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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes sewage treatment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Secondary Sewage Treatment Versus Ocean Outfalls: An Assessment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the energy balance, the system...Secondary Sewage Treatment Versus Ocean...treatment of wastewater is unneeded...secondary sewage treatment plants are estimated...secondary sewage treatment biologically...organic matter in wastewater. This action...

Charles B. Officer; John H. Ryther

1977-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

2

On-Site Sewage Treatment Alternatives  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-site Wastewater Treatment and Disposal Options, VCE publication 448-403, and Individual Homeowner & Small Community Wastewa- ter Treatment & Disposal Options, VCE publication 448-406. Figure 1. Many ruralOn-Site Sewage Treatment Alternatives C. Zipper,Extension specialist and associate professor

Liskiewicz, Maciej

3

Study of Performance of Heat Pump Usage in Sewage Treatment and Fouling Impact on System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A heat pump using disposed sewage as a heat source to heat raw sewage is presented to solve the problem that sewage temperature is low in sewage biologic treatment in cold region. According to the status of one medicine factory in Harbin, China...

Song, Y.; Yao, Y.; Ma, Z.; Na, W.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced sewage treatment Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Summary: , of confirm, the health of an on-lot sewage system. PSMA On-lot Wastewater Treatment Inspection Vs... F 168On-lot Sewage Disposal Resources Available Through the...

5

Operation and Maintenance Manual for the Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant  

SciTech Connect

This Operation and Maintenance Manual lists operator and management responsibilities, permit standards, general operating procedures, maintenance requirements and monitoring methods for the Sewage Treatment Plant at the Central Facilities Area at the Idaho National Laboratory. The manual is required by the Municipal Wastewater Reuse Permit (LA-000141-03) the sewage treatment plant.

Norm Stanley

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Modelling the fate of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) during the municipal sewage treatment process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Sewage treatment plants (STPs) are an important source to the environment for many chemicals of concern (COCs). Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are one such group of COCs of present day concern for which studies on fate and transport during the ... Keywords: chemical fate and transport, mass balance model, polybrominated diphenyl ethers, risk assessment, sewage treatment, water and wastewater management

Kerry N. McPhedran; Rajesh Seth

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

ESTABoues, a decision tool to assess greenhouse gases of sewage sludge treatment and di  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

digestion, aerobic digestion, dewatering, al composting, drying) and sludge disposal route (land applicationORBIT2012 G ESTABoues, a decision tool to assess greenhouse gases of sewage sludge treatment and di-laure.reverdy@irstea.fr EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Sewage sludge production increases continuously reaching almost 20% (946 700 t 1 118 795

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

8

Fate of Triclosan and Triclosan-Methyl in Sewage TreatmentPlants and Surface Waters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The fate of triclosan in diverse stages of two sewage treatment ... two-stage biologic (activated sludge) process removed triclosan more efficiently than the STP with a ... not very effective. The elimination rat...

Kai Bester

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Management of sewage sludge and ash containing radioactive materials.  

SciTech Connect

Approximately 50% of the seven to eight million metric tonnes of municipal sewage sludge produced annually in the US is reused. Beneficial uses of sewage sludge include agricultural land application, land reclamation, forestry, and various commercial applications. Excessive levels of contaminants, however, can limit the potential usefulness of land-applied sewage sludge. A recently completed study by a federal inter-agency committee has identified radioactive contaminants that could interfere with the safe reuse of sewage sludge. The study found that typical levels of radioactive materials in most municipal sewage sludge and incinerator ash do not present a health hazard to sewage treatment plant workers or to the general public. The inter-agency committee has developed recommendations for operators of sewage treatment plants for evaluating measured or estimated levels of radioactive material in sewage sludge and for determining whether actions to reduce potential exposures are appropriate.

Bachmaier, J. T.; Aiello, K.; Bastian, R. K.; Cheng, J.-J.; Chiu, W. A.; Goodman, J.; Hogan, R.; Jones, A. R.; Kamboj, S.; Lenhart, T.; Ott, W. R.; Rubin, A. B.; Salomon, S. N.; Schmidt, D. W.; Setlow, L. W.; Yu, C.; Wolbarst, A. B.; Environmental Science Division; Middlesex County Utilities Authority; U.S. EPA; N.J. Dept of Environmental Protection; NRC

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

SUSTAINABLE SEWAGE TREATMENT AND RE-USE IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

technological knowledge and empirical Know-How of wastewater treatment processes and their implementation; also

Walid Abdel-halim; Dirk Weichgrebe; K. -h. Rosenwinkel; Johan Verink

11

BEHAVIOR CANOLA (BRASSICA NAPUS) FOLLOWING A SEWAGE SLUDGE TREATMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. INTRODUCTION In Tunisia, the amount of sludge produced by wastewater treatment stations is constantly waste water treatment stations, in other words, most of it is wastewater from domestic sources. The second type is obtained from the treatment of industrial wastewater or partly from industrial wastewater

Boyer, Edmond

12

The Development of a Guideline on the Sampling/Testing of Innovative/Alternative Disposal Technologies for Sewage Treatment and Disposal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Technologies for Sewage Treatment and Disposal Principle Investigators Calvin P. C. Poon #12;Problem will be built in rural areas of Rhode Island. Many of the installations are the newly innovative will be specifically Most I/A ISDS technologies claim better treatment of the sewage which leads to their claim

Rhode Island, University of

13

SEWAGE: Algae at Work  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

SEWAGE: Algae at Work ... Taking their cue from the successful use of bacteria to rid sewage of biodegradable wastes, engineers at the University of Kansas and Trans Union Corp. have a process that uses algae to remove inorganic nitrogen, phosphorus, and carbon compounds from secondary treatment plant effluent. ... Though it has long been known that algae feed on inorganic wastes, the phenomenon had not been thought to hold much promise for sewage treatment. ...

1969-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Sewage sludge ash to phosphorus fertiliser: Variables influencing heavy metal removal during thermochemical treatment  

SciTech Connect

The aim of this study was to improve the removal of heavy metals from sewage sludge ash by a thermochemical process. The resulting detoxified ash was intended for use as a raw material rich in phosphorus (P) for inorganic fertiliser production. The thermochemical treatment was performed in a rotary kiln where the evaporation of relevant heavy metals was enhanced by additives. The four variables investigated for process optimisation were treatment temperature, type of additive (KCl, MgCl{sub 2}) and its amount, as well as type of reactor (directly or indirectly heated rotary kiln). The removal rates of Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, Zn and of Ca, P and Cl were investigated. The best overall removal efficiency for Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn could be found for the indirectly heated system. The type of additive was critical, since MgCl{sub 2} favours Zn- over Cu-removal, while KCl acts conversely. The use of MgCl{sub 2} caused less particle abrasion from the pellets in the kiln than KCl. In the case of the additive KCl, liquid KCl - temporarily formed in the pellets - acted as a barrier to heavy metal evaporation as long as treatment temperatures were not sufficiently high to enhance its reaction or evaporation.

Mattenberger, H.; Fraissler, G. [Austrian Bioenergy Centre GmbH, Inffeldgasse 21b, 8010 Graz (Austria); Brunner, T. [Austrian Bioenergy Centre GmbH, Inffeldgasse 21b, 8010 Graz (Austria); BIOS BIOENERGIESYSTEME GmbH, Inffeldgasse 21b, 8010 Graz (Austria)], E-mail: thomas.brunner@abc-energy.at; Herk, P. [ARP GmbH, Johann Sacklgasse 65-67, 8700 Leoben (Austria); Hermann, L. [Austrian Bioenergy Centre GmbH, Inffeldgasse 21b, 8010 Graz (Austria); ASH DEC Umwelt AG, Donaufelderstrasse 101/4/5, 1210 Wien (Austria); Obernberger, I. [Austrian Bioenergy Centre GmbH, Inffeldgasse 21b, 8010 Graz (Austria); BIOS BIOENERGIESYSTEME GmbH, Inffeldgasse 21b, 8010 Graz (Austria)

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

15

Sewage Sludge (Maryland) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sewage Sludge (Maryland) Sewage Sludge (Maryland) Sewage Sludge (Maryland) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Maryland Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Maryland Department of the Environment Sewage sludge utilization permits are required prior to the use, processing, and disposal of sewage sludge in Maryland. Sewage sludge (also known as biosolids) is not sewage, but rather is one of the final products of treated sewage at a sewage (wastewater) treatment plant. Sewage sludge is the fine particulate matter remaining after treatment which breaks down organic matter and destroys disease organisms in sewage. A SSU Permit is required for any person who collects,

16

2013 Annual Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant  

SciTech Connect

This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA-000141-03), for the wastewater land application site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant from November 1, 2012, through October 31, 2013. The report contains, as applicable, the following information: • Site description • Facility and system description • Permit required monitoring data and loading rates • Status of compliance conditions and activities • Discussion of the facility’s environmental impacts. During the 2013 permit year, no wastewater was land-applied to the irrigation area of the Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant and therefore, no effluent flow volumes or samples were collected from wastewater sampling point WW-014102. However, soil samples were collected in October from soil monitoring unit SU-014101.

Mike Lewis

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Gille-STPA 35 1 Sewage on San Diego Beaches  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

outflow pipe? (3) When plans were first made to address the heavy metals in Tijuana pollution on where sewage ends up? (2) One big issue for understanding sewage treatment has to do with heavy metals't dioxin or heavy metal a problem when Tijuana sewage is mixed with San Diego sewage in the Point Loma

Gille, Sarah T.

18

Sewage Sludge, Pros & Cons  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Sewage Sludge, Pros & Cons ... Efficient Hydrogen Sulfide Adsorbents Obtained by Pyrolysis of Sewage Sludge Derived Fertilizer Modified with Spent Mineral Oil ... Efficient Hydrogen Sulfide Adsorbents Obtained by Pyrolysis of Sewage Sludge Derived Fertilizer Modified with Spent Mineral Oil ...

Rebecca Renner

2011-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

19

Heavy Metal Removal from Sewage Sludge Ash by Thermochemical Treatment with Gaseous Hydrochloric acid  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Division 4.3 Waste Treatment and Remedial Engineering, BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Unter den Eichen 87, D-12205 Berlin ... Therefore, thermochemical investigations were carried out with focus on the performance of HCl-gas as Cl-donor in comparison to the well investigated solid Cl-donors magnesium chloride and calcium chloride. ... However, Kuderna(11) found that the Pcit test showed worse correlation with the results of pot experiments carried out with thermochemically treated SSA whereas the Pnac test showed very good correlation in the same investigation. ...

Christian Vogel; Christian Adam

2011-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

20

Effectiveness of irradiation in killing pathogens. [Treatment of sewage sludge for land application  

SciTech Connect

United States Environmental Protection Agency regulations include gamma ray irradiation of sludge as an approved Process to Further Reduce Pathogens (PFRP) prior to land application. Research at Sandia National Laboratories on pathogen inactivation in sludge by gamma irradiation has demonstrated that the 1 Mrad PFRP dose is capable, by itself, of eliminating bacterial, fungal, and parasitic pathogens from sludge. Gamma irradiation of sludge in conjunction with the required Processes to Significantly Reduce Pathogens (PSRP) should also eliminate the viral hazard from wastewater sludges.

Yeager, J.G.; Ward, R.L.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes sewage treatment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

State Waste Discharge Permit application, 100-N Sewage Lagoon  

SciTech Connect

As part of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order negotiations (Ecology et al. 1994), the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, the US Environmental Protection Agency, and the Washington State Department of Ecology agreed that liquid effluent discharges to the ground on the Hanford Site which affect groundwater or have the potential to affect groundwater would be subject to permitting under the structure of Chapter 173--216 (or 173--218 where applicable) of the Washington Administrative Code, the State Waste Discharge Permit Program. As a result of this decision, the Washington State Department of Ecology and the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office entered into Consent Order No. DE 91NM-177, (Ecology and DOE-RL 1991). This document constitutes the State Waste Discharge Permit application for the 100-N Sewage Lagoon. Since the influent to the sewer lagoon is domestic waste water, the State Waste Discharge Permit application for Public Owned Treatment Works Discharges to Land was used. Although the 100-N Sewage Lagoon is not a Public Owned Treatment Works, the Public Owned Treatment Works application is more applicable than the application for industrial waste water. The 100-N Sewage Lagoon serves the 100-N Area and other Hanford Site areas by receiving domestic waste from two sources. A network of sanitary sewer piping and lift stations transfers domestic waste water from the 100-N Area buildings directly to the 100-N Sewage Lagoon. Waste is also received by trucks that transport domestic waste pumped from on site septic tanks and holding tanks. Three ponds comprise the 100-N Sewage Lagoon treatment system. These include a lined aeration pond and stabilization pond, as well as an unlined infiltration pond. Both piped-in and trucked-in domestic waste is discharged directly into the aeration pond.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Water/Wastewater Engineering Report (Storm Sewer/Infiltration Sanitary Sewage Separation-M1 Model)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In some cities, the municipal sewer system collects both storm water and sanitary sewage in the same pipes. During dry weather these sewers carry all the sanitary sewage to the wastewater treatment plant for treatment. However, when rainstorms...

Liu, Z.; Brumbelow, K.; Haberl, J. S.

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

23

Experimental Research of the Oxygen-Enriched Combustion of Sewage Sludge and Coal in CFB  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Sewage sludge is the by-products of sewage treatment, and it is a fuel of high moisture, high ash and low caloric. Oxygen-enriched combustion technology is one of the new and clean coal combustion technologies...

S. W. Xin; X. F. Lu; H. Z. Liu

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Thermal characteristics of the combustion process of biomass and sewage sludge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The combustion of two kinds of biomass and sewage sludge was studied. The biomass fuels were wood biomass (pellets) and agriculture biomass (oat). The sewage sludge came from waste water treatment plant. The biomass

Aneta Magdziarz; Ma?gorzata Wilk

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Flash pyrolysis of sewage sludge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Flash pyrolysis of sewage sludge ... Influence of the Pyrolysis Temperature on Sewage Sludge Product Distribution, Bio-Oil, and Char Properties ... Influence of the Pyrolysis Temperature on Sewage Sludge Product Distribution, Bio-Oil, and Char Properties ...

Jan Piskorz; Donald S. Scott; Ian B. Westerberg

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Interim Control Strategy for the Test Area North/Technical Support Facility Sewage Treatment Facility Disposal Pond - Two-year Update  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho Cleanup Project has prepared this interim control strategy for the U.S. Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office pursuant to DOE Order 5400.5, Chapter 11.3e (1) to support continued discharges to the Test Area North/Technical Support Facility Sewage Treatment Facility Disposal Pond. In compliance with DOE Order 5400.5, a 2-year review of the Interim Control Strategy document has been completed. This submittal documents the required review of the April 2005 Interim Control Strategy. The Idaho Cleanup Project's recommendation is unchanged from the original recommendation. The Interim Control Strategy evaluates three alternatives: (1) re-route the discharge outlet to an uncontaminated area of the TSF-07; (2) construct a new discharge pond; or (3) no action based on justification for continued use. Evaluation of Alternatives 1 and 2 are based on the estimated cost and implementation timeframe weighed against either alternative's minimal increase in protection of workers, the public, and the environment. Evaluation of Alternative 3, continued use of the TSF-07 Disposal Pond under current effluent controls, is based on an analysis of four points: - Record of Decision controls will protect workers and the public - Risk of increased contamination is low - Discharge water will be eliminated in the foreseeable future - Risk of contamination spread is acceptable. The Idaho Cleanup Project recommends Alternative 3, no action other than continued implementation of existing controls and continued deactivation, decontamination, and dismantlement efforts at the Test Area North/Technical Support Facility.

L. V. Street

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Economic–environmental analysis of handling biogas from sewage sludge digesters in \\{WWTPs\\} (wastewater treatment plants) for energy recovery: Case study of Bekkelaget WWTP in Oslo (Norway)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper outlines a methodology for a systematic economic–environmental analysis of realistic and realisable options for recovering and utilising energy from biogas produced in sewage sludge digesters in \\{WWTPs\\} (wastewater treatment plants). Heat, electricity and transport fuel can be produced from biogas, consumed in-plant or even sold to external end-users. The paper initially considers global warming as the environmental impact of concern, but later also stresses on the necessity of avoiding problem shifting by factoring in other environmental impact categories as well. The methodology is subsequently applied to the Bekkelaget WWTP in Oslo (Norway). Five different options for handling biogas are considered, in addition to the status quo – the business-as-usual in year-2012, and a baseline case, where it is assumed that all biogas generated is flared completely and not utilised for energy recovery of any kind. Seven different cost scenarios – for electricity, natural gas, wood pellets, bio-methane and diesel – are constructed. This gives a total of 49 combinations, for each of which the net costs and net environmental impacts (global warming, eutrophication and acidification) are determined for the 10-year period 2012–2021. The changes (in percentages) with respect to the corresponding values for the baseline case, are recorded; suitable weighting factors are considered after interaction with experts and personnel associated with the plant, and the options are evaluated using this double-bottom-line approach (economic and environmental).

G. Venkatesh; Rashid Abdi Elmi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from sewage sludge by anaerobic degradation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for treatment in EU, followed by spreading on land, which accounted for 37% of the sewage sludge produced allow recycling of nutrients. Hence, bioprocessed sewage sludge application on agricultural soilRemoval of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from sewage sludge by anaerobic degradation N

29

Concentrations of Heavy Metals in Soil and Cassava Plant on Sewage Sludge Dump  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

JM. (1989). Assessment of sludge regulation assumptions: AMunicipal Wasteland and Sludge on Land. Univ. of California,1998). Effects of sewage sludge pre-treatment on microbial

Igbozuruike, Chris Washington Ifeanyi Mr.; Opara-Nadi, Achilihu Oliver Prof; Okorie, Ikechukwu Kennedy DR

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerobic granular sewage Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

from... -lot sewage systems concern the soil. For the soil to properly renovate the treatment tank's effluent, two Source: Boyer, Elizabeth W. - School of Forest Resources,...

31

International Best Practices for Pre-Processing and Co-Processing Municipal Solid Waste and Sewage Sludge in the Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2008. “Utilization of sewage sludge in EU application of old2007. “Cost evaluation of sludge treatment options andwastewater treatment plant sludge treating leather tanning

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Spreading lagooned sewage sludge on farm land: A case history  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the development of a project involving the application of approximately 265,000 cubic meters of lagooned sewage sludge from a metropolitan area on privately-owned farm land in an adjacent, rural county. The sludge application project was initiated to enable use of the land occupied by the lagoons for expansion of the sewage treatment plant. The procedures developed will be valuable to those proposing to practice land disposal of stabilized sludge as part of the Nation`s resource conservation program.

Robson, C.M.; Sommers, L.E.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Proper Sanitization of Sewage Sludge: a Critical Issue for a Sustainable Society  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...significantly benefit the recycling of sewage sludge back...implementation in municipal wastewater treatment facilities...Response of bacteria in wastewater sludge to moisture...for hygienic nutrient recycling. Bioresour. Technol...regrowth of bacteria in wastewater sludge. Appl. Environ...

Veronica Arthurson

2008-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

34

Effect of a sewage plant in the distribution of organochlorine residues in the Diyala River, Iraq  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

As a continuation of the National Pesticide Monitoring Program in Iraq, this work was carried out to study ... from the lower part of Diyala river, Iraq, where a large sewage treatment plant is...

Muthanna A. Al-Omar; Behla H. Al-Ogaily; Dhia A. Shebl

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Purification of domestic sewage by water-hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Sewage management is posing serious techno-economic problems in cities, particularly in developing countries. A new technology, sewage purification by water-hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes), is a possible solution. This paper studied the suitability and effectiveness of water-hyacinth in treating domestic sewage. A 28-day experiment was performed under a controlled environment of a screen-house subjected to natural conditions. Several parameters were measured and analysed, including the Biochemical Oxygen Demand (BOD), Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD), faecal coliform count, nitrate and phosphate contents, pH value, heavy metals, turbidity, odour and colour at intervals of seven days. Laboratory analyses indicated that the water-hyacinth culture drastically reduced the faecal coliforms by about 80%. BOD dropped from 900 to 460 mg litre?1. COD was reduced from 1,424 to 766 mg litre?1 while the nitrogen content increased by about 77.5% and the phosphorus content rose by 63.3%. The pH value fell slightly from 8.58 to 7.81. The initial pungent odour of the raw sewage gradually disappeared during the purification period while the deep yellowish colour turned almost colourless in the final effluent sample. The sludge from the culture was rich and applicable as a bio-fertiliser. After comparison with the World Health Organisation Stream Standards, it was determined that the final effluent from water-hyacinth could be used for irrigation and fishing activities, or recycled to a flowing stream for other uses except for drinking purposes.

G.A. Alade; S.O. Ojoawo

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Waste treatment by reverse osmosis and membrane processing. (Latest citations from the NTIS Bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the technology of reverse osmosis and membrane processing in sewage and industrial waste treatment. Citations discuss ultrafiltration, industrial water reuse, hazardous waste treatment, municipal wastes, and materials recovery. Waste reduction and recycling in electroplating, metal finishing, and circuit board manufacturing are considered. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Waste treatment by reverse osmosis and membrane processing. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the technology of reverse osmosis and membrane processing in sewage and industrial waste treatment. Citations discuss ultrafiltration, industrial water reuse, hazardous waste treatment, municipal wastes, and materials recovery. Waste reduction and recycling in electroplating, metal finishing, and circuit board manufacturing are considered. (Contains a minimum of 245 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Sewage sludge dewatering using flowing liquid metals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for reducing the moisture content of a moist sewage sludge having a moisture content of about 50% to 80% and formed of small cellular micro-organism bodies having internally confined water is provided. A hot liquid metal is circulated in a circulation loop and the moist sewage sludge is injected in the circulation loop under conditions of temperature and pressure such that the confined water vaporizes and ruptures the cellular bodies. The vapor produced, the dried sludge, and the liquid metal are then separated. Preferably, the moist sewage sludge is injected into the hot liquid metal adjacent the upstream side of a venturi which serves to thoroughly mix the hot liquid metal and the moist sewage sludge. The venturi and the drying zone after the venturi are preferably vertically oriented. The dried sewage sludge recovered is available as a fuel and is preferably used for heating the hot liquid metal.

Carlson, Larry W. (Oswego, IL)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Author's personal copy Modelling and automation of water and wastewater treatment processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Jeppsson, 2006), including sewage systems and surrounding land use. From the methodological viewpoint on the applications of modelling and automation to water and wastewater treatment processes. The session, under sludge processes, to which unconventional and innovative control strategies were applied. But there were

40

Greenhouse gases emissions accounting for typical sewage sludge digestion with energy utilization and residue land application in China  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer GHGs emissions from sludge digestion + residue land use in China were calculated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The AD unit contributes more than 97% of total biogenic GHGs emissions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AD with methane recovery is attractive for sludge GHGs emissions reduction. - Abstract: About 20 million tonnes of sludge (with 80% moisture content) is discharged by the sewage treatment plants per year in China, which, if not treated properly, can be a significant source of greenhouse gases (GHGs) emissions. Anaerobic digestion is a conventional sewage sludge treatment method and will continue to be one of the main technologies in the following years. This research has taken into consideration GHGs emissions from typical processes of sludge thickening + anaerobic digestion + dewatering + residue land application in China. Fossil CO{sub 2}, biogenic CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4,} and avoided CO{sub 2} as the main objects is discussed respectively. The results show that the total CO{sub 2}-eq is about 1133 kg/t DM (including the biogenic CO{sub 2}), while the net CO{sub 2}-eq is about 372 kg/t DM (excluding the biogenic CO{sub 2}). An anaerobic digestion unit as the main GHGs emission source occupies more than 91% CO{sub 2}-eq of the whole process. The use of biogas is important for achieving carbon dioxide emission reductions, which could reach about 24% of the total CO{sub 2}-eq reduction.

Niu Dongjie, E-mail: niudongjie@tongji.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Yangtze Aquatic Environment, Ministry of Education, College of Environmental Science and Engineering of Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); UNEP-Tongji Institute of Environment for Sustainable Development, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); Huang Hui [Key Laboratory of Yangtze Aquatic Environment, Ministry of Education, College of Environmental Science and Engineering of Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); Dai Xiaohu [Key Laboratory of Yangtze Aquatic Environment, Ministry of Education, College of Environmental Science and Engineering of Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); National Engineering Research Center for Urban Pollution Control, Shanghai 200092 (China); Zhao Youcai [Key Laboratory of Yangtze Aquatic Environment, Ministry of Education, College of Environmental Science and Engineering of Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China)

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes sewage treatment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Sewage sludge application effects on runoff water quality in a semiarid grassland  

SciTech Connect

One of the concerns of land application of sewage sludge (also referred to as biosolids) to rangeland is its effect on the amount and quality of runoff water. In this study, we applied three treatments consisting of 0, 22, and 41 Mg ha{sup -1} of municipal sewage sludge to Larim gravelly sandy loam (Ustollic Argiustoll) and Altvan sandy loam (Aridic Argiustoll) soils in paired plots on two slope gradients (8 and 15%). We used a one-time application of simulated rainfall for 30 min at a rate of 100 mm h{sup -1} and collected and analyzed the runoff. Results are described. 22 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

Harris-Pierce, R.L.; Redente, E.F.; Barbarick, K.A. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

IMPACT OF HEAVY METALS IN SEWAGE SLUDGE ON SOIL AND PLANTS (COLZA and WHEAT)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IMPACT OF HEAVY METALS IN SEWAGE SLUDGE ON SOIL AND PLANTS (COLZA and WHEAT) Najla LASSOUED1@emse.fr Abstract We are testing the impact of heavy metals in sludge from urban and industrial wastewater treatment> Cu> Ni> Co> Cd The contents of heavy metals in the sludge is made very high and exceed European

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

43

Guidance for writing permits for the use or disposal of sewage sludge. Draft report  

SciTech Connect

Section 405(d) of the Clean Water Act (CWA) directs the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to develop regulations containing guidelines for the use and disposal of sewage sludge. On February 19th, 1993, EPA published final regulations at 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 503 as the culmination of a major effort to develop technical standards in response to Section 405(d). These regulations govern three sewage sludge use and disposal practices: land application, surface disposal, and incineration. A key element in EPA's implementation of the Part 503 regulations is educating Agency and State personnel about these new requirements. Although the regulations are generally directly enforceable against all persons involved in the use and disposal of sewage sludge, they will also be implemented through permits issued to treatment works treating domestic sewage as defined in 40 CFR 122.22. Thus, the primary focus of the manual is to assist permit writers in incorporating the Part 503 requirements into permits; it serves as an update to the Guidance for Writing Case-by-Case Permit Conditions for Municipal Sewage Sludge (PB91-145508/HDM).

Not Available

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Modeling of the reburning process using sewage sludge-derived syngas  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gasification provides an attractive method for sewage sludges treatment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gasification generates a fuel gas (syngas) which can be used as a reburning fuel. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Reburning potential of sewage sludge gasification gases was defined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Numerical simulation of co-combustion of syngases in coal fired boiler has been done. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Calculation shows that analysed syngases can provide higher than 80% reduction of NO{sub x}. - Abstract: Gasification of sewage sludge can provide clean and effective reburning fuel for combustion applications. The motivation of this work was to define the reburning potential of the sewage sludge gasification gas (syngas). A numerical simulation of the co-combustion process of syngas in a hard coal-fired boiler was done. All calculations were performed using the Chemkin programme and a plug-flow reactor model was used. The calculations were modelled using the GRI-Mech 2.11 mechanism. The highest conversions for nitric oxide (NO) were obtained at temperatures of approximately 1000-1200 K. The combustion of hard coal with sewage sludge-derived syngas reduces NO emissions. The highest reduction efficiency (>90%) was achieved when the molar flow ratio of the syngas was 15%. Calculations show that the analysed syngas can provide better results than advanced reburning (connected with ammonia injection), which is more complicated process.

Werle, Sebastian, E-mail: sebastian.werle@polsl.pl [Institute of Thermal Technology, Silesian University of Technology at Gliwice, 44-100 Gliwice, Konarskiego 22 (Poland)

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

45

Wastewater treatment using flocculation, coagulation, and flotation. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). NewSearch  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the design, development, and evaluation of flocculation coagulation and flotation processes for the treatment of sewage and industrial wastes. Citations examine technology requirements and limitations, activated sludge and anaerobic processes, chlorination, runoff pollution control, wastewater recycling and reuse, and materials recovery. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Land application of sewage sludge: A guide for land appliers on the requirements of the federal standards for the use or disposal of sewage sludge, 40 CFR part 503  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency promulgated a regulation at 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 503 to ensure that sewage sludge is used or disposed of in a way that protects human health and the environment. Part 503 imposes requirements for the land application, surface disposal, and incineration of sewage sludge. The manual focuses on land application, providing guidance to land appliers of sewage sludge. The purpose of the document is to provide the land applier with sufficient guidance to comply fully with all applicable Part 503 requirements. The guidance is structured to first provide a general understanding of the Rule and its underlying principles, including definitions of sewage sludge, land application, and an explanation of who under the Rule is considered a land applier.

NONE

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Sewage sludge dewatering using flowing liquid metals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates generally to the dewatering of sludge, and more particularly to the dewatering of a sewage sludge having a moisture content of about 50 to 80% in the form of small cellular micro-organism bodies having internally confined water.

Carlson, L.W.

1985-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

48

Sedimentary coprostanol as an index of sewage addition in Santa Monica Basin, southern California  

SciTech Connect

Sediment cores from Santa Monica Basin and effluent from two major municipal wastewater dischargers in southern California were analyzed for sterols. Specifically the fecal sterols, coprostanols (coprostanol and epicoprostanol), were quantitated to determine the degree of sewage addition to the sediment. Although coprostanols are distributed throughout the Santa Monica Basin sediments in association with fine particles, some stations contain elevated levels, either due to their proximity to the outfalls or because of preferential advection of fine-grained sediments into their location where anoxicity aids in better preservation. The progressive seaward decline of coprostanols relative to total sterols from the outfalls represents dilution of sewage by biogenic sterols. The ratios of coprostanols to dinosterol appears to be a better indicator of the degree of sewage addition. A rapid increase in content of coprostanols from about 1935 coincides with the start of offshore wastewater discharge by JWPCP, the Los Angeles County Sanitation Districts on Palos Verdes Shelf. It is estimated that wastewater treatment plants release into southern California Bight 260 metric tons/yr of fecal sterols and 5 {times} 10{sup 4} metric tons/yr of sewage carbon.

Venkatesan, M.I.; Kaplan, I.R. (Univ. of California, Los Angeles (USA))

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Waste treatment by reverse osmosis and membrane processing. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the technology of reverse osmosis and membrane processing in sewage and industrial waste treatment. Citations discuss ultrafiltration, industrial water reuse, hazardous waste treatment, municipal wastes, and materials recovery. Waste reduction and recycling in electroplating, metal finishing, and circuit board manufacturing are considered. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Waste treatment by reverse osmosis and membrane processing. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the technology of reverse osmosis and membrane processing in sewage and industrial waste treatment. Citations discuss ultrafiltration, industrial water reuse, hazardous waste treatment, municipal wastes, and materials recovery. Waste reduction and recycling in electroplating, metal finishing, and circuit board manufacturing are considered. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Survivorship of meadow voles, Microtus pennsylvanicus, from sewage sludge-treated fields  

SciTech Connect

A long-term field study was begun in 1977 at Miami University to evaluate the effects of land application of sewage sludge on experimental old-field communities. The effects of sludge application on toxic metal concentrations in meadow vole (Microtus pennsylvanicus) organs during the first two years of the study have been reported. During the first two years of sludge application, no detrimental effects were observed in vole survivorship as a result of sludge treatment.

Maly, M.S.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Treatability study of industrial waste using sanitary sewage to supply nutrients  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ferguson, B. S. , U. S. Merchant Marine Academy Co-Chairmen of Advisory Conmittee: Dr. Harold W. Wolf Dr. Tom D. Reynolds Industrial wastewaters in many instances do not contain suffi- cient nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorus to permit effective... and phosphorus, which adds to the cost. Sanitary sewage contains these nutrients and, if mixed in proper proportions with petrochemical industrial waste- waters requiring added nutrients, could satisfy the nutrient demand and reduce treatment cost. A limited...

Ferguson, James Ritchie

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

53

Sewage Sludge Management Rule (West Virginia) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sewage Sludge Management Rule (West Virginia) Sewage Sludge Management Rule (West Virginia) Sewage Sludge Management Rule (West Virginia) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State West Virginia Program Type Siting and Permitting This rule establishes requirements for the permitting siting, bonding, installation, establishment, construction, modification, and operation of any facility that generates, processes, recycles and/or disposes of sewage

54

E-Print Network 3.0 - alternative sewage sludge Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Summary: spreading machines. Key words: Spreading technology, environmental performances, LCA, sewage sludge... of sewage sludge spreading scenarios involving different types of...

55

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic sewage sludge Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Summary: spreading machines. Key words: Spreading technology, environmental performances, LCA, sewage sludge... of sewage sludge spreading scenarios involving different types of...

56

E-Print Network 3.0 - alternative wastewater treatment Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geosciences ; Environmental Sciences and Ecology 59 Sustainable Use of Resources Recycling of Sewage Treatment Plant Water in Concrete Summary: of knowledge of the use of...

57

Preference of the green peach aphid, Myzus persicae, for plants grown in sewage sludges  

SciTech Connect

Since passage of the Clean Water Act in the 1970s, disposal of the millions of tonnes of sewage sludge generated annually has become a major concern of municipalities throughout the United States. With the range of other disposal options having narrowed in recent years, application of sludge to land is increasingly viewed as a practical and economical means to recycle this waste material. However, sludges from large cities with industries may be contaminated with various toxic chemicals, including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), other organic chemicals, such as pesticides, and heavy metals. Sludge application to land thus has the potential adversely to affect biota and the functioning of terrestrial ecosystems. The authors previously demonstrated marked reductions in fecundity and survival of green peach aphids, Myzus persicae, on collard plants, Brassica oleracea var. sabellica, growing in soil treated with chemically contaminated sludge as compared to aphids on plants growing either in soil treated with uncontaminated sludge of soil conventionally fertilized. Reduced plant growth and increased restlessness in aphids in the contaminated sludge treatment were also observed. The purpose of the present study was to examine more closely the influence of sludge contaminants on aphid settling behavior as indicated by differential preference of M. persicae for leaves of its collard host grown under different soil conditions.

Culliney, T.W.; Pimentel, D.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Growth of chrysanthemums in sewage sludge amended media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of seedlings of Lironden- d ~tl' 'f, L. d C fl d, L. g t tt screened compost (224 metric tons/ha) made from degested sewage sludge and woodchips. However, Kirkham and Emino (50) found with increasing rates of liquid sewage sludge (50 ml...

Schlutt, Edward Frederick

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Review article The use of urban sewage sludge on pastures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Review article The use of urban sewage sludge on pastures: the cysticercosis threat Jacques appears to be one of the major pathological threats when sewage sludge is used to fertilise cattle highly prevalent) and Asia (Taenia saginata-like are prevalent). The processing of sludge and the delay

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

60

Effect of Microbial Activity on Trace Element Release from Sewage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effect of Microbial Activity on Trace Element Release from Sewage Sludge S H A B N A M Q U R E S H in mobilization of trace elements from land-applied wastewater sludge is not well-defined. Our study examined-effective management alternative. Unfor- tunately, sewage sludge also contains potentially toxic trace elements

Walter, M.Todd

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes sewage treatment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Wastewater treatment using flocculation, coagulation, and flotation. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the design, development, and evaluation of flocculation coagulation and flotation processes for the treatment of sewage and industrial wastes. Citations examine technology requirements and limitations, activated sludge and anaerobic processes, chlorination, runoff pollution control, wastewater recycling and reuse, and materials recovery.(Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Wastewater treatment using flocculation, coagulation, and flotation. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the design, development, and evaluation of flocculation coagulation and flotation processes for the treatment of sewage and industrial wastes. Citations examine technology requirements and limitations, activated sludge and anaerobic processes, chlorination, runoff pollution control, wastewater recycling and reuse, and materials recovery.(Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Comparative LCA of sewage sludge valorisation as both fuel and raw material substitute in clinker production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A life cycle assessment to evaluate the environmental impact of urban sewage sludge use as alternative fuel or raw material in clinker production was carried out. In order to quantify in detail the overall environmental impact of both scenarios, the sewage sludge treatment process and the transport to cement facilities for both alternatives were considered. The substitution ratio of fuel (petcoke) and raw material (limestone) was fixed between 5 and 15% according to the cement production plant limitations. Both scenarios show CO2 savings when compared to the clinker production without substitution. The mid-point and end-point analysis were favourable to the fuel substitution with savings ranging from 3 to 7% compared to the raw material substitution and also to base case without substitution. The influence of the amount of sewage sludge used for both scenarios indicates that fuel substitution reduced the CO2 emissions when the amount of substitution is increased, while other mid-point and end-point categories were proportionally favourable to the fuel substitution scenario. Additionally, the influence of the substituted material characteristics showed that low heating value (fuel substitution) and CaO addition in lime stabilized sludge (raw material substitution) are critical parameters in terms of environmental impact in clinker production. The fuel substitution represents a significant environmental improvement compared to the raw material substitution scenario and clinker production without substitution.

Cesar Valderrama; Ricard Granados; Jose Luis Cortina; Carles M. Gasol; Manel Guillem; Alejandro Josa

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Waste-Water Treatment: The Tide Is Turning  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...combine to form water. The resins...by waste-water treatment standards. In electrodialysis, an electric...human use. Electrodialysis and reverse...brackish waste water, and these...problem in sewage treatment. The cost...

Robert W. Holcomb

1970-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

65

Comparative assessment of municipal sewage sludge incineration, gasification and pyrolysis for a sustainable sludge-to-energy management in Greece  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: • The high output of MSS highlights the need for alternative routes of valorization. • Evaluation of 3 sludge-to-energy valorisation methods through SWOT analysis. • Pyrolysis is an energy and material recovery process resulting to ‘zero waste’. • Identification of challenges and barriers for MSS pyrolysis in Greece was investigated. • Adopters of pyrolysis systems face the challenge of finding new product markets. - Abstract: For a sustainable municipal sewage sludge management, not only the available technology, but also other parameters, such as policy regulations and socio-economic issues should be taken in account. In this study, the current status of both European and Greek Legislation on waste management, with a special insight in municipal sewage sludge, is presented. A SWOT analysis was further developed for comparison of pyrolysis with incineration and gasification and results are presented. Pyrolysis seems to be the optimal thermochemical treatment option compared to incineration and gasification. Sewage sludge pyrolysis is favorable for energy savings, material recovery and high added materials production, providing a ‘zero waste’ solution. Finally, identification of challenges and barriers for sewage sludge pyrolysis deployment in Greece was investigated.

Samolada, M.C. [Dept. Secretariat of Environmental and Urban Planning – Decentralized Area Macedonian Thrace, Taki Oikonomidi 1, 54008 Thessaloniki (Greece); Zabaniotou, A.A., E-mail: azampani@auth.gr [Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Dept. of Chemical Engineering, University Box 455, University Campus, 541 24 Thessaloniki (Greece)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

66

Biosolids are the solids produced during municipal wastewater treatment. Composts are made from a variety of organic materials, including both urban and agriculture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ISSUE Biosolids are the solids produced during municipal wastewater treatment. Composts are made resources, restoring soils, and combating climate change. Biosolids are still viewed as harmful wastes County and a number of smaller treatment plants is applied to dryland wheat in Douglas County. More than

Collins, Gary S.

67

Rules and Regulations for Sewage Sludge Management (Rhode Island)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The purpose of these rules and regulations is to ensure that sewage sludge that is treated, land applied, disposed, distributed, stockpiled or transported in the State of Rhode Island is done so in...

68

A reburning process using sewage sludge-derived syngas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The motivation for this work was to define the reburning potential of sewage sludge (SS) gasification gas (syngas). A numerical simulation of the co-combustion process of syngas in a hard coal-fired boiler was .....

Sebastian Werle

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Sandis irradiator for dried sewage solids. Final safety analysis report  

SciTech Connect

Analyses of the hazards associated with the operation of the Sandia irradiator for dried sewage solids, as well as methods and design considerations to minimize these hazards, are presented in accordance with DOE directives.

