Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes pyrolysis oils" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Methods and apparatuses for preparing upgraded pyrolysis oil  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods and apparatuses for preparing upgraded pyrolysis oil are provided herein. In an embodiment, a method of preparing upgraded pyrolysis oil includes providing a biomass-derived pyrolysis oil stream having an original oxygen content. The biomass-derived pyrolysis oil stream is hydrodeoxygenated under catalysis in the presence of hydrogen to form a hydrodeoxygenated pyrolysis oil stream comprising a cyclic paraffin component. At least a portion of the hydrodeoxygenated pyrolysis oil stream is dehydrogenated under catalysis to form the upgraded pyrolysis oil.

Brandvold, Timothy A; Baird, Lance Awender; Frey, Stanley Joseph

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Fuel and fuel blending components from biomass derived pyrolysis oil  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for the conversion of biomass derived pyrolysis oil to liquid fuel components is presented. The process includes the production of diesel, aviation, and naphtha boiling point range fuels or fuel blending components by two-stage deoxygenation of the pyrolysis oil and separation of the products.

McCall, Michael J.; Brandvold, Timothy A.; Elliott, Douglas C.

2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

3

Ammonia evolution during oil shale pyrolysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ammonia evolution during oil shale pyrolysis ... Parallel pyrolytic studies were carried out on an immature, ultralaminae-rich, type I kerogen (Göynük oil shale kerogen) and a related algaenan (isolated from the extant green microalga Scenedesmus communis). ...

Myongsook S. Oh; Robert W. Taylor; Thomas T. Coburn; Richard W. Crawford

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Volatile constituents in a wood pyrolysis oil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Science VOLATILE CONSTITUTENTS IN A WOOD PYROLYSIS OIL A Thesis SHIH-CHIEN LIN Appro d as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) Head of epa tmen (Member Member Nay 1978 442936 ABSTRACT Volatile Constituents in a Wood Pyrolysis Oil.../120 Supelcoport. Other trace constituents of volatile acid were also 'dentifi="' by trap- ping the substances from the C. C. column into i: n;- 0-sh ped capillary tube and subjecting to mass spectrometry. The corrosivity of pyrolysis oil and it, volati'e acids...

Lin, Shih-Chien

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Technical Information Exchange on Pyrolysis Oil: Potential for...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

renewable heating oil substitution Technical Information Exchange on Pyrolysis Oil: Potential for a renewable heating oil substitution Two-day agenda from the workshop: Technical...

6

Production of valuable hydrocarbons by flash pyrolysis of oil shale  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for the production of gas and liquid hydrocarbons from particulated oil shale by reaction with a pyrolysis gas at a temperature of from about 700/sup 0/C to about 1100/sup 0/C, at a pressure of from about 400 psi to about 600 psi, for a period of about 0.2 second to about 20 seconds. Such a pyrolysis gas includes methane, helium, or hydrogen. 3 figs., 3 tabs.

Steinberg, M.; Fallon, P.T.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Nitrogen chemistry during oil shale pyrolysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Real time evolution of ammonia (NH{sub 3}) and hydrogen cyanide (HCN), two major nitrogen-containing volatiles evolved during oil shale pyrolysis, was measured by means of a mass spectrometer using chemical ionization and by infrared spectroscopy. While the on-line monitoring of NH{sub 3} in oil shale pyrolysis games was possible by both techniques, HCN measurements were only possible by IR. We studied one Green River Formation oil shale and one New Albany oil shale. The ammonia from the Green River oil shale showed one broad NH{sub 3} peak maximizing at a high temperature. For both oil shales, most NH{sub 3} evolves at temperatures above oil-evolving temperature. The important factors governing ammonia salts such as Buddingtonite in Green River oil shales, the distribution of nitrogen functional groups in kerogen, and the retorting conditions. The gas phase reactions, such as NH{sub 3} decomposition and HCN conversion reactions, also play an important role in the distribution of nitrogen volatiles, especially at high temperatures. Although pyrolysis studies of model compounds suggests the primary nitrogen product from kerogen pyrolysis to be HCN at high temperatures, we found only a trace amount of HCN at oil-evolving temperatures and none at high temperatures (T {gt} 600{degree}C). 24 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

Oh, Myongsook S.; Crawford, R.W.; Foster, K.G.; Alcaraz, A.

1990-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

8

Utilization of pyrolysis oil in industrial scale boilers.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The performance of pyrolysis oil in a large-scale combustion system is investigated to determine the feasibility of displacing fuel oil or natural gas in current… (more)

Redfern, Kyle D.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

European Market Study for BioOil (Pyrolysis Oil)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

European Market Study for BioOil (Pyrolysis Oil) Dec 15, 2006 Doug Bradley President Climate Change Solutions National Team Leader- IEA Bioenergy Task 40- Bio-trade 402 Third Avenue ·Ottawa, Ontario ·Canada K. Market Determining Factors 5. EU Country Perspectives 6. Potential European Markets 6.1. Pulp Mill Lime

10

Technical Information Exchange on Pyrolysis Oil: Potential for...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Renewab;e Heating Oil Substation Fuel in New England Technical Information Exchange on Pyrolysis Oil: Potential for a Renewab;e Heating Oil Substation Fuel in New England This...

11

Pyrolysis of shale oil vacuum distillate fractions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The freezing point of US Navy jet fuel (JP-5) has been related to the amounts of large n-alkanes present in the fuel. This behavior applies to jet fuels derived from alternate fossil fuel resources, such as shale oil, coal, and tar sands, as well as those derived from petroleum. In general, jet fuels from shale oil have the highest and those from coal the lowest n-alkane content. The origin of these n-alkanes in the amounts observed, especially in shale-derived fuels, is not readily explained on the basis of literature information. Studies of the processes, particularly the ones involving thermal stress, used to produce these fuels are needed to define how the n-alkanes form from larger molecules. The information developed will significantly contribute to the selection of processes and refining techniques for future fuel production from shale oil. Carbon-13 nmr studies indicate that oil shale rock contains many long unbranched straight chain hydrocarbon groups. The shale oil derived from the rock also gives indication of considerable straight chain material with large peaks at 14, 23, 30, and 32 ppM in the C-13 nmr spectrum. Previous pyrolysis studies stressed fractions of shale crude oil residua, measured the yields of JP-5, and determined the content of potential n-alkanes in the JP-5 distillation range (4). In this work, a shale crude oil vacuum distillate (Paraho) was separated into three chemical fractions. The fractions were then subjected to nmr analysis to estimate the potential for n-alkane production and to pyrolysis studies to determine an experimental n-alkane yield.

Hazlett, R.N.; Beal, E.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Pyrolysis of shale oil vacuum distillate fractions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The freezing point of U.S. Navy jet fuel (JP-5) has been related to the amounts of large nalkanes present in the fuel. This behavior applies to jet fuels derived from alternate fossil fuel resources, such as shale oil, coal, and tar sands, as well as those derived from petroleum. In general, jet fuels from shale oil have the highest and those from coal the lowest n-alkane content. The origin of these n-alkanes in the amounts observed, especially in shale-derived fuels, is not readily explained on the basis of literature information. Studies of the processes, particularly the ones involving thermal stress, used to produce these fuels are needed to define how th n-alkanes form from larger molecules. The information developed will significantly contribute to the selection of processes and refining techniques for future fuel production from shale oil. Carbon-13 nmr studies indicate that oil shale rock contains many long unbranched straight chain hydrocarbon groups. The shale oil derived from the rock also gives indication of considerable straight chain material with large peaks at 14, 23, 30 and 32 ppm in the C-13 nmr spectrum. Previous pyrolysis studies stressed fractions of shale crude oil residua, measured the yields of JP-5, and determined the content of potential n-alkanes in the JP-5 distillation range (4). In this work, a shale crude oil vacuum distillate (Paraho) was separated into three chemical fractions. The fractions were then subjected to nmr analysis to estimate the potential for n-alkane production and to pyrolysis studies to determine an experimental n-alkane yield.

Hazlett, R.N.; Beal, E.

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Multistep pyrolysis kinetics of North Korean oil shale  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, multistep pyrolysis kinetics of North Korean oil shale was investigated by thermogravimetric analysis. All the...?1...from room temperature to 873 K under nitrogen atmosphere. The main oil-producin...

Wei Wang; Shuyuan Li; Changtao Yue; Yue Ma

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Technical Information Exchange on Pyrolysis Oil: Potential for a renewable heating oil substitution  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Two-day agenda from the workshop: Technical Information Exchange on Pyrolysis Oil: Potential for a renewable heating oil substitution fuel in New England.

15

Diesel Engine Combustion of Biomass Pyrolysis Oils  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Biomass pyrolysis oils are manufactured through a moderate-temperature process (?500 °C) in which the biomass feedstock is subjected to rapid heating in the absence of air, where it vaporizes, cracks, and is condensed after a short residence time (?500 ms) into a dark brown liquid composed of a complex mixture of oxygenated hydrocarbons whose heating value is approximately half that of No. 2 diesel fuel. ... The combustion air inlet temperature can be preheated up to 130 °C through the use of an in-line electric heater, which allows engine operation with fuels that have long ignition delay, without relying on any ignition additives. ... Their data showed that in addition to reducing the peak heat release magnitude, slower chemical kinetics resulted in reduced rate of instantaneous heat release (the slope of the instantaneous heat release curve) in the early combustion phase, resulting in delayed peak heat release timing relative to SOC. ...

Alan Shihadeh; Simone Hochgreb

2000-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

16

Pyrolysis of shale oil residual fractions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The freezing point of JP-5, the Navy jet fuel, has been related to the n-alkane content, specifically n-hexadecane. In general, jet fuels from shale oil have the highest n-alkanes. The formation of n-alkanes in the jet fuel distillation range can be explained if large n-alkanes are present in the crude oil source. Quantities of large n-alkanes are insufficient, however, to explain the amounts found - up to 37% n-alkanes in the jet fuel range. Other possible precursors to small straight chain molecules are substituted cyclic compounds. Attack in the side chain obviously afford a path to an n-alkane. Aromatic hydrocarbons, esters, acids, amines, and ethers also have the potential to form n-alkanes if an unbranched alkyl chain is present in the molecule. Investigations showed that the best yield of the JP-5 cut comes at different times for the various fractions, but a time in the 60 to 120 min range would appear to be the optimum time for good yield at 450/sup 0/C. The longer time would be preferred with respect to lower potential n-alkane yield. None of the fractions gave n-alkane yields approaching the 37% amount found in the Shale-I JP-5. A temperature different than the 450/sup 0/C used here might affect the conversion percentage. Further the combined saturate, aromatic, and polar fractions may interact under pyrolysis conditions to give higher potential n-alkane yields than the fractions stressed independently.

Hazlett, R.N.; Beal, E.; Vetter, T.; Sonntag, R.; Moniz, W.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Isothermal pyrolysis and char combustion of oil shales  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Yields and rates of hydrocarbons evolved during pyrolysis of oil shales have been measured with improved accuracy. Green River and New Albany oil shales were heated in a fluidized sand bed, and volatile pyrolysis products were transferred to a combustion tube and burned. Resulting H/sub 2/O and CO/sub 2 were detected in real time by mass spectrometry. Residual char was subsequently burned to allow complete C and H balances. Good closure was obtained. Proportions of organic C and H released as pyrolysis products and retained as char were determined. Shale oil loss due to the presence of oxidized shale in the fluidized bed was measured accurately. We find that all of the experimental apparatus that the pyrolysis gas contacts must be near pyrolysis temperature to avoid condensation of heavy oil which subsequently forms coke and secondary products. We observe a faster release of products with all transfer lines 450/degree/C than when they are at 300/degree/C. The current uncertainty in pyrolysis rates is due in part to such difficulties with experimental techniques. 12 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

Coburn, T.T.; Taylor, R.W.; Morris, C.J.; Duval, V.

1988-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

18

Modeling a set of heavy oil aqueous pyrolysis experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Aqueous pyrolysis experiments, aimed at mild upgrading of heavy oil, were analyzed using various computer models. The primary focus of the analysis was the pressure history of the closed autoclave reactors obtained during the heating of the autoclave to desired reaction temperatures. The models used included a means of estimating nonideal behavior of primary components with regard to vapor liquid equilibrium. The modeling indicated that to match measured autoclave pressures, which often were well below the vapor pressure of water at a given temperature, it was necessary to incorporate water solubility in the oil phase and an activity model for the water in the oil phase which reduced its fugacity below that of pure water. Analysis also indicated that the mild to moderate upgrading of the oil which occurred in experiments that reached 400{degrees}C or more using a FE(III) 2-ethylhexanoate could be reasonably well characterized by a simple first order rate constant of 1.7xl0{sup 8} exp(-20000/T)s{sup {minus}l}. Both gas production and API gravity increase were characterized by this rate constant. Models were able to match the complete pressure history of the autoclave experiments fairly well with relatively simple equilibria models. However, a consistent lower than measured buildup in pressure at peak temperatures was noted in the model calculations. This phenomena was tentatively attributed to an increase in the amount of water entering the vapor phase caused by a change in its activity in the oil phase.

Thorsness, C.B.; Reynolds, J.G.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Upgrading of Fast Pyrolysis Oil via HDO Using Nano-Structured Catalysts.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The effects of type of solvents (hydro-treated or upgraded pyrolysis oil and ethanol) on hydro-de-oxygenation (HDO) of fast pyrolysis oil were studied. The presence and… (more)

Ahmadi, Shima

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Decaking of coal or oil shale during pyrolysis in the presence of iron oxides  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for producing a fuel from the pyrolysis of coal or oil shale in the presence of iron oxide in an inert gas atmosphere is described. The method includes the steps of pulverizing feed coal or oil shale, pulverizing iron oxide, mixing the pulverized feed and iron oxide, and heating the mixture in a gas atmosphere which is substantially inert to the mixture so as to form a product fuel, which may be gaseous, liquid and/or solid. The method of the invention reduces the swelling of coals, such as bituminous coal and the like, which are otherwise known to swell during pyrolysis. 4 figs., 8 tabs.

Rashid Khan, M.

1988-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes pyrolysis oils" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Decaking of coal or oil shale during pyrolysis in the presence of iron oxides  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for producing a fuel from the pyrolysis of coal or oil shale in the presence of iron oxide in an inert gas atmosphere. The method includes the steps of pulverizing feed coal or oil shale, pulverizing iron oxide, mixing the pulverized feed and iron oxide, and heating the mixture in a gas atmosphere which is substantially inert to the mixture so as to form a product fuel, which may be gaseous, liquid and/or solid. The method of the invention reduces the swelling of coals, such as bituminous coal and the like, which are otherwise known to swell during pyrolysis.

Khan, M. Rashid (Morgantown, WV)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Reactive gases evolved during pyrolysis of Devonian oil shale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Computer modeling of oil shale pyrolysis is an important part of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Oil Shale Program. Models containing detailed chemistry have been derived from an investigation of Colorado oil shale. We are currently attempting to use models to treat more completely reactions of nitrogen and sulfur compounds in the retort to better understand emissions. Batch retorting work on Devonian oil shale is proving particularly useful for this study of nitrogen/sulfur chemistry. Improved analytical methods have been developed to quantitatively determine reactive volatiles at the parts-per-million level. For example, the triple quadrupole mass spectrometer (TQMS) is used in the chemical ionization (CI) mode to provide real-time analytical data on ammonia evolution as the shale is pyrolyzed. A heated transfer line and inlet ensure rapid and complete introduction of ammonia to the instrument by preventing water condensation. Ammonia and water release data suitable for calculating kinetic parameters have been obtained from a New Albany Shale sample. An MS/MS technique with the TQMS in the electron ionization (EI) mode allows hydrogen sulfide, carbonyl sulfide, and certain trace organic sulfur compounds to be monitored during oil shale pyrolysis. Sensitivity and selectivity for these compounds have been increased by applying artificial intelligence techniques to tuning of the spectrometer. Gas evolution profiles (100 to 900/sup 0/C) are reported for hydrogen sulfide, water, ammonia, and trace sulfur species formed during pyrolysis of Devonian oil shale. Implications for retorting chemistry are discussed. 18 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

Coburn, T.T.; Crawford, R.W.; Gregg, H.R.; Oh, M.S.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Large-Scale Pyrolysis Oil Production: A Technology Assessment and Economic Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A broad perspective of pyrolysis technology as it relates to converting biomass substrates to a liquid bio-oil product and a detailed technical and economic assessment of a fast pyrolysis plant.

Ringer, M.; Putsche, V.; Scahill, J.

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Low oxygen biomass-derived pyrolysis oils and methods for producing the same  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Low oxygen biomass-derived pyrolysis oils and methods for producing them from carbonaceous biomass feedstock are provided. The carbonaceous biomass feedstock is pyrolyzed in the presence of a catalyst comprising base metal-based catalysts, noble metal-based catalysts, treated zeolitic catalysts, or combinations thereof to produce pyrolysis gases. During pyrolysis, the catalyst catalyzes a deoxygenation reaction whereby at least a portion of the oxygenated hydrocarbons in the pyrolysis gases are converted into hydrocarbons. The oxygen is removed as carbon oxides and water. A condensable portion (the vapors) of the pyrolysis gases is condensed to low oxygen biomass-derived pyrolysis oil.

Marinangeli, Richard; Brandvold, Timothy A; Kocal, Joseph A

2013-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

25

Oil production by entrained pyrolysis of biomass and processing of oil and char  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Entrained pyrolysis of lignocellulosic material proceeds from a controlled pyrolysis-initiating temperature to completion of an oxygen free environment at atmospheric pressure and controlled residence time to provide a high yield recovery of pyrolysis oil together with char and non-condensable, combustible gases. The residence time is a function of gas flow rate and the initiating temperature is likewise a function of the gas flow rate, varying therewith. A controlled initiating temperature range of about 400.degree. C. to 550.degree. C. with corresponding gas flow rates to maximize oil yield is disclosed.

Knight, James A. (Atlanta, GA); Gorton, Charles W. (Atlanta, GA)

1990-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

26

Staged Catalytic Gasification/Steam Reforming of Pyrolysis Oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

While the slag can be used in the current industry infrastructure as a construction material, up-scaling of biomass utilization will lead to land depletion because the mineral and metal balances are not closed. ... Table 4 shows gasification results at similar temperatures for two different types of pyrolysis oil (pine and beech) and of another liquid biomass stream, a “light” and a “heavy” sugar waste stream. ... The sugar waste streams that were gasified are a side product from lactic acid production. ...

Guus van Rossum; Sascha R. A. Kersten; Wim P. M. van Swaaij

2009-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

27

Co-pyrolysis of oil shale and High density polyethylene: Structural characterization of the oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study describes a detailed characterization of the oil obtained by co-pyrolysis of Tarfaya oil shale (Morocco) and high density polyethylene (HDPE) and by pyrolysis of oil shale and HDPE individually. The oil (obtained under the most suitable conditions, temperature of 500–525 °C and heating rate of 10 °C/min) was characterised by elemental analysis, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H NMR) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). In addition, column chromatography was used group composition of oil was determined. Gas chromatography was achieved on n-hexane fractions. Adding HDPE to the oil shale results in increased oil yields, which indicates synergetic effect between the oil shale and HDPE. The addition of HDPE to oil shale improved fuel properties of shale oil leading to a decrease in the oxygen content of shale oil. The results show that the oil obtained by co-pyrolysis has similar properties with commercial gasoline. HDPE acts as a hydrogenation medium for the oil shale product as revealed by FTIR results.

A. Aboulkas; T. Makayssi; L. Bilali; K. El harfi; M. Nadifiyine; M. Benchanaa

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Pore Scale Analysis of Oil Shale/Sands Pyrolysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There are important questions concerning the quality and volume of pore space that is created when oil shale is pyrolyzed for the purpose of producing shale oil. In this report, 1.9 cm diameter cores of Mahogany oil shale were pyrolyzed at different temperatures and heating rates. Detailed 3D imaging of core samples was done using multiscale X-ray computed tomography (CT) before and after pyrolysis to establish the pore structure. The pore structure of the unreacted material was not clear. Selected images of a core pyrolyzed at 400oC were obtained at voxel resolutions from 39 microns (?m) to 60 nanometers (nm). Some of the pore space created during pyrolysis was clearly visible at these resolutions and it was possible to distinguish between the reaction products and the host shale rock. The pore structure deduced from the images was used in Lattice Boltzmann simulations to calculate the permeability in the pore space. The permeabilities of the pyrolyzed samples of the silicate-rich zone were on the order of millidarcies, while the permeabilities of the kerogen-rich zone after pyrolysis were very anisotropic and about four orders of magnitude higher.

Lin, Chen-Luh; Miller, Jan

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Pyrolysis Kinetics and Chemical Structure Considerations of a Green River Oil Shale and Its Derivatives.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This work had the objective of determining both the kinetic parameters for the pyrolysis of oil shale and kerogen as well as using analytical techniques… (more)

Hillier, James L

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Known Challenges Associated with the Production, Transportation, Storage and Usage of Pyrolysis Oil in Residential and Industrial Settings  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Dr. Jani Lehto presentation at the May 9 Pyrolysis Oil Workshop on Known Challenges Associated with the Production, Transportation, Storage and Usage of Pyrolysis Oil in Residential and Industrial Settings.

31

Isolation of levoglucosan from pyrolysis oil derived from cellulose  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

High purity levoglucosan is obtained from pyrolysis oil derived from cellulose by: mixing pyrolysis oil with water and a basic metal hydroxide, oxide, or salt in amount sufficient to elevate pH values to a range of from about 12 to about 12.5, and adding an amount of the hydroxide, oxide, or salt in excess of the amount needed to obtain the pH range until colored materials of impurities from the oil are removed and a slurry is formed; drying the slurry azeotropically with methyl isobutyl ketone solvent to form a residue, and further drying the residue by evaporation; reducing the residue into a powder; continuously extracting the powder residue with ethyl acetate to provide a levoglucosan-rich extract; and concentrating the extract by removing ethyl acetate to provide crystalline levoglucosan. Preferably, Ca(OH)[sub 2] is added to adjust the pH to the elevated values, and then Ca(OH)[sub 2] is added in an excess amount needed. 3 figures.

Moens, L.

1994-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

32

Reaction mechanism and kinetics of pressurized pyrolysis of Chinese oil shale in the presence of water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A study of reaction mechanisms and chemical kinetics of pressurized pyrolysis of Chinese Liushuhe oil shale in the presence of water were conducted ... thermal degradation. It was found that the oil shale was fir...

Chaohe Fang; Shuyuan Li; Guili Ma; Hongyan Wang; Zhilong Huang

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Bio-mass for biomass: biological mass spectrometry techniques for biomass fast pyrolysis oils.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Biomass fast pyrolysis oils, or bio-oils, are a promising renewable energy source to supplement or replace petroleum-based products and fuels. However, there is a current… (more)

Dalluge, Erica A.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Metal Oxide Laser Ioniza2on Mass Spectrometry for the Direct Profiling of Pyrolysis Oil Cons2tuents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from the anoxic pyrolysis of biomass (py-oils) represent a promising, renewable of Pyrolysis Oil Cons2tuents Casey R. McAlpin and Kent J. Voorhees Colorado School: ·MOLI MS produces profiles of pyrolysis oil consGtuents without separa

35

Isolation of levoglucosan from lignocellulosic pyrolysis oil derived from wood or waste newsprint  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is provided for preparing high purity levoglucosan from lignocellulosic pyrolysis oils derived from wood or waste newsprint. The method includes reducing wood or newsprint to fine particle sizes, treating the particles with a hot mineral acid for a predetermined period of time, and filtering off and drying resulting solid wood or newsprint material; pyrolyzing the dried solid wood or newsprint material at temperatures between about 350 and 375 C to produce pyrolysis oils; treating the oils to liquid-liquid extraction with methyl isobutyl ketone to remove heavy tar materials from the oils, and to provide an aqueous fraction mixture of the oils containing primarily levoglucosan; treating the aqueous fraction mixtures with a basic metal salt in an amount sufficient to elevate pH values to a range of about 12 to about 12.5 and adding an amount of the salt in excess of the amount needed to obtain the pH range to remove colored materials of impurities from the oil and form a slurry, and freeze-drying the resulting slurry to produce a dry solid residue; and extracting the levoglucosan from the residue using ethyl acetate solvent to produce a purified crystalline levoglucosan. 2 figs.

Moens, L.

1995-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

36

Isolation of levoglucosan from lignocellulosic pyrolysis oil derived from wood or waste newsprint  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is provided for preparing high purity levoglucosan from lignocellulosic pyrolysis oils derived from wood or waste newsprint. The method includes reducing wood or newsprint to fine particle sizes, treating the particles with a hot mineral acid for a predetermined period of time, and filtering off and drying resulting solid wood or newsprint material; pyrolyzing the dried solid wood or newsprint material at temperatures between about 350.degree. and 375.degree. C. to produce pyrolysis oils; treating the oils to liquid-liquid extraction with methyl isobutyl ketone to remove heavy tar materials from the oils, and to provide an aqueous fraction mixture of the oils containing primarily levoglucosan; treating the aqueous fraction mixtures with a basic metal salt in an amount sufficient to elevate pH values to a range of about 12 to about 12.5 and adding an amount of the salt in excess of the amount needed to obtain the pH range to remove colored materials of impurities from the oil and form a slurry, and freeze-drying the resulting slurry to produce a dry solid residue; and extracting the levoglucosan from the residue using ethyl acetate solvent to produce a purified crystalline levoglucosan.

Moens, Luc (Lakewood, CO)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Characterization and pyrolysis behavior of novel anthracene oil derivatives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The characterization and pyrolysis behavior of a set of pitches prepared from anthracene oil have been described. The pitches were obtained from four successive cycles of a sequential process that begins with blowing air through the heated anthracene oil, to bring about recombination reactions. Reaction products are distilled to give a pitch residue and a lighter fraction. Thermal treatment/distillation cycles of this reaction product yield a pitch and a distillate fraction (unreacted anthracene oil) during each subsequent stage. Products obtained during the process have been characterized by elemental analysis, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and ultraviolet (UV)-fluorescence spectroscopy, and size-exclusion chromatography (SEC). The pyrolytic behavior of the anthracene oil derivatives was examined using a thermogravimetric balance. Thermal treatment of the anthracene oil and its (distilled) reaction products at 440-460{degree}C under 5 bar pressure leads to a partially anisotropic pitch with the formation of a liquid crystal phase (mesophase). The formation and evolution of these mesophases were analyzed by optical microscopy. 25 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

P. Alvarez; M. Granda; J. Sutil; R. Menendez; J.J. Fernandez; J.A. Vina; T.J. Morgan; M. Millan; A.A. Herod; R. Kandiyoti [Instituto Nacional del Carbon, Oviedo (Spain)

2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

38

Production of higher quality bio-oils by in-line esterification of pyrolysis vapor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The disclosure encompasses in-line reactive condensation processes via vapor phase esterification of bio-oil to decease reactive species concentration and water content in the oily phase of a two-phase oil, thereby increasing storage stability and heating value. Esterification of the bio-oil vapor occurs via the vapor phase contact and subsequent reaction of organic acids with ethanol during condensation results in the production of water and esters. The pyrolysis oil product can have an increased ester content and an increased stability when compared to a condensed pyrolysis oil product not treated with an atomized alcohol.

Hilten, Roger Norris; Das, Keshav; Kastner, James R; Bibens, Brian P

2014-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

39

Combustion Tests of Bio-Oils Derived from Biomass Slow Pyrolysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

ENEL in collaboration with Region Abruzzo and Tecnars has carried out some experimental combustion tests of bio-oil produced with a conventional slow pyrolysis process, with a partial economic support of EEC.

C. Rossi; R. Frandi; E. Bonfitto…

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Preparation of brightness stabilization agent for lignin containing pulp from biomass pyrolysis oils  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for producing a brightness stabilization mixture of water-soluble organic compounds from biomass pyrolysis oils comprising: a) size-reducing biomass material and pyrolyzing the size-reduced biomass material in a fluidized bed reactor; b) separating a char/ash component while maintaining char-pot temperatures to avoid condensation of pyrolysis vapors; c) condensing pyrolysis gases and vapors, and recovering pyrolysis oils by mixing the oils with acetone to obtain an oil-acetone mixture; d) evaporating acetone and recovering pyrolysis oils; e) extracting the pyrolysis oils with water to obtain a water extract; f) slurrying the water extract with carbon while stirring, and filtering the slurry to obtain a colorless filtrate; g) cooling the solution and stabilizing the solution against thermally-induced gelling and solidification by extraction with ethyl acetate to form an aqueous phase lower layer and an organic phase upper layer; h) discarding the upper organic layer and extracting the aqueous layer with ethyl acetate, and discarding the ethyl acetate fraction to obtain a brown-colored solution not susceptible to gelling or solidification upon heating; i) heating the solution to distill off water and other light components and concentrating a bottoms fraction comprising hydroxyacetaldehyde and other non-volatile components having high boiling points; and j) decolorizing the stabilized brown solution with activated carbon to obtain a colorless solution.

Agblevor, Foster A. (Blacksburg, VA); Besler-Guran, Serpil (Flemington, NJ)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes pyrolysis oils" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Semi-Open Pyrolysis of Oil Shale from the Garden Gulch Member of the Green River Formation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Semi-Open Pyrolysis of Oil Shale from the Garden Gulch Member of the Green River Formation ... Energy Fuels, Article ASAP ...

Alan K. Burnham; James R. McConaghy

2014-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

42

Guidelines for Transportation, Handling, and Use of Fast Pyrolysis Bio-Oil. 1. Flammability and Toxicity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The first bio-oil burner fuel standard in ASTM D7544 was approved in 2010. ... A technical specification for a quality specification for pyrolysis oil suitable for gasification feedstock for production of syngas and synthetic biofuels ... Because of the severity of the dermal changes (erythema/edema i.e., burns) and for ethical reasons, the eye irritation test was not run. ...

Anja Oasmaa; Anssi Källi; Christian Lindfors; Douglas C. Elliott; Dave Springer; Cordner Peacocke; David Chiaramonti

2012-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

43

Technical Information Exchange on Pyrolysis Oil: Potential for a Renewab;e Heating Oil Substation Fuel in New England  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This report summarizes the results of an information exchange sponsored by the DOE/EERE Bioenergy Technologies Office in Manchester, New Hampshire, on May 9-10, 2012. The participand identifies top challenges regarding feedstocks and production, logistics and compatibility, and operational issues, then prioritized next steps for expanding use of pyrolysis oil as a replacement for home heating oil in the Northeast

44

Synthesis of Mixed Metal Oxides for Hydrodeoxygenation of Pyrolysis Oil for Alternative Fuels Sarah McNew, Tiorra Ross and Carsten Sievers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· Flash pyrolysis on biomass [1] · Short residence times and flexible feed · Bio-oils produced are close to dissociate hydrogen Goal: synthesize metal free, sulfur free, catalysts for HDO Biomass Pyrolysis OilSynthesis of Mixed Metal Oxides for Hydrodeoxygenation of Pyrolysis Oil for Alternative Fuels Sarah

Das, Suman

45

Pyrolysis Using Microwave Heating: A Sustainable Process for Recycling Used Car Engine Oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Pyrolysis Using Microwave Heating: A Sustainable Process for Recycling Used Car Engine Oil ... A reaction temperature of 600 °C provided the greatest yield of commercially valuable products: the recovered liquid oils were composed of light paraffins and aromatic hydrocarbons that could be used as industrial feedstock; the remaining incondensable gases comprised light hydrocarbons that could potentially be used as a fuel source to power the process. ... The pyrolysis products leave the reactor and pass through a system of three water-cooled Liebig condensers [5, 6, 7], which collect condensed hydrocarbons in main and secondary collection flasks [8, 9]. ...

Su Shiung Lam; Alan D. Russell; Howard A. Chase

2010-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

46

Influence of inorganic compounds on char formation and quality of fast pyrolysis oils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Inorganic compounds, especially potassium, calcium, sodium, silicon, phosphorus, and chlorine, are the main constituents of ash in biomass feedstocks. The concentrations of ash in biomass feedstocks range from less than 1% in softwoods to 15% in herbaceous biomass and agricultural residues. During biomass pyrolysis, these inorganics, especially potassium and calcium, catalyze both decomposition and char formation reactions. Decomposition reactions may either result in levoglucosan-rich or hydroxyacetaldehyde-rich pyrolysis products depending on the concentration of the ash in the feedstocks. The catalytic effect of the ash levels off at high organic ion concentrations. Chars formed during these reactions invariably end up in the pyrolysis oils (biofuel oils). A high proportion of the alkali metals in the ash are sequestered in the chars. The presence of high concentrations of alkali metals in the biofuel oils make them unsuitable for combustion in boilers, diesel engines, and in turbine operations. The highest concentration of alkali metals are found in herbaceous feedstocks and agricultural residue biofuel oils. Leaching studies conducted on the chars suspended in the oils showed no leaching of the alkali metals from the chars into the oils. Our data suggest that hot gas filtration of the oils can effectively reduce the alkali metals contents of the biofuel oils to acceptable levels to be used as turbine, diesel engine, and boiler fuels.

Agbleyor, F.A.; Besler, S.; Montane, D. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Fast Pyrolysis Oil Stabilization: An Integrated Catalytic and Membrane Approach for Improved Bio-oils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This University of Massachusetts, Amherst project, "Fast Pyrolysis Oil Stabilization: An Integrated Catalytic and Membrane Approach for Improved Bio-oils" started on 1st February 2009 and finished on August 31st 2011. The project consisted following tasks: Task 1.0: Char Removal by Membrane Separation Technology The presence of char particles in the bio-oil causes problems in storage and end-use. Currently there is no well-established technology to remove char particles less than 10 micron in size. This study focused on the application of a liquid-phase microfiltration process to remove char particles from bio-oil down to slightly sub-micron levels. Tubular ceramic membranes of nominal pore sizes 0.5 and 0.8 ���µm were employed to carry out the microfiltration, which was conducted in the cross-flow mode at temperatures ranging from 38 to 45 C and at three different trans-membrane pressures varying from 1 to 3 bars. The results demonstrated the removal of the major quantity of char particles with a significant reduction in overall ash content of the bio-oil. The results clearly showed that the cake formation mechanism of fouling is predominant in this process. Task 2.0 Acid Removal by Membrane Separation Technology The feasibility of removing small organic acids from the aqueous fraction of fast pyrolysis bio-oils using nanofiltration (NF) and reverse osmosis (RO) membranes was studied. Experiments were carried out with a single solute solutions of acetic acid and glucose, binary solute solutions containing both acetic acid and glucose, and a model aqueous fraction of bio-oil (AFBO). Retention factors above 90% for glucose and below 0% for acetic acid were observed at feed pressures near 40 bar for single and binary solutions, so that their separation in the model AFBO was expected to be feasible. However, all of the membranes were irreversibly damaged when experiments were conducted with the model AFBO due to the presence of guaiacol in the feed solution. Experiments with model AFBO excluding guaiacol were also conducted. NF membranes showed retention factors of glucose greater than 80% and of acetic acid less than 15% when operated at transmembrane pressures near 60 bar. Task 3.0 Acid Removal by Catalytic Processing It was found that the TAN reduction in bio-oil was very difficult using low temperature hydrogenation in flow and batch reactors. Acetic acid is very resilient to hydrogenation and we could only achieve about 16% conversion for acetic acid. Although it was observed that acetic acid was not responsible for instability of aqueous fraction of bio-oil during ageing studies (described in task 5). The bimetallic catalyst PtRe/ceria-zirconia was found to be best catalyst because its ability to convert the acid functionality with low conversion to gas phase carbon. Hydrogenation of the whole bio-oil was carried out at 125���°C, 1450 psi over Ru/C catalyst in a flow reactor. Again, negligible acetic acid conversion was obtained in low temperature hydrogenation. Hydrogenation experiments with whole bio-oil were difficult to perform because of difficulty to pumping the high viscosity oil and reactor clogging. Task 4.0 Acid Removal using Ion Exchange Resins DOWEX M43 resin was used to carry out the neutralization of bio-oil using a packed bed column. The pH of the bio-oil increased from 2.43 to 3.7. The GC analysis of the samples showed that acetic acid was removed from the bio-oil during the neutralization and recovered in the methanol washing. But it was concluded that process would not be economical at large scale as it is extremely difficult to regenerate the resin once the bio-oil is passed over it. Task 5.0 Characterization of Upgraded Bio-oils We investigated the viscosity, microstructure, and chemical composition of bio-oils prepared by a fast pyrolysis approach, upon aging these fuels at 90���ºC for periods of several days. Our results suggest that the viscosity increase is not correlated with the acids or char present in the bio-oils. The

George W. Huber, Aniruddha A Upadhye, David M. Ford, Surita R. Bhatia, Phillip C. Badger

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

48

A high liquid yield process for retorting various organic materials including oil shale  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention is a continuous retorting process for various high molecular weight organic materials, including oil shale, that yields an enhanced output of liquid product. The organic material, mineral matter, and an acidic catalyst, that appreciably adsorbs alkenes on surface sites at prescribed temperatures, are mixed and introduced into a pyrolyzer. A circulating stream of olefin enriched pyrolysis gas is continuously swept through the organic material and catalyst, whereupon, as the result of pyrolysis, the enhanced liquid product output is provided. Mixed spent organic material, mineral matter, and cool catalyst are continuously withdrawn from the pyrolyzer. Combustion of the spent organic material and mineral matter serves to reheat the catalyst. Olefin depleted pyrolysis gas, from the pyrolyzer, is enriched in olefins and recycled into the pyrolyzer. The reheated acidic catalyst is separated from the mineral matter and again mixed with fresh organic material, to maintain the continuously cyclic process. 2 figs.

Coburn, T.T.

1988-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

49

High liquid yield process for retorting various organic materials including oil shale  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention is a continuous retorting process for various high molecular weight organic materials, including oil shale, that yields an enhanced output of liquid product. The organic material, mineral matter, and an acidic catalyst, that appreciably adsorbs alkenes on surface sites at prescribed temperatures, are mixed and introduced into a pyrolyzer. A circulating stream of olefin enriched pyrolysis gas is continuously swept through the organic material and catalyst, whereupon, as the result of pyrolysis, the enhanced liquid product output is provided. Mixed spent organic material, mineral matter, and cool catalyst are continuously withdrawn from the pyrolyzer. Combustion of the spent organic material and mineral matter serves to reheat the catalyst. Olefin depleted pyrolysis gas, from the pyrolyzer, is enriched in olefins and recycled into the pyrolyzer. The reheated acidic catalyst is separated from the mineral matter and again mixed with fresh organic material, to maintain the continuously cyclic process.

Coburn, Thomas T. (Livermore, CA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

1 Pore Scale Analysis of Oil Shale/Sands Pyrolysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

quality and volume of pore space that is created when oil shale is pyrolyzed for the purpose of producing

unknown authors

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Flash pyrolysis of sewage sludge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Flash pyrolysis of sewage sludge ... Influence of the Pyrolysis Temperature on Sewage Sludge Product Distribution, Bio-Oil, and Char Properties ... Influence of the Pyrolysis Temperature on Sewage Sludge Product Distribution, Bio-Oil, and Char Properties ...

Jan Piskorz; Donald S. Scott; Ian B. Westerberg

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Process and economic model of in-field heavy oil upgrading using aqueous pyrolysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A process and economic model for aqueous pyrolysis in-field upgrading of heavy oil has been developed. The model has been constructed using the ASPEN PLUS chemical process simulator. The process features cracking of heavy oil at moderate temperatures in the presence of water to increase oil quality and thus the value of the oil. Calculations with the model indicate that for a 464 Mg/day (3,000 bbl/day) process, which increases the oil API gravity of the processed oil from 13.5{degree} to 22.4{degree}, the required value increase of the oil would need to be at least $2.80/Mg{center_dot}{degree}API($0.40/bbl{center_dot}{degree}API) to make the process economically attractive. This level of upgrading has been demonstrated in preliminary experiments with candidate catalysts. For improved catalysts capable of having the coke make and increasing the pyrolysis rate, a required price increase for the oil as low as $1.34/Mg{center_dot}{degree}API ($0.21/bbl{center_dot}{degree}API)has been calculated.

