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1

Scaling Factor Inconsistencies in Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The modern theory of neutrinoless double beta decay includes a scaling factor that has often been treated inconsistently in the literature. The nuclear contribution to the decay half life can be suppressed by 15-20% when scaling factors are mismatched. Correspondingly, $$ is overestimated.

S. Cowell

2005-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

2

Scaling factor inconsistencies in neutrinoless double beta decay  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The modern theory of neutrinoless double beta decay includes a scaling factor that has often been treated inconsistently in the literature. The nuclear contribution to the decay half-life can be suppressed by 15%-20% when scaling factors are mismatched. Correspondingly, is overestimated.

Cowell, S. [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

2006-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

3

DISTINCTIONS The unique combination of factors which distinguish Berea includes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

throughout Appala- chia. SUSTAINABLE CAMPUS FEATURES The College environment demonstrates sustainable living and enhances student learning. Recently renovated historical buildings and residence halls include sustain, Washington Monthly ranked Berea the #1 liberal arts college in the nation Listed as a "Best Buy" college

Baltisberger, Jay H.

4

Infrared Scales and Factorization in QCD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effective field theory methods are used to study factorization of the deep inelastic scattering cross-section. The cross-section is shown to factor in QCD, even though it does not factor in perturbation theory for some choices of the infrared regulator. Messenger modes are not required in soft-collinear effective theory for deep inelastic scattering as x -> 1.

Aneesh V. Manohar

2005-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

5

#include #include  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

process #12;#include #include pid_t pid = fork(); if (pid () failed */ } else if (pid == 0) { /* parent process */ } else { /* child process */ } #12;thread #12

Campbell, Andrew T.

6

#include #include  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#include #include //Rappels : "getpid()" permet d'obtenir son propre pid // "getppid()" renvoie le pid du père d'un processus int main (void) { pid_t pid_fils; pid_fils = fork(); if(pid_fils==-1) { printf("Erreur de création du processus fils\

Poinsot, Laurent

7

Investigation of scaling and inhibition mechanisms and the influencing factors in static and dynamic inhibition tests  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents results of some recent laboratory study on barium sulfate scale inhibition in oilfield brines and investigation of several factors potentially effecting scale inhibition efficiency. In addition to well known mechanisms of scale nucleation inhibition and crystal growth retardation, dispersion/anti-conglomeration appears to be a significant inhibition mechanism associated with some scale inhibitors, which may play an important role in a dynamic flowing system. The contamination of a brine by an organic chelating agent such as EDTA or citric acid did not, in this study, show any significant effect on the barium sulfate inhibition efficiency of any of the three generically different scale inhibitors included. Experiments show that, in a properly enclosed system, the pH of an oilfield brine even with hydrogen bicarbonate presence can be sufficiently buffered with acetic acid. These new results are believed to be useful in evaluating/selecting scale inhibitors and improving barium sulfate scale inhibition test methods.

Yuan, M.D.; Jamieson, E.; Hammonds, P. [Baker Petrolite, Aberdeen (United Kingdom)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

8

Application of exterior complex scaling to positron-hydrogencollisions including rearrangement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The first application of an exterior complex scaling method to an atomic scattering problem with distinct rearrangement channels is reported. Calculations are performed for positron-hydrogen collisions in an s-wave model employing an electron-positron potential of V{sub 12} = -(8+(r{sub 1}-r{sub 2}){sup 2}){sup 1/2}, using the time-independent propagating exterior complex scaling (PECS) method. This potential has the correct long-range Coulomb tail of the full problem and the results demonstrate that ECS-based methods can accurately calculate scattering, ionization and positronium formation cross sections in this three-body rearrangement collision.

Bartlett, Philip L.; Stelbovics, Andris T.; Rescigno, Thomas N.; McCurdy, C. William

2007-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

9

Potential Application Of Radionuclide Scaling Factors To High Level Waste Characterization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Production sources, radiological properties, relative solubilities in waste, and laboratory analysis techniques for the forty-five radionuclides identified in Hanford?s Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Feed Acceptance Data Quality Objectives (DQO) document are addressed in this report. Based on Savannah River Site (SRS) experience and waste characteristics, thirteen of the radionuclides are judged to be candidates for potential scaling in High Level Waste (HLW) based on the concentrations of other radionuclides as determined through laboratory measurements. The thirteen radionuclides conducive to potential scaling are: Ni-59, Zr-93, Nb-93m, Cd-113m, Sn-121m, Sn-126, Cs-135, Sm-151, Ra-226, Ra-228, Ac-227, Pa-231, and Th-229. The ability to scale radionuclides is useful from two primary perspectives: 1) it provides a means of checking the radionuclide concentrations that have been determined by laboratory analysis; and 2) it provides a means of estimating radionuclide concentrations in the absence of a laboratory analysis technique or when a complex laboratory analysis technique fails. Along with the rationale for identifying and applying the potential scaling factors, this report also provides examples of using the scaling factors to estimate concentrations of radionuclides in current SRS waste and into the future. Also included in the report are examples of independent laboratory analysis techniques that can be used to check results of key radionuclide analyses. Effective utilization of radionuclide scaling factors requires understanding of the applicable production sources and the chemistry of the waste. As such, the potential scaling approaches identified in this report should be assessed from the perspective of the Hanford waste before reaching a decision regarding WTP applicability.

Reboul, S. H.

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

10

Factors affecting the rate of hydrolysis of phenylboronic acid in lab-scale precipitate reactor studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Removing aromatic carbon from an aqueous slurry of cesium-137 and other alkali tetraphenylborates by acid hydrolysis will be an important step in preparing high-level radioactive waste for vitrification at the Savannah River Site`s Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Kinetic data obtained in bench-scale precipitate hydrolysis reactors suggest changes in operating parameters to improve product quality in the future plant-scale radioactive operation. The rate-determining step is the removal of the fourth phenyl group, i.e. hydrolysis of phenylboronic acid. Efforts to maximize this rate have established the importance of several factors in the system, including the ratio of copper(II) catalyst to formic acid, the presence of nitrite ion, reactions of diphenylmercury, and the purge gas employed in the system.

Bannochie, C.J.; Marek, J.C.; Eibling, R.E.; Baich, M.A.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Factors affecting the rate of hydrolysis of phenylboronic acid in lab-scale precipitate reactor studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Removing aromatic carbon from an aqueous slurry of cesium-137 and other alkali tetraphenylborates by acid hydrolysis will be an important step in preparing high-level radioactive waste for vitrification at the Savannah River Site's Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Kinetic data obtained in bench-scale precipitate hydrolysis reactors suggest changes in operating parameters to improve product quality in the future plant-scale radioactive operation. The rate-determining step is the removal of the fourth phenyl group, i.e. hydrolysis of phenylboronic acid. Efforts to maximize this rate have established the importance of several factors in the system, including the ratio of copper(II) catalyst to formic acid, the presence of nitrite ion, reactions of diphenylmercury, and the purge gas employed in the system.

Bannochie, C.J.; Marek, J.C.; Eibling, R.E.; Baich, M.A.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

FULL-SCALE, WIND TUNNEL AND CFD WIND ENGINEERING STUDIES A variety of methods can be used to obtain wind engineering design information. These include  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FULL-SCALE, WIND TUNNEL AND CFD WIND ENGINEERING STUDIES A variety of methods can be used to obtain wind engineering design information. These include codes of practice, full-scale, wind tunnel are listed in the table below: Table 1. Relative advantages and disadvantages of wind engineering techniques

Savory, Eric

13

Nonadiabatic dynamics of electron transfer in solution: Explicit and implicit solvent treatments that include multiple relaxation time scales  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development of efficient theoretical methods for describing electron transfer (ET) reactions in condensed phases is important for a variety of chemical and biological applications. Previously, dynamical dielectric continuum theory was used to derive Langevin equations for a single collective solvent coordinate describing ET in a polar solvent. In this theory, the parameters are directly related to the physical properties of the system and can be determined from experimental data or explicit molecular dynamics simulations. Herein, we combine these Langevin equations with surface hopping nonadiabatic dynamics methods to calculate the rate constants for thermal ET reactions in polar solvents for a wide range of electronic couplings and reaction free energies. Comparison of explicit and implicit solvent calculations illustrates that the mapping from explicit to implicit solvent models is valid even for solvents exhibiting complex relaxation behavior with multiple relaxation time scales and a short-time inertial response. The rate constants calculated for implicit solvent models with a single solvent relaxation time scale corresponding to water, acetonitrile, and methanol agree well with analytical theories in the Golden rule and solvent-controlled regimes, as well as in the intermediate regime. The implicit solvent models with two relaxation time scales are in qualitative agreement with the analytical theories but quantitatively overestimate the rate constants compared to these theories. Analysis of these simulations elucidates the importance of multiple relaxation time scales and the inertial component of the solvent response, as well as potential shortcomings of the analytical theories based on single time scale solvent relaxation models. This implicit solvent approach will enable the simulation of a wide range of ET reactions via the stochastic dynamics of a single collective solvent coordinate with parameters that are relevant to experimentally accessible systems.

Schwerdtfeger, Christine A.; Soudackov, Alexander V.; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon, E-mail: shs3@illinois.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 600 South Mathews Avenue, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)] [Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 600 South Mathews Avenue, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

2014-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

14

Mass scale effects for the Sudakov form factors in theories with the broken gauge symmetry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The off-shell and the on-shell Sudakov form factors in theories with broken gauge symmetry are calculated in the double-logarithmic approximation. We have used different infrared cut-offs, i.e. different mass scales, for virtual photons and weak gauge bosons.

A. Barroso; B. I. Ermolaev

2002-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

15

Virtual MISO: Experimental Evaluation of MAC to Network-Scale Factors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Virtual MISO: Experimental Evaluation of MAC to Network-Scale Factors Oscar Bejarano and Edward W-Input Single-Output (vMISO) sys- tems distribute multi-antenna diversity capabilities between a sending and a cooperating node. vMISO has been shown to vastly improve wireless link reliability and bit error rates

16

Extended scaling factors for in situ cosmogenic nuclides: New measurements at low latitude  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Extended scaling factors for in situ cosmogenic nuclides: New measurements at low latitude Darin by the intensity of energetic cosmic-ray nucleons, which changes rapidly with elevation. An incomplete knowledge, and that there has been an incomplete mapping of nucleon fluxes at high RC (low geomagnetic latitude). We report new

Zreda, Marek

17

The X-factor in Galaxies: I. Dependence on Environment and Scale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Characterizing the conversion factor between CO emission and column density of molecular hydrogen, X{sub CO}, is crucial in studying the gaseous content of galaxies, its evolution, and relation to star formation. In most cases the conversion factor is assumed to be close to that of giant molecular clouds (GMCs) in the Milky Way, except possibly for mergers and star-bursting galaxies. However, there are physical grounds to expect that it should also depend on the gas metallicity, surface density, and strength of the interstellar radiation field. The X{sub CO} factor may also depend on the scale on which CO emission is averaged due to effects of limited resolution. We study the dependence of X{sub CO} on gas properties and averaging scale using a model that is based on a combination of results of sub-pc scale magneto-hydrodynamic simulations and on the gas distribution from self-consistent cosmological simulations of galaxy formation. Our model predicts X{sub CO} {approx} 2 - 4 x 10{sup 20} K{sup -1} cm{sup -2} km{sup -1} s, consistent with the Galactic value, for interstellar medium conditions typical for the Milky Way. For such conditions the predicted X{sub CO} varies by only a factor of two for gas surfaced densities in the range {Sigma}{sub H{sub 2}} {approx} 50-500 M{sub {circle_dot}} pc{sup -2}. However, the model also predicts that more generally on the scale of GMCs, X{sub CO} is a strong function of metallicity, and depends on the column density and the interstellar UV flux. We show explicitly that neglecting these dependencies in observational estimates can strongly bias the inferred distribution of H2 column densities of molecular clouds to have a narrower and offset range compared to the true distribution. We find that when averaged on {approx} kpc scales the X-factor depends only weakly on radiation field and column density, but is still a strong function of metallicity. The predicted metallicity dependence can be approximated as X{sub CO} {proportional_to} Z{sup -{gamma}} with {gamma} {approx} 0.5 - 0.8.

Feldmann, Robert; /Fermilab /Chicago U., EFI; Gnedin, Nickolay Y.; /Fermilab /Chicago U., EFI /Chicago U.; Kravtsov, Andrey V.; /Chicago U., EFI /Chicago U.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Scaling study of the pion electroproduction cross sections and the pion form factor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The $^{1}$H($e,e^\\prime \\pi^+$)n cross section was measured for a range of four-momentum transfer up to $Q^2$=3.91 GeV$^2$ at values of the invariant mass, $W$, above the resonance region. The $Q^2$-dependence of the longitudinal component is consistent with the $Q^2$-scaling prediction for hard exclusive processes. This suggests that perturbative QCD concepts are applicable at rather low values of $Q^2$. Pion form factor results, while consistent with the $Q^2$-scaling prediction, are inconsistent in magnitude with perturbative QCD calculations. The extraction of Generalized Parton Distributions from hard exclusive processes assumes the dominance of the longitudinal term. However, transverse contributions to the cross section are still significant at $Q^2$=3.91 GeV$^2$.

Tanja Horn; Xin Qian; John Arrington; Razmik Asaturyan; Fatiha Benmokthar; Werner Boeglin; Peter Bosted; Antje Bruell; Eric Christy; Eugene Chudakov; Ben Clasie; Mark Dalton; AJI Daniel; Donal Day; Dipangkar Dutta; Lamiaa El Fassi; Rolf Ent; Howard Fenker; J. Ferrer; Nadia Fomin; H. Gao; K Garrow; Dave Gaskell; C Gray; G. Huber; M. Jones; N Kalantarians; C. Keppel; K Kramer; Y Li; Y Liang; A. Lung; S Malace; P. Markowitz; A. Matsumura; D. Meekins; T Mertens; T Miyoshi; H. Mykrtchyan; R. Monson; T. Navasardyan; G. Niculescu; I. Niculescu; Y. Okayasu; A. Opper; C Perdrisat; V. Punjabi; A. Rauf; V. Rodriguez; D. Rohe; J Seely; E Segbefia; G. Smith; M. Sumihama; V. Tadevoyan; L Tang; V. Tvaskis; A. Villano; W. Vulcan; F. Wesselmann; S. Wood; L. Yuan; X. Zheng

2007-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

19

PROCEEDINGS of the HUMAN FACTORS AND ERGONOMICS SOCIETY 42nd ANNUAL MEETING--IYYB SCALED WORLDS AS RESEARCH TOOLS: A  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PROCEEDINGS of the HUMAN FACTORS AND ERGONOMICS SOCIETY 42nd ANNUAL MEETING--IYYB 1157 SCALED and Ergonomics Society (pp. 163-167). Santa Monica, CA: HFES. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The work at George Mason

Gray, Wayne

20

Test of a scaling hypothesis for the structure factor of disordered diblock copolymer melts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Coarse-grained theories of dense polymer liquids such as block copolymer melts predict a universal dependence of equilibrium properties on a few dimensionless parameters. For symmetric diblock copolymer melts, such theories predict a universal dependence on only chi N and Nbar, where chi is an effective interaction parameter, N is a degree of polymerization, and Nbar is a measure of overlap. We test whether simulation results for the structure factor S(q) obtained from several different simulation models are consistent with this two-parameter scaling hypothesis. We compare results from three models: (1) a lattice Monte Carlo model, the bond-fluctuation model, (2) a bead-spring model with harsh repulsive interactions, similar to that of Kremer and Grest, and (3) a bead-spring model with very soft repulsion between beads, and strongly overlapping beads. We compare results from pairs of simulations of different models that have been designed to have matched values of Nbar, over a range of values of chi N and N, and devise methods to test the scaling hypothesis without relying on any prediction for how the phenomenological interaction parameter chi depends on more microscopic parameters. The results strongly support the scaling hypothesis, even for rather short chains, confirming that it is indeed possible to give an accurate universal description of simulation models that differ in many details.

Jens Glaser; Jian Qin; Pavani Medapuram; Marcus Mller; David Morse

2012-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes scale factor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Gravity-anti-Gravity Symmetric Mini-Superspace: Quantum Entanglement and Cosmological Scale Factor Grid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A gravity-anti-gravity (GaG) odd linear dilaton action offers an eternal inflation evolution governed by the unified (cosmological constant plus radiation) equation of state $\\rho-3P=4\\Lambda$. At the mini superspace level, a 'two-particle' variant of the no-boundary proposal, notably 'one-particle' energy dependent, is encountered. While a GaG-odd wave function can only host a weak Big Bang boundary condition, albeit for any $k$, a strong Big Bang boundary condition requires a GaG-even entangled wave function, and singles out $k=0$ flat space. The locally most probable values for the cosmological scale factor and the dilaton field form a grid $\\{a^2,a\\phi\\}\\sim\\sqrt{4n_1+1}\\pm\\sqrt{4n_2+1}$.

Aharon Davidson; Tomer Ygael

2014-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

22

Holographic reconstruction of $f(G)$ Gravity for scale factors pertaining to Emergent, Logamediate and Intermediate scenarios  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, we reconstruct the holographic dark energy in the framework of $f(G)$ modified theory of gravity, where $G$ is Gauss-Bonnet invariant. In this context, we choose the infrared cut-off as Granda-Oliveros cut-off which is proportional to the Hubble parameter $H$ and its first derivative with respect to the cosmic time $t$. We reconstruct $f(G)$ model with the inclusion of HDE and three well-known forms of the scale factor $a(t)$, i.e. the emergent, the logamediate and the intermediate scale factors. The reconstructed model as well as equation of state parameter are discussed numerically with the help of graphical representation to explore the accelerated expansion of the universe. Moreover, the stability of the models incorporating all the scale factors is checked through squared speed of sound $v_s^2$.

Abdul Jawad; Antonio Pasqua; Surajit Chattopadhyay

2014-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

23

Observation of Discrete Oscillations in a Model-independent Plot of Cosmological Scale Factor vs. Lookback Time and a Scalar Field Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have observed damped longitudinal cosmological-scale oscillations in a unique model-independent plot of scale factor against lookback time for Type Ia supernovae data. We found several first-derivative relative maxima/minima spanning the range of reported transition-redshifts. These extrema comprise 2 full cycles with a period of approximately 0.15 Hubble times (H0=68 km/s/Mpc). This period corresponds to a fundamental frequency of approximately 7 cycles over the Hubble time. Transition-z values quoted in the literature generally fall near these minima and may explain the reported wide spread up to the predicted LCDM value of approximately z = 0.77. We also observe second and third harmonics of the fundamental. The scale factor data is analyzed several different ways including smoothing, Fourier transform and autocorrelation. We propose a cosmological scalar field harmonic oscillator model for the observation. On this time scale, for a quantum scalar field, the scalar field mass is extraordinarily small at...

Ringermacher, H I

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Concerted bioinformatic analysis of genome-scale blood transcription factor compendium reveals new control mechanisms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 to chromatin by core binding transcription factors. Mol Cell 2012, 45:330343. 5. Trowbridge JJ, Sinha AU, Zhu N, Li M, Armstrong SA, Orkin SH: Haploinsufficiency of Dnmt1 impairs leukemia stem cell function through derepression of bivalent... of polycomb repressive complex 1 to chromatin by core binding transcription factors, Mol. Cell, 2012, 45, 330343. 5 J. J. Trowbridge, A. U. Sinha, N. Zhu, M. Li, S. A. Armstrong and S. H. Orkin, Haploinsufficiency of Dnmt1 impairs leukemia stem cell function...

Joshi, Anagha; Gottgens, Berthold

2014-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

25

Investigation of the scaling factor LVuw in the recovery of oil by water flooding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

rnediuxn and. the Buid system, but also by the length of the flooded system and the x'ate of irjection. They further cor eluded that for floods performed in identical porous media and with the same oil-water viscosity ratio, the total length... water) as a scaling w coefficient. In other words, all floods conducted in a given porous rnediuxn, with a given oil-watex viscosity ratio and haVing the same value of this scalixxg coefficient must behave similarly and yield equal recoveries fax...

McWilliams, Morris Hampton

1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Buried pipelines essentially involve problems of soil-structure interaction that include several complex factors such as geometry, material properties, and boundary  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Abstract Buried pipelines essentially involve problems of soil-structure interaction that include Bend, and Buckling Check. Keywords: buried pipelines, regression, horizontal bend, vertical bend, homoscedasticity, normality. 1 Introduction Analysis and design of buried pipelines are usually based on classical

Al-Shayea, Naser Abdul-Rahman

27

X-RAY SCALING RELATION IN EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES: DARK MATTER AS A PRIMARY FACTOR IN RETAINING HOT GAS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have revisited the X-ray scaling relations of early-type galaxies (ETG) by investigating, for the first time, the L{sub X,Gas}-M{sub Total} relation in a sample of 14 ETGs. In contrast to the large scatter (a factor of 10{sup 2}-10{sup 3}) in the L{sub X,Total}-L{sub B} relation, we found a tight correlation between these physically motivated quantities with an rms deviation of a factor of three in L{sub X,Gas} = 10{sup 38}-10{sup 43} erg s{sup 1} or M{sub Total} = a few 10{sup 10} to a few 10{sup 12} M{sub ?}. More striking, this relation becomes even tighter with an rms deviation of a factor of 1.3 among the gas-rich galaxies (with L{sub X,Gas} > 10{sup 40} erg s{sup 1}). In a simple power-law form, the new relation is (L{sub X,Gas}/10{sup 40} erg s{sup 1}) = (M{sub Total}/3.2 10{sup 11} M{sub ?}){sup 3}. This relation is also consistent with the steep relation between the gas luminosity and temperature, L{sub X,Gas} ? T{sub Gas} {sup 4.5}, identified by Boroson et al., if the gas is virialized. Our results indicate that the total mass of an ETG is the primary factor in regulating the amount of hot gas. Among the gas-poor galaxies (with L{sub X,Gas} < a few 10{sup 39} erg s{sup 1}), the scatter in the L{sub X,Gas}-M{sub Total} (and L{sub X,Gas}-T{sub Gas}) relation increases, suggesting that secondary factors (e.g., rotation, flattening, star formation history, cold gas, environment, etc.) may become important.

Kim, Dong-Woo; Fabbiano, Giuseppina [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

2013-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

28

Emerging factors associated with the decline of a gray fox population and multi-scale land cover associations of mesopredators in the Chicago metropolitan area.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Statewide surveys of furbearers in Illinois indicate gray (Urocyon cinereoargenteus) and red (Vulpes vulpes) foxes have experienced substantial declines in relative abundance, whereas other species such as raccoons (Procyon lotor) and coyotes (Canis latrans) have exhibited dramatic increases during the same time period. The cause of the declines of gray and red foxes has not been identified, and the current status of gray foxes remains uncertain. Therefore, I conducted a large-scale predator survey and tracked radiocollared gray foxes from 2004 to 2007 in order to determine the distribution, survival, cause-specific mortality sources and land cover associations of gray foxes in an urbanized region of northeastern Illinois, and examined the relationships between the occurrence of gray fox and the presence other species of mesopredators, specifically coyotes and raccoons. Although generalist mesopredators are common and can reach high densities in many urban areas their urban ecology is poorly understood due to their secretive nature and wariness of humans. Understanding how mesopredators utilize urbanized landscapes can be useful in the management and control of disease outbreaks, mitigation of nuisance wildlife issues, and gaining insight into how mesopredators shape wildlife communities in highly fragmented areas. I examined habitat associations of raccoons, opossums (Didelphis virginiana), domestic cats (Felis catus), coyotes, foxes (gray and red), and striped skunks (Mephitis mephitis) at multiple spatial scales in an urban environment. Gray fox occurrence was rare and widely dispersed, and survival estimates were similar to other studies. Gray fox occurrence was negatively associated with natural and semi-natural land cover types. Fox home range size increased with increasing urban development suggesting that foxes may be negatively influenced by urbanization. Gray fox occurrence was not associated with coyote or raccoon presence. However, spatial avoidance and mortality due to coyote predation was documented and disease was a major mortality source for foxes. The declining relative abundance of gray fox in Illinois is likely a result of a combination of factors. Assessment of habitat associations indicated that urban mesopredators, particularly coyotes and foxes, perceived the landscape as relatively homogeneous and that urban mesopredators interacted with the environment at scales larger than that accommodated by remnant habitat patches. Coyote and fox presence was found to be associated with a high degree of urban development at large and intermediate spatial scales. However, at a small spatial scale fox presence was associated with high density urban land cover whereas coyote presence was associated with urban development with increased forest cover. Urban habitats can offer a diversity of prey items and anthropogenic resources and natural land cover could offer coyotes daytime resting opportunities in urban areas where they may not be as tolerated as smaller foxes. Raccoons and opossums were found to utilize moderately developed landscapes with interspersed natural and semi-natural land covers at a large spatial scale, which may facilitate dispersal movements. At intermediate and small spatial scales, both species were found to utilize areas that were moderately developed and included forested land cover. These results indicated that raccoons and opossums used natural areas in proximity to anthropogenic resources. At a large spatial scale, skunk presence was associated with highly developed landscapes with interspersed natural and semi-natural land covers. This may indicate that skunks perceived the urban matrix as more homogeneous than raccoons or opossums. At an intermediate spatial scale skunks were associated with moderate levels of development and increased forest cover, which indicated that they might utilize natural land cover in proximity to human-dominated land cover. At the smallest spatial scale skunk presence was associated with forested land cover surrounded by a suburban matrix. Compared to raccoon

Willingham, Alison N.; /Ohio State U.; ,

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Statistical Analyses of Scatterplots to Identify Important Factors in Large-Scale Simulations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The robustness of procedures for identifying patterns in scatterplots generated in Monte Carlo sensitivity analyses is investigated. These procedures are based on attempts to detect increasingly complex patterns in the scatterplots under consideration and involve the identification of (1) linear relationships with correlation coefficients, (2) monotonic relationships with rank correlation coefficients, (3) trends in central tendency as defined by means, medians and the Kruskal-Wallis statistic, (4) trends in variability as defined by variances and interquartile ranges, and (5) deviations from randomness as defined by the chi-square statistic. The following two topics related to the robustness of these procedures are considered for a sequence of example analyses with a large model for two-phase fluid flow: the presence of Type I and Type II errors, and the stability of results obtained with independent Latin hypercube samples. Observations from analysis include: (1) Type I errors are unavoidable, (2) Type II errors can occur when inappropriate analysis procedures are used, (3) physical explanations should always be sought for why statistical procedures identify variables as being important, and (4) the identification of important variables tends to be stable for independent Latin hypercube samples.

Kleijnen, J.P.C.; Helton, J.C.

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Factor structure, validity and test re-test reliability of the Austin, Farrelly, Black and Moore emotional manipulation scale.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A self report emotional manipulation scale was completed by 121 participants, who also completed a tactics of manipulation scale and a personality measure. A subset of the group (thirty three participants) also completed ...

Smith, Charlotte

2008-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

31

CHARACTERIZATION OF GRAPHITE SLEEVES FROM BUGEY 1 EDF PLANT FOR PERMANENT DISPOSAL--MEASUREMENT AND CALCULATION OF SCALING FACTORS FOR DIFFICULT-TO-MEASURE NUCLIDES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electricite De France's Bugey-1 reactor, with graphite moderator, was shutdown permanently in 1994. The natural uranium elements are encased in graphite sleeves to facilitate handling. 2,000 m3 of concrete containers, containing non conditioned graphite sleeves, must be characterized and conditioned before shipment to the national repository site called ''Centre de l'Aube''. The characterization work consists in quantifying Difficult-To-Measure nuclides (DTM) by the use of Scaling Factors (SF), which use Co-60 as tracer. Bugey developed an industrial method for the gamma counting of each package to perform easily and rapidly the measurement of the Co-60 content. Depending upon the DTM radionuclide, Co-60 scaling factors are determined, or by measurement on graphite samples (case of C-14, Cl-36, Ni-63, H-3), either by using a calculation technique which is based upon the impurities present in the graphite sleeves. This method is applied for the other pure beta emitters all DTM radionucli des : Ag-108m, Be-10, Ca-41, Cd-109, Cd-113m, Co-57, Cs-135, Cs-137, Eu-155, Fe-55, Gd-153, Mo-93, Nb- 93m, Nb-94, Ni-59, Pd-107, Pm-147, Sm-151, Sn-119m, Sn-121m, Sn-126, Sr-90, Tc-99, V-49 and Zr-93. Calculations use six sleeve history cases : 1 year at 50% power, 2 years at 50 % power, 3 years at 50 % power, 4 years at 50 % power, 1 year at 100 % power and 2 years at 100 % power. The DTM nuclides have been calculated from impurity concentrations for each of these six cases, and the greatest scaling factor has been kept. The calculation is based upon two impurity sets: First impurity set : a reverse activation calculation provides us with the best estimate value of impurities calculated from the measured mean gamma spectrum and from measured scaling factors. It consists in solving a system of simultaneous equations for the impurities as a function of the mean gamma radioactive spectrum and of the measured scaling factors. The concerned calculated impurities are Co, Cl, Li, Ag, Cs, Eu, Fe, Ni, Sb, Sc, Zn and Sn. Second impurity set: The other impurities which were not available by this reverse calculation are originated from the greatest value, which has been measured in the graphite and sometimes by using the detection limit. This method allows us to avoid some detection limit problems and statistical weaknesses. It gets better, cheaper and faster characterization by mixing easy gamma spectrum measurement and simple linear calculation.

PONCET, Bernard R.

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

32

Internship Contract (Includes Practicum)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Internship Contract (Includes Practicum) Student's name-mail: _________________________________________ Internship Agency Contact Agency Name: ____________________________________ Address-mail: __________________________________________ Location of Internship, if different from Agency: ________________________________________________ Copies

Thaxton, Christopher S.

33

Pump apparatus including deconsolidator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A pump apparatus includes a particulate pump that defines a passage that extends from an inlet to an outlet. A duct is in flow communication with the outlet. The duct includes a deconsolidator configured to fragment particle agglomerates received from the passage.

Sonwane, Chandrashekhar; Saunders, Timothy; Fitzsimmons, Mark Andrew

2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

34

THE CO-TO-H{sub 2} CONVERSION FACTOR AND DUST-TO-GAS RATIO ON KILOPARSEC SCALES IN NEARBY GALAXIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present ?kiloparsec spatial resolution maps of the CO-to-H{sub 2} conversion factor (?{sub CO}) and dust-to-gas ratio (DGR) in 26 nearby, star-forming galaxies. We have simultaneously solved for ?{sub CO} and the DGR by assuming that the DGR is approximately constant on kiloparsec scales. With this assumption, we can combine maps of dust mass surface density, CO-integrated intensity, and H I column density to solve for both ?{sub CO} and the DGR with no assumptions about their value or dependence on metallicity or other parameters. Such a study has just become possible with the availability of high-resolution far-IR maps from the Herschel key program KINGFISH, {sup 12}CO J = (2-1) maps from the IRAM 30 m large program HERACLES, and H I 21 cm line maps from THINGS. We use a fixed ratio between the (2-1) and (1-0) lines to present our ?{sub CO} results on the more typically used {sup 12}CO J = (1-0) scale and show using literature measurements that variations in the line ratio do not affect our results. In total, we derive 782 individual solutions for ?{sub CO} and the DGR. On average, ?{sub CO} = 3.1 M{sub ?} pc{sup 2} (K km s{sup 1}){sup 1} for our sample with a standard deviation of 0.3 dex. Within galaxies, we observe a generally flat profile of ?{sub CO} as a function of galactocentric radius. However, most galaxies exhibit a lower ?{sub CO} value in the central kiloparseca factor of ?2 below the galaxy mean, on average. In some cases, the central ?{sub CO} value can be factors of 5-10 below the standard Milky Way (MW) value of ?{sub CO,{sub MW}} = 4.4 M{sub ?} pc{sup 2} (K km s{sup 1}){sup 1}. While for ?{sub CO} we find only weak correlations with metallicity, the DGR is well-correlated with metallicity, with an approximately linear slope. Finally, we present several recommendations for choosing an appropriate ?{sub CO} for studies of nearby galaxies.

Sandstrom, K. M.; Walter, F. [Max Planck Institut fr Astronomie, Knigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Leroy, A. K. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Bolatto, A. D.; Wolfire, M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Croxall, K. V.; Crocker, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Mail Drop 111, University of Toledo, 2801 West Bancroft Street, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States); Draine, B. T.; Aniano, G. [Princeton University Observatory, Peyton Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544-1001 (United States); Wilson, C. D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4M1 (Canada); Calzetti, D. [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Kennicutt, R. C.; Galametz, M. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Donovan Meyer, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, SUNY Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3800 (United States); Usero, A. [Observatorio Astronmico Nacional, Alfonso XII, 3, E-28014 Madrid (Spain); Bigiel, F. [Institut fr theoretische Astrophysik, Zentrum fr Astronomie der Universitt Heidelberg, Albert-Ueberle Str. 2, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Brinks, E. [Centre for Astrophysics Research, University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield AL10 9AB (United Kingdom); De Blok, W. J. G. [ASTRON, The Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy, Postbus 2, 7990-AA Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Dale, D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY 82071 (United States); Engelbracht, C. W., E-mail: sandstrom@mpia.de [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); and others

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

A simultaneous measurement of the $b$-tagging efficiency scale factor and the $t\\bar{t}$ Production Cross Section at the Collider Detector at Fermilab  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ability to compare results between Monte Carlo and data is imperative in modern experimental high-energy physics analyses. The b-tagging efficiency Scale Factor (SF) allows for an accurate comparison of b quark identification in data samples and Monte Carlo. This thesis presents a simultaneous measurement of the SF for the SecVtx algorithm and the t{bar t} production cross section using 5.6 fb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collision data at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) experiment. The t{bar t} cross section was measured to be 7.26 {+-} 0.47 pb, consistent with prior CDF analyses. The tight SF value was measured to be 0.925 {+-} 0.032 and the loose SF value was measured at 0.967 {+-} 0.033. These are the most precise SF SecVtx measurements to be performed at CDF to date.

Hussain, Nazim; /McGill U.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Introduction to Small-Scale Wind Energy Systems (Including RETScreen...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Programs DeploymentPrograms: Project Development This video teaches the viewer about wind turbines and RETscreen's wind...

37

Including Variability in Large-Scale Cluster Power Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, mobile (laptop), desktop, and server processor spac- es, reflecting energy-efficient server.rivoire@sonoma.edu University of CA, Santa Cruz3 eka@soe.ucsc.edu Abstract--Studying the energy efficiency of large five-node clusters using embedded, laptop, desktop, and server processors. The variation is manifested

Rivoire, Suzanne

39

Introduction to Small-Scale Photovoltaic Systems (Including RETScreen Case  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpInc Place: EdenOverview Of TheIntevac Jump to:Framework

40

A Statistical Selection Strategy for Normalization Procedures in LC-MS Proteomics Experiments through Dataset Dependent Ranking of Normalization Scaling Factors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Quantification of LC-MS peak intensities assigned during peptide identification in a typical comparative proteomics experiment will deviate from run-to-run of the instrument due to both technical and biological variation. Thus, normalization of peak intensities across a LC-MS proteomics dataset is a fundamental step in pre-processing. However, the downstream analysis of LC-MS proteomics data can be dramatically affected by the normalization method selected . Current normalization procedures for LC-MS proteomics data are presented in the context of normalization values derived from subsets of the full collection of identified peptides. The distribution of these normalization values is unknown a priori. If they are not independent from the biological factors associated with the experiment the normalization process can introduce bias into the data, which will affect downstream statistical biomarker discovery. We present a novel approach to evaluate normalization strategies, where a normalization strategy includes the peptide selection component associated with the derivation of normalization values. Our approach evaluates the effect of normalization on the between-group variance structure in order to identify candidate normalization strategies that improve the structure of the data without introducing bias into the normalized peak intensities.

Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Matzke, Melissa M.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Pounds, Joel G.; Waters, Katrina M.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes scale factor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Correlates of walking and cycling for transport and recreation: factor structure, reliability and behavioural associations of the perceptions of the environment in the neighbourhood scale (PENS)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sources. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were used to identify a set of summary environmental variables using data from the iConnect baseline survey (n?=?3494); test-retest reliability of the individual and summary environmental...

Adams, Emma J; Goodman, Anna; Sahlqvist, Shannon; Bull, Fiona C; Ogilvie, David; on behalf of the iConnect consortium

2013-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

42

Meals included in Conference Registrations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Meals included in Conference Registrations Meals included as part of the cost of a conference the most reasonable rates are obtained. Deluxe hotels and motels should be avoided. GSA rates have been for Georgia high cost areas. 75% of these amounts would be $21 for non- high cost areas and $27 for high cost

Arnold, Jonathan

43

ALLSMOG: an APEX Low-redshift Legacy Survey for MOlecular Gas. I - molecular gas scaling relations, and the effect of the CO/H2 conversion factor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present ALLSMOG, the APEX Low-redshift Legacy Survey for MOlecular Gas. ALLSMOG is a survey designed to observe the CO(2-1) emission line with the APEX telescope, in a sample of local galaxies (0.01 conversion factor. We find an increase in the H2/HI mass ratio with stellar mass which closely matches semi-analytic predictions. We find a mean molecular gas fraction for ALLSMOG galaxies of MH2/M* = (0.09 - 0.13),...

Bothwell, M S; Cicone, C; Maiolino, R; Mller, P; Aravena, M; De Breuck, C; Peng, Y; Espada, D; Hodge, J A; Impellizzeri, C M V; Martn, S; Riechers, D; Walter, F

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Sponsorship includes: Agriculture in the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sponsorship includes: · Agriculture in the Classroom · Douglas County Farm Bureau · Gifford Farm · University of Nebraska Agricultural Research and Development Center · University of Nebraska- Lincoln Awareness Coalition is to help youth, primarily from urban communities, become aware of agriculture

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

45

CORR-REL: A Program for Reliability Analysis and Optimal One-Factor Scaling Douglas R. White and J. Patrick Gray  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-REL currently runs only in a Win32 environment. Further, screen clearing will not work correctly unless ANSI.SYS or ANSI.COM is operating. A copy of ANSI.COM is included on this disk. Type "ansi.com" to run (it will not run if ANSI.SYS is already operating). The easiest way to start CORR-REL is to use the run selection

White, Douglas R.

46

From Hubble diagrams to scale factors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a lower bound on the radius of the universe today $a_0$ and a monotonicity constraint on the Hubble diagram. Our theoretical input is Einstein's kinematics and maximally symmetric universes. Present supernova data yield $a_0 > 1.2\\cdot 10^{26}$ m. A first attempt to quantify the monotonicity constraint is described. We do not see any indication of non-monotonicity.

Thomas Schucker; Andre Tilquin

2005-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

47

Kinetics of the Reaction of the Heaviest Hydrogen Atom with H2, the 4He? + H2 -> 4He?? + H Reaction: Experiments, Accurate Quantal Calculations, and Variational Transition State Theory, including Kinetic Isotope Effects for a Factor of 36.1 in Isotopic Mass  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The neutral muonic helium atom {sup 4}He{mu}, in which one of the electrons of He is replaced by a negative muon, may be effectively regarded as the heaviest isotope of the hydrogen atom, with a mass of 4.115 amu. We report details of the first muon spin rotation ({mu}SR) measurements of the chemical reaction rate constant of {sup 4}He{mu} with molecular hydrogen, {sup 4}He{mu} + H{sub 2} {yields} {sup 4}He{mu}H + H, at temperatures of 295.5, 405, and 500 K, as well as a {mu}SR measurement of the hyperfine coupling constant of muonic He at high pressures. The experimental rate constants, k{sub He{mu}}, are compared with the predictions of accurate quantum mechanical (QM) dynamics calculations carried out on a well converged Born-Huang (BH) potential energy surface, based on complete configuration interaction calculations and including a Born-Oppenheimer diagonal correction. At the two highest measured temperatures the agreement between the quantum theory and experiment is good to excellent, well within experimental uncertainties that include an estimate of possible systematic error, but at 295.5 K the quantum calculations for k{sub He{mu}} are below the experimental value by 2.1 times the experimental uncertainty estimates. Possible reasons for this discrepancy are discussed. Variational transition state theory calculations with multidimensional tunneling have also been carried out for k{sub He{mu}} on the BH surface, and they agree with the accurate QM rate constants to within 30% over a wider temperature range of 200-1000 K. Comparisons between theory and experiment are also presented for the rate constants for both the D + H{sub 2} and Mu + H{sub 2} reactions in a novel study of kinetic isotope effects for the H + H{sub 2} reactions over a factor of 36.1 in isotopic mass of the atomic reactant.

Fleming, Donald G.; Arseneau, Donald J.; Sukhorukov, Oleksandr; Brewer, Jess H.; Mielke, Steven L.; Truhlar, Donald G.; Schatz, George C.; Garrett, Bruce C.; Peterson, Kirk A.

2011-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

48

Scale invariability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I recently demonstrated that the Earth is a forced mechanical oscillator in which springtide induced magnification of all-masses resonance causes tectonics. I here generalize this georesonator concept so to make it apply to any body, anywhere in all the universes and at all times. It turns out that there is no distinction between physics at intergalactic, mechanist, quantum, and smaller scales. Instead of being a constant (of proportionality of physics at all scales), G is a parameter of most general form: G = s e^2, nonlinearly varying amongst different scales s. The so called scale variability of physics but not of G, imagined as such by Planck and Einstein, is due to springtide-induced extreme resonance of Earth masses, critically impeding terrestrial experiments for estimating G, while providing artificial settings for quantum experiments to all trivially "work". I propose that reality is a system of near infinitely many magnifying oscillators where permanent energy decay of all oscillation naturally forb...

Omerbashich, M

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Seepage Model for PA Including Dift Collapse  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document the predictions and analysis performed using the Seepage Model for Performance Assessment (PA) and the Disturbed Drift Seepage Submodel for both the Topopah Spring middle nonlithophysal and lower lithophysal lithostratigraphic units at Yucca Mountain. These results will be used by PA to develop the probability distribution of water seepage into waste-emplacement drifts at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as part of the evaluation of the long term performance of the potential repository. This AMR is in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Flow and Transport Process Model Report'' (CRWMS M&O 2000 [153447]). This purpose is accomplished by performing numerical simulations with stochastic representations of hydrological properties, using the Seepage Model for PA, and evaluating the effects of an alternative drift geometry representing a partially collapsed drift using the Disturbed Drift Seepage Submodel. Seepage of water into waste-emplacement drifts is considered one of the principal factors having the greatest impact of long-term safety of the repository system (CRWMS M&O 2000 [153225], Table 4-1). This AMR supports the analysis and simulation that are used by PA to develop the probability distribution of water seepage into drift, and is therefore a model of primary (Level 1) importance (AP-3.15Q, ''Managing Technical Product Inputs''). The intended purpose of the Seepage Model for PA is to support: (1) PA; (2) Abstraction of Drift-Scale Seepage; and (3) Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Flow and Transport Process Model Report (PMR). Seepage into drifts is evaluated by applying numerical models with stochastic representations of hydrological properties and performing flow simulations with multiple realizations of the permeability field around the drift. The Seepage Model for PA uses the distribution of permeabilities derived from air injection testing in niches and in the cross drift to stochastically simulate the 3D flow of water in the fractured host rock (in the vicinity of potential emplacement drifts) under ambient conditions. The Disturbed Drift Seepage Submodel evaluates the impact of the partial collapse of a drift on seepage. Drainage in rock below the emplacement drift is also evaluated.

G. Li; C. Tsang

2000-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

50

Prices include compostable serviceware and linen tablecloths  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

APPETIZERS Prices include compostable serviceware and linen tablecloths for the food tables.ucdavis.edu. BUTTERNUT SQUASH & BLACK BEAN ENCHILADAS #12;BUFFETS Prices include compostable serviceware and linen

California at Davis, University of

51

A continuum constitutive model for the mechanical behavior of woven fabrics including slip and failure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Woven fabrics are used in many applications, including ballistic armors and fabric-reinforced composites. Advances in small-scale technologies are enabling new applications including fabrics with embedded electronics, ...

