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1

Introduction to Small-Scale Photovoltaic Systems (Including RETScreen Case  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Introduction to Small-Scale Photovoltaic Systems (Including RETScreen Case Introduction to Small-Scale Photovoltaic Systems (Including RETScreen Case Study) (Webinar) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Introduction to Small-Scale Photovoltaic Systems (Including RETScreen Case Study) (Webinar) Focus Area: Solar Topics: Market Analysis Website: www.leonardo-energy.org/webinar-introduction-small-scale-photovoltaic- Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/introduction-small-scale-photovoltaic Language: English Policies: Deployment Programs DeploymentPrograms: Project Development This video teaches the viewer about photovoltaic arrays and RETscreen's photovoltaic module, which can be used to project the cost and production of an array. An example case study was

2

INTRODUCTION Embryonic development is sensitive to many factors, including  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, mothers can attempt to maintain their developing embryos at an optimal temperature, and thus The Journal RESEARCH ARTICLE Maternal influences on early development: preferred temperature prior to oviposition1346 INTRODUCTION Embryonic development is sensitive to many factors, including hormones, toxins

Denardo, Dale

3

Introduction to Small-Scale Wind Energy Systems (Including RETScreen...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Application Design Website: www.leonardo-energy.orgwebinar-introduction-small-scale-wind-energy-s Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.orgcontentintroduction-small-scale-wind-en...

4

Can the scale factor be rippled?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We address an issue: would the cosmological scale factor be a locally oscillating quantity? This problem is examined in the framework of two classical 1+1-dimensional models: the first one is a string against a curved background, and the second one is an inhomogeneous Bianchi I model. For the string model, it is shown that there exist the gauge and the initial condition providing an oscillation of scale factor against a slowly evolving background, which is not affected by such an oscillation "at the mean". For the inhomogeneous Bianchi I model with the conformal time gauge, an initially homogeneous scale factor can become inhomogeneous and undergo the nonlinear oscillations. As is shown these nonlinear oscillations can be treated as a nonlinear gauge wave.

S. L. Cherkas; V. L. Kalashnikov

2012-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

5

Can the scale factor be rippled?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We address an issue: would the cosmological scale factor be a locally oscillating quantity? This problem is examined in the framework of two classical 1+1-dimensional models: the first one is a string against a curved background, and the second one is an inhomogeneous Bianchi I model. For the string model, it is shown that there exist the gauge and the initial condition providing an oscillation of scale factor against a slowly evolving background, which is not affected by such an oscillation "at the mean". For the inhomogeneous Bianchi I model with the conformal time gauge, an initially homogeneous scale factor can become inhomogeneous and undergo the nonlinear oscillations. As is shown these nonlinear oscillations can be treated as a nonlinear gauge wave.

Cherkas, S L

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

DISTINCTIONS The unique combination of factors which distinguish Berea includes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

throughout Appala- chia. SUSTAINABLE CAMPUS FEATURES The College environment demonstrates sustainable living and enhances student learning. Recently renovated historical buildings and residence halls include sustain, Washington Monthly ranked Berea the #1 liberal arts college in the nation Listed as a "Best Buy" college

Baltisberger, Jay H.

7

Introduction to Small-Scale Wind Energy Systems (Including RETScreen Case  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Introduction to Small-Scale Wind Energy Systems (Including RETScreen Case Introduction to Small-Scale Wind Energy Systems (Including RETScreen Case Study) (Webinar) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Introduction to Small-Scale Wind Energy Systems (Including RETScreen Case Study) (Webinar) Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: System & Application Design Website: www.leonardo-energy.org/webinar-introduction-small-scale-wind-energy-s Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/introduction-small-scale-wind-energy- Language: English Policies: Deployment Programs DeploymentPrograms: Project Development This video teaches the viewer about wind turbines and RETscreen's wind module, which can be used to project the cost and production of a wind

8

Scale-factor-stabilized fiber-optic gyroscope by deep phase modulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A scale-factor-stabilized fiber-optic gyroscope by deep phase modulation is demonstrated. There are two servo loops included in this system. The first servo loop is used for...

Chien, Pie-Yau; Pan, Ci-Ling

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

NREL: Energy Analysis - Utility-Scale Energy Technology Capacity Factors  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Utility-Scale Energy Technology Capacity Factors Utility-Scale Energy Technology Capacity Factors This chart indicates the range of recent capacity factor estimates for utility-scale renewable energy technologies. The dots indicate the average, and the vertical lines represent the range: Average +1 standard deviation and average -1 standard deviation. If you are seeking utility-scale technology cost and performance estimates, please visit the Transparent Cost Database website for NREL's information regarding vehicles, biofuels, and electricity generation. Capital Cost (September 2013 Update) Operations & Maintenance (September 2013 Update) Utility-Scale Capacity Factors Useful Life Land Use by System Technology LCOE Calculator Capacity factor for energy technologies. For more information, please download supporting data for energy technology costs.

10

A decision support system prototype including human factors based on the TOGA meta-theory approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The human contribution to the risk of operation of complex technological systems is often not negligible and sometimes tends to become significant, as shown by many reports on incidents and accidents occurred in the past inside Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). An error of a human operator of a NPP can derive by both omission and commission. For instance, complex commission errors can also lead to significant catastrophic technological accidents, as for the case of the Three Mile Island accident. Typically, the problem is analyzed by focusing on the single event chain that has provoked the incident or accident. What is needed is a general framework able to include as many parameters as possible, i.e. both technological and human factors. Such a general model could allow to envisage an omission or commission error before it can happen or, alternatively, suggest preferred actions to do in order to take countermeasures to neutralize the effect of the error before it becomes critical. In this paper, a preliminary Decision Support System (DSS) based on the so-called (-) TOGA meta-theory approach is presented. The application of such a theory to the management of nuclear power plants has been presented in the previous ICAPP 2011. Here, a human factor simulator prototype is proposed in order to include the effect of human errors in the decision path. The DSS has been developed using a TRIGA research reactor as reference plant, and implemented using the LabVIEW programming environment and the Finite State Machine (FSM) model The proposed DSS shows how to apply the Universal Reasoning Paradigm (URP) and the Universal Management Paradigm (UMP) to a real plant context. The DSS receives inputs from instrumentation data and gives as output a suggested decision. It is obtained as the result of an internal elaborating process based on a performance function. The latter, describes the degree of satisfaction and efficiency, which are dependent on the level of responsibility related to each professional role. As an application, we present the simulation of the discussed error, e.g. the unchecked extraction of the control rods during a power variation maneuver and we show how the effect of human errors can affect the performance function, giving rise to different countermeasures which could call different operator figures into play, potentially not envisaged in the standard procedure. (authors)

Cappelli, M.; Memmi, F. [UTFISST, ENEA Casaccia, via Anguillarese 301, Rome (Italy); Gadomski, A. M. [ECONA, Centro Interuniv. Elaborazione Cognitiva Sistemi Naturali e Artificiali, via dei Marsi 47, Rome (Italy); Sepielli, M. [UTFISST, ENEA Casaccia, via Anguillarese 301, Rome (Italy)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Analytical expressions for the gate utilization factors of passive multiplicity counters including signal build-up  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the realm of nuclear safeguards, passive neutron multiplicity counting using shift register pulse train analysis to nondestructively quantify Pu in product materials is a familiar and widely applied technique. The approach most commonly taken is to construct a neutron detector consisting of {sup 3}He filled cylindrical proportional counters embedded in a high density polyethylene moderator. Fast neutrons from the item enter the moderator and are quickly slowed down, on timescales of the order of 1-2 {micro}s, creating a thermal population which then persists typically for several 10's {micro}s and is sampled by the {sup 3}He detectors. Because the initial transient is of comparatively short duration it has been traditional to treat it as instantaneous and furthermore to approximate the subsequent capture time distribution as exponential in shape. With these approximations simple expressions for the various Gate Utilization Factors (GUFs) can be obtained. These factors represent the proportion of time correlated events i.e. Doubles and Triples signal present in the pulse train that is detected by the coincidence gate structure chosen (predelay and gate width settings of the multiplicity shift register). More complicated expressions can be derived by generalizing the capture time distribution to multiple time components or harmonics typically present in real systems. When it comes to applying passive neutron multiplicity methods to extremely intense (i.e. high emission rate and highly multiplying) neutron sources there is a drive to use detector types with very fast response characteristics in order to cope with the high rates. In addition to short pulse width, detectors with a short capture time profile are also desirable so that a short coincidence gate width can be set in order to reduce the chance or Accidental coincidence signal. In extreme cases, such as might be realized using boron loaded scintillators, the dieaway time may be so short that the build-up (thermalization transient) within the detector cannot be ignored. Another example where signal build-up might be observed is when a {sup 3}He based system is used to track the evolution of the time correlated signal created by a higher multiplying item within a reflective configuration such as the measurement of a spent fuel assembly. In this work we develop expressions for the GUFs which include signal build-up.

Croft, Stephen [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Evans, Louise G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schear, Melissa A [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

The Two-Loop Scale Dependence of the Static QCD Potential including Quark Masses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The interaction potential V(Q{sup 2}) between static test charges can be used to define an effective charge {alpha}{sub V}(Q{sup 2}) and a physically-based renormalization scheme for quantum chromodynamics and other gauge theories. In this paper we use recent results for the finite-mass fermionic corrections to the heavy-quark potential at two-loops to derive the next-to-leading order term for the Gell Mann-Low function of the V-scheme. The resulting effective number of flavors N{sub F}(Q{sup 2}/m{sup 2}) in the {alpha}{sub V} scheme is determined as a gauge-independent and analytic function of the ratio of the momentum transfer to the quark pole mass. The results give automatic decoupling of heavy quarks and are independent of the renormalization procedure. Commensurate scale relations then provide the next-to-leading order connection between all perturbatively calculable observables to the analytic and gauge-invariant {alpha}{sub V} scheme without any scale ambiguity and a well defined number of active flavors. The inclusion of the finite quark mass effects in the running of the coupling is compared with the standard treatment of finite quark mass effects in the {ovr MS} scheme.

Brodsky, Stanley J.

1999-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

13

Abstract--Digitization of production factors, including the knowledge for knowledge workers and consumers, opens almost  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

such as collaborative computing, Web services, and ontologies attempt to respond to these large-scale challenges/CAM, CIM, CE, Agile Manufacturing, Virtual Engineering, e-Engineering, etc.) and service (e.g., health care

Hsu, Cheng

14

Potential Application Of Radionuclide Scaling Factors To High Level Waste Characterization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Production sources, radiological properties, relative solubilities in waste, and laboratory analysis techniques for the forty-five radionuclides identified in Hanford?s Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Feed Acceptance Data Quality Objectives (DQO) document are addressed in this report. Based on Savannah River Site (SRS) experience and waste characteristics, thirteen of the radionuclides are judged to be candidates for potential scaling in High Level Waste (HLW) based on the concentrations of other radionuclides as determined through laboratory measurements. The thirteen radionuclides conducive to potential scaling are: Ni-59, Zr-93, Nb-93m, Cd-113m, Sn-121m, Sn-126, Cs-135, Sm-151, Ra-226, Ra-228, Ac-227, Pa-231, and Th-229. The ability to scale radionuclides is useful from two primary perspectives: 1) it provides a means of checking the radionuclide concentrations that have been determined by laboratory analysis; and 2) it provides a means of estimating radionuclide concentrations in the absence of a laboratory analysis technique or when a complex laboratory analysis technique fails. Along with the rationale for identifying and applying the potential scaling factors, this report also provides examples of using the scaling factors to estimate concentrations of radionuclides in current SRS waste and into the future. Also included in the report are examples of independent laboratory analysis techniques that can be used to check results of key radionuclide analyses. Effective utilization of radionuclide scaling factors requires understanding of the applicable production sources and the chemistry of the waste. As such, the potential scaling approaches identified in this report should be assessed from the perspective of the Hanford waste before reaching a decision regarding WTP applicability.

Reboul, S. H.

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

15

Nonadiabatic dynamics of electron transfer in solution: Explicit and implicit solvent treatments that include multiple relaxation time scales  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development of efficient theoretical methods for describing electron transfer (ET) reactions in condensed phases is important for a variety of chemical and biological applications. Previously, dynamical dielectric continuum theory was used to derive Langevin equations for a single collective solvent coordinate describing ET in a polar solvent. In this theory, the parameters are directly related to the physical properties of the system and can be determined from experimental data or explicit molecular dynamics simulations. Herein, we combine these Langevin equations with surface hopping nonadiabatic dynamics methods to calculate the rate constants for thermal ET reactions in polar solvents for a wide range of electronic couplings and reaction free energies. Comparison of explicit and implicit solvent calculations illustrates that the mapping from explicit to implicit solvent models is valid even for solvents exhibiting complex relaxation behavior with multiple relaxation time scales and a short-time inertial response. The rate constants calculated for implicit solvent models with a single solvent relaxation time scale corresponding to water, acetonitrile, and methanol agree well with analytical theories in the Golden rule and solvent-controlled regimes, as well as in the intermediate regime. The implicit solvent models with two relaxation time scales are in qualitative agreement with the analytical theories but quantitatively overestimate the rate constants compared to these theories. Analysis of these simulations elucidates the importance of multiple relaxation time scales and the inertial component of the solvent response, as well as potential shortcomings of the analytical theories based on single time scale solvent relaxation models. This implicit solvent approach will enable the simulation of a wide range of ET reactions via the stochastic dynamics of a single collective solvent coordinate with parameters that are relevant to experimentally accessible systems.

Schwerdtfeger, Christine A.; Soudackov, Alexander V.; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon, E-mail: shs3@illinois.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 600 South Mathews Avenue, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)] [Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 600 South Mathews Avenue, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

2014-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

16

Periodic Verification of the Scaling Factor for Radwastes in Korean NPPs - 13294  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

According to the acceptance criteria for a low and intermediate level radioactive waste (LILW) listed in Notice No. 2012-53 of the Nuclear Safety and Security Commission (NSSC), specific concentrations of radionuclides inside a drum has to be identified and quantified. In 5 years of effort, scaling factors were derived through destructive radiochemical analysis, and the dry active waste, spent resin, concentration bottom, spent filter, and sludge drums generated during 2004 ? 2008 were evaluated to identify radionuclide inventories. Eventually, only dry active waste among LILWs generated from Korean NPPs were first shipped to a permanent disposal facility on December 2010. For the LILWs generated after 2009, the radionuclides are being radiochemically quantified because the Notice clarifies that the certifications of the scaling factors should be verified biennially. During the operation of NPP, the radionuclides designated in the Notice are formed by neutron activation of primary coolant, reactor structural materials, corrosion products, and fission products released into primary coolant through defects or failures in fuel cladding. Eventually, since the radionuclides released into primary coolant are transported into the numerous auxiliary and support systems connected to primary system, the LILWs can be contaminated, and the radionuclides can have various concentration distributions. Thus, radioactive wastes, such as spent resin and dry active waste generated at various Korean NPP sites, were sampled at each site, and the activities of the regulated radionuclides present in the sample were determined using radiochemical methods. The scaling factors were driven on the basis of the activity ratios between a or ?-emitting nuclides and ?-emitting nuclides. The resulting concentrations were directly compared with the established scaling factors' data using statistical methods. In conclusions, the established scaling factors were verified with a reliability of within 2?, and the scaling factors will be applied for newly analyzed LILWs to evaluate the radionuclide inventories. (authors)

Park, Yong Joon; Ahn, Hong Joo; Song, Byoung Chul; Song, Kyuseok [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, P.O. Box 105, Yuseong, Daejeon, 305-330 (Korea, Republic of)] [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, P.O. Box 105, Yuseong, Daejeon, 305-330 (Korea, Republic of)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Mass scale effects for the Sudakov form factors in theories with the broken gauge symmetry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The off-shell and the on-shell Sudakov form factors in theories with broken gauge symmetry are calculated in the double-logarithmic approximation. We have used different infrared cut-offs, i.e. different mass scales, for virtual photons and weak gauge bosons.

A. Barroso; B. I. Ermolaev

2002-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

18

The X-factor in Galaxies: I. Dependence on Environment and Scale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Characterizing the conversion factor between CO emission and column density of molecular hydrogen, X{sub CO}, is crucial in studying the gaseous content of galaxies, its evolution, and relation to star formation. In most cases the conversion factor is assumed to be close to that of giant molecular clouds (GMCs) in the Milky Way, except possibly for mergers and star-bursting galaxies. However, there are physical grounds to expect that it should also depend on the gas metallicity, surface density, and strength of the interstellar radiation field. The X{sub CO} factor may also depend on the scale on which CO emission is averaged due to effects of limited resolution. We study the dependence of X{sub CO} on gas properties and averaging scale using a model that is based on a combination of results of sub-pc scale magneto-hydrodynamic simulations and on the gas distribution from self-consistent cosmological simulations of galaxy formation. Our model predicts X{sub CO} {approx} 2 - 4 x 10{sup 20} K{sup -1} cm{sup -2} km{sup -1} s, consistent with the Galactic value, for interstellar medium conditions typical for the Milky Way. For such conditions the predicted X{sub CO} varies by only a factor of two for gas surfaced densities in the range {Sigma}{sub H{sub 2}} {approx} 50-500 M{sub {circle_dot}} pc{sup -2}. However, the model also predicts that more generally on the scale of GMCs, X{sub CO} is a strong function of metallicity, and depends on the column density and the interstellar UV flux. We show explicitly that neglecting these dependencies in observational estimates can strongly bias the inferred distribution of H2 column densities of molecular clouds to have a narrower and offset range compared to the true distribution. We find that when averaged on {approx} kpc scales the X-factor depends only weakly on radiation field and column density, but is still a strong function of metallicity. The predicted metallicity dependence can be approximated as X{sub CO} {proportional_to} Z{sup -{gamma}} with {gamma} {approx} 0.5 - 0.8.

Feldmann, Robert; /Fermilab /Chicago U., EFI; Gnedin, Nickolay Y.; /Fermilab /Chicago U., EFI /Chicago U.; Kravtsov, Andrey V.; /Chicago U., EFI /Chicago U.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Scaling study of the pion electroproduction cross sections and the pion form factor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The $^{1}$H($e,e^\\prime \\pi^+$)n cross section was measured for a range of four-momentum transfer up to $Q^2$=3.91 GeV$^2$ at values of the invariant mass, $W$, above the resonance region. The $Q^2$-dependence of the longitudinal component is consistent with the $Q^2$-scaling prediction for hard exclusive processes. This suggests that perturbative QCD concepts are applicable at rather low values of $Q^2$. Pion form factor results, while consistent with the $Q^2$-scaling prediction, are inconsistent in magnitude with perturbative QCD calculations. The extraction of Generalized Parton Distributions from hard exclusive processes assumes the dominance of the longitudinal term. However, transverse contributions to the cross section are still significant at $Q^2$=3.91 GeV$^2$.

T. Horn

2007-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

20

PROCEEDINGS of the HUMAN FACTORS AND ERGONOMICS SOCIETY 42nd ANNUAL MEETING--IYYB SCALED WORLDS AS RESEARCH TOOLS: A  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PROCEEDINGS of the HUMAN FACTORS AND ERGONOMICS SOCIETY 42nd ANNUAL MEETING--IYYB 1157 SCALED and Ergonomics Society (pp. 163-167). Santa Monica, CA: HFES. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The work at George Mason

Gray, Wayne

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes scale factor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Gravity-anti-Gravity Symmetric Mini-Superspace: Quantum Entanglement and Cosmological Scale Factor Grid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A gravity-anti-gravity (GaG) odd linear dilaton action offers an eternal inflation evolution governed by the unified (cosmological constant plus radiation) equation of state $\\rho-3P=4\\Lambda$. At the mini superspace level, a 'two-particle' variant of the no-boundary proposal, notably 'one-particle' energy dependent, is encountered. While a GaG-odd wave function can only host a weak Big Bang boundary condition, albeit for any $k$, a strong Big Bang boundary condition requires a GaG-even entangled wave function, and singles out $k=0$ flat space. The locally most probable values for the cosmological scale factor and the dilaton field form a grid $\\{a^2,a\\phi\\}\\sim\\sqrt{4n_1+1}\\pm\\sqrt{4n_2+1}$.

Aharon Davidson; Tomer Ygael

2014-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

22

Gravity-anti-Gravity Symmetric Mini-Superspace: Quantum Entanglement and Cosmological Scale Factor Grid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A gravity-anti-gravity (GaG) odd linear dilaton action offers an eternal inflation evolution governed by the unified (cosmological constant plus radiation) equation of state $\\rho-3P=4\\Lambda$. At the mini superspace level, a 'two-particle' variant of the no-boundary proposal, notably 'one-particle' energy dependent, is encountered. While a GaG-odd wave function can only host a weak Big Bang boundary condition, albeit for any $k$, a strong Big Bang boundary condition requires a GaG-even entangled wave function, and singles out $k=0$ flat space. The locally most probable values for the cosmological scale factor and the dilaton field form a grid $\\{a^2,a\\phi\\}\\sim\\sqrt{4n_1+1}\\pm\\sqrt{4n_2+1}$.

Davidson, Aharon

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Identification and Quantitative Analysis of Project Success Factors for Large Scale Projects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Software projects require a right mix of the software resources and the expertise to increase the chances of timely completion. The interface for the resource allocation to the software projects is provided by the project factors. The identification ...

Basit Shahzad, Abass Md Said

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

UV-B-Responsive Association of the Arabidopsis bZIP Transcription Factor ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL5 with Target Genes, Including Its Own Promoter  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Instructions for Authors ( www.plantcell.org ) is: Roman Ulm ( roman.ulm@unige.ch ). [W] Online version contains Web-only data. [OPEN] Articles can be viewed online without a subscription. The bZIP transcription factor HY5 plays an important...

Melanie Binkert; László Kozma-Bognár; Kata Terecskei; Lieven De Veylder; Ferenc Nagy; Roman Ulm

2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

25

Concerted bioinformatic analysis of genome-scale blood transcription factor compendium reveals new control mechanisms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 to chromatin by core binding transcription factors. Mol Cell 2012, 45:330343. 5. Trowbridge JJ, Sinha AU, Zhu N, Li M, Armstrong SA, Orkin SH: Haploinsufficiency of Dnmt1 impairs leukemia stem cell function through derepression of bivalent... of polycomb repressive complex 1 to chromatin by core binding transcription factors, Mol. Cell, 2012, 45, 330343. 5 J. J. Trowbridge, A. U. Sinha, N. Zhu, M. Li, S. A. Armstrong and S. H. Orkin, Haploinsufficiency of Dnmt1 impairs leukemia stem cell function...

Joshi, Anagha; Gottgens, Berthold

2014-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

26

Factors Affecting the Rate of Penetration of Large-Scale Electricity Technologies: The Case of Carbon Sequestration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project falls under the Technology Innovation and Diffusion topic of the Integrated Assessment of Climate Change Research Program. The objective was to better understand the critical variables that affect the rate of penetration of large-scale electricity technologies in order to improve their representation in integrated assessment models. We conducted this research in six integrated tasks. In our first two tasks, we identified potential factors that affect penetration rates through discussions with modeling groups and through case studies of historical precedent. In the next three tasks, we investigated in detail three potential sets of critical factors: industrial conditions, resource conditions, and regulatory/environmental considerations. Research to assess the significance and relative importance of these factors involved the development of a microeconomic, system dynamics model of the US electric power sector. Finally, we implemented the penetration rate models in an integrated assessment model. While the focus of this effort is on carbon capture and sequestration technologies, much of the work will be applicable to other large-scale energy conversion technologies.

James R. McFarland; Howard J. Herzog

2007-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

27

Buried pipelines essentially involve problems of soil-structure interaction that include several complex factors such as geometry, material properties, and boundary  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Abstract Buried pipelines essentially involve problems of soil-structure interaction that include Bend, and Buckling Check. Keywords: buried pipelines, regression, horizontal bend, vertical bend, homoscedasticity, normality. 1 Introduction Analysis and design of buried pipelines are usually based on classical

Al-Shayea, Naser Abdul-Rahman

28

X-RAY SCALING RELATION IN EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES: DARK MATTER AS A PRIMARY FACTOR IN RETAINING HOT GAS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have revisited the X-ray scaling relations of early-type galaxies (ETG) by investigating, for the first time, the L{sub X,Gas}-M{sub Total} relation in a sample of 14 ETGs. In contrast to the large scatter (a factor of 10{sup 2}-10{sup 3}) in the L{sub X,Total}-L{sub B} relation, we found a tight correlation between these physically motivated quantities with an rms deviation of a factor of three in L{sub X,Gas} = 10{sup 38}-10{sup 43} erg s{sup 1} or M{sub Total} = a few 10{sup 10} to a few 10{sup 12} M{sub ?}. More striking, this relation becomes even tighter with an rms deviation of a factor of 1.3 among the gas-rich galaxies (with L{sub X,Gas} > 10{sup 40} erg s{sup 1}). In a simple power-law form, the new relation is (L{sub X,Gas}/10{sup 40} erg s{sup 1}) = (M{sub Total}/3.2 10{sup 11} M{sub ?}){sup 3}. This relation is also consistent with the steep relation between the gas luminosity and temperature, L{sub X,Gas} ? T{sub Gas} {sup 4.5}, identified by Boroson et al., if the gas is virialized. Our results indicate that the total mass of an ETG is the primary factor in regulating the amount of hot gas. Among the gas-poor galaxies (with L{sub X,Gas} < a few 10{sup 39} erg s{sup 1}), the scatter in the L{sub X,Gas}-M{sub Total} (and L{sub X,Gas}-T{sub Gas}) relation increases, suggesting that secondary factors (e.g., rotation, flattening, star formation history, cold gas, environment, etc.) may become important.

Kim, Dong-Woo; Fabbiano, Giuseppina [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

2013-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

29

CHARACTERIZATION OF GRAPHITE SLEEVES FROM BUGEY 1 EDF PLANT FOR PERMANENT DISPOSAL--MEASUREMENT AND CALCULATION OF SCALING FACTORS FOR DIFFICULT-TO-MEASURE NUCLIDES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electricite De France's Bugey-1 reactor, with graphite moderator, was shutdown permanently in 1994. The natural uranium elements are encased in graphite sleeves to facilitate handling. 2,000 m3 of concrete containers, containing non conditioned graphite sleeves, must be characterized and conditioned before shipment to the national repository site called ''Centre de l'Aube''. The characterization work consists in quantifying Difficult-To-Measure nuclides (DTM) by the use of Scaling Factors (SF), which use Co-60 as tracer. Bugey developed an industrial method for the gamma counting of each package to perform easily and rapidly the measurement of the Co-60 content. Depending upon the DTM radionuclide, Co-60 scaling factors are determined, or by measurement on graphite samples (case of C-14, Cl-36, Ni-63, H-3), either by using a calculation technique which is based upon the impurities present in the graphite sleeves. This method is applied for the other pure beta emitters all DTM radionucli des : Ag-108m, Be-10, Ca-41, Cd-109, Cd-113m, Co-57, Cs-135, Cs-137, Eu-155, Fe-55, Gd-153, Mo-93, Nb- 93m, Nb-94, Ni-59, Pd-107, Pm-147, Sm-151, Sn-119m, Sn-121m, Sn-126, Sr-90, Tc-99, V-49 and Zr-93. Calculations use six sleeve history cases : 1 year at 50% power, 2 years at 50 % power, 3 years at 50 % power, 4 years at 50 % power, 1 year at 100 % power and 2 years at 100 % power. The DTM nuclides have been calculated from impurity concentrations for each of these six cases, and the greatest scaling factor has been kept. The calculation is based upon two impurity sets: First impurity set : a reverse activation calculation provides us with the best estimate value of impurities calculated from the measured mean gamma spectrum and from measured scaling factors. It consists in solving a system of simultaneous equations for the impurities as a function of the mean gamma radioactive spectrum and of the measured scaling factors. The concerned calculated impurities are Co, Cl, Li, Ag, Cs, Eu, Fe, Ni, Sb, Sc, Zn and Sn. Second impurity set: The other impurities which were not available by this reverse calculation are originated from the greatest value, which has been measured in the graphite and sometimes by using the detection limit. This method allows us to avoid some detection limit problems and statistical weaknesses. It gets better, cheaper and faster characterization by mixing easy gamma spectrum measurement and simple linear calculation.

PONCET, Bernard R.

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

30

SEEPAGE MODEL FOR PA INCLUDING DRIFT COLLAPSE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to document the predictions and analyses performed using the seepage model for performance assessment (SMPA) for both the Topopah Spring middle nonlithophysal (Tptpmn) and lower lithophysal (Tptpll) lithostratigraphic units at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Look-up tables of seepage flow rates into a drift (and their uncertainty) are generated by performing numerical simulations with the seepage model for many combinations of the three most important seepage-relevant parameters: the fracture permeability, the capillary-strength parameter 1/a, and the percolation flux. The percolation flux values chosen take into account flow focusing effects, which are evaluated based on a flow-focusing model. Moreover, multiple realizations of the underlying stochastic permeability field are conducted. Selected sensitivity studies are performed, including the effects of an alternative drift geometry representing a partially collapsed drift from an independent drift-degradation analysis (BSC 2004 [DIRS 166107]). The intended purpose of the seepage model is to provide results of drift-scale seepage rates under a series of parameters and scenarios in support of the Total System Performance Assessment for License Application (TSPA-LA). The SMPA is intended for the evaluation of drift-scale seepage rates under the full range of parameter values for three parameters found to be key (fracture permeability, the van Genuchten 1/a parameter, and percolation flux) and drift degradation shape scenarios in support of the TSPA-LA during the period of compliance for postclosure performance [Technical Work Plan for: Performance Assessment Unsaturated Zone (BSC 2002 [DIRS 160819], Section I-4-2-1)]. The flow-focusing model in the Topopah Spring welded (TSw) unit is intended to provide an estimate of flow focusing factors (FFFs) that (1) bridge the gap between the mountain-scale and drift-scale models, and (2) account for variability in local percolation flux due to stochastic hydrologic properties and flow processes.

C. Tsang

2004-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

31

Pump apparatus including deconsolidator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A pump apparatus includes a particulate pump that defines a passage that extends from an inlet to an outlet. A duct is in flow communication with the outlet. The duct includes a deconsolidator configured to fragment particle agglomerates received from the passage.

Sonwane, Chandrashekhar; Saunders, Timothy; Fitzsimmons, Mark Andrew

2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

32

Stand-scale tree mortality factors differ by site and species following drought in southwestern mixed conifer forests  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Impacts of drought on tree mortality in high-elevation mixed-conifer forests of southwestern U.S. are poorly understood. A recent extended and severe drought in the region provided an opportunity to investigate the patterns and factors associated with tree mortality in this forest type. Specifically, we quantified mortality that occurred between 1995 and 2008 of four tree species, white fir (Abies concolor), limber pine (Pinus flexilis), trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides), and Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii), in mixed-conifer forests over three sites in northern Arizona within 84, 0.02ha plots. We found: (1) varied but substantial tree mortality (456% by basal area) in most species between 1996 and 2006 in association with recent severe and prolonged drought; (2) tree mortality differed among sites and species with aspen and white fir having the most mortality (>30% by basal area); (3) relationships between tree mortality and most climatic factors (e.g. temperature, precipitation, Palmer Drought Severity Index) were lagged 14yr; (4) bark beetle attack and intraspecific tree basal area were consistently and positively related to tree mortality for most species and sites, whereas topographic and other stand characteristics were less consistently related to mortality. Results show that aspen, Douglas-fir, and white fir were more vulnerable to recent drought-associated mortality than limber pine. Associations between tree mortality and intraspecific basal area support further evaluation of treatments that reduce intraspecific competition within stands to lower risks of tree mortality in southwestern mixed conifer forests.

Jeffrey M. Kane; Thomas E. Kolb; Joel D. McMillin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Test plan: Sealing of the Disturbed Rock Zone (DRZ), including Marker Bed 139 (MB139) and the overlying halite, below the repository horizon, at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Small-scale seal performance test-series F  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This test plan describes activities intended to demonstrate equipment and techniques for producing, injecting, and evaluating microfine cementitious grout. The grout will be injected in fractured rock located below the repository horizon at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). These data are intended to support the development of the Alcove Gas Barrier System (AGBS), the design of upcoming, large-scale seal tests, and ongoing laboratory evaluations of grouting efficacy. Degradation of the grout will be studied in experiments conducted in parallel with the underground grouting experiment.

Ahrens, E.H.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

THE CO-TO-H{sub 2} CONVERSION FACTOR AND DUST-TO-GAS RATIO ON KILOPARSEC SCALES IN NEARBY GALAXIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present ?kiloparsec spatial resolution maps of the CO-to-H{sub 2} conversion factor (?{sub CO}) and dust-to-gas ratio (DGR) in 26 nearby, star-forming galaxies. We have simultaneously solved for ?{sub CO} and the DGR by assuming that the DGR is approximately constant on kiloparsec scales. With this assumption, we can combine maps of dust mass surface density, CO-integrated intensity, and H I column density to solve for both ?{sub CO} and the DGR with no assumptions about their value or dependence on metallicity or other parameters. Such a study has just become possible with the availability of high-resolution far-IR maps from the Herschel key program KINGFISH, {sup 12}CO J = (2-1) maps from the IRAM 30 m large program HERACLES, and H I 21 cm line maps from THINGS. We use a fixed ratio between the (2-1) and (1-0) lines to present our ?{sub CO} results on the more typically used {sup 12}CO J = (1-0) scale and show using literature measurements that variations in the line ratio do not affect our results. In total, we derive 782 individual solutions for ?{sub CO} and the DGR. On average, ?{sub CO} = 3.1 M{sub ?} pc{sup 2} (K km s{sup 1}){sup 1} for our sample with a standard deviation of 0.3 dex. Within galaxies, we observe a generally flat profile of ?{sub CO} as a function of galactocentric radius. However, most galaxies exhibit a lower ?{sub CO} value in the central kiloparseca factor of ?2 below the galaxy mean, on average. In some cases, the central ?{sub CO} value can be factors of 5-10 below the standard Milky Way (MW) value of ?{sub CO,{sub MW}} = 4.4 M{sub ?} pc{sup 2} (K km s{sup 1}){sup 1}. While for ?{sub CO} we find only weak correlations with metallicity, the DGR is well-correlated with metallicity, with an approximately linear slope. Finally, we present several recommendations for choosing an appropriate ?{sub CO} for studies of nearby galaxies.

Sandstrom, K. M.; Walter, F. [Max Planck Institut fr Astronomie, Knigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Leroy, A. K. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Bolatto, A. D.; Wolfire, M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Croxall, K. V.; Crocker, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Mail Drop 111, University of Toledo, 2801 West Bancroft Street, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States); Draine, B. T.; Aniano, G. [Princeton University Observatory, Peyton Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544-1001 (United States); Wilson, C. D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4M1 (Canada); Calzetti, D. [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Kennicutt, R. C.; Galametz, M. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Donovan Meyer, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, SUNY Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3800 (United States); Usero, A. [Observatorio Astronmico Nacional, Alfonso XII, 3, E-28014 Madrid (Spain); Bigiel, F. [Institut fr theoretische Astrophysik, Zentrum fr Astronomie der Universitt Heidelberg, Albert-Ueberle Str. 2, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Brinks, E. [Centre for Astrophysics Research, University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield AL10 9AB (United Kingdom); De Blok, W. J. G. [ASTRON, The Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy, Postbus 2, 7990-AA Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Dale, D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY 82071 (United States); Engelbracht, C. W., E-mail: sandstrom@mpia.de [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); and others

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

A Statistical Selection Strategy for Normalization Procedures in LC-MS Proteomics Experiments through Dataset Dependent Ranking of Normalization Scaling Factors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Quantification of LC-MS peak intensities assigned during peptide identification in a typical comparative proteomics experiment will deviate from run-to-run of the instrument due to both technical and biological variation. Thus, normalization of peak intensities across a LC-MS proteomics dataset is a fundamental step in pre-processing. However, the downstream analysis of LC-MS proteomics data can be dramatically affected by the normalization method selected . Current normalization procedures for LC-MS proteomics data are presented in the context of normalization values derived from subsets of the full collection of identified peptides. The distribution of these normalization values is unknown a priori. If they are not independent from the biological factors associated with the experiment the normalization process can introduce bias into the data, which will affect downstream statistical biomarker discovery. We present a novel approach to evaluate normalization strategies, where a normalization strategy includes the peptide selection component associated with the derivation of normalization values. Our approach evaluates the effect of normalization on the between-group variance structure in order to identify candidate normalization strategies that improve the structure of the data without introducing bias into the normalized peak intensities.

Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Matzke, Melissa M.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Pounds, Joel G.; Waters, Katrina M.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Meals included in Conference Registrations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Meals included in Conference Registrations Meals included as part of the cost of a conference the most reasonable rates are obtained. Deluxe hotels and motels should be avoided. GSA rates have been for Georgia high cost areas. 75% of these amounts would be $21 for non- high cost areas and $27 for high cost

Arnold, Jonathan

37

ALLSMOG: an APEX Low-redshift Legacy Survey for MOlecular Gas. I - molecular gas scaling relations, and the effect of the CO/H2 conversion factor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present ALLSMOG, the APEX Low-redshift Legacy Survey for MOlecular Gas. ALLSMOG is a survey designed to observe the CO(2-1) emission line with the APEX telescope, in a sample of local galaxies (0.01 conversion factor. We find an increase in the H2/HI mass ratio with stellar mass which closely matches semi-analytic predictions. We find a mean molecular gas fraction for ALLSMOG galaxies of MH2/M* = (0.09 - 0.13),...

Bothwell, M S; Cicone, C; Maiolino, R; Mller, P; Aravena, M; De Breuck, C; Peng, Y; Espada, D; Hodge, J A; Impellizzeri, C M V; Martn, S; Riechers, D; Walter, F

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Sponsorship includes: Agriculture in the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sponsorship includes: · Agriculture in the Classroom · Douglas County Farm Bureau · Gifford Farm · University of Nebraska Agricultural Research and Development Center · University of Nebraska- Lincoln Awareness Coalition is to help youth, primarily from urban communities, become aware of agriculture

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

39

Emerging and Reemerging Neglected Tropical Diseases: a Review of Key Characteristics, Risk Factors, and the Policy and Innovation Environment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...environmental scale, reducing factors contributing...amount of greenhouse gases than lower-income...health-related consequences...including the Greenhouse Gas Protocol...accomplished by reducing or eliminating...357). The policy proposal...of trade-related barriers...

Tim K. Mackey; Bryan A. Liang; Raphael Cuomo; Ryan Hafen; Kimberly C. Brouwer; Daniel E. Lee

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

CORR-REL: A Program for Reliability Analysis and Optimal One-Factor Scaling Douglas R. White and J. Patrick Gray  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-REL currently runs only in a Win32 environment. Further, screen clearing will not work correctly unless ANSI.SYS or ANSI.COM is operating. A copy of ANSI.COM is included on this disk. Type "ansi.com" to run (it will not run if ANSI.SYS is already operating). The easiest way to start CORR-REL is to use the run selection

White, Douglas R.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes scale factor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Appendix F Cultural Resources, Including  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Appendix F Appendix F Cultural Resources, Including Section 106 Consultation STATE OF CALIFORNIA - THE RESOURCES AGENCY EDMUND G. BROWN, JR., Governor OFFICE OF HISTORIC PRESERVATION DEPARTMENT OF PARKS AND RECREATION 1725 23 rd Street, Suite 100 SACRAMENTO, CA 95816-7100 (916) 445-7000 Fax: (916) 445-7053 calshpo@parks.ca.gov www.ohp.parks.ca.gov June 14, 2011 Reply in Reference To: DOE110407A Angela Colamaria Loan Programs Office Environmental Compliance Division Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave SW, LP-10 Washington, DC 20585 Re: Topaz Solar Farm, San Luis Obispo County, California Dear Ms. Colamaria: Thank you for seeking my consultation regarding the above noted undertaking. Pursuant to 36 CFR Part 800 (as amended 8-05-04) regulations implementing Section

42

Countries Gasoline Prices Including Taxes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Countries (U.S. dollars per gallon, including taxes) Countries (U.S. dollars per gallon, including taxes) Date Belgium France Germany Italy Netherlands UK US 01/13/14 7.83 7.76 7.90 8.91 8.76 8.11 3.68 01/06/14 8.00 7.78 7.94 8.92 8.74 8.09 3.69 12/30/13 NA NA NA NA NA NA 3.68 12/23/13 NA NA NA NA NA NA 3.63 12/16/13 7.86 7.79 8.05 9.00 8.78 8.08 3.61 12/9/13 7.95 7.81 8.14 8.99 8.80 8.12 3.63 12/2/13 7.91 7.68 8.07 8.85 8.68 8.08 3.64 11/25/13 7.69 7.61 8.07 8.77 8.63 7.97 3.65 11/18/13 7.99 7.54 8.00 8.70 8.57 7.92 3.57 11/11/13 7.63 7.44 7.79 8.63 8.46 7.85 3.55 11/4/13 7.70 7.51 7.98 8.70 8.59 7.86 3.61 10/28/13 8.02 7.74 8.08 8.96 8.79 8.04 3.64 10/21/13 7.91 7.71 8.11 8.94 8.80 8.05 3.70 10/14/13 7.88 7.62 8.05 8.87 8.74 7.97 3.69

43

From Hubble diagrams to scale factors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a lower bound on the radius of the universe today $a_0$ and a monotonicity constraint on the Hubble diagram. Our theoretical input is Einstein's kinematics and maximally symmetric universes. Present supernova data yield $a_0 > 1.2\\cdot 10^{26}$ m. A first attempt to quantify the monotonicity constraint is described. We do not see any indication of non-monotonicity.

Thomas Schucker; Andre Tilquin

2005-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

44

Kinetics of the Reaction of the Heaviest Hydrogen Atom with H2, the 4He? + H2 -> 4He?? + H Reaction: Experiments, Accurate Quantal Calculations, and Variational Transition State Theory, including Kinetic Isotope Effects for a Factor of 36.1 in Isotopic Mass  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The neutral muonic helium atom {sup 4}He{mu}, in which one of the electrons of He is replaced by a negative muon, may be effectively regarded as the heaviest isotope of the hydrogen atom, with a mass of 4.115 amu. We report details of the first muon spin rotation ({mu}SR) measurements of the chemical reaction rate constant of {sup 4}He{mu} with molecular hydrogen, {sup 4}He{mu} + H{sub 2} {yields} {sup 4}He{mu}H + H, at temperatures of 295.5, 405, and 500 K, as well as a {mu}SR measurement of the hyperfine coupling constant of muonic He at high pressures. The experimental rate constants, k{sub He{mu}}, are compared with the predictions of accurate quantum mechanical (QM) dynamics calculations carried out on a well converged Born-Huang (BH) potential energy surface, based on complete configuration interaction calculations and including a Born-Oppenheimer diagonal correction. At the two highest measured temperatures the agreement between the quantum theory and experiment is good to excellent, well within experimental uncertainties that include an estimate of possible systematic error, but at 295.5 K the quantum calculations for k{sub He{mu}} are below the experimental value by 2.1 times the experimental uncertainty estimates. Possible reasons for this discrepancy are discussed. Variational transition state theory calculations with multidimensional tunneling have also been carried out for k{sub He{mu}} on the BH surface, and they agree with the accurate QM rate constants to within 30% over a wider temperature range of 200-1000 K. Comparisons between theory and experiment are also presented for the rate constants for both the D + H{sub 2} and Mu + H{sub 2} reactions in a novel study of kinetic isotope effects for the H + H{sub 2} reactions over a factor of 36.1 in isotopic mass of the atomic reactant.