Thorsness, C. B., LLNL

1997-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

53

Hydrocracking of a Plastics Pyrolysis Gas Oil to Naphtha  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

1 Of the approximately 80 billion pounds of plastics currently produced in the United States, most eventually ends up in landfills, with only 2?3% being recycled. ... Disposal of these waste plastics by direct incineration would lead to increased greenhouse gas emissions, primarily carbon dioxide, and particulate pollutants, while direct mechanical recycling of plastics is limited by the fact that reconstituted objects generally possess a downgraded appearance in comparison with virgin plastics. ... 14 On the other hand, there has been little study of the hydrocracking of waste plastic-derived pyrolysis liquids. ...

H. S. Joo; James A. Guin

1997-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

54

Oil shale pyrolysis: benchscale experimental studies and modeling.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Oil shale is a complex material that is composed of organic matter, mineral matrix and trace amount of bound and/or unbound water. The endothermic decomposition… (more)

Tiwari, Pankaj

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Technical Information Exchange on Pyrolysis Oil: Potential for...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Potential for a renewable heating oil substitution fuel in New England - Agenda Time Pre-Conference Presentation and Discussion (Grenier Room) May 8, 2012; Manchester New Hampshire...

56

Upgrading of heavy oil from the San Joaquin valley of California by aqueous pyrolysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Midway Sunset crude oil and well-head oil were treated at elevated temperatures in a closed system with the presence of water. Mild to moderate upgrading, as measured by increasing in API gravity, was observed at 400 C or above. Reduced pressure operation exhibited upgrading activity comparable to upgrading under normal aqueous pyrolysis conditions. Reduced pressure operation was obtained by the use of specific blending methods, a surfactant, and the proper amount of water. The use of metal complexes provided additional upgrading. The best of the minimum set tested was Co(II) 2-ethylhexanoate. Fe, Zn, Mo, Cu, and Ni complexes also showed some levels of activity.

Reynolds, J.G.; Murray, A.M.; Nuxoll, E.V.; Fox, G.A.; Thorsness, C.B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Khan, M.R. [Texaco R and D, Beacon, NY (United States)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Effects of low temperature preheating on the pyrolysis products from blocks of oil shale.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Oil shale is a sedimentary rock composed of inorganic and organic fractions. The inorganic minerals contained in oil shale include: dolomite, calcite, quartz, i1 lite,… (more)

Alston, David W.

1905-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Overview of Applications of Biomass Fast Pyrolysis Oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

National Bioenergy Center NREL, 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401, and Bio-Energy Research Group, Aston University, Birmingham B4 7ET, UK ... The paper critically reviews scientific and technical developments in applications of bio-oil to date and concludes with some suggestions for research and strategic developments. ... Literature Review. ...

S. Czernik; A. V. Bridgwater

2004-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

59

Pyrolysis Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry Studies to Evaluate High-Temperature Aqueous Pretreatment as a Way to Modify the Composition of Bio-Oil from Fast Pyrolysis of Wheat Straw  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Pyrolysis Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry Studies to Evaluate High-Temperature Aqueous Pretreatment as a Way to Modify the Composition of Bio-Oil from Fast Pyrolysis of Wheat Straw ... ?-Cellulose was obtained from Sigma-Aldrich (St. Louis, Missouri). ... This evidence suggests that CHW pretreatment may produce bio-oil that is composed of a greater amount of sugars and furanics and fewer small molecules and may therefore be a viable option to modify the chemical composition of bio-oils. ...

Robert Lee Johnson; Shi-Shen Liaw; Manuel Garcia-Perez; Su Ha; Sean S.-Y. Lin; Armando G. McDonald; Shulin Chen

2009-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

60

Method and system including a double rotary kiln pyrolysis or gasification of waste material  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of destructively distilling an organic material in particulate form wherein the particulates are introduced through an inlet into one end of an inner rotating kiln ganged to and coaxial with an outer rotating kiln. The inner and outer kilns define a cylindrical annular space with the inlet being positioned in registry with the axis of rotation of the ganged kilns. During operation, the temperature of the wall of the inner rotary kiln at the inlet is not less than about 500.degree. C. to heat the particulate material to a temperature in the range of from about 200.degree. C. to about 900.degree. C. in a pyrolyzing atmosphere to reduce the particulate material as it moves from the one end toward the other end. The reduced particulates including char are transferred to the annular space between the inner and the outer rotating kilns near the other end of the inner rotating kiln and moved longitudinally in the annular space from near the other end toward the one end in the presence of oxygen to combust the char at an elevated temperature to produce a waste material including ash. Also, heat is provided which is transferred to the inner kiln. The waste material including ash leaves the outer rotating kiln near the one end and the pyrolysis vapor leaves through the particulate material inlet.

McIntosh, Michael J. (Bolingbrook, IL); Arzoumanidis, Gregory G. (Naperville, IL)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes pyrolysis oils" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

A method and system including a double rotary kiln pyrolysis or gasification of waste material  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method is described for destructively distilling an organic material in particulate form wherein the particulates are introduced through an inlet into one end of an inner rotating kiln ganged to and coaxial with an outer rotating kiln. The inner and outer kilns define a cylindrical annular space with the inlet being positioned in registry with the axis of rotation of the ganged kilns. During operation, the temperature of the wall of the inner rotary kiln at the inlet is not less than about 500 C to heat the particulate material to a temperature in the range of from about 200 C to about 900 C in a pyrolyzing atmosphere to reduce the particulate material as it moves from the one end toward the other end. The reduced particulates including char are transferred to the annular space between the inner and the outer rotating kilns near the other end of the inner rotating kiln and moved longitudinally in the annular space from near the other end toward the one end in the presence of oxygen to combust the char at an elevated temperature to produce a waste material including ash. Also, heat is provided which is transferred to the inner kiln. The waste material including ash leaves the outer rotating kiln near the one end and the pyrolysis vapor leaves through the particulate material inlet.

McIntosh, M.J.; Arzoumanidis, G.G.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

62

Method and system including a double rotary kiln pyrolysis or gasification of waste material  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is described for destructively distilling an organic material in particulate form wherein the particulates are introduced through an inlet into one end of an inner rotating kiln ganged to and coaxial with an outer rotating kiln. The inner and outer kilns define a cylindrical annular space with the inlet being positioned in registry with the axis of rotation of the ganged kilns. During operation, the temperature of the wall of the inner rotary kiln at the inlet is not less than about 500 C to heat the particulate material to a temperature in the range of from about 200 C to about 900 C in a pyrolyzing atmosphere to reduce the particulate material as it moves from the one end toward the other end. The reduced particulates including char are transferred to the annular space between the inner and the outer rotating kilns near the other end of the inner rotating kiln and moved longitudinally in the annular space from near the other end toward the one end in the presence of oxygen to combust the char at an elevated temperature to produce a waste material including ash. Also, heat is provided which is transferred to the inner kiln. The waste material including ash leaves the outer rotating kiln near the one end and the pyrolysis vapor leaves through the particulate material inlet. 5 figs.

McIntosh, M.J.; Arzoumanidis, G.G.

1997-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

63

Facilities: NHMFL 9.4 Tesla Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometer Citation: Characterization of Pine Pellet and Peanut Hull Pyrolysis of Bio-Oils by Negative-Ion Electrospray Ionization Fourier  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with greater than 1% relative abundance in either phase are shown. Pyrolysis of solid biomass, in this case: Characterization of Pine Pellet and Peanut Hull Pyrolysis of Bio-Oils by Negative-Ion Electrospray Ionization of nitrogen-containing species identified in the peanut hull pyrolysis oil by FT-ICR mass spectrometry

Weston, Ken

64

FCC Pilot Plant Results with Vegetable Oil and Pyrolysis Oil Feeds  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Breakout Session 2: Frontiers and Horizons Session 2–D: Working Together: Conventional Refineries and Bio-Oil R&D Technologies E. Thomas (Tom) Habib, Jr., Director, Customer Research Partnerships, W.R. Grace & Co.

65

Production of Bio-oil from Alfalfa Stems by Fluidized-Bed Fast Pyrolysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Findings included a lower-than-average yield of bio-oil and a higher-than-average yield of charcoal from alfalfa stems, compared to previous results for other biomass feedstocks. ...

Akwasi A. Boateng; Charles A. Mullen; Neil Goldberg; Kevin B. Hicks; Hans-Joachim G. Jung; JoAnn F. S. Lamb

2008-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

66

Results of rapid pyrolysis experiments using eastern US oil shale in the Livermore solid-recycle retort  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the past several years Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has operated a 2-ton/day pilot-scale solid-recycle system for the study of oil shale retorting under rapid-pyrolysis conditions. Results of processing eastern US New Albany oil shale are presented and compared with results obtained previously using two western US Green River oil shales. The retort consists of a cascading mixer and plug-flow soak-tank pyrolyzer with an air lift pipe and cascading-bed combustor. In the solid-recycle system, spent shale leaving the pyrolyzer is burned in the lift and cascading-bed combustor and then returned to the retort to heat the incoming raw shale. In laboratory experiments, when raw shale is rapidly heated in a fluidized bed of sand, oil yields above those of Fischer assay are obtained. In the present experiments, hot-recycled shale is used as the heat-carrying media, resulting in oil yields comparable to those obtained from Fischer assay. The distribution and composition of solid, oil, and gas throughout the recycle system is reported for the three shales studied. The distribution of sulfur and nitrogen during processing Green River oil shale has been the focus of environmental studies at LLNL. Eastern oil shale contains 5 to 10 times more sulfur and approximately the same amount of nitrogen as western oil shale. The high sulfur content coupled with low carbonate mineral concentrations results in significant sulfur releases in the combustor-gas, compared with trace releases for western shale. Iron oxide in the recycled solid was found to effectively scrub H/sub 2/S from the pyrolysis gas for both western and eastern shales. From 0.4 to 3% of the raw shale nitrogen is released as NO/sub x/ in the combustor-gas for western shale. Releases for New Albany shale are one-tenth these levels. 8 refs., 9 figs., 7 tabs.

Cena, R.J.; Taylor, R.W.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Flash pyrolysis of kerogens from algal rich oil shales from the Eocene Huadian Formation, NE China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The hydrocarbon composition of the kerogen fractions of two samples (HD-20 and HD-21) from oil shale layer 4 in the Eocene Huadian Formation, NE China were investigated by analytical flash pyrolysis (650 °C/10 s) followed by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (Py–GC–MS). Organic petrography showed that the two kerogens were almost entirely derived from algal remains but contained very different algal maceral compositions, with 40% of the macerals in HD-20 being of macroalgal origin that were not present in HD-21. Py–GC–MS yielded high concentrations of n-alkanes from both kerogens, but with different molecular weight profiles due to the different algal contributors to the two kerogen samples. The hydrocarbon pyrolysates generated at 650 °C from HD-21 in which the green microalga Botryococcus braunii was identified showed a higher proportion of longer chain alkanes and alkenes presumably from cracking of the botryococcus algaenan. We also identified a C40 monoaromatic lycopane derivative, which was absent in the HD-20. The high hydrocarbon potential of both kerogens can be attributed to common microalgal sources, whereas the macroalgae, which is abundant in HD-20, makes only a minor contribution to the hydrocarbon products.

Zhirong Zhang; John K. Volkman; Paul F. Greenwood; Wenxuan Hu; Jianzhong Qin; Tenger Borjigin; Changbo Zhai; Weixin Liu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Lignin Fast Pyrolysis: Results from an International Collaboration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An international study of fast pyrolysis of lignin was undertaken. Fourteen laboratories in eight different countries contributed. Two lignin samples were distributed to the laboratories for analysis and bench-scale process testing in fast pyrolysis. Analyses included proximate and ultimate analysis, thermogravimetric analysis, and analytical pyrolysis. The bench-scale test included bubbling fluidized bed reactors and entrained flow systems. Based on the results of the various analyses and tests it was concluded that a concentrated lignin (estimated at about 50% lignin and 50% cellulose) behaved like a typical biomass, producing a slightly reduced amount of a fairly typical bio-oil, while a purified lignin material was difficult to process in the fast pyrolysis reactors and produced a much lower amount of a different kind of bio-oil. It was concluded that for highly concentrated lignin feedstocks new reactor designs will be required other than the typical fluidized bed fast pyrolysis systems.

Nowakowski, Daniel J.; Bridgwater, Anthony V.; Elliott, Douglas C.; Meier, Dietrich; de Wild, Paul

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

The effect of clay catalyst on the chemical composition of bio-oil obtained by co-pyrolysis of cellulose and polyethylene  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: • Non-catalytic and catalytic fast pyrolysis of cellulose/polyethylene blend was carried out in a laboratory scale reactor. • Optimization of process temperature was done. • Optimization of clay catalyst type and amount for co-pyrolysis of cellulose and polyethylene was done. • The product yields and the chemical composition of bio-oil was investigated. - Abstract: Cellulose/polyethylene (CPE) mixture 3:1, w/w with and without three clay catalysts (K10 – montmorillonite K10, KSF – montmorillonite KSF, B – Bentonite) addition were subjected to pyrolysis at temperatures 400, 450 and 500 °C with heating rate of 100 °C/s to produce bio-oil with high yield. The pyrolytic oil yield was in the range of 41.3–79.5 wt% depending on the temperature, the type and the amount of catalyst. The non-catalytic fast pyrolysis at 500 °C gives the highest yield of bio-oil (79.5 wt%). The higher temperature of catalytic pyrolysis of cellulose/polyethylene mixture the higher yield of bio-oil is. Contrarily, increasing amount of montmorillonite results in significant, almost linear decrease in bio-oil yield followed by a significant increase of gas yield. The addition of clay catalysts to CPE mixture has a various influence on the distribution of bio-oil components. The addition of montmorillonite K10 to cellulose/polyethylene mixture promotes the deepest conversion of polyethylene and cellulose. Additionally, more saturated than unsaturated hydrocarbons are present in resultant bio-oils. The proportion of liquid hydrocarbons is the highest when a montmorillonite K10 is acting as a catalyst.

Solak, Agnieszka; Rutkowski, Piotr, E-mail: piotr.rutkowski@pwr.wroc.pl

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

70

Pyrolysis of waste animal fats in a fixed-bed reactor: Production and characterization of bio-oil and bio-char  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: • Produced bio-fuels (bio-oil and bio-char) from some animal fatty wastes. • Investigated the effects of main parameters on pyrolysis products distribution. • Determined the suitable conditions for the production of the maximum of bio-oil. • Characterized bio-oils and bio-chars obtained from several animal fatty wastes. - Abstract: Several animal (lamb, poultry and swine) fatty wastes were pyrolyzed under nitrogen, in a laboratory scale fixed-bed reactor and the main products (liquid bio-oil, solid bio-char and syngas) were obtained. The purpose of this study is to produce and characterize bio-oil and bio-char obtained from pyrolysis of animal fatty wastes. The maximum production of bio-oil was achieved at a pyrolysis temperature of 500 °C and a heating rate of 5 °C/min. The chemical (GC–MS analyses) and spectroscopic analyses (FTIR analyses) of bio-oil showed that it is a complex mixture consisting of different classes of organic compounds, i.e., hydrocarbons (alkanes, alkenes, cyclic compounds…etc.), carboxylic acids, aldehydes, ketones, esters,…etc. According to fuel properties, produced bio-oils showed good properties, suitable for its use as an engine fuel or as a potential source for synthetic fuels and chemical feedstock. Obtained bio-chars had low carbon content and high ash content which make them unattractive for as renewable source energy.

Ben Hassen-Trabelsi, A., E-mail: aidabenhassen@yahoo.fr [Centre de Recherche et de Technologies de l’Energie (CRTEn), Technopôle Borj-Cédria, B.P 95, 2050, Hammam Lif (Tunisia); Kraiem, T. [Centre de Recherche et de Technologies de l’Energie (CRTEn), Technopôle Borj-Cédria, B.P 95, 2050, Hammam Lif (Tunisia); Département de Géologie, Université de Tunis, 2092, Tunis (Tunisia); Naoui, S. [Centre de Recherche et de Technologies de l’Energie (CRTEn), Technopôle Borj-Cédria, B.P 95, 2050, Hammam Lif (Tunisia); Belayouni, H. [Département de Géologie, Université de Tunis, 2092, Tunis (Tunisia)

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

71

Distributed Reforming of Biomass Pyrolysis Oils: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA number CRD-06-00192  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is for Chevron and NREL to collaborate in determining the effect of bio-oil composition variability on autothermal reforming performance including bio-oil volatilization, homogeneous oxidative cracking, and catalytic reforming.

Czernik, S.

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Study on the pyrolysis of Moroccan oil shale with poly (ethylene terephthalate)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Investigations into the pyrolytic behaviours of oil shale, poly (ethylene terephthalate) (PET) and...

A. Aboulkas; K. El Harfi; A. El Bouadili…

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

U.S., Canada, and Finland Pyrolysis Collaborations  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

feeds to compare bio-oil product quality - Evaluate pyrolysis oil vapor quality by small scale analysis - Understand upgrading requirements for bio-oil from low quality...

74

Proceedings of the Biomass Pyrolysis Oil Properties and Combustion Meeting, 26-28 September 1994, Estes Park, Colorado  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The increasing scale-up of fast pyrolysis in North America and Europe, as well as the exploration and expansion of markets for the energy use of biocrude oils that now needs to take place, suggested that it was timely to convene an international meeting on the properties and combustion behavior of these oils. A common understanding of the state-of-the-art and technical and other challenges which need to be met during the commercialization of biocrude fuel use, can be achieved. The technical issues and understanding of combustion of these oils are rapidly being advanced through R&D in the United States. Canada, Europe and Scandinavia. It is obvious that for the maximum economic impact of biocrude, it will be necessary to have a common set of specifications so that oils can be used interchangeably with engines and combustors which require minimal modification to use these renewable fuels. Fundamental and applied studies being pursued in several countries are brought together in this workshop so that we can arrive at common strategies. In this way, both the science and the commercialization are advanced to the benefit of all, without detracting from the competitive development of both the technology and its applications. This United States-Canada-Finland collaboration has led to the two and one half day specialists meeting at which the technical basis for advances in biocrude development is discussed. The goal is to arrive at a common agenda on issues that cross national boundaries in this area. Examples of agenda items are combustion phenomena, the behavior of trace components of the oil (N, alkali metals), the formation of NOx in combustion, the need for common standards and environmental safety and health issues in the handling, storage and transportation of biocrudes.

Milne, T.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

FLUIDIZABLE CATALYSTS FOR PRODUCING HYDROGEN BY STEAM REFORMING BIOMASS PYROLYSIS LIQUIDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FLUIDIZABLE CATALYSTS FOR PRODUCING HYDROGEN BY STEAM REFORMING BIOMASS PYROLYSIS LIQUIDS Kimberly established that biomass pyrolysis oil could be steam-reformed to generate hydrogen using non pyrolysis oil could be almost stoichiometrically converted to hydrogen. However, process performance

76

Low temperature pyrolysis of coal or oil shale in the presence of calcium compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A coal pyrolysis technique or process is described in which particulate coal is pyrolyzed in the presence of about 5 to 21 wt. % of a calcium compound selected from calcium oxide, calcined (hydrate) dolomite, or calcined calcium hydrate to produce a high quality hydrocarbon liquid and a combustible product gas which are characterized by low sulfur content. The pyrolysis is achieved by heating the coal-calcium compound mixture at a relatively slow rate at a temperature of about 450.degree. to 700.degree. C. over a duration of about 10 to 60 minutes in a fixed or moving bed reactor. The gas exhibits an increased yield in hydrogen and C.sub.1 -C.sub.8 hydrocarbons and a reduction in H.sub.2 S over gas obtainable by pyrolyzing cola without the calcium compound. The liquid product obtained is of a sufficient quality to permit its use directly as a fuel and has a reduced sulfur and oxygen content which inhibits polymerization during storage.

Khan, M. Rashid (Morgantown, WV)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Working Group Meeting Presentation Guidance at a Glance Distributed Reforming of Biomass Pyrolysis Oils  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(75%) Char (13%) Gas (12%) Catalytic Auto-thermal Reforming of Bio-Oil at 650oC: 0.71 CH1.98O0.76 + 0 Case (Ethanol Case) Bio-oil Storage Tank $106,040 Reformer $803,000 Shift Reactor, PSA, BOP $1 Oils DOE Bio-Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed Reforming Working Group Meeting November 6

78

Development of a Computational Fluid Dynamics Model for Combustion of Fast Pyrolysis Liquid (Bio-oil).  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??A study was carried out into the computational fluid dynamic simulation of bio-oil combustion. Measurements were taken in an empirical burner to obtain information regarding… (more)

McGrath, Arran Thomas

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Use of bark-derived pyrolysis oils ass a phenol substitute in structural panel adhesives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The main objective of this program was to pilot the world's first commercial-scale production of an acceptable phenol formaldehyde (PF) resin containing natural resin (NR) ingredients, for use as an adhesive in Oriented-Strand Board (OSB) and plywood panel products. Natural Resin products, specifically MNRP are not lignin ''fillers''. They are chemically active, natural phenolics that effectively displace significant amounts of phenol in PF resins, and which are extracted from bark-derived and wood-derived bio-oils. Other objectives included the enhancement of the economics of NR (MNRP) production by optimizing the production of certain Rapid Thermal Processing (RTP{trademark}) byproducts, particularly char and activated carbon. The options were to activate the char for use in waste-water and/or stack gas purification. The preliminary results indicate that RTP{trademark} carbon may ultimately serve as a feedstock for activated carbon synthesis, as a fuel to be used within the wood product mill, or a fuel for an electrical power generating facility. Incorporation of the char as an industrial heat source for use in mill operations was L-P's initial intention for the carbon, and was also of interest to Weyerhaeuser as they stepped into in the project.

Louisiana Pacific Corp

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Process for oil shale retorting  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Particulate oil shale is subjected to a pyrolysis with a hot, non-oxygenous gas in a pyrolysis vessel, with the products of the pyrolysis of the shale contained kerogen being withdrawn as an entrained mist of shale oil droplets in a gas for a separation of the liquid from the gas. Hot retorted shale withdrawn from the pyrolysis vessel is treated in a separate container with an oxygenous gas so as to provide combustion of residual carbon retained on the shale, producing a high temperature gas for the production of some steam and for heating the non-oxygenous gas used in the oil shale retorting process in the first vessel. The net energy recovery includes essentially complete recovery of the organic hydrocarbon material in the oil shale as a liquid shale oil, a high BTU gas, and high temperature steam.

Jones, John B. (300 Enterprise Bldg., Grand Junction, CO 80501); Kunchal, S. Kumar (300 Enterprise Bldg., Grand Junction, CO 80501)

1981-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes pyrolysis oils" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Rapid pyrolysis of Green River and New Albany oil shales in solid-recycle systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We are studying second generation oil shale retorting by a combined laboratory and modeling program coupled with operation of a 1 tonne-per-day solid-recycle pilot retorting facility. In the retort, we have measured oil yields equal to Fischer assay for Western, Green River shale and Eastern, New Albany shale. Laboratory experiments have measured yields of 125% of Fischer assay under ideal conditions in sand fluidized beds. However, when oxidized (or spent) shale is present in the bed, a decline in yield is observed along with increased coke formation. Recycling clay catalysts may improve oil yield by olefin absorption on active sites, preventing coke formation on these sites and allowing olefin incorporation into the oil. We studied the solid mixing limits in solid-recycle systems and conclude that nearly intimate mixing is required for adequate heat transfer and to minimize oil coke formation. Recycling oxidized shale has shown to self-scrub H/sub 2/S and SO/sub 2/ when processing Western shale. Cooling of spent shale with water from 500/degree/C releases H/sub 2/S. We describe an apparatus which uses solid-recycle to reduce the temperature before water spray to cool the shale without H/sub 2/S release. 6 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

Cena, R.J.

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

The effects of biomass pretreatments on the products of fast pyrolysis.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Fast pyrolysis thermochemically degrades lignocellulosic material into solid char, organic liquids, and gaseous products. Using fast pyrolysis to produce renewable liquid bio-oil to replace crude… (more)

Kasparbauer, Randall Dennis

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Gas Evolution from the Pyrolysis of Jordan Oil Shale in A Fixed-bed Reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Jordan oil shale from El-Lajjun deposit was pyrolysed in ... and nitrogen/steam on the product yield and gas composition were investigated. The gases analysed were H2, CO, CO2 and hydrocarbons from C1 to C4. The ...

J. M. Nazzal

84

Major Products Obtained from Plasma Torch Pyrolysis of Sunflower-Oil Cake  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Therefore, biomass waste is one of the bioenergy sources and can be converted to syngas and liquid oil as a fuel or raw material to further produce chemical feedstocks. ... (1) Air compressor, (2) N2-separation device, (3) power-supply chopper, (4) argon cylinder, (5) sample input apparatus, (6) sample, (7) plasma torch and reactor, (8) water condenser bath, (9) quench system, (10) gas detectors and analytical instruments, (11) storage tank, and (12) direct burner. ...

Je-Lueng Shie; Ching-Yuan Chang; Wen-Kai Tu; Yu-Chieh Yang; Jui-Ke Liao; Chin-Ching Tzeng; Heng-Yi Li; Yuh-Jenq Yu; Ching-Hui Kuo; Lieh-Chih Chang

2007-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

85

Optimization of Jatropha Oil Extraction and Its By-Product Utilization by Pyrolysis Method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bio-Energy Testing and Analysis Laboratory EERE Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy EIA Energy Information Administration FC Fixed Carbon GC Gas Chromatography HID Helium Ionization Detector LSD Least Significant Difference NTP Normal..., resulting in 50 wt.% oil yield, 23 wt.% char, 17 wt.% gas and ash. 20 CHAPTER III METHODOLOGY All experiments of this study were performed at the Bio-Energy Testing and Analysis Laboratory (BETA Lab) of the Biological and Agricultural...

Kongkasawan, Jinjuta 1987-

2012-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

86

Liquid-phase Processing of Fast Pyrolysis Bio-oil using Pt/HZSM-5 Catalyst  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

such as switchgrass, sorghum and miscanthus, agriculture crops such as corn and sugarcane, municipal solid waste, agriculture wastes and forest residues. Energy crops are more preferred since they produce high yield, low fertilizer application requirements and low...), plastic wastes (Bhattacharya et al., 2009; Karaduman et al., 2001; Rutkowski and 7 Kubacki, 2006; Scott et al., 1990), waste biomass like oil cakes (?zbay et al., 2001), energy crops (He et al., 2009), and forest residues (Ingram et al., 2007...

Santos, Bjorn Sanchez

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Biomass Derivatives Competitive with Heating Oil Costs.  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation at the May 9, 2012, Pyrolysis Oil Workship on biomass derivatives competitive with heating oil costs.

88

Understanding the product distribution from biomass fast pyrolysis.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Fast pyrolysis of biomass is an attractive route to transform solid biomass into a liquid bio-oil, which has been envisioned as a renewable substitute for… (more)

Patwardhan, Pushkaraj Ramchandra

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Pyrolysis of waste tyres: A review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Pyrolysis of waste tyres produces oil, gas and char, and recovered steel. • Batch, screw kiln, rotary kiln, vacuum and fluidised-bed are main reactor types. • Product yields are influenced by reactor type, temperature and heating rate. • Pyrolysis oils are complex and can be used as chemical feedstock or fuel. • Research into higher value products from the tyre pyrolysis process is reviewed. - Abstract: Approximately 1.5 billion tyres are produced each year which will eventually enter the waste stream representing a major potential waste and environmental problem. However, there is growing interest in pyrolysis as a technology to treat tyres to produce valuable oil, char and gas products. The most common reactors used are fixed-bed (batch), screw kiln, rotary kiln, vacuum and fluidised-bed. The key influence on the product yield, and gas and oil composition, is the type of reactor used which in turn determines the temperature and heating rate. Tyre pyrolysis oil is chemically very complex containing aliphatic, aromatic, hetero-atom and polar fractions. The fuel characteristics of the tyre oil shows that it is similar to a gas oil or light fuel oil and has been successfully combusted in test furnaces and engines. The main gases produced from the pyrolysis of waste tyres are H{sub 2}, C{sub 1}–C{sub 4} hydrocarbons, CO{sub 2}, CO and H{sub 2}S. Upgrading tyre pyrolysis products to high value products has concentrated on char upgrading to higher quality carbon black and to activated carbon. The use of catalysts to upgrade the oil to a aromatic-rich chemical feedstock or the production of hydrogen from waste tyres has also been reported. Examples of commercial and semi-commercial scale tyre pyrolysis systems show that small scale batch reactors and continuous rotary kiln reactors have been developed to commercial scale.

Williams, Paul T., E-mail: p.t.williams@leeds.ac.uk

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

90

Vacuum pyrolysis of bark residues and primary sludges  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Black spruce bark residues and primary sludges derived from the operation of the Daishowa pulp and paper plant in Quebec City, PQ, were processed by vacuum pyrolysis in a laboratory-scale batch reactor. The pyrolysis oil, water, charcoal, and gas were recovered and analyzed. The bark residues yielded 30.6% oil and 34.1% charcoal, and the primary sludges gave 40.1% oil and 30.1% charcoal on a feedstock air-dry basis. The oil phases recovered from the two pyrolysis experiments were fractionated into eight fractions; they were analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Both pyrolysis oil samples had a high content of phenolic compounds. These oils contained various fine chemicals that have possible commercial potential. Aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, as well as long- and short-chain carboxylic acids, are also present in both pyrolysis oils.

Pakdel, H.; Couture, G.; Roy, C. (Univ. Laval, Ste-Foy, Quebec (Canada))

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Chemical Characterization and Water Content Determination of Bio-Oils Obtained from Various Biomass Species using 31P NMR Spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pyrolysis is a promising approach to utilize biomass for biofuels. One of the key challenges for this conversion is how to analyze complicated components in the pyrolysis oils. Water contents of pyrolysis oils are normally analyzed by Karl Fischer titration. The use of 2-chloro-4,4,5,5,-tetramethyl-1,3,2-dioxaphospholane followed by {sup 31}P NMR analysis has been used to quantitatively analyze the structure of hydroxyl groups in lignin and whole biomass. Results: {sup 31}P NMR analysis of pyrolysis oils is a novel technique to simultaneously characterize components and analyze water contents in pyrolysis oils produced from various biomasses. The water contents of various pyrolysis oils range from 16 to 40 wt%. The pyrolysis oils obtained from Loblolly pine had higher guaiacyl content, while that from oak had a higher syringyl content. Conclusion: The comparison with Karl Fischer titration shows that {sup 31}P NMR could also reliably be used to measure the water content of pyrolysis oils. Simultaneously with analysis of water content, quantitative characterization of hydroxyl groups, including aliphatic, C-5 substituted/syringyl, guaiacyl, p-hydroxyl phenyl and carboxylic hydroxyl groups, could also be provided by {sup 31}P NMR analysis.

David, K.; Ben, H.; Muzzy, J.; Feik, C.; Iisa, K.; Ragauskas, A.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

The technology of the New South Wales torbanite : including an introduction on oil shale.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Although the nature of the products of thermal decomposition of oil shale has attracted the attention of both scientist and industrialist, oil shale possibly ranks… (more)

Cane, Reginald Frank

1946-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Biomass Feedstocks for Renewable Fuel Production: A review of the impacts of feedstock and pretreatment on the yield and product distribution of fast pyrolysis bio-oils and vapors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Renewable transportation fuels from biomass have the potential to substantially reduce greenhouse gas emissions and diversify global fuel supplies. Thermal conversion by fast pyrolysis converts up to 75% of the starting plant material (and its energy content) to a bio-oil intermediate suitable for upgrading to motor fuel. Woody biomass, by far the most widely-used and researched material, is generally preferred in thermochemical processes due to its low ash content and high quality bio-oil produced. However, the availability and cost of biomass resources, e.g. forest residues, agricultural residues, or dedicated energy crops, vary greatly by region and will be key determinates in the overall economic feasibility of a pyrolysis-to-fuel process. Formulation or blending of various feedstocks, combined with thermal and/or chemical pretreatment, could facilitate a consistent, high-volume, lower-cost biomass supply to an emerging biofuels industry. However, the impact of biomass type and pretreatment conditions on bio-oil yield and quality, and the potential process implications, are not well understood. This literature review summarizes the current state of knowledge regarding the effect of feedstock and pretreatments on the yield, product distribution, and upgradability of bio-oil.

Daniel Carpenter; Stefan Czernik; Whitney Jablonski; Tyler L. Westover

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Effect of Acid, Alkali, and Steam Explosion Pretreatments on Characteristics of Bio-Oil Produced from Pinewood  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bio-oil produced from pinewood by fast pyrolysis has the potential to be a valuable substitute for fossil fuels. Pretreatment prior to the fast pyrolysis process has been shown to alter the structure and chemical composition of biomass. To determine the influence of biomass pretreatments on bio-oil produced during fast pyrolysis, we tested three pretreatment methods: dilute acid, dilute alkali, and steam explosion. Bio-oils were produced from untreated and pretreated pinewood feedstocks in an auger reactor at 450 C. The bio-oils�¢���� physical properties including pH, water content, acid value, density, viscosity, and heating value were measured. Chemical characteristics of the bio-oils were determined by gas chromatographymass spectrometry. Results showed that bio-oil yield and composition were influenced by biomass pretreatment. Of the three pretreatment methods, 1%H2SO4 pretreatment resulted in the highest bio-oil yield and best bio-oil quality.

Wang, Hui; Srinivasan, Radhakrishnan; Yu, Fei; Steele, Philip; Li, Qi; Mitchell, Brian

2011-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

95

Characterisation and Evaluation of Wastes for Treatment in the Batch Pyrolysis Plant in Studsvik, Sweden - 13586  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The new batch pyrolysis plant in Studsvik is built primarily for treatment of uranium containing dry active waste, 'DAW'. Several other waste types have been identified that are considered or assumed suitable for treatment in the pyrolysis plant because of the possibility to carefully control the atmosphere and temperature of the thermal treatment. These waste types must be characterised and an evaluation must be made with a BAT perspective. Studsvik have performed or plan to perform lab scale pyrolysis tests on a number of different waste types. These include: - Pyrophoric materials (uranium shavings), - Uranium chemicals that must be oxidised prior to being deposited in repository, - Sludges and oil soaks (this category includes NORM-materials), - Ion exchange resins (both 'free' and solidified/stabilised), - Bitumen solidified waste. Methodology and assessment criteria for various waste types, together with results obtained for the lab scale tests that have been performed, are described. (authors)

Lindberg, Maria; Oesterberg, Carl; Vernersson, Thomas [Studsvik Nuclear AB, Studsvik Nuclear AB, 611 82 Nykoeping (Sweden)] [Studsvik Nuclear AB, Studsvik Nuclear AB, 611 82 Nykoeping (Sweden)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Silane pyrolysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We show that silane pyrolysis is initiated by decomposition on the amorphous silicon surface, with an activation energy Ea of 56 kcal/mole. The observed surface decomposition rate is only weakly dependent on silane pressure. Much faster delayed decomposition rates, approximately independent of surface area and proportional to pressure, are shown to be initiated by surface reactons. A model for surface decomposition is given. Also a model for gas reactions is suggested based on H atom or SiH3 release by surface decomposition, causing chain reactions that process the gas to higher silanes that decompose rapidly. This model can explain the previous observations that the initial disilane formation rate and the delayed decomposition rate were independent of the surface area to volume ratio A/V, which had misled previous investigators to suggest homogeneous initiation processes.

R. Robertson; D. Hils; A. Gallagher

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Catalytic fast pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Increasing energy demand, especially in the transportation sector, and soaring CO2 emissions necessitate the exploitation of renewable sources of energy. Despite the large variety of new energy Q3 carriers, liquid hydrocarbon still appears to be the most attractive and feasible form of transportation fuel taking into account the energy density, stability and existing infrastructure. Biomass is an abundant, renewable source of energy; however, utilizing it in a cost-effective way is still a substantial challenge. Lignocellulose is composed of three major biopolymers, namely cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin. Fast pyrolysis of biomass is recognized as an efficient and feasible process to selectively convert lignocellulose into a liquid fuel—bio-oil. However bio-oil from fast pyrolysis contains a large amount of oxygen, distributed in hundreds of oxygenates. These oxygenates are the cause of many negative properties, such as low heating values, high corrosiveness, high viscosity, and instability; they also greatly Q4 limit the application of bio-oil particularly as transportation fuel. Hydrocarbons derived from biomass are most attractive because of their high energy density and compatibility with the existing infrastructure. Thus, converting lignocellulose into transportation fuels via catalytic fast pyrolysis has attracted much attention. Many studies related to catalytic fast pyrolysis of biomass have been published. The main challenge of this process is the development of active and stable catalysts that can deal with a large variety of decomposition intermediates from lignocellulose. This review starts with the current understanding of the chemistry in fast pyrolysis of lignocellulose and focuses on the development of catalysts in catalytic fast pyrolysis. Recent progress in the experimental studies on catalytic fast pyrolysis of biomass is also summarized with the emphasis on bio-oil yields and quality.

Liu, Changjun; Wang, Huamin; Karim, Ayman M.; Sun, Junming; Wang, Yong

2014-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

98

Bioenergy Technologies Office R&D Pathways: Fast Pyrolysis and Hydroprocessing  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

In fast pyrolysis and hydrotreating, biomass is rapidly heated in a fluidized bed to create bio-oils, which can then be used to create hydrocarbon biofuel blendstocks.

99

Bioenergy Technologies Office R&D Pathways: Ex-Situ Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

In ex-situ catalytic fast pyrolysis, biomass is heated with catalysts to create bio-oils, which are then used to produce biofuel blendstocks.

100

CATALYTIC MICROWAVE PYROLYSIS OF BIOMASS FOR RENEWABLE PHENOLS AND FUELS .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Bio-oil is an unstable intermediate and needs to be upgraded before its use. This study focused on improving the selectivity of bio-oilby catalytic pyrolysis of… (more)

[No author

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes pyrolysis oils" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Production of Gasoline and Diesel from Biomass via Fast Pyrolysis, Hydrotreating and Hydrocracking: 2012 State of Technology and Projections to 2017  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the economic impact of the work performed at PNNL during FY12 to improve fast pyrolysis oil upgrading via hydrotreating. A comparison is made between the projected economic outcome and the actual results based on experimental data. Sustainability metrics are also included.

Jones, Susanne B.; Snowden-Swan, Lesley J.

2013-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

102

Copyrolysis of Seyitömer?Lignite and Safflower Seed:? Influence of the Blending Ratio and Pyrolysis Temperature on Product Yields and Oil Characterization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The use of a variety of low-grade coal, as a primary energy source is becoming a subject of importance in some countries, such as Turkey, where there is a substantial reserve of such materials. ... Total lignite reserves are estimated with 8075 million tons, of which 7339 million tons are economically feasible. ... Upgrading of Kutahya region lignites by mild pyrolysis and high intensity dry magnetic separation ...

Özlem Onay; Evren Bayram; Ö. Mete Koçkar

2007-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

103

A Carbon Molecular Sieve-based Catalyst with Encapsulated Ruthenium Nanoparticles for Bio-oil Stabilization and Upgrading  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pyrolysis oil derived from biomass (bio-oil) is regarded as a potential substitute for petroleum crude for producing environmentally friendly fuels of the future. However, pyrolysis oil upgrading still remains an issue due to its complex composition...

Mironenko, Alexander

2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

104

Biomass pyrolysis for chemicals.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Biomass Pyrolysis for Chemicals The problems associated with the use of fossil fuels demand a transition to renewable sources (sun, wind, water, geothermal, biomass) for… (more)

Wild, Paul de

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Novel Fast Pyrolysis/Catalytic Technology for the Production of Stable Upgraded Liquids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the proposed research is the demonstration and development of a novel biomass pyrolysis technology for the production of a stable bio-oil. The approach is to carry out catalytic hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) and upgrading together with pyrolysis in a single fluidized bed reactor with a unique two-level design that permits the physical separation of the two processes. The hydrogen required for the HDO will be generated in the catalytic section by the water-gas shift reaction employing recycled CO produced from the pyrolysis reaction itself. Thus, the use of a reactive recycle stream is another innovation in this technology. The catalysts will be designed in collaboration with BASF Catalysts LLC (formerly Engelhard Corporation), a leader in the manufacture of attrition-resistant cracking catalysts. The proposed work will include reactor modeling with state-of-the-art computational fluid dynamics in a supercomputer, and advanced kinetic analysis for optimization of bio-oil production. The stability of the bio-oil will be determined by viscosity, oxygen content, and acidity determinations in real and accelerated measurements. A multi-faceted team has been assembled to handle laboratory demonstration studies and computational analysis for optimization and scaleup.

