge application rate, method of sludge application, soil properties, and on compound characteristics. Experiments indicated that spiking sludge-amended soils gave a reasonable indication of VOC loss rates from systems amended with contaminated sludge at least over a period of 23 d. The majority of VOCs applied to soils in sludge volatilizes quickly to the atmosphere over a few to 10s of days with a small fraction lost more slowly. Potential for VOC crop uptake, livestock ingestion, and contamination of ground water is low under routine, managed applications of sewage sludge to agricultural land.

  20. Crop and soil responses to sewage sludge applied to reclaimed prime farmland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhai, Qiang; Barnhisel, R.I. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Improvements in reclamation of surface mined prime farmland may be obtained by adding sewage sludge to topsoil and subsoil. This prime farmland reclamation study was done in western Kentucky. The experiment was conducted to investigate effects of the sludge amendment to topsoil and subsoil on soil and crop responses. The experiment showed, in most cases at highest application rates, that the sludge addition significantly increased the soil organic matter, total N content, and available P levels. However, water holding capacity, CEC, and exchangeable cations were not significantly affected. Higher microbial populations and activates were also obtained. The wheat biomass, tiller number, tissue N, grain N, grain yield, and N removal in grain were well correlated with application rates of sewage sludge. Corn also responded positively to additions of sewage sludge. The corn ear-leaf N concentration, grain yield, and grain N removal increased with application rates of sewage sludge. Experiments indicated that topsoil and subsoil sewage sludge addition was beneficial practices in terms of increasing crop yield and improving some soil properties.

  1. Effect of Cd-Enriched Sewage Sludge on Plant Growth, Nutrients and Heavy Metals Concentrations in the Soil–Plant System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rusan, Munir Mohammad; Athamneh, Bayan Mahmoud

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    from waste-activated sludge, Soil Sci. Soc. Am. J, 60:505-utilization of sewage sludge. A twenty-year study atCd-enriched sewage sludge (SS) and diammonium phosphate (

  2. Fate of Radionuclides in Wastewater Treatment Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shabani Samgh Abadi, Farzaneh

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Used Radionuclides in Sewage Sludge. Water, Air, and Soilin Ground Level Air and Sewage Sludge. Water, Air, and SoilMeans of Measurements on Sewage Sludge. Water, Air, and Soil

  3. Oxygen-enriched coincineration of MSW and sewage sludge: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Federal regulations banning ocean dumping of sewage sludge coupled with stricter regulations on the disposal of sewage sludge in landfills have forced municipalities, especially those in the northeast United States, to consider alternate methods for disposal of this solid waste. Coincineration of municipal solid waste (MSW) and sludge has proven to be economically attractive for both Europe and Japan, but has not yet proven to be a viable sludge disposal technology in the United States because of a history of operational problems in existing facilities. The most prevalent problem in coincinerating MSW and a dewatered sewage sludge (15 to 25% solids) is incomplete sludge combustion. Incomplete sludge combustion is primarily a function of sludge particle size, occurring when the surface of the sludge particle dries and hardens, while the inner mass is unaffected. This phenomenon is commonly referred to in the industry as the {open_quotes}hamburger effect.{close_quotes} In an effort to promote technology development in this area, Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. teamed with the US Department of Energy (DOE) through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to evaluate a new process being developed for the disposal of a dewatered sewage sludge, {open_quotes}Oxygen-Enriched Coincineration of MSW and Sewage Sludge.{close_quotes} This report provides a comprehensive summary of the pilot demonstration test program for oxygen-enriched coincineration of MSW and sewage sludge. This report describes the pilot test facility, instrumentation, and methods of data collection and data analyses; describes how the tests were executed; and discusses the test results. Recommendations for the future development of this technology in the current marketplace are also provided.

  4. Technical support document for the surface disposal of sewage sludge. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The document provides the technical background and justification for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) final regulation (40 CFR Part 503) covering the surface disposal of sewage sludge. The document summarizes current practices in land application and presents data supporting the risk assessment methodology used to derive human health and environmental risk-based limits for contaminants in sewage sludge placed on surface disposal sites. The management practices associated with surface disposal are outlined and the different pathways by which contaminants reach highly-exposed individuals (HEIs) through surface disposal are discussed.

  5. Technical support document for land application of sewage sludge. Volume 1. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, A.; Beyer, L.; Rookwood, M.; Pacenka, J.; Bergin, J.

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The document provides the technical background and justification for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) final regulation (40 CFR Part 503) covering the land application of sewage sludge. The document summarizes current practices in land application and presents data supporting the risk assessment methodology used to derive human health and environmental risk-based limits for contaminants in land applied sewage sludge. The management practices associated with land application are outlined and the different pathways by which contaminants reach highly-exposed individuals (HEIs) through land application are discussed.

  6. The effect of sewage sludge on the physical properties of lignite overburden

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cocke, Catherine Lynn

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . 47:770-775. 24. Ryan, J. A. , 0. E. Keeney, and L. M. Walsh. 1973. Nitrogen transformation and availability of an anaerobically digested sewage sludge in soil. J. Environ. Qual. 2:489-492. 32 25. Soppec, W. E. , and S. Kerr. 1981. Revegetation... if water is to penetrate downward. A study using raw and digested sewage sludge added to a Beltsville silt loam soil at 5% by weight resulted in an increase in percent water stable aggregates with the addition of sludge (Epstein, 1975). After 175 days...

  7. Sustainable Use of Resources Recycling of Sewage Treatment Plant Water in Concrete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    . The concrete industry is a significant contributor to air pollution and also a consumer of vast quantities widely used construction material in the world. Production of portland cement used in concrete produces is one of the largest water consuming industries. Approximately 150 liters of water is required per cu. m

  8. Study of Performance of Heat Pump Usage in Sewage Treatment and Fouling Impact on System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, Y.; Yao, Y.; Ma, Z.; Na, W.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    deteriorated performance of the compressor, and a decrease in EER and refrigerant mass flow rate....

  9. Heavy metal balances of an Italian soil as affected by sewage sludge and Bordeaux mixture applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moolenaar, S.W. [Wageningen Agricultural Univ. (Netherlands); Beltrami, P. [Univ. Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Piacenza (Italy)

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Applications of sewage sludge and Bordeaux mixture (Bm) (a mixture of copper sulfate and lime) add heavy metals to the soil. At an experimental farm in the Cremona district (Italy), the authors measured current heavy metal contents in soil and their removal via harvested products. They also measured heavy metal adsorption by soil from this farm. With these data, projections were made of the long-term development of heavy metal (Cd, Cu, and Zn) contents in soil, crop removal, and leaching at different application rates of sewage sludge and Bm. These projections were compared with existing quality standards of the European Union (EU) and Italy with regard to soil and groundwater. The calculations reveal that the permitted annual application rates of sewage sludge and Bm are likely to result in exceedance of groundwater and soil standards. Sewage sludge applications, complying with the Italian legal limits, may pose problems for Cd, Cu, and Zn within 30, 70, and 100 yr, respectively. Furthermore, severe Cu pollution of integrated and especially organic (Bm only) vineyards is unavoidable with the currently allowed application rates of Bm. The results suggest that the current Italian soil protection policy as well as the EU policy are not conducive of a sustainable heavy metal management in agroecosystems.

  10. Fractal analysis of soil water hysteresis as influenced by sewage sludge application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perfect, Ed

    Fractal analysis of soil water hysteresis as influenced by sewage sludge application G. Ojeda a,, E) and a loamy sand soil (Typic Haplustalf) from central Catalonia (NE Spain) was investigated using fractal analysis. First, we proposed a composite fractal model that covers both the low and high suction regimes

  11. NITROGEN REMOVAL FOR ON-SITE SEWAGE DISPOSAL: A RECIRCULATING SAND FILTER/ROCK TANK DESIGN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gold, Art

    NITROGEN REMOVAL FOR ON-SITE SEWAGE DISPOSAL: A RECIRCULATING SAND FILTER/ROCK TANK DESIGN, C. G. McKiel ABSTRACT: The nitrogen removal abilities of recirculating sand filter/rock tank (RSF) systems and conventional septic tank/soil absorption trench systems were compared in a field laboratory

  12. Removing oestrogenic compounds from sewage effluent Andrew Johnson and Richard Darton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Darton, Richard

    of intersex roach, with oocytes in the testes, downstream of many domestic sewage effluents in the UK (figure 2). #12;3 Figures 2(a) Roach fish. 2(b) Testis of intersex roach showing presence of ova within chemicals, suggesting that these roach had been exposed to similar chemicals in the wild. Initially

  13. Utilizing New Binder Materials for Green Building has Zero Waste by Recycling Slag and Sewage Sludge Ash

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeedan, S. R.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    binding material to save energy and to produce new innovative zero materials waste . The current research aims to investigate new binder materials as alternative of Portland cement. Alkali activated slag (AAS) blended with sewage sludge ash (SSA...

  14. Lagoon Seepage Testing Report for Central Facilities Area (CFA) Sewage Lagoons at Idaho National Laboratory, Butte County, Idaho

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bridger Morrison

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    J-U-B ENGINEERS, Inc. (J-U-B) performed seepage tests on the CFA Wastewater Lagoons 1, 2, and 3 between August 26th and September 22nd, 2014. The lagoons were tested to satisfy the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) Rules (IDAPA 58.01.16) that require all lagoons be tested at a frequency of every 10 years and the Compliance Activity CA-141-03 in the DEQ Wastewater Reuse Permit for the CFA Sewage Treatment Plant (LA-000141-03). The lagoons were tested to determine if the average seepage rates are less than 0.25 in/day, the maximum seepage rate allowed for lagoons built prior to April 15, 2007. The average seepage rates were estimated for each lagoon and are given in Table-ES1. The average seepage rates for Lagoons 1 and 2 are less than the allowable seepage rate of 0.25 in/day. Lagoon 1 and 2 passed the seepage test and will not have to be tested again until the year 20241. However, the average seepage rate for Lagoon 3 appears to exceed the allowable seepage rate of 0.25 in/day which means the potential source for the excessive leakage should be investigated further.

  15. ASSESSING GHG EMISSIONS FROM SLUDGE TREATMENT AND DISPOSAL ROUTES THE METHOD BEHIND GESTABOUES TOOL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    .pradel@irstea.fr EXECUTIVE SUMMARY In 2007, 1 100 000 tons of sewage sludge were produced in France. This figure is constantly increasing and sludges have to be eliminated. Four disposal routes are currently possible: landASSESSING GHG EMISSIONS FROM SLUDGE TREATMENT AND DISPOSAL ROUTES ­ THE METHOD BEHIND GESTABOUES

  16. Land application and distribution and marketing of sewage sludge: technical support document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides the technical background and justification for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) proposed regulation (40 CFR Part 503) covering the land application and distribution and marketing of sewage sludge. The document summarizes current practices in land application and presents data supporting the risk-assessment methodology used to derive human health and environmental risk-based limits for contaminants in land-applied sewage sludge. The underlying assumptions of the methodology, embodied in a series of computer models, are discussed, and the risk-based contaminant limits derived by the models are presented. The three management practices associated with land application are outlined, and the twelve different pathways by which contaminants reach most-exposed individuals through land application are discussed.

  17. K-Area and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Sites groundwater monitoring report: Second quarter 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During second quarter 1993, samples from the three monitoring wells at the K-Area site (KSS series) and the three monitoring wells at the Par Pond site (PSS series) were analyzed for constituents required by South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Construction Permit 13,173 and for other constituents as part of the Savannah River Site (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. This report describes monitoring results that exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or the SRS flagging criteria. During second quarter 1993, no constituents exceeded the final PDWS or any other flagging criteria at the K-Area and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Sites. During first quarter 1993, aluminum and iron exceeded the SRS Flag 2 criteria in one or more of the KSS and the PSS wells. These constituents were not analyzed second quarter 1993. In the KSS well series, the field measurement for alkalinity ranged as high as 35 mg/L in well KSS 1D. Alkalinity measurements were zero in the PSS wells, except for a single measurement of 1 mg/L in well PSS 1D. Historical and current water-level elevations at the K-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site indicate that the groundwater flow direction is south to southwest (SRS grid coordinates). The groundwater flow direction at the Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Site could not be determined second quarter 1993.

  18. Tar-free fuel gas production from high temperature pyrolysis of sewage sludge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Leguan; Xiao, Bo; Hu, Zhiquan; Liu, Shiming, E-mail: Zhangping101@yeah.net; Cheng, Gong; He, Piwen; Sun, Lei

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: • High temperature pyrolysis of sewage sludge was efficient for producing tar-free fuel gas. • Complete tar removal and volatile matter release were at elevated temperature of 1300 °C. • Sewage sludge was converted to residual solid with high ash content. • 72.60% of energy conversion efficiency for gas production in high temperature pyrolysis. • Investment and costing for tar cleaning were reduced. - Abstract: Pyrolysis of sewage sludge was studied in a free-fall reactor at 1000–1400 °C. The results showed that the volatile matter in the sludge could be completely released to gaseous product at 1300 °C. The high temperature was in favor of H{sub 2} and CO in the produced gas. However, the low heating value (LHV) of the gas decreased from 15.68 MJ/N m{sup 3} to 9.10 MJ/N m{sup 3} with temperature increasing from 1000 °C to 1400 °C. The obtained residual solid was characterized by high ash content. The energy balance indicated that the most heating value in the sludge was in the gaseous product.

  19. International Best Practices for Pre-Processing and Co-Processing Municipal Solid Waste and Sewage Sludge in the Cement Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasanbeigi, Ali

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Co-processing Municipal Solid Waste and Sewage Sludge in theno date. “Integrated Solid Waste Management. ” Presentationincineration of Municipal Solid Waste in Cement Industry. :

  20. Meals included in Conference Registrations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    Meals included in Conference Registrations Meals included as part of the cost of a conference the most reasonable rates are obtained. Deluxe hotels and motels should be avoided. GSA rates have been for Georgia high cost areas. 75% of these amounts would be $21 for non- high cost areas and $27 for high cost

  1. Thermal sludge dryer demonstration: Bird Island Wastewater Treatment Plant, Buffalo, NY. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Buffalo Sewer Authority (BSA), in cooperation with the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (Energy Authority), commissioned a demonstration of a full scale indirect disk-type sludge dryer at the Bird Island Wastewater Treatment Plant (BIWWTP). The purpose of the project was to determine the effects of the sludge dryer on the sludge incineration process at the facility. Sludge incineration is traditionally the most expensive, energy-intensive unit process involving solids handling at wastewater treatment plants; costs for incineration at the BIWWTP have averaged $2.4 million per year. In the conventional method of processing solids, a series of volume reduction measures, which usually includes thickening, digestion, and mechanical dewatering, is employed prior to incineration. Usually, a high level of moisture is still present within sewage sludge following mechanical dewatering. The sludge dryer system thermally dewaters wastewater sludge to approximately 26%, (and as high as 38%) dry solids content prior to incineration. The thermal dewatering system at the BIWWTP has demonstrated that it meets its design requirements. It has the potential to provide significant energy and other cost savings by allowing the BSA to change from an operation employing two incinerators to a single incinerator mode. While the long-term reliability of the thermal dewatering system has yet to be established, this project has demonstrated that installation of such a system in an existing treatment plant can provide the owner with significant operating cost savings.

  2. 15th International Conference Ramiran, May 3-6, 2013, Versailles Accounting GHG emissions from sludge treatment and disposal routes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    % of sewage sludge is directly land spreading or composted before land spreading. Sludge application sludge treatment and disposal routes ­ methodological problems focused on sludge land spreading this tool can be used to quantify GHG emissions of sludge land spreading of a 380 000 per captia equivalent

  3. Banat's Journal of Biotechnology, 2014, 9, doi: 10.7904/20684738V(9)86 Transfert heavy metal sewage sludge as fertilizer from soil to ray

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    sewage sludge as fertilizer from soil to ray grass Najla Lassoued(1), Mohamed Naceur Khelil(2), Saloua de physiologie, Université de Lausanne-CHUV, Lausanne, Suisse. Abstract. The land application of sewage sludge reveals a significant increase in the dray matter production of Ray Grass. In equivalent

  4. TEX-A-SYST: Reducing the Risk of Ground Water Contamination by Improving Household Wastewater Treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Bill L.; Hoffman, D.; Mazac Jr., F. J.

    1997-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    . This publication covers the following topics: 1. Septic tanks/soil absorption systems 2. Quantity of wastewater 3. Quality of wastewater 4. Collection of wastewater 5. Treatment systems 6. Disposal system 7. Assistance with failing systems or new designs 8.... Evaluation table Septic Tanks/Soil Absorption Systems The most common form of on-site waste- water treatment is a septic tank/soil absorption system. In this system, wastewater flows from the household sewage lines into an under- ground septic tank...

  5. Molybdenum uptake by forage crops grown on sewage sludge -- Amended soils in the field and greenhouse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McBride, M.B.; Richards, B.K.; Steenhuis, T.; Spiers, G.

    2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Molybdenum (Mo) is a plant-available element in soils that can adversely affect the health of farm animals. There is a need for more information on its uptake into forage crops from waste materials, such as sewage sludge, applied to agricultural land. Field and greenhouse experiments with several crops grown on long-term sewage sludge-amended soils as well as soils recently amended with dewatered (DW) and alkaline-stabilized (ALK) sludges indicated that Mo supplied from sludge is readily taken up by legumes in particular. Excessive uptake into red clover (Trifolium pratense L.) was seen in a soil that had been heavily amended with sewage sludge 20 yr earlier, where the soil contained about 3 mg Mo/kg soil, three times the background soil concentration. The greenhouse and field studies indicated that Mo can have a long residual availability in sludge-amended soils. The effect of sludge application was to decrease Cu to Mo ratios in legume forages, canola (Brassica napus var. napus) and soybeans [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] below the recommended limit of 2:1 for ruminant diets, a consequence of high bioavailability of Mo and low uptake of Cu added in sludge. Molybdenum uptake coefficients (UCs) for ALK sludge were higher than for DW sludge, presumably due to the greater solubility of Mo measured in the more alkaline sludges and soils. Based on these UCs, it is tentatively recommended that cumulative Mo loadings on forages grown on nonacid soils should not exceed 1.0 kg/ha from ALK sludge or 4.0 kg/ha from DW sludge.

  6. Sponsorship includes: Agriculture in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    Sponsorship includes: · Agriculture in the Classroom · Douglas County Farm Bureau · Gifford Farm · University of Nebraska Agricultural Research and Development Center · University of Nebraska- Lincoln Awareness Coalition is to help youth, primarily from urban communities, become aware of agriculture

  7. An assessment of methyl mercury and volatile mercury in land-applied sewage sludge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carpi, A. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States); Lindberg, S.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1993, the US Environmental Protection Agency issued regulations covering the land-application of municipal sewage sludge. These regulations established maximum pollutant concentrations and were based upon a risk assessment of human exposure. Mercury, assumed to be inorganic and non-volatile, was one pollutant evaluated. From April, 1995 through February, 1996, the authors studied the species of mercury contaminating municipal sludge applied to land, and the potential for volatilization of mercury from land-applied sludge. Methyl mercury was found at 0.1% of total mercury concentrations and was emitted from land-applied sludge to the atmosphere. Elemental mercury (Hg) was formed in land-applied sludge via the reduction of oxidized mercury and was also emitted to the atmosphere. Hg emission from land-applied sludge was significantly elevated over background soil emission. Methyl mercury is more toxic and more highly bioaccumulated than inorganic mercury, and warrants assessment considering these special criteria. Additionally, mercury emission from sludge-amended soil may lead to the contamination of other environmental media with significant concentrations of the metal. Although these pathways were not evaluated in the regulatory risk assessment, they are an important consideration for evaluating the risks from mercury in land-applied sludge. This presentation will summarize the results of a re-assessment of US EPA regulations regarding the land-application of municipal sewage sludge using data on methyl mercury toxicity and mercury transport in the atmosphere.

  8. Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 230: Area 22 Sewage Lagoons and Corrective Action Unit 320: Area 22 Desert Rock Airport Strainer Box, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office

    2000-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Decision Document identifies and rationalizes the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's selection of a recommended corrective action alternative (CAA) appropriate to facilitate the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 230, Area 22 Sewage Lagoons, and CAU 320, Area 22 Desert Rock Airport Strainer Box, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Referred to as CAU 230/320, both CAUs are located at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and comprise two Corrective Action Sites (CASs), 22-03-01 (Sewage Lagoons) and 22-99-01 (Strainer Box). The Area 22 Sewage Lagoons site also includes a buried Imhoff Tank, sludge bed, and associated sewer piping. A September 1999 corrective action investigation identified the only contaminant of concern above preliminary action levels at this CAU (i.e., total petroleum hydrocarbons as diesel-range organics). During this same investigation, three Corrective Action Objectives (CAOs) were identified to prevent or mitigate exposure to subsurface debris and contaminated soil. Based on these CAOs, a review of existing data, future use, and current operations in Area 22 of the NTS, three CAAs were developed for consideration: Alternative 1 - No Further Action, Alternative 2 - Closure in Place with Administrative Controls, and Alternative 3 - Excavation and Removal. These alternatives were evaluated based on four general corrective action standards and five remedy selection decision factors. Alternative 3 was chosen on technical merit as the preferred alternative for CAU 230/320. This alternative was judged to meet all applicable state and federal regulations for closure of the site and will eliminate potential future exposure pathways to the buried debris and contaminated soils at both of the CASs within Area 22.

  9. Effect of sewage sludge content on gas quality and solid residues produced by cogasification in an updraft gasifier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seggiani, Maurizia, E-mail: m.seggiani@diccism.unipi.it [Department of Chemical Engineering, Industrial Chemistry and Material Science, University of Pisa, Largo Lucio Lazzarino 1, 56126 Pisa (Italy); Puccini, Monica, E-mail: m.puccini@diccism.unipi.it [Department of Chemical Engineering, Industrial Chemistry and Material Science, University of Pisa, Largo Lucio Lazzarino 1, 56126 Pisa (Italy); Raggio, Giovanni, E-mail: g.raggio@tiscali.it [Italprogetti Engineering SPA, Lungarno Pacinotti, 59/A, 56020 San Romano (Pisa) (Italy); Vitolo, Sandra, E-mail: s.vitolo@diccism.unipi.it [Department of Chemical Engineering, Industrial Chemistry and Material Science, University of Pisa, Largo Lucio Lazzarino 1, 56126 Pisa (Italy)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cogasification of sewage sludge with wood pellets in updraft gasifier was analysed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effects of sewage sludge content on the gasification process were examined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sewage sludge addition up to 30 wt.% reduces moderately the process performance. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer At high sewage sludge content slagging and clinker formation occurred. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Solid residues produced resulted acceptable at landfills for non-hazardous waste. - Abstract: In the present work, the gasification with air of dehydrated sewage sludge (SS) with 20 wt.% moisture mixed with conventional woody biomass was investigated using a pilot fixed-bed updraft gasifier. Attention was focused on the effect of the SS content on the gasification performance and on the environmental impact of the process. The results showed that it is possible to co-gasify SS with wood pellets (WPs) in updraft fixed-bed gasification installations. However, at high content of sewage sludge the gasification process can become instable because of the very high ash content and low ash fusion temperatures of SS. At an equivalent ratio of 0.25, compared with wood pellets gasification, the addition of sewage sludge led to a reduction of gas yield in favor of an increase of condensate production with consequent cold gas efficiency decrease. Low concentrations of dioxins/furans and PAHs were measured in the gas produced by SS gasification, well below the limiting values for the exhaust gaseous emissions. NH{sub 3}, HCl and HF contents were very low because most of these compounds were retained in the wet scrubber systems. On the other hand, high H{sub 2}S levels were measured due to high sulfur content of SS. Heavy metals supplied with the feedstocks were mostly retained in gasification solid residues. The leachability tests performed according to European regulations showed that metals leachability was within the limits for landfilling inert residues. On the other hand, sulfate and chloride releases were found to comply with the limits for non-hazardous residues.

  10. Feasibility study for alternate fuels production: unconventional natural gas from wastewater treatment plants. Volume II, Appendix D. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Overly, P.; Tawiah, K.

    1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Data are presented from a study performed to determined the feasibility of recovering methane from sewage at a typical biological secondary wastewater treatment plant. Three tasks are involved: optimization of digester gas; digester gas scrubbing; and application to the East Bay Municipal Utility District water pollution control plant. Results indicate that excess digester gas can be used economically at the wastewater treatment plant and that distribution and scrubbing can be complex and costly. (DMC) 193 references, 93 figures, 26 tables.

  11. Treatment of metal-laden hazardous wastes with advanced clean coal technology by-products. Quarterly report, February--May 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the activities of the project team during the reporting period. The principal work has focused upon the laboratory treatment of six wastes with three by-products and the evaluation of the stability of the resulting eighteen materials. Other efforts during the third quarter have been directed toward completion of the collection and analysis of by-products, the identification of a suitable fourth by-product, and the definition of the approach to the solidification tests. The activity on the project during the third quarter of Phase One has fallen into three major areas: acquiring and analyzing by-products; treating hazardous wastes with by-products in the laboratory and analyzing the results; and conducting administrative activities, including public relations and personnel additions. The hazardous wastes that are used include industrial wastewater treatment residue from battery manufacturing plant; contaminated soil from a remediation project conducted at a munitions depot; contaminated soil from a remediation project conducted at an abandoned industrial site; contaminated soil from a remediation project conducted at a former sewage treatment plant; air pollution control dust from basic oxygen furnace steel production; and air pollution control ash from municipal waste incineration.

  12. Electrostatic-precipitator efficiency on a multiple-hearth incinerator burning sewage sludge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, R.C.; Bockol, G.; Maddox, J.A.; Robb, E.V.

    1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A pilot-scale electrostatic precipitator (ESP) was evaluated for its removal performance of 23 metals and for sulfur-containing particles when fitted to a multiple hearth incinerator burning sewage sludge. The small-scale ESP was installed to take a slipstream of about 3% of the total incinerator emissions. Particle size fractions were collected from the gas streams entering and leaving the ESP. Each particle was evaluated for overall removal efficiency, size-fraction removal efficiency, and selective removal of specific metals. Total concentrations of each element in the controlled emission stream was determined as well as the proportionate concentration of species in the solid and volatile states. Concentrations of each metal in the emission stream were compared with the concentration in the sludge residue. To obtain comparisons of ESP performance with a more typical emission-control device, the performance of the incinerator's full-scale wet scrubber was also evaluated.

  13. Use of Municipal Sewage Sludge for Improvement of Forest Sites in the Southeast

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charles R. Berry

    1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In eight field experiments dried municipal sewage sludge was applied to forest sites before planting of seedlings. In all cases, tree growth was faster on sludge-amended plots than on plots that received fertilizer and lime or no amendment. In all studies, concentrations of total nitrogen in the soil were higher on sludge plots than on control or fertilizer plots, even on good forest sites. In seven of the eight studies, concentrations of phosphorus also were higher on sludge plots than on control or fertilizer plots. Nitrogen and phosphorus tended to be higher in foliage from trees growing on sludge plots. Deep subsoiling was beneficial regardless of soil amendment. Where weeds were plentiful at the outset, they became serious competitors on plots receiving sludge.

  14. E-Print Network 3.0 - alginate scaffold including Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    created through a three step process which included: treatment... ; and exposure to a CaCl2 to crosslink the alginate sheets. Process variables included volume and concentra-...

  15. E-Print Network 3.0 - activated sewage sludge Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    University Collection: Geosciences ; Environmental Sciences and Ecology 66 Advanced Wastewater Treatment Processes Summary: Treatment Plant Conventional Activated Sludge Process...

  16. International Best Practices for Pre-Processing and Co-Processing Municipal Solid Waste and Sewage Sludge in the Cement Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasanbeigi, Ali

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    least two seconds. ” The waste heat from the co-processingis drawn from the waste heat of the associated cementSewage sludge drying using waste heat from cement plant flue

  17. E-Print Network 3.0 - ammonia removal vpcar Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and simple amines early in the sewage treabnentprocess. Removal of ammonia from wastewater include... THE ALLOWABLE AMMONIA CONCENTRATIONS IN WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANT...

  18. FRPC User Guidance -for FY2006

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    systems' cost in the cost of the building. Includes heating plants and related steam and gas lines, sewage disposal plants, storm and sanitary sewer lines, water treatment plants,...

  19. Evaluation of air pollution abatement systems for multiple-hearth sewage sludge incinerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Annamraju, G.; Gerstle, R.W.; Shah, Y.M.; Arora, M.L.

    1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Capital and annual costs were calculated for the application of six different air-pollution-control system options to municipal sewage-sludge incinerators that were using multiple-hearth furnaces. The systems involved three principal types of air-pollution equipment - wet scrubbers, fabric filters, and electrostatic precipitators - applied to three different plant sizes (plants incinerating 36, 72, and 300 tons of dry sludge per day in one, two, and eight multiple-hearth furnaces, respectively). The six options were: (1) venturi/tray scrubber with a 40-inch pressure drop, (2) fabric filter system operating at 500 deg and equipped with an upstream temperature control, (3) fabric filter system operating at 500 deg and equipped with a heat exchanger and a scrubber for SO/sub 2/ reduction, (4) electrostatic precipitator (ESP) with upstream limited temperature and humidity control, (5) same as Option 4 but with an additional downstream wet scrubber for SO/sub 2/ reduction, and (6) ESP with upstream temperature control and an SO/sub 2/ scrubber. Technical feasibility studies indicated that all three types of controls could achieve a total particulate removal efficiency of 99 percent. The venturi/tray scrubber option entailed the lowest capital cost, but annual operating costs were highest because of the high pressure drops and increased energy use.

  20. Application of sewage sludge to non-agricultural ecosystems: Assessment of contaminant risks to wildlife

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sample, B.E.; Efroymson, R.A.; Barnthouse, L.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.; Daniel, F.B. [Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH (United States). Office of Research and Development

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is part of a larger study evaluating nutrient and contaminant impacts associated with the land application of biosolids in four non-agricultural ecosystems: Pacific Northwest forests, semi-arid rangelands, eastern deciduous forests, and southeasternpine plantations. Because contaminants in biosolids may be taken up by biota and transferred through the food web, they may present a risk to wildlife. Biosolids application scenarios that reflect actual practices in each ecosystem were developed. Concentrations of contaminants in biosolids were obtained from the US EPA`s 1988 National Sewage Sludge Survey. Soil-biota uptake factors for contaminants in sludge were developed from contaminant studies performed in each ecosystem type. Where ecosystem-specific data were unavailable, more generalized factors were used. Endpoints were selected that reflected species expected to be present in each ecosystem. Four trophic groups were considered: herbivores (e.g., deer) vermivores (earthworm-consumers; e.g., shrews), insectivores (e.g., songbirds), and carnivores (e.g., fox). Contaminant concentrations in wildlife foods were estimated using the uptake factors. These estimates were then incorporated into models to estimate the contaminant exposure for endpoints in each trophic group in each ecosystem. Exposure estimates were then compared to NOAELs and LOAELs to determine the nature and magnitude of risks that biosolids may present to wildlife.

  1. Carbon and Water Resource Management for Water Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hendrickson, Thomas Peter

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    wastewater transmission and sewage treatment. Distribution pumping and sewage treatment were found to contribute the most to climate change

  2. Prices include compostable serviceware and linen tablecloths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    APPETIZERS Prices include compostable serviceware and linen tablecloths for the food tables.ucdavis.edu. BUTTERNUT SQUASH & BLACK BEAN ENCHILADAS #12;BUFFETS Prices include compostable serviceware and linen

  3. Environmental and plant effects of sewage sludge application to forests and pastures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Miegroet, H.; Boston, H.L.; Johnson, D.W.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Digested sewage sludge was applied to pastures and tree plantations at 19 to 44 Mg/ha (dry weight) as part of a municipal sludge disposal program. The sludge had low concentrations of heavy metals and traces of /sup 137/Cs and /sup 60/Co. Monitoring of soils, soil solutions, and runoff indicated that N, P, heavy metals, and radionuclides were largely retained in the upper 15cm of the soil. Soil solutions had elevated NO/sub 3//sup /minus// concentrations often >100 mg/L, but no significant increases in groundwater NO/sub 3//sup /minus// were found during the first year. Runoff from active sites had elevated concentrations of NO/sub 3//sup /minus// (20--30 mg/L), soluble P (1 mg/L), BOD/sub 5/ (5--30 mg/L), and fecal coliform (up to 14,000 colonies per 100 ml), not unlike runoff from pastures with cattle. Enrichment of organic N (2 times), available (inorganic) N (5 to 10 times), and Bray-P in the upper soils persisted for several years following sludge application. Sludge increased vegetation N concentrations from 1.5% to 2.3% and P concentrations from 0.16% to 0.31%. With the exception of Zn, heavy metals did not accumulate substantially in the vegetation. The sludge addition increased the survival and growth of sycamore (Platanus occidentalis L.). For a loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) plantation future growth improvements are expected based on elevated foliar N concentrations. 37 refs., 3 figs., 7 tabs.