Fleming, Donald G.; Arseneau, Donald J.; Sukhorukov, Oleksandr; Brewer, Jess H.; Mielke, Steven L.; Truhlar, Donald G.; Schatz, George C.; Garrett, Bruce C.; Peterson, Kirk A.

2011-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

45

Scale Sensitivity and Rank Preservation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the previous chapters we have extensively used a geometric scale in order to model the gradations of comparative human judgement. Geometric progression seems to be reasonable but the progression factor 2 es...

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Seepage Model for PA Including Dift Collapse  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document the predictions and analysis performed using the Seepage Model for Performance Assessment (PA) and the Disturbed Drift Seepage Submodel for both the Topopah Spring middle nonlithophysal and lower lithophysal lithostratigraphic units at Yucca Mountain. These results will be used by PA to develop the probability distribution of water seepage into waste-emplacement drifts at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as part of the evaluation of the long term performance of the potential repository. This AMR is in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Flow and Transport Process Model Report'' (CRWMS M&O 2000 [153447]). This purpose is accomplished by performing numerical simulations with stochastic representations of hydrological properties, using the Seepage Model for PA, and evaluating the effects of an alternative drift geometry representing a partially collapsed drift using the Disturbed Drift Seepage Submodel. Seepage of water into waste-emplacement drifts is considered one of the principal factors having the greatest impact of long-term safety of the repository system (CRWMS M&O 2000 [153225], Table 4-1). This AMR supports the analysis and simulation that are used by PA to develop the probability distribution of water seepage into drift, and is therefore a model of primary (Level 1) importance (AP-3.15Q, ''Managing Technical Product Inputs''). The intended purpose of the Seepage Model for PA is to support: (1) PA; (2) Abstraction of Drift-Scale Seepage; and (3) Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Flow and Transport Process Model Report (PMR). Seepage into drifts is evaluated by applying numerical models with stochastic representations of hydrological properties and performing flow simulations with multiple realizations of the permeability field around the drift. The Seepage Model for PA uses the distribution of permeabilities derived from air injection testing in niches and in the cross drift to stochastically simulate the 3D flow of water in the fractured host rock (in the vicinity of potential emplacement drifts) under ambient conditions. The Disturbed Drift Seepage Submodel evaluates the impact of the partial collapse of a drift on seepage. Drainage in rock below the emplacement drift is also evaluated.

G. Li; C. Tsang

2000-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

47

The effect of penetration factor, deposition, and environmental factors on  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The effect of penetration factor, deposition, and environmental factors on The effect of penetration factor, deposition, and environmental factors on the indoor concentration of pm2.5 sulfate, nitrate, and carbon Title The effect of penetration factor, deposition, and environmental factors on the indoor concentration of pm2.5 sulfate, nitrate, and carbon Publication Type Conference Proceedings Year of Publication 2002 Authors Thatcher, Tracy L., Melissa M. Lunden, Richard G. Sextro, Susanne V. Hering, and Nancy J. Brown Conference Name Proceedings of the Indoor Air 2002 Conference, Monterey, CA Volume 1 Pagination 846-851 Publisher Indoor Air 2002, Santa Cruz, CA Abstract Indoor exposure to particles of outdoor origin constitutes an important exposure pathway. We conducted an intensive set of indoor particle measurements in an unoccupied house under differing operating conditions. Real-time measurements were conducted both indoors and outdoors, including PM2.5 nitrate, sulfate, and carbon. Because the time-scale of the fluctuations in outdoor particle concentrations and meteorological conditions are often similar to the time constant for building air exchange, a steady state concentration may never be reached. The time-series experimental data were used to determine the effect of changes in air exchange rate and indoor/outdoor temperature and relative humidity differences on indoor particle concentrations. A multivariate regression was performed to investigate the difference between measured indoor concentrations and results from a simple time-dependent physical model. Environmental conditions had a significant effect on indoor concentrations of all three PM2.5 species, but did not explain all of the model variation

48

Running Large Scale Jobs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Running Large Scale Jobs Running Large Scale Jobs Users face various challenges with running and scaling large scale jobs on peta-scale production systems. For example, certain...

49

The Douglas Factors  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Douglas Factors Douglas Factors The Merit Systems Protection Board in its landmark decision, Douglas vs. Veterans Administration, 5 MSPR 280, established criteria that supervisors must consider in determining an appropriate penalty to impose for an act of employee misconduct. These twelve factors are commonly referred to as "Douglas Factors: (1) The nature and seriousness of the offense, and its relation to the employee's duties, position, and responsibilities, including whether the offense was intentional or technical or inadvertent, or was committed maliciously or for gain, or was frequently repeated; (2) the employee's job level and type of employment, including supervisory or fiduciary role,

50

Environmental factors influencing methanogenesis from refuse in landfill samples  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Environmental factors influencing methanogenesis from refuse in landfill samples ... Biodegradability of Municipal Solid Waste Components in Laboratory-Scale Landfills ...

K. Rao Gurijala; Joseph M. Suflita

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Thin film solar cell including a spatially modulated intrinsic layer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

One or more thin film solar cells in which the intrinsic layer of substantially amorphous semiconductor alloy material thereof includes at least a first band gap portion and a narrower band gap portion. The band gap of the intrinsic layer is spatially graded through a portion of the bulk thickness, said graded portion including a region removed from the intrinsic layer-dopant layer interfaces. The band gap of the intrinsic layer is always less than the band gap of the doped layers. The gradation of the intrinsic layer is effected such that the open circuit voltage and/or the fill factor of the one or plural solar cell structure is enhanced.

Guha, Subhendu (Troy, MI); Yang, Chi-Chung (Troy, MI); Ovshinsky, Stanford R. (Bloomfield Hills, MI)

1989-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

52

Net Taxable Gasoline Gallons (Including Aviation Gasoline)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Net Taxable Gasoline Gallons (Including Aviation Gasoline) Period 2000 2001 (2) 2002 2003 2004 "gross" to "net" , was deemed impractical. (5) This report replaces the Gross Taxable Gasoline Gallons (Including Aviation Gasoline) report which will not be produced after December 2002. (6) The November 2007

53

Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material, such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

54

BatteryConscious Task Sequencing for Portable Devices Including Voltage/Clock Scaling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

power sources: a battery and a solar panel. The objective was to utilize the solar panel (the ''free

Kambhampati, Subbarao

55

Two-fluid turbulence including electron inertia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a full two-fluid magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) description for a completely ionized hydrogen plasma, retaining the effects of the Hall current, electron pressure and electron inertia. According to this description, each plasma species introduces a new spatial scale: the ion inertial length $\\lambda_{i}$ and the electron inertial length $\\lambda_{e}$, which are not present in the traditional MHD description. In the present paper, we seek for possible changes in the energy power spectrum in fully developed turbulent regimes, using numerical simulations of the two-fluid equations in two-and-a-half dimensions (2.5D). We have been able to reproduce different scaling laws in different spectral ranges, as it has been observed in the solar wind for the magnetic energy spectrum. At the smallest wavenumbers where plain MHD is valid, we obtain an inertial range following a Kolmogorov $k^{-5/3}$ law. For intermediate wavenumbers such that $\\lambda_{i}^{-1} \\lambda_{e}^{-1}$ arises. The power spectrum for magnetic...

Andrs, Nahuel; Martin, Luis; Dmitruk, Pablo; Gmez, Daniel

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Intentionally Including - Engaging Minorities in Physics Careers |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Intentionally Including - Engaging Minorities in Physics Careers Intentionally Including - Engaging Minorities in Physics Careers Intentionally Including - Engaging Minorities in Physics Careers April 24, 2013 - 4:37pm Addthis Joining Director Dot Harris (second from left) were Marlene Kaplan, the Deputy Director of Education and director of EPP, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Claudia Rankins, a Program Officer with the National Science Foundation and Jim Stith, the past Vice-President of the American Institute of Physics Resources. Joining Director Dot Harris (second from left) were Marlene Kaplan, the Deputy Director of Education and director of EPP, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Claudia Rankins, a Program Officer with the National Science Foundation and Jim Stith, the past Vice-President of the

57

Scramjet including integrated inlet and combustor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes a scramjet engine. It comprises: a first surface including an aft facing step; a cowl including: a leading edge and a trailing edge; an upper surface and a lower surface extending between the leading edge and the trailing edge; the cowl upper surface being spaced from and generally parallel to the first surface to define an integrated inlet-combustor therebetween having an inlet for receiving and channeling into the inlet-combustor supersonic inlet airflow; means for injecting fuel into the inlet-combustor at the step for mixing with the supersonic inlet airflow for generating supersonic combustion gases; and further including a spaced pari of sidewalls extending between the first surface to the cowl upper surface and wherein the integrated inlet-combustor is generally rectangular and defined by the sidewall pair, the first surface and the cowl upper surface.

Kutschenreuter, P.H. Jr.; Blanton, J.C.

1992-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

58

Transmission line including support means with barriers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gas insulated transmission line includes an elongated outer sheath, a plurality of inner conductors disposed within and extending along the outer sheath, and an insulating gas which electrically insulates the inner conductors from the outer sheath. A support insulator insulatably supports the inner conductors within the outer sheath, with the support insulator comprising a main body portion including a plurality of legs extending to the outer sheath, and barrier portions which extend between the legs. The barrier portions have openings therein adjacent the main body portion through which the inner conductors extend.

Cookson, Alan H. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Energy Consumption of Personal Computing Including Portable  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Consumption of Personal Computing Including Portable Communication Devices Pavel Somavat1 consumption, questions are being asked about the energy contribution of computing equipment. Al- though studies have documented the share of energy consumption by this type of equipment over the years, research

Namboodiri, Vinod

60

EE Regional Technology Roadmap Includes comparison  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EE Regional Technology Roadmap Includes comparison against 6th Power Plan (Update cyclically Roadmap with a strong linkage to utility programs Scan for Technologies 1. How does it address the NW Data Clearinghouse BPA/RTF NEEA/Regional Programs Group Update Regional EE Technology Roadmap Lighting

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes scale factor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Video Topics Include Freshman Inquiry Course  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Video Topics Include Freshman Inquiry Course Open Advisement/ Group Advisement Dinning Campus: End of Spring 2012, Commencement May 18: Grades available on MAX after 4:30pm AdvisementYouTubeVideoSeries I N S I D E T H I S I S S U E : YouTube Video Series 1 Mark Your Calendar 1 Exploring Major Tips 2

Hardy, Christopher R.

62

Including Ocean Model Uncertainties in Climate Predictions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Including Ocean Model Uncertainties in Climate Predictions Chris Brierley, Alan Thorpe, Mat Collins's to perform the integrations Currently uses a `slab' ocean #12;An Ocean Model Required to accurately model transient behaviour Will have its own uncertainties Requires even more computing power Create new models

Jones, Peter JS

63

Douglas Factors  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Merit Systems Protection Board in its landmark decision, Douglas vs. Veterans Administration, 5 MSPR 280, established criteria that supervisors must consider in determining an appropriate penalty to impose for an act of employee misconduct. These twelve factors are commonly referred to as Douglas Factors and have been incorporated into the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Personnel Management System and various FAA Labor Agreements.

64

Buildings Included on EMS Reports"  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Buildings Included on EMS Reports" "Site","Property Name","Property ID","GSF","Incl. in Water Baseline (CY2007)","Water Baseline (sq. ft.)","Water CY2008 (sq. ft.)","Water CY2009 (sq. ft.)","Water Notes","Incl. in Energy Baseline (CY2003)","Energy Baseline (sq. ft.)","CY2008 Energy (sq. ft.)","CY2009 Energy (sq. ft.)","Energy Notes","Included as Existing Building","CY2008 Existing Building (sq. ft.)","Reason for Building Exclusion" "Column Totals",,"Totals",115139,,10579,10579,22512,,,3183365,26374,115374,,,99476 "Durango, CO, Disposal/Processing Site","STORAGE SHED","DUD-BLDG-STORSHED",100,"no",,,,,"no",,,,"OSF","no",,"Less than 5,000 GSF"

65

Power generation method including membrane separation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for generating electric power, such as at, or close to, natural gas fields. The method includes conditioning natural gas containing C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons and/or acid gas by means of a membrane separation step. This step creates a leaner, sweeter, drier gas, which is then used as combustion fuel to run a turbine, which is in turn used for power generation.

Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Union City, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Completion strategy includes clay and precipitate control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article describes the conditions which are necessary for a successful oil well completion in the Mississippi and Cherokee zones of South Central Kansas. Topics considered include paraffin precipitation, clay swelling and migration, and iron precipitation. Clays in these zones are sensitive to water-base treating fluids and tend to swell and migrate to the well bore, thereby causing permeability damage. The presence of iron in the Mississippi and Cherokee formations has been indicated by cuttings, core samples, and connate water samples.

Sandy, T.; Gardner, G.R.

1985-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

67

Jet-calculus approach including coherence effects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We show how integrodifferential equations typical of jet calculus can be combined with an averaging procedure to obtain jet-calculus-based results including the Mueller interference graphs. Results in longitudinal-momentum fraction x for physical quantities are higher at intermediate x and lower at large x than with the conventional incoherent jet calculus. These results resemble those of Marchesini and Webber, who used a Monte Carlo approach based on the same dynamics.

L. M. Jones; R. Migneron; K. S. S. Narayanan

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Community Scale Development | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Energy Resource Library » Community Scale Development Energy Resource Library » Community Scale Development Community Scale Development Below are resources for Tribes on community scale energy project development. Commercial Lending in Indian Country: Potential Opportunities in an Emerging Market Explores the commercial lending environment in Indian Country, including the interrelationship of governmental, legal, institutional, organizational, and financial infrastructures. The report examines the major challenges and constraints that have impeded larger scale efforts and describes banking and tribal community responses to these barriers considered critical to successful implementation of commercial lending activities. Source: U.S. Department of the Treasury. Community Wind Financing Handbook Provides information on financing community wind projects, including

69

Scales of Fermion Mass Generation and Electroweak Symmetry Breaking  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The scale of mass generation for fermions (including neutrinos) and the scale for electroweak symmetry breaking (EWSB) can be bounded from above by the unitarity of scattering involving longitudinal weak gauge bosons or their corresponding would-be Goldstone bosons. Including the exact n-body phase space we analyze the 2 --> n ($n \\geq 2$) processes for the fermion-(anti)fermion scattering into multiple gauge boson final states. Contrary to naive energy power counting, we demonstrate that as $n$ becomes large, the competition between an increasing energy factor and a phase-space suppression leads to a {\\it strong new upper bound} on the scale of fermion mass generation at a finite value $n=n_s$, which is {\\it independent of the EWSB scale,} $v = (\\sqrt{2}G_F)^{-1/2}$. For quarks, leptons and Majorana neutrinos, the strongest 2 --> n limits range from about 3TeV to 130-170TeV (with $2\\lesssim n_s \\lesssim 24$), depending on the measured fermion masses. Strikingly, given the tiny neutrino masses as constrained by the neutrino oscillations, neutrinoless double-beta decays and astrophysical observations, the unitarity violation of $\

Duane A. Dicus; Hong-Jian He

2005-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

70

Optical panel system including stackable waveguides  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An optical panel system including stackable waveguides is provided. The optical panel system displays a projected light image and comprises a plurality of planar optical waveguides in a stacked state. The optical panel system further comprises a support system that aligns and supports the waveguides in the stacked state. In one embodiment, the support system comprises at least one rod, wherein each waveguide contains at least one hole, and wherein each rod is positioned through a corresponding hole in each waveguide. In another embodiment, the support system comprises at least two opposing edge structures having the waveguides positioned therebetween, wherein each opposing edge structure contains a mating surface, wherein opposite edges of each waveguide contain mating surfaces which are complementary to the mating surfaces of the opposing edge structures, and wherein each mating surface of the opposing edge structures engages a corresponding complementary mating surface of the opposite edges of each waveguide.

DeSanto, Leonard (Dunkirk, MD); Veligdan, James T. (Manorville, NY)

2007-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

71

Thermovoltaic semiconductor device including a plasma filter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A thermovoltaic energy conversion device and related method for converting thermal energy into an electrical potential. An interference filter is provided on a semiconductor thermovoltaic cell to pre-filter black body radiation. The semiconductor thermovoltaic cell includes a P/N junction supported on a substrate which converts incident thermal energy below the semiconductor junction band gap into electrical potential. The semiconductor substrate is doped to provide a plasma filter which reflects back energy having a wavelength which is above the band gap and which is ineffectively filtered by the interference filter, through the P/N junction to the source of radiation thereby avoiding parasitic absorption of the unusable portion of the thermal radiation energy.

Baldasaro, Paul F. (Clifton Park, NY)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Critical point anomalies include expansion shock waves  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

From first-principle fluid dynamics, complemented by a rigorous state equation accounting for critical anomalies, we discovered that expansion shock waves may occur in the vicinity of the liquid-vapor critical point in the two-phase region. Due to universality of near-critical thermodynamics, the result is valid for any common pure fluid in which molecular interactions are only short-range, namely, for so-called 3-dimensional Ising-like systems, and under the assumption of thermodynamic equilibrium. In addition to rarefaction shock waves, diverse non-classical effects are admissible, including composite compressive shock-fan-shock waves, due to the change of sign of the fundamental derivative of gasdynamics.

Nannan, N. R., E-mail: ryan.nannan@uvs.edu [Mechanical Engineering Discipline, Anton de Kom University of Suriname, Leysweg 86, PO Box 9212, Paramaribo, Suriname and Process and Energy Department, Delft University of Technology, Leeghwaterstraat 44, 2628 CA Delft (Netherlands); Guardone, A., E-mail: alberto.guardone@polimi.it [Department of Aerospace Science and Technology, Politecnico di Milano, Via La Masa 34, 20156 Milano (Italy); Colonna, P., E-mail: p.colonna@tudelft.nl [Propulsion and Power, Delft University of Technology, Kluyverweg 1, 2629 HS Delft (Netherlands)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

73

Complex shell model representation including antibound states  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A generalization of the complex shell model formalism is presented that includes antibound states in the basis. These states, together with bound states, Gamow states, and the continuum background, represented by properly chosen scattering waves, form a representation in which all states are treated on the same footing. Two-particle states are evaluated within this formalism, and observable two-particle resonances are defined. The formalism is illustrated in the well-known case of Li11 in its bound ground state and in Ca70(g.s.), which is also bound. Both cases are found to have a halo structure. These halo structures are described within the generalized complex shell model. We investigated the formation of two-particle resonances in these nuclei, but no evidence of such resonances was found.

R. Id Betan; R. J. Liotta; N. Sandulescu; T. Vertse; R. Wyss

2005-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

74

Multi-factor authentication  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Detection and deterrence of spoofing of user authentication may be achieved by including a cryptographic fingerprint unit within a hardware device for authenticating a user of the hardware device. The cryptographic fingerprint unit includes an internal physically unclonable function ("PUF") circuit disposed in or on the hardware device, which generates a PUF value. Combining logic is coupled to receive the PUF value, combines the PUF value with one or more other authentication factors to generate a multi-factor authentication value. A key generator is coupled to generate a private key and a public key based on the multi-factor authentication value while a decryptor is coupled to receive an authentication challenge posed to the hardware device and encrypted with the public key and coupled to output a response to the authentication challenge decrypted with the private key.

Hamlet, Jason R; Pierson, Lyndon G

2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

75

Bench Scale Saltcake Dissolution Test Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A potential scenario for retrieving saltcake from single shell tanks is the ''Rainbird{reg_sign} sprinkler'' method. Water is distributed evenly across the surface of the saltcake and allowed to percolate by gravity through the waste. The salt dissolves in the water, forming a saturated solution. The saturated liquid is removed by a saltwell pump situated near the bottom of the tank. By this method, there is never a large inventory of liquid in the tank that could pose a threat of leakage. There are many variables or factors that can influence the hydrodynamics of this retrieval process. They include saltcake porosity; saltwell pumping rate; salt dissolution chemistry; factors that could promote flow channeling (e.g. tank walls, dry wells, inclusions or discontinuities in the saltcake); method of water distribution; plug formation due to crystal formations or accumulation of insoluble solids. A brief literature search indicates that very little experimental data exist on these aspects of saltcake dissolution (Wiersma 1996, 1997). The tests reported here were planned (Herting, 2000) to provide preliminary data and information for planning future, scaled-up tests of the sprinkler method.

BECHTOLD, D.B.; PACQUET, E.A.

2000-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

76

Silica Scaling Removal Process  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Silica Scaling Removal Process Silica Scaling Removal Process Scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory have developed a novel technology to remove both dissolved and colloidal...

77

Guidelines for Power Factor Improvement Projects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Power factor is an indication of electrical system efficiency. Low power factor, or low system efficiency, may be due to one or more causes, including lightly loaded transformers, oversized electric motors, and harmonic-generating non-linear loads...

Massey, G. W.

78

Crop Management Factors: What is Important?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Various management factors, including specific practices and the persistence of those practices over time, can greatly influence farm profitability. Some of those factors are managing for high yield or low production cost, as well as adoption...

Kastens, Terry L.; Dhuyvetter, Kevin C.; Nivens, Heather; Klinefelter, Danny A.

1999-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

79

Modification of chemical and physical factors in steamflood to increase heavy oil recovery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report covers the work performed in the various physicochemical factors for the improvement of oil recovery efficiency. In this context the following general areas were studied: (1) The understanding of vapor-liquid flows in porous media, including processes in steam injection; (2) The effect of reservoir heterogeneity in a variety of foams, from pore scale to macroscopic scale; (3) The flow properties of additives for improvement of recovery efficiency, particularly foams and other non-Newtonian fluids; and (4) The development of optimization methods to maximize various measures of oil recovery.

Yortsos, Yanis C.

2000-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

80

Scale Insects and Mealy Bugs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Scale Insects and Mealy Bugs Scale Insects and Mealy Bugs Nature Bulletin No. 404-A January 30, 1971 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation SCALE INSECTS AND MEALY BUGS The insect world contains an enormous number and variety of species but, of them all, the Scale Insects and Mealy Bugs come nearest to being vegetables. Most insects are active animals that fly, hop, scamper, crawl or burrow, but these queer creatures spend most of their lives merely sitting in one spot, sucking plant juices from a branch, twig, leaf, or fruit. Some of our most destructive pests are included among the several hundred kinds of these highly specialized insects. They are so small that the average person seldom realizes that they are responsible for the sickly or dying condition of a tree or shrub. Adult scale insects are extremely variable in shape, and range in size from that of a pinhead up to forms which are a quarter of an inch long. Each hides under a hard protective shell, or scale, of wax secreted by pores on its body, and are frequently so numerous that they form a dense crust. The females molt a few times, and usually discard their legs and wings, before they mature. She lays eggs under the scale and then dies. These hatch into young (called "crawlers") which move around for a period varying from a few hours to a day or two before they settle down and build scales. Unlike the female, the male -always the smaller of the two -- goes through a cocoon stage from which he emerges with a pair of wings but with no means of taking food. He merely mates and dies. Males are scarce In most kinds and in many species have never been seen.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes scale factor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Validation of SCALE-4 criticality sequences using ENDF/B-V data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The SCALE code system developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory contains criticality safety analysis sequences that include the KENO V.a Monte Carlo code for calculation of the effective multiplication factor. These sequences are widely used for criticality safety analyses performed both in the United States and abroad. The purpose of the current work is to validate the SCALE-4 criticality sequences with an ENDF/B-V cross-section library for future distribution with SCALE-4. The library used for this validation is a broad-group library (44 groups) collapsed from the 238-group SCALE library. Extensive data testing of both the 238-group and the 44-group libraries included 10 fast and 18 thermal CSEWG benchmarks and 5 other fast benchmarks. Both libraries contain approximately 300 nuclides and are, therefore, capable of modeling most systems, including those containing spent fuel or radioactive waste. The validation of the broad-group library used 93 critical experiments as benchmarks. The range of experiments included 60 light-water-reactor fuel rod lattices, 13 mixed-oxide fuel rod lattice, and 15 other low- and high-enriched uranium critical assemblies.

Bowman, S.M.; Wright, R.Q.; DeHart, M.D. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Taniuchi, H. [Kobe Steel Ltd. (Japan)

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Meso-scale machining capabilities and issues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Meso-scale manufacturing processes are bridging the gap between silicon-based MEMS processes and conventional miniature machining. These processes can fabricate two and three-dimensional parts having micron size features in traditional materials such as stainless steels, rare earth magnets, ceramics, and glass. Meso-scale processes that are currently available include, focused ion beam sputtering, micro-milling, micro-turning, excimer laser ablation, femto-second laser ablation, and micro electro discharge machining. These meso-scale processes employ subtractive machining technologies (i.e., material removal), unlike LIGA, which is an additive meso-scale process. Meso-scale processes have different material capabilities and machining performance specifications. Machining performance specifications of interest include minimum feature size, feature tolerance, feature location accuracy, surface finish, and material removal rate. Sandia National Laboratories is developing meso-scale electro-mechanical components, which require meso-scale parts that move relative to one another. The meso-scale parts fabricated by subtractive meso-scale manufacturing processes have unique tribology issues because of the variety of materials and the surface conditions produced by the different meso-scale manufacturing processes.

BENAVIDES,GILBERT L.; ADAMS,DAVID P.; YANG,PIN

2000-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

83

Scaling-up of Chemical Plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... were devoted to scaling problems related to specific processes and equipment, including the rotating-disk contactor, cyclones, air-separation plant, continuous-filtration equipment, and solvent extraction and gas absorption ...

1958-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

84

Lessons from Large-Scale Renewable Energy Integration Studies...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

including 10% post consumer waste. 1 WREF 2012: LESSONS FROM LARGE-SCALE RENEWABLE ENERGY INTEGRATION STUDIES A number of large-scale studies have been conducted in the...

85

SPACE BASED INTERCEPTOR SCALING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Space Based Interceptor (SBI) have ranges that are adequate to address rogue ICBMs. They are not overly sensitive to 30-60 s delay times. Current technologies would support boost phase intercept with about 150 interceptors. Higher acceleration and velocity could reduce than number by about a factor of 3 at the cost of heavier and more expensive Kinetic Kill Vehicles (KKVs). 6g SBI would reduce optimal constellation costs by about 35%; 8g SBI would reduce them another 20%. Interceptor ranges fall rapidly with theater missile range. Constellations increase significantly for ranges under 3,000 km, even with advanced interceptor technology. For distributed launches, these estimates recover earlier strategic scalings, which demonstrate the improved absentee ratio for larger or multiple launch areas. Constellations increase with the number of missiles and the number of interceptors launched at each. The economic estimates above suggest that two SBI per missile with a modest midcourse underlay is appropriate. The SBI KKV technology would appear to be common for space- and surface-based boost phase systems, and could have synergisms with improved midcourse intercept and discrimination systems. While advanced technology could be helpful in reducing costs, particularly for short range theater missiles, current technology appears adequate for pressing rogue ICBM, accidental, and unauthorized launches.

G. CANAVAN

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Scale?up considerations: Pilot to commercial scale  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The success of Photovoltaic (PV) technology as a viable business enterprise depends largely on its ability to provide a competitive advantage over other current energy technologies in meeting the customers needs. Successful commercialization of the PV technology therefore requires in part an efficient and effective manufacturing strategy in order to ensure a superior quality low cost product. Several key design considerations for process scale?up were examined associated with GPIs PV module manufacturing expansion project completed in Spring 1994. Particular emphasis was given to product specification process specification process engineering design site location selection environmental/health/safety (EHS) factors and plant maintenance.

Dan Weisiger

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Exposure factors handbook  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The document provides a summary of the available data on various factors used in assessing human exposure including drinking-water consumption, consumption rates of broad classes of food including fruits, vegetables, beef, dairy products, and fish; soil ingestion; inhalation rate; skin area; lifetime; activity patterns; and body weight. Additionally, a number of specific exposure scenarios are identified with recommendations for default values to use when site-specific data are not available. The basic equations using these parameters to calculate exposure levels are also presented for each scenario. Default values are presented as ranges from typical to reasonable worst case and as frequency distributions where appropriate data were available. Finally, procedures for assessing the uncertainties in exposure assessments are also presented with illustrative examples. These procedures include qualitative and quantitative methods such as Monte Carlo and sensitivity analysis.

Konz, J.J.; Lisi, K.; Friebele, E.; Dixon, D.A.

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Recent validation experience with multigroup cross-section libraries and scale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper will discuss the results obtained and lessons learned from an extensive validation of new ENDF/B-V and ENDF/B-VI multigroup cross-section libraries using analyses of critical experiments. The KENO V. a Monte Carlo code in version 4.3 of the SCALE computer code system was used to perform the critical benchmark calculations via the automated SCALE sequence CSAS25. The cross-section data were processed by the SCALE automated problem-dependent resonance-processing procedure included in this sequence. Prior to calling KENO V.a, CSAS25 accesses BONAMI to perform resonance self-shielding for nuclides with Bondarenko factors and NITAWL-II to process nuclides with resonance parameter data via the Nordheim Integral Treatment.

Bowman, S.M.; Wright, R.Q.; DeHart, M.D.; Parks, C.V.; Petrie, L.M.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Robot calibration without scaling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

methods. Scaling is a common way of improving the condition number for a matrix. Researchers in other fields have developed specific methods of scaling matrices to improve the condition number. However, robotics researchers have not specifically addressed...

Ives, Thomas W.

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

90

Measuring Cosmological Distances Scale Factor Evolution: a(t)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

" Model : CDM 0 = 71, m = 0.27 = 0.73 #12;Dark Matter in the 1840s: Neptune Discovery Uranus orbit #12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;Equation of State of Dark Energy: w w ~ P/ #12;) Mass-Energy = Curvature Spacetime (1/a2) d2a/dt2 = -4/3G ( + 3P/c2) + c2/3 #12;Derivation: Critical

Shirley, Yancy

91

Wigner distinguished lecturer Majumdar says scale-up factor key...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

speaks at ORNL's Wigner Distinguished Lecture Series. Arun Majumdar, vice president of energy at Google, speaks at ORNL's Wigner Distinguished Lecture Series. (hi-res image)...

92

Many Factors Affect MPG  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Many Factors Affect Fuel Economy Many Factors Affect Fuel Economy How You Drive Vehicle Maintenance Fuel Variations Vehicle Variations Engine Break-In Vehicles in traffic Quick acceleration and heavy braking can reduce fuel economy by up to 33 percent on the highway and 5 percent around town. New EPA tests account for faster acceleration rates, but vigorous driving can still lower MPG. Excessive idling decreases MPG. The EPA city test includes idling, but more idling will lower MPG. Driving at higher speeds increases aerodynamic drag (wind resistance), reducing fuel economy. The new EPA tests account for aerodynamic drag up to highway speeds of 80 mph, but some drivers exceed this speed. Cold weather and frequent short trips can reduce fuel economy, since your engine doesn't operate efficiently until it is warmed up. In colder

93

CMI Unique Facility: Pilot-Scale Separations Test Bed Facility...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Idaho National Laboratory Noting that the CMI Grand Challenges include separating rare earth elements from each other, the Critical Materials Institute established a pilot-scale...

94

7, 1553315563, 2007 Large-scale  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Pacific, correlations with CO, CO2, CH4, and C2Cl4 were dif- fuse overall, but recognizable on flights out Chemistry and Physics Discussions Factors influencing the large-scale distribution of Hg in the Mexico City the Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment Phase B (INTEX-B) cam- paign in spring 2006. Flights were conducted

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

95

Oregon: a guide to geothermal energy development. [Includes glossary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The following subjects are covered: Oregons' geothermal potential, exploration methods and costs, drilling, utilization methods, economic factors of direct use projects, and legal and institutional setting. (MHR)

Justus, D.; Basescu, N.; Bloomquist, R.G.; Higbee, C.; Simpson, S.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Nuclear Arms Control R&D Consortium includes Los Alamos  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nuclear Arms Control R&D Consortium includes Los Alamos Nuclear Arms Control R&D Consortium includes Los Alamos A consortium led by the University of Michigan that includes LANL as...

97

Scale inhibition in desalination applications: An overview  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Desalination is a process in which dissolved impurities are removed from water. Three processes commonly employed include: distillation, electrodialysis, and reverse osmosis. This paper provides a general discussion of various desalination processes including advantages and disadvantages of each, performance comparisons, and problems encountered in the operation of the process. An in-depth discussion of fouling by mineral scales, colloidal matter, and metal hydroxides is also included. The role of the foulant control agent in treating a desalination system is also presented. Basic chemistry and efficacy of the individual scale inhibitors is summarized.

Amjad, Z. [BFGoodrich Co., Brecksville, OH (United States). Advanced Technology Group

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Silica Scaling Removal Process  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Silica Scaling Removal Process Silica Scaling Removal Process Silica Scaling Removal Process Scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory have developed a novel technology to remove both dissolved and colloidal silica using small gel particles. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Silica Scaling Removal Process Applications: Cooling tower systems Water treatment systems Water evaporation systems Potential mining applications (produced water) Industry applications for which silica scaling must be prevented Benefits: Reduces scaling in cooling towers by up to 50% Increases the number of cycles of concentration substantially Reduces the amount of antiscaling chemical additives needed Decreases the amount of makeup water and subsequent discharged water (blowdown) Enables considerable cost savings derived from reductions in

99

Thermodynamics and scale relativity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is shown how the fractal paths of scale relativity (following Nottale) can be introduced into a thermodynamical context (following Asadov-Kechkin).

Robert Carroll

2011-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

100

EMSL - micro-scales  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

micro-scales en Physical Properties of Ambient and Laboratory-Generated Secondary Organic Aerosol. http:www.emsl.pnl.govemslwebpublicationsphysical-properties-ambient-and-labo...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes scale factor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Scale control in thermal desalination processes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermal desalination processes involve the heating of seawater to form water vapor which is then condensed to produce salt free water. Multiple Effect Evaporation (ME) and Multiple-Stage Flash distillation (MSF) are the two main processes used for thermal distillation. MSF distillation, currently is the dominant process. MSF distillation is run under pressure at relatively high temperatures (90--125 C). Scale formation is one of the most critical problems affecting both processes. In the case of MSF, calcium carbonate, magnesium hydroxide and calcium sulfate are the main scale forming salts. The first two scale forming salts are usually controlled by keeping neutral the pH of the system by the addition of acid. Scale inhibitors are used to prevent calcium sulfate scale. Because of economical reasons, the trend in the industry is to operate systems at as high a temperature and concentration factor as possible in order to increase purified water production at a lower cost. Safety concerns have also increased the need for acid feed elimination as a mean of controlling pH. These practices increased the scaling tendencies in MSF processes and created the need for more effective treatment programs to control scale formation on heat exchangers. A new multi-component inhibitor program that enable operation of MSF systems without the need of acid feed for pH control has been developed. The program prevent scale formation and allows to operate the system under typical or higher concentration factors and temperatures than normally found in MSF evaporators operating with acid feed.

Perez, L.A.; Polizzotti, D.M. [BetzDearborn, Trevose, PA (United States)

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Power Factor Compensation (PFC) Power Factor Compensation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Power Factor Compensation (PFC) Power Factor Compensation The power factor (PF) is defined as the ratio between the active power and the apparent power of a system. If the current and voltage are periodic with period , and [ ), then the active power is defined by ( ) ( ) (their inner product

Knobloch,Jürgen

103

Multimodal interaction: A suitable strategy for including older users?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......control and modulate applied forces and have difficulty receiving...Human-Computer Interaction Handbook: Fundamentals, Evolving Technologies and Emerging...and speed of behavior. In: Handbook of Human Factors and the Older......

Anja B. Naumann; Ina Wechsung; Jrn Hurtienne

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Abstract--Small-scale hydraulics is ideal for powered human assistive devices including powered ankle foot orthoses because  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ankle foot orthoses because a large torque can be generated with an actuator that is small and light. A portable hydraulic ankle foot orthosis has been designed and is undergoing preliminary prototyping and engineering bench test evaluation. The device provides 90 Nm of ankle torque and has an operating pressure

Durfee, William K.

105

Including Retro-Commissioning in Federal Energy Savings Performance Contracts  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Guidance document on the importance of (and steps to) including retro-commissioning in Federal energy savings performance contracts (ESPCs).

106

On characterization and measurement of average solar field mirror reflectance in utility-scale concentrating solar power plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Due to the emerging need for the development of acceptance test codes for commercial concentrating solar power (CSP) plants, an effort is made here to develop a mirror reflectance model suitable for CSP applications as well as a general procedure to measure the average mirror reflectance of a solar field. Typically, a utility-scale solar field includes hundreds of thousands of mirror panels (if not more), and their reflectance is subject to many factors, such as weather and planned washing schedule. The newly developed mirror reflectance model can be used to characterize different types of mirror materials and can be directly used to perform optical performance evaluation of solar collectors. The newly proposed procedure for average solar field reflectance measurements includes a baseline comprehensive measurement and an individual factor measurement: the former allows a comprehensive survey of mirror reflectance across the whole solar field, and the latter can provide correcting factors for selected individual factors to further improve the accuracy of the baseline measurements. A detailed test case implementing the general procedure is applied to a state-of-the-art commercial parabolic trough plant and validates the proposed mirror reflectance model and average reflectance measurement procedure. In the test case, the plant-wide reflectance measurements at a commercial utility-scale solar plant were conducted and can shed light on relevant analysis of CSP applications. The work can also be naturally applied to other types of solar plants, such as power towers and linear Fresnel plants.

Guangdong Zhu; David Kearney; Mark Mehos

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

22 - Conversion Factors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This chapter details the viscosity and pressure conversion chart. To convert absolute or dynamic viscosity from one set of units to another, one must locate the given set of units in the left-hand column then multiply the numerical value by the factor shown horizontally to the right-hand side, under the set of units desired. The chapter also explains that to convert kinematic viscosity from one set of units to another, one must locate the given set of units in the left-hand column and multiply the numerical value by the factor shown horizontally to the right-hand side, under the set of units desired. The chapter also defines how the conversion from natural gas to other fuels has progressed from possibility to reality for many companies and will become necessary for many others in months and years ahead. Fuels that are considered practical replacements for gas include coal, heavy fuel oils, middle distillates (such as kerosinetypeturbo fuel and burner fuel oils) and liquefied petroleum gas.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Scale Models & Wind Turbines  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Scale Models and Wind Turbines Grades: 5-8, 9-12 Topics: Wind Energy Owner: Kidwind Project This educational material is brought to you by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of...

109

Solar Firms Scale Back  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Solar Firms Scale Back ... First Solar, an Arizona-based thin-film photovoltaics firm, said last week that it will restructure its operations to reduce capacity and shift production to more efficient facilities. ...

MELODY BOMGARDNER

2012-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

110

On the combination of variables in empirical scalings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A scaling serves to determine a certain characteristic as a function of a set of variables. It is usually represented in a power-law form in which a constant factor and exponents are the scaling parameters. If there is no theoretical basis to define the values of the scaling parameters, they are determined empirically by fitting them to a certain database using the ordinary least squares regression. It was proposed for various purposes to replace individual primary variables with a combination of these variables in a power-law form when determining the scaling parameters. It is shown that the standard procedure for constructing an empirical scaling in new combined variables gives a scaling equivalent to the primary one. Without any additional modifications in the procedure for determining the scaling parameters, this way of combining the variables seems to be fruitless.

Chudnovskiy, A. N. [Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Institute, Nuclear Fusion Institute (Russian Federation)

2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

111

Standard Model scales from warped extra dimensions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

If in the Randall and Sundrum RS1 model the inverse of the compactification radius, the AdS curvature scale, and the five and four-dimensional Planck scales are equal in size, as is natural, then the warp factor at the location of the low energy brane is of value 1/pi. So that all scales derive from locations in the space, we identify the extra dimension with the infinite covering space of the S1/Z2 orbifold. The extra dimension is then essentially a series of connected line intervals, punctuated by branes. Scales on successive branes in the extra dimension descend from Planck scale in a geometric sequence of common ratio 1/pi. Evidence is provided for such a sequence within the spectrum of particle masses, and of a second geometric sequence, of common ratio 2/pi, which suggests that the AdS spacetime is six-dimensional and doubly warped. The scales of the Standard Model lie at coincident levels within the two sequences. A third sequence, of common ratio 1/e, provides a symmetrical framework for the Standard Model and points to a warped product spacetime.

Bernard Riley

2008-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

112

Scaling Relationships Based on Scaled Tank Mixing and Transfer Test Results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the statistical analyses performed (by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for Washington River Protection Solutions) on data from 26 tests conducted using two scaled tanks (43 and 120 inches) in the Small Scale Mixing Demonstration platform. The 26 tests varied several test parameters, including mixer-jet nozzle velocity, base simulant, supernatant viscosity, and capture velocity. For each test, samples were taken pre-transfer and during five batch transfers. The samples were analyzed for the concentrations (lbs/gal slurry) of four primary components in the base simulants (gibbsite, stainless steel, sand, and ZrO2). The statistical analyses including modeling the component concentrations as functions of test parameters using stepwise regression with two different model forms. The resulting models were used in an equivalent performance approach to calculate values of scaling exponents (for a simple geometric scaling relationship) as functions of the parameters in the component concentration models. The resulting models and scaling exponents are displayed in tables and graphically. The sensitivities of component concentrations and scaling exponents to the test parameters are presented graphically. These results will serve as inputs to subsequent work by other researchers to develop scaling relationships that are applicable to full-scale tanks.

Piepel, Gregory F.; Holmes, Aimee E.; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro; Lee, Kearn P.; Kelly, Steven E.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Scaling Relationships Based on Scaled Tank Mixing and Transfer Test Results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the statistical analyses performed (by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for Washington River Protection Solutions) on data from 26 tests conducted using two scaled tanks (43 and 120 inches) in the Small Scale Mixing Demonstration platform. The 26 tests varied several test parameters, including mixer-jet nozzle velocity, base simulant, supernatant viscosity, and capture velocity. For each test, samples were taken pre-transfer and during five batch transfers. The samples were analyzed for the concentrations (lbs/gal slurry) of four primary components in the base simulants (gibbsite, stainless steel, sand, and ZrO2). The statistical analyses including modeling the component concentrations as functions of test parameters using stepwise regression with two different model forms. The resulting models were used in an equivalent performance approach to calculate values of scaling exponents (for a simple geometric scaling relationship) as functions of the parameters in the component concentration models. The resulting models and scaling exponents are displayed in tables and graphically. The sensitivities of component concentrations and scaling exponents to the test parameters are presented graphically. These results will serve as inputs to subsequent work by other researchers to develop scaling relationships that are applicable to full-scale tanks.