Ted Oyama, Foster Agblevor, Francine Battaglia, Michael Klein

2013-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

106

Catalytic pyrolysis using UZM-39 aluminosilicate zeolite  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new family of coherently grown composites of TUN and IMF zeotypes has been synthesized and shown to be effective catalysts for catalytic pyrolysis of biomass. These zeolites are represented by the empirical formula. Na.sub.nM.sub.m.sup.n+R.sub.rQ.sub.qAl.sub.1-xE.sub.xSi.sub.yO.s- ub.z where M represents zinc or a metal or metals from Group 1, Group 2, Group 3 or the lanthanide series of the periodic table, R is an A,.OMEGA.-dihalosubstituted paraffin such as 1,4-dibromobutane, Q is a neutral amine containing 5 or fewer carbon atoms such as 1-methylpyrrolidine and E is a framework element such as gallium. The process involves contacting a carbonaceous biomass feedstock with UZM-39 at pyrolysis conditions to produce pyrolysis gases comprising hydrocarbons. The catalyst catalyzes a deoxygenation reaction converting oxygenated hydrocarbons into hydrocarbons and removing the oxygen as carbon oxides and water. A portion of the pyrolysis gases is condensed to produce low oxygen biomass-derived pyrolysis oil.

Nicholas, Christopher P; Boldingh, Edwin P

2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

107

Catalytic pyrolysis using UZM-39 aluminosilicate zeolite  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A new family of coherently grown composites of TUN and IMF zeotypes has been synthesized and show to be effective catalysts for catalytic pyrolysis of biomass. These zeolites are represented by the empirical formula. Na.sub.nM.sub.m.sup.n+R.sub.rQ.sub.qAl.sub1-xE.sub.xSi.sub.yO.s- ub.z where M represents zinc or a metal or metals from Group 1, Group 2, Group 3 or the lanthanide series of the periodic table, R is an A,.OMEGA.-dihalosubstituted paraffin such as 1,4-dibromobutane, Q is a neutral amine containing 5 or fewer carbon atoms such as 1-methylpyrrolidine and E is a framework element such as gallium. The process involves contacting a carbonaceous biomass feedstock with UZM-39 at pyrolysis conditions to produce pyrolysis gases comprising hydrocarbons. The catalyst catalyzes a deoxygenation reaction converting oxygenated hyrdocarbons into hydrocarbons removing the oxygen as carbon oxides and water. A portion of the pyrolysis gases is condensed to produce low oxygen biomass-derived pyrolysis oil.

Nicholas, Christpher P; Boldingh, Edwin P

2013-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

108

Fluidized bed pyrolysis of terrestrial biomass feedstocks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hybrid poplar, switchgrass, and corn stover were pyrolyzed in a bench scale fluidized-bed reactor to examine the influence of storage time on thermochemical converting of these materials. The influence of storage on the thermochemical conversion of the biomass feedstocks was assessed based on pyrolysis product yields and chemical and instrumental analyses of the pyrolysis products. Although char and gas yields from corn stover feedstock were influenced by storage time, hybrid poplar and switchgrass were not significantly affected. Liquid, char, and gas yields were feedstock dependent. Total liquid yields (organic+water) varied from 58%-73% depending on the feedstock. Char yields varied from 14%-19% while gas yields ranged from 11%-15%. The chemical composition of the pyrolysis oils from hybrid polar feedstock was slightly changed by storage, however, corn stover and switchgrass feedstock showed no significant changes. Additionally, stored corn stover and hybrid poplar pyrolysis oils showed a significant decrease in their higher heating values compared to the fresh material.

Besler, S.; Agblevor, F.A.; Davis, M.F. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)] [and others

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

109

Utah Heavy Oil Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Utah Heavy Oil Program (UHOP) was established in June 2006 to provide multidisciplinary research support to federal and state constituents for addressing the wide-ranging issues surrounding the creation of an industry for unconventional oil production in the United States. Additionally, UHOP was to serve as an on-going source of unbiased information to the nation surrounding technical, economic, legal and environmental aspects of developing heavy oil, oil sands, and oil shale resources. UHOP fulGilled its role by completing three tasks. First, in response to the Energy Policy Act of 2005 Section 369(p), UHOP published an update report to the 1987 technical and economic assessment of domestic heavy oil resources that was prepared by the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission. The UHOP report, entitled 'A Technical, Economic, and Legal Assessment of North American Heavy Oil, Oil Sands, and Oil Shale Resources' was published in electronic and hard copy form in October 2007. Second, UHOP developed of a comprehensive, publicly accessible online repository of unconventional oil resources in North America based on the DSpace software platform. An interactive map was also developed as a source of geospatial information and as a means to interact with the repository from a geospatial setting. All documents uploaded to the repository are fully searchable by author, title, and keywords. Third, UHOP sponsored Give research projects related to unconventional fuels development. Two projects looked at issues associated with oil shale production, including oil shale pyrolysis kinetics, resource heterogeneity, and reservoir simulation. One project evaluated in situ production from Utah oil sands. Another project focused on water availability and produced water treatments. The last project considered commercial oil shale leasing from a policy, environmental, and economic perspective.

J. Bauman; S. Burian; M. Deo; E. Eddings; R. Gani; R. Goel; C.K. Huang; M. Hogue; R. Keiter; L. Li; J. Ruple; T. Ring; P. Rose; M. Skliar; P.J. Smith; J.P. Spinti; P. Tiwari; J. Wilkey; K. Uchitel

2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

110

A Generalized Pyrolysis Model for Combustible Solids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

processes of wood and biomass pyrolysis,” to appear ineffect during biomass pyrolysis,” Industrial & Engineeringprocesses during pyrolysis of a large biomass particle,”

Lautenberger, Chris

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Pyrolysis Autoclave Technology Demonstration Program for Treatment of DOE Solidified Organic Wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the summer of 2005, MSE Technologies Applications, Inc. (MSE) and THOR Treatment Technologies, LLC (TTT) conducted a demonstration test of the Thermal Organic Reduction (THOR{sup sm}) in-drum pyrolysis autoclave system under contract to the Department of Energy. The purpose of the test was to demonstrate that the THOR{sup sm} pyrolysis autoclave system could successfully treat solidified organic waste to remove organics from the waste drums. The target waste was created at Rocky Flats and currently resides at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Removing the organics from these drums would allow them to be shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant for disposal. Two drums of simulated organic setup waste were successfully treated. The simulated waste was virtually identical to the expected waste except for the absence of radioactive components. The simulated waste included carbon tetrachloride, trichloroethylene, perchloroethylene, Texaco Regal oil, and other organics mixed with calcium silicate and Portland cement stabilization agents. The two-stage process consisted of the THOR{sup sm} electrically heated pyrolysis autoclave followed by the MSE off gas treatment system. The treatment resulted in a final waste composition that meets the requirements for WIPP transportation and disposal. There were no detectable volatile organic compounds in the treated solid residues. The destruction and removal efficiency (DRE) for total organics in the two drums ranged from >99.999% to >99.9999%. The operation of the process proved to be easily controllable using the pyrolysis autoclave heaters. Complete treatment of a fully loaded surrogate waste drum including heat-up and cooldown took place over a two-day period. This paper discusses the results of the successful pyrolysis autoclave demonstration testing. (authors)

Roesener, W.S.; Mason, J.B.; Ryan, K. [THOR Treatment Technologies, LLC, 7800 E Union Ave, Denver, CO 80237 (United States); Bryson, S. [MSE Technologies Applications, Inc., 200 Technology Way, Butte, MT 59702 (United States); Eldredge, H.B. [Eldredge Engineering, P.A., 1090 Blue Ridge Dr., Idaho Falls, ID 83402 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Waste tire recycling by pyrolysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project examines the City of New Orleans' waste tire problem. Louisiana State law, as of January 1, 1991, prohibits the knowing disposal of whole waste tires in landfills. Presently, the numerous waste tire stockpiles in New Orleans range in size from tens to hundreds of tires. New Orleans' waste tire problem will continue to increase until legal disposal facilities are made accessible and a waste tire tracking and regulatory system with enforcement provisions is in place. Tires purchased outside of the city of New Orleans may be discarded within the city's limits; therefore, as a practical matter this study analyzes the impact stemming from the entire New Orleans metropolitan area. Pyrolysis mass recovery (PMR), a tire reclamation process which produces gas, oil, carbon black and steel, is the primary focus of this report. The technical, legal and environmental aspects of various alternative technologies are examined. The feasibility of locating a hypothetical PMR operation within the city of New Orleans is analyzed based on the current economic, regulatory, and environmental climate in Louisiana. A thorough analysis of active, abandoned, and proposed Pyrolysis operations (both national and international) was conducted as part of this project. Siting a PMR plant in New Orleans at the present time is technically feasible and could solve the city's waste tire problem. Pending state legislation could improve the city's ability to guarantee a long term supply of waste tires to any large scale tire reclamation or recycling operation, but the local market for PMR end products is undefined.

Not Available

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Flash Pyrolysis -A Powerful Method for Characterization of Polymers Helge Egsgaard  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;Analytical flash pyrolysis Direct analysis of polymers including biopolymers & biomass Products detectedFlash Pyrolysis - A Powerful Method for Characterization of Polymers Helge Egsgaard Biosystems Department Risø National Laboratory DK-4000 Roskilde, Denmark The rational behind the pyrolysis technique

114

A Generalized Pyrolysis Model for Combustible Solids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

processes such as flash pyrolysis [187], but it has not yetreaction model for flash wood pyrolysis,” Fuel 68: 1408–

Lautenberger, Chris

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Catalytic pyrolysis using UZM-44 aluminosilicate zeolite  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A new family of aluminosilicate zeolites designated UZM-44 has been synthesized. These zeolites are represented by the empirical formula. Na.sub.nM.sub.m.sup.k+T.sub.tAl.sub.1-xE.sub.xSi.sub.yO.sub.z where "n" is the mole ratio of Na to (Al+E), M represents a metal or metals from zinc, Group 1, Group 2, Group 3 and or the lanthanide series of the periodic table, "m" is the mole ratio of M to (Al+E), "k" is the average charge of the metal or metals M, T is the organic structure directing agent or agents, and E is a framework element such as gallium. The process involves contacting a carbonaceous biomass feedstock with UZM-44 at pyrolysis conditions to produce pyrolysis gases comprising hydrocarbons. The catalyst catalyzes a deoxygenation reaction converting oxygenated hydrocarbons into hydrocarbons and removing the oxygen as carbon oxides and water. A portion of the pyrolysis gases is condensed to produce low oxygen biomass-derived pyrolysis oil.

Nicholas, Christopher P; Boldingh, Edwin P

2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

116

Catalytic pyrolysis using UZM-44 aluminosilicate zeolite  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A new family of aluminosilicate zeolites designated UZM-44 has been synthesized. These zeolites are represented by the empirical formula Na.sub.nM.sub.m.sup.k+T.sub.tAl.sub.1-xE.sub.xSi.sub.yO.sub.z where "n" is the mole ratio of Na to (Al+E), M represents a metal or metals from zinc, Group 1, Group 2, Group 3 and or the lanthanide series of the periodic table, "m" is the mole ratio of M to (Al+E), "k" is the average charge of the metal or metals M, T is the organic structure directing agent or agents, and E is a framework element such as gallium. The process involves contacting a carbonaceous biomass feedstock with UZM-44 at pyrolysis conditions to produce pyrolysis gases comprising hydrocarbons. The catalyst catalyzes a deoxygenation reaction converting oxygenated hydrocarbons into hydrocarbons and removing the oxygen as carbon oxides and water. A portion of the pyrolysis gases is condensed to produce low oxygen biomass-derived pyrolysis oil.

Nicholas, Christopher P; Boldingh, Edwin P

2013-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

117

Effect of the concentration of organic matter on the yield of thermal bitumen from the baltic oil shale kukersite  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The low-temperature (360°C) autoclave pyrolysis of the oil shale kukersite, which has carbonatetype mineral matter, ... was found that, in the pyrolysis of oil shale in an autoclave, the extract yield on ... basi...

L. Tiikma; Yu. Sokolova; N. Vink

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Design, optimization and evaluation of a free-fall biomass fast pyrolysis reactor and its products.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The focus of this work is a radiatively heated, free-fall, fast pyrolysis reactor. The reactor was designed and constructed for the production of bio-oil from… (more)

Ellens, Cody James

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Using mobile distributed pyrolysis facilities to deliver a forest residue resource for bio-fuel production.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Distributed mobile conversion facilities using either fast pyrolysis or torrefaction processes can be used to convert forest residues to more energy dense substances (bio-oil, bio-slurry… (more)

Brown, Duncan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

A Systems Approach to Bio-Oil Stabilization - Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to develop practical, cost effective methods for stabilizing biomass-derived fast pyrolysis oil for at least six months of storage under ambient conditions. The U.S. Department of Energy has targeted three strategies for stabilizing bio-oils: (1) reducing the oxygen content of the organic compounds comprising pyrolysis oil; (2) removal of carboxylic acid groups such that the total acid number (TAN) of the pyrolysis oil is dramatically reduced; and (3) reducing the charcoal content, which contains alkali metals known to catalyze reactions that increase the viscosity of bio-oil. Alkali and alkaline earth metals (AAEM), are known to catalyze decomposition reactions of biomass carbohydrates to produce light oxygenates that destabilize the resulting bio-oil. Methods envisioned to prevent the AAEM from reaction with the biomass carbohydrates include washing the AAEM out of the biomass with water or dilute acid or infusing an acid catalyst to passivate the AAEM. Infusion of acids into the feedstock to convert all of the AAEM to salts which are stable at pyrolysis temperatures proved to be a much more economically feasible process. Our results from pyrolyzing acid infused biomass showed increases in the yield of anhydrosugars by greater than 300% while greatly reducing the yield of light oxygenates that are known to destabilize bio-oil. Particulate matter can interfere with combustion or catalytic processing of either syngas or bio-oil. It also is thought to catalyze the polymerization of bio-oil, which increases the viscosity of bio-oil over time. High temperature bag houses, ceramic candle filters, and moving bed granular filters have been variously suggested for syngas cleaning at elevated temperatures. High temperature filtration of bio-oil vapors has also been suggested by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory although there remain technical challenges to this approach. The fast pyrolysis of biomass yields three main organic products: condensable vapors, non-condensable gases, and liquid aerosols. Traditionally these are recovered by a spray quencher or a conventional shell and tube condenser. The spray quencher or condenser is typically followed by an electrostatic precipitator to yield 1 or 2 distinct fractions of bio-oil. The pyrolyzer system developed at Iowa State University incorporates a proprietary fractionating condenser train. The system collects the bio-oil into five unique fractions. For conditions typical of fluidized bed pyrolyzers, stage fractions have been collected that are carbohydrate-rich (anhydrosugars), lignin-rich, and an aqueous solution of carboxylic acids and aldehydes. One important feature is that most of the water normally found in bio-oil appears in the last stage fraction along with several water-soluble components that are thought to be responsible for bio-oil aging (low molecular weight carboxylic acids and aldehydes). Research work on laser diagnostics for hot-vapor filtration and bio-oil recovery centered on development of analytical techniques for in situ measurements during fast pyrolysis, hot-vapor filtration, and fractionation relative to bio-oil stabilization. The methods developed in this work include laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), laser-induced incandescence (LII), and laser scattering for elemental analysis (N, O, H, C), detection of particulates, and detection of aerosols, respectively. These techniques were utilized in simulated pyrolysis environments and applied to a small-scale pyrolysis unit. Stability of Bio-oils is adversely affected by the presence of particulates that are formed as a consequence of thermal pyrolysis, improving the CFD simulations of moving bed granular filter (MBGF) is useful for improving the design of MBGF for bio-oil production. The current work uses fully resolved direct numerical simulation (where the flow past each granule is accurately represented) to calculate the filter efficiency that is used in the CFD model at all flow speeds. This study shows that fully-resolved direct numerical simulation (DNS

Brown, Robert C; Meyer, Terrence; Fox, Rodney; Submramaniam, Shankar; Shanks, Brent; Smith, Ryan G

2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes pyrolysis oils" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Oil shale, tar sands, and related materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This sixteen-chapter book focuses on the many problems and the new methodology associated with the commercialization of the oil shale and tar sand industry. Topics discussed include: an overview of the Department of Energy's oil shale R, D, and D program; computer simulation of explosive fracture of oil shale; fracturing of oil shale by treatment with liquid sulfur dioxide; chemistry of shale oil cracking; hydrogen sulfide evolution from Colorado oil shale; a possible mechanism of alkene/alkane production in oil shale retorting; oil shale retorting kinetics; kinetics of oil shale char gasification; a comparison of asphaltenes from naturally occurring shale bitumen and retorted shale oils: the influence of temperature on asphaltene structure; beneficiation of Green River oil shale by density methods; beneficiation of Green River oil shale pelletization; shell pellet heat exchange retorting: the SPHER energy-efficient process for retorting oil shale; retorted oil shale disposal research; an investigation into the potential economics of large-scale shale oil production; commercial scale refining of Paraho crude shale oil into military specification fuels; relation between fuel properties and chemical composition; chemical characterization/physical properties of US Navy shale-II fuels; relation between fuel properties and chemical composition: stability of oil shale-derived jet fuel; pyrolysis of shale oil residual fractions; synfuel stability: degradation mechanisms and actual findings; the chemistry of shale oil and its refined products; the reactivity of Cold Lake asphaltenes; influence of thermal processing on the properties of Cold Lake asphaltenes: the effect of distillation; thermal recovery of oil from tar sands by an energy-efficient process; and hydropyrolysis: the potential for primary upgrading of tar sand bitumen.

Stauffer, H.C.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

The kerogen types and pyrolysis kinetics of several Chinese carbonate source rocks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The kerogen types and pyrolysis kinetics of several Chinese carbonate source rocks are studied in this paper. Samples involved are from Proterozoic to Neogene, including marine and lacustrine environments. Their TOC range from 0.15% to 1.69%. The carbonate contents are more than 80% except the Paleozoic Pingliang marl, Shanganning Basin. The maturations range from immature to late stage of oil generation. The Green River calcareous shale and Ghareb marl, Jordan are included for comparison. The study of kerogen types is based on analyses of kerogens including: optical method, elemental analysis, infrared spectrum, rock eval pyrolysis, pyrolysis-gas chromatography, and C-13 Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectrometry. The results of the study shows that most of the kerogens studied belong to type 1 or sapropelic type 2 (2a), while the kerogens from Triassic Qinglong limestone (restricted by), Jiangsu and Neogene Guantao limestone (small fault lacustrine), Shandong belong to mixed type 2 (2b). The study of pyrolysis kinetics is based on standard Rock Eval information (5 C/min.), a two-stage first order reaction model and optimization method which has been confirmed to be a simple, practical and effective method by a previous study. The current study reveals that different kerogen types have their own kinetic characteristics. Generally, kinetics parameters of type 1 and type 2a kerogens are greater than those of type 2b. However, high-sulfur type 1 and type 2a kerogens, such as those from Ghareb marl, Jordan, and Proterozoic kerogen, North China have relatively low kinetics parameters. The study also shows that kerogens with similar hydrocarbon potential (HI) and elemental composition (atomic H/C, O/C) may have very different kinetic processes.

Zhang, Youcheng (Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Oceanography); Shisheng Hao (Petroleum Univ., Beijing (China). Dept. of Geosciences)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Mineral Nutrient Recovery from Pyrolysis Co-Products  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pyrolysis is the thermo-chemical degradation of biomass in an oxygen-free environment to product liquid, gaseous, and solid co-products. The liquid co-product, known as bio-oil, can be used as a transportation fuel. The gaseous co-product, known...

Wise, Jatara Rob

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

124

Waste tire recycling by pyrolysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project examines the City of New Orleans` waste tire problem. Louisiana State law, as of January 1, 1991, prohibits the knowing disposal of whole waste tires in landfills. Presently, the numerous waste tire stockpiles in New Orleans range in size from tens to hundreds of tires. New Orleans` waste tire problem will continue to increase until legal disposal facilities are made accessible and a waste tire tracking and regulatory system with enforcement provisions is in place. Tires purchased outside of the city of New Orleans may be discarded within the city`s limits; therefore, as a practical matter this study analyzes the impact stemming from the entire New Orleans metropolitan area. Pyrolysis mass recovery (PMR), a tire reclamation process which produces gas, oil, carbon black and steel, is the primary focus of this report. The technical, legal and environmental aspects of various alternative technologies are examined. The feasibility of locating a hypothetical PMR operation within the city of New Orleans is analyzed based on the current economic, regulatory, and environmental climate in Louisiana. A thorough analysis of active, abandoned, and proposed Pyrolysis operations (both national and international) was conducted as part of this project. Siting a PMR plant in New Orleans at the present time is technically feasible and could solve the city`s waste tire problem. Pending state legislation could improve the city`s ability to guarantee a long term supply of waste tires to any large scale tire reclamation or recycling operation, but the local market for PMR end products is undefined.

Not Available

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Auto shredder residue recycling: Mechanical separation and pyrolysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Directive 2000/53/EC sets a goal of 85% material recycling from end-of-life vehicles (ELVs) by the end of 2015. The current ELV recycling rate is around 80%, while the remaining waste is called automotive shredder residue (ASR), or car fluff. In Europe, this is mainly landfilled because it is extremely heterogeneous and often polluted with car fluids. Despite technical difficulties, in the coming years it will be necessary to recover materials from car fluff in order to meet the ELV Directive requirement. This study deals with ASR pretreatment and pyrolysis, and aims to determine whether the ELV material recycling target may be achieved by car fluff mechanical separation followed by pyrolysis with a bench scale reactor. Results show that flotation followed by pyrolysis of the light, organic fraction may be a suitable ASR recycling technique if the oil can be further refined and used as a chemical. Moreover, metals are liberated during thermal cracking and can be easily separated from the pyrolysis char, amounting to roughly 5% in mass. Lastly, pyrolysis can be a good starting point from a “waste-to-chemicals” perspective, but further research should be done with a focus on oil and gas refining, in order both to make products suitable for the chemical industry and to render the whole recycling process economically feasible.

Alessandro Santini; Fabrizio Passarini; Ivano Vassura; David Serrano; Javier Dufour; Luciano Morselli

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Fast Pyrolysis Conversion Tests of Forest Concepts’ Crumbles.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report describes the work done by PNNL on assessing Forest Concept's engineered feedstock using the bench-scale continuous fast pyrolysis system to produce liquid bio-oil, char and gas. Specifically, bio-oil from the following process were evaluated for its yield and quality to determine impact of varying feed size parameters. Furthermore, the report also describes the handling process of the biomass and the challenges of operating the system with above average particle size.

Santosa, Daniel M.; Zacher, Alan H.; Eakin, David E.

2012-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

127

Feasibility study for thermal treatment of solid tire wastes in Bangladesh by using pyrolysis technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study on the basis of lab data and available resources in Bangladesh, feasibility study has been carried out for pyrolysis process converting solid tire wastes into pyrolysis oils, solid char and gases. The process considered for detailed analysis was fixed-bed fire-tube heating pyrolysis reactor system. The comparative techno-economic assessment was carried out in US$ for three different sizes plants: medium commercial scale (144 tons/day), small commercial scale (36 tons/day), pilot scale (3.6 tons/day). The assessment showed that medium commercial scale plant was economically feasible, with the lowest unit production cost than small commercial and pilot scale plants for the production of crude pyrolysis oil that could be used as boiler fuel oil and for the production of upgraded liquid-products.

Islam, M.R., E-mail: mrislam1985@yahoo.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Rajshahi University of Engineering and Technology, Rajshahi 6204 (Bangladesh); Joardder, M.U.H.; Hasan, S.M. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Rajshahi University of Engineering and Technology, Rajshahi 6204 (Bangladesh); Takai, K.; Haniu, H. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National University Corporation Kitami Institute of Technology, 165 Koen-cho, Kitami City, Hokkaido 090-8507 (Japan)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

128

Experimental Investigation of the Effects of Fuel Properties on Combustion Performance and Emissions of Biomass Fast Pyrolysis Liquid-ethanol Blends in a Swirl Burner.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Biomass fast pyrolysis liquid, also known as bio-oil, is a promising renewable fuel for heat and power generation; however, implementing crude bio-oil in some current… (more)

Moloodi, Sina

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Characterization and Alteration of Wettability States of Alaskan Reserviors to Improve Oil Recovery Efficiency (including the within-scope expansion based on Cyclic Water Injection - a pulsed waterflood for Enhanced Oil Recovery)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Numerous early reports on experimental works relating to the role of wettability in various aspects of oil recovery have been published. Early examples of laboratory waterfloods show oil recovery increasing with increasing water-wetness. This result is consistent with the intuitive notion that strong wetting preference of the rock for water and associated strong capillary-imbibition forces gives the most efficient oil displacement. This report examines the effect of wettability on waterflooding and gasflooding processes respectively. Waterflood oil recoveries were examined for the dual cases of uniform and non-uniform wetting conditions. Based on the results of the literature review on effect of wettability and oil recovery, coreflooding experiments were designed to examine the effect of changing water chemistry (salinity) on residual oil saturation. Numerous corefloods were conducted on reservoir rock material from representative formations on the Alaska North Slope (ANS). The corefloods consisted of injecting water (reservoir water and ultra low-salinity ANS lake water) of different salinities in secondary as well as tertiary mode. Additionally, complete reservoir condition corefloods were also conducted using live oil. In all the tests, wettability indices, residual oil saturation, and oil recovery were measured. All results consistently lead to one conclusion; that is, a decrease in injection water salinity causes a reduction in residual oil saturation and a slight increase in water-wetness, both of which are comparable with literature observations. These observations have an intuitive appeal in that water easily imbibes into the core and displaces oil. Therefore, low-salinity waterfloods have the potential for improved oil recovery in the secondary recovery process, and ultra low-salinity ANS lake water is an attractive source of injection water or a source for diluting the high-salinity reservoir water. As part of the within-scope expansion of this project, cyclic water injection tests using high as well as low salinity were also conducted on several representative ANS core samples. These results indicate that less pore volume of water is required to recover the same amount of oil as compared with continuous water injection. Additionally, in cyclic water injection, oil is produced even during the idle time of water injection. It is understood that the injected brine front spreads/smears through the pores and displaces oil out uniformly rather than viscous fingering. The overall benefits of this project include increased oil production from existing Alaskan reservoirs. This conclusion is based on the performed experiments and results obtained on low-salinity water injection (including ANS lake water), vis-a-vis slightly altering the wetting conditions. Similarly, encouraging cyclic water-injection test results indicate that this method can help achieve residual oil saturation earlier than continuous water injection. If proved in field, this would be of great use, as more oil can be recovered through cyclic water injection for the same amount of water injected.

Abhijit Dandekar; Shirish Patil; Santanu Khataniar

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

130

Formation characteristics of PCDD and PCDF during pyrolysis processes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In recent years, pyrolysis processes have become technologies developed to industrial scale and discussed as alternatives to the existing waste combustion technology. However, little information is published regarding PCDD/F formation characteristics during pyrolysis processes. Two common shredder fractions – industrial light shredder (ILS) and refrigerators (REF) – both with high chlorine and copper content were pyrolysed for this pyrolysis study using a pilot plant with a capacity of 100 kg/h. At oxygen concentrations below 2% and temperatures between 430°C and 470°C, considerable amounts of PCDD/F were formed during the pyrolysis. More than 90% of total TEQ was found in the oil fraction (gas phase). The PCDD/PCDF ratio and the homologue pattern differed significantly from those formed during waste incineration. Considering mono- to octachlorinated congeners, up to 400 times more PCDF were formed compared to PCDD. For the investigated pyrolysis conditions, the formation of low chlorinated congeners was highly favoured. The distribution of TEQ within the individual congeners were very similar in all investigated runs. More than 80% of total TEQ stem from 2,3,7,8-substituted T4CDF and P5CDF. The isomer pattern, however, did not show significant differences compared to the common waste incineration pattern suggesting that the basic formation routes are similar.

Roland Weber; Takeshi Sakurai

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Move Over Flash Pyrolysis, There's a New Bioenergy Sheriff in Town |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Move Over Flash Pyrolysis, There's a New Bioenergy Sheriff in Town Move Over Flash Pyrolysis, There's a New Bioenergy Sheriff in Town Move Over Flash Pyrolysis, There's a New Bioenergy Sheriff in Town December 16, 2011 - 12:10pm Addthis Jonathan Peters, a researcher at RTI International (an ARPA-E awardee), characterizes the water content of a bio-oil sample. | Courtesy of RTI International. Jonathan Peters, a researcher at RTI International (an ARPA-E awardee), characterizes the water content of a bio-oil sample. | Courtesy of RTI International. April Saylor April Saylor Former Digital Outreach Strategist, Office of Public Affairs How does it work? This ARPA-E awardee removes the oxygen and other contaminants in the biomass to be turned into fuel with a novel "catalytic biomass pyrolysis" approach. This substance is more carbon efficient, requires less hydrogen to

132

Move Over Flash Pyrolysis, There's a New Bioenergy Sheriff in Town |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Move Over Flash Pyrolysis, There's a New Bioenergy Sheriff in Town Move Over Flash Pyrolysis, There's a New Bioenergy Sheriff in Town Move Over Flash Pyrolysis, There's a New Bioenergy Sheriff in Town December 16, 2011 - 12:10pm Addthis Jonathan Peters, a researcher at RTI International (an ARPA-E awardee), characterizes the water content of a bio-oil sample. | Courtesy of RTI International. Jonathan Peters, a researcher at RTI International (an ARPA-E awardee), characterizes the water content of a bio-oil sample. | Courtesy of RTI International. April Saylor April Saylor Former Digital Outreach Strategist, Office of Public Affairs How does it work? This ARPA-E awardee removes the oxygen and other contaminants in the biomass to be turned into fuel with a novel "catalytic biomass pyrolysis" approach. This substance is more carbon efficient, requires less hydrogen to

133

Oil shale research in China  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There have been continued efforts and new emergence in oil shale research in Chine since 1980. In this paper, the studies carried out in universities, academic, research and industrial laboratories in recent years are summarized. The research areas cover the chemical structure of kerogen; thermal behavior of oil shale; drying, pyrolysis and combustion of oil shale; shale oil upgrading; chemical utilization of oil shale; retorting waste water treatment and economic assessment.

Jianqiu, W.; Jialin, Q. (Beijing Graduate School, Petroleum Univ., Beijing (CN))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Distributed Reforming of Biomass Pyrolysis Oils (Presentation)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presented at the 2007 Bio-Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed Reforming Working Group held November 6, 2007 in Laurel, Maryland.

135

Transportation fuels from biomass via fast pyrolysis and hydroprocessing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Biomass is a renewable source of carbon, which could provide a means to reduce the greenhouse gas impact from fossil fuels in the transportation sector. Biomass is the only renewable source of liquid fuels, which could displace petroleum-derived products. Fast pyrolysis is a method of direct thermochemical conversion (non-bioconversion) of biomass to a liquid product. Although the direct conversion product, called bio-oil, is liquid; it is not compatible with the fuel handling systems currently used for transportation. Upgrading the product via catalytic processing with hydrogen gas, hydroprocessing, is a means that has been demonstrated in the laboratory. By this processing the bio-oil can be deoxygenated to hydrocarbons, which can be useful replacements of the hydrocarbon distillates in petroleum. While the fast pyrolysis of biomass is presently commercial, the upgrading of the liquid product by hydroprocessing remains in development, although it is moving out of the laboratory into scaled-up process demonstration systems.

Elliott, Douglas C.

2013-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

136

Method of producing pyrolysis gases from carbon-containing materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gasification process of improved efficiency is disclosed. A dual bed reactor system is used in which carbon-containing feedstock materials are first treated in a gasification reactor to form pyrolysis gases. The pyrolysis gases are then directed into a catalytic reactor for the destruction of residual tars/oils in the gases. Temperatures are maintained within the catalytic reactor at a level sufficient to crack the tars/oils in the gases, while avoiding thermal breakdown of the catalysts. In order to minimize problems associated with the deposition of carbon-containing materials on the catalysts during cracking, a gaseous oxidizing agent preferably consisting of air, oxygen, steam, and/or mixtures thereof is introduced into the catalytic reactor at a high flow rate in a direction perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the reactor. This oxidizes any carbon deposits on the catalysts, which would normally cause catalyst deactivation.

Mudge, Lyle K. (Richland, WA); Brown, Michael D. (West Richland, WA); Wilcox, Wayne A. (Kennewick, WA); Baker, Eddie G. (Richland, WA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Entrained-Flow, Fast Ablative Pyrolysis of Biomass - Annual Report, 1 December 1984 - 31 December 1985  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ablative, fast pyrolysis system was relocated to SERI's new, permanent Field Test Laboratory. Pyrolysis system modifications were made to increase the energy available to the vortex reactor and to enhance the collection efficiency of primary pyrolysis vapors. Mathematical modeling of the vapor cracker has resulted in the ability to accurately predict experimental results with respect to the thermal cracking of the primary vapors, the generation of noncondensible gases, and the gas composition. The computer algorithm of this model can be readily used to perform experimental simulation and/or reactor scale-up due to its fundamental nature. Preliminary screening tests with pure ZSM-5 zeolite catalyst, supplied by Mobil Research and Development Corporation, have shown promise for the conversion of primary pyrolysis oil vapors to aromatic hydrocarbons; i.e., gasoline.

Diebold, J. P.; Scahill, J. W.; Evans, R. J.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Molecule-based modeling of heavy oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A molecular-level kinetics model has been developed for the pyrolysis of heavy residual oil. Resid structure was modeled in terms of three attribute groups: cores, inter-core linkages, and side chains. The con...

Scott R. Horton; Zhen Hou; Brian M. Moreno; Craig A. Bennett…

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Pyrolysis of lignin for phenols with alkaline additive  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This study is devoted to investigating the effect of alkaline additives on lignin pyrolysis for producing phenols. The effects of different types and amounts of alkaline additives, i.e., 0–20 wt.% NaOH, KOH, Na2CO3 or K2CO3, on lignin pyrolysis were tested in a fixed bed reactor. The chemicals in the pyrolysis liquid from a commercial alkali lignin with and without alkaline additive were mainly phenols including 2-methoxy-phenol, 2,6-dimethoxy-phenol, alkyl-phenols (free of methoxyl group) and 2-methoxy-4-alkyl-phenols. More vanillin and dimethoxy-benzene appeared in the pyrolysis liquid of alkali lignin and lignin purified from black liquor, respectively. While carbonate additives facilitated the production of methxoy-phenols, more alkyl-phenols were formed with the hydroxide additives. Analysis showed that all the alkaline additives promoted the reactions of decarboxylation or decarbonylation and the removal of unsaturated alkyl branch chains. The strong alkalescence of NaOH and KOH facilitated more deoxygenation of methoxyl groups so that there were more phenols free of methoxyl groups. The pyrolysis of PL resulted in the liquid yields of up to 30 wt.% (dry base), and the content of phenols was above 80% in the liquid.

Cuina Peng; Guangyi Zhang; Junrong Yue; Guangwen Xu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Simulation and Economic Screening of Improved Oil Recovery Methods with Emphasis on Injection Profile Control Including Waterflooding, Polymer Flooding and a Thermally Activated Deep Diverting Gel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at 95% Watercut ................................................ 35 Figure 18: Polymer flood [LH] ? Oil Saturation at 95% Watercut .................................. 36 Figure 19: Base Cases ? Incremental Oil Production... 22: DDG ? Incremental Oil Production with 0 md Block .................................... 39 Figure 23: DDG ? Incremental Water Production with 0 md Block................................ 39 Figure 24: Polymer Flood ? Oil Production at Different...

Okeke, Tobenna

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes pyrolysis oils" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Experimental Investigation of the Effects of Fuel Aging on Combustion Performance and Emissions of Biomass Fast Pyrolysis Liquid-Ethanol Blends in a Swirl Burner.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Biomass fast pyrolysis liquid is a renewable fuel for stationary heat and power generation; however degradation of bio-oil by time, a.k.a. aging, has an impact… (more)

Zarghami-Tehran, Milad

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Recovery of valuable chemical feedstocks from waste automotive plastics via pyrolysis processes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Each year in North America over 9 million scrap vehicles are shredded to recover approximately 10 million tons of ferrous metal. The process also produces 3 million tons of waste known as automobile shredder residue (ASR) which consists of plastics, rubber, foams, textiles, glass, dirt, rust, etc. This waste is currently landfilled. In this study the authors present the results obtained in three different pyrolysis processes when ASR was used as the pyrolysis feedstock. The pyrolysis processes examined included: (1) a fast pyrolysis process, featuring rapid heat transfer and short residence times. This process produced primarily a gas stream that was rich in C{sub 1} to C{sub 3} hydrocarbons; (2) a screw kiln unit, characterized by slow heating and long residence times. This process produced a liquid stream that was high in aromatics; (3) a bench-scale autoclave reactor which, in the presence of water, produced a pyrolysis liquid containing large quantities of oxygenated hydrocarbons.

Shen, Z.; Day, M.; Cooney, D. [National Research Council Canada, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada). Inst. for Environmental Research and Technology

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Life Cycle Environmental and Economic Tradeoffs of Using Fast Pyrolysis Products for Power Generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

ash ... To find favorable locations for a 200 dry metric ton/day fast pyrolysis plant in Pennsylvania (PA), analysis was undertaken using GIS tools that considered locations and the availability of corn farms, fuel oil-fired power plants, and coal-fired power plants in the state. ...

Ghasideh Pourhashem; Sabrina Spatari; Akwasi A. Boateng; Andrew J. McAloon; Charles A. Mullen

2013-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

145

Experimental Study on Microwave Pyrolysis of an Indonesian Low-Rank Coal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Microwave pyrolysis of an Indonesian lignite is investigated in this study. ... About half of the world’s coal reserves are low-rank coals. ... Considerable amts. of 3,4-dihydro-1(2H)-naphthalenone (alpha-tetralone) were found in the oil fractions of lignites treated by microwave energy. ...

Nan Wang; Jianglong Yu; Arash Tahmasebi; Yanna Han; John Lucas; Terry Wall; Yu Jiang

2013-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

146

A review of the toxicity of biomass pyrolysis liquids formed at low temperatures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The scaleup of biomass fast pyrolysis systems to large pilot and commercial scales will expose an increasingly large number of personnel to potential health hazards, especially during the evaluation of the commercial use of the pyrolysis condensates. Although the concept of fast pyrolysis to optimize liquid products is relatively new, low-temperature pyrolysis processes have been used over the aeons to produce charcoal and liquid by-products, e.g., smoky food flavors, food preservatives, and aerosols containing narcotics, e.g., nicotine. There are a number of studies in the historical literature that concern the hazards of acute and long-term exposure to smoke and to the historical pyrolysis liquids formed at low temperatures. The reported toxicity of smoke, smoke food flavors, and fast pyrolysis oils is reviewed. The data found for these complex mixtures suggest that the toxicity may be less than that of the individual components. It is speculated that there may be chemical reactions that take place that serve to reduce the toxicity during aging. 81 refs.

Diebold, J.P. [Thermalchemie, Inc., Lakewood, CO (United States)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Pyrolysis/Gas Chromatography: Application in the Study of Biomass Pyrolysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The analytical chemistry technique of pyrolysis/gas chromatography has been applied to the study of biomass pyrolysis. Very small samples of biomass feedstocks were pyrolyzed in a controlled, reproducible manner....

John C. Franklin; James L. Kuester

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Production of Gasoline and Diesel from Biomass via Fast Pyrolysis...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Production of Gasoline and Diesel from Biomass via Fast Pyrolysis, Hydrotreating and Hydrocracking: A Design Case Production of Gasoline and Diesel from Biomass via Fast Pyrolysis,...

149

Study of Surface Cleaning Methods and Pyrolysis Temperature on...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Surface Cleaning Methods and Pyrolysis Temperature on Nano-Structured Carbon Films using X-ray Photoelectron Study of Surface Cleaning Methods and Pyrolysis Temperature on...

150

Bio-oils Upgrading for Second Generation Biofuels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Bio-oils Upgrading for Second Generation Biofuels ... The present review is then focused on the upgrading possibilities of renewable nonedible feedstocks, obtained from biomass fast pyrolysis or liquefaction, in petroleum refineries, toward the production of second generation biofuels. ...