  4. Biologically Inspired Photocatalytically Active Membranes for Water Treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kinsinger, Nichola

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    wastewater treatment systems include treatment of the influent by a series of stages: pretreatment, primary sedimentation, biological

  5. Fixation and partitioning of heavy metals in slag after incineration of sewage sludge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen Tao [State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100082 (China); Yan Bo, E-mail: yanbo2007@gig.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China)

    2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The contents and partitioning of HMs in slag of sludge incineration were examined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The fixation rate decreases with residential time and finally keeps a constant. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Water mass fraction of 55% is optimal for the sediment for Ni, Mn, Zn, Cu and Cr. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Water mass fraction of 75% is optimal for the sediment for Pb. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We found higher temperature versus lower non-residual fraction except that of Pb. - Abstract: Fixation of heavy metals in the slag produced during incineration of sewage sludge will reduce emission of the metals to the atmosphere and make the incineration process more environmentally friendly. The effects of incineration conditions (incineration temperature 500-1100 Degree-Sign C, furnace residence time 0-60 min, mass fraction of water in the sludge 0-75%) on the fixation rates and species partitioning of Cd, Pb, Cr, Cu, Zn, Mn and Ni in slag were investigated. When the incineration temperature was increased from 500 to 1100 Degree-Sign C, the fixation rate of Cd decreased from 87% to 49%, while the fixation rates of Cu and Mn were stable. The maximum fixation rates for Pb and Zn and for Ni and Cr were reached at 900 and 1100 Degree-Sign C, respectively. The fixation rates of Cu, Ni, Cd, Cr and Zn decreased as the residence time increased. With a 20 min residence time, the fixation rates of Pb and Mn were low. The maximum fixation rates of Ni, Mn, Zn, Cu and Cr were achieved when the mass fraction of water in the sludge was 55%. The fixation rate of Cd decreased as the water mass fraction increased, while the fixation rate of Pb increased. Partitioning analysis of the metals contained in the slag showed that increasing the incineration temperature and residence time promoted complete oxidation of the metals. This reduced the non-residual fractions of the metals, which would lower the bioavailability of the metals. The mass fraction of water in the sludge had little effect on the partitioning of the metals. Correlation analysis indicated that the fixation rates of heavy metals in the sludge and the forms of heavy metals in the incinerator slag could be controlled by optimization of the incineration conditions. These results show how the bioavailability of the metals can be reduced for environmentally friendly disposal of the incinerator slag.

  6. Effects of land disposal of municipal sewage sludge on soil, streambed sediment, and ground- and surface-water quality at a site near Denver, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaggiani, N.G.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report describes the effects of burial and land application of municipal sewage sludge on soil and streambed sediment and water quality in the underlying aquifers and surface water within and around the Lowry sewage-sludge-disposal area. The existing ground-water observation-well network at the disposal area was expanded for the study. Surface-water-sampling sites were selected so that runoff could be sampled from intense rainstorms or snowmelt. The sampling frequency for ground-water and surface-water runoff was changed from yearly to quarterly, and soil samples were collected. Four years of data were collected from 1984 to 1987 during the expanded monitoring program at the Lowry sewage-sludge-disposal area. These data, in addition to the data collected by the U.S. Geological Survey from 1981 to 1983, were used to determine effects of sewage-sludge-disposal on soil and streambed sediment and surface- and ground-water quality at the disposal area.

  7. Sewage disposal in the Musi-River, India: water quality remediation through irrigation infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Christopher

    on the river. Keywords Agriculture . Helminths . India . Musi River. Wastewater use . Wastewater treatment-pollution levels, through dilution, die-off, sedimentation and biological processes. These natural treatment sustainability. Hyderabad, one of India's largest cities, disposes large amounts of its wastewater untreated

  8. Net Taxable Gasoline Gallons (Including Aviation Gasoline)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Net Taxable Gasoline Gallons (Including Aviation Gasoline) Period 2000 2001 (2) 2002 2003 2004 "gross" to "net" , was deemed impractical. (5) This report replaces the Gross Taxable Gasoline Gallons (Including Aviation Gasoline) report which will not be produced after December 2002. (6) The November 2007

  9. EE Regional Technology Roadmap Includes comparison

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EE Regional Technology Roadmap Includes comparison against 6th Power Plan (Update cyclically Data Clearinghouse BPA/RTF NEEA/Regional Programs Group Update Regional EE Technology Roadmap Lighting

  10. DIDACTICAL HOLOGRAPHIC EXHIBIT INCLUDING (HOLOGRAPHIC TELEVISION)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Aguiar, Marcus A. M.

    DIDACTICAL HOLOGRAPHIC EXHIBIT INCLUDING HoloTV (HOLOGRAPHIC TELEVISION) José J. Lunazzi , DanielCampinasSPBrasil Abstract: Our Institute of Physics exposes since 1980 didactical exhibitions of holography in Brazil where

  11. Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

    2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material, such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

  12. Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

    2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

  13. NOx, FINE PARTICLE AND TOXIC METAL EMISSIONS FROM THE COMBUSTION OF SEWAGE SLUDGE/COAL MIXTURES: A SYSTEMATIC ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jost O.L. Wendt

    2002-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This research project focuses on pollutants from the combustion of mixtures of dried municipal sewage sludge (MSS) and coal. The objective is to determine the relationship between (1) fraction sludge in the sludge/coal mixture, and (2) combustion conditions on (a) NO{sub x} concentrations in the exhaust, (b) the size segregated fine and ultra-fine particle composition in the exhaust, and (c) the partitioning of toxic metals between vapor and condenses phases, within the process. To this end work is progress using an existing 17kW downflow laboratory combustor, available with coal and sludge feed capabilities. The proposed study will be conducted in concert with an existing ongoing research on toxic metal partitioning mechanisms for very well characterized pulverized coals alone. Both high NO{sub x} and low NO{sub x} combustion conditions will be investigated (unstaged and staged combustion). The proposed work uses existing analytical and experimental facilities and draws on 20 years of research on NO{sub x} and fine particles that has been funded by DOE in this laboratory. Four barrels of dried sewage sludge are currently in the laboratory. Insofar as possible pertinent mechanisms will be elucidated. Tradeoffs between CO{sub 2} control, NO{sub x} control, and inorganic fine particle and toxic metal emissions will be determined. Progress in the Sixth Quarter (January 1, 2002 through March 31, 2002) was slow because of slagging problems in the combustor. These required the combustor to be rebuilt, a job that is not yet complete. A paper describing our results heretofore has been accepted by the Journal Environmental Science and Technology.

  14. Scramjet including integrated inlet and combustor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kutschenreuter, P.H. Jr.; Blanton, J.C.

    1992-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This patent describes a scramjet engine. It comprises: a first surface including an aft facing step; a cowl including: a leading edge and a trailing edge; an upper surface and a lower surface extending between the leading edge and the trailing edge; the cowl upper surface being spaced from and generally parallel to the first surface to define an integrated inlet-combustor therebetween having an inlet for receiving and channeling into the inlet-combustor supersonic inlet airflow; means for injecting fuel into the inlet-combustor at the step for mixing with the supersonic inlet airflow for generating supersonic combustion gases; and further including a spaced pari of sidewalls extending between the first surface to the cowl upper surface and wherein the integrated inlet-combustor is generally rectangular and defined by the sidewall pair, the first surface and the cowl upper surface.

  15. Electric Power Monthly, August 1990. [Glossary included

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly summaries of electric utility statistics at the national, Census division, and State level. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data includes generation by energy source (coal, oil, gas, hydroelectric, and nuclear); generation by region; consumption of fossil fuels for power generation; sales of electric power, cost data; and unusual occurrences. A glossary is included.

  16. Energy Consumption of Personal Computing Including Portable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Namboodiri, Vinod

    Energy Consumption of Personal Computing Including Portable Communication Devices Pavel Somavat1 consumption, questions are being asked about the energy contribution of computing equipment. Al- though studies have documented the share of energy consumption by this type of equipment over the years, research

  17. Communication in automation, including networking and wireless

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antsaklis, Panos

    Communication in automation, including networking and wireless Nicholas Kottenstette and Panos J and networking in automation is given. Digital communication fundamentals are reviewed and networked control are presented. 1 Introduction 1.1 Why communication is necessary in automated systems Automated systems use

  18. Developer Installed Treatment Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    unknown authors

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -installed treatment plants. These treatment plants are more commonly known as package wastewater treatment plants. 1

  19. Subterranean barriers including at least one weld

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nickelson, Reva A.; Sloan, Paul A.; Richardson, John G.; Walsh, Stephanie; Kostelnik, Kevin M.

    2007-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A subterranean barrier and method for forming same are disclosed, the barrier including a plurality of casing strings wherein at least one casing string of the plurality of casing strings may be affixed to at least another adjacent casing string of the plurality of casing strings through at least one weld, at least one adhesive joint, or both. A method and system for nondestructively inspecting a subterranean barrier is disclosed. For instance, a radiographic signal may be emitted from within a casing string toward an adjacent casing string and the radiographic signal may be detected from within the adjacent casing string. A method of repairing a barrier including removing at least a portion of a casing string and welding a repair element within the casing string is disclosed. A method of selectively heating at least one casing string forming at least a portion of a subterranean barrier is disclosed.

  20. Completion strategy includes clay and precipitate control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sandy, T.; Gardner, G.R.

    1985-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This article describes the conditions which are necessary for a successful oil well completion in the Mississippi and Cherokee zones of South Central Kansas. Topics considered include paraffin precipitation, clay swelling and migration, and iron precipitation. Clays in these zones are sensitive to water-base treating fluids and tend to swell and migrate to the well bore, thereby causing permeability damage. The presence of iron in the Mississippi and Cherokee formations has been indicated by cuttings, core samples, and connate water samples.

  1. Power generation method including membrane separation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Union City, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for generating electric power, such as at, or close to, natural gas fields. The method includes conditioning natural gas containing C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons and/or acid gas by means of a membrane separation step. This step creates a leaner, sweeter, drier gas, which is then used as combustion fuel to run a turbine, which is in turn used for power generation.

  2. Rotor assembly including superconducting magnetic coil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Snitchler, Gregory L. (Shrewsbury, MA); Gamble, Bruce B. (Wellesley, MA); Voccio, John P. (Somerville, MA)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Superconducting coils and methods of manufacture include a superconductor tape wound concentrically about and disposed along an axis of the coil to define an opening having a dimension which gradually decreases, in the direction along the axis, from a first end to a second end of the coil. Each turn of the superconductor tape has a broad surface maintained substantially parallel to the axis of the coil.

  3. Nuclear reactor shield including magnesium oxide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rouse, Carl A. (Del Mar, CA); Simnad, Massoud T. (La Jolla, CA)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improvement in nuclear reactor shielding of a type used in reactor applications involving significant amounts of fast neutron flux, the reactor shielding including means providing structural support, neutron moderator material, neutron absorber material and other components as described below, wherein at least a portion of the neutron moderator material is magnesium in the form of magnesium oxide either alone or in combination with other moderator materials such as graphite and iron.

  4. Electric power monthly, September 1990. [Glossary included

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide energy decision makers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues. The power plants considered include coal, petroleum, natural gas, hydroelectric, and nuclear power plants. Data are presented for power generation, fuel consumption, fuel receipts and cost, sales of electricity, and unusual occurrences at power plants. Data are compared at the national, Census division, and state levels. 4 figs., 52 tabs. (CK)

  5. Ash Street Place 1 -2 1 299.00 -520.00 0.82 -0.99 2.6 7 51 No Yes No Yes Water, Sewage, Trash 1964 Ashland Manor 1 -2 1 -2 262.50 -465.00 0.53 -0.72 1 4 23 No Yes No No Internet, Trash 1981

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Jerry

    Ash Street Place 1 - 2 1 299.00 - 520.00 0.82 - 0.99 2.6 7 51 No Yes No Yes Water, Sewage, Trash.50 1.97 2.2 6 46 Yes Yes Yes Yes Internet, Cable, Water, Sewage, Trash, Electric 2011 Campus View 2 - 4 1 - 2 359.00 - 510.00 1.18 - 1.31 2.8 7 29 Yes Yes Yes No Internet, Cable, Water, Sewage, Trash

  6. Radiological Instrumentation Assessment for King County Wastewater Treatment Division

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strom, Daniel J.; McConn, Ronald J.; Brodzinski, Ronald L.

    2005-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The King County Wastewater Treatment Division (WTD) have concern about the aftermath of a radiological dispersion event (RDE) leading to the introduction of significant quantities of radioactive material into its combined sanitary and storm sewer system. Radioactive material could come from the use of a radiological dispersion device (RDD). RDDs include "dirty bombs" that are not nuclear detonations but are explosives designed to spread radioactive material. Radioactive material also could come from deliberate introduction or dispersion of radioactive material into the environment, including waterways and water supply systems. Volume 2 of PNNL-15163 assesses the radiological instrumentation needs for detection of radiological or nuclear terrorism, in support of decisions to treat contaminated wastewater or to bypass the West Point Treatment Plant (WPTP), and in support of radiation protection of the workforce, the public, and the infrastructure of the WPTP. Fixed radiation detection instrumentation should be deployed in a defense-in-depth system that provides 1) early warning of significant radioactive material on the way to the WPTP, including identification of the radionuclide(s) and estimates of the soluble concentrations, with a floating detector located in the wet well at the Interbay Pump Station and telemetered via the internet to all authorized locations; 2) monitoring at strategic locations within the plant, including 2a) the pipe beyond the hydraulic ram in the bar screen room; 2b) above the collection funnels in the fine grit facility; 2c) in the sampling tank in the raw sewage pump room; and 2d) downstream of the concentration facilities that produce 6% blended and concentrated biosolids. Engineering challenges exist for these applications. It is necessary to deploy both ultra-sensitive detectors to provide early warning and identification and detectors capable of functioning in high-dose rate environments that are likely under some scenarios, capable of functioning from 10 microrems per hour (background) up to 1000 rems per hour. Software supporting fixed spectroscopic detectors is needed to provide prompt, reliable, and simple interpretations of spectroscopic outputs that are of use to operators and decision-makers. Software to provide scientists and homeland security personnel with sufficient technical detail for identification, quantification, waste management decisions, and for the inevitable forensic and attribution needs must be developed. Computational modeling using MCNP software has demonstrated that useful detection capabilities can be deployed. In particular, any of the isotopes examined can be detected at levels between 0.01 and 0.1 ?Ci per gallon. General purpose instruments that can be used to determine the nature and extent of radioactive contamination and measure radiation levels for purposes of protecting personnel and members of the public should be available. One or more portable radioisotope identifiers (RIIDs) should be available to WTD personnel. Small, portable battery-powered personal radiation monitors should be widely available WTD personnel. The personal monitors can be used for personal and group radiation protection decisions, and to alert management to the need to get expert backup. All considerations of radiological instrumentation require considerations of training and periodic retraining of personnel, as well as periodic calibration and maintenance of instruments. Routine “innocent” alarms will occur due to medical radionuclides that are legally discharged into sanitary sewers on a daily basis.

  7. Portable treatment systems study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherick, M.J.; Schwinkendorf, W.E.; Bechtold, T.E.; Cole, L.T.

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In developing their Site Treatment Plans (STPs), many of the Department of Energy installations identified some form of portable treatment, to facilitate compliant disposition of select mixed low-level wastestreams. The Environmental Management Office of Science and Technology requested that a systems study be performed to better define the potential role of portable treatment with respect to mixed low-level waste, highlight obstacles to implementation, and identify opportunities for future research and development emphasis. The study was performed by first establishing a representative set of mixed waste, then formulating portable treatment system concepts to meet the required processing needs for these wastes. The portable systems that were conceptualized were evaluated and compared to a fixed centralized treatment alternative. The system evaluations include a life-cycle cost analysis and an assessment of regulatory, institutional, and technical issues associated with the potential use of portable systems. The results of this study show that when all costs are included, there are no significant cost differences between portable systems and fixed systems. However, it is also emphasized that many uncertainties exist that could impact the cost of implementing portable treatment systems. Portable treatment could be made more attractive through private sector implementation, although there is little economic incentive for a commercial vendor to develop small, specialized treatment capabilities with limited applicability. Alternatively, there may also be valid reasons why fixed units cannot be used for some problematic wastestreams. In any event, there are some site-specific problems that still need to be addressed, and there may be some opportunity for research and development to make a positive impact in these areas.

  8. Optical panel system including stackable waveguides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DeSanto, Leonard (Dunkirk, MD); Veligdan, James T. (Manorville, NY)

    2007-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical panel system including stackable waveguides is provided. The optical panel system displays a projected light image and comprises a plurality of planar optical waveguides in a stacked state. The optical panel system further comprises a support system that aligns and supports the waveguides in the stacked state. In one embodiment, the support system comprises at least one rod, wherein each waveguide contains at least one hole, and wherein each rod is positioned through a corresponding hole in each waveguide. In another embodiment, the support system comprises at least two opposing edge structures having the waveguides positioned therebetween, wherein each opposing edge structure contains a mating surface, wherein opposite edges of each waveguide contain mating surfaces which are complementary to the mating surfaces of the opposing edge structures, and wherein each mating surface of the opposing edge structures engages a corresponding complementary mating surface of the opposite edges of each waveguide.

  9. Thermovoltaic semiconductor device including a plasma filter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baldasaro, Paul F. (Clifton Park, NY)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermovoltaic energy conversion device and related method for converting thermal energy into an electrical potential. An interference filter is provided on a semiconductor thermovoltaic cell to pre-filter black body radiation. The semiconductor thermovoltaic cell includes a P/N junction supported on a substrate which converts incident thermal energy below the semiconductor junction band gap into electrical potential. The semiconductor substrate is doped to provide a plasma filter which reflects back energy having a wavelength which is above the band gap and which is ineffectively filtered by the interference filter, through the P/N junction to the source of radiation thereby avoiding parasitic absorption of the unusable portion of the thermal radiation energy.

  10. Critical point anomalies include expansion shock waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nannan, N. R., E-mail: ryan.nannan@uvs.edu [Mechanical Engineering Discipline, Anton de Kom University of Suriname, Leysweg 86, PO Box 9212, Paramaribo, Suriname and Process and Energy Department, Delft University of Technology, Leeghwaterstraat 44, 2628 CA Delft (Netherlands); Guardone, A., E-mail: alberto.guardone@polimi.it [Department of Aerospace Science and Technology, Politecnico di Milano, Via La Masa 34, 20156 Milano (Italy); Colonna, P., E-mail: p.colonna@tudelft.nl [Propulsion and Power, Delft University of Technology, Kluyverweg 1, 2629 HS Delft (Netherlands)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    From first-principle fluid dynamics, complemented by a rigorous state equation accounting for critical anomalies, we discovered that expansion shock waves may occur in the vicinity of the liquid-vapor critical point in the two-phase region. Due to universality of near-critical thermodynamics, the result is valid for any common pure fluid in which molecular interactions are only short-range, namely, for so-called 3-dimensional Ising-like systems, and under the assumption of thermodynamic equilibrium. In addition to rarefaction shock waves, diverse non-classical effects are admissible, including composite compressive shock-fan-shock waves, due to the change of sign of the fundamental derivative of gasdynamics.

  11. Optical panel system including stackable waveguides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DeSanto, Leonard; Veligdan, James T.

    2007-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical panel system including stackable waveguides is provided. The optical panel system displays a projected light image and comprises a plurality of planar optical waveguides in a stacked state. The optical panel system further comprises a support system that aligns and supports the waveguides in the stacked state. In one embodiment, the support system comprises at least one rod, wherein each waveguide contains at least one hole, and wherein each rod is positioned through a corresponding hole in each waveguide. In another embodiment, the support system comprises at least two opposing edge structures having the waveguides positioned therebetween, wherein each opposing edge structure contains a mating surface, wherein opposite edges of each waveguide contain mating surfaces which are complementary to the mating surfaces of the opposing edge structures, and wherein each mating surface of the opposing edge structures engages a corresponding complementary mating surface of the opposite edges of each waveguide.

  12. Models of Procyon A including seismic constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Eggenberger; F. Carrier; F. Bouchy

    2005-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Detailed models of Procyon A based on new asteroseismic measurements by Eggenberger et al (2004) have been computed using the Geneva evolution code including shellular rotation and atomic diffusion. By combining all non-asteroseismic observables now available for Procyon A with these seismological data, we find that the observed mean large spacing of 55.5 +- 0.5 uHz favours a mass of 1.497 M_sol for Procyon A. We also determine the following global parameters of Procyon A: an age of t=1.72 +- 0.30 Gyr, an initial helium mass fraction Y_i=0.290 +- 0.010, a nearly solar initial metallicity (Z/X)_i=0.0234 +- 0.0015 and a mixing-length parameter alpha=1.75 +- 0.40. Moreover, we show that the effects of rotation on the inner structure of the star may be revealed by asteroseismic observations if frequencies can be determined with a high precision. Existing seismological data of Procyon A are unfortunately not accurate enough to really test these differences in the input physics of our models.

  13. Conversion of geothermal waste to commercial products including silica

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Premuzic, Eugene T. (East Moriches, NY); Lin, Mow S. (Rocky Point, NY)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for the treatment of geothermal residue includes contacting the pigmented amorphous silica-containing component with a depigmenting reagent one or more times to depigment the silica and produce a mixture containing depigmented amorphous silica and depigmenting reagent containing pigment material; separating the depigmented amorphous silica and from the depigmenting reagent to yield depigmented amorphous silica. Before or after the depigmenting contacting, the geothermal residue or depigmented silica can be treated with a metal solubilizing agent to produce another mixture containing pigmented or unpigmented amorphous silica-containing component and a solubilized metal-containing component; separating these components from each other to produce an amorphous silica product substantially devoid of metals and at least partially devoid of pigment. The amorphous silica product can be neutralized and thereafter dried at a temperature from about 25.degree. C. to 300.degree. C. The morphology of the silica product can be varied through the process conditions including sequence contacting steps, pH of depigmenting reagent, neutralization and drying conditions to tailor the amorphous silica for commercial use in products including filler for paint, paper, rubber and polymers, and chromatographic material.

  14. NOx, FINE PARTICLE AND TOXIC METAL EMISSIONS FROM THE COMBUSTION OF SEWAGE SLUDGE/COAL MIXTURES: A SYSTEMATIC ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jost O.L. Wendt

    2003-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This research project focuses on pollutants from the combustion of mixtures of dried municipal sewage sludge (MSS) and coal. The objective is to determine the relationship between (1) fraction sludge in the sludge/coal mixture, and (2) combustion conditions on (a) NOx concentrations in the exhaust, (b) the size segregated fine and ultra-fine particle composition in the exhaust, and (c) the partitioning of toxic metals between vapor and condenses phases, within the process. The proposed study will be conducted in concert with an existing ongoing research on toxic metal partitioning mechanisms for very well characterized pulverized coals alone. Both high NOx and low NOx combustion conditions will be investigated (unstaged and staged combustion). Tradeoffs between CO{sub 2} control, NO{sub x} control, and inorganic fine particle and toxic metal emissions will be determined. Previous research results have demonstrated that the inhalation of coal/MSS ash particles cause an increase in lung permeability than coal ash particles alone. Elemental analysis of the coal/MSS ash particles showed that Zn was more abundant in these ash particles than the ash particles of coal ash alone.

  15. Integrated nonthermal treatment system study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biagi, C.; Bahar, D.; Teheranian, B.; Vetromile, J. [Morrison Knudsen Corp. (United States); Quapp, W.J. [Nuclear Metals (United States); Bechtold, T.; Brown, B.; Schwinkendorf, W. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Swartz, G. [Swartz and Associates (United States)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of a study of nonthermal treatment technologies. The study consisted of a systematic assessment of five nonthermal treatment alternatives. The treatment alternatives consist of widely varying technologies for safely destroying the hazardous organic components, reducing the volume, and preparing for final disposal of the contact-handled mixed low-level waste (MLLW) currently stored in the US Department of Energy complex. The alternatives considered were innovative nonthermal treatments for organic liquids and sludges, process residue, soil and debris. Vacuum desorption or various washing approaches are considered for treatment of soil, residue and debris. Organic destruction methods include mediated electrochemical oxidation, catalytic wet oxidation, and acid digestion. Other methods studied included stabilization technologies and mercury separation of treatment residues. This study is a companion to the integrated thermal treatment study which examined 19 alternatives for thermal treatment of MLLW waste. The quantities and physical and chemical compositions of the input waste are based on the inventory database developed by the US Department of Energy. The Integrated Nonthermal Treatment Systems (INTS) systems were evaluated using the same waste input (2,927 pounds per hour) as the Integrated Thermal Treatment Systems (ITTS). 48 refs., 68 figs., 37 tabs.

  16. Life Cycle environmental Assessment (LCA) of sanitation systems including sewerage: Case of vertical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Waste Water Treatment Plant (Renou, 2006) and wastewater sanitation systems (Doka, 2007). ApplicationLife Cycle environmental Assessment (LCA) of sanitation systems including sewerage: Case The article presents the application of Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) to a complete sanitation system including

  17. Technology for Treatment of Liquid Radioactive Waste Generated during Uranium and Plutonium Chemical and Metallurgical Manufacturing in FSUE PO Mayak - 13616

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adamovich, D. [SUE MosSIA Radon, 2/14 7th Rostovsky lane, Moscow, 119121 (Russian Federation)] [SUE MosSIA Radon, 2/14 7th Rostovsky lane, Moscow, 119121 (Russian Federation); Batorshin, G.; Logunov, M.; Musalnikov, A. [FSUE 'PO Mayak', 31 av. Lenin, Ozyorsk, Chelyabinsk region, 456780 (Russian Federation)] [FSUE 'PO Mayak', 31 av. Lenin, Ozyorsk, Chelyabinsk region, 456780 (Russian Federation)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Created technological scheme for treatment of liquid radioactive waste generated while uranium and plutonium chemical and metallurgical manufacturing consists of: - Liquid radioactive waste (LRW) purification from radionuclides and its transfer into category of manufacturing waste; - Concentration of suspensions containing alpha-nuclides and their further conversion to safe dry state (calcinate) and moving to long controlled storage. The following technologies are implemented in LRW treatment complex: - Settling and filtering technology for treatment of liquid intermediate-level waste (ILW) with volume about 1500m{sup 3}/year and alpha-activity from 10{sup 6} to 10{sup 8} Bq/dm{sup 3} - Membrane and sorption technology for processing of low-level waste (LLW) of radioactive drain waters with volume about 150 000 m{sup 3}/year and alpha-activity from 10{sup 3} to 10{sup 4} Bq/dm{sup 3}. Settling and filtering technology includes two stages of ILW immobilization accompanied with primary settling of radionuclides on transition metal hydroxides with the following flushing and drying of the pulp generated; secondary deep after settling of radionuclides on transition metal hydroxides with the following solid phase concentration by the method of tangential flow ultrafiltration. Besides, the installation capacity on permeate is not less than 3 m{sup 3}/h. Concentrates generated are sent to calcination on microwave drying (MW drying) unit. Membrane and sorption technology includes processing of averaged sewage flux by the method of tangential flow ultrafiltration with total capacity of installations on permeate not less than 18 m{sup 3}/h and sorption extraction of uranium from permeate on anionite. According to radionuclide contamination level purified solution refers to general industrial waste. Concentrates generated during suspension filtering are evaporated in rotary film evaporator (RFE) in order to remove excess water, thereafter they are dried on infrared heating facility. Solid concentrate produced is sent for long controlled storage. Complex of the procedures carried out makes it possible to solve problems on treatment of LRW generated while uranium and plutonium chemical and metallurgical manufacturing in Federal State Unitary Enterprise (FSUE) Mayak and cease its discharge into open water reservoirs. (authors)

  18. Quantifying uncertainty in nitrate pollution from land application of sewage sludge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mummert, M.C.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Uncertainty associated with nitrate-nitrogen pollution of ground water from sludge applications was investigated. Three alternative planning models were proposed. The models estimate annual loads and concentrations of nitrate-nitrogen in percolation. Published data from four field studies that included aerobic and anaerobic sludge and surface- and soil-incorporated applications were used for model testing. Point and stochastic validation procedures were used. The models were generally conservative. For three data sets average relative errors were approximately +/- 25% for all three models. The fourth data set had average relative errors of 100-500%. Wilcoxon Signed Rank test results (at ..cap alpha.. = 5%) suggested point-model predictions and observations were drawn from similar distributions. Stochastic validation tests also suggested that observations were samples from distributions of predictions. The models were tested as uncalibrated approximations of nitrate percolation. All three appear sufficiently accurate for planning application systems. A planning procedure was developed which utilizes analytically approximated probability distributions of nitrate loads and concentrations. Distributions are specified with analytical moment expressions and a normal distribution function limited to be non-negative.

  19. Nutrient leaching following land application of aerobically digested municipal sewage sludge in a northern hardwood forest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Medalie, L.; Bowden, W.B.; Smith, C.T. [Univ. of New Hampshire, Durham, NH (United States)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Concentrations of selected cations and anions were determined in soil solutions from a forested site in southern New Hampshire during the first growing season after surface application of an aerobically digested, limed, liquid municipal sludge. Sludge was applied in June 1989 at 0, 3.3, 6.9, and 14.5 Mg ha{sup -1}, which corresponded to 199, 396, and 740 kg N ha{sup -1} as total Kjeldahl N (TKN). Porous, suction-cup lysimeters were used to sample soil solutions below the rooting zone ({approximately}60 cm) within subplots designed to include (untrenched) or exclude (trenched) uptake by vegetation. Following sludge application, measured solute concentrations remained low until September 1989, when NO{sub 3}, Cl, Ca, Mg, Na, and K in trenched subplots increased simultaneously to maximum values in October or November 1989, just before the soil froze for the winter. Nitrate was the dominant anion in soil solutions from trenched subplots and averaged in excess of 0.71 mmol L{sup -1} (10 mg L{sup -1} NO{sub 3}-N) at all loading rates. Highest concentrations of NO{sub 3} occurred on subplots with the highest sludge application rates. In the entrenched areas, NO{sub 3} concentrations rarely exceeded 0.001 mmol L{sup -1}; Cl increased in treated areas and was the dominant anion by the end of the season. Soil solution NH{sub 4}, PO{sub 4}, SO{sub 4} K, and pH did not change significantly for any sludge application rate. Comparison of results from trenched and untrenched areas suggests that, at application rates of up to 14.5 Mg ha{sup -1 }(799 kg TKN ha{sup -1}), a combination of physical, chemical, and biological factors (most likely plant uptake) limited the movement of sludge or sludge-derived constituents from the sites of application. 37 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. The Substance Abuse Treatment Workforce of South Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sodano, Ruthlyn; Watson, Donnie W.; Rataemane, Solomon; Rataemane, Lusanda; Ntlhe, Nomvuyo; Rawson, Richard

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Direct care workers in the National Drug Abuse Treatmentabuse treatment system includes a diverse set of health care

  1. Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 230: Area 22 Sewage Lagoons and Corrective Action Unit 320: Area 22 Desert Rock Airport Strainer Box, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. S. Tobiason

    2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this Corrective Action Plan (CAP) is to provide the strategy and methodology to close the Area 22 Sewage Lagoons site. The CAU will be closed following state and federal regulations and the FFACO (1996). Site characterization was done during September 1999, Soil samples were collected using a direct-push method and a backhoe. Soil samples were collected from the sludge bed, sewage lagoons, strainer box, and Imhoff tank areas. Characterization of the manholes associated with the septic system leading to the Imhoff tank was done during March 2000. The results of the characterization were reported in the Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) (DOE/NV, 2000). Soil sample results indicated that the only constituent of concern (COC) detected above Preliminary Action Levels (PALs) was total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) as diesel-range organics. This COC was detected in three samples from the sludge bed at concentrations up to 580 milligrams per kilogram (mg/kg). This exceeds the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) regulatory action level for TPH of 100 mg/kg (Nevada Administrative Code, 1996). Excavation of the area during characterization uncovered asphalt debris, four safety poles, and strands of barbed wire. The TPH-impacted soil and debris will be removed and disposed in the NTS Area 6 Hydrocarbon Landfill.