Piepel, Gregory F.; Holmes, Aimee E.; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro

2013-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

114

FEMP Expands ESPC ENABLE Program to Include More Energy Conservation...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

(ESPC) ENABLE program to include two new energy conservation measures (ECMs): solar photovoltaic (PV) and simple one-for-one heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC)...

115

SciTech Connect: Microfluidic devices and methods including porous...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

porous polymer monolith may include surfaces terminated with iniferter species. Capture molecules may then be grafted to the monolith pores. Authors: Hatch, Anson V; Sommer,...

116

Including Retro-Commissioning in Federal Energy Savings Performance Contracts  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Document describes guidance on the importance of (and steps to) including retro-commissioning in federal energy savings performance contracts (ESPCs).

117

Percentage of Total Natural Gas Industrial Deliveries included...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Industrial Price Percentage of Total Industrial Deliveries included in Prices Vehicle Fuel Price Electric Power Price Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download...

118

Decaying Vacuum Inflationary Cosmologies: A Complete Scenario Including Curvature Effects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a large class of nonsingular cosmologies of arbitrary spatial curvature whose cosmic history is determined by a primeval dynamical $\\Lambda (t)$-term. For all values of the curvature, the models evolve between two extreme de Sitter phases driven by the relic time-varying vacuum energy density. The transition from inflation to the radiation phase is universal and points to a natural solution of the graceful exit problem regardless of the values of the curvature parameter. The flat case recovers the scenario recently discussed in the literature (Perico et al., Phys. Rev. D88, 063531, 2013). The early de Sitter phase is characterized by an arbitrary energy scale $H_I$ associated to the primeval vacuum energy density. If $H_I$ is fixed to be nearly the Planck scale, the ratio between the relic and the present observed vacuum energy density is $\\rho_{vI}/\\rho_{v0} \\simeq 10^{123}$.

Lima, J A S; Zilioti, G J M

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Cloud Controlling Factors --Low Clouds BJORN STEVENS,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cloud Controlling Factors -- Low Clouds BJORN STEVENS, Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic) clouds is reviewed, with an emphasis on factors that may be expected to change in a changing climate of low-cloud control- ling processes are offered: these include renewing our focus on theory, model

Stevens, Bjorn

120

Enhancements in SCALE 6.1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Standardized Computer Analysis for Licensing Evaluation (SCALE) code system developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory provides a comprehensive, verified and validated, user-friendly tool set for criticality safety, reactor physics, radiation shielding, and sensitivity and uncertainty analysis. For more than 30 years, regulators, licensees, and research institutions around the world have used SCALE for safety analysis and design. SCALE provides a 'plug-and-play' framework with nearly 80 computational modules, including three deterministic and three Monte Carlo radiation transport solvers that are selected based on the desired solution. SCALE's graphical user interfaces assist with accurate system modeling and convenient access to desired results. SCALE 6.1, scheduled for release in the fall of 2010, provides improved reliability and introduces a number of enhanced features, some of which are briefly described here. SCALE 6.1 provides state-of-the-art capabilities for criticality safety, reactor physics, and radiation shielding in a robust yet user-friendly package. The new features and improved reliability of this latest release of SCALE are intended to improve safety and efficiency throughout the nuclear community.

Rearden, Bradley T [ORNL] [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes scale factor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Microfluidic devices and methods including porous polymer monoliths  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Microfluidic devices and methods including porous polymer monoliths are described. Polymerization techniques may be used to generate porous polymer monoliths having pores defined by a liquid component of a fluid mixture. The fluid mixture may contain iniferters and the resulting porous polymer monolith may include surfaces terminated with iniferter species. Capture molecules may then be grafted to the monolith pores.

Hatch, Anson V; Sommer, Gregory J; Singh, Anup K; Wang, Ying-Chih; Abhyankar, Vinay V

2014-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

122

Solar Energy Education. Reader, Part II. Sun story. [Includes glossary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Magazine articles which focus on the subject of solar energy are presented. The booklet prepared is the second of a four part series of the Solar Energy Reader. Excerpts from the magazines include the history of solar energy, mythology and tales, and selected poetry on the sun. A glossary of energy related terms is included. (BCS)

Not Available

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Range of a projectile, including air resistance. Introduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

resistance, it is easy to show (elementary physics classes) that if we throw a projectile with a speed vRange of a projectile, including air resistance. Introduction Here we study the motion of a projectile thrown through the air, including the important effects of air resistance.We will investi- gate

Young, A. Peter

124

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 2. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal",,"RSE" " "," ","Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal"," ","Row" "End Use","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(e)","Factors"

125

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal",,"RSE" " "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural ","LPG and","(excluding Coal"," ","Row" "End Use","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(e)","Factors"

126

Tribal Renewable Energy Advanced Course: Community Scale Project  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Community Scale Project Community Scale Project Development Tribal Renewable Energy Advanced Course: Community Scale Project Development Watch the DOE Office of Indian Energy renewable energy course entitled "Tribal Renewable Energy Project Development and Financing: Community Scale" by clicking on the .swf link below. You can also download a PDF of the PowerPoint slides. This course provides in-depth information on community-scale project development process for renewable energy projects on tribal lands, including: Project development and financing concepts for a community-scale project Project development and financing process and decision points for a community-scale project How to pay for a community-scale project. See the full list of DOE Office of Indian Energy educational webinars and

127

Articles which include chevron film cooling holes, and related processes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An article is described, including an inner surface which can be exposed to a first fluid; an inlet; and an outer surface spaced from the inner surface, which can be exposed to a hotter second fluid. The article further includes at least one row or other pattern of passage holes. Each passage hole includes an inlet bore extending through the substrate from the inlet at the inner surface to a passage hole-exit proximate to the outer surface, with the inlet bore terminating in a chevron outlet adjacent the hole-exit. The chevron outlet includes a pair of wing troughs having a common surface region between them. The common surface region includes a valley which is adjacent the hole-exit; and a plateau adjacent the valley. The article can be an airfoil. Related methods for preparing the passage holes are also described.

Bunker, Ronald Scott; Lacy, Benjamin Paul

2014-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

128

What To Include In The Whistleblower Complaint? | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

To Include In The Whistleblower Complaint? | National Nuclear Security To Include In The Whistleblower Complaint? | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog What To Include In The Whistleblower Complaint? Home > About Us > Our Operations > Management and Budget > Whistleblower Program > What To Include In The Whistleblower Complaint? What To Include In The Whistleblower Complaint?

129

Fish Scales and Science  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fish Scales and Science Fish Scales and Science Name: Amanda Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: In special education class.Science project time.Topic choosen is HOW DO SCALES HELP FISH? Any suggestions or information would be of help. Replies: Wait a minute. Why do you think the scales help the fish? How do you know they do? Have you talked to a fish lately? Maybe they are useless, or even a problem. Maybe the fish wishes it didn't have scales! I say this only to emphasize two things: First of all, when you think scientifically, the MOST IMPORTANT thing is to be very careful not to assume you know something when you really don't. What I mean by that is: don't think you know the answer before you are dead positive absolutely for-sure 100% certain that you do. Why? Why make a big fuss over being so very careful? Well, I hate to tell you this (but you probably already know it), it's just SO EASY for human beings to fool themselves, to think they know the answers when they really don't know AT ALL what they are talking about. If you have a brother or sister, you know EXACTLY what I mean, I expect.

130

Accelerated Least Squares Multidimensional Scaling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

x(make_x(36,2)) xACCELERATED SCALING R EFERENCES I.ACCELERATED LEAST SQUARES MULTIDIMENSIONAL SCALING JAN DEare simpler to write. ACCELERATED SCALING It is shown in De

Leeuw, Jan de

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Accelerated Least Squares Multidimensional Scaling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

x(make_x(36,2)) xACCELERATED SCALING R EFERENCES I.ACCELERATED LEAST SQUARES MULTIDIMENSIONAL SCALING JAN DEare simpler to write. ACCELERATED SCALING It is shown in De

Jan de Leeuw

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Nuclear physics in soft-wall AdS/QCD: deuteron electromagnetic form factors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a calculation of the deuteron electromagnetic form factors in a soft-wall AdS/QCD approach. The power scaling of the deuteron form factors is consistent with quark counting rules.

Gutsche, Thomas; Schmidt, Ivan; Vega, Alfredo

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Safety Science & Solutions Integrating Human Factors in Healthcare  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Safety Science & Solutions Integrating Human Factors in Healthcare Tuesday 2nd December 2014 safety, quality and productivity in healthcare. Showcasing enduring solutions to patient safety recognised speakers in patient safety including: Martin Bromiley, Founder, Clinical Human Factors Group Dr

Levi, Ran

134

Solazyme Pilot-Scale Biorefinery  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

SzIBR will demonstrate integrated scale-up of Solazyme's novel heterotrophic algal oil biomanufacturing process, validate the projected commercial-scale economics of...

135

Angular Scaling In Jets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We introduce a jet shape observable defined for an ensemble of jets in terms of two-particle angular correlations and a resolution parameter R. This quantity is infrared and collinear safe and can be interpreted as a scaling exponent for the angular distribution of mass inside the jet. For small R it is close to the value 2 as a consequence of the approximately scale invariant QCD dynamics. For large R it is sensitive to non-perturbative effects. We describe the use of this correlation function for tests of QCD, for studying underlying event and pile-up effects, and for tuning Monte Carlo event generators.

Jankowiak, Martin; Larkoski, Andrew J.; /SLAC

2012-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

136

U-182: Microsoft Windows Includes Some Invalid Certificates | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

82: Microsoft Windows Includes Some Invalid Certificates 82: Microsoft Windows Includes Some Invalid Certificates U-182: Microsoft Windows Includes Some Invalid Certificates June 4, 2012 - 7:00am Addthis PROBLEM: A vulnerability was reported in Microsoft Windows. A remote user may be able to spoof code signing signatures. PLATFORM: Version(s): XP SP3, 2003 SP2, Vista SP2, 2008 SP2, 7 SP1, 2008 R2 SP1; and prior service packs ABSTRACT: The operating system includes some invalid intermediate certificates. The vulnerability is due to the certificate authorities and not the operating system itself. Reference Links: Security tracker ID 1027114 GENERIC-MAP-NOMATCH Vendor Advisory IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High Discussion: The invalid certificates and their thumbprints are: Microsoft Enforced Licensing Intermediate PCA: 2a 83 e9 02 05 91 a5 5f c6

137

FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF STEEL WELDED COVERPLATE INCLUDING COMPOSITE DOUBLERS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

With the increasing focus on welded bridge members resulting in crack initiation and propagation, there is a large demand for creative solutions. One of these solutions includes the application of composite doublers over the critical weld. In order...

Petri, Brad

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

138

Search for Earth-like planets includes LANL star analysis  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Search for earth-like planets Search for Earth-like planets includes LANL star analysis The mission will not only be able to search for planets around other stars, but also yield...

139

atlantic region including: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

R: L. Tossey, T. Beeson, Parks, B. TruittTNC, UD MPEO staff 2 Climate scenarios of sea level rise for the northeast Atlantic Ocean: a study including the effects of ocean...

140

Forward osmosis for desalination and water treatment : a study of the factors influencing process performance.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This thesis explores various factors that have significant impacts on FO process performance in desalination and water treatment. These factors mainly include working temperatures, solution (more)

Zhao, Shuaifei

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes scale factor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Limited Personal Use of Government Office Equipment including Information Technology  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The Order establishes requirements and assigns responsibilities for employees' limited personal use of Government resources (office equipment and other resources including information technology) within DOE, including NNSA. The Order is required to provide guidance on appropriate and inappropriate uses of Government resources. This Order was certified 04/23/2009 as accurate and continues to be relevant and appropriate for use by the Department. Certified 4-23-09. No cancellation.

2005-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

142

Percentage of Total Natural Gas Commercial Deliveries included in Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

City Gate Price Residential Price Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices Commercial Price Percentage of Total Commercial Deliveries included in Prices Industrial Price Percentage of Total Industrial Deliveries included in Prices Electric Power Price Period: Monthly Annual City Gate Price Residential Price Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices Commercial Price Percentage of Total Commercial Deliveries included in Prices Industrial Price Percentage of Total Industrial Deliveries included in Prices Electric Power Price Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History U.S. 63.3 59.3 57.9 57.0 57.4 61.3 1983-2013 Alabama 71.7 71.0 68.5 68.2 68.4 66.7 1989-2013 Alaska 94.1 91.6 91.1 91.0 92.3 92.6 1989-2013 Arizona 84.0 83.0 81.6 80.3 82.8 82.7 1989-2013 Arkansas 37.8 28.3 28.1 28.6 26.7 28.0 1989-2013

143

Percentage of Total Natural Gas Industrial Deliveries included in Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

City Gate Price Residential Price Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices Commercial Price Percentage of Total Commercial Deliveries included in Prices Industrial Price Percentage of Total Industrial Deliveries included in Prices Electric Power Price Period: Monthly Annual City Gate Price Residential Price Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices Commercial Price Percentage of Total Commercial Deliveries included in Prices Industrial Price Percentage of Total Industrial Deliveries included in Prices Electric Power Price Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History U.S. 16.5 16.3 16.0 16.2 16.6 16.9 2001-2013 Alabama 22.1 21.7 21.6 22.8 22.0 22.7 2001-2013 Alaska 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2001-2013 Arizona 13.4 15.7 15.3 13.8 13.7 13.9 2001-2013 Arkansas 1.7 1.4 1.2 1.4 1.3 1.5 2001-2013

144

SCALED ELECTRON MODEL OF A DOGBONE MUON RLA WITH MULTI-PASS ARCS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The design of a dogbone RLA with linear-field multi-pass arcs was earlier developed for accelerating muons in a Neutrino Factory and a Muon Collider. It allows for efficient use of expensive RF while the multi-pass arc design based on linear combined-function magnets exhibits a number of advantages over separate-arc or pulsed-arc designs. Such an RLA may have applications going beyond muon acceleration. This paper describes a possible straightforward test of this concept by scaling a GeV scale muon design for electrons. Scaling muon momenta by the muon-to-electron mass ratio leads to a scheme, in which a 4.5 MeV electron beam is injected at the middle of a 3 MeV/pass linac with two double-pass return arcs and is accelerated to 18 MeV in 4.5 passes. All spatial dimensions including the orbit distortion are scaled by a factor of 7.5, which arises from scaling the 200 MHz muon RF to a readily available at CEBAF 1.5 GHz. The footprint of a complete RLA fits in an area of 25 by 7 m. The scheme utilizes only fixed magnetic fields including injection and extraction. The hardware requirements are not very demanding, making it straightforward to implement. In this report, we have shown first of all that measuring the energy spectrum of the fast neutrons in the liquid scintillators allows one to distinguish the two chemical forms of plutonium. In addition, combining this information with the Feynman 2-neutron and 3-neutron correlations allows one to extract the {alpha}-ratio without explicitly knowing the multiplication. Given the {alpha}-ratio one can then extract the multiplication as well as the {sup 239}Pu and {sup 240}Pu masses directly from the moment equations.

Kevin Beard, Rolland Johnson, Vasiliy Morozov, Yves Roblin, Andrew Hutton, Geoffrey Krafft, Slawomir Bogacz

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

xi-scaling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A class of purely kinematical corrections to xi-scaling is exposed. These corrections are inevitably present in any realistic hadron model with spin and gauge invariance and lead to phenomenologically important M/sub hadron//sup 2//Q/sup 2/ corrections to Nachtmann moments.

Gunion, J.F.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Sensor system scaling issues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A model for IR sensor performance is used to compare estimates of sensor cost effectiveness. Although data from aircraft sensors indicate a weaker scaling, their agreement is adequate to support the assessment of the benefits of operating up to the maximum altitude of most current UAVs.

Canavan, G.H.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Power Factor Improvement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Power factor control is a necessary ingredient in any successful Energy Management Program. Many companies are operating with power factors of 70% or less and are being penalized through the electrical utility bill. This paper starts by describing...

Viljoen, T. A.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Honda Smart Home to Include Berkeley Lab Ventilation Controller  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Honda Smart Home to Include Berkeley Lab Ventilation Controller Honda Smart Home to Include Berkeley Lab Ventilation Controller Honda smart home October 2013 October-November Special Focus: Energy Efficiency, Buildings, and the Electric Grid Honda Motor Company Inc is proceeding with plans to build a Smart Home in Davis, California, to demonstrate the latest in renewable energy technologies and energy efficiency. The home is expected to produce more energy than is consumed, demonstrating how the goal of "zero net energy" can be met in the near term future. A ventilation controller developed by researchers at Berkeley Lab's Environmental Energy Technologies Division (EETD) will be included in the smart home. EETD is currently working with the developers of the home control system to integrate its control algorithms.

149

DOE Revises its NEPA Regulations, Including Categorical Exclusions |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Revises its NEPA Regulations, Including Categorical Exclusions Revises its NEPA Regulations, Including Categorical Exclusions DOE Revises its NEPA Regulations, Including Categorical Exclusions September 30, 2011 - 2:30pm Addthis On September 27, 2011, the Department of Energy (DOE) approved revisions to its National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) regulations, and on September 28th, submitted the revisions to the Federal Register. The final regulations, which become effective 30 days after publication in the Federal Register, are the culmination of a 2-year process to review and update DOE's NEPA implementing procedures. This process involved internal evaluation, public participation, and Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) review. The revisions are designed to focus Departmental resources on projects with the potential for significant environmental impact, to better

150

projects are valued at approximately $67 million (including $15 million  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

projects are valued at approximately $67 million (including $15 million projects are valued at approximately $67 million (including $15 million in non-Federal cost sharing) over four years. The overall goal of the research is to develop carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) capture and separation technologies that can achieve at least 90 percent CO 2 removal at no more than a 35 percent increase in the cost of electricity. The projects, managed by FE's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), include: (1) Linde, LLC, which will use a post-combustion capture technology incorporating BASF's novel amine-based process at a 1-megawatt electric (MWe) equivalent slipstream pilot plant at the National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC) (DOE contribution: $15 million); (2) Neumann Systems Group, Inc., which will design, construct, and test a patented NeuStreamTM absorber at the Colorado

151

Including Tunneling in Non-BornOppenheimer Simulations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Including Tunneling in Non-BornOppenheimer Simulations ... We note that tunneling may be included in the modeling of electronically nonadiabatic processes by other methods as well, for example, quantal wave packet methods where the wave packet is not restricted to follow a classical trajectory,(18) path integral dynamics,(19-21) and the initial value representation,(22) but these methods will require more development of efficient computational strategies for their practical application to complex systems, whereas the method proposed here has a cost comparable to non-BornOppenheimer (NBO) trajectory calculations that do not include tunneling. ... We also ran BornOppenheimer trajectories with the same total energy on the adiabatic ground state for comparison. ...

Jingjing Zheng; Rubn Meana-Paeda; Donald G. Truhlar

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

152

Solar Energy Education. Renewable energy: a background text. [Includes glossary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Some of the most common forms of renewable energy are presented in this textbook for students. The topics include solar energy, wind power hydroelectric power, biomass ocean thermal energy, and tidal and geothermal energy. The main emphasis of the text is on the sun and the solar energy that it yields. Discussions on the sun's composition and the relationship between the earth, sun and atmosphere are provided. Insolation, active and passive solar systems, and solar collectors are the subtopics included under solar energy. (BCS)

Not Available

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Methods of producing adsorption media including a metal oxide  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods of producing a metal oxide are disclosed. The method comprises dissolving a metal salt in a reaction solvent to form a metal salt/reaction solvent solution. The metal salt is converted to a metal oxide and a caustic solution is added to the metal oxide/reaction solvent solution to adjust the pH of the metal oxide/reaction solvent solution to less than approximately 7.0. The metal oxide is precipitated and recovered. A method of producing adsorption media including the metal oxide is also disclosed, as is a precursor of an active component including particles of a metal oxide.

Mann, Nicholas R; Tranter, Troy J

2014-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

154

Watson Library enhancements to include new service desk  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

12/5/13 KU Libraries News: Watson Library enhancements to include new service desk www.lib.ku.edu/news/newservicedesk.shtml 1/1 Contact Us The University of Kansas Libraries Lawrence, KS 66045 (785) 864-8983 Copyright 2013 by the University... of Kansas Watson Library enhancements to include new service desk The University of Kansas Libraries is adding a new service desk to Watson Library to enhance the user experience and draw attention to new and existing resources. The desk, which...

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

On the strong coupling scale in Higgs G-inflation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Higgs G-inflation takes advantage of a Galileon-like ghost-free derivative coupling. It is a nonrenormalizable operator and is strongly coupled at high energy scales. Perturbative analysis has no longer predictive power there. In general, when the Lagrangian is expanded around the vacuum, the strong coupling scale is identified as the mass scale that appears in nonrenormalizable operators. In inflationary models, however, the identification of the strong coupling scale is subtle, since the structures of the kinetic term as well as the interaction itself are modified by the background inflationary dynamics. As a result, the strong coupling scale is back ground field dependent. In this letter, we evaluate the strong coupling scale of the fluctuations around the inflationary background including the Nambu Goldstone mode associated with the symmetry breaking in the Higgs G-inflation. We find that the system is weakly coupled when the scales which we now observe exit the horizon during inflation, and the observati...

Kamada, Kohei

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Anthrax Lethal Factor  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Thiang Yian Wong, Robert Schwarzenbacher and Robert C. Liddington Thiang Yian Wong, Robert Schwarzenbacher and Robert C. Liddington The Burnham Institute, 10901 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92037. Anthrax Toxin is a major virulence factor in the infectious disease, Anthrax1. This toxin is produced by Bacillus anthracis, which is an encapsulated, spore-forming, rod-shaped bacterium. Inhalation anthrax, the most deadly form, is contracted through breathing spores. Once spores germinate within cells of the immune system called macrophages2, bacterial cells are released into the bloodstream. There they proliferate rapidly and secrete Anthrax Toxin, ultimately leading to septic shock and death. Although antibiotics may be used to kill the bacteria, the level of toxin has often become so high in the bloodstream that removing the bacteria alone is not sufficient to prevent death. Therefore, the design of anti-toxins offers the prospect of treatment in the advanced stages of infection. Together with collaborators from the NIH and Harvard Medical School, we are involved in the atomic resolution study of the Anthrax Toxin components and their complexes, including small molecules with therapeutic potential. Data collection at SSRL and other synchrotron radiation sources has been key to the advances made in this research so far and is expected to play a continuing role in the future.

157

Requirements: A minimum of 15 PSYC credits, including  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

» Three other 2000-3000-level PSYC courses (any area) No more than 3 credits of PSYC 3889 or 3999 canRequirements: A minimum of 15 PSYC credits, including: » One Area I course » One Area II course) ___2100 (Principles of Research in Psychology) Area I. Social, Developmental, Clinical, & Industrial

Alpay, S. Pamir

158

Procedures in Modules (1) Including all procedures within modules  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Procedures in Modules (1) Including all procedures within modules works very well in almost all designing these if possible #12;Procedures in Modules (2) These are very much like internal procedures Works very well in almost all programs Everything accessible in the module can also be used in the procedure

159

Free Energy Efficiency Kit includes CFL light bulbs,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Free Energy Efficiency Kit Kit includes CFL light bulbs, spray foam, low-flow shower head, and more! Building Science 101 Presentation BPI Certified Building Professionals will present home energy efficiency for discounted energy assessments. FREE HOME ENERGY EFFICIENCY SEMINAR N e w R i ver L i g ht & Pow e r a n d W

Rose, Annkatrin

160

Biomass Potentials from California Forest and Shrublands Including Fuel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biomass Potentials from California Forest and Shrublands Including Fuel Reduction Potentials-04-004 February 2005 Revised: October 2005 Arnold Schwarzenegger, Governor, State of California #12;Biomass Tiangco, CEC Bryan M. Jenkins, University of California #12;Biomass Potentials from California Forest

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes scale factor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Project Management Business Process Project Delivery Processes Includes VE Budget  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project Management Business Process Project Delivery Processes Includes VE Budget Schedule Activities that do/could feed into PMBP LEGEND VE Cost Avoidance Program Coverage Document Results (Before, could use the value methodology to facilitate after action review. The project manager is responsible

US Army Corps of Engineers

162

FORUMA Hamilton Spectator Town Hall Event SPEAKERS INCLUDE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

R001990104 OPEN FORUMA Hamilton Spectator Town Hall Event SPEAKERS INCLUDE: STEVE BUIST, Spectator, former chairman of Hamilton-Wentworth region and now president and CEO of the Hamilton Community Foundation. DR. CHRIS MACKIE, Hamilton's associate medical officer of health. MARK CHAMBERLAIN, president

Thompson, Michael

163

ASTRO-F/FIS observing simulation including detector characteristics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ASTRO-F/FIS observing simulation including detector characteristics Woong-Seob Jeong a,*, Soojong instruments, the far-infrared surveyor (FIS) will map the entire sky in four bands using short wavelength (SW- oped a suite of software with an aim to simulate the FIS observations (Jeong et al., 2000, 2003, 2004

Pak, Soojong

164

ASTRO-F/FIS Observing Simulation Including Detector Characteristics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ASTRO-F/FIS Observing Simulation Including Detector Characteristics Woong-Seob Jeong1, Soojong Pak1 simulations to examined the detector characteristics on the FIS instrument (Far- Infrared Surveyor) images narrow and wide bands using a short wavelength (SW) and long wavelength (LW) detector array. The FIS (Far

Lee, Hyung Mok

165

cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1,018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids.

Raikhel, N.V.; Broekaert, W.F.; Namhai Chua; Kush, A.

1993-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

166

Methods of Purchasing Purchasing methods include the different  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

" purchases must be reviewed and approved by the Controller's Office. This may result in the end user beingMethods of Purchasing Purchasing methods include the different processes of ordering goods and/or services, and encumbering funds. #12;Method of Purchase Field Purchase Orders (FPO) Accepted

167

Monetary Awards Scale  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

MONETARY AWARDS SCALE FOR INTANGIBLE BENEFITS FROM MONETARY AWARDS SCALE FOR INTANGIBLE BENEFITS FROM SUGGESTIONS, INVENTIONS, SPECIAL ACTS OR SERVICES VALUE OF BENEFIT EXTENT OF APPLICATION Limited Affects functions, mission, or personnel of one office (e.g., field site office or one office within a HQ Departmental element). Affects a small area of science or technology. Extended Affects functions, mission, or personnel of a several field site offices or HQ office within a Departmental element (e.g., more than one). Affects an important area of science or technology. Broad Affects functions, mission, or personnel of an entire Departmental element or Departmental element with multiple site offices. Affects a broad area of science or technology. General Affects functions, mission, or personnel

168

POWER SYSTEMS STABILITY WITH LARGE-SCALE WIND POWER PENETRATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of offshore wind farms, wind power fluctuations may introduce several challenges to reliable power system behaviour due to natural wind fluctuations. The rapid power fluctuations from the large scale wind farms Generation Control (AGC) system which includes large- scale wind farms for long-term stability simulation

Bak-Jensen, Birgitte

169

DSM SCALES BACK  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

DSM SCALES BACK ... DSM PHARMACEUTICAL PRODucts is restructuring its pharma chemicals and biologies units, discontinuing operations at its pharmaceutical chemicals plant in South Haven, Mich., in the first half of 2007, and mothballing its biologics facility in Montreal in the beginning of this year. ... They are taking place as part of a DSM review process called Vision 2010 that, among other things, aims to better position the company's contract manufacturing business. ...

RICK MULLIN

2006-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

170

DOE Considers Natural Gas Utility Service Options: Proposal Includes  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Considers Natural Gas Utility Service Options: Proposal Considers Natural Gas Utility Service Options: Proposal Includes 30-mile Natural Gas Pipeline from Pasco to Hanford DOE Considers Natural Gas Utility Service Options: Proposal Includes 30-mile Natural Gas Pipeline from Pasco to Hanford January 23, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Cameron Hardy, DOE , (509) 376-5365, Cameron.Hardy@rl.doe.gov RICHLAND, WASH. - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is considering natural gas transportation and distribution requirements to support the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) and evaporator operations at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. DOE awarded a task order worth up to $5 million to the local, licensed supplier of natural gas in the Hanford area, Cascade Natural Gas Corporation (Cascade). Cascade will support DOE and its Environmental

171

Italy (including San Marino) Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Western Europe » Italy Western Europe » Italy (including San Marino) Italy (including San Marino) Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions Graph graphic Graphics Data graphic Data Trends As occurred in many industrialized nations, CO2 emissions from Italy rose steeply since the late 1940's until the growth was abruptly terminated in 1974. Since 1974, emissions from liquid fuels have vacillated, dropping from 76% to 46% of a static but varying total. Significant increases in natural gas consumption have compensated for the drop in oil consumption. In 2008, 35.8% of Italy's fossil-fuel CO2 emissions were due to natural gas consumption. Coal usage grew steadily until 1985 when CO2 emissions from coal consumption reached 16 million metric tons of carbon. Not until 2004 did coal usage exceed 1985 levels and now accounts for 13.9% of Italy's

172

Multi-processor including data flow accelerator module  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An accelerator module for a data flow computer includes an intelligent memory. The module is added to a multiprocessor arrangement and uses a shared tagged memory architecture in the data flow computer. The intelligent memory module assigns locations for holding data values in correspondence with arcs leading to a node in a data dependency graph. Each primitive computation is associated with a corresponding memory cell, including a number of slots for operands needed to execute a primitive computation, a primitive identifying pointer, and linking slots for distributing the result of the cell computation to other cells requiring that result as an operand. Circuitry is provided for utilizing tag bits to determine automatically when all operands required by a processor are available and for scheduling the primitive for execution in a queue. Each memory cell of the module may be associated with any of the primitives, and the particular primitive to be executed by the processor associated with the cell is identified by providing an index, such as the cell number for the primitive, to the primitive lookup table of starting addresses. The module thus serves to perform functions previously performed by a number of sections of data flow architectures and coexists with conventional shared memory therein. A multiprocessing system including the module operates in a hybrid mode, wherein the same processing modules are used to perform some processing in a sequential mode, under immediate control of an operating system, while performing other processing in a data flow mode.

Davidson, George S. (Albuquerque, NM); Pierce, Paul E. (Albuquerque, NM)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Effect of wettability on scale-up of multiphase flow from core-scale to reservoir fine-grid-scale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Typical field simulation grid-blocks are internally heterogeneous. The objective of this work is to study how the wettability of the rock affects its scale-up of multiphase flow properties from core-scale to fine-grid reservoir simulation scale ({approximately} 10{prime} x 10{prime} x 5{prime}). Reservoir models need another level of upscaling to coarse-grid simulation scale, which is not addressed here. Heterogeneity is modeled here as a correlated random field parameterized in terms of its variance and two-point variogram. Variogram models of both finite (spherical) and infinite (fractal) correlation length are included as special cases. Local core-scale porosity, permeability, capillary pressure function, relative permeability functions, and initial water saturation are assumed to be correlated. Water injection is simulated and effective flow properties and flow equations are calculated. For strongly water-wet media, capillarity has a stabilizing/homogenizing effect on multiphase flow. For small variance in permeability, and for small correlation length, effective relative permeability can be described by capillary equilibrium models. At higher variance and moderate correlation length, the average flow can be described by a dynamic relative permeability. As the oil wettability increases, the capillary stabilizing effect decreases and the deviation from this average flow increases. For fractal fields with large variance in permeability, effective relative permeability is not adequate in describing the flow.

Chang, Y.C.; Mani, V.; Mohanty, K.K. [Univ. of Houston, TX (United States)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

CATALYST ENHANCED MICRO SCALE BATCHCATALYST ENHANCED MICRO SCALE BATCH ASSEMBLYASSEMBLY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CATALYST ENHANCED MICRO SCALE BATCHCATALYST ENHANCED MICRO SCALE BATCH ASSEMBLYASSEMBLY RajashreeCollection/Analysis Capabilities · Parts (800x800x50µmParts (800x800x50µm33 ) and catalysts (2x2x.5mm) and catalysts (2x2x.5mm33 non-participating millimeter scale parts that act as `catalysts'. We present experimental results

175

Electric Power Industry Needs for Grid-Scale Storage Applications |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Industry Needs for Grid-Scale Storage Applications Industry Needs for Grid-Scale Storage Applications Electric Power Industry Needs for Grid-Scale Storage Applications Stationary energy storage technologies will address the growing limitations of the electricity infrastructure and meet the increasing demand for renewable energy use. Widespread integration of energy storage devices offers many benefits, including the following: Alleviating momentary electricity interruptions Meeting peak demand Postponing or avoiding upgrades to grid infrastructure Facilitating the integration of high penetrations of renewable energy Providing other ancillary services that can improve the stability and resiliency of the electric grid Electric Power Industry Needs for Grid-Scale Storage Applications More Documents & Publications

176

The San Jose Scale.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

control much easier now than we will ever be able to do in the future. It is spreading and every succeeding year makes the problem more and more difficult of control. 1 Let us briefly consider what the insect-is, its habits and life history ; also...? ture, described it and gave it the appropriate name of ? Pernicious Scale.? Its introduction into California was for some years a mystery until it was found that trees imported from China were infested with the pest. In 1901-,02 Prof. C. L. Marlatt...

Conradi, Albert F.

1906-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

United States/Mexico electricity trade study. [Glossary included  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During energy discussions between the United States and Mexico, it was suggested that the two countries revisit the issue of enhanced electricity trade because 10 years had elapsed since this issue was first studied. Responsibility to organize the updated study was jointly assigned to the US and to the Comision Federal de Electricidad (CFE). The study highlights the opportunities for increased cooperation among the electric utilities in the U.S. and Mexico. Direct benefits could include increased reliability of electric power service and cost savings through diversity of peak demand patterns and locational benefits associated with the siting of new generation sources. Indirect benefits could include improved economic and employment opportunities, especially in the border areas of both countries. While the study indicates that increased electricity trade is possible, there are significant technical and economic issues to consider. Any major increase in electricity trade would require a higher level of cooperation and coordination among utilities in both countries and would need to be preceded by a detailed analysis of associated benefits and costs (including environmental impacts) on both a short-term and a long-term basis. Whether US utilities and CFE decide to pursue specific projects will depend upon the need for and economics of those projects. The study recommends that the work begun by the two utility groups be continued. The study also recommends that regulators at all levels consider policies to increase coordination and review among all relevant parties so that unnecessary delays in planning and constructing needed facilities are avoided. 12 figs., 17 tabs.

Not Available

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Information regarding previous INCITE awards including selected highlights  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Information regarding previous INCITE awards including selected highlights Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) ASCR Home About Research Facilities Accessing ASCR Supercomputers Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF) Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) Research & Evaluation Prototypes (REP) Innovative & Novel Computational Impact on Theory and Experiment (INCITE) ASCR Leadership Computing Challenge (ALCC) Science Highlights Benefits of ASCR Funding Opportunities Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee (ASCAC) News & Resources Contact Information Advanced Scientific Computing Research U.S. Department of Energy SC-21/Germantown Building

179

Composite armor, armor system and vehicle including armor system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Composite armor panels are disclosed. Each panel comprises a plurality of functional layers comprising at least an outermost layer, an intermediate layer and a base layer. An armor system incorporating armor panels is also disclosed. Armor panels are mounted on carriages movably secured to adjacent rails of a rail system. Each panel may be moved on its associated rail and into partially overlapping relationship with another panel on an adjacent rail for protection against incoming ordnance from various directions. The rail system may be configured as at least a part of a ring, and be disposed about a hatch on a vehicle. Vehicles including an armor system are also disclosed.

Chu, Henry S.; Jones, Warren F.; Lacy, Jeffrey M.; Thinnes, Gary L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a pu GOVERNMENT RIGHTS This application was funded under Department of Energy Contract DE-AC02-76ER01338. The U.S. Government has certain rights under this application and any patent issuing thereon.

Raikhel, Natasha V. (Okemos, MI); Broekaert, Willem F. (Dilbeek, BE); Chua, Nam-Hai (Scarsdale, NY); Kush, Anil (New York, NY)

1993-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes scale factor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Reliability modeling of transmission and distribution systems including dependent failures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is considered. Therefore, the trans i t ion rate mat r i x of the entire system need not be generated. Th i s method is compared wi th the sequential method for normal and stormy weather condit ions, and is then extended to include m weather conditions... . 9 E . Cut -Set Equations 10 III M A R K O V C U T - S E T M E T H O D 13 A . Basic Approach 13 B . Markov Cut -Set Me thod 13 C . Examp le 18 D . Compar ison wi th the Sequential Me thod 22 E . Cut-Sets w i th m Weather States 24 F . Extens...

Beydoun, Rami Sami

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

182

Meson electromagnetic form factors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The electromagnetic structure of the pseudoscalar meson nonet is completely described by the sophisticated Unitary&Analytic model, respecting all known theoretical properties of the corresponding form factors.

Stanislav Dubnicka; Anna Z. Dubnickova

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

183

Improved best estimate plus uncertainty methodology including advanced validation concepts to license evolving nuclear reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many evolving nuclear energy programs plan to use advanced predictive multi-scale multi-physics simulation and modeling capabilities to reduce cost and time from design through licensing. Historically, the role of experiments was primary tool for design and understanding of nuclear system behavior while modeling and simulation played the subordinate role of supporting experiments. In the new era of multi-scale multi-physics computational based technology development, the experiments will still be needed but they will be performed at different scales to calibrate and validate models leading predictive simulations. Cost saving goals of programs will require us to minimize the required number of validation experiments. Utilization of more multi-scale multi-physics models introduces complexities in the validation of predictive tools. Traditional methodologies will have to be modified to address these arising issues. This paper lays out the basic aspects of a methodology that can be potentially used to address these new challenges in design and licensing of evolving nuclear technology programs. The main components of the proposed methodology are verification, validation, calibration, and uncertainty quantification. An enhanced calibration concept is introduced and is accomplished through data assimilation. The goal is to enable best-estimate prediction of system behaviors in both normal and safety related environments. To achieve this goal requires the additional steps of estimating the domain of validation and quantification of uncertainties that allow for extension of results to areas of the validation domain that are not directly tested with experiments, which might include extension of the modeling and simulation (M&S) capabilities for application to full-scale systems. The new methodology suggests a formalism to quantify an adequate level of validation (predictive maturity) with respect to required selective data so that required testing can be minimized for cost saving purposes by showing further testing wold not enhance the quality of the validation of predictive tools. The proposed methodology is at a conceptual level. When matured and if considered favorably by the stakeholders, it could serve as a new framework for the next generation of the best estimate plus uncertainty licensing methodology that USNRC developed previously. In order to come to that level of maturity it is necessary to communicate the methodology to scientific, design and regulatory stakeholders for discussion and debates. This paper is the first step to establish this communication.

Unal, Cetin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Williams, Brian [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mc Clure, Patrick [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nelson, Ralph A [IDAHO NATIONAL LAB

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

[Article 1 of 7: Motivates and Includes the Consumer]  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2 of 7: Research on the Characteristics of a Modern Grid by the NETL 2 of 7: Research on the Characteristics of a Modern Grid by the NETL Modern Grid Strategy Team Accommodates All Generation and Storage Options Last month we presented the first Principal Characteristic of a Modern Grid, "Motivates and Includes the Consumer". This month we present a second characteristic, "Accommodates All Generation and Storage Options". This characteristic will fundamentally transition today's grid from a centralized model for generation to one that also has a more balanced contribution from decentralized generation and storage. This characteristic, along with the other six, define a Modern Grid that will power the 21 st Century economy. For a more detailed discussion on "Accommodates All Generation and Storage Options", please see:

185

Search for Earth-like planets includes LANL star analysis  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Search for earth-like planets Search for earth-like planets Search for Earth-like planets includes LANL star analysis The mission will not only be able to search for planets around other stars, but also yield new insights into the parent stars themselves. March 6, 2009 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials.

186

Notices ROUTINE USES OF RECORDS MAINTAINED IN THE SYSTEM, INCLUDING  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

83 Federal Register 83 Federal Register / Vol. 78, No. 51 / Friday, March 15, 2013 / Notices ROUTINE USES OF RECORDS MAINTAINED IN THE SYSTEM, INCLUDING CATEGORIES OF USERS AND THE PURPOSES OF SUCH USES: The Department may disclose information contained in a record in this system of records under the routine uses listed in this system of records without the consent of the individual if the disclosure is compatible with the purposes for which the record was collected. These disclosures may be made on a case-by-case basis or, if the Department has complied with the computer matching requirements of the Privacy Act of 1974, as amended (Privacy Act), under a computer matching agreement. Any disclosure of individually identifiable information from a record in this system must also comply with the requirements of section

187

Including stereoscopic information in the reconstruction of coronal magnetic fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a method to include stereoscopic information about the three dimensional structure of flux tubes into the reconstruction of the coronal magnetic field. Due to the low plasma beta in the corona we can assume a force free magnetic field, with the current density parallel to the magnetic field lines. Here we use linear force free fields for simplicity. The method uses the line of sight magnetic field on the photosphere as observational input. The value of $\\alpha$ is determined iteratively by comparing the reconstructed magnetic field with the observed structures. The final configuration is the optimal linear force solution constrained by both the photospheric magnetogram and the observed plasma structures. As an example we apply our method to SOHO MDI/EIT data of an active region. In the future it is planned to apply the method to analyse data from the SECCHI instrument aboard the STEREO mission.

T. Wiegelmann; T. Neukirch

2008-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

188

Electra-optical device including a nitrogen containing electrolyte  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Described is a thin-film battery, especially a thin-film microbattery, and a method for making same having application as a backup or primary integrated power source for electronic devices. The battery includes a novel electrolyte which is electrochemically stable and does not react with the lithium anode and a novel vanadium oxide cathode Configured as a microbattery, the battery can be fabricated directly onto a semiconductor chip, onto the semiconductor die or onto any portion of the chip carrier. The battery can be fabricated to any specified size or shape to meet the requirements of a particular application. The battery is fabricated of solid state materials and is capable of operation between -15.degree. C. and 150.degree. C.

Bates, John B. (Oak Ridge, TN); Dudney, Nancy J. (Knoxville, TN); Gruzalski, Greg R. (Oak Ridge, TN); Luck, Christopher F. (Knoxville, TN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Copper laser modulator driving assembly including a magnetic compression laser  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A laser modulator (10) having a low voltage assembly (12) with a plurality of low voltage modules (14) with first stage magnetic compression circuits (20) and magnetic assist inductors (28) with a common core (91), such that timing of the first stage magnetic switches (30b) is thereby synchronized. A bipolar second stage of magnetic compression (42) is coupled to the low voltage modules (14) through a bipolar pulse transformer (36) and a third stage of magnetic compression (44) is directly coupled to the second stage of magnetic compression (42). The low voltage assembly (12) includes pressurized boxes (117) for improving voltage standoff between the primary winding assemblies (34) and secondary winding (40) contained therein.