Morris, M.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Landfarming of municipal sewage sludge at Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

The City of Oak Ridge, Tennessee, has been applying municipal sanitary sludge to 9 sites comprising 90 ha on the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) since 1983. Approximately 13,000,000 L are applied annually by spraying sludge (2 to 3% solids) under pressure from a tanker. Under an ongoing monitoring program, both the sludge and the soil in the application areas are analyzed for organic, inorganic, and radioactive parameters on a regular basis. Organic pollutants are analyzed in sludge on a semiannual basis and in the soil application areas on an annual basis. Inorganic parameters are analyzed daily (e.g., pH, total solids) or monthly (e.g., nitrogen, manganese) in sludge and annually in soil in application areas. Radionuclides (Co-60, Cs-137, I-131, Be-7, K-40, Ra-228, U-235, U-238) are scanned daily during application by the sewage treatment plant and analyzed weekly in composite sludge samples and annually in soil. Additionally, data on radioactive body burden for maximally exposed workers who apply the sludge show no detectable exposures. This monitoring program is comprehensive and is one of the few in the United States that analyzes radionuclides. Results from the monitoring program show heavy metals and radionuclides are not accumulating to levels in the soil application areas.

Tischler, M.L.; Pergler, C.; Wilson, M.; Mabry, D.; Stephenson, M.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Dioxins and furans formation in pilot incineration tests of sewage sludge spiked with organic chlorine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The factors affecting polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDD) and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDF) formation were studied in sewage sludge incineration tests carried out on a demonstrative plant. The plant includes a circulating fluidised bed furnace (FBF) and a rotary kiln furnace (RKF), operating alternatively. During the tests sewage sludge was spiked with chlorinated hydrocarbons and the operating parameters of the afterburning chamber were varied. PCDD/F were sampled in each test before the bag filter, thus collecting the above contaminants before abatement systems. From the tests it appeared that PCDD/F were always produced in more abundance in the tests carried out by FBF than by RKF. The higher PCDD/F concentrations in the tests by FBF were reached when sewage sludge was spiked with a high dosage of a surrogate organic mixture of chlorinated hydrocarbons and when the afterburning chamber was used only as transit equipment with the burner off. The distribution of the different PCDD/F homologues was compared. \\{P5CDFs\\} were generally the prevalent fraction, with very few exceptions for the tests by RKF at high temperature of the afterburning chamber. As for FBF tests, it was found that the PCDD/F homologue profile depends on the afterburning chamber temperature.

Giuseppe Mininni; Andrea Sbrilli; Ettore Guerriero; Mauro Rotatori

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Secondary Sewage Treatment Versus Ocean Outfalls: An Assessment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...stable. The membrane will overheat and be de-stroyed...W. A. Beckman, in Solar Ener-gy Thermal Processes (Wiley, New...was supported by a Solar Energy Traineeship grant...have sufficient daytime solar insolation and sufficiently...

Charles B. Officer; John H. Ryther

1977-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

73

Biological Factors in Treatment of Raw Sewage in Artificial Ponds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

be improved. Accordingly ... Various factors, such as loading, solar ..... example, follows changes in air temperature .... In these observations ice quality appeared ... of solar energy by aquatic organisms. Problems in. Lake Biology;. A.A.A.S..

1999-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

74

Preparing sewage sludge for land application or surface disposal: A guide for preparers of sewage sludge on the monitoring, record keeping, and reporting requirements of the federal standards for the use of disposal of sewage sludge, 40 CFR part 503  

SciTech Connect

The document focuses on the monitoring, recordkeeping, and reporting requirements that apply to persons who prepare sewage sludge or a material derived from sewage sludge. It defines persons who prepare sewage sludge and then summarizes their general responsibilities. USEPA promulgated at 40 CFR Part 503 Phase 1 of the risk-based regulations that govern the final use or disposal of sewage sludge. The intent of the Federal program is to ensure that the use or disposal of sewage sludge occurs in a way that protects both human health and the environment. The Part 503 regulation establishes general requirements, pollutant limits, operational standards, and management practices, as well as monitoring, recordkeeping, and reporting requirements. These requirements apply to sewage sludge that is land applied, placed on a surface disposal site, or incinerated in a sewage sludge-only incinerator.

Not Available

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Specification of CuCrZr Alloy Properties after Various Thermo-Mechanical Treatments and Design Allowables including Neutron Irradiation Effects  

SciTech Connect

Precipitation hardened CuCrZr alloy is a promising heat sink and functional material for various applica- tions in ITER, for example the first wall, blanket electrical attachment, divertor, and heating systems. Three types of thermo-mechanical treatment were identified as most promising for the various applica- tions in ITER: solution annealing, cold working and ageing; solution annealing and ageing; solution annealing and ageing at non-optimal condition due to specific manufacturing processes for engineer- ing-scale components. The available data for these three types of treatments were assessed and mini- mum tensile properties were determined based on recommendation of Structural Design Criteria for the ITER In-vessel Components. The available data for these heat treatments were analyzed for assess- ment of neutron irradiation effect. Using the definitions of the ITER Structural Design Criteria the design allowable stress intensity values are proposed for CuCrZr alloy after various heat treatments.

Barabash, Vladimir [ITER Organization, Saint Paul Lez Durance, France] [ITER Organization, Saint Paul Lez Durance, France; Kalinin, G. M. [RDIPE, P.O. Box 788, 101000 Moscow, Russia] [RDIPE, P.O. Box 788, 101000 Moscow, Russia; Fabritsiev, Sergei A. [D.V. Efremov Scientific Research Institute, St. Petersburg, Russia] [D.V. Efremov Scientific Research Institute, St. Petersburg, Russia; Zinkle, Steven J [ORNL] [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Model calibration and validation for OFMSW and sewage sludge co-digestion reactors  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: > Disintegration is the limiting step of the anaerobic co-digestion process. > Disintegration kinetic constant does not depend on the waste particle size. > Disintegration kinetic constant depends only on the waste nature and composition. > The model calibration can be performed on organic waste of any particle size. - Abstract: A mathematical model has recently been proposed by the authors to simulate the biochemical processes that prevail in a co-digestion reactor fed with sewage sludge and the organic fraction of municipal solid waste. This model is based on the Anaerobic Digestion Model no. 1 of the International Water Association, which has been extended to include the co-digestion processes, using surface-based kinetics to model the organic waste disintegration and conversion to carbohydrates, proteins and lipids. When organic waste solids are present in the reactor influent, the disintegration process is the rate-limiting step of the overall co-digestion process. The main advantage of the proposed modeling approach is that the kinetic constant of such a process does not depend on the waste particle size distribution (PSD) and rather depends only on the nature and composition of the waste particles. The model calibration aimed to assess the kinetic constant of the disintegration process can therefore be conducted using organic waste samples of any PSD, and the resulting value will be suitable for all the organic wastes of the same nature as the investigated samples, independently of their PSD. This assumption was proven in this study by biomethane potential experiments that were conducted on organic waste samples with different particle sizes. The results of these experiments were used to calibrate and validate the mathematical model, resulting in a good agreement between the simulated and observed data for any investigated particle size of the solid waste. This study confirms the strength of the proposed model and calibration procedure, which can thus be used to assess the treatment efficiency and predict the methane production of full-scale digesters.

Esposito, G., E-mail: giovanni.esposito@unicas.it [Department of Mechanics, Structures and Environmental Engineering, University of Cassino, via Di Biasio 43, 03043 Cassino (Italy); Frunzo, L., E-mail: luigi.frunzo@unina.it [Department of Mathematics and Applications Renato Caccioppoli, University of Naples Federico II, via Cintia, Monte S. Angelo, I-80126 Naples (Italy); Panico, A., E-mail: anpanico@unina.it [Department of Hydraulic, Geotechnical and Environmental Engineering, University of Naples Federico II, via Claudio 21, 80125 Naples (Italy); Pirozzi, F., E-mail: francesco.pirozzi@unina.it [Department of Hydraulic, Geotechnical and Environmental Engineering, University of Naples Federico II, via Claudio 21, 80125 Naples (Italy)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

77

Use of nutrients of sewage sludge in the initial development of Copaifera langsdorffii  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

under the 20 t ha -1 of sludge rate. Figure 1: CopaibaSupl. K) and sewage sludge doses (2.5, 5, 10, 15 e 20 t ha -dm Fe Mn Zn Table 2: Sewage sludge chemical characteristics.

Sampaio, Thalita Fernanda; Guerrini, Iraê Amaral; Croce, Ciro; de Toledo, Maria Angélica; Morales, Marina

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Pantex Sewage Reservoir - TX 03  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Pantex Sewage Reservoir - TX 03 Pantex Sewage Reservoir - TX 03 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Pantex Sewage Reservoir (TX.03 ) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: This site is one of a group of 77 FUSRAP considered sites for which few, if any records are available in their respective site files to provide an historical account of past operations and their relationship, if any, with MED/AEC operations. Reviews of contact lists, accountable station lists, health and safety records and other documentation of the period do not provide sufficient information to warrant further search of historical records for information on these sites. These site files remain "open" to

79

Impacts on groundwater due to land application of sewage sludge  

SciTech Connect

The project was designed to demonstrate the potential benefits of utilizing sewage sludge as a soil conditioner and fertilizer on Sassafras sandy loam soil. Aerobically digested, liquid sewage sludge was applied to the soil at rates of 0, 22.4, and 44.8 Mg of dry solids/ha for three consecutive years between 1978 and 1981. Groundwater, soil, and crop contamination levels were monitored to establish the maximum sewage solids loading rate that could be applied without causing environmental deterioration. The results indicate that application of 22.4 Mg of dry solids/ha of sludge is the upper limit to ensure protection of the groundwater quality on the site studied. Application rates at or slightly below 22.4 Mg of dry solids/ha are sufficient for providing plant nutrients for the dent corn and rye cropping system utilized in the study.

Higgins, A.J.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Assessing nitrogen losses after sewage sludge spreading: A method based on simulation models and spreader  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Assessing nitrogen losses after sewage sludge spreading: A method based on simulation models performances. We define 45 sewage sludge spreading scenarios covering a wide range of situations in France. Several models are used to (i) assess nitrogen losses due to sewage sludge spreading and (ii) calculate

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes sewage treatment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Anticipating the next century of wastewater treatment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Anticipating the next century of wastewater treatment 10.1126/science...sewage. The settling and recycling of sludge inside treatment...and the contribution to the recycling of resources (2, 3). The...impact of human activities. Wastewater treatment is in itself a relatively...

Mark C. M. van Loosdrecht; Damir Brdjanovic

2014-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

82

Forest land application of sewage sludge on the Savannah River Plant  

SciTech Connect

In 1980, a sewage sludge application study was initiated on the Savannah River Plant to evaluate the effects of sludge additions on nutrient cycling processes in loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) forest ecosystems and to determine whether or not such additions beneficially enhance forest productivity. Sewage sludge, either as a liquid anaerobic sludge at 0, 402, or 804 kg N/ha (360 and 720 lb/ac) containing approximately 7% N (oven dry) or a solid aerobic material at 632 kg N/ha (560 lb/ac) with approximately 1.3% N (oven dry), was applied to 1-, 3-, 8-, and 28-year-old loblolly pine stands on sandy and clayey upper coastal plain soils. A total of 525,000 gallons of liquid sludge and 560 tons of solid sludge was applied on 11.6 hectares (28.7 acres) of loblolly pine forest plots. Sludge additions were monitored to determine availability and movement so that potential impacts could be evaluated on water quality, nutrient and heavy metal cycling, soil and forest floor, understory vegetation, tree foliage, stand growth, biomass production, and wood quality. This study concluded that using liquid sludge at rates of 400 kg N/ha or less as a silvicultural treatment to fertilize pulp and sawtimber loblolly pine stands resulted in increased forest productivity without environmental or wood quality degradation. Application recommendations for stand age and loading rates for management purposes are addressed.

Davis, C.E. (comp.)

1989-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

83

Urban Sewage Delivery Heat Transfer System (2): Heat Transfer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The thimble delivery heat-transfer (TDHT) system is one of the primary modes to utilize the energy of urban sewage. Using the efficiency-number of transfer units method ( ), the heat-transfer efficiencies of the parallel-flow and reverse-flow TDTH...

Zhang, C.; Wu, R.; Li, X.; Li, G.; Zhuang, Z.; Sun, D.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

APPLICATION OF SEWAGE SLUDGES AND COMPOSTS BPG NOTE 6  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the nutrients without resulting in damage to the tree stand. Soil pH will be affected by the application or increase pH · Most immobilise metal contamination · Act as slow release fertiliser (nitrogen and phosphorus NOTE 6 PAGE 2 Applications of sewage sludges and composts Forestry Tree growth on nutrient

85

The long-term and the short-term at a cropping municipal sewage sludge disposal facility  

SciTech Connect

The City of Raleigh, NC, chose land application of municipal sewage sludge as a means of reducing pollution to the Neuse River. The Neuse River Waste Water Treatment Plant (NRWWTP) is located in the Piedmont Province of North Carolina. The soils at the facility are derived largely from the Rolesville Granite. Sewage sludge is applied to over 640 acres of cropland, owned in fee or leased. In making the policy decision for use of the sludge land application method 20 or so years ago, the City had to evaluate the potential for heavy metal accumulation in the soils and plants as well as the potential for ground-water contamination from the nitrate-nitrogen. The city also had to make a policy decision about limiting the discharge of heavy metals to the sewer system. Study of data from monitoring wells demonstrate that well position is a key in determining whether or not nitrate-nitrogen contamination is detected. Data from a three-year study suggest that nitrate-nitrogen moves fairly rapidly t the water table, although significant buildup in nitrogen-nitrogen may take a number of years. Evidence exists suggesting that the time between application of sewage sludge and an increase of nitrate-nitrogen at the water table may be on the order of nine months to a year. It is apparent that in the case of municipal sewage sludge application one can anticipate some nitrate-nitrogen buildup and that the public policy on drinking water standards must recognize this fact.

Welby, C.W. (North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States). Dept. of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences)

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Application of sewage sludge to non-agricultural ecosystems: Impacts of nitrogen on forests  

SciTech Connect

The Clean Water Act (CWA) of 1977 directed EPA to establish standards for use and disposal of sewage sludge (biosolids). This report is part of a larger study evaluating nutrient and contaminant impacts associated with the land application of biosolids in non-agricultural ecosystems. Ecological risk assessments rarely focus on nutrients as stressors. The nutrient components of municipal sewage sludge may impact tree community composition, growth and production, habitat and forage quality for wildlife, and nutrient cycling. The focus here is on three forest ecosystems: northwestern Douglas-fir forest (Pack Forest, WA), southeastern loblolly pine plantation (Athens, GA), and eastern deciduous forest (Hubbard Brook, NH). A model called LINKAGES has been developed at ORNL to examine the relationships between nitrogen cycling and long-term forest stand dynamics, limited by climate and soil water status. Plant-available nitrogen from biosolids is added in several application scenarios and compared to the no-amendment case. All changes are noted, even if they may be viewed as benefits rather than risks. Model outputs include: above-ground biomass, individual species biomass, net above-ground production, leaf litter, evapotranspiration, available nitrogen, and dead trunks. The changes in plant community composition and production are dependent on the rate, frequency, and duration of sludge application and on the age of the stand at the time of application. Model outputs are compared to empirical studies of forests where biosolids have been applied.

Efroymson, R.A.; Tharp, M.L.; Luxmoore, R.J.; Sample, B.E.; Barnthouse, L.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Daniel, F.B. [Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

87

Oxygen-enriched multiple-hearth sewage sludge incineration demonstration. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Oxygen-enhanced multiple-hearth sludge incineration was the focus of a five-month joint study by Praxair and the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority. Testing and demonstration were conducted in Rochester NY, at Monroe County`s Frank E. Van Lare Sewage Treatment Plant. A simple retrofit of high-momentum oxygen lances created a convection hearth in which convective heat and mass transfer with the drying sludge were greatly enhanced, while hearth temperatures were moderated by the wet sludge to prevent overheating. Based on the results of short- and long-term controlled tests discussed in this report, oxygen enhancement of multiple-hearth sludge incinerators can be economically viable, with a savings between $30 and $60 per hour at Van Lare based upon increased sludge throughput and reduced fuel consumption.

NONE

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Application of Municipal Sewage Sludge to Forest and Degraded Land  

SciTech Connect

The paper summarizes research done over a decade at the Savannah River Site and elsewhere in the South evaluating the benefits of land application of municipal wastes. Studies have demonstrated that degraded lands, ranging from borrow pits to mine spoils can be successfully revegetated using a mixture of composed municipal sewage sludge and other amendments. The studies have demonstrated a practical approach to land application and restoration.

D.H. Marx, C. R. Berry, and P. P. Kormanik

1995-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

89

Simulation of substrate degradation in composting of sewage sludge  

SciTech Connect

To simulate the substrate degradation kinetics of the composting process, this paper develops a mathematical model with a first-order reaction assumption and heat/mass balance equations. A pilot-scale composting test with a mixture of sewage sludge and wheat straw was conducted in an insulated reactor. The BVS (biodegradable volatile solids) degradation process, matrix mass, MC (moisture content), DM (dry matter) and VS (volatile solid) were simulated numerically by the model and experimental data. The numerical simulation offered a method for simulating k (the first-order rate constant) and estimating k{sub 20} (the first-order rate constant at 20 {sup o}C). After comparison with experimental values, the relative error of the simulation value of the mass of the compost at maturity was 0.22%, MC 2.9%, DM 4.9% and VS 5.2%, which mean that the simulation is a good fit. The k of sewage sludge was simulated, and k{sub 20}, k{sub 20s} (first-order rate coefficient of slow fraction of BVS at 20 {sup o}C) of the sewage sludge were estimated as 0.082 and 0.015 d{sup -1}, respectively.

Zhang Jun [Center for Environmental Remediation, Institute of Geographic Sciences and Natural Resources Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 11A Datun Road, Beijing 100101 (China); Gao Ding, E-mail: gaod@igsnrr.ac.c [Center for Environmental Remediation, Institute of Geographic Sciences and Natural Resources Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 11A Datun Road, Beijing 100101 (China); Chen Tongbin; Zheng Guodi; Chen Jun; Ma Chuang; Guo Songlin [Center for Environmental Remediation, Institute of Geographic Sciences and Natural Resources Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 11A Datun Road, Beijing 100101 (China); Du Wei [Beijing GreenTech Environmental Engineering Company, Beijing 100080 (China)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

90

Soil solution chemistry of a fly ash-, poultry litter-, and sewage sludge-amended soil  

SciTech Connect

Mixing coal fly ash (FA) with organic wastes to provide balanced soil amendments offers a potential viable use of this industrial by-product. When such materials are land-applied to supply nutrients for agronomic crops, trace element contaminant solubility must be evaluated. In this study, major and trace element soil solution concentrations arising from application of fly ash, organic wastes, and mixtures of the two were compared in a laboratory incubation. Two fly ashes, broiler poultry litter (PL), municipal sewage sludge (SS), and mixtures of FA with either PL or SS were mixed with a Cecil sandy loam (fine, kaolinitic, thermic Typic Kanhapludult) at rates of 32.3, 8.1, and 16.1 g kg{sup {minus}1} soil for FA, PL, and SS, respectively. Treatments were incubated at 22 C at 17% moisture content and soil solution was periodically extracted by centrifugation over 33 d. Initial soil solution concentrations of As, Mo, Se, and Cu were significantly greater in FA/OL treatments than the respective FA-only treatments. For Cu, increased solution concentrations were attributable to increased loading rates in FA/PL mixtures. Solution Cu concentrations were strongly correlated with dissolved C (R{sup 2} > 0.96) in all PL treatments. Significant interactive effects for solution Mo and Se concentrations were observed for the FA/PL and may have resulted from the increased pH and competing anion concentrations of these treatments. Solution As concentrations showed a significant interactive effect for one FA/PL mixture. For the individual treatments, As was more soluble in the Pl treatment than either FA treatment. Except for soluble Se from on FA/SS mixture, trace element solubility in the FA/SS mixtures was not significantly different than the respective FA-only treatment.

Jackson, B.P.; Miller, W.P.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Estimation of E. coli Concentrations from Failing On-Site Wastewater Treatment Facilities (OWTS) Using GIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Failing Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems (OWTSs) have been identified as a significant threat to water quality, discharging significant amounts of inadequately treated sewage effluents. When developing a Watershed Protection Plan (WPP), OWTS has...

Virani, Afreen Shiraz

2014-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

92

Effect of treated-sewage contamination upon bacterial energy charge, adenine nucleotides, and DNA content in a sandy aquifer on Cape Cod.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) | Water Resources Division, U...effects Massachusetts Sewage Water Microbiology georef;1995036952...plumes DNA eutrophication ground water Massachusetts Plantae pollution remediation sewage thallophytes United...

D W Metge; M H Brooks; R L Smith; R W Harvey

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Analysis of Energy and Soft Dirt in an Urban Untreated Sewage Source Heat Pump System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

When using urban untreated sewage as a cool and heat source of heat pump, it is unavoidable to form soft dirt. Based on the method of exergy, an analysis is given of the impact the dirt growth of a tube-shell sewage heat exchanger will have...

Qian, J.; Sun, D.; Li, X.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Microbial acidification and pH effects on trace element release from sewage sludge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Microbial acidification and pH effects on trace element release from sewage sludge Shabnam Qureshia; Trace metals; Mobilization; Land application 1. Introduction Trace elements in land-applied wastewater sludge (sewage biosolids) are potentially phyto- or zoo-toxic if present in sufficient concentration

Walter, M.Todd

95

Activated carbon and biochar amendments decrease pore-water concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in sewage sludge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hydrocarbons (PAHs) in sewage sludge Patryk Oleszczuk a,b, , Sarah E. Hale a , Johannes Lehmann c , Gerard Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons Bioavailability Sewage sludge a b s t r a c t The aim of the research of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in sewage sludge. Two different biochars (MSB and PMW) and two ACs

Lehmann, Johannes

96

Case Study- The Challenge: Improving Sewage Pump System Performance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This case study looks at how Trumbull, Connecticut increased the energy and operating efficiency of its Reservoir Avenue sewage pump station. With the help of ITT Flygt Corporation, the town altered the existing pump system by adding a smaller pump and modifying the system control scheme. The changes reduced annual electricity consumption by almost 44 percent, or nearly 31,900 kWh, saving more than $2,600 per year. The $12,000 project had a simple payback of 4.6 years.

97

Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 232: Area 25 Sewage Lagoons, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report (CADD/CR) has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 232, Area 25 Sewage Lagoons, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Located at the Nevada Test Site in Nevada, approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, CAU 232 is comprised of Corrective Action Site 25-03-01, Sewage Lagoon. This CADD/CR identifies and rationalizes the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's (DOE/NV's) recommendation that no corrective action is deemed necessary for CAU 232. The Corrective Action Decision Document and Closure Report have been combined into one report because sample data collected during the July 1999 corrective action investigation (CAI) activities disclosed no evidence of contamination at the site. Contaminants of potential concern (COPCs) addressed during the CAI included total volatile organic compounds, total semivolatile organic compounds, total Resource Conservation and Recovery Act metals, total pesticides, total herbicides, total petroleum hydrocarbons (gasoline and diesel/oil range), polychlorinated biphenyls, isotopic uranium, isotopic plutonium, strontium-90, and gamma-emitting radionuclides. The data confirmed that none of the COPCs identified exceeded preliminary action levels outlined in the CAIP; therefore, no corrective actions were necessary for CAU 232. After the CAI, best management practice activities were completed and included installation of a fence and signs to limit access to the lagoons, cementing Manhole No. 2 and the diverter box, and closing off influent and effluent ends of the sewage lagoon piping. As a result of the CAI, the DOE/NV recommended that: (1) no further actions were required; (2) no Corrective Action Plan would be required; and (3) no use restrictions were required to be placed on the CAU.

US Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office

1999-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

98

Pyrolysis, combustion and gasification characteristics of miscanthus and sewage sludge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The energetic conversion of biomass into syngas is considered as reliable energy source. In this context, biomass (miscanthus) and sewage sludge have been investigated. A simultaneous thermal analyzer and mass spectrometer was used for the characterization of samples and identified the volatiles evolved during the heating of the sample up to 1100 °C under combustion and gasification conditions. The TG and DTA results were discussed in argon, oxygen, steam and steam blended gas atmospheres. Different stages of pyrolysis, combustion and gasification of the samples have been examined. It was shown that the combustion and gasification of char were occurred in two different temperature zones. The DTA–MS profile of the sample gives information on combustion and gasification process of the samples (ignition, peak combustion and burnout temperatures) and gases released (H2, O2, CO and CO2). The results showed that the different processes were mainly dependent on temperature. The evolution of the gas species was consistent with the weight loss of the samples during pyrolysis, combustion and gasification process. The effect of the ambiences during pyrolysis, combustion and gasification of the samples were reported. The appropriate temperature range to the sludge and miscanthus gasification was evaluated. The kinetic parameters of the biomass and sewage sludge were estimated for TGA using two models based on first-order reactions with distributed activation energies. The presence of ash in the biomass char was more influential during the gasification process.

Kandasamy Jayaraman; Iskender Gökalp

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Effect of sludge treatment on the bioaccumulation of nonylphenol in grass grown on sludge-amended soil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We studied the accumulation of p353-nonylphenol residues in the biomass of grass grown in soil amended with sewage sludge submitted to various conditioning/dewatering treatments. Incubation...Poa pratensis in sludge

K. M. Nowak; V. N. Kouloumbos; A. Schäffer…

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

A case study of mercury and methylmercury dynamics in a Hg-contaminated municipal wastewater treatment plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A study of total Hg (Hg) and methylmercury (MeHg) was performed in a 40 mgd capacity municipal sewage treatment plant in which elemental Hg was used as ... the Hg seals with mechanical seals. A mass balance condu...

C. C. Gilmour; N. S. Bloom

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes sewage treatment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

A Case Study of Mercury and Methylmercury Dynamics in a Hg-Contaminated Municipal Wastewater Treatment Plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A study of total Hg (Hg) and methylmercury (MeHg) was performed in a 40 mgd capacity municipal sewage treatment plant in which elemental Hg was used as ... the Hg seals with mechanical seals. A mass balance condu...

C. C. Gilmour; N. S. Bloom

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Availability and distribution of heavy metals, nitrogen, and phosphorus from sewage sludge in the plant-soil-water continuum  

SciTech Connect

Research was conducted during 1984 and 1985 to determine Cd, Cu, N, Ni, P, and Zn availabilities to barley (Hordeum vulgare) and corn (Zea mays) grown on four sludge-amended soils. An aerobically digested sewage sludge, which was dewatered for approximately 2 years on sandbeds, was obtained from a sewage-treatment plant with major industrial inputs. A 14-day anaerobic N incubation study indicated that mineralization of sludge organic N varied from 9.2% at the 42 Mg ha(-1) sludge rate to 4.2% at the 210 Mg ha(-1) rate. This relatively low percentage of N mineralized from the sludge may reflect the inhibitory effects of the high sludge-metal levels on N transformations and the changes in sludge composition during long-term dewatering on sandbeds. Sludge application increased crop yields, except where the amounts of N mineralized from the sludge was inadequate to supply the N requirement of the crop. Crop yields were not decreased by either metal phytotoxity or P deficiency on the four sludge-amended soils.

Rappaport, B.D.; Scott, J.D.; Martens, D.C.; Reneau, R.B.; Simpson, T.W.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Application of dried anaerobic digested sewage sludge as phenol biosorbent  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Untreated anaerobically digested sewage sludge was used for the first time as a biosorbent for removing phenol from aqueous solution. Results showed that adsorption capacity was influenced by the pH of the aqueous solution with an observed maximum phenol removal at pH around 6-8. The adsorption equilibrium of phenolic compounds was obtained after almost two hours with an adsorption of approximately 90% of the phenolic compounds. A sorbent concentration of 1.8 g/L was found to insure the best removal percentage and the best sorbent capacity. Both Langmuir and Freundlich models have provided reasonable fittings for the data of phenol adsorption. The experimental data fitted the pseudo-second-order kinetic model and the intraparticle diffusion model. The values of change in Gibbs free energy (?G°), enthalpy (?H°) and entropy (?S°) were calculated. The thermodynamic study of adsorption process showed that the process was exothermic in nature.

Alaa H. Hawari

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Case Study - The Challenge: Saving Energy at a Sewage Lift Station...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

pump to the sewage pumping system, the city reduced the station's annual energy consumption by 36,096 kWh, or more than 15 percent, which resulted in annual savings of 2,960....

105

Sewage sludge ash as an alternative low-cost oxygen carrier for chemical looping combustion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, novel low-cost oxygen carriers containing Fe2O3 are evaluated for use in chemical looping combustion. Sewage sludge ashes and reference samples were...2...) fuel and a solid fuel (hard coal) were t...

Ewelina Ksepko

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

College of Agricultural Sciences Agricultural Research and Cooperative Extension Land Application of Sewage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

College of Agricultural Sciences · Agricultural Research and Cooperative Extension Land Application of Sewage Sludge in Pennsylvania Effects of Biosolids on Soil and Crop Quality ENVIRONME NTAL· ISSUES land application of biosolids represents a beneficial reuse alternative to landfill disposal

Kaye, Jason P.

107

F- and H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Sites groundwater monitoring report  

SciTech Connect

Samples from the four wells at the F-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (FSS wells) and the three wells at the H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (HSS wells) are analyzed quarterly for constituents as required by South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Construction Permit 12,076 and, as requested, for other constituents as part of the Savannah River Site Groundwater Monitoring Program. Annual analyses for other constituents, primarily metals, also are required by the permit. Historically and currently, no permit-required analytes exceed standards at the F- and H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Sites except iron, lead, and manganese, which occur in elevated concentrations frequently in FSS wells and occasionally in HSS wells. Tritium and aluminum are the primary nonpermit constituents that exceed standards at the F-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site. Other constituents also exceed standards at this site but only sporadically.

Not Available

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Soil solution chemistry of sewage-sludge incinerator ash and phosphate fertilizer amended soil  

SciTech Connect

The chemical composition of the soil provides useful information on the feasibility of amending agricultural land with municipal and industrial waste, because the soil solution is the medium for most soil chemical reactions, the mobile phase in soils, and the medium for mineral adsorption by plant roots. The soil solutions studies in this research were from plots in a 4-yr field experiment conducted to evaluate the effects of the trace metals and P in sewage-sludge incinerator ash. Treatments compared ash with equivalent P rates from triple-superphosphate fertilizer and a control receiving no P application. Ash and phosphate fertilizer were applied annually at rates of 35, 70, and 140 kg citrate-soluble P ha{sup -1}. Cumulative ash applications during 4 yr amounted to 3.6, 7.2, and 14.4 Mg ash ha{sup -1}. Soil solutions were obtained by centrifugation-immiscible liquid displacement using a fluorocarbon displacing agent. Following chemical analysis, a chemical speciation model was used to determine possible solubility-controlling minerals for trace metals and P, and correlations between solution composition and plant uptake were analyzed. 37 refs., 5 tabs.

Bierman, P.M.; Rosen, C.J.; Bloom, P.R.; Nater, E.A. [Univ. of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN (United States)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Sewage sludge as an amendment for calcareous bauxite mine spoils reclamation  

SciTech Connect

Dried aerobically digested sewage sludge applied at seven rates (0, 10, 20, 40, 60, 80, and 120 Mg ha{sup {minus}1}) in a field experiment on calcareous bauxite mine spoils significantly increased the available water capacity, concentrations of organic matter, total N, extractable P (Olsen), exchangeable Mg{sup 2+}, and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA)-extractable Cu, Mn, Zn, and Pb of mine spoils. Total N and extractable P concentrations decreased with time after sludge application. The DTPA-extractable Cu concentration was high 4 yr after application at sludge rates of 80 and 120 Mg Ha{sup {minus}1}. Extractable Cu and Zn concentrations correlated significantly and positively with Cu and Zn concentrations in burnet (Sanguisorba minor subsp. minor) and fiddleneck (Phacelia tanacetifolia Benth) tissue. Sludge application depressed plant Mn uptake. Plant biomass, plant density, and foliar cover significantly increased with treatment rates in the first and fourth growing seasons but decreased with time. Fiddleneck and burnet were the species favored by the high rate of sludge application.

Brofas, G.; Michopoulos, P.; Alifragis, D.

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

K-Area and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Sites groundwater monitoring report, Third quarter 1992  

SciTech Connect

During third quarter 1992, the three wells at the K-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (KSS wells) and the three wells at the Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Site (PSS wells) were sampled for analyses required each quarter or annually by South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Construction Permit 13,173 and for base-neutral/acid semivolatile constituents. None of the analytical results exceeded standards.

Thompson, C.Y.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Case Study- The Challenge: Saving Energy at a Sewage Lift Station Through Pump System Modifications  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This case study explores how the City of Milford, Connecticut saved energy at the Welches Point sewage lift station. By adding a small booster pump to the sewage pumping system, the city reduced the station's annual energy consumption by 36,096 kWh, or more than 15 percent, which resulted in annual savings of $2,960. With a total implementation cost of $16,000, the project yielded a simple payback of 5.4 years.

112

Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 230: Area 22 Sewage Lagoons and Corrective Action Unit 320: Area 22 Desert Rock Airport Strainer Box Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This Closure Report (CR) describes the remediation activities performed and the results of verification sampling conducted at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 230, Area 22 Sewage Lagoons and CAU 320, Area 22 Desert Rock Airport Strainer Box. The CAU is currently listed in Appendix III of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996). The CAU is located in Area 22 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) (Figure 1) and consists of the following Corrective Action Sites (CASs): 22-03-01- Sewage Lagoon (CAU 230); and 22-99-01- Strainer Box (CAU 320). Included with CAS 22-99-01 is a buried Imhoff tank and a sludge bed. These CAUs will be collectively referred to in this plan as the Area 22 Sewage Lagoons site. Site characterization activities were done during September 1999. Characterization of the manholes associated with the septic system leading to the Imhoff tank was done during March 2000. The results of the characterization presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) indicated that only the sludge bed (CAS 22-99-01) contained constituents of concern (COC) above action levels and required remediation (U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office [DOE/NV], 2000a).

D. S. Tobiason

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 230: Area 22 Sewage Lagoons and Corrective Action Unit 320: Area 22 Desert Rock Air port Strainer Box, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operation Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 230/320 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 230 consists of Corrective Action Site (CAS) 22-03-01, Sewage Lagoon; while CAU 320 consists of CAS 22-99-01, Strainer Box. These CAUs are referred to as CAU 230/320 or the Sewage Lagoons Site. The Sewage Lagoons Site also includes an Imhoff tank, sludge bed, and associated buried sewer piping. Located in Area 22, the site was used between 1951 to 1958 for disposal of sanitary sewage effluent from the historic Camp Desert Rock Facility at the Nevada Test Site in Nevada. Based on site history, the contaminants of potential concern include volatile organic compounds (VOCs), semivolatile organic compounds, total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH), and radionuclides. Vertical migration is estimated to be less than 12 feet below ground surface, and lateral migration is limited to the soil immediately adjacent to or within areas of concern. The proposed investigation will involve a combination of field screening for VOCs and TPH using the direct-push method and excavation using a backhoe to gather soil samples for analysis. Gamma spectroscopy will also be conducted for waste management purposes. Sampling locations will be biased to suspected worst-case areas including the nearby sludge bed, sewage lagoon inlet(s) and outlet(s), disturbed soil surrounding the lagoons, surface drainage channel south of the lagoons, and the area near the Imhoff tank. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office

1999-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

114

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 230: Area 22 Sewage Lagoons and Corrective Action Unit 320: Area 22 Desert Rock Airport Strainer Box, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operation Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 230/320 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 230 consists of Corrective Action Site (CAS) 22-03-01, Sewage Lagoon; while CAU 320 consists of CAS 22-99-01, Strainer Box. These CAUs are referred to as CAU 230/320 or the Sewage Lagoons Site. The Sewage Lagoons Site also includes an Imhoff tank, sludge bed, and associated buried sewer piping. Located in Area 22, the site was used between 1951 to 1958 for disposal of sanitary sewage effluent from the historic Camp Desert Rock Facility at the Nevada Test Site in Nevada. Based on site history, the contaminants of potential concern include volatile organic compounds (VOCs), semivolatile organic compounds, total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH), and radionuclides. Vertical migration is estimated to be less than 12 feet below ground surface, and lateral migration is limited to the soil immediately adjacent to or within areas of concern. The proposed investigation will involve a combination of field screening for VOCs and TPH using the direct-push method and excavation using a backhoe to gather soil samples for analysis. Gamma spectroscopy will also be conducted for waste management purposes. Sampling locations will be biased to suspected worst-case areas including the nearby sludge bed, sewage lagoon inlet(s) and outlet(s), disturbed soil surrounding the lagoons, surface drainage channel south of the lagoons, and the area near the Imhoff tank. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

US DOE/Nevada Operations Office

1999-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

115

Pump apparatus including deconsolidator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pump apparatus includes a particulate pump that defines a passage that extends from an inlet to an outlet. A duct is in flow communication with the outlet. The duct includes a deconsolidator configured to fragment particle agglomerates received from the passage.

Sonwane, Chandrashekhar; Saunders, Timothy; Fitzsimmons, Mark Andrew

2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

116

I N F O R M A T I O N N O T E Use of Sewage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of sludge to land. Fourthly, sewage sludge is only one of several types of organic waste now being produced1 I N F O R M A T I O N N O T E Use of Sewage Sludges and Composts in Forestry J A N U A R Y 2 0 0 saw a large national research campaign to investigate the potential benefits of using sewage sludges

117

Volatile organic compound losses from sewage sludge-amended soils  

SciTech Connect

Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) applied to soil in sludge have been assumed to disappear quickly and completely. The VOC behavior in sludge-amended soils has been studied previously only in laboratory systems where the sludged soil has been spiked with compounds of interest. Behavior in these systems may not necessarily represent compound behavior in field soils to which contaminated sludge is added. A series of laboratory microcosm experiments were designed therefore to investigate the behavior of toluene, ethyl benzene, o-, m-, and p-xylene applied to soil in contaminated sludge, and factors influencing loss processes. The VOC loss from sludge-amended soil was well described by a simple one step pseudo-first-order model but in certain soils was better described by a two step first-order model. Volatilization was the predominant loss process. Rates of loss depended on sludge application rate, method of sludge application, soil properties, and on compound characteristics. Experiments indicated that spiking sludge-amended soils gave a reasonable indication of VOC loss rates from systems amended with contaminated sludge at least over a period of 23 d. The majority of VOCs applied to soils in sludge volatilizes quickly to the atmosphere over a few to 10s of days with a small fraction lost more slowly. Potential for VOC crop uptake, livestock ingestion, and contamination of ground water is low under routine, managed applications of sewage sludge to agricultural land.

Wilson, S.C.; Jones, K.C.

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Energy recovery from municipal solid waste and sewage sludge using multi-solid fluidized bed combustion technology  

SciTech Connect

This study was initiated to investigate the recovery of energy from municipal solid waste (MSW) and domestic sewage sludge (DSS) simultaneously by using Battelle's multi-solid fluidized-bed combustion (MS-FBC) technology. The concept was to recover energy as high and low pressure steam, simultaneously. High pressure steam would be generated from flue gas using a conventional tubular boiler. Low pressure steam would be generated by direct contact drying of DSS (as 4% solids) with hot sand in a fluidized bed that is an integral part of the MS-FBC process. It was proposed that high pressure steam could be used for district heating or electricity generation. The low pressure steam could be used for close proximity building heat. Alternatively, low pressure steam could be used to heat wastewater in a sewage treatment plant to enhance sedimentation and biological activity that would provide a captive market for this part of the recovered energy. The direct contact drying or tubeless steam generation eliminates fouling problems that are common during heat exchange with DSS. The MS-FBC process was originally developed for coal and was chosen for this investigation because its combustion rate is about three times that of conventional fluidized beds and it was projected to have the flexibility needed for accomplishing tubeless steam generation. The results of the investigation show that the MS-FBC process concept for the co-utilization of MSW and DSS is technically feasible and that the thermal efficiency of the process is 76 to 82% based on experiments conducted in a 70 to 85 lb/h pilot plant and calculations on three conceptual cases.

Not Available

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Crop and soil responses to sewage sludge applied to reclaimed prime farmland  

SciTech Connect

Improvements in reclamation of surface mined prime farmland may be obtained by adding sewage sludge to topsoil and subsoil. This prime farmland reclamation study was done in western Kentucky. The experiment was conducted to investigate effects of the sludge amendment to topsoil and subsoil on soil and crop responses. The experiment showed, in most cases at highest application rates, that the sludge addition significantly increased the soil organic matter, total N content, and available P levels. However, water holding capacity, CEC, and exchangeable cations were not significantly affected. Higher microbial populations and activates were also obtained. The wheat biomass, tiller number, tissue N, grain N, grain yield, and N removal in grain were well correlated with application rates of sewage sludge. Corn also responded positively to additions of sewage sludge. The corn ear-leaf N concentration, grain yield, and grain N removal increased with application rates of sewage sludge. Experiments indicated that topsoil and subsoil sewage sludge addition was beneficial practices in terms of increasing crop yield and improving some soil properties.