  2. Cyanide treatment options in coke plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minak, H.P.; Lepke, P. [Krupp Uhde GmbH, Dortmund (Germany)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper discusses the formation of cyanides in coke oven gas and describes and compares waste processing options. These include desulfurization by aqueous ammonia solution, desulfurization using potash solution, desulfurization in oxide boxes, decomposition of NH{sub 3} and HCN for gas scrubbing. Waste water treatment methods include chemical oxidation, precipitation, ion exchange, reverse osmosis, and biological treatment. It is concluded that biological treatment is the most economical process, safe in operation and requires a minimum of manpower.

  3. A model of flocculation Witold Brostow a,, Sagar Pal b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    North Texas, University of

    , treatment of industrial effluents, and municipal sewage sludge purification. Obtaining metals from ores: Flocculation; Radius of gyration; Silica suspensions; Coal suspensions; Industrial effluents; Iron ores environmental contamination and also slowing down depletion of raw materials -- including potable, industrial

  4. Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Aerobic Treatment Unit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2008-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    wastewater treatment systems use. They remove 85 to 98 percent of the organic matter and solids from the wastewater, producing effluent as clean as that from munici- pal wastewater treatment plants, and cleaner than that from conventional septic tanks.... Onsite wastewater treatment systems Single-compartment trash tank Chlorinator Aerobic treatment unit Spray heads Pump tank Bruce Lesikar Professor and Extension Agricultural Engineer The Texas A&M System Aerobic treatment units, which are certified...

  5. Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact: Wastewater Treatment Capability Upgrade, Project NO. 96-D-122 Pantex Plant Amarillo, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    1999-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This Environmental Assessment (EA) addresses the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) proposed action regarding an upgrade of the Pantex Plant Wastewater Treatment Facility (WWTF). Potential environmental consequences associated with the proposed action and alternative actions are provided. DOE proposes to design, build, and operate a new WWTF, consistent with the requirements of Title 30 of the Texas Administrative Code (TAC), Chapter 317, ''Design Criteria for Sewage Systems,'' capable of supporting current and future wastewater treatment requirements of the Plant. Wastewater treatment at Pantex must provide sufficient operational flexibility to meet Pantex Plant's anticipated future needs, including potential Plant mission changes, alternative effluent uses, and wastewater discharge permit requirements. Treated wastewater effluent and non-regulated water maybe used for irrigation on DOE-owned agricultural land. Five factors support the need for DOE action: (1) The current WWTF operation has the potential for inconsistent permit compliance. (2) The existing WWTF lies completely within the 100-year floodplain. (3) The Pantex Plant mission has the potential to change, requiring infrastructure changes to the facility. (4) The life expectancy of the existing facility would be nearing its end by the time a new facility is constructed. (5) The treated wastewater effluent and non-regulated water would have a beneficial agricultural use through irrigation. Evaluation during the internal scoping led to the conclusion that the following factors are present and of concern at the proposed action site on Pantex Plant: (1) Periodic wastewater effluent permit exceedances; (2) Wetlands protection and floodplain management; (3) Capability of the existing facility to meet anticipated future needs of Pantex (4) Existing facility design life; and (5) Use of treated wastewater effluent and non-regulated water for irrigation. Evaluation during the internal scoping led to the conclusion that the following conditions are not present, nor of concern at the proposed site on Pantex Plant, and no further analysis was conducted: (1) State or national parks, forests, or other conservation areas; (2) Wild and scenic rivers; (3) Natural resources, such as timber, range, soils, minerals; (4) Properties of historic, archeological, or architectural significance; (5) Native American concerns; (6) Minority and low-income populations; and (7) Prime or unique farmland. In this document, DOE describes the proposed action and a reasonable range of alternatives to the proposed action, including the ''No-Action'' alternative. The proposed action cited in the ''U.S. Department of Energy Application for a Texas Pollutant Discharge Elimination System Permit Modifying Permit to Dispose of Waste, No. 02296,'' December 1998, included the construction of a new wastewater treatment facility, a new irrigation storage pond, and the conversion of the current wastewater treatment facility into an irrigation storage pond. Although a permit modification application has been filed, if a decision on this EA necessitates it, an amendment to the permit application would be made. The permit application would be required for any of the alternatives and the filing does not preclude or predetermine selection of an alternative considered by this EA. This permit change would allow Pantex to land-dispose treated wastewater by irrigating agricultural land. This construction for the proposed action would include designing two new lagoons for wastewater treatment. One of the lagoons could function as a facultative lagoon for treatment of wastewater. The second lagoon would serve as an irrigation storage impoundment (storage pond), with the alternative use as a facultative lagoon if the first lagoon is out of service for any reason. The new facultative lagoon and irrigation water storage pond would be sited outside of the 100-year flood plain. The existing WWTF lagoon would be used as a storage pond for treated wastewater effluent for irrigation water, as needed. The two new lagoons would be li

  6. Coal pile leachate treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, E C; Kimmitt, R R

    1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The steam plant located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory was converted from oil- to coal-fired boilers. In the process, a diked, 1.6-ha coal storage yard was constructed. The purpose of this report is to describe the treatment system designed to neutralize the estimated 18,000 m/sup 3/ of acidic runoff that will be produced each year. A literature review and laboratory treatability study were conducted which identified two treatment systems that will be employed to neutralize the acidic runoff. The first, a manually operated system, will be constructed at a cost of $200,000 and will operate for an interim period of four years. This system will provide for leachate neutralization until a more automated system can be brought on-line. The second, a fully automated system, is described and will be constructed at an estimated cost of $650,000. This automated runoff treatment system will ensure that drainage from the storage yard meets current National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System Standards for pH and total suspended solids, as well as future standards, which are likely to include several metals along with selected trace elements.

  7. [Article 1 of 7: Motivates and Includes the Consumer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and include the consumer exist. Some examples include advanced two-way metering (AMI), demand response (DR), and distributed energy resources (DER). A common misconception is...

  8. Apparatus and process for water treatment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phifer, Mark A. (North Augusta, SC); Nichols, Ralph L. (North Augusta, SC)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus is disclosed utilizing permeable treatment media for treatment of contaminated water, along with a method for enhanced passive flow of contaminated water through the treatment media. The apparatus includes a treatment cell including a permeable structure that encloses the treatment media, the treatment cell may be located inside a water collection well, exterior to a water collection well, or placed in situ within the pathway of contaminated groundwater. The passive flow of contaminated water through the treatment media is maintained by a hydraulic connection between a collecting point of greater water pressure head, and a discharge point of lower water pressure head. The apparatus and process for passive flow and groundwater treatment utilizes a permeable treatment media made up of granular metal, bimetallics, granular cast iron, activated carbon, cation exchange resins, and/or additional treatment materials. An enclosing container may have an outer permeable wall for passive flow of water into the container and through the enclosed treatment media to an effluent point. Flow of contaminated water is attained without active pumping of water through the treatment media. Remediation of chlorinated hydrocarbons and other water contaminants to acceptable regulatory concentration levels is accomplished without the costs of pumping, pump maintenance, and constant oversight by personnel.

  9. Development of a Web-Based, Emissions Reduction Calculator for Storm Water/Infiltration Sanitary Sewage Separation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Z.; Haberl, J. S.; Brumbelow, K.; Culp, C.; Gilman, D.; Yazdani, B.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (Kissock et al. 2003; Haberl et al. 2003) to evaluate the performance of wastewater collection and treatment system, and any weather dependence using average rainfall data. The pre-retrofit data are weather normalized to the 1999 or 2002 base year... wastewater data from a wastewater treatment facility and the coincident rainfall data. It shows that during the most rainy days, the amount of wastewater treated rose as high as 19 million gallons per day (MGD). Analysis of the input data also shows...

  10. Biomarkers Core Lab Price List Does NOT Include

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grishok, Alla

    v3102014 Biomarkers Core Lab Price List Does NOT Include Kit Cost PURCHASED by INVESTIGATOR/1/2013 Page 1 of 5 #12;Biomarkers Core Lab Price List Does NOT Include Kit Cost PURCHASED by INVESTIGATOR

  11. Including Retro-Commissioning in Federal Energy Savings Performance Contracts

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Guidance document on the importance of (and steps to) including retro-commissioning in Federal energy savings performance contracts (ESPCs).

  12. Waste Treatment Plant Overview

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    contracted Bechtel National, Inc., to design and build the world's largest radioactive waste treatment plant. The Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP), also known as the...

  13. Maraging superalloys and heat treatment processes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Korenko, Michael K. (Wexford, PA); Gelles, David S. (W. Richland, WA); Thomas, Larry E. (Richland, WA)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Described herein are nickel-chromium-iron maraging, gamma prime strengthened superalloys containing about 18 to 25 weight percent nickel, about 4 to 8 weight percent chromium, gamma prime forming elements such as aluminum and/or titanium, and a solid solution strengthening element, such as molybdenum. After heat treatment, which includes at least one ausaging treatment and at least one maraging treatment, a microstructure containing gamma prime phase and decomposed Fe-Ni-Cr type martensite is produced.

  14. Combining boron isotopes and carbamazepine to trace sewage in salinized groundwater: a case study in Cap Bon, Tunisia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    treatment and so recognized as a pertinent tracer of wastewater contamination. The system equilibrium of Research in Rural Engineering of Water and Forestry), rue Hédi Karray, B.P.10- 2080 Ariana, Tunisia based on a managed aquifer recharge with treated wastewater. Water quality monitoring was implemented

  15. Linking Heroin Users in China to Drug Treatment and Other Resources in the Community: Effect of a Recovery Management Intervention Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Fei

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    substance abuse treatment: Reexamining “Comprehensive” care.abuse include: intake processing/assessment, treatment plan, pharmacotherapy, continuing care,

  16. E-Print Network 3.0 - acid treatment impairs Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    treatment to eliminate the problem. Other programs and projects... in a BMAP may include fertilizer ordinances, advanced waste water treatment systems, redirecting ... Source:...

  17. Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Ultraviolet Light Disinfection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2008-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Some onsite wastewater treatment systems include a disinfection component. This publication explains how homeowners can disinfect wastewater with ultraviolet light, what the components of such a system are, what factors affect the performance of a...

  18. Assessing nutrient and pharmaceutical removal efficiency from wastewater using shallow wetland treatment mesocosms.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cardinal, Pascal

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??Wastewaters from rural sewage lagoons in Manitoba contain pharmaceuticals that are potentially harmful to non-target organisms and reduce overall water quality when released. An option… (more)

  19. Brandeis University prohibits all forms of sexual misconduct (including sexual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snider, Barry B.

    -736-3677 brandeis.edu/studentaffairs/health screening, treatment and follow-up care for sexually transmittedGLy) 617-227-4313 www.bagly.org the Network/La Red 617-742-4911 www.tnlr.org Rape, abuse & Incest National

  20. analysis including plasma: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Assembly 2010 Space Plasmas in the Solar System, including Planetary Magnetospheres (D) Solar Variability, Cosmic Rays and Climate (D21) GEOMAGNETIC ACTIVITY AT HIGH-LATITUDE:...

  1. Energy Department Expands Gas Gouging Reporting System to Include...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Washington, DC - Energy Secretary Samuel W. Bodman announced today that the Department of Energy has expanded its gas gouging reporting system to include a toll-free telephone...

  2. PLOT: A UNIX PROGRAM FOR INCLUDING GRAPHICS IN DOCUMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Curtis, Pavel

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    simple, easy-to-read graphics language designed specificallyPROGRAM FOR INCLUDING GRAPHICS IN DOCUMENTS Pavel Curtismeanings as in the GRAFPAC graphics system. Definl. ~ tions

  3. U-182: Microsoft Windows Includes Some Invalid Certificates

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The operating system includes some invalid intermediate certificates. The vulnerability is due to the certificate authorities and not the operating system itself.

  4. Nitrogen is a natural and necessary part of every healthy ecosystem, but too much nitrogen in our rivers,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    ), sewage treatment plants, and animal ma- nure. Once in water, nitrogen can change in chemical form

  5. Energy Transitions: A Systems Approach Including Marcellus Shale Gas Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angenent, Lars T.

    Energy Transitions: A Systems Approach Including Marcellus Shale Gas Development A Report Transitions: A Systems Approach Including Marcellus Shale Gas Development Executive Summary In the 21st the Marcellus shale In addition to the specific questions identified for the case of Marcellus shale gas in New

  6. Federal Facilities Compliance Act, Conceptual Site Treatment Plan. Part 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1993-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This Conceptual Site Treatment Plan was prepared by Ames Laboratory to meet the requirements of the Federal Facilities Compliance Act. Topics discussed in this document include: general discussion of the plan, including the purpose and scope; technical aspects of preparing plans, including the rationale behind the treatability groupings and a discussion of characterization issues; treatment technology needs and treatment options for specific waste streams; low-level mixed waste options; TRU waste options; and future waste generation from restoration activities.

  7. Articles which include chevron film cooling holes, and related processes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bunker, Ronald Scott; Lacy, Benjamin Paul

    2014-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    An article is described, including an inner surface which can be exposed to a first fluid; an inlet; and an outer surface spaced from the inner surface, which can be exposed to a hotter second fluid. The article further includes at least one row or other pattern of passage holes. Each passage hole includes an inlet bore extending through the substrate from the inlet at the inner surface to a passage hole-exit proximate to the outer surface, with the inlet bore terminating in a chevron outlet adjacent the hole-exit. The chevron outlet includes a pair of wing troughs having a common surface region between them. The common surface region includes a valley which is adjacent the hole-exit; and a plateau adjacent the valley. The article can be an airfoil. Related methods for preparing the passage holes are also described.

  8. Underground Coal Thermal Treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P. Smith; M. Deo; E. Eddings; A. Sarofim; K. Gueishen; M. Hradisky; K. Kelly; P. Mandalaparty; H. Zhang

    2011-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The long-term objective of this work is to develop a transformational energy production technology by insitu thermal treatment of a coal seam for the production of substitute natural gas (SNG) while leaving much of the coalâ??s carbon in the ground. This process converts coal to a high-efficiency, low-GHG emitting gas fuel. It holds the potential of providing environmentally acceptable access to previously unusable coal resources. This topical report discusses the development of experimental capabilities, the collection of available data, and the development of simulation tools to obtain process thermo-chemical and geo-thermal parameters in preparation for the eventual demonstration in a coal seam. It also includes experimental and modeling studies of CO{sub 2} sequestration. Efforts focused on: â?¢ Constructing a suite of three different coal pyrolysis reactors. These reactors offer the ability to gather heat transfer, mass transfer and kinetic data during coal pyrolysis under conditions that mimic in situ conditions (Subtask 6.1). â?¢ Studying the operational parameters for various underground thermal treatment processes for oil shale and coal and completing a design matrix analysis for the underground coal thermal treatment (UCTT). This analysis yielded recommendations for terms of targeted coal rank, well orientation, rubblization, presence of oxygen, temperature, pressure, and heating sources (Subtask 6.2). â?¢ Developing capabilities for simulating UCTT, including modifying the geometry as well as the solution algorithm to achieve long simulation times in a rubblized coal bed by resolving the convective channels occurring in the representative domain (Subtask 6.3). â?¢ Studying the reactive behavior of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) with limestone, sandstone, arkose (a more complex sandstone) and peridotite, including mineralogical changes and brine chemistry for the different initial rock compositions (Subtask 6.4). Arkose exhibited the highest tendency of participating in mineral reactions, which can be attributed to the geochemical complexity of its initial mineral assemblage. In experiments with limestone, continuous dissolution was observed with the release of CO{sub 2} gas, indicated by the increasing pressure in the reactor (formation of a gas chamber). This occurred due to the lack of any source of alkali to buffer the solution. Arkose has the geochemical complexity for permanent sequestration of CO{sub 2} as carbonates and is also relatively abundant. The effect of including NH{sub 3} in the injected gas stream was also investigated in this study. Precipitation of calcite and trace amounts of ammonium zeolites was observed. A batch geochemical model was developed using Geochemists Workbench (GWB). Degassing effect in the experiments was corrected using the sliding fugacity model in GWB. Experimental and simulation results were compared and a reasonable agreement between the two was observed.

  9. Comparison of Joint Modeling Approaches Including Eulerian Sliding Interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lomov, I; Antoun, T; Vorobiev, O

    2009-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Accurate representation of discontinuities such as joints and faults is a key ingredient for high fidelity modeling of shock propagation in geologic media. The following study was done to improve treatment of discontinuities (joints) in the Eulerian hydrocode GEODYN (Lomov and Liu 2005). Lagrangian methods with conforming meshes and explicit inclusion of joints in the geologic model are well suited for such an analysis. Unfortunately, current meshing tools are unable to automatically generate adequate hexahedral meshes for large numbers of irregular polyhedra. Another concern is that joint stiffness in such explicit computations requires significantly reduced time steps, with negative implications for both the efficiency and quality of the numerical solution. An alternative approach is to use non-conforming meshes and embed joint information into regular computational elements. However, once slip displacement on the joints become comparable to the zone size, Lagrangian (even non-conforming) meshes could suffer from tangling and decreased time step problems. The use of non-conforming meshes in an Eulerian solver may alleviate these difficulties and provide a viable numerical approach for modeling the effects of faults on the dynamic response of geologic materials. We studied shock propagation in jointed/faulted media using a Lagrangian and two Eulerian approaches. To investigate the accuracy of this joint treatment the GEODYN calculations have been compared with results from the Lagrangian code GEODYN-L which uses an explicit treatment of joints via common plane contact. We explore two approaches to joint treatment in the code, one for joints with finite thickness and the other for tight joints. In all cases the sliding interfaces are tracked explicitly without homogenization or blending the joint and block response into an average response. In general, rock joints will introduce an increase in normal compliance in addition to a reduction in shear strength. In the present work we consider the limiting case of stiff discontinuities that only affect the shear strength of the material.

  10. Summary - Building C-400 Thermal Treatment Remedial Design Report...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Decision. What the ETR Team Recommended The data provide an initial basis for designoperation; however, characterization should include expanding the target treatment zones in...

  11. Turbomachine injection nozzle including a coolant delivery system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zuo, Baifang (Simpsonville, SC)

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    An injection nozzle for a turbomachine includes a main body having a first end portion that extends to a second end portion defining an exterior wall having an outer surface. A plurality of fluid delivery tubes extend through the main body. Each of the plurality of fluid delivery tubes includes a first fluid inlet for receiving a first fluid, a second fluid inlet for receiving a second fluid and an outlet. The injection nozzle further includes a coolant delivery system arranged within the main body. The coolant delivery system guides a coolant along at least one of a portion of the exterior wall and around the plurality of fluid delivery tubes.

  12. Nonadiabatic dynamics of electron transfer in solution: Explicit and implicit solvent treatments that include multiple relaxation time scales

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwerdtfeger, Christine A.; Soudackov, Alexander V.; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon, E-mail: shs3@illinois.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 600 South Mathews Avenue, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)] [Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 600 South Mathews Avenue, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

    2014-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of efficient theoretical methods for describing electron transfer (ET) reactions in condensed phases is important for a variety of chemical and biological applications. Previously, dynamical dielectric continuum theory was used to derive Langevin equations for a single collective solvent coordinate describing ET in a polar solvent. In this theory, the parameters are directly related to the physical properties of the system and can be determined from experimental data or explicit molecular dynamics simulations. Herein, we combine these Langevin equations with surface hopping nonadiabatic dynamics methods to calculate the rate constants for thermal ET reactions in polar solvents for a wide range of electronic couplings and reaction free energies. Comparison of explicit and implicit solvent calculations illustrates that the mapping from explicit to implicit solvent models is valid even for solvents exhibiting complex relaxation behavior with multiple relaxation time scales and a short-time inertial response. The rate constants calculated for implicit solvent models with a single solvent relaxation time scale corresponding to water, acetonitrile, and methanol agree well with analytical theories in the Golden rule and solvent-controlled regimes, as well as in the intermediate regime. The implicit solvent models with two relaxation time scales are in qualitative agreement with the analytical theories but quantitatively overestimate the rate constants compared to these theories. Analysis of these simulations elucidates the importance of multiple relaxation time scales and the inertial component of the solvent response, as well as potential shortcomings of the analytical theories based on single time scale solvent relaxation models. This implicit solvent approach will enable the simulation of a wide range of ET reactions via the stochastic dynamics of a single collective solvent coordinate with parameters that are relevant to experimentally accessible systems.

  13. Including costs of supply chain risk in strategic sourcing decisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jain, Avani

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cost evaluations do not always include the costs associated with risks when organizations make strategic sourcing decisions. This research was conducted to establish and quantify the impact of risks and risk-related costs ...

  14. FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF STEEL WELDED COVERPLATE INCLUDING COMPOSITE DOUBLERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petri, Brad

    2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    With the increasing focus on welded bridge members resulting in crack initiation and propagation, there is a large demand for creative solutions. One of these solutions includes the application of composite doublers over the critical weld. In order...

  15. atlantic region including: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    R: L. Tossey, T. Beeson, Parks, B. TruittTNC, UD MPEO staff 2 Climate scenarios of sea level rise for the northeast Atlantic Ocean: a study including the effects of ocean...

  16. T-603: Mac OS X Includes Some Invalid Comodo Certificates

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The operating system includes some invalid certificates. The vulnerability is due to the invalid certificates and not the operating system itself. Other browsers, applications, and operating systems are affected.

  17. Limited Personal Use of Government Office Equipment including Information Technology

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2005-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The Order establishes requirements and assigns responsibilities for employees' limited personal use of Government resources (office equipment and other resources including information technology) within DOE, including NNSA. The Order is required to provide guidance on appropriate and inappropriate uses of Government resources. This Order was certified 04/23/2009 as accurate and continues to be relevant and appropriate for use by the Department. Certified 4-23-09. No cancellation.

  18. Thin film solar cell including a spatially modulated intrinsic layer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Guha, Subhendu (Troy, MI); Yang, Chi-Chung (Troy, MI); Ovshinsky, Stanford R. (Bloomfield Hills, MI)

    1989-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    One or more thin film solar cells in which the intrinsic layer of substantially amorphous semiconductor alloy material thereof includes at least a first band gap portion and a narrower band gap portion. The band gap of the intrinsic layer is spatially graded through a portion of the bulk thickness, said graded portion including a region removed from the intrinsic layer-dopant layer interfaces. The band gap of the intrinsic layer is always less than the band gap of the doped layers. The gradation of the intrinsic layer is effected such that the open circuit voltage and/or the fill factor of the one or plural solar cell structure is enhanced.

  19. Solar Energy Education. Renewable energy: a background text. [Includes glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Some of the most common forms of renewable energy are presented in this textbook for students. The topics include solar energy, wind power hydroelectric power, biomass ocean thermal energy, and tidal and geothermal energy. The main emphasis of the text is on the sun and the solar energy that it yields. Discussions on the sun's composition and the relationship between the earth, sun and atmosphere are provided. Insolation, active and passive solar systems, and solar collectors are the subtopics included under solar energy. (BCS)

  20. Methods of producing adsorption media including a metal oxide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mann, Nicholas R; Tranter, Troy J

    2014-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods of producing a metal oxide are disclosed. The method comprises dissolving a metal salt in a reaction solvent to form a metal salt/reaction solvent solution. The metal salt is converted to a metal oxide and a caustic solution is added to the metal oxide/reaction solvent solution to adjust the pH of the metal oxide/reaction solvent solution to less than approximately 7.0. The metal oxide is precipitated and recovered. A method of producing adsorption media including the metal oxide is also disclosed, as is a precursor of an active component including particles of a metal oxide.

  1. I. INTRODUCTION Previous research in water treatment has been

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMaster University

    I. INTRODUCTION Previous research in water treatment has been varied and extensive. In the past, water treatment research included remote plasma processes, such as ozone, UV and electron processes the knowledge gleaned from past research, PAED seems to be a viable water treatment option. PAED may provide

  2. E-Print Network 3.0 - air treatment system Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Last Updated: 41702 Summary: , including refrigeration, air conditioning, heating systems, ventilating fans, roof ventilators, exhaust fans... , water treatment equipment,...

  3. E-Print Network 3.0 - air treatment heating Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Last Updated: 41702 Summary: , including refrigeration, air conditioning, heating systems, ventilating fans, roof ventilators, exhaust fans... , water treatment equipment,...

  4. Measurement and Treatment of Nuisance Odors at Wastewater Treatment Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abraham, Samantha Margaret

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the ability of existing treatment technologies at Plant 1 toof existing treatment technologies at both OCSD plantsof existing treatment technologies at both OCSD plants

  5. Biomass Potentials from California Forest and Shrublands Including Fuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biomass Potentials from California Forest and Shrublands Including Fuel Reduction Potentials-04-004 February 2005 Revised: October 2005 Arnold Schwarzenegger, Governor, State of California #12;Biomass Tiangco, CEC Bryan M. Jenkins, University of California #12;Biomass Potentials from California Forest

  6. Project Management Business Process Project Delivery Processes Includes VE Budget

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Project Management Business Process Project Delivery Processes Includes VE Budget Schedule Activities that do/could feed into PMBP LEGEND VE Cost Avoidance Program Coverage Document Results (Before, could use the value methodology to facilitate after action review. The project manager is responsible

  7. DISTINCTIONS The unique combination of factors which distinguish Berea includes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baltisberger, Jay H.

    throughout Appala- chia. SUSTAINABLE CAMPUS FEATURES The College environment demonstrates sustainable living and enhances student learning. Recently renovated historical buildings and residence halls include sustain, Washington Monthly ranked Berea the #1 liberal arts college in the nation Listed as a "Best Buy" college

  8. Free Energy Efficiency Kit includes CFL light bulbs,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, Annkatrin

    Free Energy Efficiency Kit Kit includes CFL light bulbs, spray foam, low-flow shower head, and more! Building Science 101 Presentation BPI Certified Building Professionals will present home energy efficiency for discounted energy assessments. FREE HOME ENERGY EFFICIENCY SEMINAR N e w R i ver L i g ht & Pow e r a n d W

  9. Area of cooperation includes: Joint research and development on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buyya, Rajkumar

    Technologies August 2, 2006: HCL Technologies Ltd (HCL), India's leading global IT services company, has signed projects that are using this technology currently such as BioGrid in Japan, National Grid Service in UKArea of cooperation includes: · Joint research and development on Grid computing technologies

  10. Energy Transitions: A Systems Approach Including Marcellus Shale Gas Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    Energy Transitions: A Systems Approach Including Marcellus Shale Gas Development A Report Engineering) W. VA #12;Energy Transitions: A Systems Approach August 2011 version Page 2 Energy Transitions sources globally, some very strong short-term drivers of energy transitions reflect rising concerns over

  11. Procedures in Modules (1) Including all procedures within modules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Procedures in Modules (1) Including all procedures within modules works very well in almost all designing these if possible #12;Procedures in Modules (2) These are very much like internal procedures Works very well in almost all programs Everything accessible in the module can also be used in the procedure

  12. FORUMA Hamilton Spectator Town Hall Event SPEAKERS INCLUDE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Michael

    R001990104 OPEN FORUMA Hamilton Spectator Town Hall Event SPEAKERS INCLUDE: STEVE BUIST, Spectator, former chairman of Hamilton-Wentworth region and now president and CEO of the Hamilton Community Foundation. DR. CHRIS MACKIE, Hamilton's associate medical officer of health. MARK CHAMBERLAIN, president

  13. DO NOT INCLUDE: flatten cardboard staples, tape & envelope windows ok

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolfe, Patrick J.

    / bottles Metal items other than cans/foil Napkins Paper towels Plastic bags Plastic films Plastic utensilsDO NOT INCLUDE: flatten cardboard staples, tape & envelope windows ok Aerosol cans Books Bottle, PDAs, inkjet cartridges, CFL bulbs (cushioned, sealed in plastic) computers, printers, printer

  14. cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Raikhel, N.V.; Broekaert, W.F.; Namhai Chua; Kush, A.

    1993-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1,018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids.

  15. ASTRO-F/FIS observing simulation including detector characteristics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pak, Soojong

    ASTRO-F/FIS observing simulation including detector characteristics Woong-Seob Jeong a,*, Soojong instruments, the far-infrared surveyor (FIS) will map the entire sky in four bands using short wavelength (SW- oped a suite of software with an aim to simulate the FIS observations (Jeong et al., 2000, 2003, 2004

  16. ASTRO-F/FIS Observing Simulation Including Detector Characteristics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Hyung Mok

    ASTRO-F/FIS Observing Simulation Including Detector Characteristics Woong-Seob Jeong1, Soojong Pak1 simulations to examined the detector characteristics on the FIS instrument (Far- Infrared Surveyor) images narrow and wide bands using a short wavelength (SW) and long wavelength (LW) detector array. The FIS (Far

  17. Methods of Purchasing Purchasing methods include the different

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    " purchases must be reviewed and approved by the Controller's Office. This may result in the end user beingMethods of Purchasing Purchasing methods include the different processes of ordering goods and/or services, and encumbering funds. #12;Method of Purchase Field Purchase Orders (FPO) Accepted

  18. Including Blind Students in Computer Science Through Access to Graphs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, R. Michael

    Including Blind Students in Computer Science Through Access to Graphs Suzanne Balik, Sean Mealin SKetching tool, GSK, to provide blind and sighted people with a means to create, examine, and share graphs (node-link diagrams) in real-time. GSK proved very effective for one blind computer science student

  19. HTS Conductor Design Issues Including Quench and Stability,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    /background · Stability and protection are crucial issues for HTS tapes and coils applied to electric power devices. ­Both for the economic argument for HTS AC applications like cables and transformers. · Conductor design is importantHTS Conductor Design Issues Including Quench and Stability, AC Losses, and Fault Currents M. J

  20. Bayesian hierarchical reconstruction of protein profiles including a digestion model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Bayesian hierarchical reconstruction of protein profiles including a digestion model Pierre to recover the protein biomarkers content in a robust way. We will focus on the digestion step since and each branch to a molecular processing such as digestion, ionisation and LC-MS separation

  1. GRADUATE STUDIES IN BUILDING TECHNOLOGY AN INTERDISCIPLINARY PROGRAM INCLUDING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reif, Rafael

    -growing economies in other parts of the world, there is a growing demand for practical, sustainable building designs as the broader architectural design and construction processes. Likely careers of graduates are in the building1 GRADUATE STUDIES IN BUILDING TECHNOLOGY AN INTERDISCIPLINARY PROGRAM INCLUDING DEPARTMENT

  2. Requirements: A minimum of 15 PSYC credits, including

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    » Three other 2000-3000-level PSYC courses (any area) No more than 3 credits of PSYC 3889 or 3999 canRequirements: A minimum of 15 PSYC credits, including: » One Area I course » One Area II course) ___2100 (Principles of Research in Psychology) Area I. Social, Developmental, Clinical, & Industrial

  3. Multi-processor including data flow accelerator module

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Davidson, George S. (Albuquerque, NM); Pierce, Paul E. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An accelerator module for a data flow computer includes an intelligent memory. The module is added to a multiprocessor arrangement and uses a shared tagged memory architecture in the data flow computer. The intelligent memory module assigns locations for holding data values in correspondence with arcs leading to a node in a data dependency graph. Each primitive computation is associated with a corresponding memory cell, including a number of slots for operands needed to execute a primitive computation, a primitive identifying pointer, and linking slots for distributing the result of the cell computation to other cells requiring that result as an operand. Circuitry is provided for utilizing tag bits to determine automatically when all operands required by a processor are available and for scheduling the primitive for execution in a queue. Each memory cell of the module may be associated with any of the primitives, and the particular primitive to be executed by the processor associated with the cell is identified by providing an index, such as the cell number for the primitive, to the primitive lookup table of starting addresses. The module thus serves to perform functions previously performed by a number of sections of data flow architectures and coexists with conventional shared memory therein. A multiprocessing system including the module operates in a hybrid mode, wherein the same processing modules are used to perform some processing in a sequential mode, under immediate control of an operating system, while performing other processing in a data flow mode.