Cook, Edward G. (Livermore, CA); Birx, Daniel L. (Oakley, CA); Ball, Don G. (Livermore, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Fuel cell repeater unit including frame and separator plate  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An example fuel cell repeater includes a separator plate and a frame establishing at least a portion of a flow path that is operative to communicate fuel to or from at least one fuel cell held by the frame relative to the separator plate. The flow path has a perimeter and any fuel within the perimeter flow across the at least one fuel cell in a first direction. The separator plate, the frame, or both establish at least one conduit positioned outside the flow path perimeter. The conduit is outside of the flow path perimeter and is configured to direct flow in a second, different direction. The conduit is fluidly coupled with the flow path.

Yamanis, Jean; Hawkes, Justin R; Chiapetta, Jr., Louis; Bird, Connie E; Sun, Ellen Y; Croteau, Paul F

2013-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

191

Computing nonnegative tensor factorizations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oct 19, 2006 ... Keywords N-dimensional arrays, tensors, nonnegative tensor factorization, alternating ..... for each A(n)) are standard nonnegative linear least-squares problems over the vector ..... interface (lsNTF) implements the nonnegative tensor factorization for N = 3 and relies on .... and inaccurate measurements.

2006-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

192

Synthetic heparin-binding factor analogs  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention provides synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs having at least one peptide chain, and preferably two peptide chains branched from a dipeptide branch moiety composed of two trifunctional amino acid residues, which peptide chain or chains bind a heparin-binding growth factor receptor and are covalently bound to a non-signaling peptide that includes a heparin-binding domain, preferably by a linker, which may be a hydrophobic linker. The synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs are useful as pharmaceutical agents, soluble biologics or as surface coatings for medical devices.

Pena, Louis A. (Poquott, NY); Zamora, Paul O. (Gaithersburg, MD); Lin, Xinhua (Plainview, NY); Glass, John D. (Shoreham, NY)

2010-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

193

Summer Research Opportunities -2014 Heather Anderson OD, PhD My research interests include objective measurements of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Summer Research Opportunities - 2014 Heather Anderson OD, PhD � My research interests include objective measurements of accommodation in children and factors limiting visual quality in individuals, PhD � My research centers on understanding the visual impact of the optical aberrations of the normal

Glasser, Adrian

194

Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs Guidelines to Defra's Greenhouse Gas Conversion Factors for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Factors for Company Reporting June 2008 What are Greenhouse Gas Conversion Factors? These conversion of activities, including energy use and transport activities Who should use these factors? These factors by organisations or individuals overseas as the conversion factors are specific to the UK. What should I use

195

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Basic Energy Sciences Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Scale Nanostructure Electronic Structure Calculations mp261d) Some electronic structure calculations, including someNanostructure Electronic Structure Calculations Lin-Wang

Gerber, Richard

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

EcoFactor Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

EcoFactor Inc EcoFactor Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name EcoFactor Inc Place Millbrae, California Zip 94030 Product California-based home energy management service provider. Coordinates 37.60276°, -122.395444° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.60276,"lon":-122.395444,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

197

Parallel Stochastic Gradient Algorithms for Large-Scale Matrix ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On large-scale matrix completion tasks, Jellyfish is orders of magnitude more efficient than ...... NNLS was written in Matlab, and some of the functions are available .... Figure 6: Low-Rank Factorization Graph on (A) Movielens1M and (B)

2013-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

198

Biomass energy: the scale of the potential resource  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of biomass energy in the global energy system is dependent on the complex interplay of four major factors as novel biomass-to-fuel conversion processes for increas- ing the yield of usable energy from each unitBiomass energy: the scale of the potential resource Christopher B. Field1 , J. Elliott Campbell1

199

cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74-79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli.

Raikhel, Natasha V. (Okemos, MI); Broekaert, Willem F. (Dilbeek, BE); Chua, Nam-Hai (Scarsdale, NY); Kush, Anil (New York, NY)

1999-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

200

CDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74-79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli.

Raikhel, Natasha V. (Okemos, MI); Broekaert, Willem F. (Dilbeek, BE); Chua, Nam-Hai (Scarsdale, NY); Kush, Anil (New York, NY)

1995-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes scale factor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74--79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli. 12 figs.

Raikhel, N.V.; Broekaert, W.F.; Chua, N.H.; Kush, A.

1999-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

202

cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1,018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74--79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli. 11 figures.

Raikhel, N.V.; Broekaert, W.F.; Chua, N.H.; Kush, A.

1995-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

203

Extractant composition including crown ether and calixarene extractants  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An extractant composition comprising a mixed extractant solvent consisting of calix[4] arene-bis-(tert-octylbenzo)-crown-6 ("BOBCalixC6"), 4',4',(5')-di-(t-butyldicyclo-hexano)-18-crown-6 ("DtBu18C6"), and at least one modifier dissolved in a diluent. The DtBu18C6 may be present at from approximately 0.01M to approximately 0.4M, such as at from approximately 0.086 M to approximately 0.108 M. The modifier may be 1-(2,2,3,3-tetrafluoropropoxy)-3-(4-sec-butylphenoxy)-2-propanol ("Cs-7SB") and may be present at from approximately 0.01M to approximately 0.8M. In one embodiment, the mixed extractant solvent includes approximately 0.15M DtBu18C6, approximately 0.007M BOBCalixC6, and approximately 0.75M Cs-7SB modifier dissolved in an isoparaffinic hydrocarbon diluent. The extractant composition further comprises an aqueous phase. The mixed extractant solvent may be used to remove cesium and strontium from the aqueous phase.

Meikrantz, David H. (Idaho Falls, ID); Todd, Terry A. (Aberdeen, ID); Riddle, Catherine L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Law, Jack D. (Pocalello, ID); Peterman, Dean R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Mincher, Bruce J. (Idaho Falls, ID); McGrath, Christopher A. (Blackfoot, ID); Baker, John D. (Blackfoot, ID)

2009-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

204

Process simulation of refinery units including chemical reactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Process simulation methods for design and operation of refinery units are well established as long as no chemical reactors are included. The feedstocks are divided into pseudo-components which enables calculation of phase equilibria and transport properties. When chemical reactors are present some chemical conversion takes place which obviously affects the nature of the pseudo-components and their properties. The stream leaving the reactor will not only be of a different composition than the stream entering the reactor but in addition, the pseudo-components making up the outlet stream will also have other physical properties than the ones in the inlet stream. These changes affect not only the reactor unit but also the simulation of the whole flow-sheet. The paper presents a detailed model for an adiabatic distillate hydrotreater which takes into account the elemental composition of the feed. A special simulation strategy has been developed to incorporate such reactor units into process simulators. Finally, the simulation strategy is illustrated for a hydrotreating plant.

Jens A. Hansen; Barry H. Cooper

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Falsifying High-Scale Leptogenesis at the LHC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Measuring a non-zero value for the cross section of any lepton number violating (LNV) process would put a strong lower limit on the washout factor for the effective lepton number density in the early universe at times close to the electroweak phase transition and thus would lead to important constraints on any high-scale model for the generation of the observed baryon asymmetry based on LNV. In particular, for leptogenesis models with masses of the right-handed neutrinos heavier than the mass scale observed at the LHC, the implied large washout factors would lead to a violation of the out-of-equilibrium condition and exponentially suppress the net lepton number produced in such leptogenesis models. We thus demonstrate that the observation of LNV processes at the LHC results in the falsification of high-scale leptogenesis models. However, no conclusions about the viability of leptogenesis models can be drawn from the non-observation of LNV processes.

Frank F. Deppisch; Julia Harz; Martin Hirsch

2014-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

206

Substrate comprising a nanometer-scale projection array  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for forming a substrate comprising nanometer-scale pillars or cones that project from the surface of the substrate is disclosed. The method enables control over physical characteristics of the projections including diameter, sidewall angle, and tip shape. The method further enables control over the arrangement of the projections including characteristics such as center-to-center spacing and separation distance.

Cui, Yi; Zhu, Jia; Hsu, Ching-Mei; Connor, Stephen T; Yu, Zongfu; Fan, Shanhui; Burkhard, George

2012-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

207

Spreadsheet Based Scaling Calculations and Membrane Performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many membrane element manufacturers provide a computer program to aid buyers in the use of their elements. However, to date there are few examples of fully integrated public domain software available for calculating reverse osmosis and nanofiltration system performance. The Total Flux and Scaling Program (TFSP), written for Excel 97 and above, provides designers and operators new tools to predict membrane system performance, including scaling and fouling parameters, for a wide variety of membrane system configurations and feedwaters. The TFSP development was funded under EPA contract 9C-R193-NTSX. It is freely downloadable at www.reverseosmosis.com/download/TFSP.zip. TFSP includes detailed calculations of reverse osmosis and nanofiltration system performance. Of special significance, the program provides scaling calculations for mineral species not normally addressed in commercial programs, including aluminum, iron, and phosphate species. In addition, ASTM calculations for common species such as calcium sulfate (CaSO{sub 4}{times}2H{sub 2}O), BaSO{sub 4}, SrSO{sub 4}, SiO{sub 2}, and LSI are also provided. Scaling calculations in commercial membrane design programs are normally limited to the common minerals and typically follow basic ASTM methods, which are for the most part graphical approaches adapted to curves. In TFSP, the scaling calculations for the less common minerals use subsets of the USGS PHREEQE and WATEQ4F databases and use the same general calculational approach as PHREEQE and WATEQ4F. The activities of ion complexes are calculated iteratively. Complexes that are unlikely to form in significant concentration were eliminated to simplify the calculations. The calculation provides the distribution of ions and ion complexes that is used to calculate an effective ion product ''Q.'' The effective ion product is then compared to temperature adjusted solubility products (Ksp's) of solids in order to calculate a Saturation Index (SI) for each solid of interest. The SI is expressed as a log value (log(Q) - log(Ksp)) where positive values indicate potential scaling conditions. As this is an unprotected spreadsheet, the methodology is plainly visible to and readily modified by the user.

Wolfe, T D; Bourcier, W L; Speth, T F

2000-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

208

Not Easy Being Mead's: Comparative Herbivory on Three Milkweeds, Including Threatened Mead's Milkweed (Asclepias meadii), and Seedling Ecology of Mead's Milkweed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 1: Comparative Herbivory and Herbivore Effects on Reproduction for Three Milkweeds (Asclepias) in Two Landscape Contexts. The ability of herbivores to regulate plant populations depends on many factors including herbivore species, abundance...

Roels, Steve M.

2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

209

Two-Factor Authentication  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Two-Factor Authentication (2FA) is a system wherein two different methods are used to authenticate an individual. 2FA is based on something you know (a secret PIN) and something you have (an...

210

factors | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

36 36 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142253836 Varnish cache server factors Dataset Summary Description This dataset is from the report Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies: a review of existing literature (J. Macknick, R. Newmark, G. Heath and K.C. Hallett) and provides estimates of operational water withdrawal and water consumption factors for electricity generating technologies in the United States. Estimates of water factors were collected from published primary literature and were not modified except for unit conversions. Source National Renewable Energy Laboratory Date Released August 28th, 2012 (2 years ago)

211

Mountaineer Commercial Scale Carbon Capture and Storage Project Topical Report: Preliminary Public Design Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Preliminary Public Design Report consolidates for public use nonproprietary design information on the Mountaineer Commercial Scale Carbon Capture & Storage project. The report is based on the preliminary design information developed during the Phase I - Project Definition Phase, spanning the time period of February 1, 2010 through September 30, 2011. The report includes descriptions and/or discussions for: (1) DOE's Clean Coal Power Initiative, overall project & Phase I objectives, and the historical evolution of DOE and American Electric Power (AEP) sponsored projects leading to the current project; (2) Alstom's Chilled Ammonia Process (CAP) carbon capture retrofit technology and the carbon storage and monitoring system; (3) AEP's retrofit approach in terms of plant operational and integration philosophy; (4) The process island equipment and balance of plant systems for the CAP technology; (5) The carbon storage system, addressing injection wells, monitoring wells, system monitoring and controls logic philosophy; (6) Overall project estimate that includes the overnight cost estimate, cost escalation for future year expenditures, and major project risks that factored into the development of the risk based contingency; and (7) AEP's decision to suspend further work on the project at the end of Phase I, notwithstanding its assessment that the Alstom CAP technology is ready for commercial demonstration at the intended scale.

Guy Cerimele

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

212

Factors Shaping Macrofaunal Polychaete Communities in the Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This dissertation addresses large-scale trends in composition, density, taxonomic and functional diversity in deep-sea benthic polychaete communities in the Gulf of Mexico (GoM). The study includes samples from two major sampling programs: the Deep...

Carvalho, Russell G

2013-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

213

Factors affecting stranding of juvenile salmonids by wakes from ship passage in the Lower Columbia River  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effects of deep-draft vessel traffic in confined riverine channels on shorelines and fish are of widespread concern. In the Pacific Northwest of the United States, wakes and subsequent beach run-up from ships transiting the Lower Columbia River have been observed to strand juvenile salmon and other fish. As part of a before-and-after study to assess stranding effects that may be associated with channel deepening, we measured 19 co-variables from observations of 126 vessel passages at three low-slope beaches and used multiple logistic regression to discern the significant factors influencing the frequency of stranding. Subyearling Chinook salmon were 82% of the fish stranded over all sites and seasons. Given a low-slope beach, stranding frequencies for juvenile salmon were significantly related to river location, salmon density in the shallows, a proxy for ship kinetic energy, tidal height, and two interactions. The beach types selected for our study do not include all the beach types along the Lower Columbia River so that the stranding probabilities described here cannot be extrapolated river-wide. A more sophisticated modeling effort, informed by additional field data, is needed to assess salmon losses by stranding for the entire lower river. Such modeling needs to include river-scale factors such as beach type, berms, proximity to navigation channel, and perhaps, proximity to tributaries that act as sources of out-migrating juvenile salmon. At both river and beach scales, no one factor produces stranding; rather interactions among several conditions produce a stranding event and give stranding its episodic nature.

Pearson, Walter H.; Skalski, John R.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Scaled Solar | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Place: San Francisco, California Sector: Solar Product: Scaled Solar manufacturers and markets utility-grade, concentrated photovoltaic solar energy systems to commercial...

215

Large scale anisotropic bias from primordial non-Gaussianity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this work we study the large scale structure bias in models of anisotropic inflation. We use the Peak Background Splitting method in Excursion Set Theory to find the scale-dependent bias. We show that the amplitude of the bias is modified by a direction-dependent factor. In the specific anisotropic inflation model which we study, the scale-dependent bias vanishes at leading order when the long wavelength mode in squeezed limit is aligned with the anisotropic direction in the sky. We also extend the scale-dependent bias formulation to the general situations with primordial anisotropy. We find some selection rules indicating that some specific parts of a generic anisotropic bispectrum is picked up by the bias parameter. We argue that the anisotropic bias is mainly sourced by the angle between the anisotropic direction and the long wavelength mode in the squeezed limit.

Baghram, Shant; Firouzjahi, Hassan [School of Astronomy, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), P.O. Box 19395-5531, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Namjoo, Mohammad Hossein, E-mail: baghram@ipm.ir, E-mail: mh.namjoo@ipm.ir, E-mail: firouz@ipm.ir [School of Physics, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), P.O. Box 19395-5531, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

New England Wind Forum: Determining Factors Influencing Wind Economics in  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Determining Factors Influencing Wind Economics in New England Determining Factors Influencing Wind Economics in New England Figure 1: Installed Wind Project Costs by Region: 2003 through 2006 Projects Only New England's high land values, smaller land parcels, varied terrain, and more moderate wind speeds make for projects of smaller scale and higher unit cost than those likely to be built in Texas or the Great Plains states. Click on the graph to view a larger version. New England's high land values, smaller land parcels, varied terrain, and more moderate wind speeds make for projects of smaller scale and higher unit cost than those likely to be built in Texas or the Great Plains states. View a larger version of the graph. Figure 2: 2006 Project Capacity Factors by Region: 2002 through 2005 Projects Only The chart depicts project capacity factor by region. Click on the graph to view a larger version.

217

STEAM-SIDE OXIDE SCALE EXFOLIATION BEHAVIOR IN SUPERHEATERS AND REHEATERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Advances in materials for power plants include not only new materials with higher-temperature capabilities, but also the use of current materials at increasingly higher temperatures. This latter activity builds on extensive experience of the performance of the various alloys, and provides a basis for identifying changes in alloy behavior with increasing temperature as well as understanding the factors that ultimately determine the maximum use temperatures of the different alloy classes. This paper presents results from an effort to model the exfoliation processes of steam-side oxide scales in a manner that describes as accurately as possible the evolution of strains in oxides growing inside small-diameter tubes subjected to large thermal gradients and to thermal transients typical of normal steam boiler operation. One way of portraying the results of such calculations is by plotting the evolving strains in a given oxide scale on an Exfoliation Diagram (of the type pioneered by Manning et al. of the British Central Electricity Research Laboratory) to determine the earliest time at which the trajectory of these strains intersects a criterion for scale failure. Understanding of how such strain trajectories differ among different alloys and are affected by the major variables associated with boiler operation has the potential to suggest boiler operating strategies to manage scale exfoliation, as well as to highlight the mode of scale failure and the limitations of each alloy. Preliminary results are presented of the strain trajectories calculated for alloys T22, T91, and TP347 subjected to the conditions experienced by superheaters under assumed boiler operating scenarios. For all three alloys the earliest predicted scale failures were associated with the increased strains developed during a boiler shut-down event; indeed, in the cases considered it appeared unlikely that scale failure would occur in any practically meaningful time due to strains accumulated during operation in a load-following mode in the absence of a shut down. The accuracy of the algorithms used for the kinetics of oxide growth appeared to be a very important consideration, especially for alloy TP347 for which large effects on oxide growth rate are known to occur with changes in alloy grain size and surface cold work.

Sabau, Adrian S [ORNL; Shingledecker, John P. [Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI); Wright, Ian G [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Cloud Controlling Factors --Low Clouds BJORN STEVENS,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cloud Controlling Factors -- Low Clouds BJORN STEVENS, Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic conspire to determine the statistics and cli- matology of layers of shallow (boundary layer) clouds of low-cloud control- ling processes are offered: these include renewing our focus on theory, model

Stevens, Bjorn

219

Asymptotic Scaling and Monte Carlo Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is a generally known problem that the behaviour predicted from perturbation theory for asymptotically free theories like QCD, i.e. asymptotic scaling, has not been observed in Monte Carlo simulations when the series is expressed in terms of the bare coupling g_0. This discrepancy has been explained in the past with the poor convergence properties of the perturbative series in the g_0. An alternative point of view, called Lattice-Distorted Perturbation Theory proposes that lattice artifacts due to the finiteness of the lattice spacing, a, cause the disagreement between Monte Carlo data and perturbative scaling. Following this alternative scenario, we fit recent quenched data from different observables to fitting functions that include these cut-off effects, confirming that the lattice data are well reproduced by g_0-PT with the simple addition of terms O(a^n).

A. Trivini; C. R. Allton

2005-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

220

Factors favorable to public participation success  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Categories of factors linked to successful public participation (PP) program outcomes include PP process, organizational context, sociopolitical context, strategic considerations and unique (special circumstances) factors. We re-order the long list factors according to how essential, important, and unique they are and discuss their significance and interrelationships. It is argued that bureacratic structure and operational modes are basically in conflict with features of successful PP programs (openness, two-way education, communication with nonexpert outsiders). If this is so, then it is not surprising that the factors essential for PP success in bureacracies involve extraordinary management efforts by agencies to bypass, compensate for, or overcome structural constraints. We conclude by speculating about the long-term viability of PP practices in the agency setting as well as the consequences for agencies that attempt the problematic task of introducing PP into their complex, mission-oriented organizations.

Peelle, E.; Schweitzer, M.; Munro, J.; Carnes, S.; Wolfe, A.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes scale factor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

The Food Crises: A quantitative model of food prices including speculators and ethanol conversion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent increases in basic food prices are severely impacting vulnerable populations worldwide. Proposed causes such as shortages of grain due to adverse weather, increasing meat consumption in China and India, conversion of corn to ethanol in the US, and investor speculation on commodity markets lead to widely differing implications for policy. A lack of clarity about which factors are responsible reinforces policy inaction. Here, for the first time, we construct a dynamic model that quantitatively agrees with food prices. The results show that the dominant causes of price increases are investor speculation and ethanol conversion. Models that just treat supply and demand are not consistent with the actual price dynamics. The two sharp peaks in 2007/2008 and 2010/2011 are specifically due to investor speculation, while an underlying upward trend is due to increasing demand from ethanol conversion. The model includes investor trend following as well as shifting between commodities, equities and bonds to take ad...

Lagi, Marco; Bertrand, Karla Z; Bar-Yam, Yaneer

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Clean Energy Manufacturing Resources - Technology Full-Scale Production |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Full-Scale Production Full-Scale Production Clean Energy Manufacturing Resources - Technology Full-Scale Production Clean Energy Manufacturing Resources - Technology Full-Scale Production Find resources to help you design a production and manufacturing process for a new clean energy technology or product. For full-scale production, other areas to consider include workforce development; R&D funding; and regional, state, and local resources. For more resources, see the Clean Energy Manufacturing Federal Resource Guide. Design Production and Manufacturing Process Advanced Research Projects Agency: Tech-to-Market Resources - general tech-to-market (T2M) resources. DOE Advanced Manufacturing Office: Manufacturing Demonstration Facility - a collaborative manufacturing community that works to provide real data to

223

Tribal Renewable Energy Advanced Course: Commercial Scale Project  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Commercial Scale Project Commercial Scale Project Development Tribal Renewable Energy Advanced Course: Commercial Scale Project Development Watch the DOE Office of Indian Energy advanced course presentation entitled "Tribal Renewable Energy Project Development and Financing: Commercial Scale" by clicking on the .swf link below. You can also download a PDF of the PowerPoint slides. This course provides in-depth information on the project development and financing process for commercial-scale renewable energy projects on tribal lands, including: Key concepts and decision points Investment opportunities How to pay for a commercial project. See the full list of DOE Office of Indian Energy educational webinars and provide your feedback on the National Training & Education Resource (NTER)

224

A numerical study of the effectiveness factors of nickel catalyst pellets used in steam methane reforming for residential fuel cell applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A numerical study is performed to evaluate the effectiveness factors of commercial nickel catalyst pellets commonly used in small-scale steam methane reformers for residential fuel cell applications. Based on the intrinsic reaction kinetics of the steam reforming process, the standard composition of the partially reformed gas mixture is determined as a function of the methane conversion. The heterogeneous reforming reactions inside the spherical catalyst pellets are then modeled by considering the distributed reaction, multi-component diffusion and permeation, and conductive and convective heat transfer in the porous media. Various operating conditions, including the reforming temperature, steam-to-carbon (S/C) ratio, operating pressure, and geometrical parameters, such as the pellet diameter and mean pore size, are simulated. The effectiveness factors calculated for each condition are presented as a function of the methane conversion. Finally, simple correlations for the effectiveness factors are presented, and their accuracies are assessed.

Seung Man Baek; Jung Ho Kang; Kyu-Jin Lee; Jin Hyun Nam

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

The Economic Productivity of Urban Areas: Disentangling General Scale Effects from Local Exceptionality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;The Economic Productivity of Urban Areas: Disentangling General Scale Effects from Local The factors that explain differences in the economic productivity of urban areas have remained difficult of economic activity in a city in terms of a production function, together with a scaling perspective

226

Scaling Laws and Temperature Profiles for Solar and Stellar Coronal Loops with Non-uniform Heating  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The bulk of solar coronal radiative loss consists of soft X-ray emission from quasi-static loops at the cores of Active Regions. In order to develop diagnostics for determining the heating mechanism of these loops from observations by coronal imaging instruments, I have developed analytical solutions for the temperature structure and scaling laws of loop strands for a wide range of heating functions, including footpoint heating, uniform heating, and heating concentrated at the loop apex. Key results are that the temperature profile depends only weakly on the heating distribution -- not sufficiently to be of significant diagnostic value -- and that the scaling laws survive for this wide range of heating distributions, but with the constant of proportionality in the RTV scaling law ($P_{0}L \\thicksim T_{max}^3$) depending on the specific heating function. Furthermore, quasi-static analytical solutions do not exist for an excessive concentration of heating near the loop footpoints, a result in agreement with recent numerical simulations. It is demonstrated that a generalization of the solutions to the case of a strand with a variable diameter leads to only relatively small correction factors in the scaling laws and temperature profiles for constant diameter loop strands. A quintet of leading theoretical coronal heating mechanisms is shown to be captured by the formalism of this paper, and the differences in thermal structure between them may be verified through observations. Preliminary results from full numerical simulations demonstrate that, despite the simplifying assumptions, the analytical solutions from this paper are stable and accurate.

P. C. H. Martens

2008-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

227

Large-scale anisotropy in stably stratified rotating flows  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present results from direct numerical simulations of the Boussinesq equations in the presence of rotation and/or stratification, both in the vertical direction. The runs are forced isotropically and randomly at small scales and have spatial resolutions of up to $1024^3$ grid points and Reynolds numbers of $\\approx 1000$. We first show that solutions with negative energy flux and inverse cascades develop in rotating turbulence, whether or not stratification is present. However, the purely stratified case is characterized instead by an early-time, highly anisotropic transfer to large scales with almost zero net isotropic energy flux. This is consistent with previous studies that observed the development of vertically sheared horizontal winds, although only at substantially later times. However, and unlike previous works, when sufficient scale separation is allowed between the forcing scale and the domain size, the total energy displays a perpendicular (horizontal) spectrum with power law behavior compatible with $\\sim k_\\perp^{-5/3}$, including in the absence of rotation. In this latter purely stratified case, such a spectrum is the result of a direct cascade of the energy contained in the large-scale horizontal wind, as is evidenced by a strong positive flux of energy in the parallel direction at all scales including the largest resolved scales.

Marino, Dr. Raffaele [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR); Mininni, Dr. Pablo D. [Universidad de Buenos Aires, Argentina; Rosenberg, Duane L [ORNL; Pouquet, Dr. Annick [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Connecting the molecular scale to the continuum scale for diffusion processes in smectite-rich porous media  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, we address the manner in which the continuum-scale diffusive properties of smectite-rich porous media arise from their molecular- and pore-scale features. Our starting point is a successful model of the continuum-scale apparent diffusion coefficient for water tracers and cations which decomposes it as a sum of pore-scale terms describing diffusion in macropore and interlayer 'compartments.' We then apply molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to determine molecular-scale diffusion coefficients D{sub interlayer} of water tracers and representative cations (Na{sup +}, Cs{sup +}, Sr{sup 2+}) in Na-smectite interlayers. We find that a remarkably simple expression relates D{sub interlayer} to the pore-scale parameter {delta}{sub nanopore} {<=} 1, a constrictivity factor that accounts for the lower mobility in interlayers as compared to macropores: {delta}{sub nanopore} = D{sub interlayer}/D{sub 0}, where D{sub 0} is the diffusion coefficient in bulk liquid water. Using this scaling expression, we can accurately predict the apparent diffusion coefficients of tracer H{sub 2}O, Na{sup +}, Sr{sup 2+} and Cs{sup +}+ in compacted Na-smectite-rich materials.

Bourg, I.C.; Sposito, G.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Surface modification to prevent oxide scale spallation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A surface modification to prevent oxide scale spallation is disclosed. The surface modification includes a ferritic stainless steel substrate having a modified surface. A cross-section of the modified surface exhibits a periodic morphology. The periodic morphology does not exceed a critical buckling length, which is equivalent to the length of a wave attribute observed in the cross section periodic morphology. The modified surface can be created using at least one of the following processes: shot peening, surface blasting and surface grinding. A coating can be applied to the modified surface.

Stephens, Elizabeth V; Sun, Xin; Liu, Wenning; Stevenson, Jeffry W; Surdoval, Wayne; Khaleel, Mohammad A

2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

230

Composting of soils/sediments and sludges containing toxic organics including high energy explosives. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laboratory and pilot-scale experimentation were conducted to evaluate composting as an on-site treatment technology to remediate soils contaminated with hazardous waste at DOE`s PANTEX Plant. Suspected contaminated sites within the PANTEX Plant were sampled and analyzed for explosives, other organics, and inorganic wastes. Soils in drainage ditches and playas at PANTEX Plant were found to be contaminated with low levels of explosives (including RDX, HMX, PETN and TATB). Additional sites previously used for solvent disposal were heavily contaminated with solvents and transformation products of the solvent, as well as explosives and by-products of explosives. Laboratory studies were conducted using {sup 14}C-labeled explosives and {sup 14}C-labeled diacetone alcohol contaminated soil loaded into horse manure/hay composts at three rates: 20, 30, and 40%(W/W). The composts were incubated for six weeks at approximately 60{degree}C with continuous aeration. All explosives degraded rapidly and were reduced to below detection limits within 3 weeks in the laboratory studies. {sup 14}C-degradates from {sup 14}C-RDX, {sup 14}C-HMX and {sup 14}C-TATB were largely limited to {sup 14}CO{sub 2} and unextracted residue in the compost. Volatile and non-volatile {sup 14}C-degradates were found to result from {sup 14}C-PETN breakdown, but these compounds were not identified. {sup 14}C-diacetone alcohol concentrations were significantly reduced during composting. However, most of the radioactivity was volatilized from the compost as non-{sup 14}CO{sub 2} degradates or as {sup 14}C-diacetone alcohol. Pilot scale composts loaded with explosives contaminated soil at 30% (W/W) with intermittent aeration were monitored over six weeks. Data from the pilot-scale study generally was in agreement with the laboratory studies. However, the {sup 14}C-labeled TATB degraded much faster than the unlabeled TATB. Some formulations of TATB may be more resistant to composting activity than others.

Doyle, R.C.; Kitchens, J.F.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Method for large-scale fabrication of atomic-scale structures on material surfaces using surface vacancies  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for forming atomic-scale structures on a surface of a substrate on a large-scale includes creating a predetermined amount of surface vacancies on the surface of the substrate by removing an amount of atoms on the surface of the material corresponding to the predetermined amount of the surface vacancies. Once the surface vacancies have been created, atoms of a desired structure material are deposited on the surface of the substrate to enable the surface vacancies and the atoms of the structure material to interact. The interaction causes the atoms of the structure material to form the atomic-scale structures.

Lim, Chong Wee (Urbana, IL); Ohmori, Kenji (Urbana, IL); Petrov, Ivan Georgiev (Champaign, IL); Greene, Joseph E. (Champaign, IL)

2004-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

232

Public Health FAT FACTORS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: THE UNITED STATES SPENDS MORE ON HEALTH CARE THAN ANY OTHER COUNTRY. YET WE CONTINUE TO FALL FAR BEHIND States spends an astonishing percent of our gross domestic product on health care--significantly moreColumbia Public Health HOT TOPIC Climate Change FAT FACTORS Obesity Prevention BOOK SMART

Qian, Ning

233

Factors Affecting Photosynthesis!  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Factors Affecting Photosynthesis! Temperature Eppley (1972) Light Sverdrup's Critical Depth-493, but the general concept is still valid! ! #12;PB opt & Temperature! #12;Photosynthesis & Temperature! Remember: in the laboratory, we can measure photosynthesis versus irradiance (PvsE) and calculate Ek, Pmax, and alpha

Kudela, Raphael M.

234

Hydranet: network support for scaling of large scale servic es  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

With the explosive growth of demand for services on the Internet, the networking infrastructure (routers 7 protocols, servers) is under considerable stress. Mechanisms are needed for current and future IP services to scale in a client transparent...

Chawla, Hamesh

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Factorization in B ---> V gamma decays  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The factorization properties of the radiative decays B {yields} V{gamma} are analyzed at leading order in 1/m{sub b} using the soft-collinear effective theory. It is shown that the decay amplitudes can be expressed in terms of a B {yields} V form factor evaluated at q{sup 2} = 0, light-cone distribution amplitudes of the B and V mesons, and calculable hard-scattering kernels. The renormalization-group equations in the effective theory are solved to resum perturbative logarithms of the different scales in the decay process. Phenomenological implications for the B {yields} K*{gamma} branching ratio, isospin asymmetry, and CP asymmetries are discussed, with particular emphasis on possible effects from physics beyond the Standard Model.

Becher, Thomas; /Fermilab; Hill, Richard J.; /SLAC; Neubert, Matthias; /Cornell U., LEPP

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Factorization in B to V gamma Decays  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The factorization properties of the radiative decays B {yields} V{gamma} are analyzed at leading order in 1/mb using the soft-collinear effective theory. It is shown that the decay amplitudes can be expressed in terms of a B {yields} V form factor evaluated at q{sup 2} = 0, light-cone distribution amplitudes of the B and V mesons, and calculable hard-scattering kernels. The renormalization-group equations in the effective theory are solved to resume perturbative logarithms of the different scales in the decay process. Phenomenological implications for the B {yields} K*{gamma} branching ratio, isospin asymmetry, and CP asymmetries are discussed, with particular emphasis on possible effects from physics beyond the Standard Model.

Becher, T

2005-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

237

NETL: Carbon Storage - Small-Scale Field Tests  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Small-Scale Field Tests Small-Scale Field Tests Carbon Storage Small-Scale Field Tests The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is supporting a number of small-scale field tests (injection of less than 500,000 million metric tons of CO2 per year) to explore various geologic CO2 storage opportunities within the United States and portions of Canada. DOE's small-scale field test efforts are designed to demonstrate that regional reservoirs have the capability to store thousands of years of CO2 emissions and provide the basis for larger volume, commercial-scale CO2 tests. The field studies are focused on developing better understanding 11 major types of geologic storage reservoir classes, each having their own unique opportunities and challenges. Understanding these different storage classes provides insight into how the systems influence fluids flow within these systems today, and how CO2 in geologic storage would be anticipated to flow in the future. The different storage formation classes include: deltaic, coal/shale, fluvial, alluvial, strandplain, turbidite, eolian, lacustrine, clastic shelf, carbonate shallow shelf, and reef. Basaltic interflow zones are also being considered as potential reservoirs. These storage reservoirs contain fluids that may include natural gas, oil, or saline water; any of which may impact CO2 storage differently. The data gathered during these small-scale tests provides valuable information regarding specific formations that have historically not been evaluated for the purpose of CO2 storage. The Carbon Storage Program strategy includes an established set of field test objectives applicable to the small-scale projects:

238

CALL FOR PAPERS HUMAN FACTORS IN SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of practice, knowledge sharing and organizational learning Interaction in large scale online communities of effective coordination among the developers and factors such as developer motivation and organizational the patterns in which communities work Human and Organizational Issues particular to Agile software

Vellekoop, Michel

239

E-Print Network 3.0 - axis factoring method Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Once this is done, we can call the setup method to properly initialize the axis... On: color values start end moveBy scaleFactor minValue maxValue AbstractAxis AxisAxisDecorator...

240

Human Factors Review Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

''Human Factors'' is concerned with the incorporation of human user considerations into a system in order to maximize human reliability and reduce errors. This Review Plan is intended to assist in the assessment of human factors conditions in existing DOE facilities. In addition to specifying assessment methodologies, the plan describes techniques for improving conditions which are found to not adequately support reliable human performance. The following topics are addressed: (1) selection of areas for review describes techniques for needs assessment to assist in selecting and prioritizing areas for review; (2) human factors engineering review is concerned with optimizing the interfaces between people and equipment and people and their work environment; (3) procedures review evaluates completeness and accuracy of procedures, as well as their usability and management; (4) organizational interface review is concerned with communication and coordination between all levels of an organization; and (5) training review evaluates training program criteria such as those involving: trainee selection, qualification of training staff, content and conduct of training, requalification training, and program management.

Paramore, B.; Peterson, L.R. (eds.)

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes scale factor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Heart of Darkness: The Significance of the Zeptobarn Scale for Neutralino Direct Detection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The direct detection of dark matter through its elastic scattering off nucleons is among the most promising methods for establishing the particle identity of dark matter. The current bound on the spin-independent scattering cross section is sigma^SI 1 TeV, effectively decoupling squarks and sleptons from neutralino dark matter phenomenology. In this case, we find characteristic cross sections in the narrow range 1 zb 70 GeV. As sfermion masses are lowered to near their experimental limit mtilde ~ 400 GeV, the upper and lower limits of this range are extended, but only by factors of around two, and the lower limit is not significantly altered by relaxing many particle physics assumptions, varying the strange quark content of the nucleon, including the effects of galactic small-scale structure, or assuming other components of dark matter. Experiments are therefore rapidly entering the heart of dark matter-favored supersymmetry parameter space. If no signal is seen, supersymmetric models must contain some level of fine-tuning, and we identify and analyze several possibilities. Barring large cancellations, however, in a large and generic class of models, if thermal relic neutralinos are a significant component of dark matter, experiments will discover them as they probe down to the zeptobarn scale.

Jonathan L. Feng; David Sanford

2011-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

242

Linearly Scaling 3D Fragment Method for Large-Scale Electronic Structure Calculations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for large scale electronic structure calculations. J. Phys.large-scale electronic struc- ture calculations. Phys. Rev.Large-Scale Electronic Structure Calculations Lin-Wang Wang,

Wang, Lin-Wang

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Linear scaling 3D fragment method for large-scale electronic structure calculations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

large-scale electronic structure calculations. Phys. Rev. B,for large scale electronic structure calculations. J. Phys.Large-Scale Electronic Structure Calculations Lin-Wang Wang,

Wang, Lin-Wang

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

ARM - Evaluation Product - Vertical Air Motion during Large-Scale  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ProductsVertical Air Motion during Large-Scale ProductsVertical Air Motion during Large-Scale Stratiform Rain Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Evaluation Product : Vertical Air Motion during Large-Scale Stratiform Rain Site(s) NIM SGP General Description The Vertical Air Motion during Large-Scale Stratiform Rain (VERVELSR) value-added product (VAP) uses the unique properties of a 95-GHz radar Doppler velocity spectra to produce vertical profiles of air motion during low-to-moderate (1-20 mm/hr) rainfall events It is designed to run at ARM sites that include a W-band ARM cloud radar (WACR) radar with spectra data processing. The VERVELSR VAP, based on the work of Giangrande et al. (2010), operates by exploiting a resonance effect that occurs in

245

The energetic coupling of scales in gyrokinetic plasma turbulence  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In magnetized plasma turbulence, the couplings of perpendicular spatial scales that arise due to the nonlinear interactions are analyzed from the perspective of the free-energy exchanges. The plasmas considered here, with appropriate ion or electron adiabatic electro-neutrality responses, are described by the gyrokinetic formalism in a toroidal magnetic geometry. Turbulence develops due to the electrostatic fluctuations driven by temperature gradient instabilities, either ion temperature gradient (ITG) or electron temperature gradient (ETG). The analysis consists in decomposing the system into a series of scale structures, while accounting separately for contributions made by modes possessing special symmetries (e.g., the zonal flow modes). The interaction of these scales is analyzed using the energy transfer functions, including a forward and backward decomposition, scale fluxes, and locality functions. The comparison between the ITG and ETG cases shows that ETG turbulence has a more pronounced classical turbulent behavior, exhibiting a stronger energy cascade, with implications for gyrokinetic turbulence modeling.

Teaca, Bogdan, E-mail: bogdan.teaca@coventry.ac.uk [Applied Mathematics Research Centre, Coventry University, Coventry CV1 5FB (United Kingdom); Max-Planck fr Sonnensystemforschung, Justus-von-Liebig-Weg 3, D-37077 Gttingen (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut fr Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Max-Planck/Princeton Center for Plasma Physics (Germany); Navarro, Alejandro Ban, E-mail: alejandro.banon.navarro@ipp.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut fr Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Jenko, Frank, E-mail: frank.jenko@ipp.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut fr Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Max-Planck/Princeton Center for Plasma Physics (Germany)

2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

246

Large-Scale Industrial CCS Projects Selected for Continued Testing |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Large-Scale Industrial CCS Projects Selected for Continued Testing Large-Scale Industrial CCS Projects Selected for Continued Testing Large-Scale Industrial CCS Projects Selected for Continued Testing June 10, 2010 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Three Recovery Act funded projects have been selected by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to continue testing large-scale carbon capture and storage (CCS) from industrial sources. The projects - located in Texas, Illinois, and Louisiana - were initially selected for funding in October 2009 as part of a $1.4 billion effort to capture carbon dioxide (CO2) from industrial sources for storage or beneficial use. The first phase of research and development (R&D) included $21.6 million in Recovery Act funding and $22.5 million in private funding for a total initial investment of $44.1 million.

247

Scaling solution, radion stabilization, and initial condition for brane-world cosmology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We propose a self-consistent and dynamical scenario which gives rise to well-defined initial conditions for five-dimensional brane-world cosmologies with radion stabilization. At high energies, the five-dimensional effective theory is assumed to have a scale invariance so that it admits an expanding scaling solution as a future attractor. The system automatically approaches the scaling solution and, hence, the initial condition for the subsequent low-energy brane cosmology is set by the scaling solution. At low energies, the scale invariance is broken and a radion stabilization mechanism drives the dynamics of the brane-world system. We present an exact, analytic scaling solution for a class of scale-invariant effective theories of five-dimensional brane-world models which includes the five-dimensional reduction of the Horava-Witten theory, and provide convincing evidence that the scaling solution is a future attractor.

Shinji Mukohyama and Alan Coley

2004-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

248

EFRT M-12 Issue Resolution: Caustic Leach Rate Constants from PEP and Laboratory-Scale Tests  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Testing Summary Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project-Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) project to perform research and development activities to resolve technical issues identified for the Pretreatment Facility (PTF). The Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) was designed and constructed and is to be operated as part of a plan to respond to issue M12, Undemonstrated Leaching Processes. The PEP is a 1/4.5-scale test platform designed to simulate the WTP pretreatment caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, ultrafiltration solids concentration, and slurry washing processes. The PEP replicates the WTP leaching processes using prototypic equipment and control strategies. The PEP also includes non-prototypic ancillary equipment to support the core processing. Two operating scenarios are currently being evaluated for the ultrafiltration process (UFP) and leaching operations. The first scenario has caustic leaching performed in the UFP-2 ultrafiltration feed vessels (i.e., vessel UFP-VSL-T02A in the PEP and vessels UFP-VSL-00002A and B in the WTP PTF). The second scenario has caustic leaching conducted in the UFP-1 ultrafiltration feed preparation vessels (i.e., vessels UFP-VSL-T01A and B in the PEP; vessels UFP-VSL-00001A and B in the WTP PTF). In both scenarios, 19-M sodium hydroxide solution (NaOH, caustic) is added to the waste slurry in the vessels to leach solid aluminum compounds (e.g., gibbsite, boehmite). Caustic addition is followed by a heating step that uses direct injection of steam to accelerate the leaching process. Following the caustic leach, the vessel contents are cooled using vessel cooling jackets and/or external heat exchangers. The main difference between the two scenarios is that for leaching in UFP-1, the 19-M NaOH is added to un-concentrated waste slurry (3 to 8 wt% solids), while for leaching in UFP-2, the slurry is concentrated to nominally 20 wt% solids using cross-flow ultrafiltration before adding caustic. The work described in this report addresses the kinetics of caustic leach under WTP conditions, based on tests performed with a Hanford waste simulant. The tests were completed at the lab-scale and in the PEP, which is a 1/4.5-scale mock-up of key PTF process equipment. The purpose of this report is to summarize the results from both scales that are related to caustic leach chemistry to support a scale-up factor for the submodels to be used in the G2 model, which predicts WTP operating performance. The scale-up factor will take the form of an adjustment factor for the rate constant in the boehmite leach kinetic equation in the G2 model.