Inês Graça; José M. Lopes; Henrique S. Cerqueira; Maria F. Ribeiro

2012-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

151

Efficiency and Emissions Study of a Residential Micro-cogeneration System based on a Modified Stirling Engine and Fuelled by a Wood Derived Fas Pyrolysis Liquid-ethanol Blend.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??A residential micro-cogeneration system based on a Stirling engine unit was modified to operate with wood derived fast pyrolysis liquid (bio-oil)-ethanol blend. A pilot stabilized… (more)

Khan, Umer

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Chemical kinetics and oil shale process design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oil shale processes are reviewed with the goal of showing how chemical kinetics influences the design and operation of different processes for different types of oil shale. Reaction kinetics are presented for organic pyrolysis, carbon combustion, carbonate decomposition, and sulfur and nitrogen reactions.

Burnham, A.K.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Pyrolysis of coal  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for mild gasification of crushed coal in a single vertical elongated reaction vessel providing a fluidized bed reaction zone, a freeboard reaction zone, and an entrained reaction zone within the single vessel. Feed coal and gas may be fed separately to each of these reaction zones to provide different reaction temperatures and conditions in each reaction zone. The reactor and process of this invention provides for the complete utilization of a coal supply for gasification including utilization of caking and non-caking or agglomerating feeds in the same reactor. The products may be adjusted to provide significantly greater product economic value, especially with respect to desired production of char having high surface area.

Babu, Suresh P. (Willow Springs, IL); Bair, Wilford G. (Morton Grove, IL)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Application of bio-oils from lignocellulosic biomass to transportation, heat and power generation—A review  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This review will be concentrated on the application of bio-oil produced from the cellulosic biomass among the various liquid biofuels to transport fuels, heat and power generation as substitute. Main application of bio-oil and biocrude from two main thermochemical processes, i.e., pyrolysis and liquefaction include boiler for heat and electricity production, diesel engine or gas turbine for power generation, and diesel engine for transportation fuel. Fast pyrolysis is the most popular process for converting cellulosic biomass to high yield of bio-oil with relatively low cost. For the application of bio-oils to transportation, heat and power generation, physical upgrading methods such as emulsions (bio-oil/diesel or bio-oil/biodiesel ) and blends of bio-oil/oxygenated fuel (ethanol, diglyme) were mainly used and tested. The studies on the spray characteristics of emulsions and blends in diesel engine condition are not available in the literature. In most studies on the combustion and emission characteristics of emulsions and blends, CO emission was increased in most fuels and engines tested and HC was increased or comparable to diesel operation. However, \\{NOx\\} and soot emissions were decreased in most case of experiments. In the pressure-swirl nozzle for gas turbine application, preheating and blending techniques were employed to reduce the SMD of spray. In case of blend for the application of heat and power generation, E20 blend was mainly selected in most studies. Most studies related to bio-oil combustion in burners, diesel engines and gas turbines demonstrated the higher HC, CO and soot emissions than the original design fuel. Although the properties of bio-oil/methanol blend were widely investigated, there are no studies available about the application of bio-oil/methanol blend to transportation, heat and power generation in the literature. In addition, more research is required for the combustion of upgraded bio-oils for transportation application.

Soo-Young No

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Cellulose Pyrolysis A Literature, Review.  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Reaction Mechanisms in Reaction Mechanisms in Cellulose Pyrolysis A Literature, Review. - - pacific N o r t h ~ ~ ~ , baboratwies I - - bCL-T-,,;, .,- , . . . I ' I . - " 1- jl,! # . .' , . - --h 1 , i b - . "I 1.- . . ., .. ' N O T - I C E , , If PACIF tC NORTHWLST U B O R A T ~ R Y .4peiild by B h m E far c h t ,EP4ERGY RESEARCH AN0 PEVELOPMEM ADMtNlSTRAnQN U m h Contract Z Y - ~ ~ - C ~ & I # D w n : m a , m & l 3 Q j l m OIdrfrn m y - !*? 1SI71Y9 1 - m-u3 2s-m .**-2?3 ,Sbca lcPa w m *a0 Iffy &a It- w-% w w @.a SlO.0 m u 6 REACTION MECHANISMS IN CELLULOSE PYROLYSIS A LITERATURE REVIEW by Peter M. Molton T.F. Demmitt Chemical Technology Department BATTELLE Pacific Northwest Laboratories Richland, Washington 99352 CONTENTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . L I S T OF F I G U R E S iii L I S T O F T A B L E S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . i v . . . . . . . . . . . . . I . INTRODUCTION 1

156

Comparison of Biological and Thermal (Pyrolysis) Pathways for Conversion of Lignocellulose to Biofuels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

D study. This journey was great because of her and Tinku being around! Thanks to my advisor Dr. Capareda for the diverse bio-energy research opportunity at BETA lab, Dr. El-Halwagi for the unconditional care in every step since I joined TX A... to produce bio-energy from biomass ....................... 3 1.2.2 Pretreatment and hydrolysis in lignocellulose breakdown ....................... 5 1.2.3 Pyrolysis oil upgrade technology...

Imam, Tahmina 1983-

2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

157

Particles of spilled oil-absorbing carbon in contact with water  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Hydrogen generator coupled to or integrated with a fuel cell for portable power applications. Hydrogen is produced via thermocatalytic decomposition (cracking, pyrolysis) of hydrocarbon fuels in oxidant-free environment. The apparatus can utilize a variety of hydrocarbon fuels, including natural gas, propane, gasoline, kerosene, diesel fuel, crude oil (including sulfurous fuels). The hydrogen-rich gas produced is free of carbon oxides or other reactive impurities, so it could be directly fed to any type of a fuel cell. The catalysts for hydrogen production in the apparatus are carbon-based or metal-based materials and doped, if necessary, with a sulfur-capturing agent. Additionally disclosed are two novel processes for the production of two types of carbon filaments, and a novel filamentous carbon product. Carbon particles with surface filaments having a hydrophobic property of oil film absorption, compositions of matter containing those particles, and a system for using the carbon particles for cleaning oil spills.

Muradov, Nazim (Melbourne, FL)

2011-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

158

Pyrolysis of polycyclic perhydroarenes. 3: 1-n-decylperhydropyrene and structure-reactivity relations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Naphthenic (perhydroarene) moieties decorated with n-alkyl substituents exist in heavy hydrocarbon resources such as coal, heavy oils, and asphaltenes. 1-n-Decylperhydropyrene (DPP) was pyrolyzed neat at temperatures between 400 and 475 C. DPP disappearance followed first-order kinetics, and the Arrhenius parameters for the first-order rate constant were A (s{sup {minus}1}) = 10{sup 9.55.0} and E = 42.9 {+-} 16.5 kcal/mol, where the uncertainties are the 95% confidence intervals. DPP pyrolysis generated numerous primary products, and the primary products with the highest initial selectivities were, in order of decreasing abundance, perhydropyrene plus 1-decene, methylene perhydropyrene plus n-nonane, tetradecahydropyrene plus n-decane, and methylperhydropyrene plus nonene. This ordering of product pairs is completely analogous to that observed from pyrolysis of an alkylcyclohexane, but it differed from that observed for the pyrolysis of other polycyclic n-alkylnaphthenes. Eight other n-alkylperhydroarenes were pyrolyzed at temperatures between 400 and 450 C. The resulting kinetics data were used to test three structure-reactivity correlations in the literature for the pyrolysis kinetics of saturated cyclic compounds and to update one of these correlations so that it becomes consistent with the kinetics of long-chain n-alkylperhydroarenes.

Savage, P.E.; Ratz, S.; Diaz, J. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering] [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Pyrolysis Research: Bioenergy Testing and Analysis Laboratory BIOENERGY PROGRAM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pyrolysis Research: Bioenergy Testing and Analysis Laboratory BIOENERGY PROGRAM Pyrolysis research is conducted at Texas A&M University at the Bioenergy Testing and Analysis Laboratory. Our researchers create

160

Liquefaction of cellulosic wastes. 6: Oxygen compounds in pyrolytic oil and water fractions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Liquid hydrocarbon oil and water have been produced from the liquefaction of cellulosic matter present in municipal solid wastes. The produced pyrolytic oil and water fraction seemed to be contaminated with considerable amounts of oxygen compounds as compared with fuels derived from a petroleum origin. The oxygen compounds included organic acids (fatty and naphthenic acids), phenols, and carbonyl compounds. These classes of oxygen compounds were extracted selectively from the pyrolytic oils and water using chemical extraction methods. Methyl esters of fatty acids and 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazones of carbonyl compounds were identified by gas chromatography and thin layer chromatography, respectively. It was suggested that the identified oxygen compounds could be produced from the pyrolysis of volatiles (e.g., levoglucosane, which is the primary product of cellulose depolymerization) via different mechanistic pathways.

Gharieb, H.K.; Faramawy, S.; El-Amrousi, F.A.; El-Sabagh, S.M. [Egyptian Petroleum Research Inst., Cairo (Egypt)

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes pyrolysis oils" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Oil shale, tar sand, coal research, advanced exploratory process technology, jointly sponsored research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress made in five research programs is described. The subtasks in oil shale study include oil shale process studies and unconventional applications and markets for western oil shale.The tar sand study is on recycle oil pyrolysis and extraction (ROPE) process. Four tasks are described in coal research: underground coal gasification; coal combustion; integrated coal processing concepts; and sold waste management. Advanced exploratory process technology includes: advanced process concepts; advanced mitigation concepts; and oil and gas technology. Jointly sponsored research covers: organic and inorganic hazardous waste stabilization; CROW field demonstration with Bell Lumber and Pole; development and validation of a standard test method for sequential batch extraction fluid; PGI demonstration project; operation and evaluation of the CO[sub 2] HUFF-N-PUFF process; fly ash binder for unsurfaced road aggregates; solid state NMR analysis of Mesaverde group, Greater Green River Basin, tight gas sands; flow-loop testing of double-wall pipe for thermal applications; shallow oil production using horizontal wells with enhanced oil recovery techniques; NMR analysis of sample from the ocean drilling program; and menu driven access to the WDEQ hydrologic data management system.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Thermochemical Conversion Research and Development: Gasification and Pyrolysis (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Biomass gasification and pyrolysis research and development activities at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

Not Available

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Comparison of Heating Methods for In-Situ Oil Shale Extraction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oil shales are lamellar, non-porous, impermeable hydrocarbon bearing rocks that contain organic matter called kerogen which, when heated at pyrolysis temperature of approximately 600-800 ?, thermo-chemically decomposes to liberate hydrocarbons...

Hazra, Kaushik Gaurav

2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

164

LLNL oil shale project review: METC third annual oil shale contractors meeting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory combines laboratory and pilot-scale experimental measurements with mathematical modeling of fundamental chemistry and physics to provide a technical base for evaluating oil shale retorting alternatives. Presented herein are results of four research areas of interest in oil shale process development: Recent Progress in Solid-Recycle Retorting and Related Laboratory and Modeling Studies; Water Generation During Pyrolysis of Oil Shale; Improved Analytical Methods and Measurements of Rapid Pyrolysis Kinetics for Western and Eastern Oil Shale; and Rate of Cracking or Degradation of Oil Vapor In Contact with Oxidized Shale. We describe operating results of a 1 tonne-per-day, continuous-loop, solid-recycle, retort processing both Western And Eastern oil shale. Sulfur chemistry, solid mixing limits, shale cooling tests and catalyst addition are all discussed. Using a triple-quadrupole mass spectrometer, we measure individual species evolution with greater sensitivity and selectivity. Herein we discuss our measurements of water evolution during ramped heating of Western and Eastern oil shale. Using improved analytical techniques, we determine isothermal pyrolysis kinetics for Western and Eastern oil shale, during rapid heating, which are faster than previously thought. Finally, we discuss the rate of cracking of oil vapor in contact with oxidized shale, qualitatively using a sand fluidized bed and quantitatively using a vapor cracking apparatus. 3 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

Cena, R.J.; Coburn, T.T.; Taylor, R.W.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Outer Continental Shelf oil and gas activities in the Gulf of Alaska (including Lower Cook Inlt) and their onshore impacts: a summary report, September 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The search for oil and gas on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) in the Gulf of Alaska subregion of the Alaska leasing region began in 1967, when geophysical surveys of the area were initiated. Two lease sales have been held in the subregion. Lease Sale 39, for the Northern Gulf of Alaska, was held on April 13, 1976, and resulted in the leasing of 76 tracts. Lease Sale CI, for Lower Cook Inlet, was held on October 27, 1977, and resulted in the leasing of 87 tracts. Exploratory drilling on the tracts leased in Sale 39 began in September 1976, and exploratory drilling on tracts leased in Sale CI began in July 1978. Commercial amounts of hydrocarbons have not been found in any of the wells drilled in either sale area. Seventy-four of the leases issued in the Northern Gulf of Alaska have been relinquished. As of June 1980, exploratory drilling in both areas had ceased, and none was planned for the near future. The next lease sale in the Gulf of Alaska, Sale 55, is scheduled for October 1980. Lease Sale 60 (Lower Cook Inlet and Shelikof Strait) is scheduled for September 1981, and Lease Sale 61 (OCS off Kodiak Island) is scheduled for April 1983. Sale 60 will be coordinated with a State lease sale in adjacent State-owned waters. The most recent estimates (June 1980) by the US Geological Survey of risked, economically recoverable resources for the 2 tracts currently under lease in the Northern Gulf of Alaska are negligible. For the 87 tracts currently under lease in Lower Cook Inlet, the USGS has produced risked, economically recoverable resource estimates of 35 million barrels of oil and 26 billion cubic feet of gas. These resource estimates for the leased tracts in both areas are short of commercially producible amounts. Onshore impacts from OCS exploration have been minimal. Two communities - Yakutat and Seward - served as support bases for the Northern Gulf of Alaska.

Jackson, J.B.; Dorrier, R.T.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Western oil shale conversion using the ROPE copyright process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Western Research Institute (WRI) is continuing to develop the Recycle Oil Pyrolysis and Extraction (ROPE) process to recover liquid hydrocarbon products from oil shale, tar sand, and other solid hydrocarbonaceous materials. The process consists of three major steps: (1) pyrolyzing the hydrocarbonaceous material at a low temperature (T {le} 400{degrees}C) with recycled product oil, (2) completing the pyrolysis of the residue at a higher temperature (T > 400{degrees}C) in the absence of product oil, and (3) combusting the solid residue and pyrolysis gas in an inclined fluidized-bed reactor to produce process heat. Many conventional processes, such as the Paraho and Union processes, do not use oil shale fines (particles smaller than 1.27 cm in diameter). The amount of shale discarded as fines from these processes can be as high as 20% of the total oil shale mined. Research conducted to date suggests that the ROPE process can significantly improve the overall oil recovery from western oil shale by processing the oil shale fines typically discarded by conventional processes. Also, if the oil shale fines are co-processed with shale oil used as the heavy recycle oil, a better quality oil will be produced that can be blended with the original shale oil to make an overall produce that is more acceptable to the refineries and easier to pipeline. Results from tests conducted in a 2-inch process development unit (PDU) and a 6-inch bench-scale unit (BSU) with western oil shale demonstrated a maximum oil yield at temperatures between 700 and 750{degrees}F (371 and 399{degrees}C). Test results also suggest that the ROPE process has a strong potential for recovering oil from oil shale fines, upgrading shale oil, and separating high-nitrogen-content oil for use as an asphalt additive. 6 refs., 10 figs., 11 tabs.

Cha, C.Y.; Fahy, L.J.; Grimes, R.W.

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Specialists' workshop on fast pyrolysis of biomass  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This workshop brought together most of those who are currently working in or have published significant findings in the area of fast pyrolysis of biomass or biomass-derived materials, with the goal of attaining a better understanding of the dominant mechanisms which produce olefins, oxygenated liquids, char, and tars. In addition, background papers were given in hydrocarbon pyrolysis, slow pyrolysis of biomass, and techniques for powdered-feedstock preparation in order that the other papers did not need to introduce in depth these concepts in their presentations for continuity. In general, the authors were requested to present summaries of experimental data with as much interpretation of that data as possible with regard to mechanisms and process variables such as heat flux, temperatures, partial pressure, feedstock, particle size, heating rates, residence time, etc. Separate abstracts have been prepared of each presentation for inclusion in the Energy Data Base. (DMC)

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Pyrolysis and ignition behavior of coal, cattle biomass, and coal/cattle biomass blends  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

derived from biomass. Current research at Texas A&M University is focused on the effectiveness of using cattle manure biomass as a fuel source in conjunction with coal burning utilities. The scope of this project includes fuel property analysis, pyrolysis...

Martin, Brandon Ray

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

169

Pyrolysis of Organic Molecules Relevant to Combustion as Monitored by Photoionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Small Molecules by Flash Pyrolysis, University ofapproach of coupling flash pyrolysis of the compound ofZhang, Chairperson Flash pyrolysis coupled to molecular beam

Weber, Kevin Howard

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Thermal Decomposition of Molecules Relevant to Combustion and Chemical Vapor Deposition by Flash Pyrolysis Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Small Molecules by Flash Pyrolysis, University ofwas performed using flash pyrolysis vacuum-ultraviolet time-Vapor Deposition by Flash Pyrolysis Time-of-Flight Mass

Lemieux, Jessy Mario

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Technical Information Exchange on Pyrolysis Oil: Potential for...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

volatility in the United States while creating American jobs and reducing greenhouse gas emissions. It could replace over 30 million barrels of petroleum-based fuels each year,...

172

Oil shale technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oil shale is undoubtedly an excellent energy source that has great abundance and world-wide distribution. Oil shale industries have seen ups and downs over more than 100 years, depending on the availability and price of conventional petroleum crudes. Market forces as well as environmental factors will greatly affect the interest in development of oil shale. Besides competing with conventional crude oil and natural gas, shale oil will have to compete favorably with coal-derived fuels for similar markets. Crude shale oil is obtained from oil shale by a relatively simple process called retorting. However, the process economics are greatly affected by the thermal efficiencies, the richness of shale, the mass transfer effectiveness, the conversion efficiency, the design of retort, the environmental post-treatment, etc. A great many process ideas and patents related to the oil shale pyrolysis have been developed; however, relatively few field and engineering data have been published. Due to the vast heterogeneity of oil shale and to the complexities of physicochemical process mechanisms, scientific or technological generalization of oil shale retorting is difficult to achieve. Dwindling supplied of worldwide petroleum reserves, as well as the unprecedented appetite of mankind for clean liquid fuel, has made the public concern for future energy market grow rapidly. the clean coal technology and the alternate fuel technology are currently of great significance not only to policy makers, but also to process and chemical researchers. In this book, efforts have been made to make a comprehensive text for the science and technology of oil shale utilization. Therefore, subjects dealing with the terminological definitions, geology and petrology, chemistry, characterization, process engineering, mathematical modeling, chemical reaction engineering, experimental methods, and statistical experimental design, etc. are covered in detail.

Lee, S. (Akron Univ., OH (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Effects of torrefaction and densification on switchgrass pyrolysis products  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Abstract The pyrolysis behaviors of four types of pretreated switchgrass (torrefied at 230 and 270 °C, densification, and torrefaction at 270 ºC followed by densification) were studied at three temperatures (500, 600, 700 ºC) using a pyroprobe attached to a gas chromatogram mass spectroscopy (Py-GC/MS). The torrefaction of switchgrass improved its oxygen to carbon ratio and energy content. Contents of anhydrous sugars and phenols in pyrolysis products of torrefied switchgrass were higher than those in pyrolysis products of raw switchgrass. As the torrefaction temperature increased from 230 to 270 °C, the contents of anhydrous sugars and phenols in pyrolysis products increased whereas content of guaiacols decreased. High pyrolysis temperature (600 and 700 °C as compared to 500 °C) enhanced decomposition of lignin and anhydrous sugars, leading to increase in phenols, aromatics and furans. Densification enhanced depolymerization of cellulose and hemicellulose during pyrolysis.

Yang, Z; Sarkar, M; Kumar, A; Jaya Shankar Tumuluru; R.L. Huhnke

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Accepted Manuscript Kinetic modelling of high density polyethylene pyrolysis: Part 2. Reduction of existing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Accepted Manuscript Kinetic modelling of high density polyethylene pyrolysis: Part 2. Reduction density polyethylene pyrolysis: Part 2. Reduction of existing detailed mechanism, Polymer Degradation Modelling of High Density PolyEthylene Pyrolysis: Part 2. Reduction of existing detailed mechanism. N

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

175

Dynamic study of coupled heavy hydrocarbon pyrolysis and combustion. N. Gascoina*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1/28 Dynamic study of coupled heavy hydrocarbon pyrolysis and combustion. N. Gascoina* , P of the heat transfer dynamics. Finally, the combustion mechanism is applied and validated experimentally for kerosene pyrolysis application. Keywords Regenerative cooling; Hydrocarbon pyrolysis; Supersonic Combustion

Boyer, Edmond

176

U.S., Canada, and Finland Pyrolysis Collaborations  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Jonathan Male, PNNL, presentation at the December 5, 2012, Biomass Program-hosted International webinar on U.S., Canada, and Finland pyrolysis collaborations.

177

Sala Dolomite-Catalysed Conversion of Tar from Biomass Pyrolysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Dolomite from the Swedish Sala quarry has been examined as a possible catalyst for cracking and steam reforming of tar produced during pyrolysis of biomass.

K. Sjöström; G. Taralas; L. Liinanki

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Modelling and experimental studies of biomass and organic pyrolysis.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Pyrolysis is a thermal conversion process that decomposes organic materials into liquid hydrocarbons, carbonaceous residues and combustible gases in the absence of oxygen. Depending on… (more)

Lam, Ka Leung

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Coke resistant coating technology for applications in ethylene pyrolysis heaters.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? This dissertation begins with a description of the history of the events leading to ethylene pyrolysis tube failure. During service, hydrocarbons pass through the… (more)

Chauhan, Alok Pratap Singh

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Process for minimizing solids contamination of liquids from coal pyrolysis  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In a continuous process for recovery of liquid hydrocarbons from a solid carbonaceous material by pyrolysis of the carbonaceous material in the presence of a particulate source of heat, particulate contamination of the liquid hydrocarbons is minimized. This is accomplished by removing fines from the solid carbonaceous material feed stream before pyrolysis, removing fines from the particulate source of heat before combining it with the carbonaceous material to effect pyrolysis of the carbonaceous material, and providing a coarse fraction of reduced fines content of the carbon containing solid residue resulting from the pyrolysis of the carbonaceous material before oxidizing carbon in the carbon containing solid residue to form the particulate source of heat.

Wickstrom, Gary H. (Yorba Linda, CA); Knell, Everett W. (Los Alamitos, CA); Shaw, Benjamin W. (Costa Mesa, CA); Wang, Yue G. (West Covina, CA)

1981-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes pyrolysis oils" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Study of the mechanism of pyrolysis and gasification of Mallee biomass.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Mechanisms of pyrolysis/gasification (steam and carbon dioxide) of mallee biomass were investigated. Wood biochar obtained under slow pyrolysis kept botanical structure but lost its original… (more)

Yang, Yanwu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Catalytic microwave torrefaction and pyrolysis of Douglas fir pellet to improve biofuel quality .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The aims of this dissertation were to understand the effects of torrefaction as pretreatment on biomass pyrolysis and catalytic pyrolysis for improving biofuel quality, and… (more)

[No author

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Pyrolysis behavior of coal and petroleum coke at high temperature and high pressure.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??While pyrolysis of coal is a well-studied thermal process, little is known about pressurized pyrolysis of coal and petroleum coke. This study aims to interpret… (more)

Wagner, David Ray

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

The Alpha–Bet(a) of Glucose Pyrolysis: Computational and Experimental Investigations of 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural and Levoglucosan Formation Reveal Implications for Cellulose Pyrolysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Alpha–Bet(a) of Glucose Pyrolysis: Computational and Experimental Investigations of 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural and Levoglucosan Formation Reveal Implications for Cellulose Pyrolysis ... For example, there are several proposed mechanisms for evolution of an important product and platform chemical, 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (5-HMF), but evaluation with different methodologies has hindered comparison. ... (12, 17) The remaining 41% is composed of water (from dehydration) and products that individually account for less than 7 wt % of the yield, including 6.7 wt % glycolaldehyde, 4.1 wt % of the furanose form of levoglucosan (1,6-anhydro-?-d-glucofuranose), and 2.8 wt % 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (5-HMF), as reported in the meticulous study by Patwardhan et al. conducted at 500 °C with pure cellulose feed, rapid heating, and minimization of secondary reactions. ...

Heather B. Mayes; Michael W. Nolte; Gregg T. Beckham; Brent H. Shanks; Linda J. Broadbelt

2014-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

185

Method of increasing anhydrosugars, pyroligneous fractions and esterified bio-oil  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The device and method are provided to increase anhydrosugars yield during pyrolysis of biomass. This increase is achieved by injection of a liquid or gas into the vapor stream of any pyrolysis reactor prior to the reactor condensers. A second feature of our technology is the utilization of sonication, microwave excitation, or shear mixing of the biomass to increase the acid catalyst rate for demineralization or removal of hemicellulose prior to pyrolysis. The increased reactivity of these treatments reduces reaction time as well as the required amount of catalyst to less than half of that otherwise required. A fractional condensation system employed by our pyrolysis reactor is another feature of our technology. This system condenses bio-oil pyrolysis vapors to various desired fractions by differential temperature manipulation of individual condensers comprising a condenser chain.

Steele, Philip H; Yu, Fei; Li, Qi; Mitchell, Brian

2014-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

186

Thermal decomposition of Colorado and Kentucky reference oil shales  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Isothermal pyrolysis studies have been conducted on a Green River Formation oil shale from Colorado and a New Albany oil shale from Kentucky. The conversion of kerogen to bitumen, oil, gas, and residue products was obtained for different isothermal reaction times in the temperature range of 375/degree/C to 440/degree/C (707/degree/ to 824/degree/F) using a heated sand bath reactor system. Particular attention was paid to the formation of the bitumen intermediate during decomposition of the two shales. The maximum amount of extractable bitumen in the New Albany shale was 14% or less of the original kerogen at any given temperature, indicating that direct conversion of kerogen to oil, gas, and residue products is a major pathway of conversion of this shale during pyrolysis. In contrast, a significant fraction of the Colorado oil shale kerogen was converted to the intermediate bitumen during pyrolysis. The bitumen data imply that the formation of soluble intermediates may depend on original kerogen structure and may be necessary for producing high yields by pyrolysis. 24 refs., 14 figs., 8 tabs.

Miknis, F.P.; Turner, T.F.; Ennen, L.W.; Chong, S.L.; Glaser, R.

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Ex-Situ Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis Technology Pathway  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In support of the Bioenergy Technologies Office, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are undertaking studies of biomass conversion technologies to hydrocarbon fuels to identify barriers and target research toward reducing conversion costs. Process designs and preliminary economic estimates for each of these pathway cases were developed using rigorous modeling tools (Aspen Plus and Chemcad). These analyses incorporated the best information available at the time of development, including data from recent pilot and bench-scale demonstrations, collaborative industrial and academic partners, and published literature and patents. This pathway case investigates converting woody biomass using ex-situ catalytic fast pyrolysis followed by upgrading to gasoline , diesel and jet range blendstocks . Technical barriers and key research needs that should be pursued for this pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived blendstocks have been identified.

Biddy, Mary J.; Dutta, Abhijit; Jones, Susanne B.; Meyer, Pimphan A.

2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

188

In-Situ Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis Technology Pathway  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In support of the Bioenergy Technologies Office, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are undertaking studies of biomass conversion technologies to hydrocarbon fuels to identify barriers and target research toward reducing conversion costs. Process designs and preliminary economic estimates for each of these pathway cases were developed using rigorous modeling tools (Aspen Plus and Chemcad). These analyses incorporated the best information available at the time of development, including data from recent pilot and bench-scale demonstrations, collaborative industrial and academic partners, and published literature and patents. This pathway case investigates converting woody biomass using in-situ catalytic fast pyrolysis followed by upgrading to gasoline, diesel, and jet range blendstocks. Technical barriers and key research needs that should be pursued for this pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived blendstocks have been identified.

Biddy, Mary J.; Dutta, Abhijit; Jones, Susanne B.; Meyer, Pimphan A.

2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

189

Oil shale, tar sand, coal research, advanced exploratory process technology, jointly sponsored research. Quarterly technical progress report, July--September 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress made in five research programs is described. The subtasks in oil shale study include oil shale process studies and unconventional applications and markets for western oil shale.The tar sand study is on recycle oil pyrolysis and extraction (ROPE) process. Four tasks are described in coal research: underground coal gasification; coal combustion; integrated coal processing concepts; and sold waste management. Advanced exploratory process technology includes: advanced process concepts; advanced mitigation concepts; and oil and gas technology. Jointly sponsored research covers: organic and inorganic hazardous waste stabilization; CROW field demonstration with Bell Lumber and Pole; development and validation of a standard test method for sequential batch extraction fluid; PGI demonstration project; operation and evaluation of the CO{sub 2} HUFF-N-PUFF process; fly ash binder for unsurfaced road aggregates; solid state NMR analysis of Mesaverde group, Greater Green River Basin, tight gas sands; flow-loop testing of double-wall pipe for thermal applications; shallow oil production using horizontal wells with enhanced oil recovery techniques; NMR analysis of sample from the ocean drilling program; and menu driven access to the WDEQ hydrologic data management system.

Not Available

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

190

Effects of Preparation Method on the Performance of Ni/Al2O3 Catalysts for Hydrogen Production by Bio-Oil Steam Reforming  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Steam reforming of bio-oil derived from the fast pyrolysis of biomass is an economic and renewable process for hydrogen production. The main objective of the present work ... been to investigate the effects of th...

Xinbao Li; Shurong Wang; Qinjie Cai; Lingjun Zhu…

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Pyrolysis of automotive shredder residues: a lumped kinetic characterization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A lumped kinetic model for the pyrolysis of industrial wastes of unknown chemical composition is developed. The model is applied to the pyrolysis of automotive shredder residues (ASRs), studied by means of thermogravimetric and calorimetric analyses, in isothermal and non-isothermal conditions.

Oreste Patierno; Paola Cipriani; Fausto Pochetti; Massimiliano Giona

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Accepted Manuscript Title: Fuel Pyrolysis through Porous Media: Coke Formation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Accepted Manuscript Title: Fuel Pyrolysis through Porous Media: Coke Formation and Coupled effect. Gascoin, P. Gillard, M. Bouchez, J. Steelant, Fuel Pyrolysis through Porous Media: Coke Formation Coke Formation and Coupled effect on Permeability2 G. Fau1* , N. Gascoin1 , P. Gillard1 , M. Bouchez2

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

193

NITROGEN EVOLUTION AND SOOT FORMATION DURING SECONDARY COAL PYROLYSIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NITROGEN EVOLUTION AND SOOT FORMATION DURING SECONDARY COAL PYROLYSIS by Haifeng Zhang DURING SECONDARY COAL PYROLYSIS Haifeng Zhang Department of Chemical Engineering Doctor of Philosophy Economical NOx control techniques used in pulverized coal furnaces, such as air/fuel staging, promote

Fletcher, Thomas H.

194

Modeling of Coal Drying before Pyrolysis Damintode Kolani1, a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the coal without chemical decomposition and pyrolysis converts dry coal into gas and coke [1]. The final1 Modeling of Coal Drying before Pyrolysis Damintode Kolani1, a , Eric Blond1, b , Alain Gasser1 Forbach, France a damintode.kolani@univ-orleans.fr, b eric.blond@univ-orleans.fr Keywords: coal, drying

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

195

Oil and Gas Exploration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Metals Industrial Minerals Oil and Gas Geothermal Exploration Development Mining Processing Nevada, oil and gas, and geothermal activities and accomplishments in Nevada: production statistics, exploration and development including drilling for petroleum and geothermal resources, discoveries of ore

Tingley, Joseph V.

196

Conductivity heating a subterranean oil shale to create permeability and subsequently produce oil  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes an improvement in a process in which oil is produced from a subterranean oil shale deposit by extending at least one each of heat-injecting and fluid-producing wells into the deposit, establishing a heat-conductive fluid-impermeable barrier between the interior of each heat-injecting well and the adjacent deposit, and then heating the interior of each heat-injecting well at a temperature sufficient to conductively heat oil shale kerogen and cause pyrolysis products to form fractures within the oil shale deposit through which the pyrolysis products are displaced into at least one production well. The improvement is for enhancing the uniformity of the heat fronts moving through the oil shale deposit. Also described is a process for exploiting a target oil shale interval, by progressively expanding a heated treatment zone band from about a geometric center of the target oil shale interval outward, such that the formation or extension of vertical fractures from the heated treatment zone band to the periphery of the target oil shale interval is minimized.

Van Meurs, P.; DeRouffignac, E.P.; Vinegar, H.J.; Lucid, M.F.

1989-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

197

Mathematical Modeling of a Semibatch Pyrolyser for Sesame Oil Cake  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The present study deals with slow pyrolysis of sesame oil cake in an isothermally operated 50 mm diameter and 640 mm long semibatch pyrolyser in the temperature range of 673–1173 K. Under isothermal condition, a lumped parameter model has been used to ...

Aparna Sarkar; Biswarup Mondal; Ranjana Chowdhury

2014-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

198

The stimulation of heavy oil reservoirs with electrical resistance heating  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-307. Stuckey, W. D. : "A Study of the Pyrolysis of Oil Shale By Microwave Heating, " MS Thesis, University of Colorado, Boulder (1977). Bridges, J. E. , Taflove, A. , and Snow, R. H. : eNet Energy Recoveries for the In-Situ Dielectric Heating of Oil Shales..., w Proc. 1978 Oil Shale Symposium, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Apr. 12-14. Solomon, B. : "Shale Oil Via Microwaves: Illinois Institute Says Yes, e Energy Daily (May 1978) 2-4; Energy Abstr. Policy Anal. (Nov. 1978) 831. Snowi R H i et. el...

Baylor, Blake Allen

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

199

Biochemical upgrading of oils  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for biochemical conversion of heavy crude oils is provided. The process includes contacting heavy crude oils with adapted biocatalysts. The resulting upgraded oil shows, a relative increase in saturated hydrocarbons, emulsions and oxygenates and a decrease in compounds containing organic sulfur, organic nitrogen and trace metals. Adapted microorganisms which have been modified under challenged growth processes are also disclosed. 121 figs.

Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.S.

1999-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

200

Fluidized bed selective pyrolysis of coal  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention discloses a process for the pyrolysis of coal which comprises the effective utilization of two zonal inclined fluidized beds, where said zones can be selectively controlled as to temperature and heating rate. The first zonal inclined fluidized bed serves as a dryer for crushed coal and additionally is controlled to selectively pyrolyze said coal producing substantially carbon dioxide for recycle use. The second zonal inclined fluidized bed further pyrolyzes the coal to gaseous, liquid and char products under controlled temperature and heating rate zones designed to economically integrate the product mix. The gas and liquid products are recovered from the gaseous effluent stream while the char which remains can be further treated or utilized in a subsequent process step.

Shang, Jer Y. (McLean, VA); Cha, Chang Y. (Golden, CO); Merriam, Norman W. (Laramie, WY)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes pyrolysis oils" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Flash pyrolysis and hydropyrolysis of biomass  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Process chemistry data on the flash pyrolysis and hydropyrolysis of wood is being obtained in a 1'' downflow entrained tubular reactor. The data indicates that at residence times of <1 second, and 900 to 1000/sup 0/C and 500 psi pressure, the flash hydropyrolysis of wood yields mainly methane and water. As the residence time increases to >3 seconds, the products are methane and CO. Almost complete conversion of the carbon to methane and CO are obtained in these experiments. At lower temperatures, in the order of 800/sup 0/C, 500 psi and residence times <4 seconds, significant amounts of benzene and ethane are produced. The experimental process chemistry data have been used to design and evaluate two processes in a preliminary manner. One process converts wood to high BTU pipeline gas and the other to methanol and chemical feedstocks consisting of benzene and ethylene. Reasonable plant investments which compare favorably with coal conversion plant estimates are derived.

Not Available

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Pyrolysis—Gas Chromatography: A Bibliography (1960–1963)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......THE PYROLYSIS OF TOULENE, Price, S. J., Can. J. Chem...CHROMATOGRAPHIC ANALYSIS OF POLY(ETHYLENE ETHYLACRYLATE) AND POLY(ETHYLENE VINYL ACETATE) PYROLY- SATES...CHROMATOGRAPHIC ANALYSIS OF POLY(ETHYLENE ETHYL ACRYLATE) AND POLY......

R. W. McKinney

1964-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

No Oil: The coming Utopia/Dystopia and Communal Possibilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

supplies of conventional oil, and exploitable supplies of alternative forms of oil and related hydrocarbons, including tar sands and oil shale. Because new supplies of conventional oil are declining steadily, there is quite a lot of activity in the oil... to exploit the huge deposits of oil sands in Canada. Oil sands and oil shale look good because they contain vast amounts of oil. The problem is that of turning the reserves, locked into other geological formations, into useful oil. According to current...

Miller, Timothy

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

The extraction of bitumen from western oil sands: Volume 2. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The program is composed of 20 projects, of which 17 are laboratory bench or laboratory pilot scale processes or computer process simulations that are performed in existing facilities on the University of Utah campus in north-east Salt Lake City. These tasks are: (1) coupled fluidized-bed bitumen recovery and coked sand combustion; (2) water-based recovery of bitumen; (3) oil sand pyrolysis in a continuous rotary kiln reactor; (4) oil sand pyrolysis in a large diameter fluidized bed reactor; (5) oil sand pyrolysis in a small diameter fluidized bed reactor; (6) combustion of spent sand in a transport reactor; (7) recovery and upgrading of oil sand bitumen using solvent extraction methods; (8) fixed-bed hydrotreating of Uinta Basin bitumens and bitumen-derived hydrocarbon liquids; (9) ebullieted bed hydrotreating of bitumen and bitumen derived liquids; (10) bitumen upgrading by hydropyrolysis; (11) evaluation of Utah`s major oil sand deposits for the production of asphalt, high-energy jet fuels and other specialty products; (12) characterization of the bitumens and reservoir rocks from the Uinta Basin oil sand deposits; (13) bitumen upgrading pilot plant recommendations; (14) liquid-solid separation and fine tailings thickening; (15) in-situ production of heavy oil from Uinta Basin oil sand deposits; (16) oil sand research and development group analytical facility; and (17) process economics. This volume contains reports on nine of these projects, references, and a bibliography. 351 refs., 192 figs., 65 tabs.

Oblad, A.G.; Dahlstrom, D.A.; Deo, M.D.; Fletcher, J.V.; Hanson, F.V.; Miller, J.D.; Seader, J.D.

1997-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

205

The extraction of bitumen from western oil sands: Volume 1. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The program is composed of 20 projects, of which 17 are laboratory bench or laboratory pilot scale processes or computer process simulations that are performed in existing facilities on the University of Utah campus in north-east Salt Lake City. These tasks are: (1) coupled fluidized-bed bitumen recovery and coked sand combustion; (2) water-based recovery of bitumen; (3) oil sand pyrolysis in a continuous rotary kiln reactor; (4) oil sand pyrolysis in a large diameter fluidized bed reactor; (5) oil sand pyrolysis in a small diameter fluidized bed reactor; (6) combustion of spent sand in a transport reactor; (7) recovery and upgrading of oil sand bitumen using solvent extraction methods; (8) fixed-bed hydrotreating of Uinta Basin bitumens and bitumen-derived hydrocarbon liquids; (9) ebullieted bed hydrotreating of bitumen and bitumen derived liquids; (10) bitumen upgrading by hydropyrolysis; (11) evaluation of Utah`s major oil sand deposits for the production of asphalt, high-energy jet fuels and other specialty products; (12) characterization of the bitumens and reservoir rocks from the Uinta Basin oil sand deposits; (13) bitumen upgrading pilot plant recommendations; (14) liquid-solid separation and fine tailings thickening; (15) in-situ production of heavy oil from Uinta Basin oil sand deposits; (16) oil sand research and development group analytical facility; and (17) process economics. This volume contains an executive summary and reports for five of these projects. 137 figs., 49 tabs.

Oblad, A.G.; Dahlstrom, D.A.; Deo, M.D.; Fletcher, J.V.; Hanson, F.V.; Miller, J.D.; Seader, J.D.