  4. System and process for biomass treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunson, Jr., James B; Tucker, III, Melvin P; Elander, Richard T; Lyons, Robert C

    2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A system including an apparatus is presented for treatment of biomass that allows successful biomass treatment at a high solids dry weight of biomass in the biomass mixture. The design of the system provides extensive distribution of a reactant by spreading the reactant over the biomass as the reactant is introduced through an injection lance, while the biomass is rotated using baffles. The apparatus system to provide extensive assimilation of the reactant into biomass using baffles to lift and drop the biomass, as well as attrition media which fall onto the biomass, to enhance the treatment process.

  5. A coke oven model including thermal decomposition kinetics of tar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munekane, Fuminori; Yamaguchi, Yukio [Mitsubishi Chemical Corp., Yokohama (Japan); Tanioka, Seiichi [Mitsubishi Chemical Corp., Sakaide (Japan)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A new one-dimensional coke oven model has been developed for simulating the amount and the characteristics of by-products such as tar and gas as well as coke. This model consists of both heat transfer and chemical kinetics including thermal decomposition of coal and tar. The chemical kinetics constants are obtained by estimation based on the results of experiments conducted to investigate the thermal decomposition of both coal and tar. The calculation results using the new model are in good agreement with experimental ones.

  6. Composite armor, armor system and vehicle including armor system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chu, Henry S.; Jones, Warren F.; Lacy, Jeffrey M.; Thinnes, Gary L.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Composite armor panels are disclosed. Each panel comprises a plurality of functional layers comprising at least an outermost layer, an intermediate layer and a base layer. An armor system incorporating armor panels is also disclosed. Armor panels are mounted on carriages movably secured to adjacent rails of a rail system. Each panel may be moved on its associated rail and into partially overlapping relationship with another panel on an adjacent rail for protection against incoming ordnance from various directions. The rail system may be configured as at least a part of a ring, and be disposed about a hatch on a vehicle. Vehicles including an armor system are also disclosed.

  7. cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Raikhel, Natasha V. (Okemos, MI); Broekaert, Willem F. (Dilbeek, BE); Chua, Nam-Hai (Scarsdale, NY); Kush, Anil (New York, NY)

    1993-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a pu GOVERNMENT RIGHTS This application was funded under Department of Energy Contract DE-AC02-76ER01338. The U.S. Government has certain rights under this application and any patent issuing thereon.

  8. Cogeneration handbook for the petroleum refining industry. [Glossary included

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Handbook deals only with industrial cogeneration, that is, simultaneous production of both heat and electricity at the industrial plant site. The cogenerator has the option of either selling all cogenerated power to the utility while simultaneously purchasing power to satisfy his plant demand, or directly supplying the plant demand with cogenerated power, thus displacing utility-supplied power. This Handbook provides the refinery plant manager or company energy coordinator with a framework for making a preliminary assessment of the feasibility and viability of cogeneration at a particular plant. The handbook is intended to provide an understanding of the potential of several standardized cogeneration systems, as well as their limitations. However, because the decision to cogenerate is very site specific, the handbook cannot provide all of the answers. It does attempt, however, to bring to light the major issues that should be addressed in the decision-making process. The decision of whether to cogenerate involves several considerations, including technical, economic, environmental, legal, and regulatory issues. Each of these issues is addressed separately in this handbook. In addition, a chapter is included on preparing a three-phase work statement, which is needed to guide the design of a cogeneration system. 39 figures, 37 tables.

  9. Community Assessment Tool for Public Health Emergencies Including Pandemic Influenza

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ORAU's Oak Ridge Institute for Science Education (HCTT-CHE)

    2011-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The Community Assessment Tool (CAT) for Public Health Emergencies Including Pandemic Influenza (hereafter referred to as the CAT) was developed as a result of feedback received from several communities. These communities participated in workshops focused on influenza pandemic planning and response. The 2008 through 2011 workshops were sponsored by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Feedback during those workshops indicated the need for a tool that a community can use to assess its readiness for a disaster - readiness from a total healthcare perspective, not just hospitals, but the whole healthcare system. The CAT intends to do just that - help strengthen existing preparedness plans by allowing the healthcare system and other agencies to work together during an influenza pandemic. It helps reveal each core agency partners (sectors) capabilities and resources, and highlights cases of the same vendors being used for resource supplies (e.g., personal protective equipment [PPE] and oxygen) by the partners (e.g., public health departments, clinics, or hospitals). The CAT also addresses gaps in the community's capabilities or potential shortages in resources. This tool has been reviewed by a variety of key subject matter experts from federal, state, and local agencies and organizations. It also has been piloted with various communities that consist of different population sizes, to include large urban to small rural communities.

  10. Treatment of mercury containing waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kalb, Paul D. (Wading River, NY); Melamed, Dan (Gaithersburg, MD); Patel, Bhavesh R (Elmhurst, NY); Fuhrmann, Mark (Babylon, NY)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is provided for the treatment of mercury containing waste in a single reaction vessel which includes a) stabilizing the waste with sulfur polymer cement under an inert atmosphere to form a resulting mixture and b) encapsulating the resulting mixture by heating the mixture to form a molten product and casting the molten product as a monolithic final waste form. Additional sulfur polymer cement can be added in the encapsulation step if needed, and a stabilizing additive can be added in the process to improve the leaching properties of the waste form.

  11. Mobile water treatment plant special study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Characterization of the level and extent of groundwater contamination in the vicinity of Title I mill sites began during the surface remedial action stage (Phase 1) of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. Some of the contamination in the aquifer(s) at the abandoned sites is attributable to milling activities during the years the mills were in operation. To begin implementation of Phase 11 groundwater remediation, the US Department of Energy (DOE) requested that (1) the Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) conduct a study to provide for the design of a mobile water treatment plant to treat groundwater extracted during site characterization studies at completed Phase I UMTRA sites, and (2) the results of the TAC investigations be documented in a special study report. This special study develops the design criteria for a water treatment plant that can be readily transported from one UMTRA site to another and operated as a complete treatment system. The 1991 study provides the basis for selecting a mobile water treatment system to meet the operating requirements recommended in this special study. The scope of work includes the following: Determining contaminants, flows, and loadings. Setting effluent quality criteria. Sizing water treatment unit(s). Evaluating non-monetary aspects of alternate treatment processes. Comparing costs of alternate treatment processes. Recommending the mobile water treatment plant design criteria.

  12. Medical Management Treatment Manual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bezrukov, Sergey M.

    Medical Management Treatment Manual: A Clinical Guide for Researchers and Clinicians) This manual is an adaptation of: Medical Management Treatment Manual: A Clinical Research Guide for Medically, Maryland #12;Message to the Users of this Medical Management (MM) Manual from the Editors Background

  13. Municipal Wastewater Characteristics of Sylhet City, Bangladesh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alam, Raquibul; Ahmed, Mushtaq; Chowdhury, Md. Aktarul Islam; Nath, Suman Kanti

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    biological treatment of the sewage. According to the Metcalf & Eddy (1995), a standard reference for wastewater treatment

  14. Hydraulic engine valve actuation system including independent feedback control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marriott, Craig D

    2013-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A hydraulic valve actuation assembly may include a housing, a piston, a supply control valve, a closing control valve, and an opening control valve. The housing may define a first fluid chamber, a second fluid chamber, and a third fluid chamber. The piston may be axially secured to an engine valve and located within the first, second and third fluid chambers. The supply control valve may control a hydraulic fluid supply to the piston. The closing control valve may be located between the supply control valve and the second fluid chamber and may control fluid flow from the second fluid chamber to the supply control valve. The opening control valve may be located between the supply control valve and the second fluid chamber and may control fluid flow from the supply control valve to the second fluid chamber.

  15. Electra-optical device including a nitrogen containing electrolyte

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bates, John B. (Oak Ridge, TN); Dudney, Nancy J. (Knoxville, TN); Gruzalski, Greg R. (Oak Ridge, TN); Luck, Christopher F. (Knoxville, TN)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Described is a thin-film battery, especially a thin-film microbattery, and a method for making same having application as a backup or primary integrated power source for electronic devices. The battery includes a novel electrolyte which is electrochemically stable and does not react with the lithium anode and a novel vanadium oxide cathode Configured as a microbattery, the battery can be fabricated directly onto a semiconductor chip, onto the semiconductor die or onto any portion of the chip carrier. The battery can be fabricated to any specified size or shape to meet the requirements of a particular application. The battery is fabricated of solid state materials and is capable of operation between -15.degree. C. and 150.degree. C.

  16. Dye laser amplifier including a specifically designed diffuser assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Davin, James (Gilroy, CA); Johnston, James P. (Stanford, CA)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A large (high flow rate) dye laser amplifier in which a continuous replened supply of dye is excited by a first light beam, specifically a copper vapor laser beam, in order to amplify the intensity of a second different light beam, specifically a dye beam, passing through the dye is disclosed herein. This amplifier includes a dye cell defining a dye chamber through which a continuous stream of dye is caused to pass at a relatively high flow rate and a specifically designed diffuser assembly for slowing down the flow of dye while, at the same time, assuring that as the dye stream flows through the diffuser assembly it does so in a stable manner.

  17. Electra-optical device including a nitrogen containing electrolyte

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bates, J.B.; Dudney, N.J.; Gruzalski, G.R.; Luck, C.F.

    1995-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Described is a thin-film battery, especially a thin-film microbattery, and a method for making same having application as a backup or primary integrated power source for electronic devices. The battery includes a novel electrolyte which is electrochemically stable and does not react with the lithium anode and a novel vanadium oxide cathode. Configured as a microbattery, the battery can be fabricated directly onto a semiconductor chip, onto the semiconductor die or onto any portion of the chip carrier. The battery can be fabricated to any specified size or shape to meet the requirements of a particular application. The battery is fabricated of solid state materials and is capable of operation between {minus}15 C and 150 C.

  18. Fuel cell repeater unit including frame and separator plate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yamanis, Jean; Hawkes, Justin R; Chiapetta, Jr., Louis; Bird, Connie E; Sun, Ellen Y; Croteau, Paul F

    2013-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    An example fuel cell repeater includes a separator plate and a frame establishing at least a portion of a flow path that is operative to communicate fuel to or from at least one fuel cell held by the frame relative to the separator plate. The flow path has a perimeter and any fuel within the perimeter flow across the at least one fuel cell in a first direction. The separator plate, the frame, or both establish at least one conduit positioned outside the flow path perimeter. The conduit is outside of the flow path perimeter and is configured to direct flow in a second, different direction. The conduit is fluidly coupled with the flow path.

  19. Pulse transmission transmitter including a higher order time derivate filter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dress Jr., William B.; Smith, Stephen F.

    2003-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems and methods for pulse-transmission low-power communication modes are disclosed. A pulse transmission transmitter includes: a clock; a pseudorandom polynomial generator coupled to the clock, the pseudorandom polynomial generator having a polynomial load input; an exclusive-OR gate coupled to the pseudorandom polynomial generator, the exclusive-OR gate having a serial data input; a programmable delay circuit coupled to both the clock and the exclusive-OR gate; a pulse generator coupled to the programmable delay circuit; and a higher order time derivative filter coupled to the pulse generator. The systems and methods significantly reduce lower-frequency emissions from pulse transmission spread-spectrum communication modes, which reduces potentially harmful interference to existing radio frequency services and users and also simultaneously permit transmission of multiple data bits by utilizing specific pulse shapes.

  20. Including stereoscopic information in the reconstruction of coronal magnetic fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Wiegelmann; T. Neukirch

    2008-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a method to include stereoscopic information about the three dimensional structure of flux tubes into the reconstruction of the coronal magnetic field. Due to the low plasma beta in the corona we can assume a force free magnetic field, with the current density parallel to the magnetic field lines. Here we use linear force free fields for simplicity. The method uses the line of sight magnetic field on the photosphere as observational input. The value of $\\alpha$ is determined iteratively by comparing the reconstructed magnetic field with the observed structures. The final configuration is the optimal linear force solution constrained by both the photospheric magnetogram and the observed plasma structures. As an example we apply our method to SOHO MDI/EIT data of an active region. In the future it is planned to apply the method to analyse data from the SECCHI instrument aboard the STEREO mission.

  1. Copper laser modulator driving assembly including a magnetic compression laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cook, Edward G. (Livermore, CA); Birx, Daniel L. (Oakley, CA); Ball, Don G. (Livermore, CA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser modulator (10) having a low voltage assembly (12) with a plurality of low voltage modules (14) with first stage magnetic compression circuits (20) and magnetic assist inductors (28) with a common core (91), such that timing of the first stage magnetic switches (30b) is thereby synchronized. A bipolar second stage of magnetic compression (42) is coupled to the low voltage modules (14) through a bipolar pulse transformer (36) and a third stage of magnetic compression (44) is directly coupled to the second stage of magnetic compression (42). The low voltage assembly (12) includes pressurized boxes (117) for improving voltage standoff between the primary winding assemblies (34) and secondary winding (40) contained therein.

  2. cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Raikhel, Natasha V. (Okemos, MI); Broekaert, Willem F. (Dilbeek, BE); Chua, Nam-Hai (Scarsdale, NY); Kush, Anil (New York, NY)

    1999-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74-79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli.

  3. CDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Raikhel, Natasha V. (Okemos, MI); Broekaert, Willem F. (Dilbeek, BE); Chua, Nam-Hai (Scarsdale, NY); Kush, Anil (New York, NY)

    1995-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74-79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli.

  4. cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Raikhel, N.V.; Broekaert, W.F.; Chua, N.H.; Kush, A.

    1999-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74--79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli. 12 figs.

  5. cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Raikhel, N.V.; Broekaert, W.F.; Chua, N.H.; Kush, A.

    1995-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1,018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74--79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli. 11 figures.

  6. Extractant composition including crown ether and calixarene extractants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meikrantz, David H. (Idaho Falls, ID); Todd, Terry A. (Aberdeen, ID); Riddle, Catherine L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Law, Jack D. (Pocalello, ID); Peterman, Dean R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Mincher, Bruce J. (Idaho Falls, ID); McGrath, Christopher A. (Blackfoot, ID); Baker, John D. (Blackfoot, ID)

    2009-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    An extractant composition comprising a mixed extractant solvent consisting of calix[4] arene-bis-(tert-octylbenzo)-crown-6 ("BOBCalixC6"), 4',4',(5')-di-(t-butyldicyclo-hexano)-18-crown-6 ("DtBu18C6"), and at least one modifier dissolved in a diluent. The DtBu18C6 may be present at from approximately 0.01M to approximately 0.4M, such as at from approximately 0.086 M to approximately 0.108 M. The modifier may be 1-(2,2,3,3-tetrafluoropropoxy)-3-(4-sec-butylphenoxy)-2-propanol ("Cs-7SB") and may be present at from approximately 0.01M to approximately 0.8M. In one embodiment, the mixed extractant solvent includes approximately 0.15M DtBu18C6, approximately 0.007M BOBCalixC6, and approximately 0.75M Cs-7SB modifier dissolved in an isoparaffinic hydrocarbon diluent. The extractant composition further comprises an aqueous phase. The mixed extractant solvent may be used to remove cesium and strontium from the aqueous phase.

  7. Ammonia fiber explosion (AFEX) treatment of grass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashok, Ganesh

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    solution), high-temperature treatment, and freezing in water suspensions at -75 C (Millett, Baker, and Satter, 1975), Chemical pretreatments include alkali and ammonia swelling, dilute acid extraction, NO with alkali, explosive steam decompression, wet... for ruminants. Ammonia explosion pulping has been investigated as an approach to fiber separation in wood chips (O' Connor, 1971). Recent work on pretreatment techniques includes: pretreatment of cedar with peracetic acid and steam explosion to improve...

  8. Community Assessment Tool for Public Health Emergencies Including Pandemic Influenza

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HCTT-CHE

    2011-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The Community Assessment Tool (CAT) for Public Health Emergencies Including Pandemic Influenza (hereafter referred to as the CAT) was developed as a result of feedback received from several communities. These communities participated in workshops focused on influenza pandemic planning and response. The 2008 through 2011 workshops were sponsored by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Feedback during those workshops indicated the need for a tool that a community can use to assess its readiness for a disaster—readiness from a total healthcare perspective, not just hospitals, but the whole healthcare system. The CAT intends to do just that—help strengthen existing preparedness plans by allowing the healthcare system and other agencies to work together during an influenza pandemic. It helps reveal each core agency partners' (sectors) capabilities and resources, and highlights cases of the same vendors being used for resource supplies (e.g., personal protective equipment [PPE] and oxygen) by the partners (e.g., public health departments, clinics, or hospitals). The CAT also addresses gaps in the community's capabilities or potential shortages in resources. While the purpose of the CAT is to further prepare the community for an influenza pandemic, its framework is an extension of the traditional all-hazards approach to planning and preparedness. As such, the information gathered by the tool is useful in preparation for most widespread public health emergencies. This tool is primarily intended for use by those involved in healthcare emergency preparedness (e.g., community planners, community disaster preparedness coordinators, 9-1-1 directors, hospital emergency preparedness coordinators). It is divided into sections based on the core agency partners, which may be involved in the community's influenza pandemic influenza response.

  9. International Best Practices for Pre-Processing and Co-Processing Municipal Solid Waste and Sewage Sludge in the Cement Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasanbeigi, Ali

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sludge treatment to increase biogas production. Available atal. , no date) Use of biogas from anaerobic sludge digestionsludge are mass reduction, biogas production, and improved

  10. Thermal treatment wall

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aines, Roger D. (Livermore, CA); Newmark, Robin L. (Livermore, CA); Knauss, Kevin G. (Livermore, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermal treatment wall emplaced to perform in-situ destruction of contaminants in groundwater. Thermal destruction of specific contaminants occurs by hydrous pyrolysis/oxidation at temperatures achievable by existing thermal remediation techniques (electrical heating or steam injection) in the presence of oxygen or soil mineral oxidants, such as MnO.sub.2. The thermal treatment wall can be installed in a variety of configurations depending on the specific objectives, and can be used for groundwater cleanup, wherein in-situ destruction of contaminants is carried out rather than extracting contaminated fluids to the surface, where they are to be cleaned. In addition, the thermal treatment wall can be used for both plume interdiction and near-wellhead in-situ groundwater treatment. Thus, this technique can be utilized for a variety of groundwater contamination problems.

  11. Medical Actinium Therapeutic Treatment

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Learn how INL researchers are increasing world supplies of Bismuth 213 to help with cancer treatments. For more information about INL research projects, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  12. Responding to Changing Workforce Needs and Challenges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for utilities sector including electric power, natural gas, steam supply, water supply, and sewage removal #12

  13. Journal of Hazardous Materials 252253 (2013) 375381 Contents lists available at SciVerse ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    include land application of sewage sludge, wastewater irrigation, and disposal of expired pharmaceutical

  14. Gas injection to inhibit migration during an in situ heat treatment process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kuhlman, Myron Ira (Houston, TX); Vinegar; Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Baker, Ralph Sterman (Fitchburg, MA); Heron, Goren (Keene, CA)

    2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods of treating a subsurface formation are described herein. Methods for treating a subsurface treatment area in a formation may include introducing a fluid into the formation from a plurality of wells offset from a treatment area of an in situ heat treatment process to inhibit outward migration of formation fluid from the in situ heat treatment process.

  15. Waste Treatment Plant - 12508

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harp, Benton; Olds, Erik [US DOE (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) will immobilize millions of gallons of Hanford's tank waste into solid glass using a proven technology called vitrification. The vitrification process will turn the waste into a stable glass form that is safe for long-term storage. Our discussion of the WTP will include a description of the ongoing design and construction of this large, complex, first-of-a-kind project. The concept for the operation of the WTP is to separate high-level and low-activity waste fractions, and immobilize those fractions in glass using vitrification. The WTP includes four major nuclear facilities and various support facilities. Waste from the Tank Farms is first pumped to the Pretreatment Facility at the WTP through an underground pipe-in-pipe system. When construction is complete, the Pretreatment Facility will be 12 stories high, 540 feet long and 215 feet wide, making it the largest of the four major nuclear facilities that compose the WTP. The total size of this facility will be more than 490,000 square feet. More than 8.2 million craft hours are required to construct this facility. Currently, the Pretreatment Facility is 51 percent complete. At the Pretreatment Facility the waste is pumped to the interior waste feed receipt vessels. Each of these four vessels is 55-feet tall and has a 375,000 gallon capacity, which makes them the largest vessels inside the Pretreatment Facility. These vessels contain a series of internal pulse-jet mixers to keep incoming waste properly mixed. The vessels are inside the black-cell areas, completely enclosed behind thick steel-laced, high strength concrete walls. The black cells are designed to be maintenance free with no moving parts. Once hot operations commence the black-cell area will be inaccessible. Surrounded by black cells, is the 'hot cell canyon'. The hot cell contains all the moving and replaceable components to remove solids and extract liquids. In this area, there is ultrafiltration equipment, cesium-ion exchange columns, evaporator boilers and recirculation pumps, and various mechanical process pumps for transferring process fluids. During the first phase of pretreatment, the waste will be concentrated using an evaporation process. Solids will be filtered out, and the remaining soluble, highly radioactive isotopes will be removed using an ion-exchange process. The high-level solids will be sent to the High-Level Waste (HLW) Vitrification Facility, and the low activity liquids will be sent to the Low-Activity Waste (LAW) Vitrification Facility for further processing. The high-level waste will be transferred via underground pipes to the HLW Facility from the Pretreatment Facility. The waste first arrives at the wet cell, which rests inside a black-cell area. The pretreated waste is transferred through shielded pipes into a series of melter preparation and feed vessels before reaching the melters. Liquids from various facility processes also return to the wet cell for interim storage before recycling back to the Pretreatment Facility. (authors)

  16. Mixed waste characterization, treatment & disposal focus area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mission of the Mixed Waste Characterization, Treatment, and Disposal Focus Area (referred to as the Mixed Waste Focus Area or MWFA) is to provide treatment systems capable of treating DOE`s mixed waste in partnership with users, and with continual participation of stakeholders, tribal governments, and regulators. The MWFA deals with the problem of eliminating mixed waste from current and future storage in the DOE complex. Mixed waste is waste that contains both hazardous chemical components, subject to the requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), and radioactive components, subject to the requirements of the Atomic Energy Act. The radioactive components include transuranic (TRU) and low-level waste (LLW). TRU waste primarily comes from the reprocessing of spent fuel and the use of plutonium in the fabrication of nuclear weapons. LLW includes radioactive waste other than uranium mill tailings, TRU, and high-level waste, including spent fuel.

  17. New Gravity Wave Treatments for GISS Climate Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geller, Marvin A.

    Previous versions of GISS climate models have either used formulations of Rayleigh drag to represent unresolved gravity wave interactions with the model-resolved flow or have included a rather complicated treatment of ...

  18. On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Selecting and Permitting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2005-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication explains factors to consider when choosing an on-site wastewater treatment system and lists the nine steps required to obtain a permit for one. It includes addresses and phone numbers of Texas Natural Resource Conservation...

  19. Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Homeowner's Guide to Evaluating Service Contracts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.; O'Neill, Courtney; Deal, Nancy; Loomis, George; Gustafson, David; Lindbo, David

    2008-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This guide helps homeowners who are seeking maintenance services for their onsite wastewater treatment systems (such as septic systems). Included are definitions of common terms used in service contracts, types of service contracts available...

  20. WHAT'S INCLUDED?

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500IIVasudhaSurface.Laboratory in Golden, Colorado6

  1. Natural and synthetic estrogens in wastewater treatment plant effuent and the coastal ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Griffith, David R. (David Richmond)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Steroidal estrogens are potent endocrine disrupting chemicals that are naturally excreted by vertebrates (e.g., humans and fish) and can enter natural waters through the discharge of treated and raw sewage. Because estrogens ...

  2. TREATMENT SYSTEMS AN INTEGRATED APPROACH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heal, Kate

    ECOLOGICAL TREATMENT SYSTEMS AN INTEGRATED APPROACH TO THE TREATMENT OF WASTE AND WASTE WATER's naturally pure water #12;Wetland Ecology Our treatment systems incorporate a wide variety of wetland plants for on-site management and treatment of effluent and solid waste 3. Provide for surface water attenuation

  3. WASTEWATER TREATMENT OVER SAND COLUMNS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    93/0096 WASTEWATER TREATMENT OVER SAND COLUMNS TREATMENT YIELDS, LOCALISATION OF THE BIOMASS Domestic wastewater treatment by infiltration-percolation is a process that becomming common in France, a greater depth for desinfection purposes. KEYWORDS Wastewater treatment, Infiltration-percolation. Sand

  4. Non-biodegradable landfill leachate treatment by combined process of agitation, coagulation, SBR and filtration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abood, Alkhafaji R. [State Key Laboratory of Biogeology and Environmental Geology, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); Thi Qar University, Nasiriyah (Iraq); Bao, Jianguo, E-mail: bjianguo888@126.com [State Key Laboratory of Biogeology and Environmental Geology, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); Du, Jiangkun; Zheng, Dan; Luo, Ye [State Key Laboratory of Biogeology and Environmental Geology, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: • A novel method of stripping (agitation) was investigated for NH{sub 3}-N removal. • PFS coagulation followed agitation process enhanced the leachate biodegradation. • Nitrification–denitrification achieved by changing operation process in SBR treatment. • A dual filter of carbon-sand is suitable as a polishing treatment of leachate. • Combined treatment success for the complete treatment of non-biodegradable leachate. - Abstract: This study describes the complete treatment of non-biodegradable landfill leachate by combined treatment processes. The processes consist of agitation as a novel stripping method used to overcome the ammonia toxicity regarding aerobic microorganisms. The NH{sub 3}-N removal ratio was 93.9% obtained at pH 11.5 and a gradient velocity (G) 150 s{sup ?1} within a five-hour agitation time. By poly ferric sulphate (PFS) coagulation followed the agitation process; chemical oxygen demand (COD) and biological oxygen demand (BOD{sub 5}) were removed at 70.6% and 49.4%, respectively at an optimum dose of 1200 mg L{sup ?1} at pH 5.0. The biodegradable ratio BOD{sub 5}/COD was improved from 0.18 to 0.31 during pretreatment step by agitation and PFS coagulation. Thereafter, the effluent was diluted with sewage at a different ratio before it was subjected to sequencing batch reactor (SBR) treatment. Up to 93.3% BOD{sub 5}, 95.5% COD and 98.1% NH{sub 3}-N removal were achieved by SBR operated under anoxic–aerobic–anoxic conditions. The filtration process was carried out using sand and carbon as a dual filter media as polishing process. The final effluent concentration of COD, BOD{sub 5}, suspended solid (SS), NH{sub 3}-N and total organic carbon (TOC) were 72.4 mg L{sup ?1}, 22.8 mg L{sup ?1}, 24.2 mg L{sup ?1}, 18.4 mg L{sup ?1} and 50.8 mg L{sup ?1} respectively, which met the discharge standard. The results indicated that a combined process of agitation-coagulation-SBR and filtration effectively eliminated pollutant loading from landfill leachate.

  5. Cryogenic treatment of gas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bravo, Jose Luis (Houston, TX); Harvey, III, Albert Destrehan (Kingwood, TX); Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX)

    2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems and methods of treating a gas stream are described. A method of treating a gas stream includes cryogenically separating a first gas stream to form a second gas stream and a third stream. The third stream is cryogenically contacted with a carbon dioxide stream to form a fourth and fifth stream. A majority of the second gas stream includes methane and/or molecular hydrogen. A majority of the third stream includes one or more carbon oxides, hydrocarbons having a carbon number of at least 2, one or more sulfur compounds, or mixtures thereof. A majority of the fourth stream includes one or more of the carbon oxides and hydrocarbons having a carbon number of at least 2. A majority of the fifth stream includes hydrocarbons having a carbon number of at least 3 and one or more of the sulfur compounds.

  6. 300 Area waste acid treatment system closure plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LUKE, S.N.

    1999-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application is considered to be a single application organized into a General Information Portion (document number DOERL-91-28) and a Unit-Specific Portion. The scope of the Unit-Specific Portion includes closure plan documentation submitted for individual, treatment, storage, and/or disposal units undergoing closure, such as the 300 Area Waste Acid Treatment System. Documentation contained in the General Information Portion is broader in nature and could be used by multiple treatment, storage, and/or disposal units (e.g., the glossary provided in the General Information Portion). Whenever appropriate, 300 Area Waste Acid Treatment System documentation makes cross-reference to the General Information Portion, rather than duplicating text. This 300 Area Waste Acid Treatment System Closure Plan (Revision 2) includes a Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application, Part A, Form 3. Information provided in this closure plan is current as of April 1999.

  7. Oxidative particle mixtures for groundwater treatment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siegrist, Robert L. (Boulder, CO); Murdoch, Lawrence C. (Clemson, SC)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is a method and a composition of a mixture for degradation and immobilization of contaminants in soil and groundwater. The oxidative particle mixture and method includes providing a material having a minimal volume of free water, mixing at least one inorganic oxidative chemical in a granular form with a carrier fluid containing a fine grained inorganic hydrophilic compound and injecting the resulting mixture into the subsurface. The granular form of the inorganic oxidative chemical dissolves within the areas of injection, and the oxidative ions move by diffusion and/or advection, therefore extending the treatment zone over a wider area than the injection area. The organic contaminants in the soil and groundwater are degraded by the oxidative ions, which form solid byproducts that can sorb significant amounts of inorganic contaminants, metals, and radionuclides for in situ treatment and immobilization of contaminants. The method and composition of the oxidative particle mixture for long-term treatment and immobilization of contaminants in soil and groundwater provides for a reduction in toxicity of contaminants in a subsurface area of contamination without the need for continued injection of treatment material, or for movement of the contaminants, or without the need for continuous pumping of groundwater through the treatment zone, or removal of groundwater from the subsurface area of contamination.

  8. Electrometallurgical treatment demonstration at ANL-West

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goff, K. M.; Benedict, R. W.; Johnson, S. G.; Mariani, R. D.; Simpson, M. F.; Westphal, B. R.

    2000-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrometallurgical treatment (EMT) was developed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) to ready sodium-bonded spent nuclear fuel for geological disposal. A demonstration of this technology was successfully completed in August 1999. EMT was used to condition irradiated EBR-II driver and blanket fuel at ANL-West. The results of this demonstration, including the production of radioactive high-level waste forms, are presented.

  9. BULKING SLUDGE TREATMENT BY MICROSCOPIC OBSERVATION AND MECHANICAL TREATMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for the operation of the biological stage of waste water treatment plants. If the threatening extensive growth of wastewater treatment plants often need a complex control for the optimal processing. The measurement status and for the regulation of biological parts in waste water treatment plants. Furthermore, e

  10. ARM: Surface Radiation Measurement Quality Control testing, including climatologically configurable limits

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Hodges, Gary; Stoffel, Tom; Kutchenreiter, Mark; Kay, Bev; Habte, Aron; Ritsche, Michael; Morris, Victor; Anderberg, Mary

    Surface Radiation Measurement Quality Control testing, including climatologically configurable limits

  11. Heat treatment furnace

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Seals, Roland D; Parrott, Jeffrey G; DeMint, Paul D; Finney, Kevin R; Blue, Charles T

    2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A furnace heats through both infrared radiation and convective air utilizing an infrared/purge gas design that enables improved temperature control to enable more uniform treatment of workpieces. The furnace utilizes lamps, the electrical end connections of which are located in an enclosure outside the furnace chamber, with the lamps extending into the furnace chamber through openings in the wall of the chamber. The enclosure is purged with gas, which gas flows from the enclosure into the furnace chamber via the openings in the wall of the chamber so that the gas flows above and around the lamps and is heated to form a convective mechanism in heating parts.