Mahoney, Lenna A.; Rassat, Scot D.; Eslinger, Paul W.; Aaberg, Rosanne L.; Aker, Pamela M.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Hanson, Brady D.; Hausmann, Tom S.; Huckaby, James L.; Kurath, Dean E.; Minette, Michael J.; Sundaram, S. K.; Yokuda, Satoru T.

2009-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

249

Scale and deposits in high-heat-rejection engines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Scaling under conditions very similar to those of a heavy-duty diesel engine cooling system was investigated using a newly designed, versatile test stand. The parameters included flow rate, heat flux, hardness, along with bulk fluid temperatures. The hot surface temperature, a critical parameter, was also measured. Results were interpreted in terms of the conditions in the boundary layer at the hot surface. Critical values of flow rate and heat flux existed for scaling under experimental conditions. A quantitative relationship of scale with heat flux and hardness was observed. Deposits produced from testing of different types of commercial coolants, including phosphate based and nonphosphate bases, were measured and compared with results from simple beaker tests.

Chen, Y.S.; Kershisnik, E.I. [Dober Group, Glenwood, IL (United States); Hudgens, R.D. [Fleetguard, Inc., Cookeville, TN (United States); Corbeels, C.L.; Zehr, R.L. [Cummins Engine Co., Inc., Columbus, IN (United States)

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Optimizing Power Factor Correction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

studied were 100, 150, 200, 300, 400, and 500 hours times each value of KW. The values of the capacitor cost parameters B and D were chosen to cover the range of costs suggested by capacitor suppliers and an electrical contractor. The values for B... plots correspond Power Factor Range: 0.5 to 1.0. to values of KW and KWH as shown in Fig. 5. The Figure 6; B ? $1,500; D ? $15 per kV I\\R. values of KWH are the products of the KW's and the hours. KWH/KII, hr 100 150 200 300 400 500 KII, kll...

Phillips, R. K.; Burmeister, L. C.

251

ARM: Surface Radiation Measurement Quality Control testing, including climatologically configurable limits  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Surface Radiation Measurement Quality Control testing, including climatologically configurable limits

Hodges, Gary; Stoffel, Tom; Kutchenreiter, Mark; Kay, Bev; Habte, Aron; Ritsche, Michael; Morris, Victor; Anderberg, Mary

252

Structurally assisted blackness in butterfly scales  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...research-article Structurally assisted blackness in butterfly scales...photonic structure| Structurally assisted blackness in butterfly scales...ultrastructure Structurally assisted blackness in butterfly scales...Controlled absorption of incident solar radiation is the principal...

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Valueadded Mediation in LargeScale Information Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

workflow, and help desks [WiederholdCC:1994]. Other services available over networks include textual, mediating services can be performed by independent entrepreneurs. 1 INTRODUCTION As information systemsValue­added Mediation in Large­Scale Information Systems Gio Wiederhold Computer Science Department

Wiederhold, Gio

254

Accounting for biological variability and sampling scale: a multi-scale approach to building epidemic models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...sedentary, by developing a multi-scale framework...individuals within families (or other social units...within parishes). The multi-scale framework developed...and sampling scale: a multi-scale approach to building epidemic models...

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Determination of prescription dose for Cs-131 permanent implants using the BED formalism including resensitization correction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: The current widely used biological equivalent dose (BED) formalism for permanent implants is based on the linear-quadratic model that includes cell repair and repopulation but not resensitization (redistribution and reoxygenation). The authors propose a BED formalism that includes all the four biological effects (4Rs), and the authors propose how it can be used to calculate appropriate prescription doses for permanent implants with Cs-131. Methods: A resensitization correction was added to the BED calculation for permanent implants to account for 4Rs. Using the same BED, the prescription doses with Au-198, I-125, and Pd-103 were converted to the isoeffective Cs-131 prescription doses. The conversion factor F, ratio of the Cs-131 dose to the equivalent dose with the other reference isotope (F{sub r}: with resensitization, F{sub n}: without resensitization), was thus derived and used for actual prescription. Different values of biological parameters such as ?, ?, and relative biological effectiveness for different types of tumors were used for the calculation. Results: Prescription doses with I-125, Pd-103, and Au-198 ranging from 10 to 160 Gy were converted into prescription doses with Cs-131. The difference in dose conversion factors with (F{sub r}) and without (F{sub n}) resensitization was significant but varied with different isotopes and different types of tumors. The conversion factors also varied with different doses. For I-125, the average values of F{sub r}/F{sub n} were 0.51/0.46, for fast growing tumors, and 0.88/0.77 for slow growing tumors. For Pd-103, the average values of F{sub r}/F{sub n} were 1.25/1.15 for fast growing tumors, and 1.28/1.22 for slow growing tumors. For Au-198, the average values of F{sub r}/F{sub n} were 1.08/1.25 for fast growing tumors, and 1.00/1.06 for slow growing tumors. Using the biological parameters for the HeLa/C4-I cells, the averaged value of F{sub r} was 1.07/1.11 (rounded to 1.1), and the averaged value of F{sub n} was 1.75/1.18. F{sub r} of 1.1 has been applied to gynecological cancer implants with expected acute reactions and outcomes as expected based on extensive experience with permanent implants. The calculation also gave the average Cs-131 dose of 126 Gy converted from the I-125 dose of 144 Gy for prostate implants. Conclusions: Inclusion of an allowance for resensitization led to significant dose corrections for Cs-131 permanent implants, and should be applied to prescription dose calculation. The adjustment of the Cs-131 prescription doses with resensitization correction for gynecological permanent implants was consistent with clinical experience and observations. However, the Cs-131 prescription doses converted from other implant doses can be further adjusted based on new experimental results, clinical observations, and clinical outcomes.

Luo, Wei, E-mail: wei.luo@uky.edu; Molloy, Janelle; Aryal, Prakash; Feddock, Jonathan; Randall, Marcus [Department of Radiation Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40536 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40536 (United States)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

256

Scaling of cosmic string loops  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the spectrum of loops as a part of a complete network of cosmic strings in flat space-time. After a long transient regime, characterized by production of small loops at the scale of the initial conditions, it appears that a true scaling regime takes over. In the final regime the characteristic size of loops scales as $0.1 t$, and the production rate of small loops goes as $l^{-1.63}$. In the expanding universe, we expect similar behavior with perhaps a less negative index. For such indices, the distribution of loops existing at any given time goes as $l^{-5/2}$ in the radiation era and $l^{-2}$ in the matter era.

Vanchurin, V; Vilenkin, A; Olum, Ken D.; Vanchurin, Vitaly; Vilenkin, Alexander

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Scale Invariance in Global Terrorism  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Traditional analysis of international terrorism, now an endemic feature of the modern era, has not sought to explain the emergence of rare but extremely severe events. Using the tools of extremal statistics, we analyze terrorist attacks worldwide between 1968 and 2004, as compiled in the National Memorial Institute for the Prevention of Terrorism (MIPT) database. We find that international terrorism exhibits a "scale-free" behavior with an exponent close to two. We conjecture that such power-law behavior is an extension of the still unexplained scale invariance between the frequency and intensity of wars. Finally, we briefly consider the reasons why such scaling may exist and its implications for counter-terrorism policy.

Clauset, A; Clauset, Aaron; Young, Maxwell

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Time-Off Awards Scale  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

/1/2010 /1/2010 TIME OFF AWARD SCALE The following chart is recommended and should be used unless another time-off award scale has been adopted by the servicing human resources office. TIME OFF SCALE VALUE OF THE EMPLOYEE'S CONTRIBUTION HOURS TO BE AWARDED MODERATE - A contribution to a product, program or service to the public which is of sufficient value to merit formal recognition. Beneficial change or modification of operating principles or procedures. 1 - 10 Hours SUBSTANTIAL - An important contribution to the value of a product, activity, program or service to the public. Significant change or modification or operating principles or procedures. 11 - 20 Hours HIGH - A significant contribution to the value of a product, activity, program or service to

259

Site-Scale Saturated Zone Flow Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this model report is to document the components of the site-scale saturated-zone flow model at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, in accordance with administrative procedure (AP)-SIII.lOQ, ''Models''. This report provides validation and confidence in the flow model that was developed for site recommendation (SR) and will be used to provide flow fields in support of the Total Systems Performance Assessment (TSPA) for the License Application. The output from this report provides the flow model used in the ''Site-Scale Saturated Zone Transport'', MDL-NBS-HS-000010 Rev 01 (BSC 2003 [162419]). The Site-Scale Saturated Zone Transport model then provides output to the SZ Transport Abstraction Model (BSC 2003 [164870]). In particular, the output from the SZ site-scale flow model is used to simulate the groundwater flow pathways and radionuclide transport to the accessible environment for use in the TSPA calculations. Since the development and calibration of the saturated-zone flow model, more data have been gathered for use in model validation and confidence building, including new water-level data from Nye County wells, single- and multiple-well hydraulic testing data, and new hydrochemistry data. In addition, a new hydrogeologic framework model (HFM), which incorporates Nye County wells lithology, also provides geologic data for corroboration and confidence in the flow model. The intended use of this work is to provide a flow model that generates flow fields to simulate radionuclide transport in saturated porous rock and alluvium under natural or forced gradient flow conditions. The flow model simulations are completed using the three-dimensional (3-D), finite-element, flow, heat, and transport computer code, FEHM Version (V) 2.20 (software tracking number (STN): 10086-2.20-00; LANL 2003 [161725]). Concurrently, process-level transport model and methodology for calculating radionuclide transport in the saturated zone at Yucca Mountain using FEHM V 2.20 are being carried out in the model report, ''Site-Scale Saturated Zone Transport'', MDL-NBS-HS-000010 Rev 01 (BSC 2003 [162419]). The velocity fields are calculated by the flow model, described herein, independent of the transport processes, and are then used as inputs to the transport model. Justification for this abstraction is presented in the model report, ''Saturated Zone Flow and Transport Model Abstraction'', MDL-NBS-HS-000021 (BSC 2003 [164870]).

G. Zyvoloski

2003-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

260

Constraints and tensions in testing general relativity from Planck and CFHTLenS including intrinsic alignment systematics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present constraints on testing general relativity (GR) at cosmological scales using recent data sets and the impact of galaxy intrinsic alignment (IA) in the CFHTLenS lensing data on those constraints. We consider CMB temperature data from Planck, the galaxy power spectrum from WiggleZ, weak lensing tomography from the CFHTLenS, ISW-galaxy cross correlations, and BAO data from 6dF, SDSS DR7, and BOSS DR9. We use a parameterization of the modified gravity (MG) that is binned in redshift and scale, a parameterization that evolves monotonically in scale but is binned in redshift, and a functional parameterization that evolves only in redshift. We present the results in terms of the MG parameters $Q$ and $\\Sigma$. We employ an IA model with an amplitude $A_{CFHTLenS}$ that is included in the parameter analysis. We find an improvement in the constraints on the MG parameters corresponding to $40-53\\%$ increase on the figure of merit compared to previous studies, and GR is found consistent with the data at the $9...

Dossett, Jason N; Parkinson, David; Davis, Tamara

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes scale factor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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261

Heart of darkness: the significance of the zeptobarn scale for neutralino direct detection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The direct detection of dark matter through its elastic scattering off nucleons is among the most promising methods for establishing the particle identity of dark matter. The current bound on the spin-independent scattering cross section is ?{sup SI} < 10 zb for dark matter masses m{sub ?} ? 100 GeV, with improved sensitivities expected soon. We examine the implications of this progress for neutralino dark matter. We work in a supersymmetric framework well-suited to dark matter studies that is simple and transparent, with models defined in terms of four weak-scale parameters. We first show that robust constraints on electric dipole moments motivate large sfermion masses m-tilde ? 1 TeV, effectively decoupling squarks and sleptons from neutralino dark matter phenomenology. In this case, we find characteristic cross sections in the narrow range 1 zb ? ?{sup SI} ? 40 zb for m{sub ?} ? 70 GeV. As sfermion masses are lowered to near their experimental limit m-tilde ? 400 GeV, the upper and lower limits of this range are extended, but only by factors of around two, and the lower limit is not significantly altered by relaxing many particle physics assumptions, varying the strange quark content of the nucleon, including the effects of galactic small-scale structure, or assuming other components of dark matter. Experiments are therefore rapidly entering the heart of dark matter-favored supersymmetry parameter space. If no signal is seen, supersymmetric models must contain some level of fine-tuning, and we identify and analyze several possibilities. Barring large cancellations, however, in a large and generic class of models, if thermal relic neutralinos are a significant component of dark matter, experiments will discover them as they probe down to the zeptobarn scale.

Feng, Jonathan L.; Sanford, David, E-mail: jlf@uci.edu, E-mail: dsanford@uci.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California Irvine, 4129 Frederick Reines Hall, Irvine, CA 92697-4575 (United States)

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Scaling Properties of Universal Tetramers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We evidence the existence of a universal correlation between the binding energies of successive four-boson bound states (tetramers), for large two-body scattering lengths (a), related to an additional scale not constrained by three-body Efimov physics. Relevant to ultracold atom experiments, the atom-trimer relaxation peaks for |a|{yields}{infinity} when the ratio between the tetramer and trimer energies is {approx_equal}4.6 and a new tetramer is formed. The new scale is also revealed for a<0 by the prediction of a correlation between the positions of two successive peaks in the four-atom recombination process.

Hadizadeh, M. R.; Yamashita, M. T. [Instituto de Fisica Teorica, Universidade Estadual Paulista, 01140-070, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Tomio, Lauro [Instituto de Fisica Teorica, Universidade Estadual Paulista, 01140-070, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal Fluminense, 24210-346, Niteroi, RJ (Brazil); Delfino, A. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal Fluminense, 24210-346, Niteroi, RJ (Brazil); Frederico, T. [Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica, 12228-900, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil)

2011-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

263

Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor Modulates Behavioral and Brain Responses to Social Stress.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Social stress is a prevalent factor in society that can cause or exacerbate neuropsychiatric disorders including depression and posttraumatic stress disorder. According to the (more)

Jeffress, Elizabeth

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Power scaling analysis of fiber lasers and amplifiers based on non-silica materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A developed formalism for analyzing the power scaling of diffraction limited fiber lasers and amplifiers is applied to a wider range of materials. Limits considered include thermal rupture, thermal lensing, melting of the core, stimulated Raman scattering, stimulated Brillouin scattering, optical damage, bend induced limits on core diameter and limits to coupling of pump diode light into the fiber. For conventional fiber lasers based upon silica, the single aperture, diffraction limited power limit was found to be 36.6kW. This is a hard upper limit that results from an interaction of the stimulated Raman scattering with thermal lensing. This result is dependent only upon physical constants of the material and is independent of the core diameter or fiber length. Other materials will have different results both in terms of ultimate power out and which of the many limits is the determining factor in the results. Materials considered include silica doped with Tm and Er, YAG and YAG based ceramics and Yb doped phosphate glass. Pros and cons of the various materials and their current state of development will be assessed. In particular the impact of excess background loss on laser efficiency is discussed.

Dawson, J W; Messerly, M J; Heebner, J E; Pax, P H; Sridharan, A K; Bullington, A L; Beach, R J; Siders, C W; Barty, C P; Dubinskii, M

2010-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

265

Cross-sample invariance of the structure of self-reported distress and difficulty in assertiveness: Experiences with the scale for interpersonal behaviour  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recent surveys of psychometric studies with respect to the construct and/or factorial validity of self-report assertion measures (e.g. Beck and Heimberg, 1983) point to the paucity of systematic research addressing such issues. To date no attempts have been made to examine the cross-sample generalisability of dimensions of assertion by means of objective techniques of factorial invariance (i.e. hypothesis-testing variations of principal factor or principal components analysis). Employing such a technique in the present study, distress and performance factors identified previously in a phobic population (N = 703) with a Dutch measure of assertion (Scale for Interpersonal Behaviour) the factors being: (I) DISPLAY OF NEGATIVE FEELINGS, (II) EXPRESSION of and DEALING with PERSONAL LIMITATIONS, (III) INITIATING ASSERTIVENESS and (IV) POSITIVE ASSERTION were shown to be replicable in a new phobic sample (N = 119) and invariant across three distinct samples, namely psychiatric outpatients (N = 253), (non-patient) students (N = 412) and (non-student) normals (N = 250). Additional reliability and validity data supported the utility of a fifth overall measure within the Scale, which was termed GENERAL ASSERTIVENESS. These data also underline the contention of Futch et al. (1982) that it would be unwise to take any demonstrated multidimensionality of an assertion construct as evidence in the context of the trait-state issue (e.g. Eisler et al., 1975). However, the exclusive use of an overall assertion scale of a purportedly multidimensional measure is likely to invalidate research findings (including clinical research) since it masks relevant component information. To counteract this problem it is proposed that either the subscales should be used on their own or that the subscales and the overall scale should be used together. It is further concluded that (1) in developing and using an assertion measure a multidimensional approach should be taken, there being at least four distress and four performance factors to be taken account of; (2) of these four factors, that of Positive Assertion in particular should be considered more thoroughly in adequately defining and operationalising the assertion construct.

Willem A. Arrindell; Jan van der Ende

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

QGESS: Capital Cost Scaling Methodology  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(costs and values of inputs, outputs, and processes, including capital and operating costs) and performance (mass conversion, energy efficiency, and, generally speaking,...

267

Validation of Criticality Safety Calculations with SCALE 6.2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

SCALE 6.2 provides numerous updates in nuclear data, nuclear data processing, and computational tools utilized in the criticality safety calculational sequences relative to SCALE 6.1. A new 252-group ENDF/B-VII.0 multigroup neutron library, improved ENDF/B-VII.0 continuous energy data, as well as the previously deployed 238-group ENDF/B-VII.0 neutron library are included in SCALE 6.2 for criticality safety analysis. The performance of all three libraries for keff calculations is examined with a broad sampling of critical experiment models covering a range of fuels and moderators. Critical experiments from the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments (IHECSBE) that are available in the SCALE Verified, Archived Library of Inputs and Data (VALID) are used in this validation effort. Over 300 cases are used in the validation of KENO V.a, and a more limited set of approximately 50 configurations are used for KENO-VI validation. Additionally, some KENO V.a cases are converted to KENO-VI models so that an equivalent set of experiments can be used to validate both codes. For continuous-energy calculations, SCALE 6.2 provides improved performance relative to SCALE 6.1 in most areas with notable improvements in fuel pin lattice cases, particularly those with mixed oxide fuel. Multigroup calculations with the 252-group library also demonstrate improved performance for fuel lattices, uranium (high and intermediate enrichment) and plutonium metal experiments, and plutonium solution systems. Overall, SCALE 6.2 provides equivalent or smaller biases than SCALE 6.1, and the two versions of KENO provide similar results on the same suite of problems.

Marshall, William BJ J [ORNL] [ORNL; Wiarda, Dorothea [ORNL] [ORNL; Celik, Cihangir [ORNL] [ORNL; Rearden, Bradley T [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Stress intensity factors for small fatigue cracks in tubular joints  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Some simple fracture mechanics models are presented for estimating stress intensity factors for small surface fatigue cracks in welded tubular joints. Model predictions are compared with large-scale experimental results for the cases of in-plane and out-of-plane bending in multi-brace tubular nodes. It is demonstrated that reasonably accurate predictions of the stress intensity factor are possible using a modified flat plate solution if the effects of weld geometry, load shedding and crack shape are adequately accounted for.

Monahan, C.C. [Memorial Univ. of Newfoundland, St. Johns, Newfoundland (Canada). Centre for Cold Ocean Resources Engineering; Dover, W.D. [University College, London (United Kingdom)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

269

E-Print Network 3.0 - alginate scaffold including Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

created through a three step process which included: treatment... ; and exposure to a CaCl2 to crosslink the alginate sheets. Process variables included volume and concentra-...

270

E-Print Network 3.0 - actinides including cm Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: of waste actinides. Such damage can be studied by many techniques, including heavy-ionfast neutron... were presented and proposed, including; Fundamental studies...

271

Information transfer at multiple scales  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the study of complex systems a fundamental issue is the mapping of the networks of interaction between constituent subsystems of a complex system or between multiple complex systems. Such networks define the web of dependencies and patterns of continuous and dynamic coupling between the systems elements characterized by directed flow of information spanning multiple spatial and temporal scales. Here, we propose a wavelet-based extension of transfer entropy to measure directional transfer of information between coupled systems at multiple time scales and demonstrate its effectiveness by studying (a) three artificial maps, (b) physiological recordings, and (c) the time series recorded from a chaos-controlled simulated robot. Limitations and potential extensions of the proposed method are discussed.

Max Lungarella; Alex Pitti; Yasuo Kuniyoshi

2007-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

272

Common Data Set 2011-2012 J Column heading for CIP categories to include now reads: CIP 2010 Categories to Include  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Common Data Set 2011-2012 J Column heading for CIP categories to include now reads: CIP 2010 Categories to Include J CIP category 3 description now reads: Natural resources and conservation J CIP category 5 description now reads: Area, ethnic, and gender studies J CIP category 16 description now reads

273

Quantum Critical Scaling in Graphene  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We show that the emergent relativistic symmetry of electrons in graphene near its quantum critical point (QCP) implies a crucial importance of the Coulomb interaction. We derive scaling laws, valid near the QCP, that dictate the nontrivial magnetic and charge response of interacting graphene. Our analysis yields numerous predictions for how the Coulomb interaction will be manifested in experimental observables such as the diamagnetic response and electronic compressibility.

Daniel E. Sheehy and Jrg Schmalian

2007-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

274

New electric-field scaling law for swarm experiments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We generalize the familiar result that the drift velocity Vd and the product pD of the pressure and the diffusion coefficient depend on pressure p and electric field E only through the ratio Ep in swarm experiments. Our new scaling law applies to different systems to the extent that their elastic and inelastic cross sections are in the same ratio. We present model calculations of Vd for electrons in gaseous CH4-Ar and CH4-He4 mixtures predicting that the scaling is approximately obeyed if the CH4 concentrations are appropriately related. We also examine Vd and D? data for electrons in CH4 and SiH4 at low E and find that the scaling is approximately obeyed with a factor of 6. This suggests strongly that the low energy (?1 eV) effective elastic and inelastic electron cross sections for these molecules have approximately the same shape and differ by the same factor, which is approximately 6. Thus in particular we predict a Ramsauer minimum for SiH4, which has been suggested previously.

P. Kleban; L. Foreman; H. Ted Davis

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Economic Development from Gigawatt-Scale Wind Deployment in Wyoming (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation provides an overview of economic development in Wyoming from gigawatt-scale wind development and includes a discussion of project context, definitions and caveats, a deployment scenario, modeling inputs, results, and conclusions.

Lantz, E.

2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

276

Development and Application of Engineering-Scale Solar Water Heater System Assisted by Heat Pump  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An engineering-scale solar water heater system assisted by heat pump was developed based on ... . The subunits of modularized system include vacuum solar energy collectors, air source heat pump, ... Energy source...

Xiufeng Gao; Shiyu Feng; Wei Hu

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Experimental realisation of Shor's quantum factoring algorithm using qubit recycling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantum computational algorithms exploit quantum mechanics to solve problems exponentially faster than the best classical algorithms. Shor's quantum algorithm for fast number factoring is a key example and the prime motivator in the international effort to realise a quantum computer. However, due to the substantial resource requirement, to date, there have been only four small-scale demonstrations. Here we address this resource demand and demonstrate a scalable version of Shor's algorithm in which the n qubit control register is replaced by a single qubit that is recycled n times: the total number of qubits is one third of that required in the standard protocol. Encoding the work register in higher-dimensional states, we implement a two-photon compiled algorithm to factor N=21. The algorithmic output is distinguishable from noise, in contrast to previous demonstrations. These results point to larger-scale implementations of Shor's algorithm by harnessing scalable resource reductions applicable to all physical architectures.

Enrique Martin-Lopez; Anthony Laing; Thomas Lawson; Roberto Alvarez; Xiao-Qi Zhou; Jeremy L. O'Brien

2011-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

278

Stochastic Model Output Statistics for Bias Correcting and Downscaling Precipitation Including Extremes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Precipitation is highly variable in space and time; hence, rain gauge time series generally exhibit additional random small-scale variability compared to area averages. Therefore, differences between daily precipitation statistics simulated by ...

Geraldine Wong; Douglas Maraun; Mathieu Vrac; Martin Widmann; Jonathan M. Eden; Thomas Kent

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

From HERA to the Tevatron: A scaling law in hard diffraction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Results on hard diffraction from CDF are reviewed and compared with predictions based on the diffractive structure function of the proton measured in deep inelastic scattering at HERA. The predictions are generally larger than the measured rates by a factor of {approximately} 6, suggesting a breakdown of conventional factorization. Correct predictions are obtained by scaling the rapidity gap probability distribution of the diffractive structure function to the total integrated gap probability. The scaling of the gap probability is traced back to the pomeron flux renormalization hypothesis, which was introduced to unitarize the soft diffraction amplitude.

Goulianos, K.; CDF

1997-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

280

CLA Transfer Admission Decision Overview: Transfer students are considered for admission based on an individual review of their complete application, including the following  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on an individual review of their complete application, including the following key factors: grades, such as grade point average (GPA), grade trends, prerequisite course grades and completion patterns, high school Undergraduate Catalog by visiting www.catalogs.umn.edu/ug/cla/index.html. Transfer admission to CLA is highly

Amin, S. Massoud

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes scale factor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Composite materials and bodies including silicon carbide and titanium diboride and methods of forming same  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods of forming composite materials include coating particles of titanium dioxide with a substance including boron (e.g., boron carbide) and a substance including carbon, and reacting the titanium dioxide with the substance including boron and the substance including carbon to form titanium diboride. The methods may be used to form ceramic composite bodies and materials, such as, for example, a ceramic composite body or material including silicon carbide and titanium diboride. Such bodies and materials may be used as armor bodies and armor materials. Such methods may include forming a green body and sintering the green body to a desirable final density. Green bodies formed in accordance with such methods may include particles comprising titanium dioxide and a coating at least partially covering exterior surfaces thereof, the coating comprising a substance including boron (e.g., boron carbide) and a substance including carbon.

Lillo, Thomas M.; Chu, Henry S.; Harrison, William M.; Bailey, Derek

2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

282

Did you know heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States? Contributing factors include smoking, obesity, diabetes, high blood pressure,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the risk of stroke or heart attack. · Weight loss will improve heart health and heart function. · Reduced6:00 AM Wake up Did you know heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States history of heart disease. 7:30 AM Breakfast: Whole grain cereal, 1 medium orange and 1 cup fat-free milk

283

UV-B-Responsive Association of the Arabidopsis bZIP Transcription Factor ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL5 with Target Genes, Including Its Own Promoter  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...response to UV-B are unclear. In order to test whether UV-B specifically affects the...and Is Negatively Regulated by RUP2 To test whether the UV-B-enhanced association...We performed two lines of experiments to test our hypothesis that HY5 and/or its homolog...

Melanie Binkert; László Kozma-Bognár; Kata Terecskei; Lieven De Veylder; Ferenc Nagy; Roman Ulm

2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

284

UV-B-Responsive Association of the Arabidopsis bZIP Transcription Factor ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL5 with Target Genes, Including Its Own Promoter  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Plant Biology, University of Geneva, Sciences III, CH-1211 Geneva 4, Switzerland...Research Centre of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, H-6726 Szeged, Hungary c Department...Ghent, Belgium e School of Biological Sciences, University of Edinburgh, EH9 3JR Edinburgh...

Melanie Binkert; László Kozma-Bognár; Kata Terecskei; Lieven De Veylder; Ferenc Nagy; Roman Ulm

2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

285

Bounding Heavy Meson Form Factors Using Inclusive Sum Rules  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We utilize inclusive sum rules to construct both upper and lower bounds on the form factors for B to D, D*, rho, pi, omega, K and K* semi-leptonic and radiative decays. We include the leading nonperturbative 1/E corrections and point out cases when alpha_s corrections are equally important. We compute the alpha_s correction to the lower bound on the B to D* form factor f(w) at zero recoil, thereby constraining its normalization f(1) to within 6-8% of the upper bound. We show that the B to rho form factor a_+ is suppressed at small momentum transfer by either a factor of 1/E or alpha_s. These bounds can be used to rule out phenomenological models as well as to determine values for the CKM matrix elements once radiative corrections are included.

C. Glenn Boyd; Ira Z. Rothstein

1996-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

286

Preliminary Scaling Estimate for Select Small Scale Mixing Demonstration Tests  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Site double-shell tank (DST) system provides the staging location for waste that will be transferred to the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Specific WTP acceptance criteria for waste feed delivery describe the physical and chemical characteristics of the waste that must be met before the waste is transferred from the DSTs to the WTP. One of the more challenging requirements relates to the sampling and characterization of the undissolved solids (UDS) in a waste feed DST because the waste contains solid particles that settle and their concentration and relative proportion can change during the transfer of the waste in individual batches. A key uncertainty in the waste feed delivery system is the potential variation in UDS transferred in individual batches in comparison to an initial sample used for evaluating the acceptance criteria. To address this uncertainty, a number of small-scale mixing tests have been conducted as part of Washington River Protection Solutions Small Scale Mixing Demonstration (SSMD) project to determine the performance of the DST mixing and sampling systems.

Wells, Beric E.; Fort, James A.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Rector, David R.; Schonewill, Philip P.

2013-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

287

Geospatial Optimization of Siting Large-Scale Solar Projects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent policy and economic conditions have encouraged a renewed interest in developing large-scale solar projects in the U.S. Southwest. However, siting large-scale solar projects is complex. In addition to the quality of the solar resource, solar developers must take into consideration many environmental, social, and economic factors when evaluating a potential site. This report describes a proof-of-concept, Web-based Geographical Information Systems (GIS) tool that evaluates multiple user-defined criteria in an optimization algorithm to inform discussions and decisions regarding the locations of utility-scale solar projects. Existing siting recommendations for large-scale solar projects from governmental and non-governmental organizations are not consistent with each other, are often not transparent in methods, and do not take into consideration the differing priorities of stakeholders. The siting assistance GIS tool we have developed improves upon the existing siting guidelines by being user-driven, transparent, interactive, capable of incorporating multiple criteria, and flexible. This work provides the foundation for a dynamic siting assistance tool that can greatly facilitate siting decisions among multiple stakeholders.

Macknick, J.; Quinby, T.; Caulfield, E.; Gerritsen, M.; Diffendorfer, J.; Haines, S.

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Scaling properties of the gravitational clustering in the nonlinear regime  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The growth of density perturbations in an expanding universe in the non-linear regime is investigated. The underlying equations of motion are cast in a suggestive form, and motivate a conjecture that the scaled pair velocity, $h(a,x)\\equiv -[v/(\\dot{a}x)]$ depends on the expansion factor $a$ and comoving coordinate $x$ only through the density contrast $\\sigma(a,x)$. This leads to the result that the true, non-linear, density contrast $^{1/2}=\\sigma(a,x)$ is a universal function of the density contrast $\\sigma_L(a,l)$, computed in the linear theory and evaluated at a scale $l$ where $l=x(1+\\sigma^2)^{1/3}$. This universality is supported by existing numerical simulations with scale-invariant initial conditions having different power laws. We discuss a physically motivated ansatz $h(a,x)=h[\\sigma^2(a,x)]$ and use it to compute the non-linear density contrast at any given scale analytically. This provides a promising method for analysing the non-linear evolution of density perturbations in the universe and for interpreting numerical simulations.

R. Nityananda; T. Padmanabhan

1993-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

289

Full-scale studies of factors related to coliform regrowth in drinking water.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...analysis of assimilable organic carbon (AOC), coliforms, disinfectant residuals...disinfectant type and disinfectant level, AOC level, corrosion control, and operational...residuals. Free-chlorinated systems with AOC levels greater than 100 micrograms/liter...

M W LeChevallier; N J Welch; D B Smith

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Investigation of the scaling factor LVuw in the recovery of oil by water flooding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. 5 32. 6 3?. 6 32. 6 32. 6 3Z. 6 3?. 6 3Z. 6 3?. 6 3Z. 6 15. 0 16. 0 16. 0 15. 0 16. 0 16. 0 15, 0 16. 0 16. 0 46. 5 1. 987 5. 067 Zo. 268 1. 978 5. 067 20. 268 1. 978 5. 067 20. Z68 1. 978 5. D67 20. 268 1, 978 5. 067... Zo. Z68 1. 978 5. 067 20. 268 1. 978 5. 067 20. 268 i. 978 58 16? 676 60 172 683 60 172 683 60 172 683 ZB 84. 8 340 28 84. 8 340 28 84. 8 340 86 17. 25 48. 42 Z13. 36 20. 63 52. 20 214. 51 18. 63 53. 7Z 205. 30...

McWilliams, Morris Hampton

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

291

Factors Influencing Water Heating Energy Use and Peak Demand in a Large Scale Residential Monitoring Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A load research project by the Florida Power Corporation (FPC) is monitoring 200 residences in Central Florida, collecting detailed end-use load data. The monitoring is being performed to better estimate the impact of FPC's load control program...

Bouchelle, M. P.; Parker, D. S.; Anello, M. T.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Independent surrogate variable analysis to deconvolve confounding factors in large-scale microarray profiling studies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Batzoglou, 2003; Liebermeister, 2002; Martoglio et al., 2002; Saidi et al., 2004; Teschendorff et al., 2007; Zhang et al...bivalent chromatin domains. Genome Res. (2010) 20:434-439. Saidi S.A. , et al. Independent component analysis of microarray......

Andrew E. Teschendorff; Joanna Zhuang; Martin Widschwendter

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Scaling laws for ignition at the National Ignition Facility from first principles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have developed an analytical physics model from fundamental physics principles and used the reduced one-dimensional model to derive a thermonuclear ignition criterion and implosion energy scaling laws applicable to inertial confinement fusion capsules. The scaling laws relate the fuel pressure and the minimum implosion energy required for ignition to the peak implosion velocity and the equation of state of the pusher and the hot fuel. When a specific low-entropy adiabat path is used for the cold fuel, our scaling laws recover the ignition threshold factor dependence on the implosion velocity, but when a high-entropy adiabat path is chosen, the model agrees with recent measurements.

Baolian Cheng; Thomas J. T. Kwan; Yi-Ming Wang; Steven H. Batha

2013-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

294

Spatial Scaling for the Numerical Approximation of Problems on Unbounded Domains  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: : : : : : : 41 5.1 L2 and H1 norms of the error : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 71 6.1 Number of iterations and an estimated condition number for the in nity-norm scaling (infty) and the componentwise scaling (c/w) for three di erent scaling factors..., in equations (1.1) and (1.2) the unknown u is a scalar function of the position x, while u in equation (1.3) is a vector valued function. We shall denote the components of a vector or a vector valued function w by wi, i = 1:::d. In most of the dissertation, we...

Trenev, Dimitar Vasilev

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

295

Drift-Scale Radionuclide Transport  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this model report is to document the drift scale radionuclide transport model, taking into account the effects of emplacement drifts on flow and transport in the vicinity of the drift, which are not captured in the mountain-scale unsaturated zone (UZ) flow and transport models ''UZ Flow Models and Submodels'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169861]), ''Radionuclide Transport Models Under Ambient Conditions'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 164500]), and ''Particle Tracking Model and Abstraction of Transport Process'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170041]). The drift scale radionuclide transport model is intended to be used as an alternative model for comparison with the engineered barrier system (EBS) radionuclide transport model ''EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169868]). For that purpose, two alternative models have been developed for drift-scale radionuclide transport. One of the alternative models is a dual continuum flow and transport model called the drift shadow model. The effects of variations in the flow field and fracture-matrix interaction in the vicinity of a waste emplacement drift are investigated through sensitivity studies using the drift shadow model (Houseworth et al. 2003 [DIRS 164394]). In this model, the flow is significantly perturbed (reduced) beneath the waste emplacement drifts. However, comparisons of transport in this perturbed flow field with transport in an unperturbed flow field show similar results if the transport is initiated in the rock matrix. This has led to a second alternative model, called the fracture-matrix partitioning model, that focuses on the partitioning of radionuclide transport between the fractures and matrix upon exiting the waste emplacement drift. The fracture-matrix partitioning model computes the partitioning, between fractures and matrix, of diffusive radionuclide transport from the invert (for drifts without seepage) into the rock water. The invert is the structure constructed in a drift to provide the floor of the drift. The reason for introducing the fracture-matrix partitioning model is to broaden the conceptual model for flow beneath waste emplacement drifts in a way that does not rely on the specific flow behavior predicted by a dual continuum model and to ensure that radionuclide transport is not underestimated. The fracture-matrix partitioning model provides an alternative method of computing the partitioning of radionuclide releases from drifts without seepage into rock fractures and rock matrix. Drifts without seepage are much more likely to have a significant fraction of radionuclide releases into the rock matrix, and therefore warrant additional attention in terms of the partitioning model used for TSPA.

J. Houseworth

2004-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

296

New Scalings in Nuclear Fragmentation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fragment partitions of fragmenting hot nuclei produced in central and semiperipheral collisions have been compared in the excitation energy region 4-10 MeV per nucleon where radial collective expansion takes place. It is shown that, for a given total excitation energy per nucleon, the amount of radial collective energy fixes the mean fragment multiplicity. It is also shown that, at a given total excitation energy per nucleon, the different properties of fragment partitions are completely determined by the reduced fragment multiplicity (i.e., normalized to the source size). Freeze-out volumes seem to play a role in the scalings observed.

Bonnet, E. [GANIL (DSM-CEA/CNRS/IN2P3), F-14076 Caen cedex (France); Institut de Physique Nucleaire, CNRS/IN2P3, Universite Paris-Sud 11, F-91406 Orsay cedex (France); Borderie, B.; Rivet, M. F. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, CNRS/IN2P3, Universite Paris-Sud 11, F-91406 Orsay cedex (France); Le Neindre, N. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, CNRS/IN2P3, Universite Paris-Sud 11, F-91406 Orsay cedex (France); LPC, CNRS/IN2P3, Ensicaen, Universite de Caen, F-14050 Caen cedex (France); Raduta, Ad. R. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, CNRS/IN2P3, Universite Paris-Sud 11, F-91406 Orsay cedex (France); National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, RO-76900 Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Bougault, R. [LPC, CNRS/IN2P3, Ensicaen, Universite de Caen, F-14050 Caen cedex (France); Chbihi, A.; Frankland, J. D.; Wieleczko, J. P. [GANIL (DSM-CEA/CNRS/IN2P3), F-14076 Caen cedex (France); Galichet, E. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, CNRS/IN2P3, Universite Paris-Sud 11, F-91406 Orsay cedex (France); Conservatoire National des Arts et Metiers, F-75141 Paris cedex 03 (France); Gagnon-Moisan, F. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, CNRS/IN2P3, Universite Paris-Sud 11, F-91406 Orsay cedex (France); Laboratoire de Physique Nucleaire, Departement de Physique, de Genie Physique et d'Optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, G1K 7P4 (Canada); Guinet, D.; Lautesse, P. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, CNRS/IN2P3, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, F-69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Lukasik, J. [Institute of Nuclear Physics IFJ-PAN, PL-31342 Krakow (Poland); Marini, P. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, CNRS/IN2P3, Universite Paris-Sud 11, F-91406 Orsay cedex (France); GANIL (DSM-CEA/CNRS/IN2P3), F-14076 Caen cedex (France); Parlog, M. [LPC, CNRS/IN2P3, Ensicaen, Universite de Caen, F-14050 Caen cedex (France); National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, RO-76900 Bucharest-Magurele (Romania)

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Large scale electronic structure calculations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We formulate the Kohn-Sham density functional theory in terms of nonorthogonal, localized orbitals. Within this formulation we introduce a simple and effective method to localize the orbitals. Our approach leads to a plane-wave-based algorithm for total energy calculations whose computational complexity is of O(N), where N is the number of electrons. This opens the way to calculations of unprecedented scale. Our method appears to be of general character and applicable in other contexts such as quantum chemical or projected quantum Monte Carlo calculations.

Giulia Galli and Michele Parrinello

1992-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

298

Land and Water Use, CO2 Emissions, and Worker Radiological Exposure Factors for the Nuclear Fuel Cycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energys Fuel Cycle Technologies program is preparing to evaluate several proposed nuclear fuel cycle options to help guide and prioritize Fuel Cycle Technology research and development. Metrics are being developed to assess performance against nine evaluation criteria that will be used to assess relevant impacts resulting from all phases of the fuel cycle. This report focuses on four specific environmental metrics. land use water use CO2 emissions radiological Dose to workers Impacts associated with the processes in the front-end of the nuclear fuel cycle, mining through enrichment and deconversion of DUF6 are summarized from FCRD-FCO-2012-000124, Revision 1. Impact estimates are developed within this report for the remaining phases of the nuclear fuel cycle. These phases include fuel fabrication, reactor construction and operations, fuel reprocessing, and storage, transport, and disposal of associated used fuel and radioactive wastes. Impact estimates for each of the phases of the nuclear fuel cycle are given as impact factors normalized per unit process throughput or output. These impact factors can then be re-scaled against the appropriate mass flows to provide estimates for a wide range of potential fuel cycles. A companion report, FCRD-FCO-2013-000213, applies the impact factors to estimate and provide a comparative evaluation of 40 fuel cycles under consideration relative to these four environmental metrics.

Brett W Carlsen; Brent W Dixon; Urairisa Pathanapirom; Eric Schneider; Bethany L. Smith; Timothy M. AUlt; Allen G. Croff; Steven L. Krahn

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Modeling Sustainable Agricultural Residue Removal at the Subfield Scale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study developed a computational strategy that utilizes data inputs from multiple spatial scales to investigate how variability within individual fields can impact sustainable residue removal for bioenergy production. Sustainable use of agricultural residues for bioenergy production requires consideration of the important role that residues play in limiting soil erosion and maintaining soil C, health, and productivity. Increased availability of subfield-scale data sets such as grain yield data, high-fidelity digital elevation models, and soil characteristic data provides an opportunity to investigate the impacts of subfield-scale variability on sustainable agricultural residue removal. Using three representative fields in Iowa, this study contrasted the results of current NRCS conservation management planning analysis with subfield-scale analysis for rake-and-bale removal of agricultural residue. The results of the comparison show that the field-average assumptions used in NRCS conservation management planning may lead to unsustainable residue removal decisions for significant portions of some fields. This highlights the need for additional research on subfield-scale sustainable agricultural residue removal including the development of real-time variable removal technologies for agricultural residue.