King, Michael J. (Michael James), 1978-

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

A parallel scaled conjugate-gradient  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The scaled conjugate- gradient method is a powerful technique for solving large sparse linear systems for form-factor computation. Key words: Gathering radiosity -- Scaled conjugate-gradient method -- Parallel, the Gauss--Jacobi (GJ) method is used in the solution phase. The scaled conjugate-gradient (SCG) method

Aykanat, Cevdet

53

Nuclear scales  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear scales are discussed from the nuclear physics viewpoint. The conventional nuclear potential is characterized as a black box that interpolates nucleon-nucleon (NN) data, while being constrained by the best possible theoretical input. The latter consists of the longer-range parts of the NN force (e.g., OPEP, TPEP, the {pi}-{gamma} force), which can be calculated using chiral perturbation theory and gauged using modern phase-shift analyses. The shorter-range parts of the force are effectively parameterized by moments of the interaction that are independent of the details of the force model, in analogy to chiral perturbation theory. Results of GFMC calculations in light nuclei are interpreted in terms of fundamental scales, which are in good agreement with expectations from chiral effective field theories. Problems with spin-orbit-type observables are noted.

Friar, J.L.

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Scale invariability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I recently demonstrated that the Earth is a mechanical oscillator in which springtide induced magnification of all-masses resonance forces tectonics. I here generalize this georesonator concept so to make it apply to any body, anywhere in all the universes, and at all times. It turns out that there is no distinction between physics at intergalactic, mechanist, quantum, and smaller scales. Instead of being a constant (of proportionality of physics at all scales), G is a parameter of most general form: G = s e^2, nonlinearly varying amongst different scales s. The so called scale variability of physics but not of G, imagined as such by Planck and Einstein, is due to springtide-induced extreme resonance of Earth masses critically impeding terrestrial experiments for estimating G, while providing artificial settings for quantum experiments to all trivially "work". Thus the derived equation is that of levitation. Reality is a system of near infinitely many magnifying oscillators, where permanent energy decay of all oscillation forbids constancy of known "physical constants". This hyperresonator concept explains the magnetism (as every forced oscillator feature), as well as the gravitation (as forward propagation of mechanical vibrations along the aether i.e. throughout the vacuum structure). To test my claim I propose a Space mission to collect on site measurements of eigenperiods of the Sun, its planets, and their satellites. The levitation equitation enables propulsionless Space travel via gravity sailing: Space vehicle hull ought to be engineered so as to automatically adjust its grave mode, to the vehicle instant gravitational surroundings, akin to trout up swimming.

M. Omerbashich

2010-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

55

Transition from Large-Scale to Small-Scale Dynamo  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The dynamo equations are solved numerically with a helical forcing corresponding to the Roberts flow. In the fully turbulent regime the flow behaves as a Roberts flow on long time scales, plus turbulent fluctuations at short time scales. The dynamo onset is controlled by the long time scales of the flow, in agreement with the former Karlsruhe experimental results. The is governed by a generalized {alpha} effect, which includes both the usual {alpha} effect and turbulent diffusion, plus all higher order effects. Beyond the onset we find that this generalized {alpha} effect scales as O(Rm{sup -1}), suggesting the takeover of small-scale dynamo action. This is confirmed by simulations in which dynamo occurs even if the large-scale field is artificially suppressed.

Ponty, Y. [Universite de Nice Sophia-Antipolis, CNRS, Observatoire de la Cote d'Azur, B.P. 4229, Nice cedex 04 (France); Plunian, F. [Institut des Sciences de la Terre, CNRS, Universite Joseph Fourier, B.P. 53, 38041 Grenoble cedex 09 (France)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

56

SMART Scale  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l LPROJECTS IN7 Roadmap forDKT.Awards and IncentivesSHARPofofSMART Scale

57

Net Taxable Gasoline Gallons (Including Aviation Gasoline)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Net Taxable Gasoline Gallons (Including Aviation Gasoline) Period 2000 2001 (2) 2002 2003 2004 "gross" to "net" , was deemed impractical. (5) This report replaces the Gross Taxable Gasoline Gallons (Including Aviation Gasoline) report which will not be produced after December 2002. (6) The November 2007

58

Thin film solar cell including a spatially modulated intrinsic layer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

One or more thin film solar cells in which the intrinsic layer of substantially amorphous semiconductor alloy material thereof includes at least a first band gap portion and a narrower band gap portion. The band gap of the intrinsic layer is spatially graded through a portion of the bulk thickness, said graded portion including a region removed from the intrinsic layer-dopant layer interfaces. The band gap of the intrinsic layer is always less than the band gap of the doped layers. The gradation of the intrinsic layer is effected such that the open circuit voltage and/or the fill factor of the one or plural solar cell structure is enhanced.

Guha, Subhendu (Troy, MI); Yang, Chi-Chung (Troy, MI); Ovshinsky, Stanford R. (Bloomfield Hills, MI)

1989-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

59

Large-scale biomass plantings in Minnesota: Scale-up and demonstration projects in perspective  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Scale-up projects are an important step toward demonstration and commercialization of woody biomass because simply planting extensive acreage of hybrid poplar will not develop markets. Project objectives are to document the cost to plant and establish, and effort needed to monitor and maintain woody biomass on agricultural land. Conversion technologies and alternative end-uses are examined in a larger framework in order to afford researchers and industrial partners information necessary to develop supply and demand on a local or regional scale. Likely to be determined are risk factors of crop failure and differences between establishment of research plots and agricultural scale field work. Production economics are only one consideration in understanding demonstration and scale-up. Others are environmental, marketing, industrial, and agricultural in nature. Markets for energy crops are only beginning to develop. Although information collected as a result of planting up to 5000 acres of hybrid poplar in central Minnesota will not necessarily be transferable to other areas of the country, a national perspective will come from development of regional markets for woody and herbaceous crops. Several feedstocks, with alternative markets in different regions will eventually comprise the entire picture of biofuels feedstock market development. Current projects offer opportunities to learn about the complexity and requirements that will move biomass from research and development to actual market development. These markets may include energy and other end-uses such as fiber.

Kroll, T. [Minnesota Univ., St. Paul, MN (United States). Forestry Div.; Downing, M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

EE Regional Technology Roadmap Includes comparison  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EE Regional Technology Roadmap Includes comparison against 6th Power Plan (Update cyclically Data Clearinghouse BPA/RTF NEEA/Regional Programs Group Update Regional EE Technology Roadmap Lighting

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes scale factor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

DIDACTICAL HOLOGRAPHIC EXHIBIT INCLUDING (HOLOGRAPHIC TELEVISION)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DIDACTICAL HOLOGRAPHIC EXHIBIT INCLUDING HoloTV (HOLOGRAPHIC TELEVISION) José J. Lunazzi , DanielCampinasSPBrasil Abstract: Our Institute of Physics exposes since 1980 didactical exhibitions of holography in Brazil where

de Aguiar, Marcus A. M.

62

JLab announces two Spring Science Series events - topics include 'scale of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFunInfrared LandResponsesIon/SurfacePump-TestingJEDI:User/Researcher

63

Introduction to Small-Scale Wind Energy Systems (Including RETScreen Case  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpInc Place: EdenOverview Of TheIntevac Jump to:FrameworkStudy)

64

BatteryConscious Task Sequencing for Portable Devices Including Voltage/Clock Scaling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

power sources: a battery and a solar panel. The objective was to utilize the solar panel (the ''free

Kambhampati, Subbarao

65

Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material, such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

66

Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

67

Scramjet including integrated inlet and combustor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes a scramjet engine. It comprises: a first surface including an aft facing step; a cowl including: a leading edge and a trailing edge; an upper surface and a lower surface extending between the leading edge and the trailing edge; the cowl upper surface being spaced from and generally parallel to the first surface to define an integrated inlet-combustor therebetween having an inlet for receiving and channeling into the inlet-combustor supersonic inlet airflow; means for injecting fuel into the inlet-combustor at the step for mixing with the supersonic inlet airflow for generating supersonic combustion gases; and further including a spaced pari of sidewalls extending between the first surface to the cowl upper surface and wherein the integrated inlet-combustor is generally rectangular and defined by the sidewall pair, the first surface and the cowl upper surface.

Kutschenreuter, P.H. Jr.; Blanton, J.C.

1992-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

68

Electric Power Monthly, August 1990. [Glossary included  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly summaries of electric utility statistics at the national, Census division, and State level. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data includes generation by energy source (coal, oil, gas, hydroelectric, and nuclear); generation by region; consumption of fossil fuels for power generation; sales of electric power, cost data; and unusual occurrences. A glossary is included.

Not Available

1990-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

69

FGF growth factor analogs  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides a fibroblast growth factor heparin-binding analog of the formula: ##STR00001## where R.sub.1, R.sub.2, R.sub.3, R.sub.4, R.sub.5, X, Y and Z are as defined, pharmaceutical compositions, coating compositions and medical devices including the fibroblast growth factor heparin-binding analog of the foregoing formula, and methods and uses thereof.

Zamora, Paul O. (Gaithersburg, MD); Pena, Louis A. (Poquott, NY); Lin, Xinhua (Plainview, NY); Takahashi, Kazuyuki (Germantown, MD)

2012-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

70

Energy Consumption of Personal Computing Including Portable  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Consumption of Personal Computing Including Portable Communication Devices Pavel Somavat1 consumption, questions are being asked about the energy contribution of computing equipment. Al- though studies have documented the share of energy consumption by this type of equipment over the years, research

Namboodiri, Vinod

71

Communication in automation, including networking and wireless  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Communication in automation, including networking and wireless Nicholas Kottenstette and Panos J and networking in automation is given. Digital communication fundamentals are reviewed and networked control are presented. 1 Introduction 1.1 Why communication is necessary in automated systems Automated systems use

Antsaklis, Panos

72

Subterranean barriers including at least one weld  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A subterranean barrier and method for forming same are disclosed, the barrier including a plurality of casing strings wherein at least one casing string of the plurality of casing strings may be affixed to at least another adjacent casing string of the plurality of casing strings through at least one weld, at least one adhesive joint, or both. A method and system for nondestructively inspecting a subterranean barrier is disclosed. For instance, a radiographic signal may be emitted from within a casing string toward an adjacent casing string and the radiographic signal may be detected from within the adjacent casing string. A method of repairing a barrier including removing at least a portion of a casing string and welding a repair element within the casing string is disclosed. A method of selectively heating at least one casing string forming at least a portion of a subterranean barrier is disclosed.

Nickelson, Reva A.; Sloan, Paul A.; Richardson, John G.; Walsh, Stephanie; Kostelnik, Kevin M.

2007-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

73

Completion strategy includes clay and precipitate control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article describes the conditions which are necessary for a successful oil well completion in the Mississippi and Cherokee zones of South Central Kansas. Topics considered include paraffin precipitation, clay swelling and migration, and iron precipitation. Clays in these zones are sensitive to water-base treating fluids and tend to swell and migrate to the well bore, thereby causing permeability damage. The presence of iron in the Mississippi and Cherokee formations has been indicated by cuttings, core samples, and connate water samples.

Sandy, T.; Gardner, G.R.

1985-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

74

Power generation method including membrane separation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for generating electric power, such as at, or close to, natural gas fields. The method includes conditioning natural gas containing C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons and/or acid gas by means of a membrane separation step. This step creates a leaner, sweeter, drier gas, which is then used as combustion fuel to run a turbine, which is in turn used for power generation.

Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Union City, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Rotor assembly including superconducting magnetic coil  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Superconducting coils and methods of manufacture include a superconductor tape wound concentrically about and disposed along an axis of the coil to define an opening having a dimension which gradually decreases, in the direction along the axis, from a first end to a second end of the coil. Each turn of the superconductor tape has a broad surface maintained substantially parallel to the axis of the coil.

Snitchler, Gregory L. (Shrewsbury, MA); Gamble, Bruce B. (Wellesley, MA); Voccio, John P. (Somerville, MA)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Nuclear reactor shield including magnesium oxide  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improvement in nuclear reactor shielding of a type used in reactor applications involving significant amounts of fast neutron flux, the reactor shielding including means providing structural support, neutron moderator material, neutron absorber material and other components as described below, wherein at least a portion of the neutron moderator material is magnesium in the form of magnesium oxide either alone or in combination with other moderator materials such as graphite and iron.

Rouse, Carl A. (Del Mar, CA); Simnad, Massoud T. (La Jolla, CA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Electric power monthly, September 1990. [Glossary included  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide energy decision makers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues. The power plants considered include coal, petroleum, natural gas, hydroelectric, and nuclear power plants. Data are presented for power generation, fuel consumption, fuel receipts and cost, sales of electricity, and unusual occurrences at power plants. Data are compared at the national, Census division, and state levels. 4 figs., 52 tabs. (CK)

Not Available

1990-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

78

Scales of Fermion Mass Generation and Electroweak Symmetry Breaking  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The scale of mass generation for fermions (including neutrinos) and the scale for electroweak symmetry breaking (EWSB) can be bounded from above by the unitarity of scattering involving longitudinal weak gauge bosons or their corresponding would-be Goldstone bosons. Including the exact n-body phase space we analyze the 2 --> n ($n \\geq 2$) processes for the fermion-(anti)fermion scattering into multiple gauge boson final states. Contrary to naive energy power counting, we demonstrate that as $n$ becomes large, the competition between an increasing energy factor and a phase-space suppression leads to a {\\it strong new upper bound} on the scale of fermion mass generation at a finite value $n=n_s$, which is {\\it independent of the EWSB scale,} $v = (\\sqrt{2}G_F)^{-1/2}$. For quarks, leptons and Majorana neutrinos, the strongest 2 --> n limits range from about 3TeV to 130-170TeV (with $2\\lesssim n_s \\lesssim 24$), depending on the measured fermion masses. Strikingly, given the tiny neutrino masses as constrained by the neutrino oscillations, neutrinoless double-beta decays and astrophysical observations, the unitarity violation of $\

Duane A. Dicus; Hong-Jian He

2005-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

79

Optical panel system including stackable waveguides  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An optical panel system including stackable waveguides is provided. The optical panel system displays a projected light image and comprises a plurality of planar optical waveguides in a stacked state. The optical panel system further comprises a support system that aligns and supports the waveguides in the stacked state. In one embodiment, the support system comprises at least one rod, wherein each waveguide contains at least one hole, and wherein each rod is positioned through a corresponding hole in each waveguide. In another embodiment, the support system comprises at least two opposing edge structures having the waveguides positioned therebetween, wherein each opposing edge structure contains a mating surface, wherein opposite edges of each waveguide contain mating surfaces which are complementary to the mating surfaces of the opposing edge structures, and wherein each mating surface of the opposing edge structures engages a corresponding complementary mating surface of the opposite edges of each waveguide.

DeSanto, Leonard (Dunkirk, MD); Veligdan, James T. (Manorville, NY)

2007-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

80

Thermovoltaic semiconductor device including a plasma filter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A thermovoltaic energy conversion device and related method for converting thermal energy into an electrical potential. An interference filter is provided on a semiconductor thermovoltaic cell to pre-filter black body radiation. The semiconductor thermovoltaic cell includes a P/N junction supported on a substrate which converts incident thermal energy below the semiconductor junction band gap into electrical potential. The semiconductor substrate is doped to provide a plasma filter which reflects back energy having a wavelength which is above the band gap and which is ineffectively filtered by the interference filter, through the P/N junction to the source of radiation thereby avoiding parasitic absorption of the unusable portion of the thermal radiation energy.

Baldasaro, Paul F. (Clifton Park, NY)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes scale factor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Critical point anomalies include expansion shock waves  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

From first-principle fluid dynamics, complemented by a rigorous state equation accounting for critical anomalies, we discovered that expansion shock waves may occur in the vicinity of the liquid-vapor critical point in the two-phase region. Due to universality of near-critical thermodynamics, the result is valid for any common pure fluid in which molecular interactions are only short-range, namely, for so-called 3-dimensional Ising-like systems, and under the assumption of thermodynamic equilibrium. In addition to rarefaction shock waves, diverse non-classical effects are admissible, including composite compressive shock-fan-shock waves, due to the change of sign of the fundamental derivative of gasdynamics.

Nannan, N. R., E-mail: ryan.nannan@uvs.edu [Mechanical Engineering Discipline, Anton de Kom University of Suriname, Leysweg 86, PO Box 9212, Paramaribo, Suriname and Process and Energy Department, Delft University of Technology, Leeghwaterstraat 44, 2628 CA Delft (Netherlands); Guardone, A., E-mail: alberto.guardone@polimi.it [Department of Aerospace Science and Technology, Politecnico di Milano, Via La Masa 34, 20156 Milano (Italy); Colonna, P., E-mail: p.colonna@tudelft.nl [Propulsion and Power, Delft University of Technology, Kluyverweg 1, 2629 HS Delft (Netherlands)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

82

Optical panel system including stackable waveguides  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An optical panel system including stackable waveguides is provided. The optical panel system displays a projected light image and comprises a plurality of planar optical waveguides in a stacked state. The optical panel system further comprises a support system that aligns and supports the waveguides in the stacked state. In one embodiment, the support system comprises at least one rod, wherein each waveguide contains at least one hole, and wherein each rod is positioned through a corresponding hole in each waveguide. In another embodiment, the support system comprises at least two opposing edge structures having the waveguides positioned therebetween, wherein each opposing edge structure contains a mating surface, wherein opposite edges of each waveguide contain mating surfaces which are complementary to the mating surfaces of the opposing edge structures, and wherein each mating surface of the opposing edge structures engages a corresponding complementary mating surface of the opposite edges of each waveguide.

DeSanto, Leonard; Veligdan, James T.

2007-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

83

Multi-factor authentication  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Detection and deterrence of spoofing of user authentication may be achieved by including a cryptographic fingerprint unit within a hardware device for authenticating a user of the hardware device. The cryptographic fingerprint unit includes an internal physically unclonable function ("PUF") circuit disposed in or on the hardware device, which generates a PUF value. Combining logic is coupled to receive the PUF value, combines the PUF value with one or more other authentication factors to generate a multi-factor authentication value. A key generator is coupled to generate a private key and a public key based on the multi-factor authentication value while a decryptor is coupled to receive an authentication challenge posed to the hardware device and encrypted with the public key and coupled to output a response to the authentication challenge decrypted with the private key.

Hamlet, Jason R; Pierson, Lyndon G

2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

84

Models of Procyon A including seismic constraints  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Detailed models of Procyon A based on new asteroseismic measurements by Eggenberger et al (2004) have been computed using the Geneva evolution code including shellular rotation and atomic diffusion. By combining all non-asteroseismic observables now available for Procyon A with these seismological data, we find that the observed mean large spacing of 55.5 +- 0.5 uHz favours a mass of 1.497 M_sol for Procyon A. We also determine the following global parameters of Procyon A: an age of t=1.72 +- 0.30 Gyr, an initial helium mass fraction Y_i=0.290 +- 0.010, a nearly solar initial metallicity (Z/X)_i=0.0234 +- 0.0015 and a mixing-length parameter alpha=1.75 +- 0.40. Moreover, we show that the effects of rotation on the inner structure of the star may be revealed by asteroseismic observations if frequencies can be determined with a high precision. Existing seismological data of Procyon A are unfortunately not accurate enough to really test these differences in the input physics of our models.

P. Eggenberger; F. Carrier; F. Bouchy

2005-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

85

Large-scale Intelligent Transporation Systems simulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A prototype computer system has been developed which defines a high-level architecture for a large-scale, comprehensive, scalable simulation of an Intelligent Transportation System (ITS) capable of running on massively parallel computers and distributed (networked) computer systems. The prototype includes the modelling of instrumented ``smart`` vehicles with in-vehicle navigation units capable of optimal route planning and Traffic Management Centers (TMC). The TMC has probe vehicle tracking capabilities (display position and attributes of instrumented vehicles), and can provide 2-way interaction with traffic to provide advisories and link times. Both the in-vehicle navigation module and the TMC feature detailed graphical user interfaces to support human-factors studies. The prototype has been developed on a distributed system of networked UNIX computers but is designed to run on ANL`s IBM SP-X parallel computer system for large scale problems. A novel feature of our design is that vehicles will be represented by autonomus computer processes, each with a behavior model which performs independent route selection and reacts to external traffic events much like real vehicles. With this approach, one will be able to take advantage of emerging massively parallel processor (MPP) systems.

Ewing, T.; Canfield, T.; Hannebutte, U.; Levine, D.; Tentner, A.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Modification of chemical and physical factors in steamflood to increase heavy oil recovery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report covers the work performed in the various physicochemical factors for the improvement of oil recovery efficiency. In this context the following general areas were studied: (1) The understanding of vapor-liquid flows in porous media, including processes in steam injection; (2) The effect of reservoir heterogeneity in a variety of foams, from pore scale to macroscopic scale; (3) The flow properties of additives for improvement of recovery efficiency, particularly foams and other non-Newtonian fluids; and (4) The development of optimization methods to maximize various measures of oil recovery.

Yortsos, Yanis C.

2000-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

87

Guidelines for Power Factor Improvement Projects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Power factor is an indication of electrical system efficiency. Low power factor, or low system efficiency, may be due to one or more causes, including lightly loaded transformers, oversized electric motors, and harmonic-generating non-linear loads...

Massey, G. W.

88

Crop Management Factors: What is Important?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Various management factors, including specific practices and the persistence of those practices over time, can greatly influence farm profitability. Some of those factors are managing for high yield or low production cost, as well as adoption...

Kastens, Terry L.; Dhuyvetter, Kevin C.; Nivens, Heather; Klinefelter, Danny A.

1999-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

89

Large-Scale in the United  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Large-Scale Offshore Wind Power in the United States ASSESSMENT OF OPPORTUNITIES AND BARRIERS, including 10% post consumer waste. #12;Large-Scale Offshore Wind Power in the United States ASSESSMENT Energy, Office of Wind and Water Power Technologies for their financial and technical support

90

Meso-scale machining capabilities and issues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Meso-scale manufacturing processes are bridging the gap between silicon-based MEMS processes and conventional miniature machining. These processes can fabricate two and three-dimensional parts having micron size features in traditional materials such as stainless steels, rare earth magnets, ceramics, and glass. Meso-scale processes that are currently available include, focused ion beam sputtering, micro-milling, micro-turning, excimer laser ablation, femto-second laser ablation, and micro electro discharge machining. These meso-scale processes employ subtractive machining technologies (i.e., material removal), unlike LIGA, which is an additive meso-scale process. Meso-scale processes have different material capabilities and machining performance specifications. Machining performance specifications of interest include minimum feature size, feature tolerance, feature location accuracy, surface finish, and material removal rate. Sandia National Laboratories is developing meso-scale electro-mechanical components, which require meso-scale parts that move relative to one another. The meso-scale parts fabricated by subtractive meso-scale manufacturing processes have unique tribology issues because of the variety of materials and the surface conditions produced by the different meso-scale manufacturing processes.

BENAVIDES,GILBERT L.; ADAMS,DAVID P.; YANG,PIN

2000-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

91

Scaling the Web Scaling Web Sites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Scaling the Web Scaling Web Sites Through Caching A large jump in a Web site's traffic may indi, pushing the site's through- put to its maximum point. When a Web site becomes overloaded, cus- tomers grow-generated revenue and may even tarnish the reputation of organizations relying on Web sites to support mission

Menascé, Daniel A.

92

Validation of SCALE-4 criticality sequences using ENDF/B-V data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The SCALE code system developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory contains criticality safety analysis sequences that include the KENO V.a Monte Carlo code for calculation of the effective multiplication factor. These sequences are widely used for criticality safety analyses performed both in the United States and abroad. The purpose of the current work is to validate the SCALE-4 criticality sequences with an ENDF/B-V cross-section library for future distribution with SCALE-4. The library used for this validation is a broad-group library (44 groups) collapsed from the 238-group SCALE library. Extensive data testing of both the 238-group and the 44-group libraries included 10 fast and 18 thermal CSEWG benchmarks and 5 other fast benchmarks. Both libraries contain approximately 300 nuclides and are, therefore, capable of modeling most systems, including those containing spent fuel or radioactive waste. The validation of the broad-group library used 93 critical experiments as benchmarks. The range of experiments included 60 light-water-reactor fuel rod lattices, 13 mixed-oxide fuel rod lattice, and 15 other low- and high-enriched uranium critical assemblies.

Bowman, S.M.; Wright, R.Q.; DeHart, M.D. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Taniuchi, H. [Kobe Steel Ltd. (Japan)

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Recent validation experience with multigroup cross-section libraries and scale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper will discuss the results obtained and lessons learned from an extensive validation of new ENDF/B-V and ENDF/B-VI multigroup cross-section libraries using analyses of critical experiments. The KENO V. a Monte Carlo code in version 4.3 of the SCALE computer code system was used to perform the critical benchmark calculations via the automated SCALE sequence CSAS25. The cross-section data were processed by the SCALE automated problem-dependent resonance-processing procedure included in this sequence. Prior to calling KENO V.a, CSAS25 accesses BONAMI to perform resonance self-shielding for nuclides with Bondarenko factors and NITAWL-II to process nuclides with resonance parameter data via the Nordheim Integral Treatment.

Bowman, S.M.; Wright, R.Q.; DeHart, M.D.; Parks, C.V.; Petrie, L.M.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Effective scaling factor for transient infiltration in heterogeneous soils  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tel.: C1 979 458 4421; fax: C1 979 845 3932. DTD 5 ARTICLE IN PRESS #12;Because the soil hydraulic; accepted 7 July 2005 Abstract Effective hydraulic properties at large grid resolution are viable. In this study, we investigate the effective hydraulic parameters for transient infiltration under ponding

Mohanty, Binayak P.

95

Wigner distinguished lecturer Majumdar says scale-up factor key...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

speaks at ORNL's Wigner Distinguished Lecture Series. Arun Majumdar, vice president of energy at Google, speaks at ORNL's Wigner Distinguished Lecture Series. (hi-res image)...

96

A Review of Multidimensional, Multifluid Intermediate-scale Experiment...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

mapping for intermediate-scale experiments include photon-attenuation methods such as gamma and X-ray techniques, and photographic methods such as the light reflection, light...

97

Physical Modeling of Scaled Water Distribution System Networks.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Threats to water distribution systems include release of contaminants and Denial of Service (DoS) attacks. A better understanding, and validated computational models, of the flow in water distribution systems would enable determination of sensor placement in real water distribution networks, allow source identification, and guide mitigation/minimization efforts. Validation data are needed to evaluate numerical models of network operations. Some data can be acquired in real-world tests, but these are limited by 1) unknown demand, 2) lack of repeatability, 3) too many sources of uncertainty (demand, friction factors, etc.), and 4) expense. In addition, real-world tests have limited numbers of network access points. A scale-model water distribution system was fabricated, and validation data were acquired over a range of flow (demand) conditions. Standard operating variables included system layout, demand at various nodes in the system, and pressure drop across various pipe sections. In addition, the location of contaminant (salt or dye) introduction was varied. Measurements of pressure, flowrate, and concentration at a large number of points, and overall visualization of dye transport through the flow network were completed. Scale-up issues that that were incorporated in the experiment design include Reynolds number, pressure drop across nodes, and pipe friction and roughness. The scale was chosen to be 20:1, so the 10 inch main was modeled with a 0.5 inch pipe in the physical model. Controlled validation tracer tests were run to provide validation to flow and transport models, especially of the degree of mixing at pipe junctions. Results of the pipe mixing experiments showed large deviations from predicted behavior and these have a large impact on standard network operations models.3

O'Hern, Timothy J.; Hammond, Glenn Edward; Orear, Leslie ,; van Bloemen Waanders, Bart G.; Paul Molina; Ross Johnson

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Progress in Grid Scale Flow Batteries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Progress in Grid Scale Flow Batteries IMRE GYUK, PROGRAM MANAGER ENERGY STORAGE RESEARCH, DOE Flow;LogMW Renewables (not capacity factor adjusted) 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 Wind Wind (proj) Solar PV Solar PV 2011Year #12;Flow Battery Research at PNNL and Sandia #12

99

7, 1553315563, 2007 Large-scale  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Pacific, correlations with CO, CO2, CH4, and C2Cl4 were dif- fuse overall, but recognizable on flights out Chemistry and Physics Discussions Factors influencing the large-scale distribution of Hg in the Mexico City the Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment Phase B (INTEX-B) cam- paign in spring 2006. Flights were conducted

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

100

OVERVIEW OF SCALE 6.2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

SCALE is an industry-leading suite of tools for nuclear systems modeling and simulation that provides comprehensive, verified and validated, user-friendly capabilities for criticality safety, reactor physics, radiation shielding, and sensitivity and uncertainty analysis. For more than 30 years, regulators, licensees, and research institutions around the world have used SCALE for nuclear safety analysis and design. SCALE provides a plug-and-play framework that includes three deterministic and three Monte Carlo radiation transport solvers that are selected based on the desired solution. SCALE includes the latest nuclear data libraries for continuous-energy and multigroup radiation transport as well as activation, depletion, and decay calculations. SCALE s graphical user interfaces assist with accurate system modeling, visualization, and convenient access to desired results. SCALE 6.2 provides several new capabilities and significant improvements in many existing features, especially with expanded CE Monte Carlo capabilities for criticality safety, shielding, depletion, and sensitivity and uncertainty analysis. A brief overview of SCALE capabilities is provided with emphasis on new features for SCALE 6.2.

Rearden, Bradley T [ORNL] [ORNL; Dunn, Michael E [ORNL] [ORNL; Wiarda, Dorothea [ORNL] [ORNL; Celik, Cihangir [ORNL] [ORNL; Bekar, Kursat B [ORNL] [ORNL; Williams, Mark L [ORNL] [ORNL; Peplow, Douglas E. [ORNL] [ORNL; Perfetti, Christopher M [ORNL] [ORNL; Gauld, Ian C [ORNL] [ORNL; Wieselquist, William A [ORNL] [ORNL; Lefebvre, Jordan P [ORNL] [ORNL; Lefebvre, Robert A [ORNL] [ORNL; Havluj, Frantisek [Nuclear Research Institute, Rez, Czech Republic] [Nuclear Research Institute, Rez, Czech Republic; Skutnik, Steven [The University of Tennessee] [The University of Tennessee; Dugan, Kevin [Texas A& M University] [Texas A& M University

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes scale factor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Scaling of structural failure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article attempts to review the progress achieved in the understanding of scaling and size effect in the failure of structures. Particular emphasis is placed on quasibrittle materials for which the size effect is complicated. Attention is focused on three main types of size effects, namely the statistical size effect due to randomness of strength, the energy release size effect, and the possible size effect due to fractality of fracture or microcracks. Definitive conclusions on the applicability of these theories are drawn. Subsequently, the article discusses the application of the known size effect law for the measurement of material fracture properties, and the modeling of the size effect by the cohesive crack model, nonlocal finite element models and discrete element models. Extensions to compression failure and to the rate-dependent material behavior are also outlined. The damage constitutive law needed for describing a microcracked material in the fracture process zone is discussed. Various applications to quasibrittle materials, including concrete, sea ice, fiber composites, rocks and ceramics are presented.

Bazant, Z.P. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Chen, Er-Ping [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Classifying forest productivity at different scales  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Spatial scale is an important consideration when evaluating, using, or constructing forest productivity classifications. First, the factors which dominate spatial variability in forest productivity are scale dependent. For example, within a stand, spatial variability in productivity is dominated by microsite differences; within a national forest such as the Cherokee National Forest, spatial variability is dominated by topography and land-use history (e.g., years since harvest); within a large region such as the southeast, spatial variability is dominated by climatic patterns. Second, classifications developed at different spatial scales are often used for different purposes. For example, stand-level classifications are often keys or rules used in the field to judge the quality or potential of a site. National-forest classifications are often presented as maps or tables and may be used in forest land planning. Regional classifications may be maps or tables and may be used to quantify or predict resource availability. These scale-related differences in controlling factors and purposes will affect both the methods and the data used to develop classifications. In this paper, I will illustrate these points by describing and comparing three forest productivity classifications, each developed for a specific purpose at a specific scale. My objective is not to argue for or against any of these particular classifications but rather to heighten awareness of the critical role that spatial scale plays in the use and development of forest productivity classifications. 8 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

Graham, R.L.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Modeling emergent large-scale structures of barchan dune fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that cannot be readily explained by examining the dynamics at the scale of single dunes, or by appealingModeling emergent large-scale structures of barchan dune fields S. Worman , A.B. Murray , R for a range of field-scale phenomena including isolated patches of dunes and heterogeneous arrangements

Claudin, Philippe

104

Identifying Product Scaling Principles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

shows how laws of similarity were determined for wind turbine rotors in order for ease of optimization when scaling to the desired level (Peterson, 1984). The study depicts how certain scaling laws for varying changes such as rotational speed, radius... and scale the physical shape and features of the fin in order to produce wind turbine blades for producing electricity. A similar study takes the fins propulsion motion and converts it into a mechanical system for swimming robots and submarines...

Perez, Angel 1986-

2011-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

105

Oregon: a guide to geothermal energy development. [Includes glossary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The following subjects are covered: Oregons' geothermal potential, exploration methods and costs, drilling, utilization methods, economic factors of direct use projects, and legal and institutional setting. (MHR)

Justus, D.; Basescu, N.; Bloomquist, R.G.; Higbee, C.; Simpson, S.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Thermodynamics and scale relativity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is shown how the fractal paths of scale relativity (following Nottale) can be introduced into a thermodynamical context (following Asadov-Kechkin).

Robert Carroll

2011-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

107

Silica Scaling Removal Process  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

systems Water treatment systems Water evaporation systems Potential mining applications (produced water) Industry applications for which silica scaling must be prevented Benefits:...

108

Large-scale simulations of reionization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We use cosmological simulations to explore the large-scale effects of reionization. Since reionization is a process that involves a large dynamic range--from galaxies to rare bright quasars--we need to be able to cover a significant volume of the universe in our simulation without losing the important small scale effects from galaxies. Here we have taken an approach that uses clumping factors derived from small scale simulations to approximate the radiative transfer on the sub-cell scales. Using this technique, we can cover a simulation size up to 1280h{sup -1} Mpc with 10h{sup -1} Mpc cells. This allows us to construct synthetic spectra of quasars similar to observed spectra of SDSS quasars at high redshifts and compare them to the observational data. These spectra can then be analyzed for HII region sizes, the presence of the Gunn-Peterson trough, and the Lyman-{alpha} forest.

Kohler, Katharina; /JILA, Boulder /Fermilab; Gnedin, Nickolay Y.; /Fermilab; Hamilton, Andrew J.S.; /JILA, Boulder

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

[Article 1 of 7: Motivates and Includes the Consumer  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and include the consumer exist. Some examples include advanced two-way metering (AMI), demand response (DR), and distributed energy resources (DER). A common misconception is...

110

Emerging universe from scale invariance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We consider a scale invariant model which includes a R{sup 2} term in action and show that a stable ''emerging universe'' scenario is possible. The model belongs to the general class of theories, where an integration measure independent of the metric is introduced. To implement scale invariance (S.I.), a dilaton field is introduced. The integration of the equations of motion associated with the new measure gives rise to the spontaneous symmetry breaking (S.S.B) of S.I. After S.S.B. of S.I. in the model with the R{sup 2} term (and first order formalism applied), it is found that a non trivial potential for the dilaton is generated. The dynamics of the scalar field becomes non linear and these non linearities are instrumental in the stability of some of the emerging universe solutions, which exists for a parameter range of the theory.

Del Campo, Sergio; Herrera, Ramn [Instituto de Fsica, Pontificia Universidad Catlica de Valparaso, Avenida Brasil 2950, Casilla 4059, Valparaso (Chile); Guendelman, Eduardo I. [Physics Department, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva 84105 (Israel); Labraa, Pedro, E-mail: sdelcamp@ucv.cl, E-mail: guendel@bgu.ac.il, E-mail: ramon.herrera@ucv.cl, E-mail: plabrana@ubiobio.cl [Departamento de Fsica, Universidad del Bo Bo, Avenida Collao 1202, Casilla 5-C, Concepcin (Chile)

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Nonspecific transcription factor binding reduces variability in transcription factor and target protein expression  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Transcription factors (TFs) interact with a multitude of binding sites on DNA and partner proteins inside cells. We investigate how nonspecific binding/unbinding to such decoy binding sites affects the magnitude and time-scale of random fluctuations in TF copy numbers arising from stochastic gene expression. A stochastic model of TF gene expression, together with decoy site interactions is formulated. Distributions for the total (bound and unbound) and free (unbound) TF levels are derived by analytically solving the chemical master equation under physiologically relevant assumptions. Our results show that increasing the number of decoy binding sides considerably reduces stochasticity in free TF copy numbers. The TF autocorrelation function reveals that decoy sites can either enhance or shorten the time-scale of TF fluctuations depending on model parameters. To understand how noise in TF abundances propagates downstream, a TF target gene is included in the model. Intriguingly, we find that noise in the expression of the target gene decreases with increasing decoy sites for linear TF-target protein dose-responses, even in regimes where decoy sites enhance TF autocorrelation times. Moreover, counterintuitive noise transmissions arise for nonlinear dose-responses. In summary, our study highlights the critical role of molecular sequestration by decoy binding sites in regulating the stochastic dynamics of TFs and target proteins at the single-cell level.

Mohammad Soltani; Pavol Bokes; Zachary Fox; Abhyudai Singh

2015-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

112

Power Factor Compensation (PFC) Power Factor Compensation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Power Factor Compensation (PFC) Power Factor Compensation The power factor (PF) is defined as the ratio between the active power and the apparent power of a system. If the current and voltage are periodic with period , and [ ), then the active power is defined by ( ) ( ) (their inner product

Knobloch,Jürgen

113

Abstract--Small-scale hydraulics is ideal for powered human assistive devices including powered ankle foot orthoses because  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ankle foot orthoses because a large torque can be generated with an actuator that is small and light. A portable hydraulic ankle foot orthosis has been designed and is undergoing preliminary prototyping and engineering bench test evaluation. The device provides 90 Nm of ankle torque and has an operating pressure

Durfee, William K.

114

Biomarkers Core Lab Price List Does NOT Include  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

v3102014 Biomarkers Core Lab Price List Does NOT Include Kit Cost PURCHASED by INVESTIGATOR/1/2013 Page 1 of 5 #12;Biomarkers Core Lab Price List Does NOT Include Kit Cost PURCHASED by INVESTIGATOR

Grishok, Alla

115

Including Retro-Commissioning in Federal Energy Savings Performance Contracts  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Guidance document on the importance of (and steps to) including retro-commissioning in Federal energy savings performance contracts (ESPCs).

116

Scaling Relationships Based on Scaled Tank Mixing and Transfer Test Results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the statistical analyses performed (by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for Washington River Protection Solutions) on data from 26 tests conducted using two scaled tanks (43 and 120 inches) in the Small Scale Mixing Demonstration platform. The 26 tests varied several test parameters, including mixer-jet nozzle velocity, base simulant, supernatant viscosity, and capture velocity. For each test, samples were taken pre-transfer and during five batch transfers. The samples were analyzed for the concentrations (lbs/gal slurry) of four primary components in the base simulants (gibbsite, stainless steel, sand, and ZrO2). The statistical analyses including modeling the component concentrations as functions of test parameters using stepwise regression with two different model forms. The resulting models were used in an equivalent performance approach to calculate values of scaling exponents (for a simple geometric scaling relationship) as functions of the parameters in the component concentration models. The resulting models and scaling exponents are displayed in tables and graphically. The sensitivities of component concentrations and scaling exponents to the test parameters are presented graphically. These results will serve as inputs to subsequent work by other researchers to develop scaling relationships that are applicable to full-scale tanks.

Piepel, Gregory F.; Holmes, Aimee E.; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro

2013-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

117

Scaling Relationships Based on Scaled Tank Mixing and Transfer Test Results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the statistical analyses performed (by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for Washington River Protection Solutions) on data from 26 tests conducted using two scaled tanks (43 and 120 inches) in the Small Scale Mixing Demonstration platform. The 26 tests varied several test parameters, including mixer-jet nozzle velocity, base simulant, supernatant viscosity, and capture velocity. For each test, samples were taken pre-transfer and during five batch transfers. The samples were analyzed for the concentrations (lbs/gal slurry) of four primary components in the base simulants (gibbsite, stainless steel, sand, and ZrO2). The statistical analyses including modeling the component concentrations as functions of test parameters using stepwise regression with two different model forms. The resulting models were used in an equivalent performance approach to calculate values of scaling exponents (for a simple geometric scaling relationship) as functions of the parameters in the component concentration models. The resulting models and scaling exponents are displayed in tables and graphically. The sensitivities of component concentrations and scaling exponents to the test parameters are presented graphically. These results will serve as inputs to subsequent work by other researchers to develop scaling relationships that are applicable to full-scale tanks.

Piepel, Gregory F.; Holmes, Aimee E.; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro; Lee, Kearn P.; Kelly, Steven E.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

The Improbability scale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Improbability Scale (IS) is proposed as a way of communicating to the general public the improbability (and by implication, the probability) of events predicted as the result of scientific research. Through the use of the Improbability Scale, the public will be able to evaluate more easily the relative risks of predicted events and draw proper conclusions when asked to support governmental and public policy decisions arising from that research.

Ritchie, David J.; /Fermilab

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Standard Model scales from warped extra dimensions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

If in the Randall and Sundrum RS1 model the inverse of the compactification radius, the AdS curvature scale, and the five and four-dimensional Planck scales are equal in size, as is natural, then the warp factor at the location of the low energy brane is of value 1/pi. So that all scales derive from locations in the space, we identify the extra dimension with the infinite covering space of the S1/Z2 orbifold. The extra dimension is then essentially a series of connected line intervals, punctuated by branes. Scales on successive branes in the extra dimension descend from Planck scale in a geometric sequence of common ratio 1/pi. Evidence is provided for such a sequence within the spectrum of particle masses, and of a second geometric sequence, of common ratio 2/pi, which suggests that the AdS spacetime is six-dimensional and doubly warped. The scales of the Standard Model lie at coincident levels within the two sequences. A third sequence, of common ratio 1/e, provides a symmetrical framework for the Standard Model and points to a warped product spacetime.

Bernard Riley

2008-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

120

Nucleon Electromagnetic Form Factors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There has been much activity in the measurement of the elastic electromagnetic proton and neutron form factors in the last decade, and the quality of the data has greatly improved by performing double polarization experiments, in comparison with previous unpolarized data. Here we review the experimental data base in view of the new results for the proton, and neutron, obtained at JLab, MAMI, and MIT-Bates. The rapid evolution of phenomenological models triggered by these high-precision experiments will be discussed, including the recent progress in the determination of the valence quark generalized parton distributions of the nucleon, as well as the steady rate of improvements made in the lattice QCD calculations.

Marc Vanderhaeghen; Charles Perdrisat; Vina Punjabi

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes scale factor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Accelerated Least Squares Multidimensional Scaling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

x(make_x(36,2)) xACCELERATED SCALING R EFERENCES I.ACCELERATED LEAST SQUARES MULTIDIMENSIONAL SCALING JAN DEare simpler to write. ACCELERATED SCALING It is shown in De

Leeuw, Jan de

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Accelerated Least Squares Multidimensional Scaling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

x(make_x(36,2)) xACCELERATED SCALING R EFERENCES I.ACCELERATED LEAST SQUARES MULTIDIMENSIONAL SCALING JAN DEare simpler to write. ACCELERATED SCALING It is shown in De

Jan de Leeuw

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

analysis including plasma: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Assembly 2010 Space Plasmas in the Solar System, including Planetary Magnetospheres (D) Solar Variability, Cosmic Rays and Climate (D21) GEOMAGNETIC ACTIVITY AT HIGH-LATITUDE:...

124

Energy Department Expands Gas Gouging Reporting System to Include...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Washington, DC - Energy Secretary Samuel W. Bodman announced today that the Department of Energy has expanded its gas gouging reporting system to include a toll-free telephone...

125

PLOT: A UNIX PROGRAM FOR INCLUDING GRAPHICS IN DOCUMENTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

simple, easy-to-read graphics language designed specificallyPROGRAM FOR INCLUDING GRAPHICS IN DOCUMENTS Pavel Curtismeanings as in the GRAFPAC graphics system. Definl. ~ tions

Curtis, Pavel

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

U-182: Microsoft Windows Includes Some Invalid Certificates  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The operating system includes some invalid intermediate certificates. The vulnerability is due to the certificate authorities and not the operating system itself.