1997-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

206

Oil shale retorting with steam and produced gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes a process for retorting oil shale in a vertical retort. It comprises introducing particles of oil shale into the retort, the particles of oil shale having a minimum size such that the particles are retained on a screen having openings 1/4 inch in size; contacting the particles of oil shale with hot gas to heat the particles of oil shale to a state of pyrolysis, thereby producing retort off-gas; removing the off-gas from the retort; cooling the off-gas; removing oil from the cooled off-gas; separating recycle gas from the off-gas, the recycle gas comprising steam and produced gas, the steam being present in amount, by volume, of at least 50% of the recycle gas so as to increase the yield of sand oil; and heating the recycle gas to form the hot gas.

Merrill, L.S. Jr.; Wheaton, L.D.

1991-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

207

Oil shale as an energy source in Israel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reserves, characteristics, energetics, chemistry, and technology of Israeli oil shales are described. Oil shale is the only source of energy and the only organic natural resource in Israel. Its reserves of about 12 billion tons will be enough to meet Israel`s requirements for about 80 years. The heating value of the oil shale is 1,150 kcal/kg, oil yield is 6%, and sulfur content of the oil is 5--7%. A method of oil shale processing, providing exhaustive utilization of its energy and chemical potential, developed in the Technion, is described. The principal feature of the method is a two-stage pyrolysis of the oil shale. As a result, gas and aromatic liquids are obtained. The gas may be used for energy production in a high-efficiency power unit, or as a source for chemical synthesis. The liquid products can be an excellent source for production of chemicals.

Fainberg, V.; Hetsroni, G. [Technion-Israel Inst. of Tech., Haifa (Israel)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

OIL SHALE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seyitömer, Himmeto?lu and Hat?lda? oil shale deposits. The results demonstrate that these oil shales are

Fields (in-situ Combustion Approach; M. V. Kök; G. Guner; S. Bagci?

209

Bio-methane via fast pyrolysis of biomass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Bio-methane, a renewable vehicle fuel, is today produced by anaerobic digestion and a 2nd generation production route via gasification is under development. This paper proposes a poly-generation plant that produces bio-methane, bio-char and heat via fast pyrolysis of biomass. The energy and material flows for the fuel synthesis are calculated by process simulation in Aspen Plus®. The production of bio-methane and bio-char amounts to 15.5 MW and 3.7 MW, when the total inputs are 23 MW raw biomass and 1.39 MW electricity respectively (HHV basis). The results indicate an overall efficiency of 84% including high-temperature heat and the biomass to bio-methane yield amounts to 83% after allocation of the biomass input to the final products (HHV basis). The overall energy efficiency is higher for the suggested plant than for the gasification production route and is therefore a competitive route for bio-methane production.

Martin Görling; Mårten Larsson; Per Alvfors

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Kinetic Model Development for Lignin Pyrolysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lignin pyrolysis poses a significant barrier to the formation of liquid fuel products from biomass. Lignin pyrolyzes at higher temperatures than other biomass components (e.g. cellulose and hemi-cellulose) and tends to form radicals species that lead to cross-linking and ultimately char formation. A first step in the advancement of biomass-to-fuel technology is to discover the underlying mechanisms that lead to the breakdown of lignin at lower temperatures into more stable and usable products. We have investigated the thermochemistry of the various inter-linkage units found in lignin (B-O4, a-O4, B-B, B-O5, etc) using electronic structure calculations at the M06-2x/6-311++G(d,p) on a series of dimer model compounds. In addition to bond homolysis reactions, a variety of concerted elimination pathways are under investigation that tend to produce closed-shell stable products. Such a bottom-up approach could aid in the targeted development of catalysts that produce more desirable products under less severe reactor conditions.

Clark, J.; Robichaud, D.; Nimlos, M.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Autothermal oxidative pyrolysis of biomass feedstocks over noble metal catalysts to liquid products.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Two thermal processing technologies have emerged for processing biomass into renewable liquid products: pyrolysis and gasification/Fischer-Tropsch processing. The work presented here will demonstrate oxidative pyrolysis… (more)

Balonek, Christine Marie

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Pyrolysis of Municipal Solid Waste for Syngas Production by Microwave Irradiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the present study, we discuss the application of microwave-irradiated pyrolysis of municipal solid waste (MSW) for total recovery of useful gases and energy. The MSW pyrolysis under microwave irradiation hi...

Vidyadhar V. Gedam; Iyyaswami Regupathi

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Biomass pyrolysis processes: performance parameters and their influence on biochar system benefits   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study focuses on performance of biomass pyrolysis processes for use in biochar systems. Objectives are to understand the range of control of such processes and how this affects potential benefits of pyrolysis biochar ...

Brownsort, Peter A

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

The best use of biomass? Greenhouse gas lifecycle analysis of predicted pyrolysis biochar systems   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to pessimistic scenarios are used for system operation. Slow pyrolysis is compared to fast pyrolysis and biomass co-firing for GHG abatement and electricity production, using various scenarios for availability of indigenous Scottish feedstocks....

Hammond, James A R

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Solar coal gasification reactor with pyrolysis gas recycle  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Coal (or other carbonaceous matter, such as biomass) is converted into a duct gas that is substantially free from hydrocarbons. The coal is fed into a solar reactor (10), and solar energy (20) is directed into the reactor onto coal char, creating a gasification front (16) and a pyrolysis front (12). A gasification zone (32) is produced well above the coal level within the reactor. A pyrolysis zone (34) is produced immediately above the coal level. Steam (18), injected into the reactor adjacent to the gasification zone (32), reacts with char to generate product gases. Solar energy supplies the energy for the endothermic steam-char reaction. The hot product gases (38) flow from the gasification zone (32) to the pyrolysis zone (34) to generate hot char. Gases (38) are withdrawn from the pyrolysis zone (34) and reinjected into the region of the reactor adjacent the gasification zone (32). This eliminates hydrocarbons in the gas by steam reformation on the hot char. The product gas (14) is withdrawn from a region of the reactor between the gasification zone (32) and the pyrolysis zone (34). The product gas will be free of tar and other hydrocarbons, and thus be suitable for use in many processes.

Aiman, William R. (Livermore, CA); Gregg, David W. (Morago, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT DIVISION. INTERACTION OF ORGANIC SOLVENT WITH A SUBBITUMINOUS COAL BELOW PYROLYSIS TEMPERATURE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

~. ~. ~. ~. Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . Coal and Solventon Subbiturninous Coal Below Pyrolysis Temperatures, LBL-Treatment of Extract Solution Coal Residue Treatment. Yield

Lindsey, D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Fast pyrolysis of a waste fraction of high impact polystyrene (HIPS) containing brominated flame retardants in a fluidized bed reactor: The effects of various Ca-based additives (CaO, Ca(OH)2 and oyster shells) on the removal of bromine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A waste fraction of high impact polystyrene (HIPS) containing brominated flame retardants and antimony trioxide (Sb2O3) as a synergist was pyrolyzed in a bench-scale system equipped with a fluidized bed and char separation system. Experiments were carried out to observe the effects of the reaction temperature and three additives (CaO, Ca(OH)2, oyster shells) on the removal of bromine. An analysis of the pyrolysis oils obtained showed the oils were mainly composed of toluene, ethyl-benzene, styrene, cumene, ?-methylstyrene, 1,3-diphenylpropane, 1,3-diphenylbutane and (1-bromoethyl)-benzene. When the Ca-based additives were used, the concentration of styrene was markedly increased; whereas, those of ethlybenzene and cumene were reduced. The total bromine content of pyrolysis oil produced without any additive at 459 °C was about 5 wt.%. When Ca(OH)2 and oyster shells were applied, the total bromine contents of the pyrolysis oils were decreased to 1.3 and 2.7 wt.%, respectively. The antimony content in the pyrolysis oil was relatively small due to the efficient operation of the char separation system.

Su-Hwa Jung; Seon-Jin Kim; Joo-Sik Kim

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Pyrolysis as a way to close a CFRC life cycle: Carbon fibers recovery and their use as feedstock for a new composite production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Pyrolysis is shown to be an efficient method for recycling carbon fiber composites in the form of both uncured prepregs scraps or as cured end-of-life objects. The pyrolytic process leads to different products in three physical states of matter. The gaseous fraction called syngas can be used as energy feedstock in the process itself. The oil fraction can be used as fuel or chemical feedstock. The solid residue contains substantially unharmed carbon fibers that can be isolated and recovered for the production of new composite materials thus closing the life cycle of the composite in a “cradle to cradle” approach. All the pyrolysis outputs were thoroughly analyzed and characterized in terms of composition for oil and gas fraction and surface characteristics of the fibers. In particular it is of paramount importance to correlate the aspect and properties of the fibers obtained with different composite feedstock and operational conditions that can be significantly different with the reinforcing performance in the newly produced Recycled Carbon Fibers Reinforced Polymers. Present results have been obtained on a pyrolysis pilot plant that offers the possibility of treating up to 70kg of materials thus leading to a significant amount of products to be tested in the further composites production focused mainly on chopped carbon fiber reinforcement.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

VUV photoionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry of flash pyrolysis of silane and disilane  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Flash pyrolysis of silane, SiH4, and disilane, Si2H6, diluted in He or Ar (1%), was carried out at temperatures ranging from ?700 to ?1500 K. After a short reaction time of ?20 ?s, the initial products were isolated in a supersonic molecular beam and detected by single vacuum ultra-violet (VUV) photon (?=118 or 121 nm) ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOFMS). Initial decomposition and reaction products, both free radical intermediates and stable species, were directly observed, which included SiH2 and Si2H4.

Steven D. Chambreau; Jingsong Zhang

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Thermal Decomposition of Dichlorosilane Investigated by Pulsed Laser Powered Homogeneous Pyrolysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of vacuum flash pyrolysis of SiH 2Cl2. Ban and Gilbert6 observed SiCl2 by mass spectrometry under sili- conThermal Decomposition of Dichlorosilane Investigated by Pulsed Laser Powered Homogeneous Pyrolysis powered homogeneous pyrolysis of dichlorosilane are reported. Pyrolyses at temperatures of 1350 to 1700 K

Swihart, Mark T.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes pyrolysis oils" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

1 Solvent-Extractable Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Biochar: 2 Influence of Pyrolysis Temperature and Feedstock  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

combustion (or 30 pyrolysis) of plant biomass are important natural constituents 31 of soils and sediments.1 45 different starting materials. 46 Pyrolysis of biomass is known to produce a wide variety of 47 low and high molecular weight (LMW and HMW, respectively) 48 PAHs depending on the biomass type, pyrolysis

222

Ab Initio Dynamics of Cellulose Pyrolysis: Nascent Decomposition Pathways at 327 and 600 C  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

reserves in lignocellulosic biomass.1 Fast pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass, which involves rapidAb Initio Dynamics of Cellulose Pyrolysis: Nascent Decomposition Pathways at 327 and 600 °C Vishal pyrolysis at 327 and 600 °C using Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics (CPMD) simulations with rare events

Auerbach, Scott M.

223

"Optimization of Zero Length Chromatographic System and Measuring Properties of Model Compounds from Biomass Pyrolysis"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Compounds from Biomass Pyrolysis" Ross Kendall Faculty Mentor: Dr. Paul Dauenhauer, Chemical Engineering by using what he made to measure many of the compounds involved in biomass pyrolysis. If we can understand to retrieve diffusion coefficients of many intermediates of the biomass pyrolysis reaction. From this data

Mountziaris, T. J.

224

Oil and Gas Conservation (Montana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Parts 1 and 2 of this chapter contain a broad range of regulations pertaining to oil and gas conservation, including requirements for the regulation of oil and gas exploration and extraction by the...

225

OIl Speculation  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Investor Investor Flows and the 2008 Boom/Bust in Oil Prices Kenneth J. Singleton 1 August 10, 2011 1 Graduate School of Business, Stanford University, kenneths@stanford.edu. This research is the outgrowth of a survey paper I prepared for the Air Transport Association of America. I am grateful to Kristoffer Laursen for research assistance and to Kristoffer and Stefan Nagel for their comments. Abstract This paper explores the impact of investor flows and financial market conditions on returns in crude-oil futures markets. I begin by arguing that informational frictions and the associated speculative activity may induce prices to drift away from "fundamental" values and show increased volatility. This is followed by a discussion of the interplay between imperfect infor- mation about real economic activity, including supply, demand, and inventory accumulation, and speculative

226

Experimental Investigations of an IC Engine Operating with Alkyl Esters of Jatropha, Karanja and Castor Seed Oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Diesel engines are efficient systems popularly used to meet electricity and other power requirements for agriculture, industry, transportation and decentralized power generation. Vegetable oils can be successfully used in Compression Ignition (CI) engine either through engine modifications or fuel modifications, later being more feasible option. Fuel modification options include blending of vegetable oils with mineral diesel, transesterification, cracking/pyrolysis, micro-emulsion, and hydrogenation to reduce polymerization and viscosity, transesterification of vegetable oil with a short chain alcohol i.e. methanol or ethanol being most popular. Several non-edible plant oils have been found to be promising crude oils for the production of biodiesel. Methanol is most commonly used in commercial production of biodiesel. Fatty acid alkyl esters (FAAE) produced from higher alcohols is of interest as they may have different fuel properties in comparison to methyl or ethyl esters. In the present investigations, preparation of methanol, ethanol, propanol and butanol were used for formation of alkyl esters of Jatropha, Karanja and Castor. The composition of Jatropha, Karanja and Castor oil were analysed and alcoholysis process for preparing alkyl esters of Jatropha, Karanja and Castor oil with various alcohols was optimised. Alkyl ester-diesel blends were used to test the diesel engine at different load conditions and extensive performance and emissions studies were conducted in single cylinder direct injection compression ignition engines. It is concluded that lower blends of ethyl, propyl and butyl esters of Jatropha and Karanja feedstock have physico-chemical properties similar to methyl esters. However, deviation from the properties became larger for higher blending ratio. Therefore, in order to get engine performance in close range of diesel, the optimum blending ratio of higher alkyl esters need to be even less than methyl esters. Lower blends of higher alkyl esters are expected to give engine characteristics in close proximity to diesel overcoming the limitations of bio-diesel, while retaining the advantages.

Sanjay Bajpai; Lalit Mohan Das

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Development of gas turbine combustor fed with bio-fuel oil  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Considering the increasing interest in the utilization of biofuels derived from biomass pyrolysis, ENEL/CRT carried out some experimental investigations on feasibility of biofuels utilization in the electricity production systems. The paper considers the experimental activity for the development and the design optimization of a gas turbine combustor suitable to be fed with biofuel oil, on the basis of the pressurized combustion performance obtained in a small gas turbine combustor fed with bio-fuel oil and ethanol/bio-fuel oil mixtures. Combustion tests were performed using the combustion chamber of a 40 kWe gas turbine. A small pressurized rig has been constructed including a nozzle for pressurization and a heat recovering combustion air preheating system, together with a proper injection system consisting of two dual fuel atomizers. Compressed air allowed a good spray quality and a satisfactory flame instability, without the need of a pilot frame, also when firing crude bio-fuel only. A parametric investigation on the combustion performance has been performed in order to evaluate the effect of fuel properties, operating conditions and injection system geometry, especially as regards CO and NO{sub x} emissions and smoke index.

Ardy, P.L.; Barbucci, P.; Benelli, G. [ENEL SpA R& D Dept., Pisa (Italy)] [and others

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

„Peak Oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Wissenschaftliche Voraussagen deuten auf „Peak Oil“, das Maximum globaler Erdölförderung, in unserer ... der demokratischen Systeme führen. Psychoanalytische Betrachtung darf „Peak Oil“ für die Zivilisation als e...

Dr. Manuel Haus; Dr. med. Christoph Biermann

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

ATOMISTIC MODELING OF OIL SHALE KEROGENS AND ASPHALTENES ALONG WITH THEIR INTERACTIONS WITH THE INORGANIC MINERAL MATRIX  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this project is to obtain and validate three dimensional atomistic models for the organic matter in both oil shales and oil sands. In the case of oil shales the modeling was completed for kerogen, the insoluble portion of the organic matter; for oil sands it was for asphaltenes, a class of molecules found in crude oil. The three dimensional models discussed in this report were developed starting from existing literature two dimensional models. The models developed included one kerogen, based on experimental data on a kerogen isolated from a Green River oil shale, and a set of six representative asphaltenes. Subsequently, the interactions between these organic models and an inorganic matrix was explored in order to gain insight into the chemical nature of this interaction, which could provide vital information in developing efficient methods to remove the organic material from inorganic mineral substrate. The inorganic substrate used to model the interaction was illite, an aluminum silicate oxide clay. In order to obtain the feedback necessary to validate the models, it is necessary to be able to calculate different observable quantities and to show that these observables both reproduce the results of experimental measurements on actual samples as well as that the observables are sensitive to structural differences between models. The observables that were calculated using the models include 13C NMR spectra, the IR vibrational spectra, and the atomic pair wise distribution function; these were chosen as they are among the methods for which both experimental and calculated values can be readily obtained. Where available, comparison was made to experiment results. Finally, molecular dynamic simulations of pyrolysis were completed on the models to gain an understanding into the nature of the decomposition of these materials when heated.

Facelli, Julio; Pugmire, Ronald; Pimienta, Ian

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

230

Waste oil reduction: GKN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report details the steps required to establish a waste oil management program. Such a program can reduce operational costs, cut wastewater treatment costs and produce a better quality wastewater effluent through such means as: reducing the volume of oils used; segregating oils at the source of generation for recovery and reuse; and reducing the quality of oily wastewater generated. It discusses the metal-working fluid recovery options available for such a program, namely settling, filtration, hydrocyclone, and centrifugation. Included are source lists for vendors of oil skimmer equipment and coolant recovery systems.

Hunt, G.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Interaction of Plastics in Mixed-Plastics Pyrolysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The pyrolysis of mixed-plastic waste has been proposed as a means of recycling to produce petrochemical feedstock. ... The main gases produced from the individual plastics were hydrogen, methane, ethane, ethene, propane, propene, butane, and butene and for the PET plastic carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide. ...

Paul T. Williams; Elizabeth A. Williams

1998-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

232

Pyrolysis in Porous Media: Numerical Analysis and Comparison to Experiments.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

reactions which contribute to the heat flux absorption. The formation of a thin film inside the combustion hydrocarbon fuel pyrolysis, which can be of practical interest for the active cooling of head loaded is an additional way to investigate the related phenomena (heat and mass transfer with chemistry). After a first

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

233

Synthetic and Jet Fuels Pyrolysis for Cooling and Combustion Applications.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

phenomenon (heat and mass transfers, pyrolysis, combustion) in a cooling channel surrounding a SCRamjet regeneratively cooled SCRamjet is provided to get a large vision of the fuel nature impact on the system of supersonic combustion ramjet (SCRamjet) [1]. For such high velocity, the total temperature of external air

Boyer, Edmond

234

Hydrocarbons Heterogeneous Pyrolysis: Experiments and Modeling for Scramjet Thermal Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Hydrocarbons Heterogeneous Pyrolysis: Experiments and Modeling for Scramjet Thermal Management : United States (2008)" #12;2 I. Introduction One of the main issues of the development of scramjet, an air to the endothermicity of its thermal decomposition. Because of the large heat load found in a scramjet, engine

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

235

Ex-Situ Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis Technology Pathway  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This technology pathway case investigates converting woody biomass using ex-situ catalytic fast pyrolysis followed by upgrading to gasoline-, diesel-, and jet-range hydrocarbon blendstocks. Technical barriers and key research needs that should be pursued for this pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived blendstocks have been identified.

Biddy, M.; Dutta, A.; Jones, S.; Meyer, A.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

In-Situ Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis Technology Pathway  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This technology pathway case investigates converting woody biomass using in-situ catalytic fast pyrolysis followed by upgrading to gasoline-, diesel-, and jet-range hydrocarbon blendstocks. Technical barriers and key research needs that should be pursued for this pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived blendstocks have been identified.

Biddy, M.; Dutta, A.; Jones, S.; Meyer, A.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Analysis and comparison of biomass pyrolysis/gasification condensates: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides results of chemical and physical analysis of condensates from eleven biomass gasification and pyrolysis systems. The samples were representative of the various reactor configurations being researched within the Department of Energy, Biomass Thermochemical Conversion program. The condensates included tar phases and aqueous phases. The analyses included gross compositional analysis (elemental analysis, ash, moisture), physical characterization (pour point, viscosity, density, heat of combustion, distillation), specific chemical analysis (gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, infrared spectrophotometry, proton and carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry) and biological activity (Ames assay and mouse skin tumorigenicity tests). These results are the first step of a longer term program to determine the properties, handling requirements, and utility of the condensates recovered from biomass gasification and pyrolysis. The analytical data demonstrates the wide range of chemical composition of the organics recovered in the condensates and suggests a direct relationship between operating temperature and chemical composition of the condensates. A continuous pathway of thermal degradation of the tar components as a function of temperature is proposed. Variations in the chemical composition of the organic components in the tars are reflected in the physical properties of tars and phase stability in relation to water in the condensate. The biological activity appears to be limited to the tars produced at high temperatures. 56 refs., 25 figs., 21 tabs.

Elliott, D.C.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

A study of pyrolysis of Texas lignites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Heating Values. 15 8 Tar Composition g Coal Properties, . 10 Theoretical Gasification Results 11 Chromatograph Program. Pa&ac 17 26 27 28 44 46 47 48 50 51 56 INTRODUCTION As national interest develops 1n fuels other than oil and natural... gasification of the lignite in-situ. The Soviet Union has studied this method and has built several facilities to burn lignite underground. The gases produced from this process are used to prov1de power for a steel m111 in the Urals. At various times 2...

Clark, Robert A

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

239

Structural Oil Pan With Integrated Oil Filtration And Cooling System  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An oil pan for an internal combustion engine includes a body defining a reservoir for collecting engine coolant. The reservoir has a bottom and side walls extending upwardly from the bottom to present a flanged lip through which the oil pan may be mounted to the engine. An oil cooler assembly is housed within the body of the oil pan for cooling lubricant received from the engine. The body includes an oil inlet passage formed integrally therewith for receiving lubricant from the engine and delivering lubricant to the oil cooler. In addition, the body also includes an oil pick up passage formed integrally therewith for providing fluid communication between the reservoir and the engine through the flanged lip.

Freese, V, Charles Edwin (Westland, MI)

2000-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

240

Effects of scale-up on oil and gas yields in a solid-recycle bed oil shale retorting process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fluidized bed pyrolysis of oil shale in a non-hydrogen atmosphere has been shown to significantly increase oil yield in laboratory-scale reactors compared to the Fischer assay by many workers. The enhancement in oil yield by this relatively simple and efficient thermal technique has led to the development of several oil shale retorting processes based on fluidized bed and related technologies over the past fifteen years. Since 1986, the Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER) has been developing one such process, KENTORT II, which is mainly tailored for the Devonian oil shales that occur in the eastern U.S. The process contains three main fluidized bed zones to pyrolyze, gasify, and combust the oil shale. A fourth fluidized bed zone serves to cool the spent shale prior to exiting the system. The autothermal process utilizes processed shale recirculation to transfer heat from the combustion to the gasification and pyrolysis zones. The CAER is currently testing the KENTORT II process in a 22.7-kg/hr process-development unit (PDU).

Carter, S.D.; Taulbee, D.N.; Vego, A. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes pyrolysis oils" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

A study of the pyrolysis behaviors of pelletized recovered municipal solid waste fuels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Pelletized recovered solid waste fuel is often applied in gasification systems to provide feedstock with a stabilized quality and high heating value and to avoid the bridging behavior caused by high moisture content, low particle density, and irregular particle size. However, the swelling properties and the sticky material generated from pyrolysis of the plastic group components also tend to trigger bridging in the retorting zone. It is well known that the plastic group materials, which occupy a considerable proportion of municipal solid waste, can melt together easily even under low temperature. This study investigates the pyrolysis behaviors of typical recovered solid waste pellets, including the devolatilization rate, heat transfer properties, char properties, and swelling/shrinkage properties, in a small fixed-bed facility over a wide temperature range, from 900 °C to 450 °C. The results are also compared with those from wheat straw pellets, a typical cellulosic fuel. Moreover, the SEM images and BET analysis of the char structure are further analyzed to provide additional explanation for the mechanisms of swelling/shrinkage phenomena observed during heating.

Chunguang Zhou; Qinglin Zhang; Leonie Arnold; Weihong Yang; Wlodzimierz Blasiak

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Computational Analysis of the Pyrolysis of ..beta..-O4 Lignin Model Compounds: Concerted vs. Homolytic Fragmentation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The thermochemical conversion of biomass to liquid transportation fuels is a very attractive technology for expanding the utilization of carbon neutral processes and reducing dependency on fossil fuel resources. As with all such emerging technologies, biomass conversion through gasification or pyrolysis has a number of obstacles that need to be overcome to make these processes cost competitive with the refining of fossil fuels. Our current efforts have focused on the investigation of the thermochemistry of the linkages between lignin units using ab initio calculations on dimeric lignin model compounds. All calculations were carried out using M062X density functional theory at the 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. The M062X method has been shown to be consistent with the CBS-QB3 method while being significantly less computationally expensive. To date we have only completed the study on the b-O4 compounds. The theoretical calculations performed in the study indicate that concerted elimination pathways dominate over bond homolysis reactions under typical pyrolysis conditions. However, this does not mean that concerted elimination will be the dominant loss process for lignin. Bimolecular radical chemistry could very well dwarf the unimolecular pathways investigated in this study. These concerted pathways tend to form stable, reasonably non-reactive products that would be more suited producing a fungible bio-oil for the production of liquid transportation fuels.

Clark, J. M.; Robichaud, D. J.; Nimlos, M. R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Division of Oil, Gas, and Mining Permitting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

" or "Gas" does not include any gaseous or liquid substance processed from coal, oil shale, or tar sands

Utah, University of

244

Oil shale quarterly report, August--December 1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper contains four status reports on the following oil shale research projects: (1) Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory 4-tonne-per-day pilot plant; (2) chemistry and kinetics of New Albany shale flash pyrolysis under Hot-Recycled-Solid (HRS) conditions; (3) modeling of shale oil cracking and coking in the HRS process; and (4) modeling and analysis of particle slip and drag in a lift pipe of the retort for the HRS process. Each project report has been indexed separately for inclusion on the data base. (CK)

Cena, R.

1991-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

245

Experimental Flash Pyrolysis of High Density1 PolyEthylene under Hybrid Propulsion Conditions2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1/25 Experimental Flash Pyrolysis of High Density1 PolyEthylene under Hybrid Propulsion Conditions2 Poly-Ethylene (HDPE) is studied6 up to 20 000 K.s-1 , under pressure up to 3.0 MPa and at temperature Pyrolysis (2013) 1-11" DOI : 10.1016/j.jaap.2013.02.014 #12;2/25 Keywords: Polyethylene; flash pyrolysis

Boyer, Edmond

246

Catalytic pyrolysis of straight-run gasoline on a promoted vanadium catalyst  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the years the catalytic pyrolysis has been studied of various hydrocarbon materials - from gaseous (ethane, propane and n-butane) to heavy petroleum fractions with an end boiling point higher than 500/sup 0/C. The process indices for all the raw materials studied were significantly better than those from thermal pyrolysis. Improvement of operational properties for the vanadium catalyst for pyrolysis involved the selecting a better acceptor and the use of promotor additives which inhibit coke formation.

Chernykh, S.P.; Adel'son, S.V.; Rudyk, E.M.; Zhagfarov, F.G.; Motorina, I.A.; Nikonov, V.I.; Mukhina, T.N.; Barabanov, N.L.; Pyatiletov, V.I.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Co-processing of heavy oil  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In co-processing of petroleum and coal, the petroleum fraction may serve as the {open_quotes}liquefaction solvent,{close_quotes} or hydrogen donor, and the aromatics present in the coal liquid may serve as hydrogen {open_quotes}shuttlers{close_quotes} by efficiently transferring hydrogen moieties to places where they are most deficient. The important advantages of co-processing include the following: (1) upgrading of heavy petroleum in a reaction with coal and (2) conversion of coal to synthetic crudes which could be further upgraded to a premium liquid fuel. Co-processing of coal with petroleum, heavy crudes, and residues through catalytic hydrogenation or solvent extraction have been extensively investigated. The studies were typically conducted in the temperature range of 450{degrees}-500{degrees}C under pressurized hydrogen; catalysts are generally also added for hydroconversion of the feedstocks. However, relatively little has been reported in the literature regarding co-processing of coal with heavy petroleum by simple pyrolysis. In this study, co-processing of heavy oil and coal at relatively middle conditions was conducted without the complicating influences of pressurized hydrogen or catalysts. The resulted demonstrate that there is a synergism during co-processing of petroleum and coal. This synergism enhances both the yield and quality of the liquid products. In general, liquids from co-processing the mixture contain a higher content of alkane/alkene, neutral aromatics, lower content of monophenols, and other oxygen containing compounds as compared to the liquids from coal alone. The liquid from the mixture also contains a higher content of naphthenic carbon and naphthenic rings/molecules than those from coal liquid. This suggests that the product from the mixture can be easily upgraded to a premium quality fuel.

Khan, M.R. [Texaco Research and Development, Beacon, NY (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

248

Pyrolysis, combustion and gasification characteristics of miscanthus and sewage sludge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The energetic conversion of biomass into syngas is considered as reliable energy source. In this context, biomass (miscanthus) and sewage sludge have been investigated. A simultaneous thermal analyzer and mass spectrometer was used for the characterization of samples and identified the volatiles evolved during the heating of the sample up to 1100 °C under combustion and gasification conditions. The TG and DTA results were discussed in argon, oxygen, steam and steam blended gas atmospheres. Different stages of pyrolysis, combustion and gasification of the samples have been examined. It was shown that the combustion and gasification of char were occurred in two different temperature zones. The DTA–MS profile of the sample gives information on combustion and gasification process of the samples (ignition, peak combustion and burnout temperatures) and gases released (H2, O2, CO and CO2). The results showed that the different processes were mainly dependent on temperature. The evolution of the gas species was consistent with the weight loss of the samples during pyrolysis, combustion and gasification process. The effect of the ambiences during pyrolysis, combustion and gasification of the samples were reported. The appropriate temperature range to the sludge and miscanthus gasification was evaluated. The kinetic parameters of the biomass and sewage sludge were estimated for TGA using two models based on first-order reactions with distributed activation energies. The presence of ash in the biomass char was more influential during the gasification process.

Kandasamy Jayaraman; Iskender Gökalp

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Investigation of oil adsorption capacity of granular organoclay media and the kinetics of oil removal from oil-in-water emulsions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Produced water, a byproduct of oil and gas production, includes almost 98% of all waste generated by oil and gas exploration and their production activities. This oil contaminated waste water has a great impact on our environment and is considered...

Islam, Sonia

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

250

Pyrolysis and hydrolysis of mixed polymer waste comprising polyethyleneterephthalate and polyethylene to sequentially recover  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process of using fast pyrolysis in a carrier gas to convert a plastic waste feedstream having a mixed polymeric composition in a manner such that pyrolysis of a given polymer to its high value monomeric constituent occurs prior to pyrolysis of other plastic components therein comprising: selecting a first temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of said given polymer to its high value monomeric constituent prior to a temperature range that causes pyrolysis of other plastic components; selecting a catalyst and support for treating said feed streams with said catalyst to effect acid or base catalyzed reaction pathways to maximize yield or enhance separation of said high value monomeric constituent in said temperature program range; differentially heating said feed stream at a heat rate within the first temperature program range to provide differential pyrolysis for selective recovery of optimum quantities of the high value monomeric constituent prior to pyrolysis of other plastic components; separating the high value monomeric constituents; selecting a second higher temperature range to cause pyrolysis of a different high value monomeric constituent of said plastic waste and differentially heating the feedstream at the higher temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of the different high value monomeric constituent; and separating the different high value monomeric constituent.

Evans, Robert J. (Lakewood, CO); Chum, Helena L. (Arvada, CO)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

APPLICATION OF PYROLYSIS-GC/MS TO THE STUDY OF BIOMASS AND BIOMASS CONSTITUENTS.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Fast pyrolysis, the rapid thermal decomposition of organic material in the absence of oxygen, is a process that can be used to convert biomass into… (more)

Ware, Anne E

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

The best use of biomass? Greenhouse gas lifecycle analysis of predicted pyrolysis biochar systems.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Life cycle analysis is carried out for 11 predicted configurations of pyrolysis biochar systems to determine greenhouse gas balance, using an original spreadsheet model. System… (more)

Hammond, James A R

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Biomass pyrolysis processes: performance parameters and their influence on biochar system benefits.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This study focuses on performance of biomass pyrolysis processes for use in biochar systems. Objectives are to understand the range of control of such processes… (more)

Brownsort, Peter A

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Product Analysis and Thermodynamic Simulations from the Pyrolysis of Several Biomass Feedstocks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Product Analysis and Thermodynamic Simulations from the Pyrolysis of Several Biomass Feedstocks ... Forestry residue is one of the most viable biomass feedstocks for liq. ...

Jieling Zhang; Hossein Toghiani; Dinesh Mohan; Charles U. Pittman, Jr.; Rebecca K. Toghiani

2007-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

255

Peak Oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

At the start of the new millennium, the expression “Peak Oil” was unknown. Nevertheless, a discussion about when the world’s rate of oil production would reach its maximum had already ... . King Hubbert presented...

Kjell Aleklett

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Peak Oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Between 2000 and 2010, world oil prices advanced from approximately $25 per barrel to more than $100 per barrel. The price appreciation of oil over the decade was around ten times the rate of inflation.

Robert Rapier

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Infra red spectroscopy, flash pyrolysis, thermally assisted hydrolysis and methylation (THM) in the presence of tetramethylammonium hydroxide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Infra red spectroscopy, flash pyrolysis, thermally assisted hydrolysis and methylation (THM to sporopollenin or algaenan. This is in agreement with flash pyrolysis­gas chromatography­mass spectrometry (py

258

Oil shale: The environmental challenges III  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This book presents the papers of a symposium whose purpose was to discuss the environmental and socio-economic aspects of oil shale development. Topics considered include oil shale solid waste disposal, modeling spent shale disposal, water management, assessing the effects of oil shale facilities on water quality, wastewater treatment and use at oil shale facilities, potential air emissions from oil shale retorting, the control of air pollutant emissions from oil shale facilities, oil shale air emission control, socioeconomic research, a framework for mitigation agreements, the Garfield County approach to impact mitigation, the relationship of applied industrial hygiene programs and experimental toxicology programs, and industrial hygiene programs.

Petersen, K.K.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Dynamics of the Oil Transition: Modeling Capacity, Costs, and Emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

playing key role in peak-oil debate, future energy supply.of di?ering views of peak oil, including Yergin’s, isHubbert’s Peak: The Impending World Oil Shortage. Princeton

Brandt, Adam R.; Farrell, Alexander E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Carbonization of Coal Evaluation of Effects of Rate of Heating and of Maximum Temperature on Pyrolysis of a Coking Coal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Carbonization of Coal Evaluation of Effects of Rate of Heating and of Maximum Temperature on Pyrolysis of a Coking Coal ...

William B. Warren

1935-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes pyrolysis oils" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Peak Oil and REMI PI+: State Fiscal Implications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, nation, and states) · Shale oil not included ­ Shale oil reserve estimates 2.0 Trillion bbls in USPeak Oil and REMI PI+: State Fiscal Implications Jim Peach Arrowhead Center Prosper Project is peak oil? · Why peak oil (and gas) matters ­ (In energy and non-energy states) ­ National Real GDP

Johnson, Eric E.

262

Peculiarities of Rapid Pyrolysis of Biomass Covering Medium- and High-Temperature Ranges  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Peculiarities of Rapid Pyrolysis of Biomass Covering Medium- and High-Temperature Ranges ... It is considered that rapid pyrolysis is the first step in both gasification and combustion, which occurs at the same temperature of gasification or combustion in an industrial gasifier or boiler. ...

Yan Zhang; Shiro Kajitani; Masami Ashizawa; Kouichi Miura

2006-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

263

Pyrolysis of polystyrene - polyphenylene oxide to recover styrene and useful products  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process of using fast pyrolysis in a carrier gas to convert a polystyrene and polyphenylene oxide plastic waste to a given polystyrene and polyphenylene oxide prior to pyrolysis of other plastic components therein comprising: selecting a first temperature range to cause pyrolysis of given polystyrene and polyphenylene oxide and its high value monomeric constituent prior to a temperature range that causes pyrolysis of other plastic components; selecting a catalyst and a support and treating the feed stream with the catalyst to affect acid or base catalyzed reaction pathways to maximize yield or enhance separation of high value monomeric constituent of styrene from polystyrene and polyphenylene oxide in the first temperature range; differentially heating the feed stream at a heat rate within the first temperature range to provide differential pyrolysis for selective recovery of the high value monomeric constituent of styrene from polystyrene and polyphenylene oxide prior to pyrolysis of other plastic components; separating the high value monomer constituent of styrene; selecting a second higher temperature range to cause pyrolysis to a different derived high value product of polyphenylene oxide from the plastic waste and differentially heating the feed stream at the higher temperature range to cause pyrolysis of the plastic into a polyphenylene oxide derived product; and separating the different derived high value polyphenylene oxide product.

Evans, Robert J. (Lakewood, CO); Chum, Helena L. (Arvada, CO)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Controlled catalytic and thermal sequential pyrolysis and hydrolysis of polycarbonate and plastic waste to recover monomers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is described using fast pyrolysis to convert a plastic waste feed stream containing polycarbonate and ABS to high value monomeric constituents prior to pyrolysis of other plastic components therein comprising: selecting a first temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of a given polymer to its high value monomeric constituents prior to a temperature range that causes pyrolysis of other plastic components; selecting an acid or base catalysts and an oxide or carbonate support for treating the feed stream to affect acid or base catalyzed reaction pathways to maximize yield or enhance separation of the high value monomeric constituents of polycarbonate and ABS in the first temperature program range; differentially heating the feed stream at a heat rate within the first temperature program range to provide differential pyrolysis for selective recovery of optimum quantities of the high value monomeric constituents prior to pyrolysis or other plastic components; separating the high value monomeric constituents from the polycarbonate to cause pyrolysis to a different high value monomeric constituent of the plastic waste and differentially heating the feed stream at the second higher temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of different high value monomeric constituents; and separating the different high value monomeric constituents. 68 figs.

Evans, R.J.; Chum, H.L.

1994-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

265

Controlled catalystic and thermal sequential pyrolysis and hydrolysis of polycarbonate and plastic waste to recover monomers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process of using fast pyrolysis to convert a plastic waste feed stream containing polycarbonate and ABS to high value monomeric constituents prior to pyrolysis of other plastic components therein comprising: selecting a first temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of a given polymer to its high value monomeric constituents prior to a temperature range that causes pyrolysis of other plastic components; selecting an acid or base catalysts and an oxide or carbonate support for treating the feed stream to affect acid or base catalyzed reaction pathways to maximize yield or enhance separation of the high value monomeric constituents of polycarbonate and ABS in the first temperature program range; differentially heating the feed stream at a heat rate within the first temperature program range to provide differential pyrolysis for selective recovery of optimum quantities of the high value monomeric constituents prior to pyrolysis or other plastic components; separating the high value monomeric constituents from the polycarbonate to cause pyrolysis to a different high value monomeric constituent of the plastic waste and differentially heating the feed stream at the second higher temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of different high value monomeric constituents; and separating the different high value monomeric constituents.

Evans, Robert J. (Lakewood, CO); Chum, Helena L. (Arvada, CO)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Cell Wall Chemotyping for Functional Applications of PyrolysisGas Chromatography / Mass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cell Wall Chemotyping for Functional Genomics Applications of Pyrolysis­Gas Chromatography / Mass, Umeå 2012 #12;Cell Wall Chemotyping for Functional Genomics Applications of Pyrolysis.4.1 The Basic Tool-set 27 1.5 Wood Formation and Functional Genomics 31 2 Objectives 33 3 Methodological

267

American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Modeling the motion of pyrolysis gas through charring  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Modeling the motion of pyrolysis gas through problem with gas motion through the porous media employing finite element based Galerkin and Discontinuous t = time Subscripts c = char g = pyrolysis gas r = resin I. Introduction pace vehicles enter earth's (or

Roy, Subrata

268

Forensic Discrimination of Automotive Paint Samples Using Pyrolysis-Gas Chromatography–Mass Spectrometry with Multivariate Statistics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Analytical pyrolysis-gas chromatography (Py-GC...Analytical pyrolysis-gas chromatography (Py-GC...development, pyrolysis-gas chromatography (Py...considerations, such as lower cost, can lead one to change...does not vary between production sites, subtle differences......