Muth, D.J.; McCorkle, D.S.; Koch, J.B.; Bryden, K.M.

2012-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

300

Factors that Determine Academic Versus Private Practice Career Interest in Radiation Oncology Residents in the United States: Results of a Nationwide Survey  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To determine what factors US radiation oncology residents consider when choosing academic or nonacademic careers. Methods and Materials: A 20-question online survey was developed and sent to all US radiation oncology residents to assess factors that influence their career interest. Residents were asked to rate their interest in academics (A) versus private practice (PP) on a 0 (strong interest in A) to 100 (strong interest in PP) scale. Responses were classified as A (0-30), undecided (40-60), and PP (70-100). Residents were also asked to rank 10 factors that most strongly influenced their career interest. Results: Three hundred thirty-one responses were collected, of which 264 were complete and form the basis for this analysis. Factors that correlated with interest in A included having a PhD (P=.018), postgraduate year level (P=.0006), research elective time (P=.0003), obtaining grant funding during residency (P=.012), and number of publications before residency (P=.0001), but not number of abstracts accepted in the past year (P=.65) or publications during residency (P=.67). The 3 most influential factors for residents interested in A were: (1) baseline interest before residency; (2) academic role models; and (3) research opportunities during residency. The 3 most influential factors for residents interested in PP were: (1) baseline interest before residency; (2) academic role models; and (3) academic pressure and obligations. Conclusions: Interest in A correlated with postgraduate year level, degree, and research time during residency. Publications before but not during residency correlated with academic interest, and baseline interest was the most influential factor. These data can be used by residency program directors to better understand what influences residents' career interest.

Chang, Daniel T., E-mail: dtchang@stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Shaffer, Jenny L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Haffty, Bruce G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Wilson, Lynn D. [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States)

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

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301

SITE-SCALE SATURATED ZONE TRANSPORT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work provides a site-scale transport model for calculating radionuclide transport in the saturated zone (SZ) at Yucca Mountain, for use in the abstractions model in support of ''Total System Performance Assessment for License Application'' (TSPA-LA). The purpose of this model report is to provide documentation for the components of the site-scale SZ transport model in accordance with administrative procedure AP-SIII.10Q, Models. The initial documentation of this model report was conducted under the ''Technical Work Plan For: Saturated Zone Flow and Transport Modeling and Testing'' (BSC 2003 [DIRS 163965]). The model report has been revised in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan For: Natural System--Saturated Zone Analysis and Model Report Integration'', Section 2.1.1.4 (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171421]) to incorporate Regulatory Integration Team comments. All activities listed in the technical work plan that are appropriate to the transport model are documented in this report and are described in Section 2.1.1.4 (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171421]). This report documents: (1) the advection-dispersion transport model including matrix diffusion (Sections 6.3 and 6.4); (2) a description and validation of the transport model (Sections 6.3 and 7); (3) the numerical methods for simulating radionuclide transport (Section 6.4); (4) the parameters (sorption coefficient, Kd ) and their uncertainty distributions used for modeling radionuclide sorption (Appendices A and C); (5) the parameters used for modeling colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport (Table 4-1, Section 6.4.2.6, and Appendix B); and (6) alternative conceptual models and their dispositions (Section 6.6). The intended use of this model is to simulate transport in saturated fractured porous rock (double porosity) and alluvium. The particle-tracking method of simulating radionuclide transport is incorporated in the finite-volume heat and mass transfer numerical analysis (FEHM) computer code, (FEHM V2.20, STN: 10086-2.20-00) (LANL 2003 [DIRS 161725]) and is described in Section 6.4 of this report. FEHM is a three-dimensional (3-D), finite-volume, finite-element, heat and mass flow-and-transport code. This report documents the features and capabilities of the site-scale transport model for calculating radionuclide transport in the SZ at Yucca Mountain in support of the TSPA-LA. Correlative flow-model calculations using FEHM are carried out and documented in the model report ''Saturated Zone Site-Scale Flow Model'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170037]). The velocity fields are calculated by the flow model independent of the transport processes and supplied as a part of the output package from the flow model, which is then used as inputs to the transport model. Several SZ analysis model reports provide information and data needed as feed-ins for this report, and this report in turn provides technical product outputs that feed into other SZ reports. The details of inputs to the site-scale transport model are provided in Section 4.

S. KELLER

2004-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

302

Utility Scale Solar Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Scale Solar Inc Place: Palo Alto, California Zip: 94301 Product: California-based PV tracker maker. References: Utility Scale Solar Inc1 This article is a stub. You can help...

303

NUTRITIVE VALUE OF POLLOCK FISH SCALES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

indicated that pollock fish scale protein is as well digested but about 30 percent less assimilated than for growth, the biological values for maintenance, and the digestibilities of pollock fish scale possibilities of wool, an

304

"Thermodynamics", Temporal Correlations and Scaling Laws  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......research-article Articles Thermodynamics, Temporal Correlations and Scaling Laws Hirokazu Fujisaka * Department...equilibrium statistical-thermodynamics, and the temporal correlation...static and dynamic scaling laws of relevant functions characteristic......

Hirokazu Fujisaka

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Scale-space research at Utrecht University  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper describes the contributions to scale-space research by Utrecht University over the period 19891995. Starting with work on the fundamental basis of scale-space from causality and first principles, t...

Bart M. ter Haar Romeny

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Scale-free information systems networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Many real, complex networks have been shown to be scale-free. Scale-free in networks mean that their degree distribution is independent of the network size, have short path lengths and are highly clustered. We identify the ...

Ang, Wee Horng

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Scaling Behaviors of Global Sea Surface Temperature  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Temporal scaling properties of the monthly sea surface temperature anomaly (SSTA) in global ocean basins are examined by the power spectrum and detrended fluctuation analysis methods in this paper. Analysis results show that scaling behaviors of ...

Ming Luo; Yee Leung; Yu Zhou; Wei Zhang

308

Large scale inhomogeneity and local dynamical friction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the effect of a density gradient on Chandrasekhar's dynamical friction formula based on the method of 2-body encounters in the local approximation. We apply these generalizations to the orbit evolution of satellite galaxies in Dark Matter haloes. We find from the analysis that the main influence occurs through a position-dependent maximum impact parameter in the Coulomb logarithm, which is determined by the local scale-length of the density distribution. We also show that for eccentric orbits the explicit dependence of the Coulomb logarithm on position yields significant differences for the standard homogeneous force. Including the velocity dependence of the Coulomb logarithm yields ambigous results. The orbital fits in the first few periods are further improved, but the deviations at later times are much larger. The additional force induced by the density gradient, the inhomogeneous force, is not antiparallel to the satellite motion and can exceed 10% of the homogeneous friction force in magnitude. However, due to the symmetry properties of the inhomogeneous force, there is a deformation and no secular effect on the orbit at the first order. Therefore the inhomogeneous force can be safely neglected for the orbital evolution of satellite galaxies. For the homogeneous force we compare numerical N-body calculations with semi-analytical orbits to determine quantitatively the accuracy of the generalized formulae of the Coulomb logarithm in the Chandresekhar approach. With the local scale-length as the maximum impact parameter we find a significant improvement of the orbital fits and a better interpretation of the quantitative value of the Coulomb logarithm.

A. Just; J. Penarrubia

2004-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

309

Reducing Power Factor Cost | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Power Factor Cost Reducing Power Factor Cost Low power factor is expensive and inefficient. Many utility companies charge an additional fee if your power factor is less than 0.95....

310

Goethite Bench-scale and Large-scale Preparation Tests  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is the keystone for cleanup of high-level radioactive waste from our nation's nuclear defense program. The WTP will process high-level waste from the Hanford tanks and produce immobilized high-level waste glass for disposal at a national repository, low activity waste (LAW) glass, and liquid effluent from the vitrification off-gas scrubbers. The liquid effluent will be stabilized into a secondary waste form (e.g. grout-like material) and disposed on the Hanford site in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) along with the low-activity waste glass. The major long-term environmental impact at Hanford results from technetium that volatilizes from the WTP melters and finally resides in the secondary waste. Laboratory studies have indicated that pertechnetate ({sup 99}TcO{sub 4}{sup -}) can be reduced and captured into a solid solution of {alpha}-FeOOH, goethite (Um 2010). Goethite is a stable mineral and can significantly retard the release of technetium to the environment from the IDF. The laboratory studies were conducted using reaction times of many days, which is typical of environmental subsurface reactions that were the genesis of this new process. This study was the first step in considering adaptation of the slow laboratory steps to a larger-scale and faster process that could be conducted either within the WTP or within the effluent treatment facility (ETF). Two levels of scale-up tests were conducted (25x and 400x). The largest scale-up produced slurries of Fe-rich precipitates that contained rhenium as a nonradioactive surrogate for {sup 99}Tc. The slurries were used in melter tests at Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) to determine whether captured rhenium was less volatile in the vitrification process than rhenium in an unmodified feed. A critical step in the technetium immobilization process is to chemically reduce Tc(VII) in the pertechnetate (TcO{sub 4}{sup -}) to Tc(Iv)by reaction with the ferrous ion, Fe{sup 2+}-Fe{sup 2+} is oxidized to Fe{sup 3+} - in the presence of goethite seed particles. Rhenium does not mimic that process; it is not a strong enough reducing agent to duplicate the TcO{sub 4}{sup -}/Fe{sup 2+} redox reactions. Laboratory tests conducted in parallel with these scaled tests identified modifications to the liquid chemistry necessary to reduce ReO{sub 4}{sup -} and capture rhenium in the solids at levels similar to those achieved by Um (2010) for inclusion of Tc into goethite. By implementing these changes, Re was incorporated into Fe-rich solids for testing at VSL. The changes also changed the phase of iron that was in the slurry product: rather than forming goethite ({alpha}-FeOOH), the process produced magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}). Magnetite was considered by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and VSL to probably be a better product to improve Re retention in the melter because it decomposes at a higher temperature than goethite (1538 C vs. 136 C). The feasibility tests at VSL were conducted using Re-rich magnetite. The tests did not indicate an improved retention of Re in the glass during vitrification, but they did indicate an improved melting rate (+60%), which could have significant impact on HLW processing. It is still to be shown whether the Re is a solid solution in the magnetite as {sup 99}Tc was determined to be in goethite.

Josephson, Gary B.; Westsik, Joseph H.

2011-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

311

NETL: Bench-Scale Process for Low-Cost Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Capture Using a  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Bench-Scale Process for Low-Cost Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Capture Using a Phase-Changing Absorbent Bench-Scale Process for Low-Cost Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Capture Using a Phase-Changing Absorbent Project No.: DE-FE0013687 GE global is constructing and operating a continuous, bench-scale CO2 capture system that employs a phase-changing silicone solvent . Experimental data obtained at the laboratory scale in a previous ARPA-E funded project, including mass transfer and kinetic information, is being used to determine process scalability and perform a techno-economic assessment of the commercial scale process. The manufacturability of the solvent is being examined to obtain the material needed for bench-scale testing. Data obtained from the bench-scale system will include mass transfer parameters, kinetic parameters, heat transfer parameters, solvent stability, effects of flue gas contaminants, and recommended operating conditions. Other data such as absorption/desorption isotherms and solvent regeneration energy will be determined in laboratory testing. The solvent manufacturing cost, the bench-scale engineering data, and the laboratory property data will be used to complete the techno-economic assessment and to develop a scale-up strategy for commercialization.

312

Scaling in high-temperature superconductors by  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Hartree approximation is used to study the interplay of two kinds of scaling which arise in high-temperature

Ian D Lawrie

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Promoting Sustainability on a Global Scale  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Promoting Sustainability on a Global Scale Martina Otto, Head of the Policy Unit, United Nations Environment Programme

314

Sapphire Energy, Inc. Demonstration-Scale Project  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Sapphire Energy, Inc. is scaling up an operational facility to demonstrate conversion of algal carbon dioxide to green crude oil.

315

Nuclear Reactions & Scaling Arguments 11 October 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nuclear Reactions & Scaling Arguments 11 October 2011 Goals · Review nuclear reaction rates · Practice using scaling arguments Nuclear Reactions 1. Consider the simple reaction A k1 ---- B k2 ---- C rate for something like p + p D scales like n2 p. Think in microscopic terms. #12;nuclear reactions

Militzer, Burkhard

316

Nuclear Reactions & Scaling Arguments 11 October 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nuclear Reactions & Scaling Arguments 11 October 2011 Goals · Review nuclear reaction rates · Practice using scaling arguments Nuclear Reactions 1. Consider the simple reaction A k1 ---- B k2 ---- C = 3. #12;nuclear reactions & scaling arguments 2 3. Frequently, we approximate nuclear reaction rates

Militzer, Burkhard

317

Conundrum of the Large Scale Streaming  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The etiology of the large scale peculiar velocity (large scale streaming motion) of clusters would increasingly seem more tenuous, within the context of the gravitational instability hypothesis. Are there any alternative testable models possibly accounting for such large scale streaming of clusters?

T. M. Malm

1999-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

318

Patient, Hospital, and Neighborhood Factors Associated with Treatment of Early-Stage Breast Cancer among Asian American Women in California  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...2012 research-article Research Articles Patient, Hospital, and Neighborhood Factors Associated with Treatment...Americans ethnicities, and additional factors including hospital [smaller hospital size, not National Cancer Institute cancer center...

Scarlett Lin Gomez; David J. Press; Daphne Lichtensztajn; Theresa H.M. Keegan; Sarah J. Shema; Gem M. Le; Allison W. Kurian

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

SBIR/STTR FY15 Release 1 Awards Announced-Includes Fuel Cell...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

FY15 Release 1 Awards Announced-Includes Fuel Cell Catalyst and Hydrogen Contamination Detection R&D SBIRSTTR FY15 Release 1 Awards Announced-Includes Fuel Cell Catalyst and...

320

SBIR/STTR Release 2 Topics Announced-Includes Hydrogen and Fuel...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Release 2 Topics Announced-Includes Hydrogen and Fuel Cells SBIRSTTR Release 2 Topics Announced-Includes Hydrogen and Fuel Cells October 31, 2014 - 12:05pm Addthis The 2015 Small...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes scale factor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

E-Print Network 3.0 - anti-platelet therapy including Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

management including exercise, cognitive behavioral therapy 3. ... Source: Messersmith, Phillip B.- Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University...

322

Mountain-Scale Coupled Processes (TH/THC/THM)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this Model Report is to document the development of the Mountain-Scale Thermal-Hydrological (TH), Thermal-Hydrological-Chemical (THC), and Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical (THM) Models and evaluate the effects of coupled TH/THC/THM processes on mountain-scale UZ flow at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. This Model Report was planned in ''Technical Work Plan (TWP) for: Performance Assessment Unsaturated Zone'' (BSC 2002 [160819], Section 1.12.7), and was developed in accordance with AP-SIII.10Q, Models. In this Model Report, any reference to ''repository'' means the nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, and any reference to ''drifts'' means the emplacement drifts at the repository horizon. This Model Report provides the necessary framework to test conceptual hypotheses for analyzing mountain-scale hydrological/chemical/mechanical changes and predict flow behavior in response to heat release by radioactive decay from the nuclear waste repository at the Yucca Mountain site. The mountain-scale coupled TH/THC/THM processes models numerically simulate the impact of nuclear waste heat release on the natural hydrogeological system, including a representation of heat-driven processes occurring in the far field. The TH simulations provide predictions for thermally affected liquid saturation, gas- and liquid-phase fluxes, and water and rock temperature (together called the flow fields). The main focus of the TH Model is to predict the changes in water flux driven by evaporation/condensation processes, and drainage between drifts. The TH Model captures mountain-scale three dimensional (3-D) flow effects, including lateral diversion at the PTn/TSw interface and mountain-scale flow patterns. The Mountain-Scale THC Model evaluates TH effects on water and gas chemistry, mineral dissolution/precipitation, and the resulting impact to UZ hydrological properties, flow and transport. The THM Model addresses changes in permeability due to mechanical and thermal disturbances in stratigraphic units above and below the repository host rock. The Mountain-Scale THM Model focuses on evaluating the changes in 3-D UZ flow fields arising out of thermal stress and rock deformation during and after the thermal periods.

P. Dixon

2004-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

323

Electrical and Production Load Factors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Texas Abstract Load factors and operating hours of small and medium-sized industrial plants are analyzed to classify shift-work patterns and develop energy conservation diagnostic tools. This paper discusses two types of electric load factors... for each shift classification within major industry groups. The load factor based on billing hours (ELF) increases with operating hours from about 0.4 for a nominal one shift operation, to about 0.7 for around-the-clock operation. On the other hand...

Sen, T.; Heffington, W. M.

324

Photovoltaic Device Including A Boron Doping Profile In An I-Type Layer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A photovoltaic cell for use in a single junction or multijunction photovoltaic device, which includes a p-type layer of a semiconductor compound including silicon, an i-type layer of an amorphous semiconductor compound including silicon, and an n-type layer of a semiconductor compound including silicon formed on the i-type layer. The i-type layer including an undoped first sublayer formed on the p-type layer, and a boron-doped second sublayer formed on the first sublayer.

Yang, Liyou (Lawrenceville, NJ)

1993-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

325

DTM: Dynamic Tone Mapping for Backlight Scaling University of Southern California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a cascaded energy attenuator to the battery (cf. Figure 1.) Battery energy is lost in the DC conversion for pixel transformation of the displayed image to increase the potential energy saving of the backlight: Algorithms, Human Factors, Management Keywords: LCDs, Backlight-scaling, Power Management 1. Introduction

Pedram, Massoud

326

Advanced Robotics Journal, Vol. X, No. Y, 2002 (to appear) SCALED TELEOPERATION SYSTEM FOR NANO SCALE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Advanced Robotics Journal, Vol. X, No. Y, 2002 (to appear) SCALED TELEOPERATION SYSTEM FOR NANO for teleoperated nano scale object interaction and manipulation. Design specifications for a bilateral scaled system, initial experiments are realized for interacting with nano scale surfaces. It is shown that fine

Sitti, Metin

327

Solar heating and hot water system installed at the Senior Citizen Center, Huntsville, Alabama. [Includes engineering drawings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Information is provided on the solar energy system installed at the Huntsville Senior Citizen Center. The solar space heating and hot water facility and the project involved in its construction are described in considerable detail and detailed drawings of the complete system and discussions of the planning, the hardware, recommendations, and other pertinent information are included. The facility was designed to provide 85 percent of the hot water and 85 percent of the space heating requirements. Two important factors concerning this project for commercial demonstration are the successful use of silicon oil as a heat transfer fluid and the architecturally aesthetic impact of a large solar energy system as a visual centerpoint. There is no overheat or freeze protection due to the characteristics of the silicon oil and the design of the system. Construction proceeded on schedule with no cost overruns. It is designed to be relatively free of scheduled maintenance, and has experienced practically no problems.

Not Available

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Heart of Darkness: The Significance of the Zeptobarn Scale for Neutralino Direct Detection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The direct detection of dark matter through its elastic scattering off nucleons is among the most promising methods for establishing the particle identity of dark matter. The current bound on the spin-independent scattering cross section is sigma^SI 1 TeV, effectively decoupling squarks and sleptons from neutralino dark matter phenomenology. In this case, we find characteristic cross sections in the narrow range 1 zb 70 GeV. As sfermion masses are lowered to near their experimental limit mtilde ~ 400 GeV, the upper and lower limits of this range are extended, but only by factors of around two, and the lower limit is not significantly altered by relaxing many particle physics assumptions, varying the strange quark content of the nucleon, including the effects of galactic small-scale structure, or assuming other components of dark matter. Experiments are therefore rapidly entering the heart of dark matter-favored supersymmetry parameter space. If no signal is seen, supersym metric models must contain some lev...

Feng, Jonathan L

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Design and validation of laboratory-scale simulations for selecting tribomaterials and surface treatments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Engineering approaches to solving tribology problems commonly involve friction, lubrication, or wear testing, either in the field or in a laboratory setting. Since wear and friction are properties of the materials in the larger context of the tribosystem, the selection of appropriate laboratory tribotesting procedures becomes critically important. Laboratory simulations must exhibit certain key characteristics of the application in order for the test results to be relevant, but they may not have to mimic all operating conditions. The current paper illustrates a step-by-step method to develop laboratory-scale friction and wear simulations based on a tribosystem analysis. Quantitative or qualitative metrics are established and used to validate the effectiveness of the tribosimulation. Sometimes standardized test methods can be used, but frequently a new type of test method or procedure must be developed. There are four factors to be addressed in designing effective simulations: (1) contact macrogeometry and the characteristics of relative motion, (2) pressure--velocity relationships, (3) thermal and chemical environment (including type of lubrication), and (4) the role of third-bodies. In addition, there are two typical choices of testing philosophy: (1) the worst-case scenario and, (2) the nominal-operations scenario. Examples of the development and use of simulative friction and wear tests are used to illustrate major points.

Blau, P.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Metals and Ceramics Div.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Economic and Policy Factors Affecting Energy Efficiency Improvements in the U. S. Paper Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. These national policies include issues associated with cogeneration, licensing and relicensing of private small scale hydroelectric projects, acid rain, and federal funding of energy technology research and development. The paper industry's actions...

Freund, S. H.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Industrial Power Factor Analysis Guidebook.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Power factor is a way of measuring the percentage of reactive power in an electrical system. Reactive power represents wasted energy--electricity that does no useful work because the electrical current is out of phase with the voltage. Reactive power is used by inductive loads (such as, motors, transformers, fluorescent lights, arc welders and induction furnaces) to sustain their magnetic fields. Electric systems with many motors exhibit low power factors, increased conductor and transformer losses, and lower voltages. Utilities must supply both active and reactive power and compensate for these losses. Power factor can be improved by the addition of shunt capacitors. Capacitors act in opposition to inductive loads, thereby minimizing the reactive power required to serve them. In raising the power factor, shunt capacitors release energy to the system, reduce system losses, and ultimately decrease power costs. Improving system power factor can reduce reactive and active power losses for both industry and utilities through the addition of shunt capacitors. This Guide Book gives electric utility technical staff, industrial end-users, consultants and BPA employees a step-by-step method for evaluating the cost effectiveness of installing power factor correction capacitors in an industrial plant.

Electrotek Concepts.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

On the Connectivity Analysis over Large-Scale Hybrid Wireless Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are hybrid networks which include infrastructure nodes in multi-hop wireless networks, such as sinks nodes. hybrid networks which include infrastructure nodes in multi- hop wireless networks, such as sinksOn the Connectivity Analysis over Large-Scale Hybrid Wireless Networks Chi Yi and Wenye Wang

Wang, Wenye

333

Determinations of the QCD strong coupling ?s and the scale ?QCD  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We review determinations, via experiment, of the strong coupling of QCD, ?s. In almost every case we use the results of perturbative QCD to make the necessary extraction from data. These include scaling violations of deep inelastic scattering, e+e- annihilation experiments (including quarkonium decays) and lepton pair production. Finally estimates for ? from lattice calculations are listed.

D.W. Duke; R.G. Roberts

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Hoopa Valley Small Scale Hydroelectric Feasibility Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study considered assessing the feasibility of developing small scale hydro-electric power from seven major tributaries within the Hoopa Valley Indian Reservation of Northern California (http://www.hoopa-nsn.gov/). This study pursued the assessment of seven major tributaries of the Reservation that flow into the Trinity River. The feasibility of hydropower on the Hoopa Valley Indian Reservation has real potential for development and many alternative options for project locations, designs, operations and financing. In order to realize this opportunity further will require at least 2-3 years of intense data collection focusing on stream flow measurements at multiple locations in order to quantify real power potential. This also includes on the ground stream gradient surveys, road access planning and grid connectivity to PG&E for sale of electricity. Imperative to this effort is the need for negotiations between the Hoopa Tribal Council and PG&E to take place in order to finalize the power rate the Tribe will receive through any wholesale agreement that utilizes the alternative energy generated on the Reservation.

Curtis Miller

2009-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

335

A multi-scale iterative approach for finite element modeling of thermal contact resistance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Surface topography has long been considered a key factor in the performance of many contact applications including thermal contact resistance. However, essentially all analytical and numerical models of thermal contact ...

Thompson, Mary Kathryn, 1980-

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

NREL/Ventyx Utility Rates: What is included? | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NREL/Ventyx Utility Rates: What is included? NREL/Ventyx Utility Rates: What is included? Home > Groups > Utility Rate Does anyone know what pieces of electric rates are included in the NREL/Ventyx database of rates by utility, i.e. is it supply only or does the file include supply, transmission & distribution costs? Thanks! Submitted by Vbugnion on 27 February, 2013 - 16:25 1 answer Points: 1 Hi Vbugnion, Just to clarify, you're not asking about the OpenEI utility rates, but rather the Ventyx rates found here: http://developer.nrel.gov/doc/api/georeserv/service/utility_rates If so, then the Ventyx rates do include all bundled rates (which includes supply, trans, and distr costs). However, there's a small but non-zero possibility that a few energy-only or delivery-only rates may not have been cleaned

337

DOE Order 440. 1 B: Worker Protection Program for DOE (Including NNSA)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

0. 1 B: Worker Protection Program for DOE (Including 0. 1 B: Worker Protection Program for DOE (Including NNSA) Federal Employees DOE Order 440. 1 B: Worker Protection Program for DOE (Including NNSA) Federal Employees Stakeholders: DOE and NNSA employees Scope: DOE Order 440.1 B establishes the framework for an effective worker protection program that will reduce or prevent injuries, illnesses, and accidental losses by providing Department of Energy, including National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Federal workers with a safe and healthful workplace. Summary: Among the requirements of DOE Order 440.1 B, the Department must provide its employees, including NNSA, a number of protections relating to whistle blowing guidelines. The relevant section of requirements includes: 4. REQUIREMENTS. DOE elements must:

338

Photovoltaic module kit including connector assembly for non-penetrating array installation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A PV module kit for non-penetrating rooftop installation, including a plurality of PV modules and a plurality of connectors. Each of the PV modules includes a PV laminate and a frame forming a mounting region assembled thereto. The connectors include a male connector having a male fastener extending from a head, and a female connector having a female fastener assembled within a head. The heads are entirely formed of plastic. The kit provides a mounted array state including a junction at which the mounting region of at least two of the PV modules are aligned and interconnected by engagement of the male connector with the female connector. The so-formed junction is substantially electrically insulated. The plurality of connectors can further include a spacer connector including a head forming a bore sized to slidably receive the male fastener, with all of the connector heads being identical.

Botkin, Jonathan (El Cerrito, CA); Graves, Simon (Berkeley, CA); Danning, Matt (Oakland, CA); Culligan, Matthew (Berkeley, CA)

2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

339

Photovoltaic module kit including connector assembly for non-penetrating array installation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A PV module kit for non-penetrating rooftop installation, including a plurality of PV modules and a plurality of connectors. Each of the PV modules includes a PV laminate and a frame forming a mounting region assembled thereto. The connectors include a male connector having a male fastener extending from a head, and a female connector having a female fastener assembled within a head. The heads are entirely formed of plastic. The kit provides a mounted array state including a junction at which the mounting region of at least two of the PV modules are aligned and interconnected by engagement of the male connector with the female connector. The so-formed junction is substantially electrically insulated. The plurality of connectors can further include a spacer connector including a head forming a bore sized to slidably receive the male fastener, with all of the connector heads being identical.

Botkin, Jonathan; Graves, Simon; Danning, Matt; Culligan, Matthew

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

340

Photovoltaic module kit including connector assembly for non-penetrating array installation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A PV module kit for non-penetrating rooftop installation, including a plurality of PV modules and a plurality of connectors. Each of the PV modules includes a PV laminate and a frame forming a mounting region assembled thereto. The connectors include a male connector having a male fastener extending from a head, and a female connector having a female fastener assempbled within a head. The heads are entirely formed of plastic. The kit provides a mounted array state including a junction at which the mounting regions of at least two of the PV modules are aligned and interconnected by engagement of the male connector with the female connector. The so-formed junction is substantially electrically insulated. The plurality of connectors can further include a spacer connector including a head forming a bore sized slidably receive the male fastener, with all of the connector heads being identical.

Botkin, Jonathan; Graves, Simon; Danning, Matt; Culligan, Matthew

2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes scale factor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

E-Print Network 3.0 - anu including biomedical Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Centre... -Europe Meeting (ASEM) process. Some of her recent publications include "EU-ASEAN Relations and Policy Learning... to ASEAN Economic Community - Is ASEAN moving towards...

342

E-Print Network 3.0 - approach including plasma Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

plasmas confined... to mi crocavities has provided a pathway to new optoelectronic devices, including hybrid Source: Shyy, Wei - Department of Aerospace Engineering,...

343

E-Print Network 3.0 - abdominal surgery including Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

reality allows... , a virtual reality laparoscopic surgery simulator that includes a brand new educational component, to assist... . Virtual reality simulators for...

344

E-Print Network 3.0 - african countries including Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

biofuel drive raises risk of eviction for African farmers Summary: by next year. In Africa, countries including Malawi, Mali, Mauritius, Nigeria, Senegal, South Africa... to...

345

Indoor Residential Chemical Emissions as Risk Factors for Children's  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Indoor Residential Chemical Emissions as Risk Factors for Children's Indoor Residential Chemical Emissions as Risk Factors for Children's Respiratory Health Speaker(s): Mark Mendell Date: February 23, 2007 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Most research into the effects of residential indoor air exposures on asthma and allergies has focused on exposures to biologic allergens, moisture and mold, endotoxin, or combustion byproducts. A growing body of research suggests that chemical emissions from common indoor materials and finishes have adverse effects, including increased risk of asthma, allergies, and pulmonary infections. The identified risk factors include specific organic compounds such as formaldehyde, benzene, and phthalates, as well as indoor materials or finishes such as vinyl flooring, carpet, paint, and plastics. This presentation presents a brief review of studies

346

Magnetic pattern at supergranulation scale: the Void Size Distribution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The large-scale magnetic pattern of the quiet sun is dominated by the magnetic network. This network, created by photospheric magnetic fields swept into convective downflows, delineates the boundaries of large scale cells of overturning plasma and exhibits voids in magnetic organization. Such voids include internetwork fields, a mixed-polarity sparse field that populate the inner part of network cells. To single out voids and to quantify their intrinsic pattern a fast circle packing based algorithm is applied to 511 SOHO/MDI high resolution magnetograms acquired during the outstanding solar activity minimum between 23 and 24 cycles. The computed Void Distribution Function shows a quasi-exponential decay behavior in the range 10-60 Mm. The lack of distinct flow scales in such a range corroborates the hypothesis of multi-scale motion flows at the solar surface. In addition to the quasi-exponential decay we have found that the voids reveal departure from a simple exponential decay around 35 Mm.

Berrilli, Francesco; Del Moro, Dario

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

THE BUILDUP OF A SCALE-FREE PHOTOSPHERIC MAGNETIC NETWORK  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We use a global Monte Carlo simulation of the formation of the solar photospheric magnetic network to investigate the origin of the scale invariance characterizing magnetic flux concentrations visible on high-resolution magnetograms. The simulations include spatially and temporally homogeneous injection of small-scale magnetic elements over the whole photosphere, as well as localized episodic injection associated with the emergence and decay of active regions. Network elements form in response to cumulative pairwise aggregation or cancellation of magnetic elements, undergoing a random walk on the sphere and advected on large spatial scales by differential rotation and a poleward meridional flow. The resulting size distribution of simulated network elements is in very good agreement with observational inferences. We find that the fractal index and size distribution of network elements are determined primarily by these post-emergence surface mechanisms, and carry little or no memory of the scales at which magnetic flux is injected in the simulation. Implications for models of dynamo action in the Sun are briefly discussed.

Thibault, K.; Charbonneau, P. [Departement de Physique, Universite de Montreal, 2900 Edouard-Montpetit, Montreal, Quebec H3C 3J7 (Canada); Crouch, A. D., E-mail: kim@astro.umontreal.ca-a, E-mail: paulchar@astro.umontreal.ca-b, E-mail: ash@cora.nwra.com-c [CORA/NWRA, 3380 Mitchell Lane, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States)

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Measurements of Form Factors with the BaBar Experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Selected recent results on measurements of form factors by the BaBar Collaboration are reviewed, including e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} {eta}{prime}{gamma}, leptonic and semileptonic charm decays from data collected at or near the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance.

Li, Selina Z.; /SLAC

2011-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

349

Advanced, High Power, Next Scale, Wave Energy Conversion Device...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Advanced, High Power, Next Scale, Wave Energy Conversion Device Advanced, High Power, Next Scale, Wave Energy Conversion Device Advanced, High Power, Next Scale, Wave Energy...

350

DLFM library tools for large scale dynamic applications.  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

DLFM library tools for large scale dynamic applications DLFM library tools for large scale dynamic applications Large scale Python and other dynamic applications may spend huge...

351

Analysis Of Factors Affecting Natural Source Slf Electromagnetic  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Factors Affecting Natural Source Slf Electromagnetic Factors Affecting Natural Source Slf Electromagnetic Exploration At Geothermal Wells Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Analysis Of Factors Affecting Natural Source Slf Electromagnetic Exploration At Geothermal Wells Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The Super Low Frequency (SLF) electromagnetic exploration was performed by using a nature source SLF electromagnetic detector at two geothermal wells in Peking University. The data of the SLF electromagnetic exploration at well JR-119 and JR-168 were obtained with the observation of continued five days and four times per day at well JR-119 and of one day at well JR-168. Based on these data, the influencing factors of the SI-F electromagnetic exploration were analyzed, which included the relationship

352

Field Derived Emission Factors For Formaldehyde and other Volatile Organic  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Field Derived Emission Factors For Formaldehyde and other Volatile Organic Field Derived Emission Factors For Formaldehyde and other Volatile Organic Compounds in FEMA Temporary Housing Units Title Field Derived Emission Factors For Formaldehyde and other Volatile Organic Compounds in FEMA Temporary Housing Units Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-4083E Year of Publication 2010 Authors Parthasarathy, Srinandini, Randy L. Maddalena, Marion L. Russell, and Michael G. Apte Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley Abstract Sixteen previously occupied temporary housing units (THUs) were studied to assess emissions of volatile organic compounds. The whole trailer emission factors were evaluated for 36 VOCs including formaldehyde. Indoor sampling was carried out in the THUs located in Purvis staging yard in Mississippi, USA. Indoor temperature and relative humidity (RH) were also measured in all the trailers during sampling. Indoor temperatures were varied (increased or decreased) in a selection of THUs using the

353

Connecting the Molecular and the Continuum Scales  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Connecting the Connecting the Molecular and the Continuum Scales Connecting the Molecular and the Continuum Scales Key Challenges: A molecular-scale understanding of structure and surface chemistry of clay mineral surface nanoparticles. Why it Matters: With a ubiquitous presence in natural materials and strong surface reactions, nanoparticles figure importantly in a broad range of phenomena, from climate change to contaminant remediation. Accomplishments: Used molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to determine molecular-scale diffusion coefficients of water tracers and representative cations (Na+,Cs+,Sr2+) in Smectite and found a simple way to accurately relate this to bulk, pore-scale diffusion. The result is that a remarkably simple expression relates Dinterlayer to the pore-scale

354

Scaling in the Lattice Gas Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A good quality scaling of the cluster size distributions is obtained for the Lattice Gas Model using the Fisher's ansatz for the scaling function. This scaling identifies a pseudo-critical line in the phase diagram of the model that spans the whole (subcritical to supercritical) density range. The independent cluster hypothesis of the Fisher approach is shown to describe correctly the thermodynamics of the lattice only far away from the critical point.

F. Gulminelli; Ph. Chomaz; M. Bruno; M. D'Agostino

2002-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

355

Improved Geometrical Scaling at the LHC  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We show that geometrical scaling exhibited by the pT spectra measured by the CMS Collaboration at the LHC is substantially improved if the exponent ? of the saturation scale depends on pT. This dependence is shown to be the same as the dependence of small x exponent of F2 structure function in deep inelastic scattering taken at the scale pT?Q/2.

Michal Praszalowicz

2011-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

356

Custom Detector Technology LASP satellite instruments include a wide range of technology,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Custom Detector Technology LASP satellite instruments include a wide range of technology, including particles, electric fields, and dust particles in space. Low-noise detectors are critical technology for our Extremely low-noise CCDs and intensified CCDs have flown on SDO for observing solar EUV and on AIM

Mojzsis, Stephen J.

357

Neutron Star Matter Including Delta Isobars Guang-Zhou Liu1,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Neutron Star Matter Including Delta Isobars Guang-Zhou Liu1,2 , Wei Liu1 and En-Guang Zhao2 1 a new phase structure of neutron star matter including nucleons and delta isobars is presented. Particle fractions populated and pion condensations in neutron star matter are investgated in this model

Xu, Ren-Xin

358

Hybrid approach for including electronic and nuclear quantum effects in molecular dynamics simulations of hydrogen transfer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hybrid approach for including electronic and nuclear quantum effects in molecular dynamics January 2001 A hybrid approach for simulating proton and hydride transfer reactions in enzymes coefficient and to investigate the real-time dynamics of reactive trajectories. This hybrid approach includes

Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

359

Red-Tide Research Summarized to 1964 Including an Annotated Bibliography  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

535^ Red-Tide Research Summarized to 1964 Including an Annotated Bibliography By George A, Harold E. Crowther, Acting Director Red-Tide Research Summarized to 1964 Including an Annotated Historical 2 General conditions during red-tide outbreaks 3 Temperature 3 Salinity 3 Rainfall 4 Wind 4 Light

360

Life Cycle environmental Assessment (LCA) of sanitation systems including sewerage: Case of vertical  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Life Cycle environmental Assessment (LCA) of sanitation systems including sewerage: Case The article presents the application of Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) to a complete sanitation system including the sewer network. It first describes the LCA hypothesis which concerns two types of waste water

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes scale factor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

OFFICE USE ONLY: Date Entered: App Rating: Complete Incomplete Documents Included  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OFFICE USE ONLY: Date Entered: App Rating: Complete Incomplete Documents Included: Declaration/ Assessment APPLICATION INSTRUCTIONS: 1. All supporting documentation must be included with the application printed from BearTracks 2. Have you signed the Declaration and Consent form on the last page

MacMillan, Andrew

362

Introduction Apis mellifera L. is native to Europe, Africa, and Asia (including Saudi  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Introduction Apis mellifera L. is native to Europe, Africa, and Asia (including Saudi Arabia, Iran migrations and introductions (Ruttner, 1988). Apis mellifera includes about two dozen subspecies bee (Apis mellifera L.) populations from the USA Allen L Szalanski1* and Roxane M Magnus1 1 Social

Szalanski, Allen L.

363

What are the symptoms of flu? Symptoms include sudden onset of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

What are the symptoms of flu? · Symptoms include sudden onset of: o fever/chills o cough o muscle lasting 5 or more days (measured with a thermometer; 37.0 Celsius is normal) · Coughing up blood that improve but then return with fever and worse cough Those in high risk groups including pregnant women

Ellis, Randy

364

Small-signal dynamic model of a micro-grid including conventional and electronically  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Small-signal dynamic model of a micro-grid including conventional and electronically interfaced-signal modelling of a micro-grid system that includes conventional (rotating machine) and electronically interfaced deviations in the overall system model and provides a methodology for the analysis of autonomous micro-grid

Lehn, Peter W.

365

Laboratory investigation of constitutive property up-scaling in volcanic tuffs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the critical issues facing the Yucca Mountain site characterization and performance assessment programs is the manner in which property up-scaling is addressed. Property up-scaling becomes an issue whenever heterogeneous media properties are measured at one scale but applied at another. A research program has been established to challenge current understanding of property up-scaling with the aim of developing and testing improved models that describe up-scaling behavior in a quantitative manner. Up-scaling of constitutive rock properties is investigated through physical experimentation involving the collection of suites of gas-permeability data measured over a range of discrete scales. To date, up-scaling studies have been performed on a series of tuff and sandstone (used as experimental controls) blocks. Samples include a welded, anisotropic tuff (Tiva Canyon Member of the Paintbrush Tuff, upper cliff microstratigraphic unit), and a moderately welded tuff (Tiva Canyon Member of the Paintbrush Tuff, Caprock microstratigraphic unit). A massive fluvial sandstone (Berea Sandstone) was also investigated as a means of evaluating the experimental program and to provide a point of comparison for the tuff data. Because unsaturated flow is of prime interest to the Yucca Mountain Program, scoping studies aimed at investigating the up-scaling of hydraulic properties under various saturated conditions were performed to compliment these studies of intrinsic permeability. These studies focused on matrix sorptivity, a constitutive property quantifying the capillarity of a porous medium. 113 refs.

Tidwell, V.C. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Geohydrology Dept.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Cosmic string scaling in flat space  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We investigate the evolution of infinite strings as a part of a complete cosmic string network in flat space. We perform a simulation of the network which uses functional forms for the string position and thus is exact to the limits of computer arithmetic. Our results confirm that the wiggles on the strings obey a scaling law described by universal power spectrum. The average distance between long strings also scales accurately with the time. These results suggest that small-scale structure will also scale in an expanding universe, even in the absence of gravitational damping.

Vitaly Vanchurin; Ken Olum; Alexander Vilenkin

2005-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

367

Analysis of micro-scale EDM .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Micro electromechanical systems (MEMS) are presented and the application of electro discharge machining (EDM) to this scale of manufacture is discussed. A model relating input (more)

Tibbles, Christopher Jeremy

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Sandia National Laboratories: Characterizing Scaled Wind Farm...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Inflow On April 1, 2014, in Energy, News, News & Events, Partnership, Renewable Energy, Wind Energy The Scaled Wind Farm Technology (SWiFT) research facility will provide...

369

T-603: Mac OS X Includes Some Invalid Comodo Certificates | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

03: Mac OS X Includes Some Invalid Comodo Certificates 03: Mac OS X Includes Some Invalid Comodo Certificates T-603: Mac OS X Includes Some Invalid Comodo Certificates April 15, 2011 - 1:46am Addthis PROBLEM: Mac OS X Includes Some Invalid Comodo Certificates PLATFORM: For Mac OS X Server v10.5.8, Mac OS X v10.5.8, Mac OS X v10.6.7 and Mac OS X Server v10.6.7 ABSTRACT: The operating system includes some invalid certificates. The vulnerability is due to the invalid certificates and not the operating system itself. Other browsers, applications, and operating systems are affected. reference LINKS: SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1025362 APPLE-SA-2011-04-14-4 Security Update 2011-002 Apple Support Downloads IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High Discussion: A partner of Comodo with Registration Authority capabilities suffered an internal security breach and the attacker caused seven certificates to be

370

Property:Number of Plants Included in Planned Estimate | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Plants Included in Planned Estimate Plants Included in Planned Estimate Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Number of Plants Included in Planned Estimate Property Type String Description Number of plants included in the estimate of planned capacity per GEA Pages using the property "Number of Plants Included in Planned Estimate" Showing 21 pages using this property. A Alaska Geothermal Region + 3 + C Cascades Geothermal Region + 1 + Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region + 4 + G Gulf of California Rift Zone Geothermal Region + 7 + H Hawaii Geothermal Region + 1 + Holocene Magmatic Geothermal Region + 4 + I Idaho Batholith Geothermal Region + 1 + N Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region + 9 + Northern Rockies Geothermal Region + 0 + Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region + 6 +

371

Systems and strippable coatings for decontaminating structures that include porous material  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods of removing contaminant matter from porous materials include applying a polymer material to a contaminated surface, irradiating the contaminated surface to cause redistribution of contaminant matter, and removing at least a portion of the polymer material from the surface. Systems for decontaminating a contaminated structure comprising porous material include a radiation device configured to emit electromagnetic radiation toward a surface of a structure, and at least one spray device configured to apply a capture material onto the surface of the structure. Polymer materials that can be used in such methods and systems include polyphosphazine-based polymer materials having polyphosphazine backbone segments and side chain groups that include selected functional groups. The selected functional groups may include iminos, oximes, carboxylates, sulfonates, .beta.-diketones, phosphine sulfides, phosphates, phosphites, phosphonates, phosphinates, phosphine oxides, monothio phosphinic acids, and dithio phosphinic acids.