Zhai, Qiang; Barnhisel, R.I. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

120

Influence of sewage sludge from sludge beds of Ulan-Ude on the soil properties and the yield and quality of potatoes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The influence of sewage sludge from sludge beds of the city of Ulan-Ude ... was studied. It was shown that sewage sludge could be used both separately (15 t...

E. P. Pakhnenko; A. V. Ermakov; L. L. Ubugunov

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes sewage treatment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Effect of Cd-Enriched Sewage Sludge on Plant Growth, Nutrients and Heavy Metals Concentrations in the Soil–Plant System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from waste-activated sludge, Soil Sci. Soc. Am. J, 60:505-utilization of sewage sludge. A twenty-year study atCd-enriched sewage sludge (SS) and diammonium phosphate (

Rusan, Munir Mohammad; Athamneh, Bayan Mahmoud

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Thermal treatment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thermal treatment can be regarded as either a pre-treatment of waste prior to final disposal, or as a means of valorising waste by recovering energy. It includes both the burning of mixed MSW in municipal inciner...

Dr. P. White; Dr. M. Franke; P. Hindle

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Oxygen-enriched coincineration of MSW and sewage sludge: Final report  

SciTech Connect

Federal regulations banning ocean dumping of sewage sludge coupled with stricter regulations on the disposal of sewage sludge in landfills have forced municipalities, especially those in the northeast United States, to consider alternate methods for disposal of this solid waste. Coincineration of municipal solid waste (MSW) and sludge has proven to be economically attractive for both Europe and Japan, but has not yet proven to be a viable sludge disposal technology in the United States because of a history of operational problems in existing facilities. The most prevalent problem in coincinerating MSW and a dewatered sewage sludge (15 to 25% solids) is incomplete sludge combustion. Incomplete sludge combustion is primarily a function of sludge particle size, occurring when the surface of the sludge particle dries and hardens, while the inner mass is unaffected. This phenomenon is commonly referred to in the industry as the {open_quotes}hamburger effect.{close_quotes} In an effort to promote technology development in this area, Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. teamed with the US Department of Energy (DOE) through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to evaluate a new process being developed for the disposal of a dewatered sewage sludge, {open_quotes}Oxygen-Enriched Coincineration of MSW and Sewage Sludge.{close_quotes} This report provides a comprehensive summary of the pilot demonstration test program for oxygen-enriched coincineration of MSW and sewage sludge. This report describes the pilot test facility, instrumentation, and methods of data collection and data analyses; describes how the tests were executed; and discusses the test results. Recommendations for the future development of this technology in the current marketplace are also provided.

none,

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Acid dye removal from industrial wastewater by adsorption on treated sewage sludge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study investigated the suitability of sewage sludge for the removal of Acid Blue 93 industrial wastewater. Washed sewage sludge (WS) and sludge activated carbon (AS) were used as adsorbents. The effect of pH, contact time, adsorbent dose and adsorption temperature was studied. Equilibrium isotherms for the adsorption were analysed by Freundlich and Langmuir isotherm models. The pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second order, intra-particle diffusion and Bangham models were used to describe the adsorption kinetics. The results reveal that adsorption using AS show better results (removal 96.57%) than WS, while both adsorptions depended on pH, contact time and adsorbent dose.

M.N. Rashed

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Technical support document for the surface disposal of sewage sludge. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The document provides the technical background and justification for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) final regulation (40 CFR Part 503) covering the surface disposal of sewage sludge. The document summarizes current practices in land application and presents data supporting the risk assessment methodology used to derive human health and environmental risk-based limits for contaminants in sewage sludge placed on surface disposal sites. The management practices associated with surface disposal are outlined and the different pathways by which contaminants reach highly-exposed individuals (HEIs) through surface disposal are discussed.

Not Available

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Technical support document for land application of sewage sludge. Volume 1. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The document provides the technical background and justification for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) final regulation (40 CFR Part 503) covering the land application of sewage sludge. The document summarizes current practices in land application and presents data supporting the risk assessment methodology used to derive human health and environmental risk-based limits for contaminants in land applied sewage sludge. The management practices associated with land application are outlined and the different pathways by which contaminants reach highly-exposed individuals (HEIs) through land application are discussed.

Jones, A.; Beyer, L.; Rookwood, M.; Pacenka, J.; Bergin, J.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

The effect of sewage sludge on the physical properties of lignite overburden  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. 47:770-775. 24. Ryan, J. A. , 0. E. Keeney, and L. M. Walsh. 1973. Nitrogen transformation and availability of an anaerobically digested sewage sludge in soil. J. Environ. Qual. 2:489-492. 32 25. Soppec, W. E. , and S. Kerr. 1981. Revegetation... if water is to penetrate downward. A study using raw and digested sewage sludge added to a Beltsville silt loam soil at 5% by weight resulted in an increase in percent water stable aggregates with the addition of sludge (Epstein, 1975). After 175 days...

Cocke, Catherine Lynn

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Alteration of a Salt Marsh Bacterial Community by Fertilization with Sewage Sludge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...OF SEWAGE SLUDGE ON MARSH BACTERIA 923 35. Meany, R., I. Valiela, and...ofpollutants in American salt marshes, p. 357-366. In B. Gopal, R. E. Turner, R...limitation in salt marsh vegetation, p. 547-563. In R. J. Reimold and W...

Nancy V. Hamlett

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

NITROGEN REMOVAL FOR ON-SITE SEWAGE DISPOSAL: A RECIRCULATING SAND FILTER/ROCK TANK DESIGN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NITROGEN REMOVAL FOR ON-SITE SEWAGE DISPOSAL: A RECIRCULATING SAND FILTER/ROCK TANK DESIGN, C. G. McKiel ABSTRACT: The nitrogen removal abilities of recirculating sand filter/rock tank (RSF) systems and conventional septic tank/soil absorption trench systems were compared in a field laboratory

Gold, Art

130

Heavy metal balances of an Italian soil as affected by sewage sludge and Bordeaux mixture applications  

SciTech Connect

Applications of sewage sludge and Bordeaux mixture (Bm) (a mixture of copper sulfate and lime) add heavy metals to the soil. At an experimental farm in the Cremona district (Italy), the authors measured current heavy metal contents in soil and their removal via harvested products. They also measured heavy metal adsorption by soil from this farm. With these data, projections were made of the long-term development of heavy metal (Cd, Cu, and Zn) contents in soil, crop removal, and leaching at different application rates of sewage sludge and Bm. These projections were compared with existing quality standards of the European Union (EU) and Italy with regard to soil and groundwater. The calculations reveal that the permitted annual application rates of sewage sludge and Bm are likely to result in exceedance of groundwater and soil standards. Sewage sludge applications, complying with the Italian legal limits, may pose problems for Cd, Cu, and Zn within 30, 70, and 100 yr, respectively. Furthermore, severe Cu pollution of integrated and especially organic (Bm only) vineyards is unavoidable with the currently allowed application rates of Bm. The results suggest that the current Italian soil protection policy as well as the EU policy are not conducive of a sustainable heavy metal management in agroecosystems.

Moolenaar, S.W. [Wageningen Agricultural Univ. (Netherlands); Beltrami, P. [Univ. Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Piacenza (Italy)

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Organic contaminants in sewage sludge (biosolids) and their significance for agricultural recycling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...chemical industry was banned...a direct impact of POPs on...led to a new PNECsoil...possible impacts on soil...and, while emissions of chemicals...Document guidelines. For soil...agreement-risk reduction for nonylphenol...chemical supply industry and downstream...pollutants in German sewage sludges...Huyard 2001 Impact du futur...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Pathogenic Escherichia coli Found in Sewage Treatment Plants and Environmental Waters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Escobar-Paramo, P , et al. 2006. Identification of forces shaping the commensal Escherichia coli genetic...Spellman, FR . 1999. Spellman's standard handbook for wastewater operators-fundamental level, vol. 1 . Technomic Publishing Company...

E. M. Anastasi; B. Matthews; H. M. Stratton; M. Katouli

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Prevalence and Persistence of Escherichia coli Strains with Uropathogenic Virulence Characteristics in Sewage Treatment Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...and E. Denamur. 2006. Identification of forces shaping the commensal Escherichia coli genetic...Spellman, F. R. 1999. Spellmans standard handbook for wastewater operators: fundamental level, vol. 1. Technomic Publishing Company...

E. M. Anastasi; B. Matthews; A. Gundogdu; T. L. Vollmerhausen; N. L. Ramos; H. Stratton; W. Ahmed; M. Katouli

2010-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

134

Research of sludge compost maturity degree modeling method based on wavelet neural network for sewage treatment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Because of the complicated interaction of the sludge compost components, it makes the compost maturity degree judging system appear the nonlinearity and uncertainty. According to the physical circumstances of sludge compost, a compost maturity degree ...

Meijuan Gao; Jingwen Tian; Wei Jiang; Kai Li

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Sustainable Use of Resources Recycling of Sewage Treatment Plant Water in Concrete  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

industries have the environmental and societal responsibility to contribute to sustainable development. The concrete industry is a significant contributor to air pollution and also a consumer of vast quantities widely used construction material in the world. Production of portland cement used in concrete produces

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

136

Investigation of microalgae cultivation and anaerobic codigestion of algae and sewage sludge for wastewater treatment facilities.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The main goals of this research are to investigate the anaerobic digestibility of algae and to investigate the effects of growth media on the growth… (more)

Wang, Meng

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Electropositive Filter Membrane as an Alternative for the Elimination of PCR Inhibitors from Sewage and Water Samples  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...additional sample purification methods. Contamination of drinking water, recreational...additional DNA and RNA purification methods unnecessary...MATERIALS AND METHODS Water samples. Raw...genetics isolation & purification Sewage virology Water Pollution

A. P. S. Queiroz; F. M. Santos; A. Sassaroli; C. M. Hársi; T. A. Monezi; D. U. Mehnert

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Utilizing New Binder Materials for Green Building has Zero Waste by Recycling Slag and Sewage Sludge Ash  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

binding material to save energy and to produce new innovative zero materials waste . The current research aims to investigate new binder materials as alternative of Portland cement. Alkali activated slag (AAS) blended with sewage sludge ash (SSA...

Zeedan, S. R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Biological hydrogen production by anaerobic digestion of food waste and sewage sludge treated using various pretreatment technologies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to enhance the efficiency of anaerobic co-digestion with sewage sludge using pretreatment technologies and food waste. We studied the effects of various pretreatment methods (thermal...

Seungjin Kim; Kwangkeun Choi; Jong-Oh Kim; Jinwook Chung

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Land application and distribution and marketing of sewage sludge: technical support document  

SciTech Connect

This document provides the technical background and justification for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) proposed regulation (40 CFR Part 503) covering the land application and distribution and marketing of sewage sludge. The document summarizes current practices in land application and presents data supporting the risk-assessment methodology used to derive human health and environmental risk-based limits for contaminants in land-applied sewage sludge. The underlying assumptions of the methodology, embodied in a series of computer models, are discussed, and the risk-based contaminant limits derived by the models are presented. The three management practices associated with land application are outlined, and the twelve different pathways by which contaminants reach most-exposed individuals through land application are discussed.

Not Available

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes sewage treatment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

K-Area and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Sites groundwater monitoring report: Second quarter 1993  

SciTech Connect

During second quarter 1993, samples from the three monitoring wells at the K-Area site (KSS series) and the three monitoring wells at the Par Pond site (PSS series) were analyzed for constituents required by South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Construction Permit 13,173 and for other constituents as part of the Savannah River Site (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. This report describes monitoring results that exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or the SRS flagging criteria. During second quarter 1993, no constituents exceeded the final PDWS or any other flagging criteria at the K-Area and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Sites. During first quarter 1993, aluminum and iron exceeded the SRS Flag 2 criteria in one or more of the KSS and the PSS wells. These constituents were not analyzed second quarter 1993. In the KSS well series, the field measurement for alkalinity ranged as high as 35 mg/L in well KSS 1D. Alkalinity measurements were zero in the PSS wells, except for a single measurement of 1 mg/L in well PSS 1D. Historical and current water-level elevations at the K-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site indicate that the groundwater flow direction is south to southwest (SRS grid coordinates). The groundwater flow direction at the Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Site could not be determined second quarter 1993.

Not Available

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Meals included in Conference Registrations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Meals included in Conference Registrations Meals included as part of the cost of a conference the most reasonable rates are obtained. Deluxe hotels and motels should be avoided. GSA rates have been for Georgia high cost areas. 75% of these amounts would be $21 for non- high cost areas and $27 for high cost

Arnold, Jonathan

143

Effects of Adding Sewage Sludge and Urea-Phosphate Fertilizers to the Great Sippewissett Salt Marsh, Falmouth, MA on Heavy Metals and Microbial N-Cycling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effects of Adding Sewage Sludge and Urea-Phosphate Fertilizers to the Great Sippewissett Salt Marsh in sludge form. Metals were not found to inhibit nitrification nor denitrification. Neither fertilizer nor, microbes, nitrogen cycle, sewage sludge, urea phosphate fertilizer, heavy metals INTRODUCTION Pollution

Vallino, Joseph J.

144

ABSTRACT: Farms that once spread only manures are now also applying sewage biosolids (sludge) and/or other wastes such as  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ABSTRACT: Farms that once spread only manures are now also applying sewage biosolids (sludge) and streamwater concentrations in most cases. (KEY TERMS: nonpoint source pollution; sludge; waste such as food processing wastes and sewage biosolids (sludge). A concurrent trend in agriculture is the con

Walter, M.Todd

145

Banat's Journal of Biotechnology, 2014, 9, doi: 10.7904/20684738V(9)86 Transfert heavy metal sewage sludge as fertilizer from soil to ray  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sewage sludge as fertilizer from soil to ray grass Najla Lassoued(1), Mohamed Naceur Khelil(2), Saloua de physiologie, Université de Lausanne-CHUV, Lausanne, Suisse. Abstract. The land application of sewage sludge reveals a significant increase in the dray matter production of Ray Grass. In equivalent

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

146

BPA and phthalate fate in a sewage network and an elementary river of France. Influence of hydroclimatic conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Our purpose was to characterize the fate of bisphenol A (BPA) and phthalate contamination simultaneously in a sewage network and a watercourse, in relation with hydrological and climatic conditions. An elementary catchment of the Seine basin, receiving effluents from a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP), was chosen because of its basic hydrological features. BPA and DEHP concentrations in the WWTP inputs were 4 and 33 ?g L?1 whereas in the outputs, they were only 0.4 and 2 ?g L?1, respectively. Contaminant ratios in the suspended sediment phase of the WWTP inputs ranged from 0.5% to 88%, related to their molecular properties. BPA and phthalates were effectively removed in the WWTP (>90% for both compounds), by degradation and decantation. Upstream of the discharge, river concentrations ranged from 0.002 to 0.175 ?g L?1 for BPA and from 0.16 to 0.90 ?g L?1 for DEHP. Downstream from the WWTP outputs, concentrations ranged from 0.11 to 0.79 ?g L?1 for BPA and from 0.31 ?g L?1 to 1.7 ?g L?1 for DEHP: the WWTP discharge led to contaminant increases of 3.8 and 2 times, respectively. Far downstream, concentrations were lower ranging from 0.11 to 0.19 ?g L?1 for BPA and from 0.36 ?g L?1 to 1.1 ?g L?1 for DEHP. BPA and phthalates displayed opposite seasonal variations with a decrease for the first one and an increase for the second one during summer. BPA contamination in the Charmoise river derived mainly from the WWTP, while phthalate contamination was attributed to both WWTP discharges and diffuse sources such as atmospheric bulk deposition.

Bich Chau Tran; Marie Jeanne Teil; Martine Blanchard; Fabrice Alliot; Marc Chevreuil

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Molybdenum uptake by forage crops grown on sewage sludge -- Amended soils in the field and greenhouse  

SciTech Connect

Molybdenum (Mo) is a plant-available element in soils that can adversely affect the health of farm animals. There is a need for more information on its uptake into forage crops from waste materials, such as sewage sludge, applied to agricultural land. Field and greenhouse experiments with several crops grown on long-term sewage sludge-amended soils as well as soils recently amended with dewatered (DW) and alkaline-stabilized (ALK) sludges indicated that Mo supplied from sludge is readily taken up by legumes in particular. Excessive uptake into red clover (Trifolium pratense L.) was seen in a soil that had been heavily amended with sewage sludge 20 yr earlier, where the soil contained about 3 mg Mo/kg soil, three times the background soil concentration. The greenhouse and field studies indicated that Mo can have a long residual availability in sludge-amended soils. The effect of sludge application was to decrease Cu to Mo ratios in legume forages, canola (Brassica napus var. napus) and soybeans [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] below the recommended limit of 2:1 for ruminant diets, a consequence of high bioavailability of Mo and low uptake of Cu added in sludge. Molybdenum uptake coefficients (UCs) for ALK sludge were higher than for DW sludge, presumably due to the greater solubility of Mo measured in the more alkaline sludges and soils. Based on these UCs, it is tentatively recommended that cumulative Mo loadings on forages grown on nonacid soils should not exceed 1.0 kg/ha from ALK sludge or 4.0 kg/ha from DW sludge.

McBride, M.B.; Richards, B.K.; Steenhuis, T.; Spiers, G.

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Removal of hydrogen sulphide on sewage sludge/industrial sludge based carbonaceous adsorbents  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The adsorbents were prepared for sewage sludge, waste oil sludge and metal oil sludge. On the materials obtained dynamic adsorption of H2S was measured. The initial and exhausted adsorbents were characterised using sorption of nitrogen, thermal analysis, and XRF, XRD and surface pH measurements. The adsorbents have high capacity for H2S (10% wt) The high volume of mesopores contributes significantly to reactive adsorption and provides space to store sulphur as the oxidation product. The highly dispersed mineral-like phase formed during pyrolysis provides basicity and catalytic centres for hydrogen sulphide dissociation and its oxidation to sulphur.

Teresa J. Bandosz

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Thermal sludge dryer demonstration: Bird Island Wastewater Treatment Plant, Buffalo, NY. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Buffalo Sewer Authority (BSA), in cooperation with the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (Energy Authority), commissioned a demonstration of a full scale indirect disk-type sludge dryer at the Bird Island Wastewater Treatment Plant (BIWWTP). The purpose of the project was to determine the effects of the sludge dryer on the sludge incineration process at the facility. Sludge incineration is traditionally the most expensive, energy-intensive unit process involving solids handling at wastewater treatment plants; costs for incineration at the BIWWTP have averaged $2.4 million per year. In the conventional method of processing solids, a series of volume reduction measures, which usually includes thickening, digestion, and mechanical dewatering, is employed prior to incineration. Usually, a high level of moisture is still present within sewage sludge following mechanical dewatering. The sludge dryer system thermally dewaters wastewater sludge to approximately 26%, (and as high as 38%) dry solids content prior to incineration. The thermal dewatering system at the BIWWTP has demonstrated that it meets its design requirements. It has the potential to provide significant energy and other cost savings by allowing the BSA to change from an operation employing two incinerators to a single incinerator mode. While the long-term reliability of the thermal dewatering system has yet to be established, this project has demonstrated that installation of such a system in an existing treatment plant can provide the owner with significant operating cost savings.

NONE

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

TEX-A-SYST: Reducing the Risk of Ground Water Contamination by Improving Household Wastewater Treatment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. This publication covers the following topics: 1. Septic tanks/soil absorption systems 2. Quantity of wastewater 3. Quality of wastewater 4. Collection of wastewater 5. Treatment systems 6. Disposal system 7. Assistance with failing systems or new designs 8.... Evaluation table Septic Tanks/Soil Absorption Systems The most common form of on-site waste- water treatment is a septic tank/soil absorption system. In this system, wastewater flows from the household sewage lines into an under- ground septic tank...

Harris, Bill L.; Hoffman, D.; Mazac Jr., F. J.

1997-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

151

An assessment of methyl mercury and volatile mercury in land-applied sewage sludge  

SciTech Connect

In 1993, the US Environmental Protection Agency issued regulations covering the land-application of municipal sewage sludge. These regulations established maximum pollutant concentrations and were based upon a risk assessment of human exposure. Mercury, assumed to be inorganic and non-volatile, was one pollutant evaluated. From April, 1995 through February, 1996, the authors studied the species of mercury contaminating municipal sludge applied to land, and the potential for volatilization of mercury from land-applied sludge. Methyl mercury was found at 0.1% of total mercury concentrations and was emitted from land-applied sludge to the atmosphere. Elemental mercury (Hg) was formed in land-applied sludge via the reduction of oxidized mercury and was also emitted to the atmosphere. Hg emission from land-applied sludge was significantly elevated over background soil emission. Methyl mercury is more toxic and more highly bioaccumulated than inorganic mercury, and warrants assessment considering these special criteria. Additionally, mercury emission from sludge-amended soil may lead to the contamination of other environmental media with significant concentrations of the metal. Although these pathways were not evaluated in the regulatory risk assessment, they are an important consideration for evaluating the risks from mercury in land-applied sludge. This presentation will summarize the results of a re-assessment of US EPA regulations regarding the land-application of municipal sewage sludge using data on methyl mercury toxicity and mercury transport in the atmosphere.

Carpi, A. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States); Lindberg, S.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

152

Sponsorship includes: Agriculture in the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sponsorship includes: · Agriculture in the Classroom · Douglas County Farm Bureau · Gifford Farm · University of Nebraska Agricultural Research and Development Center · University of Nebraska- Lincoln Awareness Coalition is to help youth, primarily from urban communities, become aware of agriculture

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

153

Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 230: Area 22 Sewage Lagoons and Corrective Action Unit 320: Area 22 Desert Rock Airport Strainer Box, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. 0  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Decision Document identifies and rationalizes the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's selection of a recommended corrective action alternative (CAA) appropriate to facilitate the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 230, Area 22 Sewage Lagoons, and CAU 320, Area 22 Desert Rock Airport Strainer Box, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Referred to as CAU 230/320, both CAUs are located at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and comprise two Corrective Action Sites (CASs), 22-03-01 (Sewage Lagoons) and 22-99-01 (Strainer Box). The Area 22 Sewage Lagoons site also includes a buried Imhoff Tank, sludge bed, and associated sewer piping. A September 1999 corrective action investigation identified the only contaminant of concern above preliminary action levels at this CAU (i.e., total petroleum hydrocarbons as diesel-range organics). During this same investigation, three Corrective Action Objectives (CAOs) were identified to prevent or mitigate exposure to subsurface debris and contaminated soil. Based on these CAOs, a review of existing data, future use, and current operations in Area 22 of the NTS, three CAAs were developed for consideration: Alternative 1 - No Further Action, Alternative 2 - Closure in Place with Administrative Controls, and Alternative 3 - Excavation and Removal. These alternatives were evaluated based on four general corrective action standards and five remedy selection decision factors. Alternative 3 was chosen on technical merit as the preferred alternative for CAU 230/320. This alternative was judged to meet all applicable state and federal regulations for closure of the site and will eliminate potential future exposure pathways to the buried debris and contaminated soils at both of the CASs within Area 22.

U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office

2000-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

154

Effect of sewage sludge content on gas quality and solid residues produced by cogasification in an updraft gasifier  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cogasification of sewage sludge with wood pellets in updraft gasifier was analysed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effects of sewage sludge content on the gasification process were examined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sewage sludge addition up to 30 wt.% reduces moderately the process performance. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer At high sewage sludge content slagging and clinker formation occurred. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Solid residues produced resulted acceptable at landfills for non-hazardous waste. - Abstract: In the present work, the gasification with air of dehydrated sewage sludge (SS) with 20 wt.% moisture mixed with conventional woody biomass was investigated using a pilot fixed-bed updraft gasifier. Attention was focused on the effect of the SS content on the gasification performance and on the environmental impact of the process. The results showed that it is possible to co-gasify SS with wood pellets (WPs) in updraft fixed-bed gasification installations. However, at high content of sewage sludge the gasification process can become instable because of the very high ash content and low ash fusion temperatures of SS. At an equivalent ratio of 0.25, compared with wood pellets gasification, the addition of sewage sludge led to a reduction of gas yield in favor of an increase of condensate production with consequent cold gas efficiency decrease. Low concentrations of dioxins/furans and PAHs were measured in the gas produced by SS gasification, well below the limiting values for the exhaust gaseous emissions. NH{sub 3}, HCl and HF contents were very low because most of these compounds were retained in the wet scrubber systems. On the other hand, high H{sub 2}S levels were measured due to high sulfur content of SS. Heavy metals supplied with the feedstocks were mostly retained in gasification solid residues. The leachability tests performed according to European regulations showed that metals leachability was within the limits for landfilling inert residues. On the other hand, sulfate and chloride releases were found to comply with the limits for non-hazardous residues.

Seggiani, Maurizia, E-mail: m.seggiani@diccism.unipi.it [Department of Chemical Engineering, Industrial Chemistry and Material Science, University of Pisa, Largo Lucio Lazzarino 1, 56126 Pisa (Italy); Puccini, Monica, E-mail: m.puccini@diccism.unipi.it [Department of Chemical Engineering, Industrial Chemistry and Material Science, University of Pisa, Largo Lucio Lazzarino 1, 56126 Pisa (Italy); Raggio, Giovanni, E-mail: g.raggio@tiscali.it [Italprogetti Engineering SPA, Lungarno Pacinotti, 59/A, 56020 San Romano (Pisa) (Italy); Vitolo, Sandra, E-mail: s.vitolo@diccism.unipi.it [Department of Chemical Engineering, Industrial Chemistry and Material Science, University of Pisa, Largo Lucio Lazzarino 1, 56126 Pisa (Italy)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

155

Appendix F Cultural Resources, Including  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Appendix F Appendix F Cultural Resources, Including Section 106 Consultation STATE OF CALIFORNIA - THE RESOURCES AGENCY EDMUND G. BROWN, JR., Governor OFFICE OF HISTORIC PRESERVATION DEPARTMENT OF PARKS AND RECREATION 1725 23 rd Street, Suite 100 SACRAMENTO, CA 95816-7100 (916) 445-7000 Fax: (916) 445-7053 calshpo@parks.ca.gov www.ohp.parks.ca.gov June 14, 2011 Reply in Reference To: DOE110407A Angela Colamaria Loan Programs Office Environmental Compliance Division Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave SW, LP-10 Washington, DC 20585 Re: Topaz Solar Farm, San Luis Obispo County, California Dear Ms. Colamaria: Thank you for seeking my consultation regarding the above noted undertaking. Pursuant to 36 CFR Part 800 (as amended 8-05-04) regulations implementing Section

156

Countries Gasoline Prices Including Taxes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Countries (U.S. dollars per gallon, including taxes) Countries (U.S. dollars per gallon, including taxes) Date Belgium France Germany Italy Netherlands UK US 01/13/14 7.83 7.76 7.90 8.91 8.76 8.11 3.68 01/06/14 8.00 7.78 7.94 8.92 8.74 8.09 3.69 12/30/13 NA NA NA NA NA NA 3.68 12/23/13 NA NA NA NA NA NA 3.63 12/16/13 7.86 7.79 8.05 9.00 8.78 8.08 3.61 12/9/13 7.95 7.81 8.14 8.99 8.80 8.12 3.63 12/2/13 7.91 7.68 8.07 8.85 8.68 8.08 3.64 11/25/13 7.69 7.61 8.07 8.77 8.63 7.97 3.65 11/18/13 7.99 7.54 8.00 8.70 8.57 7.92 3.57 11/11/13 7.63 7.44 7.79 8.63 8.46 7.85 3.55 11/4/13 7.70 7.51 7.98 8.70 8.59 7.86 3.61 10/28/13 8.02 7.74 8.08 8.96 8.79 8.04 3.64 10/21/13 7.91 7.71 8.11 8.94 8.80 8.05 3.70 10/14/13 7.88 7.62 8.05 8.87 8.74 7.97 3.69

157

Removal of copper and lead ions from aqueous solutions by adsorbent derived from sewage sludge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Adsorbent prepared from sewage sludge has been used for the adsorption of Cu2+ and Pb2+ from aqueous solutions. It was noted that an increase in removal efficiency achieved 72% and 56% when agitation time achieved 120 min, and a decrease in the removal efficiency from 81% and 70% to 36% and 40% when the heavy metals initial concentration from 10 mg L?1 to 80 mg L?1 for Cu2+ and Pb2+ concentration, the removal efficiency increased with the adsorbent concentration increased. The Langmuir model fitted the experimental data reasonably well. The adsorption capacities achieved 9.737 mg g?1 and 7.386 mg g?1 for the Cu2+ and Pb2+, respectively. Desorption studies were performed by using dilute hydrochloric acid. Quantitative recovery of the metal ion is possible. The mechanism of adsorption seems to be ion exchange.

YunBo Zhai; GuangMing Zeng; LaFang Wang; XianXun Wei; CaiTing Li; ShanHong Li

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Use of Municipal Sewage Sludge for Improvement of Forest Sites in the Southeast  

SciTech Connect

In eight field experiments dried municipal sewage sludge was applied to forest sites before planting of seedlings. In all cases, tree growth was faster on sludge-amended plots than on plots that received fertilizer and lime or no amendment. In all studies, concentrations of total nitrogen in the soil were higher on sludge plots than on control or fertilizer plots, even on good forest sites. In seven of the eight studies, concentrations of phosphorus also were higher on sludge plots than on control or fertilizer plots. Nitrogen and phosphorus tended to be higher in foliage from trees growing on sludge plots. Deep subsoiling was beneficial regardless of soil amendment. Where weeds were plentiful at the outset, they became serious competitors on plots receiving sludge.

Charles R. Berry

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Evaluation of sewage source and fate on southeast Florida coastal reefs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Water, sponge and coral samples were collected from stations impacted by a variety of pollution sources and screened for human enteric viruses as conservative markers for human sewage. While human enteroviruses and adenoviruses were not detected, noroviruses (NoV; human genogroups I and II) were detected in 31% of samples (especially in sponge tissue). Stations near inlets were the only ones to show multiple sample types positive for NoV. Fecal indicator bacteria and enteric viruses were further evaluated at multiple inlet stations on an outgoing tide. Greatest indicator concentrations and highest prevalence of viruses were found at the mouth of the inlet and offshore in the inlet plume. Results suggest that inlets moving large volumes of water into the coastal zone with tides may be an important source of fecal contaminants. Efforts to reduce run-off or unintended release of water into the Intracoastal Waterway may lower contaminants entering sensitive coastal areas.

J. Carrie Futch; Dale W. Griffin; Kenneth Banks; Erin K. Lipp

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Urban Sewage Delivery Heat Transfer System (1): Flow Resistance and Energy Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

? Specific Resistance?s 2/m6? Diameter?mm? Specific Resistance?s 2/m6? Diameter?mm? Specific Resistance?s 2/m6? 10 77392033.96 125 118.87 400 0.249907 15 9024280.53 150 45.23 450 0.133866 20 1964433.28 175 19.98 500 0.076587 25 602024... pipe and the old cast iron pipe. It is 0.30 0.021 z d? = (6) (1.2/um> )s Defined the ratio of flow resistance of mediate water and sewage is zHw, the ratio of the flux is wz,and the ratio of velocity is z wUr u u= , supposed the inside...

Zhang, C.; Wu, R.; Li, G.; Li, X.; Huang, L.; Sun, D.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes sewage treatment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Geotechnical investigation of sewage wastewater disposal sites and use of GIS land use maps to assess environmental hazards: Sohag, upper Egypt  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Land application is the only currently available technique for sewage wastewater disposal along the Nile Valley in Upper Egypt. Wastewater disposal projects have been established in the lowland desert zone ext...

Ahmed M. Youssef; Adly A. Omer; Mohamed S. Ibrahim…

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

International Best Practices for Pre-Processing and Co-Processing Municipal Solid Waste and Sewage Sludge in the Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

least two seconds. ” The waste heat from the co-processingis drawn from the waste heat of the associated cementSewage sludge drying using waste heat from cement plant flue

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Feasibility study for alternate fuels production: unconventional natural gas from wastewater treatment plants. Volume II, Appendix D. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Data are presented from a study performed to determined the feasibility of recovering methane from sewage at a typical biological secondary wastewater treatment plant. Three tasks are involved: optimization of digester gas; digester gas scrubbing; and application to the East Bay Municipal Utility District water pollution control plant. Results indicate that excess digester gas can be used economically at the wastewater treatment plant and that distribution and scrubbing can be complex and costly. (DMC) 193 references, 93 figures, 26 tables.

Overly, P.; Tawiah, K.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

E-Print Network 3.0 - activated sewage sludge Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

University Collection: Geosciences ; Environmental Sciences and Ecology 66 Advanced Wastewater Treatment Processes Summary: Treatment Plant Conventional Activated Sludge Process...

165

E-Print Network 3.0 - alginate scaffold including Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

created through a three step process which included: treatment... ; and exposure to a CaCl2 to crosslink the alginate sheets. Process variables included volume and concentra-...

166

Development of a Web-Based, Emissions Reduction Calculator for Storm Water/Infiltration Sanitary Sewage Separation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ICEBO2006, Shenzhen, China 1 DEVELOPMENT OF A WEB-BASED, EMISSIONS REDUCTION CALCULATOR FOR STORM WATER/INFILTRATION SANITARY SEWAGE SEPARATION Zi Liu, Ph.D. Research Engineer Energy Systems Laboratory Charles Culp, Ph.D., P.... Professor Department of Civil Engineering Bahman Yazdani, P.E., CEM. Assc. Director Energy Systems Laboratory Texas A&M University ABSTRACT This paper presents the procedures developed to calculate the electricity savings and emissions...

Liu, Z.; Haberl, J. S.; Brumbelow, K.; Culp, C.; Gilman, D.; Yazdani, B.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Sewage Sludge as a Biomass Resource for the Production of Energy: Overview and Assessment of the Various Options  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Sewage Sludge as a Biomass Resource for the Production of Energy: Overview and Assessment of the Various Options† ... This effort simultaneously proceeded with an enforcement of the industry and households to reduce or eliminate the discharge of toxic pollutants into the sewer. ... A lot of effort has been put into the manufacturing of valuable products by thermal solidification of the inorganic sludge compounds, especially in Japan. ...

Wim Rulkens

2007-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

168

Sewage sludge application in a plantation: Effects on trace metal transfer in soil–plant–snail continuum  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract We studied the potential bioaccumulation of Cu, Zn, Pb and Cd by the snail Cantareus aspersus and evaluated the risk of leaching after application of sewage sludge to forest plantation ecosystems. Sewage sludge was applied to the soil surface at two loading rates (0, and 6 tons ha? 1 in dry matter) without incorporation into the soil so as to identify the sources of trace metal contamination in soil and plants and to evaluate effects on snail growth. The results indicated a snail mortality rate of less than 1% during the experiment, while their dry weight decreased significantly (sludge over the exposure period considered. Additions of sewage sludge led to higher levels of trace metals in forest litter compared to control subplots, but similar trace metal concentrations were observed in sampling plants. Bioaccumulation study demonstrated that Zn had not accumulated in snails compared to Cu which accumulated only after 28 days of exposure to amended subplots. However, Pb and Cd contents in snails increased significantly after 14 and 28 days of exposure in both the control and amended subplots. At the last sampling date, in comparison to controls the Cd increase was higher in snails exposed to amended subplots. Thus, sludge spread therefore appears to be responsible for the observed bioaccumulation for Cu and Cd after 28 days of exposure. Concerning Pb accumulation, the results from litter–soil–plant compartments suggest that soil is this metal's best transfer source.

Mohamed Bourioug; Frédéric Gimbert; Laurence Alaoui-Sehmer; Mohammed Benbrahim; Lotfi Aleya; Badr Alaoui-Sossé

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Application of sewage sludge to non-agricultural ecosystems: Assessment of contaminant risks to wildlife  

SciTech Connect

This report is part of a larger study evaluating nutrient and contaminant impacts associated with the land application of biosolids in four non-agricultural ecosystems: Pacific Northwest forests, semi-arid rangelands, eastern deciduous forests, and southeasternpine plantations. Because contaminants in biosolids may be taken up by biota and transferred through the food web, they may present a risk to wildlife. Biosolids application scenarios that reflect actual practices in each ecosystem were developed. Concentrations of contaminants in biosolids were obtained from the US EPA`s 1988 National Sewage Sludge Survey. Soil-biota uptake factors for contaminants in sludge were developed from contaminant studies performed in each ecosystem type. Where ecosystem-specific data were unavailable, more generalized factors were used. Endpoints were selected that reflected species expected to be present in each ecosystem. Four trophic groups were considered: herbivores (e.g., deer) vermivores (earthworm-consumers; e.g., shrews), insectivores (e.g., songbirds), and carnivores (e.g., fox). Contaminant concentrations in wildlife foods were estimated using the uptake factors. These estimates were then incorporated into models to estimate the contaminant exposure for endpoints in each trophic group in each ecosystem. Exposure estimates were then compared to NOAELs and LOAELs to determine the nature and magnitude of risks that biosolids may present to wildlife.

Sample, B.E.; Efroymson, R.A.; Barnthouse, L.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.; Daniel, F.B. [Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH (United States). Office of Research and Development

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

170

Carbon and Water Resource Management for Water Distribution Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

wastewater transmission and sewage treatment. Distribution pumping and sewage treatment were found to contribute the most to climate change

Hendrickson, Thomas Peter

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Environmental and plant effects of sewage sludge application to forests and pastures  

SciTech Connect

Digested sewage sludge was applied to pastures and tree plantations at 19 to 44 Mg/ha (dry weight) as part of a municipal sludge disposal program. The sludge had low concentrations of heavy metals and traces of /sup 137/Cs and /sup 60/Co. Monitoring of soils, soil solutions, and runoff indicated that N, P, heavy metals, and radionuclides were largely retained in the upper 15cm of the soil. Soil solutions had elevated NO/sub 3//sup /minus// concentrations often >100 mg/L, but no significant increases in groundwater NO/sub 3//sup /minus// were found during the first year. Runoff from active sites had elevated concentrations of NO/sub 3//sup /minus// (20--30 mg/L), soluble P (1 mg/L), BOD/sub 5/ (5--30 mg/L), and fecal coliform (up to 14,000 colonies per 100 ml), not unlike runoff from pastures with cattle. Enrichment of organic N (2 times), available (inorganic) N (5 to 10 times), and Bray-P in the upper soils persisted for several years following sludge application. Sludge increased vegetation N concentrations from 1.5% to 2.3% and P concentrations from 0.16% to 0.31%. With the exception of Zn, heavy metals did not accumulate substantially in the vegetation. The sludge addition increased the survival and growth of sycamore (Platanus occidentalis L.). For a loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) plantation future growth improvements are expected based on elevated foliar N concentrations. 37 refs., 3 figs., 7 tabs.

Van Miegroet, H.; Boston, H.L.; Johnson, D.W.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Carbon sequestration potential of green roofs using mixed-sewage-sludge substrate in Chengdu World Modern Garden City  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Green roofs which use sewage sludge to sequestrate urban carbon dioxide may represent a potential opportunity to evaluate carbon sequestration benefits for the urban development under increasing global climate change. In this study, green roofs composed of 6 small green segments with two different substrates, mixed-sewage-sludge substrate (MSSS, volume ratio of sewage sludge and local-natural soil 1:1), and local-natural soil (LNS), three different substrate depths (20 cm, 25 cm and 30 cm), and three types of native plants (Ligustrum vicaryi, Neottia auriculata, and Liriope spicata) in Chengdu City were established to determine carbon sequestration from July 2012 to July 2013 through assessment of the carbon storage and sequestration. Results show that the average carbon storage of MSSS and LNS on green roofs was respectively 13.15 kg C m?2 and 8.58 kg C m?2, and the average carbon sequestration followed the order of LNS (3.89 kg C m?2 yr?1) > MSSS (3.81 kg C m?2 yr?1). Thus MSSS could be considered as a potential material for carbon sequestration. The carbon storage and carbon sequestration by native plants on the green roofs followed the order of L. vicaryi > L. spicata > N. auriculata. The whole green roof had a mean carbon storage of 18.28 kg C m?2 and average carbon sequestration of 6.47 kg C m?2 yr?1 in the combined biomass and substrate organic matter. The best green roof configuration was L. vicaryi together with MSSS substrate, with a middle-high level of carbon sequestration. It will be feasible and worthwhile to scale-up the adaptable green roof configurations in Chengdu World Modern Garden City.