Brian K. Kochanowski; Stephen L. Morgan

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Water issues associated with heavy oil production.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Crude oil occurs in many different forms throughout the world. An important characteristic of crude oil that affects the ease with which it can be produced is its density and viscosity. Lighter crude oil typically can be produced more easily and at lower cost than heavier crude oil. Historically, much of the nation's oil supply came from domestic or international light or medium crude oil sources. California's extensive heavy oil production for more than a century is a notable exception. Oil and gas companies are actively looking toward heavier crude oil sources to help meet demands and to take advantage of large heavy oil reserves located in North and South America. Heavy oil includes very viscous oil resources like those found in some fields in California and Venezuela, oil shale, and tar sands (called oil sands in Canada). These are described in more detail in the next chapter. Water is integrally associated with conventional oil production. Produced water is the largest byproduct associated with oil production. The cost of managing large volumes of produced water is an important component of the overall cost of producing oil. Most mature oil fields rely on injected water to maintain formation pressure during production. The processes involved with heavy oil production often require external water supplies for steam generation, washing, and other steps. While some heavy oil processes generate produced water, others generate different types of industrial wastewater. Management and disposition of the wastewater presents challenges and costs for the operators. This report describes water requirements relating to heavy oil production and potential sources for that water. The report also describes how water is used and the resulting water quality impacts associated with heavy oil production.

Veil, J. A.; Quinn, J. J.; Environmental Science Division

2008-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

270

Starting Up Microbial Enhanced Oil Recovery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This chapter gives the reader a practical introduction into microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) including the microbial production of natural gas from oil. Decision makers who consider the use of one of the...

Michael Siegert; Jana Sitte; Alexander Galushko; Martin Krüger

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Enhanced Oil Recovery | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Enhanced Oil Recovery Enhanced Oil Recovery Enhanced Oil Recovery Cross-section illustrating how carbon dioxide and water can be used to flush residual oil from a subsurface rock formation between wells. Cross-section illustrating how carbon dioxide and water can be used to flush residual oil from a subsurface rock formation between wells. Crude oil development and production in U.S. oil reservoirs can include up to three distinct phases: primary, secondary, and tertiary (or enhanced) recovery. During primary recovery, the natural pressure of the reservoir or gravity drive oil into the wellbore, combined with artificial lift techniques (such as pumps) which bring the oil to the surface. But only about 10 percent of a reservoir's original oil in place is typically produced during primary recovery. Secondary recovery techniques extend a

272

Test plan for ISV laboratory-pyrolysis testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the laboratory-pyrolysis studies is to obtain information on the high temperature (< 1200{degree}C) degradation and alteration of organic chemicals and materials similar to those found in the Radioactive Waste Management Complex, Pit 9. This test plan describes experimental procedures, sampling and analysis strategy, sampling procedures, sample control, and document management. It addresses safety issues in the experimental apparatus and procedures, personal training, and hazardous waste disposal. Finally, it describes the data quality objectives using the EPA tiered approach to treatability studies to define where research/scoping tests fit into these studies and the EPA analytical levels required for the tests.

McAtee, R.E.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Experimental and theoretical investigation of heat and mass transfer processes during wood pyrolysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermal decomposition of 25.4 mm diameter dry wood spheres is studied both experimentally and theoretically. Wood spheres were pyrolyzed in a vertical tube furnace at temperatures ranging from 638 K to 879 K. Mass loss and temperatures of the sample were measured during pyrolysis. Center temperature measurements showed two distinct thermal events consisting of sequential endothermic and exothermic reactions. A numerical investigation of these endo/exothermic reactions using various pyrolysis kinetics models was conducted to determine the pyrolysis mechanism and the heats of the pyrolysis reactions. A comparison of the experimental and numerical results showed that (i) Contrary to the suggestions in the literature, the contributions of the secondary tar decomposition and lignin decomposition to the center temperature exothermic peak are small. (ii) Exothermic decomposition of the intermediate solid is responsible for the center temperature peak. (iii) The center temperature plateau is caused by the endothermic decomposition of cellulose. (iv) Internal pressure generation was found to be quite important because it controls the pyrolyzate mass transfer and thus affects both the heat transfer and the residence time of the pyrolysis gases for secondary decomposition. Based on the experimental and numerical results, a new wood pyrolysis model is proposed. The model consists of three endothermic parallel reactions producing tar, gas and intermediate solid and subsequent exothermic decomposition of the intermediate solid to char and exothermic decomposition of tar to char and gas. The proposed pyrolysis model shows good agreement with the experiments. Pressure calculations based on the new pyrolysis model revealed that high pressure is generated inside the biomass particle during pyrolysis and sample splitting was observed during the experiments. The splitting is due to both weakening of the structure and internal pressure generation during pyrolysis. At low heating rates, structural weakness is the primary factor, whereas at high heating rates, internal pressure is the determining factor. It is expected that moisture, while not considered in this work will have a similar effect, but at lower temperatures. (author)

Park, Won Chan; Atreya, Arvind [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan, 2158 GGBL 2350 Hayward St., Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Baum, Howard R. [Department of Fire Protection Engineering, University of Maryland, 3106-D J.M. Patterson Building, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

274

Winter Crude Oil and  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Notes: While the relatively low stock forecast (although not as low as last winter) adds some extra pressure to prices, the price of crude oil could be the major factor affecting heating oil prices this winter. The current EIA forecast shows residential prices averaging $1.29 this winter, assuming no volatility. The average retail price is about 7 cents less than last winter, but last winter included the price spike in November 2000, December 2000, and January 2001. Underlying crude oil prices are currently expected to be at or below those seen last winter. WTI averaged over $30 per barrel last winter, and is currently forecast to average about $27.50 per barrel this winter. As those of you who watch the markets know, there is tremendous uncertainty in the amount of crude oil supply that will be available this winter. Less

275

Fuel oil and kerosene sales 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fuel Oil and Kerosene Sales 1997 report provides information, illustrations and state-level statistical data on end-use sales of kerosene; No. 1, No. 2, and No. 4 distillate fuel oil; and residual fuel oil. State-level kerosene sales include volumes for residential, commercial, industrial, farm, and all other uses. State-level distillate sales include volumes for residential, commercial, industrial, oil company, railroad, vessel bunkering, military, electric utility, farm, on-highway, off highway construction, and other uses. State-level residual fuel sales include volumes for commercial, industrial, oil company, vessel bunkering, military, electric utility, and other uses. 24 tabs.

NONE

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Preparation and HPLC Characterization of 3-(2,2,2-Trichloroacetamide)propylsilane and 3-(2,2,2-Trichloroethoxy)propylsilane Bonded Phases  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......shale oil was a Tosco (II) sample (Oil Shale Corporation). Infrared spectral...heterocyclic compounds. The high-grade oil shale deposits in the Green River formation...compounds produced in pyrolysis of oil shale include pyrroles, pyridines, and......

Daniel Y. Pharr; Peter C. Uden; Sidney Siggia

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Co-pyrolysis of low rank coals and biomass: Product distributions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pyrolysis and gasification of combined low rank coal and biomass feeds are the subject of much study in an effort to mitigate the production of green house gases from integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) systems. While co-feeding has the potential to reduce the net carbon footprint of commercial gasification operations, the effects of co-feeding on kinetics and product distributions requires study to ensure the success of this strategy. Southern yellow pine was pyrolyzed in a semi-batch type drop tube reactor with either Powder River Basin sub-bituminous coal or Mississippi lignite at several temperatures and feed ratios. Product gas composition of expected primary constituents (CO, CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, H{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, and C{sub 2}H{sub 4}) was determined by in-situ mass spectrometry while minor gaseous constituents were determined using a GC-MS. Product distributions are fit to linear functions of temperature, and quadratic functions of biomass fraction, for use in computational co-pyrolysis simulations. The results are shown to yield significant nonlinearities, particularly at higher temperatures and for lower ranked coals. The co-pyrolysis product distributions evolve more tar, and less char, CH{sub 4}, and C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, than an additive pyrolysis process would suggest. For lignite co-pyrolysis, CO and H{sub 2} production are also reduced. The data suggests that evolution of hydrogen from rapid pyrolysis of biomass prevents the crosslinking of fragmented aromatic structures during coal pyrolysis to produce tar, rather than secondary char and light gases. Finally, it is shown that, for the two coal types tested, co-pyrolysis synergies are more significant as coal rank decreases, likely because the initial structure in these coals contains larger pores and smaller clusters of aromatic structures which are more readily retained as tar in rapid co-pyrolysis.

Soncini, Ryan M.; Means, Nicholas C.; Weiland, Nathan T.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Bio-Oil Separation and Stabilization by Supercritical Fluid Fractionation – 2014 Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to use supercritical fluids to separate and fractionate algal-based bio-oils into stable products that can be subsequently upgraded to produce drop-in renewable fuels. To accomplish this objective, algae was grown and thermochemically converted to bio-oils using hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL), pyrolysis, and catalytic pyrolysis. The bio-oils were separated into an extract and a raffinate using near-critical propane or carbon dioxide. The fractions were then subjected to thermal aging studies to determine if the extraction process had stabilized the products. It was found that the propane extract fraction was twice as stable as the parent catalytic pyrolysis bio-oils as measured by the change in viscosity after two weeks of accelerated aging at 80°C. Further, in-situ NMR aging studies found that the propane extract was chemically more stable than the parent bio-oil. Thus the milestone of stabilizing the product was met. A preliminary design of the extraction plant was prepared. The design was based on a depot scale plant processing 20,000,000 gallons per year of bio-oil. It was estimated that the capital costs for such a plant would be $8,700,000 with an operating cost of $3,500,000 per year. On a per gallon of product cost and a 10% annual rate of return, capital costs would represent $0.06 per gallon and operating costs would amount to $0.20 per gallon. Further, it was found that the energy required to run the process represented 6.2% of the energy available in the bio-oil, meeting the milestone of less than 20%. Life cycle analysis and greenhouse gas (GHG) emission analysis found that the energy for running the critical fluid separation process and the GHG emissions were minor compared to all the inputs to the overall well to pump system. For the well to pump system boundary, energetics in biofuel conversion are typically dominated by energy demands in the growth, dewater, and thermochemical process. Bio-oil stabilization by near critical propane extraction had minimal impact in the overall energetics of the process with NER contributions of 0.03. Based on the LCA, the overall conversion pathways were found to be energy intensive with a NER of about 2.3 and 1.2 for catalytic pyrolysis and HTL, respectively. GHG emissions for the catalytic pyrolysis process were greater than that of petroleum diesel at 210 g CO2 eq compared to 18.9 g CO2 eq. Microalgae bio-oil based diesel with thermochemical conversion through HTL meets renewable fuel standards with favorable emission reductions of -10.8 g CO2 eq. The importance of the outcomes is that the critical fluid extraction and stabilization process improved product stability and did so with minimal energy inputs and processing costs. The LCA and GHG emission calculations point toward the HTL pathway as the more favorable thermochemical route towards upgrading algae to bio-fuels. Since the quality of the HTL oil was significantly lower than that of the catalytic pyrolysis bio-oil, the next steps point toward improving the quality of the HTL oils from algae biomass and focusing the critical fluid stabilization on that bio-oil product.

Foster Agblevor; Lucia Petkovic; Edward Bennion; Jason Quinn; John Moses; Deborah Newby; Daniel Ginosar

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Oil Spill Prevention, Control and Countermeasures Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Environmental Protection Agency regulations 40 CFR Part 112, Oil Pollution Prevention,'' include requirements for a written Oil Spill Prevention, Control, and Countermeasures (SPCC) Plan. This document provides such an SPCC Plan for facilities at 100-N Area managed by Westinghouse Hanford Co. Should an oil spill occur at 100-N Area, the following actions should be followed: stop the flow of oil, contain the oil spill in order to prevent it from reaching the river, and notify Environmental Protection. Environmental Protection will assess the oil spill and determine if remedial action is necessary. If needed, an oil spill response team will deploy oil spill control and clean-up equipment at the river shoreline to remove any oil that enters the river.

Zoric, J P

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Essays on Macroeconomics and Oil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oil Production . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Oil Production in Venezuela and Mexico . . . . . . . . . .Oil Production and Productivity in Venezuela and

CAKIR, NIDA

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes pyrolysis oils" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Essays on Macroeconomics and Oil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Oil Industry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .in the Venezuelan Oil Industry . . . . . . . . . . . . .and Productivity: Evidence from the Oil Industry . .

CAKIR, NIDA

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Renewable Chemical Commodity Feedstocks from Integrated Catalytic Processing of Pyrolysis Oils  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Technologies (report, NREL/TP-570-27079, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO, 1999); http://www1.eere.energy.gov/hydrogenandfuelcells//pdfs/27079.pdf. 39 National Research Council and National Academy of Engineering...

Tushar P. Vispute; Huiyan Zhang; Aimaro Sanna; Rui Xiao; George W. Huber

2010-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

283

Renewable Chemical Commodity Feedstocks from Integrated Catalytic Processing of Pyrolysis Oils  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...hydrogen is from large steam reformers and...amounts of undesired methane are produced, which...such as by the reforming of biomass-derived...aqueous-phase reforming of biomass-derived...Survey of the Economics of Hydrogen Technologies...Hydrogen from catalytic reforming of biomass-derived...

Tushar P. Vispute; Huiyan Zhang; Aimaro Sanna; Rui Xiao; George W. Huber

2010-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

284

Review of the pyrolysis platform for coproducing bio-oil and...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and environmentally sustainable means of producing large quantities of renewable bioenergy while simultaneously reducing emissions of greenhouse gases. At the present...

285

Inorganic Compounds in Biomass Feedstocks. 1. Effect on the Quality of Fast Pyrolysis Oils  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Inorganic Compounds in Biomass Feedstocks. 1. ... Inorganic compoundsespecially potassium, calcium, sodium, silicon, phosphorus, and chlorineare the main constituents of the ash in biomass feedstocks. ...

F. A. Agblevor; S. Besler

1996-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

286

CORE-BASED INTEGRATED SEDIMENTOLOGIC, STRATIGRAPHIC, AND GEOCHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF THE OIL SHALE BEARING GREEN RIVER FORMATION, UINTA BASIN, UTAH  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An integrated detailed sedimentologic, stratigraphic, and geochemical study of Utah's Green River Formation has found that Lake Uinta evolved in three phases (1) a freshwater rising lake phase below the Mahogany zone, (2) an anoxic deep lake phase above the base of the Mahogany zone and (3) a hypersaline lake phase within the middle and upper R-8. This long term lake evolution was driven by tectonic basin development and the balance of sediment and water fill with the neighboring basins, as postulated by models developed from the Greater Green River Basin by Carroll and Bohacs (1999). Early Eocene abrupt global-warming events may have had significant control on deposition through the amount of sediment production and deposition rates, such that lean zones below the Mahogany zone record hyperthermal events and rich zones record periods between hyperthermals. This type of climatic control on short-term and long-term lake evolution and deposition has been previously overlooked. This geologic history contains key points relevant to oil shale development and engineering design including: (1) Stratigraphic changes in oil shale quality and composition are systematic and can be related to spatial and temporal changes in the depositional environment and basin dynamics. (2) The inorganic mineral matrix of oil shale units changes significantly from clay mineral/dolomite dominated to calcite above the base of the Mahogany zone. This variation may result in significant differences in pyrolysis products and geomechanical properties relevant to development and should be incorporated into engineering experiments. (3) This study includes a region in the Uinta Basin that would be highly prospective for application of in-situ production techniques. Stratigraphic targets for in-situ recovery techniques should extend above and below the Mahogany zone and include the upper R-6 and lower R-8.

Lauren P. Birgenheier; Michael D. Vanden Berg,

2011-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

287

Borate-containing oil-in-water microemulsion fluid  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An oil-in-water emulsion is described that contains water, oil, borate and a surfactant to prevent the separation of the components into various phases. Suitable oils include both natural and synthetic oil. Preferred are the lower viscosity mineral oils having viscosities ranging from 10 centistroke at 40 C to 100 centistroke at 40 C. Mineral oil fractions of naphthenic-based stocks also are preferred because of their ease of emulsification as compared to paraffinic-based stocks. Suitable synthetic oils include the diesters, alkyl benzenes, and polyalphaolefins. The hydrated potassium borates are preferred. Suitable surfactants include the anionic, nonionic, cationic and amphoteric surfactants. 5 claims.

Stayner, R.A.

1982-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

288

International Energy Outlook 2006 - World Oil Markets  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil Markets Oil Markets International Energy Outlook 2006 Chapter 3: World Oil Markets In the IEO2006 reference case, world oil demand increases by 47 percent from 2003 to 2030. Non-OECD Asia, including China and India, accounts for 43 percent of the increase. In the IEO2006 reference case, world oil demand grows from 80 million barrels per day in 2003 to 98 million barrels per day in 2015 and 118 million barrels per day in 2030. Demand increases strongly despite world oil prices that are 35 percent higher in 2025 than in last yearÂ’s outlook. Much of the growth in oil consumption is projected for the nations of non-OECD Asia, where strong economic growth is expected. Non-OECD Asia (including China and India) accounts for 43 percent of the total increase in world oil use over the projection period.

289

Pump apparatus including deconsolidator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A pump apparatus includes a particulate pump that defines a passage that extends from an inlet to an outlet. A duct is in flow communication with the outlet. The duct includes a deconsolidator configured to fragment particle agglomerates received from the passage.

Sonwane, Chandrashekhar; Saunders, Timothy; Fitzsimmons, Mark Andrew

2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

290

Oil from Coal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... sources are not capable of indefinite expansion, since their industrial stability is dependent upon adequate markets for the main products—coke of various kinds or gas. They were, however, ... gallon and remain in operation until 1950, and that it should be extended to include diesel oil used in motor vehicles. It might be feared that this extension would involve ...

C. H. LANDER

1938-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

291

Numerical simulations of the Macondo well blowout reveal strong control of oil flow by reservoir permeability and exsolution of gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

simulation of reservoir depletion and oil flow from themodel included the oil reservoir and the well with a toppressures of the deep oil reservoir, to a two-phase oil-gas

Oldenburg, C.M.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Bakken Shale Oil Production Trends  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) database and in the format of monthly production for oil, water and gas. Additional 95 well data including daily production rate, completion, Pressure Volume Temperature (PVT), pressure data are given from companies who sponsor for this research study...

Tran, Tan

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

293

Peaking of World Oil Production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nonrenewable and renewable energy sources make up the two major energy categories of interest to our industrial civilization. Nonrenewable energy includes different fossil fuels (coal, oil, natural gas) th...

J. Edward Gates

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Pyrolysis, combustion and steam gasification of various types of scrap tires for energy recovery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The energy recovery from carbonaceous materials is considered as reliable energy source. In this context, pyrolysis, combustion and gasification characteristics of scrap truck and car tire samples were investigated using a thermo-gravimetric analyzer ...

Jayaraman KANDASAMY; Iskender Gökalp

2014-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

295

Study on HCl removal for medical waste pyrolysis and combustion using a TG-FTIR analyzer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Under both pyrolysis and combustion condition, HCl removal efficiency for medical waste with Cabased additives was semi-quantitatively studied by means of ... TG-FTIR. Additionally, the difference of HCl removal ...

Hongmei Zhu; Weiying Chen; Xuguang Jiang…

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Detailed kinetic study of anisole pyrolysis and oxidation to understand tar formation during biomass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

biomass combustion and gasification Milena Nowakowska, Olivier Herbinet, Anthony Dufour, Pierre. Methoxyphenols are one of the main precursors of PAH and soot in biomass combustion and gasification. Keywords: Anisole; Pyrolysis; Oxidation; Tars; Biomass; Kinetic modeling Corresponding author

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

297

Production of Liquid Feedstock from Biomass via Steam Pyrolysis in a Fluidized Bed Reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Dry basis. ... loss on ignition ... A pre-charred, wood-based carbonaceous precursor was activated using a two-step process (steam-pyrolysis activation) to investigate the potential for optimizing an activation protocol for the prodn. of powd. ...

Efthymios Kantarelis; Weihong Yang; Wlodzimierz Blasiak

2013-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

298

Pyrolysis in Porous Media:1 Part 1. Numerical model and parametric study.2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

due to the formation of light species and heavy ones (up to solid coke particles). The1 presence by the formation of3 permeable char [10,11]. The coal pyrolysi

Boyer, Edmond

299

Pyrolysis products from amino acids and protein: Highest mutagenicity requires cytochrome P1-450  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...and halogenated dibenzo-p-dioxins present in combustion processes (e.g., charcoal cooking, cigarette...etiology of envi- ronmental carcinogenesis caused by combustion processes. Pyrolysis Products Are Ineffective as Inducers...

Daniel W. Nebert; Sanford W. Bigelow; Allan B. Okey; Takie Yahagi; Yuko Mori; Minako Nagao; Takashi Sugimura

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

OIL IMPORTS: For and Against  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

OIL IMPORTS: For and Against ... The eight—Ashland Oil, Atlantic Richfield, Cities Service, Marathon Oil, Mobil Oil, Standard Oil (Ind.), ...

1969-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes pyrolysis oils" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Fuel oil and kerosene sales 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fuel Oil and Kerosene Sales 1996 report provides information, illustrations and State-level statistical data on end-use sales of kerosene; No. 1, No. 2, and No. 4 distillate fuel oil; and residual fuel oil. State-level kerosene sales include volumes for residential, commercial, industrial, farm, and all other uses. State-level distillate sales include volumes for residential, commercial, industrial, oil company, railroad, vessel bunkering, military, electric utility, farm, on-highway, off highway construction, and other uses. State-level residual fuel sales include volumes for commercial, industrial, oil company, vessel bunkering, military, electric utility, and other uses. The Petroleum Marketing Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration ensures the accuracy, quality, and confidentiality of the published data in the Fuel Oil and Kerosene Sales 1996. 24 tabs.

NONE

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Influences of Additives on Steam Gasification of Biomass. 1. Pyrolysis Procedure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To remove tar and upgrade the quality of gaseous product, researchers have extensively studied the influences of various additives(2-6) and diverse reactors(7-9) on biomass gasification. ... For the pyrolysis procedure, there are two effectual methods, improving operating conditions and adding additives into reactors, to control the formations of tar and CnHm. ... The chemical components of additives added in the related pyrolysis procedure are shown in Table 2. ...

Yu R. Xie; Lai H. Shen; Jun Xiao; Da X. Xie; Jing Zhu

2009-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

303

Pyrolysis for Biochar Purposes: A Review to Establish Current Knowledge Gaps and Research Needs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Khalil(28) reported very low surface areas for charcoals (from a wide variety of biomass feedstocks) pyrolyzed at temperatures near 550 °C. ... Cetin and co-workers(33) reported a slight decrease of the total surface area by increasing pressure during the pyrolysis of several biomass feedstocks (radiata pine, eucalyptus wood, and sugar cane bagasse). ... Table 1 reports several experimental data from the literature for slow pyrolysis of different biomass feedstocks under various operating conditions. ...

Joan J. Manyà

2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

304

Group pyrolysis, ignition, and combustion of a spherical cloud of coal particles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GROUP PYROLYSIS, IGNITION, AND COMBUSTION OF A SPHERICAL CLOUD OF COAL PARTICLES A Thesis by WILLIAM RICHARD RYAN, JR. Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1988 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering GROUP PYROLYSIS, IGNITION, AND COMBUSTION OF A SPHERICAL CLOUD OF COAL PARTICLES A Thesis by WIL LI AM RI C HA RD RYA N ~ JR Approved ss to style and content by...

Ryan, William Richard

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Palm oil - towards a sustainable future?.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? The food industry faces problems relating to the sustainability of palm oil as a food commodity. These problem areas include social, environmental, economic and… (more)

Nilsson, Sara

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Bioconversion of Heavy oil.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??70 % of world?s oil reservoirs consist of heavy oil, and as the supply of conventional oil decreases, researchers are searching for new technologies to… (more)

Steinbakk, Sandra

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Analysis and comparison of biomass pyrolysis/gasification condensates: an interim report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides results of chemical and physical analysis of condensates from eleven biomass gasification and pyrolysis systems. The analyses were performed in order to provide more detailed data concerning these condensates for the different process research groups and to allow a determination of the differences in properties of the condensates as a function of reactor environment. The samples were representative of the various reactor configurations being researched within the Department of Energy, Biomass Thermochemical Conversion program. The condensates included tar phases, aqueous phases and, in some cases, both phases depending on the output of the particular reactor system. The analyses included gross compositional analysis (elemental analysis, ash, moisture), physical characterization (pour point, viscosity, density, heat of combustion, distillation), specific chemical analysis (gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, infrared spectrophotometry, proton and carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry) and biological activity (Ames assay). The analytical data demonstrate the wide range of chemical composition of the organics recovered in the condensates and suggests a direct relationship between operating temperature and chemical composition of the condensates. A continuous pathway of thermal degradation of the tar components as a function of temperature is proposed. Variations in the chemical composition of the organic components in the tars are reflected in the physical properties of tars and phase stability in relation to water in the condensate. The biological activity appears to be limited to the tars produced at high temperatures as a result of formation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in high concentrations. 55 refs., 13 figs., 6 tabs.

Elliott, D.C.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Completion strategy includes clay and precipitate control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article describes the conditions which are necessary for a successful oil well completion in the Mississippi and Cherokee zones of South Central Kansas. Topics considered include paraffin precipitation, clay swelling and migration, and iron precipitation. Clays in these zones are sensitive to water-base treating fluids and tend to swell and migrate to the well bore, thereby causing permeability damage. The presence of iron in the Mississippi and Cherokee formations has been indicated by cuttings, core samples, and connate water samples.

Sandy, T.; Gardner, G.R.

1985-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

309

5 World Oil Trends WORLD OIL TRENDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

5 World Oil Trends Chapter 1 WORLD OIL TRENDS INTRODUCTION In considering the outlook for California's petroleum supplies, it is important to give attention to expecta- tions of what the world oil market. Will world oil demand increase and, if so, by how much? How will world oil prices be affected

310

Crude Existence: The Politics of Oil in Northern Angola  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

oil corporations including Conoco, Petrofina, Texaco, Elf Aqui- taine, British Petroleum, Braspetro, Total, Cities Services, Mitsubishi, and Marathon

Reed, Kristin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Steam reforming of carbo-metallic oils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A process is disclosed for economically converting carbo-metallic oils to liquid fuel products by bringing a converter feed containing 650/sup 0/ F. + material characterized by a carbon residue on pyrolysis of at least about 1 and by containing at least about 4 ppm of nickel equivalents of heavy metals, including nickel, into contact with a particulate cracking catalyst in a progressive flow type reactor having an elongated conversion zone. The suspension of catalyst and feed in the reactor has a vapor residence time in the range of about 0.5 to about 10 seconds, a temperature of about 900/sup 0/ F. to about 1400/sup 0/ F. and a pressure of about 10 to about 50 pounds per square inch absolute for causing a conversion per pass in the range of about 50 to about 90 percent while depositing nickel on the catalyst and coke on the catalyst in amounts in the range of about 0.3 to about 3 percent by weight. The coke-laden catalyst is separated from the resulting stream of hydrocarbons and regenerated by combustion of the coke with oxygen, the regenerated catalyst being characterized by deposited nickel in at least a partially oxidized state and a level of carbon on catalyst of about 0.25 percent by weight or less. The regenerated catalyst is contacted with a reducing gas under reducing conditions sufficient to reduce at least a portion of the oxidized nickel deposits to a reduced state and the regenerated catalyst with reduced nickel deposits is recycled to the conversion zone for contact with fresh feed. Water is also introduced into the reactor conversion zone and the amount of water and the amount of reduced nickel on the recycled catalyst are sufficient to provide a steam reforming reaction so that hydrogen deficient components of the feed are converted to products having higher hydrogen to carbon ratios and the amount of feed converted to coke is reduced. The amount of deposited nickel on catalyst is preferably in the range from about 2,000 to about 20,000 ppm.

Myers, G.D.; Hettinger, W.P. Jr.; Kovach, S.M.; Zandona, O.J.

1984-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

312

Pulping black liquor used directly as a green and effective source for neat oil and as an emulsifier of catalytic cracking heavy oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to evaluate the use of emulsified heavy oils to conduct the FCC reaction. The emulsified heavy oil was prepared by homogenizing. Properties of emulsified heavy oil, including int...

Ge Xu; Ji-he Yang; Hui-hui Mao; Zhi Yun

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Oil shale ash-layer thickness and char combustion kinetics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Hot-Recycled-Solids (HRS) oil shale retort is being studied at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. In the HRS process, raw shale is heated by mixing it with burnt retorted shale. Retorted shale is oil shale which has been heated in an oxygen deficient atmosphere to pyrolyze organic carbon, as kerogen into oil, gas, and a nonvolatile carbon rich residue, char. In the HRS retort process, the char in the spent shale is subsequently exposed to an oxygen environment. Some of the char, starting on the outer surface of the shale particle, is burned, liberating heat. In the HRS retort, the endothermic pyrolysis step is supported by heat from the exothermic char combustion step. The rate of char combustion is controlled by three resistances; the resistance of oxygen mass transfer through the gas film surrounding the solid particle, resistance to mass transfer through a ash layer which forms on the outside of the solid particles as the char is oxidized and the resistance due to the intrinsic chemical reaction rate of char and oxygen. In order to estimate the rate of combustion of the char in a typical oil shale particle, each of these resistances must be accurately estimated. We begin by modeling the influence of ash layer thickness on the over all combustion rate of oil shale char. We then present our experimental measurements of the ash layer thickness of oil shale which has been processed in the HRS retort.

Aldis, D.F.; Singleton, M.F.; Watkins, B.E.; Thorsness, C.B.; Cena, R.J.

1992-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

314

Isothermal kinetics of new Albany oil shale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

From the development of technologies for the utilization of eastern U.S. oil shales, fluidized bed pyrolysis technology is emerging as one of the most promising in terms of oil yield, operating cost, and capital investment. Bench-scale testing of eastern shales has reached a level where scale-up represents the next logical step in the evolution of this technology. A major consideration in this development and an essential part of any fluidized bed reactor scale-up effort--isothermal kinetics-- has largely been ignored for eastern US shale with the exception of a recent study conducted by Richardson et al. with a Cleveland shale. The method of Richardson et al. was used previously by Wallman et al. with western shale and has been used most recently by Forgac, also with western shale. This method, adopted for the present study, entails injecting a charge of shale into a fluidized bed and monitoring the hydrocarbon products with a flame ionization detector (FID). Advantages of this procedure are that fluidized bed heat-up effects are simulated exactly and real-time kinetics are obtained due to the on-line FID. Other isothermal methods have suffered from heat-up and cool-down effects making it impossible to observe the kinetics at realistic operating temperatures. A major drawback of the FID approach, however, is that no differentiation between oil and gas is possible.

Carter, S.D.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Pyrolysis and hydrolysis of mixed polymer waste comprising polyethylene-terephthalate and polyethylene to sequentially recover [monomers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is described for using fast pyrolysis in a carrier gas to convert a plastic waste feed stream having a mixed polymeric composition in a manner such that pyrolysis of a given polymer to its high value monomeric constituent occurs prior to pyrolysis of other plastic components therein comprising: selecting a first temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of said given polymer to its high value monomeric constituent prior to a temperature range that causes pyrolysis of other plastic components; selecting a catalyst and support for treating said feed streams with said catalyst to effect acid or base catalyzed reaction pathways to maximize yield or enhance separation of said high value monomeric constituent in said temperature program range; differentially heating said feed stream at a heat rate within the first temperature program range to provide differential pyrolysis for selective recovery of optimum quantities of the high value monomeric constituent prior to pyrolysis of other plastic components; separating the high value monomeric constituents; selecting a second higher temperature range to cause pyrolysis of a different high value monomeric constituent of said plastic waste and differentially heating the feed stream at the higher temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of the different high value monomeric constituent; and separating the different high value monomeric constituent. 83 figs.

Evans, R.J.; Chum, H.L.

1998-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

316

A component based model for the prediction of the product yields of the pyrolysis of a biomass particle.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Pyrolysis of biomass can produce several useful, renewable products: biochar for soil amendment and long-term carbon sequestration; tars for chemicals and biofuels; and syngas as… (more)

Eberly, Brian C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

of oil yields from enhanced oil recovery  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

oil yields from enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and CO oil yields from enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and CO 2 storage capacity in depleted oil reservoirs. The primary goal of the project is to demonstrate that remaining oil can be economically produced using CO 2 -EOR technology in untested areas of the United States. The Citronelle Field appears to be an ideal site for concurrent CO 2 storage and EOR because the field is composed of sandstone reservoirs

318

Summary of Fast Pyrolysis and Upgrading GHG Analyses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007 established new renewable fuel categories and eligibility requirements (EPA 2010). A significant aspect of the National Renewable Fuel Standard 2 (RFS2) program is the requirement that the life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of a qualifying renewable fuel be less than the life cycle GHG emissions of the 2005 baseline average gasoline or diesel fuel that it replaces. Four levels of reduction are required for the four renewable fuel standards. Table 1 lists these life cycle performance improvement thresholds. Table 1. Life Cycle GHG Thresholds Specified in EISA Fuel Type Percent Reduction from 2005 Baseline Renewable fuel 20% Advanced biofuel 50% Biomass-based diesel 50% Cellulosic biofuel 60% Notably, there is a specialized subset of advanced biofuels that are the cellulosic biofuels. The cellulosic biofuels are incentivized by the Cellulosic Biofuel Producer Tax Credit (26 USC 40) to stimulate market adoption of these fuels. EISA defines a cellulosic biofuel as follows (42 USC 7545(o)(1)(E)): The term “cellulosic biofuel” means renewable fuel derived from any cellulose, hemicellulose, or lignin that is derived from renewable biomass and that has lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions, as determined by the Administrator, that are at least 60 percent less than the baseline lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions. As indicated, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has sole responsibility for conducting the life cycle analysis (LCA) and making the final determination of whether a given fuel qualifies under these biofuel definitions. However, there appears to be a need within the LCA community to discuss and eventually reach consensus on discerning a 50–59 % GHG reduction from a ? 60% GHG reduction for policy, market, and technology development. The level of specificity and agreement will require additional development of capabilities and time for the sustainability and analysis community, as illustrated by the rich dialogue and convergence around the energy content and GHG reduction of cellulosic ethanol (an example of these discussions can be found in Wang 2011). GHG analyses of fast pyrolysis technology routes are being developed and will require significant work to reach the levels of development and maturity of cellulosic ethanol models. This summary provides some of the first fast pyrolysis analyses and clarifies some of the reasons for differing results in an effort to begin the convergence on assumptions, discussion of quality of models, and harmonization.

Snowden-Swan, Lesley J.; Male, Jonathan L.

2012-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

319

Hydrotreating of oil from eastern oil shale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oil shale provides one of the major fossil energy reserves for the United States. The quantity of reserves in oil shale is less than the quantity in coal, but is much greater (by at least an order of magnitude) than the quantity of crude oil reserves. With so much oil potentially available from oil shale, efforts have been made to develop techniques for its utilization. In these efforts, hydrotreating has proved to be an acceptable technique for upgrading raw shale oil to make usuable products. The present work demonstrated the use of the hydrotreating technique for upgrading an oil from Indiana New Albany oil shale.

Scinta, J.; Garner, J.W.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Deactivation and regeneration of ZSM-5 zeolite in catalytic pyrolysis of plastic wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: > Pyrolysis transforms plastic wastes in valuable liquids and gases useful as fuels or source of chemicals. > The use of ZSM-5 zeolite in pyrolysis favours the production of gases and of lighter and more aromatic liquids. > ZSM-5 zeolite is almost completely deactivated after one plastics pyrolysis experiment. > ZSM-5 zeolite used in plastic wastes pyrolysis can be regenerated by burning the deposited coke in an air stream. > Regenerated ZSM-5 recovers its activity and produces liquids and gases equivalent to those obtained with fresh catalyst. - Abstract: In this work, a study of the regeneration and reuse of ZSM-5 zeolite in the pyrolysis of a plastic mixture has been carried out in a semi-batch reactor at 440 deg. C. The results have been compared with those obtained with fresh-catalyst and in non-catalytic experiments with the same conditions. The use of fresh catalyst produces a significant change in both the pyrolysis yields and the properties of the liquids and gases obtained. Gases more rich in C3-C4 and H{sub 2} are produced, as well as lower quantities of aromatic liquids if compared with those obtained in thermal decomposition. The authors have proved that after one pyrolysis experiment the zeolite loses quite a lot of its activity, which is reflected in both the yields and the products quality; however, this deactivation was found to be reversible since after regeneration heating at 550 deg. C in oxygen atmosphere, this catalyst recovered its initial activity, generating similar products and in equivalent proportions as those obtained with fresh catalyst.

Lopez, A., E-mail: alex.lopez@ehu.es [Chemical and Environmental Engineering Department, School of Engineering of Bilbao, Alameda Urquijo s/n, 48013 Bilbao (Spain); Marco, I. de; Caballero, B.M.; Adrados, A.; Laresgoiti, M.F. [Chemical and Environmental Engineering Department, School of Engineering of Bilbao, Alameda Urquijo s/n, 48013 Bilbao (Spain)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes pyrolysis oils" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Gas-phase reaction study of disilane pyrolysis: Applications to low pressure chemical vapor deposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The gas-phase thermal reactions during disilane decomposition at low pressure chemical vapor deposition conditions were studied from 300 to 1,000 K using resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) and multiphoton ionization (MPI). REMPI of gas-phase Si, mass 28, was detected from 640 to 840 K and 1 to 10 Torr, with a maximum signal intensity between 700 to 720 K. During disilane decomposition, no SiH (427.8 nm), SiH[sub 2] (494-515 nm), or SiH[sub 3] (419.0 nm) was detected. MPI of higher silanes, silenes, and silylenes were detected through mass fragments 2, 32, and 60; these species reached a maximum signal intensity 20 degrees prior to the mass-28 maximum. Modeling studies that included a detailed low pressure gas-phase kinetic scheme predict relative gas-phase partial pressures generated during disilane pyrolysis. The model predicted experimental trends in the Si partial pressure and the higher silane, silene, and silylene partial pressures.

Johannes, J.E.; Ekerdt, J.G. (Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Dutchess County Resource Recovery Task Force report: Dutchess County Pyrolysis Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dutchess County initiated development of a long-range master plan for Solid Waste Management in 1971. The plan included development of a resource recovery facility to service the municipalities in the County population center. Based on early recommendations, a pyrolysis facility employing Purox technology was to be implemented. A feasibility study, paid for by County funds was completed in 1975. The study provided siting recommendations, estimation of available waste, and preliminary facility design. Because of various considerations, the project was not developed. Under the Department of Energy grant, the County reassessed the feasibility of a resource recovery facility, with emphasis on confirming previous conclusions supporting the Purox technology, waste availability, energy recovery and sale and siting of the plant. The conclusions reached in the new study were: a resource recovery facility is feasible for the County; sufficient waste for such a facility is available and subject to control; While Purox technology was feasible it is not the most appropriate available technoloy for the County; that mass burning with steam recovery is the most appropriate technology; and that resource recovery while presently more expensive than landfilling, represents the only cost effective, energy efficient, and environmentally sound way to handle the solid waste problem in the County.

None

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Coal pyrolysis to acetylene using dc hydrogen plasma torch: effects of system variables on acetylene concentration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In order to unveil the inner mechanisms that determine acetylene concentration, experimental studies on the effect of several parameters such as plasma torch power, hydrogen flux and coal flux were carried out from coal pyrolysis in a dc plasma torch. Xinjiang long flame coals including volatile constituents at a level of about 42% were used in the experiment. Under the following experimental conditions, namely plasma torch power, hydrogen flow rate and pulverized coal feed speed of 2.12?MW, 32?kg?h?1 and 900?kg?h?1, respectively, acetylene volume concentration of about 9.4% was achieved. The experimental results indicate that parameters such as plasma torch power and coal flux play important roles in the formation of acetylene. Acetylene concentration increases inconspicuously with hydrogen flux. A chemical thermodynamic equilibrium model using the free energy method is introduced in this paper to numerically simulate each experimental condition. The numerical results are qualitatively consistent with the experimental results. Two parameters, i.e. the gas temperature and the ratio of hydrogen/carbon, are considered to be the dominant and independent factors that determine acetylene concentration.