Fox, Robert V. (Idaho Falls, ID); Avci, Recep (Bozeman, MT); Groenewold, Gary S. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2011-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

372

Relating Pore-Scale Uranium Aquatic Speciation to Intermediate-Scale Aquifer Heterogeneity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The speciation and transport of uranium (VI) through porous media is highly dependent on solution conditions, the presence of complexing ligands, and the nature of the porous media. The dependency on many variables makes prediction of U transport in bench-scale experiments and in the field difficult. In particular, the identification of colloidal U phases poses a technical challenge. Transport of U in the presence and absence of natural organic matter (Suwannee River humic acid, SRHA) through silica sand and hematite coated silica sand was tested at pH 4 and 5 using static columns, where flow is controlled by gravity and residence time between advective pore volume exchanges can be strictly controlled. The column effluents were characterized by traditional techniques including ICPMS quantification of total [U] and [Fe], TOC analysis of [DOC], and pH analysis, and also by non-traditional techniques: flow field flow fractionation with online ICPMS detection (FlFFF-ICPMS) and specific UV absorbance (SUVA) characterization of effluent fractions. Key results include that the transport of U through the columns was enhanced by pre-equilibration with SRHA, and previously deposited U was remobilized by the addition of SRHA. The advanced techniques yielded important insights on the mechanisms of transport: FlFFF-ICPMS identified a U?SRHA complex as the mobile U species and directly quantified relative amounts of the complex, while specific UV absorbance (SUVA) measurements indicated a composition-based fractionation onto the porous media.

Ranville, James

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Mercury capture in bench-scale absorbers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper gives,a brief overview of research being conducted at Argonne National Laboratory on the capture of mercury by both dry sorbents and wet scrubbers. The emphasis in the research is on development of a better understanding of the key factors that control the capture of mercury. Future work is expected to utilize that information for the development of new or modified process concepts featuring enhanced mercury capture capabilities. The results and conclusions to date from the Argonne -research on dry sorbents can be summarized as follows: lime hydrates, either regular or high-surface-area, are `not effective in removing mercury; mercury removals are enhanced by the addition of activated carbon; mercury removals with activated carbon decrease with increasing temperature, larger particle size, and decreasing mercury concentration in the gas; and chemical pretreatment (e.g., with sulfur or (CaCl{sub 2}) can greatly increase the removal capacity of activated carbon. Preliminary results from the wet scrubbing research include: no removal of elemental mercury is obtained under normal scrubber operating conditions; mercury removal is improved by the addition of packing or production of smaller gas bubbles to increase the gas-liquid contact area; polysulfide solutions do not appear promising for enhancing mercury removal in typical FGC systems; stainless steel packing appears to have beneficial properties for mercury removal and should be investigated further; and other chemical additives may offer greatly enhanced removals.

Livengood, C.D.; Huang, H.S.; Mendelsohn, M.H.; Wu, J.M.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

SCALE 6: Comprehensive Nuclear Safety Analysis Code System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Version 6 of the Standardized Computer Analyses for Licensing Evaluation (SCALE) computer software system developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, released in February 2009, contains significant new capabilities and data for nuclear safety analysis and marks an important update for this software package, which is used worldwide. This paper highlights the capabilities of the SCALE system, including continuous-energy flux calculations for processing multigroup problem-dependent cross sections, ENDF/B-VII continuous-energy and multigroup nuclear cross-section data, continuous-energy Monte Carlo criticality safety calculations, Monte Carlo radiation shielding analyses with automated three-dimensional variance reduction techniques, one- and three-dimensional sensitivity and uncertainty analyses for criticality safety evaluations, two- and three-dimensional lattice physics depletion analyses, fast and accurate source terms and decay heat calculations, automated burnup credit analyses with loading curve search, and integrated three-dimensional criticality accident alarm system analyses using coupled Monte Carlo criticality and shielding calculations.

Bowman, Stephen M [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Dynamic Structure Factor of Microemulsions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The dynamic structure factor G(k,?) is studied in a time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau model for microemulsions in thermal equilibrium by field-theoretic perturbation methods. For small viscosities, the structure factor develops a peak at a nonzero frequency ?, for fixed wavelengths of the order of the typical domain size of oil and water regions. This implies that the intermediate scattering function oscillates in time. We give a simple explanation for these temporal oscillations by considering the flow through a tube with a radius-dependent tension.

G. Gompper and M. Hennes

1994-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

376

Energy Restriction Reduces the Number of Advanced Aberrant Crypt Foci and Attenuates the Expression of Colonic Transforming Growth Factor ? and Cyclooxygenase Isoforms in Zucker Obese (fa/fa) Rats  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...genetic and environmental factors in the etiology and...acts as a critical factor in the pathogenesis...rats. Several dietary factors including dietary energy composition have been...isoform catalyzing the conversion of arachidonic acid...

Jayadev Raju and Ranjana P. Bird

2003-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

377

Multilevel method for modeling large-scale networks.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Understanding the behavior of real complex networks is of great theoretical and practical significance. It includes developing accurate artificial models whose topological properties are similar to the real networks, generating the artificial networks at different scales under special conditions, investigating a network dynamics, reconstructing missing data, predicting network response, detecting anomalies and other tasks. Network generation, reconstruction, and prediction of its future topology are central issues of this field. In this project, we address the questions related to the understanding of the network modeling, investigating its structure and properties, and generating artificial networks. Most of the modern network generation methods are based either on various random graph models (reinforced by a set of properties such as power law distribution of node degrees, graph diameter, and number of triangles) or on the principle of replicating an existing model with elements of randomization such as R-MAT generator and Kronecker product modeling. Hierarchical models operate at different levels of network hierarchy but with the same finest elements of the network. However, in many cases the methods that include randomization and replication elements on the finest relationships between network nodes and modeling that addresses the problem of preserving a set of simplified properties do not fit accurately enough the real networks. Among the unsatisfactory features are numerically inadequate results, non-stability of algorithms on real (artificial) data, that have been tested on artificial (real) data, and incorrect behavior at different scales. One reason is that randomization and replication of existing structures can create conflicts between fine and coarse scales of the real network geometry. Moreover, the randomization and satisfying of some attribute at the same time can abolish those topological attributes that have been undefined or hidden from researchers. We propose to develop multilevel methods to model complex networks. The key point of the proposed strategy is that it will help to preserve part of the unknown structural attributes by guaranteeing the similar behavior of the real and artificial model on different scales.

Safro, I. M. (Mathematics and Computer Science)

2012-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

378

Real-Time Imaging of Plant Cell Wall Structure at Nanometer Scale, with Respect to Cellulase Accessibility and Degradation Kinetics (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Presentation on real-time imaging of plant cell wall structure at nanometer scale. Objectives are to develop tools to measure biomass at the nanometer scale; elucidate the molecular bases of biomass deconstruction; and identify factors that affect the conversion efficiency of biomass-to-biofuels.

Ding, S. Y.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Invariant time-series factorization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Time-series analysis is an important domain of machine learning and a plethora of methods have been developed for the task. This paper proposes a new representation of time series, which in contrast to existing approaches, decomposes a time-series dataset ... Keywords: Data mining, Time-series classification, Time-series factorization

Josif Grabocka; Lars Schmidt-Thieme

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Low sulfate seawater mitigates barite scale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Low-sulfate seawater (LSSW) technology provides operational and economic benefits for desulfating seawater to control barium sulfate (BaSO{sub 4}) and strontium sulfate (SrSO{sub 4}) scale. This concluding article in a three part series describes, from a scale control perspective, the membrane technology deployed in the North Sea Brae fields.

Hardy, J.A.; Simm, I. [Marathon Oil UK Ltd., Aberdeen (United Kingdom)

1996-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes scale factor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

4, 40694124, 2007 Global-scale  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

into evapotranspiration and total runoff. We estimate that global groundwater recharge was 12 666 km3 /yr for the climateHESSD 4, 4069­4124, 2007 Global-scale modeling of groundwater recharge P. D¨oll and K. Fiedler System Sciences Global-scale modeling of groundwater recharge P. D¨oll and K. Fiedler Institute

Boyer, Edmond

382

Spectral multidimensional scaling Yonathan Aflaloa,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

images as feature points that we map to a plane. flat embedding | distance maps | big data | diffusionSpectral multidimensional scaling Yonathan Aflaloa,1 and Ron Kimmelb Departments of a Electrical reduc- tion. There are various approaches for large data simplification by scaling its dimensions down

Kimmel, Ron

383

Fermilab Energy Scaling Workshop April 27, 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fermilab Energy Scaling Workshop April 27, 2009 Rick Field ­ Florida/CDF/CMS Page 1 11stst Workshop-bias" collisions and the "underlying event" in Run 1 at CDF. Rick's View of Hadron Collisions Fermilab 2009 Studying the "associated" charged particle densities in "min-bias" collisions. #12;Fermilab Energy Scaling

Field, Richard

384

Microfluidic Large-Scale Integration: The Evolution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Microfluidic Large-Scale Integration: The Evolution of Design Rules for Biological Automation, polydimethylsiloxane Abstract Microfluidic large-scale integration (mLSI) refers to the develop- ment of microfluidic, are discussed. Several microfluidic components used as building blocks to create effective, complex, and highly

Quake, Stephen R.

385

February 2002 Grid Scale Oscillations in MICOM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are the implications of the grid scale oscillation on ­ Surface Fluxes that drive THC ­ Heat transport ­ MeridionalFebruary 2002 Grid Scale Oscillations in MICOM Balasubramanya T. Nadiga Los Alamos National Model · 3o displaced pole grid. 16 layers · Kraus-Turner Bulk Mixed Layer · Explicit diapycnal

Nadiga, Balasubramanya T. "Balu"

386

Broken Scale Invariance and Anomalous Dimensions  

DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

Mack and Kastrup have proposed that broken scale invariance is a symmetry of strong interactions. There is evidence from the Thirring model and perturbation theory that the dimensions of fields defined by scale transformations will be changed by the interaction from their canonical values. We review these ideas and their consequences for strong interactions.

Wilson, K. G.

1970-05-00T23:59:59.000Z

387

Multi-scale thermalhydraulic analyses performed in Nuresim and Nurisp projects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The NURESIM and NURISP successive projects of the 6. and 7. European Framework Programs joined the efforts of 21 partners for developing and validating a reference multi-physics and multi-scale platform for reactor simulation. The platform includes system codes, component codes, and also CFD or CMFD simulation tools. Fine scale CFD simulations are useful for a better understanding of physical processes, for the prediction of small scale geometrical effects and for solving problems that require a fine space and/or time resolution. Many important safety issues usually treated at the system scale may now benefit from investigations at a CFD scale. The Pressurized Thermal Shock is investigated using several simulation scales including Direct Numerical Simulation, Large Eddy Simulation, Very Large Eddy Simulation and RANS approaches. At the end a coupling of system code and CFD is applied. Condensation Induced Water-Hammer was also investigated at both CFD and 1-D scale. Boiling flow in a reactor core up to Departure from Nucleate Boiling or Dry-Out is investigated at scales much smaller than the classical subchannel analysis codes. DNS was used to investigate very local processes whereas CFD in both RANS and LES was used to simulate bubbly flow and Euler-Lagrange simulations were used for annular mist flow investigations. Loss of Coolant Accidents are usually treated by system codes. Some related issues are now revisited at the CFD scale. In each case the progress of the analysis is summarized and the benefit of the multi-scale approach is shown. (authors)

Bestion, D. [CEA-Grenoble, DEN-DANS-DM2S, Grenoble, (France); Lucas, D. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden, (Germany); Anglart, H. [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, (Sweden); Niceno, B. [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villingen, (Switzerland); Vyskocil, L. [Nuclear Research Institute Rez plc, Rez, (Czech Republic)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

The Role of Scaling in Societal Applications: Public and Private  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Role of Scaling in Societal Applications: Public and Private Role of Scaling in Societal Applications: Public and Private Infrastructure Vulnerabilities Title The Role of Scaling in Societal Applications: Public and Private Infrastructure Vulnerabilities Publication Type Book Chapter Year of Publication 2010 Authors Larsen, Peter H. Book Title Scaling Studies in Arctic System Science and Policy Support Date Published 2010 Publisher U.S.Arctic Research Commission Abstract The large number of examples paints the picture of an Arctic experiencing rapid, arguably unprecedented, and ongoing environmental change. Such change, from a biogeophysical perspective, cascades into many domains-land and coastline permafrost degradation, sea ice retreat, winds and waves leading to coastal erosion, changes in vegetation, longer ice-free seasons, "greening" of the Arctic, waterlogging of soils, more variable weather, including extremes of cold or warm, icing, flooding, droughts, and increased incidence of fire. These linked changes in the Arctic environment are fundamentally interdisciplinary in nature and require system-level, synthetic, and multiscale thinking. But the change also reverberates into many societally relevant domains: damage to and loss of civil infrastructure due to permafrost degradation, reduction in ice-dependent transportation routes over land, coastal infrastructure battered by waves, northward migration of pathogens and vectors affecting human health, sea ice retreat leading to coastal erosion, fires and smoke affecting navigation and infrastructure, pest outbreaks, and loss of species, including traditionally hunted/fished species. Although there will be many, clearly positive, effects, including access to ocean shipping, resource extraction, and new fisheries, preliminary assessment indicates substantial negative impacts from climate change alone-of billions if not tens of billions of dollars for the State of Alaska to year 2030. Such estimates are generated by extrapolating site-specific damage assessments through spatial extrapolation to the domain of the entire state-fundamentally a scaling issue, but one with substantial uncertainty surrounding it, as will be discussed below. It is thus important to identify the readiness of the research and assessment community across a wide spectrum of applications. Identifying and filling key gaps in science and technology readiness today helps to forestall delays in acquiring policy-actionable knowledge upon which future climate change adaptation can be based. Focus again will be on climate change, as an overriding backdrop of Arctic system change and as a principal forcing that will challenge policymakers and managers. Seven societal applications are presented: Arctic human health, climate change mitigation and adaptation, infrastructure at risk, subsistence fisheries, non-renewable resource extractions, sea ice navigation, and oil spill response and restoration.

389

Energy Department Expands Gas Gouging Reporting System to Include 1-800  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Expands Gas Gouging Reporting System to Include Expands Gas Gouging Reporting System to Include 1-800 Number: 1-800-244-3301 Energy Department Expands Gas Gouging Reporting System to Include 1-800 Number: 1-800-244-3301 September 6, 2005 - 9:50am Addthis Washington, DC - Energy Secretary Samuel W. Bodman announced today that the Department of Energy has expanded its gas gouging reporting system to include a toll-free telephone hotline. The hotline is available to American consumers starting today. "While we've largely seen the best of American generosity and unity throughout the recovery effort, we recognize that there are some bad actors that may try to take advantage of the situation. Consumers are our first line of defense in guarding against gas price gouging. I can assure you, our Administration - from the President down - takes this issue very

390

Counselling Psychology Practicum The Counselling Psychology program includes two practicum placements. These placements allow you to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Counselling Psychology Practicum The Counselling Psychology program includes two practicum development in real counselling settings. The general goal of the Counselling Psychology Practica. Students in the Master of Education (Counselling Psychology) program are responsible for making their own

Morris, Joy

391

A simulation study of the solar wind including the solar rotation effect  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An axisymmetric solar wind structure including the solar rotation effect is studied by the method of MHD computer simulation. For the case of the radial magnetic field configuration, the simulation result is fair...

H. Washimi; T. Sakurai

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Data and analysis on energy usage included: Taking readings on energy each minute  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Appendix B Data and analysis on energy usage included: § Taking readings on energy each minute § 14 usage at the schools we monitored. The usage is compared to the PIER target, Title 24, and Ashrae 90

393

Automated solar collector installation design including ability to define heterogeneous design preferences  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Embodiments may include systems and methods to create and edit a representation of a worksite, to create various data objects, to classify such objects as various types of pre -defined "features" with attendant properties and layout constraints. As part of or in addition to classification, an embodiment may include systems and methods to create, associate, and edit intrinsic and extrinsic properties to these objects. A design engine may apply of design rules to the features described above to generate one or more solar collectors installation design alternatives, including generation of on-screen and/or paper representations of the physical layout or arrangement of the one or more design alternatives. Embodiments may also include definition of one or more design apertures, each of which may correspond to boundaries in which solar collector layouts should comply with distinct sets of user-defined design preferences. Distinct apertures may provide heterogeneous regions of collector layout according to the user-defined design preferences.

Wayne, Gary; Frumkin, Alexander; Zaydman, Michael; Lehman, Scott; Brenner, Jules

2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

394

Automated solar collector installation design including ability to define heterogeneous design preferences  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Embodiments may include systems and methods to create and edit a representation of a worksite, to create various data objects, to classify such objects as various types of pre-defined "features" with attendant properties and layout constraints. As part of or in addition to classification, an embodiment may include systems and methods to create, associate, and edit intrinsic and extrinsic properties to these objects. A design engine may apply of design rules to the features described above to generate one or more solar collectors installation design alternatives, including generation of on-screen and/or paper representations of the physical layout or arrangement of the one or more design alternatives. Embodiments may also include definition of one or more design apertures, each of which may correspond to boundaries in which solar collector layouts should comply with distinct sets of user-defined design preferences. Distinct apertures may provide heterogeneous regions of collector layout according to the user-defined design preferences.

Wayne, Gary; Frumkin, Alexander; Zaydman, Michael; Lehman, Scott; Brenner, Jules

2013-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

395

AMO Issues Request for Information on Clean Energy Manufacturing Topics, Including Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Applications  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The AMO seeks information on mid-Technology Readiness Level R&D needs, market challenges, supply chain challenges, and shared facility needs addressing clean energy manufacturing topics, including the fuel cell and hydrogen sectors.

396

Modeling the Interaction between the Atmospheric and Oceanic Boundary Layers, Including a Surface Wave Layer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The interaction between the atmospheric and oceanic boundary layers is simulated by solving a closed system of equations including equations of motion, turbulent kinetic energy (TKE), turbulent exchange coefficient (TEC), expressions for air and ...

Le Ngoc Ly

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Diffractive laser beam homogenizer including a photo-active material and method of fabricating the same  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method of manufacturing a plurality of diffractive optical elements includes providing a partially transmissive slide, providing a first piece of PTR glass, and directing first UV radiation through the partially transmissive slide to impinge on the first piece of PTR glass. The method also includes exposing predetermined portions of the first piece of PTR glass to the first UV radiation and thermally treating the exposed first piece of PTR glass. The method further includes providing a second piece of PTR glass and directing second UV radiation through the thermally treated first piece of PTR glass to impinge on the second piece of PTR glass. The method additionally includes exposing predetermined portions of the second piece of PTR glass to the second UV radiation, thermally treating the exposed second piece of PTR glass, and repeating providing and processing of the second piece of PTR glass using additional pieces of PTR glass.

Bayramian, Andy J; Ebbers, Christopher A; Chen, Diana C

2014-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

398

FEMP Expands ESPC ENABLE Program to Include More Energy Conservation Measures  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy's Federal Energy Management Program announced the expansion of the Energy Savings Performance Contract ENABLE program to include two new energy conservation measures.

399

E-Print Network 3.0 - approach including back-translation Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

include the back-translation, is always available for later inspection.) They can... safeguard against translation errors, we supply a back-translation, or re-translation of the...

400

includes gravity, there are other interesting consequences of this line of argument. One  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

includes gravity, there are other interesting consequences of this line of argument. One f there is any truth to the adage that `practice makes perfect', we should cer- tainly be near

Murray, Richard

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes scale factor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Mineral balances, including in drinking water, estimated for Merced County dairy herds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of daily mineral intake, drinking-water mineral contributionND Total daily intake, including minerals in drinking water.mineral contents in drinking water and daily drinking-water

Castillo, Alejandro R Dr.; Santos, Jose Eduardo P.; Tabone, Tom J.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Scaling Analysis of On-Chip Power Grid Voltage Variations in Nanometer Scale ULSI  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents a detailed scaling analysis of the power supply distribution network voltage drop in DSM technologies. The effects of chip temperature, electromigration and interconnect technology scaling (in...

Amir H. Ajami; Kaustav Banerjee

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Modeling and application of soil moisture at varying spatial scales with parameter scaling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The dissertation focuses on characterization of subpixel variability within a satellite-based remotely sensed coarse-scale soil moisture footprint. The underlying heterogeneity of coarse-scale soil moisture footprint is masked by the area...

Das, Narendra Narayan

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

404

Global fits of the cMSSM and NUHM including the LHC Higgs discovery and new XENON100 constraints  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present global fits of the constrained Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (cMSSM) and the Non-Universal Higgs Model (NUHM), including the most recent CMS constraint on the Higgs boson mass, 5.8 fb{sup ?1} integrated luminosity null Supersymmetry searches by ATLAS, the new LHCb measurement of BR( B-bar {sub s} ? ?{sup +}?{sup ?}) and the 7-year WMAP dark matter relic abundance determination. We include the latest dark matter constraints from the XENON100 experiment, marginalising over astrophysical and particle physics uncertainties. We present Bayesian posterior and profile likelihood maps of the highest resolution available today, obtained from up to 350M points. We find that the new constraint on the Higgs boson mass has a dramatic impact, ruling out large regions of previously favoured cMSSM and NUHM parameter space. In the cMSSM, light sparticles and predominantly gaugino-like dark matter with a mass of a few hundred GeV are favoured. The NUHM exhibits a strong preference for heavier sparticle masses and a Higgsino-like neutralino with a mass of 1 TeV. The future ton-scale XENON1T direct detection experiment will probe large portions of the currently favoured cMSSM and NUHM parameter space. The LHC operating at 14 TeV collision energy will explore the favoured regions in the cMSSM, while most of the regions favoured in the NUHM will remain inaccessible. Our best-fit points achieve a satisfactory quality-of-fit, with p-values ranging from 0.21 to 0.35, so that none of the two models studied can be presently excluded at any meaningful significance level.

Strege, C.; Trotta, R. [Astrophysics Group, and Imperial Centre for Inference and Cosmology, Imperial College London, Blackett Laboratory, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Bertone, G. [GRAPPA Institute, University of Amsterdam, Science Park 904, 1090 GL Amsterdam (Netherlands); Feroz, F. [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, J.J. Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Fornasa, M. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, University Park NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Austri, R. Ruiz de, E-mail: charlotte.strege09@imperial.ac.uk, E-mail: gf.bertone@gmail.com, E-mail: f.feroz@mrao.cam.ac.uk, E-mail: fornasam@gmail.com, E-mail: rruiz@ific.uv.es, E-mail: r.trotta@imperial.ac.uk [Instituto de Fsica Corpuscular, IFIC-UV/CSIC, Valencia (Spain)

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

EFRT M12 Issue Resolution: Comparison of PEP and Bench-Scale Oxidative Leaching Results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project-Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) project to perform research and development activities to resolve technical issues identified for the Pretreatment Facility (PTF). The Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) was designed and constructed and is to be operated as part of a plan to respond to issue M12, Undemonstrated Leaching Processes. The PEP is a 1/4.5-scale test platform designed to simulate the WTP pretreatment caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, ultrafiltration solids concentration, and slurry washing processes. The PEP replicates the WTP leaching processes using prototypic equipment and control strategies. The PEP also includes non-prototypic ancillary equipment to support the core processing. Two operating scenarios are currently being evaluated for the ultrafiltration process (UFP) and leaching operations. The first scenario has caustic leaching performed in the UFP-2 ultrafiltration feed vessels (i.e., vessel UFP-VSL-T02A in the PEP; and vessels UFP-VSL-00002A and B in the WTP PTF). The second scenario has caustic leaching conducted in the UFP-1 ultrafiltration feed preparation vessels (i.e., vessels UFP-VSL-T01A and B in the PEP; vessels UFP-VSL-00001A and B in the WTP PTF). In both scenarios, 19-M sodium hydroxide solution (NaOH, caustic) is added to the waste slurry in the vessels to dissolve solid aluminum compounds (e.g., gibbsite, boehmite). Caustic addition is followed by a heating step that uses direct steam injection to accelerate the leaching process. Following the caustic leach, the vessel contents are cooled using vessel cooling jackets and/or external heat exchangers. The main difference between the two scenarios is that for leaching in UFP1, the 19-M NaOH is added to un-concentrated waste slurry (3 to 8 wt% solids), while for leaching in UFP2, the slurry is concentrated to nominally 20 wt% solids using cross-flow ultrafiltration before the addition of caustic. For wastes that have significantly high chromium content, the caustic leaching and slurry dewatering is followed by adding sodium permanganate to UFP-VSL-T02A, and the slurry is subjected to oxidative leaching at nominally ambient temperature. The purpose of the oxidative leaching is to selectively oxidize the poorly alkaline-soluble Cr(III) believed to be the insoluble form in Hanford tank sludge to the much more alkaline-soluble Cr(VI), e.g., chromate. The work described in this report provides the test results that are related to the efficiency of the oxidative leaching process to support process modeling based on tests performed with a Hanford waste simulant. The tests were completed both at the lab-bench scale and in the PEP. The purpose of this report is to summarize the results from both scales that are related to oxidative leaching chemistry to support a scale factor for the submodels to be used in the G2 model, which predicts WTP operating performance. Owing to schedule constraints, the PEP test data to be included in this report are limited to those from Integrated Tests A (T01 A/B caustic leaching) and B (T02A caustic leaching).

Rapko, Brian M.; Brown, Christopher F.; Eslinger, Paul W.; Fountain, Matthew S.; Hausmann, Tom S.; Huckaby, James L.; Hanson, Brady D.; Kurath, Dean E.; Minette, Michael J.

2009-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

406

A Linear Scaling Three Dimensional Fragment Method for Large Scale Electronic Structure Calculations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

large scale electronic structure calculations Lin-Wang Wang,total energy electronic structure calculation method, which

Wang, Lin-Wang; Zhao, Zhengji; Meza, Juan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

A Linear Scaling Three Dimensional Fragment Method for Large Scale Electronic Structure Calculations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

large scale electronic structure calculations Lin-Wang Wang,total energy electronic structure calculation method, which

Wang, Lin-Wang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Numerical Simulation of the Meso-? Scale Structure and Evolution of the 1977 Johnstown Flood. Part I: Model Description and Verification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Pennsylvania State University/NCAR mesoscale model, originally developed by Anthes and Warner, is modified to simulate the meso-? scale structure and evolution of convectively driven weather systems. The modifications include: (i) two-way ...

Da-Lin Zhang; J. Michael Fritsch

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Comparison of BES measurements of ion-scale turbulence with direct, gyrokinetic simulations of MAST L-mode plasmas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Observations of ion-scale (k_y*rho_i code NEMORB. This validation exercise highlights the need to include increasingly sophisticated physics, e.g., kinetic treatment of trapped electrons, equilibrium flow shear and collisions, to reprodu...

Field, A R; Ghim, Y-c; Hill, P; McMillan, B; Roach, C M; Saarelma, S; Schekochihin, A A; Zoletnik, S

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Generation of Retroviral Packaging and Producer Cell Lines for Large-Scale Vector Production with Improved Safety and Titer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Several technologies designed for attachment-dependent cells are available to accommodate various scales, including Cell Factories, CellCube, roller bottles, and perfusion-based controlled...54). In a reduced v...

Thomas W. Dubensky Jr.; Sybille L. Sauter

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

EFRT M-12 Issue Resolution: Comparison of Filter Performance at PEP and CUF Scale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project-Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) project to perform research and development activities to resolve technical issues identified for the Pretreatment Facility (PTF). The Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) was designed and constructed and is to be operated as part of a plan to respond to issue M12, Undemonstrated Leaching Processes. The PEP is a 1/4.5-scale test platform designed to simulate the WTP pretreatment caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, ultrafiltration solids concentration, and slurry washing processes. The PEP replicates the WTP leaching processes using prototypic equipment and control strategies. The PEP also includes non-prototypic ancillary equipment to support the core processing. Two operating scenarios are currently being evaluated for the ultrafiltration process (UFP) and leaching operations. The first scenario has caustic leaching performed in the UFP-2 ultrafiltration feed vessels (i.e., vessel UFP-VSL-T02A in the PEP and vessels UFP-VSL-00002A and B in the WTP PTF). The second scenario has caustic leaching conducted in the UFP-1 ultrafiltration feed-preparation vessels (i.e., vessels UFP-VSL-T01A and B in the PEP; vessels UFP-VSL-00001A and B in the WTP PTF). In both scenarios, 19-M sodium hydroxide solution (NaOH, caustic) is added to the waste slurry in the vessels to leach solid aluminum compounds (e.g., gibbsite, boehmite). Caustic addition is followed by a heating step that uses direct injection of steam to accelerate the leach process. Following the caustic leach, the vessel contents are cooled using vessel cooling jackets and/or external heat exchangers. The main difference between the two scenarios is that for leaching in UFP1, the 19-M NaOH is added to un-concentrated waste slurry (3 to 8 wt% solids), while for leaching in UFP2, the slurry is concentrated to nominally 20 wt% solids using cross-flow ultrafiltration before the addition of caustic. The work described in this report presents filter flux results obtained at two different scales based on tests performed with a Hanford tank waste simulant. The tests were made at the lab-bench scale on a cold (i.e., designated for non-radioactive simulant test materials) Cells Unit Filter [CUF]) and in the Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP), which is a 1/4.5-scale mock-up of key PTF process equipment. One set of tests was conducted with the simulant feed (low solids), and one test was conducted at a relatively high solids concentration. The results of these tests are compared to support a scale factor for use in the WTP.

Daniel, Richard C.; Billing, Justin M.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Brown, Christopher F.; Eslinger, Paul W.; Hanson, Brady D.; Huckaby, James L.; Karri, Naveen K.; Kimura, Marcia L.; Kurath, Dean E.; Minette, Michael J.

2009-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

412

ADVANCED INTEGRATION OF MULTI-SCALE MECHANICS AND WELDING PROCESS SIMULATION IN WELD INTEGRITY ASSESSMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The potential to save trillions of BTUs in energy usage and billions of dollars in cost on an annual basis based on use of higher strength steel in major oil and gas transmission pipeline construction is a compelling opportunity recognized by both the US Department of Energy (DOE). The use of high-strength steels (X100) is expected to result in energy savings across the spectrum, from manufacturing the pipe to transportation and fabrication, including welding of line pipe. Elementary examples of energy savings include more the 25 trillion BTUs saved annually based on lower energy costs to produce the thinner-walled high-strength steel pipe, with the potential for the US part of the Alaskan pipeline alone saving more than 7 trillion BTU in production and much more in transportation and assembling. Annual production, maintenance and installation of just US domestic transmission pipeline is likely to save 5 to 10 times this amount based on current planned and anticipated expansions of oil and gas lines in North America. Among the most important conclusions from these studies were: While computational weld models to predict residual stress and distortions are well-established and accurate, related microstructure models need improvement. Fracture Initiation Transition Temperature (FITT) Master Curve properly predicts surface-cracked pipe brittle-to-ductile initiation temperature. It has value in developing Codes and Standards to better correlate full-scale behavior from either CTOD or Charpy test results with the proper temperature shifts from the FITT master curve method. For stress-based flaw evaluation criteria, the new circumferentially cracked pipe limit-load solution in the 2007 API 1104 Appendix A approach is overly conservative by a factor of 4/?, which has additional implications. . For strain-based design of girth weld defects, the hoop stress effect is the most significant parameter impacting CTOD-driving force and can increase the crack-driving force by a factor of 2 depending on strain-hardening, pressure level as a % of SMYS, and flaw size. From years of experience in circumferential fracture analyses and experimentation, there has not been sufficient integration of work performed for other industries into analogous problems facing the oil and gas pipeline markets. Some very basic concepts and problems solved previously in these fields could have circumvented inconsistencies seen in the stress-based and strain-based analysis efforts. For example, in nuclear utility piping work, more detailed elastic-plastic fracture analyses were always validated in their ability to predict loads and displacements (stresses and strains). The eventual implementation of these methodologies will result in acceleration of the industry adoption of higher-strength line-pipe steels.

Wilkowski, Gery M.; Rudland, David L.; Shim, Do-Jun; Brust, Frederick W.; Babu, Sundarsanam

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

413

The socio-economic, dwelling and appliance related factors affecting electricity consumption in domestic buildings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper aims to investigate the socio-economic, dwelling and appliance related factors that have significant or non-significant effects on domestic electricity consumption. To achieve this aim, a comprehensive literature review of international research investigating these factors was undertaken. Although papers examining the factors affecting electricity demand are numerous, to the authors knowledge, a comprehensive analysis taking stock of all previous findings has not previously been undertaken. The review establishes that no less than 62 factors potentially have an effect on domestic electricity use. This includes 13 socio-economic factors, 12 dwelling factors and 37 appliance factors. Of the 62 factors, four of the socio-economic factors, seven of the dwelling factors, and nine of the appliance related factors were found to unambiguously have a significant positive effect on electricity use. This paper contributes to a better understanding of those factors that certainly affect electricity consumption and those for which effects are unclear and require further research. Understanding the effects of factors can support both the implementation of effective energy policy and aid prediction of future electricity consumption in the domestic sector.

Rory V. Jones; Alba Fuertes; Kevin J. Lomas

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Linearly Scaling 3D Fragment Method for Large-Scale Electronic Structure Calculations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Linearly Scaling 3D Fragment Method for Large-Scale Electronic Structure Calculations Lin-Wang Wang-dimensional fragment (LS3DF) method for large scale ab initio electronic structure calculations. LS3DF is based. The fragments of the LS3DF algorithm can be calculated separately with different groups of processors

Bailey, David H.

415

The Future of the Local Large Scale Structure: the roles of Dark Matter and Dark Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the distinct effects of Dark Matter and Dark Energy on the future evolution of nearby large scale structures using constrained N-body simulations. We contrast a model of Cold Dark Matter and a Cosmological Constant (LCDM) with an Open CDM (OCDM) model with the same matter density Omega_m =0.3 and the same Hubble constant h=0.7. Already by the time the scale factor increased by a factor of 6 (29 Gyr from now in LCDM; 78 Gyr from now in OCDM) the comoving position of the Local Group is frozen. Well before that epoch the two most massive members of the Local Group, the Milky Way and Andromeda, will merge. However, as the expansion rates of the scale factor in the two models are different, the Local Group will be receding in physical coordinates from Virgo exponentially in a LCDM model and at a roughly constant velocity in an OCDM model. More generally, in comoving coordinates the future large scale structure will look like a sharpened image of the present structure: the skeleton of the cosmic web will remain the same, but clusters will be more `isolated' and the filaments will become thinner. This implies that the long-term fate of large scale structure as seen in comoving coordinates is determined primarily by the matter density. We conclude that although the LCDM model is accelerating at present due to its Dark Energy component while the OCDM model is non accelerating, their large scale structure in the future will look very similar in comoving coordinates.

Yehuda Hoffman; Ofer Lahav; Gustavo Yepes; Yaniv Dover

2007-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

416

Optimization of wind turbine energy and power factor with an evolutionary computation algorithm  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optimization of wind turbine energy and power factor with an evolutionary computation algorithm the energy capture from the wind and enhance the quality of the power produced by the wind turbine, and harmonic distortion. As the generation of wind energy on an industrial scale is relatively new, the area

Kusiak, Andrew

417

Geoelectrical Measurement of Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Parameters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mass transfer affects contaminant transport and is thought to control the efficiency of aquifer remediation at a number of sites within the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. An improved understanding of mass transfer is critical to meeting the enormous scientific and engineering challenges currently facing DOE. Informed design of site remedies and long-term stewardship of radionuclide-contaminated sites will require new cost-effective laboratory and field techniques to measure the parameters controlling mass transfer spatially and across a range of scales. In this project, we sought to capitalize on the geophysical signatures of mass transfer. Previous numerical modeling and pilot-scale field experiments suggested that mass transfer produces a geoelectrical signaturea hysteretic relation between sampled (mobile-domain) fluid conductivity and bulk (mobile + immobile) conductivityover a range of scales relevant to aquifer remediation. In this work, we investigated the geoelectrical signature of mass transfer during tracer transport in a series of controlled experiments to determine the operation of controlling parameters, and also investigated the use of complex-resistivity (CR) as a means of quantifying mass transfer parameters in situ without tracer experiments. In an add-on component to our grant, we additionally considered nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to help parse mobile from immobile porosities. Including the NMR component, our revised study objectives were to: 1. Develop and demonstrate geophysical approaches to measure mass-transfer parameters spatially and over a range of scales, including the combination of electrical resistivity monitoring, tracer tests, complex resistivity, nuclear magnetic resonance, and materials characterization; and 2. Provide mass-transfer estimates for improved understanding of contaminant fate and transport at DOE sites, such as uranium transport at the Hanford 300 Area. To achieve our objectives, we implemented a 3-part research plan involving (1) development of computer codes and techniques to estimate mass-transfer parameters from time-lapse electrical data; (2) bench-scale experiments on synthetic materials and materials from cores from the Hanford 300 Area; and (3) field demonstration experiments at the DOEs Hanford 300 Area. In a synergistic add-on to our workplan, we analyzed data from field experiments performed at the DOE Naturita Site under a separate DOE SBR grant, on which PI Day-Lewis served as co-PI. Techniques developed for application to Hanford datasets also were applied to data from Naturita. 1. Introduction The Department of Energy (DOE) faces enormous scientific and engineering challenges associated with the remediation of legacy contamination at former nuclear weapons production facilities. Selection, design and optimization of appropriate site remedies (e.g., pump-and-treat, biostimulation, or monitored natural attenuation) requires reliable predictive models of radionuclide fate and transport; however, our current modeling capabilities are limited by an incomplete understanding of multi-scale mass transferits rates, scales, and the heterogeneity of controlling parameters. At many DOE sites, long tailing behavior, concentration rebound, and slower-than-expected cleanup are observed; these observations are all consistent with multi-scale mass transfer [Haggerty and Gorelick, 1995; Haggerty et al., 2000; 2004], which renders pump-and-treat remediation and biotransformation inefficient and slow [Haggerty and Gorelick, 1994; Harvey et al., 1994; Wilson, 1997]. Despite the importance of mass transfer, there are significant uncertainties associated with controlling parameters, and the prevalence of mass transfer remains a point of debate [e.g., Hill et al., 2006; Molz et al., 2006] for lack of experimental methods to verify and measure it in situ or independently of tracer breakthrough. There is a critical need for new field-experimental techniques to measure mass transfer in-situ and estimate multi-scale and spatially variable mass-transfer parame

Day-Lewis, Frederick; Singha, Kamini; Haggerty, Roy; Johnson, Tim; Binley, Andrew; Lane, John

2014-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

418

A Supernodal Approach to Incomplete LU Factorization with Partial Pivoting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a new supernode-based incomplete LU factorization method to construct a preconditioner for solving sparse linear systems with iterative methods. The new algorithm is primarily based on the ILUTP approach by Saad, and we incorporate a number of techniques to improve the robustness and performance of the traditional ILUTP method. These include the new dropping strategies that accommodate the use of supernodal structures in the factored matrix. We present numerical experiments to demonstrate that our new method is competitive with the other ILU approaches and is well suited for today's high performance architectures.

Li, Xiaoye Sherry; Shao, Meiyue

2009-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

419

Computing prime factors with a Josephson phase qubit quantum processor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A quantum processor (QuP) can be used to exploit quantum mechanics to find the prime factors of composite numbers[1]. Compiled versions of Shor's algorithm have been demonstrated on ensemble quantum systems[2] and photonic systems[3-5], however this has yet to be shown using solid state quantum bits (qubits). Two advantages of superconducting qubit architectures are the use of conventional microfabrication techniques, which allow straightforward scaling to large numbers of qubits, and a toolkit of circuit elements that can be used to engineer a variety of qubit types and interactions[6, 7]. Using a number of recent qubit control and hardware advances [7-13], here we demonstrate a nine-quantum-element solid-state QuP and show three experiments to highlight its capabilities. We begin by characterizing the device with spectroscopy. Next, we produces coherent interactions between five qubits and verify bi- and tripartite entanglement via quantum state tomography (QST) [8, 12, 14, 15]. In the final experiment, we run a three-qubit compiled version of Shor's algorithm to factor the number 15, and successfully find the prime factors 48% of the time. Improvements in the superconducting qubit coherence times and more complex circuits should provide the resources necessary to factor larger composite numbers and run more intricate quantum algorithms.