127

Small Scale Poultry Production Breed Selection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Small Scale Poultry Production Breed Selection Cindy Sanders, Ph.D. ­ UF/IFAS Alachua County Extension #12;`Alternative' Poultry Production · Pastured Poultry ­ Access to pasture daily ­ Options include: open-bottomed pen moved daily, day-range, chicken tractor. · Free Range Poultry ­ Demonstrated

Jawitz, James W.

128

Decaying Vacuum Inflationary Cosmologies: A Complete Scenario Including Curvature Effects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a large class of nonsingular cosmologies of arbitrary spatial curvature whose cosmic history is determined by a primeval dynamical $\\Lambda (t)$-term. For all values of the curvature, the models evolve between two extreme de Sitter phases driven by the relic time-varying vacuum energy density. The transition from inflation to the radiation phase is universal and points to a natural solution of the graceful exit problem regardless of the values of the curvature parameter. The flat case recovers the scenario recently discussed in the literature (Perico et al., Phys. Rev. D88, 063531, 2013). The early de Sitter phase is characterized by an arbitrary energy scale $H_I$ associated to the primeval vacuum energy density. If $H_I$ is fixed to be nearly the Planck scale, the ratio between the relic and the present observed vacuum energy density is $\\rho_{vI}/\\rho_{v0} \\simeq 10^{123}$.

Lima, J A S; Zilioti, G J M

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Density matrix renormalization group and wave function factorization for nuclei  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We employ the density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) and the wave function factorization method for the numerical solution of large scale nuclear structure problems. The DMRG exhibits an improved convergence for problems with realistic interactions due to the implementation of the finite algorithm. The wave function factorization of fpg-shell nuclei yields rapidly converging approximations that are at the present frontier for large-scale shell model calculations.

T. Papenbrock; D. J. Dean

2005-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

130

Synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention provides synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs having at least one peptide chain that binds a heparin-binding growth factor receptor, covalently bound to a hydrophobic linker, which is in turn covalently bound to a non-signaling peptide that includes a heparin-binding domain. The synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs are useful as soluble biologics or as surface coatings for medical devices.

Pena, Louis A.; Zamora, Paul; Lin, Xinhua; Glass, John D.

2007-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

131

Cloud Controlling Factors --Low Clouds BJORN STEVENS,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cloud Controlling Factors -- Low Clouds BJORN STEVENS, Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic) clouds is reviewed, with an emphasis on factors that may be expected to change in a changing climate of low-cloud control- ling processes are offered: these include renewing our focus on theory, model

Stevens, Bjorn

132

Energy Transitions: A Systems Approach Including Marcellus Shale Gas Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Transitions: A Systems Approach Including Marcellus Shale Gas Development A Report Transitions: A Systems Approach Including Marcellus Shale Gas Development Executive Summary In the 21st the Marcellus shale In addition to the specific questions identified for the case of Marcellus shale gas in New

Angenent, Lars T.

133

Nuclear physics in soft-wall AdS/QCD: deuteron electromagnetic form factors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a calculation of the deuteron electromagnetic form factors in a soft-wall AdS/QCD approach. The power scaling of the deuteron form factors is consistent with quark counting rules.

Gutsche, Thomas; Schmidt, Ivan; Vega, Alfredo

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Angular Scaling In Jets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We introduce a jet shape observable defined for an ensemble of jets in terms of two-particle angular correlations and a resolution parameter R. This quantity is infrared and collinear safe and can be interpreted as a scaling exponent for the angular distribution of mass inside the jet. For small R it is close to the value 2 as a consequence of the approximately scale invariant QCD dynamics. For large R it is sensitive to non-perturbative effects. We describe the use of this correlation function for tests of QCD, for studying underlying event and pile-up effects, and for tuning Monte Carlo event generators.

Jankowiak, Martin; Larkoski, Andrew J.; /SLAC

2012-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

135

Articles which include chevron film cooling holes, and related processes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An article is described, including an inner surface which can be exposed to a first fluid; an inlet; and an outer surface spaced from the inner surface, which can be exposed to a hotter second fluid. The article further includes at least one row or other pattern of passage holes. Each passage hole includes an inlet bore extending through the substrate from the inlet at the inner surface to a passage hole-exit proximate to the outer surface, with the inlet bore terminating in a chevron outlet adjacent the hole-exit. The chevron outlet includes a pair of wing troughs having a common surface region between them. The common surface region includes a valley which is adjacent the hole-exit; and a plateau adjacent the valley. The article can be an airfoil. Related methods for preparing the passage holes are also described.

Bunker, Ronald Scott; Lacy, Benjamin Paul

2014-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

136

Safety Science & Solutions Integrating Human Factors in Healthcare  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Safety Science & Solutions Integrating Human Factors in Healthcare Tuesday 2nd December 2014 safety, quality and productivity in healthcare. Showcasing enduring solutions to patient safety recognised speakers in patient safety including: Martin Bromiley, Founder, Clinical Human Factors Group Dr

Levi, Ran

137

Sensor system scaling issues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A model for IR sensor performance is used to compare estimates of sensor cost effectiveness. Although data from aircraft sensors indicate a weaker scaling, their agreement is adequate to support the assessment of the benefits of operating up to the maximum altitude of most current UAVs.

Canavan, G.H.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

PAIN SCALES (ATTACHMENT A)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TOTAL SCORE: ADD INDIVIDUAL ASSESSMENT SCORES TO DETERMINE THE TOTAL PAIN SCORE. TOTAL THE 5 CATEGORIES FOR TOTAL PAIN SCORE. MAXIMUM SCORE = 10/10. Reference: Merkel SJ, et al. The FLACC: A Behavioral Pain Scale or groan. Low level speech with a negative or disapproving quality. Repeated troubled calling out. Loud

Oliver, Douglas L.

139

Mathematics Achievement Scale Score  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Croatia 490 New Zealand 486 Spain 482 Romania 482 Poland 481 Turkey 469 Azerbaijan 463 Chile 462 Thailand Romania 505 Spain 505 Poland 505 TIMSS Scale Centerpoint 500 New Zealand 497 Kazakhstan 495 Norway 494 Kazakhstan 487 Sweden 484 Ukraine 479 Norway 475 Armenia 467 Romania 458 United Arab Emirates 456 Turkey 452

Huang, Jianyu

140

Turbomachine injection nozzle including a coolant delivery system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An injection nozzle for a turbomachine includes a main body having a first end portion that extends to a second end portion defining an exterior wall having an outer surface. A plurality of fluid delivery tubes extend through the main body. Each of the plurality of fluid delivery tubes includes a first fluid inlet for receiving a first fluid, a second fluid inlet for receiving a second fluid and an outlet. The injection nozzle further includes a coolant delivery system arranged within the main body. The coolant delivery system guides a coolant along at least one of a portion of the exterior wall and around the plurality of fluid delivery tubes.

Zuo, Baifang (Simpsonville, SC)

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes scale factor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Including costs of supply chain risk in strategic sourcing decisions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cost evaluations do not always include the costs associated with risks when organizations make strategic sourcing decisions. This research was conducted to establish and quantify the impact of risks and risk-related costs ...

Jain, Avani

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF STEEL WELDED COVERPLATE INCLUDING COMPOSITE DOUBLERS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

With the increasing focus on welded bridge members resulting in crack initiation and propagation, there is a large demand for creative solutions. One of these solutions includes the application of composite doublers over the critical weld. In order...

Petri, Brad

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

143

atlantic region including: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

R: L. Tossey, T. Beeson, Parks, B. TruittTNC, UD MPEO staff 2 Climate scenarios of sea level rise for the northeast Atlantic Ocean: a study including the effects of ocean...

144

T-603: Mac OS X Includes Some Invalid Comodo Certificates  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The operating system includes some invalid certificates. The vulnerability is due to the invalid certificates and not the operating system itself. Other browsers, applications, and operating systems are affected.

145

Limited Personal Use of Government Office Equipment including Information Technology  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The Order establishes requirements and assigns responsibilities for employees' limited personal use of Government resources (office equipment and other resources including information technology) within DOE, including NNSA. The Order is required to provide guidance on appropriate and inappropriate uses of Government resources. This Order was certified 04/23/2009 as accurate and continues to be relevant and appropriate for use by the Department. Certified 4-23-09. No cancellation.

2005-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

146

On the strong coupling scale in Higgs G-inflation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Higgs G-inflation takes advantage of a Galileon-like ghost-free derivative coupling. It is a nonrenormalizable operator and is strongly coupled at high energy scales. Perturbative analysis has no longer predictive power there. In general, when the Lagrangian is expanded around the vacuum, the strong coupling scale is identified as the mass scale that appears in nonrenormalizable operators. In inflationary models, however, the identification of the strong coupling scale is subtle, since the structures of the kinetic term as well as the interaction itself are modified by the background inflationary dynamics. As a result, the strong coupling scale is back ground field dependent. In this letter, we evaluate the strong coupling scale of the fluctuations around the inflationary background including the Nambu Goldstone mode associated with the symmetry breaking in the Higgs G-inflation. We find that the system is weakly coupled when the scales which we now observe exit the horizon during inflation, and the observati...

Kamada, Kohei

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Cosmological Simulations of Galaxy Formation Including Hydrodynamics (hyper-abridged)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The formation of galaxies in hierarchical cosmogonies is studied using high resolution N-body plus SPH hydrodynamics simulations. The collapse of structure is followed self-consistently from Mpc scale filamentary structures to kpc scale galactic objects. The characteristics and formation processes of the galaxy like objects are studied in detail, along with the aggregation into a poor cluster. Related studies consider the effects of modelling star formation, the reliability of tracing galaxies in simulations, and tests of SPH methods. This submission serves first to notify that the full text and figures of my thesis are available in compressed PostScript form via anonymous ftp from astro.princeton.edu in the directory /summers/thesis (122 files, 19 MB compressed, 65 MB uncompressed). See the README file first. Second, this submission contains the title page, abstract, table of contents, introductory chapter, summary chapter, and references for my thesis. Those who are curious about the work may scan these pages to identify which chapters may be interesting to get via ftp.

F J Summers

1994-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

148

History and evolution of buildup factors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The gamma-ray buildup factor is a term whose origin is lost in the mists of the early history of the Manhattan Project.' Its introduction stems from the observation that the calculations for the uncollided photons, i.e., those that have arrived at R without suffering any collisions, are usually a relatively simple matter, involving only an exponential kernel. The buildup factor is then a multiplicative factor, which corrects the answer that is proportional to the uncollided flux density to include the effects of the scattered photons. This paper further summarizes and traces efforts since 1954 at calculating and mathematically defining buildup factors.

Trubey, D.K.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

POWER SYSTEMS STABILITY WITH LARGE-SCALE WIND POWER PENETRATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of offshore wind farms, wind power fluctuations may introduce several challenges to reliable power system behaviour due to natural wind fluctuations. The rapid power fluctuations from the large scale wind farms Generation Control (AGC) system which includes large- scale wind farms for long-term stability simulation

Bak-Jensen, Birgitte

150

Power Factor Improvement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Power factor control is a necessary ingredient in any successful Energy Management Program. Many companies are operating with power factors of 70% or less and are being penalized through the electrical utility bill. This paper starts by describing...

Viljoen, T. A.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Robot calibration without scaling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) Je rinkle (Member) arry Hogan (Member) eorge P. Peterson (Head of Department) May 1995 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering 111 ABSTRACT Robot Calibration without Scaling. (May 1995) Thomas W. Ives, B. S. , The University of Texas... robot. Researchers at Texas A6tM University found that convergence can be achieved simply by converting the original translational parameters fiom millimeters to inches. While this is nice and convenient for this particular case, it does not prove...

Ives, Thomas W.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Extreme Scale Visual Analytics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Given the scale and complexity of today s data, visual analytics is rapidly becoming a necessity rather than an option for comprehensive exploratory analysis. In this paper, we provide an overview of three applications of visual analytics for addressing the challenges of analyzing climate, text streams, and biosurveilance data. These systems feature varying levels of interaction and high performance computing technology integration to permit exploratory analysis of large and complex data of global significance.

Steed, Chad A [ORNL] [ORNL; Potok, Thomas E [ORNL] [ORNL; Pullum, Laura L [ORNL] [ORNL; Ramanathan, Arvind [ORNL] [ORNL; Shipman, Galen M [ORNL] [ORNL; Thornton, Peter E [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Testing general relativity with compact coalescing binaries: comparing exact and predictive methods to compute the Bayes factor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The second generation of gravitational-wave detectors is scheduled to start operations in 2015. Gravitational-wave signatures of compact binary coalescences could be used to accurately test the strong-field dynamical predictions of general relativity. Computationally expensive data analysis pipelines, including TIGER, have been developed to carry out such tests. As a means to cheaply assess whether a particular deviation from general relativity can be detected, Cornish et al. and Vallisneri recently proposed an approximate scheme to compute the Bayes factor between a general-relativity gravitational-wave model and a model representing a class of alternative theories of gravity parametrised by one additional parameter. This approximate scheme is based on only two easy-to-compute quantities: the signal-to-noise ratio of the signal and the fitting factor between the signal and the manifold of possible waveforms within general relativity. In this work, we compare the prediction from the approximate formula against an exact numerical calculation of the Bayes factor using the lalinference library. We find that, using frequency-domain waveforms, the approximate scheme predicts exact results with good accuracy, providing the correct scaling with the signal-to-noise ratio at a fitting factor value of 0.992 and the correct scaling with the fitting factor at a signal-to-noise ratio of 20, down to a fitting factor of $\\sim$ 0.9. We extend the framework for the approximate calculation of the Bayes factor which significantly increases its range of validity, at least to fitting factors of $\\sim$ 0.7 or higher.

Walter Del Pozzo; Katherine Grover; Ilya Mandel; Alberto Vecchio

2014-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

154

Solar Energy Education. Renewable energy: a background text. [Includes glossary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Some of the most common forms of renewable energy are presented in this textbook for students. The topics include solar energy, wind power hydroelectric power, biomass ocean thermal energy, and tidal and geothermal energy. The main emphasis of the text is on the sun and the solar energy that it yields. Discussions on the sun's composition and the relationship between the earth, sun and atmosphere are provided. Insolation, active and passive solar systems, and solar collectors are the subtopics included under solar energy. (BCS)

Not Available

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Methods of producing adsorption media including a metal oxide  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods of producing a metal oxide are disclosed. The method comprises dissolving a metal salt in a reaction solvent to form a metal salt/reaction solvent solution. The metal salt is converted to a metal oxide and a caustic solution is added to the metal oxide/reaction solvent solution to adjust the pH of the metal oxide/reaction solvent solution to less than approximately 7.0. The metal oxide is precipitated and recovered. A method of producing adsorption media including the metal oxide is also disclosed, as is a precursor of an active component including particles of a metal oxide.

Mann, Nicholas R; Tranter, Troy J

2014-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

156

2-D Stellar Evolution Code Including Arbitrary Magnetic Fields. I. Mathematical Techniques and Test Cases  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A high-precision two-dimensional stellar evolution code has been developed for studying solar variability due to structural changes produced by varying internal magnetic fields of arbitrary configurations. Specifically, we are interested in modeling the effects of a dynamo-type field on the detailed internal structure and on the global parameters of the Sun. The high precision is required both to model very small solar changes (of order of $10^{-4}$) and short time scales (or order of one year). It is accomplished by using the mass coordinate to replace the radial coordinate, by using fixed and adjustable time steps, a realistic stellar atmosphere, elements diffusion, and by adjusting the grid points. We have also built into the code the potential to subsequently include rotation and turbulence. The current code has been tested for several cases, including its ability to reproduce the 1-D results.

L. H. Li; P. Ventura; S. Basu; S. Sofia; P. Demarque

2006-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

157

Effect of wettability on scale-up of multiphase flow from core-scale to reservoir fine-grid-scale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Typical field simulation grid-blocks are internally heterogeneous. The objective of this work is to study how the wettability of the rock affects its scale-up of multiphase flow properties from core-scale to fine-grid reservoir simulation scale ({approximately} 10{prime} x 10{prime} x 5{prime}). Reservoir models need another level of upscaling to coarse-grid simulation scale, which is not addressed here. Heterogeneity is modeled here as a correlated random field parameterized in terms of its variance and two-point variogram. Variogram models of both finite (spherical) and infinite (fractal) correlation length are included as special cases. Local core-scale porosity, permeability, capillary pressure function, relative permeability functions, and initial water saturation are assumed to be correlated. Water injection is simulated and effective flow properties and flow equations are calculated. For strongly water-wet media, capillarity has a stabilizing/homogenizing effect on multiphase flow. For small variance in permeability, and for small correlation length, effective relative permeability can be described by capillary equilibrium models. At higher variance and moderate correlation length, the average flow can be described by a dynamic relative permeability. As the oil wettability increases, the capillary stabilizing effect decreases and the deviation from this average flow increases. For fractal fields with large variance in permeability, effective relative permeability is not adequate in describing the flow.

Chang, Y.C.; Mani, V.; Mohanty, K.K. [Univ. of Houston, TX (United States)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Biomass Potentials from California Forest and Shrublands Including Fuel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biomass Potentials from California Forest and Shrublands Including Fuel Reduction Potentials-04-004 February 2005 Revised: October 2005 Arnold Schwarzenegger, Governor, State of California #12;Biomass Tiangco, CEC Bryan M. Jenkins, University of California #12;Biomass Potentials from California Forest

159

Project Management Business Process Project Delivery Processes Includes VE Budget  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project Management Business Process Project Delivery Processes Includes VE Budget Schedule Activities that do/could feed into PMBP LEGEND VE Cost Avoidance Program Coverage Document Results (Before, could use the value methodology to facilitate after action review. The project manager is responsible

US Army Corps of Engineers

160

Free Energy Efficiency Kit includes CFL light bulbs,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Free Energy Efficiency Kit Kit includes CFL light bulbs, spray foam, low-flow shower head, and more! Building Science 101 Presentation BPI Certified Building Professionals will present home energy efficiency for discounted energy assessments. FREE HOME ENERGY EFFICIENCY SEMINAR N e w R i ver L i g ht & Pow e r a n d W

Rose, Annkatrin

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes scale factor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Area of cooperation includes: Joint research and development on  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technologies August 2, 2006: HCL Technologies Ltd (HCL), India's leading global IT services company, has signed projects that are using this technology currently such as BioGrid in Japan, National Grid Service in UKArea of cooperation includes: · Joint research and development on Grid computing technologies

Buyya, Rajkumar

162

Energy Transitions: A Systems Approach Including Marcellus Shale Gas Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Transitions: A Systems Approach Including Marcellus Shale Gas Development A Report Engineering) W. VA #12;Energy Transitions: A Systems Approach August 2011 version Page 2 Energy Transitions sources globally, some very strong short-term drivers of energy transitions reflect rising concerns over

Walter, M.Todd

163

Procedures in Modules (1) Including all procedures within modules  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Procedures in Modules (1) Including all procedures within modules works very well in almost all designing these if possible #12;Procedures in Modules (2) These are very much like internal procedures Works very well in almost all programs Everything accessible in the module can also be used in the procedure

164

FORUMA Hamilton Spectator Town Hall Event SPEAKERS INCLUDE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

R001990104 OPEN FORUMA Hamilton Spectator Town Hall Event SPEAKERS INCLUDE: STEVE BUIST, Spectator, former chairman of Hamilton-Wentworth region and now president and CEO of the Hamilton Community Foundation. DR. CHRIS MACKIE, Hamilton's associate medical officer of health. MARK CHAMBERLAIN, president

Thompson, Michael

165

DO NOT INCLUDE: flatten cardboard staples, tape & envelope windows ok  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/ bottles Metal items other than cans/foil Napkins Paper towels Plastic bags Plastic films Plastic utensilsDO NOT INCLUDE: flatten cardboard staples, tape & envelope windows ok Aerosol cans Books Bottle, PDAs, inkjet cartridges, CFL bulbs (cushioned, sealed in plastic) computers, printers, printer

Wolfe, Patrick J.

166

cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1,018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids.

Raikhel, N.V.; Broekaert, W.F.; Namhai Chua; Kush, A.

1993-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

167

ASTRO-F/FIS observing simulation including detector characteristics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ASTRO-F/FIS observing simulation including detector characteristics Woong-Seob Jeong a,*, Soojong instruments, the far-infrared surveyor (FIS) will map the entire sky in four bands using short wavelength (SW- oped a suite of software with an aim to simulate the FIS observations (Jeong et al., 2000, 2003, 2004

Pak, Soojong

168

ASTRO-F/FIS Observing Simulation Including Detector Characteristics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ASTRO-F/FIS Observing Simulation Including Detector Characteristics Woong-Seob Jeong1, Soojong Pak1 simulations to examined the detector characteristics on the FIS instrument (Far- Infrared Surveyor) images narrow and wide bands using a short wavelength (SW) and long wavelength (LW) detector array. The FIS (Far

Lee, Hyung Mok

169

Methods of Purchasing Purchasing methods include the different  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

" purchases must be reviewed and approved by the Controller's Office. This may result in the end user beingMethods of Purchasing Purchasing methods include the different processes of ordering goods and/or services, and encumbering funds. #12;Method of Purchase Field Purchase Orders (FPO) Accepted

170

Including Blind Students in Computer Science Through Access to Graphs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Including Blind Students in Computer Science Through Access to Graphs Suzanne Balik, Sean Mealin SKetching tool, GSK, to provide blind and sighted people with a means to create, examine, and share graphs (node-link diagrams) in real-time. GSK proved very effective for one blind computer science student

Young, R. Michael

171

HTS Conductor Design Issues Including Quench and Stability,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/background · Stability and protection are crucial issues for HTS tapes and coils applied to electric power devices. ­Both for the economic argument for HTS AC applications like cables and transformers. · Conductor design is importantHTS Conductor Design Issues Including Quench and Stability, AC Losses, and Fault Currents M. J

172

Bayesian hierarchical reconstruction of protein profiles including a digestion model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bayesian hierarchical reconstruction of protein profiles including a digestion model Pierre to recover the protein biomarkers content in a robust way. We will focus on the digestion step since and each branch to a molecular processing such as digestion, ionisation and LC-MS separation

Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

173

GRADUATE STUDIES IN BUILDING TECHNOLOGY AN INTERDISCIPLINARY PROGRAM INCLUDING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-growing economies in other parts of the world, there is a growing demand for practical, sustainable building designs as the broader architectural design and construction processes. Likely careers of graduates are in the building1 GRADUATE STUDIES IN BUILDING TECHNOLOGY AN INTERDISCIPLINARY PROGRAM INCLUDING DEPARTMENT

Reif, Rafael

174

Requirements: A minimum of 15 PSYC credits, including  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

» Three other 2000-3000-level PSYC courses (any area) No more than 3 credits of PSYC 3889 or 3999 canRequirements: A minimum of 15 PSYC credits, including: » One Area I course » One Area II course) ___2100 (Principles of Research in Psychology) Area I. Social, Developmental, Clinical, & Industrial

Alpay, S. Pamir

175

Cloud-Scale Datacenters Page 1 Cloud-Scale  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cloud-Scale Datacenters Page 1 Cloud-Scale Datacenters #12;Cloud-Scale Datacenters Page 2, and operating datacenters. When software applications are built as distributed systems, every aspect brief will explore how cloud workloads have changed the way datacenters are designed and operated

Chaudhuri, Surajit

176

The San Jose Scale.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for controlling the scale. The most important spray mixtures in use are lime-sulphur salt, lime-sulphur, whale oil soap, kero? sene, crude petroleum, Kero-water, and kerosene or crude oil emulsions. All these preparations are mainly winter sprays, being applied... applied while cold, however, it clogs the apparatus and causes considerable inconven? ience in getting it on the tree. It is more expensive than the Lime- Sulphur wash. i I o . B I 3 I 2 In some States coal oil or kerosene has been experimented...

Conradi, Albert F.

1906-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

ATLAS Jet Energy Scale  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Jets originating from the fragmentation of quarks and gluons are the most common, and complicated, final state objects produced at hadron colliders. A precise knowledge of their energy calibration is therefore of great importance at experiments at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, while is very difficult to ascertain. We present in-situ techniques and results for the jet energy scale at ATLAS using recent collision data. ATLAS has demonstrated an understanding of the necessary jet energy corrections to within \\approx 4% in the central region of the calorimeter.

D. Schouten; A. Tanasijczuk; M. Vetterli; for the ATLAS Collaboration

2012-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

178

Pore Scale Micromodels | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar Home Design Passive SolarCenterYou areConstructionAPore Scale

179

Silica Scaling Removal Process  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBi (2)Sharing Smart GridShift EndSidneyChemistry » Silica Scaling

180

Scale dependence of entrainment-mixing mechanisms in cumulus clouds  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

This work empirically examines the dependence of entrainment-mixing mechanisms on the averaging scale in cumulus clouds using in situ aircraft observations during the Routine Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Aerial Facility Clouds with Low Optical Water Depths Optical Radiative Observations (RACORO) field campaign. A new measure of homogeneous mixing degree is defined that can encompass all types of mixing mechanisms. Analysis of the dependence of the homogenous mixing degree on the averaging scale shows that, on average, the homogenous mixing degree decreases with increasing averaging scales, suggesting that apparent mixing mechanisms gradually approach from homogeneous mixing to extreme inhomogeneous mixing with increasing scales. The scale dependence can be well quantified by an exponential function, providing first attempt at developing a scale-dependent parameterization for the entrainment-mixing mechanism. The influences of three factors on the scale dependence are further examined: droplet-free filament properties (size and fraction), microphysical properties (mean volume radius and liquid water content of cloud droplet size distributions adjacent to droplet-free filaments), and relative humidity of entrained dry air. It is found that the decreasing rate of homogeneous mixing degree with increasing averaging scales becomes larger with larger droplet-free filament size and fraction, larger mean volume radius and liquid water content, or higher relative humidity. The results underscore the necessity and possibility of considering averaging scale in representation of entrainment-mixing processes in atmospheric models.

Lu, Chunsong [Nanjing Univ. of Information Science and Technology (China). Collaborative Innovation Center on Forecast and Evaluation of Meteorological Disasters; Chinese Acadamy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Biological, Environmental and Climate Science Dept.; Liu, Yangang [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Biological, Environmental and Climate Science Dept.; Niu, Shengjie [Nanjing Univ. of Information Science and Technology (China). Collaborative Innovation Center on Forecast and Evaluation of Meteorological Disasters; Endo, Satoshi [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Biological, Environmental and Climate Science Dept.

2014-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes scale factor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Multi-processor including data flow accelerator module  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An accelerator module for a data flow computer includes an intelligent memory. The module is added to a multiprocessor arrangement and uses a shared tagged memory architecture in the data flow computer. The intelligent memory module assigns locations for holding data values in correspondence with arcs leading to a node in a data dependency graph. Each primitive computation is associated with a corresponding memory cell, including a number of slots for operands needed to execute a primitive computation, a primitive identifying pointer, and linking slots for distributing the result of the cell computation to other cells requiring that result as an operand. Circuitry is provided for utilizing tag bits to determine automatically when all operands required by a processor are available and for scheduling the primitive for execution in a queue. Each memory cell of the module may be associated with any of the primitives, and the particular primitive to be executed by the processor associated with the cell is identified by providing an index, such as the cell number for the primitive, to the primitive lookup table of starting addresses. The module thus serves to perform functions previously performed by a number of sections of data flow architectures and coexists with conventional shared memory therein. A multiprocessing system including the module operates in a hybrid mode, wherein the same processing modules are used to perform some processing in a sequential mode, under immediate control of an operating system, while performing other processing in a data flow mode.

Davidson, George S. (Albuquerque, NM); Pierce, Paul E. (Albuquerque, NM)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Conversion of geothermal waste to commercial products including silica  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for the treatment of geothermal residue includes contacting the pigmented amorphous silica-containing component with a depigmenting reagent one or more times to depigment the silica and produce a mixture containing depigmented amorphous silica and depigmenting reagent containing pigment material; separating the depigmented amorphous silica and from the depigmenting reagent to yield depigmented amorphous silica. Before or after the depigmenting contacting, the geothermal residue or depigmented silica can be treated with a metal solubilizing agent to produce another mixture containing pigmented or unpigmented amorphous silica-containing component and a solubilized metal-containing component; separating these components from each other to produce an amorphous silica product substantially devoid of metals and at least partially devoid of pigment. The amorphous silica product can be neutralized and thereafter dried at a temperature from about 25.degree. C. to 300.degree. C. The morphology of the silica product can be varied through the process conditions including sequence contacting steps, pH of depigmenting reagent, neutralization and drying conditions to tailor the amorphous silica for commercial use in products including filler for paint, paper, rubber and polymers, and chromatographic material.

Premuzic, Eugene T. (East Moriches, NY); Lin, Mow S. (Rocky Point, NY)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Economic investigation of discount factors for agricultural greenhouse gas emission offsets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

approaches to discount factors, estimation and incorporation of discount factors procedures are developed. Discount factors would be imposed by credit purchasers due to noncompliance with regulatory program of the credits with GHG program including...

Kim, Man-Keun

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

184

Determination of critical length scales for corrosion processes using microelectroanalytical techniques.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A key factor in our ability to produce and predict the stability of metal-based macro- to nano-scale structures and devices is a fundamental understanding of the localized nature of corrosion. Corrosion processes where physical dimensions become critical in the degradation process include localized corrosion initiation in passivated metals, microgalvanic interactions in metal alloys, and localized corrosion in structurally complex materials like nanocrystalline metal films under atmospheric and inundated conditions. This project focuses on two areas of corrosion science where a fundamental understanding of processes occurring at critical dimensions is not currently available. Sandia will study the critical length scales necessary for passive film breakdown in the inundated aluminum (Al) system and the chemical processes and transport in ultra-thin water films relevant to the atmospheric corrosion of nanocrystalline tungsten (W) films. Techniques are required that provide spatial information without significantly perturbing or masking the underlying relationships. Al passive film breakdown is governed by the relationship between area of the film sampled and its defect structure. We will combine low current measurements with microelectrodes to study the size scale required to observe a single initiation event and record electrochemical breakdown events. The resulting quantitative measure of stability will be correlated with metal grain size, secondary phase size and distribution to understand which metal properties control stability at the macro- and nano-scale. Mechanisms of atmospheric corrosion on W are dependent on the physical dimensions and continuity of adsorbed water layers as well as the chemical reactions that take place in this layer. We will combine electrochemical and scanning probe microscopic techniques to monitor the chemistry and resulting material transport in these thin surface layers. A description of the length scales responsible for driving the corrosion of the nanocrystalline metal films will be developed. The techniques developed and information derived from this work will be used to understand and predict degradation processes in microelectronic and microsystem devices critical to Sandia's mission.

Zavadil, Kevin Robert; Wall, Frederick Douglas

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

A coke oven model including thermal decomposition kinetics of tar  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new one-dimensional coke oven model has been developed for simulating the amount and the characteristics of by-products such as tar and gas as well as coke. This model consists of both heat transfer and chemical kinetics including thermal decomposition of coal and tar. The chemical kinetics constants are obtained by estimation based on the results of experiments conducted to investigate the thermal decomposition of both coal and tar. The calculation results using the new model are in good agreement with experimental ones.

Munekane, Fuminori; Yamaguchi, Yukio [Mitsubishi Chemical Corp., Yokohama (Japan); Tanioka, Seiichi [Mitsubishi Chemical Corp., Sakaide (Japan)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

186

Composite armor, armor system and vehicle including armor system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Composite armor panels are disclosed. Each panel comprises a plurality of functional layers comprising at least an outermost layer, an intermediate layer and a base layer. An armor system incorporating armor panels is also disclosed. Armor panels are mounted on carriages movably secured to adjacent rails of a rail system. Each panel may be moved on its associated rail and into partially overlapping relationship with another panel on an adjacent rail for protection against incoming ordnance from various directions. The rail system may be configured as at least a part of a ring, and be disposed about a hatch on a vehicle. Vehicles including an armor system are also disclosed.

Chu, Henry S.; Jones, Warren F.; Lacy, Jeffrey M.; Thinnes, Gary L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a pu GOVERNMENT RIGHTS This application was funded under Department of Energy Contract DE-AC02-76ER01338. The U.S. Government has certain rights under this application and any patent issuing thereon.

Raikhel, Natasha V. (Okemos, MI); Broekaert, Willem F. (Dilbeek, BE); Chua, Nam-Hai (Scarsdale, NY); Kush, Anil (New York, NY)

1993-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

188

Meson electromagnetic form factors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The electromagnetic structure of the pseudoscalar meson nonet is completely described by the sophisticated Unitary&Analytic model, respecting all known theoretical properties of the corresponding form factors.

Stanislav Dubnicka; Anna Z. Dubnickova

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

189

Including environmental concerns in management strategies for depleted uranium hexafluoride  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the major programs within the Office of Nuclear Energy, Science, and Technology of the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) management program. The program is intended to find a long-term management strategy for the DUF{sub 6} that is currently stored in approximately 46,400 cylinders at Paducah, KY; Portsmouth, OH; and Oak Ridge, TN, USA. The program has four major components: technology assessment, engineering analysis, cost analysis, and the environmental impact statement (EIS). From the beginning of the program, the DOE has incorporated the environmental considerations into the process of strategy selection. Currently, the DOE has no preferred alternative. The results of the environmental impacts assessment from the EIS, as well as the results from the other components of the program, will be factored into the strategy selection process. In addition to the DOE`s current management plan, other alternatives continued storage, reuse, or disposal of depleted uranium, will be considered in the EIS. The EIS is expected to be completed and issued in its final form in the fall of 1997.

Goldberg, M. [Argonne National Laboratory, Washington, DC (United States); Avci, H.I. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Bradley, C.E. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

190

A corrosion control concept by scale engineering: a novel green inhibitor applied for high temperature and pressure aqueous supercritical CO2 systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Traditional corrosion inhibitors are bio-toxic chemicals with organic components that bond to the fresh metal surface and thus isolate them from corrosive environments. The shortcoming of these inhibitors is that they are less effective in high-temperature and high-pressure environments, and where corrosion scale is formed or particulates are deposited. In this paper, we describe a novel green inorganic inhibitor made of environmentally friendly and cost-effective geo-material that was developed for high-temperature and high-pressure environments, particularly under scale-forming conditions. It inhibits corrosion by enhancing the protectiveness of corrosion scale. In contrast to traditional corrosion inhibitors which are efficient for bare surface corrosion but not effective with scale, the novel inhibitor has no effect on bare surface corrosion but greatly improves corrosion inhibition under scale-formation conditions. This is because a homogeneous scale doped with inhibitor component forms. This enhanced corrosion scale demonstrated excellent protection against corrosion. In high-pressure CO{sub 2} systems (pCO{sub 2}=10 Mpa, T=50 C and [NaCl]=1 wt%) without inhibitor, the bare-surface corrosion rate decreases from ca. 10 mm/y to 0.3 mm/year due to formation of scale. Application of a six hundred ppm solution ofthe new inorganic inhibitor reduced the corrosion rate to 0.01 mm/year, an additional factor of 30. The current inhibitor product was designed for application to CO{sub 2} systems that form corrosion scale, including but not limited to oil and gas wells, offshore production of oil and gas, CO{sub 2} sequestration and enhanced geothermal production involving CO{sub 2}.

Jiabin, Han [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Carey, James W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Zhang, Jinsuo [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

191

Cogeneration handbook for the petroleum refining industry. [Glossary included  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Handbook deals only with industrial cogeneration, that is, simultaneous production of both heat and electricity at the industrial plant site. The cogenerator has the option of either selling all cogenerated power to the utility while simultaneously purchasing power to satisfy his plant demand, or directly supplying the plant demand with cogenerated power, thus displacing utility-supplied power. This Handbook provides the refinery plant manager or company energy coordinator with a framework for making a preliminary assessment of the feasibility and viability of cogeneration at a particular plant. The handbook is intended to provide an understanding of the potential of several standardized cogeneration systems, as well as their limitations. However, because the decision to cogenerate is very site specific, the handbook cannot provide all of the answers. It does attempt, however, to bring to light the major issues that should be addressed in the decision-making process. The decision of whether to cogenerate involves several considerations, including technical, economic, environmental, legal, and regulatory issues. Each of these issues is addressed separately in this handbook. In addition, a chapter is included on preparing a three-phase work statement, which is needed to guide the design of a cogeneration system. 39 figures, 37 tables.

Not Available

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Community Assessment Tool for Public Health Emergencies Including Pandemic Influenza  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Community Assessment Tool (CAT) for Public Health Emergencies Including Pandemic Influenza (hereafter referred to as the CAT) was developed as a result of feedback received from several communities. These communities participated in workshops focused on influenza pandemic planning and response. The 2008 through 2011 workshops were sponsored by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Feedback during those workshops indicated the need for a tool that a community can use to assess its readiness for a disaster - readiness from a total healthcare perspective, not just hospitals, but the whole healthcare system. The CAT intends to do just that - help strengthen existing preparedness plans by allowing the healthcare system and other agencies to work together during an influenza pandemic. It helps reveal each core agency partners (sectors) capabilities and resources, and highlights cases of the same vendors being used for resource supplies (e.g., personal protective equipment [PPE] and oxygen) by the partners (e.g., public health departments, clinics, or hospitals). The CAT also addresses gaps in the community's capabilities or potential shortages in resources. This tool has been reviewed by a variety of key subject matter experts from federal, state, and local agencies and organizations. It also has been piloted with various communities that consist of different population sizes, to include large urban to small rural communities.

ORAU's Oak Ridge Institute for Science Education (HCTT-CHE)

2011-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

193

Improved best estimate plus uncertainty methodology including advanced validation concepts to license evolving nuclear reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many evolving nuclear energy programs plan to use advanced predictive multi-scale multi-physics simulation and modeling capabilities to reduce cost and time from design through licensing. Historically, the role of experiments was primary tool for design and understanding of nuclear system behavior while modeling and simulation played the subordinate role of supporting experiments. In the new era of multi-scale multi-physics computational based technology development, the experiments will still be needed but they will be performed at different scales to calibrate and validate models leading predictive simulations. Cost saving goals of programs will require us to minimize the required number of validation experiments. Utilization of more multi-scale multi-physics models introduces complexities in the validation of predictive tools. Traditional methodologies will have to be modified to address these arising issues. This paper lays out the basic aspects of a methodology that can be potentially used to address these new challenges in design and licensing of evolving nuclear technology programs. The main components of the proposed methodology are verification, validation, calibration, and uncertainty quantification. An enhanced calibration concept is introduced and is accomplished through data assimilation. The goal is to enable best-estimate prediction of system behaviors in both normal and safety related environments. To achieve this goal requires the additional steps of estimating the domain of validation and quantification of uncertainties that allow for extension of results to areas of the validation domain that are not directly tested with experiments, which might include extension of the modeling and simulation (M&S) capabilities for application to full-scale systems. The new methodology suggests a formalism to quantify an adequate level of validation (predictive maturity) with respect to required selective data so that required testing can be minimized for cost saving purposes by showing further testing wold not enhance the quality of the validation of predictive tools. The proposed methodology is at a conceptual level. When matured and if considered favorably by the stakeholders, it could serve as a new framework for the next generation of the best estimate plus uncertainty licensing methodology that USNRC developed previously. In order to come to that level of maturity it is necessary to communicate the methodology to scientific, design and regulatory stakeholders for discussion and debates. This paper is the first step to establish this communication.

Unal, Cetin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Williams, Brian [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mc Clure, Patrick [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nelson, Ralph A [IDAHO NATIONAL LAB

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Hydraulic engine valve actuation system including independent feedback control  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A hydraulic valve actuation assembly may include a housing, a piston, a supply control valve, a closing control valve, and an opening control valve. The housing may define a first fluid chamber, a second fluid chamber, and a third fluid chamber. The piston may be axially secured to an engine valve and located within the first, second and third fluid chambers. The supply control valve may control a hydraulic fluid supply to the piston. The closing control valve may be located between the supply control valve and the second fluid chamber and may control fluid flow from the second fluid chamber to the supply control valve. The opening control valve may be located between the supply control valve and the second fluid chamber and may control fluid flow from the supply control valve to the second fluid chamber.

Marriott, Craig D

2013-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

195

Electra-optical device including a nitrogen containing electrolyte  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Described is a thin-film battery, especially a thin-film microbattery, and a method for making same having application as a backup or primary integrated power source for electronic devices. The battery includes a novel electrolyte which is electrochemically stable and does not react with the lithium anode and a novel vanadium oxide cathode Configured as a microbattery, the battery can be fabricated directly onto a semiconductor chip, onto the semiconductor die or onto any portion of the chip carrier. The battery can be fabricated to any specified size or shape to meet the requirements of a particular application. The battery is fabricated of solid state materials and is capable of operation between -15.degree. C. and 150.degree. C.

Bates, John B. (Oak Ridge, TN); Dudney, Nancy J. (Knoxville, TN); Gruzalski, Greg R. (Oak Ridge, TN); Luck, Christopher F. (Knoxville, TN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Dye laser amplifier including a specifically designed diffuser assembly  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A large (high flow rate) dye laser amplifier in which a continuous replened supply of dye is excited by a first light beam, specifically a copper vapor laser beam, in order to amplify the intensity of a second different light beam, specifically a dye beam, passing through the dye is disclosed herein. This amplifier includes a dye cell defining a dye chamber through which a continuous stream of dye is caused to pass at a relatively high flow rate and a specifically designed diffuser assembly for slowing down the flow of dye while, at the same time, assuring that as the dye stream flows through the diffuser assembly it does so in a stable manner.

Davin, James (Gilroy, CA); Johnston, James P. (Stanford, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Electra-optical device including a nitrogen containing electrolyte  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Described is a thin-film battery, especially a thin-film microbattery, and a method for making same having application as a backup or primary integrated power source for electronic devices. The battery includes a novel electrolyte which is electrochemically stable and does not react with the lithium anode and a novel vanadium oxide cathode. Configured as a microbattery, the battery can be fabricated directly onto a semiconductor chip, onto the semiconductor die or onto any portion of the chip carrier. The battery can be fabricated to any specified size or shape to meet the requirements of a particular application. The battery is fabricated of solid state materials and is capable of operation between {minus}15 C and 150 C.

Bates, J.B.; Dudney, N.J.; Gruzalski, G.R.; Luck, C.F.

1995-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

198

Fuel cell repeater unit including frame and separator plate  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An example fuel cell repeater includes a separator plate and a frame establishing at least a portion of a flow path that is operative to communicate fuel to or from at least one fuel cell held by the frame relative to the separator plate. The flow path has a perimeter and any fuel within the perimeter flow across the at least one fuel cell in a first direction. The separator plate, the frame, or both establish at least one conduit positioned outside the flow path perimeter. The conduit is outside of the flow path perimeter and is configured to direct flow in a second, different direction. The conduit is fluidly coupled with the flow path.

Yamanis, Jean; Hawkes, Justin R; Chiapetta, Jr., Louis; Bird, Connie E; Sun, Ellen Y; Croteau, Paul F

2013-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

199

Pulse transmission transmitter including a higher order time derivate filter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Systems and methods for pulse-transmission low-power communication modes are disclosed. A pulse transmission transmitter includes: a clock; a pseudorandom polynomial generator coupled to the clock, the pseudorandom polynomial generator having a polynomial load input; an exclusive-OR gate coupled to the pseudorandom polynomial generator, the exclusive-OR gate having a serial data input; a programmable delay circuit coupled to both the clock and the exclusive-OR gate; a pulse generator coupled to the programmable delay circuit; and a higher order time derivative filter coupled to the pulse generator. The systems and methods significantly reduce lower-frequency emissions from pulse transmission spread-spectrum communication modes, which reduces potentially harmful interference to existing radio frequency services and users and also simultaneously permit transmission of multiple data bits by utilizing specific pulse shapes.

Dress Jr., William B.; Smith, Stephen F.