  12. Proposed Site Treatment Plan (PSTP). STP reference document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is required by Section 3021(b) of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), as amended by the Federal Facility Compliance Act (FFCAct), to prepare a plan describing the development of treatment capacities and technologies for treating mixed waste (hazardous/radioactive waste). DOE decided to prepare its site treatment plan in a three phased approach. The first phase, called the Conceptual Site Treatment Plan (CSTP), was issued in October 1993. At the Savannah River Site (SRS) the CSTP described mixed waste streams generated at SRS and listed treatment scenarios for each waste stream utilizing an onsite, offsite DOE, and offsite or onsite commercial or vendor treatment option. The CSTP is followed by the Draft Site Treatment Plan (DSTP), due to be issued in August 1994. The DSTP, the current activity., will narrow the options discussed in the CSTP to a preferred treatment option, if possible, and will include waste streams proposed to be shipped to SRS from other DOE facilities as well as waste streams SRS may send offsite for treatment. The SRS DSTP process has been designed to address treatment options for each of the site`s mixed waste streams. The SRS Proposed Site Treatment Plan (PSTP) is due to be issued in February 1995. The compliance order would be derived from the PSTP.

  13. Sustainable Urbanism: Vision and Planning Process Through an Examination of Two Model Neighborhood Developments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kasioumi, Eirini

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    systems for district heating and sewage treatment into anin an extensive district heating network and plants for

  14. Scoping Document: Proposed Statewide Policy on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .......................................................................................... 24 K. Sewage Treatment Plant Wastewater Used as Cooling Water........................... 25 #12.......................................................................................................... 20 G. Biological and Cumulative Impacts

  15. E-Print Network 3.0 - aqueous medium including Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8 Abstract Biological treatment methods are effective at destroying polycyclic aromatic hydro- Summary: concentrations in the aqueous phase medium (3 l) were tripled in response...

  16. HIV and Its Treatment Is My Treatment Regimen Working? Is My Treatment Regimen Working?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levin, Judith G.

    viral load, it's important to closely follow your treatment regimen. Poor treatment adherence can also blood tests to monitor your HIV treatment: CD4 count and viral load test. The results of the tests need a CD4 count only once every 6 to 12 months. What is a viral load test? Preventing HIV from

  17. Selection of water treatment processes special study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Characterization of the level and extent of groundwater contamination in the vicinity of Title I mill sites began during the surface remedial action stage (Phase 1) of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. Some of the contamination in the aquifer(s) at the abandoned sites is attributable to milling activities during the years the mills were in operation. The restoration of contaminated aquifers is to be undertaken in Phase II of the UMTRA Project. To begin implementation of Phase II, DOE requested that groundwater restoration methods and technologies be investigated by the Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC). and that the results of the TAC investigations be documented in special study reports. Many active and passive methods are available to clean up contaminated groundwater. Passive groundwater treatment includes natural flushing, geochemical barriers, and gradient manipulation by stream diversion or slurry walls. Active groundwater.cleanup techniques include gradient manipulation by well extraction or injection. in-situ biological or chemical reclamation, and extraction and treatment. Although some or all of the methods listed above may play a role in the groundwater cleanup phase of the UMTRA Project, the extraction and treatment (pump and treat) option is the only restoration alternative discussed in this report. Hence, all sections of this report relate either directly or indirectly to the technical discipline of process engineering.

  18. Nevada Test Site Treatment Plan. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Treatment Plans (STPS) are required for facilities at which the US Department of Energy (DOE) or stores mixed waste, defined by the Federal Facility Compliance Act (FFCAct) as waste containing both a hazardous waste subject to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act and a radioactive material subject to the Atomic Energy Act. On April 6, 1993, DOE published a Federal Register notice (58 FR 17875) describing its proposed process for developing the STPs in three phases including a Conceptual, a Draft, and a Proposed Site Treatment Plan (PSTP). All of the DOE Nevada Operations Office STP iterations have been developed with the state of Nevada`s input. The options and schedules reflect a ``bottoms-up`` approach and have been evaluated for impacts on other DOE sites, as well as impacts to the overall DOE program. Changes may have occurred in the preferred option and associated schedules between the PSTP, which was submitted to the state of Nevada and US Environmental Protection Agency April 1995, and the Final STP (hereafter referred to as the STP) as treatment evaluations progressed. The STP includes changes that have occurred since the submittal of the PSTP as a result of state-to-state and DOE-to-state discussions.

  19. Independent Activity Report, Hanford Sludge Treatment Project...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Sludge Treatment Project - February 2012 Independent Activity Report, Hanford Sludge Treatment Project - February 2012 February 2012 Hanford Sludge Treatment Project Operational...

  20. Independent Oversight Activity Report, Hanford Sludge Treatment...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sludge Treatment Project - September 2013 Independent Oversight Activity Report, Hanford Sludge Treatment Project - September 2013 November 2013 Hanford Sludge Treatment Project...

  1. Treatment and prevention systems for acid mine drainage and halogenated contaminants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jin, Song (Fort Collins, CO); Fallgren, Paul H. (Laramie, WY); Morris, Jeffrey M. (Laramie, WY)

    2012-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Embodiments include treatments for acid mine drainage generation sources (10 perhaps by injection of at least one substrate (11) and biologically constructing a protective biofilm (13) on acid mine drainage generation source materials (14). Further embodiments include treatments for degradation of contaminated water environments (17) with substrates such as returned milk and the like.

  2. E-Print Network 3.0 - actinides including cm Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: of waste actinides. Such damage can be studied by many techniques, including heavy-ionfast neutron... were presented and proposed, including; Fundamental studies...

  3. Common Data Set 2011-2012 J Column heading for CIP categories to include now reads: CIP 2010 Categories to Include

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Common Data Set 2011-2012 J Column heading for CIP categories to include now reads: CIP 2010 Categories to Include J CIP category 3 description now reads: Natural resources and conservation J CIP category 5 description now reads: Area, ethnic, and gender studies J CIP category 16 description now reads

  4. Supercritical water oxidation test bed effluent treatment study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnes, C.M.

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents effluent treatment options for a 50 h Supercritical Water Test Unit. Effluent compositions are calculated for eight simulated waste streams, using different assumed cases. Variations in effluent composition with different reactor designs and operating schemes are discussed. Requirements for final effluent compositions are briefly reviewed. A comparison is made of two general schemes. The first is one in which the effluent is cooled and effluent treatment is primarily done in the liquid phase. In the second scheme, most treatment is performed with the effluent in the gas phase. Several unit operations are also discussed, including neutralization, mercury removal, and evaporation.

  5. Review of technical documents supporting proposed revisions to EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) regulations for the disposal/reuse of sewage sludge under Section 405(D) of the Clean Water Act. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In August 1985 the Environmental Engineering Committee of the Science Advisory Board was asked by the Office of Water Regulations and Standards (OWRS) to review technical documents supporting development of EPA regulations for the disposal/reuse of sewage sludge under Section 405(d) of the Clean Water Act. The Committee was also asked by the Office of Marine and Estuarine Protection (OMEP) to review technical documents supporting revisions of the EPA ocean dumping regulations. The Committee chose to review the two sets of documents together, since they both dealt with a common subject, and since they shared, in some respects, a common methodology. The report, however, covers only the review of the OWRS documents, which consist of a set of risk-assessment methodologies (1,2,3,4) for four sludge disposal/reuse options (landfilling, land application/distribution and marketing, incineration, and ocean disposal). The reviews of the OMEP documents are covered in separate Committee reports. The Committee's principal findings are outlined.

  6. NM's Flying 40 List Includes CHTM Start-Up By Stefi Weisburd June 23, 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Mexico, University of

    -ups including Sandia Systems, Inc., Semiconductor Bridge Technology, Gratings, Inc., Zia Laser, Inc., K

  7. Uranium ore treatment. January 1970-May 1981 (citations from the Engineering Index Data Base). Report for Jan 70-May 81

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The treatment of uranium ores is presented with emphasis placed on acid leaching as the primary step in the process. Tailing disposal and proper handling of radioactive materials, including environmental monitoring is emphasized. Primary treatment procedures include ion exchange, sulfuric acid leaching, solvent extraction and sedimentation. (Contains 300 citations fully indexed and including a title list.)

  8. Composite materials and bodies including silicon carbide and titanium diboride and methods of forming same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lillo, Thomas M.; Chu, Henry S.; Harrison, William M.; Bailey, Derek

    2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods of forming composite materials include coating particles of titanium dioxide with a substance including boron (e.g., boron carbide) and a substance including carbon, and reacting the titanium dioxide with the substance including boron and the substance including carbon to form titanium diboride. The methods may be used to form ceramic composite bodies and materials, such as, for example, a ceramic composite body or material including silicon carbide and titanium diboride. Such bodies and materials may be used as armor bodies and armor materials. Such methods may include forming a green body and sintering the green body to a desirable final density. Green bodies formed in accordance with such methods may include particles comprising titanium dioxide and a coating at least partially covering exterior surfaces thereof, the coating comprising a substance including boron (e.g., boron carbide) and a substance including carbon.

  9. Rocky Mountain NP, Colorado Nitrogen emissions from a variety of human made sources, including ammonia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacDonald, Lee

    and gas production, wastewater treatment plants, landfills, fertilized crops, and livestock production comes into RMNP from both urban and rural areas in Colorado as well as from other states. Agricultural

  10. Harvesting Energy from Wastewater Treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harvesting Energy from Wastewater Treatment Bruce Logan Penn State University #12;Energy Costs? 5-7% of electricity used in USA is for water &wastewater #12;Global Energy & Health Issues 1 Billion people lack #12;Energy content of Wastewaters · Electricity "lost" to water and wastewater treatment= 0.6 quad

  11. Dept. of Soil Science, UW-Madison/UW-Extension, 1525 Observatory Dr., Madison, WI 53706/608-262-0485 November 2010 Issue #1 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balser, Teri C.

    . Formerly called sewage sludge, they reflect the current best technology for the biological treatment. There are three methods for handling biosolids, which include land-filling, incineration, and land application considerations for the safe and effective recycling of biosolids by land application in Wisconsin. Rules

  12. As a starting point, can you briefly outline your current study and what you

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oviatt, Candace

    of pollutants to the Bay. Current infrastructure includes transportation, hospitals, schools, scrap metals the Industrial Revolution started in Rhode Island, the current levels of industry are low and not a major source and light industries, among others. In recent years sewage treatment facilities have been the main source

  13. OTHER APPROACHES TO MANAGING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    requirements Include minimum separations between wells and conventional/alternative onsite sewage treatment systems Supplement public sanitary sewerage systems primarily in rural areas Legal Approaches ConstructionOTHER APPROACHES TO MANAGING POLLUTANT SOURCES Laws and Land Use [Chapter 10.2] Rules of Thumb Rule

  14. Modeling Hepatitis C treatment policy.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuypers, Marshall A.; Lambert, Gregory Joseph; Moore, Thomas W.; Glass, Robert John,; Finley, Patrick D.; Ross, David [Clinical Public Health Group, Veterans Health Administration, Washington, D.C.; Chartier, Maggie

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chronic infection with Hepatitis C virus (HCV) results in cirrhosis, liver cancer and death. As the nation's largest provider of care for HCV, US Veterans Health Administration (VHA) invests extensive resources in the diagnosis and treatment of the disease. This report documents modeling and analysis of HCV treatment dynamics performed for the VHA aimed at improving service delivery efficiency. System dynamics modeling of disease treatment demonstrated the benefits of early detection and the role of comorbidities in disease progress and patient mortality. Preliminary modeling showed that adherence to rigorous treatment protocols is a primary determinant of treatment success. In depth meta-analysis revealed correlations of adherence and various psycho-social factors. This initial meta-analysis indicates areas where substantial improvement in patient outcomes can potentially result from VA programs which incorporate these factors into their design.

  15. Regulatory treatment of allowances and compliance costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rose, K. [National Regulatory Research Institute, Columbus, OH (United States)

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA) established a national emission allowance trading system, a market-based form of environmental regulation designed to reduce and limit sulfur dioxide emissions. However, the allowance trading system is being applied primarily to an economically regulated electric utility industry. The combining of the new form of environmental regulation and economic regulation of electric utilities has raised a number of questions including what the role should be of the federal and state utility regulating commissions and how those actions will affect the decision making process of the utilities and the allowance market. There are several dimensions to the regulatory problems that commissions face. Allowances and utility compliance expenditures have implications for least-cost/IPR (integrated resource planning), prudence review procedures, holding company and multistate utility regulation and ratemaking treatment. The focus of this paper is on the ratemaking treatment. The following topics are covered: ratemaking treatment of allowances and compliance costs; Traditional cost-recovery mechanisms; limitations to the traditional approach; traditional approach and the allowance trading market; market-based cost recovery mechanisms; methods of determining the benchmark; determining the split between ratepayers and the utility; other regulatory approaches; limitations of incentive mechanisms.

  16. Enhanced integrated nonthermal treatment system study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biagi, C.; Schwinkendorf, B.; Teheranian, B.

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the Enhanced Nonthermal Treatment Systems (ENTS) study is to evaluate alternative configurations of one of the five systems evaluated in the Integrated Nonthermal Treatment Systems (INTS) study. Five alternative configurations are evaluated. Each is designed to enhance the final waste form performance by replacing grout with improved stabilization technologies, or to improve system performance by improving the destruction efficiency for organic contaminants. AU enhanced systems are alternative configurations of System NT-5, which has the following characteristics: Nonthermal System NT-5: (1) catalytic wet oxidation (CWO) to treat organic material including organic liquids, sludges, and soft (or combustible) debris, (2) thermal desorption of inorganic sludge and process residue, (3) washing of soil and inorganic debris with treatment by CWO of removed organic material, (4) metal decontamination by abrasive blasting, (5) stabilization of treated sludge, soil, debris, and untreated debris with entrained contamination in grout, and (6) stabilization of inorganic sludge, salts and secondary waste in polymer. System NT-5 was chosen because it was designed to treat combustible debris thereby minimizing the final waste form volume, and because it uses grout for primary stabilization. The enhanced nonthermal systems were studied to determine the cost and performance impact of replacing grout (a commonly used stabilization agent in the DOE complex) with improved waste stabilization methods such as vitrification and polymer.

  17. Determining the Viability of a Hybrid Experiential and Distance Learning Educational Model for Water Treatment Plant Operators in Kentucky.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fattic, Jana R.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ?? Drinking water and wastewater industries are facing a nationwide workforce shortfall of qualified treatment plant operators due to factors including the en masse retirement… (more)

  18. A continuum constitutive model for the mechanical behavior of woven fabrics including slip and failure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    King, Michael J. (Michael James), 1978-

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Woven fabrics are used in many applications, including ballistic armors and fabric-reinforced composites. Advances in small-scale technologies are enabling new applications including fabrics with embedded electronics, ...

  19. SBIR/STTR FY15 Release 1 Awards Announced-Includes Fuel Cell...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    FY15 Release 1 Awards Announced-Includes Fuel Cell Catalyst and Hydrogen Contamination Detection R&D SBIRSTTR FY15 Release 1 Awards Announced-Includes Fuel Cell Catalyst and...

  20. SBIR/STTR Release 2 Topics Announced-Includes Hydrogen and Fuel...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Release 2 Topics Announced-Includes Hydrogen and Fuel Cells SBIRSTTR Release 2 Topics Announced-Includes Hydrogen and Fuel Cells October 31, 2014 - 12:05pm Addthis The 2015 Small...

  1. E-Print Network 3.0 - anti-platelet therapy including Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    management including exercise, cognitive behavioral therapy 3. ... Source: Messersmith, Phillip B.- Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University...

  2. Process modeling for the Integrated Thermal Treatment System (ITTS) study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liebelt, K.H.; Brown, B.W.; Quapp, W.J.

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the process modeling done in support of the integrated thermal treatment system (ITTS) study, Phases 1 and 2. ITTS consists of an integrated systems engineering approach for uniform comparison of widely varying thermal treatment technologies proposed for treatment of the contact-handled mixed low-level wastes (MLLW) currently stored in the U.S. Department of Energy complex. In the overall study, 19 systems were evaluated. Preconceptual designs were developed that included all of the various subsystems necessary for a complete installation, from waste receiving through to primary and secondary stabilization and disposal of the processed wastes. Each system included the necessary auxiliary treatment subsystems so that all of the waste categories in the complex were fully processed. The objective of the modeling task was to perform mass and energy balances of the major material components in each system. Modeling of trace materials, such as pollutants and radioactive isotopes, were beyond the present scope. The modeling of the main and secondary thermal treatment, air pollution control, and metal melting subsystems was done using the ASPEN PLUS process simulation code, Version 9.1-3. These results were combined with calculations for the remainder of the subsystems to achieve the final results, which included offgas volumes, and mass and volume waste reduction ratios.

  3. Photovoltaic Device Including A Boron Doping Profile In An I-Type Layer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yang, Liyou (Lawrenceville, NJ)

    1993-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A photovoltaic cell for use in a single junction or multijunction photovoltaic device, which includes a p-type layer of a semiconductor compound including silicon, an i-type layer of an amorphous semiconductor compound including silicon, and an n-type layer of a semiconductor compound including silicon formed on the i-type layer. The i-type layer including an undoped first sublayer formed on the p-type layer, and a boron-doped second sublayer formed on the first sublayer.

  4. Mixed debris treatment at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia, E.C. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Porter, C.L. [Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Co., Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Wallace, M.T. [Argonne National Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    August 18, 1992 the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) published the final revised treatment standards for hazardous debris, including mixed debris. (1) Whereas previous standards had been concentration based, the revised standards are performance based. Debris must be treated prior to land disposal, using specific technologies from one or more of the following families of debris treatment technologies: Extraction, destruction, or immobilization. Seventeen specific technologies with generic application are discussed in the final rule. The existing capabilities and types of debris at the INEL were scrubbed against the debris rule to determine an overall treatment strategy. Seven types of debris were identified: combustible, porous, non-porous, inherently hazardous, HEPA filters, asbestos contaminated, and reactive metals contaminated debris. With the exception of debris contaminated with reactive metals treatment can be achieved utilizing existing facilities coupled with minor modifications.

  5. Chemical treatment of mixed waste at the FEMP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Honigford, L.; Sattler, J.; Dilday, D.; Cook, D.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Chemical Treatment Project is one in a series of projects implemented by the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) to treat mixed waste. The projects were initiated to address concerns regarding treatment capacity for mixed waste and to comply with requirements established by the Federal Facility Compliance Act. The Chemical Treatment Project is designed to utilize commercially available mobile technologies to perform treatment at the FEMP site. The waste in the Project consists of a variety of waste types with a wide range of hazards and physical characteristics. The treatment processes to be established for the waste types will be developed by a systematic approach including waste streams evaluation, projectization of the waste streams, and categorization of the stream. This information is utilized to determine the proper train of treatment which will be required to lead the waste to its final destination (i.e., disposal). This approach allows flexibility to manage a wide variety of waste in a cheaper, faster manner than designing a single treatment technology diverse enough to manage all the waste streams.

  6. Chemical treatment of mixed waste can be done.....Today!

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Honigford, L.; Dilday, D.; Cook, D. [Fernald Environmental Restoration Management Corp., Cincinnati, OH (United States); Sattler, J. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Chemical Treatment Project is one in a series of projects implemented by the FEMP to treat mixed waste. The projects were initiated to address concerns regarding treatment capacity for mixed waste and to comply with requirements established by the Federal Facility Compliance Act. The Chemical Treatment Project is designed to utilize commercially available mobile technologies to perform treatment at the FEMP site. The waste in the Project consists of a variety of waste types with a wide range of hazards and physical characteristics. The treatment processes to be established for the waste types will be developed by a systematic approach including waste streams evaluation, projectization of the waste streams, and categorization of the stream. This information is utilized to determine the proper train of treatment which will be required to lead the waste to its final destination (i.e., disposal). This approach allows flexibility to manage a wide variety of waste in a cheaper, faster manner than designing a single treatment technology diverse enough to manage all the waste streams.

  7. RESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access Compliance and treatment satisfaction of post

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    practicing in France. Investigators included post- menopausal women with a diagnosis of osteoporosis significantly the risk of osteoporotic fracture in women with post-menopausal osteoporosis [1]. NonethelessRESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access Compliance and treatment satisfaction of post menopausal women treated

  8. Analysis of waste treatment requirements for DOE mixed wastes: Technical basis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The risks and costs of managing DOE wastes are a direct function of the total quantities of 3wastes that are handled at each step of the management process. As part of the analysis of the management of DOE low-level mixed wastes (LLMW), a reference scheme has been developed for the treatment of these wastes to meet EPA criteria. The treatment analysis in a limited form was also applied to one option for treatment of transuranic wastes. The treatment requirements in all cases analyzed are based on a reference flowsheet which provides high level treatment trains for all LLMW. This report explains the background and basis for that treatment scheme. Reference waste stream chemical compositions and physical properties including densities were established for each stream in the data base. These compositions are used to define the expected behavior for wastes as they pass through the treatment train. Each EPA RCRA waste code was reviewed, the properties, chemical composition, or characteristics which are of importance to waste behavior in treatment were designated. Properties that dictate treatment requirements were then used to develop the treatment trains and identify the unit operations that would be included in these trains. A table was prepared showing a correlation of the waste physical matrix and the waste treatment requirements as a guide to the treatment analysis. The analysis of waste treatment loads is done by assigning wastes to treatment steps which would achieve RCRA compliant treatment. These correlation`s allow one to examine the treatment requirements in a condensed manner and to see that all wastes and contaminant sets are fully considered.

  9. Photovoltaic module kit including connector assembly for non-penetrating array installation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Botkin, Jonathan (El Cerrito, CA); Graves, Simon (Berkeley, CA); Danning, Matt (Oakland, CA); Culligan, Matthew (Berkeley, CA)

    2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A PV module kit for non-penetrating rooftop installation, including a plurality of PV modules and a plurality of connectors. Each of the PV modules includes a PV laminate and a frame forming a mounting region assembled thereto. The connectors include a male connector having a male fastener extending from a head, and a female connector having a female fastener assembled within a head. The heads are entirely formed of plastic. The kit provides a mounted array state including a junction at which the mounting region of at least two of the PV modules are aligned and interconnected by engagement of the male connector with the female connector. The so-formed junction is substantially electrically insulated. The plurality of connectors can further include a spacer connector including a head forming a bore sized to slidably receive the male fastener, with all of the connector heads being identical.

  10. Photovoltaic module kit including connector assembly for non-penetrating array installation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Botkin, Jonathan; Graves, Simon; Danning, Matt; Culligan, Matthew

    2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A PV module kit for non-penetrating rooftop installation, including a plurality of PV modules and a plurality of connectors. Each of the PV modules includes a PV laminate and a frame forming a mounting region assembled thereto. The connectors include a male connector having a male fastener extending from a head, and a female connector having a female fastener assembled within a head. The heads are entirely formed of plastic. The kit provides a mounted array state including a junction at which the mounting region of at least two of the PV modules are aligned and interconnected by engagement of the male connector with the female connector. The so-formed junction is substantially electrically insulated. The plurality of connectors can further include a spacer connector including a head forming a bore sized to slidably receive the male fastener, with all of the connector heads being identical.

  11. Photovoltaic module kit including connector assembly for non-penetrating array installation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Botkin, Jonathan; Graves, Simon; Danning, Matt; Culligan, Matthew

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A PV module kit for non-penetrating rooftop installation, including a plurality of PV modules and a plurality of connectors. Each of the PV modules includes a PV laminate and a frame forming a mounting region assembled thereto. The connectors include a male connector having a male fastener extending from a head, and a female connector having a female fastener assempbled within a head. The heads are entirely formed of plastic. The kit provides a mounted array state including a junction at which the mounting regions of at least two of the PV modules are aligned and interconnected by engagement of the male connector with the female connector. The so-formed junction is substantially electrically insulated. The plurality of connectors can further include a spacer connector including a head forming a bore sized slidably receive the male fastener, with all of the connector heads being identical.

  12. E-Print Network 3.0 - actinium isotopes including Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    chemicals. Contaminants of concern include plutonium, polonium, uranium, americium... , curium, radiumlanthanum and actinium. The estimated quantity of waste in the pits is 4000...

  13. E-Print Network 3.0 - articles including cerium Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    effect in cerium oxides Peng Gao, Zhenzhong Wang, Wangyang Fu, Zhaoliang Liao, Kaihui Liu... the resistance switching effect, including Mott transition (Fors et al., 2005; Oka...

  14. E-Print Network 3.0 - approach including plasma Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    plasmas confined... to mi crocavities has provided a pathway to new optoelectronic devices, including hybrid Source: Shyy, Wei - Department of Aerospace Engineering,...

  15. E-Print Network 3.0 - antibodies including immunoglobulin Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    search results for: antibodies including immunoglobulin Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 BIOLOGY 4201 -ANIMAL CELL CULTURE: METHODS & APPLICATIONS January 11, 2008 Summary: -specific...

  16. E-Print Network 3.0 - african countries including Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    year. In Africa, countries including Malawi, Mali, Mauritius, Nigeria, Senegal, South Africa... to food security is particularly profound for African countries where food is...

  17. E-Print Network 3.0 - abdominal surgery including Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    reality allows... , a virtual reality laparoscopic surgery simulator that includes a brand new educational component, to assist... . Virtual reality simulators for...

  18. New records of the Cryphonectriaceae from southern Africa including Latruncellus aurorae gen. sp. nov.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New records of the Cryphonectriaceae from southern Africa including Latruncellus aurorae gen. sp, Latruncellus aurorae gen. sp. nov., is described from Galpinia transvaalica (Lythraceae, Myrtales) in Swazi

  19. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT WASTE WATER TREATMENT MODIFICATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR WASTE WATER TREATMENT MODIFICATIONS FOR IMPROVED EFFLUENT COMPLIANCE................................................38 5.3.4 Effects of the Enhanced Treatment Alternative on Water Resources........................39 5.................................................................................................. 21 4.3 Alternative 3 ­ Enhanced Effluent Treatment

  20. Compositions produced using an in situ heat treatment process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roes, Augustinus Wilhelmus Maria; Nair, Vijay; Munsterman, Erwin Hunh; Van Bergen, Petrus Franciscus; Van Den Berg, Franciscus Gondulfus Antonius

    2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods for treating a subsurface formation and compositions produced therefrom are described herein. At least one method for producing hydrocarbons from a subsurface formation includes providing heat to the subsurface formation using an in situ heat treatment process. One or more formation particles may be formed during heating of the subsurface formation. Fluid that includes hydrocarbons and the formation particles may be produced from the subsurface formation. The formation particles in the produced fluid may include cenospheres and have an average particle size of at least 0.5 micrometers.

  1. Compositions produced using an in situ heat treatment process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roes, Augustinus Wilhelmus Maria (Houston, TX); Nair, Vijay (Katy, TX); Munsterman, Erwin Henh (Amsterdam, NL); Van Bergen, Petrus Franciscus (Amsterdam, NL); Van Den Berg, Franciscus Gondulfus Antonius (Amsterdam, NL)

    2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems, methods, and heaters for treating a subsurface formation are described herein. At least one method for producing hydrocarbons from a subsurface formation includes providing heat to the subsurface formation using an in situ heat treatment process. One or more formation particles may be formed during heating of the subsurface formation. Fluid that includes hydrocarbons and the formation particles may be produced from the subsurface formation. The formation particles in the produced fluid may include cenospheres and have an average particle size of at least 0.5 micrometers.

  2. Carbide and carbonitride surface treatment method for refractory metals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meyer, G.A.; Schildbach, M.A.

    1996-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A carbide and carbonitride surface treatment method for refractory metals is provided, in steps including, heating a part formed of boron, chromium, hafnium, molybdenum, niobium, tantalum, titanium, tungsten or zirconium, or alloys thereof, in an evacuated chamber and then introducing reaction gases including nitrogen and hydrogen, either in elemental or water vapor form, which react with a source of elemental carbon to form carbon-containing gaseous reactants which then react with the metal part to form the desired surface layer. Apparatus for practicing the method is also provided, in the form of a carbide and carbonitride surface treatment system including a reaction chamber, a source of elemental carbon, a heating subassembly and a source of reaction gases. Alternative methods of providing the elemental carbon and the reaction gases are provided, as well as methods of supporting the metal part, evacuating the chamber with a vacuum subassembly and heating all of the components to the desired temperature. 5 figs.

  3. Independent Oversight Review, Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Review, Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project - April 2013 April 2013 Review of Radiation Protection Program Implementation at the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project of...

  4. Wastewater and Wastewater Treatment Systems (Oklahoma)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality administers regulations for waste water and waste water treatment systems. Construction of a municipal treatment work, non-industrial waste water...

  5. Independent Oversight Activity Report, Hanford Waste Treatment...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    October 2013 Independent Oversight Activity Report, Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - October 2013 October 2013 Observation of Waste Treatment and Immobilization...

  6. Independent Oversight Review, Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Federal - June 2012 Independent Oversight Review, Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project - Federal - June 2012 June 2012 Review of the Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project -...

  7. Independent Oversight Review, Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Contractor - June 2012 Independent Oversight Review, Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project - Contractor - June 2012 June 2012 Review of the Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project...

  8. Field's Point Wastewater Treatment Facility (Narragansett Bay...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Field's Point Wastewater Treatment Facility (Narragansett Bay Commission) Jump to: navigation, search Name Field's Point Wastewater Treatment Facility (Narragansett Bay Commission)...

  9. Independent Oversight Assessment, Waste Treatment and Immobilization...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - January 2012 Independent Oversight Assessment, Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - January 2012 January 2012 Assessment of the...

  10. Innovative Mercury Treatment Benefits Stream, Fish | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mercury Treatment Benefits Stream, Fish Innovative Mercury Treatment Benefits Stream, Fish October 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Oak Ridge scientists Kelly Roy, left, and Trent Jett...

  11. Independent Oversight Activity Report, Hanford Waste Treatment...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    July 2013 Independent Oversight Activity Report, Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - July 2013 July 2013 Operational Awareness of Waste Treatment and Immobilization...

  12. Independent Oversight Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - December 2012 December 2012 Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Low Activity Waste Melter Process...

  13. Mathematical optimization of a flexible job shop problem including preventive maintenance and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patriksson, Michael

    1 Mathematical optimization of a flexible job shop problem including preventive maintenance as the scheduling problem includes limited availability of fixtures and preventive maintenance planning periodicity, a number of preventive maintenance activities need to be carried out in some of the resources

  14. GL069 Financial Summary (Including Multi-Year Funds And Excluding Agency Funds)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shull, Kenneth R.