Erik Lucero; Rami Barends; Yu Chen; Julian Kelly; Matteo Mariantoni; Anthony Megrant; Peter O'Malley; Daniel Sank; Amit Vainsencher; James Wenner; Ted White; Yi Yin; Andrew N. Cleland; John M. Martinis

2012-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

420

Laboratory studies of 2H evaporator scale dissolution in dilute nitric acid  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The rate of 2H evaporator scale solids dissolution in dilute nitric acid has been experimentally evaluated under laboratory conditions in the SRNL shielded cells. The 2H scale sample used for the dissolution study came from the bottom of the evaporator cone section and the wall section of the evaporator cone. The accumulation rate of aluminum and silicon, assumed to be the two principal elemental constituents of the 2H evaporator scale aluminosilicate mineral, were monitored in solution. Aluminum and silicon concentration changes, with heating time at a constant oven temperature of 90 deg C, were used to ascertain the extent of dissolution of the 2H evaporator scale mineral. The 2H evaporator scale solids, assumed to be composed of mostly aluminosilicate mineral, readily dissolves in 1.5 and 1.25 M dilute nitric acid solutions yielding principal elemental components of aluminum and silicon in solution. The 2H scale dissolution rate constant, based on aluminum accumulation in 1.5 and 1.25 M dilute nitric acid solution are, respectively, 9.21E-04 6.39E-04 min{sup -1} and 1.07E-03 7.51E-05 min{sup -1}. Silicon accumulation rate in solution does track the aluminum accumulation profile during the first few minutes of scale dissolution. It however diverges towards the end of the scale dissolution. This divergence therefore means the aluminum-to-silicon ratio in the first phase of the scale dissolution (non-steady state conditions) is different from the ratio towards the end of the scale dissolution. Possible causes of this change in silicon accumulation in solution as the scale dissolution progresses may include silicon precipitation from solution or the 2H evaporator scale is a heterogeneous mixture of aluminosilicate minerals with several impurities. The average half-life for the decomposition of the 2H evaporator scale mineral in 1.5 M nitric acid is 12.5 hours, while the half-life for the decomposition of the 2H evaporator scale in 1.25 M nitric acid is 10.8 hours. Based on averaging the two half-lives from the 2H scale acid dissolution in 1.25 and 1.5 M nitric acid solutions, a reasonable half-live for the dissolution of 2H scales in dilute nitric acid is 11.7 1.3 hours. The plant operational time for chemically cleaning (soaking) the 2H evaporator with dilute nitric acid is 32 hours. It therefore may require about 3 half-lives or less to completely dissolve most of the scales in the Evaporator pot which come into contact with the dilute nitric acid solution. On a mass basis, the Al-to-Si ratio for the scale dissolution in 1.5 M nitric acid averaged 1.30 0.20 and averaged 1.18 0.10 for the 2H scale dissolution in 1.25 M nitric acid. These aluminum-to-silicon ratios are in fairly good agreement with ratios from previous studies. Therefore, there is still more aluminum in the 2H evaporator scales than silicon which implies that there are no significant changes in scale properties which will exclude nitric acid as a viable protic solvent for aluminosilicate scale buildup dissolution from the 2H evaporator. Overall, the monitoring of the scale decomposition reaction in 1.25 and 1.5 M nitric acid may be better ascertained through the determination of aluminum concentration in solution than monitoring silicon in solution. Silicon solution chemistry may lead to partial precipitating of silicon with time as the scale and acid solution is heated.

Oji, L.

2014-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

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421

Length Scaling of Carbon Nanotube Electric and Photo Diodes down to Sub-50 nm  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Yet, the scaling of CNT pn diodes or photodiodes, basic elements for most optoelectronic devices, is held back on a scale of micrometers.5?8 ... As elementary building blocks, such tiny electric and photodiodes could be used in nanoscale rectifiers, photodetectors, light sources, and high-efficiency photovoltaic devices. ... The IV characteristic of the diode may be described by a modified diode equation(1)where Is is the reverse saturation current, Rs is the effective series resistance of the device, Rsh is the shunt resistance, q is the electron charge, k is the Boltzmann constant, T is temperature, and n denotes the ideality factor of the diode. ...

Haitao Xu; Sheng Wang; Zhiyong Zhang; Lian-Mao Peng

2014-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

422

Experiments to investigate direct containment heating phenomena with scaled models of the Surry Nuclear Power Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Containment Technology Test Facility (CTTF) and the Surtsey Test Facility at Sandia National Laboratories are used to perform scaled experiments that simulate High Pressure Melt Ejection accidents in a nuclear power plant (NPP). These experiments are designed to investigate the effects of direct containment heating (DCH) phenomena on the containment load. High-temperature, chemically reactive melt (thermite) is ejected by high-pressure steam into a scale model of a reactor cavity. Debris is entrained by the steam blowdown into a containment model where specific phenomena, such as the effect of subcompartment structures, prototypic air/steam/hydrogen atmospheres, and hydrogen generation and combustion, can be studied. Four Integral Effects Tests (IETs) have been performed with scale models of the Surry NPP to investigate DCH phenomena. The 1/61{sup th} scale Integral Effects Tests (IET-9, IET-10, and IET-11) were conducted in CTRF, which is a 1/6{sup th} scale model of the Surry reactor containment building (RCB). The 1/10{sup th} scale IET test (IET-12) was performed in the Surtsey vessel, which had been configured as a 1/10{sup th} scale Surry RCB. Scale models were constructed in each of the facilities of the Surry structures, including the reactor pressure vessel, reactor support skirt, control rod drive missile shield, biological shield wall, cavity, instrument tunnel, residual heat removal platform and heat exchangers, seal table room and seal table, operating deck, and crane wall. This report describes these experiments and gives the results.

Blanchat, T.K.; Allen, M.D.; Pilch, M.M. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Nichols, R.T. [Ktech Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Network Analysis of Epidermal Growth Factor Signaling using Integrated Genomic, Proteomic and Phosphorylation Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To understand how integration of multiple data types can help decipher cellular responses at the systems level, we analyzed the mitogenic response of human mammary epithelial cells to epidermal growth factor (EGF) using whole genome microarrays, mass spectrometry-based proteomics and large-scale western blots with over 1000 antibodies. A time course analysis revealed significant differences in the expression of 3172 genes and 596 proteins, including protein phosphorylation changes measured by western blot. Integration of these disparate data types showed that each contributed qualitatively different components to the observed cell response to EGF and that varying degrees of concordance in gene expression and protein abundance measurements could be linked to specific biological processes. Networks inferred from individual data types were relatively limited, whereas networks derived from the integrated data recapitulated the known major cellular responses to EGF and exhibited more highly connected signaling nodes than networks derived from any individual dataset. While cell cycle regulatory pathways were altered as anticipated, we found the most robust response to mitogenic concentrations of EGF was induction of matrix metalloprotease cascades, highlighting the importance of the EGFR system as a regulator of the extracellular environment. These results demonstrate the value of integrating multiple levels of biological information to more accurately reconstruct networks of cellular response.

Waters, Katrina M.; Liu, Tao; Quesenberry, Ryan D.; Willse, Alan R.; Bandyopadhyay, Somnath; Kathmann, Loel E.; Weber, Thomas J.; Smith, Richard D.; Wiley, H. S.; Thrall, Brian D.

2012-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

424

The friction factor of two-dimensional rough-boundary turbulent soap film flows  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We use momentum transfer arguments to predict the friction factor $f$ in two-dimensional turbulent soap-film flows with rough boundaries (an analogue of three-dimensional pipe flow) as a function of Reynolds number Re and roughness $r$, considering separately the inverse energy cascade and the forward enstrophy cascade. At intermediate Re, we predict a Blasius-like friction factor scaling of $f\\propto\\textrm{Re}^{-1/2}$ in flows dominated by the enstrophy cascade, distinct from the energy cascade scaling of $\\textrm{Re}^{-1/4}$. For large Re, $f \\sim r$ in the enstrophy-dominated case. We use conformal map techniques to perform direct numerical simulations that are in satisfactory agreement with theory, and exhibit data collapse scaling of roughness-induced criticality, previously shown to arise in the 3D pipe data of Nikuradse.

Nicholas Guttenberg; Nigel Goldenfeld

2008-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

425

Factors Associated With Newly Graduated Nurses' Intent to Leave Current Position in U.S. Acute Care Hospitals: A Descriptive Research Study Using Secondary Data Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Indicators TM (NDNQI ) RN Survey with Job Satisfaction Scales and NDNQI patient census and staffing data (N = 8343). The data were analyzed using three-level hierarchical linear modeling to identify factors that were significantly correlated with ITLcp...

Meyer, Mary N.

2014-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

426

Factors Impacting Decommissioning Costs - 13576  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) studied United States experience with decommissioning cost estimates and the factors that impact the actual cost of decommissioning projects. This study gathered available estimated and actual decommissioning costs from eight nuclear power plants in the United States to understand the major components of decommissioning costs. Major costs categories for decommissioning a nuclear power plant are removal costs, radioactive waste costs, staffing costs, and other costs. The technical factors that impact the costs were analyzed based on the plants' decommissioning experiences. Detailed cost breakdowns by major projects and other cost categories from actual power plant decommissioning experiences will be presented. Such information will be useful in planning future decommissioning and designing new plants. (authors)

Kim, Karen; McGrath, Richard [Electric Power Research Institute, 3420 Hillview Ave., Palo Alto, California (United States)] [Electric Power Research Institute, 3420 Hillview Ave., Palo Alto, California (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Recommended Practices for Human Factors Evaluation Development Process for Advanced Avionics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Advanced avionic systems are currently being developed for use in general aviation aircraft. The avionics include both primary flight displays and multi-functional displays. In order to support the human factors development ...

Lyne, Lisette

428

Terrorism in Australia: factors associated with perceived threat and incident-critical behaviours  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Socioeconomic and demographic factors including low education level and migrant background predict a perception of high terrorism risk in Australia, indicating the need for group-specific terrorist risk communication strategies in this country.

Garry Stevens; Kingsley Agho; Melanie Taylor; Margo Barr; Beverley Raphael; Louisa Jorm

2009-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

429

System Theoretic Approach for Determining Causal Factors of Quality Loss in Complex System Design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Traditional design methods such as Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA), Fault Tree Analysis (FTA to identify more causal factors for quality losses than FMEA or FTA, including component interactions

430

Precise Neutron Magnetic Form Factors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Precise data on the neutron magnetic form factor G_{mn} have been obtained with measurements of the ratio of cross sections of D(e,e'n) and D(e,e'p) up to momentum transfers of Q^2 = 0.9 (GeV/c)^2. Data with typical uncertainties of 1.5% are presented. These data allow for the first time to extract a precise value of the magnetic radius of the neutron.

G. Kubon; H. Anklin; P. Bartsch; D. Baumann; W. U. Boeglin; K. Bohinc; R. Boehm; C. Carasco; M. O. Distler; I. Ewald; J. Friedrich; J. M Friedrich; M. Hauger; A. Honegger; P. Jennewein; J. Jourdan; M. Kahrau; K. W. Krygier; A. Liesenfeld; H. Merkel; U. Mueller; R. Neuhausen; Ch. Normand; Th. Petitjean; Th. Pospischil; M. Potokar; D. Rohe; G. Rosner; H. Schmieden; I. Sick; S. Sirca; Ph. Trueb; A. Wagner; Th. Walcher; G. Warren; M. Weis; H. Woehrle; M. ZeierJ. Zhao; B. Zihlmann

2001-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

431

The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Includes $4.5 billion for the  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Includes $4.5 billion The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Includes $4.5 billion for the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Includes $4.5 billion for the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability February 25, 2009 - 4:52pm Addthis President Barack Obama signed into law the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (P.L.111-5). The $787 billion economic recovery package represents the largest and most ambitious effort to stimulate the economy in United States history. The Department of Energy (DOE) will be responsible for implementing over $38 billion of the $787 billion package. Of the DOE total, $4.5 Billion is allotted to the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability. As outlined in the legislation, these funds are an investment in a

432

Order Module--DOE O 440.1B, WORKER PROTECTION PROGRAM FOR DOE (INCLUDING  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

40.1B, WORKER PROTECTION PROGRAM FOR DOE 40.1B, WORKER PROTECTION PROGRAM FOR DOE (INCLUDING NNSA) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES Order Module--DOE O 440.1B, WORKER PROTECTION PROGRAM FOR DOE (INCLUDING NNSA) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES The familiar level of this module is divided into two sections. In the first section, we will discuss the objective, requirements, and the responsibilities assigned to the heads of field elements. In the second section, we will discuss the content of attachment 1, Functional Area Requirements. We have provided examples and a practice to help familiarize you with the material. The practice will also help prepare you for the criterion test. DOE Order Self Study Modules - DOE O 440.1B, Worker Protection Management for DOE (Including the National Nuclear Security Administration) Federal Employees

433

1) What are the current and future communications needs of utilities, including  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

(1) What are the current and future communications needs of utilities, including for the (1) What are the current and future communications needs of utilities, including for the deployment of new Smart Grid applications, and how are these needs being met? The current communication needs of SCE include: telephony, data, video, voice dispatch, mobile data, grid monitoring, grid control, tele-protection, customer communication, load management, automated meter reading, and collaboration capabilities ranging from virtual meetings to e-learning. SCE is using a combination of private, leased, and shared telecommunication networks to support these requirements. Those applications that require high availability, low latency, and stringent security rely on a private telecommunications network (SCEnet). A combination of transport media are

434

Order Module--DOE O 440.1B, WORKER PROTECTION PROGRAM FOR DOE (INCLUDING  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Order Module--DOE O 440.1B, WORKER PROTECTION PROGRAM FOR DOE Order Module--DOE O 440.1B, WORKER PROTECTION PROGRAM FOR DOE (INCLUDING NNSA) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES Order Module--DOE O 440.1B, WORKER PROTECTION PROGRAM FOR DOE (INCLUDING NNSA) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES The familiar level of this module is divided into two sections. In the first section, we will discuss the objective, requirements, and the responsibilities assigned to the heads of field elements. In the second section, we will discuss the content of attachment 1, Functional Area Requirements. We have provided examples and a practice to help familiarize you with the material. The practice will also help prepare you for the criterion test. DOE Order Self Study Modules - DOE O 440.1B, Worker Protection Management for DOE (Including the National Nuclear Security Administration) Federal

435

C3E also includes a network of leaders from the public, private, non-profit  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

C3E also includes a network of leaders from the public, private, non-profit, C3E also includes a network of leaders from the public, private, non-profit, and academic sectors who support advocacy, research, scholarships, hands-on training, funding, and networking opportunities to prepare and inspire young women to enter and thrive in STEM fields. C3E Network participants have pledged many types of commitments, from highlighting female role models to creating hands-on activities for young girls. Ongoing activities include: * Filming and featuring women in clean energy fields on online / TV outlets (Earth Day Network); * Designing pilot projects and expanding Young Women's Conferences at DOE's

436

Including Alternative Resources in State Renewable Portfolio Standards: Current Design and Implementation Experience  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Including Alternative Resources Including Alternative Resources in State Renewable Portfolio Standards: Current Design and Implementation Experience Jenny Heeter and Lori Bird Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-55979 November 2012 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Including Alternative Resources in State Renewable Portfolio Standards: Current Design and Implementation Experience Jenny Heeter and Lori Bird Prepared under Task No. SAO9.3110

437

Force measuring valve assemblies, systems including such valve assemblies and related methods  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods of evaluating a fluid condition may include stroking a valve member and measuring a force acting on the valve member during the stroke. Methods of evaluating a fluid condition may include measuring a force acting on a valve member in the presence of fluid flow over a period of time and evaluating at least one of the frequency of changes in the measured force over the period of time and the magnitude of the changes in the measured force over the period of time to identify the presence of an anomaly in a fluid flow and, optionally, its estimated location. Methods of evaluating a valve condition may include directing a fluid flow through a valve while stroking a valve member, measuring a force acting on the valve member during the stroke, and comparing the measured force to a reference force. Valve assemblies and related systems are also disclosed.

DeWall, Kevin George (Pocatello, ID); Garcia, Humberto Enrique (Idaho Falls, ID); McKellar, Michael George (Idaho Falls, ID)

2012-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

438

Fabrication of contacts for silicon solar cells including printing burn through layers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for fabricating a contact (240) for a solar cell (200). The method includes providing a solar cell substrate (210) with a surface that is covered or includes an antireflective coating (220). For example, the substrate (210) may be positioned adjacent or proximate to an outlet of an inkjet printer (712) or other deposition device. The method continues with forming a burn through layer (230) on the coating (220) by depositing a metal oxide precursor (e.g., using an inkjet or other non-contact printing method to print or apply a volume of liquid or solution containing the precursor). The method includes forming a contact layer (240) comprising silver over or on the burn through layer (230), and then annealing is performed to electrically connect the contact layer (240) to the surface of the solar cell substrate (210) through a portion of the burn through layer (230) and the coating (220).

Ginley, David S; Kaydanova, Tatiana; Miedaner, Alexander; Curtis, Calvin J; Van Hest, Marinus Franciscus Antonius Maria

2014-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

439

Quantum Computers, Factoring, and Decoherence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In a quantum computer any superposition of inputs evolves unitarily into the corresponding superposition of outputs. It has been recently demonstrated that such computers can dramatically speed up the task of finding factors of large numbers -- a problem of great practical significance because of its cryptographic applications. Instead of the nearly exponential ($\\sim \\exp L^{1/3}$, for a number with $L$ digits) time required by the fastest classical algorithm, the quantum algorithm gives factors in a time polynomial in $L$ ($\\sim L^2$). This enormous speed-up is possible in principle because quantum computation can simultaneously follow all of the paths corresponding to the distinct classical inputs, obtaining the solution as a result of coherent quantum interference between the alternatives. Hence, a quantum computer is sophisticated interference device, and it is essential for its quantum state to remain coherent in the course of the operation. In this report we investigate the effect of decoherence on the quantum factorization algorithm and establish an upper bound on a ``quantum factorizable'' $L$ based on the decoherence suffered per operational step.

I. Chuang; Raymond Laflamme; P. Shor; W. Zurek

1995-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

440

Hub Synchronization in Scale-Free Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Heterogeneity in the degree distribution is known to suppress global synchronization in complex networks of symmetrically coupled oscillators. Scale-free networks display a great deal of heterogeneity, containing a few nodes, termed hubs, that are highly connected, while most nodes receive only a few connections. Here, we show that a group of synchronized nodes may appear in scale-free networks: hubs undergo a transition to synchronization while the other nodes remain unsynchronized. This general phenomenon can occur even in the absence of global synchronization. Our results suggest that scale-free networks may have evolved to complement various levels of synchronization.

Tiago Pereira

2010-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes scale factor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Method and system for small scale pumping  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates generally to the field of small scale pumping and, more specifically, to a method and system for very small scale pumping media through microtubes. One preferred embodiment of the invention generally comprises: method for small scale pumping, comprising the following steps: providing one or more media; providing one or more microtubes, the one or more tubes having a first end and a second end, wherein said first end of one or more tubes is in contact with the media; and creating surface waves on the tubes, wherein at least a portion of the media is pumped through the tube.

Insepov, Zeke (Darien, IL); Hassanein, Ahmed (Bolingbrook, IL)

2010-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

442

Coherence Scale of the Kondo Lattice  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is shown that the large- N approach yields two energy scales for the Kondo lattice model. The single-impurity Kondo temperature, TK, signals the onset of local singlet formation, while Fermi-liquid coherence sets in only below a lower scale, T?. At low conduction electron density nc (exhaustion limit), the ratio T?/TK is much smaller than unity, and is shown to depend only on nc and not on the Kondo coupling. The physical meaning of these two scales is demonstrated by computing several quantities as a function of nc and temperature.

S. Burdin; A. Georges; D. R. Grempel

2000-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

443

Scaling the policy response to climate change  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This article assesses the advantages and disadvantages of fighting climate change through local, bottom-up strategies as well as global, top-down approaches. After noting that each scale of actionthe local and the globalhas distinct costs and benefits, the article explores the importance of scale in three case studies (the EU Emissions Trading Scheme, Clean Development Mechanism of the Kyoto Protocol, and efforts at adaptation/mitigation). It concludes that local thinking must be coupled with global and national scales of action in order to achieve the levels of carbon dioxide reductions needed to avoid dangerous climate impacts.

Benjamin K. Sovacool; Marilyn A. Brown

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Capillary Adhesion at the Nanometer Scale  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Molecular dynamics simulations are used to study the capillary adhesion from a nonvolatile liquid meniscus between a spherical tip and a flat substrate. The atomic structure of the tip, the tip radius, the contact angles of the liquid on the two surfaces, and the volume of the liquid bridge are varied. The capillary force between the tip and substrate is calculated as a function of their separation h. The force agrees with continuum predictions for h down to ~ 5 to 10nm. At smaller h, the force tends to be less attractive than predicted and has strong oscillations. This oscillatory component of the capillary force is completely missed in the continuum theory, which only includes contributions from the surface tension around the circumference of the meniscus and the pressure difference over the cross section of the meniscus. The oscillation is found to be due to molecular layering of the liquid confined in the narrow gap between the tip and substrate. This effect is most pronounced for large tip radii and/or smooth surfaces. The other two components considered by the continuum theory are also identified. The surface tension term, as well as the meniscus shape, is accurately described by the continuum prediction for h down to ~ 1nm, but the capillary pressure term is always more positive than the corresponding continuum result. This shift in the capillary pressure reduces the average adhesion by a factor as large as 2 from its continuum value and is found to be due to an anisotropy in the pressure tensor. The cross-sectional component is consistent with the capillary pressure predicted by the continuum theory (i.e., the Young-Laplace equation), but the normal pressure that determines the capillary force is always more positive than the continuum counterpart.

Shengfeng Cheng; Mark O. Robbins

2014-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

445

Computation of the split factor of earth fault currents by considering the proximity effects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To determine a safe substation grounding grid in power systems, it is important to compute the split factor for earth fault current including the proximity influences among the grid and the earthing systems of the incoming/outgoing transmission lines' ... Keywords: earth fault currents, grounding grid design, proximity effects, split factor, touch and step voltages

N. Ramezani; S. M. Shahrtash

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Cognitive and Environmental Factors Influencing the Process of Spatial Knowledge Acquisition within Virtual Reality Environments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

As the fidelity of virtual environments VE continues to increase, the possibility of using them as training platforms is becoming increasingly realistic for a variety of application domains, including military and emergency personnel training. In the ... Keywords: Cognitive Factors, Environmental Factors, Individual User Differences, Spatial Knowledge Acquisition SKA, Virtual Environments VE

Markos Kyritsis, Stephen R. Gulliver, Sonali Morar

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

PLT scaling laws for thermonuclear fusion power multiplication  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

While present experiments are evaluated on the basis of confinement time, it is the fusion power multiplication factor, Q, and the fusion power which will be the parameters that measure the performance of ignition experiments and fusion reactors. We have determined the relationship of Q to tau/sub E/ and the Lawson number, n tau/sub e/, for ohmically heated plasmas from the Princeton Large Tokamak (PLT). Q, tau/sub E/, and n tau/sub E/ all increase with density at low densities. Above anti n/sub e/ approx. = 4 x 10/sup 13/ cm/sup -3/, tau/sub Ee/ approx. = 30 msec, or anti n/sub e/ tau/sub Ee/ approx. = 1.5 x 10/sup 12/ cm/sup -3/s, Q saturates. Q scaling has also been obtained on PLT as a function of toroidal magnetic field, plasma current, and auxiliary heating power.

Grisham, L.R.; Strachan, J.D.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Mountaineer Commerical Scale Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Final Technical documents all work performed during the award period on the Mountaineer Commercial Scale Carbon Capture & Storage project. This report presents the findings and conclusions produced as a consequence of this work. As identified in the Cooperative Agreement DE-FE0002673, AEP's objective of the Mountaineer Commercial Scale Carbon Capture and Storage (MT CCS II) project is to design, build and operate a commercial scale carbon capture and storage (CCS) system capable of treating a nominal 235 MWe slip stream of flue gas from the outlet duct of the Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) system at AEP's Mountaineer Power Plant (Mountaineer Plant), a 1300 MWe coal-fired generating station in New Haven, WV. The CCS system is designed to capture 90% of the CO{sub 2} from the incoming flue gas using the Alstom Chilled Ammonia Process (CAP) and compress, transport, inject and store 1.5 million tonnes per year of the captured CO{sub 2} in deep saline reservoirs. Specific Project Objectives include: (1) Achieve a minimum of 90% carbon capture efficiency during steady-state operations; (2) Demonstrate progress toward capture and storage at less than a 35% increase in cost of electricity (COE); (3) Store CO{sub 2} at a rate of 1.5 million tonnes per year in deep saline reservoirs; and (4) Demonstrate commercial technology readiness of the integrated CO{sub 2} capture and storage system.

Deanna Gilliland; Matthew Usher

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

449

Seismic fragility formulations for segmented buried pipeline systems including the impact of differential ground subsidence  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Though Differential Ground Subsidence (DGS) impacts the seismic response of segmented buried pipelines augmenting their vulnerability, fragility formulations to estimate repair rates under such condition are not available in the literature. Physical models to estimate pipeline seismic damage considering other cases of permanent ground subsidence (e.g. faulting, tectonic uplift, liquefaction, and landslides) have been extensively reported, not being the case of DGS. The refinement of the study of two important phenomena in Mexico City - the 1985 Michoacan earthquake scenario and the sinking of the city due to ground subsidence - has contributed to the analysis of the interrelation of pipeline damage, ground motion intensity, and DGS; from the analysis of the 48-inch pipeline network of the Mexico City's Water System, fragility formulations for segmented buried pipeline systems for two DGS levels are proposed. The novel parameter PGV{sup 2}/PGA, being PGV peak ground velocity and PGA peak ground acceleration, has been used as seismic parameter in these formulations, since it has shown better correlation to pipeline damage than PGV alone according to previous studies. By comparing the proposed fragilities, it is concluded that a change in the DGS level (from Low-Medium to High) could increase the pipeline repair rates (number of repairs per kilometer) by factors ranging from 1.3 to 2.0; being the higher the seismic intensity the lower the factor.

Pineda Porras, Omar Andrey [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ordaz, Mario [UNAM, MEXICO CITY

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Origin of Scale-Dependent Dispersivity and Its Implications For Miscible Gas Flooding  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dispersive mixing has an important impact on the effectiveness of miscible floods. Simulations routinely assume Fickian dispersion, yet it is well established that dispersivity depends on the scale of measurement. This is one of the main reasons that a satisfactory method for design of field-scale miscible displacement processes is still not available. The main objective of this project was to improve the understanding of the fundamental mechanisms of dispersion and mixing, particularly at the pore scale. To this end, microsensors were developed and used in the laboratory to measure directly the solute concentrations at the scale of individual pores; the origin of hydrodynamic dispersion was evaluated from first principles of laminar flow and diffusion at the grain scale in simple but geometrically completely defined porous media; techniques to use flow reversal to distinguish the contribution to dispersion of convective spreading from that of true mixing; and the field scale impact of permeability heterogeneity on hydrodynamic dispersion was evaluated numerically. This project solved a long-standing problem in solute transport in porous media by quantifying the physical basis for the scaling of dispersion coefficient with the 1.2 power of flow velocity. The researchers also demonstrated that flow reversal uniquely enables a crucial separation of irreversible and reversible contributions to mixing. The interpretation of laboratory and field experiments that include flow reversal provides important insight. Other advances include the miniaturization of long-lasting microprobes for in-situ, pore-scale measurement of tracers, and a scheme to account properly in a reservoir simulator (grid-block scale) for the contributions of convective spreading due to reservoir heterogeneity and of mixing.

Steven Bryant; Russ Johns; Larry Lake; Thomas Harmon

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

451

Two-dimensional numerical methods in electromagnetic hypersonics including fully coupled Maxwell equations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the magnetic field source (solenoid or permanent magnet). To test the technique, we show the results obtainedTwo-dimensional numerical methods in electromagnetic hypersonics including fully coupled Maxwell Keplerlaan 1, 2200 AG Noordwijk, The Netherlands We describe a numerical technique for solving the coupled

D'Ambrosio, Domenic

452

1. INTRODUCTION Bridge engineering is not only about designing but also includes "looking after" and maintain-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1. INTRODUCTION Bridge engineering is not only about designing but also includes "looking after" and maintain- ing the service-life of bridges. In the UK, after a period of relative neglect in the 1970s there was a growing awareness of the necessity to safeguard and maintain the stock of bridges as part of the national

453

Asymptotic stability of ground states in 3D nonlinear Schrodinger equation including subcritical cases  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Asymptotic stability of ground states in 3D nonlinear Schr?odinger equation including subcritical general encompassing for the first time both subcritical and supercritical (in L 2 ) nonlinearities. We #12; The main contribution of our result is to allow for subcritical and critical (L 2

454

Asymptotic stability of ground states in 3D nonlinear Schrodinger equation including subcritical cases  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Asymptotic stability of ground states in 3D nonlinear Schr¨odinger equation including subcritical general encompassing for the first time both subcritical and supercritical (in L2 ) nonlinearities. We result is to allow for subcritical and critical (L2 ) nonlinearities, 0

Kirr, Eduard-Wilhelm

455

Asymptotic stability of ground states in 2D nonlinear Schrodinger equation including subcritical cases  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Asymptotic stability of ground states in 2D nonlinear Schr¨odinger equation including subcritical encompassing for the first time both subcritical and supercrit- ical (in L2 ) nonlinearities. We study) = ei g(s), R. (1.4) The equation has important applications in statistical physics, optics and water

456

Asymptotic stability of ground states in 2D nonlinear Schrodinger equation including subcritical cases  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Asymptotic stability of ground states in 2D nonlinear Schr¨odinger equation including subcritical general encompassing for the first time both subcritical and supercritical (in L2 ) nonlinearities. We physics, optics and water waves. For g(s) = s3 , it describes certain limiting behavior of Bose

Zarnescu, Arghir Dani

457

The efficient frontier for a portfolio that includes one risk-free asset  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents a description of the efficient frontier of a portfolio composed by three assets, including a risk-free asset. We use a data analysis method to obtain two classes of assets and then we estimate the risk of each asset corresponding ... Keywords: efficient frontier, optimization, portfolio selection, principal component analysis, risk estimation

Florentin Serban; Maria Viorica Stefanescu; Silvia Dedu

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

MAC-Kaust Project P1 CO2 Sequestration Modeling of CO2 sequestration including parameter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MAC-Kaust Project P1 ­ CO2 Sequestration Modeling of CO2 sequestration including parameter identification and numerical simulation M. Brokate, O. A. PykhteevHysteresis aspects of CO2 sequestration modeling K-H. Hoffmann, N. D. Botkin Objectives and methods of CO2 sequestration There is a popular belief

Turova, Varvara

459

Functional designed to include surface effects in self-consistent density functional theory R. Armiento1,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Functional designed to include surface effects in self-consistent density functional theory R 2005 We design a density-functional-theory DFT exchange-correlation functional that enables an accurate density functional theory1 DFT is a method for electronic structure calculations of unparalleled

Armiento, Rickard

460

Office of River Protection Looks Back on 2014 Achievements, Including Tank Retrieval Progress  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

RICHLAND, Wash. In 2014, EMs Office of River Protection (ORP) marked several accomplishments at the Hanford site, including continuing efforts to resolve remaining technical issues with the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP); restarting operations of the 242-A Evaporator; establishing waste acceptance limits for WTP; and continuing progress in waste tank retrievals.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes scale factor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Breakfast Pastry Platters Includes a variety of scones, muffins, fruit and cheese Danish and cinnamon rolls.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Breakfast Breakfast Pastry Platters Includes a variety of scones, muffins, fruit and cheese Danish Fruit Tarts, Mini Lemon Tarts and Cream Puffs. (Minimum order 10) ........... each pastry | $2.50 Quiche.) ............................................................................each quiche | $30 Fresh Fruit Salad An assortment of fresh melon, bananas, pineapple, grapes

Liberzon, Daniel

462

What measures climate? A variety of variables including their variability and extreme values determine climate for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

climate zones? The sun is the ultimate power source for the climate "machine". The uneven distribution conditions. Typical variables to consider are temperature (maximum, miniumum), precipitation (includes rain, sleet, snow, hail, etc), sunlight/cloudiness, wind, humidity, ice cover, sea temperature, etc... Many

Allan, Richard P.

463

Solar Energy Education. Home economics: teacher's guide. Field test edition. [Includes glossary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An instructional aid is provided for home economics teachers who wish to integrate the subject of solar energy into their classroom activities. This teacher's guide was produced along with the student activities book for home economics by the US Department of Energy Solar Energy Education. A glossary of solar energy terms is included. (BCS)

Not Available

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Solar Energy Education. Industrial arts: teacher's guide. Field test edition. [Includes glossary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An instructional aid is presented which integrates the subject of solar energy into the classroom study of industrial arts. This guide for teachers was produced in addition to the student activities book for industrial arts by the USDOE Solar Energy Education. A glossary of solar energy terms is included. (BCS)

Not Available

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Confirmed speakers include: THE GLOBAL ROLE OF VIRUSES IN BLOOM TERMINATION, BIODIVERSITY AND MARINE ECOLOGY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IN BLOOM TERMINATION, BIODIVERSITY AND MARINE ECOLOGY GUNNAR BRATBAK ­ University of Bergen, NorwayConfirmed speakers include: THE GLOBAL ROLE OF VIRUSES IN BLOOM TERMINATION, BIODIVERSITY AND MARINE ECOLOGY GUNNAR BRATBAK ­ University of Bergen, Norway COLLECTION, PROCESSING AND PRESERVATION

Wilhelm, Steven W.

466

Worker Protection Program for DOE (Including the National Nuclear Security Administration) Federal Employees  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The Order establishes the framework for an effective worker protection program that will reduce or prevent injuries, illnesses, and accidental losses by providing Department of Energy (DOE), including National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Federal workers with a safe and healthful workplace. Cancels DOE O 440.1A. Certified 6/17/2011. Canceled by DOE O 440.1B Chg 1.

2007-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

467

Accounting for the Energy Consumption of Personal Computing Including Portable Devices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Accounting for the Energy Consumption of Personal Computing Including Portable Devices Pavel.S.A vinod.namboodiri@wichita.edu ABSTRACT In light of the increased awareness of global energy consumption the share of energy consumption due to these equipment over the years, these have rarely characterized

Namboodiri, Vinod

468

EARTH SCIENCESEARTH SCIENCESEARTH SCIENCES This major includes a spectrum of disciplines focused on understanding the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EARTH SCIENCESEARTH SCIENCESEARTH SCIENCES This major includes a spectrum of disciplines focused this understanding to read the record of earth history written in rocks and sediments, and on developing models by humans. Opportunities for Students Sigma Gamma Epsilon: The Omega Chapter of the national honorary earth

Krylov, Anna I.

469

Your membership includes: S10health Fitness Centre; Group Fitness Classes; Swimming Pool,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Your membership includes: S10health Fitness Centre; Group Fitness Classes; Swimming Pool, Sauna Standard Price Concessions* (at Off Peak times only) Swimming £4.00 £3.00 Group Fitness Classes (1 hour/45.sport-sheffield.com Support line: 0114 222 6996 #12;Pool Timetable 11th June ­ 23rd September 2012 The Matrix bouldering wall

Li, Yi

470

POLITICAL SCIENCE 2013 SCHOLARSHIP APPLICATION (Includes Alumni, Brazil, Francis, Glickman, Hubbard, Young, and Rinn Scholarships)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

POLITICAL SCIENCE 2013 SCHOLARSHIP APPLICATION (Includes Alumni, Brazil, Francis, Glickman, Hubbard. _____________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________ Please have a member of the SJSU Political Science faculty who is willing to provide a reference sign this application. Faculty sponsor's signature: Applicant's signature: You can apply for as many Political Science

Su, Xiao

471

Improved One-dimensional Analysis of CMOS Photodiode Including Epitaxial-Substrate Junction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Improved One-dimensional Analysis of CMOS Photodiode Including Epitaxial-Substrate Junction J. S-dimensional analysis of CMOS photodiode has been derived in which the effect of the substrate, which forms a high-empirical expression exhibits a good agreement with the measured spectral response of n+ pepi photodiodes fabricated

Hornsey, Richard

472

Primal-Dual Interior Point Method Applied to the Short Term Hydroelectric Scheduling Including a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Primal-Dual Interior Point Method Applied to the Short Term Hydroelectric Scheduling Including that minimizes losses in the transmission and costs in the generation of a hydroelectric power system, formulated such perturbing parameter. Keywords-- Hydroelectric power system, Network flow, Predispatch, Primal-dual interior

Oliveira, Aurélio R. L.

473

Student Poster Competition The 2004 UFFC Joint Anniversary Conference will include a Student Poster  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Student Poster Competition The 2004 UFFC Joint Anniversary Conference will include a Student Poster to the student's CV. Students who are submitting abstracts for presentation are also invited to participate in this student paper competition. Abstracts submitted by students for the Student Paper Competition

Lu, Jian-yu

474

Humanities: 12 credits (L,H,X,Z) --Must include 6 credits Literature (L)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Humanities: 12 credits (L,H,X,Z) -- Must include 6 credits Literature (L) Social Science: 12-level credits in residence in each major BREADTH of Exploration in the Liberal Arts & Sciences DEPTH of Inquiry in the Liberal Arts & Sciences Mastery of Intermediate/Advanced Work: 60 credits (I,A,D) QUANTITY & QUALITY

Liblit, Ben

475

Vertebrates are animals with a backbone and include mammals, birds and fishes. Considering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vertebrates are animals with a backbone and include mammals, birds and fishes. Considering roughly three quarters of the earth is covered in water it should be no surprise that fish are the most numerous vertebrates in the world. According to the Florida Museum of Natural History there are about 28,000 known fish

Watson, Craig A.

476

Safety First Safety Last Safety Always Aerial lifts include the following types of vehicle-mounted  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Safety First Safety Last Safety Always Aerial lifts include the following types of vehicle, if they can be installed safely. Aerial Lifts Safety Tip #11 A spill, a slip, a hospital trip #12;Additional Information for Presenters Review the information provided on the reverse side of this safety tip sheet

Minnesota, University of

477

Safety First Safety Last Safety Always Personal fall-protection systems include a body harness (safe-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Safety First Safety Last Safety Always Personal fall-protection systems include a body harness so they will not be damaged. Personal Fall-Protection Systems Safety Tip #8 Just because you always;Additional Information for Presenters Review the information provided on the reverse side of this safety tip

Minnesota, University of

478

Abstract. Increased ethylene evolution accompanies seed germination of many species including Pisum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract. Increased ethylene evolution accompanies seed germination of many species including Pisum sativum L., but only a little is known about the regulation of the ethylene biosynthetic pathway in dierent seed tissues. Biosynthesis of the direct ethylene precursor 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid

Leubner, Gerhard

479

A virtual environment for the interrogation of 3D polycrystalline microstructure including  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A virtual environment for the interrogation of 3D polycrystalline microstructure including grain of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, 101 Frank H.T. Rhodes Hall, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853. The macroscopic response is obtained through volume- averaging laws. A constitutive framework for elasto

Zabaras, Nicholas J.

480

A non-isothermal PEM fuel cell model including two water transport mechanisms in the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A non-isothermal PEM fuel cell model including two water transport mechanisms in the membrane K Freiburg Germany A dynamic two-phase flow model for proton exchange mem- brane (PEM) fuel cells and the species concentrations. In order to describe the charge transport in the fuel cell the Poisson equations

Münster, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes scale factor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Learn more about the summer course which includes a 3 week trip to South Africa.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Learn more about the summer course which includes a 3 week trip to South Africa. The program an introduction to the historical and the con- temporary South Africa as well as at least one post trip meeting@binghamton.edu or Josephine Allen at jaallen@binghamton.edu. Destination South Africa - Summer Course 2012 February 28th

Suzuki, Masatsugu

482

SBIR/STTR Release 2 Topics AnnouncedIncludes Hydrogen and Fuel Cells  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The 2015 Small Business Innovation Research and Small Business Technology Transfer (SBIR/STTR) Phase I Release 2 topics include fuel cell-battery electric hybrid trucks and in-line quality control devices for polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells.

483

WBS DICTIONARY This dictionary gives a succinct definition of some of the most important tasks included  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

include the 100 kV insulating platform for the EBIS source and its associated power supplies, as well for the solenoid in order to enable use of its magnet field "tails" for the electron beam transmission in areas support structures for the EBIS, the electron gun, the LEBT line, and the external ion sources. It also

484

NUMERICAL MODELING OF DEFORMATION AND FRACTURE OF WOOD INCLUDING HETEROGENEITY AND ANISOTROPY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NUMERICAL MODELING OF DEFORMATION AND FRACTURE OF WOOD INCLUDING HETEROGENEITY AND ANISOTROPY John A. Nairn Wood Science & Engineering, Oregon State University, USA Abstract The challenge in numerical modeling of wood is to have the model closely match the structure of a real specimen. The model

Nairn, John A.

485

The Peach State Alliance is a coalition of seven higher education institutions, including  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Peach State Alliance is a coalition of seven higher education institutions, including Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation (PS-LSAMP) About the Peach State Alliance "Educating the next, and receive financial support." Stephanie Hernandez Biology Major #12;The Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority

Weber, Rodney

486

Process Testing Results and Scaling for the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Pretreatment Engineering Platform - 10173  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy-Office of River Protections Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is being designed and built to pretreat and then vitrify a large portion of the wastes in Hanfords 177 underground waste storage tanks at Richland, Washington. In support of this effort, engineering-scale tests at the Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) have been completed to confirm the process design and provide improved projections of system capacity. The PEP is a 1/4.5-scale facility designed, constructed, and operated to test the integrated leaching and ultrafiltration processes being deployed at the WTP. The PEP replicates the WTP leaching processes with prototypic equipment and control strategies and non-prototypic ancillary equipment to support the core processing. The testing approach used a nonradioactive aqueous slurry simulant to demonstrate the unit operations of caustic and oxidative leaching, cross-flow ultrafiltration solids concentration, and solids washing. Parallel tests conducted at the laboratory scale with identical simulants provided results that allow scale-up factors to be developed between the laboratory and PEP performance. This paper presents the scale-up factors determined between the laboratory and engineering-scale results and presents arguments that extend these results to the full-scale process.

Kurath, Dean E.; Daniel, Richard C.; Baldwin, David L.; Rapko, Brian M.; Barnes, Steven M.; Gilbert, Robert A.; Mahoney, Lenna A.; Huckaby, James L.

2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

487

Property:Scale Test | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Scale Test Scale Test Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Scale Test Property Type Text Pages using the property "Scale Test" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) M MHK Technologies/Aegir Dynamo + Prototype model has been constructed and tested in a specially designed wave tank MHK Technologies/AirWEC + They had to file a our SBIR Phase I technical report before we could conduct comprehensive open water testing MHK Technologies/Atlantis AN 150 + Atlantis conducted tow testing configuration optimisation and performance enhancement of the Nereus150 prior to offshore installation Tow testing took place in November 2007 and February 2008 the results of this testing were observed verified and validated by Black Veatch B V High correlation between the actual and predicted power output were observed during this testing It is noted that at higher flows the AN400 outperformed the predicted power generation performance during this testing

488

Extreme Scale Computing, Co-design  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Extreme Scale Computing, Co-design Extreme Scale Computing, Co-design Extreme Scale Computing, Co-design Computational co-design may facilitate revolutionary designs in the next generation of supercomputers. Get Expertise Tim Germann Physics and Chemistry of Materials Email Allen McPherson Energy and Infrastructure Analysis Email Turab Lookman Physics and Condensed Matter and Complex Systems Email Computational co-design involves developing the interacting components of a computational system as a whole. Informing system design, ensuring productive and efficient code Project Description To address the increasingly complex problems of the modern world, scientists at Los Alamos are pushing the scale of computing to the extreme, forming partnerships with other national laboratories and industry to

489

External Surveillance of Geothermal Scale Deposits Employing...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

can detect scale buildup in pipes to 1-2 m accuracy. Radiography has also detected corrosion in piping. Development of this technique is shown to be useful of monitoring...

490

Strength scaling of brittle graphitic foam  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...many different type of open- and closed-cell solids such as aerogels (Pekala et al. 1991), graphitic foams (Brezny & Green...mechanical properties and scaling law relationships for silica aerogels and their organic counterparts. Mater. Res. Soc. Symp...

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Large scale prediction models and algorithms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Over 90% of the data available across the world has been produced over the last two years, and the trend is increasing. It has therefore become paramount to develop algorithms which are able to