Longwei Chen; Yuedong Meng; Jie Shen; Xingsheng Shu; Shidong Fang; Xinyang Xiong

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Real-time method for the identification and quantification of hydrocarbon pyrolysis products: Part II. Application to transient pyrolysis and validation by numerical simulation.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is expected to be achieved with Supersonic Combustion Ramjet engine [1]-[4]. Due to the large heat load applied on the structure (elevated total temperature in case of high speed [5],[6] and combustion heat such a technology, the combustion of the hydrocarbon pyrolysis products should be assessed and this requires

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

325

Remedial investigation work plan for Bear Creek Valley Operable Unit 1 (S-3 Ponds, Boneyard/Burnyard, Oil Landfarm, Sanitary Landfill 1, and the Burial Grounds, including Oil Retention Ponds 1 and 2) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 1, Main text  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The intent and scope of the work plan are to assemble all data necessary to facilitate selection of remediation alternatives for the sites in Bear Creek Valley Operable Unit 1 (BCV OU 1) such that the risk to human health and the environment is reduced to acceptable levels based on agreements with regulators. The ultimate goal is to develop a final Record Of Decision (ROD) for all of the OUs in BCV, including the integrator OU. However, the initial aim of the source OUs is to develop a ROD for interim measures. For source OUs such as BCV OU 1, data acquisition will not be carried out in a single event, but will be carried out in three stages that accommodate the schedule for developing a ROD for interim measures and the final site-wide ROD. The three stages are as follows: Stage 1, Assemble sufficient data to support decisions such as the need for removal actions, whether to continue with the remedial investigation (RI) process, or whether no further action is required. If the decision is made to continue the RI/FS process, then: Stage 2, Assemble sufficient data to allow for a ROD for interim measures that reduce risks to the human health and the environment. Stage 3, Provide input from the source OU that allows a final ROD to be issued for all OUs in the BCV hydrologic regime. One goal of the RI work plan will be to ensure that sampling operations required for the initial stage are not repeated at later stages. The overall goals of this RI are to define the nature and extent of contamination so that the impact of leachate, surface water runoff, and sediment from the OU I sites on the integrator OU can be evaluated, the risk to human health and the environment can be defined, and the general physical characteristics of the subsurface can be determined such that remedial alternatives can be screened.

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

System and method for preparing near-surface heavy oil for extraction using microbial degradation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system and method for enhancing the recovery of heavy oil in an oil extraction environment by feeding nutrients to a preferred microbial species (bacteria and/or fungi). A method is described that includes the steps of: sampling and identifying microbial species that reside in the oil extraction environment; collecting fluid property data from the oil extraction environment; collecting nutrient data from the oil extraction environment; identifying a preferred microbial species from the oil extraction environment that can transform the heavy oil into a lighter oil; identifying a nutrient from the oil extraction environment that promotes a proliferation of the preferred microbial species; and introducing the nutrient into the oil extraction environment.

Busche, Frederick D. (Highland Village, TX); Rollins, John B. (Southlake, TX); Noyes, Harold J. (Golden, CO); Bush, James G. (West Richland, WA)

2011-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

327

Coke formation during pyrolysis of 1,2-dichloroethane  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Most processes involving hydrocarbons or carbon oxides at high temperatures suffer from the disadvantage of coke formation. The formation of coke deposits during pyrolysis of hydrocarbons or chlorinated hydrocarbons is of significant practical importance. Examples of such processes are the steam cracking of alkanes to produce olefins and the thermal decomposition of 1,2-dichloroethane (EDC) for the production of vinyl chloride monomer (VCM). Even id the rate of coke production is low, the cumulative nature of the solid product will result in reactor fouling. The present work deals with the thermal decomposition of EDC. Coke formation has been studied on metal surfaces in a quartz tubular reactor. The rate of coke deposition was measures on metal foils hanging from one arm of a microbalance. A complete analysis of the product gas was accomplished using on-line gas chromatography. The results show that coke deposition during thermal decomposition of EDC depends on the composition of the feed as well as on the nature of the surface of the metal foil. Small amounts of other components (contamination with other chlorinated hydrocarbons as an example) may have a large influence on the rate of coke formation. The results are discussed in terms of surface composition/morphology of the metal foil and the free radical mechanism for thermal decomposition of FDC.

Holmen, A. [Norwegian Institute of Technology, Trondheim (Norway); Lindvag, O.A. [SINTEF Applied Chemistry, Trondheim (Norway)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

328

Integration of biomass fast pyrolysis and precedent feedstock steam drying with a municipal combined heat and power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Biomass fast pyrolysis (BFP) is a promising pre-treatment technology for converting biomass to transport fuel and in the future also for high-grade chemicals. BFP can be integrated with a municipal combined heat and power (CHP) plant. This paper shows the influence of BFP integration on a CHP plant's main parameters and its effect on the energetic and environmental performance of the connected district heating network. The work comprises full- and part-load operation of a CHP plant integrated with BFP and steam drying. It also evaluates different usage alternatives for the BFP products (char and oil). The results show that the integration is possible and strongly beneficial regarding energetic and environmental performance. Offering the possibility to provide lower district heating loads, the operation hours of the plant can be increased by up to 57%. The BFP products should be sold rather than applied for internal use as this increases the district heating network's primary energy efficiency the most. With this integration strategy future CHP plants can provide valuable products at high efficiency and also can help to mitigate global CO2 emissions.

Thomas Kohl; Timo P. Laukkanen; Mika P. Järvinen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory oil shale project. Quarterly report, April-June 1982  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of the proportion of oxidized shale to raw shale, on the heat of combustion of retort product was studied in a fluidized sand bed at 500/sup 0/C. Results show a significant increase in the heat of combustion, produced by the activity of the oxidized shale. The functionality of organic sulfur in various oil shale types is being investigated. An oil shale pyrolyzer for aboveground retorting is being studied in an engineering facility. Thermochemical and experimental equations were developed for the heat of combustion of raw shale. A heat balance was calculated for 24.6 gal/ton Colorado oil shale. The rapid-pyrolysis data was analyzed to determine the best kinetic scheme for retort modeling. Incipient fluidization velocity measurements were made for various crushed oil shale mixtures of different particle sizes. 10 figures, 1 table. (DLC)

Carley, J.F. (ed.)

1982-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

330

Putting oil prices in perspective  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The author discusses the flawed'' energy policy of the US that seems to be: protect access to Persian Gulf oil with every means at its disposal. He discusses in general terms the real cost of oil which should include the military cost of the continuing conflicts in the Middle East. Full-cycle measurement (from the point of origin to the point of use) to determine energy costs would show natural gas and alternative fuels in their true cost.

Kauffmann, B.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Life Cycle Assessment of Gasoline and Diesel Produced via Fast Pyrolysis and Hydroprocessing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this work, a life cycle assessment (LCA) estimating greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and net energy value (NEV) of the production of gasoline and diesel from forest residues via fast pyrolysis and hydroprocessing, from production of the feedstock to end use of the fuel in a vehicle, is performed. The fast pyrolysis and hydrotreating and hydrocracking processes are based on a Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) design report. The LCA results show GHG emissions of 0.142 kg CO2-equiv. per km traveled and NEV of 1.00 MJ per km traveled for a process using grid electricity. Monte Carlo uncertainty analysis shows a range of results, with all values better than those of conventional gasoline in 2005. Results for GHG emissions and NEV of gasoline and diesel from pyrolysis are also reported on a per MJ fuel basis for comparison with ethanol produced via gasification. Although pyrolysis-derived gasoline and diesel have lower GHG emissions and higher NEV than conventional gasoline does in 2005, they underperform ethanol produced via gasification from the same feedstock. GHG emissions for pyrolysis could be lowered further if electricity and hydrogen are produced from biomass instead of from fossil sources.

Hsu, D. D.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Near Shore Submerged Oil Assessment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, submerged oil refers to near shore oil which has picked up sediments You Should Know About Submerged Oil 1. Submerged oil is relatively uncommon: DWH oil is a light crude

333

Waste oil reclamation. (Latest citations from the NTIS Bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning the reclamation and recycling of used lubricating oils. Topics include specific program descriptions, re-refining techniques, chemical component analysis, and reclaimed oil performance. Appropriate regulations, standards, and clean-up efforts at sites contaminated by waste oils or waste oil refineries are included. (Contains a minimum of 228 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Waste oil reclamation. (Latest citations from the NTIS database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning the reclamation and recycling of used lubricating oils. Topics include specific program descriptions, re-refining techniques, chemical component analysis, and reclaimed oil performance. Appropriate regulations, standards, and clean-up efforts at sites contaminated by waste oils or waste oil refineries are included. (Contains a minimum of 222 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Energy dependence, oil prices and exchange rates: the Dominican economy since 1990  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper studies the impact that oil prices have had on the floating exchange rate ... these two variables for large developed economies and oil-producing countries, always including the 1970s oil crises in the...

Diego Méndez-Carbajo

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Fact #652: December 6, 2010 U.S. Crude Oil Production Rises ...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

2: December 6, 2010 U.S. Crude Oil Production Rises Fact 652: December 6, 2010 U.S. Crude Oil Production Rises The production of crude oil in the U.S., including lease...

337

Crude Oil Imports From Persian Gulf  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Crude Oil Imports From Persian Gulf Crude Oil Imports From Persian Gulf January - June 2013 | Release Date: August 29, 2013 | Next Release Date: February 27, 2014 2013 Crude Oil Imports From Persian Gulf Highlights It should be noted that several factors influence the source of a company's crude oil imports. For example, a company like Motiva, which is partly owned by Saudi Refining Inc., would be expected to import a large percentage from the Persian Gulf, while Citgo Petroleum Corporation, which is owned by the Venezuelan state oil company, would not be expected to import a large percentage from the Persian Gulf, since most of their imports likely come from Venezuela. In addition, other factors that influence a specific company's sources of crude oil imports would include the characteristics of various crude oils as well as a company's economic

338

Minerals and potentially hazardous trace elements in marine oil shale: new insights from the Shengli River North surface mine, northern Tibet, China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Shengli River–Changshe Mountain oil shale zone, including the Changliang Mountain–Shengli River oil shale, the Shengli River North oil shale, and the Changshe Mountain oil shale, represents potentially the la...

Xiugen Fu; Jian Wang; Fuwen Tan; Xinglei Feng…

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Techno-Economic Analysis of Biomass Fast Pyrolysis to Transportation Fuels  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biomass Fast Pyrolysis to Biomass Fast Pyrolysis to Transportation Fuels Mark M. Wright, Justinus A. Satrio, and Robert C. Brown Iowa State University Daren E. Daugaard ConocoPhillips Company David D. Hsu National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-46586 November 2010 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Techno-Economic Analysis of Biomass Fast Pyrolysis to Transportation Fuels Mark M. Wright, Justinus A. Satrio, and Robert C. Brown Iowa State University

340

Chemical and Oil Spill/Release Clean-Up and Reporting Requirements Chemicals and oils are used throughout Penn State University. Chemicals may be loosely defined as any material  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemical and Oil Spill/Release Clean-Up and Reporting Requirements Chemicals and oils are used, reactive, flammable, or toxic. This can include, for example, oil-based paints, alcohol, WD-40, and any number of laboratory materials. Oils include petroleum products, vegetable oils, hydraulic and mineral

Maroncelli, Mark

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes pyrolysis oils" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Transformation of alkali metals during pyrolysis and gasification of a lignite  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Transformation of Na and K in a lignite was investigated during pyrolysis and gasification in a fixed-bed by using a serial dissolution method with H{sub 2}O, CH{sub 3}COONH{sub 4}, and HCl solutions. The evolution of the fractions of four forms in solid and alkali volatilization during pyrolysis and gasification was determined. The results show that a different mode of occurrence between Na and of K in coal existed. Na in coal can be nearly completely dissolved by H{sub 2}O, CH{sub 3}COONH{sub 4}, and HCl solution. However, K in coal exists almost in the stable forms. Both H{sub 2}O soluble and CH{sub 3}COONH{sub 4} soluble Na and K fractions decline during pyrolysis and early gasification stage and increase a little with the process of char gasification. The stable form Na in the char produced during pyrolysis is transferred to other forms during char gasification via the pore opening and a series of chemical reactions. Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} (K{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) may play an important role in producing stable forms such as Na{sub 2}O.Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}2SiO{sub 2} and K{sub 2}O.Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}.2SiO{sub 2} during pyrolysis. The fraction of HCl soluble K increases during pyrolysis but decreases markedly during the early gasification stage. 20 refs., 7 figs., 1 tabs.

Xiaofang Wei; Jiejie Huang; Tiefeng Liu; Yitian Fang; Yang Wang [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Taiyuan (China). Institute of Coal Chemistry

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

342

Category:Oil and Gas | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Gas Jump to: navigation, search This category includes companies and information related to oil (petroleum) or natural gas. Pages in category "Oil and Gas" The following 114 pages are in this category, out of 114 total. A Abu Dhabi National Oil Company Abu Dhabi Supreme Petroleum Council Al Furat Petroleum Company Alabama Oil and Gas Board Alaska Division of Oil and Gas Alaska Oil and Gas Conservation Commission Algeria Ministry of Energy and Mining Archaeological Resource Protection Act Archaeological Resources Protection Act Arizona Oil and Gas Commission Arkansas Oil and Gas Commission B Bahrain National Gas and Oil Authority Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act C California Division of Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Resources California Environmental Quality Act

343

CO2 Gasification Kinetics of Biomass Char Derived from High-Temperature Rapid Pyrolysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

CO2 Gasification Kinetics of Biomass Char Derived from High-Temperature Rapid Pyrolysis ... The rapid pyrolysis char produced was isothermally gasified in a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) under a CO2 atmosphere. ... In the study by Zhang and co-workers, where as much as 14 biomass chars were gasified, gasification rates of all of the wooden biomass chars present a similar feature as Figure 7a (PS char), but this feature has not been found from gasification rates of the herbaceous biomass char. ...

Shuai Yuan; Xue-li Chen; Jun Li; Fu-chen Wang

2011-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

344

Biofuels from Pyrolysis in Perspective: Trade-offs between Energy Yields and Soil-Carbon Additions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Biofuels from Pyrolysis in Perspective: Trade-offs between Energy Yields and Soil-Carbon Additions ... We then apply this model to quantify the trade-offs between energy and biochar yields in BEBCS for a range of possible biofuel pathways for the coproduction of biochar with liquid or gaseous biofuels. ... (43) Thus, we can see that when biochar prices (per Mg C) are less than 33 times the price (per GJ) of gaseous fuels or 21 times the price of liquid pyrolysis fuels, coproduction of biochar with biofuels will reduce revenues compared to biofuel-only production. ...

Dominic Woolf; Johannes Lehmann; Elizabeth M. Fisher; Largus T. Angenent

2014-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

345

Fuel nitrogen release during black liquor pyrolysis; Part 2: Comparisons between different liquors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This continuation of earlier work reports fuel nitrogen release for black liquors at two temperatures during pyrolysis of single droplets in an oxygen-free environment. Approximately half of the 20--60% fuel nitrogen released was ammonia and half was molecular nitrogen. The total amount of fixed nitrogen released during pyrolysis was almost linearly proportional to the liquor nitrogen content. The yield of fixed nitrogen for birch liquors was significantly higher than for pine liquors, and the yield for bagasse liquor was extremely high.

Aho, K.; Nikkanen, S. (A. Ahlstrom Corp., Varkaus (Finland)); Hupa, M. (Abo Akademi Univ., Turku (Finland). Chemical Engineering Dept.)

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Flash Pyrolysis of Biomass with Reactive and Non-Reactive Gases: Summary Report for Period July 1983 through September 1984  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this program is to study the conversion of biomass to liquid and gaseous hydrocarbon fuels and chemical feedstocks by a flash or rapid pyrolysis technique. During this period of study pine wood was flash pyrolyzed in atmospheres of methane and helium at a pressure of 50 psi and at temperatures up to 1050 C. The 1-inch I.D. entrained downflow tubular reactor was used in these experiments. Product yields of methane, ethane, ethylene, BTX, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide were determined as a function of temperature and gas to wood ratio. Of particular interest were the ethylene and BTX yields. These represented as much as 29.6% and 24.6% of the carbon contained in the feed wood respectively when flash pyrolyzing in methane (flash methanolysls) and 14.7% and 9.7% when pyrolyzing in helium. In the case of flash methanolysis of wood the yields of ethylene and benzene increased with increasing methane to wood feed ratios. In the case of flash pyrolysis in helium the yields of ethylene and BTX decreased with increasing helium gas to wood feed ratios. These results indicate a mechanism by which a free radical reactive species originating from the wood interacts with the methane pyrolyzing gas to produce an enhanced yield of ethylene and benzene. The flash methanolysis of lignin extract from wood produced lower yields of ethylene, indicating the yields mainly originate from the cellulosic fractions of the wood. Some work was also performed on substituting wood ash for sillca flour (Cab-O-Sil) to allow free flow of wood particles through the entrained flow reactor. Preliminary process design and analysis indicates an economically competitive process for the flash methanolysis of wood for the production of methanol, benzene and ethylene. Future plans include completing the studies on obtaining the process chemistry of the flash methanolysis of woods, to obtain a better understanding of the enhanced ethylene and benzene yield and to investigate other biomass forms.

Steinberg M.; Fallon, P.T.; Sundaram, M.S.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

RMOTC - Testing - Enhanced Oil Recovery  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Enhanced Oil Recovery Enhanced Oil Recovery Notice: As of July 15th 2013, the Department of Energy announced the intent to sell Naval Petroleum Reserve Number 3 (NPR3). The sale of NPR-3 will also include the sale of all equipment and materials onsite. A decision has been made by the Department of Energy to complete testing at RMOTC by July 1st, 2014. RMOTC will complete testing in the coming year with the currently scheduled testing partners. For more information on the sale of NPR-3 and sale of RMOTC equipment and materials please join our mailing list here. RMOTC will play a significant role in continued enhanced oil recovery (EOR) technology development and field demonstration. A scoping engineering study on Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3's (NPR-3) enhanced oil recovery

348

Oil shale retort apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A retorting apparatus including a vertical kiln and a plurality of tubes for delivering rock to the top of the kiln and removal of processed rock from the bottom of the kiln so that the rock descends through the kiln as a moving bed. Distributors are provided for delivering gas to the kiln to effect heating of the rock and to disturb the rock particles during their descent. The distributors are constructed and disposed to deliver gas uniformly to the kiln and to withstand and overcome adverse conditions resulting from heat and from the descending rock. The rock delivery tubes are geometrically sized, spaced and positioned so as to deliver the shale uniformly into the kiln and form symmetrically disposed generally vertical paths, or "rock chimneys", through the descending shale which offer least resistance to upward flow of gas. When retorting oil shale, a delineated collection chamber near the top of the kiln collects gas and entrained oil mist rising through the kiln.

Reeves, Adam A. (Grand Junction, CO); Mast, Earl L. (Norman, OK); Greaves, Melvin J. (Littleton, CO)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Heating oils, 1982  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Properties of 235 heating oils marketed in the United States were submitted for study and compilation under agreement between BETC and API. The fuels were manufactured by 25 petroleum refining companies in 88 domestic refineries. The data are tabulated according to six grades of fuel and subdivided into five geographic regions in which the fuels are marketed. The five regions containing a total of 16 marketing districts are shown on a map in the report. Trend charts are included showing average properties of the six grades of fuel for the past several years. Summaries of the results of the tests by grade and by region for 1982 compared with data for 1981 are tabulated. Analyses of grade 6 foreign import oils are presented.

Shelton, E.M.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Heating oils, 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Properties of 247 heating oils marketed in the United States were submitted for study and compilation under agreement between the Bartlesville Energy Technology Center and the American Petroleum Institute. The fuels were manufactured by 26 petroleum refining companies in 87 domestic refineries. The data are tabulated according to six grades of fuel and subdivided into five geographic regions in which the fuels are marketed. The six grades of fuel are defined by the American Society for Testing and Materials Specification D396. The five regions containing a total of 16 marketing districts are shown on a map in the report. Trend charts are included showing average properties of the six grades of fuel for the past several years. Summaries of the results of the tests by grade and by region for 1980 compared with data for 1979 are shown in tables. Analyses of grades 2, 5(light), and 6 foreign import oils are presented.

Shelton, E.M.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Heating oils, 1981  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Properties of 249 heating oils marketed in the United States were submitted for study and compilation under agreement between the Bartlesville Energy Technology Center (BETC) and the American Petroleum Institute (API). The fuels were manufactured by 28 petroleum refining companies in 92 domestic refineries. The data are tabulated according to six grades of fuel and subdivided into five geographic regions in which the fuels are marketed. The six grades of fuels are defined by the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) Specification D396. The five regions containing a total of 16 marketing districts are shown on a map in the report. Trend charts are included showing average properties of the six grades of fuel for the past several years. Summaries of the results of the tests by grade and by region for 1981 compared with data for 1980 are shown in Tables 1 through 6. Analyses of grade 6 foreign import oils are presented in Table 13.

Shelton, E.M.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

China's Global Oil Strategy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

capability to secure oil transport security. Additionally,international oil agreements: 1) ensuring energy security;security, and many argue that as the second-largest consumer of oil

Thomas, Bryan G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Understanding Crude Oil Prices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2007”. comparison, Mexico used 6.6— Chinese oil consumption17. Oil production from the North Sea, Mexico’s Cantarell,Mexico, Italy, France, Canada, US, and UK. Figure 10. Historical Chinese oil

Hamilton, James Douglas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Understanding Crude Oil Prices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2004. “OPEC’s Optimal Crude Oil Price,” Energy Policy 32(2),023 Understanding Crude Oil Prices James D. Hamilton Junedirectly. Understanding Crude Oil Prices* James D. Hamilton

Hamilton, James Douglas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Understanding Crude Oil Prices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

business of having some oil in inventory, which is referredKnowledge of all the oil going into inventory today for salebe empty, because inventories of oil are essential for the

Hamilton, James Douglas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Understanding Crude Oil Prices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2004. “OPEC’s Optimal Crude Oil Price,” Energy Policy 32(2),percent change in real oil price. Figure 3. Price of crude023 Understanding Crude Oil Prices James D. Hamilton June

Hamilton, James Douglas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Understanding Crude Oil Prices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2004. “OPEC’s Optimal Crude Oil Price,” Energy Policy 32(2),percent change in real oil price. Figure 3. Price of crudein predicting quarterly real oil price change. variable real

Hamilton, James Douglas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

China's Global Oil Strategy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by this point, China’s demand Oil Demand vs. Domestic Supplycurrent pace of growth in oil demand as staying consistentand predictions of oil supply and demand affected foreign

Thomas, Bryan G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Understanding Crude Oil Prices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Income on Energy and Oil Demand,” Energy Journal 23(1),2006. “China’s Growing Demand for Oil and Its Impact on U.S.in the supply or demand for oil itself could be regarded as

Hamilton, James Douglas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Understanding Crude Oil Prices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2007”. comparison, Mexico used 6.6— Chinese oil consumption17. Oil production from the North Sea, Mexico’s Cantarell,

Hamilton, James Douglas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes pyrolysis oils" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Desulfurization of heavy oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Strategies for heavy oil desulfurization were evaluated by reviewing desulfurization literature and critically assessing the viability of the various methods for heavy oil. The desulfurization methods includin...

Rashad Javadli; Arno de Klerk

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

China's Global Oil Strategy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

China’s domestic oil supply will peak, and demand Robertpeak will come around 2020, 24 and that by this point, China’s demand Oil

Thomas, Bryan G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Tall oil pitch  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

n....Undistilled residue from the distillation of crude tall oil. It is generally recognized that tall oil pitches contain some high-boiling esters and neutral...

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

China's Global Oil Strategy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Analysts agree that the Persian Gulf region will continue tos oil imports. 17 The Persian Gulf region is particularlyaccess to oil from the Persian Gulf because of conflict

Thomas, Bryan G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

oil1990.xls  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

(dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Table 1. Consumption and Expenditures in U.S. Households that Use Fuel OilKerosene, 1990 Residential Buildings Average Fuel Oil...

366

Oil Sands Feedstocks  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Centre for Upgrading Technology 'a Canada-Alberta alliance for bitumen and heavy oil research' Oil Sands Feedstocks C Fairbridge, Z Ring, Y Briker, D Hager National Centre...

367

Crude Oil Domestic Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Data Series: Crude Oil Domestic Production Refinery Crude Oil Inputs Refinery Gross Inputs Refinery Operable Capacity (Calendar Day) Refinery Percent Operable Utilization Net...

368

Re-refined lubrication oils. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning treatments and re-refining of used lubrication oils. Topics include the decontamination processes, reclamation of automobile oils, and handling and storage of waste oils. Environmental analyses of used oil recycling are included. Environmental, resource conservation, and economic aspects of recycled lubricating oils are also discussed. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

NONE

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Comparative assessment of municipal sewage sludge incineration, gasification and pyrolysis for a sustainable sludge-to-energy management in Greece  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: • The high output of MSS highlights the need for alternative routes of valorization. • Evaluation of 3 sludge-to-energy valorisation methods through SWOT analysis. • Pyrolysis is an energy and material recovery process resulting to ‘zero waste’. • Identification of challenges and barriers for MSS pyrolysis in Greece was investigated. • Adopters of pyrolysis systems face the challenge of finding new product markets. - Abstract: For a sustainable municipal sewage sludge management, not only the available technology, but also other parameters, such as policy regulations and socio-economic issues should be taken in account. In this study, the current status of both European and Greek Legislation on waste management, with a special insight in municipal sewage sludge, is presented. A SWOT analysis was further developed for comparison of pyrolysis with incineration and gasification and results are presented. Pyrolysis seems to be the optimal thermochemical treatment option compared to incineration and gasification. Sewage sludge pyrolysis is favorable for energy savings, material recovery and high added materials production, providing a ‘zero waste’ solution. Finally, identification of challenges and barriers for sewage sludge pyrolysis deployment in Greece was investigated.

Samolada, M.C. [Dept. Secretariat of Environmental and Urban Planning – Decentralized Area Macedonian Thrace, Taki Oikonomidi 1, 54008 Thessaloniki (Greece); Zabaniotou, A.A., E-mail: azampani@auth.gr [Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Dept. of Chemical Engineering, University Box 455, University Campus, 541 24 Thessaloniki (Greece)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

370

John L Gaunt and Johannes Lehmann Energy balance and emissions associated with biochar sequestration and pyrolysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2 Table S1. Energy inputs (Mj ha-1 ) associated with bio-energy crop production Forage Corn CropS1 John L Gaunt and Johannes Lehmann Energy balance and emissions associated with biochar sequestration and pyrolysis bioenergy production Summary of tables Data are provided energy inputs (Mj ha-1

Lehmann, Johannes

371

State-of-the-art of fast pyrolysis in IEA bioenergy member countries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fast pyrolysis of biomass is becoming increasingly important in some member countries of the International Energy Agency (IEA). Six countries have joined the IEA Task 34 of the Bioenergy Activity: Canada, Finland, Germany, Netherlands, UK, and USA. The National Task Leaders give an overview of the current activities in their countries both on research, pilot and demonstration level.

Dietrich Meier; Bert van de Beld; Anthony V. Bridgwater; Douglas C. Elliott; Anja Oasmaa; Fernando Preto

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Quantitative Determination of Aliphatic Sulfur-Containing Additives by Pyrolysis-Gas Chromatography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......pyrolysis (7), infrared (8), combustion to SO4 = with subsequent determination...Drushel. The Analytical Chemistry of Sulfur and Its Compounds...London, p. 358. Sulfur in Coal and Coke by the Bomb Washing...organic materials by oxygen bomb combustion. Anal. Chem. 33:1760......

J.W. Sinclair; L. Schall; N.T. Crabb

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Recycling of automobile shredder residue with a microwave pyrolysis combined with high temperature steam gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Presently, there is a growing need for handling automobile shredder residues – ASR or “car fluff”. One of the most promising methods of treatment ASR is pyrolysis. Apart of obvious benefits of pyrolysis: energy and metals recovery, there is serious concern about the residues generated from that process needing to be recycled. Unfortunately, not much work has been reported providing a solution for treatment the wastes after pyrolysis. This work proposes a new system based on a two-staged process. The ASR was primarily treated by microwave pyrolysis and later the liquid and solid products become the feedstock for the high temperature gasification process. The system development is supported within experimental results conducted in a lab-scale, batch-type reactor at the Royal Institute of Technology (KTH). The heating rate, mass loss, gas composition, LHV and gas yield of producer gas vs. residence time are reported for the steam temperature of 1173 K. The sample input was 10 g and the steam flow rate was 0.65 kg/h. The conversion reached 99% for liquids and 45–55% for solids, dependently from the fraction. The H2:CO mol/mol ratio varied from 1.72 solids and 1.4 for liquid, respectively. The average LHV of generated gas was 15.8 MJ/N m3 for liquids and 15 MJ/N m3 for solids fuels.

Pawel Donaj; Weihong Yang; W?odzimierz B?asiak; Christer Forsgren

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Accepted Manuscript Kinetic Modelling of High Density PolyEthylene Pyrolysis: Part 1. Comparison of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Accepted Manuscript Kinetic Modelling of High Density PolyEthylene Pyrolysis: Part 1. Comparison this article as: Gascoin N, Navarro-Rodriguez A, Gillard P, Mangeot A, Kinetic Modelling of High Density PolyEthylene.polymdegradstab.2012.05.008 #12;M ANUSCRIPT ACCEPTED ACCEPTED MANUSCRIPT 1 Kinetic Modelling of High Density PolyEthylene

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

375

Pyrolysis in Porous Media: Part 2.1 Numerical Analysis and Comparison to Experiments.2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the heat flux absorption. The formation of a thin film inside the combustion13 chamber, the so-called film, France17 Only limited studies are available experimentally to investigate18 hydrocarbon fuel pyrolysis investigate the related phenomena (heat and mass transfer with chemistry).22 After a first code validation

Boyer, Edmond

376

A Study on the Relationship between Fuel Composition and Pyrolysis Kinetics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A Study on the Relationship between Fuel Composition and Pyrolysis Kinetics ... ‡ Foster Wheeler Energy Corporation, Clinton, New Jersey 08809, United States ... The DTR system, illustrated in Figure 1, consists of four main components: a fuel feeder, a preheater, a furnace, and a sample collection probe. ...

Laura C. Bradley; Sharon Falcone Miller; Bruce G. Miller; David A. Tillman

2011-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

377

The Intramolecular Isotope Effect in the Pyrolysis of 1-$^{14}$C Propane  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Intramolecular Isotope Effect in the Pyrolysis of 1- C Propane H. M. Frey C. J. Danby Cyril Hinshelwood 1- C propane has been synthesized from active barium carbonate in 50% yield. This propane has been pyrolyzed at temperatures from 550 to 603...

1956-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Preparation of BaTiO3 nanoparticles by combustion spray pyrolysis Sangjin Leea  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

], hydrothermal [6], and spray pyrolysis [7­9] have been developed to prepare stoichiometric, ultra- fine BaTiO3 process. Hydrothermal BaTiO3 powders [6] are usually a paraelectric cubic phase, which needs additional freedom from hydrocarbon-based chem- icals, and thus avoiding carbon-contamination problems. As a result

Messing, Gary L.

379

CaO-based sorbents for CO2 capture prepared by ultrasonic spray pyrolysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of additives in the CaO matrix and the relatively high surface area materials obtained via USP explain are currently under investigation for CO2 capture, both for post- combustion (e.g., silica supported amines,2 of metal oxides, even on an industrial scale.18,19 We report here the rst use of ultrasonic spray pyrolysis

Suslick, Kenneth S.

380

Molecular beam mass spectrometric characterization of biomass pyrolysis products for fuels and chemicals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Converting biomass feedstocks to fuels and chemicals requires rapid characterization of the wide variety of possible feedstocks. The combination of pyrolysis molecular beam mass spectrometry (Py-MBMS) and multivariate statistical analysis offers a unique capability for characterizing these feedstocks. Herbaceous and woody biomass feedstocks that were harvested at different periods were used in this study. The pyrolysis mass spectral data were acquired in real time on the MBMS, and multivariate statistical analysis (factor analysis) was used to analyze and classify Py-MBMS data into compound classes. The effect of harvest times on the thermal conversion of these feedstocks was assessed from these data. Apart from sericea lespedeza, the influence of harvest time on the pyrolysis products of the various feedstocks was insignificant. For sericea lespedeza, samples harvested before plant defoliation were significantly different from those harvested after defoliation. The defoliated plant samples had higher carbohydrate-derived pyrolysis products than the samples obtained from the foliated plant. Additionally, char yields from the defoliated plant samples were lower than those from the foliated plant samples.

Agblevor, F.A.; Davis, M.F.; Evans, R.J. [National Renewal Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes pyrolysis oils" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Theoretical principles of the use of coal fractions with different densities for pyrolysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To obtain process gas and liquid products upon thermal action on low-grade (D, DG, and G) coals, it is reasonable to pyrolyze the lightest organic fractions with enhanced quality characteristics in terms of both the yield of liquid products (pyrolysis tar) and the component composition of the gas (hydrogen and methane hydrocarbons).

A.M. Gyul'maliev; S.G. Gagarin [Institute for Fossil Fuels, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

The great Arctic oil race begins  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... oil, and up to 30% of its gas — and most of it is offshore. On 17 January, Moe awarded 26 production licences for developed ... . On 17 January, Moe awarded 26 production licences for developed offshore oil areas in the Norwegian and Barents Sea to companies including Statoil, Total, ExxonMobil ...

Quirin Schiermeier

2012-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

383

CONGRESS STALLS ON OIL-SPILL RESPONSE  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

CONGRESS STALLS ON OIL-SPILL RESPONSE ... Efforts to pass OFFSHORE DRILLING safety legislation have sputtered over the past year ... In response, the Interior Department has revised the rules governing offshore oil and natural gas drilling to include a lengthier and more extensive permitting process, and the industry has developed new well control and deepwater spill containment technology. ...

GLENN HESS

2011-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

384

Biochemically enhanced oil recovery and oil treatment  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates to the preparation of new, modified organisms, through challenge growth processes, that are viable in the extreme temperature, pressure and pH conditions and salt concentrations of an oil reservoir and that are suitable for use in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The modified microorganisms of the present invention are used to enhance oil recovery and remove sulfur compounds and metals from the crude oil. 62 figures.

Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.

1994-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

385

Biochemically enhanced oil recovery and oil treatment  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates to the preparation of new, modified organisms, through challenge growth processes, that are viable in the extreme temperature, pressure and pH conditions and salt concentrations of an oil reservoir and that are suitable for use in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The modified microorganisms of the present invention are used to enhance oil recovery and remove sulfur compounds and metals from the crude oil.

Premuzic, Eugene T. (East Moriches, NY); Lin, Mow (Rocky Point, NY)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Economic vulnerability to Peak Oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Peak Oil, which refers to the maximum possible global oil production rate, is increasingly gaining attention in both science and policy discourses. However, little is known about how this phenomenon will impact economies, despite its apparent imminence and potential dangers. In this paper, we construct a vulnerability map of the U.S. economy, combining two approaches for analyzing economic systems, i.e. input–output analysis and social network analysis (applied to economic data). Our approach reveals the relative importance of individual economic sectors, and how vulnerable they are to oil price shocks. As such, our dual-analysis helps identify which sectors, due to their strategic position, could put the entire U.S. economy at risk from Peak Oil. For the U.S., such sectors would include Iron Mills, Fertilizer Production and Transport by Air. Our findings thus provide early warnings to downstream companies about potential ‘trouble’ in their supply chain, and inform policy action for Peak Oil. Although our analysis is embedded in a Peak Oil narrative, it is just as valid and useful in the context of developing a climate roadmap toward a low carbon economy.

Christian Kerschner; Christina Prell; Kuishuang Feng; Klaus Hubacek

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Evaluating incentives in the tax legislation applicable to the South African oil, petroleum and gas industry / Moolman A.M.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The oil and gas sector holds several advantages for South Africa: direct benefits include providing growth in the country’s economy by optimising available oil and… (more)

Moolman, Anneke Maré.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Pyrolysis process for producing condensed stabilized hydrocarbons utilizing a beneficially reactive gas  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In a process for recovery of values contained in solid carbonaceous material, the solid carbonaceous material is comminuted and then subjected to pyrolysis, in the presence of a carbon containing solid particulate source of heat and a beneficially reactive transport gas in a transport flash pyrolysis reactor, to form a pyrolysis product stream. The pyrolysis product stream contains a gaseous mixture and particulate solids. The solids are separated from the gaseous mixture to form a substantially solids-free gaseous stream which comprises volatilized hydrocarbon free radicals newly formed by pyrolysis. Preferably the solid particulate source of heat is formed by oxidizing part of the separated particulate solids. The beneficially reactive transport gas inhibits the reactivity of the char product and the carbon-containing solid particulate source of heat. Condensed stabilized hydrocarbons are obtained by quenching the gaseous mixture stream with a quench fluid which contains a capping agent for stabilizing and terminating newly formed volatilized hydrocarbon free radicals. The capping agent is partially depleted of hydrogen by the stabilization and termination reaction. Hydrocarbons of four or more carbon atoms in the gaseous mixture stream are condensed. A liquid stream containing the stabilized liquid product is then treated or separated into various fractions. A liquid containing the hydrogen depleted capping agent is hydrogenated to form a regenerated capping agent. At least a portion of the regenerated capping agent is recycled to the quench zone as the quench fluid. In another embodiment capping agent is produced by the process, separated from the liquid product mixture, and recycled.

Durai-Swamy, Kandaswamy (Culver City, CA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Method for forming an in-situ oil shale retort in differing grades of oil shale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An in-situ oil shale retort is formed in a subterranean formation containing oil shale. The formation comprises at least one region of relatively richer oil shale and another region of relatively leaner oil shale. According to one embodiment, formation is excavated from within a retort site for forming at least one void extending horizontally across the retort site, leaving a portion of unfragmented formation including the regions of richer and leaner oil shale adjacent such a void space. A first array of vertical blast holes are drilled in the regions of richer and leaner oil shale, and a second array of blast holes are drilled at least in the region of richer oil shale. Explosive charges are placed in portions of the blast holes in the first and second arrays which extend into the richer oil shale, and separate explosive charges are placed in portions of the blast holes in the first array which extend into the leaner oil shale. This provides an array with a smaller scaled depth of burial (sdob) and closer spacing distance between explosive charges in the richer oil shale than the sdob and spacing distance of the array of explosive charges in the leaner oil shale. The explosive charges are detonated for explosively expanding the regions of richer and leaner oil shale toward the horizontal void for forming a fragmented mass of particles. Upon detonation of the explosive, greater explosive energy is provided collectively by the explosive charges in the richer oil shale, compared with the explosive energy produced by the explosive charges in the leaner oil shale, resulting in comparable fragmentation in both grades of oil shale.

Ricketts, T.E.

1984-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

390

A Century of Oil-Shale Patents (1845 to 1945)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A Century of Oil-Shale Patents (1845 to 1945) ... Oil Shale Research and Demonstration Plant Division, Bureau of Mines, Department of the Interior, Washington 25, D. C. ... THE research and development program of the Bureau of Mines relating to synthetic liquid fuels includes a project for the compilation and study of all patents concerned with the treatment of oil shale and its products. ...

SIMON KLOSKY

1946-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

391

RFID BASED GRAIN AND OIL PRODUCTS TRACEABILITY1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RFID BASED GRAIN AND OIL PRODUCTS TRACEABILITY1 AND ITS COMPUTER IMPLEMENTATION Haiyan Hu ,*2 the study of the traceability of grain and oil products. Include the study contents, and a system we developed for traceability of grain and oil products, and the demonstration of the study. The system we

Boyer, Edmond

392

Oil depletion or a market problem? A framing analysis of peak oil in The Economist news magazine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Despite an increase of oil production from unconventional resources, concerns about the depletion of ‘cheap oil’ are more imminent than ever. Recognising the importance of media in influencing public opinion, risk perceptions and policy making, this research presents a framing analysis of peak oil in The Economists’ news magazine (2008 and 2012). One hundred and seventy articles, of which 58 focused on energy security and oil production, were analysed using content and discourse analysis. Coverage was multi-facetted, and included oil depletion as one storyline within the supply challenge frame, especially during times of very high oil prices. Oil prices and the rapid growth in ‘fracking’ were found to be critical discourse moments, influencing the nature of oil coverage in The Economist. Overall, due to The Economist's neoliberal ideology and the resulting optimistic framing of market forces and new technologies, this research found that the news magazine does not contribute majorly to enhancing the public debate on peak oil.