2003-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

200

Including stereoscopic information in the reconstruction of coronal magnetic fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a method to include stereoscopic information about the three dimensional structure of flux tubes into the reconstruction of the coronal magnetic field. Due to the low plasma beta in the corona we can assume a force free magnetic field, with the current density parallel to the magnetic field lines. Here we use linear force free fields for simplicity. The method uses the line of sight magnetic field on the photosphere as observational input. The value of $\\alpha$ is determined iteratively by comparing the reconstructed magnetic field with the observed structures. The final configuration is the optimal linear force solution constrained by both the photospheric magnetogram and the observed plasma structures. As an example we apply our method to SOHO MDI/EIT data of an active region. In the future it is planned to apply the method to analyse data from the SECCHI instrument aboard the STEREO mission.

T. Wiegelmann; T. Neukirch

2008-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes scale factor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Copper laser modulator driving assembly including a magnetic compression laser  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A laser modulator (10) having a low voltage assembly (12) with a plurality of low voltage modules (14) with first stage magnetic compression circuits (20) and magnetic assist inductors (28) with a common core (91), such that timing of the first stage magnetic switches (30b) is thereby synchronized. A bipolar second stage of magnetic compression (42) is coupled to the low voltage modules (14) through a bipolar pulse transformer (36) and a third stage of magnetic compression (44) is directly coupled to the second stage of magnetic compression (42). The low voltage assembly (12) includes pressurized boxes (117) for improving voltage standoff between the primary winding assemblies (34) and secondary winding (40) contained therein.

Cook, Edward G. (Livermore, CA); Birx, Daniel L. (Oakley, CA); Ball, Don G. (Livermore, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Parallel Stochastic Gradient Algorithms for Large-Scale Matrix ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On large-scale matrix completion tasks, Jellyfish is orders of magnitude more efficient than ...... NNLS was written in Matlab, and some of the functions are available .... Figure 6: Low-Rank Factorization Graph on (A) Movielens1M and (B)

2013-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

203

Synthetic heparin-binding factor analogs  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention provides synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs having at least one peptide chain, and preferably two peptide chains branched from a dipeptide branch moiety composed of two trifunctional amino acid residues, which peptide chain or chains bind a heparin-binding growth factor receptor and are covalently bound to a non-signaling peptide that includes a heparin-binding domain, preferably by a linker, which may be a hydrophobic linker. The synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs are useful as pharmaceutical agents, soluble biologics or as surface coatings for medical devices.

Pena, Louis A. (Poquott, NY); Zamora, Paul O. (Gaithersburg, MD); Lin, Xinhua (Plainview, NY); Glass, John D. (Shoreham, NY)

2010-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

204

Substrate comprising a nanometer-scale projection array  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for forming a substrate comprising nanometer-scale pillars or cones that project from the surface of the substrate is disclosed. The method enables control over physical characteristics of the projections including diameter, sidewall angle, and tip shape. The method further enables control over the arrangement of the projections including characteristics such as center-to-center spacing and separation distance.

Cui, Yi; Zhu, Jia; Hsu, Ching-Mei; Connor, Stephen T; Yu, Zongfu; Fan, Shanhui; Burkhard, George

2012-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

205

Falsifying High-Scale Leptogenesis at the LHC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Measuring a non-zero value for the cross section of any lepton number violating (LNV) process would put a strong lower limit on the washout factor for the effective lepton number density in the early universe at times close to the electroweak phase transition and thus would lead to important constraints on any high-scale model for the generation of the observed baryon asymmetry based on LNV. In particular, for leptogenesis models with masses of the right-handed neutrinos heavier than the mass scale observed at the LHC, the implied large washout factors would lead to a violation of the out-of-equilibrium condition and exponentially suppress the net lepton number produced in such leptogenesis models. We thus demonstrate that the observation of LNV processes at the LHC results in the falsification of high-scale leptogenesis models. However, no conclusions about the viability of leptogenesis models can be drawn from the non-observation of LNV processes.

Frank F. Deppisch; Julia Harz; Martin Hirsch

2014-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

206

Mineral dissolution kinetics at the pore scale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mineral dissolution rates in the field have been reported to be orders of magnitude slower than those measured in the laboratory, an unresolved discrepancy that severely limits our ability to develop scientifically defensible predictive or even interpretive models for many geochemical processes in the earth and environmental sciences. One suggestion links this discrepancy to the role of physical and chemical heterogeneities typically found in subsurface soils and aquifers in producing scale-dependent rates where concentration gradients develop. In this paper, we examine the possibility that scale-dependent mineral dissolution rates can develop even at the single pore and fracture scale, the smallest and most fundamental building block of porous media. To do so, we develop two models to analyze mineral dissolution kinetics at the single pore scale: (1) a Poiseuille Flow model that applies laboratory-measured dissolution kinetics at the pore or fracture wall and couples this to a rigorous treatment of both advective and diffusive transport, and (2) a Well-Mixed Reactor model that assumes complete mixing within the pore, while maintaining the same reactive surface area, average flow rate, and geometry as the Poiseuille Flow model. For a fracture, a 1D Plug Flow Reactor model is considered in addition to quantify the effects of longitudinal versus transverse mixing. The comparison of averaged dissolution rates under various conditions of flow, pore size, and fracture length from the three models is used as a means to quantify the extent to which concentration gradients at the single pore and fracture scale can develop and render rates scale-dependent. Three important minerals that dissolve at widely different rates, calcite, plagioclase, and iron hydroxide, are considered. The modeling indicates that rate discrepancies arise primarily where concentration gradients develop due to comparable rates of reaction and advective transport, and incomplete mixing via molecular diffusion. The magnitude of the reaction rate is important, since it is found that scaling effects (and thus rate discrepancies) are negligible at the single pore and fracture scale for plagioclase and iron hydroxide because of the slow rate at which they dissolve. In the case of calcite, where dissolution rates are rapid, scaling effects can develop at high flow rates from 0.1 cm/s to 1000 cm/s and for fracture lengths less than 1 cm. At more normal flow rates, however, mixing via molecular diffusion is effective in homogenizing the concentration field, thus eliminating any discrepancies between the Poiseuille Flow and the Well-Mixed Reactor model. This suggests that a scale dependence to mineral dissolution rates is unlikely at the single pore or fracture scale under normal geological/hydrologic conditions, implying that the discrepancy between laboratory and field rates must be attributed to other factors.

Li, L.; Steefel, C.I.; Yang, L.

2007-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

207

cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74-79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli.

Raikhel, Natasha V. (Okemos, MI); Broekaert, Willem F. (Dilbeek, BE); Chua, Nam-Hai (Scarsdale, NY); Kush, Anil (New York, NY)

1999-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

208

CDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74-79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli.

Raikhel, Natasha V. (Okemos, MI); Broekaert, Willem F. (Dilbeek, BE); Chua, Nam-Hai (Scarsdale, NY); Kush, Anil (New York, NY)

1995-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

209

cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74--79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli. 12 figs.

Raikhel, N.V.; Broekaert, W.F.; Chua, N.H.; Kush, A.

1999-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

210

cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1,018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74--79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli. 11 figures.

Raikhel, N.V.; Broekaert, W.F.; Chua, N.H.; Kush, A.

1995-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

211

Extractant composition including crown ether and calixarene extractants  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An extractant composition comprising a mixed extractant solvent consisting of calix[4] arene-bis-(tert-octylbenzo)-crown-6 ("BOBCalixC6"), 4',4',(5')-di-(t-butyldicyclo-hexano)-18-crown-6 ("DtBu18C6"), and at least one modifier dissolved in a diluent. The DtBu18C6 may be present at from approximately 0.01M to approximately 0.4M, such as at from approximately 0.086 M to approximately 0.108 M. The modifier may be 1-(2,2,3,3-tetrafluoropropoxy)-3-(4-sec-butylphenoxy)-2-propanol ("Cs-7SB") and may be present at from approximately 0.01M to approximately 0.8M. In one embodiment, the mixed extractant solvent includes approximately 0.15M DtBu18C6, approximately 0.007M BOBCalixC6, and approximately 0.75M Cs-7SB modifier dissolved in an isoparaffinic hydrocarbon diluent. The extractant composition further comprises an aqueous phase. The mixed extractant solvent may be used to remove cesium and strontium from the aqueous phase.

Meikrantz, David H. (Idaho Falls, ID); Todd, Terry A. (Aberdeen, ID); Riddle, Catherine L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Law, Jack D. (Pocalello, ID); Peterman, Dean R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Mincher, Bruce J. (Idaho Falls, ID); McGrath, Christopher A. (Blackfoot, ID); Baker, John D. (Blackfoot, ID)

2009-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

212

Mountaineer Commercial Scale Carbon Capture and Storage Project Topical Report: Preliminary Public Design Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Preliminary Public Design Report consolidates for public use nonproprietary design information on the Mountaineer Commercial Scale Carbon Capture & Storage project. The report is based on the preliminary design information developed during the Phase I - Project Definition Phase, spanning the time period of February 1, 2010 through September 30, 2011. The report includes descriptions and/or discussions for: (1) DOE's Clean Coal Power Initiative, overall project & Phase I objectives, and the historical evolution of DOE and American Electric Power (AEP) sponsored projects leading to the current project; (2) Alstom's Chilled Ammonia Process (CAP) carbon capture retrofit technology and the carbon storage and monitoring system; (3) AEP's retrofit approach in terms of plant operational and integration philosophy; (4) The process island equipment and balance of plant systems for the CAP technology; (5) The carbon storage system, addressing injection wells, monitoring wells, system monitoring and controls logic philosophy; (6) Overall project estimate that includes the overnight cost estimate, cost escalation for future year expenditures, and major project risks that factored into the development of the risk based contingency; and (7) AEP's decision to suspend further work on the project at the end of Phase I, notwithstanding its assessment that the Alstom CAP technology is ready for commercial demonstration at the intended scale.

Guy Cerimele

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

213

Large scale tracking algorithms.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Low signal-to-noise data processing algorithms for improved detection, tracking, discrimination and situational threat assessment are a key research challenge. As sensor technologies progress, the number of pixels will increase signi cantly. This will result in increased resolution, which could improve object discrimination, but unfortunately, will also result in a significant increase in the number of potential targets to track. Many tracking techniques, like multi-hypothesis trackers, suffer from a combinatorial explosion as the number of potential targets increase. As the resolution increases, the phenomenology applied towards detection algorithms also changes. For low resolution sensors, "blob" tracking is the norm. For higher resolution data, additional information may be employed in the detection and classfication steps. The most challenging scenarios are those where the targets cannot be fully resolved, yet must be tracked and distinguished for neighboring closely spaced objects. Tracking vehicles in an urban environment is an example of such a challenging scenario. This report evaluates several potential tracking algorithms for large-scale tracking in an urban environment.

Hansen, Ross L.; Love, Joshua Alan; Melgaard, David Kennett; Karelitz, David B.; Pitts, Todd Alan; Zollweg, Joshua David; Anderson, Dylan Z.; Nandy, Prabal; Whitlow, Gary L.; Bender, Daniel A.; Byrne, Raymond Harry

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Factors Shaping Macrofaunal Polychaete Communities in the Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This dissertation addresses large-scale trends in composition, density, taxonomic and functional diversity in deep-sea benthic polychaete communities in the Gulf of Mexico (GoM). The study includes samples from two major sampling programs: the Deep...

Carvalho, Russell G

2013-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

215

Community Assessment Tool for Public Health Emergencies Including Pandemic Influenza  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Community Assessment Tool (CAT) for Public Health Emergencies Including Pandemic Influenza (hereafter referred to as the CAT) was developed as a result of feedback received from several communities. These communities participated in workshops focused on influenza pandemic planning and response. The 2008 through 2011 workshops were sponsored by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Feedback during those workshops indicated the need for a tool that a community can use to assess its readiness for a disasterreadiness from a total healthcare perspective, not just hospitals, but the whole healthcare system. The CAT intends to do just thathelp strengthen existing preparedness plans by allowing the healthcare system and other agencies to work together during an influenza pandemic. It helps reveal each core agency partners' (sectors) capabilities and resources, and highlights cases of the same vendors being used for resource supplies (e.g., personal protective equipment [PPE] and oxygen) by the partners (e.g., public health departments, clinics, or hospitals). The CAT also addresses gaps in the community's capabilities or potential shortages in resources. While the purpose of the CAT is to further prepare the community for an influenza pandemic, its framework is an extension of the traditional all-hazards approach to planning and preparedness. As such, the information gathered by the tool is useful in preparation for most widespread public health emergencies. This tool is primarily intended for use by those involved in healthcare emergency preparedness (e.g., community planners, community disaster preparedness coordinators, 9-1-1 directors, hospital emergency preparedness coordinators). It is divided into sections based on the core agency partners, which may be involved in the community's influenza pandemic influenza response.

HCTT-CHE

2011-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

216

STEAM-SIDE OXIDE SCALE EXFOLIATION BEHAVIOR IN SUPERHEATERS AND REHEATERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Advances in materials for power plants include not only new materials with higher-temperature capabilities, but also the use of current materials at increasingly higher temperatures. This latter activity builds on extensive experience of the performance of the various alloys, and provides a basis for identifying changes in alloy behavior with increasing temperature as well as understanding the factors that ultimately determine the maximum use temperatures of the different alloy classes. This paper presents results from an effort to model the exfoliation processes of steam-side oxide scales in a manner that describes as accurately as possible the evolution of strains in oxides growing inside small-diameter tubes subjected to large thermal gradients and to thermal transients typical of normal steam boiler operation. One way of portraying the results of such calculations is by plotting the evolving strains in a given oxide scale on an Exfoliation Diagram (of the type pioneered by Manning et al. of the British Central Electricity Research Laboratory) to determine the earliest time at which the trajectory of these strains intersects a criterion for scale failure. Understanding of how such strain trajectories differ among different alloys and are affected by the major variables associated with boiler operation has the potential to suggest boiler operating strategies to manage scale exfoliation, as well as to highlight the mode of scale failure and the limitations of each alloy. Preliminary results are presented of the strain trajectories calculated for alloys T22, T91, and TP347 subjected to the conditions experienced by superheaters under assumed boiler operating scenarios. For all three alloys the earliest predicted scale failures were associated with the increased strains developed during a boiler shut-down event; indeed, in the cases considered it appeared unlikely that scale failure would occur in any practically meaningful time due to strains accumulated during operation in a load-following mode in the absence of a shut down. The accuracy of the algorithms used for the kinetics of oxide growth appeared to be a very important consideration, especially for alloy TP347 for which large effects on oxide growth rate are known to occur with changes in alloy grain size and surface cold work.

Sabau, Adrian S [ORNL; Shingledecker, John P. [Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI); Wright, Ian G [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Weakly bound molecules trapped with discrete scaling symmetries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

When the scattering length is proportional to the distance from the center of the system, two particles are shown to be trapped about the center. Furthermore, their spectrum exhibits discrete scale invariance, whose scale factor is controlled by the slope of the scattering length. While this resembles the Efimov effect, our system has a number of advantages when realized with ultracold atoms. We also elucidate how the emergent discrete scaling symmetry is violated for more than two bosons, which may shed new light on Efimov physics. Our system thus serves as a tunable model system to investigate universal physics involving scale invariance, quantum anomaly, and renormalization group limit cycle, which are important in a broad range of quantum physics.

Yusuke Nishida; Dean Lee

2012-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

218

Large scale anisotropic bias from primordial non-Gaussianity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this work we study the large scale structure bias in models of anisotropic inflation. We use the Peak Background Splitting method in Excursion Set Theory to find the scale-dependent bias. We show that the amplitude of the bias is modified by a direction-dependent factor. In the specific anisotropic inflation model which we study, the scale-dependent bias vanishes at leading order when the long wavelength mode in squeezed limit is aligned with the anisotropic direction in the sky. We also extend the scale-dependent bias formulation to the general situations with primordial anisotropy. We find some selection rules indicating that some specific parts of a generic anisotropic bispectrum is picked up by the bias parameter. We argue that the anisotropic bias is mainly sourced by the angle between the anisotropic direction and the long wavelength mode in the squeezed limit.

Baghram, Shant; Firouzjahi, Hassan [School of Astronomy, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), P.O. Box 19395-5531, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Namjoo, Mohammad Hossein, E-mail: baghram@ipm.ir, E-mail: mh.namjoo@ipm.ir, E-mail: firouz@ipm.ir [School of Physics, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), P.O. Box 19395-5531, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Multi-scale Characterization and Prediction of Coupled Subsurface Biogeochemical-Hydrological Processes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To advance solutions needed for remediation of DOE contaminated sites, approaches are needed that can elucidate and predict reactions associated with coupled biological, geochemical, and hydrological processes over a variety of spatial scales and in heterogeneous environments. Our previous laboratory experimental experiments, which were conducted under controlled and homogeneous conditions, suggest that geophysical methods have the potential for elucidating system transformations that often occur during remediation. Examples include tracking the onset and aggregation of precipitates associated with sulfate reduction using seismic and complex resistivity methods (Williams et al., 2005; Ntarlagiannis et al., 2005) as well as estimating the volume of evolved gas associated with denitrification using radar velocity. These exciting studies illustrated that geophysical responses correlated with biogeochemical changes, but also that multiple factors could impact the geophysical signature and thus a better understanding as well as integration tools were needed to advance the techniques to the point where they can be used to provide quantitative estimates of system transformations.

Hubbard, Susan; Williams, Ken; Steefel, Carl; Banfield, Jill; Long, Phil; Slater, Lee; Pride, Steve; Jinsong Chen

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Not Easy Being Mead's: Comparative Herbivory on Three Milkweeds, Including Threatened Mead's Milkweed (Asclepias meadii), and Seedling Ecology of Mead's Milkweed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 1: Comparative Herbivory and Herbivore Effects on Reproduction for Three Milkweeds (Asclepias) in Two Landscape Contexts. The ability of herbivores to regulate plant populations depends on many factors including herbivore species, abundance...

Roels, Steve M.

2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes scale factor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Industrial Scale Demonstration of Smart Manufacturing Achieving...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Scale Demonstration of Smart Manufacturing Achieving Transformational Energy Productivity Gains Industrial Scale Demonstration of Smart Manufacturing Achieving...

222

The Economic Productivity of Urban Areas: Disentangling General Scale Effects from Local Exceptionality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;The Economic Productivity of Urban Areas: Disentangling General Scale Effects from Local The factors that explain differences in the economic productivity of urban areas have remained difficult of economic activity in a city in terms of a production function, together with a scaling perspective

223

Implicit Scaling in Ecological Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- sion, and abstruse structures, such as communities and ecosystems. The diversity of organisms and eco. It was our supposition that the often unrecognized relation- ship between organism/concept and scale should- ination, we hope to raise ecologists' awareness of scale-dependent rela- tionships among organisms and eco

Tullos, Desiree

224

Scaling Laws and Temperature Profiles for Solar and Stellar Coronal Loops with Non-uniform Heating  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The bulk of solar coronal radiative loss consists of soft X-ray emission from quasi-static loops at the cores of Active Regions. In order to develop diagnostics for determining the heating mechanism of these loops from observations by coronal imaging instruments, I have developed analytical solutions for the temperature structure and scaling laws of loop strands for a wide range of heating functions, including footpoint heating, uniform heating, and heating concentrated at the loop apex. Key results are that the temperature profile depends only weakly on the heating distribution -- not sufficiently to be of significant diagnostic value -- and that the scaling laws survive for this wide range of heating distributions, but with the constant of proportionality in the RTV scaling law ($P_{0}L \\thicksim T_{max}^3$) depending on the specific heating function. Furthermore, quasi-static analytical solutions do not exist for an excessive concentration of heating near the loop footpoints, a result in agreement with recent numerical simulations. It is demonstrated that a generalization of the solutions to the case of a strand with a variable diameter leads to only relatively small correction factors in the scaling laws and temperature profiles for constant diameter loop strands. A quintet of leading theoretical coronal heating mechanisms is shown to be captured by the formalism of this paper, and the differences in thermal structure between them may be verified through observations. Preliminary results from full numerical simulations demonstrate that, despite the simplifying assumptions, the analytical solutions from this paper are stable and accurate.

P. C. H. Martens

2008-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

225

Large-scale anisotropy in stably stratified rotating flows  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present results from direct numerical simulations of the Boussinesq equations in the presence of rotation and/or stratification, both in the vertical direction. The runs are forced isotropically and randomly at small scales and have spatial resolutions of up to $1024^3$ grid points and Reynolds numbers of $\\approx 1000$. We first show that solutions with negative energy flux and inverse cascades develop in rotating turbulence, whether or not stratification is present. However, the purely stratified case is characterized instead by an early-time, highly anisotropic transfer to large scales with almost zero net isotropic energy flux. This is consistent with previous studies that observed the development of vertically sheared horizontal winds, although only at substantially later times. However, and unlike previous works, when sufficient scale separation is allowed between the forcing scale and the domain size, the total energy displays a perpendicular (horizontal) spectrum with power law behavior compatible with $\\sim k_\\perp^{-5/3}$, including in the absence of rotation. In this latter purely stratified case, such a spectrum is the result of a direct cascade of the energy contained in the large-scale horizontal wind, as is evidenced by a strong positive flux of energy in the parallel direction at all scales including the largest resolved scales.

Marino, Dr. Raffaele [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR); Mininni, Dr. Pablo D. [Universidad de Buenos Aires, Argentina; Rosenberg, Duane L [ORNL; Pouquet, Dr. Annick [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Cloud Controlling Factors --Low Clouds BJORN STEVENS,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cloud Controlling Factors -- Low Clouds BJORN STEVENS, Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic conspire to determine the statistics and cli- matology of layers of shallow (boundary layer) clouds of low-cloud control- ling processes are offered: these include renewing our focus on theory, model

Stevens, Bjorn

227

Boiling behavior of sodium-potassium alloy in a bench-scale solar receiver  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During 1989-90, a 75-kW{sub t} sodium reflux pool-boiler solar receiver was successfully demonstrated at Sandia National Laboratories. Significant features of this receiver include (1) boiling sodium as the heat transfer medium and (2) electric-discharge-machined (EDM) cavities as artificial nucleation sites to stabilize boiling. Since this first demonstration, design of a second-generation pool-boiler receiver that will bring the concept closer to commercialization has begun. For long life, the new receiver uses Haynes Alloy 230. For increased safety factors against film boiling and flooding, it has a refined shape and somewhat larger dimensions. To eliminate the need for trace heating, the receiver will boil the sodium-potassium alloy NaK-78 instead of sodium. To reduce manufacturing costs, it will use one of a number of alternatives to EDM cavities for stabilization of boiling. To control incipient-boiling superheats, especially during hot restarts, it will contain a small amount of inert gas. Before the new receiver design could be finalized, bench-scale tests of some of the proposed changes were necessary. A series of bench-scale pool boilers were built from Haynes Alloy 230 and filled with NaK-78. Various boiling-stabilizer candidates were incorporated into them, including laser-drilled cavities and a number of different sintered-powder-metal coatings. These bench-scale pool boilers have been operated at temperatures up to 750{degree}C, heated by quartz lamps with incident radiant fluxes up to 95 W/cm{sup 2}. The effects of various orientations and added gases have been studied. results of these studies are presented. 15 refs.

Moreno, J.B.; Andraka, C.E.; Moss, T.A.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

DUSEL Facility Cooling Water Scaling Issues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Precipitation (crystal growth) in supersaturated solutions is governed by both kenetic and thermodynamic processes. This is an important and evolving field of research, especially for the petroleum industry. There are several types of precipitates including sulfate compounds (ie. barium sulfate) and calcium compounds (ie. calcium carbonate). The chemical makeup of the mine water has relatively large concentrations of sulfate as compared to calcium, so we may expect that sulfate type reactions. The kinetics of calcium sulfate dihydrate (CaSO4 {center_dot} 2H20, gypsum) scale formation on heat exchanger surfaces from aqueous solutions has been studied by a highly reproducible technique. It has been found that gypsum scale formation takes place directly on the surface of the heat exchanger without any bulk or spontaneous precipitation in the reaction cell. The kinetic data also indicate that the rate of scale formation is a function of surface area and the metallurgy of the heat exchanger. As we don't have detailed information about the heat exchanger, we can only infer that this will be an issue for us. Supersaturations of various compounds are affected differently by temperature, pressure and pH. Pressure has only a slight affect on the solubility, whereas temperature is a much more sensitive parameter (Figure 1). The affect of temperature is reversed for calcium carbonate and barium sulfate solubilities. As temperature increases, barium sulfate solubility concentrations increase and scaling decreases. For calcium carbonate, the scaling tendencies increase with increasing temperature. This is all relative, as the temperatures and pressures of the referenced experiments range from 122 to 356 F. Their pressures range from 200 to 4000 psi. Because the cooling water system isn't likely to see pressures above 200 psi, it's unclear if this pressure/scaling relationship will be significant or even apparent. The most common scale minerals found in the oilfield include calcium carbonates (CaCO3, mainly calcite) and alkaline-earth metal sulfates (barite BaSO4, celestite SrSO4, anhydrite CaSO4, hemihydrate CaSO4 1/2H2O, and gypsum CaSO4 2H2O or calcium sulfate). The cause of scaling can be difficult to identify in real oil and gas wells. However, pressure and temperature changes during the flow of fluids are primary reasons for the formation of carbonate scales, because the escape of CO2 and/or H2S gases out of the brine solution, as pressure is lowered, tends to elevate the pH of the brine and result in super-saturation with respect to carbonates. Concerning sulfate scales, the common cause is commingling of different sources of brines either due to breakthrough of injected incompatible waters or mixing of two different brines from different zones of the reservoir formation. A decrease in temperature tends to cause barite to precipitate, opposite of calcite. In addition, pressure drops tend to cause all scale minerals to precipitate due to the pressure dependence of the solubility product. And we can expect that there will be a pressure drop across the heat exchanger. Weather or not this will be offset by the rise in pressure remains to be seen. It's typically left to field testing to prove out. Progress has been made toward the control and treatment of the scale deposits, although most of the reaction mechanisms are still not well understood. Often the most efficient and economic treatment for scale formation is to apply threshold chemical inhibitors. Threshold scale inhibitors are like catalysts and have inhibition efficiency at very low concentrations (commonly less than a few mg/L), far below the stoichiometric concentrations of the crystal lattice ions in solution. There are many chemical classes of inhibitors and even more brands on the market. Based on the water chemistry it is anticipated that there is a high likelihood for sulfate compound precipitation and scaling. This may be dependent on the temperature and pressure, which vary throughout the system. Therefore, various types and amounts of scaling may occur at different

Daily, W D

2011-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

229

Factors favorable to public participation success  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Categories of factors linked to successful public participation (PP) program outcomes include PP process, organizational context, sociopolitical context, strategic considerations and unique (special circumstances) factors. We re-order the long list factors according to how essential, important, and unique they are and discuss their significance and interrelationships. It is argued that bureacratic structure and operational modes are basically in conflict with features of successful PP programs (openness, two-way education, communication with nonexpert outsiders). If this is so, then it is not surprising that the factors essential for PP success in bureacracies involve extraordinary management efforts by agencies to bypass, compensate for, or overcome structural constraints. We conclude by speculating about the long-term viability of PP practices in the agency setting as well as the consequences for agencies that attempt the problematic task of introducing PP into their complex, mission-oriented organizations.

Peelle, E.; Schweitzer, M.; Munro, J.; Carnes, S.; Wolfe, A.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

The Food Crises: A quantitative model of food prices including speculators and ethanol conversion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent increases in basic food prices are severely impacting vulnerable populations worldwide. Proposed causes such as shortages of grain due to adverse weather, increasing meat consumption in China and India, conversion of corn to ethanol in the US, and investor speculation on commodity markets lead to widely differing implications for policy. A lack of clarity about which factors are responsible reinforces policy inaction. Here, for the first time, we construct a dynamic model that quantitatively agrees with food prices. The results show that the dominant causes of price increases are investor speculation and ethanol conversion. Models that just treat supply and demand are not consistent with the actual price dynamics. The two sharp peaks in 2007/2008 and 2010/2011 are specifically due to investor speculation, while an underlying upward trend is due to increasing demand from ethanol conversion. The model includes investor trend following as well as shifting between commodities, equities and bonds to take ad...

Lagi, Marco; Bertrand, Karla Z; Bar-Yam, Yaneer

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Method for large-scale fabrication of atomic-scale structures on material surfaces using surface vacancies  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for forming atomic-scale structures on a surface of a substrate on a large-scale includes creating a predetermined amount of surface vacancies on the surface of the substrate by removing an amount of atoms on the surface of the material corresponding to the predetermined amount of the surface vacancies. Once the surface vacancies have been created, atoms of a desired structure material are deposited on the surface of the substrate to enable the surface vacancies and the atoms of the structure material to interact. The interaction causes the atoms of the structure material to form the atomic-scale structures.

Lim, Chong Wee (Urbana, IL); Ohmori, Kenji (Urbana, IL); Petrov, Ivan Georgiev (Champaign, IL); Greene, Joseph E. (Champaign, IL)

2004-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

232

Surface modification to prevent oxide scale spallation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A surface modification to prevent oxide scale spallation is disclosed. The surface modification includes a ferritic stainless steel substrate having a modified surface. A cross-section of the modified surface exhibits a periodic morphology. The periodic morphology does not exceed a critical buckling length, which is equivalent to the length of a wave attribute observed in the cross section periodic morphology. The modified surface can be created using at least one of the following processes: shot peening, surface blasting and surface grinding. A coating can be applied to the modified surface.

Stephens, Elizabeth V; Sun, Xin; Liu, Wenning; Stevenson, Jeffry W; Surdoval, Wayne; Khaleel, Mohammad A

2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

233

Hydranet: network support for scaling of large scale servic es  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

With the explosive growth of demand for services on the Internet, the networking infrastructure (routers 7 protocols, servers) is under considerable stress. Mechanisms are needed for current and future IP services to scale in a client transparent...

Chawla, Hamesh

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Towards the Scale Invariant Cosmology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An argument is made to show that the singularity in the General Theory of Relativity (GTR) is the expression of a non-Machian feature. It can be avoided with a scale-invariant dynamical theory, a property lacking in GTR. It is further argued that the global non-conservation of energy in GTR also results from the lack of scale-invariance and the field formulation presented by several authors can only resolve the problem in part. A truly scale-invariant theory is required to avoid these two problems in a more consistent approach

M. M. Verma

2005-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

235

Scaling of Thermal-Hydraulic Experiments for a Space Rankine Cycle and Selection of a Preconceptual Scaled Experiment Design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To assist with the development of a space-based Rankine cycle power system using liquid potassium as the working fluid, a study has been conducted on possible scaled experiments with simulant fluids. This report will consider several possible working fluids and describe a scaling methodology to achieve thermal-hydraulic similarity between an actual potassium system and scaled representations of the Rankine cycle boiler or condenser. The most practical scaling approach examined is based on the selection of perfluorohexane (FC-72) as the simulant. Using the scaling methodology, a series of possible solutions have been calculated for the FC-72 boiler and condenser. The possible scaled systems will then be compared and preconceptual specifications and drawings given for the most promising design. The preconceptual design concept will also include integrating the scaled boiler and scaled condenser into a single experimental loop. All the preconceptual system specifications appear practical from a fabrication and experimental standpoint, but further work will be needed to arrive at a final experiment design.

Sulfredge, CD

2006-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

236

Dynamic structure factors of a dense mixture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We compute the dynamic structure factors of a dense binary liquid mixture. These describe dynamics on molecular length scales, where structural relaxation is important. We find that the presence of a few large particles in a dense fluid of small particles slows down the dynamics considerably. We also observe a deep narrowing of the spectrum for a disordered mixture composed of a nearly equal packing of the two species. In contrast, a few small particles diffuse easily in the background of a dense fluid of large particles. We expect our results to describe neutron scattering from a dense mixture.

Supurna Sinha

2005-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

237

Factors Affecting Photosynthesis!  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Factors Affecting Photosynthesis! Temperature Eppley (1972) Light Sverdrup's Critical Depth-493, but the general concept is still valid! ! #12;PB opt & Temperature! #12;Photosynthesis & Temperature! Remember: in the laboratory, we can measure photosynthesis versus irradiance (PvsE) and calculate Ek, Pmax, and alpha

Kudela, Raphael M.

238

Public Health FAT FACTORS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: THE UNITED STATES SPENDS MORE ON HEALTH CARE THAN ANY OTHER COUNTRY. YET WE CONTINUE TO FALL FAR BEHIND States spends an astonishing percent of our gross domestic product on health care--significantly moreColumbia Public Health HOT TOPIC Climate Change FAT FACTORS Obesity Prevention BOOK SMART

Qian, Ning

239

Time-scale for accretion of matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mass accretion is the key factor for evolution of galaxies. It can occur through secular evolution, when gas in the outer parts is driven inwards by dynamical instabilities, such as spirals or bars. This secular evolution proceeds very slowly when spontaneous, and can be accelerated when triggered by companions. Accretion can also occur directly through merging of small companions, or more violent interaction and coalescence. We discuss the relative importance of both processes, their time-scale and frequency along a Hubble time. Signatures of both processes can be found in the Milky Way. It is however likely that our Galaxy had already gathered the bulk of its mass about 8-10 Gyr ago, as is expected in hierarchical galaxy formation scenarios.

F. Combes

1998-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

240

Dissecting Soft Radiation with Factorization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An essential part of high-energy hadronic collisions is the soft hadronic activity that underlies the primary hard interaction. It includes soft radiation from the primary hard partons, secondary multiple parton interactions (MPI), and factorization-violating effects. The invariant mass spectrum of the leading jet in $Z$+jet and $H$+jet events is directly sensitive to these effects, and we use a QCD factorization theorem to predict its dependence on the jet radius $R$, jet $p_T$, jet rapidity, and partonic process for both the perturbative and nonperturbative components of primary soft radiation. We prove that the nonperturbative contributions involve only odd powers of $R$, and the linear $R$ term is universal for quark and gluon jets. The hadronization model in PYTHIA8 agrees well with these properties. The perturbative soft initial state radiation (ISR) has a contribution that depends on the jet area in the same way as the underlying event, but this degeneracy is broken by dependence on the jet $p_T$. The size of this soft ISR contribution is proportional to the color state of the initial partons, yielding the same positive contribution for $gg\\to Hg$ and $gq\\to Zq$, but a negative interference contribution for $q\\bar q\\to Z g$. Hence, measuring these dependencies allows one to separate hadronization, soft ISR, and MPI contributions in the data.

Iain W. Stewart; Frank J. Tackmann; Wouter J. Waalewijn

2015-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

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241

Factorization in B to V gamma Decays  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The factorization properties of the radiative decays B {yields} V{gamma} are analyzed at leading order in 1/mb using the soft-collinear effective theory. It is shown that the decay amplitudes can be expressed in terms of a B {yields} V form factor evaluated at q{sup 2} = 0, light-cone distribution amplitudes of the B and V mesons, and calculable hard-scattering kernels. The renormalization-group equations in the effective theory are solved to resume perturbative logarithms of the different scales in the decay process. Phenomenological implications for the B {yields} K*{gamma} branching ratio, isospin asymmetry, and CP asymmetries are discussed, with particular emphasis on possible effects from physics beyond the Standard Model.

Becher, T

2005-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

242

WHAT'S INCLUDED?  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500IIVasudhaSurface.Laboratory in Golden, Colorado6

243

Proximate Population Factors and Deforestation in Tropical Agricultural Frontiers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proximate Population Factors and Deforestation in Tropical Agricultural Frontiers David L. Carr are significantly associated at the global and regional scales, evidence for population links to deforestation of thought on population­environment theories relevant to deforestation in tropical agricultural frontiers

Lopez-Carr, David

244

CALL FOR PAPERS HUMAN FACTORS IN SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of practice, knowledge sharing and organizational learning Interaction in large scale online communities of effective coordination among the developers and factors such as developer motivation and organizational the patterns in which communities work Human and Organizational Issues particular to Agile software

Vellekoop, Michel

245

Scale Effects in Crystal Plasticity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The goal of this research work is to further the understanding of crystal plasticity, particularly at reduced structural and material length scales. Fundamental understanding of plasticity is central to various challenges facing design...

Padubidri Janardhanachar, Guruprasad

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

246

Commercial Scale Wind Incentive Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Energy Trust of Oregons Commercial Scale Wind offering provides resources and cash incentives to help communities, businesses land owners, and government entities install wind turbine systems up...

247

E-Print Network 3.0 - axis factoring method Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Once this is done, we can call the setup method to properly initialize the axis... On: color values start end moveBy scaleFactor minValue maxValue AbstractAxis AxisAxisDecorator...

248

The Factors of Chronic Kidney Disease: Diabetes, Hypertension, Smoking, Drinking, Betelnut Chewing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Factors of Chronic Kidney Disease: Diabetes, Hypertension, Smoking, Drinking, Betelnut Chewing CKD 75 CKD Abstract The risk factors of Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD), including diabetes risk factors in a population-based cohort. Compared with single risk factors, diabetes (odds ratio 1

Chen, Chaur-Chin

249

Heart of Darkness: The Significance of the Zeptobarn Scale for Neutralino Direct Detection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The direct detection of dark matter through its elastic scattering off nucleons is among the most promising methods for establishing the particle identity of dark matter. The current bound on the spin-independent scattering cross section is sigma^SI 1 TeV, effectively decoupling squarks and sleptons from neutralino dark matter phenomenology. In this case, we find characteristic cross sections in the narrow range 1 zb 70 GeV. As sfermion masses are lowered to near their experimental limit mtilde ~ 400 GeV, the upper and lower limits of this range are extended, but only by factors of around two, and the lower limit is not significantly altered by relaxing many particle physics assumptions, varying the strange quark content of the nucleon, including the effects of galactic small-scale structure, or assuming other components of dark matter. Experiments are therefore rapidly entering the heart of dark matter-favored supersymmetry parameter space. If no signal is seen, supersymmetric models must contain some level of fine-tuning, and we identify and analyze several possibilities. Barring large cancellations, however, in a large and generic class of models, if thermal relic neutralinos are a significant component of dark matter, experiments will discover them as they probe down to the zeptobarn scale.

Jonathan L. Feng; David Sanford

2011-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

250

The energetic coupling of scales in gyrokinetic plasma turbulence  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In magnetized plasma turbulence, the couplings of perpendicular spatial scales that arise due to the nonlinear interactions are analyzed from the perspective of the free-energy exchanges. The plasmas considered here, with appropriate ion or electron adiabatic electro-neutrality responses, are described by the gyrokinetic formalism in a toroidal magnetic geometry. Turbulence develops due to the electrostatic fluctuations driven by temperature gradient instabilities, either ion temperature gradient (ITG) or electron temperature gradient (ETG). The analysis consists in decomposing the system into a series of scale structures, while accounting separately for contributions made by modes possessing special symmetries (e.g., the zonal flow modes). The interaction of these scales is analyzed using the energy transfer functions, including a forward and backward decomposition, scale fluxes, and locality functions. The comparison between the ITG and ETG cases shows that ETG turbulence has a more pronounced classical turbulent behavior, exhibiting a stronger energy cascade, with implications for gyrokinetic turbulence modeling.

Teaca, Bogdan, E-mail: bogdan.teaca@coventry.ac.uk [Applied Mathematics Research Centre, Coventry University, Coventry CV1 5FB (United Kingdom); Max-Planck fr Sonnensystemforschung, Justus-von-Liebig-Weg 3, D-37077 Gttingen (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut fr Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Max-Planck/Princeton Center for Plasma Physics (Germany); Navarro, Alejandro Ban, E-mail: alejandro.banon.navarro@ipp.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut fr Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Jenko, Frank, E-mail: frank.jenko@ipp.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut fr Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Max-Planck/Princeton Center for Plasma Physics (Germany)

2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

251

Role of Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 4 alpha in Hepatocyte Proliferation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 4 alpha (HNF4?) is the master regulator of hepatocyte differentiation. It is involved in the up-regulation of genes involved in many classic hepatic functions including: bile acid metabolism, ...

Walesky, Chad Michael

2014-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

252

Global fits of the cMSSM including the first LHC and XENON100 data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present updated global fits of the constrained Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (cMSSM), including the most recent constraints from the ATLAS and CMS detectors at the LHC, as well as the most recent results of the XENON100 experiment. Our robust analysis takes into account both astrophysical and hadronic uncertainties that enter in the calculation of the rate of WIMP-induced recoils in direct detection experiment. We study the consequences for neutralino Dark Matter, and show that current direct detection data already allow to robustly rule out the so-called Focus Point region, therefore demonstrating the importance of particle astrophysics experiments in constraining extensions of the Standard Model of Particle Physics. We also observe an increased compatibility between results obtained from a Bayesian and a Frequentist statistical perspective. We find that upcoming ton-scale direct detection experiments will probe essentially the entire currently favoured region (at the 99% level), almost independently of the statistical approach used. Prospects for indirect detection of the cMSSM are further reduced.

Bertone, Gianfranco [GRAPPA Institute, University of Amsterdam, Science Park 904, 1090 GL Amsterdam (Netherlands); Cerdeo, David G. [Departamento de Fsica Terica and Instituto de Fsica Terica UAM-CSIC, Universidad Autnoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Fornasa, Mattia [Instituto de Astrofsica de Andaluca (CSIC), E-18008, Granada (Spain); Austri, Roberto Ruiz de [Instituto de Fsica Corpuscular, IFIC-UV/CSIC, Valencia (Spain); Strege, Charlotte; Trotta, Roberto, E-mail: gf.bertone@gmail.com, E-mail: davidg.cerdeno@uam.es, E-mail: mattia@iaa.es, E-mail: rruiz@ific.uv.es, E-mail: charlotte.strege09@imperial.ac.uk, E-mail: r.trotta@imperial.ac.uk [Astrophysics Group, Imperial College London, Blackett Laboratory, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Human Factors Aspects of Power System Flow Animation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

into utility control centers. For example, [1] and [2] describe the on-line usage of animated flows, voltageHuman Factors Aspects of Power System Flow Animation Douglas A. Wiegmann, Gavin R. Essenberg flow information, including transmission line MW flow and power transfer distribution factor (PTDF

254

On Local and Global Centrality in Large Scale Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Estimating influential nodes in large scale networks including but not limited to social networks, biological networks, communication networks, emerging smart grids etc. is a topic of fundamental interest. To understand influences of nodes in a network, a classical metric is centrality within which there are multiple specific instances including degree centrality, closeness centrality, betweenness centrality and more. As of today, existing algorithms to identify nodes with high centrality measures operate upon the entire (or rather global) network, resulting in high computational complexity. In this paper, we design efficient algorithms for determining the betweenness centrality in large scale networks by taking advantage of the modular topology exhibited by most of these large scale networks. Very briefly, modular topologies are those wherein the entire network appears partitioned into distinct modules (or clusters or communities), wherein nodes within the module (that likely share highly similar profiles) h...

Das, Sima

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Scale and deposits in high-heat-rejection engines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Scaling under conditions very similar to those of a heavy-duty diesel engine cooling system was investigated using a newly designed, versatile test stand. The parameters included flow rate, heat flux, hardness, along with bulk fluid temperatures. The hot surface temperature, a critical parameter, was also measured. Results were interpreted in terms of the conditions in the boundary layer at the hot surface. Critical values of flow rate and heat flux existed for scaling under experimental conditions. A quantitative relationship of scale with heat flux and hardness was observed. Deposits produced from testing of different types of commercial coolants, including phosphate based and nonphosphate bases, were measured and compared with results from simple beaker tests.