Hongbing Luo; Xiaoling Liu; Bruce C. Anderson; Ke Zhang; Xiaoting Li; Bo Huang; Mei Li; You Mo; Liangqian Fan; Qiong Shen; Fenghui Chen; Mingshu Jiang

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Fixation and partitioning of heavy metals in slag after incineration of sewage sludge  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The contents and partitioning of HMs in slag of sludge incineration were examined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The fixation rate decreases with residential time and finally keeps a constant. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Water mass fraction of 55% is optimal for the sediment for Ni, Mn, Zn, Cu and Cr. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Water mass fraction of 75% is optimal for the sediment for Pb. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We found higher temperature versus lower non-residual fraction except that of Pb. - Abstract: Fixation of heavy metals in the slag produced during incineration of sewage sludge will reduce emission of the metals to the atmosphere and make the incineration process more environmentally friendly. The effects of incineration conditions (incineration temperature 500-1100 Degree-Sign C, furnace residence time 0-60 min, mass fraction of water in the sludge 0-75%) on the fixation rates and species partitioning of Cd, Pb, Cr, Cu, Zn, Mn and Ni in slag were investigated. When the incineration temperature was increased from 500 to 1100 Degree-Sign C, the fixation rate of Cd decreased from 87% to 49%, while the fixation rates of Cu and Mn were stable. The maximum fixation rates for Pb and Zn and for Ni and Cr were reached at 900 and 1100 Degree-Sign C, respectively. The fixation rates of Cu, Ni, Cd, Cr and Zn decreased as the residence time increased. With a 20 min residence time, the fixation rates of Pb and Mn were low. The maximum fixation rates of Ni, Mn, Zn, Cu and Cr were achieved when the mass fraction of water in the sludge was 55%. The fixation rate of Cd decreased as the water mass fraction increased, while the fixation rate of Pb increased. Partitioning analysis of the metals contained in the slag showed that increasing the incineration temperature and residence time promoted complete oxidation of the metals. This reduced the non-residual fractions of the metals, which would lower the bioavailability of the metals. The mass fraction of water in the sludge had little effect on the partitioning of the metals. Correlation analysis indicated that the fixation rates of heavy metals in the sludge and the forms of heavy metals in the incinerator slag could be controlled by optimization of the incineration conditions. These results show how the bioavailability of the metals can be reduced for environmentally friendly disposal of the incinerator slag.

Chen Tao [State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100082 (China); Yan Bo, E-mail: yanbo2007@gig.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

174

Effects of land disposal of municipal sewage sludge on soil, streambed sediment, and ground- and surface-water quality at a site near Denver, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

The report describes the effects of burial and land application of municipal sewage sludge on soil and streambed sediment and water quality in the underlying aquifers and surface water within and around the Lowry sewage-sludge-disposal area. The existing ground-water observation-well network at the disposal area was expanded for the study. Surface-water-sampling sites were selected so that runoff could be sampled from intense rainstorms or snowmelt. The sampling frequency for ground-water and surface-water runoff was changed from yearly to quarterly, and soil samples were collected. Four years of data were collected from 1984 to 1987 during the expanded monitoring program at the Lowry sewage-sludge-disposal area. These data, in addition to the data collected by the U.S. Geological Survey from 1981 to 1983, were used to determine effects of sewage-sludge-disposal on soil and streambed sediment and surface- and ground-water quality at the disposal area.

Gaggiani, N.G.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Enhanced photodegradation of pentachlorophenol in a soil washing system under solar irradiation with TiO2 nanorods combined with municipal sewage sludge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A novel remediation method for soil contaminated with hydrophobic chlorinated aromatic pollutants (HCAPs) was developed using TiO2 nanorods combined with municipal sewage sludge in surfactant solution. The target contaminant washed into surfactant solution from polluted soil can be rapidly removed under natural sunlight irradiation. The photocatalyst synthesized by TiO2 combined with municipal sewage sludge by a hydrothermal process shows excellent ability in this situation. The TiO2 nanorods appear on the surface of municipal sewage sludge, which offers a new way of solving waste municipal sewage sludge disposal problem and of producing high-activity photocatalyst. The nanocomposite was characterized by SEM, X-ray diffraction, and UV–Vis DRS. Results showed that the new nanocomposite was better than the original TiO2 catalyst. Using the proposed method in this study, the target contaminant can be removed by up to 97% after 30 min of irradiation in natural sunlight, whereas the surfactant loss was only 27%.

Zeyu Zhou; Yaxin Zhang; Hongtao Wang; Tan Chen; Wenjing Lu

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Risk of communicable disease infection associated with wastewater irrigation in agricultural settlements  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Strong wastewater treatment measures, including...AEROSOLS EMITTED BY SEWAGE TREATMENT PLANTS, SCIENCE 169 : 1218...MICROORGANISMS FROM WASTEWATER TREATMENT PROCESSES .1. SUMMARY...of the major water masses that affect this region...

E Katzenelson; I Buium; HI Shuval

1976-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

177

Net Taxable Gasoline Gallons (Including Aviation Gasoline)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Net Taxable Gasoline Gallons (Including Aviation Gasoline) Period 2000 2001 (2) 2002 2003 2004 "gross" to "net" , was deemed impractical. (5) This report replaces the Gross Taxable Gasoline Gallons (Including Aviation Gasoline) report which will not be produced after December 2002. (6) The November 2007

178

NOx, FINE PARTICLE AND TOXIC METAL EMISSIONS FROM THE COMBUSTION OF SEWAGE SLUDGE/COAL MIXTURES: A SYSTEMATIC ASSESSMENT  

SciTech Connect

This research project focuses on pollutants from the combustion of mixtures of dried municipal sewage sludge (MSS) and coal. The objective is to determine the relationship between (1) fraction sludge in the sludge/coal mixture, and (2) combustion conditions on (a) NO{sub x} concentrations in the exhaust, (b) the size segregated fine and ultra-fine particle composition in the exhaust, and (c) the partitioning of toxic metals between vapor and condenses phases, within the process. To this end work is progress using an existing 17kW downflow laboratory combustor, available with coal and sludge feed capabilities. The proposed study will be conducted in concert with an existing ongoing research on toxic metal partitioning mechanisms for very well characterized pulverized coals alone. Both high NO{sub x} and low NO{sub x} combustion conditions will be investigated (unstaged and staged combustion). The proposed work uses existing analytical and experimental facilities and draws on 20 years of research on NO{sub x} and fine particles that has been funded by DOE in this laboratory. Four barrels of dried sewage sludge are currently in the laboratory. Insofar as possible pertinent mechanisms will be elucidated. Tradeoffs between CO{sub 2} control, NO{sub x} control, and inorganic fine particle and toxic metal emissions will be determined. Progress in the Sixth Quarter (January 1, 2002 through March 31, 2002) was slow because of slagging problems in the combustor. These required the combustor to be rebuilt, a job that is not yet complete. A paper describing our results heretofore has been accepted by the Journal Environmental Science and Technology.

Jost O.L. Wendt

2002-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

179

Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material, such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

180

Intentionally Including - Engaging Minorities in Physics Careers |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Intentionally Including - Engaging Minorities in Physics Careers Intentionally Including - Engaging Minorities in Physics Careers Intentionally Including - Engaging Minorities in Physics Careers April 24, 2013 - 4:37pm Addthis Joining Director Dot Harris (second from left) were Marlene Kaplan, the Deputy Director of Education and director of EPP, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Claudia Rankins, a Program Officer with the National Science Foundation and Jim Stith, the past Vice-President of the American Institute of Physics Resources. Joining Director Dot Harris (second from left) were Marlene Kaplan, the Deputy Director of Education and director of EPP, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Claudia Rankins, a Program Officer with the National Science Foundation and Jim Stith, the past Vice-President of the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes sewage treatment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Scramjet including integrated inlet and combustor  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a scramjet engine. It comprises: a first surface including an aft facing step; a cowl including: a leading edge and a trailing edge; an upper surface and a lower surface extending between the leading edge and the trailing edge; the cowl upper surface being spaced from and generally parallel to the first surface to define an integrated inlet-combustor therebetween having an inlet for receiving and channeling into the inlet-combustor supersonic inlet airflow; means for injecting fuel into the inlet-combustor at the step for mixing with the supersonic inlet airflow for generating supersonic combustion gases; and further including a spaced pari of sidewalls extending between the first surface to the cowl upper surface and wherein the integrated inlet-combustor is generally rectangular and defined by the sidewall pair, the first surface and the cowl upper surface.

Kutschenreuter, P.H. Jr.; Blanton, J.C.

1992-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

182

Transmission line including support means with barriers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas insulated transmission line includes an elongated outer sheath, a plurality of inner conductors disposed within and extending along the outer sheath, and an insulating gas which electrically insulates the inner conductors from the outer sheath. A support insulator insulatably supports the inner conductors within the outer sheath, with the support insulator comprising a main body portion including a plurality of legs extending to the outer sheath, and barrier portions which extend between the legs. The barrier portions have openings therein adjacent the main body portion through which the inner conductors extend.

Cookson, Alan H. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Energy Consumption of Personal Computing Including Portable  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Consumption of Personal Computing Including Portable Communication Devices Pavel Somavat1 consumption, questions are being asked about the energy contribution of computing equipment. Al- though studies have documented the share of energy consumption by this type of equipment over the years, research

Namboodiri, Vinod

184

EE Regional Technology Roadmap Includes comparison  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EE Regional Technology Roadmap Includes comparison against 6th Power Plan (Update cyclically Roadmap with a strong linkage to utility programs Scan for Technologies 1. How does it address the NW Data Clearinghouse BPA/RTF NEEA/Regional Programs Group Update Regional EE Technology Roadmap Lighting

185

Video Topics Include Freshman Inquiry Course  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Video Topics Include Freshman Inquiry Course Open Advisement/ Group Advisement Dinning Campus: End of Spring 2012, Commencement May 18: Grades available on MAX after 4:30pm AdvisementYouTubeVideoSeries I N S I D E T H I S I S S U E : YouTube Video Series 1 Mark Your Calendar 1 Exploring Major Tips 2

Hardy, Christopher R.

186

Including Ocean Model Uncertainties in Climate Predictions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Including Ocean Model Uncertainties in Climate Predictions Chris Brierley, Alan Thorpe, Mat Collins's to perform the integrations Currently uses a `slab' ocean #12;An Ocean Model Required to accurately model transient behaviour Will have its own uncertainties Requires even more computing power Create new models

Jones, Peter JS

187

Biohydrogen production from oil palm frond juice and sewage sludge by a metabolically engineered  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

when hydrogen productivity increased 8-fold after enzymatic treatment of the sludge with a mixture biomass as an alternative substrate for enhanced biohydrogen production. Copyright ª 2013, Hydrogen Energy hydrogen compared to other methods such as coal gasification, water electrolysis and the water-gas shift

Wood, Thomas K.

188

Buildings Included on EMS Reports"  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Buildings Included on EMS Reports" "Site","Property Name","Property ID","GSF","Incl. in Water Baseline (CY2007)","Water Baseline (sq. ft.)","Water CY2008 (sq. ft.)","Water CY2009 (sq. ft.)","Water Notes","Incl. in Energy Baseline (CY2003)","Energy Baseline (sq. ft.)","CY2008 Energy (sq. ft.)","CY2009 Energy (sq. ft.)","Energy Notes","Included as Existing Building","CY2008 Existing Building (sq. ft.)","Reason for Building Exclusion" "Column Totals",,"Totals",115139,,10579,10579,22512,,,3183365,26374,115374,,,99476 "Durango, CO, Disposal/Processing Site","STORAGE SHED","DUD-BLDG-STORSHED",100,"no",,,,,"no",,,,"OSF","no",,"Less than 5,000 GSF"

189

Power generation method including membrane separation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for generating electric power, such as at, or close to, natural gas fields. The method includes conditioning natural gas containing C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons and/or acid gas by means of a membrane separation step. This step creates a leaner, sweeter, drier gas, which is then used as combustion fuel to run a turbine, which is in turn used for power generation.

Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Union City, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Completion strategy includes clay and precipitate control  

SciTech Connect

This article describes the conditions which are necessary for a successful oil well completion in the Mississippi and Cherokee zones of South Central Kansas. Topics considered include paraffin precipitation, clay swelling and migration, and iron precipitation. Clays in these zones are sensitive to water-base treating fluids and tend to swell and migrate to the well bore, thereby causing permeability damage. The presence of iron in the Mississippi and Cherokee formations has been indicated by cuttings, core samples, and connate water samples.

Sandy, T.; Gardner, G.R.

1985-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

191

Jet-calculus approach including coherence effects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We show how integrodifferential equations typical of jet calculus can be combined with an averaging procedure to obtain jet-calculus-based results including the Mueller interference graphs. Results in longitudinal-momentum fraction x for physical quantities are higher at intermediate x and lower at large x than with the conventional ‘‘incoherent’’ jet calculus. These results resemble those of Marchesini and Webber, who used a Monte Carlo approach based on the same dynamics.

L. M. Jones; R. Migneron; K. S. S. Narayanan

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

DOE Considers Natural Gas Utility Service Options: Proposal Includes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Considers Natural Gas Utility Service Options: Proposal Considers Natural Gas Utility Service Options: Proposal Includes 30-mile Natural Gas Pipeline from Pasco to Hanford DOE Considers Natural Gas Utility Service Options: Proposal Includes 30-mile Natural Gas Pipeline from Pasco to Hanford January 23, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Cameron Hardy, DOE , (509) 376-5365, Cameron.Hardy@rl.doe.gov RICHLAND, WASH. - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is considering natural gas transportation and distribution requirements to support the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) and evaporator operations at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. DOE awarded a task order worth up to $5 million to the local, licensed supplier of natural gas in the Hanford area, Cascade Natural Gas Corporation (Cascade). Cascade will support DOE and its Environmental

193

Optical panel system including stackable waveguides  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An optical panel system including stackable waveguides is provided. The optical panel system displays a projected light image and comprises a plurality of planar optical waveguides in a stacked state. The optical panel system further comprises a support system that aligns and supports the waveguides in the stacked state. In one embodiment, the support system comprises at least one rod, wherein each waveguide contains at least one hole, and wherein each rod is positioned through a corresponding hole in each waveguide. In another embodiment, the support system comprises at least two opposing edge structures having the waveguides positioned therebetween, wherein each opposing edge structure contains a mating surface, wherein opposite edges of each waveguide contain mating surfaces which are complementary to the mating surfaces of the opposing edge structures, and wherein each mating surface of the opposing edge structures engages a corresponding complementary mating surface of the opposite edges of each waveguide.

DeSanto, Leonard (Dunkirk, MD); Veligdan, James T. (Manorville, NY)

2007-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

194

Thermovoltaic semiconductor device including a plasma filter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermovoltaic energy conversion device and related method for converting thermal energy into an electrical potential. An interference filter is provided on a semiconductor thermovoltaic cell to pre-filter black body radiation. The semiconductor thermovoltaic cell includes a P/N junction supported on a substrate which converts incident thermal energy below the semiconductor junction band gap into electrical potential. The semiconductor substrate is doped to provide a plasma filter which reflects back energy having a wavelength which is above the band gap and which is ineffectively filtered by the interference filter, through the P/N junction to the source of radiation thereby avoiding parasitic absorption of the unusable portion of the thermal radiation energy.

Baldasaro, Paul F. (Clifton Park, NY)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Critical point anomalies include expansion shock waves  

SciTech Connect

From first-principle fluid dynamics, complemented by a rigorous state equation accounting for critical anomalies, we discovered that expansion shock waves may occur in the vicinity of the liquid-vapor critical point in the two-phase region. Due to universality of near-critical thermodynamics, the result is valid for any common pure fluid in which molecular interactions are only short-range, namely, for so-called 3-dimensional Ising-like systems, and under the assumption of thermodynamic equilibrium. In addition to rarefaction shock waves, diverse non-classical effects are admissible, including composite compressive shock-fan-shock waves, due to the change of sign of the fundamental derivative of gasdynamics.

Nannan, N. R., E-mail: ryan.nannan@uvs.edu [Mechanical Engineering Discipline, Anton de Kom University of Suriname, Leysweg 86, PO Box 9212, Paramaribo, Suriname and Process and Energy Department, Delft University of Technology, Leeghwaterstraat 44, 2628 CA Delft (Netherlands); Guardone, A., E-mail: alberto.guardone@polimi.it [Department of Aerospace Science and Technology, Politecnico di Milano, Via La Masa 34, 20156 Milano (Italy); Colonna, P., E-mail: p.colonna@tudelft.nl [Propulsion and Power, Delft University of Technology, Kluyverweg 1, 2629 HS Delft (Netherlands)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

196

Complex shell model representation including antibound states  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A generalization of the complex shell model formalism is presented that includes antibound states in the basis. These states, together with bound states, Gamow states, and the continuum background, represented by properly chosen scattering waves, form a representation in which all states are treated on the same footing. Two-particle states are evaluated within this formalism, and observable two-particle resonances are defined. The formalism is illustrated in the well-known case of Li11 in its bound ground state and in Ca70(g.s.), which is also bound. Both cases are found to have a halo structure. These halo structures are described within the generalized complex shell model. We investigated the formation of two-particle resonances in these nuclei, but no evidence of such resonances was found.

R. Id Betan; R. J. Liotta; N. Sandulescu; T. Vertse; R. Wyss

2005-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

197

Developer Installed Treatment Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-installed treatment plants. These treatment plants are more commonly known as package wastewater treatment plants. 1

unknown authors

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

NOx, FINE PARTICLE AND TOXIC METAL EMISSIONS FROM THE COMBUSTION OF SEWAGE SLUDGE/COAL MIXTURES: A SYSTEMATIC ASSESSMENT  

SciTech Connect

This research project focuses on pollutants from the combustion of mixtures of dried municipal sewage sludge (MSS) and coal. The objective is to determine the relationship between (1) fraction sludge in the sludge/coal mixture, and (2) combustion conditions on (a) NOx concentrations in the exhaust, (b) the size segregated fine and ultra-fine particle composition in the exhaust, and (c) the partitioning of toxic metals between vapor and condenses phases, within the process. The proposed study will be conducted in concert with an existing ongoing research on toxic metal partitioning mechanisms for very well characterized pulverized coals alone. Both high NOx and low NOx combustion conditions will be investigated (unstaged and staged combustion). Tradeoffs between CO{sub 2} control, NO{sub x} control, and inorganic fine particle and toxic metal emissions will be determined. Previous research results have demonstrated that the inhalation of coal/MSS ash particles cause an increase in lung permeability than coal ash particles alone. Elemental analysis of the coal/MSS ash particles showed that Zn was more abundant in these ash particles than the ash particles of coal ash alone.

Jost O.L. Wendt

2003-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

199

Radiological Instrumentation Assessment for King County Wastewater Treatment Division  

SciTech Connect

The King County Wastewater Treatment Division (WTD) have concern about the aftermath of a radiological dispersion event (RDE) leading to the introduction of significant quantities of radioactive material into its combined sanitary and storm sewer system. Radioactive material could come from the use of a radiological dispersion device (RDD). RDDs include "dirty bombs" that are not nuclear detonations but are explosives designed to spread radioactive material. Radioactive material also could come from deliberate introduction or dispersion of radioactive material into the environment, including waterways and water supply systems. Volume 2 of PNNL-15163 assesses the radiological instrumentation needs for detection of radiological or nuclear terrorism, in support of decisions to treat contaminated wastewater or to bypass the West Point Treatment Plant (WPTP), and in support of radiation protection of the workforce, the public, and the infrastructure of the WPTP. Fixed radiation detection instrumentation should be deployed in a defense-in-depth system that provides 1) early warning of significant radioactive material on the way to the WPTP, including identification of the radionuclide(s) and estimates of the soluble concentrations, with a floating detector located in the wet well at the Interbay Pump Station and telemetered via the internet to all authorized locations; 2) monitoring at strategic locations within the plant, including 2a) the pipe beyond the hydraulic ram in the bar screen room; 2b) above the collection funnels in the fine grit facility; 2c) in the sampling tank in the raw sewage pump room; and 2d) downstream of the concentration facilities that produce 6% blended and concentrated biosolids. Engineering challenges exist for these applications. It is necessary to deploy both ultra-sensitive detectors to provide early warning and identification and detectors capable of functioning in high-dose rate environments that are likely under some scenarios, capable of functioning from 10 microrems per hour (background) up to 1000 rems per hour. Software supporting fixed spectroscopic detectors is needed to provide prompt, reliable, and simple interpretations of spectroscopic outputs that are of use to operators and decision-makers. Software to provide scientists and homeland security personnel with sufficient technical detail for identification, quantification, waste management decisions, and for the inevitable forensic and attribution needs must be developed. Computational modeling using MCNP software has demonstrated that useful detection capabilities can be deployed. In particular, any of the isotopes examined can be detected at levels between 0.01 and 0.1 ?Ci per gallon. General purpose instruments that can be used to determine the nature and extent of radioactive contamination and measure radiation levels for purposes of protecting personnel and members of the public should be available. One or more portable radioisotope identifiers (RIIDs) should be available to WTD personnel. Small, portable battery-powered personal radiation monitors should be widely available WTD personnel. The personal monitors can be used for personal and group radiation protection decisions, and to alert management to the need to get expert backup. All considerations of radiological instrumentation require considerations of training and periodic retraining of personnel, as well as periodic calibration and maintenance of instruments. Routine “innocent” alarms will occur due to medical radionuclides that are legally discharged into sanitary sewers on a daily basis.

Strom, Daniel J.; McConn, Ronald J.; Brodzinski, Ronald L.

2005-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

200

SEEPAGE MODEL FOR PA INCLUDING DRIFT COLLAPSE  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to document the predictions and analyses performed using the seepage model for performance assessment (SMPA) for both the Topopah Spring middle nonlithophysal (Tptpmn) and lower lithophysal (Tptpll) lithostratigraphic units at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Look-up tables of seepage flow rates into a drift (and their uncertainty) are generated by performing numerical simulations with the seepage model for many combinations of the three most important seepage-relevant parameters: the fracture permeability, the capillary-strength parameter 1/a, and the percolation flux. The percolation flux values chosen take into account flow focusing effects, which are evaluated based on a flow-focusing model. Moreover, multiple realizations of the underlying stochastic permeability field are conducted. Selected sensitivity studies are performed, including the effects of an alternative drift geometry representing a partially collapsed drift from an independent drift-degradation analysis (BSC 2004 [DIRS 166107]). The intended purpose of the seepage model is to provide results of drift-scale seepage rates under a series of parameters and scenarios in support of the Total System Performance Assessment for License Application (TSPA-LA). The SMPA is intended for the evaluation of drift-scale seepage rates under the full range of parameter values for three parameters found to be key (fracture permeability, the van Genuchten 1/a parameter, and percolation flux) and drift degradation shape scenarios in support of the TSPA-LA during the period of compliance for postclosure performance [Technical Work Plan for: Performance Assessment Unsaturated Zone (BSC 2002 [DIRS 160819], Section I-4-2-1)]. The flow-focusing model in the Topopah Spring welded (TSw) unit is intended to provide an estimate of flow focusing factors (FFFs) that (1) bridge the gap between the mountain-scale and drift-scale models, and (2) account for variability in local percolation flux due to stochastic hydrologic properties and flow processes.

C. Tsang

2004-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes sewage treatment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Sewage sludge minimisation by means of wet oxidation: process performance and economic sustainability  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Today, several technologies and management strategies are proposed and applied in WWTPs to minimise sludge production and contamination and their techno-economic feasibility has to be carefully evaluated. In this work (which is being conducted within the European Union project 'ROUTES'), based on bench results, a mass balance was drawn for a WWTP (500,000 PE), where it was supposed to install a wet oxidation (WO) stage for sludge minimisation. The design of treatment units and the estimation of capital and operation costs were then performed. Subsequently, a procedure for technical-economic assessment was developed. Basically, this procedure consists in the definition and ranking of several technical (e.g., reliability of the technology, complexity and integration with the existing facilities, amount of residues to be disposed of or recovered, etc.) and economic aspects. Preliminary results have shown WO to be a suitable solution for sludge minimisation.

Giorgio Bertanza; Sabrina Zanaboni; Matteo Canato; Giuseppe Laera; Raniero Galessi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Influence of sludge disintegration by high pressure homogenizer on microbial growth in sewage sludge: an approach for excess sludge reduction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Excess sludge treatment and disposal is currently a challenge ... explore and develop technology for reduction of excess sludge in wastewater treatment plants rather than treating the generated sludge. This paper...

Chockalingam Lajapathi Rai…

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Integrated nonthermal treatment system study  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of a study of nonthermal treatment technologies. The study consisted of a systematic assessment of five nonthermal treatment alternatives. The treatment alternatives consist of widely varying technologies for safely destroying the hazardous organic components, reducing the volume, and preparing for final disposal of the contact-handled mixed low-level waste (MLLW) currently stored in the US Department of Energy complex. The alternatives considered were innovative nonthermal treatments for organic liquids and sludges, process residue, soil and debris. Vacuum desorption or various washing approaches are considered for treatment of soil, residue and debris. Organic destruction methods include mediated electrochemical oxidation, catalytic wet oxidation, and acid digestion. Other methods studied included stabilization technologies and mercury separation of treatment residues. This study is a companion to the integrated thermal treatment study which examined 19 alternatives for thermal treatment of MLLW waste. The quantities and physical and chemical compositions of the input waste are based on the inventory database developed by the US Department of Energy. The Integrated Nonthermal Treatment Systems (INTS) systems were evaluated using the same waste input (2,927 pounds per hour) as the Integrated Thermal Treatment Systems (ITTS). 48 refs., 68 figs., 37 tabs.

Biagi, C.; Bahar, D.; Teheranian, B.; Vetromile, J. [Morrison Knudsen Corp. (United States); Quapp, W.J. [Nuclear Metals (United States); Bechtold, T.; Brown, B.; Schwinkendorf, W. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Swartz, G. [Swartz and Associates (United States)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Zeolitized tuffs in pedotechniques to improve soil resilience against the impact of treatment by municipal sewage: balance of nutrient and noxious cations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...sample; (2) the natural cationic composition of these exchangers; (3) the concentration...depending on the variability of DSW composition, with peaks at the third, seventh...Gavalova Z. (2004) Agricultural and agrochemical uses of natural zeolite of the clinoptilolite...

G. F. Capra; A. Buondonno; E. Coppola; M. G. Duras; S. Vacca; C. Colella

205

Quantifying uncertainty in nitrate pollution from land application of sewage sludge  

SciTech Connect

Uncertainty associated with nitrate-nitrogen pollution of ground water from sludge applications was investigated. Three alternative planning models were proposed. The models estimate annual loads and concentrations of nitrate-nitrogen in percolation. Published data from four field studies that included aerobic and anaerobic sludge and surface- and soil-incorporated applications were used for model testing. Point and stochastic validation procedures were used. The models were generally conservative. For three data sets average relative errors were approximately +/- 25% for all three models. The fourth data set had average relative errors of 100-500%. Wilcoxon Signed Rank test results (at ..cap alpha.. = 5%) suggested point-model predictions and observations were drawn from similar distributions. Stochastic validation tests also suggested that observations were samples from distributions of predictions. The models were tested as uncalibrated approximations of nitrate percolation. All three appear sufficiently accurate for planning application systems. A planning procedure was developed which utilizes analytically approximated probability distributions of nitrate loads and concentrations. Distributions are specified with analytical moment expressions and a normal distribution function limited to be non-negative.

Mummert, M.C.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Nutrient leaching following land application of aerobically digested municipal sewage sludge in a northern hardwood forest  

SciTech Connect

Concentrations of selected cations and anions were determined in soil solutions from a forested site in southern New Hampshire during the first growing season after surface application of an aerobically digested, limed, liquid municipal sludge. Sludge was applied in June 1989 at 0, 3.3, 6.9, and 14.5 Mg ha{sup -1}, which corresponded to 199, 396, and 740 kg N ha{sup -1} as total Kjeldahl N (TKN). Porous, suction-cup lysimeters were used to sample soil solutions below the rooting zone ({approximately}60 cm) within subplots designed to include (untrenched) or exclude (trenched) uptake by vegetation. Following sludge application, measured solute concentrations remained low until September 1989, when NO{sub 3}, Cl, Ca, Mg, Na, and K in trenched subplots increased simultaneously to maximum values in October or November 1989, just before the soil froze for the winter. Nitrate was the dominant anion in soil solutions from trenched subplots and averaged in excess of 0.71 mmol L{sup -1} (10 mg L{sup -1} NO{sub 3}-N) at all loading rates. Highest concentrations of NO{sub 3} occurred on subplots with the highest sludge application rates. In the entrenched areas, NO{sub 3} concentrations rarely exceeded 0.001 mmol L{sup -1}; Cl increased in treated areas and was the dominant anion by the end of the season. Soil solution NH{sub 4}, PO{sub 4}, SO{sub 4} K, and pH did not change significantly for any sludge application rate. Comparison of results from trenched and untrenched areas suggests that, at application rates of up to 14.5 Mg ha{sup -1 }(799 kg TKN ha{sup -1}), a combination of physical, chemical, and biological factors (most likely plant uptake) limited the movement of sludge or sludge-derived constituents from the sites of application. 37 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

Medalie, L.; Bowden, W.B.; Smith, C.T. [Univ. of New Hampshire, Durham, NH (United States)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 230: Area 22 Sewage Lagoons and Corrective Action Unit 320: Area 22 Desert Rock Airport Strainer Box, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Corrective Action Plan (CAP) is to provide the strategy and methodology to close the Area 22 Sewage Lagoons site. The CAU will be closed following state and federal regulations and the FFACO (1996). Site characterization was done during September 1999, Soil samples were collected using a direct-push method and a backhoe. Soil samples were collected from the sludge bed, sewage lagoons, strainer box, and Imhoff tank areas. Characterization of the manholes associated with the septic system leading to the Imhoff tank was done during March 2000. The results of the characterization were reported in the Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) (DOE/NV, 2000). Soil sample results indicated that the only constituent of concern (COC) detected above Preliminary Action Levels (PALs) was total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) as diesel-range organics. This COC was detected in three samples from the sludge bed at concentrations up to 580 milligrams per kilogram (mg/kg). This exceeds the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) regulatory action level for TPH of 100 mg/kg (Nevada Administrative Code, 1996). Excavation of the area during characterization uncovered asphalt debris, four safety poles, and strands of barbed wire. The TPH-impacted soil and debris will be removed and disposed in the NTS Area 6 Hydrocarbon Landfill.

D. S. Tobiason

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Technology for Treatment of Liquid Radioactive Waste Generated during Uranium and Plutonium Chemical and Metallurgical Manufacturing in FSUE PO Mayak - 13616  

SciTech Connect

Created technological scheme for treatment of liquid radioactive waste generated while uranium and plutonium chemical and metallurgical manufacturing consists of: - Liquid radioactive waste (LRW) purification from radionuclides and its transfer into category of manufacturing waste; - Concentration of suspensions containing alpha-nuclides and their further conversion to safe dry state (calcinate) and moving to long controlled storage. The following technologies are implemented in LRW treatment complex: - Settling and filtering technology for treatment of liquid intermediate-level waste (ILW) with volume about 1500m{sup 3}/year and alpha-activity from 10{sup 6} to 10{sup 8} Bq/dm{sup 3} - Membrane and sorption technology for processing of low-level waste (LLW) of radioactive drain waters with volume about 150 000 m{sup 3}/year and alpha-activity from 10{sup 3} to 10{sup 4} Bq/dm{sup 3}. Settling and filtering technology includes two stages of ILW immobilization accompanied with primary settling of radionuclides on transition metal hydroxides with the following flushing and drying of the pulp generated; secondary deep after settling of radionuclides on transition metal hydroxides with the following solid phase concentration by the method of tangential flow ultrafiltration. Besides, the installation capacity on permeate is not less than 3 m{sup 3}/h. Concentrates generated are sent to calcination on microwave drying (MW drying) unit. Membrane and sorption technology includes processing of averaged sewage flux by the method of tangential flow ultrafiltration with total capacity of installations on permeate not less than 18 m{sup 3}/h and sorption extraction of uranium from permeate on anionite. According to radionuclide contamination level purified solution refers to general industrial waste. Concentrates generated during suspension filtering are evaporated in rotary film evaporator (RFE) in order to remove excess water, thereafter they are dried on infrared heating facility. Solid concentrate produced is sent for long controlled storage. Complex of the procedures carried out makes it possible to solve problems on treatment of LRW generated while uranium and plutonium chemical and metallurgical manufacturing in Federal State Unitary Enterprise (FSUE) Mayak and cease its discharge into open water reservoirs. (authors)

Adamovich, D. [SUE MosSIA Radon, 2/14 7th Rostovsky lane, Moscow, 119121 (Russian Federation)] [SUE MosSIA Radon, 2/14 7th Rostovsky lane, Moscow, 119121 (Russian Federation); Batorshin, G.; Logunov, M.; Musalnikov, A. [FSUE 'PO Mayak', 31 av. Lenin, Ozyorsk, Chelyabinsk region, 456780 (Russian Federation)] [FSUE 'PO Mayak', 31 av. Lenin, Ozyorsk, Chelyabinsk region, 456780 (Russian Federation)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Energy efficiency in municipal wastewater treatment plants: Technology assessment  

SciTech Connect

The New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) estimates that municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) in New York State consume about 1.5 billion kWh of electricity each year for sewage treatment and sludge management based on the predominant types of treatment plants, the results of an energy use survey, and recent trends in the amounts of electricity WWTPs use nationwide. Electric utilities in New York State have encouraged demand-side management (DSM) to help control or lower energy costs and make energy available for new customers without constructing additional facilities. This report describes DSM opportunities for WWTPs in New York State; discusses the costs and benefits of several DSM measures; projects energy impact statewide of the DSM technologies; identifies the barrier to implementing DSM at WWTPs; and outlines one possible incentive that could stimulate widespread adoption of DSM by WWTP operators. The DSM technologies discussed are outfall hydropower, on-site generation, aeration efficiency, time-of-day electricity pricing, and storing wastewater.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

A model of flocculation Witold Brostow a,, Sagar Pal b  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, treatment of industrial effluents, and municipal sewage sludge purification. Obtaining metals from ores: Flocculation; Radius of gyration; Silica suspensions; Coal suspensions; Industrial effluents; Iron ores environmental contamination and also slowing down depletion of raw materials -- including potable, industrial

North Texas, University of

211

A comprehensive substance flow analysis of a municipal wastewater and sludge treatment plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The fate of total organic carbon, 32 elements (Al, Ag, As, Ba, Be, Br, Ca, Cd, Cl, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, K, Li, Mg, Mn, Mo, N, Na, Ni, P, Pb, S, Sb, Se, Sn, Sr, Ti, V, and Zn) and 4 groups of organic pollutants (linear alkylbenzene sulfonates, bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate, polychlorinated biphenyl and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) in a conventional wastewater treatment plant were assessed. Mass balances showed reasonable closures for most of the elements. However, gaseous emissions were accompanied by large uncertainties and show the limitation of mass balance based substance flow analysis. Based on the assessment, it is evident that both inorganic and organic elements accumulated in the sewage sludge, with the exception of elements that are highly soluble or degradable by wastewater and sludge treatment processes. The majority of metals and metalloids were further accumulated in the incineration ash, while the organic pollutants were effectively destroyed by both biological and thermal processes. Side streams from the sludge treatment process (dewatering and incineration) back to the wastewater treatment represented less than 1% of the total volume entering the wastewater treatment processes, but represented significant substance flows. In contrast, the contribution by spent water from the flue gas treatment process was almost negligible. Screening of human and eco-toxicity by applying the consensus-based environmental impact assessment method \\{USEtox\\} addressing 15 inorganic constituents showed that removal of inorganic constituents by the wastewater treatment plant reduced the toxic impact potential by 87–92%.

H. Yoshida; T.H. Christensen; T. Guildal; C. Scheutz

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Office of River Protection Looks Back on 2014 Achievements, Including Tank Retrieval Progress  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

RICHLAND, Wash. – In 2014, EM’s Office of River Protection (ORP) marked several accomplishments at the Hanford site, including continuing efforts to resolve remaining technical issues with the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP); restarting operations of the 242-A Evaporator; establishing waste acceptance limits for WTP; and continuing progress in waste tank retrievals.

213

Nuclear Arms Control R&D Consortium includes Los Alamos  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Arms Control R&D Consortium includes Los Alamos Nuclear Arms Control R&D Consortium includes Los Alamos A consortium led by the University of Michigan that includes LANL as...

214

habitual speech of stutterers that included bilateral motor system activation, overalloveractivation inthe motor system and reduced left  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;habitual speech of stutterers that included bilateral motor system activation, and Braun (2003) compared brain activations of both nonstuttering and stutter- ing individuals during and after fluency shaping therapy for stuttering. Such treatment in adults essentially teaches a modified

215

Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact: Wastewater Treatment Capability Upgrade, Project NO. 96-D-122 Pantex Plant Amarillo, Texas  

SciTech Connect

This Environmental Assessment (EA) addresses the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) proposed action regarding an upgrade of the Pantex Plant Wastewater Treatment Facility (WWTF). Potential environmental consequences associated with the proposed action and alternative actions are provided. DOE proposes to design, build, and operate a new WWTF, consistent with the requirements of Title 30 of the Texas Administrative Code (TAC), Chapter 317, ''Design Criteria for Sewage Systems,'' capable of supporting current and future wastewater treatment requirements of the Plant. Wastewater treatment at Pantex must provide sufficient operational flexibility to meet Pantex Plant's anticipated future needs, including potential Plant mission changes, alternative effluent uses, and wastewater discharge permit requirements. Treated wastewater effluent and non-regulated water maybe used for irrigation on DOE-owned agricultural land. Five factors support the need for DOE action: (1) The current WWTF operation has the potential for inconsistent permit compliance. (2) The existing WWTF lies completely within the 100-year floodplain. (3) The Pantex Plant mission has the potential to change, requiring infrastructure changes to the facility. (4) The life expectancy of the existing facility would be nearing its end by the time a new facility is constructed. (5) The treated wastewater effluent and non-regulated water would have a beneficial agricultural use through irrigation. Evaluation during the internal scoping led to the conclusion that the following factors are present and of concern at the proposed action site on Pantex Plant: (1) Periodic wastewater effluent permit exceedances; (2) Wetlands protection and floodplain management; (3) Capability of the existing facility to meet anticipated future needs of Pantex (4) Existing facility design life; and (5) Use of treated wastewater effluent and non-regulated water for irrigation. Evaluation during the internal scoping led to the conclusion that the following conditions are not present, nor of concern at the proposed site on Pantex Plant, and no further analysis was conducted: (1) State or national parks, forests, or other conservation areas; (2) Wild and scenic rivers; (3) Natural resources, such as timber, range, soils, minerals; (4) Properties of historic, archeological, or architectural significance; (5) Native American concerns; (6) Minority and low-income populations; and (7) Prime or unique farmland. In this document, DOE describes the proposed action and a reasonable range of alternatives to the proposed action, including the ''No-Action'' alternative. The proposed action cited in the ''U.S. Department of Energy Application for a Texas Pollutant Discharge Elimination System Permit Modifying Permit to Dispose of Waste, No. 02296,'' December 1998, included the construction of a new wastewater treatment facility, a new irrigation storage pond, and the conversion of the current wastewater treatment facility into an irrigation storage pond. Although a permit modification application has been filed, if a decision on this EA necessitates it, an amendment to the permit application would be made. The permit application would be required for any of the alternatives and the filing does not preclude or predetermine selection of an alternative considered by this EA. This permit change would allow Pantex to land-dispose treated wastewater by irrigating agricultural land. This construction for the proposed action would include designing two new lagoons for wastewater treatment. One of the lagoons could function as a facultative lagoon for treatment of wastewater. The second lagoon would serve as an irrigation storage impoundment (storage pond), with the alternative use as a facultative lagoon if the first lagoon is out of service for any reason. The new facultative lagoon and irrigation water storage pond would be sited outside of the 100-year flood plain. The existing WWTF lagoon would be used as a storage pond for treated wastewater effluent for irrigation water, as needed. The two new lagoons would be li

N /A

1999-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

216

Treatment of acid mine wastewaters  

SciTech Connect

Acid mine drainage often results from the oxidation sulfide minerals to form sulfuric acid. As a consequence, high concentrations of metals in the both the suspended and dissolved state result from the low pH water. This paper discusses several of the more common treatment methods for acid mine drainage including the use of chemical precipitation agents, pH correction agents, filtration methods, and biodegradation methods. Advanced treatment technologies are also briefly described and include microfiltration, reverse osmosis, ion exchange, and electrodialysis.