    GL069 Financial Summary (Including Multi-Year Funds And Excluding Agency Funds) GL069 Cognos Report, or click . Legacy Name/Type - This report is an enhancement to the GL013 report. #12;GL069 Financial Summary (Including Multi-Year Funds And Excluding Agency Funds) GL069 Cognos Report Job Aid ­ cdm 7

  15. Red-Tide Research Summarized to 1964 Including an Annotated Bibliography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    535^ Red-Tide Research Summarized to 1964 Including an Annotated Bibliography By George A, Harold E. Crowther, Acting Director Red-Tide Research Summarized to 1964 Including an Annotated Historical 2 General conditions during red-tide outbreaks 3 Temperature 3 Salinity 3 Rainfall 4 Wind 4 Light

  16. Research Activities Web Technologies Web Technologies include procedures that are used in order

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bouras, Christos

    Research Activities ­ Web Technologies Web Technologies include procedures that are used in order to enhance the services that are offered by the World Wide Web. They include both services that can be presented directly to the users of the World Wide Web and services that are transparent to the end user

  17. Neutron Star Matter Including Delta Isobars Guang-Zhou Liu1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Ren-Xin

    Neutron Star Matter Including Delta Isobars Guang-Zhou Liu1,2 , Wei Liu1 and En-Guang Zhao2 1 a new phase structure of neutron star matter including nucleons and delta isobars is presented. Particle fractions populated and pion condensations in neutron star matter are investgated in this model

  18. A bottom-up analysis of including aviation within theEU's Emissions Trading Scheme

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Andrew

    A bottom-up analysis of including aviation within theEU's Emissions Trading Scheme Alice Bows-up analysis of including aviation within the EU's Emissions Trading Scheme Alice Bows & Kevin Anderson Tyndall's emissions trading scheme. Results indicate that unless the scheme adopts both an early baseline year

  19. What are the symptoms of flu? Symptoms include sudden onset of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellis, Randy

    What are the symptoms of flu? · Symptoms include sudden onset of: o fever/chills o cough o muscle lasting 5 or more days (measured with a thermometer; 37.0 Celsius is normal) · Coughing up blood that improve but then return with fever and worse cough Those in high risk groups including pregnant women

  20. Hybrid approach for including electronic and nuclear quantum effects in molecular dynamics simulations of hydrogen transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    Hybrid approach for including electronic and nuclear quantum effects in molecular dynamics January 2001 A hybrid approach for simulating proton and hydride transfer reactions in enzymes coefficient and to investigate the real-time dynamics of reactive trajectories. This hybrid approach includes

  1. Systems and strippable coatings for decontaminating structures that include porous material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fox, Robert V. (Idaho Falls, ID); Avci, Recep (Bozeman, MT); Groenewold, Gary S. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2011-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods of removing contaminant matter from porous materials include applying a polymer material to a contaminated surface, irradiating the contaminated surface to cause redistribution of contaminant matter, and removing at least a portion of the polymer material from the surface. Systems for decontaminating a contaminated structure comprising porous material include a radiation device configured to emit electromagnetic radiation toward a surface of a structure, and at least one spray device configured to apply a capture material onto the surface of the structure. Polymer materials that can be used in such methods and systems include polyphosphazine-based polymer materials having polyphosphazine backbone segments and side chain groups that include selected functional groups. The selected functional groups may include iminos, oximes, carboxylates, sulfonates, .beta.-diketones, phosphine sulfides, phosphates, phosphites, phosphonates, phosphinates, phosphine oxides, monothio phosphinic acids, and dithio phosphinic acids.

  2. Systems including catalysts in porous zeolite materials within a reactor for use in synthesizing hydrocarbons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rolllins, Harry W. (Idaho Falls, ID); Petkovic, Lucia M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Ginosar, Daniel M. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2012-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Catalytic structures include a catalytic material disposed within a zeolite material. The catalytic material may be capable of catalyzing a formation of methanol from carbon monoxide and/or carbon dioxide, and the zeolite material may be capable of catalyzing a formation of hydrocarbon molecules from methanol. The catalytic material may include copper and zinc oxide. The zeolite material may include a first plurality of pores substantially defined by a crystal structure of the zeolite material and a second plurality of pores dispersed throughout the zeolite material. Systems for synthesizing hydrocarbon molecules also include catalytic structures. Methods for synthesizing hydrocarbon molecules include contacting hydrogen and at least one of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide with such catalytic structures. Catalytic structures are fabricated by forming a zeolite material at least partially around a template structure, removing the template structure, and introducing a catalytic material into the zeolite material.

  3. Methods of using structures including catalytic materials disposed within porous zeolite materials to synthesize hydrocarbons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rollins, Harry W. (Idaho Falls, ID); Petkovic, Lucia M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Ginosar, Daniel M. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Catalytic structures include a catalytic material disposed within a zeolite material. The catalytic material may be capable of catalyzing a formation of methanol from carbon monoxide and/or carbon dioxide, and the zeolite material may be capable of catalyzing a formation of hydrocarbon molecules from methanol. The catalytic material may include copper and zinc oxide. The zeolite material may include a first plurality of pores substantially defined by a crystal structure of the zeolite material and a second plurality of pores dispersed throughout the zeolite material. Systems for synthesizing hydrocarbon molecules also include catalytic structures. Methods for synthesizing hydrocarbon molecules include contacting hydrogen and at least one of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide with such catalytic structures. Catalytic structures are fabricated by forming a zeolite material at least partially around a template structure, removing the template structure, and introducing a catalytic material into the zeolite material.

  4. E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic cometabolic conversion Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    degradation Summary: Removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from sewage sludge by anaerobic degradation N... treatment in a wastewater treatment plant. They...

  5. Microsoft Word - FINAL! Healy FT 1251 07062007.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    packaged domestic sewage treatment plant with effluent discharged to the industrial wastewater treatment system. Sludge will be hauled off site. Water Discharge Most of the...

  6. Challenges when performing economic optimization of waste treatment: A review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Juul, N., E-mail: njua@dtu.dk [DTU Management, Risø Campus, Technical University of Denmark (Denmark); Münster, M., E-mail: maem@dtu.dk [DTU Management, Risø Campus, Technical University of Denmark (Denmark); Ravn, H., E-mail: hans.ravn@aeblevangen.dk [RAM-løse edb, Æblevangen 55, 2765 Smørum (Denmark); Söderman, M. Ljunggren, E-mail: maria.ljunggren@chalmers.se [Energy and Environment, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg (Sweden); IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute, Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: • Review of main optimization tools in the field of waste management. • Different optimization methods are applied. • Different fractions are analyzed. • There is focus on different parameters in different geographical regions. • More research is needed which encompasses both recycling and energy solutions. - Abstract: Strategic and operational decisions in waste management, in particular with respect to investments in new treatment facilities, are needed due to a number of factors, including continuously increasing amounts of waste, political demands for efficient utilization of waste resources, and the decommissioning of existing waste treatment facilities. Optimization models can assist in ensuring that these investment strategies are economically feasible. Various economic optimization models for waste treatment have been developed which focus on different parameters. Models focusing on transport are one example, but models focusing on energy production have also been developed, as well as models which take into account a plant’s economies of scale, environmental impact, material recovery and social costs. Finally, models combining different criteria for the selection of waste treatment methods in multi-criteria analysis have been developed. A thorough updated review of the existing models is presented, and the main challenges and crucial parameters that need to be taken into account when assessing the economic performance of waste treatment alternatives are identified. The review article will assist both policy-makers and model-developers involved in assessing the economic performance of waste treatment alternatives.

  7. High post-irradiation ductility thermomechanical treatment for precipitation strengthened austenitic alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Laidler, James J. (Richland, WA); Borisch, Ronald R. (Kennewick, WA); Korenko, Michael K. (Rockville, MD)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for improving the post-irradiation ductility is described which prises a solution heat treatment following which the materials are cold worked. They are included to demonstrate the beneficial effect of this treatment on the swelling resistance and the ductility of these austenitic precipitation hardenable alloys.

  8. ADHERENCE TO TREATMENT GUIDELINES FOR THE PREVENTION OF MOTHER-TO-CHILD HIV TRANSMISSION IN KENYA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Kristine Frances

    2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Access to the most effective treatments is not universal and treatment coverage for the prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) is still low in many countries, including Kenya (WHO, 2010a). To improve uptake of PMTCT to reduce perinatal...

  9. Review of metallic surface treatments for corrosion mitigation. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hock, V.F.; Rigsbee, J.M.; Boy, J.H.

    1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Innovative metallic surface treatments for corrosion protection of facility systems and components were reviewed, including plasma spraying, electroless nickel plating, and ion plating. The work is part of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers effort to find coatings with properties superior to conventional polymeric types. The three methods were judged for adhesion, corrosion and erosion resistance, rust mitigation, and possible use in electromagnetic shielding. A brief description of physics is given for these methods along with case studies documenting their performance. Such metallic treatments may be a cost-effective, long-term corrosion protection alternative to traditional polymeric coatings, depending on component design and purpose.

  10. Challenges With the Diagnosis and Treatment of Cerebral Radiation Necrosis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chao, Samuel T., E-mail: chaos@ccf.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Rose Ella Burkhardt Brain Tumor and Neuro-oncology Center, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Ahluwalia, Manmeet S. [Department of Medical Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Rose Ella Burkhardt Brain Tumor and Neuro-oncology Center, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Barnett, Gene H. [Department of Neurosurgery, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Rose Ella Burkhardt Brain Tumor and Neuro-oncology Center, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Stevens, Glen H.J. [Department of Neurology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Rose Ella Burkhardt Brain Tumor and Neuro-oncology Center, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Murphy, Erin S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Rose Ella Burkhardt Brain Tumor and Neuro-oncology Center, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Stockham, Abigail L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Shiue, Kevin [Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Suh, John H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Rose Ella Burkhardt Brain Tumor and Neuro-oncology Center, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States)

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The incidence of radiation necrosis has increased secondary to greater use of combined modality therapy for brain tumors and stereotactic radiosurgery. Given that its characteristics on standard imaging are no different that tumor recurrence, it is difficult to diagnose without use of more sophisticated imaging and nuclear medicine scans, although the accuracy of such scans is controversial. Historically, treatment had been limited to steroids, hyperbaric oxygen, anticoagulants, and surgical resection. A recent prospective randomized study has confirmed the efficacy of bevacizumab in treating radiation necrosis. Novel therapies include using focused interstitial laser thermal therapy. This article will review the diagnosis and treatment of radiation necrosis.

  11. Experiences of specialist inpatient treatment for anorexia nervosa: a qualitative study from adult patients’ perspectives 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Vivien

    2012-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Background: Response to treatment in anorexia nervosa entails various challenges, including an increased risk of relapse and re-admission in those treated as inpatients. A better understanding of patients’ experiences ...

  12. Experiences with treatment of mixed waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dziewinski, J.; Marczak, S.; Smith, W.H. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Nuttall, E. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Chemical and Nuclear Engineering Dept.

    1996-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    During its many years of research activities involving toxic chemicals and radioactive materials, Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos) has generated considerable amounts of waste. Much of this waste includes chemically hazardous components and radioisotopes. Los Alamos chose to use an electrochemical process for the treatment of many mixed waste components. The electro-chemical process, which the authors are developing, can treat a great variety of waste using one type of equipment built at a moderate expense. Such a process can extract heavy metals, destroy cyanides, dissolve contamination from surfaces, oxidize toxic organic compounds, separate salts into acids and bases, and reduce the nitrates. All this can be accomplished using the equipment and one crew of trained operating personnel. Results of a treatability study of chosen mixed wastes from Los Alamos Mixed Waste Inventory are presented. Using electrochemical methods cyanide and heavy metals bearing wastes were treated to below disposal limits.

  13. Pressurized heat treatment of glass ceramic

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kramer, D.P.

    1984-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of producing a glass-ceramic having a specified thermal expansion value is disclosed. The method includes the step of pressurizing the parent glass material to a predetermined pressure during heat treatment so that the glass-ceramic produced has a specified thermal expansion value. Preferably, the glass-ceramic material is isostatically pressed. A method for forming a strong glass-ceramic to metal seal is also disclosed in which the glass-ceramic is fabricated to have a thermal expansion value equal to that of the metal. The determination of the thermal expansion value of a parent glass material placed in a high-temperature environment is also used to determine the pressure in the environment.

  14. Electrical machines and assemblies including a yokeless stator with modular lamination stacks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Qu, Ronghai; Jansen, Patrick Lee; Bagepalli, Bharat Sampathkumar; Carl Jr., Ralph James; Gadre, Aniruddha Dattatraya; Lopez, Fulton Jose

    2010-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrical machine includes a rotor with an inner rotor portion and an outer rotor portion, and a double-sided yokeless stator. The yokeless stator includes modular lamination stacks and is configured for radial magnetic flux flow. The double-sided yokeless stator is concentrically disposed between the inner rotor portion and the outer rotor portion of the electrical machine. Examples of particularly useful embodiments for the electrical machine include wind turbine generators, ship propulsion motors, switch reluctance machines and double-sided synchronous machines.

  15. Imprinted Polymers in Wastewater Treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eastman, Christopher; Goodrich, Scott; Gartner, Isabelle; Mueller, Anja

    2004-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In wastewater treatment, a method that specifically recognizes a variety of impurities in a flexible manner would be useful for treatment facilities with varying needs. Current purification techniques (i.e. bacteria, oxidation, reduction, precipitation and filtration) are nonspecific and difficult to control in complex mixtures. Heavy metal removal is particularly important in improving the efficiency of wastewater treatment, as they inhibit or even destroy the bacteria used for filtration. Imprinting polymerization is a technique that allows for the efficient removal of specific compounds and has been used in purification of enantiomers. It has potential to be applied in wastewater systems with the impurities acting as the template for the imprinting polymerization. The polymer with the bound impurities intact can then be removed via precipitation. After removal of the impurity the polymer can be reused. Data for the imprinting polymerization of polyacrylates and polyacrylamides for several metal complexes will be presented. Imprinting polymerization in combination with emulsion polymerization to improve the removal of hydrophobic contaminants will be described. Removal efficiencies will be presented and compared with conventional wastewater treatment methods.

  16. Harvesting Energy from Wastewater Treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harvesting Energy from Wastewater Treatment Bruce Logan Penn State University #12;Energy Costs? 5-7% of electricity used in USA is for water &wastewater #12;Global Energy & Health IssuesGlobal Energy & Health content of WastewatersEnergy content of Wastewaters ·· ElectricityElectricity ""lostlost"" to water

  17. TRAITEMENT DES EFFLUENTS WASTE TREATMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    residence time the production of biogas (7l-78 p. 100 CH,) was 237 1 per kg dry matter, i.e. 479 1 of CH to obtain the same amount of biogas four times quicklier. The treatment yield was improved (65 p. 100 COD). The mean production was 4931 biogas/kg degraded COD. It seems to be possible to apply that procedure

  18. Normal shock solutions to the viscous shock layer equations including thermal, chemical, thermodynamic, and radiative nonequilibrium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mott, David Ray

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An existing axisymmetric body viscous shock layer code including chemical, thermal, and thermodynamic nonequilibrium and nonequilibrium radiative gasdynamic coupling is adapted to simulate the one-dimensional flow within a shock tube. A suitable...

  19. Automated solar collector installation design including ability to define heterogeneous design preferences

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wayne, Gary; Frumkin, Alexander; Zaydman, Michael; Lehman, Scott; Brenner, Jules

    2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Embodiments may include systems and methods to create and edit a representation of a worksite, to create various data objects, to classify such objects as various types of pre -defined "features" with attendant properties and layout constraints. As part of or in addition to classification, an embodiment may include systems and methods to create, associate, and edit intrinsic and extrinsic properties to these objects. A design engine may apply of design rules to the features described above to generate one or more solar collectors installation design alternatives, including generation of on-screen and/or paper representations of the physical layout or arrangement of the one or more design alternatives. Embodiments may also include definition of one or more design apertures, each of which may correspond to boundaries in which solar collector layouts should comply with distinct sets of user-defined design preferences. Distinct apertures may provide heterogeneous regions of collector layout according to the user-defined design preferences.

  20. Automated solar collector installation design including ability to define heterogeneous design preferences

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wayne, Gary; Frumkin, Alexander; Zaydman, Michael; Lehman, Scott; Brenner, Jules

    2013-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Embodiments may include systems and methods to create and edit a representation of a worksite, to create various data objects, to classify such objects as various types of pre-defined "features" with attendant properties and layout constraints. As part of or in addition to classification, an embodiment may include systems and methods to create, associate, and edit intrinsic and extrinsic properties to these objects. A design engine may apply of design rules to the features described above to generate one or more solar collectors installation design alternatives, including generation of on-screen and/or paper representations of the physical layout or arrangement of the one or more design alternatives. Embodiments may also include definition of one or more design apertures, each of which may correspond to boundaries in which solar collector layouts should comply with distinct sets of user-defined design preferences. Distinct apertures may provide heterogeneous regions of collector layout according to the user-defined design preferences.

  1. E-Print Network 3.0 - additional cases including Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for: additional cases including Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 SWE 214 (062) Chapter 21: Refining the Use Cases Slide 1 Chapter 21 Summary: requirements. The additional use-case...

  2. Including risk in stated-preference economic valuations: Experiments on choices for marine recreation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerber, Leah R.

    . All rights reserved. 1. Introduction Stated-preference valuation methods use hypothetical scenariosIncluding risk in stated-preference economic valuations: Experiments on choices for marine xxx Keywords: Choice experiments Diving Economic valuation Fishing Hypothetical bias Recreation Risk

  3. Diffractive laser beam homogenizer including a photo-active material and method of fabricating the same

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bayramian, Andy J; Ebbers, Christopher A; Chen, Diana C

    2014-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of manufacturing a plurality of diffractive optical elements includes providing a partially transmissive slide, providing a first piece of PTR glass, and directing first UV radiation through the partially transmissive slide to impinge on the first piece of PTR glass. The method also includes exposing predetermined portions of the first piece of PTR glass to the first UV radiation and thermally treating the exposed first piece of PTR glass. The method further includes providing a second piece of PTR glass and directing second UV radiation through the thermally treated first piece of PTR glass to impinge on the second piece of PTR glass. The method additionally includes exposing predetermined portions of the second piece of PTR glass to the second UV radiation, thermally treating the exposed second piece of PTR glass, and repeating providing and processing of the second piece of PTR glass using additional pieces of PTR glass.

  4. Legal protection for the red squirrel The red squirrel is included in Schedules 5 and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    circumstances, permit actions that would otherwise be illegal. These include: · The act was the incidental, there is also a licensing system, which can permit activities that would otherwise be offences for certain

  5. Electrode assemblies, plasma apparatuses and systems including electrode assemblies, and methods for generating plasma

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kong, Peter C; Grandy, Jon D; Detering, Brent A; Zuck, Larry D

    2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrode assemblies for plasma reactors include a structure or device for constraining an arc endpoint to a selected area or region on an electrode. In some embodiments, the structure or device may comprise one or more insulating members covering a portion of an electrode. In additional embodiments, the structure or device may provide a magnetic field configured to control a location of an arc endpoint on the electrode. Plasma generating modules, apparatus, and systems include such electrode assemblies. Methods for generating a plasma include covering at least a portion of a surface of an electrode with an electrically insulating member to constrain a location of an arc endpoint on the electrode. Additional methods for generating a plasma include generating a magnetic field to constrain a location of an arc endpoint on an electrode.

  6. E-Print Network 3.0 - alaska including cultivated Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Flame cultivation can be effective in killing weeds, including those growing in the crop... cultivation varied from 4.11 per acre to 11.42, with an average of 7.14. This...

  7. Mineral balances, including in drinking water, estimated for Merced County dairy herds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Castillo, Alejandro R Dr.; Santos, Jose Eduardo P.; Tabone, Tom J.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of daily mineral intake, drinking-water mineral contributionND Total daily intake, including minerals in drinking water.mineral contents in drinking water and daily drinking-water

  8. Planning, Execution, and Analysis of the Meridian UAS Flight Test Program Including System and Parameter Identification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom, Jonathan

    2010-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this Master Thesis is to present the flight test procedures, planning, and analysis including system identification, parameter identification, and drag calculations of the Meridian UAS. The system identification is performed using...

  9. Water Resources Water Quality and Water Treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohoni, Milind

    Water Resources TD 603 Lecture 1: Water Quality and Water Treatment CTARA Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay 2nd November, 2011 #12;OVERVIEW Water Quality WATER TREATMENT PLANTS WATER TREATMENT PLANTS WATER TREATMENT PLANTS WATER TRE OVERVIEW OF THE LECTURE 1. Water Distribution Schemes Hand Pump

  10. Sodium-Bearing Waste Treatment Alternatives Implementation Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charles M. Barnes; James B. Bosley; Clifford W. Olsen

    2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this document is to discuss issues related to the implementation of each of the five down-selected INEEL/INTEC radioactive liquid waste (sodium-bearing waste - SBW) treatment alternatives and summarize information in three main areas of concern: process/technical, environmental permitting, and schedule. Major implementation options for each treatment alternative are also identified and briefly discussed. This report may touch upon, but purposely does not address in detail, issues that are programmatic in nature. Examples of these include how the SBW will be classified with respect to the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA), status of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) permits and waste storage availability, available funding for implementation, stakeholder issues, and State of Idaho Settlement Agreement milestones. It is assumed in this report that the SBW would be classified as a transuranic (TRU) waste suitable for disposal at WIPP, located in New Mexico, after appropriate treatment to meet transportation requirements and waste acceptance criteria (WAC).

  11. Optimizing fracture stimulation using treatment-well tiltmeters and integrated fracture modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mayerhofer, M.; Stutz, L.; Davis, E.; Wolhart, S. [Pinnacle Technology Houston, Houston, TX (United States)

    2006-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper covers the optimization of hydraulic fracture treatments in a new coalbed methane (CBM) reservoir in Wyoming. A multiwell pilot project was conducted in the Copper Ridge (CR) field to assess future development potential. Hydraulic fracture mapping was successfully performed with treatment-well tiltmeters on six wells including the first-ever used on propped treatments. The mapped fracture height was then used to calibrate the fracture model, perform on-site fracture-design changes, and optimize future fracture treatments. This paper shows how early use of fracture diagnostics can assist in the development of a new reservoir.

  12. Force measuring valve assemblies, systems including such valve assemblies and related methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DeWall, Kevin George (Pocatello, ID); Garcia, Humberto Enrique (Idaho Falls, ID); McKellar, Michael George (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2012-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods of evaluating a fluid condition may include stroking a valve member and measuring a force acting on the valve member during the stroke. Methods of evaluating a fluid condition may include measuring a force acting on a valve member in the presence of fluid flow over a period of time and evaluating at least one of the frequency of changes in the measured force over the period of time and the magnitude of the changes in the measured force over the period of time to identify the presence of an anomaly in a fluid flow and, optionally, its estimated location. Methods of evaluating a valve condition may include directing a fluid flow through a valve while stroking a valve member, measuring a force acting on the valve member during the stroke, and comparing the measured force to a reference force. Valve assemblies and related systems are also disclosed.

  13. Fabrication of contacts for silicon solar cells including printing burn through layers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ginley, David S; Kaydanova, Tatiana; Miedaner, Alexander; Curtis, Calvin J; Van Hest, Marinus Franciscus Antonius Maria

    2014-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for fabricating a contact (240) for a solar cell (200). The method includes providing a solar cell substrate (210) with a surface that is covered or includes an antireflective coating (220). For example, the substrate (210) may be positioned adjacent or proximate to an outlet of an inkjet printer (712) or other deposition device. The method continues with forming a burn through layer (230) on the coating (220) by depositing a metal oxide precursor (e.g., using an inkjet or other non-contact printing method to print or apply a volume of liquid or solution containing the precursor). The method includes forming a contact layer (240) comprising silver over or on the burn through layer (230), and then annealing is performed to electrically connect the contact layer (240) to the surface of the solar cell substrate (210) through a portion of the burn through layer (230) and the coating (220).

  14. Combinatorial evaluation of systems including decomposition of a system representation into fundamental cycles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Oliveira, Joseph S. (Richland, WA); Jones-Oliveira, Janet B. (Richland, WA); Bailey, Colin G. (Wellington, NZ); Gull, Dean W. (Seattle, WA)

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One embodiment of the present invention includes a computer operable to represent a physical system with a graphical data structure corresponding to a matroid. The graphical data structure corresponds to a number of vertices and a number of edges that each correspond to two of the vertices. The computer is further operable to define a closed pathway arrangement with the graphical data structure and identify each different one of a number of fundamental cycles by evaluating a different respective one of the edges with a spanning tree representation. The fundamental cycles each include three or more of the vertices.

  15. Sighting optics including an optical element having a first focal length and a second focal length

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Crandall, David Lynn (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One embodiment of sighting optics according to the teachings provided herein may include a front sight and a rear sight positioned in spaced-apart relation. The rear sight includes an optical element having a first focal length and a second focal length. The first focal length is selected so that it is about equal to a distance separating the optical element and the front sight and the second focal length is selected so that it is about equal to a target distance. The optical element thus brings into simultaneous focus, for a user, images of the front sight and the target.

  16. In situ treatment of VOCs by recirculation technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Webb, O.F.; Siegrist, R.L.; Ally, M.R.; Sanford, W.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Kearl, P.M.; Zutman, J.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., Grand Junction, CO (United States). Environmental Science Div.

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Confronted with contaminated land from the world wars and the postwar industrialization period, German researchers and practicing professionals have worked to develop processes for effective environmental restoration. This presentation documents efforts by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) researchers to (1) identify collaborators and German technologies exhibiting near-term potential for clean-up of volatile organic contaminated soil and groundwater at Department of Energy sites, (2) critically assess performance, and (3) inform interested agencies. The project was limited to identification and preliminary evaluation and included engineering computations, groundwater flow modeling, and treatment process modeling. Two processes were identified: (1) the vacuum vaporizer well/groundwater recirculation well and (2) the porous pipe/horizontal well (PP/HW). Both technologies induce a recirculation flow field in the aquifer and enable simultaneous down hole treatment of the aquifer and vadose zone. University of Karlsruhe researchers have demonstrated the UVB/GZB technology in shallow aquifers with moderately high saturated thickness and hydraulic conductivities. The PP/HW technology offers potential for VOC treatment in sites with thin aquifers or heterogeneities. This paper describes identified German technologies and includes critical evaluations of well performance, associated treatment processes, operating variables, and aquifer-well interactions.

  17. Metal behavior during fluidized bed thermal treatment of soil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ho, T.C.; Lee, H.T.; Shiao, C.C.; Hopper, J.R. [Lamar Univ., Beaumont, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering] [Lamar Univ., Beaumont, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Bostick, W.D. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Chemistry Dept.] [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Chemistry Dept.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Superfund dumpsites are frequently composed of soils contaminated with hazardous organic constituents and toxic heavy metals. While thermal treatment is an effective method of remediating the contaminated soils, the major environmental concerns are the emissions of toxic metal fumes during the treatment and the leaching of metals from the treated soil. The US EPA has reported that metals can account for almost all of the identified cancer risks from waste incineration systems. Research leading to better understanding of their behavior and better controlling of their emissions is urgently needed. In this study, the behavior of metals during the fluidized bed thermal treatment of artificially prepared metal-contaminated clay was experimentally and theoretically investigated. The objective of the study was to evaluate the effects of operating conditions on metal volatilization and metal leachability associated with the process. Metal experiments were carried out in a well instrumented 76 mm (3 inch) i.d. fluidized bed incinerator. The metals involved were compounds of lead and cadmium and the operating parameters included metal concentration, air flow rate, treatment temperature and treatment duration. The observed results indicated that metal volatilization is mainly a function of treatment temperature and treatment duration. The degree of volatilization was observed to range from 5 to 40% depending on the operating conditions. Cadmium leachability was observed to be relatively high compared to that of lead. In addition to the experimental study, a theoretical model based on the laws of heat and mass transfer operations and reaction kinetics was derived to simulate the metal volatilization process. The derived model was found to predict reasonably well the experimental observations.

  18. Online Produced Water Treatment Catalog and Decision Tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Arthur

    2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project was to create an internet-based Water Treatment Technology Catalog and Decision Tool that will increase production, decrease costs and enhance environmental protection. This is to be accomplished by pairing an operator's water treatment cost and capacity needs to specific water treatments. This project cataloged existing and emerging produced water treatment technologies and allows operators to identify the most cost-effective approaches for managing their produced water. The tool captures the cost and capabilities of each technology and the disposal and beneficial use options for each region. The tool then takes location, chemical composition, and volumetric data for the operator's water and identifies the most cost effective treatment options for that water. Regulatory requirements or limitations for each location are also addressed. The Produced Water Treatment Catalog and Decision Tool efficiently matches industry decision makers in unconventional natural gas basins with: 1) appropriate and applicable water treatment technologies for their project, 2) relevant information on regulatory and legal issues that may impact the success of their project, and 3) potential beneficial use demands specific to their project area. To ensure the success of this project, it was segmented into seven tasks conducted in three phases over a three year period. The tasks were overseen by a Project Advisory Council (PAC) made up of stakeholders including state and federal agency representatives and industry representatives. ALL Consulting has made the catalog and decision tool available on the Internet for the final year of the project. The second quarter of the second budget period, work was halted based on the February 18, 2011 budget availability; however previous project deliverables were submitted on time and the deliverables for Task 6 and 7 were completed ahead of schedule. Thus the application and catalog were deployed to the public Internet. NETL did not provide additional funds and work on the project stopped on February 18, 2011. NETL ended the project on March 31, 2012.

  19. INDIUM--2003 36.1 References that include a section mark () are found in the Internet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Crews, statistical assistant, and the world production table was prepared by Glenn J. Wallace energy savings, various national governments have targeted solid-state technologies, which include light-emitting diodes (LEDs), for increased research funding and development. A proposal for a program to fund solid

  20. A wave equation including leptons and quarks for the standard model of quantum physics in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    A wave equation including leptons and quarks for the standard model of quantum physics in Clifford-m@orange.fr August 27, 2014 Abstract A wave equation with mass term is studied for all particles and an- tiparticles of color and antiquarks u and d. This wave equation is form invariant under the Cl 3 group generalizing

  1. A non-isothermal PEM fuel cell model including two water transport mechanisms in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Münster, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität

    A non-isothermal PEM fuel cell model including two water transport mechanisms in the membrane K Freiburg Germany A dynamic two-phase flow model for proton exchange mem- brane (PEM) fuel cells and the species concentrations. In order to describe the charge transport in the fuel cell the Poisson equations

  2. Worker Protection Program for DOE (Including the National Nuclear Security Administration) Federal Employees

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2007-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The Order establishes the framework for an effective worker protection program that will reduce or prevent injuries, illnesses, and accidental losses by providing Department of Energy (DOE), including National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Federal workers with a safe and healthful workplace. Cancels DOE O 440.1A. Certified 6/17/2011. Canceled by DOE O 440.1B Chg 1.

  3. RESERVOIR RELEASE FORECAST MODEL FOR FLOOD OPERATION OF THE FOLSOM PROJECT INCLUDING PRE-RELEASES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowles, David S.

    1 RESERVOIR RELEASE FORECAST MODEL FOR FLOOD OPERATION OF THE FOLSOM PROJECT INCLUDING PRE-line Planning Mode, the Reservoir Release Forecast Model (RRFM) is being used to test alternatives operating River Forecast Center. The RRFM will make possible the risk-based operation of the Folsom Project

  4. Strong permanent magnets provide a backbone technology required many products, including computers, electric cars, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McQuade, D. Tyler

    Strong permanent magnets provide a backbone technology required many products, including computers, electric cars, and wind-powered generators. Currently, the strongest permanent magnets contain rare earth for most technologies requiring permanent magnets, due to their high energy product and coercivity. However

  5. EARTH SCIENCESEARTH SCIENCESEARTH SCIENCES This major includes a spectrum of disciplines focused on understanding the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krylov, Anna I.

    EARTH SCIENCESEARTH SCIENCESEARTH SCIENCES This major includes a spectrum of disciplines focused this understanding to read the record of earth history written in rocks and sediments, and on developing models by humans. Opportunities for Students Sigma Gamma Epsilon: The Omega Chapter of the national honorary earth

  6. Primal-Dual Interior Point Method Applied to the Short Term Hydroelectric Scheduling Including a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliveira, Aurélio R. L.