Chen, Y.S.; Kershisnik, E.I. [Dober Group, Glenwood, IL (United States); Hudgens, R.D. [Fleetguard, Inc., Cookeville, TN (United States); Corbeels, C.L.; Zehr, R.L. [Cummins Engine Co., Inc., Columbus, IN (United States)

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

EFRT M-12 Issue Resolution: Caustic Leach Rate Constants from PEP and Laboratory-Scale Tests  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Testing Summary Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project-Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) project to perform research and development activities to resolve technical issues identified for the Pretreatment Facility (PTF). The Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) was designed and constructed and is to be operated as part of a plan to respond to issue M12, Undemonstrated Leaching Processes. The PEP is a 1/4.5-scale test platform designed to simulate the WTP pretreatment caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, ultrafiltration solids concentration, and slurry washing processes. The PEP replicates the WTP leaching processes using prototypic equipment and control strategies. The PEP also includes non-prototypic ancillary equipment to support the core processing. Two operating scenarios are currently being evaluated for the ultrafiltration process (UFP) and leaching operations. The first scenario has caustic leaching performed in the UFP-2 ultrafiltration feed vessels (i.e., vessel UFP-VSL-T02A in the PEP and vessels UFP-VSL-00002A and B in the WTP PTF). The second scenario has caustic leaching conducted in the UFP-1 ultrafiltration feed preparation vessels (i.e., vessels UFP-VSL-T01A and B in the PEP; vessels UFP-VSL-00001A and B in the WTP PTF). In both scenarios, 19-M sodium hydroxide solution (NaOH, caustic) is added to the waste slurry in the vessels to leach solid aluminum compounds (e.g., gibbsite, boehmite). Caustic addition is followed by a heating step that uses direct injection of steam to accelerate the leaching process. Following the caustic leach, the vessel contents are cooled using vessel cooling jackets and/or external heat exchangers. The main difference between the two scenarios is that for leaching in UFP-1, the 19-M NaOH is added to un-concentrated waste slurry (3 to 8 wt% solids), while for leaching in UFP-2, the slurry is concentrated to nominally 20 wt% solids using cross-flow ultrafiltration before adding caustic. The work described in this report addresses the kinetics of caustic leach under WTP conditions, based on tests performed with a Hanford waste simulant. The tests were completed at the lab-scale and in the PEP, which is a 1/4.5-scale mock-up of key PTF process equipment. The purpose of this report is to summarize the results from both scales that are related to caustic leach chemistry to support a scale-up factor for the submodels to be used in the G2 model, which predicts WTP operating performance. The scale-up factor will take the form of an adjustment factor for the rate constant in the boehmite leach kinetic equation in the G2 model.

Mahoney, Lenna A.; Rassat, Scot D.; Eslinger, Paul W.; Aaberg, Rosanne L.; Aker, Pamela M.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Hanson, Brady D.; Hausmann, Tom S.; Huckaby, James L.; Kurath, Dean E.; Minette, Michael J.; Sundaram, S. K.; Yokuda, Satoru T.

2009-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

257

Community-Scale Environmental Measures and Urban Heat Island  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, such as photovoltaic arrays, solar thermal collectors, and passive solar designs, as well as measures to mitigate, are not well quantified. Community-scale environmental measures include solar collection technologies of solar radiation, planting trees and other vegetation for shading and evapotranspirative cooling

258

Valueadded Mediation in LargeScale Information Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

workflow, and help desks [WiederholdCC:1994]. Other services available over networks include textual, mediating services can be performed by independent entrepreneurs. 1 INTRODUCTION As information systemsValue­added Mediation in Large­Scale Information Systems Gio Wiederhold Computer Science Department

Wiederhold, Gio

259

SMALL SCALE WASTE-TO-ENERGY TECHNOLOGIES Claudine Ellyin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in operation. The investigation included both existing grate combustion plants and novel processes. The Energos grate gasification and combustion technology is currently in operation at six plants in Norway1 SMALL SCALE WASTE-TO-ENERGY TECHNOLOGIES Claudine Ellyin Advisor: Prof. Nickolas J. Themelis

260

Site-Scale Saturated Zone Flow Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this model report is to document the components of the site-scale saturated-zone flow model at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, in accordance with administrative procedure (AP)-SIII.lOQ, ''Models''. This report provides validation and confidence in the flow model that was developed for site recommendation (SR) and will be used to provide flow fields in support of the Total Systems Performance Assessment (TSPA) for the License Application. The output from this report provides the flow model used in the ''Site-Scale Saturated Zone Transport'', MDL-NBS-HS-000010 Rev 01 (BSC 2003 [162419]). The Site-Scale Saturated Zone Transport model then provides output to the SZ Transport Abstraction Model (BSC 2003 [164870]). In particular, the output from the SZ site-scale flow model is used to simulate the groundwater flow pathways and radionuclide transport to the accessible environment for use in the TSPA calculations. Since the development and calibration of the saturated-zone flow model, more data have been gathered for use in model validation and confidence building, including new water-level data from Nye County wells, single- and multiple-well hydraulic testing data, and new hydrochemistry data. In addition, a new hydrogeologic framework model (HFM), which incorporates Nye County wells lithology, also provides geologic data for corroboration and confidence in the flow model. The intended use of this work is to provide a flow model that generates flow fields to simulate radionuclide transport in saturated porous rock and alluvium under natural or forced gradient flow conditions. The flow model simulations are completed using the three-dimensional (3-D), finite-element, flow, heat, and transport computer code, FEHM Version (V) 2.20 (software tracking number (STN): 10086-2.20-00; LANL 2003 [161725]). Concurrently, process-level transport model and methodology for calculating radionuclide transport in the saturated zone at Yucca Mountain using FEHM V 2.20 are being carried out in the model report, ''Site-Scale Saturated Zone Transport'', MDL-NBS-HS-000010 Rev 01 (BSC 2003 [162419]). The velocity fields are calculated by the flow model, described herein, independent of the transport processes, and are then used as inputs to the transport model. Justification for this abstraction is presented in the model report, ''Saturated Zone Flow and Transport Model Abstraction'', MDL-NBS-HS-000021 (BSC 2003 [164870]).

G. Zyvoloski

2003-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes scale factor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Turbulence Effects at Small Scales  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is most natural to assume that mysterious Small Ionized and Neutral Structures (SINS) indiffuse ISM arise from turbulence. There are two obvious problem with such an explanation, however. First of all, it is generally believed that at the small scales turbulence should be damped. Second, turbulence with Kolmogorov spectrum cannot be the responsible for the SINS. We consider, however, effects, that provide spectral index flatter than the Kolmogorov one and allow action at very small scales. These are the shocks that arise in high Mach number turbulence and transfer of energy to small scales by instabilities in cosmic rays. Our examples indicate that the origin of SINS may be discovered through systematic studies of astrophysical turbulence.

A. Beresnyak; A. Lazarian

2006-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

262

Fully relativistic form factor for Thomson scattering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We derive a fully relativistic form factor for Thomson scattering in unmagnetized plasmas valid to all orders in the normalized electron velocity, beta->=v->/c. The form factor is compared to a previously derived expression where the lowest order electron velocity, beta->, corrections are included [J. Sheffield, Plasma Scattering of Electromagnetic Radiation (Academic Press, New York, 1975)]. The beta-> expansion approach is sufficient for electrostatic waves with small phase velocities such as ion-acoustic waves, but for electron-plasma waves the phase velocities can be near luminal. At high phase velocities, the electron motion acquires relativistic corrections including effective electron mass, relative motion of the electrons and electromagnetic wave, and polarization rotation. These relativistic corrections alter the scattered emission of thermal plasma waves, which manifest as changes in both the peak power and width of the observed Thomson-scattered spectra.

Palastro, J. P.; Ross, J. S.; Pollock, B.; Divol, L.; Froula, D. H.; Glenzer, S. H. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

263

Case Studies of Potential Facility-Scale and Utility-Scale Non-Hydro Renewable Energy Projects across Reclamation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of an assessment and analysis of renewable energy opportunities conducted for the U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Reclamation by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Tasks included assessing the suitability for wind and solar on both a utility and facility scale.

Haase, S.; Burman, K.; Dahle, D.; Heimiller, D.; Jimenez, A.; Melius, J.; Stoltenberg, B.; VanGeet, O.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Heart of darkness: the significance of the zeptobarn scale for neutralino direct detection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The direct detection of dark matter through its elastic scattering off nucleons is among the most promising methods for establishing the particle identity of dark matter. The current bound on the spin-independent scattering cross section is ?{sup SI} < 10 zb for dark matter masses m{sub ?} ? 100 GeV, with improved sensitivities expected soon. We examine the implications of this progress for neutralino dark matter. We work in a supersymmetric framework well-suited to dark matter studies that is simple and transparent, with models defined in terms of four weak-scale parameters. We first show that robust constraints on electric dipole moments motivate large sfermion masses m-tilde ? 1 TeV, effectively decoupling squarks and sleptons from neutralino dark matter phenomenology. In this case, we find characteristic cross sections in the narrow range 1 zb ? ?{sup SI} ? 40 zb for m{sub ?} ? 70 GeV. As sfermion masses are lowered to near their experimental limit m-tilde ? 400 GeV, the upper and lower limits of this range are extended, but only by factors of around two, and the lower limit is not significantly altered by relaxing many particle physics assumptions, varying the strange quark content of the nucleon, including the effects of galactic small-scale structure, or assuming other components of dark matter. Experiments are therefore rapidly entering the heart of dark matter-favored supersymmetry parameter space. If no signal is seen, supersymmetric models must contain some level of fine-tuning, and we identify and analyze several possibilities. Barring large cancellations, however, in a large and generic class of models, if thermal relic neutralinos are a significant component of dark matter, experiments will discover them as they probe down to the zeptobarn scale.

Feng, Jonathan L.; Sanford, David, E-mail: jlf@uci.edu, E-mail: dsanford@uci.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California Irvine, 4129 Frederick Reines Hall, Irvine, CA 92697-4575 (United States)

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

ARM: Surface Radiation Measurement Quality Control testing, including climatologically configurable limits  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Surface Radiation Measurement Quality Control testing, including climatologically configurable limits

Hodges, Gary; Stoffel, Tom; Kutchenreiter, Mark; Kay, Bev; Habte, Aron; Ritsche, Michael; Morris, Victor; Anderberg, Mary

266

Constraints and tensions in testing general relativity from Planck and CFHTLenS including intrinsic alignment systematics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present constraints on testing general relativity (GR) at cosmological scales using recent data sets and the impact of galaxy intrinsic alignment (IA) in the CFHTLenS lensing data on those constraints. We consider CMB temperature data from Planck, the galaxy power spectrum from WiggleZ, weak lensing tomography from the CFHTLenS, ISW-galaxy cross correlations, and BAO data from 6dF, SDSS DR7, and BOSS DR9. We use a parameterization of the modified gravity (MG) that is binned in redshift and scale, a parameterization that evolves monotonically in scale but is binned in redshift, and a functional parameterization that evolves only in redshift. We present the results in terms of the MG parameters $Q$ and $\\Sigma$. We employ an IA model with an amplitude $A_{CFHTLenS}$ that is included in the parameter analysis. We find an improvement in the constraints on the MG parameters corresponding to $40-53\\%$ increase on the figure of merit compared to previous studies, and GR is found consistent with the data at the $9...

Dossett, Jason N; Parkinson, David; Davis, Tamara

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Determination of prescription dose for Cs-131 permanent implants using the BED formalism including resensitization correction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: The current widely used biological equivalent dose (BED) formalism for permanent implants is based on the linear-quadratic model that includes cell repair and repopulation but not resensitization (redistribution and reoxygenation). The authors propose a BED formalism that includes all the four biological effects (4Rs), and the authors propose how it can be used to calculate appropriate prescription doses for permanent implants with Cs-131. Methods: A resensitization correction was added to the BED calculation for permanent implants to account for 4Rs. Using the same BED, the prescription doses with Au-198, I-125, and Pd-103 were converted to the isoeffective Cs-131 prescription doses. The conversion factor F, ratio of the Cs-131 dose to the equivalent dose with the other reference isotope (F{sub r}: with resensitization, F{sub n}: without resensitization), was thus derived and used for actual prescription. Different values of biological parameters such as ?, ?, and relative biological effectiveness for different types of tumors were used for the calculation. Results: Prescription doses with I-125, Pd-103, and Au-198 ranging from 10 to 160 Gy were converted into prescription doses with Cs-131. The difference in dose conversion factors with (F{sub r}) and without (F{sub n}) resensitization was significant but varied with different isotopes and different types of tumors. The conversion factors also varied with different doses. For I-125, the average values of F{sub r}/F{sub n} were 0.51/0.46, for fast growing tumors, and 0.88/0.77 for slow growing tumors. For Pd-103, the average values of F{sub r}/F{sub n} were 1.25/1.15 for fast growing tumors, and 1.28/1.22 for slow growing tumors. For Au-198, the average values of F{sub r}/F{sub n} were 1.08/1.25 for fast growing tumors, and 1.00/1.06 for slow growing tumors. Using the biological parameters for the HeLa/C4-I cells, the averaged value of F{sub r} was 1.07/1.11 (rounded to 1.1), and the averaged value of F{sub n} was 1.75/1.18. F{sub r} of 1.1 has been applied to gynecological cancer implants with expected acute reactions and outcomes as expected based on extensive experience with permanent implants. The calculation also gave the average Cs-131 dose of 126 Gy converted from the I-125 dose of 144 Gy for prostate implants. Conclusions: Inclusion of an allowance for resensitization led to significant dose corrections for Cs-131 permanent implants, and should be applied to prescription dose calculation. The adjustment of the Cs-131 prescription doses with resensitization correction for gynecological permanent implants was consistent with clinical experience and observations. However, the Cs-131 prescription doses converted from other implant doses can be further adjusted based on new experimental results, clinical observations, and clinical outcomes.

Luo, Wei, E-mail: wei.luo@uky.edu; Molloy, Janelle; Aryal, Prakash; Feddock, Jonathan; Randall, Marcus [Department of Radiation Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40536 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40536 (United States)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

268

Estimating parameters of coalescing compact binaries with a detector network including LIGO Australia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

One of the goals of gravitational-wave astronomy is simultaneous detection of gravitational-wave signals from merging compact-object binaries and the electromagnetic transients from these mergers. With the next generation of advanced ground-based gravitational wave detectors under construction, we examine the benefits of the proposed extension of the detector network to include a fourth site in Australia in addition to the network of Hanford, Livingston and Cascina sites. Using Bayesian parameter-estimation analyses of simulated gravitational-wave signals from a range of coalescing-binary locations and orientations, we study the improvement in parameter estimation. We find that an Australian detector can break degeneracies in several parameters; in particular, the localization of the source on the sky is improved by a factor of ~4, with more modest improvements in distance and binary inclination estimates. This enhanced ability to localize sources on the sky will be crucial in any search for electromagnetic counterparts to detected gravitational-wave signals.

Benjamin Aylott; Benjamin Farr; Vassiliki Kalogera; Ilya Mandel; Vivien Raymond; Carl Rodriguez; Marc van der Sluys; Alberto Vecchio; John Veitch

2011-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

269

Surface and grain boundary scattering in nanometric Cu thin films: A quantitative analysis including twin boundaries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The relative contributions of various defects to the measured resistivity in nanocrystalline Cu were investigated, including a quantitative account of twin-boundary scattering. It has been difficult to quantitatively assess the impact twin boundary scattering has on the classical size effect of electrical resistivity, due to limitations in characterizing twin boundaries in nanocrystalline Cu. In this study, crystal orientation maps of nanocrystalline Cu films were obtained via precession-assisted electron diffraction in the transmission electron microscope. These orientation images were used to characterize grain boundaries and to measure the average grain size of a microstructure, with and without considering twin boundaries. The results of these studies indicate that the contribution from grain-boundary scattering is the dominant factor (as compared to surface scattering) leading to enhanced resistivity. The resistivity data can be well-described by the combined FuchsSondheimer surface scattering model and MayadasShatzkes grain-boundary scattering model using Matthiessen's rule with a surface specularity coefficient of p?=?0.48 and a grain-boundary reflection coefficient of R?=?0.26.

Barmak, Katayun [Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 and Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Materials Research Science and Engineering Center, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Darbal, Amith [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Materials Research Science and Engineering Center, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Ganesh, Kameswaran J.; Ferreira, Paulo J. [Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Rickman, Jeffrey M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Department of Physics, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania 18015 (United States); Sun, Tik; Yao, Bo; Warren, Andrew P.; Coffey, Kevin R., E-mail: kb2612@columbia.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Central Florida, 4000 Central Florida Boulevard, Orlando, Florida 32816 (United States)

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Unscaled Scaled (% / km) Geographic Area /  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

226 Unscaled Scaled (% / km) Geographic Area / Assessment Unit DI Prod. N(eq) Sum Total Cumu subbasin, Washington. Geographic Area / Assessment Unit IntegratedPriorityRestoration Category Habitat% (unscaled results) of the combined protection benefit for summer steelhead within the Methow basin, and 51

271

Scaling the Web Composing Web  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Scaling the Web Composing Web Services:A QoS View A n Internet application can invoke several ser- vices -- a stock-trading Web service, for example, could invoke a payment service, which could then invoke an authentication service. Such a scenario is called a composite Web service, and it can

Menascé, Daniel A.

272

Factor structure analysis of the Comprehensive Effects of Alcohol - Spanish questionnaire among adolescents in Mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from a sample of adolescents from Mexico (N = 345). The results replicated the 7-factor structure of the CEOA. Moreover, CEOA factor-scale derived scores predicted alcohol use. Overall, the CEOA-Spanish appears to be a valid measure of alcohol...

Flato, Claudia Graciela

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

273

Nucleon form factors and structure functions with N_f=2+1 dynamical domain wall fermions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report isovector form factors and low moments of structure functions of nucleon in numerical lattice quantum chromodynamics (QCD) from the on-going calculations by the RIKEN-BNL-Columbia (RBC) and UKQCD Collaborations with (2+1) dynamical flavors of domain-wall fermion (DWF) quarks. We calculate the matrix elements with four light quark masses, corresponding to pion mass values of m_\\pi = 330-670 MeV, while the dynamical strange mass is fixed at a value close to physical, on (2.7 fm)^3 spatial volume. We found that our axial charge, g_A, at the lightest mass exhibits a large deviation from the heavier mass results. This deviation seems to be a finite-size effect as the g_A value scales with a single parameter, m_\\pi L, the product of pion mass and linear spatial lattice size. The scaling is also seen in earlier 2-flavor dynamical DWF and Wilson quark calculations. Without this lightest point, the three heavier mass results show only very mild mass dependence and linearly extrapolate to g_A=1.16(6). We determined the four form factors, the vector (Dirac), induced tensor (Pauli), axial vector and induced pseudoscalar, at a few finite momentum transfer values as well. At the physical pion mass the form-factors root mean square radii determined from the momentum-transfer dependence %of the form factors are 20-30% smaller than the corresonding experiments. The ratio of the isovector quark momentum to helicity fractions, _{u-d}/_{\\Delta u - \\Delta d} is in agreement with experiment without much mass dependence including the lightest point. We obtain an estimate, 0.81(2), by a constant fit. Although the individual momentum and helicity fractions are yet to be renormalized, they show encouraging trend toward experiment.

RBC-UKQCD Collaborations; :; Takeshi Yamazaki; Shigemi Ohta

2007-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

274

Unique Selectivities. Pall's versatile line of media includes the powerful HyperCelTM sorbent family  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

scale USD 27141 #12;Proper Selection Optimizes Protein Purification* Ion Exchange Chromatography Average prepacked into disposable, small-scale 1 mL and 5 mL devices. These formats facilitate applications ranging biopharmaceutical protein purifications. Versatility. By tailoring attributes such as chemistry and particle size

Lebendiker, Mario

275

Anomalous scalings in differential models of turbulence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Differential models for hydrodynamic, passive-scalar and wave turbulence given by nonlinear first- and second-order evolution equations for the energy spectrum in the $k$-space were analysed. Both types of models predict formation an anomalous transient power-law spectra. The second-order models were analysed in terms of self-similar solutions of the second kind, and a phenomenological formula for the anomalous spectrum exponent was constructed using numerics for a broad range of parameters covering all known physical examples. The first-order models were examined analytically, including finding an analytical prediction for the anomalous exponent of the transient spectrum and description of formation of the Kolmogorov-type spectrum as a reflection wave from the dissipative scale back into the inertial range. The latter behaviour was linked to pre-shock/shock singularities similar to the ones arising in the Burgers equation. Existence of the transient anomalous scaling and the reflection-wave scenario are argu...

Thalabard, Simon; Galtier, Sebastien; Sergey, Medvedev

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Anomalous scalings in differential models of turbulence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Differential models for hydrodynamic, passive-scalar and wave turbulence given by nonlinear first- and second-order evolution equations for the energy spectrum in the $k$-space were analysed. Both types of models predict formation an anomalous transient power-law spectra. The second-order models were analysed in terms of self-similar solutions of the second kind, and a phenomenological formula for the anomalous spectrum exponent was constructed using numerics for a broad range of parameters covering all known physical examples. The first-order models were examined analytically, including finding an analytical prediction for the anomalous exponent of the transient spectrum and description of formation of the Kolmogorov-type spectrum as a reflection wave from the dissipative scale back into the inertial range. The latter behaviour was linked to pre-shock/shock singularities similar to the ones arising in the Burgers equation. Existence of the transient anomalous scaling and the reflection-wave scenario are argued to be a robust feature common to the finite-capacity turbulence systems. The anomalous exponent is independent of the initial conditions but varies for for different models of the same physical system.

Simon Thalabard; Sergey Nazarenko; Sebastien Galtier; Medvedev Sergey

2015-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

277

2.11 Embeddable Sensors (SEN) During this past year, the sensors research group made several significant advances including an up-scaled  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

biochemically specific dyes. Each algae cell is measured individually and several tho, a portable flow cytometer for real-time aquatic algae analysis, and an extremely sensitive domoic acid assay be achieved. Finally, the sensor group has also developed an extremely sensitive domoic acid assay. Domoic

California at Los Angeles, University of

278

Visualization of Large-Scale Distributed Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that are now considered the "lenses" for examining large-scale data. THE LARGE-SCALE DATA VISUALIZATIONVisualization of Large-Scale Distributed Data Jason Leigh1 , Andrew Johnson1 , Luc Renambot1 representation of data and the interactive manipulation and querying of the visualization. Large-scale data

Johnson, Andrew

279

Brane World Models Need Low String Scale  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Models with large extra dimensions offer the possibility of the Planck scale being of order the electroweak scale, thus alleviating the gauge hierarchy problem. We show that these models suffer from a breakdown of unitarity at around three quarters of the low effective Planck scale. An obvious candidate to fix the unitarity problem is string theory. We therefore argue that it is necessary for the string scale to appear below the effective Planck scale and that the first signature of such models would be string resonances. We further translate experimental bounds on the string scale into bounds on the effective Planck scale.

Antoniadis, Ignatios; Calmet, Xavier

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Power scaling analysis of fiber lasers and amplifiers based on non-silica materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A developed formalism for analyzing the power scaling of diffraction limited fiber lasers and amplifiers is applied to a wider range of materials. Limits considered include thermal rupture, thermal lensing, melting of the core, stimulated Raman scattering, stimulated Brillouin scattering, optical damage, bend induced limits on core diameter and limits to coupling of pump diode light into the fiber. For conventional fiber lasers based upon silica, the single aperture, diffraction limited power limit was found to be 36.6kW. This is a hard upper limit that results from an interaction of the stimulated Raman scattering with thermal lensing. This result is dependent only upon physical constants of the material and is independent of the core diameter or fiber length. Other materials will have different results both in terms of ultimate power out and which of the many limits is the determining factor in the results. Materials considered include silica doped with Tm and Er, YAG and YAG based ceramics and Yb doped phosphate glass. Pros and cons of the various materials and their current state of development will be assessed. In particular the impact of excess background loss on laser efficiency is discussed.

Dawson, J W; Messerly, M J; Heebner, J E; Pax, P H; Sridharan, A K; Bullington, A L; Beach, R J; Siders, C W; Barty, C P; Dubinskii, M

2010-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes scale factor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor Modulates Behavioral and Brain Responses to Social Stress.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Social stress is a prevalent factor in society that can cause or exacerbate neuropsychiatric disorders including depression and posttraumatic stress disorder. According to the (more)

Jeffress, Elizabeth

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Validation of Criticality Safety Calculations with SCALE 6.2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

SCALE 6.2 provides numerous updates in nuclear data, nuclear data processing, and computational tools utilized in the criticality safety calculational sequences relative to SCALE 6.1. A new 252-group ENDF/B-VII.0 multigroup neutron library, improved ENDF/B-VII.0 continuous energy data, as well as the previously deployed 238-group ENDF/B-VII.0 neutron library are included in SCALE 6.2 for criticality safety analysis. The performance of all three libraries for keff calculations is examined with a broad sampling of critical experiment models covering a range of fuels and moderators. Critical experiments from the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments (IHECSBE) that are available in the SCALE Verified, Archived Library of Inputs and Data (VALID) are used in this validation effort. Over 300 cases are used in the validation of KENO V.a, and a more limited set of approximately 50 configurations are used for KENO-VI validation. Additionally, some KENO V.a cases are converted to KENO-VI models so that an equivalent set of experiments can be used to validate both codes. For continuous-energy calculations, SCALE 6.2 provides improved performance relative to SCALE 6.1 in most areas with notable improvements in fuel pin lattice cases, particularly those with mixed oxide fuel. Multigroup calculations with the 252-group library also demonstrate improved performance for fuel lattices, uranium (high and intermediate enrichment) and plutonium metal experiments, and plutonium solution systems. Overall, SCALE 6.2 provides equivalent or smaller biases than SCALE 6.1, and the two versions of KENO provide similar results on the same suite of problems.

Marshall, William BJ J [ORNL] [ORNL; Wiarda, Dorothea [ORNL] [ORNL; Celik, Cihangir [ORNL] [ORNL; Rearden, Bradley T [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

QGESS: Capital Cost Scaling Methodology  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(costs and values of inputs, outputs, and processes, including capital and operating costs) and performance (mass conversion, energy efficiency, and, generally speaking,...

284

Elevance Pilot-Scale Biorefinery  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

July 2011 Printed with a renewable-source ink on paper containing at least 50% wastepaper, including 10% post consumer waste Elevance Integrated Biorefinery This project uses Nobel...

285

The scale of cosmic isotropy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The most fundamental premise to the standard model of the universe states that the large-scale properties of the universe are the same in all directions and at all comoving positions. Demonstrating this hypothesis has proven to be a formidable challenge. The cross-over scale R{sub iso} above which the galaxy distribution becomes statistically isotropic is vaguely defined and poorly (if not at all) quantified. Here we report on a formalism that allows us to provide an unambiguous operational definition and an estimate of R{sub iso}. We apply the method to galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7, finding that R{sub iso} ? 150h{sup ?1}Mpc. Besides providing a consistency test of the Copernican principle, this result is in agreement with predictions based on numerical simulations of the spatial distribution of galaxies in cold dark matter dominated cosmological models.

Marinoni, C.; Bel, J.; Buzzi, A., E-mail: christian.marinoni@cpt.univ-mrs.fr, E-mail: Julien.Bel@cpt.univ-mrs.fr, E-mail: Adeline.Buzzi@cpt.univ-mrs.fr [Centre de Physique Thorique, Aix-Marseille Universit, CNRS UMR 7332, case 907, F-13288 Marseille (France)

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Economic Development from Gigawatt-Scale Wind Deployment in Wyoming (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation provides an overview of economic development in Wyoming from gigawatt-scale wind development and includes a discussion of project context, definitions and caveats, a deployment scenario, modeling inputs, results, and conclusions.

Lantz, E.

2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

287

Transition physics and scaling overview  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents an overview of recent experimental progress towards understanding H-mode transition physics and scaling. Terminology and techniques for studying H-mode are reviewed and discussed. The model of shear E x B flow stabilization of edge fluctuations at the L-H transition is gaining wide acceptance and is further supported by observations of edge rotation on a number of new devices. Observations of poloidal asymmetries of edge fluctuations and dephasing of density and potential fluctuations after the transition pose interesting challenges for understanding H-mode physics. Dedicated scans to determine the scaling of the power threshold have now been performed on many machines. A dear B{sub t} dependence is universally observed but dependence on the line averaged density is complicated. Other dependencies are also reported. Studies of the effect of neutrals and error fields on the power threshold are under investigation. The ITER threshold database has matured and offers guidance to the power threshold scaling issues relevant to next-step devices.

Carlstrom, T.N.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Pion electromagnetic form factor in the Covariant Spectator Theory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The pion electromagnetic form factor at spacelike momentum transfer is calculated in relativistic impulse approximation using the Covariant Spectator Theory. The same dressed quark mass function and the equation for the pion bound-state vertex function as discussed in the companion paper are used for the calculation, together with a dressed quark current that satisfies the Ward-Takahashi identity. The results obtained for the pion form factor are in agreement with experimental data, they exhibit the typical monopole behavior at high momentum transfer and they satisfy some remarkable scaling relations.

Biernat, Elmar P. [CFTP, Institute Superior Tecnico, Lisboa (Portugal); Gross, Franz L. [JLAB, Newport News, VA (United States); Pena, Teresa [CFTP, Institute Superior Tecnico, Lisboa (Portugal); Stadler, Alfred [University of Evora, Lisboa (Portugal)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Toward Improved Support for Loosely Coupled Large Scale Simulation Workflows  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High-performance computing (HPC) workloads are increasingly leveraging loosely coupled large scale simula- tions. Unfortunately, most large-scale HPC platforms, including Cray/ALPS environments, are designed for the execution of long-running jobs based on coarse-grained launch capabilities (e.g., one MPI rank per core on all allocated compute nodes). This assumption limits capability-class workload campaigns that require large numbers of discrete or loosely coupled simulations, and where time-to-solution is an untenable pacing issue. This paper describes the challenges related to the support of fine-grained launch capabilities that are necessary for the execution of loosely coupled large scale simulations on Cray/ALPS platforms. More precisely, we present the details of an enhanced runtime system to support this use case, and report on initial results from early testing on systems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

Boehm, Swen [ORNL] [ORNL; Elwasif, Wael R [ORNL] [ORNL; Naughton, III, Thomas J [ORNL; Vallee, Geoffroy R [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Experimental realisation of Shor's quantum factoring algorithm using qubit recycling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantum computational algorithms exploit quantum mechanics to solve problems exponentially faster than the best classical algorithms. Shor's quantum algorithm for fast number factoring is a key example and the prime motivator in the international effort to realise a quantum computer. However, due to the substantial resource requirement, to date, there have been only four small-scale demonstrations. Here we address this resource demand and demonstrate a scalable version of Shor's algorithm in which the n qubit control register is replaced by a single qubit that is recycled n times: the total number of qubits is one third of that required in the standard protocol. Encoding the work register in higher-dimensional states, we implement a two-photon compiled algorithm to factor N=21. The algorithmic output is distinguishable from noise, in contrast to previous demonstrations. These results point to larger-scale implementations of Shor's algorithm by harnessing scalable resource reductions applicable to all physical architectures.

Enrique Martin-Lopez; Anthony Laing; Thomas Lawson; Roberto Alvarez; Xiao-Qi Zhou; Jeremy L. O'Brien

2012-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

291

E-Print Network 3.0 - actinides including cm Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: of waste actinides. Such damage can be studied by many techniques, including heavy-ionfast neutron... were presented and proposed, including; Fundamental studies...

292

E-Print Network 3.0 - alginate scaffold including Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

created through a three step process which included: treatment... ; and exposure to a CaCl2 to crosslink the alginate sheets. Process variables included volume and concentra-...

293

Common Data Set 2011-2012 J Column heading for CIP categories to include now reads: CIP 2010 Categories to Include  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Common Data Set 2011-2012 J Column heading for CIP categories to include now reads: CIP 2010 Categories to Include J CIP category 3 description now reads: Natural resources and conservation J CIP category 5 description now reads: Area, ethnic, and gender studies J CIP category 16 description now reads

294

Preliminary Scaling Estimate for Select Small Scale Mixing Demonstration Tests  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Site double-shell tank (DST) system provides the staging location for waste that will be transferred to the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Specific WTP acceptance criteria for waste feed delivery describe the physical and chemical characteristics of the waste that must be met before the waste is transferred from the DSTs to the WTP. One of the more challenging requirements relates to the sampling and characterization of the undissolved solids (UDS) in a waste feed DST because the waste contains solid particles that settle and their concentration and relative proportion can change during the transfer of the waste in individual batches. A key uncertainty in the waste feed delivery system is the potential variation in UDS transferred in individual batches in comparison to an initial sample used for evaluating the acceptance criteria. To address this uncertainty, a number of small-scale mixing tests have been conducted as part of Washington River Protection Solutions Small Scale Mixing Demonstration (SSMD) project to determine the performance of the DST mixing and sampling systems.

Wells, Beric E.; Fort, James A.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Rector, David R.; Schonewill, Philip P.

2013-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

295

Geospatial Optimization of Siting Large-Scale Solar Projects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent policy and economic conditions have encouraged a renewed interest in developing large-scale solar projects in the U.S. Southwest. However, siting large-scale solar projects is complex. In addition to the quality of the solar resource, solar developers must take into consideration many environmental, social, and economic factors when evaluating a potential site. This report describes a proof-of-concept, Web-based Geographical Information Systems (GIS) tool that evaluates multiple user-defined criteria in an optimization algorithm to inform discussions and decisions regarding the locations of utility-scale solar projects. Existing siting recommendations for large-scale solar projects from governmental and non-governmental organizations are not consistent with each other, are often not transparent in methods, and do not take into consideration the differing priorities of stakeholders. The siting assistance GIS tool we have developed improves upon the existing siting guidelines by being user-driven, transparent, interactive, capable of incorporating multiple criteria, and flexible. This work provides the foundation for a dynamic siting assistance tool that can greatly facilitate siting decisions among multiple stakeholders.

Macknick, J.; Quinby, T.; Caulfield, E.; Gerritsen, M.; Diffendorfer, J.; Haines, S.

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Scaling properties of the gravitational clustering in the nonlinear regime  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The growth of density perturbations in an expanding universe in the non-linear regime is investigated. The underlying equations of motion are cast in a suggestive form, and motivate a conjecture that the scaled pair velocity, $h(a,x)\\equiv -[v/(\\dot{a}x)]$ depends on the expansion factor $a$ and comoving coordinate $x$ only through the density contrast $\\sigma(a,x)$. This leads to the result that the true, non-linear, density contrast $^{1/2}=\\sigma(a,x)$ is a universal function of the density contrast $\\sigma_L(a,l)$, computed in the linear theory and evaluated at a scale $l$ where $l=x(1+\\sigma^2)^{1/3}$. This universality is supported by existing numerical simulations with scale-invariant initial conditions having different power laws. We discuss a physically motivated ansatz $h(a,x)=h[\\sigma^2(a,x)]$ and use it to compute the non-linear density contrast at any given scale analytically. This provides a promising method for analysing the non-linear evolution of density perturbations in the universe and for interpreting numerical simulations.

R. Nityananda; T. Padmanabhan

1993-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

297

Spatial Scaling for the Numerical Approximation of Problems on Unbounded Domains  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: : : : : : : 41 5.1 L2 and H1 norms of the error : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 71 6.1 Number of iterations and an estimated condition number for the in nity-norm scaling (infty) and the componentwise scaling (c/w) for three di erent scaling factors..., in equations (1.1) and (1.2) the unknown u is a scalar function of the position x, while u in equation (1.3) is a vector valued function. We shall denote the components of a vector or a vector valued function w by wi, i = 1:::d. In most of the dissertation, we...

Trenev, Dimitar Vasilev

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

298

Modeling Sustainable Agricultural Residue Removal at the Subfield Scale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study developed a computational strategy that utilizes data inputs from multiple spatial scales to investigate how variability within individual fields can impact sustainable residue removal for bioenergy production. Sustainable use of agricultural residues for bioenergy production requires consideration of the important role that residues play in limiting soil erosion and maintaining soil C, health, and productivity. Increased availability of subfield-scale data sets such as grain yield data, high-fidelity digital elevation models, and soil characteristic data provides an opportunity to investigate the impacts of subfield-scale variability on sustainable agricultural residue removal. Using three representative fields in Iowa, this study contrasted the results of current NRCS conservation management planning analysis with subfield-scale analysis for rake-and-bale removal of agricultural residue. The results of the comparison show that the field-average assumptions used in NRCS conservation management planning may lead to unsustainable residue removal decisions for significant portions of some fields. This highlights the need for additional research on subfield-scale sustainable agricultural residue removal including the development of real-time variable removal technologies for agricultural residue.

Muth, D.J.; McCorkle, D.S.; Koch, J.B.; Bryden, K.M.

2012-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

299

SCALED EXPERIMENTS EVALUATING PULSE JET MIXING OF SLURRIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pulse jet mixing (PJM) tests with noncohesive solids in Newtonian liquid were conducted at three geometric scales to support the design of mixing systems for the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant. The test data will be used to develop mixing models. The models predict the cloud height (the height to which solids will be lifted by the PJM action) and the critical suspension velocity (the minimum velocity needed to ensure all solids have been lifted from the floor. From the cloud height estimate, the concentration of solids near the vessel floor and the minimum velocity predicted to lift solids can be calculated. The test objective was to observe the influence of vertically downward-directed jets on noncohesive solids in a series of scaled tanks with several bottom shapes. The test tanks and bottom shapes included small-and large-scale tanks with elliptical bottoms, a mid-scale tank with a spherical bottom, and a large-scale tank with an F&D bottom. During testing, the downward-directed jets were operated in either a steady flow condition or a pulsed (periodic) flow condition. The mobilization of the solids resulting from the jets was evaluated based on: the motion/agitation of the particulate on the tank floor and the elevation the solids reach within the tank; the height the solids material reaches in the tank is referred to as the cloud height (HC).

Bamberger, Judith A.; Meyer, Perry A.; Enderlin, Carl W.; Fort, James A.; Wells, Beric E.; Minette, Michael J.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Baer, Ellen BK; Eakin, David E.; Elmore, Monte R.; Snyder, Sandra F.

2009-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

300

Sloan Digital Sky Survey II (SDSS-II), Data Release 7, including the Legacy Survey  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is a series of three interlocking imaging and spectroscopic surveys, carried out over an eight-year period with a dedicated 2.5m telescope located at Apache Point Observatory in Southern New Mexico. The seventh data release (DR7) from the SDSS represents a completion of the overall, original project, though SDSS-III began in 2008 and will build upon the knowledge gained already. The SDSS Legacy Survey provided a uniform, well-calibrated map of more than 7,500 square degrees of the North Galactic Cap, and three stripes in the South Galactic Cap totaling 740 square degrees. The central stripe in the South Galactic Gap, Stripe 82, was scanned multiple times to enable a deep co-addition of the data and to enable discovery of variable objects. Legacy data supported studies ranging from asteroids and nearby stars to the large-scale structure of the universe. All of the imaging data have been processed to yield calibrated astrometric and photometric parameters and classifications. These parameters are available in one or more tables in a database accessible via the Catalog Archive Server (CAS) at http://cas.sdss.org/astro. [taken and edited from the Legacy page at http://www.sdss.org/legacy/index.html] All three surveys summarized are: 1) Legacy: an imaging survey in five bands over a contiguous 7646 deg2 high-latitude elliptical region in the Northern Galactic Cap, plus an additional 750 deg2 in the Southern Galactic Cap, together with spectroscopy of complete samples of galaxies and quasars covering about 8200 square degrees. The total imaging area in the Legacy survey is 8423 square degrees; 2) SEGUE: (Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration): additional imaging of 3240 deg2 of sky at lower Galactic latitudes, together with spectroscopy of 240,000 stars towards 200 sight lines covering 1400 square degrees (spread throughout the Legacy and SEGUE imaging footprints), to study the structure of the Milky Way; 3) Supernova: the equivalent of about 80 repeated imaging scans of the Southern Equatorial Stripe (ra > 310 or ra < 59; -1.25 > dec < 1.25) obtained in variable weather conditions (some clouds) to search for supernovae in the redshift range 0.1 < z < 0.4. The catalog derived from the images includes more than 350 million celestial objects, and spectra of 930,000 galaxies, 120,000 quasars, and 460,000 stars. The data are fully calibrated and reduced, carefully checked for quality, and publicly accessible through efficient databases. The data have been publicly released in a series of annual data releases, culminating in the final data release, DR7.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes scale factor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Holographic Superconductors with Lifshitz Scaling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Black holes in asymptotically Lifshitz spacetime provide a window onto finite temperature effects in strongly coupled Lifshitz models. We add a Maxwell gauge field and charged matter to a recently proposed gravity dual of 2+1 dimensional Lifshitz theory. This gives rise to charged black holes with scalar hair, which correspond to the superconducting phase of holographic superconductors with z > 1 Lifshitz scaling. Along the way we analyze the global geometry of static, asymptotically Lifshitz black holes at arbitrary critical exponent z > 1. In all known exact solutions there is a null curvature singularity in the black hole region, and, by a general argument, the same applies to generic Lifshitz black holes.

E. J. Brynjolfsson; U. H. Danielsson; L. Thorlacius; T. Zingg

2010-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

302

Scale Models & Wind Turbines  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l LPROJECTS IN7 RoadmapProgram| Department ofat ThisasScale Models and

303

NM's Flying 40 List Includes CHTM Start-Up By Stefi Weisburd June 23, 2014  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-ups including Sandia Systems, Inc., Semiconductor Bridge Technology, Gratings, Inc., Zia Laser, Inc., K

New Mexico, University of

304

Reliability and Validity: One Factor and Third Factor Tests  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 7 Reliability and Validity: One Factor and Third Factor Tests D. White and A. Korotayev 26 Sept 2003 Html links are live Reliability and validity are crucial issues in research. Reliability may have high validity but low reliability, in which case its correlations with other high validity

White, Douglas R.

305

Did you know heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States? Contributing factors include smoking, obesity, diabetes, high blood pressure,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the risk of stroke or heart attack. · Weight loss will improve heart health and heart function. · Reduced6:00 AM Wake up Did you know heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States history of heart disease. 7:30 AM Breakfast: Whole grain cereal, 1 medium orange and 1 cup fat-free milk

306

Human CD34+ CD133+ Hematopoietic Stem Cells Cultured with Growth Factors Including Angptl5 Efficiently Engraft Adult NOD-SCID Il2r??/? (NSG) Mice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Increasing demand for human hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in clinical and research applications necessitates expansion of HSCs in vitro. Before these cells can be used they must be carefully evaluated to assess their ...

Drake, Adam

307

Composite materials and bodies including silicon carbide and titanium diboride and methods of forming same  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods of forming composite materials include coating particles of titanium dioxide with a substance including boron (e.g., boron carbide) and a substance including carbon, and reacting the titanium dioxide with the substance including boron and the substance including carbon to form titanium diboride. The methods may be used to form ceramic composite bodies and materials, such as, for example, a ceramic composite body or material including silicon carbide and titanium diboride. Such bodies and materials may be used as armor bodies and armor materials. Such methods may include forming a green body and sintering the green body to a desirable final density. Green bodies formed in accordance with such methods may include particles comprising titanium dioxide and a coating at least partially covering exterior surfaces thereof, the coating comprising a substance including boron (e.g., boron carbide) and a substance including carbon.

Lillo, Thomas M.; Chu, Henry S.; Harrison, William M.; Bailey, Derek

2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

308

Data analysis and radionuclide scaling factor for the B-Cell waste stream  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents a statistical data analysis of radiological data obtained to characterize the 324 Facility B-Cell decontamination and decommissioning waste stream.

HILL, R.L.

2000-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

309

Factors Influencing Water Heating Energy Use and Peak Demand in a Large Scale Residential Monitoring Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, as well as obtain improved appliance energy consumption indexes and load profiles. A portion of the monitoring measures water heater energy use and demand in each home on a 15-minute basis....