Hayward, D.; Barnard, R.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Aerobic Treatment Unit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

wastewater treatment systems use. They remove 85 to 98 percent of the organic matter and solids from the wastewater, producing effluent as clean as that from munici- pal wastewater treatment plants, and cleaner than that from conventional septic tanks.... Onsite wastewater treatment systems Single-compartment trash tank Chlorinator Aerobic treatment unit Spray heads Pump tank Bruce Lesikar Professor and Extension Agricultural Engineer The Texas A&M System Aerobic treatment units, which are certified...

Lesikar, Bruce J.

2008-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

218

Including Retro-Commissioning in Federal Energy Savings Performance Contracts  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Guidance document on the importance of (and steps to) including retro-commissioning in Federal energy savings performance contracts (ESPCs).

219

Methadone treatment improves tuberculosis treatment among hospitalized opioid dependent patients in Ukraine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

AbstractBackground Ukraine's volatile syndemics of tuberculosis (TB) and HIV among people who inject drugs (PWIDs) introduces numerous treatment challenges for each condition, including high mortality and development of multi-drug resistant TB (MDR-TB). Methods A prospective, non-randomized 90-day observational study was conducted in six Ukrainian TB treatment sites to assess the effectiveness of integrating methadone maintenance (MMT) with TB treatment using: (1) 90-day TB treatment retention; (2) time to treatment discontinuation; (3) TB medication adherence; and (4) subject disposition, including mortality. Of the 110 participants enrolled, 57 received MMT and 53 did not (non-MMT). Results All of the primary outcomes were significantly better in MMT versus non-MMT groups, including 90-day TB treatment completion (89.5% versus 73.6%; p = 0.031), time to TB treatment discontinuation (p = 0.039) and TB medication adherence (97.1% versus 86.2%; p Ukraine.

Olga Morozova; Sergii Dvoryak; Frederick L. Altice

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Continental Shelf Research 20 (2000) 1}13 Internal tide e!ects on a sewage plume  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

de Luminy, F13 288 Marseille Cedex 09, France Hancock Institute for Marine Studies, University Island treatment plant in the coastal waters of Mamala Bay, Oahu, Hawaii, was mapped using ship of contaminants detected on nearby tourist beaches. Mamala Bay is located on the * Corresponding author. 0278

Fabrikant, Sara Irina

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes sewage treatment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Combining boron isotopes and carbamazepine to trace sewage in salinized groundwater: a case study in Cap Bon, Tunisia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

treatment and so recognized as a pertinent tracer of wastewater contamination. The system equilibrium of Research in Rural Engineering of Water and Forestry), rue Hédi Karray, B.P.10- 2080 Ariana, Tunisia based on a managed aquifer recharge with treated wastewater. Water quality monitoring was implemented

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

222

FEMP Expands ESPC ENABLE Program to Include More Energy Conservation...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

(ESPC) ENABLE program to include two new energy conservation measures (ECMs): solar photovoltaic (PV) and simple one-for-one heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC)...

223

SciTech Connect: Microfluidic devices and methods including porous...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

porous polymer monolith may include surfaces terminated with iniferter species. Capture molecules may then be grafted to the monolith pores. Authors: Hatch, Anson V; Sommer,...

224

Including Retro-Commissioning in Federal Energy Savings Performance Contracts  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Document describes guidance on the importance of (and steps to) including retro-commissioning in federal energy savings performance contracts (ESPCs).

225

Percentage of Total Natural Gas Industrial Deliveries included...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Industrial Price Percentage of Total Industrial Deliveries included in Prices Vehicle Fuel Price Electric Power Price Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download...

226

Assessing nutrient and pharmaceutical removal efficiency from wastewater using shallow wetland treatment mesocosms.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Wastewaters from rural sewage lagoons in Manitoba contain pharmaceuticals that are potentially harmful to non-target organisms and reduce overall water quality when released. An option… (more)

Cardinal, Pascal

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

WATER POLLUTION CONTROL GENERAL PERMIT GNEV93001  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

antifreeze. Portable toilet waste without antifreeze, and sewage from holding tanks must be discharged into a sewage treatment works with a head works meter. I.G....

228

Nitrogen is a natural and necessary part of every healthy ecosystem, but too much nitrogen in our rivers,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

), sewage treatment plants, and animal ma- nure. Once in water, nitrogen can change in chemical form

Torgersen, Christian

229

Microfluidic devices and methods including porous polymer monoliths  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Microfluidic devices and methods including porous polymer monoliths are described. Polymerization techniques may be used to generate porous polymer monoliths having pores defined by a liquid component of a fluid mixture. The fluid mixture may contain iniferters and the resulting porous polymer monolith may include surfaces terminated with iniferter species. Capture molecules may then be grafted to the monolith pores.

Hatch, Anson V; Sommer, Gregory J; Singh, Anup K; Wang, Ying-Chih; Abhyankar, Vinay V

2014-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

230

Solar Energy Education. Reader, Part II. Sun story. [Includes glossary  

SciTech Connect

Magazine articles which focus on the subject of solar energy are presented. The booklet prepared is the second of a four part series of the Solar Energy Reader. Excerpts from the magazines include the history of solar energy, mythology and tales, and selected poetry on the sun. A glossary of energy related terms is included. (BCS)

Not Available

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Range of a projectile, including air resistance. Introduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

resistance, it is easy to show (elementary physics classes) that if we throw a projectile with a speed vRange of a projectile, including air resistance. Introduction Here we study the motion of a projectile thrown through the air, including the important effects of air resistance.We will investi- gate

Young, A. Peter

232

Articles which include chevron film cooling holes, and related processes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An article is described, including an inner surface which can be exposed to a first fluid; an inlet; and an outer surface spaced from the inner surface, which can be exposed to a hotter second fluid. The article further includes at least one row or other pattern of passage holes. Each passage hole includes an inlet bore extending through the substrate from the inlet at the inner surface to a passage hole-exit proximate to the outer surface, with the inlet bore terminating in a chevron outlet adjacent the hole-exit. The chevron outlet includes a pair of wing troughs having a common surface region between them. The common surface region includes a valley which is adjacent the hole-exit; and a plateau adjacent the valley. The article can be an airfoil. Related methods for preparing the passage holes are also described.

Bunker, Ronald Scott; Lacy, Benjamin Paul

2014-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

233

What To Include In The Whistleblower Complaint? | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

To Include In The Whistleblower Complaint? | National Nuclear Security To Include In The Whistleblower Complaint? | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog What To Include In The Whistleblower Complaint? Home > About Us > Our Operations > Management and Budget > Whistleblower Program > What To Include In The Whistleblower Complaint? What To Include In The Whistleblower Complaint?

234

E-Print Network 3.0 - adrenocortical carcinoma treatment Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

cause of Cushing's syndrome, is due... removal. Treatment of the other manifestations of CNC should be discussed and may include follow... -up, surgery, or medical treatment...

235

Radioactive residues associated with water treatment, use and disposal in Australia.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Water resources are known to contain radioactive materials, either from natural or anthropogenic sources. Treatment, including wastewater treatment, of water for drinking, domestic, agricultural and… (more)

Kleinschmidt, Ross Ivan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Ultraviolet Light Disinfection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Some onsite wastewater treatment systems include a disinfection component. This publication explains how homeowners can disinfect wastewater with ultraviolet light, what the components of such a system are, what factors affect the performance of a...

Lesikar, Bruce J.

2008-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

237

Treatment of brackish water  

SciTech Connect

Brackish water resulting from steam extraction of heavy crude oils, including oil sands bitumen, is processed for reuse by removing hydrocarbon contamination and removing mineral contamination. The purified water can be boiled in conventional boilers without scaling or fouling occurring. Heat economy is used in conducting the process. The brackish water is first subjected to oil removal by separating out as much of the free oil as possible, such as by using gravity separation and air flotation, and then stripping any residual oil by ozone treatment. The hydrocarbon-free water then is subjected to demineralization. The demineralization is effected by a first electrodialysis reversal step to remove minerals other than silica and a second silica removal step. 8 claims.

Ciepiela, E.J.

1983-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

238

DOE mixed waste treatment capacity analysis  

SciTech Connect

This initial DOE-wide analysis compares the reported national capacity for treatment of mixed wastes with the calculated need for treatment capacity based on both a full treatment of mixed low-level and transuranic wastes to the Land Disposal Restrictions and on treatment of transuranic wastes to the WIPP waste acceptance criteria. The status of treatment capacity is reported based on a fifty-element matrix of radiation-handling requirements and functional treatment technology categories. The report defines the classifications for the assessment, describes the models used for the calculations, provides results from the analysis, and includes appendices of the waste treatment facilities data and the waste stream data used in the analysis.

Ross, W.A.; Wehrman, R.R.; Young, J.R.; Shaver, S.R.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Comparison of Joint Modeling Approaches Including Eulerian Sliding Interfaces  

SciTech Connect

Accurate representation of discontinuities such as joints and faults is a key ingredient for high fidelity modeling of shock propagation in geologic media. The following study was done to improve treatment of discontinuities (joints) in the Eulerian hydrocode GEODYN (Lomov and Liu 2005). Lagrangian methods with conforming meshes and explicit inclusion of joints in the geologic model are well suited for such an analysis. Unfortunately, current meshing tools are unable to automatically generate adequate hexahedral meshes for large numbers of irregular polyhedra. Another concern is that joint stiffness in such explicit computations requires significantly reduced time steps, with negative implications for both the efficiency and quality of the numerical solution. An alternative approach is to use non-conforming meshes and embed joint information into regular computational elements. However, once slip displacement on the joints become comparable to the zone size, Lagrangian (even non-conforming) meshes could suffer from tangling and decreased time step problems. The use of non-conforming meshes in an Eulerian solver may alleviate these difficulties and provide a viable numerical approach for modeling the effects of faults on the dynamic response of geologic materials. We studied shock propagation in jointed/faulted media using a Lagrangian and two Eulerian approaches. To investigate the accuracy of this joint treatment the GEODYN calculations have been compared with results from the Lagrangian code GEODYN-L which uses an explicit treatment of joints via common plane contact. We explore two approaches to joint treatment in the code, one for joints with finite thickness and the other for tight joints. In all cases the sliding interfaces are tracked explicitly without homogenization or blending the joint and block response into an average response. In general, rock joints will introduce an increase in normal compliance in addition to a reduction in shear strength. In the present work we consider the limiting case of stiff discontinuities that only affect the shear strength of the material.

Lomov, I; Antoun, T; Vorobiev, O

2009-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

240

Air gasification of dried sewage sludge in a two-stage gasifier: Part 1. The effects and reusability of additives on the removal of tar and hydrogen production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Air gasification of dried sewage sludge was conducted in a two-stage gasifier. In the experiments, natural occurring materials, such as natural zeolite, olivine and dolomite, as well as biomass-based and coal-based activated carbons, were applied to the upper reactor of a two-stage gasifier, while sand and calcined dolomite were used as the fluidized bed material in the lower reactor. The reusability of the spent coal-based activated carbon and spent calcined dolomite was also investigated. The combination of calcined dolomite as the bed material and coal-based activated carbon in the upper reactor produced the highest H2 (28 vol.%) and CO (21 vol.%) contents. Furthermore, total amount of tar generated with the combination was 91% less than that generated with no additive in the upper reactor and sand in the lower reactor. The H2 content and tar removal efficiencies in the experiments with the spent activated carbons and spent calcined dolomites were shown to be better than those without additives in the upper reactor.

Tae-Young Mun; Jin-Won Kim; Joo-Sik Kim

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes sewage treatment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

U-182: Microsoft Windows Includes Some Invalid Certificates | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

82: Microsoft Windows Includes Some Invalid Certificates 82: Microsoft Windows Includes Some Invalid Certificates U-182: Microsoft Windows Includes Some Invalid Certificates June 4, 2012 - 7:00am Addthis PROBLEM: A vulnerability was reported in Microsoft Windows. A remote user may be able to spoof code signing signatures. PLATFORM: Version(s): XP SP3, 2003 SP2, Vista SP2, 2008 SP2, 7 SP1, 2008 R2 SP1; and prior service packs ABSTRACT: The operating system includes some invalid intermediate certificates. The vulnerability is due to the certificate authorities and not the operating system itself. Reference Links: Security tracker ID 1027114 GENERIC-MAP-NOMATCH Vendor Advisory IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High Discussion: The invalid certificates and their thumbprints are: Microsoft Enforced Licensing Intermediate PCA: 2a 83 e9 02 05 91 a5 5f c6

242

FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF STEEL WELDED COVERPLATE INCLUDING COMPOSITE DOUBLERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the increasing focus on welded bridge members resulting in crack initiation and propagation, there is a large demand for creative solutions. One of these solutions includes the application of composite doublers over the critical weld. In order...

Petri, Brad

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

243

Search for Earth-like planets includes LANL star analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Search for earth-like planets Search for Earth-like planets includes LANL star analysis The mission will not only be able to search for planets around other stars, but also yield...

244

atlantic region including: Topics by E-print Network  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

R: L. Tossey, T. Beeson, Parks, B. TruittTNC, UD MPEO staff 2 Climate scenarios of sea level rise for the northeast Atlantic Ocean: a study including the effects of ocean...

245

INTRODUCTION Embryonic development is sensitive to many factors, including  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, mothers can attempt to maintain their developing embryos at an optimal temperature, and thus The Journal RESEARCH ARTICLE Maternal influences on early development: preferred temperature prior to oviposition1346 INTRODUCTION Embryonic development is sensitive to many factors, including hormones, toxins

Denardo, Dale

246

Limited Personal Use of Government Office Equipment including Information Technology  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The Order establishes requirements and assigns responsibilities for employees' limited personal use of Government resources (office equipment and other resources including information technology) within DOE, including NNSA. The Order is required to provide guidance on appropriate and inappropriate uses of Government resources. This Order was certified 04/23/2009 as accurate and continues to be relevant and appropriate for use by the Department. Certified 4-23-09. No cancellation.

2005-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

247

Percentage of Total Natural Gas Commercial Deliveries included in Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

City Gate Price Residential Price Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices Commercial Price Percentage of Total Commercial Deliveries included in Prices Industrial Price Percentage of Total Industrial Deliveries included in Prices Electric Power Price Period: Monthly Annual City Gate Price Residential Price Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices Commercial Price Percentage of Total Commercial Deliveries included in Prices Industrial Price Percentage of Total Industrial Deliveries included in Prices Electric Power Price Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History U.S. 63.3 59.3 57.9 57.0 57.4 61.3 1983-2013 Alabama 71.7 71.0 68.5 68.2 68.4 66.7 1989-2013 Alaska 94.1 91.6 91.1 91.0 92.3 92.6 1989-2013 Arizona 84.0 83.0 81.6 80.3 82.8 82.7 1989-2013 Arkansas 37.8 28.3 28.1 28.6 26.7 28.0 1989-2013

248

Percentage of Total Natural Gas Industrial Deliveries included in Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

City Gate Price Residential Price Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices Commercial Price Percentage of Total Commercial Deliveries included in Prices Industrial Price Percentage of Total Industrial Deliveries included in Prices Electric Power Price Period: Monthly Annual City Gate Price Residential Price Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices Commercial Price Percentage of Total Commercial Deliveries included in Prices Industrial Price Percentage of Total Industrial Deliveries included in Prices Electric Power Price Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History U.S. 16.5 16.3 16.0 16.2 16.6 16.9 2001-2013 Alabama 22.1 21.7 21.6 22.8 22.0 22.7 2001-2013 Alaska 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2001-2013 Arizona 13.4 15.7 15.3 13.8 13.7 13.9 2001-2013 Arkansas 1.7 1.4 1.2 1.4 1.3 1.5 2001-2013

249

Nonadiabatic dynamics of electron transfer in solution: Explicit and implicit solvent treatments that include multiple relaxation time scales  

SciTech Connect

The development of efficient theoretical methods for describing electron transfer (ET) reactions in condensed phases is important for a variety of chemical and biological applications. Previously, dynamical dielectric continuum theory was used to derive Langevin equations for a single collective solvent coordinate describing ET in a polar solvent. In this theory, the parameters are directly related to the physical properties of the system and can be determined from experimental data or explicit molecular dynamics simulations. Herein, we combine these Langevin equations with surface hopping nonadiabatic dynamics methods to calculate the rate constants for thermal ET reactions in polar solvents for a wide range of electronic couplings and reaction free energies. Comparison of explicit and implicit solvent calculations illustrates that the mapping from explicit to implicit solvent models is valid even for solvents exhibiting complex relaxation behavior with multiple relaxation time scales and a short-time inertial response. The rate constants calculated for implicit solvent models with a single solvent relaxation time scale corresponding to water, acetonitrile, and methanol agree well with analytical theories in the Golden rule and solvent-controlled regimes, as well as in the intermediate regime. The implicit solvent models with two relaxation time scales are in qualitative agreement with the analytical theories but quantitatively overestimate the rate constants compared to these theories. Analysis of these simulations elucidates the importance of multiple relaxation time scales and the inertial component of the solvent response, as well as potential shortcomings of the analytical theories based on single time scale solvent relaxation models. This implicit solvent approach will enable the simulation of a wide range of ET reactions via the stochastic dynamics of a single collective solvent coordinate with parameters that are relevant to experimentally accessible systems.

Schwerdtfeger, Christine A.; Soudackov, Alexander V.; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon, E-mail: shs3@illinois.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 600 South Mathews Avenue, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)] [Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 600 South Mathews Avenue, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

2014-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

250

Underground Coal Thermal Treatment  

SciTech Connect

The long-term objective of this work is to develop a transformational energy production technology by insitu thermal treatment of a coal seam for the production of substitute natural gas (SNG) while leaving much of the coalâ??s carbon in the ground. This process converts coal to a high-efficiency, low-GHG emitting gas fuel. It holds the potential of providing environmentally acceptable access to previously unusable coal resources. This topical report discusses the development of experimental capabilities, the collection of available data, and the development of simulation tools to obtain process thermo-chemical and geo-thermal parameters in preparation for the eventual demonstration in a coal seam. It also includes experimental and modeling studies of CO{sub 2} sequestration. Efforts focused on: â?¢ Constructing a suite of three different coal pyrolysis reactors. These reactors offer the ability to gather heat transfer, mass transfer and kinetic data during coal pyrolysis under conditions that mimic in situ conditions (Subtask 6.1). â?¢ Studying the operational parameters for various underground thermal treatment processes for oil shale and coal and completing a design matrix analysis for the underground coal thermal treatment (UCTT). This analysis yielded recommendations for terms of targeted coal rank, well orientation, rubblization, presence of oxygen, temperature, pressure, and heating sources (Subtask 6.2). â?¢ Developing capabilities for simulating UCTT, including modifying the geometry as well as the solution algorithm to achieve long simulation times in a rubblized coal bed by resolving the convective channels occurring in the representative domain (Subtask 6.3). â?¢ Studying the reactive behavior of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) with limestone, sandstone, arkose (a more complex sandstone) and peridotite, including mineralogical changes and brine chemistry for the different initial rock compositions (Subtask 6.4). Arkose exhibited the highest tendency of participating in mineral reactions, which can be attributed to the geochemical complexity of its initial mineral assemblage. In experiments with limestone, continuous dissolution was observed with the release of CO{sub 2} gas, indicated by the increasing pressure in the reactor (formation of a gas chamber). This occurred due to the lack of any source of alkali to buffer the solution. Arkose has the geochemical complexity for permanent sequestration of CO{sub 2} as carbonates and is also relatively abundant. The effect of including NH{sub 3} in the injected gas stream was also investigated in this study. Precipitation of calcite and trace amounts of ammonium zeolites was observed. A batch geochemical model was developed using Geochemists Workbench (GWB). Degassing effect in the experiments was corrected using the sliding fugacity model in GWB. Experimental and simulation results were compared and a reasonable agreement between the two was observed.

P. Smith; M. Deo; E. Eddings; A. Sarofim; K. Gueishen; M. Hradisky; K. Kelly; P. Mandalaparty; H. Zhang

2011-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

251

Honda Smart Home to Include Berkeley Lab Ventilation Controller  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Honda Smart Home to Include Berkeley Lab Ventilation Controller Honda Smart Home to Include Berkeley Lab Ventilation Controller Honda smart home October 2013 October-November Special Focus: Energy Efficiency, Buildings, and the Electric Grid Honda Motor Company Inc is proceeding with plans to build a Smart Home in Davis, California, to demonstrate the latest in renewable energy technologies and energy efficiency. The home is expected to produce more energy than is consumed, demonstrating how the goal of "zero net energy" can be met in the near term future. A ventilation controller developed by researchers at Berkeley Lab's Environmental Energy Technologies Division (EETD) will be included in the smart home. EETD is currently working with the developers of the home control system to integrate its control algorithms.

252

DOE Revises its NEPA Regulations, Including Categorical Exclusions |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Revises its NEPA Regulations, Including Categorical Exclusions Revises its NEPA Regulations, Including Categorical Exclusions DOE Revises its NEPA Regulations, Including Categorical Exclusions September 30, 2011 - 2:30pm Addthis On September 27, 2011, the Department of Energy (DOE) approved revisions to its National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) regulations, and on September 28th, submitted the revisions to the Federal Register. The final regulations, which become effective 30 days after publication in the Federal Register, are the culmination of a 2-year process to review and update DOE's NEPA implementing procedures. This process involved internal evaluation, public participation, and Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) review. The revisions are designed to focus Departmental resources on projects with the potential for significant environmental impact, to better

253

Introduction to Small-Scale Photovoltaic Systems (Including RETScreen Case  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Introduction to Small-Scale Photovoltaic Systems (Including RETScreen Case Introduction to Small-Scale Photovoltaic Systems (Including RETScreen Case Study) (Webinar) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Introduction to Small-Scale Photovoltaic Systems (Including RETScreen Case Study) (Webinar) Focus Area: Solar Topics: Market Analysis Website: www.leonardo-energy.org/webinar-introduction-small-scale-photovoltaic- Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/introduction-small-scale-photovoltaic Language: English Policies: Deployment Programs DeploymentPrograms: Project Development This video teaches the viewer about photovoltaic arrays and RETscreen's photovoltaic module, which can be used to project the cost and production of an array. An example case study was

254

projects are valued at approximately $67 million (including $15 million  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

projects are valued at approximately $67 million (including $15 million projects are valued at approximately $67 million (including $15 million in non-Federal cost sharing) over four years. The overall goal of the research is to develop carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) capture and separation technologies that can achieve at least 90 percent CO 2 removal at no more than a 35 percent increase in the cost of electricity. The projects, managed by FE's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), include: (1) Linde, LLC, which will use a post-combustion capture technology incorporating BASF's novel amine-based process at a 1-megawatt electric (MWe) equivalent slipstream pilot plant at the National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC) (DOE contribution: $15 million); (2) Neumann Systems Group, Inc., which will design, construct, and test a patented NeuStreamTM absorber at the Colorado

255

Including Tunneling in Non-Born–Oppenheimer Simulations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Including Tunneling in Non-Born–Oppenheimer Simulations ... We note that tunneling may be included in the modeling of electronically nonadiabatic processes by other methods as well, for example, quantal wave packet methods where the wave packet is not restricted to follow a classical trajectory,(18) path integral dynamics,(19-21) and the initial value representation,(22) but these methods will require more development of efficient computational strategies for their practical application to complex systems, whereas the method proposed here has a cost comparable to non-Born–Oppenheimer (NBO) trajectory calculations that do not include tunneling. ... We also ran Born–Oppenheimer trajectories with the same total energy on the adiabatic ground state for comparison. ...

Jingjing Zheng; Rubén Meana-Pañeda; Donald G. Truhlar

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

256

Thin film solar cell including a spatially modulated intrinsic layer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

One or more thin film solar cells in which the intrinsic layer of substantially amorphous semiconductor alloy material thereof includes at least a first band gap portion and a narrower band gap portion. The band gap of the intrinsic layer is spatially graded through a portion of the bulk thickness, said graded portion including a region removed from the intrinsic layer-dopant layer interfaces. The band gap of the intrinsic layer is always less than the band gap of the doped layers. The gradation of the intrinsic layer is effected such that the open circuit voltage and/or the fill factor of the one or plural solar cell structure is enhanced.

Guha, Subhendu (Troy, MI); Yang, Chi-Chung (Troy, MI); Ovshinsky, Stanford R. (Bloomfield Hills, MI)

1989-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

257

Solar Energy Education. Renewable energy: a background text. [Includes glossary  

SciTech Connect

Some of the most common forms of renewable energy are presented in this textbook for students. The topics include solar energy, wind power hydroelectric power, biomass ocean thermal energy, and tidal and geothermal energy. The main emphasis of the text is on the sun and the solar energy that it yields. Discussions on the sun's composition and the relationship between the earth, sun and atmosphere are provided. Insolation, active and passive solar systems, and solar collectors are the subtopics included under solar energy. (BCS)

Not Available

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Methods of producing adsorption media including a metal oxide  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods of producing a metal oxide are disclosed. The method comprises dissolving a metal salt in a reaction solvent to form a metal salt/reaction solvent solution. The metal salt is converted to a metal oxide and a caustic solution is added to the metal oxide/reaction solvent solution to adjust the pH of the metal oxide/reaction solvent solution to less than approximately 7.0. The metal oxide is precipitated and recovered. A method of producing adsorption media including the metal oxide is also disclosed, as is a precursor of an active component including particles of a metal oxide.

Mann, Nicholas R; Tranter, Troy J

2014-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

259

Watson Library enhancements to include new service desk  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

12/5/13 KU Libraries News: Watson Library enhancements to include new service desk www.lib.ku.edu/news/newservicedesk.shtml 1/1 Contact Us The University of Kansas Libraries Lawrence, KS 66045 (785) 864-8983 Copyright © 2013 by the University... of Kansas Watson Library enhancements to include new service desk The University of Kansas Libraries is adding a new service desk to Watson Library to enhance the user experience and draw attention to new and existing resources. The desk, which...

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Design of experiments to assess pre-treatment and co-digestion strategies that optimize biogas production from macroalgae Gracilaria vermiculophylla  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A design of experiments was applied to evaluate different strategies to enhance the methane yield of macroalgae Gracilaria vermiculophylla. Biochemical Methane Potential (BMP) of G. vermiculophylla after physical pre-treatment (washing and maceration) reached 481 ± 9 L CH4 kg?1 VS, corresponding to a methane yield of 79 ± 2%. No significant effects were achieved in the BMP after thermochemical pre-treatment, although the seaweeds solubilisation increased up to 44%. Co-digestion with glycerol or sewage sludge has proved to be effective for increasing the methane production. Addition of 2% glycerol (w:w) increased the BMP by 18%, achieving almost complete methanation of the substrate (96 ± 3%). Co-digestion of seaweed and secondary sludge (15:85%, TS/TS) increased the BMP by 25% (605 ± 4 L CH4 kg?1 VS) compared to the seaweed individual digestion.

J.V. Oliveira; M.M. Alves; J.C. Costa

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes sewage treatment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Requirements: A minimum of 15 PSYC credits, including  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

» Three other 2000-3000-level PSYC courses (any area) No more than 3 credits of PSYC 3889 or 3999 canRequirements: A minimum of 15 PSYC credits, including: » One Area I course » One Area II course) ___2100 (Principles of Research in Psychology) Area I. Social, Developmental, Clinical, & Industrial

Alpay, S. Pamir

262

Procedures in Modules (1) Including all procedures within modules  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Procedures in Modules (1) Including all procedures within modules works very well in almost all designing these if possible #12;Procedures in Modules (2) These are very much like internal procedures Works very well in almost all programs Everything accessible in the module can also be used in the procedure

263

Free Energy Efficiency Kit includes CFL light bulbs,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Free Energy Efficiency Kit Kit includes CFL light bulbs, spray foam, low-flow shower head, and more! Building Science 101 Presentation BPI Certified Building Professionals will present home energy efficiency for discounted energy assessments. FREE HOME ENERGY EFFICIENCY SEMINAR N e w R i ver L i g ht & Pow e r a n d W

Rose, Annkatrin

264

Biomass Potentials from California Forest and Shrublands Including Fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biomass Potentials from California Forest and Shrublands Including Fuel Reduction Potentials-04-004 February 2005 Revised: October 2005 Arnold Schwarzenegger, Governor, State of California #12;Biomass Tiangco, CEC Bryan M. Jenkins, University of California #12;Biomass Potentials from California Forest

265

Project Management Business Process Project Delivery Processes Includes VE Budget  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Project Management Business Process Project Delivery Processes Includes VE Budget Schedule Activities that do/could feed into PMBP LEGEND VE Cost Avoidance Program Coverage Document Results (Before, could use the value methodology to facilitate after action review. The project manager is responsible

US Army Corps of Engineers

266

DISTINCTIONS The unique combination of factors which distinguish Berea includes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

throughout Appala- chia. SUSTAINABLE CAMPUS FEATURES The College environment demonstrates sustainable living and enhances student learning. Recently renovated historical buildings and residence halls include sustain, Washington Monthly ranked Berea the #1 liberal arts college in the nation Listed as a "Best Buy" college

Baltisberger, Jay H.

267

FORUMA Hamilton Spectator Town Hall Event SPEAKERS INCLUDE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

R001990104 OPEN FORUMA Hamilton Spectator Town Hall Event SPEAKERS INCLUDE: STEVE BUIST, Spectator, former chairman of Hamilton-Wentworth region and now president and CEO of the Hamilton Community Foundation. DR. CHRIS MACKIE, Hamilton's associate medical officer of health. MARK CHAMBERLAIN, president

Thompson, Michael

268

ASTRO-F/FIS observing simulation including detector characteristics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ASTRO-F/FIS observing simulation including detector characteristics Woong-Seob Jeong a,*, Soojong instruments, the far-infrared surveyor (FIS) will map the entire sky in four bands using short wavelength (SW- oped a suite of software with an aim to simulate the FIS observations (Jeong et al., 2000, 2003, 2004

Pak, Soojong

269

ASTRO-F/FIS Observing Simulation Including Detector Characteristics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ASTRO-F/FIS Observing Simulation Including Detector Characteristics Woong-Seob Jeong1, Soojong Pak1 simulations to examined the detector characteristics on the FIS instrument (Far- Infrared Surveyor) images narrow and wide bands using a short wavelength (SW) and long wavelength (LW) detector array. The FIS (Far

Lee, Hyung Mok

270

cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1,018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids.

Raikhel, N.V.; Broekaert, W.F.; Namhai Chua; Kush, A.

1993-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

271

Methods of Purchasing Purchasing methods include the different  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

" purchases must be reviewed and approved by the Controller's Office. This may result in the end user beingMethods of Purchasing Purchasing methods include the different processes of ordering goods and/or services, and encumbering funds. #12;Method of Purchase Field Purchase Orders (FPO) Accepted

272

Italy (including San Marino) Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Western Europe » Italy Western Europe » Italy (including San Marino) Italy (including San Marino) Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions Graph graphic Graphics Data graphic Data Trends As occurred in many industrialized nations, CO2 emissions from Italy rose steeply since the late 1940's until the growth was abruptly terminated in 1974. Since 1974, emissions from liquid fuels have vacillated, dropping from 76% to 46% of a static but varying total. Significant increases in natural gas consumption have compensated for the drop in oil consumption. In 2008, 35.8% of Italy's fossil-fuel CO2 emissions were due to natural gas consumption. Coal usage grew steadily until 1985 when CO2 emissions from coal consumption reached 16 million metric tons of carbon. Not until 2004 did coal usage exceed 1985 levels and now accounts for 13.9% of Italy's

273

Multi-processor including data flow accelerator module  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An accelerator module for a data flow computer includes an intelligent memory. The module is added to a multiprocessor arrangement and uses a shared tagged memory architecture in the data flow computer. The intelligent memory module assigns locations for holding data values in correspondence with arcs leading to a node in a data dependency graph. Each primitive computation is associated with a corresponding memory cell, including a number of slots for operands needed to execute a primitive computation, a primitive identifying pointer, and linking slots for distributing the result of the cell computation to other cells requiring that result as an operand. Circuitry is provided for utilizing tag bits to determine automatically when all operands required by a processor are available and for scheduling the primitive for execution in a queue. Each memory cell of the module may be associated with any of the primitives, and the particular primitive to be executed by the processor associated with the cell is identified by providing an index, such as the cell number for the primitive, to the primitive lookup table of starting addresses. The module thus serves to perform functions previously performed by a number of sections of data flow architectures and coexists with conventional shared memory therein. A multiprocessing system including the module operates in a hybrid mode, wherein the same processing modules are used to perform some processing in a sequential mode, under immediate control of an operating system, while performing other processing in a data flow mode.

Davidson, George S. (Albuquerque, NM); Pierce, Paul E. (Albuquerque, NM)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Surface Treatment by Laser  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

By this treatment, new hardenings of the surface can occur; the surface is higher alloyed by remelting, or layers...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

United States/Mexico electricity trade study. [Glossary included  

SciTech Connect

During energy discussions between the United States and Mexico, it was suggested that the two countries revisit the issue of enhanced electricity trade because 10 years had elapsed since this issue was first studied. Responsibility to organize the updated study was jointly assigned to the US and to the Comision Federal de Electricidad (CFE). The study highlights the opportunities for increased cooperation among the electric utilities in the U.S. and Mexico. Direct benefits could include increased reliability of electric power service and cost savings through diversity of peak demand patterns and locational benefits associated with the siting of new generation sources. Indirect benefits could include improved economic and employment opportunities, especially in the border areas of both countries. While the study indicates that increased electricity trade is possible, there are significant technical and economic issues to consider. Any major increase in electricity trade would require a higher level of cooperation and coordination among utilities in both countries and would need to be preceded by a detailed analysis of associated benefits and costs (including environmental impacts) on both a short-term and a long-term basis. Whether US utilities and CFE decide to pursue specific projects will depend upon the need for and economics of those projects. The study recommends that the work begun by the two utility groups be continued. The study also recommends that regulators at all levels consider policies to increase coordination and review among all relevant parties so that unnecessary delays in planning and constructing needed facilities are avoided. 12 figs., 17 tabs.

Not Available

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

E-Print Network 3.0 - air treatment system Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Last Updated: 41702 Summary: , including refrigeration, air conditioning, heating systems, ventilating fans, roof ventilators, exhaust fans... , water treatment equipment,...

277

Information regarding previous INCITE awards including selected highlights  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Information regarding previous INCITE awards including selected highlights Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) ASCR Home About Research Facilities Accessing ASCR Supercomputers Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF) Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) Research & Evaluation Prototypes (REP) Innovative & Novel Computational Impact on Theory and Experiment (INCITE) ASCR Leadership Computing Challenge (ALCC) Science Highlights Benefits of ASCR Funding Opportunities Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee (ASCAC) News & Resources Contact Information Advanced Scientific Computing Research U.S. Department of Energy SC-21/Germantown Building

278

Composite armor, armor system and vehicle including armor system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Composite armor panels are disclosed. Each panel comprises a plurality of functional layers comprising at least an outermost layer, an intermediate layer and a base layer. An armor system incorporating armor panels is also disclosed. Armor panels are mounted on carriages movably secured to adjacent rails of a rail system. Each panel may be moved on its associated rail and into partially overlapping relationship with another panel on an adjacent rail for protection against incoming ordnance from various directions. The rail system may be configured as at least a part of a ring, and be disposed about a hatch on a vehicle. Vehicles including an armor system are also disclosed.

Chu, Henry S.; Jones, Warren F.; Lacy, Jeffrey M.; Thinnes, Gary L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a pu GOVERNMENT RIGHTS This application was funded under Department of Energy Contract DE-AC02-76ER01338. The U.S. Government has certain rights under this application and any patent issuing thereon.

Raikhel, Natasha V. (Okemos, MI); Broekaert, Willem F. (Dilbeek, BE); Chua, Nam-Hai (Scarsdale, NY); Kush, Anil (New York, NY)

1993-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

280

Reliability modeling of transmission and distribution systems including dependent failures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is considered. Therefore, the trans i t ion rate mat r i x of the entire system need not be generated. Th i s method is compared wi th the sequential method for normal and stormy weather condit ions, and is then extended to include m weather conditions... . 9 E . Cut -Set Equations 10 III M A R K O V C U T - S E T M E T H O D 13 A . Basic Approach 13 B . Markov Cut -Set Me thod 13 C . Examp le 18 D . Compar ison wi th the Sequential Me thod 22 E . Cut-Sets w i th m Weather States 24 F . Extens...

Beydoun, Rami Sami

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes sewage treatment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

[Article 1 of 7: Motivates and Includes the Consumer]  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 of 7: Research on the Characteristics of a Modern Grid by the NETL 2 of 7: Research on the Characteristics of a Modern Grid by the NETL Modern Grid Strategy Team Accommodates All Generation and Storage Options Last month we presented the first Principal Characteristic of a Modern Grid, "Motivates and Includes the Consumer". This month we present a second characteristic, "Accommodates All Generation and Storage Options". This characteristic will fundamentally transition today's grid from a centralized model for generation to one that also has a more balanced contribution from decentralized generation and storage. This characteristic, along with the other six, define a Modern Grid that will power the 21 st Century economy. For a more detailed discussion on "Accommodates All Generation and Storage Options", please see:

282

Search for Earth-like planets includes LANL star analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Search for earth-like planets Search for earth-like planets Search for Earth-like planets includes LANL star analysis The mission will not only be able to search for planets around other stars, but also yield new insights into the parent stars themselves. March 6, 2009 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials.

283

Notices ROUTINE USES OF RECORDS MAINTAINED IN THE SYSTEM, INCLUDING  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

83 Federal Register 83 Federal Register / Vol. 78, No. 51 / Friday, March 15, 2013 / Notices ROUTINE USES OF RECORDS MAINTAINED IN THE SYSTEM, INCLUDING CATEGORIES OF USERS AND THE PURPOSES OF SUCH USES: The Department may disclose information contained in a record in this system of records under the routine uses listed in this system of records without the consent of the individual if the disclosure is compatible with the purposes for which the record was collected. These disclosures may be made on a case-by-case basis or, if the Department has complied with the computer matching requirements of the Privacy Act of 1974, as amended (Privacy Act), under a computer matching agreement. Any disclosure of individually identifiable information from a record in this system must also comply with the requirements of section

284

Including stereoscopic information in the reconstruction of coronal magnetic fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a method to include stereoscopic information about the three dimensional structure of flux tubes into the reconstruction of the coronal magnetic field. Due to the low plasma beta in the corona we can assume a force free magnetic field, with the current density parallel to the magnetic field lines. Here we use linear force free fields for simplicity. The method uses the line of sight magnetic field on the photosphere as observational input. The value of $\\alpha$ is determined iteratively by comparing the reconstructed magnetic field with the observed structures. The final configuration is the optimal linear force solution constrained by both the photospheric magnetogram and the observed plasma structures. As an example we apply our method to SOHO MDI/EIT data of an active region. In the future it is planned to apply the method to analyse data from the SECCHI instrument aboard the STEREO mission.

T. Wiegelmann; T. Neukirch

2008-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

285

Electra-optical device including a nitrogen containing electrolyte  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Described is a thin-film battery, especially a thin-film microbattery, and a method for making same having application as a backup or primary integrated power source for electronic devices. The battery includes a novel electrolyte which is electrochemically stable and does not react with the lithium anode and a novel vanadium oxide cathode Configured as a microbattery, the battery can be fabricated directly onto a semiconductor chip, onto the semiconductor die or onto any portion of the chip carrier. The battery can be fabricated to any specified size or shape to meet the requirements of a particular application. The battery is fabricated of solid state materials and is capable of operation between -15.degree. C. and 150.degree. C.

Bates, John B. (Oak Ridge, TN); Dudney, Nancy J. (Knoxville, TN); Gruzalski, Greg R. (Oak Ridge, TN); Luck, Christopher F. (Knoxville, TN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Copper laser modulator driving assembly including a magnetic compression laser  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A laser modulator (10) having a low voltage assembly (12) with a plurality of low voltage modules (14) with first stage magnetic compression circuits (20) and magnetic assist inductors (28) with a common core (91), such that timing of the first stage magnetic switches (30b) is thereby synchronized. A bipolar second stage of magnetic compression (42) is coupled to the low voltage modules (14) through a bipolar pulse transformer (36) and a third stage of magnetic compression (44) is directly coupled to the second stage of magnetic compression (42). The low voltage assembly (12) includes pressurized boxes (117) for improving voltage standoff between the primary winding assemblies (34) and secondary winding (40) contained therein.