    Primal-Dual Interior Point Method Applied to the Short Term Hydroelectric Scheduling Including that minimizes losses in the transmission and costs in the generation of a hydroelectric power system, formulated such perturbing parameter. Keywords-- Hydroelectric power system, Network flow, Predispatch, Primal-dual interior

  7. POLITICAL SCIENCE 2013 SCHOLARSHIP APPLICATION (Includes Alumni, Brazil, Francis, Glickman, Hubbard, Young, and Rinn Scholarships)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Su, Xiao

    POLITICAL SCIENCE 2013 SCHOLARSHIP APPLICATION (Includes Alumni, Brazil, Francis, Glickman, Hubbard. _____________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________ Please have a member of the SJSU Political Science faculty who is willing to provide a reference sign this application. Faculty sponsor's signature: Applicant's signature: You can apply for as many Political Science

  8. Improved One-dimensional Analysis of CMOS Photodiode Including Epitaxial-Substrate Junction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hornsey, Richard

    1 Improved One-dimensional Analysis of CMOS Photodiode Including Epitaxial-Substrate Junction J. S-dimensional analysis of CMOS photodiode has been derived in which the effect of the substrate, which forms a high-empirical expression exhibits a good agreement with the measured spectral response of n+ pepi photodiodes fabricated

  9. Chromosome Mutations Chromosomes in a Number of Different Ways Including Changes to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cutler, Chris

    Characteristics Including Mental Retardation Down Syndrome Individuals May Also Suffer from Conditions They Have of Chromosome 21 Known as the Down Syndrome Critical Region (DSCR) but this is Still Unsure The Syndrome Results to the . The Frequency of Down Syndrome Births is 1 in 1000 at a Maternal . This Rises to 1 in 100 by 40 and 1 in 50

  10. Ophiostoma species (Ophiostomatales, Ascomycota), including two new taxa on eucalypts in Australia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ophiostoma species (Ophiostomatales, Ascomycota), including two new taxa on eucalypts in Australia of Tasmania, GPO Box 252-54, Hobart, Tas. 7001, Australia. C Forest Science Centre, Industry & Investment NSW, PO Box 100, Beecroft, NSW 2119, Australia. D Agric-Science Queensland, Ecosciences Precinct, 41 Boggo

  11. Student Poster Competition The 2004 UFFC Joint Anniversary Conference will include a Student Poster

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Jian-yu

    Student Poster Competition The 2004 UFFC Joint Anniversary Conference will include a Student Poster to the student's CV. Students who are submitting abstracts for presentation are also invited to participate in this student paper competition. Abstracts submitted by students for the Student Paper Competition

  12. Figure 1. Elevation View of TPX Core including IR TV locations and view of plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    stabilizer plates PPPL-3130 - Preprint Date: August 1995 TPX Diagnostics for Tokamak Operation, Plasma. First plasma is scheduled for mid-2001. Diagnostics are required for real time plasma control, physicsFigure 1. Elevation View of TPX Core including IR TV locations and view of plasma through

  13. Vertebrates are animals with a backbone and include mammals, birds and fishes. Considering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    Vertebrates are animals with a backbone and include mammals, birds and fishes. Considering roughly three quarters of the earth is covered in water it should be no surprise that fish are the most numerous vertebrates in the world. According to the Florida Museum of Natural History there are about 28,000 known fish

  14. Safety First Safety Last Safety Always Aerial lifts include the following types of vehicle-mounted

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Safety First Safety Last Safety Always Aerial lifts include the following types of vehicle, if they can be installed safely. Aerial Lifts Safety Tip #11 A spill, a slip, a hospital trip #12;Additional Information for Presenters Review the information provided on the reverse side of this safety tip sheet

  15. Safety First Safety Last Safety Always Personal fall-protection systems include a body harness (safe-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Safety First Safety Last Safety Always Personal fall-protection systems include a body harness so they will not be damaged. Personal Fall-Protection Systems Safety Tip #8 Just because you always;Additional Information for Presenters Review the information provided on the reverse side of this safety tip

  16. Breakfast Pastry Platters Includes a variety of scones, muffins, fruit and cheese Danish and cinnamon rolls.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liberzon, Daniel

    Breakfast Breakfast Pastry Platters Includes a variety of scones, muffins, fruit and cheese Danish Fruit Tarts, Mini Lemon Tarts and Cream Puffs. (Minimum order 10) ........... each pastry | $2.50 Quiche.) ............................................................................each quiche | $30 Fresh Fruit Salad An assortment of fresh melon, bananas, pineapple, grapes

  17. atural aquatic habitats include ponds, lakes, rivers, streams, springs, estuaries, bays, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    from small (ten surface acres) to large (the Great Lakes: Erie, Michigan, Huron, Ontario, and SuperiorN atural aquatic habitats include ponds, lakes, rivers, streams, springs, estuaries, bays little oxygen. Aquatic habitats can be classified as: · non-flowing waters like lakes and ponds, · slowly

  18. Solar Energy Education. Home economics: teacher's guide. Field test edition. [Includes glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An instructional aid is provided for home economics teachers who wish to integrate the subject of solar energy into their classroom activities. This teacher's guide was produced along with the student activities book for home economics by the US Department of Energy Solar Energy Education. A glossary of solar energy terms is included. (BCS)

  19. Solar Energy Education. Industrial arts: teacher's guide. Field test edition. [Includes glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An instructional aid is presented which integrates the subject of solar energy into the classroom study of industrial arts. This guide for teachers was produced in addition to the student activities book for industrial arts by the USDOE Solar Energy Education. A glossary of solar energy terms is included. (BCS)

  20. EUTROPHICATION -This is a problem for both ocean (the hydrosphere including lakes, rivers) and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toohey, Darin W.

    EUTROPHICATION - This is a problem for both ocean (the hydrosphere including lakes, rivers, human induced eutrophication is one of the rapidly growing issues and has been recognized as pollution Species lost in both water and land: - Phytoplankton is favoured in eutrophic waters -> algae bloom

  1. Humanities: 12 credits (L,H,X,Z) --Must include 6 credits Literature (L)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liblit, Ben

    Humanities: 12 credits (L,H,X,Z) -- Must include 6 credits Literature (L) Social Science: 12-level credits in residence in each major BREADTH of Exploration in the Liberal Arts & Sciences DEPTH of Inquiry in the Liberal Arts & Sciences Mastery of Intermediate/Advanced Work: 60 credits (I,A,D) QUANTITY & QUALITY

  2. Accounting for the Energy Consumption of Personal Computing Including Portable Devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Namboodiri, Vinod

    Accounting for the Energy Consumption of Personal Computing Including Portable Devices Pavel.S.A vinod.namboodiri@wichita.edu ABSTRACT In light of the increased awareness of global energy consumption the share of energy consumption due to these equipment over the years, these have rarely characterized

  3. What measures climate? A variety of variables including their variability and extreme values determine climate for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allan, Richard P.

    climate zones? The sun is the ultimate power source for the climate "machine". The uneven distribution conditions. Typical variables to consider are temperature (maximum, miniumum), precipitation (includes rain, sleet, snow, hail, etc), sunlight/cloudiness, wind, humidity, ice cover, sea temperature, etc... Many

  4. Learn more about the summer course which includes a 3 week trip to South Africa.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    Learn more about the summer course which includes a 3 week trip to South Africa. The program an introduction to the historical and the con- temporary South Africa as well as at least one post trip meeting@binghamton.edu or Josephine Allen at jaallen@binghamton.edu. Destination South Africa - Summer Course 2012 February 28th

  5. Functional designed to include surface effects in self-consistent density functional theory R. Armiento1,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Armiento, Rickard

    Functional designed to include surface effects in self-consistent density functional theory R 2005 We design a density-functional-theory DFT exchange-correlation functional that enables an accurate density functional theory1 DFT is a method for electronic structure calculations of unparalleled

  6. Recycle Batteries CSM recycles a variety of battery types including automotive, sealed lead acid, nickel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    metal hydride and lithium ion batteries. The use of these batteries is increasing as a green, nickel metal hydride and lithium ion batteries. Please contact EHS if you need an accumulation containerRecycle Batteries CSM recycles a variety of battery types including automotive, sealed lead acid

  7. MAC-Kaust Project P1 CO2 Sequestration Modeling of CO2 sequestration including parameter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turova, Varvara

    MAC-Kaust Project P1 ­ CO2 Sequestration Modeling of CO2 sequestration including parameter identification and numerical simulation M. Brokate, O. A. PykhteevHysteresis aspects of CO2 sequestration modeling K-H. Hoffmann, N. D. Botkin Objectives and methods of CO2 sequestration There is a popular belief

  8. Data and analysis on energy usage included: Taking readings on energy each minute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Appendix B Data and analysis on energy usage included: § Taking readings on energy each minute § 14 Changes from A/V to General Room 22 Changes from General to A/V The Control Room uses 82% more energy than and presents it graphically for easy interpretation. The graphs below compare an ICLS classroom to the Control

  9. A Hierarchical Bayesian Model for Improving Short-Term Forecasting of Hospital Demand by Including Meteorological

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sahu, Sujit K

    A Hierarchical Bayesian Model for Improving Short-Term Forecasting of Hospital Demand by Including Sarran4 Abstract The effect of weather on health has been widely researched, and the ability to forecast, better predictions of hospital demand that are more sensitive to fluctuations in weather can allow

  10. Zirconium and Hafnium--2004 85. references that include a section mark () are found in the internet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -mineral sand operations at Green cove Springs, fL; Stony creek, Va; and from its new mine in Lulaton, Ga. iluka of domestic mining operations. of the two domestic zircon producers, which have four mining and processing's florida operations included a dry mining mobile concentrator and a heavy-mineral sands processing plant

  11. Digital Arts The digital arts major offers coursework on a range of topics including

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miles, Will

    Florida's growing digital media industry and world-famous tourism industry. Our relationshipDigital Arts The digital arts major offers coursework on a range of topics including image in these departments should consider the digital arts minor as a way to investigate the creative applications

  12. Process, including PSA and membrane separation, for separating hydrogen from hydrocarbons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baker, Richard W. (Palo Alto, CA); Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Union City, CA); He, Zhenjie (Fremont, CA); Pinnau, Ingo (Palo Alto, CA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved process for separating hydrogen from hydrocarbons. The process includes a pressure swing adsorption step, a compression/cooling step and a membrane separation step. The membrane step relies on achieving a methane/hydrogen selectivity of at least about 2.5 under the conditions of the process.

  13. Two-dimensional numerical methods in electromagnetic hypersonics including fully coupled Maxwell equations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D'Ambrosio, Domenic

    the magnetic field source (solenoid or permanent magnet). To test the technique, we show the results obtainedTwo-dimensional numerical methods in electromagnetic hypersonics including fully coupled Maxwell Keplerlaan 1, 2200 AG Noordwijk, The Netherlands We describe a numerical technique for solving the coupled

  14. Asymptotic stability of ground states in 3D nonlinear Schrodinger equation including subcritical cases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asymptotic stability of ground states in 3D nonlinear SchrË?odinger equation including subcritical general encompassing for the first time both subcritical and supercritical (in L 2 ) nonlinearities. We #12; The main contribution of our result is to allow for subcritical and critical (L 2

  15. Asymptotic stability of ground states in 3D nonlinear Schrodinger equation including subcritical cases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirr, Eduard-Wilhelm

    Asymptotic stability of ground states in 3D nonlinear Schr¨odinger equation including subcritical general encompassing for the first time both subcritical and supercritical (in L2 ) nonlinearities. We result is to allow for subcritical and critical (L2 ) nonlinearities, 0

  16. Asymptotic stability of ground states in 2D nonlinear Schrodinger equation including subcritical cases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asymptotic stability of ground states in 2D nonlinear Schr¨odinger equation including subcritical encompassing for the first time both subcritical and supercrit- ical (in L2 ) nonlinearities. We study) = ei g(s), R. (1.4) The equation has important applications in statistical physics, optics and water

  17. Asymptotic stability of ground states in 2D nonlinear Schrodinger equation including subcritical cases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zarnescu, Arghir Dani

    Asymptotic stability of ground states in 2D nonlinear Schr¨odinger equation including subcritical general encompassing for the first time both subcritical and supercritical (in L2 ) nonlinearities. We physics, optics and water waves. For g(s) = s3 , it describes certain limiting behavior of Bose

  18. ECOVILLAGE FACTS The complex includes 50 apartments (18 original and 32 new)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baltisberger, Jay H.

    radiant floor heating o Structurally insulated panels (SIPs) · In additional to individual garden plots of the Ecovillage apartments include: o solar tubes and compact fluorescent lighting o low-flow toilets, community gatherings o Kitchen o Playroom o Dryers for Ecovillage residents o Solar water heater o Solar

  19. low-density particles include spheres with silicate cores and organic mantles, carbonaceous spheres,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Napp, Nils

    low-density particles include spheres with silicate cores and organic mantles, carbonaceous spheres is primarily a single silicate with a mantle-core structure, whereas the others are complex aggregates of various micrometer- to nanometer-size phases such as oxides, metal, and sulfides, in addition to silicate

  20. A TURBINE RESEARCH FACILITY TO STUDY TIP DESENSITIZATION INCLUDING COOLING FLOWS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Camci, Cengiz

    CC-1 A TURBINE RESEARCH FACILITY TO STUDY TIP DESENSITIZATION INCLUDING COOLING FLOWS Cengiz Camci with the description of the Axial Flow Turbine Research Facility (AFTRF) installed at the Turbomachinery Laboratory of the Pennsylvania State University. The AFTRF is a single-stage cold flow turbine specifically designed for studying

  1. Determining Spatial and Temporal Inputs of Freshwater, Including Submarine Groundwater Discharge,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    of freshwater into the bay. A second model using Sr2+ /Ca2+ ratios was developed to discern fresh groundwater. Florida . Submarine groundwater discharge Introduction The timing and sources of freshwater deliveryDetermining Spatial and Temporal Inputs of Freshwater, Including Submarine Groundwater Discharge

  2. TUNGSTEN--2003 79.1 References that include a section mark () are found in the Internet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stockpile (NDS) and increases in stocks held by U.S. industry. No U.S. tungsten mine production was reported reported in 2001. Salient U.S. tungsten statistics and world tungsten concentrate production for 2003TUNGSTEN--2003 79.1 1 References that include a section mark (§) are found in the Internet

  3. Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Graywater Use and Water Quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.; Mechell, Justin; Alexander, Rachel

    2008-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    their homes in their landscapes. This reuse of graywater can reduce the amount of wastewater entering sewers or treatment systems, reduce the amount of fresh water used on landscapes and help preserve limited fresh water supplies. Onsite wastewater...-washing machines ? The code excludes water that has washed materials soiled with human waste, such as diapers, and water that has been in contact with toilet waste. This water, known as blackwater, includes flush water from toilets and urinals and wastewater...

  4. The reduced phase space of spherically symmetric Einstein-Maxwell theory including a cosmological constant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Thiemann

    1999-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We extend here the canonical treatment of spherically symmetric (quantum) gravity to the most simple matter coupling, namely spherically symmetric Maxwell theory with or without a cosmological constant. The quantization is based on the reduced phase space which is coordinatized by the mass and the electric charge as well as their canonically conjugate momenta, whose geometrical interpretation is explored. The dimension of the reduced phase space depends on the topology chosen, quite similar to the case of pure (2+1) gravity. We investigate several conceptual and technical details that might be of interest for full (3+1) gravity. We use the new canonical variables introduced by Ashtekar, which simplifies the analysis tremendously.

  5. Reduced Phase Space Quantization of spherically symmetric Einstein-Maxwell-Theory including a cosmological constant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Thiemann

    1999-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We present here the canonical treatment of spherically symmetric (quantum) gravity coupled to spherically symmetric Maxwell theory with or without a cosmological constant. The quantization is based on the reduced phase space which is coordinatized by the mass and the electric charge as well as their canonically conjugate momenta, whose geometrical interpretation is explored. The dimension of the reduced phase space depends on the topology chosen, quite similar to the case of pure (2+1) gravity. We also compare the reduced phase space quantization to the algebraic quantization. Altogether, we observe that the present model serves as an interesting testing ground for full (3+1) gravity. We use the new canonical variables introduced by Ashtekar which simplifies the analysis tremendously.

  6. Sour gas injection for use with in situ heat treatment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fowler, Thomas David (Houston, TX)

    2009-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems, methods, and heaters for treating a subsurface formation are described herein. At least one method for providing acidic gas to a subsurface formation is described herein. The method may include providing heat from one or more heaters to a portion of a subsurface formation; producing fluids that include one or more acidic gases from the formation using a heat treatment process. At least a portion of one of the acidic gases may be introduced into the formation, or into another formation, through one or more wellbores at a pressure below a lithostatic pressure of the formation in which the acidic gas is introduced.

  7. Sewage Sludge Management Rule (West Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This rule establishes requirements for the permitting siting, bonding, installation, establishment, construction, modification, and operation of any facility that generates, processes, recycles and...

  8. Integrated radwaste treatment system. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, M.N.; Houston, H.M.

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In May 1988, the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) began pretreating liquid high-level radioactive waste (HLW). This HLW was produced during spent nuclear fuel reprocessing operations that took place at the Western New York Nuclear Service Center from 1966 to 1972. Original reprocessing operations used plutonium/uranium extraction (PUREX) and thorium extraction (THOREX) processes to recover usable isotopes from spent nuclear fuel. The PUREX process produced a nitric acid-based waste stream, which was neutralized by adding sodium hydroxide to it. About two million liters of alkaline liquid HLW produced from PUREX neutralization were stored in an underground carbon steel tank identified as Tank 8D-2. The THOREX process, which was used to reprocess one core of mixed uranium-thorium fuel, resulted in about 31,000 liters of acidic waste. This acidic HLW was stored in an underground stainless steel tank identified as Tank 8D-4. Pretreatment of the HLW was carried out using the Integrated Radwaste Treatment System (IRTS), from May 1988 until May 1995. This system was designed to decontaminate the liquid HLW, remove salts from it, and encapsulate the resulting waste into a cement waste form that achieved US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) criteria for low-level waste (LLW) storage and disposal. A thorough discussion of IRTS operations, including all systems, subsystems, and components, is presented in US Department of Energy (DOE) Topical Report (DOE/NE/44139-68), Integrated Radwaste Treatment System Lessons Learned from 2 1/2 Years of Operation. This document also presents a detailed discussion of lessons learned during the first 2 1/2 years of IRTS operation. This report provides a general discussion of all phases of IRTS operation, and presents additional lessons learned during seven years of IRTS operation.

  9. The structure of hypersonic shock waves using Navier-Stokes equations modified to include mass diffusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenshields, Christopher J

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Howard Brenner has recently proposed modifications to the Navier-Stokes equations that relate to a diffusion of fluid volume that would be significant for flows with high density gradients. In a previous paper (Greenshields & Reese, 2007), we found these modifications gave good predictions of the viscous structure of shock waves in argon in the range Mach 1.0-12.0 (while conventional Navier-Stokes equations are known to fail above about Mach 2). However, some areas of concern with this model were a somewhat arbitrary choice of modelling coefficient, and potentially unphysical and unstable solutions. In this paper, we therefore present slightly different modifications to include molecule mass diffusion fully in the Navier-Stokes equations. These modifications are shown to be stable and produce physical solutions to the shock problem of a quality broadly similar to those from the family of extended hydrodynamic models that includes the Burnett equations. The modifications primarily add a diffusion term to t...

  10. Method for pulse control in a laser including a stimulated brillouin scattering mirror system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dane, C. Brent (Livermore, CA); Hackel, Lloyd (Livermore, CA); Harris, Fritz B. (Rocklin, CA)

    2007-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser system, such as a master oscillator/power amplifier system, comprises a gain medium and a stimulated Brillouin scattering SBS mirror system. The SBS mirror system includes an in situ filtered SBS medium that comprises a compound having a small negative non-linear index of refraction, such as a perfluoro compound. An SBS relay telescope having a telescope focal point includes a baffle at the telescope focal point which blocks off angle beams. A beam splitter is placed between the SBS mirror system and the SBS relay telescope, directing a fraction of the beam to an alternate beam path for an alignment fiducial. The SBS mirror system has a collimated SBS cell and a focused SBS cell. An adjustable attenuator is placed between the collimated SBS cell and the focused SBS cell, by which pulse width of the reflected beam can be adjusted.

  11. Hydraulically actuated fuel injector including a pilot operated spool valve assembly and hydraulic system using same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shafer, Scott F. (Morton, IL)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to hydraulic systems including hydraulically actuated fuel injectors that have a pilot operated spool valve assembly. One class of hydraulically actuated fuel injectors includes a solenoid driven pilot valve that controls the initiation of the injection event. However, during cold start conditions, hydraulic fluid, typically engine lubricating oil, is particularly viscous and is often difficult to displace through the relatively small drain path that is defined past the pilot valve member. Because the spool valve typically responds slower than expected during cold start due to the difficulty in displacing the relatively viscous oil, accurate start of injection timing can be difficult to achieve. There also exists a greater difficulty in reaching the higher end of the cold operating speed range. Therefore, the present invention utilizes a fluid evacuation valve to aid in displacement of the relatively viscous oil during cold start conditions.

  12. 2-D Stellar Evolution Code Including Arbitrary Magnetic Fields. I. Mathematical Techniques and Test Cases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. H. Li; P. Ventura; S. Basu; S. Sofia; P. Demarque

    2006-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-precision two-dimensional stellar evolution code has been developed for studying solar variability due to structural changes produced by varying internal magnetic fields of arbitrary configurations. Specifically, we are interested in modeling the effects of a dynamo-type field on the detailed internal structure and on the global parameters of the Sun. The high precision is required both to model very small solar changes (of order of $10^{-4}$) and short time scales (or order of one year). It is accomplished by using the mass coordinate to replace the radial coordinate, by using fixed and adjustable time steps, a realistic stellar atmosphere, elements diffusion, and by adjusting the grid points. We have also built into the code the potential to subsequently include rotation and turbulence. The current code has been tested for several cases, including its ability to reproduce the 1-D results.

  13. Universal cell frame for high-pressure water electrolyzer and electrolyzer including the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmitt, Edwin W.; Norman, Timothy J.

    2013-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Universal cell frame generic for use as an anode frame and as a cathode frame in a water electrolyzer. According to one embodiment, the universal cell frame includes a unitary annular member having a central opening. Four trios of transverse openings are provided in the annular member, each trio being spaced apart by about 90 degrees. A plurality of internal radial passageways fluidly interconnect the central opening and each of the transverse openings of two diametrically-opposed trios of openings, the other two trios of openings lacking corresponding radial passageways. Sealing ribs are provided on the top and bottom surfaces of the annular member. The present invention is also directed at a water electrolyzer that includes two such cell frames, one being used as the anode frame and the other being used as the cathode frame, the cathode frame being rotated 90 degrees relative to the anode frame.

  14. Neutron monitoring systems including gamma thermometers and methods of calibrating nuclear instruments using gamma thermometers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moen, Stephan Craig; Meyers, Craig Glenn; Petzen, John Alexander; Foard, Adam Muhling

    2012-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of calibrating a nuclear instrument using a gamma thermometer may include: measuring, in the instrument, local neutron flux; generating, from the instrument, a first signal proportional to the neutron flux; measuring, in the gamma thermometer, local gamma flux; generating, from the gamma thermometer, a second signal proportional to the gamma flux; compensating the second signal; and calibrating a gain of the instrument based on the compensated second signal. Compensating the second signal may include: calculating selected yield fractions for specific groups of delayed gamma sources; calculating time constants for the specific groups; calculating a third signal that corresponds to delayed local gamma flux based on the selected yield fractions and time constants; and calculating the compensated second signal by subtracting the third signal from the second signal. The specific groups may have decay time constants greater than 5.times.10-1 seconds and less than 5.times.105 seconds.

  15. Analysis of the Thermonuclear Instability including Low-Power ICRH Minority Heating in IGNITOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cardinali, Alessandro

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The nonlinear thermal balance equation for classical plasma in a toroidal geometry is analytically and numerically investigated including ICRH power. The determination of the equilibrium temperature and the analysis of the stability of the solution are performed by solving the energy balance equation that includes the transport relations obtained by the kinetic theory. An estimation of the confinement time is also provided. We show that the ICRH heating in the IGNITOR experiment, among other applications, is expected to stabilize the power of the thermonuclear burning by automatic regulation of the RF coupled power. Here a scenario is considered where IGNITOR is led to operate in a slightly sub-critical regime by adding a small fraction of ${}^3He$ to the nominal 50-50 Deuterium-Tritium mixture. The difference between power lost and alpha heating is compensated by additional ICRH heating, which should be able to increase the global plasma temperature via collisions between ${}^3He$ minority and the background...

  16. Microwave-emitting rotor, separator apparatus including same, methods of operation and design thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meikrantz, David H.

    2006-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for use in separating, at least in part, a mixture, including at least one chamber and at least one microwave generation device configured for communicating microwave energy into the at least one chamber is disclosed. The rotor assembly may comprise an electric generator for generating electricity for operating the microwave generation device. At least one microwave generation device may be positioned within a tubular interior shaft extending within the rotor assembly. At least a portion of the tubular interior shaft may be substantially transparent to microwave energy. Microwave energy may be emitted in an outward radial direction or toward an anticipated boundary surface defined between a mixture and a separated constituent thereof. A method including flowing a mixture through at least one chamber and communicating microwave energy into the at least one chamber while rotating same is disclosed. Methods of operating a centrifugal separator and design thereof are disclosed.

  17. Adaptive Treatment Strategies Getting SMART About Developing Individualized

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murphy, Susan A.

    Other names are dynamic treatment regimes, treatment algorithms, stepped care models, expert systems: prevent relapse to alcohol abuse · Critical treatment decisions: which treatment to provide first?; which1 Adaptive Treatment Strategies Getting SMART About Developing Individualized Sequences of Adaptive

  18. Effluent Treatment Facility - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series toESnet4: Networking for the FutureEdward TellerEffluent Treatment

  19. Certification and Accreditation Process for Information Systems Including National Security Systems

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2004-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The Notice ensures the effectiveness of security controls on DOE Federal information systems including national security systems. The Notice will also ensure compliance with the requirements of DOE O 205.1, Department of Energy Cyber Security Management Program, dated 3-21-03, and protect DOE information and information systems from unauthorized access, use, disclosure, modification, or destruction. No cancellations. DOE N 205.15, dated 3-18-05, extends this directive until 3-18-06.

  20. Optimization of Industrial Refrigeration Plants: Including a Case Study at Stonyfield Farm Yogurt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dixon, R.; McCowan, B.; Drake, L.; Epstein, G.; D'Antonio, M.; Moray, S.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    controls and unloading (specifically in the case of screw compressors which do not unload linearly). A lower refrigerant temperature results in lower suction pressure and increased compressor power requirements. A lower condensing pressure, which is a...Optimization of Industrial Refrigeration Plants: Including a Case Study at Stonyfield Farm Yogurt Mark D’Antonio Satyen Moray Brian McCowan Gary Epstein VP Engineering Services Project Manager VP Technology & Development President Energy...

  1. Animal Waste Treatment System Loan Program (Missouri)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of the Animal Waste Treatment System Loan Program is to finance animal waste treatment systems for independent livestock and poultry producers at below conventional interest rates. Loan...

  2. Method and system including a double rotary kiln pyrolysis or gasification of waste material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McIntosh, M.J.; Arzoumanidis, G.G.

    1997-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is described for destructively distilling an organic material in particulate form wherein the particulates are introduced through an inlet into one end of an inner rotating kiln ganged to and coaxial with an outer rotating kiln. The inner and outer kilns define a cylindrical annular space with the inlet being positioned in registry with the axis of rotation of the ganged kilns. During operation, the temperature of the wall of the inner rotary kiln at the inlet is not less than about 500 C to heat the particulate material to a temperature in the range of from about 200 C to about 900 C in a pyrolyzing atmosphere to reduce the particulate material as it moves from the one end toward the other end. The reduced particulates including char are transferred to the annular space between the inner and the outer rotating kilns near the other end of the inner rotating kiln and moved longitudinally in the annular space from near the other end toward the one end in the presence of oxygen to combust the char at an elevated temperature to produce a waste material including ash. Also, heat is provided which is transferred to the inner kiln. The waste material including ash leaves the outer rotating kiln near the one end and the pyrolysis vapor leaves through the particulate material inlet. 5 figs.

  3. Cesium and strontium extraction using a mixed extractant solvent including crown ether and calixarene extractants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meikrantz, David H. (Idaho Falls, ID); Todd, Terry A. (Aberdeen, ID); Riddle, Catherine L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Law, Jack D. (Pocatello, ID); Peterman, Dean R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Mincher, Bruce J. (Idaho Falls, ID); McGrath, Christopher A. (Blackfoot, ID); Baker, John D. (Blackfoot, ID)

    2007-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A mixed extractant solvent including calix[4]arene-bis-(tert-octylbenzo)-crown-6 ("BOBCalixC6"), 4',4',(5')-di-(t-butyldicyclo-hexano)-18-crown-6 ("DtBu18C6"), and at least one modifier dissolved in a diluent. The mixed extractant solvent may be used to remove cesium and strontium from an acidic solution. The DtBu18C6 may be present from approximately 0.01 M to approximately 0.4M, such as from approximately 0.086 M to approximately 0.108 M. The modifier may be 1-(2,2,3,3-tetrafluoropropoxy)-3-(4-sec-butylphenoxy)-2-propanol ("Cs-7SB") and may be present from approximately 0.01M to approximately 0.8M. In one embodiment, the mixed extractant solvent includes approximately 0.15M DtBu18C6, approximately 0.007M BOBCalixC6, and approximately 0.75M Cs-7SB modifier dissolved in an isoparaffinic hydrocarbon diluent. The mixed extractant solvent may form an organic phase in an extraction system that also includes an aqueous phase. Methods of extracting cesium and strontium as well as strontium alone are also disclosed.

  4. Process For Controlling Flow Rate Of Viscous Materials Including Use Of Nozzle With Changeable Openings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ellingson, William A. (Naperville, IL); Forster, George A. (Westmont, IL)

    1999-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus and a method for controlling the flow rate of viscous materials through a nozzle includes an apertured main body and an apertured end cap coupled together and having an elongated, linear flow channel extending the length thereof. An end of the main body is disposed within the end cap and includes a plurality of elongated slots concentrically disposed about and aligned with the flow channel. A generally flat cam plate having a center aperture is disposed between the main body and end cap and is rotatable about the flow channel. A plurality of flow control vane assemblies are concentrically disposed about the flow channel and are coupled to the cam plate. Each vane assembly includes a vane element disposed adjacent the end of the flow channel. Rotation of the cam plate in a first direction causes a corresponding rotation of each of the vane elements for positioning the individual vane elements over the aperture in the end cap blocking flow through the flow channel, while rotation in an opposite direction removes the vane elements from the aperture and positions them about the flow channel in a nested configuration in the full open position, with a continuous range of vane element positions available between the full open and closed positions.

  5. Swozzle based burner tube premixer including inlet air conditioner for low emissions combustion

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tuthill, Richard Sterling (Bolton, CT); Bechtel, II, William Theodore (Scotia, NY); Benoit, Jeffrey Arthur (Scotia, NY); Black, Stephen Hugh (Duanesburg, NY); Bland, Robert James (Clifton Park, NY); DeLeonardo, Guy Wayne (Scotia, NY); Meyer, Stefan Martin (Troy, NY); Taura, Joseph Charles (Clifton Park, NY); Battaglioli, John Luigi (Glenville, NY)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A burner for use in a combustion system of a heavy-duty industrial gas turbine includes a fuel/air premixer having an air inlet, a fuel inlet, and an annular mixing passage. The fuel/air premixer mixes fuel and air into a uniform mixture for injection into a combustor reaction zone. The burner also includes an inlet flow conditioner disposed at the air inlet of the fuel/air premixer for controlling a radial and circumferential distribution of incoming air. The pattern of perforations in the inlet flow conditioner is designed such that a uniform air flow distribution is produced at the swirler inlet annulus in both the radial and circumference directions. The premixer includes a swozzle assembly having a series of preferably air foil shaped turning vanes that impart swirl to the airflow entering via the inlet flow conditioner. Each air foil contains internal fuel flow passages that introduce natural gas fuel into the air stream via fuel metering holes that pass through the walls of the air foil shaped turning vanes. By injecting fuel in this manner, an aerodynamically clean flow field is maintained throughout the premixer. By injecting fuel via two separate passages, the fuel/air mixture strength distribution can be controlled in the radial direction to obtain optimum radial concentration profiles for control of emissions, lean blow outs, and combustion driven dynamic pressure activity as machine and combustor load are varied.