Bouchelle, M. P.; Parker, D. S.; Anello, M. T.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Wigner distinguished lecturer Majumdar says scale-up factor key to R&D  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched FerromagnetismWaste and MaterialsWenjun DengWISP SignInWho do IWhyWhy: TheWidesuccess

311

SITE-SCALE SATURATED ZONE TRANSPORT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work provides a site-scale transport model for calculating radionuclide transport in the saturated zone (SZ) at Yucca Mountain, for use in the abstractions model in support of ''Total System Performance Assessment for License Application'' (TSPA-LA). The purpose of this model report is to provide documentation for the components of the site-scale SZ transport model in accordance with administrative procedure AP-SIII.10Q, Models. The initial documentation of this model report was conducted under the ''Technical Work Plan For: Saturated Zone Flow and Transport Modeling and Testing'' (BSC 2003 [DIRS 163965]). The model report has been revised in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan For: Natural System--Saturated Zone Analysis and Model Report Integration'', Section 2.1.1.4 (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171421]) to incorporate Regulatory Integration Team comments. All activities listed in the technical work plan that are appropriate to the transport model are documented in this report and are described in Section 2.1.1.4 (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171421]). This report documents: (1) the advection-dispersion transport model including matrix diffusion (Sections 6.3 and 6.4); (2) a description and validation of the transport model (Sections 6.3 and 7); (3) the numerical methods for simulating radionuclide transport (Section 6.4); (4) the parameters (sorption coefficient, Kd ) and their uncertainty distributions used for modeling radionuclide sorption (Appendices A and C); (5) the parameters used for modeling colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport (Table 4-1, Section 6.4.2.6, and Appendix B); and (6) alternative conceptual models and their dispositions (Section 6.6). The intended use of this model is to simulate transport in saturated fractured porous rock (double porosity) and alluvium. The particle-tracking method of simulating radionuclide transport is incorporated in the finite-volume heat and mass transfer numerical analysis (FEHM) computer code, (FEHM V2.20, STN: 10086-2.20-00) (LANL 2003 [DIRS 161725]) and is described in Section 6.4 of this report. FEHM is a three-dimensional (3-D), finite-volume, finite-element, heat and mass flow-and-transport code. This report documents the features and capabilities of the site-scale transport model for calculating radionuclide transport in the SZ at Yucca Mountain in support of the TSPA-LA. Correlative flow-model calculations using FEHM are carried out and documented in the model report ''Saturated Zone Site-Scale Flow Model'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170037]). The velocity fields are calculated by the flow model independent of the transport processes and supplied as a part of the output package from the flow model, which is then used as inputs to the transport model. Several SZ analysis model reports provide information and data needed as feed-ins for this report, and this report in turn provides technical product outputs that feed into other SZ reports. The details of inputs to the site-scale transport model are provided in Section 4.

S. KELLER

2004-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

312

Introduction to the time scale problem  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As motivation for the symposium on extended-scale atomistic methods, I briefly discuss the time scale problem that plagues molecular dynamics simulations, some promising recent developments for circumventing the problem, and some remaining challenges.

Voter, A. F.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Small-Scale Energy Loan Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Oregon Small-Scale Energy Loan Program (SELP) - created in 1981 after voters approved a constitutional amendment authorizing the sale of bonds to finance small-scale, local energy projects - is...

314

Scale-up of miscible flood processes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Results of a wide-ranging investigation of the scaling of the physical mechanisms of miscible floods are reported. Advanced techniques for analysis of crude oils are considered in Chapter 2. Application of supercritical fluid chromatography is demonstrated for characterization of crude oils for equation-of-state calculations of phase equilibrium. Results of measurements of crude oil and phase compositions by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry are also reported. The theory of development of miscibility is considered in detail in Chapter 3. The theory is extended to four components, and sample solutions for a variety of gas injection systems are presented. The analytical theory shows that miscibility can develop even though standard tie-line extension criteria developed for ternary systems are not satisfied. In addition, the theory includes the first analytical solutions for condensing/vaporizing gas drives. In Chapter 4, methods for simulation of viscous fingering are considered. The scaling of the growth of transition zones in linear viscous fingering is considered. In addition, extension of the models developed previously to three dimensions is described, as is the inclusion of effects of equilibrium phase behavior. In Chapter 5, the combined effects of capillary and gravity-driven crossflow are considered. The experimental results presented show that very high recovery can be achieved by gravity segregation when interfacial tensions are moderately low. We argue that such crossflow mechanisms are important in multicontact miscible floods in heterogeneous reservoirs. In addition, results of flow visualization experiments are presented that illustrate the interplay of crossflow driven by gravity with that driven by viscous forces.

Orr, F.M. Jr.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Industrial Scale Demonstration of Smart Manufacturing Achieving...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Scale Demonstration of Smart Manufacturing Achieving Transformational Energy Productivity Gains Development of an Open Architecture, Widely Applicable Smart Manufacturing...

316

Range Fuels Commercial-Scale Biorefinery  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Range Fuels commercial-scale biorefinery will use a variety of feedstocks to create cellulosic ethanol, methanol, and power.

317

Land and Water Use, CO2 Emissions, and Worker Radiological Exposure Factors for the Nuclear Fuel Cycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energys Fuel Cycle Technologies program is preparing to evaluate several proposed nuclear fuel cycle options to help guide and prioritize Fuel Cycle Technology research and development. Metrics are being developed to assess performance against nine evaluation criteria that will be used to assess relevant impacts resulting from all phases of the fuel cycle. This report focuses on four specific environmental metrics. land use water use CO2 emissions radiological Dose to workers Impacts associated with the processes in the front-end of the nuclear fuel cycle, mining through enrichment and deconversion of DUF6 are summarized from FCRD-FCO-2012-000124, Revision 1. Impact estimates are developed within this report for the remaining phases of the nuclear fuel cycle. These phases include fuel fabrication, reactor construction and operations, fuel reprocessing, and storage, transport, and disposal of associated used fuel and radioactive wastes. Impact estimates for each of the phases of the nuclear fuel cycle are given as impact factors normalized per unit process throughput or output. These impact factors can then be re-scaled against the appropriate mass flows to provide estimates for a wide range of potential fuel cycles. A companion report, FCRD-FCO-2013-000213, applies the impact factors to estimate and provide a comparative evaluation of 40 fuel cycles under consideration relative to these four environmental metrics.

Brett W Carlsen; Brent W Dixon; Urairisa Pathanapirom; Eric Schneider; Bethany L. Smith; Timothy M. AUlt; Allen G. Croff; Steven L. Krahn

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Goethite Bench-scale and Large-scale Preparation Tests  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is the keystone for cleanup of high-level radioactive waste from our nation's nuclear defense program. The WTP will process high-level waste from the Hanford tanks and produce immobilized high-level waste glass for disposal at a national repository, low activity waste (LAW) glass, and liquid effluent from the vitrification off-gas scrubbers. The liquid effluent will be stabilized into a secondary waste form (e.g. grout-like material) and disposed on the Hanford site in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) along with the low-activity waste glass. The major long-term environmental impact at Hanford results from technetium that volatilizes from the WTP melters and finally resides in the secondary waste. Laboratory studies have indicated that pertechnetate ({sup 99}TcO{sub 4}{sup -}) can be reduced and captured into a solid solution of {alpha}-FeOOH, goethite (Um 2010). Goethite is a stable mineral and can significantly retard the release of technetium to the environment from the IDF. The laboratory studies were conducted using reaction times of many days, which is typical of environmental subsurface reactions that were the genesis of this new process. This study was the first step in considering adaptation of the slow laboratory steps to a larger-scale and faster process that could be conducted either within the WTP or within the effluent treatment facility (ETF). Two levels of scale-up tests were conducted (25x and 400x). The largest scale-up produced slurries of Fe-rich precipitates that contained rhenium as a nonradioactive surrogate for {sup 99}Tc. The slurries were used in melter tests at Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) to determine whether captured rhenium was less volatile in the vitrification process than rhenium in an unmodified feed. A critical step in the technetium immobilization process is to chemically reduce Tc(VII) in the pertechnetate (TcO{sub 4}{sup -}) to Tc(Iv)by reaction with the ferrous ion, Fe{sup 2+}-Fe{sup 2+} is oxidized to Fe{sup 3+} - in the presence of goethite seed particles. Rhenium does not mimic that process; it is not a strong enough reducing agent to duplicate the TcO{sub 4}{sup -}/Fe{sup 2+} redox reactions. Laboratory tests conducted in parallel with these scaled tests identified modifications to the liquid chemistry necessary to reduce ReO{sub 4}{sup -} and capture rhenium in the solids at levels similar to those achieved by Um (2010) for inclusion of Tc into goethite. By implementing these changes, Re was incorporated into Fe-rich solids for testing at VSL. The changes also changed the phase of iron that was in the slurry product: rather than forming goethite ({alpha}-FeOOH), the process produced magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}). Magnetite was considered by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and VSL to probably be a better product to improve Re retention in the melter because it decomposes at a higher temperature than goethite (1538 C vs. 136 C). The feasibility tests at VSL were conducted using Re-rich magnetite. The tests did not indicate an improved retention of Re in the glass during vitrification, but they did indicate an improved melting rate (+60%), which could have significant impact on HLW processing. It is still to be shown whether the Re is a solid solution in the magnetite as {sup 99}Tc was determined to be in goethite.

Josephson, Gary B.; Westsik, Joseph H.

2011-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

319

Large-Scale Renewable Energy Guide Webinar  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Webinar introduces the Large Scale Renewable Energy Guide." The webinar will provide an overview of this important FEMP guide, which describes FEMP's approach to large-scale renewable energy projects and provides guidance to Federal agencies and the private sector on how to develop a common process for large-scale renewable projects.

320

Nuclear Reactions & Scaling Arguments 11 October 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nuclear Reactions & Scaling Arguments 11 October 2011 Goals · Review nuclear reaction rates · Practice using scaling arguments Nuclear Reactions 1. Consider the simple reaction A k1 ---- B k2 ---- C = 3. #12;nuclear reactions & scaling arguments 2 3. Frequently, we approximate nuclear reaction rates

Militzer, Burkhard

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes scale factor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Nuclear Reactions & Scaling Arguments 11 October 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nuclear Reactions & Scaling Arguments 11 October 2011 Goals · Review nuclear reaction rates · Practice using scaling arguments Nuclear Reactions 1. Consider the simple reaction A k1 ---- B k2 ---- C rate for something like p + p D scales like n2 p. Think in microscopic terms. #12;nuclear reactions

Militzer, Burkhard

322

6, 1092910958, 2006 Regional scale CO2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ACPD 6, 10929­10958, 2006 Regional scale CO2 flux estimation using radon A. I. Hirsch Title Page Chemistry and Physics Discussions On using radon-222 and CO2 to calculate regional-scale CO2 fluxes A. I (Adam.Hirsch@noaa.gov) 10929 #12;ACPD 6, 10929­10958, 2006 Regional scale CO2 flux estimation using

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

323

Conundrum of the Large Scale Streaming  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The etiology of the large scale peculiar velocity (large scale streaming motion) of clusters would increasingly seem more tenuous, within the context of the gravitational instability hypothesis. Are there any alternative testable models possibly accounting for such large scale streaming of clusters?

T. M. Malm

1999-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

324

Nucleon and $?$ elastic and transition form factors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We compute nucleon and Delta elastic and transition form factors, and compare predictions made using a framework built upon a Faddeev equation kernel and interaction vertices that possess QCD-like momentum dependence with results obtained using a vector-vector contact-interaction. The comparison emphasises that experiment is sensitive to the momentum dependence of the running couplings and masses in the strong interaction sector of the Standard Model and highlights that the key to describing hadron properties is a veracious expression of dynamical chiral symmetry breaking in the bound-state problem. Amongst the results we describe, the following are of particular interest: $G_E^p(Q^2)/G_M^p(Q^2)$ possesses a zero at $Q^2=9.5GeV^2$; any change in the interaction which shifts a zero in the proton ratio to larger $Q^2$ relocates a zero in $G_E^n(Q^2)/G_M^n(Q^2)$ to smaller $Q^2$; and there is likely a value of momentum transfer above which $G_E^n>G_E^p$. Regarding the $\\Delta(1232)$-baryon, we find that, inter alia: the electric monopole form factor exhibits a zero; the electric quadrupole form factor is negative, large in magnitude, and sensitive to the nature and strength of correlations in the $\\Delta(1232)$ Faddeev amplitude; and the magnetic octupole form factor is negative so long as rest-frame P- and D-wave correlations are included. In connection with the N-to-Delta transition, the momentum-dependence of the magnetic transition form factor, $G_M^\\ast$, matches that of $G_M^n$ once the momentum transfer is high enough to pierce the meson-cloud; and the electric quadrupole ratio is a keen measure of diquark and orbital angular momentum correlations.

Jorge Segovia; Ian C. Cloet; Craig D. Roberts; Sebastian M. Schmidt

2014-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

325

Factors that Determine Academic Versus Private Practice Career Interest in Radiation Oncology Residents in the United States: Results of a Nationwide Survey  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To determine what factors US radiation oncology residents consider when choosing academic or nonacademic careers. Methods and Materials: A 20-question online survey was developed and sent to all US radiation oncology residents to assess factors that influence their career interest. Residents were asked to rate their interest in academics (A) versus private practice (PP) on a 0 (strong interest in A) to 100 (strong interest in PP) scale. Responses were classified as A (0-30), undecided (40-60), and PP (70-100). Residents were also asked to rank 10 factors that most strongly influenced their career interest. Results: Three hundred thirty-one responses were collected, of which 264 were complete and form the basis for this analysis. Factors that correlated with interest in A included having a PhD (P=.018), postgraduate year level (P=.0006), research elective time (P=.0003), obtaining grant funding during residency (P=.012), and number of publications before residency (P=.0001), but not number of abstracts accepted in the past year (P=.65) or publications during residency (P=.67). The 3 most influential factors for residents interested in A were: (1) baseline interest before residency; (2) academic role models; and (3) research opportunities during residency. The 3 most influential factors for residents interested in PP were: (1) baseline interest before residency; (2) academic role models; and (3) academic pressure and obligations. Conclusions: Interest in A correlated with postgraduate year level, degree, and research time during residency. Publications before but not during residency correlated with academic interest, and baseline interest was the most influential factor. These data can be used by residency program directors to better understand what influences residents' career interest.

Chang, Daniel T., E-mail: dtchang@stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Shaffer, Jenny L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Haffty, Bruce G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Wilson, Lynn D. [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States)

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Dual chain synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention provides synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs having two peptide chains each branched from a branch moiety, such as trifunctional amino acid residues, the branch moieties separated by a first linker of from 3 to about 20 backbone atoms, which peptide chains bind a heparin-binding growth factor receptor and are covalently bound to a non-signaling peptide that includes a heparin-binding domain, preferably by a second linker, which may be a hydrophobic second linker. The synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs are useful as pharmaceutical agents, soluble biologics or as surface coatings for medical devices.

Zamora, Paul O. (Gaithersburg, MD); Pena, Louis A. (Poquott, NY); Lin, Xinhua (Plainview, NY)

2012-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

327

Dual chain synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention provides synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs having two peptide chains each branched from a branch moiety, such as trifunctional amino acid residues, the branch moieties separated by a first linker of from 3 to about 20 backbone atoms, which peptide chains bind a heparin-binding growth factor receptor and are covalently bound to a non-signaling peptide that includes a heparin-binding domain, preferably by a second linker, which may be a hydrophobic second linker. The synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs are useful as pharmaceutical agents, soluble biologics or as surface coatings for medical devices.

Zamora, Paul O. (Gaithersburg, MD); Pena, Louis A. (Poquott, NY); Lin, Xinhua (Plainview, NY)

2009-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

328

Analysis of wood-energy production and consumption strategies among small-scale farmers in central Kenya  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study focuses on wood-energy production and consumption strategies among small-scale farm households in central Kenya. The specific objective were: (1) to determine how households had responded to specific wood-energy policies; (2) to identify factors associated with household adoption or non-adoption of the strategies. Different programs aimed at addressing wood-energy shortages in Kenya were initiated or strengthened during the 1980s: fuelwood or multipurpose tree planting; development and dissemination of improved stoves and fireplaces; promotion of increased accessibility to wood-energy substitutes. Household adoption levels for policy-supported strategies have remained low despite promotion. Survey data from two villages in Nyeri district were collected to determine the factors associated with adoption of the Kenya Ceramic Jiko, the [open quotes]Kuni Mbili[close quotes] stove/fireplace, kerosene stoves, electric cookers, and fuelwood or multipurpose tree planting. Adoption rates varied from as low as 1 percent for electricity to 43 percent for the Kenya Ceramic Jiko. Important policy variables included extension visits per year, income levels, years of formal education received by head of household, access to different fuels, area of farm-land owned, household size, and locational characteristics of the villages. Policy recommendations included: use of research results to direct policy; improvement of information flows between policy makers, extension agents, and technology-users; increased support of agroforestry; and better program coordination. Recommendations for further research included: examining more areas where efficiency gains in energy production and consumption can be made, extending the study to cover the drier parts of central Kenya, and conducting regular case studies in order to better understand the adoption process over time.

Mwangi, A.M.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

SBIR/STTR FY15 Release 1 Awards Announced-Includes Fuel Cell...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

FY15 Release 1 Awards Announced-Includes Fuel Cell Catalyst and Hydrogen Contamination Detection R&D SBIRSTTR FY15 Release 1 Awards Announced-Includes Fuel Cell Catalyst and...

330

SBIR/STTR Release 2 Topics Announced-Includes Hydrogen and Fuel...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Release 2 Topics Announced-Includes Hydrogen and Fuel Cells SBIRSTTR Release 2 Topics Announced-Includes Hydrogen and Fuel Cells October 31, 2014 - 12:05pm Addthis The 2015 Small...

331

Advanced Robotics Journal, Vol. X, No. Y, 2002 (to appear) SCALED TELEOPERATION SYSTEM FOR NANO SCALE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Advanced Robotics Journal, Vol. X, No. Y, 2002 (to appear) SCALED TELEOPERATION SYSTEM FOR NANO for teleoperated nano scale object interaction and manipulation. Design specifications for a bilateral scaled system, initial experiments are realized for interacting with nano scale surfaces. It is shown that fine

Sitti, Metin

332

An Analysis of the Effects of Sociodemographic Factors on Daily Per Capita Residential Water Use in Texas Cities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

consideration of numerous factors including hydrologic and physiographic factors, engineering feasibility and economic feasibility. At the same time, it is increasingly evident that water needs are closely tied to population growth and to the social, economic...

Murdock, Steve H.; Albrecht, Don E.; Hamm, Rita R.; Bachman, Kenneth; Parpia, Banoo

333

E-Print Network 3.0 - anti-platelet therapy including Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

management including exercise, cognitive behavioral therapy 3. ... Source: Messersmith, Phillip B.- Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University...

334

USING FIRM OPTIMIZATION TO EVALUATE AND ESTIMATE PRODUCTIVITY AND RETURNS TO SCALE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

USING FIRM OPTIMIZATION TO EVALUATE AND ESTIMATE PRODUCTIVITY AND RETURNS TO SCALE Yuriy, not production function. Given this observation, the paper argues that, under weak assumptions, micro profits. The puzzle arises because popular estimators ignore heterogeneity and endogeneity in factor/product

Sadoulet, Elisabeth

335

The Energy Dashboard: Improving the Visibility of Energy Consumption at a Campus-Wide Scale  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Energy (DOE) estimates that 73% of the electricity usage and 39% of the CO2 emissions in the US come from, Experimentation, Measurement, Human Factors Keywords Energy, Power, Buildings 1 Introduction The US DepartmentThe Energy Dashboard: Improving the Visibility of Energy Consumption at a Campus-Wide Scale Yuvraj

Gupta, Rajesh

336

Ecological effects of small-scale cutting of Philippine mangrove forests  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in cut forests: Sonneratia sp., A. marina and R. apiculata regenerate well by coppice regrowth the significance of small-scale cutting disturbance and coppice regeneration as biotic factors in mangrove ecology; Non-timber forest products; Canopy gaps; Coppice regeneration; Mangroves; Philippines 1. Introduction

Walters, Bradley B.

337

Electrical and Production Load Factors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Texas Abstract Load factors and operating hours of small and medium-sized industrial plants are analyzed to classify shift-work patterns and develop energy conservation diagnostic tools. This paper discusses two types of electric load factors... for each shift classification within major industry groups. The load factor based on billing hours (ELF) increases with operating hours from about 0.4 for a nominal one shift operation, to about 0.7 for around-the-clock operation. On the other hand...

Sen, T.; Heffington, W. M.

338

Heart of Darkness: The Significance of the Zeptobarn Scale for Neutralino Direct Detection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The direct detection of dark matter through its elastic scattering off nucleons is among the most promising methods for establishing the particle identity of dark matter. The current bound on the spin-independent scattering cross section is sigma^SI 1 TeV, effectively decoupling squarks and sleptons from neutralino dark matter phenomenology. In this case, we find characteristic cross sections in the narrow range 1 zb 70 GeV. As sfermion masses are lowered to near their experimental limit mtilde ~ 400 GeV, the upper and lower limits of this range are extended, but only by factors of around two, and the lower limit is not significantly altered by relaxing many particle physics assumptions, varying the strange quark content of the nucleon, including the effects of galactic small-scale structure, or assuming other components of dark matter. Experiments are therefore rapidly entering the heart of dark matter-favored supersymmetry parameter space. If no signal is seen, supersym metric models must contain some lev...

Feng, Jonathan L

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Design and validation of laboratory-scale simulations for selecting tribomaterials and surface treatments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Engineering approaches to solving tribology problems commonly involve friction, lubrication, or wear testing, either in the field or in a laboratory setting. Since wear and friction are properties of the materials in the larger context of the tribosystem, the selection of appropriate laboratory tribotesting procedures becomes critically important. Laboratory simulations must exhibit certain key characteristics of the application in order for the test results to be relevant, but they may not have to mimic all operating conditions. The current paper illustrates a step-by-step method to develop laboratory-scale friction and wear simulations based on a tribosystem analysis. Quantitative or qualitative metrics are established and used to validate the effectiveness of the tribosimulation. Sometimes standardized test methods can be used, but frequently a new type of test method or procedure must be developed. There are four factors to be addressed in designing effective simulations: (1) contact macrogeometry and the characteristics of relative motion, (2) pressure--velocity relationships, (3) thermal and chemical environment (including type of lubrication), and (4) the role of third-bodies. In addition, there are two typical choices of testing philosophy: (1) the worst-case scenario and, (2) the nominal-operations scenario. Examples of the development and use of simulative friction and wear tests are used to illustrate major points.

Blau, P.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Metals and Ceramics Div.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Investigating Operating System Noise in Extreme-Scale High-Performance Computing Systems using Simulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hardware/software co-design for future-generation high-performance computing (HPC) systems aims at closing the gap between the peak capabilities of the hardware and the performance realized by applications (application-architecture performance gap). Performance profiling of architectures and applications is a crucial part of this iterative process. The work in this paper focuses on operating system (OS) noise as an additional factor to be considered for co-design. It represents the first step in including OS noise in HPC hardware/software co-design by adding a noise injection feature to an existing simulation-based co-design toolkit. It reuses an existing abstraction for OS noise with frequency (periodic recurrence) and period (duration of each occurrence) to enhance the processor model of the Extreme-scale Simulator (xSim) with synchronized and random OS noise simulation. The results demonstrate this capability by evaluating the impact of OS noise on MPI_Bcast() and MPI_Reduce() in a simulated future-generation HPC system with 2,097,152 compute nodes.

Engelmann, Christian [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes scale factor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Hoopa Valley Small Scale Hydroelectric Feasibility Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study considered assessing the feasibility of developing small scale hydro-electric power from seven major tributaries within the Hoopa Valley Indian Reservation of Northern California (http://www.hoopa-nsn.gov/). This study pursued the assessment of seven major tributaries of the Reservation that flow into the Trinity River. The feasibility of hydropower on the Hoopa Valley Indian Reservation has real potential for development and many alternative options for project locations, designs, operations and financing. In order to realize this opportunity further will require at least 2-3 years of intense data collection focusing on stream flow measurements at multiple locations in order to quantify real power potential. This also includes on the ground stream gradient surveys, road access planning and grid connectivity to PG&E for sale of electricity. Imperative to this effort is the need for negotiations between the Hoopa Tribal Council and PG&E to take place in order to finalize the power rate the Tribe will receive through any wholesale agreement that utilizes the alternative energy generated on the Reservation.

Curtis Miller

2009-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

342

Photovoltaic Device Including A Boron Doping Profile In An I-Type Layer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A photovoltaic cell for use in a single junction or multijunction photovoltaic device, which includes a p-type layer of a semiconductor compound including silicon, an i-type layer of an amorphous semiconductor compound including silicon, and an n-type layer of a semiconductor compound including silicon formed on the i-type layer. The i-type layer including an undoped first sublayer formed on the p-type layer, and a boron-doped second sublayer formed on the first sublayer.

Yang, Liyou (Lawrenceville, NJ)

1993-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

343

Minimally non-local nucleon-nucleon potentials with chiral two-pion exchange including Delta resonances  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

We construct a coordinate-space chiral potential, including $\\Delta$-isobar intermediate states in its two-pion-exchange component up to order $Q^3$ ($Q$ denotes generically the low momentum scale).The contact interactions entering at next-to-leading and next-to-next-to-next-to-leading orders ($Q^2$ and $Q^4$, respectively) are rearranged by Fierz transformations to yield terms at most quadratic in the relative momentum operator of the two nucleons. The low-energy constant multiplying these contact interactions are fitted to the 2013 Granada database, consisting of 2309 $pp$ and 2982 $np$ data (including, respectively, 148 and 218 normalizations) in the laboratory-energy range 0--300 MeV. For the total 5291 $pp$ and $np$ data in this range, we obtain a $\\chi^2$/datum of roughly 1.3 for a set of three models characterized by long- and short-range cutoffs, $R_{\\rm L}$ and $R_{\\rm S}$ respectively, ranging from $(R_{\\rm L},R_{\\rm S})=(1.2,0.8)$ fm down to $(0.8,0.6)$ fm. The long-range (short-range) cutoff regularizes the one- and two-pion exchange (contact) part of the potential.

Piarulli, M; Girlanda, L; Schiavilla, R; Perez, R Navarro; Amaro, J E; Arriola, E Ruiz

2015-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Integer factorization is in P  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

can be solved by a deterministic Turing machine in polynomial time(see e.g.. Cormen et al. (2009)). Theorem 5. Integer factorization is in FP. Algorithm 2 can be...

owner

2014-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

345

Automatic Test Factoring for Java  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Test factoring creates fast, focused unit tests from slow system-widetests; each new unit test exercises only a subset of the functionalityexercised by the system test. Augmenting a test suite with factoredunit tests ...

Saff, David

2005-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

346

EFFICIENT STRUCTURED MULTIFRONTAL FACTORIZATION FOR ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Such rank phenomenon is indeed observed for the .... Moreover, the HSS tree can help quickly identify any off-diagonal block of the ...... Table 4.1. Factorization cost ?fact, solution cost ?sol, and storage ?mem of the structured multifrontal.

2013-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

347

Human Factors of Reporting Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Johnson,C.W. P. Carayon (ed.), A Handbook of Human Factors and Ergonomics in Healthcare and Patient Safety, Lawrence Erlbaum, London, UK. pp 715-750 Lawrence Erlbaum Associates

Johnson, C.W.

348

Advanced, High Power, Next Scale, Wave Energy Conversion Device...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Advanced, High Power, Next Scale, Wave Energy Conversion Device Advanced, High Power, Next Scale, Wave Energy Conversion Device Advanced, High Power, Next Scale, Wave Energy...

349

DLFM library tools for large scale dynamic applications.  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

DLFM library tools for large scale dynamic applications DLFM library tools for large scale dynamic applications Large scale Python and other dynamic applications may spend huge...

350

Closure for milliliter scale bioreactor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A closure for a microreactor includes a cap that is configured to be inserted into a well of the microreactor. The cap, or at least a portion of the cap, is compliant so as to form a seal with the well when the cap is inserted. The cap includes an aperture that provides an airway between the inside of the well to the external environment when the cap is inserted into the well. A porous plug is inserted in the aperture, e.g., either directly or in tube that extends through the aperture. The porous plug permits gas within the well to pass through the aperture while preventing liquids from passing through to reduce evaporation and preventing microbes from passing through to provide a sterile environment. A one-way valve may also be used to help control the environment in the well.

Klein, David L. (Palo Alto, CA); Laidlaw, Robert D. (Albany, CA); Andronaco, Gregory (Palo Alto, CA); Boyer, Stephen G. (Moss Beach, CA)

2010-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

351

Radiant-interchange configuration factors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RADIANT-INTERCHANGE CONFIGURATION FACTORS A Thesis By THOMAS E DW ARD RE D DIN Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas A)M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE January 1965 Major... wife, Dorene, whose patience and encouragement have been a constant source of inspiration. TABLE OF CONTENTS CHAPTER I . INTRODUCTION PAGE ~ 0 1 II. THE GEOMETRY OF THE BLACK BODY CONFIGURATION FACTOR. . . , . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 1...

Reddin, Thomas Edward

1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Energy and environmental research emphasizing low-rank coal: Task 3.4 -- Hot-gas cleaning. Topical report (includes semiannual report for January--June 1995)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the accomplishments of three subtasks completed in support of the current and future hot-gas cleanup activities at the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC). The overall objective of the EERC hot-gas cleanup task is to develop reliable methods to remove particulate matter from high-temperature, high-pressure gas streams produced from coal combustion and/or gasification. Near-term task objectives include (1) design, fabrication, and assembly of a high-temperature, high-pressure bench-scale filter vessel; (2) design, fabrication, and assembly of a high-temperature, high-pressure sampling train; and (3) the preliminary design of a pilot-scale high-temperature, high-pressure filter vessel and support systems. Bench-scale hot-gas filter research will be performed with the pressurized fluid-bed reactor (PFBR) or the continuous fluid-bed reactor (CFBR) and a hot-gas filter vessel. The objectives of future work with the bench-scale system will be to determine particulate and vapor-phase alkali degradation of candidate ceramic filter structures as well as filter performance relative to particulate collection efficiency, differential pressure, and filter cleanability. Construction of the high-temperature, high-pressure sampling system was intended to support bench- and pilot-scale activities with respect to conventional particulate sampling (total mass and particle-size distribution) and hazardous air pollutant (HAP) sampling. Finally, pilot-scale tests will be performed to evaluate filter performance and determine alkali corrosion of ceramic materials with a hot-gas filter vessel attached to the EERC Transport Reactor Development Unit (TRDU).

Weber, G.F.; Swanson, M.L.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

A multi-scale iterative approach for finite element modeling of thermal contact resistance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Surface topography has long been considered a key factor in the performance of many contact applications including thermal contact resistance. However, essentially all analytical and numerical models of thermal contact ...

Thompson, Mary Kathryn, 1980-

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Extreme Scale Computing to Secure the Nation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since the dawn of modern electronic computing in the mid 1940's, U.S. national security programs have been dominant users of every new generation of high-performance computer. Indeed, the first general-purpose electronic computer, ENIAC (the Electronic Numerical Integrator and Computer), was used to calculate the expected explosive yield of early thermonuclear weapons designs. Even the U. S. numerical weather prediction program, another early application for high-performance computing, was initially funded jointly by sponsors that included the U.S. Air Force and Navy, agencies interested in accurate weather predictions to support U.S. military operations. For the decades of the cold war, national security requirements continued to drive the development of high performance computing (HPC), including advancement of the computing hardware and development of sophisticated simulation codes to support weapons and military aircraft design, numerical weather prediction as well as data-intensive applications such as cryptography and cybersecurity U.S. national security concerns continue to drive the development of high-performance computers and software in the U.S. and in fact, events following the end of the cold war have driven an increase in the growth rate of computer performance at the high-end of the market. This mainly derives from our nation's observance of a moratorium on underground nuclear testing beginning in 1992, followed by our voluntary adherence to the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) beginning in 1995. The CTBT prohibits further underground nuclear tests, which in the past had been a key component of the nation's science-based program for assuring the reliability, performance and safety of U.S. nuclear weapons. In response to this change, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) initiated the Science-Based Stockpile Stewardship (SBSS) program in response to the Fiscal Year 1994 National Defense Authorization Act, which requires, 'in the absence of nuclear testing, a progam to: (1) Support a focused, multifaceted program to increase the understanding of the enduring stockpile; (2) Predict, detect, and evaluate potential problems of the aging of the stockpile; (3) Refurbish and re-manufacture weapons and components, as required; and (4) Maintain the science and engineering institutions needed to support the nation's nuclear deterrent, now and in the future'. This program continues to fulfill its national security mission by adding significant new capabilities for producing scientific results through large-scale computational simulation coupled with careful experimentation, including sub-critical nuclear experiments permitted under the CTBT. To develop the computational science and the computational horsepower needed to support its mission, SBSS initiated the Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative, later renamed the Advanced Simulation & Computing (ASC) program (sidebar: 'History of ASC Computing Program Computing Capability'). The modern 3D computational simulation capability of the ASC program supports the assessment and certification of the current nuclear stockpile through calibration with past underground test (UGT) data. While an impressive accomplishment, continued evolution of national security mission requirements will demand computing resources at a significantly greater scale than we have today. In particular, continued observance and potential Senate confirmation of the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) together with the U.S administration's promise for a significant reduction in the size of the stockpile and the inexorable aging and consequent refurbishment of the stockpile all demand increasing refinement of our computational simulation capabilities. Assessment of the present and future stockpile with increased confidence of the safety and reliability without reliance upon calibration with past or future test data is a long-term goal of the ASC program. This will be accomplished through significant increases in the scientific bases that underlie the computational tools. Computer codes must be de

Brown, D L; McGraw, J R; Johnson, J R; Frincke, D

2009-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

355

Scaling Theory for Pulsed Jet Mixed Vessels, Sparging, and Cyclic Feed Transport Systems for Slurries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is a previously unpublished work based on a draft report prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) in 2012. Work on the report stopped when WTPs approach to testing changed. PNNL is issuing a modified version of the document a year later to preserve and disseminate the valuable technical work that was completed. This document establishes technical bases for evaluating the mixing performance of Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) pretreatment process tanks based on data from less-than-full-scale testing, relative to specified mixing requirements. The technical bases include the fluid mechanics affecting mixing for specified vessel configurations, operating parameters, and simulant properties. They address scaling vessel physical performance, simulant physical performance, and scaling down the operating conditions at full scale to define test conditions at reduced scale and scaling up the test results at reduced scale to predict the performance at full scale. Essentially, this document addresses the following questions: Why and how can the mixing behaviors in a smaller vessel represent those in a larger vessel? What information is needed to address the first question? How should the information be used to predict mixing performance in WTP? The design of Large Scale Integrated Testing (LSIT) is being addressed in other, complementary documents.

Kuhn, William L.; Rector, David R.; Rassat, Scot D.; Enderlin, Carl W.; Minette, Michael J.; Bamberger, Judith A.; Josephson, Gary B.; Wells, Beric E.; Berglin, Eric J.

2013-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

356

How to calibrate the jet energy scale?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Top quarks dominantly decay into b-quark jets and W bosons, and the W bosons often decay into jets, thus the precise determination of the jet energy scale is crucial in measurements of many top quark properties. I present the strategies used by the CDF and D0 collaborations to determine the jet energy scale. The various cross checks performed to verify the determined jet energy scale and evaluate its systematic uncertainty are also discussed.

Hatakeyama, K.; /Rockefeller U.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Scaling Rules for Pre-Injector Design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Proposed designs of the prebunching system of the NLC and TESLA are based on the assumption that scaling the SLC design to NLC/TESLA requirements should provide the desired performance. A simple equation is developed to suggest a scaling rule in terms of bunch charge and duration. Detailed simulations of prebunching systems scaled from a single design have been run to investigate these issues.

Tom Schwarz; Dan Amidei

2003-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

358

Scaling in the Lattice Gas Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A good quality scaling of the cluster size distributions is obtained for the Lattice Gas Model using the Fisher's ansatz for the scaling function. This scaling identifies a pseudo-critical line in the phase diagram of the model that spans the whole (subcritical to supercritical) density range. The independent cluster hypothesis of the Fisher approach is shown to describe correctly the thermodynamics of the lattice only far away from the critical point.

F. Gulminelli; Ph. Chomaz; M. Bruno; M. D'Agostino

2002-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

359

Photovoltaic module kit including connector assembly for non-penetrating array installation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A PV module kit for non-penetrating rooftop installation, including a plurality of PV modules and a plurality of connectors. Each of the PV modules includes a PV laminate and a frame forming a mounting region assembled thereto. The connectors include a male connector having a male fastener extending from a head, and a female connector having a female fastener assembled within a head. The heads are entirely formed of plastic. The kit provides a mounted array state including a junction at which the mounting region of at least two of the PV modules are aligned and interconnected by engagement of the male connector with the female connector. The so-formed junction is substantially electrically insulated. The plurality of connectors can further include a spacer connector including a head forming a bore sized to slidably receive the male fastener, with all of the connector heads being identical.

Botkin, Jonathan (El Cerrito, CA); Graves, Simon (Berkeley, CA); Danning, Matt (Oakland, CA); Culligan, Matthew (Berkeley, CA)

2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

360

Photovoltaic module kit including connector assembly for non-penetrating array installation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A PV module kit for non-penetrating rooftop installation, including a plurality of PV modules and a plurality of connectors. Each of the PV modules includes a PV laminate and a frame forming a mounting region assembled thereto. The connectors include a male connector having a male fastener extending from a head, and a female connector having a female fastener assembled within a head. The heads are entirely formed of plastic. The kit provides a mounted array state including a junction at which the mounting region of at least two of the PV modules are aligned and interconnected by engagement of the male connector with the female connector. The so-formed junction is substantially electrically insulated. The plurality of connectors can further include a spacer connector including a head forming a bore sized to slidably receive the male fastener, with all of the connector heads being identical.

Botkin, Jonathan; Graves, Simon; Danning, Matt; Culligan, Matthew

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes scale factor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Photovoltaic module kit including connector assembly for non-penetrating array installation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A PV module kit for non-penetrating rooftop installation, including a plurality of PV modules and a plurality of connectors. Each of the PV modules includes a PV laminate and a frame forming a mounting region assembled thereto. The connectors include a male connector having a male fastener extending from a head, and a female connector having a female fastener assempbled within a head. The heads are entirely formed of plastic. The kit provides a mounted array state including a junction at which the mounting regions of at least two of the PV modules are aligned and interconnected by engagement of the male connector with the female connector. The so-formed junction is substantially electrically insulated. The plurality of connectors can further include a spacer connector including a head forming a bore sized slidably receive the male fastener, with all of the connector heads being identical.

Botkin, Jonathan; Graves, Simon; Danning, Matt; Culligan, Matthew

2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

362

Sapphire Energy, Inc. Demonstration-Scale Project  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

and run the facility. The success of this project will demonstrate the technical and economic feasibility of the algae-to- fuels process for commercial-scale biorefineries....

363

Commonwealth Wind Community-Scale Initiative  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Through the Commonwealth Wind Incentive Program Community-Scale Wind Initiative the Massachusetts Clean Energy Center (MassCEC) offers site assessment grants of services, feasibility study grants...

364

E-Print Network 3.0 - actinium isotopes including Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

chemicals. Contaminants of concern include plutonium, polonium, uranium, americium... , curium, radiumlanthanum and actinium. The estimated quantity of waste in the pits is 4000...

365

E-Print Network 3.0 - articles including cerium Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

effect in cerium oxides Peng Gao, Zhenzhong Wang, Wangyang Fu, Zhaoliang Liao, Kaihui Liu... the resistance switching effect, including Mott transition (Fors et al., 2005; Oka...

366

E-Print Network 3.0 - approach including plasma Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

plasmas confined... to mi crocavities has provided a pathway to new optoelectronic devices, including hybrid Source: Shyy, Wei - Department of Aerospace Engineering,...

367

E-Print Network 3.0 - antibodies including immunoglobulin Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

search results for: antibodies including immunoglobulin Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 BIOLOGY 4201 -ANIMAL CELL CULTURE: METHODS & APPLICATIONS January 11, 2008 Summary: -specific...

368

E-Print Network 3.0 - african countries including Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

year. In Africa, countries including Malawi, Mali, Mauritius, Nigeria, Senegal, South Africa... to food security is particularly profound for African countries where food is...

369

E-Print Network 3.0 - abdominal surgery including Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

reality allows... , a virtual reality laparoscopic surgery simulator that includes a brand new educational component, to assist... . Virtual reality simulators for...

370

New records of the Cryphonectriaceae from southern Africa including Latruncellus aurorae gen. sp. nov.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

New records of the Cryphonectriaceae from southern Africa including Latruncellus aurorae gen. sp, Latruncellus aurorae gen. sp. nov., is described from Galpinia transvaalica (Lythraceae, Myrtales) in Swazi

371

Relating Pore-Scale Uranium Aquatic Speciation to Intermediate-Scale Aquifer Heterogeneity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The speciation and transport of uranium (VI) through porous media is highly dependent on solution conditions, the presence of complexing ligands, and the nature of the porous media. The dependency on many variables makes prediction of U transport in bench-scale experiments and in the field difficult. In particular, the identification of colloidal U phases poses a technical challenge. Transport of U in the presence and absence of natural organic matter (Suwannee River humic acid, SRHA) through silica sand and hematite coated silica sand was tested at pH 4 and 5 using static columns, where flow is controlled by gravity and residence time between advective pore volume exchanges can be strictly controlled. The column effluents were characterized by traditional techniques including ICPMS quantification of total [U] and [Fe], TOC analysis of [DOC], and pH analysis, and also by non-traditional techniques: flow field flow fractionation with online ICPMS detection (FlFFF-ICPMS) and specific UV absorbance (SUVA) characterization of effluent fractions. Key results include that the transport of U through the columns was enhanced by pre-equilibration with SRHA, and previously deposited U was remobilized by the addition of SRHA. The advanced techniques yielded important insights on the mechanisms of transport: FlFFF-ICPMS identified a U?SRHA complex as the mobile U species and directly quantified relative amounts of the complex, while specific UV absorbance (SUVA) measurements indicated a composition-based fractionation onto the porous media.

Ranville, James

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Measurements of Form Factors with the BaBar Experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Selected recent results on measurements of form factors by the BaBar Collaboration are reviewed, including e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} {eta}{prime}{gamma}, leptonic and semileptonic charm decays from data collected at or near the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance.

Li, Selina Z.; /SLAC

2011-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

373

SCALE 6: Comprehensive Nuclear Safety Analysis Code System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Version 6 of the Standardized Computer Analyses for Licensing Evaluation (SCALE) computer software system developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, released in February 2009, contains significant new capabilities and data for nuclear safety analysis and marks an important update for this software package, which is used worldwide. This paper highlights the capabilities of the SCALE system, including continuous-energy flux calculations for processing multigroup problem-dependent cross sections, ENDF/B-VII continuous-energy and multigroup nuclear cross-section data, continuous-energy Monte Carlo criticality safety calculations, Monte Carlo radiation shielding analyses with automated three-dimensional variance reduction techniques, one- and three-dimensional sensitivity and uncertainty analyses for criticality safety evaluations, two- and three-dimensional lattice physics depletion analyses, fast and accurate source terms and decay heat calculations, automated burnup credit analyses with loading curve search, and integrated three-dimensional criticality accident alarm system analyses using coupled Monte Carlo criticality and shielding calculations.

Bowman, Stephen M [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Global terrestrial biogeochemistry: Perturbations, interactions, and time scales  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Global biogeochemical processes are being perturbed by human activity, principally that which is associated with industrial activity and expansion of urban and agricultural complexes. Perturbations have manifested themselves at least since the beginning of the 19th Century, and include emissions of CO{sub 2} and other pollutants from fossil fuel combustion, agricultural emissions of reactive nitrogen, and direct disruption of ecosystem function through land conversion. These perturbations yield local impacts, but there are also global consequences that are the sum of local-scale influences. Several approaches to understanding the global-scale implications of chemical perturbations to the Earth system are discussed. The lifetime of anthropogenic CO{sub 2} in the atmosphere is an important concept for understanding the current and future commitment to an altered atmospheric heat budget. The importance of the terrestrial biogeochemistry relative to the lifetime of excess CO{sub 2} is demonstrated using dynamic, aggregated models of the global carbon cycle.

Braswell, B.H. Jr.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Vanishing effective mass of the neutrinoless double beta decay including light sterile neutrinos  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Light sterile neutrinos with masses at the sub-eV or eV scale are hinted by current experimental and cosmological data. Assuming the Majorana nature of these hypothetical particles, we discuss their effects in the neutrinoless double beta decay by exploring the implications of a vanishing effective Majorana neutrino mass. Allowed ranges of neutrino masses, mixing angles and Majorana CP-violating phases are illustrated in some instructive cases for both normal and inverted mass hierarchies of three active neutrinos.