Cook, Edward G. (Livermore, CA); Birx, Daniel L. (Oakley, CA); Ball, Don G. (Livermore, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Fuel cell repeater unit including frame and separator plate  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An example fuel cell repeater includes a separator plate and a frame establishing at least a portion of a flow path that is operative to communicate fuel to or from at least one fuel cell held by the frame relative to the separator plate. The flow path has a perimeter and any fuel within the perimeter flow across the at least one fuel cell in a first direction. The separator plate, the frame, or both establish at least one conduit positioned outside the flow path perimeter. The conduit is outside of the flow path perimeter and is configured to direct flow in a second, different direction. The conduit is fluidly coupled with the flow path.

Yamanis, Jean; Hawkes, Justin R; Chiapetta, Jr., Louis; Bird, Connie E; Sun, Ellen Y; Croteau, Paul F

2013-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

288

Guide to treatment technology for contaminated soils  

SciTech Connect

This document is a guide for the screening of alternative treatment technologies for contaminated soils. The contents of this guide are organized into: 1. Introduction, II. Utilizing the table, III. Tables: Contamination Versus Technology, TV. Contaminant Waste Groups, and V. References. The four Contaminations Versus Technology tables are designed to identify the effectiveness and/or potential applicability of technologies to some or all compounds within specific waste groups. The tables also present limitations and special use considerations for the particular treatment technology. The phase of development of the technology is also included in the table. The phases are: Available, Innovative, and Emerging technologies. The technologies presented in this guide are organized according to the method of treatment. The four (4) treatment methods are Biological, Solidification/Stabilization, Thermal, and Chemical/Physical Treatment. There are several processing methods; some are well developed and proven, and others are in the development stage.

Tran, H.; Aylward, R.

1992-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

289

Successfully merging architectural and electronic acoustical treatments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In enclosed volumes the integration of electronic acoustical components with architectural surface treatments forms a hybrid system that produces the perceived acoustical conditions. Since the underlying operating principles for electro-acoustic enhancement systems differs considerably between manufacturers the requirements for system infrastructure are not germane nor is the optimum integration of architectural treatments. As a result the nature of the work performed by the acoustical consultant changes to accommodate optimum performance of the specific “hybrid” system which may also include other forms of variable treatments.

Steve Barbar

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74-79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli.

Raikhel, Natasha V. (Okemos, MI); Broekaert, Willem F. (Dilbeek, BE); Chua, Nam-Hai (Scarsdale, NY); Kush, Anil (New York, NY)

1999-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

291

CDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74-79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli.

Raikhel, Natasha V. (Okemos, MI); Broekaert, Willem F. (Dilbeek, BE); Chua, Nam-Hai (Scarsdale, NY); Kush, Anil (New York, NY)

1995-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

292

cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74--79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli. 12 figs.

Raikhel, N.V.; Broekaert, W.F.; Chua, N.H.; Kush, A.

1999-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

293

cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1,018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74--79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli. 11 figures.

Raikhel, N.V.; Broekaert, W.F.; Chua, N.H.; Kush, A.

1995-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

294

Extractant composition including crown ether and calixarene extractants  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An extractant composition comprising a mixed extractant solvent consisting of calix[4] arene-bis-(tert-octylbenzo)-crown-6 ("BOBCalixC6"), 4',4',(5')-di-(t-butyldicyclo-hexano)-18-crown-6 ("DtBu18C6"), and at least one modifier dissolved in a diluent. The DtBu18C6 may be present at from approximately 0.01M to approximately 0.4M, such as at from approximately 0.086 M to approximately 0.108 M. The modifier may be 1-(2,2,3,3-tetrafluoropropoxy)-3-(4-sec-butylphenoxy)-2-propanol ("Cs-7SB") and may be present at from approximately 0.01M to approximately 0.8M. In one embodiment, the mixed extractant solvent includes approximately 0.15M DtBu18C6, approximately 0.007M BOBCalixC6, and approximately 0.75M Cs-7SB modifier dissolved in an isoparaffinic hydrocarbon diluent. The extractant composition further comprises an aqueous phase. The mixed extractant solvent may be used to remove cesium and strontium from the aqueous phase.

Meikrantz, David H. (Idaho Falls, ID); Todd, Terry A. (Aberdeen, ID); Riddle, Catherine L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Law, Jack D. (Pocalello, ID); Peterman, Dean R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Mincher, Bruce J. (Idaho Falls, ID); McGrath, Christopher A. (Blackfoot, ID); Baker, John D. (Blackfoot, ID)

2009-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

295

Process simulation of refinery units including chemical reactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Process simulation methods for design and operation of refinery units are well established as long as no chemical reactors are included. The feedstocks are divided into pseudo-components which enables calculation of phase equilibria and transport properties. When chemical reactors are present some chemical conversion takes place which obviously affects the nature of the pseudo-components and their properties. The stream leaving the reactor will not only be of a different composition than the stream entering the reactor but in addition, the pseudo-components making up the outlet stream will also have other physical properties than the ones in the inlet stream. These changes affect not only the reactor unit but also the simulation of the whole flow-sheet. The paper presents a detailed model for an adiabatic distillate hydrotreater which takes into account the elemental composition of the feed. A special simulation strategy has been developed to incorporate such reactor units into process simulators. Finally, the simulation strategy is illustrated for a hydrotreating plant.

Jens A. Hansen; Barry H. Cooper

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

International Best Practices for Pre-Processing and Co-Processing Municipal Solid Waste and Sewage Sludge in the Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sludge treatment to increase biogas production. Available atal. , no date) Use of biogas from anaerobic sludge digestionsludge are mass reduction, biogas production, and improved

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Responding to Changing Workforce Needs and Challenges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for utilities sector including electric power, natural gas, steam supply, water supply, and sewage removal #12

298

Journal of Hazardous Materials 252253 (2013) 375381 Contents lists available at SciVerse ScienceDirect  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

include land application of sewage sludge, wastewater irrigation, and disposal of expired pharmaceutical

Ma, Lena

299

Toxicogenomic Response of Rhodospirillum rubrum S1H to the Micropollutant Triclosan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...MELISSA pilot plant facility as a...compounds in a sewage treatment plant located on the...Halden. 2007. Mass balance assessment of...conventional sewage treatment. Chemosphere...chemical fate during wastewater treatment. Environ...

Benny F. G. Pycke; Guido Vanermen; Pieter Monsieurs; Heleen De Wever; Max Mergeay; Willy Verstraete; Natalie Leys

2010-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

300

Inventory of Shale Formations in the US, Including Geologic, Hydrological, and Mechanical Characteristics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

shales. THE DEVELOPMENT OF CORRELATIONS TO ASSESS FORMATION PROPERTIES AND CONDITIONS Treatment of Anisotropic

Dobson, Patrick

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes sewage treatment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Medical Actinium Therapeutic Treatment  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Learn how INL researchers are increasing world supplies of Bismuth 213 to help with cancer treatments. For more information about INL research projects, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

None

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

302

Electrodialysis in Water Treatment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This chapter focuses on the uses of electrodialysis and specially electrodialysis reversal for the treatment of brackish and groundwater to produce drinking water. Over the last 10–15 years,...

Andréa Moura Bernardes; Marco A. S. Rodrigues

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

6230 surface treatment [n  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

constr. (Surfacing of manufactured stone products, metals, wood,...Specific term for surface treatment of stones with hammer and chisel tooling); syn. surfacing [n] (2);s tratamiento [m] de superfici...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Waste Treatment Plant - 12508  

SciTech Connect

The Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) will immobilize millions of gallons of Hanford's tank waste into solid glass using a proven technology called vitrification. The vitrification process will turn the waste into a stable glass form that is safe for long-term storage. Our discussion of the WTP will include a description of the ongoing design and construction of this large, complex, first-of-a-kind project. The concept for the operation of the WTP is to separate high-level and low-activity waste fractions, and immobilize those fractions in glass using vitrification. The WTP includes four major nuclear facilities and various support facilities. Waste from the Tank Farms is first pumped to the Pretreatment Facility at the WTP through an underground pipe-in-pipe system. When construction is complete, the Pretreatment Facility will be 12 stories high, 540 feet long and 215 feet wide, making it the largest of the four major nuclear facilities that compose the WTP. The total size of this facility will be more than 490,000 square feet. More than 8.2 million craft hours are required to construct this facility. Currently, the Pretreatment Facility is 51 percent complete. At the Pretreatment Facility the waste is pumped to the interior waste feed receipt vessels. Each of these four vessels is 55-feet tall and has a 375,000 gallon capacity, which makes them the largest vessels inside the Pretreatment Facility. These vessels contain a series of internal pulse-jet mixers to keep incoming waste properly mixed. The vessels are inside the black-cell areas, completely enclosed behind thick steel-laced, high strength concrete walls. The black cells are designed to be maintenance free with no moving parts. Once hot operations commence the black-cell area will be inaccessible. Surrounded by black cells, is the 'hot cell canyon'. The hot cell contains all the moving and replaceable components to remove solids and extract liquids. In this area, there is ultrafiltration equipment, cesium-ion exchange columns, evaporator boilers and recirculation pumps, and various mechanical process pumps for transferring process fluids. During the first phase of pretreatment, the waste will be concentrated using an evaporation process. Solids will be filtered out, and the remaining soluble, highly radioactive isotopes will be removed using an ion-exchange process. The high-level solids will be sent to the High-Level Waste (HLW) Vitrification Facility, and the low activity liquids will be sent to the Low-Activity Waste (LAW) Vitrification Facility for further processing. The high-level waste will be transferred via underground pipes to the HLW Facility from the Pretreatment Facility. The waste first arrives at the wet cell, which rests inside a black-cell area. The pretreated waste is transferred through shielded pipes into a series of melter preparation and feed vessels before reaching the melters. Liquids from various facility processes also return to the wet cell for interim storage before recycling back to the Pretreatment Facility. (authors)

Harp, Benton; Olds, Erik [US DOE (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Gas injection to inhibit migration during an in situ heat treatment process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods of treating a subsurface formation are described herein. Methods for treating a subsurface treatment area in a formation may include introducing a fluid into the formation from a plurality of wells offset from a treatment area of an in situ heat treatment process to inhibit outward migration of formation fluid from the in situ heat treatment process.

Kuhlman, Myron Ira (Houston, TX); Vinegar; Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Baker, Ralph Sterman (Fitchburg, MA); Heron, Goren (Keene, CA)

2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

306

Water treatment facilities (excluding wastewater facilities). (Latest citations from the Selected Water Resources Abstracts database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the design, construction, costs, and operation of water treatment facilities. Facilities covered include those that provide drinking water, domestic water, and water for industrial use. Types of water treatment covered include reverse osmosis, chlorination, filtration, and ozonization. Waste water treatment facilities are excluded from this bibliography. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

ADHERENCE TO TREATMENT GUIDELINES FOR THE PREVENTION OF MOTHER-TO-CHILD HIV TRANSMISSION IN KENYA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Access to the most effective treatments is not universal and treatment coverage for the prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) is still low in many countries, including Kenya (WHO, 2010a). To improve uptake of ...

Clark, Kristine Frances

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

308

On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Selecting and Permitting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This publication explains factors to consider when choosing an on-site wastewater treatment system and lists the nine steps required to obtain a permit for one. It includes addresses and phone numbers of Texas Natural Resource Conservation...

Lesikar, Bruce J.

2005-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

309

Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Homeowner's Guide to Evaluating Service Contracts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This guide helps homeowners who are seeking maintenance services for their onsite wastewater treatment systems (such as septic systems). Included are definitions of common terms used in service contracts, types of service contracts available...

Lesikar, Bruce J.; O'Neill, Courtney; Deal, Nancy; Loomis, George; Gustafson, David; Lindbo, David

2008-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

310

Plasma Treatments and Biomass Gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Exploitation of forest resources for energy production includes various methods of biomass processing. Gasification is one of the ways to recover energy from biomass. Syngas produced from biomass can be used to power internal combustion engines or, after purification, to supply fuel cells. Recent studies have shown the potential to improve conventional biomass processing by coupling a plasma reactor to a pyrolysis cyclone reactor. The role of the plasma is twofold: it acts as a purification stage by reducing production of tars and aerosols, and simultaneously produces a rich hydrogen syngas. In a first part of the paper we present results obtained from plasma treatment of pyrolysis oils. The outlet gas composition is given for various types of oils obtained at different experimental conditions with a pyrolysis reactor. Given the complexity of the mixtures from processing of biomass, we present a study with methanol considered as a model molecule. This experimental method allows a first modeling approach based on a combustion kinetic model suitable to validate the coupling of plasma with conventional biomass process. The second part of the paper is summarizing results obtained through a plasma-pyrolysis reactor arrangement. The goal is to show the feasibility of this plasma-pyrolysis coupling and emphasize more fundamental studies to understand the role of the plasma in the biomass treatment processes.

J Luche; Q Falcoz; T Bastien; J P Leninger; K Arabi; O Aubry; A Khacef; J M Cormier; J Lédé

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Guidelines for makeup water treatment  

SciTech Connect

The EPRI Fossil Plant Cycle Chemistry Program, RP 2712, was developed in recognition of the importance of controlling cycle water and steam purity in attainment of maximized unit availability, reliability and efficiency. This guideline characterizes the state-of-the-art technology for production of cycle makeup water. It is intended to complement other RP 2712 projects in the areas of cycle chemistry guidelines, instrumentation and control, guideline demonstration and verification, and related subject areas. This guideline reviews available technology for and preferred approaches to production of fossil plant cycle makeup from various raw water supplies. Subject areas covered include makeup water source and source characteristics, unit processes comprising makeup treatment systems, guidelines for process selection, resin and membrane selection guidelines, techniques for monitoring performance and cost effectiveness, and waste disposal considerations. The report also identifies additional research activity needed to advance the state-of-the-art for makeup water treatment, results of a utility industry survey and other related topics. 72 refs., 60 figs., 74 tabs.

Cline, D.A. Jr.; Shields, K.J. (Powell (Sheppard T.) Associates, Baltimore, MD (USA))

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Non-biodegradable landfill leachate treatment by combined process of agitation, coagulation, SBR and filtration  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: • A novel method of stripping (agitation) was investigated for NH{sub 3}-N removal. • PFS coagulation followed agitation process enhanced the leachate biodegradation. • Nitrification–denitrification achieved by changing operation process in SBR treatment. • A dual filter of carbon-sand is suitable as a polishing treatment of leachate. • Combined treatment success for the complete treatment of non-biodegradable leachate. - Abstract: This study describes the complete treatment of non-biodegradable landfill leachate by combined treatment processes. The processes consist of agitation as a novel stripping method used to overcome the ammonia toxicity regarding aerobic microorganisms. The NH{sub 3}-N removal ratio was 93.9% obtained at pH 11.5 and a gradient velocity (G) 150 s{sup ?1} within a five-hour agitation time. By poly ferric sulphate (PFS) coagulation followed the agitation process; chemical oxygen demand (COD) and biological oxygen demand (BOD{sub 5}) were removed at 70.6% and 49.4%, respectively at an optimum dose of 1200 mg L{sup ?1} at pH 5.0. The biodegradable ratio BOD{sub 5}/COD was improved from 0.18 to 0.31 during pretreatment step by agitation and PFS coagulation. Thereafter, the effluent was diluted with sewage at a different ratio before it was subjected to sequencing batch reactor (SBR) treatment. Up to 93.3% BOD{sub 5}, 95.5% COD and 98.1% NH{sub 3}-N removal were achieved by SBR operated under anoxic–aerobic–anoxic conditions. The filtration process was carried out using sand and carbon as a dual filter media as polishing process. The final effluent concentration of COD, BOD{sub 5}, suspended solid (SS), NH{sub 3}-N and total organic carbon (TOC) were 72.4 mg L{sup ?1}, 22.8 mg L{sup ?1}, 24.2 mg L{sup ?1}, 18.4 mg L{sup ?1} and 50.8 mg L{sup ?1} respectively, which met the discharge standard. The results indicated that a combined process of agitation-coagulation-SBR and filtration effectively eliminated pollutant loading from landfill leachate.

Abood, Alkhafaji R. [State Key Laboratory of Biogeology and Environmental Geology, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); Thi Qar University, Nasiriyah (Iraq); Bao, Jianguo, E-mail: bjianguo888@126.com [State Key Laboratory of Biogeology and Environmental Geology, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); Du, Jiangkun; Zheng, Dan; Luo, Ye [State Key Laboratory of Biogeology and Environmental Geology, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

313

WASTEWATER TREATMENT OVER SAND COLUMNS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

93/0096 WASTEWATER TREATMENT OVER SAND COLUMNS TREATMENT YIELDS, LOCALISATION OF THE BIOMASS Domestic wastewater treatment by infiltration-percolation is a process that becomming common in France, a greater depth for desinfection purposes. KEYWORDS Wastewater treatment, Infiltration-percolation. Sand

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

314

ARM: Surface Radiation Measurement Quality Control testing, including climatologically configurable limits  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Surface Radiation Measurement Quality Control testing, including climatologically configurable limits

Hodges, Gary; Stoffel, Tom; Kutchenreiter, Mark; Kay, Bev; Habte, Aron; Ritsche, Michael; Morris, Victor; Anderberg, Mary

315

Cryogenic treatment of gas  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Systems and methods of treating a gas stream are described. A method of treating a gas stream includes cryogenically separating a first gas stream to form a second gas stream and a third stream. The third stream is cryogenically contacted with a carbon dioxide stream to form a fourth and fifth stream. A majority of the second gas stream includes methane and/or molecular hydrogen. A majority of the third stream includes one or more carbon oxides, hydrocarbons having a carbon number of at least 2, one or more sulfur compounds, or mixtures thereof. A majority of the fourth stream includes one or more of the carbon oxides and hydrocarbons having a carbon number of at least 2. A majority of the fifth stream includes hydrocarbons having a carbon number of at least 3 and one or more of the sulfur compounds.

Bravo, Jose Luis (Houston, TX); Harvey, III, Albert Destrehan (Kingwood, TX); Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX)

2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

316

Prevention & Treatment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Prevention and Treatment Prevention and Treatment These steps may help prevent the spread of respiratory illnesses such as the flu: Stay Healthy Vaccination Antivirals Stay Informed Stay Healthy Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze-throw the tissue away immediately after you use it. Wash your hands often with soap and water, especially after you cough or sneeze. If you are not near water, use an alcohol-based (60-95%) hand cleaner. Avoid close contact with people who are sick. When you are sick, keep your distance from others to protect them from getting sick too. If you get the flu, stay home from work, school, and social gatherings. This will help prevent others from catching your illness. Try not to touch your eyes, nose, or mouth. Germs often spread this way.

317

Waste Treatment Plant Overview  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Site, located in southeastern Washington state, Hanford Site, located in southeastern Washington state, was the largest of three defense production sites in the U.S. Over the span of 40 years, it was used to produce 64 metric tons of plutonium, helping end World War II and playing a major role in military defense efforts during the Cold War. As a result, 56 million gallons of radioactive and chemical wastes are now stored in 177 underground tanks on the Hanford Site. To address this challenge, the U.S. Department of Energy contracted Bechtel National, Inc., to design and build the world's largest radioactive waste treatment plant. The Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP), also known as the "Vit Plant," will use vitrification to immobilize most of Hanford's dangerous tank waste.

318

Treatment of acute gout: A systematic review  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

AbstractObjective Acute gout is traditionally treated with NSAIDs, corticosteroids, and colchicine; however, subjects have multiple comorbidities that limit the use of some conventional therapies. We systematically reviewed the published data on the pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic agents used for the treatment of acute gouty arthritis. Methods A systematic search was performed using PubMed and Cochrane database through May 2013. We included only randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that included NSAIDs, corticosteroids, colchicine, adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), interleukin-1 (IL-1) inhibitors, topical ice, or herbal supplements. Results Thirty articles were selected for systematic review. The results show that \\{NSAIDs\\} and COX-2 inhibitors are effective agents for the treatment of acute gout attacks. Systemic corticosteroids have similar efficacy to therapeutic doses of NSAIDs, with studies supporting oral and intramuscular use. ACTH is suggested to be efficacious in acute gout. Oral colchicine demonstrated to be effective, with low-dose colchicine demonstrating a comparable tolerability profile as placebo and a significantly lower side effect profile to high-dose colchicine. The IL-1? inhibitory antibody, canakinumab, was effective for the treatment of acute attacks in subjects refractory to and in those with contraindications to \\{NSAIDs\\} and/or colchicine. However, rilonacept was demonstrated to be not as effective, and there are no \\{RCTs\\} for the use of anakinra. Conclusion NSAIDs, COX-2 selective inhibitors, corticosteroids, colchicine, ACTH, and canakinumab have evidence to suggest efficacy in treatment of acute gout.

Puja P. Khanna; Heather S. Gladue; Manjit K. Singh; John D. FitzGerald; Sangmee Bae; Shraddha Prakash; Marian Kaldas; Maneesh Gogia; Veronica Berrocal; Whitney Townsend; Robert Terkeltaub; Dinesh Khanna

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

300 Area waste acid treatment system closure plan  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application is considered to be a single application organized into a General Information Portion (document number DOERL-91-28) and a Unit-Specific Portion. The scope of the Unit-Specific Portion includes closure plan documentation submitted for individual, treatment, storage, and/or disposal units undergoing closure, such as the 300 Area Waste Acid Treatment System. Documentation contained in the General Information Portion is broader in nature and could be used by multiple treatment, storage, and/or disposal units (e.g., the glossary provided in the General Information Portion). Whenever appropriate, 300 Area Waste Acid Treatment System documentation makes cross-reference to the General Information Portion, rather than duplicating text. This 300 Area Waste Acid Treatment System Closure Plan (Revision 2) includes a Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application, Part A, Form 3. Information provided in this closure plan is current as of April 1999.

LUKE, S.N.

1999-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

320

Forward osmosis for desalination and water treatment : a study of the factors influencing process performance.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis explores various factors that have significant impacts on FO process performance in desalination and water treatment. These factors mainly include working temperatures, solution… (more)

Zhao, Shuaifei

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes sewage treatment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Sustainable Urbanism: Vision and Planning Process Through an Examination of Two Model Neighborhood Developments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

systems for district heating and sewage treatment into anin an extensive district heating network and plants for

Kasioumi, Eirini

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

BULKING SLUDGE TREATMENT BY MICROSCOPIC OBSERVATION AND MECHANICAL TREATMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the operation of the biological stage of waste water treatment plants. If the threatening extensive growth of wastewater treatment plants often need a complex control for the optimal processing. The measurement status and for the regulation of biological parts in waste water treatment plants. Furthermore, e

323

Explosive Waste Treatment Facility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

106 106 Environment a 1 Assessment for th.e Explosive Waste Treatment Facility at Site 300 Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory MASTER November 1995 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Washington, DOC. 20585 Portions of this document maly be illegible in electronic image products. Images are produced from the best available original document. Table of Contents 1 . 0 2.0 3 . 0 4.0 5 . 0 6.0 7 . 0 8 . 0 Document Summary .............................................................. 1 Purpose and Need for Agency Action ............................................. 3 Description of the Proposed Action and Alternatives ............................ 4 3.1.1 Location ............................................................. 4

324

Heat treatment furnace  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A furnace heats through both infrared radiation and convective air utilizing an infrared/purge gas design that enables improved temperature control to enable more uniform treatment of workpieces. The furnace utilizes lamps, the electrical end connections of which are located in an enclosure outside the furnace chamber, with the lamps extending into the furnace chamber through openings in the wall of the chamber. The enclosure is purged with gas, which gas flows from the enclosure into the furnace chamber via the openings in the wall of the chamber so that the gas flows above and around the lamps and is heated to form a convective mechanism in heating parts.

Seals, Roland D; Parrott, Jeffrey G; DeMint, Paul D; Finney, Kevin R; Blue, Charles T

2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

325

Treatment of Seafood Processing Wastewater  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Dissolved air flotation (DAF) has been widely used for the pre-treatment or the primary treatment of seafood processing wastes. Screening for removal of large ... and shut down easily to accommodate fluctuations ...

Lawrence K. Wang PhD; PE; DEE…

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Proposed Site Treatment Plan (PSTP). STP reference document  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) is required by Section 3021(b) of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), as amended by the Federal Facility Compliance Act (FFCAct), to prepare a plan describing the development of treatment capacities and technologies for treating mixed waste (hazardous/radioactive waste). DOE decided to prepare its site treatment plan in a three phased approach. The first phase, called the Conceptual Site Treatment Plan (CSTP), was issued in October 1993. At the Savannah River Site (SRS) the CSTP described mixed waste streams generated at SRS and listed treatment scenarios for each waste stream utilizing an onsite, offsite DOE, and offsite or onsite commercial or vendor treatment option. The CSTP is followed by the Draft Site Treatment Plan (DSTP), due to be issued in August 1994. The DSTP, the current activity., will narrow the options discussed in the CSTP to a preferred treatment option, if possible, and will include waste streams proposed to be shipped to SRS from other DOE facilities as well as waste streams SRS may send offsite for treatment. The SRS DSTP process has been designed to address treatment options for each of the site`s mixed waste streams. The SRS Proposed Site Treatment Plan (PSTP) is due to be issued in February 1995. The compliance order would be derived from the PSTP.

NONE

1995-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

327

E-Print Network 3.0 - actinides including cm Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Summary: of waste actinides. Such damage can be studied by many techniques, including heavy-ionfast neutron... were presented and proposed, including; Fundamental studies...

328

Common Data Set 2011-2012 J Column heading for CIP categories to include now reads: CIP 2010 Categories to Include  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Common Data Set 2011-2012 J Column heading for CIP categories to include now reads: CIP 2010 Categories to Include J CIP category 3 description now reads: Natural resources and conservation J CIP category 5 description now reads: Area, ethnic, and gender studies J CIP category 16 description now reads

329

Review of technical documents supporting proposed revisions to EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) regulations for the disposal/reuse of sewage sludge under Section 405(D) of the Clean Water Act. Final report  

SciTech Connect

In August 1985 the Environmental Engineering Committee of the Science Advisory Board was asked by the Office of Water Regulations and Standards (OWRS) to review technical documents supporting development of EPA regulations for the disposal/reuse of sewage sludge under Section 405(d) of the Clean Water Act. The Committee was also asked by the Office of Marine and Estuarine Protection (OMEP) to review technical documents supporting revisions of the EPA ocean dumping regulations. The Committee chose to review the two sets of documents together, since they both dealt with a common subject, and since they shared, in some respects, a common methodology. The report, however, covers only the review of the OWRS documents, which consist of a set of risk-assessment methodologies (1,2,3,4) for four sludge disposal/reuse options (landfilling, land application/distribution and marketing, incineration, and ocean disposal). The reviews of the OMEP documents are covered in separate Committee reports. The Committee's principal findings are outlined.

Not Available

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Impact on environment treatment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at processing facilities. Research efforts involve several processes, including: wet milling, dry milling program in corn processing and fractionation at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Our biological material, the corn kernel. Students will take part in multidisciplinary efforts to develop process

Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

331

HIV and Its Treatment Is My Treatment Regimen Working? Is My Treatment Regimen Working?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

viral load, it's important to closely follow your treatment regimen. Poor treatment adherence can also blood tests to monitor your HIV treatment: CD4 count and viral load test. The results of the tests need a CD4 count only once every 6 to 12 months. What is a viral load test? Preventing HIV from

Levin, Judith G.

332

Water_Treatment.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Since dewatering at the Weldon Spring site began in Since dewatering at the Weldon Spring site began in 1992, more than 290 million gallons of contaminated water have been treated and released into the Missouri River from two similar water treatment facilities at the site and the nearby Quarry. On September 30, 1999, dewatering efforts at the Chemical Plant site were completed, meeting one of the most substantial milestones of the project and bringing to an end a part of history that was started nearly 5 decades ago. From 1955 to 1966, uranium materials were processed at the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission's Uranium Feed Materials Plant. The ore was processed in a nitric acid solution that separated the uranium from other chemicals. The by-product, called raffinate, was neutralized with lime, then placed in four settling basins,

333

Nevada Test Site Treatment Plan. Revision 2  

SciTech Connect

Treatment Plans (STPS) are required for facilities at which the US Department of Energy (DOE) or stores mixed waste, defined by the Federal Facility Compliance Act (FFCAct) as waste containing both a hazardous waste subject to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act and a radioactive material subject to the Atomic Energy Act. On April 6, 1993, DOE published a Federal Register notice (58 FR 17875) describing its proposed process for developing the STPs in three phases including a Conceptual, a Draft, and a Proposed Site Treatment Plan (PSTP). All of the DOE Nevada Operations Office STP iterations have been developed with the state of Nevada`s input. The options and schedules reflect a ``bottoms-up`` approach and have been evaluated for impacts on other DOE sites, as well as impacts to the overall DOE program. Changes may have occurred in the preferred option and associated schedules between the PSTP, which was submitted to the state of Nevada and US Environmental Protection Agency April 1995, and the Final STP (hereafter referred to as the STP) as treatment evaluations progressed. The STP includes changes that have occurred since the submittal of the PSTP as a result of state-to-state and DOE-to-state discussions.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Composite materials and bodies including silicon carbide and titanium diboride and methods of forming same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods of forming composite materials include coating particles of titanium dioxide with a substance including boron (e.g., boron carbide) and a substance including carbon, and reacting the titanium dioxide with the substance including boron and the substance including carbon to form titanium diboride. The methods may be used to form ceramic composite bodies and materials, such as, for example, a ceramic composite body or material including silicon carbide and titanium diboride. Such bodies and materials may be used as armor bodies and armor materials. Such methods may include forming a green body and sintering the green body to a desirable final density. Green bodies formed in accordance with such methods may include particles comprising titanium dioxide and a coating at least partially covering exterior surfaces thereof, the coating comprising a substance including boron (e.g., boron carbide) and a substance including carbon.

Lillo, Thomas M.; Chu, Henry S.; Harrison, William M.; Bailey, Derek

2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

335

Rocky Mountain NP, Colorado Nitrogen emissions from a variety of human made sources, including ammonia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and gas production, wastewater treatment plants, landfills, fertilized crops, and livestock production comes into RMNP from both urban and rural areas in Colorado as well as from other states. Agricultural

MacDonald, Lee

336

Mouse embryo culture induces changes in postnatal phenotype including raised systolic blood pressure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...litters per treatment group. Different letter denotes P ? 0.05 independent of maternal...0001 0.0046 ± 0.0001 Different letters...1296 . 22 Barker DJP ( 1998 ) Mothers, Babies and Health in Later Life ( Churchill Livingstone...

Adam J. Watkins; Duncan Platt; Tom Papenbrock; Adrian Wilkins; Judith J. Eckert; Wing Yee Kwong; Clive Osmond; Mark Hanson; Tom P. Fleming

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Composting of soils/sediments and sludges containing toxic organics including high energy explosives. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Laboratory and pilot-scale experimentation were conducted to evaluate composting as an on-site treatment technology to remediate soils contaminated with hazardous waste at DOE`s PANTEX Plant. Suspected contaminated sites within the PANTEX Plant were sampled and analyzed for explosives, other organics, and inorganic wastes. Soils in drainage ditches and playas at PANTEX Plant were found to be contaminated with low levels of explosives (including RDX, HMX, PETN and TATB). Additional sites previously used for solvent disposal were heavily contaminated with solvents and transformation products of the solvent, as well as explosives and by-products of explosives. Laboratory studies were conducted using {sup 14}C-labeled explosives and {sup 14}C-labeled diacetone alcohol contaminated soil loaded into horse manure/hay composts at three rates: 20, 30, and 40%(W/W). The composts were incubated for six weeks at approximately 60{degree}C with continuous aeration. All explosives degraded rapidly and were reduced to below detection limits within 3 weeks in the laboratory studies. {sup 14}C-degradates from {sup 14}C-RDX, {sup 14}C-HMX and {sup 14}C-TATB were largely limited to {sup 14}CO{sub 2} and unextracted residue in the compost. Volatile and non-volatile {sup 14}C-degradates were found to result from {sup 14}C-PETN breakdown, but these compounds were not identified. {sup 14}C-diacetone alcohol concentrations were significantly reduced during composting. However, most of the radioactivity was volatilized from the compost as non-{sup 14}CO{sub 2} degradates or as {sup 14}C-diacetone alcohol. Pilot scale composts loaded with explosives contaminated soil at 30% (W/W) with intermittent aeration were monitored over six weeks. Data from the pilot-scale study generally was in agreement with the laboratory studies. However, the {sup 14}C-labeled TATB degraded much faster than the unlabeled TATB. Some formulations of TATB may be more resistant to composting activity than others.

Doyle, R.C.; Kitchens, J.F.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Independent Activity Report, Hanford Sludge Treatment Project...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sludge Treatment Project - February 2012 Independent Activity Report, Hanford Sludge Treatment Project - February 2012 February 2012 Hanford Sludge Treatment Project Operational...

339

Independent Oversight Activity Report, Hanford Sludge Treatment...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Sludge Treatment Project - September 2013 Independent Oversight Activity Report, Hanford Sludge Treatment Project - September 2013 November 2013 Hanford Sludge Treatment Project...

340

Independent Activity Report, Hanford Waste Treatment Plant -...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Treatment Plant - February 2011 Independent Activity Report, Hanford Waste Treatment Plant - February 2011 February 2011 Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Construction Quality...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes sewage treatment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Hanford Sludge Treatment Project, August 2011  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8-25 8-25 Site: DOE-Richland Operations Office Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for the Sludge Treatment Project Dates of Activity : 08/22/2011 - 08/25/2011 Report Preparer: Jake Wechselberger Activity Description/Purpose: The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), performed operational awareness reviews of the Sludge Treatment Project (STP), Engineered Container Retrieval and Transfer System (ECRTS) during site visits. Result: During the period August 22-25, 2011, an HSS representative attended the STP ECRTS Design Review, Value Engineering. The design review was attended by virtually all STP designated personnel, including managers and experts, representing

342

OTHER APPROACHES TO MANAGING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

requirements Include minimum separations between wells and conventional/alternative onsite sewage treatment systems Supplement public sanitary sewerage systems primarily in rural areas Legal Approaches ConstructionOTHER APPROACHES TO MANAGING POLLUTANT SOURCES Laws and Land Use [Chapter 10.2] Rules of Thumb Rule

343

Environmental services of biodiversity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...supply, nutrient cycling, energy flow, and the like) of its...include supply of freshwater for household needs, sewage treatment...Bryde's whales at Ogata in Japan would, according to very conservative...that enables plants to exploit energy from the sun. Photosyn- thesis...

N Myers

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Independent Oversight Review, Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Treatment and Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - December 2013 Independent Oversight Review, Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - December 2013 December 2013 Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Construction Quality This report documents the results of an independent oversight review of selected aspects of construction quality at the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The review, which was performed September 9-13, 2013, was the latest in a series of ongoing quarterly assessments of construction quality performed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight (Independent Oversight), within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS). The scope of this quarterly assessment of construction quality review included observations

345

SBIR/STTR FY15 Release 1 Awards Announced-Includes Fuel Cell...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

FY15 Release 1 Awards Announced-Includes Fuel Cell Catalyst and Hydrogen Contamination Detection R&D SBIRSTTR FY15 Release 1 Awards Announced-Includes Fuel Cell Catalyst and...

346

SBIR/STTR Release 2 Topics Announced-Includes Hydrogen and Fuel...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Release 2 Topics Announced-Includes Hydrogen and Fuel Cells SBIRSTTR Release 2 Topics Announced-Includes Hydrogen and Fuel Cells October 31, 2014 - 12:05pm Addthis The 2015 Small...

347

Regional brain activity change predicts responsiveness to treatment for stuttering in adults  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Developmental stuttering is known to be associated with aberrant brain activity, but there is no evidence that this knowledge has benefited stuttering treatment. This study investigated whether brain activity could predict progress during stuttering treatment for 21 dextral adults who stutter (AWS). They received one of two treatment programs that included periodic H2 15O PET scanning (during oral reading, monologue, and eyes-closed rest conditions). All participants successfully completed an initial treatment phase and then entered a phase designed to transfer treatment gains; 9/21 failed to complete this latter phase. The 12 pass and 9 fail participants were similar on speech and neural system variables before treatment, and similar in speech performance after the initial phase of their treatment. At the end of the initial treatment phase, however, decreased activation within a single region, L. putamen, in all 3 scanning conditions was highly predictive of successful treatment progress.

Roger J. Ingham; Yuedong Wang; Janis C. Ingham; Anne K. Bothe; Scott T. Grafton

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

E-Print Network 3.0 - anti-platelet therapy including Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

management including exercise, cognitive behavioral therapy 3. ... Source: Messersmith, Phillip B.- Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University...

349

Analysis and remedial treatment of a steel pipe-jacking accident in complex underground environment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Steel pipe-jacking has been widely used in the construction of water supply and sewage pipelines because of its self-sealing qualities, ability to withstand high pressure and lower environmental impact. The trend in steel pipe-jacking is towards larger diameters, longer drive lengths, and better adaptation to more complex underground conditions. Steel pipe-jacking, in which a flexible pipe is used, is different from concrete pipe-jacking where a rigid pipe is used. With increasing diameters and drive lengths, the mechanical characteristics of deep-buried steel pipe-jacking in complex underground conditions have presented new challenges for designers. In this study, the forces involved and the stability of steel pipe-jacking are analyzed by examining an example of steel pipe-jacking in a complex underground environment. The causes of high deflection under elevated water and earth pressure and local buckling incidents are investigated by the finite element method. The results show that, in this particular case, confining pressure combined with jacking force leads to buckling. Two main remedial schemes are proposed: one is to increase the wall thickness of the pipe, and the other is to install stiffening ribs on the pipe where high deflection occurs. The effect of the two remedial schemes is presented and evaluated. In particular, various stiffening ribs are used in different deflection sections with grouting to decrease friction and lower the corresponding axial jacking force. This approach demonstrates that the structural strength of the pipeline has met the requirements after the rectification action is taken. The analysis and remedial treatment for this case study will provide a reference for effective design and construction of similar steel pipe-jacking.

Liang Zhen; Jin-Jian Chen; Pizhong Qiao; Jian-Hua Wang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Photovoltaic Device Including A Boron Doping Profile In An I-Type Layer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A photovoltaic cell for use in a single junction or multijunction photovoltaic device, which includes a p-type layer of a semiconductor compound including silicon, an i-type layer of an amorphous semiconductor compound including silicon, and an n-type layer of a semiconductor compound including silicon formed on the i-type layer. The i-type layer including an undoped first sublayer formed on the p-type layer, and a boron-doped second sublayer formed on the first sublayer.

Yang, Liyou (Lawrenceville, NJ)

1993-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

351

Determining the Viability of a Hybrid Experiential and Distance Learning Educational Model for Water Treatment Plant Operators in Kentucky.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Drinking water and wastewater industries are facing a nationwide workforce shortfall of qualified treatment plant operators due to factors including the en masse retirement… (more)

Fattic, Jana R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Regulatory treatment of allowances and compliance costs  

SciTech Connect

The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA) established a national emission allowance trading system, a market-based form of environmental regulation designed to reduce and limit sulfur dioxide emissions. However, the allowance trading system is being applied primarily to an economically regulated electric utility industry. The combining of the new form of environmental regulation and economic regulation of electric utilities has raised a number of questions including what the role should be of the federal and state utility regulating commissions and how those actions will affect the decision making process of the utilities and the allowance market. There are several dimensions to the regulatory problems that commissions face. Allowances and utility compliance expenditures have implications for least-cost/IPR (integrated resource planning), prudence review procedures, holding company and multistate utility regulation and ratemaking treatment. The focus of this paper is on the ratemaking treatment. The following topics are covered: ratemaking treatment of allowances and compliance costs; Traditional cost-recovery mechanisms; limitations to the traditional approach; traditional approach and the allowance trading market; market-based cost recovery mechanisms; methods of determining the benchmark; determining the split between ratepayers and the utility; other regulatory approaches; limitations of incentive mechanisms.