  6. Casting Apparatus Including A Gas Driven Molten Metal Injector And Method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Trudel, David R. (Westlake, OH); Meyer, Thomas N. (Murrysville, PA); Kinosz, Michael J. (Apollo, PA); Arnaud, Guy (Morin Heights, CA); Bigler, Nicolas (Riviere-Beaudette, CA)

    2003-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The filtering molten metal injector system includes a holder furnace, a casting mold supported above the holder furnace, and at least one molten metal injector supported from a bottom side of the casting mold. The holder furnace contains a supply of molten metal. The mold defines a mold cavity for receiving the molten metal from the holder furnace. The molten metal injector projects into the holder furnace. The molten metal injector includes a cylinder defining a piston cavity housing a reciprocating piston for pumping the molten metal upward from the holder furnace to the mold cavity. The cylinder and piston are at least partially submerged in the molten metal when the holder furnace contains the molten metal. The cylinder or the piston includes a molten metal intake for receiving the molten metal into the piston cavity when the holder furnace contains molten metal. A conduit connects the piston cavity to the mold cavity. A molten metal filter is located in the conduit for filtering the molten metal passing through the conduit during the reciprocating movement of the piston. The molten metal intake may be a valve connected to the cylinder, a gap formed between the piston and an open end of the cylinder, an aperture defined in the sidewall of the cylinder, or a ball check valve incorporated into the piston. A second molten metal filter preferably covers the molten metal intake to the injector.

  7. Microelectromechanical accelerometer with resonance-cancelling control circuit including an idle state

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chu, Dahlon D. (Albuquerque, NM); Thelen, Jr., Donald C. (Bozeman, MT); Campbell, David V. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A digital feedback control circuit is disclosed for use in an accelerometer (e.g. a microelectromechanical accelerometer). The digital feedback control circuit, which periodically re-centers a proof mass in response to a sensed acceleration, is based on a sigma-delta (.SIGMA..DELTA.) configuration that includes a notch filter (e.g. a digital switched-capacitor filter) for rejecting signals due to mechanical resonances of the proof mass and further includes a comparator (e.g. a three-level comparator). The comparator generates one of three possible feedback states, with two of the feedback states acting to re-center the proof mass when that is needed, and with a third feedback state being an "idle" state which does not act to move the proof mass when no re-centering is needed. Additionally, the digital feedback control system includes an auto-zero trim capability for calibration of the accelerometer for accurate sensing of acceleration. The digital feedback control circuit can be fabricated using complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology, bi-CMOS technology or bipolar technology and used in single- and dual-proof-mass accelerometers.

  8. Method and system including a double rotary kiln pyrolysis or gasification of waste material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McIntosh, Michael J. (Bolingbrook, IL); Arzoumanidis, Gregory G. (Naperville, IL)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of destructively distilling an organic material in particulate form wherein the particulates are introduced through an inlet into one end of an inner rotating kiln ganged to and coaxial with an outer rotating kiln. The inner and outer kilns define a cylindrical annular space with the inlet being positioned in registry with the axis of rotation of the ganged kilns. During operation, the temperature of the wall of the inner rotary kiln at the inlet is not less than about 500.degree. C. to heat the particulate material to a temperature in the range of from about 200.degree. C. to about 900.degree. C. in a pyrolyzing atmosphere to reduce the particulate material as it moves from the one end toward the other end. The reduced particulates including char are transferred to the annular space between the inner and the outer rotating kilns near the other end of the inner rotating kiln and moved longitudinally in the annular space from near the other end toward the one end in the presence of oxygen to combust the char at an elevated temperature to produce a waste material including ash. Also, heat is provided which is transferred to the inner kiln. The waste material including ash leaves the outer rotating kiln near the one end and the pyrolysis vapor leaves through the particulate material inlet.

  9. A method and system including a double rotary kiln pyrolysis or gasification of waste material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McIntosh, M.J.; Arzoumanidis, G.G.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is described for destructively distilling an organic material in particulate form wherein the particulates are introduced through an inlet into one end of an inner rotating kiln ganged to and coaxial with an outer rotating kiln. The inner and outer kilns define a cylindrical annular space with the inlet being positioned in registry with the axis of rotation of the ganged kilns. During operation, the temperature of the wall of the inner rotary kiln at the inlet is not less than about 500 C to heat the particulate material to a temperature in the range of from about 200 C to about 900 C in a pyrolyzing atmosphere to reduce the particulate material as it moves from the one end toward the other end. The reduced particulates including char are transferred to the annular space between the inner and the outer rotating kilns near the other end of the inner rotating kiln and moved longitudinally in the annular space from near the other end toward the one end in the presence of oxygen to combust the char at an elevated temperature to produce a waste material including ash. Also, heat is provided which is transferred to the inner kiln. The waste material including ash leaves the outer rotating kiln near the one end and the pyrolysis vapor leaves through the particulate material inlet.

  10. Inhibition of Aurora-kinases for Tailored Risk Adapted Treatment of Multiple Myeloma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Inhibition of Aurora-kinases for Tailored Risk Adapted Treatment of Multiple Myeloma Dirk Hose1 associated with Aurora-kinase expression in several cancer entities, including multiple myeloma. Therefore, the expression of Aurora-A, -B and -C was determined by Affymetrix DNA-microarrays in 784 samples including two

  11. Enterprise Assessments Operational Awareness Record, Waste Treatment...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    March 2015 Enterprise Assessments Operational Awareness Record, Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - March 2015 March 2015 Enterprise Assessments Operational Awareness...

  12. STATE ESTIMATION FOR WASTEWATER TREATMENT PROCESSES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    CHAPTER 1 STATE ESTIMATION FOR WASTEWATER TREATMENT PROCESSES O. Bernard1 , B. Chachuat2 , and J sensors (also called observers) for wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). We give an overview in "Wastewater Quality Monitoring and Wastewater Quality Monitoring and Treatment, Philippe Quevauviller (Ed

  13. Simultaneous wastewater treatment and biological electricity generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simultaneous wastewater treatment and biological electricity generation B.E. Logan Department accomplishing wastewater treatment in processes based on microbial fuel cell technologies. When bacteria oxidize.4 £ 106 L of wastewater, a wastewater treatment plant has the potential to become a 2.3 MW power plant

  14. STATE ESTIMATION FOR WASTEWATER TREATMENT PROCESSES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernard, Olivier

    CHAPTER 1 STATE ESTIMATION FOR WASTEWATER TREATMENT PROCESSES O. Bernard1 , B. Chachuat2 , and J sensors (also called observers) for wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). We give an overview model description (e.g., the 1 #12;2 STATE ESTIMATION FOR WASTEWATER TREATMENT PROCESSES extended Kalman

  15. Sonic spectrometer and treatment system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Slomka, B.J.

    1997-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel system and method is developed for treating an object with sonic waveforms. A traveling broad-band sonic waveform containing a broad-band of sonic frequencies is radiated at the object. A traveling reflected sonic waveform containing sonic frequencies reflected by the object is received in response to the traveling broad-band sonic waveform. A traveling transmitted sonic waveform containing sonic frequencies transmitted through the object is also received in response to the traveling broad-band sonic waveform. In a resonance mode, the frequency spectra of the broad-band and reflected sonic waveforms is analyzed so as to select one or more sonic frequencies that cause the object to resonate. An electrical resonance treatment sonic waveform containing the sonic frequencies that cause the object to resonate is then radiated at the object so as to treat the object. In an absorption mode, the frequency spectra of the electrical broad-band, reflected, and transmitted sonic waveforms is compared so as to select one or more sonic frequencies that are absorbed by the object. An electrical absorption treatment sonic waveform containing the sonic frequencies that are absorbed by the object is then radiated at the object so as to treat the object. 1 fig.

  16. Sonic spectrometer and treatment system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Slomka, Bogdan J. (Ames, IA)

    1997-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel system and method for treating an object with sonic waveforms. A traveling broad-band sonic waveform containing a broad-band of sonic frequencies is radiated at the object. A traveling reflected sonic waveform containing sonic frequencies reflected by the object is received in response to the traveling broad-band sonic waveform. A traveling transmitted sonic waveform containing sonic frequencies transmitted through the object is also received in response to the traveling broad-band sonic waveform. In a resonance mode, the frequency spectra of the broad-band and reflected sonic waveforms is analyzed so as to select one or more sonic frequencies that cause the object to resonate. An electrical resonance treatment sonic waveform containing the sonic frequencies that cause the object to resonate is then radiated at the object so as to treat the object. In an absorption mode, the frequency spectra of the electrical broad-band, reflected, and transmitted sonic waveforms is compared so as to select one or more sonic frequencies that are absorbed by the object. An electrical absorption treatment sonic waveform containing the sonic frequencies that are absorbed by the object is then radiated at the object so as to treat the object.

  17. Situ treatment of contaminated groundwater

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McNab, Jr., Walt W. (Concord, CA); Ruiz, Roberto (Tracy, CA); Pico, Tristan M. (Livermore, CA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for treating dissolved halogenated organic compounds in groundwater that relies upon electrolytically-generated hydrogen to chemically reduce the halogenated compounds in the presence of a suitable catalyst. A direct current is placed across at least a pair, or an array, of electrodes which are housed within groundwater wells so that hydrogen is generated at the cathode and oxygen at the anode. A pump is located within the well housing in which the cathode(s) is(are) located and draws in groundwater where it is hydrogenated via electrolysis, passes through a well-bore treatment unit, and then transported to the anode well(s) for reinjection into the ground. The well-bore treatment involves a permeable cylinder located in the well bore and containing a packed bed of catalyst material that facilitates the reductive dehalogenation of the halogenated organic compounds by hydrogen into environmentally benign species such as ethane and methane. Also, electro-osmatic transport of contaminants toward the cathode also contributes to contaminant mass removal. The only above ground equipment required are the transfer pipes and a direct circuit power supply for the electrodes. The electrode wells in an array may be used in pairs or one anode well may be used with a plurality of cathode wells. The DC current flow between electrode wells may be periodically reversed which controls the formation of mineral deposits in the alkaline cathode well-bore water, as well as to help rejuvenate the catalysis.

  18. Advanced oxidation treatment of high strength bilge and aqueous petroleum waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hulsey, R.A.; Kobylinski, E.A. [Black and Veatch, Kansas City, MO (United States); Leach, B. [EEC, Inc., Virginia Beach, VA (United States); Pearce, L. [TRITECH, Greensboro, NC (United States)

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Craney Island Fuel Depot is the largest US Navy fuel terminal in the continental US. Services provided at this facility include fuel storage (current capacity is 1.5 million barrels), fuel reclamation (recovery of oil from oily wastewater), and physical/chemical treatment for the removal of residual oil from bilge water and from aqueous petroleum waste. Current wastewater treatment consists of storage/equalization, oil/water separation, dissolved air flotation, sand filtration, and carbon adsorption. The Navy initiated this study to comply with the State requirement that its existing physical/chemical oily wastewater treatment plant be upgraded to remove soluble organics and produce an effluent which would meet acute toxicity limits. The pilot tests conducted during the study included several variations of chemical and biological wastewater treatment processes. While biological treatment alone was capable of meeting the proposed BOD limit of 26 mg/L, the study showed that the effluent of the biological process contained a high concentration of refractory (nonbiodegradable) organics and could not consistently meet the proposed limits for COD and TOC when treating high-strength wastewater. Additional tests were conducted with advanced oxidation processes (AOPs). AOPs were evaluated for use as independent treatment processes as well as polishing processes following biological treatment. The AOP processes used for this study included combinations of ozone (O{sub 3}) ultraviolet radiation (UV), and hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}).

  19. Dye laser amplifier including a dye cell contained within a support vessel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Davin, James (Gilroy, CA)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A large (high flow rate) dye laser amplifier in which a continous replenished supply of dye is excited by a first light beam, specifically a copper vapor laser beam, in order to amplify the intensity of a second different light beam, specifically a dye beam, passing through the dye is disclosed herein. This amplifier includes a dye cell defining a dye chamber through which a continuous stream of dye is caused to pass at a flow rate of greater than 30 gallons/minute at a static pressure greater than 150 pounds/square inch and a specifically designed support vessel for containing the dye cell.

  20. Dye laser amplifier including a dye cell contained within a support vessel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Davin, J.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A large (high flow rate) dye laser amplifier in which a continuous replenished supply of dye is excited by a first light beam, specifically a copper vapor laser beam, in order to amplify the intensity of a second different light beam, specifically a dye beam, passing through the dye is disclosed herein. This amplifier includes a dye cell defining a dye chamber through which a continuous stream of dye is caused to pass at a flow rate of greater than 30 gallons/minute at a static pressure greater than 150 pounds/square inch and a specifically designed support vessel for containing the dye cell. 6 figs.

  1. Nuclear relativistic Hartree-Fock calculations including pions interacting with a scalar field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marcos, S.; Lopez-Quelle, M.; Niembro, R.; Savushkin, L. N. [Departamento de Fisica Moderna, Universidad de Cantabria, Santander (Spain); Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Universidad de Cantabria, Santander (Spain); Departamento de Fisica Moderna, Universidad de Cantabria, Santander (Spain); Department of Physics, St. Petersburg University for Telecommunications, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2012-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of pions on the nuclear shell structure is analyzed in a relativistic Hartree-Fock approximation (RHFA). The Lagrangian includes, in particular, a mixture of {pi}N pseudoscalar (PS) and pseudovector (PV) couplings, self-interactions of the scalar field {sigma} and a {sigma} - {pi} interaction that dresses pions with an effective mass (m*{sub {pi}}). It is found that an increase of m*{sub {pi}} strongly reduces the unrealistic effect of pions, keeping roughly unchanged their contribution to the total binding energy.

  2. DOE O 440.1 B, Worker Protection Program for DOE (Including the National

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomenthe HouseStudents2.2at MultipleorderNuclear Plants |Department ofAprilIncludes

  3. GE Progress Includes 140 Things We Made Yesterday | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Big Sky Learning Fun with Big SkyDIII-D PerformanceGE Progress Includes

  4. Environmental Aspects of Two Volatile Organic Compound Groundwater Treatment Designs at the Rocky Flats Site - 13135

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michalski, Casey C.; DiSalvo, Rick; Boylan, John [Stoller LMS Team, 11025 Dover Street, Suite 1000, Westminster, CO 80021 (United States)] [Stoller LMS Team, 11025 Dover Street, Suite 1000, Westminster, CO 80021 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DOE's Rocky Flats Site in Colorado is a former nuclear weapons production facility that began operations in the early 1950's. Because of releases of hazardous substances to the environment, the federally owned property and adjacent offsite areas were placed on the CERCLA National Priorities List in 1989. The final remedy was selected in 2006. Engineered components of the remedy include four groundwater treatment systems that were installed before closure as CERCLA-accelerated actions. Two of the systems, the Mound Site Plume Treatment System and the East Trenches Plume Treatment System, remove low levels of volatile organic compounds using zero-valent iron media, thereby reducing the loading of volatile organic compounds in surface water resulting from the groundwater pathway. However, the zero-valent iron treatment does not reliably reduce all volatile organic compounds to consistently meet water quality goals. While adding additional zero-valent iron media capacity could improve volatile organic compound removal capability, installation of a solar powered air-stripper has proven an effective treatment optimization in further reducing volatile organic compound concentrations. A comparison of the air stripper to the alternative of adding additional zero-valent iron capacity to improve Mound Site Plume Treatment System and East Trenches Plume Treatment System treatment based on several key sustainable remediation aspects indicates the air stripper is also more 'environmentally friendly'. These key aspects include air pollutant emissions, water quality, waste management, transportation, and costs. (authors)

  5. Transportation R and D included in thermal and mechanical sciences program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Argonne National Laboratory is a multiprogram research and development laboratory operated by The University of Chicago for the US Department of Energy. At Argonne, applied research in thermal and mechanical sciences is performed within the Thermal and Mechanical Sciences Section of the Energy Technology Division. Current program areas include compact evaporators and condensers for the process and transportation industries, ice slurries for district cooling, advanced fluids for improved heat transfer and reduced pressure drop, flow-induced vibration and flow distribution in shell-and-tube heat exchangers, and dynamics and control of maglev systems. In general, the objective of the research is to extend the technology base in each of these areas and to facilitate its application in solving problems of importance to US industries and utilities. This is accomplished by developing validated design correlations and predictive methods. The staff of the Thermal and Mechanical Sciences Section have extensive experimental and analytical experience in heat transfer, multiphase flow, structural dynamics and control, fluid-structure interaction, transient flow and mixing, thermally driven flows, and flow visualization using ultra-high-speed video. Large, general-purpose test facilities and smaller, single-purpose test apparatuses are available for experiments and component design evaluation. A world-class capability in the study of flow-induced vibrations exists within the Section. Individual fact sheets, describing currently active research program areas, related facilities, and listing, as a contact, the principal investigator, are included.

  6. Should Title 24 Ventilation Requirements Be Amended to include an Indoor Air Quality Procedure?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dutton, Spencer M.; Mendell, Mark J.; Chan, Wanyu R.

    2013-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Minimum outdoor air ventilation rates (VRs) for buildings are specified in standards, including California?s Title 24 standards. The ASHRAE ventilation standard includes two options for mechanically-ventilated buildings ? a prescriptive ventilation rate procedure (VRP) that specifies minimum VRs that vary among occupancy classes, and a performance-based indoor air quality procedure (IAQP) that may result in lower VRs than the VRP, with associated energy savings, if IAQ meeting specified criteria can be demonstrated. The California Energy Commission has been considering the addition of an IAQP to the Title 24 standards. This paper, based on a review of prior data and new analyses of the IAQP, evaluates four future options for Title 24: no IAQP; adding an alternate VRP, adding an equivalent indoor air quality procedure (EIAQP), and adding an improved ASHRAE-like IAQP. Criteria were established for selecting among options, and feedback was obtained in a workshop of stakeholders. Based on this review, the addition of an alternate VRP is recommended. This procedure would allow lower minimum VRs if a specified set of actions were taken to maintain acceptable IAQ. An alternate VRP could also be a valuable supplement to ASHRAE?s ventilation standard.

  7. Dye laser amplifier including an improved window configuration for its dye beam

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    O'Neil, Richard W. (Pleasanton, CA); Davin, James M. (Livermore, CA)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A dye laser amplifier in which a continuously replenished supply of dye is excited with a first light beam in order to amplify the intensity of a second different light beam passing therethrough is disclosed herein. This amplifier includes a cell though which a continuous stream of the dye is caused to pass, and means for directing the first beam into the cell while the second beam is directed into and through the same cell. There is also disclosed herein a specific improvement to this amplifier which resides in the use of a pair of particularly configured windows through which the second beam passes along fixed paths as the second beam enters and exits the dye cell. Each of these windows has a relatively thick main section which is substantially larger in dimensions transverse to its beam path than the cross section of the second beam itself, whereby to add structural integrity to the overall window. At the same time, the latter includes a second section which is disposed entirely within the confines of the main section and through which the second beam is intended to pass in its entirety. This second section is made substantially thinner than the main section in order to reduce optical distortion as the second beam passes therethrough.

  8. Dye laser amplifier including an improved window configuration for its dye beam

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    O'Neil, R.W.; Davin, J.M.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A dye laser amplifier in which a continuously replenished supply of dye is excited with a first light beam in order to amplify the intensity of a second different light beam passing therethrough is disclosed herein. This amplifier includes a cell though which a continuous stream of the dye is caused to pass, and means for directing the first beam into the cell while the second beam is directed into and through the same cell. There is also disclosed herein a specific improvement to this amplifier which resides in the use of a pair of particularly configured windows through which the second beam passes along fixed paths as the second beam enters and exits the dye cell. Each of these windows has a relatively thick main section which is substantially larger in dimensions transverse to its beam path than the cross section of the second beam itself, whereby to add structural integrity to the overall window. At the same time, the latter includes a second section which is disposed entirely within the confines of the main section and through which the second beam is intended to pass in its entirety. This second section is made substantially thinner than the main section in order to reduce optical distortion as the second beam passes therethrough. 4 figs.

  9. Including shielding effects in application of the TPCA method for detection of embedded radiation sources.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, William C.; Shokair, Isaac R.

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Conventional full spectrum gamma spectroscopic analysis has the objective of quantitative identification of all the radionuclides present in a measurement. For low-energy resolution detectors such as NaI, when photopeaks alone are not sufficient for complete isotopic identification, such analysis requires template spectra for all the radionuclides present in the measurement. When many radionuclides are present it is difficult to make the correct identification and this process often requires many attempts to obtain a statistically valid solution by highly skilled spectroscopists. A previous report investigated using the targeted principal component analysis method (TPCA) for detection of embedded sources for RPM applications. This method uses spatial/temporal information from multiple spectral measurements to test the hypothesis of the presence of a target spectrum of interest in these measurements without the need to identify all the other radionuclides present. The previous analysis showed that the TPCA method has significant potential for automated detection of target radionuclides of interest, but did not include the effects of shielding. This report complements the previous analysis by including the effects of spectral distortion due to shielding effects for the same problem of detection of embedded sources. Two examples, one with one target radionuclide and the other with two, show that the TPCA method can successfully detect shielded targets in the presence of many other radionuclides. The shielding parameters are determined as part of the optimization process using interpolation of library spectra that are defined on a 2D grid of atomic numbers and areal densities.

  10. Zirconium-based alloys, nuclear fuel rods and nuclear reactors including such alloys, and related methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mariani, Robert Dominick

    2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Zirconium-based metal alloy compositions comprise zirconium, a first additive in which the permeability of hydrogen decreases with increasing temperatures at least over a temperature range extending from 350.degree. C. to 750.degree. C., and a second additive having a solubility in zirconium over the temperature range extending from 350.degree. C. to 750.degree. C. At least one of a solubility of the first additive in the second additive over the temperature range extending from 350.degree. C. to 750.degree. C. and a solubility of the second additive in the first additive over the temperature range extending from 350.degree. C. to 750.degree. C. is higher than the solubility of the second additive in zirconium over the temperature range extending from 350.degree. C. to 750.degree. C. Nuclear fuel rods include a cladding material comprising such metal alloy compositions, and nuclear reactors include such fuel rods. Methods are used to fabricate such zirconium-based metal alloy compositions.

  11. THERMOHALINE INSTABILITIES INSIDE STARS: A SYNTHETIC STUDY INCLUDING EXTERNAL TURBULENCE AND RADIATIVE LEVITATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vauclair, Sylvie; Theado, Sylvie, E-mail: sylvie.vauclair@irap.omp.eu [Universite de Toulouse, UPS-OMP and CNRS, Institut de Recherche en Astrophysique et Planetologie, 14 avenue Edouard Belin, F-31400 Toulouse (France)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have derived a new expression for the thermohaline mixing coefficient in stars, including the effects of radiative levitation and external turbulence, by solving Boussinesq equations in a nearly incompressible stratified fluid with a linear approximation. It is well known that radiative levitation of individual elements can lead to their accumulation in specific stellar layers. In some cases, it can induce important effects on the stellar structure. Here we confirm that this accumulation is moderated by thermohaline convection due to the resulting inverse {mu}-gradient. The new coefficient that we have derived shows that the effect of radiative accelerations on the thermohaline instability itself is small. This effect must however be checked in all computations. We also confirm that the presence of large horizontal turbulence can reduce or even suppress the thermohaline convection. These results are important as they concern all the cases of heavy element accumulation in stars. Computations of radiative diffusion must be revisited to include thermohaline convection and its consequences. It may be one of the basic reasons for the fact that the observed abundances are always smaller than those predicted by pure atomic diffusion. In any case, these processes have to compete with rotation-induced mixing, but this competition is more complex than previously thought due to their mutual interaction.

  12. Copyright Awwa Research Foundation 2006 Advanced Water Treatment Impacts onAdvanced Water Treatment Impacts on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keller, Arturo A.

    , brackish groundwater, produced water, etc.produced water, etc. Advanced treatmentAdvanced treatment Water© Copyright Awwa Research Foundation 2006 Advanced Water Treatment Impacts onAdvanced Water Treatment Impacts on EnergyEnergy--Water LinkagesWater Linkages (The Water Utility Perspective)(The Water

  13. Computer program design for land treatment systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, R.K. (Clemson Univ. SC (USA)); Jantrania, A.

    1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Municipal Sludge Land Application expert System (MuSLAXS)is as expert system developed for site assessment and design analysis of municipal sludge application on agricultural land. The system has knowledge on the technical and regulatory aspects of sludge land application and understanding of soil-plant systems for South Carolina. It can be effectively used outside South Carolina with modifications to incorporate specific regulations on land treatment and soil and crop database. A database supports this expert system and provides appropriate default values for sludge and soil characteristics, and fertilizer recommendations for crops commonly grown in South Carolina. Information on the sludge characteristics is gathered from the user, if it is available, or it is retrieved from the sludge database. Based on the recommendations by the EPA and the expert, a list of 22 constituents, for which the sludge should be analyzed is developed. This list includes: total solids, volatile solids, total nitrogen (TNK), ammonia-nitrogen, organic-nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, sulfur, cadmium, copper, lead, nickel, zinc, PCBs, calcium, magnesium, chromium, boron, arsenic, aluminum, cobalt, and molybdenum.

  14. Sodium-bearing Waste Treatment Technology Evaluation Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charles M. Barnes; Arlin L. Olson; Dean D. Taylor

    2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sodium-bearing waste (SBW) disposition is one of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Idaho Operation Office’s (NE-ID) and State of Idaho’s top priorities at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The INEEL has been working over the past several years to identify a treatment technology that meets NE-ID and regulatory treatment requirements, including consideration of stakeholder input. Many studies, including the High-Level Waste and Facilities Disposition Environmental Impact Statement (EIS), have resulted in the identification of five treatment alternatives that form a short list of perhaps the most appropriate technologies for the DOE to select from. The alternatives are (a) calcination with maximum achievable control technology (MACT) upgrade, (b) steam reforming, (c) cesium ion exchange (CsIX) with immobilization, (d) direct evaporation, and (e) vitrification. Each alternative has undergone some degree of applied technical development and preliminary process design over the past four years. This report presents a summary of the applied technology and process design activities performed through February 2004. The SBW issue and the five alternatives are described in Sections 2 and 3, respectively. Details of preliminary process design activities for three of the alternatives (steam reforming, CsIX, and direct evaporation) are presented in three appendices. A recent feasibility study provides the details for calcination. There have been no recent activities performed with regard to vitrification; that section summarizes and references previous work.

  15. Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Treatment Building throughput study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    England, J.L.; Kanzleiter, J.P.

    1991-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The hazardous waste/mixed waste HW/MW Treatment Building (TB) is the specified treatment location for solid hazardous waste/mixed waste at SRS. This report provides throughput information on the facility based on known and projected waste generation rates. The HW/MW TB will have an annual waste input for the first four years of approximately 38,000 ft{sup 3} and have an annual treated waste output of approximately 50,000 ft{sup 3}. After the first four years of operation it will have an annual waste input of approximately 16,000 ft{sup 3} and an annual waste output of approximately 18,000 ft. There are several waste streams that cannot be accurately predicted (e.g. environmental restoration, decommissioning, and decontamination). The equipment and process area sizing for the initial four years should allow excess processing capability for these poorly defined waste streams. A treatment process description and process flow of the waste is included to aid in understanding the computations of the throughput. A description of the treated wastes is also included.

  16. Flexible barrier film, method of forming same, and organic electronic device including same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blizzard, John; Tonge, James Steven; Weidner, William Kenneth

    2013-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A flexible barrier film has a thickness of from greater than zero to less than 5,000 nanometers and a water vapor transmission rate of no more than 1.times.10.sup.-2 g/m.sup.2/day at 22.degree. C. and 47% relative humidity. The flexible barrier film is formed from a composition, which comprises a multi-functional acrylate. The composition further comprises the reaction product of an alkoxy-functional organometallic compound and an alkoxy-functional organosilicon compound. A method of forming the flexible barrier film includes the steps of disposing the composition on a substrate and curing the composition to form the flexible barrier film. The flexible barrier film may be utilized in organic electronic devices.

  17. Energy-density-functional calculations including the proton-neutron mixing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koichi Sato; Jacek Dobaczewski; Takashi Nakatsukasa; Wojciech Satu?a

    2013-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results of calculations based on the Skyrme energy density functional including the arbitrary mixing between protons and neutrons. In this framework, single-particle states are superpositions of proton and neutron components and the energy density functional is fully invariant with respect to three-dimensional rotations in the isospin space. The isospin of the system is controlled by means of the isocranking method, which carries over the standard cranking approach to the isospin space. We show numerical results of the isocranking calculations performed for isobaric analogue states in the A=14 and $A=40-56$ nuclei. We also present such results obtained for high-isospin states in $^{48}$Cr, with constraints on the isospin implemented by using the augmented Lagrange method.

  18. Ionization potential of {sup 9}Be calculated including nuclear motion and relativistic corrections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stanke, Monika [Department of Chemistry, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721 (United States); Institute of Physics, Nicholas Copernicus University, ulica Grudziadzka 5, PL 87-100 Torun (Poland); Kedziera, Dariusz [Department of Chemistry, Nicholas Copernicus University, ulica Gagarina 7, PL 87-100 Torun (Poland); Bubin, Sergiy [Department of Chemistry, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721 (United States); Adamowicz, Ludwik [Department of Chemistry, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721 (United States)

    2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Variational calculations employing explicitly correlated Gaussian functions have been performed for the ground states of {sup 9}Be and {sup 9}Be{sup +} including the nuclear motion [i.e., without assuming the Born-Oppenheimer (BO) approximation]. An approach based on the analytical energy gradient calculated with respect to the Gaussian exponential parameters was employed, leading to energies of the two systems noticeably improved over those found in the recent paper of Pachucki and Komasa [Phys. Rev. A 73, 052502 (2006)]. The non-BO wave functions were used to calculate the {alpha}{sup 2} relativistic corrections ({alpha}=e{sup 2}/({Dirac_h}/2{pi})c). With those corrections and the {alpha}{sup 3} and {alpha}{sup 4} corrections taken from Pachucki and Komasa, a new value of the ionization potential (IP) of {sup 9}Be was determined. It agrees very well with the most recent experimental IP.

  19. Including Alternative Resources in State Renewable Portfolio Standards: Current Design and Implementation Experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heeter, J.; Bird, L.

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Currently, 29 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico have instituted a renewable portfolio standard (RPS). An RPS sets a minimum threshold for how much renewable energy must be generated in a given year. Each state policy is unique, varying in percentage targets, timetables, and eligible resources. This paper examines state experience with implementing renewable portfolio standards that include energy efficiency, thermal resources, and non-renewable energy and explores compliance experience, costs, and how states evaluate, measure, and verify energy efficiency and convert thermal energy. It aims to gain insights from the experience of states for possible federal clean energy policy as well as to share experience and lessons for state RPS implementation.

  20. Simulation of thermal reset transitions in resistive switching memories including quantum effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Villena, M. A.; Jiménez-Molinos, F.; Roldán, J. B. [Departamento de Electrónica y Tecnología de Computadores, Universidad de Granada, Facultad de Ciencias, Avd. Fuentenueva s/n, 18071 Granada (Spain); González, M. B.; Campabadal, F. [Institut de Microelectrònica de Barcelona, IMB-CNM (CSIC), Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Suñé, J.; Miranda, E. [Departament d'Enginyeria Electrònica, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra Cerdanyola del Vallès 08193 (Spain); Romera, E. [Departamento de Física Atómica, Molecular y Nuclear and Instituto Carlos I de Física Teórica y Computacional, Universidad de Granada, Avd. Fuentenueva s/n, 18071 Granada (Spain)

    2014-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    An in-depth study of reset processes in RRAMs (Resistive Random Access Memories) based on Ni/HfO{sub 2}/Si-n{sup +} structures has been performed. To do so, we have developed a physically based simulator where both ohmic and tunneling based conduction regimes are considered along with the thermal description of the devices. The devices under study have been successfully fabricated and measured. The experimental data are correctly reproduced with the simulator for devices with a single conductive filament as well as for devices including several conductive filaments. The contribution of each conduction regime has been explained as well as the operation regimes where these ohmic and tunneling conduction processes dominate.