Y. F. Li; Si-shuo Liu

2011-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

376

Method and appartus for converting static in-ground vehicle scales into weigh-in-motion systems  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method for converting in-ground static weighing scales for vehicles to weigh-in-motion systems. The apparatus upon conversion includes the existing in-ground static scale, peripheral switches and an electronic module for automatic computation of the weight. By monitoring the velocity, tire position, axle spacing, and real time output from existing static scales as a vehicle drives over the scales, the system determines when an axle of a vehicle is on the scale at a given time, monitors the combined weight output from any given axle combination on the scale(s) at any given time, and from these measurements automatically computes the weight of each individual axle and gross vehicle weight by an integration, integration approximation, and/or signal averaging technique.

Muhs, Jeffrey D. (Lenior City, TN); Scudiere, Matthew B. (Oak Ridge, TN); Jordan, John K. (Oak Ridge, TN)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Cross-section library and processing techniques within the SCALE system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A summary of each of the SCALE system features involved in problem-dependent cross section processing is presented. These features include criticality libraries, shielding libraries, the Standard Composition Library, the SCALE functional modules: BONAMI-S, NITAWL-S, XSDRNPM-S, ICE-S, and the Material Information Processor. The automated procedure for cross-section processing is described with examples. 15 refs.

Westfall, R.M.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Mathematical optimization of a flexible job shop problem including preventive maintenance and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Mathematical optimization of a flexible job shop problem including preventive maintenance as the scheduling problem includes limited availability of fixtures and preventive maintenance planning periodicity, a number of preventive maintenance activities need to be carried out in some of the resources

Patriksson, Michael

379

GL069 Financial Summary (Including Multi-Year Funds And Excluding Agency Funds)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GL069 Financial Summary (Including Multi-Year Funds And Excluding Agency Funds) GL069 Cognos Report, or click . Legacy Name/Type - This report is an enhancement to the GL013 report. #12;GL069 Financial Summary (Including Multi-Year Funds And Excluding Agency Funds) GL069 Cognos Report Job Aid ­ cdm 7

Shull, Kenneth R.

380

Red-Tide Research Summarized to 1964 Including an Annotated Bibliography  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

535^ Red-Tide Research Summarized to 1964 Including an Annotated Bibliography By George A, Harold E. Crowther, Acting Director Red-Tide Research Summarized to 1964 Including an Annotated Historical 2 General conditions during red-tide outbreaks 3 Temperature 3 Salinity 3 Rainfall 4 Wind 4 Light

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes scale factor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Research Activities Web Technologies Web Technologies include procedures that are used in order  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research Activities ­ Web Technologies Web Technologies include procedures that are used in order to enhance the services that are offered by the World Wide Web. They include both services that can be presented directly to the users of the World Wide Web and services that are transparent to the end user

Bouras, Christos

382

Neutron Star Matter Including Delta Isobars Guang-Zhou Liu1,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Neutron Star Matter Including Delta Isobars Guang-Zhou Liu1,2 , Wei Liu1 and En-Guang Zhao2 1 a new phase structure of neutron star matter including nucleons and delta isobars is presented. Particle fractions populated and pion condensations in neutron star matter are investgated in this model

Xu, Ren-Xin

383

A bottom-up analysis of including aviation within theEU's Emissions Trading Scheme  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A bottom-up analysis of including aviation within theEU's Emissions Trading Scheme Alice Bows-up analysis of including aviation within the EU's Emissions Trading Scheme Alice Bows & Kevin Anderson Tyndall's emissions trading scheme. Results indicate that unless the scheme adopts both an early baseline year

Watson, Andrew

384

What are the symptoms of flu? Symptoms include sudden onset of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

What are the symptoms of flu? · Symptoms include sudden onset of: o fever/chills o cough o muscle lasting 5 or more days (measured with a thermometer; 37.0 Celsius is normal) · Coughing up blood that improve but then return with fever and worse cough Those in high risk groups including pregnant women

Ellis, Randy

385

Hybrid approach for including electronic and nuclear quantum effects in molecular dynamics simulations of hydrogen transfer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hybrid approach for including electronic and nuclear quantum effects in molecular dynamics January 2001 A hybrid approach for simulating proton and hydride transfer reactions in enzymes coefficient and to investigate the real-time dynamics of reactive trajectories. This hybrid approach includes

Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

386

Life Cycle environmental Assessment (LCA) of sanitation systems including sewerage: Case of vertical  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Waste Water Treatment Plant (Renou, 2006) and wastewater sanitation systems (Doka, 2007). ApplicationLife Cycle environmental Assessment (LCA) of sanitation systems including sewerage: Case The article presents the application of Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) to a complete sanitation system including

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

387

Multi-scale thermalhydraulic analyses performed in Nuresim and Nurisp projects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The NURESIM and NURISP successive projects of the 6. and 7. European Framework Programs joined the efforts of 21 partners for developing and validating a reference multi-physics and multi-scale platform for reactor simulation. The platform includes system codes, component codes, and also CFD or CMFD simulation tools. Fine scale CFD simulations are useful for a better understanding of physical processes, for the prediction of small scale geometrical effects and for solving problems that require a fine space and/or time resolution. Many important safety issues usually treated at the system scale may now benefit from investigations at a CFD scale. The Pressurized Thermal Shock is investigated using several simulation scales including Direct Numerical Simulation, Large Eddy Simulation, Very Large Eddy Simulation and RANS approaches. At the end a coupling of system code and CFD is applied. Condensation Induced Water-Hammer was also investigated at both CFD and 1-D scale. Boiling flow in a reactor core up to Departure from Nucleate Boiling or Dry-Out is investigated at scales much smaller than the classical subchannel analysis codes. DNS was used to investigate very local processes whereas CFD in both RANS and LES was used to simulate bubbly flow and Euler-Lagrange simulations were used for annular mist flow investigations. Loss of Coolant Accidents are usually treated by system codes. Some related issues are now revisited at the CFD scale. In each case the progress of the analysis is summarized and the benefit of the multi-scale approach is shown. (authors)

Bestion, D. [CEA-Grenoble, DEN-DANS-DM2S, Grenoble, (France); Lucas, D. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden, (Germany); Anglart, H. [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, (Sweden); Niceno, B. [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villingen, (Switzerland); Vyskocil, L. [Nuclear Research Institute Rez plc, Rez, (Czech Republic)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Systems and strippable coatings for decontaminating structures that include porous material  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods of removing contaminant matter from porous materials include applying a polymer material to a contaminated surface, irradiating the contaminated surface to cause redistribution of contaminant matter, and removing at least a portion of the polymer material from the surface. Systems for decontaminating a contaminated structure comprising porous material include a radiation device configured to emit electromagnetic radiation toward a surface of a structure, and at least one spray device configured to apply a capture material onto the surface of the structure. Polymer materials that can be used in such methods and systems include polyphosphazine-based polymer materials having polyphosphazine backbone segments and side chain groups that include selected functional groups. The selected functional groups may include iminos, oximes, carboxylates, sulfonates, .beta.-diketones, phosphine sulfides, phosphates, phosphites, phosphonates, phosphinates, phosphine oxides, monothio phosphinic acids, and dithio phosphinic acids.

Fox, Robert V. (Idaho Falls, ID); Avci, Recep (Bozeman, MT); Groenewold, Gary S. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2011-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

389

Systems including catalysts in porous zeolite materials within a reactor for use in synthesizing hydrocarbons  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Catalytic structures include a catalytic material disposed within a zeolite material. The catalytic material may be capable of catalyzing a formation of methanol from carbon monoxide and/or carbon dioxide, and the zeolite material may be capable of catalyzing a formation of hydrocarbon molecules from methanol. The catalytic material may include copper and zinc oxide. The zeolite material may include a first plurality of pores substantially defined by a crystal structure of the zeolite material and a second plurality of pores dispersed throughout the zeolite material. Systems for synthesizing hydrocarbon molecules also include catalytic structures. Methods for synthesizing hydrocarbon molecules include contacting hydrogen and at least one of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide with such catalytic structures. Catalytic structures are fabricated by forming a zeolite material at least partially around a template structure, removing the template structure, and introducing a catalytic material into the zeolite material.

Rolllins, Harry W. (Idaho Falls, ID); Petkovic, Lucia M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Ginosar, Daniel M. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2012-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

390

Methods of using structures including catalytic materials disposed within porous zeolite materials to synthesize hydrocarbons  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Catalytic structures include a catalytic material disposed within a zeolite material. The catalytic material may be capable of catalyzing a formation of methanol from carbon monoxide and/or carbon dioxide, and the zeolite material may be capable of catalyzing a formation of hydrocarbon molecules from methanol. The catalytic material may include copper and zinc oxide. The zeolite material may include a first plurality of pores substantially defined by a crystal structure of the zeolite material and a second plurality of pores dispersed throughout the zeolite material. Systems for synthesizing hydrocarbon molecules also include catalytic structures. Methods for synthesizing hydrocarbon molecules include contacting hydrogen and at least one of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide with such catalytic structures. Catalytic structures are fabricated by forming a zeolite material at least partially around a template structure, removing the template structure, and introducing a catalytic material into the zeolite material.

Rollins, Harry W. (Idaho Falls, ID); Petkovic, Lucia M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Ginosar, Daniel M. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Role of entropy in the thermodynamic evolution of the time scale of molecular dynamics near the glass transition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this Letter, we investigate how changes in the system entropy influence the characteristic time scale of the system molecular dynamics near the glass transition. Independently of any model of thermodynamic evolution of the time scale, against some previous suppositions, we show that the system entropy $S$ is not sufficient to govern the time scale defined by structural relaxation time $\\tau $. In the density scaling regime, we argue that the decoupling between $\\tau $ and $S$ is a consequence of different values of the scaling exponents $\\gamma $ and $\\gamma_S $ in the density scaling laws, $\\tau = f(\\rho ^\\gamma /T)$ and $S = h(\\rho ^{\\gamma_S}/T)$, where $\\rho $ and $T$ denote density and temperature, respectively. It implies that the proper relation between $\\tau $ and $S$ requires supplementing with a density factor, $u(\\rho)$, i.e.,$\\tau = g(u(\\rho)w(S))$. This meaningful finding additionally demonstrates that the density scaling idea can be successfully used to separate physically relevant contributions to the time scale of molecular dynamics near the glass transition. As an example, we revise the Avramov entropic model of the dependence $\\tau (T,\\rho)$, giving evidence that its entropic basis has to be extended by the density dependence of the maximal energy barrier for structural relaxation. We also discuss the excess entropy $S_{ex}$, the density scaling of which is found to mimic the density scaling of the total system entropy $S$.

K. Grzybowska; A. Grzybowski; S. Pawlus; J. Pionteck; M. Paluch

2014-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

392

Dynamic method to measure calcium carbonate scaling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method to measure scaling rate and the effect of scale control agents are discussed. It is based on calcium carbonate growth under controlled conditions in a capillary stainless steel column. The efficacy of blended compositions can be predicted when the response of individual components is known.

Zidovec, D. [Ashland Chemical, Boonton, NJ (United States)

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Scale invariance, unimodular gravity and dark energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We demonstrate that the combination of the ideas of unimodular gravity, scale invariance, and the existence of an exactly massless dilaton leads to the evolution of the universe supported by present observations: inflation in the past, followed by the radiation and matter dominated stages and accelerated expansion at present. All mass scales in this type of theories come from one and the same source.

Mikhail Shaposhnikov; Daniel Zenhausern

2008-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

394

Fermilab Energy Scaling Workshop April 27, 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fermilab Energy Scaling Workshop April 27, 2009 Rick Field ­ Florida/CDF/CMS Page 1 11stst Workshop-bias" collisions and the "underlying event" in Run 1 at CDF. Rick's View of Hadron Collisions Fermilab 2009 Studying the "associated" charged particle densities in "min-bias" collisions. #12;Fermilab Energy Scaling

Field, Richard

395

Microfluidic Large-Scale Integration: The Evolution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Microfluidic Large-Scale Integration: The Evolution of Design Rules for Biological Automation, polydimethylsiloxane Abstract Microfluidic large-scale integration (mLSI) refers to the develop- ment of microfluidic, are discussed. Several microfluidic components used as building blocks to create effective, complex, and highly

Quake, Stephen R.

396

February 2002 Grid Scale Oscillations in MICOM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are the implications of the grid scale oscillation on ­ Surface Fluxes that drive THC ­ Heat transport ­ MeridionalFebruary 2002 Grid Scale Oscillations in MICOM Balasubramanya T. Nadiga Los Alamos National Model · 3o displaced pole grid. 16 layers · Kraus-Turner Bulk Mixed Layer · Explicit diapycnal

Nadiga, Balasubramanya T. "Balu"

397

USING ECOLOGICALLY SCALED LANDSCAPE INDICES TO ASSESS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

81 6 USING ECOLOGICALLY SCALED LANDSCAPE INDICES TO ASSESS BIODIVERSITY CONSEQUENCES OF LAND-USE DECISIONS Robert K. Swihart and Jana Verboom CHAPTER OVERVIEW If maintenance of biological diversity the utility of ecologically scaled landscape indices (ESLIs) as measures of relative suitability of proposed

Swihart, Robert K. "Rob"

398

4, 40694124, 2007 Global-scale  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

into evapotranspiration and total runoff. We estimate that global groundwater recharge was 12 666 km3 /yr for the climateHESSD 4, 4069­4124, 2007 Global-scale modeling of groundwater recharge P. D¨oll and K. Fiedler System Sciences Global-scale modeling of groundwater recharge P. D¨oll and K. Fiedler Institute

Boyer, Edmond

399

Modeling and application of soil moisture at varying spatial scales with parameter scaling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The dissertation focuses on characterization of subpixel variability within a satellite-based remotely sensed coarse-scale soil moisture footprint. The underlying heterogeneity of coarse-scale soil moisture footprint is masked by the area...

Das, Narendra Narayan

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

400

Large scale DNA microsequencing device  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A microminiature sequencing apparatus and method provide means for simultaneously obtaining sequences of plural polynucleotide strands. The apparatus comprises a microchip into which plural channels have been etched using standard lithographic procedures and chemical wet etching. The channels include a reaction well and a separating section. Enclosing the channels is accomplished by bonding a transparent cover plate over the apparatus. A first oligonucleotide strand is chemically affixed to the apparatus through an alkyl chain. Subsequent nucleotides are selected by complementary base pair bonding. A target nucleotide strand is used to produce a family of labelled sequencing strands in each channel which are separated in the separating section. During or following separation the sequences are determined using appropriate detection means. 11 figs.

Foote, R.S.

1999-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes scale factor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Large scale DNA microsequencing device  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A microminiature sequencing apparatus and method provide means for simultaneously obtaining sequences of plural polynucleotide strands. The apparatus comprises a microchip into which plural channels have been etched using standard lithographic procedures and chemical wet etching. The channels include a reaction well and a separating section. Enclosing the channels is accomplished by bonding a transparent cover plate over the apparatus. A first oligonucleotide strand is chemically affixed to the apparatus through an alkyl chain. Subsequent nucleotides are selected by complementary base pair bonding. A target nucleotide strand is used to produce a family of labelled sequencing strands in each channel which are separated in the separating section. During or following separation the sequences are determined using appropriate detection means.

Foote, Robert S. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Large scale DNA microsequencing device  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A microminiature sequencing apparatus and method provide means for simultaneously obtaining sequences of plural polynucleotide strands. The apparatus comprises a microchip into which plural channels have been etched using standard lithographic procedures and chemical wet etching. The channels include a reaction well and a separating section. Enclosing the channels is accomplished by bonding a transparent cover plate over the apparatus. A first oligonucleotide strand is chemically affixed to the apparatus through an alkyl chain. Subsequent nucleotides are selected by complementary base pair bonding. A target nucleotide strand is used to produce a family of labelled sequencing strands in each channel which are separated in the separating section. During or following separation the sequences are determined using appropriate detection means.

Foote, Robert S. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Large scale DNA microsequencing device  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A microminiature sequencing apparatus and method provide a means for simultaneously obtaining sequences of plural polynucleotide strands. The apparatus cosists of a microchip into which plural channels have been etched using standard lithographic procedures and chemical wet etching. The channels include a reaction well and a separating section. Enclosing the channels is accomplished by bonding a transparent cover plate over the apparatus. A first oligonucleotide strand is chemically affixed to the apparatus through an alkyl chain. Subsequent nucleotides are selected by complementary base pair bonding. A target nucleotide strand is used to produce a family of labelled sequencing strands in each channel which are separated in the separating section. During or following separation the sequences are determined using appropriate detection means. 17 figs.

Foote, R.S.

1997-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

404

Bare Higgs mass at Planck scale  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We compute one- and two-loop quadratic divergent contributions to the bare Higgs mass in terms of the bare couplings in the Standard Model. We approximate the bare couplings, defined at the ultraviolet cutoff scale, by the MS-bar ones at the same scale, which are evaluated by the two-loop renormalization group equations for the Higgs mass around 126GeV in the Standard Model. We obtain the cutoff scale dependence of the bare Higgs mass, and examine where it becomes zero. We find that when we take the current central value for the top quark pole mass, 173GeV, the bare Higgs mass vanishes if the cutoff is about 10^{23}GeV. With a 1.3 sigma smaller mass, 170GeV, the scale can be of the order of the Planck scale.

Yuta Hamada; Hikaru Kawai; Kin-ya Oda

2015-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

405

EFRT M12 Issue Resolution: Comparison of PEP and Bench-Scale Oxidative Leaching Results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project-Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) project to perform research and development activities to resolve technical issues identified for the Pretreatment Facility (PTF). The Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) was designed and constructed and is to be operated as part of a plan to respond to issue M12, Undemonstrated Leaching Processes. The PEP is a 1/4.5-scale test platform designed to simulate the WTP pretreatment caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, ultrafiltration solids concentration, and slurry washing processes. The PEP replicates the WTP leaching processes using prototypic equipment and control strategies. The PEP also includes non-prototypic ancillary equipment to support the core processing. Two operating scenarios are currently being evaluated for the ultrafiltration process (UFP) and leaching operations. The first scenario has caustic leaching performed in the UFP-2 ultrafiltration feed vessels (i.e., vessel UFP-VSL-T02A in the PEP; and vessels UFP-VSL-00002A and B in the WTP PTF). The second scenario has caustic leaching conducted in the UFP-1 ultrafiltration feed preparation vessels (i.e., vessels UFP-VSL-T01A and B in the PEP; vessels UFP-VSL-00001A and B in the WTP PTF). In both scenarios, 19-M sodium hydroxide solution (NaOH, caustic) is added to the waste slurry in the vessels to dissolve solid aluminum compounds (e.g., gibbsite, boehmite). Caustic addition is followed by a heating step that uses direct steam injection to accelerate the leaching process. Following the caustic leach, the vessel contents are cooled using vessel cooling jackets and/or external heat exchangers. The main difference between the two scenarios is that for leaching in UFP1, the 19-M NaOH is added to un-concentrated waste slurry (3 to 8 wt% solids), while for leaching in UFP2, the slurry is concentrated to nominally 20 wt% solids using cross-flow ultrafiltration before the addition of caustic. For wastes that have significantly high chromium content, the caustic leaching and slurry dewatering is followed by adding sodium permanganate to UFP-VSL-T02A, and the slurry is subjected to oxidative leaching at nominally ambient temperature. The purpose of the oxidative leaching is to selectively oxidize the poorly alkaline-soluble Cr(III) believed to be the insoluble form in Hanford tank sludge to the much more alkaline-soluble Cr(VI), e.g., chromate. The work described in this report provides the test results that are related to the efficiency of the oxidative leaching process to support process modeling based on tests performed with a Hanford waste simulant. The tests were completed both at the lab-bench scale and in the PEP. The purpose of this report is to summarize the results from both scales that are related to oxidative leaching chemistry to support a scale factor for the submodels to be used in the G2 model, which predicts WTP operating performance. Owing to schedule constraints, the PEP test data to be included in this report are limited to those from Integrated Tests A (T01 A/B caustic leaching) and B (T02A caustic leaching).

Rapko, Brian M.; Brown, Christopher F.; Eslinger, Paul W.; Fountain, Matthew S.; Hausmann, Tom S.; Huckaby, James L.; Hanson, Brady D.; Kurath, Dean E.; Minette, Michael J.

2009-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

406

A SUB-GRID VOLUME-OF-FLUIDS (VOF) MODEL FOR MIXING IN RESOLVED SCALE AND IN UNRESOLVED SCALE COMPUTATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A sub-grid mix model based on a volume-of-fluids (VOF) representation is described for computational simulations of the transient mixing between reactive fluids, in which the atomically mixed components enter into the reactivity. The multi-fluid model allows each fluid species to have independent values for density, energy, pressure and temperature, as well as independent velocities and volume fractions. Fluid volume fractions are further divided into mix components to represent their 'mixedness' for more accurate prediction of reactivity. Time dependent conversion from unmixed volume fractions (denoted cf) to atomically mixed (af) fluids by diffusive processes is represented in resolved scale simulations with the volume fractions (cf, af mix). In unresolved scale simulations, the transition to atomically mixed materials begins with a conversion from unmixed material to a sub-grid volume fraction (pf). This fraction represents the unresolved small scales in the fluids, heterogeneously mixed by turbulent or multi-phase mixing processes, and this fraction then proceeds in a second step to the atomically mixed fraction by diffusion (cf, pf, af mix). Species velocities are evaluated with a species drift flux, {rho}{sub i}u{sub di} = {rho}{sub i}(u{sub i}-u), used to describe the fluid mixing sources in several closure options. A simple example of mixing fluids during 'interfacial deceleration mixing with a small amount of diffusion illustrates the generation of atomically mixed fluids in two cases, for resolved scale simulations and for unresolved scale simulations. Application to reactive mixing, including Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF), is planned for future work.

VOLD, ERIK L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; SCANNAPIECO, TONY J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2007-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

407

EFRT M-12 Issue Resolution: Comparison of Filter Performance at PEP and CUF Scale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project-Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) project to perform research and development activities to resolve technical issues identified for the Pretreatment Facility (PTF). The Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) was designed and constructed and is to be operated as part of a plan to respond to issue M12, Undemonstrated Leaching Processes. The PEP is a 1/4.5-scale test platform designed to simulate the WTP pretreatment caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, ultrafiltration solids concentration, and slurry washing processes. The PEP replicates the WTP leaching processes using prototypic equipment and control strategies. The PEP also includes non-prototypic ancillary equipment to support the core processing. Two operating scenarios are currently being evaluated for the ultrafiltration process (UFP) and leaching operations. The first scenario has caustic leaching performed in the UFP-2 ultrafiltration feed vessels (i.e., vessel UFP-VSL-T02A in the PEP and vessels UFP-VSL-00002A and B in the WTP PTF). The second scenario has caustic leaching conducted in the UFP-1 ultrafiltration feed-preparation vessels (i.e., vessels UFP-VSL-T01A and B in the PEP; vessels UFP-VSL-00001A and B in the WTP PTF). In both scenarios, 19-M sodium hydroxide solution (NaOH, caustic) is added to the waste slurry in the vessels to leach solid aluminum compounds (e.g., gibbsite, boehmite). Caustic addition is followed by a heating step that uses direct injection of steam to accelerate the leach process. Following the caustic leach, the vessel contents are cooled using vessel cooling jackets and/or external heat exchangers. The main difference between the two scenarios is that for leaching in UFP1, the 19-M NaOH is added to un-concentrated waste slurry (3 to 8 wt% solids), while for leaching in UFP2, the slurry is concentrated to nominally 20 wt% solids using cross-flow ultrafiltration before the addition of caustic. The work described in this report presents filter flux results obtained at two different scales based on tests performed with a Hanford tank waste simulant. The tests were made at the lab-bench scale on a cold (i.e., designated for non-radioactive simulant test materials) Cells Unit Filter [CUF]) and in the Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP), which is a 1/4.5-scale mock-up of key PTF process equipment. One set of tests was conducted with the simulant feed (low solids), and one test was conducted at a relatively high solids concentration. The results of these tests are compared to support a scale factor for use in the WTP.

Daniel, Richard C.; Billing, Justin M.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Brown, Christopher F.; Eslinger, Paul W.; Hanson, Brady D.; Huckaby, James L.; Karri, Naveen K.; Kimura, Marcia L.; Kurath, Dean E.; Minette, Michael J.

2009-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

408

Impact of Friction and Scale-Dependent Initial Stress on Radiated Energy-Moment Scaling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Shaw Lamont­Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University, New York, USA The radiated energy coming271 Impact of Friction and Scale-Dependent Initial Stress on Radiated Energy-Moment Scaling Bruce E of elucidat- ing their radiated energy-moment scaling. We find, contrary to expectations, that apparent stress

Shaw, Bruce E.

409

Electrical machines and assemblies including a yokeless stator with modular lamination stacks  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electrical machine includes a rotor with an inner rotor portion and an outer rotor portion, and a double-sided yokeless stator. The yokeless stator includes modular lamination stacks and is configured for radial magnetic flux flow. The double-sided yokeless stator is concentrically disposed between the inner rotor portion and the outer rotor portion of the electrical machine. Examples of particularly useful embodiments for the electrical machine include wind turbine generators, ship propulsion motors, switch reluctance machines and double-sided synchronous machines.

Qu, Ronghai; Jansen, Patrick Lee; Bagepalli, Bharat Sampathkumar; Carl Jr., Ralph James; Gadre, Aniruddha Dattatraya; Lopez, Fulton Jose

2010-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

410

Geoelectrical Measurement of Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Parameters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mass transfer affects contaminant transport and is thought to control the efficiency of aquifer remediation at a number of sites within the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. An improved understanding of mass transfer is critical to meeting the enormous scientific and engineering challenges currently facing DOE. Informed design of site remedies and long-term stewardship of radionuclide-contaminated sites will require new cost-effective laboratory and field techniques to measure the parameters controlling mass transfer spatially and across a range of scales. In this project, we sought to capitalize on the geophysical signatures of mass transfer. Previous numerical modeling and pilot-scale field experiments suggested that mass transfer produces a geoelectrical signaturea hysteretic relation between sampled (mobile-domain) fluid conductivity and bulk (mobile + immobile) conductivityover a range of scales relevant to aquifer remediation. In this work, we investigated the geoelectrical signature of mass transfer during tracer transport in a series of controlled experiments to determine the operation of controlling parameters, and also investigated the use of complex-resistivity (CR) as a means of quantifying mass transfer parameters in situ without tracer experiments. In an add-on component to our grant, we additionally considered nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to help parse mobile from immobile porosities. Including the NMR component, our revised study objectives were to: 1. Develop and demonstrate geophysical approaches to measure mass-transfer parameters spatially and over a range of scales, including the combination of electrical resistivity monitoring, tracer tests, complex resistivity, nuclear magnetic resonance, and materials characterization; and 2. Provide mass-transfer estimates for improved understanding of contaminant fate and transport at DOE sites, such as uranium transport at the Hanford 300 Area. To achieve our objectives, we implemented a 3-part research plan involving (1) development of computer codes and techniques to estimate mass-transfer parameters from time-lapse electrical data; (2) bench-scale experiments on synthetic materials and materials from cores from the Hanford 300 Area; and (3) field demonstration experiments at the DOEs Hanford 300 Area. In a synergistic add-on to our workplan, we analyzed data from field experiments performed at the DOE Naturita Site under a separate DOE SBR grant, on which PI Day-Lewis served as co-PI. Techniques developed for application to Hanford datasets also were applied to data from Naturita. 1. Introduction The Department of Energy (DOE) faces enormous scientific and engineering challenges associated with the remediation of legacy contamination at former nuclear weapons production facilities. Selection, design and optimization of appropriate site remedies (e.g., pump-and-treat, biostimulation, or monitored natural attenuation) requires reliable predictive models of radionuclide fate and transport; however, our current modeling capabilities are limited by an incomplete understanding of multi-scale mass transferits rates, scales, and the heterogeneity of controlling parameters. At many DOE sites, long tailing behavior, concentration rebound, and slower-than-expected cleanup are observed; these observations are all consistent with multi-scale mass transfer [Haggerty and Gorelick, 1995; Haggerty et al., 2000; 2004], which renders pump-and-treat remediation and biotransformation inefficient and slow [Haggerty and Gorelick, 1994; Harvey et al., 1994; Wilson, 1997]. Despite the importance of mass transfer, there are significant uncertainties associated with controlling parameters, and the prevalence of mass transfer remains a point of debate [e.g., Hill et al., 2006; Molz et al., 2006] for lack of experimental methods to verify and measure it in situ or independently of tracer breakthrough. There is a critical need for new field-experimental techniques to measure mass transfer in-situ and estimate multi-scale and spatially variable mass-transfer parame

Day-Lewis, Frederick; Singha, Kamini; Haggerty, Roy; Johnson, Tim; Binley, Andrew; Lane, John

2014-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

411

The Future of the Local Large Scale Structure: the roles of Dark Matter and Dark Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the distinct effects of Dark Matter and Dark Energy on the future evolution of nearby large scale structures using constrained N-body simulations. We contrast a model of Cold Dark Matter and a Cosmological Constant (LCDM) with an Open CDM (OCDM) model with the same matter density Omega_m =0.3 and the same Hubble constant h=0.7. Already by the time the scale factor increased by a factor of 6 (29 Gyr from now in LCDM; 78 Gyr from now in OCDM) the comoving position of the Local Group is frozen. Well before that epoch the two most massive members of the Local Group, the Milky Way and Andromeda, will merge. However, as the expansion rates of the scale factor in the two models are different, the Local Group will be receding in physical coordinates from Virgo exponentially in a LCDM model and at a roughly constant velocity in an OCDM model. More generally, in comoving coordinates the future large scale structure will look like a sharpened image of the present structure: the skeleton of the cosmic web will remain the same, but clusters will be more `isolated' and the filaments will become thinner. This implies that the long-term fate of large scale structure as seen in comoving coordinates is determined primarily by the matter density. We conclude that although the LCDM model is accelerating at present due to its Dark Energy component while the OCDM model is non accelerating, their large scale structure in the future will look very similar in comoving coordinates.

Yehuda Hoffman; Ofer Lahav; Gustavo Yepes; Yaniv Dover

2007-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

412

Laboratory studies of 2H evaporator scale dissolution in dilute nitric acid  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The rate of 2H evaporator scale solids dissolution in dilute nitric acid has been experimentally evaluated under laboratory conditions in the SRNL shielded cells. The 2H scale sample used for the dissolution study came from the bottom of the evaporator cone section and the wall section of the evaporator cone. The accumulation rate of aluminum and silicon, assumed to be the two principal elemental constituents of the 2H evaporator scale aluminosilicate mineral, were monitored in solution. Aluminum and silicon concentration changes, with heating time at a constant oven temperature of 90 deg C, were used to ascertain the extent of dissolution of the 2H evaporator scale mineral. The 2H evaporator scale solids, assumed to be composed of mostly aluminosilicate mineral, readily dissolves in 1.5 and 1.25 M dilute nitric acid solutions yielding principal elemental components of aluminum and silicon in solution. The 2H scale dissolution rate constant, based on aluminum accumulation in 1.5 and 1.25 M dilute nitric acid solution are, respectively, 9.21E-04 6.39E-04 min{sup -1} and 1.07E-03 7.51E-05 min{sup -1}. Silicon accumulation rate in solution does track the aluminum accumulation profile during the first few minutes of scale dissolution. It however diverges towards the end of the scale dissolution. This divergence therefore means the aluminum-to-silicon ratio in the first phase of the scale dissolution (non-steady state conditions) is different from the ratio towards the end of the scale dissolution. Possible causes of this change in silicon accumulation in solution as the scale dissolution progresses may include silicon precipitation from solution or the 2H evaporator scale is a heterogeneous mixture of aluminosilicate minerals with several impurities. The average half-life for the decomposition of the 2H evaporator scale mineral in 1.5 M nitric acid is 12.5 hours, while the half-life for the decomposition of the 2H evaporator scale in 1.25 M nitric acid is 10.8 hours. Based on averaging the two half-lives from the 2H scale acid dissolution in 1.25 and 1.5 M nitric acid solutions, a reasonable half-live for the dissolution of 2H scales in dilute nitric acid is 11.7 1.3 hours. The plant operational time for chemically cleaning (soaking) the 2H evaporator with dilute nitric acid is 32 hours. It therefore may require about 3 half-lives or less to completely dissolve most of the scales in the Evaporator pot which come into contact with the dilute nitric acid solution. On a mass basis, the Al-to-Si ratio for the scale dissolution in 1.5 M nitric acid averaged 1.30 0.20 and averaged 1.18 0.10 for the 2H scale dissolution in 1.25 M nitric acid. These aluminum-to-silicon ratios are in fairly good agreement with ratios from previous studies. Therefore, there is still more aluminum in the 2H evaporator scales than silicon which implies that there are no significant changes in scale properties which will exclude nitric acid as a viable protic solvent for aluminosilicate scale buildup dissolution from the 2H evaporator. Overall, the monitoring of the scale decomposition reaction in 1.25 and 1.5 M nitric acid may be better ascertained through the determination of aluminum concentration in solution than monitoring silicon in solution. Silicon solution chemistry may lead to partial precipitating of silicon with time as the scale and acid solution is heated.

Oji, L.

2014-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

413

Transcription factor-based biosensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides for a system comprising a BmoR transcription factor, a .sigma..sup.54-RNA polymerase, and a pBMO promoter operatively linked to a reporter gene, wherein the pBMO promoter is capable of expression of the reporter gene with an activated form of the BmoR and the .sigma..sup.54-RNA polymerase.

2013-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

414

Global fits of the cMSSM and NUHM including the LHC Higgs discovery and new XENON100 constraints  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present global fits of the constrained Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (cMSSM) and the Non-Universal Higgs Model (NUHM), including the most recent CMS constraint on the Higgs boson mass, 5.8 fb{sup ?1} integrated luminosity null Supersymmetry searches by ATLAS, the new LHCb measurement of BR( B-bar {sub s} ? ?{sup +}?{sup ?}) and the 7-year WMAP dark matter relic abundance determination. We include the latest dark matter constraints from the XENON100 experiment, marginalising over astrophysical and particle physics uncertainties. We present Bayesian posterior and profile likelihood maps of the highest resolution available today, obtained from up to 350M points. We find that the new constraint on the Higgs boson mass has a dramatic impact, ruling out large regions of previously favoured cMSSM and NUHM parameter space. In the cMSSM, light sparticles and predominantly gaugino-like dark matter with a mass of a few hundred GeV are favoured. The NUHM exhibits a strong preference for heavier sparticle masses and a Higgsino-like neutralino with a mass of 1 TeV. The future ton-scale XENON1T direct detection experiment will probe large portions of the currently favoured cMSSM and NUHM parameter space. The LHC operating at 14 TeV collision energy will explore the favoured regions in the cMSSM, while most of the regions favoured in the NUHM will remain inaccessible. Our best-fit points achieve a satisfactory quality-of-fit, with p-values ranging from 0.21 to 0.35, so that none of the two models studied can be presently excluded at any meaningful significance level.

Strege, C.; Trotta, R. [Astrophysics Group, and Imperial Centre for Inference and Cosmology, Imperial College London, Blackett Laboratory, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Bertone, G. [GRAPPA Institute, University of Amsterdam, Science Park 904, 1090 GL Amsterdam (Netherlands); Feroz, F. [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, J.J. Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Fornasa, M. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, University Park NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Austri, R. Ruiz de, E-mail: charlotte.strege09@imperial.ac.uk, E-mail: gf.bertone@gmail.com, E-mail: f.feroz@mrao.cam.ac.uk, E-mail: fornasam@gmail.com, E-mail: rruiz@ific.uv.es, E-mail: r.trotta@imperial.ac.uk [Instituto de Fsica Corpuscular, IFIC-UV/CSIC, Valencia (Spain)

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

ADVANCED INTEGRATION OF MULTI-SCALE MECHANICS AND WELDING PROCESS SIMULATION IN WELD INTEGRITY ASSESSMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The potential to save trillions of BTUs in energy usage and billions of dollars in cost on an annual basis based on use of higher strength steel in major oil and gas transmission pipeline construction is a compelling opportunity recognized by both the US Department of Energy (DOE). The use of high-strength steels (X100) is expected to result in energy savings across the spectrum, from manufacturing the pipe to transportation and fabrication, including welding of line pipe. Elementary examples of energy savings include more the 25 trillion BTUs saved annually based on lower energy costs to produce the thinner-walled high-strength steel pipe, with the potential for the US part of the Alaskan pipeline alone saving more than 7 trillion BTU in production and much more in transportation and assembling. Annual production, maintenance and installation of just US domestic transmission pipeline is likely to save 5 to 10 times this amount based on current planned and anticipated expansions of oil and gas lines in North America. Among the most important conclusions from these studies were: While computational weld models to predict residual stress and distortions are well-established and accurate, related microstructure models need improvement. Fracture Initiation Transition Temperature (FITT) Master Curve properly predicts surface-cracked pipe brittle-to-ductile initiation temperature. It has value in developing Codes and Standards to better correlate full-scale behavior from either CTOD or Charpy test results with the proper temperature shifts from the FITT master curve method. For stress-based flaw evaluation criteria, the new circumferentially cracked pipe limit-load solution in the 2007 API 1104 Appendix A approach is overly conservative by a factor of 4/?, which has additional implications. . For strain-based design of girth weld defects, the hoop stress effect is the most significant parameter impacting CTOD-driving force and can increase the crack-driving force by a factor of 2 depending on strain-hardening, pressure level as a % of SMYS, and flaw size. From years of experience in circumferential fracture analyses and experimentation, there has not been sufficient integration of work performed for other industries into analogous problems facing the oil and gas pipeline markets. Some very basic concepts and problems solved previously in these fields could have circumvented inconsistencies seen in the stress-based and strain-based analysis efforts. For example, in nuclear utility piping work, more detailed elastic-plastic fracture analyses were always validated in their ability to predict loads and displacements (stresses and strains). The eventual implementation of these methodologies will result in acceleration of the industry adoption of higher-strength line-pipe steels.

Wilkowski, Gery M.; Rudland, David L.; Shim, Do-Jun; Brust, Frederick W.; Babu, Sundarsanam

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

416

Experiments to investigate direct containment heating phenomena with scaled models of the Surry Nuclear Power Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Containment Technology Test Facility (CTTF) and the Surtsey Test Facility at Sandia National Laboratories are used to perform scaled experiments that simulate High Pressure Melt Ejection accidents in a nuclear power plant (NPP). These experiments are designed to investigate the effects of direct containment heating (DCH) phenomena on the containment load. High-temperature, chemically reactive melt (thermite) is ejected by high-pressure steam into a scale model of a reactor cavity. Debris is entrained by the steam blowdown into a containment model where specific phenomena, such as the effect of subcompartment structures, prototypic air/steam/hydrogen atmospheres, and hydrogen generation and combustion, can be studied. Four Integral Effects Tests (IETs) have been performed with scale models of the Surry NPP to investigate DCH phenomena. The 1/61{sup th} scale Integral Effects Tests (IET-9, IET-10, and IET-11) were conducted in CTRF, which is a 1/6{sup th} scale model of the Surry reactor containment building (RCB). The 1/10{sup th} scale IET test (IET-12) was performed in the Surtsey vessel, which had been configured as a 1/10{sup th} scale Surry RCB. Scale models were constructed in each of the facilities of the Surry structures, including the reactor pressure vessel, reactor support skirt, control rod drive missile shield, biological shield wall, cavity, instrument tunnel, residual heat removal platform and heat exchangers, seal table room and seal table, operating deck, and crane wall. This report describes these experiments and gives the results.

Blanchat, T.K.; Allen, M.D.; Pilch, M.M. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Nichols, R.T. [Ktech Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Normal shock solutions to the viscous shock layer equations including thermal, chemical, thermodynamic, and radiative nonequilibrium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An existing axisymmetric body viscous shock layer code including chemical, thermal, and thermodynamic nonequilibrium and nonequilibrium radiative gasdynamic coupling is adapted to simulate the one-dimensional flow within a shock tube. A suitable...

Mott, David Ray

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Automated solar collector installation design including ability to define heterogeneous design preferences  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Embodiments may include systems and methods to create and edit a representation of a worksite, to create various data objects, to classify such objects as various types of pre -defined "features" with attendant properties and layout constraints. As part of or in addition to classification, an embodiment may include systems and methods to create, associate, and edit intrinsic and extrinsic properties to these objects. A design engine may apply of design rules to the features described above to generate one or more solar collectors installation design alternatives, including generation of on-screen and/or paper representations of the physical layout or arrangement of the one or more design alternatives. Embodiments may also include definition of one or more design apertures, each of which may correspond to boundaries in which solar collector layouts should comply with distinct sets of user-defined design preferences. Distinct apertures may provide heterogeneous regions of collector layout according to the user-defined design preferences.

Wayne, Gary; Frumkin, Alexander; Zaydman, Michael; Lehman, Scott; Brenner, Jules

2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

419

Automated solar collector installation design including ability to define heterogeneous design preferences  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Embodiments may include systems and methods to create and edit a representation of a worksite, to create various data objects, to classify such objects as various types of pre-defined "features" with attendant properties and layout constraints. As part of or in addition to classification, an embodiment may include systems and methods to create, associate, and edit intrinsic and extrinsic properties to these objects. A design engine may apply of design rules to the features described above to generate one or more solar collectors installation design alternatives, including generation of on-screen and/or paper representations of the physical layout or arrangement of the one or more design alternatives. Embodiments may also include definition of one or more design apertures, each of which may correspond to boundaries in which solar collector layouts should comply with distinct sets of user-defined design preferences. Distinct apertures may provide heterogeneous regions of collector layout according to the user-defined design preferences.

Wayne, Gary; Frumkin, Alexander; Zaydman, Michael; Lehman, Scott; Brenner, Jules

2013-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

420

E-Print Network 3.0 - additional cases including Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for: additional cases including Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 SWE 214 (062) Chapter 21: Refining the Use Cases Slide 1 Chapter 21 Summary: requirements. The additional use-case...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes scale factor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Including risk in stated-preference economic valuations: Experiments on choices for marine recreation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction Stated-preference valuation methods use hypothetical scenariosIncluding risk in stated-preference economic valuations: Experiments on choices for marine xxx Keywords: Choice experiments Diving Economic valuation Fishing Hypothetical bias Recreation Risk

Gerber, Leah R.

422

Diffractive laser beam homogenizer including a photo-active material and method of fabricating the same  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method of manufacturing a plurality of diffractive optical elements includes providing a partially transmissive slide, providing a first piece of PTR glass, and directing first UV radiation through the partially transmissive slide to impinge on the first piece of PTR glass. The method also includes exposing predetermined portions of the first piece of PTR glass to the first UV radiation and thermally treating the exposed first piece of PTR glass. The method further includes providing a second piece of PTR glass and directing second UV radiation through the thermally treated first piece of PTR glass to impinge on the second piece of PTR glass. The method additionally includes exposing predetermined portions of the second piece of PTR glass to the second UV radiation, thermally treating the exposed second piece of PTR glass, and repeating providing and processing of the second piece of PTR glass using additional pieces of PTR glass.

Bayramian, Andy J; Ebbers, Christopher A; Chen, Diana C

2014-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

423

Legal protection for the red squirrel The red squirrel is included in Schedules 5 and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

circumstances, permit actions that would otherwise be illegal. These include: · The act was the incidental, there is also a licensing system, which can permit activities that would otherwise be offences for certain

424

Electrode assemblies, plasma apparatuses and systems including electrode assemblies, and methods for generating plasma  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Electrode assemblies for plasma reactors include a structure or device for constraining an arc endpoint to a selected area or region on an electrode. In some embodiments, the structure or device may comprise one or more insulating members covering a portion of an electrode. In additional embodiments, the structure or device may provide a magnetic field configured to control a location of an arc endpoint on the electrode. Plasma generating modules, apparatus, and systems include such electrode assemblies. Methods for generating a plasma include covering at least a portion of a surface of an electrode with an electrically insulating member to constrain a location of an arc endpoint on the electrode. Additional methods for generating a plasma include generating a magnetic field to constrain a location of an arc endpoint on an electrode.

Kong, Peter C; Grandy, Jon D; Detering, Brent A; Zuck, Larry D

2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

425

E-Print Network 3.0 - alaska including cultivated Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Flame cultivation can be effective in killing weeds, including those growing in the crop... cultivation varied from 4.11 per acre to 11.42, with an average of 7.14. This...