Rose, K. [National Regulatory Research Institute, Columbus, OH (United States)

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Enhanced integrated nonthermal treatment system study  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Enhanced Nonthermal Treatment Systems (ENTS) study is to evaluate alternative configurations of one of the five systems evaluated in the Integrated Nonthermal Treatment Systems (INTS) study. Five alternative configurations are evaluated. Each is designed to enhance the final waste form performance by replacing grout with improved stabilization technologies, or to improve system performance by improving the destruction efficiency for organic contaminants. AU enhanced systems are alternative configurations of System NT-5, which has the following characteristics: Nonthermal System NT-5: (1) catalytic wet oxidation (CWO) to treat organic material including organic liquids, sludges, and soft (or combustible) debris, (2) thermal desorption of inorganic sludge and process residue, (3) washing of soil and inorganic debris with treatment by CWO of removed organic material, (4) metal decontamination by abrasive blasting, (5) stabilization of treated sludge, soil, debris, and untreated debris with entrained contamination in grout, and (6) stabilization of inorganic sludge, salts and secondary waste in polymer. System NT-5 was chosen because it was designed to treat combustible debris thereby minimizing the final waste form volume, and because it uses grout for primary stabilization. The enhanced nonthermal systems were studied to determine the cost and performance impact of replacing grout (a commonly used stabilization agent in the DOE complex) with improved waste stabilization methods such as vitrification and polymer.

Biagi, C.; Schwinkendorf, B.; Teheranian, B.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Growth and elemental accumulation of plants grown in acidic soil amended with coal fly ash-sewage sludge co-compost  

SciTech Connect

A greenhouse experiment was conducted to evaluate the growth and heavy-metal accumulation of Brassica chinensis and Agropyron elongatum in 10 and 25% ash-sludge co-compost (ASC)-amended loamy acidic soil (pH 4.51) at two different application rates: 20% and 40% (v/v). Soil pH increased, whereas electrical conductivity decreased with the amendment of ASC to soil. Bioavailable Cu, Zn, and Mn contents of ASC-amended soil decreased, whereas Ni, Pb, and B contents increased. Concentrations of bioavailable Cu, Zn, and Mn in sludge compost (SC)-amended soils were 5.57, 20.8, and 8.19 mg kg{sup -1}, respectively. These concentrations were significantly lower than those in soil receiving an application rate of 20 or 25% ASC as 2.64, 8.48, and 5.26 mg kg(-1), respectively. Heavy metals and B contents of the composting mass significantly increased with an increase in ASC application rate from 20 to 40% (6.2 to 16.6 mg kg{sup -1} for 10% ASC- and 9.4 to 18.6 mg kg{sup -1} for 25% ASC-amended soil. However, when the ash content in co-compost increased from 10 to 25% during composting, bioavailable heavy-metal contents decreased. However, B contents increased with an increase in ash content. Addition of co-composts increased the dry-weight yield of the plants, and this increase was more obvious as the ash amendment rate in the co-composts and the ASC application rate increased. In case of B. chinensis, the biomass of 2.84 g/plant for 40% application of 25% ASC was significantly higher than SC (0.352 g/plant), which was 40% application of 10% ASC (0.434 g/plant) treatments. However, in A. elongatum, the differences between biomass of plants grown with 10% (1.34-1.94 g/ plant) and 25% ASC (2.12-2.21 g/plant) were not significantly different. ASC was favorable in increasing the growth of B. chinensis and A. elongatum. The optimal ash amendment to the sludge composting and ASC application rates were at 25 and 20%, respectively.

Wong, J.W.C.; Selvam, A. [Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong (China)

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

355

NREL/Ventyx Utility Rates: What is included? | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NREL/Ventyx Utility Rates: What is included? NREL/Ventyx Utility Rates: What is included? Home > Groups > Utility Rate Does anyone know what pieces of electric rates are included in the NREL/Ventyx database of rates by utility, i.e. is it supply only or does the file include supply, transmission & distribution costs? Thanks! Submitted by Vbugnion on 27 February, 2013 - 16:25 1 answer Points: 1 Hi Vbugnion, Just to clarify, you're not asking about the OpenEI utility rates, but rather the Ventyx rates found here: http://developer.nrel.gov/doc/api/georeserv/service/utility_rates If so, then the Ventyx rates do include all bundled rates (which includes supply, trans, and distr costs). However, there's a small but non-zero possibility that a few energy-only or delivery-only rates may not have been cleaned

356

DOE Order 440. 1 B: Worker Protection Program for DOE (Including NNSA)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0. 1 B: Worker Protection Program for DOE (Including 0. 1 B: Worker Protection Program for DOE (Including NNSA) Federal Employees DOE Order 440. 1 B: Worker Protection Program for DOE (Including NNSA) Federal Employees Stakeholders: DOE and NNSA employees Scope: DOE Order 440.1 B establishes the framework for an effective worker protection program that will reduce or prevent injuries, illnesses, and accidental losses by providing Department of Energy, including National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Federal workers with a safe and healthful workplace. Summary: Among the requirements of DOE Order 440.1 B, the Department must provide its employees, including NNSA, a number of protections relating to whistle blowing guidelines. The relevant section of requirements includes: 4. REQUIREMENTS. DOE elements must:

357

Photovoltaic module kit including connector assembly for non-penetrating array installation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A PV module kit for non-penetrating rooftop installation, including a plurality of PV modules and a plurality of connectors. Each of the PV modules includes a PV laminate and a frame forming a mounting region assembled thereto. The connectors include a male connector having a male fastener extending from a head, and a female connector having a female fastener assembled within a head. The heads are entirely formed of plastic. The kit provides a mounted array state including a junction at which the mounting region of at least two of the PV modules are aligned and interconnected by engagement of the male connector with the female connector. The so-formed junction is substantially electrically insulated. The plurality of connectors can further include a spacer connector including a head forming a bore sized to slidably receive the male fastener, with all of the connector heads being identical.

Botkin, Jonathan (El Cerrito, CA); Graves, Simon (Berkeley, CA); Danning, Matt (Oakland, CA); Culligan, Matthew (Berkeley, CA)

2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

358

Photovoltaic module kit including connector assembly for non-penetrating array installation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A PV module kit for non-penetrating rooftop installation, including a plurality of PV modules and a plurality of connectors. Each of the PV modules includes a PV laminate and a frame forming a mounting region assembled thereto. The connectors include a male connector having a male fastener extending from a head, and a female connector having a female fastener assembled within a head. The heads are entirely formed of plastic. The kit provides a mounted array state including a junction at which the mounting region of at least two of the PV modules are aligned and interconnected by engagement of the male connector with the female connector. The so-formed junction is substantially electrically insulated. The plurality of connectors can further include a spacer connector including a head forming a bore sized to slidably receive the male fastener, with all of the connector heads being identical.

Botkin, Jonathan; Graves, Simon; Danning, Matt; Culligan, Matthew

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

359

Photovoltaic module kit including connector assembly for non-penetrating array installation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A PV module kit for non-penetrating rooftop installation, including a plurality of PV modules and a plurality of connectors. Each of the PV modules includes a PV laminate and a frame forming a mounting region assembled thereto. The connectors include a male connector having a male fastener extending from a head, and a female connector having a female fastener assempbled within a head. The heads are entirely formed of plastic. The kit provides a mounted array state including a junction at which the mounting regions of at least two of the PV modules are aligned and interconnected by engagement of the male connector with the female connector. The so-formed junction is substantially electrically insulated. The plurality of connectors can further include a spacer connector including a head forming a bore sized slidably receive the male fastener, with all of the connector heads being identical.

Botkin, Jonathan; Graves, Simon; Danning, Matt; Culligan, Matthew

2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

360

Process modeling for the Integrated Thermal Treatment System (ITTS) study  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the process modeling done in support of the integrated thermal treatment system (ITTS) study, Phases 1 and 2. ITTS consists of an integrated systems engineering approach for uniform comparison of widely varying thermal treatment technologies proposed for treatment of the contact-handled mixed low-level wastes (MLLW) currently stored in the U.S. Department of Energy complex. In the overall study, 19 systems were evaluated. Preconceptual designs were developed that included all of the various subsystems necessary for a complete installation, from waste receiving through to primary and secondary stabilization and disposal of the processed wastes. Each system included the necessary auxiliary treatment subsystems so that all of the waste categories in the complex were fully processed. The objective of the modeling task was to perform mass and energy balances of the major material components in each system. Modeling of trace materials, such as pollutants and radioactive isotopes, were beyond the present scope. The modeling of the main and secondary thermal treatment, air pollution control, and metal melting subsystems was done using the ASPEN PLUS process simulation code, Version 9.1-3. These results were combined with calculations for the remainder of the subsystems to achieve the final results, which included offgas volumes, and mass and volume waste reduction ratios.

Liebelt, K.H.; Brown, B.W.; Quapp, W.J.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes sewage treatment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

E-Print Network 3.0 - anu including biomedical Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Centre... -Europe Meeting (ASEM) process. Some of her recent publications include "EU-ASEAN Relations and Policy Learning... to ASEAN Economic Community - Is ASEAN moving towards...

362

E-Print Network 3.0 - approach including plasma Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

plasmas confined... to mi crocavities has provided a pathway to new optoelectronic devices, including hybrid Source: Shyy, Wei - Department of Aerospace Engineering,...

363

E-Print Network 3.0 - abdominal surgery including Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

reality allows... , a virtual reality laparoscopic surgery simulator that includes a brand new educational component, to assist... . Virtual reality simulators for...

364

E-Print Network 3.0 - african countries including Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

biofuel drive raises risk of eviction for African farmers Summary: by next year. In Africa, countries including Malawi, Mali, Mauritius, Nigeria, Senegal, South Africa... to...

365

Occurrence and fate of eleven classes of antibiotics in two typical wastewater treatment plants in South China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) are regarded as one of the most important sources of antibiotics in the environment. Two sampling campaigns over a period of one year in two wastewater treatment plants (plant A: activated sludge with chlorination, and plant B: oxidation ditch with UV) of Guangdong Province, China were carried out to assess the occurrence and fate of 11 classes of 50 antibiotics. The wastewater samples were extracted by Oasis HLB cartridges (6 mL, 500 mg), while the solid samples (sludge and suspended solid matter) were extracted by ultrasonic-assisted extraction with solvents (acetonitrile and citric acid buffer), followed by an enrichment and clean-up step with solid-phase extraction using SAX-HLB cartridges in tandem. The results showed the presence of 20 and 17 target compounds in the influents and effluents, respectively, at the concentrations ranging from low ng/L to a few ?g/L. Sulfamethoxazole, norfloxacin, ofloxacin, anhydro erythromycin and trimethoprim were most frequently detected in the \\{WWTPs\\} wastewaters. Twenty-one antibiotics were found in the sewage sludge from the two \\{WWTPs\\} at the concentrations up to 5800 ng/g, with tetracycline, oxytetracycline, norfloxacin and ofloxacin being the predominant antibiotics. The total mass loads of antibiotics per capita in the two plants ranged from 494 to 901 ?g/d/inhabitant (672 ± 182 ?g/d/inhabitant) in the influents, from 130 to 238 ?g/d/inhabitant (175 ± 45 ?g/d/inhabitant) in the effluents and from 107 to 307 ?g/d/inhabitant (191 ± 87.9 ?g/d/inhabitant) in the dewatered sludge, respectively. The aqueous removals for sulfonamides, macrolides, trimethoprim, lincomycin and chloramphenicol in the \\{WWTPs\\} were mainly attributed to the degradation processes, while those for tetracyclines and fluoroquinolones were mainly due to the adsorption onto sludge.

Li-Jun Zhou; Guang-Guo Ying; Shan Liu; Jian-Liang Zhao; Bin Yang; Zhi-Feng Chen; Hua-Jie Lai

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Independent Activity Report, Office of River Protection Waste Treatment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office of River Protection Waste Office of River Protection Waste Treatment Plant and Tank Farms - February 2013 Independent Activity Report, Office of River Protection Waste Treatment Plant and Tank Farms - February 2013 February 2013 Site Familiarization and Introduction of New Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Site Lead for the Office of River Protection Waste Treatment Plant and Tank Farms [HIAR-HANFORD-2013-02-25] The Office of Health, Safety and Security's (HSS) Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations (HS-45) assigned a new Site Lead to provide continuous oversight of activities at the Office of River Protection (ORP) Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) and tank farms. To gain familiarity with the site programs and personnel, the new Site Lead made two trips to the site, which included tours of the WTP construction site

367

Custom Detector Technology LASP satellite instruments include a wide range of technology,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Custom Detector Technology LASP satellite instruments include a wide range of technology, including particles, electric fields, and dust particles in space. Low-noise detectors are critical technology for our Extremely low-noise CCDs and intensified CCDs have flown on SDO for observing solar EUV and on AIM

Mojzsis, Stephen J.

368

Neutron Star Matter Including Delta Isobars Guang-Zhou Liu1,2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Neutron Star Matter Including Delta Isobars Guang-Zhou Liu1,2 , Wei Liu1 and En-Guang Zhao2 1 a new phase structure of neutron star matter including nucleons and delta isobars is presented. Particle fractions populated and pion condensations in neutron star matter are investgated in this model

Xu, Ren-Xin

369

Hybrid approach for including electronic and nuclear quantum effects in molecular dynamics simulations of hydrogen transfer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hybrid approach for including electronic and nuclear quantum effects in molecular dynamics January 2001 A hybrid approach for simulating proton and hydride transfer reactions in enzymes coefficient and to investigate the real-time dynamics of reactive trajectories. This hybrid approach includes

Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

370

Red-Tide Research Summarized to 1964 Including an Annotated Bibliography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

535^ Red-Tide Research Summarized to 1964 Including an Annotated Bibliography By George A, Harold E. Crowther, Acting Director Red-Tide Research Summarized to 1964 Including an Annotated Historical 2 General conditions during red-tide outbreaks 3 Temperature 3 Salinity 3 Rainfall 4 Wind 4 Light

371

Life Cycle environmental Assessment (LCA) of sanitation systems including sewerage: Case of vertical  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Life Cycle environmental Assessment (LCA) of sanitation systems including sewerage: Case The article presents the application of Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) to a complete sanitation system including the sewer network. It first describes the LCA hypothesis which concerns two types of waste water

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

372

OFFICE USE ONLY: Date Entered: App Rating: Complete Incomplete Documents Included  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OFFICE USE ONLY: Date Entered: App Rating: Complete Incomplete Documents Included: Declaration/ Assessment APPLICATION INSTRUCTIONS: 1. All supporting documentation must be included with the application printed from BearTracks 2. Have you signed the Declaration and Consent form on the last page

MacMillan, Andrew

373

Introduction Apis mellifera L. is native to Europe, Africa, and Asia (including Saudi  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Introduction Apis mellifera L. is native to Europe, Africa, and Asia (including Saudi Arabia, Iran migrations and introductions (Ruttner, 1988). Apis mellifera includes about two dozen subspecies bee (Apis mellifera L.) populations from the USA Allen L Szalanski1* and Roxane M Magnus1 1 Social

Szalanski, Allen L.

374

What are the symptoms of flu? Symptoms include sudden onset of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

What are the symptoms of flu? · Symptoms include sudden onset of: o fever/chills o cough o muscle lasting 5 or more days (measured with a thermometer; 37.0 Celsius is normal) · Coughing up blood that improve but then return with fever and worse cough Those in high risk groups including pregnant women

Ellis, Randy

375

Small-signal dynamic model of a micro-grid including conventional and electronically  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Small-signal dynamic model of a micro-grid including conventional and electronically interfaced-signal modelling of a micro-grid system that includes conventional (rotating machine) and electronically interfaced deviations in the overall system model and provides a methodology for the analysis of autonomous micro-grid

Lehn, Peter W.

376

Electrodialysis Treatment of Tannery Wastewater  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The industrial processing of hides and skins consumes large volumes of water and generates waste that is highly polluted and causes environmental degradation. The conventional treatment of these effluents is not ...

Kátia Fernanda Streit; Marco A. S. Rodrigues…

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

T-603: Mac OS X Includes Some Invalid Comodo Certificates | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

03: Mac OS X Includes Some Invalid Comodo Certificates 03: Mac OS X Includes Some Invalid Comodo Certificates T-603: Mac OS X Includes Some Invalid Comodo Certificates April 15, 2011 - 1:46am Addthis PROBLEM: Mac OS X Includes Some Invalid Comodo Certificates PLATFORM: For Mac OS X Server v10.5.8, Mac OS X v10.5.8, Mac OS X v10.6.7 and Mac OS X Server v10.6.7 ABSTRACT: The operating system includes some invalid certificates. The vulnerability is due to the invalid certificates and not the operating system itself. Other browsers, applications, and operating systems are affected. reference LINKS: SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1025362 APPLE-SA-2011-04-14-4 Security Update 2011-002 Apple Support Downloads IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High Discussion: A partner of Comodo with Registration Authority capabilities suffered an internal security breach and the attacker caused seven certificates to be

378

Property:Number of Plants Included in Planned Estimate | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Plants Included in Planned Estimate Plants Included in Planned Estimate Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Number of Plants Included in Planned Estimate Property Type String Description Number of plants included in the estimate of planned capacity per GEA Pages using the property "Number of Plants Included in Planned Estimate" Showing 21 pages using this property. A Alaska Geothermal Region + 3 + C Cascades Geothermal Region + 1 + Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region + 4 + G Gulf of California Rift Zone Geothermal Region + 7 + H Hawaii Geothermal Region + 1 + Holocene Magmatic Geothermal Region + 4 + I Idaho Batholith Geothermal Region + 1 + N Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region + 9 + Northern Rockies Geothermal Region + 0 + Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region + 6 +

379

Systems and strippable coatings for decontaminating structures that include porous material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods of removing contaminant matter from porous materials include applying a polymer material to a contaminated surface, irradiating the contaminated surface to cause redistribution of contaminant matter, and removing at least a portion of the polymer material from the surface. Systems for decontaminating a contaminated structure comprising porous material include a radiation device configured to emit electromagnetic radiation toward a surface of a structure, and at least one spray device configured to apply a capture material onto the surface of the structure. Polymer materials that can be used in such methods and systems include polyphosphazine-based polymer materials having polyphosphazine backbone segments and side chain groups that include selected functional groups. The selected functional groups may include iminos, oximes, carboxylates, sulfonates, .beta.-diketones, phosphine sulfides, phosphates, phosphites, phosphonates, phosphinates, phosphine oxides, monothio phosphinic acids, and dithio phosphinic acids.

Fox, Robert V. (Idaho Falls, ID); Avci, Recep (Bozeman, MT); Groenewold, Gary S. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2011-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

380

Chemical treatment of mixed waste at the FEMP  

SciTech Connect

The Chemical Treatment Project is one in a series of projects implemented by the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) to treat mixed waste. The projects were initiated to address concerns regarding treatment capacity for mixed waste and to comply with requirements established by the Federal Facility Compliance Act. The Chemical Treatment Project is designed to utilize commercially available mobile technologies to perform treatment at the FEMP site. The waste in the Project consists of a variety of waste types with a wide range of hazards and physical characteristics. The treatment processes to be established for the waste types will be developed by a systematic approach including waste streams evaluation, projectization of the waste streams, and categorization of the stream. This information is utilized to determine the proper train of treatment which will be required to lead the waste to its final destination (i.e., disposal). This approach allows flexibility to manage a wide variety of waste in a cheaper, faster manner than designing a single treatment technology diverse enough to manage all the waste streams.

Honigford, L.; Sattler, J.; Dilday, D.; Cook, D.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes sewage treatment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Chemical treatment of mixed waste can be done.....Today!  

SciTech Connect

The Chemical Treatment Project is one in a series of projects implemented by the FEMP to treat mixed waste. The projects were initiated to address concerns regarding treatment capacity for mixed waste and to comply with requirements established by the Federal Facility Compliance Act. The Chemical Treatment Project is designed to utilize commercially available mobile technologies to perform treatment at the FEMP site. The waste in the Project consists of a variety of waste types with a wide range of hazards and physical characteristics. The treatment processes to be established for the waste types will be developed by a systematic approach including waste streams evaluation, projectization of the waste streams, and categorization of the stream. This information is utilized to determine the proper train of treatment which will be required to lead the waste to its final destination (i.e., disposal). This approach allows flexibility to manage a wide variety of waste in a cheaper, faster manner than designing a single treatment technology diverse enough to manage all the waste streams.

Honigford, L.; Dilday, D.; Cook, D. [Fernald Environmental Restoration Management Corp., Cincinnati, OH (United States); Sattler, J. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Analysis of waste treatment requirements for DOE mixed wastes: Technical basis  

SciTech Connect

The risks and costs of managing DOE wastes are a direct function of the total quantities of 3wastes that are handled at each step of the management process. As part of the analysis of the management of DOE low-level mixed wastes (LLMW), a reference scheme has been developed for the treatment of these wastes to meet EPA criteria. The treatment analysis in a limited form was also applied to one option for treatment of transuranic wastes. The treatment requirements in all cases analyzed are based on a reference flowsheet which provides high level treatment trains for all LLMW. This report explains the background and basis for that treatment scheme. Reference waste stream chemical compositions and physical properties including densities were established for each stream in the data base. These compositions are used to define the expected behavior for wastes as they pass through the treatment train. Each EPA RCRA waste code was reviewed, the properties, chemical composition, or characteristics which are of importance to waste behavior in treatment were designated. Properties that dictate treatment requirements were then used to develop the treatment trains and identify the unit operations that would be included in these trains. A table was prepared showing a correlation of the waste physical matrix and the waste treatment requirements as a guide to the treatment analysis. The analysis of waste treatment loads is done by assigning wastes to treatment steps which would achieve RCRA compliant treatment. These correlation`s allow one to examine the treatment requirements in a condensed manner and to see that all wastes and contaminant sets are fully considered.

NONE

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Energy Department Expands Gas Gouging Reporting System to Include 1-800  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Expands Gas Gouging Reporting System to Include Expands Gas Gouging Reporting System to Include 1-800 Number: 1-800-244-3301 Energy Department Expands Gas Gouging Reporting System to Include 1-800 Number: 1-800-244-3301 September 6, 2005 - 9:50am Addthis Washington, DC - Energy Secretary Samuel W. Bodman announced today that the Department of Energy has expanded its gas gouging reporting system to include a toll-free telephone hotline. The hotline is available to American consumers starting today. "While we've largely seen the best of American generosity and unity throughout the recovery effort, we recognize that there are some bad actors that may try to take advantage of the situation. Consumers are our first line of defense in guarding against gas price gouging. I can assure you, our Administration - from the President down - takes this issue very

384

Counselling Psychology Practicum The Counselling Psychology program includes two practicum placements. These placements allow you to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Counselling Psychology Practicum The Counselling Psychology program includes two practicum development in real counselling settings. The general goal of the Counselling Psychology Practica. Students in the Master of Education (Counselling Psychology) program are responsible for making their own

Morris, Joy

385

A simulation study of the solar wind including the solar rotation effect  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An axisymmetric solar wind structure including the solar rotation effect is studied by the method of MHD computer simulation. For the case of the radial magnetic field configuration, the simulation result is fair...

H. Washimi; T. Sakurai

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Data and analysis on energy usage included: Taking readings on energy each minute  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Appendix B Data and analysis on energy usage included: § Taking readings on energy each minute § 14 usage at the schools we monitored. The usage is compared to the PIER target, Title 24, and Ashrae 90

387

Automated solar collector installation design including ability to define heterogeneous design preferences  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Embodiments may include systems and methods to create and edit a representation of a worksite, to create various data objects, to classify such objects as various types of pre -defined "features" with attendant properties and layout constraints. As part of or in addition to classification, an embodiment may include systems and methods to create, associate, and edit intrinsic and extrinsic properties to these objects. A design engine may apply of design rules to the features described above to generate one or more solar collectors installation design alternatives, including generation of on-screen and/or paper representations of the physical layout or arrangement of the one or more design alternatives. Embodiments may also include definition of one or more design apertures, each of which may correspond to boundaries in which solar collector layouts should comply with distinct sets of user-defined design preferences. Distinct apertures may provide heterogeneous regions of collector layout according to the user-defined design preferences.

Wayne, Gary; Frumkin, Alexander; Zaydman, Michael; Lehman, Scott; Brenner, Jules

2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

388

Automated solar collector installation design including ability to define heterogeneous design preferences  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Embodiments may include systems and methods to create and edit a representation of a worksite, to create various data objects, to classify such objects as various types of pre-defined "features" with attendant properties and layout constraints. As part of or in addition to classification, an embodiment may include systems and methods to create, associate, and edit intrinsic and extrinsic properties to these objects. A design engine may apply of design rules to the features described above to generate one or more solar collectors installation design alternatives, including generation of on-screen and/or paper representations of the physical layout or arrangement of the one or more design alternatives. Embodiments may also include definition of one or more design apertures, each of which may correspond to boundaries in which solar collector layouts should comply with distinct sets of user-defined design preferences. Distinct apertures may provide heterogeneous regions of collector layout according to the user-defined design preferences.

Wayne, Gary; Frumkin, Alexander; Zaydman, Michael; Lehman, Scott; Brenner, Jules

2013-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

389

AMO Issues Request for Information on Clean Energy Manufacturing Topics, Including Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Applications  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The AMO seeks information on mid-Technology Readiness Level R&D needs, market challenges, supply chain challenges, and shared facility needs addressing clean energy manufacturing topics, including the fuel cell and hydrogen sectors.

390

Modeling the Interaction between the Atmospheric and Oceanic Boundary Layers, Including a Surface Wave Layer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The interaction between the atmospheric and oceanic boundary layers is simulated by solving a closed system of equations including equations of motion, turbulent kinetic energy (TKE), turbulent exchange coefficient (TEC), expressions for air and ...

Le Ngoc Ly

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Diffractive laser beam homogenizer including a photo-active material and method of fabricating the same  

SciTech Connect

A method of manufacturing a plurality of diffractive optical elements includes providing a partially transmissive slide, providing a first piece of PTR glass, and directing first UV radiation through the partially transmissive slide to impinge on the first piece of PTR glass. The method also includes exposing predetermined portions of the first piece of PTR glass to the first UV radiation and thermally treating the exposed first piece of PTR glass. The method further includes providing a second piece of PTR glass and directing second UV radiation through the thermally treated first piece of PTR glass to impinge on the second piece of PTR glass. The method additionally includes exposing predetermined portions of the second piece of PTR glass to the second UV radiation, thermally treating the exposed second piece of PTR glass, and repeating providing and processing of the second piece of PTR glass using additional pieces of PTR glass.

Bayramian, Andy J; Ebbers, Christopher A; Chen, Diana C

2014-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

392

FEMP Expands ESPC ENABLE Program to Include More Energy Conservation Measures  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The U.S. Department of Energy's Federal Energy Management Program announced the expansion of the Energy Savings Performance Contract ENABLE program to include two new energy conservation measures.

393

E-Print Network 3.0 - approach including back-translation Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

include the back-translation, is always available for later inspection.) They can... safeguard against translation errors, we supply a back-translation, or re-translation of the...

394

includes gravity, there are other interesting consequences of this line of argument. One  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

includes gravity, there are other interesting consequences of this line of argument. One f there is any truth to the adage that `practice makes perfect', we should cer- tainly be near

Murray, Richard

395

Mineral balances, including in drinking water, estimated for Merced County dairy herds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of daily mineral intake, drinking-water mineral contributionND Total daily intake, including minerals in drinking water.mineral contents in drinking water and daily drinking-water

Castillo, Alejandro R Dr.; Santos, Jose Eduardo P.; Tabone, Tom J.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Summary of comparative results integrated nonthermal treatment and integrated thermal treatment systems studies  

SciTech Connect

In July 1994, the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), under a contract from U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Environment Management Office of Science and Technology (OST, EM-50) published a report entitled {open_quotes}Integrated Thermal Treatment System Study - Phase 1 Results{close_quotes} (EGG-MS-11211). This report was the culmination of over a year of analysis involving scientists and engineers within the DOE complex and from private industry. The purpose of that study was {open_quotes}to conduct a systematic engineering evaluation of a variety of mixed low level waste (MLLW) treatment system alternatives.{close_quotes} The study also {open_quotes}identified the research and development, demonstrations, and testing and evaluation needed to assure unit operability in the most promising alternative system.{close_quotes} This study evaluated ten primary thermal treatment technologies, organized into complete {open_quotes}cradle-to-grave{close_quotes} systems (including complete engineering flow sheets), to treat DOE MLLW and calculated mass balances and 20-year total life cycle costs (TLCC) for all systems. The waste input used was a representative heterogenous mixture of typical DOE MLLW. An additional study was conducted, and then, based on response to these studies, additional work was started to investigate and evaluate non-thermal treatment options on a footing comparable to the effort devoted to thermal options. This report attempts to present a summary overview of the thermal and non-thermal treatment technologies which were examined in detail in the process of the above mentioned reviews.

NONE

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Compositions produced using an in situ heat treatment process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Systems, methods, and heaters for treating a subsurface formation are described herein. At least one method for producing hydrocarbons from a subsurface formation includes providing heat to the subsurface formation using an in situ heat treatment process. One or more formation particles may be formed during heating of the subsurface formation. Fluid that includes hydrocarbons and the formation particles may be produced from the subsurface formation. The formation particles in the produced fluid may include cenospheres and have an average particle size of at least 0.5 micrometers.

Roes, Augustinus Wilhelmus Maria (Houston, TX); Nair, Vijay (Katy, TX); Munsterman, Erwin Henh (Amsterdam, NL); Van Bergen, Petrus Franciscus (Amsterdam, NL); Van Den Berg, Franciscus Gondulfus Antonius (Amsterdam, NL)

2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

398

Compositions produced using an in situ heat treatment process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods for treating a subsurface formation and compositions produced therefrom are described herein. At least one method for producing hydrocarbons from a subsurface formation includes providing heat to the subsurface formation using an in situ heat treatment process. One or more formation particles may be formed during heating of the subsurface formation. Fluid that includes hydrocarbons and the formation particles may be produced from the subsurface formation. The formation particles in the produced fluid may include cenospheres and have an average particle size of at least 0.5 micrometers.

Roes, Augustinus Wilhelmus Maria; Nair, Vijay; Munsterman, Erwin Hunh; Van Bergen, Petrus Franciscus; Van Den Berg, Franciscus Gondulfus Antonius

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

399

Carbide and carbonitride surface treatment method for refractory metals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A carbide and carbonitride surface treatment method for refractory metals is provided, in steps including, heating a part formed of boron, chromium, hafnium, molybdenum, niobium, tantalum, titanium, tungsten or zirconium, or alloys thereof, in an evacuated chamber and then introducing reaction gases including nitrogen and hydrogen, either in elemental or water vapor form, which react with a source of elemental carbon to form carbon-containing gaseous reactants which then react with the metal part to form the desired surface layer. Apparatus for practicing the method is also provided, in the form of a carbide and carbonitride surface treatment system including a reaction chamber, a source of elemental carbon, a heating subassembly and a source of reaction gases. Alternative methods of providing the elemental carbon and the reaction gases are provided, as well as methods of supporting the metal part, evacuating the chamber with a vacuum subassembly and heating all of the components to the desired temperature. 5 figs.

Meyer, G.A.; Schildbach, M.A.

1996-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

400

Combined niche and neutral effects in a microbial wastewater treatment community  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...example, there may be a minimum reactor size and flow rate to ensure...Research Council (EPSRC) Advanced Fellowship, and an...Sewage microbiology Time Factors Water Microbiology Supporting Information Ofieru...least-squares analysis. The central heavy solid lines represent the parameter...

Irina Dana Ofi?eru; Mary Lunn; Thomas P. Curtis; George F. Wells; Craig S. Criddle; Christopher A. Francis; William T. Sloan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes sewage treatment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Laser research shows promise for cancer treatment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cancer treatment Laser research shows promise for cancer treatment Scientists have observed for the first time how a laser penetrates dense, electron-rich plasma to generate ions....

402

Independent Oversight Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - March 2012 March 2012 Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Project Construction Quality This...

403

Independent Oversight Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - October 2012 October 2012 Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Construction Quality This report...

404

Independent Oversight Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - August 2012 August 2012 Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Construction Quality This report...

405

Independent Oversight Activity Report, Hanford Waste Treatment...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

July 2013 Independent Oversight Activity Report, Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - July 2013 July 2013 Operational Awareness of Waste Treatment and Immobilization...

406

Independent Oversight Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - November 2011 November 2011 Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Project Construction Quality This...

407

Independent Oversight Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - March 2013 March 2013 Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Construction Quality The U.S....

408

Clot Busting Simulations Test Potential Stroke Treatment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Clot Busting Simulations Test Potential Stroke Treatment Clot Busting Simulations Test Potential Stroke Treatment September 24, 2013 | Tags: Biological and Environmental Research...

409

Wastewater and Wastewater Treatment Systems (Oklahoma)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality administers regulations for waste water and waste water treatment systems. Construction of a municipal treatment work, non-industrial waste water...

410

Independent Oversight Activity Report, Hanford Waste Treatment...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

October 2013 Independent Oversight Activity Report, Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - October 2013 October 2013 Observation of Waste Treatment and Immobilization...

411

Independent Oversight Review, Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Federal - June 2012 Independent Oversight Review, Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project - Federal - June 2012 June 2012 Review of the Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project -...

412

Independent Oversight Review, Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Contractor - June 2012 Independent Oversight Review, Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project - Contractor - June 2012 June 2012 Review of the Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project...

413

Independent Oversight Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

January 2013 Independent Oversight Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - January 2013 January 2013 Review of the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant...

414

Field's Point Wastewater Treatment Facility (Narragansett Bay...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Field's Point Wastewater Treatment Facility (Narragansett Bay Commission) Jump to: navigation, search Name Field's Point Wastewater Treatment Facility (Narragansett Bay Commission)...

415

Waste Treatment and Immobilation Plant Pretreatment Facility...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Treatment and Immobilation Plant Pretreatment Facility Waste Treatment and Immobilation Plant Pretreatment Facility Full Document and Summary Versions are available for download...

416

Independent Oversight Assessment, Waste Treatment and Immobilization...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - January 2012 Independent Oversight Assessment, Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - January 2012 January 2012 Assessment of the...

417

Independent Oversight Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Project - October 2010 October 2010 Review of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant...

418

High post-irradiation ductility thermomechanical treatment for precipitation strengthened austenitic alloys  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for improving the post-irradiation ductility is described which prises a solution heat treatment following which the materials are cold worked. They are included to demonstrate the beneficial effect of this treatment on the swelling resistance and the ductility of these austenitic precipitation hardenable alloys.

Laidler, James J. (Richland, WA); Borisch, Ronald R. (Kennewick, WA); Korenko, Michael K. (Rockville, MD)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

A Randomized Trial Comparing Treatments for Varicose Veins  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...from 0 to 100, with higher scores indicating a worse quality of life. The EQ-5D is a standardized index valuation for health status; it includes five dimensions (mobility, self-care, usual activities, pain or discomfort, and anxiety or depression; scores range from ?0.594 to 1.000, with higher scores... This trial of varicose-vein treatments showed no substantial differences in quality of life 6 months after ultrasound-guided foam sclerotherapy, endovenous laser ablation, or surgery, but disease-specific quality of life was slightly worse after foam treatment than after surgery.

Brittenden J.; Cotton S.C.; Elders A.

2014-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

420

A Randomized Trial of Intraarterial Treatment for Acute Ischemic Stroke  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...investigator, who was unaware of the treatment-group assignments, conducted the follow-up interviews at 90 days by telephone with the patient, proxy, or health care provider. This interview provided reports for the assessment of the modified Rankin score by reviewers who remained unaware of the treatment-group... Intravenous alteplase administered within 4.5 hours after symptom onset is the only reperfusion therapy with proven efficacy in patients with acute ischemic stroke.1 However, well-recognized limitations of this therapy include the narrow therapeutic time ...

2014-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes sewage treatment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Challenges With the Diagnosis and Treatment of Cerebral Radiation Necrosis  

SciTech Connect

The incidence of radiation necrosis has increased secondary to greater use of combined modality therapy for brain tumors and stereotactic radiosurgery. Given that its characteristics on standard imaging are no different that tumor recurrence, it is difficult to diagnose without use of more sophisticated imaging and nuclear medicine scans, although the accuracy of such scans is controversial. Historically, treatment had been limited to steroids, hyperbaric oxygen, anticoagulants, and surgical resection. A recent prospective randomized study has confirmed the efficacy of bevacizumab in treating radiation necrosis. Novel therapies include using focused interstitial laser thermal therapy. This article will review the diagnosis and treatment of radiation necrosis.

Chao, Samuel T., E-mail: chaos@ccf.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Rose Ella Burkhardt Brain Tumor and Neuro-oncology Center, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Ahluwalia, Manmeet S. [Department of Medical Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Rose Ella Burkhardt Brain Tumor and Neuro-oncology Center, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Barnett, Gene H. [Department of Neurosurgery, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Rose Ella Burkhardt Brain Tumor and Neuro-oncology Center, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Stevens, Glen H.J. [Department of Neurology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Rose Ella Burkhardt Brain Tumor and Neuro-oncology Center, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Murphy, Erin S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Rose Ella Burkhardt Brain Tumor and Neuro-oncology Center, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Stockham, Abigail L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Shiue, Kevin [Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Suh, John H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Rose Ella Burkhardt Brain Tumor and Neuro-oncology Center, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States)

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Pressurized heat treatment of glass ceramic  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of producing a glass-ceramic having a specified thermal expansion value is disclosed. The method includes the step of pressurizing the parent glass material to a predetermined pressure during heat treatment so that the glass-ceramic produced has a specified thermal expansion value. Preferably, the glass-ceramic material is isostatically pressed. A method for forming a strong glass-ceramic to metal seal is also disclosed in which the glass-ceramic is fabricated to have a thermal expansion value equal to that of the metal. The determination of the thermal expansion value of a parent glass material placed in a high-temperature environment is also used to determine the pressure in the environment.

Kramer, D.P.

1984-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

423

Experiences with treatment of mixed waste  

SciTech Connect

During its many years of research activities involving toxic chemicals and radioactive materials, Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos) has generated considerable amounts of waste. Much of this waste includes chemically hazardous components and radioisotopes. Los Alamos chose to use an electrochemical process for the treatment of many mixed waste components. The electro-chemical process, which the authors are developing, can treat a great variety of waste using one type of equipment built at a moderate expense. Such a process can extract heavy metals, destroy cyanides, dissolve contamination from surfaces, oxidize toxic organic compounds, separate salts into acids and bases, and reduce the nitrates. All this can be accomplished using the equipment and one crew of trained operating personnel. Results of a treatability study of chosen mixed wastes from Los Alamos Mixed Waste Inventory are presented. Using electrochemical methods cyanide and heavy metals bearing wastes were treated to below disposal limits.

Dziewinski, J.; Marczak, S.; Smith, W.H. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Nuttall, E. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Chemical and Nuclear Engineering Dept.