426

Mineral balances, including in drinking water, estimated for Merced County dairy herds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of daily mineral intake, drinking-water mineral contributionND Total daily intake, including minerals in drinking water.mineral contents in drinking water and daily drinking-water

Castillo, Alejandro R Dr.; Santos, Jose Eduardo P.; Tabone, Tom J.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Planning, Execution, and Analysis of the Meridian UAS Flight Test Program Including System and Parameter Identification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The purpose of this Master Thesis is to present the flight test procedures, planning, and analysis including system identification, parameter identification, and drag calculations of the Meridian UAS. The system identification is performed using...

Tom, Jonathan

2010-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

428

EEHG Performance and Scaling Laws  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This note will calculate the idealized performance of echo-enabled harmonic generation performance (EEHG), explore the parameter settings, and look at constraints determined by incoherent synchrotron radiation (ISR) and intrabeam scattering (IBS). Another important effect, time-of-flight variations related to transverse emittance, is included here but without detailed explanation because it has been described previously. The importance of ISR and IBS is that they lead to random energy shifts that lead to temporal shifts after the various beam manipulations required by the EEHG scheme. These effects give competing constraints on the beamline. For chicane magnets which are too compact for a given R56, the magnetic fields will be sufficiently strong that ISR will blur out the complex phase space structure of the echo scheme to the point where the bunching is strongly suppressed. The effect of IBS is more omnipresent, and requires an overall compact beamline. It is particularly challenging for the second pulse in a two-color attosecond beamline, due to the long delay between the first energy modulation and the modulator for the second pulse.

Penn, Gregory

2013-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

429

On Improving the Intelligibility of Synchronized Over-lap-and-Add (SOLA) at Low TSM Factor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On Improving the Intelligibility of Synchronized Over- lap-and-Add (SOLA) at Low TSM Factor Peter H-7053** ABSTRACT In this paper, we propose an algorithm to modify the Synchronized Overlap-and-Add (SOLA) technique. SOLA is a popular technique for time scale modification of speech and audio signal. It changes the time

Wong, Peter Hon-Wah

430

Optimization of wind turbine energy and power factor with an evolutionary computation algorithm  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optimization of wind turbine energy and power factor with an evolutionary computation algorithm the energy capture from the wind and enhance the quality of the power produced by the wind turbine, and harmonic distortion. As the generation of wind energy on an industrial scale is relatively new, the area

Kusiak, Andrew

431

Method and system for small scale pumping  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates generally to the field of small scale pumping and, more specifically, to a method and system for very small scale pumping media through microtubes. One preferred embodiment of the invention generally comprises: method for small scale pumping, comprising the following steps: providing one or more media; providing one or more microtubes, the one or more tubes having a first end and a second end, wherein said first end of one or more tubes is in contact with the media; and creating surface waves on the tubes, wherein at least a portion of the media is pumped through the tube.

Insepov, Zeke (Darien, IL); Hassanein, Ahmed (Bolingbrook, IL)

2010-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

432

Nuclear Scaling and the EMC Effect  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Results of recent EMC effect measurements and nuclear scaling measurements have both been attributed to local nuclear density effects and not properties of the bulk nuclear system. This lead us to the phenomenological observation that the ratio of the slopes in the 0.3 EMC data scale as the ratio of the x_B > 1 nuclear scaling plateaus. Using this correlation, we developed a phenomenological relation which reproduces the general trends and features of the EMC effect for nuclei from 3He to 56Fe.

D. W. Higinbotham; J. Gomez; E. Piasetzky

2010-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

433

Hub Synchronization in Scale-Free Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Heterogeneity in the degree distribution is known to suppress global synchronization in complex networks of symmetrically coupled oscillators. Scale-free networks display a great deal of heterogeneity, containing a few nodes, termed hubs, that are highly connected, while most nodes receive only a few connections. Here, we show that a group of synchronized nodes may appear in scale-free networks: hubs undergo a transition to synchronization while the other nodes remain unsynchronized. This general phenomenon can occur even in the absence of global synchronization. Our results suggest that scale-free networks may have evolved to complement various levels of synchronization.

Tiago Pereira

2010-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

434

The friction factor of two-dimensional rough-boundary turbulent soap film flows  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We use momentum transfer arguments to predict the friction factor $f$ in two-dimensional turbulent soap-film flows with rough boundaries (an analogue of three-dimensional pipe flow) as a function of Reynolds number Re and roughness $r$, considering separately the inverse energy cascade and the forward enstrophy cascade. At intermediate Re, we predict a Blasius-like friction factor scaling of $f\\propto\\textrm{Re}^{-1/2}$ in flows dominated by the enstrophy cascade, distinct from the energy cascade scaling of $\\textrm{Re}^{-1/4}$. For large Re, $f \\sim r$ in the enstrophy-dominated case. We use conformal map techniques to perform direct numerical simulations that are in satisfactory agreement with theory, and exhibit data collapse scaling of roughness-induced criticality, previously shown to arise in the 3D pipe data of Nikuradse.

Nicholas Guttenberg; Nigel Goldenfeld

2008-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

435

Factors Associated With Newly Graduated Nurses' Intent to Leave Current Position in U.S. Acute Care Hospitals: A Descriptive Research Study Using Secondary Data Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Indicators TM (NDNQI ) RN Survey with Job Satisfaction Scales and NDNQI patient census and staffing data (N = 8343). The data were analyzed using three-level hierarchical linear modeling to identify factors that were significantly correlated with ITLcp...

Meyer, Mary N.

2014-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

436

Electron loss from fast heavy ions: Target-scaling dependence  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The target dependence for projectile electron loss is investigated using experimental data taken from the literature. Impact energies range from a few tens of eV/u to tens of MeV/u. For energies less than several MeV/u, the target dependences are shown to be very similar, independent of projectile species and charge state. Overall, however, with increasing impact energy the cross-section dependence on the target nuclear charge systematically increases. It is shown that none of the existing cross-section target scaling models reproduce these features. A model, based on Born scaling and including both the antiscreening and screening contributions to projectile electron loss, is developed. With the inclusion of relativistic effects, which increase the contribution from both channels at high energies, and ''target saturation'' effects, which reduce the contribution from the screening term for heavy targets and lower impact energies, this model describes quite reasonably all available experimental data. A simple scaling formula that reproduces the measured atomic number and impact velocity dependences is provided. This formula is applicable for projectile electron loss in collisions with either atomic or molecular targets and for impact energies ranging from a few to tens of MeV/u.

DuBois, R. D. [Department of Physics, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, Missouri 65409 (United States); Santos, A. C. F.; Montenegro, E. C. [Instituto de Fisica, UFRJ, Caixa Postal 68528 Rio de Janeiro, BR-21941-972 RJ (Brazil); Sigaud, G. M. [Departamento de Fisica, Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio de Janeiro, Caixa Postal 38071, Rio de Janeiro, BR-22452-970 RJ (Brazil)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

437

Direct Drive Wave Energy Buoy 33rd scale experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Columbia Power Technologies (ColPwr) and Oregon State University (OSU) jointly conducted a series of tests in the Tsunami Wave Basin (TWB) at the O.H. Hinsdale Wave Research Laboratory (HWRL). These tests were run between November 2010 and February 2011. Models at 33rd scale representing Columbia Powers Manta series Wave Energy Converter (WEC) were moored in configurations of one, three and five WEC arrays, with both regular waves and irregular seas generated. The primary research interest of ColPwr is the characterization of WEC response. The WEC response will be investigated with respect to power performance, range of motion and generator torque/speed statistics. The experimental results will be used to validate a numerical model. The primary research interests of OSU include an investigation into the effects of the WEC arrays on the near- and far-field wave propagation. This report focuses on the characterization of the response of a single WEC in isolation. To facilitate understanding of the commercial scale WEC, results will be presented as full scale equivalents.

Rhinefrank, Kenneth E. [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.; Lenee-Bluhm, Pukha [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.; Prudell, Joseph H. [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.; Schacher, Alphonse A.; Hammagren, Erik J.; Zhang, Zhe [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.

2013-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

438

Mountaineer Commerical Scale Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Final Technical documents all work performed during the award period on the Mountaineer Commercial Scale Carbon Capture & Storage project. This report presents the findings and conclusions produced as a consequence of this work. As identified in the Cooperative Agreement DE-FE0002673, AEP's objective of the Mountaineer Commercial Scale Carbon Capture and Storage (MT CCS II) project is to design, build and operate a commercial scale carbon capture and storage (CCS) system capable of treating a nominal 235 MWe slip stream of flue gas from the outlet duct of the Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) system at AEP's Mountaineer Power Plant (Mountaineer Plant), a 1300 MWe coal-fired generating station in New Haven, WV. The CCS system is designed to capture 90% of the CO{sub 2} from the incoming flue gas using the Alstom Chilled Ammonia Process (CAP) and compress, transport, inject and store 1.5 million tonnes per year of the captured CO{sub 2} in deep saline reservoirs. Specific Project Objectives include: (1) Achieve a minimum of 90% carbon capture efficiency during steady-state operations; (2) Demonstrate progress toward capture and storage at less than a 35% increase in cost of electricity (COE); (3) Store CO{sub 2} at a rate of 1.5 million tonnes per year in deep saline reservoirs; and (4) Demonstrate commercial technology readiness of the integrated CO{sub 2} capture and storage system.

Deanna Gilliland; Matthew Usher

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

439

Gradient flow and scale setting on MILC HISQ ensembles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report on a scale determination with gradient-flow techniques on the $N_f=2+1+1$ HISQ ensembles generated by the MILC collaboration. The ensembles include four lattice spacings, ranging from approximately 0.15 to 0.06 fm, and both physical and unphysical values of the quark masses. The scales $\\sqrt{t_0}/a$ and $w_0/a$ and their tree-level improvements, $\\sqrt{t_{0,{\\rm imp}}}$ and $w_{0,{\\rm imp}}$, are computed on each ensemble using Symanzik flow and the cloverleaf definition of the energy density $E$. Using a combination of continuum chiral perturbation theory and a Taylor-series ansatz for the lattice-spacing and strong-coupling dependence, the results are simultaneously extrapolated to the continuum and interpolated to physical quark masses. We determine the scales $\\sqrt{t_0} = 0.1416({}_{-5}^{+8})$ fm and $w_0 = 0.1717({}_{-11}^{+12})$ fm, where the errors are sums, in quadrature, of statistical and all systematic errors. The precision of $w_0$ and $\\sqrt{t_0}$ is comparable to or more precise than...

Bazavov, A; Brown, N; DeTar, C; Foley, J; Gottlieb, Steven; Heller, U M; Komijani, J; Laiho, J; Levkova, L; Sugar, R L; Toussaint, D; Van de Water, R S

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Large Scale Structure in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The primary observational goals of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey are to obtain CCD imaging of 10,000 deg^2 of the north Galactic cap in five passbands, with a limiting magnitude in the r-band of 22.5, to obtain spectroscopic redshifts of 10^6 galaxies and 10^5 quasars, and to obtain similar data for three ~ 200 deg^2 stripes in the south Galactic cap, with repeated imaging to allow co-addition and variability studies in at least one of these stripes. The resulting photometric and spectroscopic galaxy datasets allow one to map the large scale structure traced by optical galaxies over a wide range of scales to unprecedented precision. Results relevant to the large scale structure of our Universe include: a flat model with a cosmological constant Omega_Lambda=0.7 provides a good description of the data; the galaxy-galaxy correlation function shows departures from a power law which are statistically significant; and galaxy clustering is a strong function of galaxy type.

M. Bernardi

2003-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes scale factor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Computing prime factors with a Josephson phase qubit quantum processor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A quantum processor (QuP) can be used to exploit quantum mechanics to find the prime factors of composite numbers[1]. Compiled versions of Shor's algorithm have been demonstrated on ensemble quantum systems[2] and photonic systems[3-5], however this has yet to be shown using solid state quantum bits (qubits). Two advantages of superconducting qubit architectures are the use of conventional microfabrication techniques, which allow straightforward scaling to large numbers of qubits, and a toolkit of circuit elements that can be used to engineer a variety of qubit types and interactions[6, 7]. Using a number of recent qubit control and hardware advances [7-13], here we demonstrate a nine-quantum-element solid-state QuP and show three experiments to highlight its capabilities. We begin by characterizing the device with spectroscopy. Next, we produces coherent interactions between five qubits and verify bi- and tripartite entanglement via quantum state tomography (QST) [8, 12, 14, 15]. In the final experiment, we run a three-qubit compiled version of Shor's algorithm to factor the number 15, and successfully find the prime factors 48% of the time. Improvements in the superconducting qubit coherence times and more complex circuits should provide the resources necessary to factor larger composite numbers and run more intricate quantum algorithms.

Erik Lucero; Rami Barends; Yu Chen; Julian Kelly; Matteo Mariantoni; Anthony Megrant; Peter O'Malley; Daniel Sank; Amit Vainsencher; James Wenner; Ted White; Yi Yin; Andrew N. Cleland; John M. Martinis

2012-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

442

Origin of Scale-Dependent Dispersivity and Its Implications For Miscible Gas Flooding  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dispersive mixing has an important impact on the effectiveness of miscible floods. Simulations routinely assume Fickian dispersion, yet it is well established that dispersivity depends on the scale of measurement. This is one of the main reasons that a satisfactory method for design of field-scale miscible displacement processes is still not available. The main objective of this project was to improve the understanding of the fundamental mechanisms of dispersion and mixing, particularly at the pore scale. To this end, microsensors were developed and used in the laboratory to measure directly the solute concentrations at the scale of individual pores; the origin of hydrodynamic dispersion was evaluated from first principles of laminar flow and diffusion at the grain scale in simple but geometrically completely defined porous media; techniques to use flow reversal to distinguish the contribution to dispersion of convective spreading from that of true mixing; and the field scale impact of permeability heterogeneity on hydrodynamic dispersion was evaluated numerically. This project solved a long-standing problem in solute transport in porous media by quantifying the physical basis for the scaling of dispersion coefficient with the 1.2 power of flow velocity. The researchers also demonstrated that flow reversal uniquely enables a crucial separation of irreversible and reversible contributions to mixing. The interpretation of laboratory and field experiments that include flow reversal provides important insight. Other advances include the miniaturization of long-lasting microprobes for in-situ, pore-scale measurement of tracers, and a scheme to account properly in a reservoir simulator (grid-block scale) for the contributions of convective spreading due to reservoir heterogeneity and of mixing.

Steven Bryant; Russ Johns; Larry Lake; Thomas Harmon

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

443

A Supernodal Approach to Incomplete LU Factorization with Partial Pivoting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a new supernode-based incomplete LU factorization method to construct a preconditioner for solving sparse linear systems with iterative methods. The new algorithm is primarily based on the ILUTP approach by Saad, and we incorporate a number of techniques to improve the robustness and performance of the traditional ILUTP method. These include the new dropping strategies that accommodate the use of supernodal structures in the factored matrix. We present numerical experiments to demonstrate that our new method is competitive with the other ILU approaches and is well suited for today's high performance architectures.

Li, Xiaoye Sherry; Shao, Meiyue

2009-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

444

PLT scaling laws for thermonuclear fusion power multiplication  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

While present experiments are evaluated on the basis of confinement time, it is the fusion power multiplication factor, Q, and the fusion power which will be the parameters that measure the performance of ignition experiments and fusion reactors. We have determined the relationship of Q to tau/sub E/ and the Lawson number, n tau/sub e/, for ohmically heated plasmas from the Princeton Large Tokamak (PLT). Q, tau/sub E/, and n tau/sub E/ all increase with density at low densities. Above anti n/sub e/ approx. = 4 x 10/sup 13/ cm/sup -3/, tau/sub Ee/ approx. = 30 msec, or anti n/sub e/ tau/sub Ee/ approx. = 1.5 x 10/sup 12/ cm/sup -3/s, Q saturates. Q scaling has also been obtained on PLT as a function of toroidal magnetic field, plasma current, and auxiliary heating power.

Grisham, L.R.; Strachan, J.D.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Geoelectrical Measurement of Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Parameters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mass transfer affects contaminant transport and is thought to control the efficiency of aquifer remediation at a number of sites within the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. An improved understanding of mass transfer is critical to meeting the enormous scientific and engineering challenges currently facing DOE. Informed design of site remedies and long-term stewardship of radionuclide-contaminated sites will require new cost-effective laboratory and field techniques to measure the parameters controlling mass transfer spatially and across a range of scales. In this project, we sought to capitalize on the geophysical signatures of mass transfer. Previous numerical modeling and pilot-scale field experiments suggested that mass transfer produces a geoelectrical signaturea hysteretic relation between sampled (mobile-domain) fluid conductivity and bulk (mobile + immobile) conductivityover a range of scales relevant to aquifer remediation. In this work, we investigated the geoelectrical signature of mass transfer during tracer transport in a series of controlled experiments to determine the operation of controlling parameters, and also investigated the use of complex-resistivity (CR) as a means of quantifying mass transfer parameters in situ without tracer experiments. In an add-on component to our grant, we additionally considered nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to help parse mobile from immobile porosities. Including the NMR component, our revised study objectives were to: 1. Develop and demonstrate geophysical approaches to measure mass-transfer parameters spatially and over a range of scales, including the combination of electrical resistivity monitoring, tracer tests, complex resistivity, nuclear magnetic resonance, and materials characterization; and 2. Provide mass-transfer estimates for improved understanding of contaminant fate and transport at DOE sites, such as uranium transport at the Hanford 300 Area. To achieve our objectives, we implemented a 3-part research plan involving (1) development of computer codes and techniques to estimate mass-transfer parameters from time-lapse electrical data; (2) bench-scale experiments on synthetic materials and materials from cores from the Hanford 300 Area; and (3) field demonstration experiments at the DOEs Hanford 300 Area. In a synergistic add-on to our workplan, we analyzed data from field experiments performed at the DOE Naturita Site under a separate DOE SBR grant, on which PI Day-Lewis served as co-PI. Techniques developed for application to Hanford datasets also were applied to data from Naturita.

Day-Lewis, Frederick David [U.S. Geological Survey; Singha, Kamini [Colorado School of Mines; Johnson, Timothy C. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Haggerty, Roy [Oregon State; Binley, Andrew [Lancaster University; Lane, John W. [US Geological Survey

2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

446

Factors Impacting Decommissioning Costs - 13576  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) studied United States experience with decommissioning cost estimates and the factors that impact the actual cost of decommissioning projects. This study gathered available estimated and actual decommissioning costs from eight nuclear power plants in the United States to understand the major components of decommissioning costs. Major costs categories for decommissioning a nuclear power plant are removal costs, radioactive waste costs, staffing costs, and other costs. The technical factors that impact the costs were analyzed based on the plants' decommissioning experiences. Detailed cost breakdowns by major projects and other cost categories from actual power plant decommissioning experiences will be presented. Such information will be useful in planning future decommissioning and designing new plants. (authors)

Kim, Karen; McGrath, Richard [Electric Power Research Institute, 3420 Hillview Ave., Palo Alto, California (United States)] [Electric Power Research Institute, 3420 Hillview Ave., Palo Alto, California (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

External Surveillance of Geothermal Scale Deposits Employing...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

can detect scale buildup in pipes to 1-2 m accuracy. Radiography has also detected corrosion in piping. Development of this technique is shown to be useful of monitoring...

448

Small-Scale Renewable Energy Incentive Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Note: On July 10, 2013, the Clean Energy Development Fund Board approved changes to the Small Scale Renewable Energy Incentive Program, effective October 1, 2013. Beginning in October, wind...

449

Planet-scale Human Mobility Measurement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research into, and design and construction of mobile systems and algorithms requires access to large-scale mobility data. Unfortunately, the wireless and mobile research community lacks such data. For instance, the largest available human contact traces contain only 100 nodes with very sparse connectivity, limited by experimental logistics. In this paper we pose a challenge to the community: how can we collect mobility data from billions of human participants? We re-assert the importance of large-scale datasets in communication network design, and claim that this could impact fundamental studies in other academic disciplines. In effect, we argue that planet-scale mobility measurements can help to save the world. For example, through understanding large-scale human mobility, we can track and model and contain the spread of epidemics of various kinds.

Pan Hui; Richard Mortier; Tristan Henderson; Jon Crowcroft

2009-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

450

Extragalactic jets on subpc and large scales  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Jets can be probed in their innermost regions (d~0.1 pc) through the study of the relativistically-boosted emission of blazars. On the other extreme of spatial scales, the study of structure and dynamics of extragalactic relativistic jets received renewed impulse after the discovery, made by Chandra, of bright X-ray emission from regions at distances larger than hundreds of kpc from the central engine. At both scales it is thus possible to infer some of the basic parameters of the flow (speed, density, magnetic field intensity, power). After a brief review of the available observational evidence, I discuss how the comparison between the physical quantities independently derived at the two scales can be used to shed light on the global dynamics of the jet, from the innermost regions to the hundreds of kpc scale.

F. Tavecchio

2007-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

451

Program Management for Large Scale Engineering Programs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The goal of this whitepaper is to summarize the LAI research that applies to program management. The context of most of the research discussed in this whitepaper are large-scale engineering programs, particularly in the ...

Oehmen, Josef

452

Predictions From High Scale Mixing Unification Hypothesis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Starting with 'High Scale Mixing Unification' hypothesis, we investigate the renormalization group evolution of mixing parameters and masses for both Dirac and Majorana type neutrinos. Following this hypothesis, the PMNS mixing parameters are taken to be identical to the CKM ones at a unifying high scale. Then, they are evolved to a low scale using MSSM renormalization-group equations. For both type of neutrinos, the renormalization group evolution 'naturally' results in a non-zero and small value of leptonic mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$. One of the important predictions of this analysis is that, in both cases, the mixing angle $\\theta_{23}$ turns out to be non-maximal for most of the parameter range. We also elaborate on the important differences between Dirac and Majorana neutrinos within our framework and how to experimentally distinguish between the two scenarios. Furthermore, for both cases, we also derive constraints on the allowed parameter range for the SUSY breaking and unification scales, for which th...

Srivastava, Rahul

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Large scale prediction models and algorithms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Over 90% of the data available across the world has been produced over the last two years, and the trend is increasing. It has therefore become paramount to develop algorithms which are able to scale to very high dimensions. ...

Monsch, Matthieu (Matthieu Frederic)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Integrating Fermentation and Transesterification Industrial Scale Processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Integrating Fermentation and Transesterification Industrial Scale Processes in the Lower l d CO2 hanol, acetic acid etc. from CO2 Algae growth for use as biomass M lti it i O ti i ti P bl

Pike, Ralph W.

455

Community-Scale Anaerobic Digesters Webinar  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This free webinar will be held on April 16, 2013, from 1-2:15 p.m. Mountain Daylight Time. It will provide information on San Jose, California's, commercial-scale, high solids dry fermentation...

456

Small-Scale Spray Releases: Additional Aerosol Test Results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the events postulated in the hazard analysis at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities is a breach in process piping that produces aerosols with droplet sizes in the respirable range. The current approach for predicting the size and concentration of aerosols produced in a spray leak involves extrapolating from correlations reported in the literature. These correlations are based on results obtained from small engineered spray nozzles using pure liquids with Newtonian fluid behavior. The narrow ranges of physical properties on which the correlations are based do not cover the wide range of slurries and viscous materials that will be processed in the WTP and across processing facilities in the DOE complex. To expand the data set upon which the WTP accident and safety analyses were based, an aerosol spray leak testing program was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNLs test program addressed two key technical areas to improve the WTP methodology (Larson and Allen 2010). The first technical area was to quantify the role of slurry particles in small breaches where slurry particles may plug the hole and prevent high-pressure sprays. The results from an effort to address this first technical area can be found in Mahoney et al. (2012a). The second technical area was to determine aerosol droplet size distribution and total droplet volume from prototypic breaches and fluids, including sprays from larger breaches and sprays of slurries for which literature data are largely absent. To address the second technical area, the testing program collected aerosol generation data at two scales, commonly referred to as small-scale and large-scale. The small-scale testing and resultant data are described in Mahoney et al. (2012b) and the large-scale testing and resultant data are presented in Schonewill et al. (2012). In tests at both scales, simulants were used to mimic the relevant physical properties projected for actual WTP process streams.

Schonewill, Philip P.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Kimura, Marcia L.; Brown, G. N.; Mahoney, Lenna A.; Tran, Diana N.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Kurath, Dean E.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Large-Scale Spray Releases: Additional Aerosol Test Results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the events postulated in the hazard analysis for the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities is a breach in process piping that produces aerosols with droplet sizes in the respirable range. The current approach for predicting the size and concentration of aerosols produced in a spray leak event involves extrapolating from correlations reported in the literature. These correlations are based on results obtained from small engineered spray nozzles using pure liquids that behave as a Newtonian fluid. The narrow ranges of physical properties on which the correlations are based do not cover the wide range of slurries and viscous materials that will be processed in the WTP and in processing facilities across the DOE complex. To expand the data set upon which the WTP accident and safety analyses were based, an aerosol spray leak testing program was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNLs test program addressed two key technical areas to improve the WTP methodology (Larson and Allen 2010). The first technical area was to quantify the role of slurry particles in small breaches where slurry particles may plug the hole and prevent high-pressure sprays. The results from an effort to address this first technical area can be found in Mahoney et al. (2012a). The second technical area was to determine aerosol droplet size distribution and total droplet volume from prototypic breaches and fluids, including sprays from larger breaches and sprays of slurries for which literature data are mostly absent. To address the second technical area, the testing program collected aerosol generation data at two scales, commonly referred to as small-scale and large-scale testing. The small-scale testing and resultant data are described in Mahoney et al. (2012b), and the large-scale testing and resultant data are presented in Schonewill et al. (2012). In tests at both scales, simulants were used to mimic the relevant physical properties projected for actual WTP process streams.

Daniel, Richard C.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Fountain, Matthew S.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Billing, Justin M.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Kurath, Dean E.; Jenks, Jeromy WJ; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Mahoney, Lenna A.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Force measuring valve assemblies, systems including such valve assemblies and related methods  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods of evaluating a fluid condition may include stroking a valve member and measuring a force acting on the valve member during the stroke. Methods of evaluating a fluid condition may include measuring a force acting on a valve member in the presence of fluid flow over a period of time and evaluating at least one of the frequency of changes in the measured force over the period of time and the magnitude of the changes in the measured force over the period of time to identify the presence of an anomaly in a fluid flow and, optionally, its estimated location. Methods of evaluating a valve condition may include directing a fluid flow through a valve while stroking a valve member, measuring a force acting on the valve member during the stroke, and comparing the measured force to a reference force. Valve assemblies and related systems are also disclosed.

DeWall, Kevin George (Pocatello, ID); Garcia, Humberto Enrique (Idaho Falls, ID); McKellar, Michael George (Idaho Falls, ID)

2012-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

459

Fabrication of contacts for silicon solar cells including printing burn through layers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for fabricating a contact (240) for a solar cell (200). The method includes providing a solar cell substrate (210) with a surface that is covered or includes an antireflective coating (220). For example, the substrate (210) may be positioned adjacent or proximate to an outlet of an inkjet printer (712) or other deposition device. The method continues with forming a burn through layer (230) on the coating (220) by depositing a metal oxide precursor (e.g., using an inkjet or other non-contact printing method to print or apply a volume of liquid or solution containing the precursor). The method includes forming a contact layer (240) comprising silver over or on the burn through layer (230), and then annealing is performed to electrically connect the contact layer (240) to the surface of the solar cell substrate (210) through a portion of the burn through layer (230) and the coating (220).

Ginley, David S; Kaydanova, Tatiana; Miedaner, Alexander; Curtis, Calvin J; Van Hest, Marinus Franciscus Antonius Maria

2014-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

460

System Theoretic Approach for Determining Causal Factors of Quality Loss in Complex System Design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Traditional design methods such as Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA), Fault Tree Analysis (FTA to identify more causal factors for quality losses than FMEA or FTA, including component interactions

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes scale factor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Scaling the Incompressible Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We derive a scaling relation for Richtmyer-Meshkov instability of incompressible fluids. The relation is tested using both numerical simulations and experimental data. We obtain collapse of growth rates for a wide range of initial conditions by using vorticity and velocity scales associated with the interfacial perturbations and the acceleration impulse. A curve fit to the collapsed growth rates yields a fairly universal model for the mixing layer thickness versus time.

Cotrell, D; Cook, A

2007-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

462

Phenomenology of SUSY with intermediate scale physics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The presence of fields at an intermediate scale between the Electroweak and the Grand Unification scale modifies the evolution of the gauge couplings and consequently the running of other parameters of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model, such as gauginos and scalar masses. The net effect is a modification of the low energy spectrum which affects both the collider phenomenology and the dark matter relic density.

C. Biggio

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Preferred hierarchy scales from the product landscape  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The product landscape method has been recently proposed to solve hierarchy problems such as the cosmological constant problem. We suggest that the parameter distribution on logarithmic scales should be used as a benchmark for hierarchy, and the preferred hierarchy scales can be obtained from the distribution peak. It is shown that generating hierarchy from purely product distribution is very inefficient. To achieve a reasonably acceptable efficiency, other effects such as accumulation of weak hierarchy in the effective theory should be incorporated.

Songlin Lv; Zheng Sun; Lina Wu

2014-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

464

Acoustofluidics 10: Scaling laws in acoustophoresis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of sound c0 in a liquid scales like the density r0 of the liquid to the power minus one-half, written as c0 in a microfluidic system scales like the pressure drop Dp to the power one, written as Q f Dp, and the speed), as well as density r0 and viscosity h of the liquid. We know the full answer to be1 Q ¼ pa4 8hL Dp

465

Parsec-Scale Jet-Environment Interactions in AGN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Observations made with the VLBA have led to fundamental advances in our understanding of how radio jets in AGN evolve from parsec-scales out to distances exceeding several hundred kiloparsecs. In this review I discuss current models of young radio source evolution, as well as the observational evidence for a rapid change in jet properties on scales of ~1 kpc. A central topic of current debate is the relative importance of intermittent jet fueling versus jet-environment interactions in causing a drop-off in powerful radio sources at this critical evolutionary stage. Recent 3-D hydrodynamical jet simulations suggest that dense environments and cloud collisions can temporarily stifle, but not completely halt powerful relativistic jets. Several VLBA studies of jet-ISM interactions in both blazars and weak Seyfert jets have indicated that collimated outflows are indeed possible in dense environments. At present, the bulk of the evidence favors intermittent AGN accretion as the dominant factor in determining the evolutionary path of large numbers of AGN jets.

Matthew L. Lister

2007-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

466

Combinatorial evaluation of systems including decomposition of a system representation into fundamental cycles  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

One embodiment of the present invention includes a computer operable to represent a physical system with a graphical data structure corresponding to a matroid. The graphical data structure corresponds to a number of vertices and a number of edges that each correspond to two of the vertices. The computer is further operable to define a closed pathway arrangement with the graphical data structure and identify each different one of a number of fundamental cycles by evaluating a different respective one of the edges with a spanning tree representation. The fundamental cycles each include three or more of the vertices.

Oliveira, Joseph S. (Richland, WA); Jones-Oliveira, Janet B. (Richland, WA); Bailey, Colin G. (Wellington, NZ); Gull, Dean W. (Seattle, WA)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Sighting optics including an optical element having a first focal length and a second focal length  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

One embodiment of sighting optics according to the teachings provided herein may include a front sight and a rear sight positioned in spaced-apart relation. The rear sight includes an optical element having a first focal length and a second focal length. The first focal length is selected so that it is about equal to a distance separating the optical element and the front sight and the second focal length is selected so that it is about equal to a target distance. The optical element thus brings into simultaneous focus, for a user, images of the front sight and the target.

Crandall, David Lynn (Idaho Falls, ID)

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

KENO-VI Primer: A Primer for Criticality Calculations with SCALE/KENO-VI Using GeeWiz  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The SCALE (Standardized Computer Analyses for Licensing Evaluation) computer software system developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is widely used and accepted around the world for criticality safety analyses. The well-known KENO-VI three-dimensional Monte Carlo criticality computer code is one of the primary criticality safety analysis tools in SCALE. The KENO-VI primer is designed to help a new user understand and use the SCALE/KENO-VI Monte Carlo code for nuclear criticality safety analyses. It assumes that the user has a college education in a technical field. There is no assumption of familiarity with Monte Carlo codes in general or with SCALE/KENO-VI in particular. The primer is designed to teach by example, with each example illustrating two or three features of SCALE/KENO-VI that are useful in criticality analyses. The primer is based on SCALE 6, which includes the Graphically Enhanced Editing Wizard (GeeWiz) Windows user interface. Each example uses GeeWiz to provide the framework for preparing input data and viewing output results. Starting with a Quickstart section, the primer gives an overview of the basic requirements for SCALE/KENO-VI input and allows the user to quickly run a simple criticality problem with SCALE/KENO-VI. The sections that follow Quickstart include a list of basic objectives at the beginning that identifies the goal of the section and the individual SCALE/KENO-VI features that are covered in detail in the sample problems in that section. Upon completion of the primer, a new user should be comfortable using GeeWiz to set up criticality problems in SCALE/KENO-VI. The primer provides a starting point for the criticality safety analyst who uses SCALE/KENO-VI. Complete descriptions are provided in the SCALE/KENO-VI manual. Although the primer is self-contained, it is intended as a companion volume to the SCALE/KENO-VI documentation. (The SCALE manual is provided on the SCALE installation DVD.) The primer provides specific examples of using SCALE/KENO-VI for criticality analyses; the SCALE/KENO-VI manual provides information on the use of SCALE/KENO-VI and all its modules. The primer also contains an appendix with sample input files.

Bowman, Stephen M [ORNL

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Full-scale tests help improve reliability of DST tools  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A joint-industry project set up procedures and full scale tests to determine the reliability and integrity of drill stem test (DST) tools for use in difficult high pressure, high temperature wells. These DST tool tests helped determine changes needed to address reliability in high pressure, high temperature (HPHT) conditions and has demonstrated that DST tools could maintain integrity in this type of environment. Eleven major operators and service/testing companies in the Norway/U.K. area undertook a joint industry study to address these problems and to determine methods to increase the reliability of DST operations in HPHT well testing. Emphasis was placed on the selection of the downhole equipment used for the HPHT drill stem tests and design of the full scale testing of the North-Sea-area field tools in use. Additionally, an investigation was to be made to establish methods that could be used to verify and increase equipment reliability. The project also included design parameters for contingency conditions that were not normally present during equipment operations but could exist in emergency situations. Eleven tools, including tester valves, multiple-cycle circulating valves, bypass valves, and safety/circulating valves, from different service company/suppliers were rigorously tested. The paper describes the project, the tools tested, test methods, and results.

Ringgenberg, P. [Halliburton Energy Services, Dallas, TX (United States); Self, J.C. [Statoil, Stavanger (Norway)

1996-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

470

BENCH SCALE SALTSTONE PROCESS DEVELOPMENT MIXING STUDY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested to develop a bench scale test facility, using a mixer, transfer pump, and transfer line to determine the impact of conveying the grout through the transfer lines to the vault on grout properties. Bench scale testing focused on the effect the transfer line has on the rheological property of the grout as it was processed through the transfer line. Rheological and other physical properties of grout samples were obtained prior to and after pumping through a transfer line. The Bench Scale Mixing Rig (BSMR) consisted of two mixing tanks, grout feed tank, transfer pump and transfer hose. The mixing tanks were used to batch the grout which was then transferred into the grout feed tank. The contents of the feed tank were then pumped through the transfer line (hose) using a progressive cavity pump. The grout flow rate and pump discharge pressure were monitored. Four sampling stations were located along the length of the transfer line at the 5, 105 and 205 feet past the transfer pump and at 305 feet, the discharge of the hose. Scaling between the full scale piping at Saltstone to bench scale testing at SRNL was performed by maintaining the same shear rate and total shear at the wall of the transfer line. The results of scaling down resulted in a shorter transfer line, a lower average velocity, the same transfer time and similar pressure drops. The condition of flow in the bench scale transfer line is laminar. The flow in the full scale pipe is in the transition region, but is more laminar than turbulent. The resulting plug in laminar flow in the bench scale results in a region of no-mixing. Hence mixing, or shearing, at the bench scale should be less than that observed in the full scale, where this plug is non existent due to the turbulent flow. The bench scale tests should be considered to be conservative due to the highly laminar condition of flow that exists. Two BSMR runs were performed. In both cases, wall shearing was shown to reduce the rheological properties of the grout as it was processed through the transfer line. Samples taken at the static feed tank showed that gelling impacted the rheological properties of the grout before it was fed into the pump and transfer line. A comparison of the rheological properties of samples taken at the feed tank and transfer line discharge indicated shearing of the grout was occurring in the transfer line. Bench scale testing of different mixing methods with three different salt solutions showed that method of mixing influences the rheological properties of the grouts. The paddle blade mixing method of the salt solution used for the BMSR testing provided comparable rheological properties of the grout prepared in the BMSR after 14 minutes of processing, B3. The paddle blade mixing method can be used to represent BMSR results and mixing time can be adjusted to represent larger scale mixing.

Cozzi, A.; Hansen, E.

2011-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

471

The Yucca Mountain Project drift scale test  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Yucca Mountain Project is currently evaluating the coupled thermal-mechanical-hydrological-chemical (TMHC) response of the potential repository host rock through an in situ thermal testing program. A drift scale test (DST) was constructed during 1997 and heaters were turned on in December 1997. The DST includes nine canister-sized containers with thirty operating heaters each located within the heated drift (HD) and fifty wing heaters located in boreholes in both ribs with a total power output of nominally 210kW. A total of 147 boreholes (combined length of 3.3 km) houses most of the over 3700 TMHC sensors connected with 201 km of cabling to a central data acquisition system. The DST is located in the Exploratory Studies Facility in a 5-m diameter drift approximately 50 m in length. Heating will last up to four years and cooling will last another four years. The rock mass surrounding the DST will experience a harsh thermal environment with rock surface temperatures expected to reach a maximum of about 200 C. This paper describes the process of designing the DST. The first 38 m of the 50-m long Heated Drift (HD) is dedicated to collection of data that will lead to a better understanding of the complex coupled TMHC processes in the host rock of the proposed repository. The final 12 m is dedicated to evaluating the interactions between the heated rock mass and cast-in-place (CIP) concrete ground support systems at elevated temperatures. In addition to a description of the DST design, data from site characterization, and a general description of the analyses and analysis approach used to design the test and make pretest predictions are presented. Test-scoping and pretest numerical predictions of one way thermal-hydrologic, thermal-mechanical, and thermal-chemical behaviors have been completed (TRW, 1997a). These analyses suggest that a dry-out zone will be created around the DST and a 10,000 m{sup 3} volume of rock will experience temperatures above 100 C. The HD will experience large stress increases, particularly in the crown of the drift. Thermoelastic displacements of up to about 16 mm are predicted for some thermomechanical gages. Additional analyses using more complex models will be performed during the conduct of the DST and the results compared with measured data.

Finley, R.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Blair, S.C. [Lawrence Livermore National Labs., CA (United States); Boyle, W.J. [Dept. of Energy, Las Vegas, NV (United States)] [and others

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

INDIUM--2003 36.1 References that include a section mark () are found in the Internet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Crews, statistical assistant, and the world production table was prepared by Glenn J. Wallace energy savings, various national governments have targeted solid-state technologies, which include light-emitting diodes (LEDs), for increased research funding and development. A proposal for a program to fund solid

473

A wave equation including leptons and quarks for the standard model of quantum physics in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A wave equation including leptons and quarks for the standard model of quantum physics in Clifford-m@orange.fr August 27, 2014 Abstract A wave equation with mass term is studied for all particles and an- tiparticles of color and antiquarks u and d. This wave equation is form invariant under the Cl 3 group generalizing

Boyer, Edmond

474

A non-isothermal PEM fuel cell model including two water transport mechanisms in the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A non-isothermal PEM fuel cell model including two water transport mechanisms in the membrane K Freiburg Germany A dynamic two-phase flow model for proton exchange mem- brane (PEM) fuel cells and the species concentrations. In order to describe the charge transport in the fuel cell the Poisson equations

Mnster, Westflische Wilhelms-Universitt

475

Worker Protection Program for DOE (Including the National Nuclear Security Administration) Federal Employees  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The Order establishes the framework for an effective worker protection program that will reduce or prevent injuries, illnesses, and accidental losses by providing Department of Energy (DOE), including National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Federal workers with a safe and healthful workplace. Cancels DOE O 440.1A. Certified 6/17/2011. Canceled by DOE O 440.1B Chg 1.

2007-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

476

RESERVOIR RELEASE FORECAST MODEL FOR FLOOD OPERATION OF THE FOLSOM PROJECT INCLUDING PRE-RELEASES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 RESERVOIR RELEASE FORECAST MODEL FOR FLOOD OPERATION OF THE FOLSOM PROJECT INCLUDING PRE-line Planning Mode, the Reservoir Release Forecast Model (RRFM) is being used to test alternatives operating River Forecast Center. The RRFM will make possible the risk-based operation of the Folsom Project

Bowles, David S.

477

Strong permanent magnets provide a backbone technology required many products, including computers, electric cars, and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Strong permanent magnets provide a backbone technology required many products, including computers, electric cars, and wind-powered generators. Currently, the strongest permanent magnets contain rare earth for most technologies requiring permanent magnets, due to their high energy product and coercivity. However

McQuade, D. Tyler

478

EARTH SCIENCESEARTH SCIENCESEARTH SCIENCES This major includes a spectrum of disciplines focused on understanding the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EARTH SCIENCESEARTH SCIENCESEARTH SCIENCES This major includes a spectrum of disciplines focused this understanding to read the record of earth history written in rocks and sediments, and on developing models by humans. Opportunities for Students Sigma Gamma Epsilon: The Omega Chapter of the national honorary earth

Krylov, Anna I.

479

Primal-Dual Interior Point Method Applied to the Short Term Hydroelectric Scheduling Including a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Primal-Dual Interior Point Method Applied to the Short Term Hydroelectric Scheduling Including that minimizes losses in the transmission and costs in the generation of a hydroelectric power system, formulated such perturbing parameter. Keywords-- Hydroelectric power system, Network flow, Predispatch, Primal-dual interior

Oliveira, Aurélio R. L.

480

POLITICAL SCIENCE 2013 SCHOLARSHIP APPLICATION (Includes Alumni, Brazil, Francis, Glickman, Hubbard, Young, and Rinn Scholarships)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

POLITICAL SCIENCE 2013 SCHOLARSHIP APPLICATION (Includes Alumni, Brazil, Francis, Glickman, Hubbard. _____________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________ Please have a member of the SJSU Political Science faculty who is willing to provide a reference sign this application. Faculty sponsor's signature: Applicant's signature: You can apply for as many Political Science

Su, Xiao

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481

Improved One-dimensional Analysis of CMOS Photodiode Including Epitaxial-Substrate Junction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Improved One-dimensional Analysis of CMOS Photodiode Including Epitaxial-Substrate Junction J. S-dimensional analysis of CMOS photodiode has been derived in which the effect of the substrate, which forms a high-empirical expression exhibits a good agreement with the measured spectral response of n+ pepi photodiodes fabricated

Hornsey, Richard

482

Chromosome Mutations Chromosomes in a Number of Different Ways Including Changes to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Characteristics Including Mental Retardation Down Syndrome Individuals May Also Suffer from Conditions They Have of Chromosome 21 Known as the Down Syndrome Critical Region (DSCR) but this is Still Unsure The Syndrome Results to the . The Frequency of Down Syndrome Births is 1 in 1000 at a Maternal . This Rises to 1 in 100 by 40 and 1 in 50

Cutler, Chris

483

Ophiostoma species (Ophiostomatales, Ascomycota), including two new taxa on eucalypts in Australia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ophiostoma species (Ophiostomatales, Ascomycota), including two new taxa on eucalypts in Australia of Tasmania, GPO Box 252-54, Hobart, Tas. 7001, Australia. C Forest Science Centre, Industry & Investment NSW, PO Box 100, Beecroft, NSW 2119, Australia. D Agric-Science Queensland, Ecosciences Precinct, 41 Boggo