1996-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

424

Introduction to Small-Scale Wind Energy Systems (Including RETScreen Case  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Introduction to Small-Scale Wind Energy Systems (Including RETScreen Case Introduction to Small-Scale Wind Energy Systems (Including RETScreen Case Study) (Webinar) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Introduction to Small-Scale Wind Energy Systems (Including RETScreen Case Study) (Webinar) Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: System & Application Design Website: www.leonardo-energy.org/webinar-introduction-small-scale-wind-energy-s Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/introduction-small-scale-wind-energy- Language: English Policies: Deployment Programs DeploymentPrograms: Project Development This video teaches the viewer about wind turbines and RETscreen's wind module, which can be used to project the cost and production of a wind

425

The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Includes $4.5 billion for the  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Includes $4.5 billion The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Includes $4.5 billion for the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Includes $4.5 billion for the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability February 25, 2009 - 4:52pm Addthis President Barack Obama signed into law the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (P.L.111-5). The $787 billion economic recovery package represents the largest and most ambitious effort to stimulate the economy in United States history. The Department of Energy (DOE) will be responsible for implementing over $38 billion of the $787 billion package. Of the DOE total, $4.5 Billion is allotted to the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability. As outlined in the legislation, these funds are an investment in a

426

Order Module--DOE O 440.1B, WORKER PROTECTION PROGRAM FOR DOE (INCLUDING  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

40.1B, WORKER PROTECTION PROGRAM FOR DOE 40.1B, WORKER PROTECTION PROGRAM FOR DOE (INCLUDING NNSA) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES Order Module--DOE O 440.1B, WORKER PROTECTION PROGRAM FOR DOE (INCLUDING NNSA) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES The familiar level of this module is divided into two sections. In the first section, we will discuss the objective, requirements, and the responsibilities assigned to the heads of field elements. In the second section, we will discuss the content of attachment 1, Functional Area Requirements. We have provided examples and a practice to help familiarize you with the material. The practice will also help prepare you for the criterion test. DOE Order Self Study Modules - DOE O 440.1B, Worker Protection Management for DOE (Including the National Nuclear Security Administration) Federal Employees

427

1) What are the current and future communications needs of utilities, including  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(1) What are the current and future communications needs of utilities, including for the (1) What are the current and future communications needs of utilities, including for the deployment of new Smart Grid applications, and how are these needs being met? The current communication needs of SCE include: telephony, data, video, voice dispatch, mobile data, grid monitoring, grid control, tele-protection, customer communication, load management, automated meter reading, and collaboration capabilities ranging from virtual meetings to e-learning. SCE is using a combination of private, leased, and shared telecommunication networks to support these requirements. Those applications that require high availability, low latency, and stringent security rely on a private telecommunications network (SCEnet). A combination of transport media are

428

Order Module--DOE O 440.1B, WORKER PROTECTION PROGRAM FOR DOE (INCLUDING  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Order Module--DOE O 440.1B, WORKER PROTECTION PROGRAM FOR DOE Order Module--DOE O 440.1B, WORKER PROTECTION PROGRAM FOR DOE (INCLUDING NNSA) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES Order Module--DOE O 440.1B, WORKER PROTECTION PROGRAM FOR DOE (INCLUDING NNSA) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES The familiar level of this module is divided into two sections. In the first section, we will discuss the objective, requirements, and the responsibilities assigned to the heads of field elements. In the second section, we will discuss the content of attachment 1, Functional Area Requirements. We have provided examples and a practice to help familiarize you with the material. The practice will also help prepare you for the criterion test. DOE Order Self Study Modules - DOE O 440.1B, Worker Protection Management for DOE (Including the National Nuclear Security Administration) Federal

429

C3E also includes a network of leaders from the public, private, non-profit  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

C3E also includes a network of leaders from the public, private, non-profit, C3E also includes a network of leaders from the public, private, non-profit, and academic sectors who support advocacy, research, scholarships, hands-on training, funding, and networking opportunities to prepare and inspire young women to enter and thrive in STEM fields. C3E Network participants have pledged many types of commitments, from highlighting female role models to creating hands-on activities for young girls. Ongoing activities include: * Filming and featuring women in clean energy fields on online / TV outlets (Earth Day Network); * Designing pilot projects and expanding Young Women's Conferences at DOE's

430

Including Alternative Resources in State Renewable Portfolio Standards: Current Design and Implementation Experience  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Including Alternative Resources Including Alternative Resources in State Renewable Portfolio Standards: Current Design and Implementation Experience Jenny Heeter and Lori Bird Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-55979 November 2012 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Including Alternative Resources in State Renewable Portfolio Standards: Current Design and Implementation Experience Jenny Heeter and Lori Bird Prepared under Task No. SAO9.3110

431

Force measuring valve assemblies, systems including such valve assemblies and related methods  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods of evaluating a fluid condition may include stroking a valve member and measuring a force acting on the valve member during the stroke. Methods of evaluating a fluid condition may include measuring a force acting on a valve member in the presence of fluid flow over a period of time and evaluating at least one of the frequency of changes in the measured force over the period of time and the magnitude of the changes in the measured force over the period of time to identify the presence of an anomaly in a fluid flow and, optionally, its estimated location. Methods of evaluating a valve condition may include directing a fluid flow through a valve while stroking a valve member, measuring a force acting on the valve member during the stroke, and comparing the measured force to a reference force. Valve assemblies and related systems are also disclosed.

DeWall, Kevin George (Pocatello, ID); Garcia, Humberto Enrique (Idaho Falls, ID); McKellar, Michael George (Idaho Falls, ID)

2012-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

432

Fabrication of contacts for silicon solar cells including printing burn through layers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for fabricating a contact (240) for a solar cell (200). The method includes providing a solar cell substrate (210) with a surface that is covered or includes an antireflective coating (220). For example, the substrate (210) may be positioned adjacent or proximate to an outlet of an inkjet printer (712) or other deposition device. The method continues with forming a burn through layer (230) on the coating (220) by depositing a metal oxide precursor (e.g., using an inkjet or other non-contact printing method to print or apply a volume of liquid or solution containing the precursor). The method includes forming a contact layer (240) comprising silver over or on the burn through layer (230), and then annealing is performed to electrically connect the contact layer (240) to the surface of the solar cell substrate (210) through a portion of the burn through layer (230) and the coating (220).

Ginley, David S; Kaydanova, Tatiana; Miedaner, Alexander; Curtis, Calvin J; Van Hest, Marinus Franciscus Antonius Maria

2014-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

433

The effectiveness of stuttering treatments in Germany  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

AbstractPurpose Persons who stutter (PWS) should be referred to the most effective treatments available, locally or regionally. A prospective comparison of the effects of the most common stuttering treatments in Germany is not available. Therefore, a retrospective evaluation by clients of stuttering treatments was carried out. Method The five most common German stuttering treatments (231 single treatment cases) were rated as to their perceived effectiveness, using a structured questionnaire, by 88 PWS recruited through various sources. The participants had received between 1 and 7 treatments for stuttering. Results Two stuttering treatments (stuttering modification, fluency shaping) showed favorable and three treatments (breathing therapy, hypnosis, unspecified logopedic treatment) showed unsatisfactory effectiveness ratings. The effectiveness ratings of stuttering modification and fluency shaping did not differ significantly. The three other treatments were equally ineffective. The differences between the effective and ineffective treatments were of large effect sizes. The typical therapy biography begins in childhood with an unspecified logopedic treatment administered extensively in single and individual sessions. Available comparisons showed intensive or interval treatments to be superior to extensive treatments, and group treatments to be superior to single client treatments. Conclusion The stuttering treatment most often prescribed in Germany, namely a weekly session of individual treatment by a speech-language pathologist, usually with an assorted package of mostly unknown components, is of limited effectiveness. Better effectiveness can be expected from fluency shaping or stuttering modification approaches, preferably with an intensive time schedule and with group sessions. Educational objectives: Readers will be able to: (a) discuss the five most prevalent stuttering treatments in Germany; (b) summarize the effectiveness of these treatments; and (c) describe structural treatment components that seem to be preferable across different kinds of treatments.

Harald A. Euler; Benjamin P. Lange; Sascha Schroeder; Katrin Neumann

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

TRAITEMENT DES EFFLUENTS WASTE TREATMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

residence time the production of biogas (7l-78 p. 100 CH,) was 237 1 per kg dry matter, i.e. 479 1 of CH to obtain the same amount of biogas four times quicklier. The treatment yield was improved (65 p. 100 COD). The mean production was 4931 biogas/kg degraded COD. It seems to be possible to apply that procedure

Boyer, Edmond

435

Heat Treatment of Alumina Aerogels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Heat Treatment of Alumina Aerogels ... Recently, using supercritical drying, we have obtained alumina aerogel monoliths and films1,2with high porosity and special morphology, different from those of common aerogels films. ... One of the main questions concerning the application of these aerogels is their thermal stability. ...

Shani Keysar; Gennady E. Shter; * Yoram de Hazan; Yachin Cohen; Gideon S. Grader

1997-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

436

Two-dimensional numerical methods in electromagnetic hypersonics including fully coupled Maxwell equations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the magnetic field source (solenoid or permanent magnet). To test the technique, we show the results obtainedTwo-dimensional numerical methods in electromagnetic hypersonics including fully coupled Maxwell Keplerlaan 1, 2200 AG Noordwijk, The Netherlands We describe a numerical technique for solving the coupled

D'Ambrosio, Domenic

437

1. INTRODUCTION Bridge engineering is not only about designing but also includes "looking after" and maintain-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1. INTRODUCTION Bridge engineering is not only about designing but also includes "looking after" and maintain- ing the service-life of bridges. In the UK, after a period of relative neglect in the 1970s there was a growing awareness of the necessity to safeguard and maintain the stock of bridges as part of the national

438

Asymptotic stability of ground states in 3D nonlinear Schrodinger equation including subcritical cases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Asymptotic stability of ground states in 3D nonlinear SchrË?odinger equation including subcritical general encompassing for the first time both subcritical and supercritical (in L 2 ) nonlinearities. We #12; The main contribution of our result is to allow for subcritical and critical (L 2

439

Asymptotic stability of ground states in 3D nonlinear Schrodinger equation including subcritical cases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Asymptotic stability of ground states in 3D nonlinear Schr¨odinger equation including subcritical general encompassing for the first time both subcritical and supercritical (in L2 ) nonlinearities. We result is to allow for subcritical and critical (L2 ) nonlinearities, 0

Kirr, Eduard-Wilhelm

440

Asymptotic stability of ground states in 2D nonlinear Schrodinger equation including subcritical cases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Asymptotic stability of ground states in 2D nonlinear Schr¨odinger equation including subcritical encompassing for the first time both subcritical and supercrit- ical (in L2 ) nonlinearities. We study) = ei g(s), R. (1.4) The equation has important applications in statistical physics, optics and water

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes sewage treatment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Asymptotic stability of ground states in 2D nonlinear Schrodinger equation including subcritical cases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Asymptotic stability of ground states in 2D nonlinear Schr¨odinger equation including subcritical general encompassing for the first time both subcritical and supercritical (in L2 ) nonlinearities. We physics, optics and water waves. For g(s) = s3 , it describes certain limiting behavior of Bose

Zarnescu, Arghir Dani

442

The efficient frontier for a portfolio that includes one risk-free asset  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents a description of the efficient frontier of a portfolio composed by three assets, including a risk-free asset. We use a data analysis method to obtain two classes of assets and then we estimate the risk of each asset corresponding ... Keywords: efficient frontier, optimization, portfolio selection, principal component analysis, risk estimation

Florentin Serban; Maria Viorica Stefanescu; Silvia Dedu

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

MAC-Kaust Project P1 CO2 Sequestration Modeling of CO2 sequestration including parameter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MAC-Kaust Project P1 ­ CO2 Sequestration Modeling of CO2 sequestration including parameter identification and numerical simulation M. Brokate, O. A. PykhteevHysteresis aspects of CO2 sequestration modeling K-H. Hoffmann, N. D. Botkin Objectives and methods of CO2 sequestration There is a popular belief

Turova, Varvara

444

Functional designed to include surface effects in self-consistent density functional theory R. Armiento1,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Functional designed to include surface effects in self-consistent density functional theory R 2005 We design a density-functional-theory DFT exchange-correlation functional that enables an accurate density functional theory1 DFT is a method for electronic structure calculations of unparalleled

Armiento, Rickard

445

Breakfast Pastry Platters Includes a variety of scones, muffins, fruit and cheese Danish and cinnamon rolls.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Breakfast Breakfast Pastry Platters Includes a variety of scones, muffins, fruit and cheese Danish Fruit Tarts, Mini Lemon Tarts and Cream Puffs. (Minimum order 10) ........... each pastry | $2.50 Quiche.) ............................................................................each quiche | $30 Fresh Fruit Salad An assortment of fresh melon, bananas, pineapple, grapes

Liberzon, Daniel

446

What measures climate? A variety of variables including their variability and extreme values determine climate for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

climate zones? The sun is the ultimate power source for the climate "machine". The uneven distribution conditions. Typical variables to consider are temperature (maximum, miniumum), precipitation (includes rain, sleet, snow, hail, etc), sunlight/cloudiness, wind, humidity, ice cover, sea temperature, etc... Many

Allan, Richard P.

447

Solar Energy Education. Home economics: teacher's guide. Field test edition. [Includes glossary  

SciTech Connect

An instructional aid is provided for home economics teachers who wish to integrate the subject of solar energy into their classroom activities. This teacher's guide was produced along with the student activities book for home economics by the US Department of Energy Solar Energy Education. A glossary of solar energy terms is included. (BCS)

Not Available

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Solar Energy Education. Industrial arts: teacher's guide. Field test edition. [Includes glossary  

SciTech Connect

An instructional aid is presented which integrates the subject of solar energy into the classroom study of industrial arts. This guide for teachers was produced in addition to the student activities book for industrial arts by the USDOE Solar Energy Education. A glossary of solar energy terms is included. (BCS)

Not Available

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Confirmed speakers include: THE GLOBAL ROLE OF VIRUSES IN BLOOM TERMINATION, BIODIVERSITY AND MARINE ECOLOGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IN BLOOM TERMINATION, BIODIVERSITY AND MARINE ECOLOGY GUNNAR BRATBAK ­ University of Bergen, NorwayConfirmed speakers include: THE GLOBAL ROLE OF VIRUSES IN BLOOM TERMINATION, BIODIVERSITY AND MARINE ECOLOGY GUNNAR BRATBAK ­ University of Bergen, Norway COLLECTION, PROCESSING AND PRESERVATION

Wilhelm, Steven W.

450

Worker Protection Program for DOE (Including the National Nuclear Security Administration) Federal Employees  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The Order establishes the framework for an effective worker protection program that will reduce or prevent injuries, illnesses, and accidental losses by providing Department of Energy (DOE), including National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Federal workers with a safe and healthful workplace. Cancels DOE O 440.1A. Certified 6/17/2011. Canceled by DOE O 440.1B Chg 1.

2007-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

451

Accounting for the Energy Consumption of Personal Computing Including Portable Devices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Accounting for the Energy Consumption of Personal Computing Including Portable Devices Pavel.S.A vinod.namboodiri@wichita.edu ABSTRACT In light of the increased awareness of global energy consumption the share of energy consumption due to these equipment over the years, these have rarely characterized

Namboodiri, Vinod

452

EARTH SCIENCESEARTH SCIENCESEARTH SCIENCES This major includes a spectrum of disciplines focused on understanding the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EARTH SCIENCESEARTH SCIENCESEARTH SCIENCES This major includes a spectrum of disciplines focused this understanding to read the record of earth history written in rocks and sediments, and on developing models by humans. Opportunities for Students Sigma Gamma Epsilon: The Omega Chapter of the national honorary earth

Krylov, Anna I.

453

Your membership includes: S10health Fitness Centre; Group Fitness Classes; Swimming Pool,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Your membership includes: S10health Fitness Centre; Group Fitness Classes; Swimming Pool, Sauna Standard Price Concessions* (at Off Peak times only) Swimming £4.00 £3.00 Group Fitness Classes (1 hour/45.sport-sheffield.com Support line: 0114 222 6996 #12;Pool Timetable 11th June ­ 23rd September 2012 The Matrix bouldering wall

Li, Yi

454

POLITICAL SCIENCE 2013 SCHOLARSHIP APPLICATION (Includes Alumni, Brazil, Francis, Glickman, Hubbard, Young, and Rinn Scholarships)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

POLITICAL SCIENCE 2013 SCHOLARSHIP APPLICATION (Includes Alumni, Brazil, Francis, Glickman, Hubbard. _____________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________ Please have a member of the SJSU Political Science faculty who is willing to provide a reference sign this application. Faculty sponsor's signature: Applicant's signature: You can apply for as many Political Science

Su, Xiao

455

Improved One-dimensional Analysis of CMOS Photodiode Including Epitaxial-Substrate Junction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Improved One-dimensional Analysis of CMOS Photodiode Including Epitaxial-Substrate Junction J. S-dimensional analysis of CMOS photodiode has been derived in which the effect of the substrate, which forms a high-empirical expression exhibits a good agreement with the measured spectral response of n+ pepi photodiodes fabricated

Hornsey, Richard

456

Primal-Dual Interior Point Method Applied to the Short Term Hydroelectric Scheduling Including a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Primal-Dual Interior Point Method Applied to the Short Term Hydroelectric Scheduling Including that minimizes losses in the transmission and costs in the generation of a hydroelectric power system, formulated such perturbing parameter. Keywords-- Hydroelectric power system, Network flow, Predispatch, Primal-dual interior

Oliveira, Aurélio R. L.

457

Student Poster Competition The 2004 UFFC Joint Anniversary Conference will include a Student Poster  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Student Poster Competition The 2004 UFFC Joint Anniversary Conference will include a Student Poster to the student's CV. Students who are submitting abstracts for presentation are also invited to participate in this student paper competition. Abstracts submitted by students for the Student Paper Competition

Lu, Jian-yu

458

Humanities: 12 credits (L,H,X,Z) --Must include 6 credits Literature (L)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Humanities: 12 credits (L,H,X,Z) -- Must include 6 credits Literature (L) Social Science: 12-level credits in residence in each major BREADTH of Exploration in the Liberal Arts & Sciences DEPTH of Inquiry in the Liberal Arts & Sciences Mastery of Intermediate/Advanced Work: 60 credits (I,A,D) QUANTITY & QUALITY

Liblit, Ben

459

Vertebrates are animals with a backbone and include mammals, birds and fishes. Considering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vertebrates are animals with a backbone and include mammals, birds and fishes. Considering roughly three quarters of the earth is covered in water it should be no surprise that fish are the most numerous vertebrates in the world. According to the Florida Museum of Natural History there are about 28,000 known fish

Watson, Craig A.

460

Safety First Safety Last Safety Always Aerial lifts include the following types of vehicle-mounted  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Safety First Safety Last Safety Always Aerial lifts include the following types of vehicle, if they can be installed safely. Aerial Lifts Safety Tip #11 A spill, a slip, a hospital trip #12;Additional Information for Presenters Review the information provided on the reverse side of this safety tip sheet

Minnesota, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes sewage treatment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Safety First Safety Last Safety Always Personal fall-protection systems include a body harness (safe-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Safety First Safety Last Safety Always Personal fall-protection systems include a body harness so they will not be damaged. Personal Fall-Protection Systems Safety Tip #8 Just because you always;Additional Information for Presenters Review the information provided on the reverse side of this safety tip

Minnesota, University of

462

Abstract. Increased ethylene evolution accompanies seed germination of many species including Pisum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. Increased ethylene evolution accompanies seed germination of many species including Pisum sativum L., but only a little is known about the regulation of the ethylene biosynthetic pathway in dierent seed tissues. Biosynthesis of the direct ethylene precursor 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid

Leubner, Gerhard

463

A virtual environment for the interrogation of 3D polycrystalline microstructure including  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A virtual environment for the interrogation of 3D polycrystalline microstructure including grain of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, 101 Frank H.T. Rhodes Hall, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853. The macroscopic response is obtained through volume- averaging laws. A constitutive framework for elasto

Zabaras, Nicholas J.

464

A non-isothermal PEM fuel cell model including two water transport mechanisms in the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A non-isothermal PEM fuel cell model including two water transport mechanisms in the membrane K Freiburg Germany A dynamic two-phase flow model for proton exchange mem- brane (PEM) fuel cells and the species concentrations. In order to describe the charge transport in the fuel cell the Poisson equations

Münster, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität

465

Learn more about the summer course which includes a 3 week trip to South Africa.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Learn more about the summer course which includes a 3 week trip to South Africa. The program an introduction to the historical and the con- temporary South Africa as well as at least one post trip meeting@binghamton.edu or Josephine Allen at jaallen@binghamton.edu. Destination South Africa - Summer Course 2012 February 28th

Suzuki, Masatsugu

466

SBIR/STTR Release 2 Topics Announced—Includes Hydrogen and Fuel Cells  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The 2015 Small Business Innovation Research and Small Business Technology Transfer (SBIR/STTR) Phase I Release 2 topics include fuel cell-battery electric hybrid trucks and in-line quality control devices for polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells.

467

WBS DICTIONARY This dictionary gives a succinct definition of some of the most important tasks included  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

include the 100 kV insulating platform for the EBIS source and its associated power supplies, as well for the solenoid in order to enable use of its magnet field "tails" for the electron beam transmission in areas support structures for the EBIS, the electron gun, the LEBT line, and the external ion sources. It also

468

NUMERICAL MODELING OF DEFORMATION AND FRACTURE OF WOOD INCLUDING HETEROGENEITY AND ANISOTROPY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NUMERICAL MODELING OF DEFORMATION AND FRACTURE OF WOOD INCLUDING HETEROGENEITY AND ANISOTROPY John A. Nairn Wood Science & Engineering, Oregon State University, USA Abstract The challenge in numerical modeling of wood is to have the model closely match the structure of a real specimen. The model

Nairn, John A.

469

The Peach State Alliance is a coalition of seven higher education institutions, including  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Peach State Alliance is a coalition of seven higher education institutions, including Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation (PS-LSAMP) About the Peach State Alliance "Educating the next, and receive financial support." Stephanie Hernandez Biology Major #12;The Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority

Weber, Rodney

470

Mud-Slinging Over Sewage Technology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...quality stan-dards-its offshore waters have high coli-form...iftoo high, can lead to fish kills. In the absence...back into the ocean far offshore-a practice that EPA...as fertilizer to sod farms and golf courses, for...of solar and stellar winds; and for his studies...

MARJORIE SUN

1989-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

471

Mud-Slinging Over Sewage Technology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...quality stan-dards-its offshore waters have high coli-form...it back into the ocean far offshore-a practice that EPA will...is sold as fertilizer to sod farms and golf courses, for example...concept of solar and stellar winds; and for his studies on the...

MARJORIE SUN

1989-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

472

Water Resources Water Quality and Water Treatment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water Resources TD 603 Lecture 1: Water Quality and Water Treatment CTARA Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay 2nd November, 2011 #12;OVERVIEW Water Quality WATER TREATMENT PLANTS WATER TREATMENT PLANTS WATER TREATMENT PLANTS WATER TRE OVERVIEW OF THE LECTURE 1. Water Distribution Schemes Hand Pump

Sohoni, Milind

473

The reduced phase space of spherically symmetric Einstein-Maxwell theory including a cosmological constant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We extend here the canonical treatment of spherically symmetric (quantum) gravity to the most simple matter coupling, namely spherically symmetric Maxwell theory with or without a cosmological constant. The quantization is based on the reduced phase space which is coordinatized by the mass and the electric charge as well as their canonically conjugate momenta, whose geometrical interpretation is explored. The dimension of the reduced phase space depends on the topology chosen, quite similar to the case of pure (2+1) gravity. We investigate several conceptual and technical details that might be of interest for full (3+1) gravity. We use the new canonical variables introduced by Ashtekar, which simplifies the analysis tremendously.

T. Thiemann

1999-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

474

Reduced Phase Space Quantization of spherically symmetric Einstein-Maxwell-Theory including a cosmological constant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present here the canonical treatment of spherically symmetric (quantum) gravity coupled to spherically symmetric Maxwell theory with or without a cosmological constant. The quantization is based on the reduced phase space which is coordinatized by the mass and the electric charge as well as their canonically conjugate momenta, whose geometrical interpretation is explored. The dimension of the reduced phase space depends on the topology chosen, quite similar to the case of pure (2+1) gravity. We also compare the reduced phase space quantization to the algebraic quantization. Altogether, we observe that the present model serves as an interesting testing ground for full (3+1) gravity. We use the new canonical variables introduced by Ashtekar which simplifies the analysis tremendously.

T. Thiemann

1999-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

475

NREL Webinar: Treatment of Solar Generation in Electric Utility Resource  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NREL Webinar: Treatment of Solar Generation in Electric Utility NREL Webinar: Treatment of Solar Generation in Electric Utility Resource Planning NREL Webinar: Treatment of Solar Generation in Electric Utility Resource Planning January 14, 2014 2:00PM to 3:00PM EST Online Today's utility planners have a different market and economic context than their predecessors, including planning for the growth of renewable energy. State and federal support policies, solar photovoltaic (PV) price declines, and the introduction of new business models for solar PV "ownership" are leading to increasing interest in solar technologies, especially PV. In this free webinar, you will hear how utilities are incorporating solar generation into their resource planning processes. Analysts from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Solar Electric Power

476

Sodium-Bearing Waste Treatment Alternatives Implementation Study  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this document is to discuss issues related to the implementation of each of the five down-selected INEEL/INTEC radioactive liquid waste (sodium-bearing waste - SBW) treatment alternatives and summarize information in three main areas of concern: process/technical, environmental permitting, and schedule. Major implementation options for each treatment alternative are also identified and briefly discussed. This report may touch upon, but purposely does not address in detail, issues that are programmatic in nature. Examples of these include how the SBW will be classified with respect to the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA), status of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) permits and waste storage availability, available funding for implementation, stakeholder issues, and State of Idaho Settlement Agreement milestones. It is assumed in this report that the SBW would be classified as a transuranic (TRU) waste suitable for disposal at WIPP, located in New Mexico, after appropriate treatment to meet transportation requirements and waste acceptance criteria (WAC).

Charles M. Barnes; James B. Bosley; Clifford W. Olsen

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Hydraulically actuated fuel injector including a pilot operated spool valve assembly and hydraulic system using same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to hydraulic systems including hydraulically actuated fuel injectors that have a pilot operated spool valve assembly. One class of hydraulically actuated fuel injectors includes a solenoid driven pilot valve that controls the initiation of the injection event. However, during cold start conditions, hydraulic fluid, typically engine lubricating oil, is particularly viscous and is often difficult to displace through the relatively small drain path that is defined past the pilot valve member. Because the spool valve typically responds slower than expected during cold start due to the difficulty in displacing the relatively viscous oil, accurate start of injection timing can be difficult to achieve. There also exists a greater difficulty in reaching the higher end of the cold operating speed range. Therefore, the present invention utilizes a fluid evacuation valve to aid in displacement of the relatively viscous oil during cold start conditions.

Shafer, Scott F. (Morton, IL)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

The structure of hypersonic shock waves using Navier-Stokes equations modified to include mass diffusion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Howard Brenner has recently proposed modifications to the Navier-Stokes equations that relate to a diffusion of fluid volume that would be significant for flows with high density gradients. In a previous paper (Greenshields & Reese, 2007), we found these modifications gave good predictions of the viscous structure of shock waves in argon in the range Mach 1.0-12.0 (while conventional Navier-Stokes equations are known to fail above about Mach 2). However, some areas of concern with this model were a somewhat arbitrary choice of modelling coefficient, and potentially unphysical and unstable solutions. In this paper, we therefore present slightly different modifications to include molecule mass diffusion fully in the Navier-Stokes equations. These modifications are shown to be stable and produce physical solutions to the shock problem of a quality broadly similar to those from the family of extended hydrodynamic models that includes the Burnett equations. The modifications primarily add a diffusion term to t...

Greenshields, Christopher J

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Method for pulse control in a laser including a stimulated brillouin scattering mirror system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A laser system, such as a master oscillator/power amplifier system, comprises a gain medium and a stimulated Brillouin scattering SBS mirror system. The SBS mirror system includes an in situ filtered SBS medium that comprises a compound having a small negative non-linear index of refraction, such as a perfluoro compound. An SBS relay telescope having a telescope focal point includes a baffle at the telescope focal point which blocks off angle beams. A beam splitter is placed between the SBS mirror system and the SBS relay telescope, directing a fraction of the beam to an alternate beam path for an alignment fiducial. The SBS mirror system has a collimated SBS cell and a focused SBS cell. An adjustable attenuator is placed between the collimated SBS cell and the focused SBS cell, by which pulse width of the reflected beam can be adjusted.

Dane, C. Brent (Livermore, CA); Hackel, Lloyd (Livermore, CA); Harris, Fritz B. (Rocklin, CA)

2007-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

480

Analysis of the Thermonuclear Instability including Low-Power ICRH Minority Heating in IGNITOR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The nonlinear thermal balance equation for classical plasma in a toroidal geometry is analytically and numerically investigated including ICRH power. The determination of the equilibrium temperature and the analysis of the stability of the solution are performed by solving the energy balance equation that includes the transport relations obtained by the kinetic theory. An estimation of the confinement time is also provided. We show that the ICRH heating in the IGNITOR experiment, among other applications, is expected to stabilize the power of the thermonuclear burning by automatic regulation of the RF coupled power. Here a scenario is considered where IGNITOR is led to operate in a slightly sub-critical regime by adding a small fraction of ${}^3He$ to the nominal 50-50 Deuterium-Tritium mixture. The difference between power lost and alpha heating is compensated by additional ICRH heating, which should be able to increase the global plasma temperature via collisions between ${}^3He$ minority and the background...

Cardinali, Alessandro

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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481

Policy Flash 2013-49 Updating Reporting Requirement Checklist including the  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Policy Flash 2013-49 Updating Reporting Requirement Checklist Policy Flash 2013-49 Updating Reporting Requirement Checklist including the research performance progress report Policy Flash 2013-49 Updating Reporting Requirement Checklist including the research performance progress report Questions concerning this policy flash should be directed to Ellen Colligan, of the Contract and Financial Assistance Policy Division, Office of Contract Management, Office of Acquisition and Project Management at (202) 287-1776, Ellen.colligan@hq.doe.gov Policy Flash 2013-49.pdf Attch_FA_RepReqChecklist_COMBINED_FINAL_4-23-13 (3).pdf More Documents & Publications ATTACHMENT FLASH 2011-46(6) Federal Assistance Reporting Checklist and Instructions for Projects Federal Assistance Reporting Checklist and Instructions for RD&D Projects

482

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal"," " "End Use","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(e)"

483

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 1. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal"," "," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural Gas(c)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)"," ","RSE" " ","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","(billion","NGL(d)","(million","Other(e)","Row"

484

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 2. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal",,"RSE" " "," ","Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal"," ","Row" "End Use","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(e)","Factors"

485

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal"," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural Gas(c)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)"," " " ","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","(billion","NGL(d)","(million","Other(e)"

486

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural ","LPG and","(excluding Coal"," ","RSE" " ","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(e)","Row"

487

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal"," " "End Use","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(e)"

488

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal",,"RSE" " "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural ","LPG and","(excluding Coal"," ","Row" "End Use","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(e)","Factors"

489

Certification and Accreditation Process for Information Systems Including National Security Systems  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The Notice ensures the effectiveness of security controls on DOE Federal information systems including national security systems. The Notice will also ensure compliance with the requirements of DOE O 205.1, Department of Energy Cyber Security Management Program, dated 3-21-03, and protect DOE information and information systems from unauthorized access, use, disclosure, modification, or destruction. No cancellations. DOE N 205.15, dated 3-18-05, extends this directive until 3-18-06.

2004-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

490

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal"," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural Gas(c)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)"," " " ","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","(billion","NGL(d)","(million","Other(e)"

491

Method and system including a double rotary kiln pyrolysis or gasification of waste material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of destructively distilling an organic material in particulate form wherein the particulates are introduced through an inlet into one end of an inner rotating kiln ganged to and coaxial with an outer rotating kiln. The inner and outer kilns define a cylindrical annular space with the inlet being positioned in registry with the axis of rotation of the ganged kilns. During operation, the temperature of the wall of the inner rotary kiln at the inlet is not less than about 500.degree. C. to heat the particulate material to a temperature in the range of from about 200.degree. C. to about 900.degree. C. in a pyrolyzing atmosphere to reduce the particulate material as it moves from the one end toward the other end. The reduced particulates including char are transferred to the annular space between the inner and the outer rotating kilns near the other end of the inner rotating kiln and moved longitudinally in the annular space from near the other end toward the one end in the presence of oxygen to combust the char at an elevated temperature to produce a waste material including ash. Also, heat is provided which is transferred to the inner kiln. The waste material including ash leaves the outer rotating kiln near the one end and the pyrolysis vapor leaves through the particulate material inlet.

McIntosh, Michael J. (Bolingbrook, IL); Arzoumanidis, Gregory G. (Naperville, IL)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Swozzle based burner tube premixer including inlet air conditioner for low emissions combustion  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A burner for use in a combustion system of a heavy-duty industrial gas turbine includes a fuel/air premixer having an air inlet, a fuel inlet, and an annular mixing passage. The fuel/air premixer mixes fuel and air into a uniform mixture for injection into a combustor reaction zone. The burner also includes an inlet flow conditioner disposed at the air inlet of the fuel/air premixer for controlling a radial and circumferential distribution of incoming air. The pattern of perforations in the inlet flow conditioner is designed such that a uniform air flow distribution is produced at the swirler inlet annulus in both the radial and circumference directions. The premixer includes a swozzle assembly having a series of preferably air foil shaped turning vanes that impart swirl to the airflow entering via the inlet flow conditioner. Each air foil contains internal fuel flow passages that introduce natural gas fuel into the air stream via fuel metering holes that pass through the walls of the air foil shaped turning vanes. By injecting fuel in this manner, an aerodynamically clean flow field is maintained throughout the premixer. By injecting fuel via two separate passages, the fuel/air mixture strength distribution can be controlled in the radial direction to obtain optimum radial concentration profiles for control of emissions, lean blow outs, and combustion driven dynamic pressure activity as machine and combustor load are varied.

Tuthill, Richard Sterling (Bolton, CT); Bechtel, II, William Theodore (Scotia, NY); Benoit, Jeffrey Arthur (Scotia, NY); Black, Stephen Hugh (Duanesburg, NY); Bland, Robert James (Clifton Park, NY); DeLeonardo, Guy Wayne (Scotia, NY); Meyer, Stefan Martin (Troy, NY); Taura, Joseph Charles (Clifton Park, NY); Battaglioli, John Luigi (Glenville, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

A method and system including a double rotary kiln pyrolysis or gasification of waste material  

SciTech Connect

A method is described for destructively distilling an organic material in particulate form wherein the particulates are introduced through an inlet into one end of an inner rotating kiln ganged to and coaxial with an outer rotating kiln. The inner and outer kilns define a cylindrical annular space with the inlet being positioned in registry with the axis of rotation of the ganged kilns. During operation, the temperature of the wall of the inner rotary kiln at the inlet is not less than about 500 C to heat the particulate material to a temperature in the range of from about 200 C to about 900 C in a pyrolyzing atmosphere to reduce the particulate material as it moves from the one end toward the other end. The reduced particulates including char are transferred to the annular space between the inner and the outer rotating kilns near the other end of the inner rotating kiln and moved longitudinally in the annular space from near the other end toward the one end in the presence of oxygen to combust the char at an elevated temperature to produce a waste material including ash. Also, heat is provided which is transferred to the inner kiln. The waste material including ash leaves the outer rotating kiln near the one end and the pyrolysis vapor leaves through the particulate material inlet.

McIntosh, M.J.; Arzoumanidis, G.G.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

494

Method and system including a double rotary kiln pyrolysis or gasification of waste material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for destructively distilling an organic material in particulate form wherein the particulates are introduced through an inlet into one end of an inner rotating kiln ganged to and coaxial with an outer rotating kiln. The inner and outer kilns define a cylindrical annular space with the inlet being positioned in registry with the axis of rotation of the ganged kilns. During operation, the temperature of the wall of the inner rotary kiln at the inlet is not less than about 500 C to heat the particulate material to a temperature in the range of from about 200 C to about 900 C in a pyrolyzing atmosphere to reduce the particulate material as it moves from the one end toward the other end. The reduced particulates including char are transferred to the annular space between the inner and the outer rotating kilns near the other end of the inner rotating kiln and moved longitudinally in the annular space from near the other end toward the one end in the presence of oxygen to combust the char at an elevated temperature to produce a waste material including ash. Also, heat is provided which is transferred to the inner kiln. The waste material including ash leaves the outer rotating kiln near the one end and the pyrolysis vapor leaves through the particulate material inlet. 5 figs.

McIntosh, M.J.; Arzoumanidis, G.G.

1997-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

495

Cesium and strontium extraction using a mixed extractant solvent including crown ether and calixarene extractants  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A mixed extractant solvent including calix[4]arene-bis-(tert-octylbenzo)-crown-6 ("BOBCalixC6"), 4',4',(5')-di-(t-butyldicyclo-hexano)-18-crown-6 ("DtBu18C6"), and at least one modifier dissolved in a diluent. The mixed extractant solvent may be used to remove cesium and strontium from an acidic solution. The DtBu18C6 may be present from approximately 0.01 M to approximately 0.4M, such as from approximately 0.086 M to approximately 0.108 M. The modifier may be 1-(2,2,3,3-tetrafluoropropoxy)-3-(4-sec-butylphenoxy)-2-propanol ("Cs-7SB") and may be present from approximately 0.01M to approximately 0.8M. In one embodiment, the mixed extractant solvent includes approximately 0.15M DtBu18C6, approximately 0.007M BOBCalixC6, and approximately 0.75M Cs-7SB modifier dissolved in an isoparaffinic hydrocarbon diluent. The mixed extractant solvent may form an organic phase in an extraction system that also includes an aqueous phase. Methods of extracting cesium and strontium as well as strontium alone are also disclosed.

Meikrantz, David H. (Idaho Falls, ID); Todd, Terry A. (Aberdeen, ID); Riddle, Catherine L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Law, Jack D. (Pocatello, ID); Peterman, Dean R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Mincher, Bruce J. (Idaho Falls, ID); McGrath, Christopher A. (Blackfoot, ID); Baker, John D. (Blackfoot, ID)

2007-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

496

Process For Controlling Flow Rate Of Viscous Materials Including Use Of Nozzle With Changeable Openings  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus and a method for controlling the flow rate of viscous materials through a nozzle includes an apertured main body and an apertured end cap coupled together and having an elongated, linear flow channel extending the length thereof. An end of the main body is disposed within the end cap and includes a plurality of elongated slots concentrically disposed about and aligned with the flow channel. A generally flat cam plate having a center aperture is disposed between the main body and end cap and is rotatable about the flow channel. A plurality of flow control vane assemblies are concentrically disposed about the flow channel and are coupled to the cam plate. Each vane assembly includes a vane element disposed adjacent the end of the flow channel. Rotation of the cam plate in a first direction causes a corresponding rotation of each of the vane elements for positioning the individual vane elements over the aperture in the end cap blocking flow through the flow channel, while rotation in an opposite direction removes the vane elements from the aperture and positions them about the flow channel in a nested configuration in the full open position, with a continuous range of vane element positions available between the full open and closed positions.

Ellingson, William A. (Naperville, IL); Forster, George A. (Westmont, IL)

1999-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

497

Optimizing fracture stimulation using treatment-well tiltmeters and integrated fracture modeling  

SciTech Connect

This paper covers the optimization of hydraulic fracture treatments in a new coalbed methane (CBM) reservoir in Wyoming. A multiwell pilot project was conducted in the Copper Ridge (CR) field to assess future development potential. Hydraulic fracture mapping was successfully performed with treatment-well tiltmeters on six wells including the first-ever used on propped treatments. The mapped fracture height was then used to calibrate the fracture model, perform on-site fracture-design changes, and optimize future fracture treatments. This paper shows how early use of fracture diagnostics can assist in the development of a new reservoir.

Mayerhofer, M.; Stutz, L.; Davis, E.; Wolhart, S. [Pinnacle Technology Houston, Houston, TX (United States)

2006-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

498

Readiness Assessment for MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility - Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project Â… 5-07  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CONDUCT OF OPERATIONS (OP) CONDUCT OF OPERATIONS (OP) Objective: OP.1 Adequate and correct procedures and safety limits are in place for operating the DTF ventilation system and conducting treatment activities. (CR1, CR-10) Criteria: a. All required procedures, AMOWs, PTWs, and work orders have been prepared, validated, and approved for all routine treatment and support activities. b. Procedures include actions for anticipated abnormal or emergency conditions. c. Workers have demonstrated their familiarity and knowledge of the procedures during interviews and mockup operations. Objective: OP.2 Routine drills have been prepared and conducted for the DTF drum treatment activities. (CR11) Criteria; a. Drills have been prepared that address the anticipated abnormal and

499

Readiness Assessment for MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility - Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project Â… 5-07  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NUCLEAR SAFETY (NS) NUCLEAR SAFETY (NS) Objective: NS.1 Facility safety documentation is in place and has been implemented that describes the "safety envelope" of the facility. (CR 7) Criterion: An unreviewed safety question (USQ) screen/evaluation has been completed and approved for the installation and use of the DTF for drum treatment in the DTF. Objective: NS.2 The facility systems and procedures, for the DTF and drum treatment activities, are consistent with the description of the facility, procedures, and accident analysis included in the safety basis. (CR9) Criterion: The DTF and drum treatment activities are adequately described in the documented safety analysis (DSA) or changes have been identified for inclusion in the next annual update.

500

Testing outer boundary treatments for the Einstein equations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Various methods of treating outer boundaries in numerical relativity are compared using a simple test problem: a Schwarzschild black hole with an outgoing gravitational wave perturbation. Numerical solutions computed using different boundary treatments are compared to a `reference' numerical solution obtained by placing the outer boundary at a very large radius. For each boundary treatment, the full solutions including constraint violations and extracted gravitational waves are compared to those of the reference solution, thereby assessing the reflections caused by the artificial boundary. These tests use a first-order generalized harmonic formulation of the Einstein equations. Constraint-preserving boundary conditions for this system are reviewed, and an improved boundary condition on the gauge degrees of freedom is presented. Alternate boundary conditions evaluated here include freezing the incoming characteristic fields, Sommerfeld boundary conditions, and the constraint-preserving boundary conditions of Kreiss and Winicour. Rather different approaches to boundary treatments, such as sponge layers and spatial compactification, are also tested. Overall the best treatment found here combines boundary conditions that preserve the constraints, freeze the Newman-Penrose scalar Psi_0, and control gauge reflections.

Oliver Rinne; Lee Lindblom; Mark A. Scheel

2007-04-05T23:59:59.000Z