Susanne Becken

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Ships After Oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ships After Oil ... Special self-propelled tenders planned for offshore drilling operations in Gulf ...

1956-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

394

OIL & GAS INSTITUTE Introduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OIL & GAS INSTITUTE CONTENTS Introduction Asset Integrity Underpinning Capabilities 2 4 4 6 8 9 10 COMPETITIVENESS UNIVERSITY of STRATHCLYDE OIL & GAS INSTITUTE OIL & GAS EXPERTISE AND PARTNERSHIPS #12;1 The launch of the Strathclyde Oil & Gas Institute represents an important step forward for the University

Mottram, Nigel

395

Effect of demineralization of El-lajjun Jordanian oil shale on oil yield  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effect of demineralization on oil yield and mineral composition of Jordanian oil shale was investigated. A standard digestion procedure using a range of inorganic and organic acids including HCl, HNO3, HF, and CH3COOH was used to enhance the oil recovery of oil shale samples collected from the El-lajjun area. The total yield of the digested samples, as determined by Fischer Assay, has shown a maximum value (two folds the untreated sample) obtained when using CH3COOH. The kaolin in the treated oil shale with a high concentration of CH3COOH is believed to have transformed to illite as found in the XRD analysis. The treatment of oil shale using \\{HCl\\} has shown an increased ratio of oil to gas as a result of the digestion of calcite in the oil shale. At higher concentrations of HNO3, the acid is believed to react with the kerogen in the oil shale resulting in high levels of low molecular weight compounds. Therefore, the amount of non-condensable gases produced by Fischer assay after treatment with a high concentration of HNO3 is relatively high. HF is believed to drive off water from the oil shale by dissolving the clay minerals leading to increased oil to gas ratio.

Adnan Al-Harahsheh; Mohammad Al-Harahsheh; Awni Al-Otoom; Mamdoh Allawzi

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

OGEL (Oil, Gas & Energy Law Intelligence): Focussing on recent developments in the area of oil-gas-energy law,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

About OGEL OGEL (Oil, Gas & Energy Law Intelligence): Focussing on recent developments in the area of oil-gas-energy law, regulation, treaties, judicial and arbitral cases, voluntary guidelines, tax and contracting, including the oil-gas- energy geopolitics. For full Terms & Conditions and subscription rates

Dixon, Juan

397

Oil | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Oil Oil Oil Oil Prices, 2000-2008 For the first time since 1995, U.S. oil production has surpassed imports. Explore the trend with our interactive chart. | Graphic by Daniel Wood, Energy Department. For the first time since 1995, U.S. oil production has surpassed imports. Explore the trend with our interactive chart. | Graphic by Daniel Wood, Energy Department. Oil is used for heating and transportation -- most notably, as fuel for gas-powered vehicles. America's dependence on foreign oil has declined in recent years, but oil prices have increased. The Energy Department supports research and policy options to increase our domestic supply of oil while ensuring environmentally sustainable supplies domestically and abroad, and is investing in research, technology and

398

Oil Dependencies and Peak Oil's Effects on Oil Consumption.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? During the year of 2007, the world has experienced historically high oil prices both in nominal and in real terms, which has reopened discussions… (more)

Tekin, Josef

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Turbine cooling waxy oil  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A process for pipelining a waxy oil to essentially eliminate deposition of wax on the pipeline wall is described comprising: providing a pressurized mixture of the waxy oil and a gas; effecting a sudden pressure drop of the mixture of the oil and the gas through an expansion turbine, thereby expanding the gas and quickly cooling the oil to below its cloud point in the substantial absence of wax deposition and forming a slurry of wax particles and oil; and pipelining the slurry.

Geer, J.S.

1987-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

400

The Thermal Decomposition of Diethyl Ether. V. The Production of Ethanol from Diethyl Ether and the Pyrolysis of Ethanol  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...The Thermal Decomposition of Diethyl Ether. V. The Production of Ethanol from Diethyl Ether and the Pyrolysis of Ethanol G. R. Freeman The two modes of decomposition of ethanol at 525 degrees C, namely dehydration and dehydrogenation, are affected...

1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes pyrolysis oils" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Thermochemical Analysis of U.S. Argonne Premium Coal Samples by Time-Resolved Pyrolysis-Field ionization Mass Spectrometry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Analytical pyrolysis techniques are widely used for the thermochemical analysis of coals and coal-derived products. During heating, complex mixtures of chemical substances are released from coal by distillatio...

Norbert Simmleit; Hans-Rolf Schulten; Yongseung Yun…

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Feedstock Logistics of a Mobile Pyrolysis System and Assessment of Soil Loss Due to Biomass Removal for Bioenergy Production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The purpose of this study was to assess feedstock logistics for a mobile pyrolysis system and to quantify the amount of soil loss caused by harvesting agricultural feedstocks for bioenergy production. The analysis of feedstock logistics...

Bumguardner, Marisa

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

403

World frontiers beckon oil finders  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper discusses the international aspects of the petroleum industry. Most who work in the industry agree that the possibilities for huge are found largely in international regions. Something that is helping fuel that possibility is the way countries are increasingly opening their doors to US oil industry involvement. Listed in this paper is a partial list of the reported projects now underway around the world involving US companies. It is not intended to be comprehensive, but rather an indication of how work continues despite a general lull atmosphere for the oil industry. These include Albania, Bulgaria, Congo, Czechoslovakia, Dominican Republic, Ethiopia, Ireland, Malta, Madagascar, Mongolia, Mozambique, Nigeria, Panama, Paraquay, and Senegal.

Not Available

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Waste oil reclamation. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning methods and equipment for reclamation and recycling of waste oils. Citations discuss recovery, disposal, and reuse of lubricating oils. Topics include economic analysis, programs assessment, re-refining techniques, chemical component analysis, and reclaimed oil evaluation. Regulations and standards for waste oil treatment and waste oil refineries are examined. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Waste oil reclamation. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning methods and equipment for reclamation and recycling of waste oils. Citations discuss recovery, disposal, and reuse of lubricating oils. Topics include economic analysis, programs assessment, re-refining techniques, chemical component analysis, and reclaimed oil evaluation. Regulations and standards for waste oil treatment and waste oil refineries are examined. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Waste oil reclamation. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning methods and equipment for reclamation and recycling of waste oils. Citations discuss recovery, disposal, and reuse of lubricating oils. Topics include economic analysis, programs assessment, re-refining techniques, chemical component analysis, and reclaimed oil evaluation. Regulations and standards for waste oil treatment and waste oil refineries are examined. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Essays on Macroeconomics and Oil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oil Production in Venezuela and Mexico . . . . . . . . . .Venezuela with Mexico, another major oil pro- ducing countryOil Production and Productivity in Venezuela and Mexico . . . . . . . .

CAKIR, NIDA

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Essays on Macroeconomics and Oil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oil Production in Venezuela and Mexico . . . . . . . . . .Oil Production and Productivity in Venezuela and Mexico . . . . . . . .2.6: Oil Production in Venezuela and Mexico 350 Productivity

CAKIR, NIDA

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

AN ENGINE OIL LIFE ALGORITHM.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??An oil-life algorithm to calculate the remaining percentage of oil life is presented as a means to determine the right time to change the oil… (more)

Bommareddi, Anveshan

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

SUPRI heavy oil research program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 14th Annual Report of the SUPRI Heavy Oil Research Program includes discussion of the following topics: (1) A Study of End Effects in Displacement Experiments; (2) Cat Scan Status Report; (3) Modifying In-situ Combustion with Metallic Additives; (4) Kinetics of Combustion; (5) Study of Residual Oil Saturation for Steam Injection and Fuel Concentration for In-Situ Combustion; (6) Analysis of Transient Foam Flow in 1-D Porous Media with Computed Tomography; (7) Steam-Foam Studies in the Presence of Residual Oil; (8) Microvisualization of Foam Flow in a Porous Medium; (9) Three- Dimensional Laboratory Steam Injection Model; (10) Saturation Evaluation Following Water Flooding; (11) Numerical Simulation of Well-to-Well Tracer Flow Test with Nonunity Mobility Ratio.

Aziz, K.; Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Castanier, L.M.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Economics of Peak Oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract ‘Peak oil’ refers to the future decline in world production of crude oil and the accompanying potentially calamitous effects. The peak oil literature typically rejects economic analysis. This article argues that economic analysis is indeed appropriate for analyzing oil scarcity because standard economic models can replicate the observed peaks in oil production. Moreover, the emphasis on peak oil is misplaced as peaking is not a good indicator of scarcity, peak oil techniques are overly simplistic, the catastrophes predicted by the peak oil literature are unlikely, and the literature does not contribute to correcting identified market failures. Efficiency of oil markets could be improved by instead focusing on remedying market failures such as excessive private discount rates, environmental externalities, market power, insufficient innovation incentives, incomplete futures markets, and insecure property rights.

S.P. Holland

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Secure Fuels from Domestic Resources The Continuing Evolution of America’s Oil Shale and Tar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

domestic oil shale and tar sands industries since the first release and to include profiles of additional

Sands Industries

413

Bio-oil Stabilization and Upgrading by Hot Gas Filtration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Removal of char and minerals from pyrolysis oil for the production of biomass-derived boiler and turbine fuels has been demonstrated at Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI)/National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) using a ceramic cloth hot gas filter (HGF). ... Non-condensable gaseous products were vented through a 2 ?m filter for collection of any residual aerosol and then to a totalizing dry-gas meter for flow rate measurement. ... The composition of the feed and product vapors to and from the HGF test stand was monitored continuously with the molecular beam mass spectrometer (MBMS), and the composition of the product gases from the HGF test stand was monitored continuously by gas chromatography (GC). ...

Robert M. Baldwin; Calvin J. Feik

2013-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

414

NOAA Technical Memorandum NOS OR&R 42 Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NOAA Technical Memorandum NOS OR&R 42 Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill: Salt Marsh Oiling Conditions, evaluating, and responding to threats to coastal environments, including oil and chemical spills, releases to prepare for and respond to oil and chemical releases. Determines damage to natural resources from

415

Mapping oil spills on sea water using spectral mixture analysis of hyperspectral image data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mapping oil spills on sea water using spectral mixture analysis of hyperspectral image data Javier large spill oil events threatening coastal habitats and species. Some recent examples include the 2002 Prestige tanker oil spill in Galicia, Northern Spain, as well as repeated oil spill leaks evidenced

Plaza, Antonio J.

416

Coking phenomena in the pyrolysis of ethylene dichloride into vinyl chloride  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pyrolysis of ethylene dichloride (EDC) into vinyl chloride (VCM) which is the monomer for polyvinyl chloride, one of the most popular polymers, has been established commercially for quite a time. The process around 500{degrees}C has been proved to give VCM of high purity at very high selectivity about 99% and a reasonable conversion about 50%. However, the coking is a major problem in the long run, requiring decoking treatment every two months. The present paper describes features of carbons produced in the pyrolysis process. Coke of respective features was found in the reactor, the transfer line, the heat exchanger and the rapid quencher. Typical pyrolytic carbon, anisotropic coke produced in the liquid phase, isotropic carbon was produced on the reactor wall as low as 500{degrees}C. The mechanisms for their formation are discussed.

Sotowa, Chiaki; Korai, Yozo; Mochida, Isao [Kyushu Univ., Kasuga, Fukuoka (Japan)] [and others

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

417

Energy Evaluation for Lignite Pyrolysis by Solid Heat Carrier Coupled with Gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Between the two reactors, solid heat carriers are circulated to carry the heat from the gasifier to the pyrolyzer. ... With the purpose of revealing the features of energy use and chemical element conversion, and the feasibility and the rationality of the coupled system, some related experiments were performed, and the simulation flow sheet for lignite pyrolysis by a solid heat carrier coupled with gasification was established by Aspen Plus 11.1 on the basis of the experimental data. ... The amount of the solid heat carrier was determined by two factors: (1) the temperature of the solid heat carrier should be heated to 750 °C in the combustion furnace; (2) the energy carried by the solid heat carrier must be sufficient to satisfy the energy demands of the drying and pyrolysis units. ...

Qun Yi; Jie Feng; Bingchuan Lu; Jing Deng; Changlian Yu; Wenying Li

2013-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

418

A case history of a fixed bed, coal-derived oil hydrotreater  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

With the apparent shrinkage in the worldwide supply of liquid hydrocarbon fuels, upgrading of coal-derived liquids to synthetic crude oils will eventually emerge as a commercial entity. Although the Char-Oil-Energy Development (COED) Project has been shelved in the short term, information about the reaction engineering of the upgrading of coal-derived liquids by hydrotreatment in the COED Process should be relevant to upgrading technologies for other coal liquefaction processes. The COED Process was developed by FMC Corporation and the Office of Coal Research (now DOE) in the late 1960's and early 1970's. The process produced a synthetic crude oil, medium Btu gas and char by multi-stage, fluidized bed pyrolysis of coal. The raw coal-tar produced by pyrolysis was upgraded to synthetic crude oil by catalytic, fixed-bed hydrotreatment. Raw coal-tar has different properties from petroleum-derived oils, and upgrading by hydrotreatment is not an off-the-shelf technology. A 30 barrel per day fixed-bed hydrotreater was constructed and operated at the COED pilot plant site. The pilot plant hydrotreater design was based on conventional petroleum residua hydrotreatment technology together with bench-scale hydrotreatment tests performed by ARCO in the 1960's utilizing coal-tars produced in a process development unit. The pilot plant hydrotreater did operate for about four years providing valuable information about the reaction engineering of the hydrotreatment process as well as providing numerous samples for applications studies performed by other DOE contractors and interested potential users of the COED syncrude. Of note, 50,000 gallons of COED syncrude were supplied to the U.S. Naval Ship Engineering Center for shipboard testing in the boilers of the U.S.S. Johnston on November 15–16th, 1973. This paper deals with the reaction engineering of the guard chamber and fixed-bed hydrotreatment reactors at the COED facility. Of major importance is the study of the role of the feedstock (pyrolysis coal-tar) properties and their effects on the catalysts utilized in the reactors. A working kinetic model has been derived that could allow a designer to optimize a particular set of design parameters and a plant operator to determine catalyst life. A quantitative comparison has been made of the effect of metals content of coal-derived oils and petroleum resids on catalyst deactivation.

Marvin I. Greene

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Apparatus for distilling shale oil from oil shale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An apparatus for distilling shale oil from oil shale comprises: a vertical type distilling furnace which is divided by two vertical partitions each provided with a plurality of vent apertures into an oil shale treating chamber and two gas chambers, said oil shale treating chamber being located between said two gas chambers in said vertical type distilling furnace, said vertical type distilling furnace being further divided by at least one horizontal partition into an oil shale distilling chamber in the lower part thereof and at least one oil shale preheating chamber in the upper part thereof, said oil shale distilling chamber and said oil shale preheating chamber communication with each other through a gap provided at an end of said horizontal partition, an oil shale supplied continuously from an oil shale supply port provided in said oil shale treating chamber at the top thereof into said oil shale treating chamber continuously moving from the oil shale preheating chamber to the oil shale distilling chamber, a high-temperature gas blown into an oil shale distilling chamber passing horizontally through said oil shale in said oil shale treating chamber, thereby said oil shale is preheated in said oil shale preheating chamber, and a gaseous shale oil is distilled from said preheated oil shale in said oil shale distilling chamber; and a separator for separating by liquefaction a gaseous shale oil from a gas containing the gaseous shale oil discharged from the oil shale preheating chamber.

Shishido, T.; Sato, Y.

1984-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

420

Effect of the Temperature on the Composition of Lignin Pyrolysis Products  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Bioenergy Research Group, Aston University, Birmingham B4 7ET, United Kingdom ... There is a lack of quantitative information on the temperature dependence of the interesting phenolic compounds in the literature, which is important for converting lignin into value-added aromatic compounds through the pyrolysis route. ... The maximum temperature for the PyGC?MS study was set at 800 °C after reviewing the yield of phenolic compounds, which peaked around 600 °C. ...

Guozhan Jiang; Daniel J. Nowakowski; Anthony V. Bridgwater

2010-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes pyrolysis oils" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Initiation Mechanisms and Kinetics of Pyrolysis and Combustion of JP-10 Hydrocarbon Jet Fuel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Initiation Mechanisms and Kinetics of Pyrolysis and Combustion of JP-10 Hydrocarbon Jet Fuel ... We found that the primary decomposition reactions involve either (1) dissociation of ethylene from JP-10, resulting in the formation of a C8 hydrocarbon intermediate, or (2) the production of two C5 hydrocarbons. ... Heats of combustion (kcal/mole) were measured via O bomb calorimetry; adamantane (I) (c), -1441.95 ...

Kimberly Chenoweth; Adri C. T. van Duin; Siddharth Dasgupta; William A. Goddard III

2009-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

422

Economic analysis of Western cooperation on oil: 1974-1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Western cooperation on oil in the International Energy Agency (IEA) began as an effort to deter future selective oil embargoes and predatory OPEC pricing. Later, cooperation was extended to include more-general emergency-preparedness measures and collective efforts to reduce oil imports. Economic theory suggests that cooperation will lead to a more nearly optimal level of oil imports and oil stocks than action taken solely on a national basis. Nevertheless, the experience of the period between 1974 and 1980 demonstrates that cooperation is difficult to achieve. IEA countries made little progress in building oil stocks and implementing oil-import-reduction policies. They were unprepared for the Iranian oil-supply interruption and failed to take sufficiently effective steps to mitigate the effects of the interruption. A case study with several appendices reviews the agreements reached in the IEA and at annual economic summit meetings and details an evolution toward national oil-import targets a means of enforcing the discipline of oil-importing nations. Closer cooperation in oil-import reduction was slowed by burden-sharing problems. The study recommends policy measures that would enhance Western cooperation. These include market pricing and free trade of fuels, increased national oil and gas stocks, and a method of encouraging more flexible use of stocks during supply interruptions too small to trigger the formal IEA sharing system.

Larson, A.P.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Total Stocks Stocks by Type  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product: Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Crude Oil All Oils (Excluding Crude Oil) Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane/Ethylene Propane/Propylene Normal Butane/Butylene Isobutane/Butylene Other Hydrocarbons Oxygenates (excluding Fuel Ethanol) MTBE Other Oxygenates Renewables (including Fuel Ethanol) Fuel Ethanol Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Unfinished Oils Unfinished Oils, Naphthas & Lighter Unfinished Oils, Kerosene & Light Gas Unfinished Oils, Heavy Gas Oils Residuum Motor Gasoline Blending Comp. (MGBC) MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB w/ Alcohol MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB w/ Ether MGBC - Reformulated, GTAB MGBC - Conventional MGBC - Conventional, CBOB MGBC - Conventional, GTAB MGBC - Conventional Other Aviation Gasoline Blending Comp. Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Reformulated Gasoline, Other Conventional Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Blended Fuel Ethanol Conventional Gasoline Blended Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 and Lower Conventional Other Gasoline Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm Sulfur and under Distillate F.O., Greater than 15 to 500 ppm Sulfur Distillate F.O., Greater 500 ppm Sulfur Residual Fuel Oil Residual F.O., than 1.00% Sulfur Petrochemical Feedstocks Naphtha for Petro. Feedstock Use Other Oils for Petro. Feedstock Use Special Naphthas Lubricants Waxes Petroleum Coke Asphalt and Road Oil Miscellaneous Products Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels

424

Effect of pretreatment and additives on boron release during pyrolysis and gasification of coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Boron is one of the most toxic and highly volatile elements present in coal. As part of a series of studies carried out on coal cleaning to prevent environmental problems and to promote efficient coal utilization processes, the removal of boron by leaching with water and acetic acid has been investigated. The effects of the addition of ash components, that is, SiO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and CaO on the control of boron release during pyrolysis and gasification were investigated. Here, 20-70% of boron in coal was removed by leaching the coal with water and acetic acid. Boron leached by water and acetic acid was related to the volatiles released from coal in pyrolysis below 1173 K. The addition of ash components such as SiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} was found to be effective in suppressing the release of boron during pyrolysis at temperatures below and above 1173 K, respectively. The addition of CaO to coal was effective in suppressing the release of boron during gasification at 1173 K. 26 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

Yuuki Mochizuki; Katsuyasu Sugawara; Yukio Enda [Akita University, Akita (Japan). Faculty of Engineering and Resources Science

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

425

Fabrication of ZnO nanorod using spray-pyrolysis and chemical bath deposition method  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ZnO thin films with nanorod structure were deposited using Ultrasonic Spray Pyrolysis method for seed growth, and Chemical Bath Deposition (CBD) for nanorod growth. High purity Zn-hydrate and Urea are used to control Ph were dissolved in ethanol and aqua bidest in Ultrasonic Spray Pyrolysis process. Glass substrate was placed above the heater plate of reaction chamber, and subsequently sprayed with the range duration of 5, 10 and 20 minutes at the temperatures of 3500 C. As for the Chemical Bath Deposition, the glass substrate with ZnO seed on the surface was immerse to Zn-hydrate, HMTA (Hexa Methylene Tetra Amine) and deionized water solution for duration of 3, 5 and 7 hour and temperatures of 600 C, washed in distilled water, dried, and annealed at 3500 C for an hour. The characterization of samples was carried out to reveal the surface morphology using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). From the data, the combination of 5 minutes of Ultrasonic Spray Pyrolysis process and 3 hour of CBD has showed the best structure of nanorod. Meanwhile the longer Spraying process and CBD yield the bigger nanorod structure that have been made, and it makes the films more dense which make the nanorod collide each other and as a result produce unsymetric nanorod structure.

Ramadhani, Muhammad F., E-mail: brian@tf.itb.ac.id; Pasaribu, Maruli A. H., E-mail: brian@tf.itb.ac.id; Yuliarto, Brian, E-mail: brian@tf.itb.ac.id; Nugraha, E-mail: brian@tf.itb.ac.id [Advanced Functional Materials Laboratory, Engineering Physics Department Faculty of Industrial Technology, Institut Teknologi Bandung (Indonesia)

2014-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

426

Fuel nitrogen release during black liquor pyrolysis; Part 1: Laboratory measurements at different conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fuel nitrogen release during black liquor pyrolysis is high. There is only minor release during the drying stage. Ammonia is the main fixed nitrogen species formed. The rate of fixed nitrogen release increases with increasing temperature. The level of fixed nitrogen released by birch liquor is almost twice the level for pine liquor. Assuming complete conversion to NO, fixed nitrogen yields gave NO concentrations near typically measured values for flue gases in full scale recovery boilers. The purpose of this work was to gain more detailed information about the behavior of the fuel nitrogen in black liquor combustion. The work focused on the pyrolysis or devolatilization of the combustion process. Devolatilization is the stage at which the majority (typically 50--80%) of the liquor organics release from a fuel particle or droplet as gaseous species due to the rapid destruction of the organic macromolecules in the liquor. In this paper, the authors use the terms devolatilization and pyrolysis interchangeably with no difference in their meaning.

Aho, K.; Vakkilainen, E. (A. Ahistrom Corp., Varkaus (Finland)); Hupa, M. (Abo Akademi Univ., Turku (Finland). Chemical Engineering Dept.)

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Thermochemical Process Development Unit: Researching Fuels from Biomass, Bioenergy Technologies (Fact Sheet)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Highlights Highlights Thermochemical conversion technologies convert biomass and its residues to fuels and chemicals using gasification and pyrolysis. Gasification entails heating biomass and results in a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen, known as syngas. Pyrolysis, which is heating biomass in the absence of oxygen, produces liquid pyrolysis oil. Both syngas and pyrolysis oil can be chemically converted into clean, renewable transportation fuels and chemicals. The Thermochemical Process Development Unit (TCPDU) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is a unique facility dedicated to researching thermochemical processes to produce fuels from biomass. Thermochemical processes include gasification and pyrolysis-processes used to convert

428

Aqueous flooding methods for tertiary oil recovery  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of aqueous flooding of subterranean oil bearing formation for tertiary oil recovery involves injecting through a well into the formation a low alkaline pH aqueous sodium bicarbonate flooding solution. The flooding solution's pH ranges from about 8.25 to 9.25 and comprises from 0.25 to 5 weight percent and preferably about 0.75 to 3.0 weight percent of sodium bicarbonate and includes a petroleum recovery surfactant of 0.05 to 1.0 weight percent and between 1 and 20 weight percent of sodium chloride. After flooding, an oil and water mixture is withdrawn from the well and the oil is separated from the oil and water mixture.

Peru, Deborah A. (Bartlesville, OK)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Sedimentological, mineralogical and geochemical definition of oil-shale facies in the lower Parachute Creek Member of Green River Formation, Colorado  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sedimentological, mineralogical and geochemical studies of two drill cores penetrating the lower Saline zone of the Parachute Creek Member (middle L-4 oil-shale zone through upper R-2 zone) of the Green River Formation in north-central Piceance Creek basin, Colorado, indicate the presence of two distinct oil-shale facies. The most abundant facies has laminated stratification and frequently occurs in the L-4, L-3 and L-2 oil-shale zones. The second, and subordinate facies, has ''streaked and blebby'' stratification and is most abundant in the R-4, R-3 and R-2 zones. Laminated oil shale originated by slow, regular sedimentation during meromictic phases of ancient Lake Uinta, whereas streaked and blebby oil shale was deposited by episodic, non-channelized turbidity currents. Laminated oil shale has higher contents of nahcolite, dawsonite, quartz, K-feldspar and calcite, but less dolomite/ankerite and albite than streaked and blebby oil shale. Ca-Mg-Fe carbonate minerals in laminated oil shale have more variable compositions than those in streaked and blebby shales. Streaked and blebby oil shale has more kerogen and a greater diversity of kerogen particles than laminated oil shale. Such variations may produce different pyrolysis reactions when each shale type is retorted.

Cole, R.D.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Controlled catalytic and thermal sequential pyrolysis and hydrolysis of mixed polymer waste streams to sequentially recover monomers or other high value products  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process of using fast pyrolysis in a carrier gas to convert a plastic waste feedstream having a mixed polymeric composition in a manner such that pyrolysis of a given polymer to its high value monomeric constituent occurs prior to pyrolysis of other plastic components therein comprising: selecting a first temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of said given polymer to its high value monomeric constituent prior to a temperature range that causes pyrolysis of other plastic components; selecting a catalyst and support for treating said feed streams with said catalyst to effect acid or base catalyzed reaction pathways to maximize yield or enhance separation of said high value monomeric constituent in said temperature program range; differentially heating said feed stream at a heat rate within the first temperature program range to provide differential pyrolysis for selective recovery of optimum quantities of the high value monomeric constituent prior to pyrolysis of other plastic components; separating the high value monomeric constituents; selecting a second higher temperature range to cause pyrolysis of a different high value monomeric constituent of said plastic waste and differentially heating the feedstream at the higher temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of the different high value monomeric constituent; and separating the different high value monomeric constituent.

Evans, Robert J. (Lakewood, CO); Chum, Helena L. (Arvada, CO)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Controlled catalytic and thermal sequential pyrolysis and hydrolysis of mixed polymer waste streams to sequentially recover monomers or other high value products  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process of using fast pyrolysis in a carrier gas to convert a plastic waste feedstream having a mixed polymeric composition in a manner such that pyrolysis of a given polymer to its high value monomeric constituent occurs prior to pyrolysis of other plastic components therein comprising: selecting a first temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of said given polymer to its high value monomeric constituent prior to a temperature range that causes pyrolysis of other plastic components; selecting a catalyst and support for treating said feed streams with said catalyst to effect acid or base catalyzed reaction pathways to maximize yield or enhance separation of said high value monomeric constituent in said temperature program range; differentially heating said feed stream at a heat rate within the first temperature program range to provide differential pyrolysis for selective recovery of optimum quantities of the high value monomeric constituent prior to pyrolysis of other plastic components; separating the high value monomeric constituents; selecting a second higher temperature range to cause pyrolysis of a different high value monomeric constituent of said plastic waste and differentially heating the feedstream at the higher temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of the different high value monomeric constituent; and separating the different high value monomeric constituent.

Evans, Robert J. (Lakewood, CO); Chum, Helena L. (Arvada, CO)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Controlled catalytic and thermal sequential pyrolysis and hydrolysis of mixed polymer waste streams to sequentially recover monomers or other high value products  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is described for using fast pyrolysis in a carrier gas to convert a plastic waste feedstream having a mixed polymeric composition in a manner such that pyrolysis of a given polymer to its high value monomeric constituent occurs prior to pyrolysis of other plastic components therein comprising: selecting a first temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of said given polymer to its high value monomeric constituent prior to a temperature range that causes pyrolysis of other plastic components; selecting a catalyst and support for treating said feed streams with said catalyst to effect acid or base catalyzed reaction pathways to maximize yield or enhance separation of said high value monomeric constituent in said temperature program range; differentially heating said feed stream at a heat rate within the first temperature program range to provide differential pyrolysis for selective recovery of optimum quantities of the high value monomeric constituent prior to pyrolysis of other plastic components; separating the high value monomeric constituents, selecting a second higher temperature range to cause pyrolysis of a different high value monomeric constituent of said plastic waste and differentially heating the feedstream at the higher temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of the different high value monomeric constituent; and separating the different high value monomeric constituent. 87 figures.

Evans, R.J.; Chum, H.L.

1994-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

433

Controlled catalytic and thermal sequential pyrolysis and hydrolysis of mixed polymer waste streams to sequentially recover monomers or other high value products  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process of using fast pyrolysis in a carrier gas to convert a plastic waste feedstream having a mixed polymeric composition in a manner such that pyrolysis of a given polymer to its high value monomeric constituent occurs prior to pyrolysis of other plastic components therein comprising: selecting a first temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of said given polymer to its high value monomeric constituent prior to a temperature range that causes pyrolysis of other plastic components; selecting a catalyst and support for treating said feed streams with said catalyst to effect acid or base catalyzed reaction pathways to maximize yield or enhance separation of said high value monomeric constituent in said temperature program range; differentially heating said feed stream at a heat rate within the first temperature program range to provide differential pyrolysis for selective recovery of optimum quantities of the high value monomeric constituent prior to pyrolysis of other plastic components; separating the high value monomeric constituents, selecting a second higher temperature range to cause pyrolysis of a different high value monomeric constituent of said plastic waste and differentially heating the feedstream at the higher temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of the different high value monomeric constituent; and separating the different high value monomeric constituent.

Evans, Robert J. (Lakewood, CO); Chum, Helena L. (Arvada, CO)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Controlled catalytic and thermal sequential pyrolysis and hydrolysis of mixed polymer waste streams to sequentially recover monomers or other high value products  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process of using fast pyrolysis in a carrier gas to convert a plastic waste feedstream having a mixed polymeric composition in a manner such that pyrolysis of a given polymer to its high value monomeric constituent occurs prior to pyrolysis of other plastic components therein comprising: selecting a first temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of said given polymer to its high value monomeric constituent prior to a temperature range that causes pyrolysis of other plastic components; selecting a catalyst and support for treating said feed streams with said catalyst to effect acid or base catalyzed reaction pathways to maximize yield or enhance separation of said high value monomeric constituent in said temperature program range; differentially heating said feed stream at a heat rate within the first temperature program range to provide differential pyrolysis for selective recovery of optimum quantities of the high value monomeric constituent prior to pyrolysis of other plastic components; separating the high value monomeric constituents; selecting a second higher temperature range to cause pyrolysis of a different high value monomeric constituent of said plastic waste and differentially heating the feedstream at the higher temperature program range to cause pyrolysis of the different high value monomeric constituent; and separating the different high value monomeric constituent. 83 figs.

Evans, R.J.; Chum, H.L.

1994-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

435

The potential of pyrolysis technology in climate change mitigation – influence of process design and –parameters, simulated in SuperPro Designer Software.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This report investigates whether or not it would be possible to produce carbon-negative energy from pyrolysis of wheat straw in a series of Danish agricultural… (more)

Ahrenfeldt, Jesper

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Chuaria circularis from the early Mesoproterozoic Suket Shale, Vindhyan Supergroup, India: Insights from light and electron microscopy and pyrolysis-gas chromatography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Chuaria circularis (Walcott 1899) from the Suket Shale of the Vindhyan Supergroup (central India) ... composition using biostatistics, electron microscopy and pyrolysis-gas chromatography. Morpho...

Suryendu Dutta; Michael Steiner; Santanu Banerjee…

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Oil and Gas Supply Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Onshore Lower 48 Oil and Gas Supply Submodule, Offshore Oil and Gas Supply Submodule, Oil Shale Supply Submodule1, and Alaska Oil and Gas Supply Submodule. A detailed description...

438

Oil and Gas Supply Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Onshore Lower 48 Oil and Gas Supply Submodule, Offshore Oil and Gas Supply Submodule, Oil Shale Supply Submodule, and Alaska Oil and Gas Supply Submodule. A detailed description of...

439

Waste oil reclamation, January 1980-August 1991 (Citations from the NTIS Data Base). Rept. for Jan 80-Aug 91  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning the reclamation and recycling of used lubricating oils. Topics include specific program descriptions, re-refining techniques, chemical component analysis, and reclaimed oil performance. Appropriate regulations, standards, and clean-up efforts at sites contaminated by waste oils or waste oil refineries are included. (Contains 144 citations with title list and subject index.)

Not Available

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

China's Global Oil Strategy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

21, 2008. Ying, Wang. “ China, Venezuela firms to co-developApril 21, “China and Venezuela sign oil agreements. ” Chinaaccessed April 21, “Venezuela and China sign oil deal. ” BBC

Thomas, Bryan G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes pyrolysis oils" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Using Oils As Pesticides  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Petroleum and plant-derived spray oils show increasing potential for use as part of Integrated Pest Management systems for control of soft-bodied pests on fruit trees, shade trees, woody ornamentals and household plants. Sources of oils, preparing...

Bogran, Carlos E.; Ludwig, Scott; Metz, Bradley

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

442

Residential heating oil price  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

heating oil price decreases The average retail price for home heating oil fell 6.3 cents from a week ago to 2.91 per gallon. That's down 1.10 from a year ago, based on the...

443

Residential heating oil price  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

heating oil price decreases The average retail price for home heating oil fell 7.5 cents from a week ago to 2.84 per gallon. That's down 1.22 from a year ago, based on the...

444

Residential heating oil price  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

heating oil price decreases The average retail price for home heating oil fell 7.6 cents from a week ago to 2.97 per gallon. That's down 1.05 from a year ago, based on the...

445

Residential heating oil price  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

heating oil price decreases The average retail price for home heating oil fell 3.6 cents from a week ago to 3.04 per gallon. That's down 99.4 cents from a year ago, based on the...

446

US Crude oil exports  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2014 EIA Energy Conference U.S. Crude Oil Exports July 14, 2014 By Lynn D. Westfall U.S. Energy Information Administration U.S. crude oil production has grown by almost 50% since...

447

PREDICTIVE MODELS. Enhanced Oil Recovery Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

PREDICTIVE MODELS is a collection of five models - CFPM, CO2PM, ICPM, PFPM, and SFPM - used in the 1982-1984 National Petroleum Council study of enhanced oil recovery (EOR) potential. Each pertains to a specific EOR process designed to squeeze additional oil from aging or spent oil fields. The processes are: 1 chemical flooding; 2 carbon dioxide miscible flooding; 3 in-situ combustion; 4 polymer flooding; and 5 steamflood. CFPM, the Chemical Flood Predictive Model, models micellar (surfactant)-polymer floods in reservoirs, which have been previously waterflooded to residual oil saturation. Thus, only true tertiary floods are considered. An option allows a rough estimate of oil recovery by caustic or caustic-polymer processes. CO2PM, the Carbon Dioxide miscible flooding Predictive Model, is applicable to both secondary (mobile oil) and tertiary (residual oil) floods, and to either continuous CO2 injection or water-alternating gas processes. ICPM, the In-situ Combustion Predictive Model, computes the recovery and profitability of an in-situ combustion project from generalized performance predictive algorithms. PFPM, the Polymer Flood Predictive Model, is switch-selectable for either polymer or waterflooding, and an option allows the calculation of the incremental oil recovery and economics of polymer relative to waterflooding. SFPM, the Steamflood Predictive Model, is applicable to the steam drive process, but not to cyclic steam injection (steam soak) processes. The IBM PC/AT version includes a plotting capability to produces a graphic picture of the predictive model results.

Ray, R.M. [DOE Bartlesville Energy Technology Center, Bartlesville, OK (United States)

1992-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

448

Oil shale retorted underground  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Oil shale retorted underground ... Low-temperature underground retorting of oil shale produces a crude oil with many attractive properties, Dr. George R. Hill of the University of Utah told a meeting of the American Institute of Mining, Metallurgical, and Petroleum Engineers last week in Los Angeles. ... Typical above-ground retorting of oil shale uses temperatures of 900° to 1100° F. because of the economic need ... ...

1967-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

449

Method for maximizing shale oil recovery from an underground formation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for maximizing shale oil recovery from an underground oil shale formation which has previously been processed by in situ retorting such that there is provided in the formation a column of substantially intact oil shale intervening between adjacent spent retorts, which method includes the steps of back filling the spent retorts with an aqueous slurry of spent shale. The slurry is permitted to harden into a cement-like substance which stabilizes the spent retorts. Shale oil is then recovered from the intervening column of intact oil shale by retorting the column in situ, the stabilized spent retorts providing support for the newly developed retorts.

Sisemore, Clyde J. (Livermore, CA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Pyrolysis of Hailar lignite in an autogenerated steam agent  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Lignite is an abundant and relatively inexpensive resource...1...]. China has about 211.8 billion tons-lignite reserve, in which ~200 billion tons are...2, 3]. The characteristics of lignite include low carbon co...

Haojie Gao; Yuezhao Zhu; Feng Fu; Hao Wu…

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Summary World Oil Data (from World on the Edge) | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Oil Data (from World on the Edge) Oil Data (from World on the Edge) Dataset Summary Description This dataset presents summary information related to world oil. It is part of a supporting dataset for the book World On the Edge: How to Prevent Environmental and Economic Collapse by Lester R. Brown, available from the Earth Policy Institute. This world oil dataset includes the following data: World oil production (1950 - 2009): Top 20 producing countries (2009); Oil production in U.S. (1900 - 2009); Oil consumption in U.S. (950 - 2010); Oil consumption in China (1965 - 2009); Oil consumption in E.U. (1965 - 2009); Top 20 oil importing countries (2009); World's 20 largest oil discoveries; Real price of gasoline (2007); Retail gas prices by country (2008); and fossil fuel consumption subsidies (2009).

452

Heavy oil production from Alaska  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

North Slope of Alaska has an estimated 40 billion barrels of heavy oil and bitumen in the shallow formations of West Sak and Ugnu. Recovering this resource economically is a technical challenge for two reasons: (1) the geophysical environment is unique, and (2) the expected recovery is a low percentage of the oil in place. The optimum advanced recovery process is still undetermined. Thermal methods would be applicable if the risks of thawing the permafrost can be minimized and the enormous heat losses reduced. Use of enriched natural gas is a probable recovery process for West Sak. Nearby Prudhoe Bay field is using its huge natural gas resources for pressure maintenance and enriched gas improved oil recovery (IOR). Use of carbon dioxide is unlikely because of dynamic miscibility problems. Major concerns for any IOR include close well spacing and its impact on the environment, asphaltene precipitation, sand production, and fines migration, in addition to other more common production problems. Studies have indicated that recovering West Sak and Lower Ugnu heavy oil is technically feasible, but its development has not been economically viable so far. Remoteness from markets and harsh Arctic climate increase production costs relative to California heavy oil or Central/South American heavy crude delivered to the U.S. Gulf Coast. A positive change in any of the key economic factors could provide the impetus for future development. Cooperation between the federal government, state of Alaska, and industry on taxation, leasing, and permitting, and an aggressive support for development of technology to improve economics is needed for these heavy oil resources to be developed.

Mahmood, S.M.; Olsen, D.K. [NIPER/BDM-Oklahoma, Inc., Bartlesville, OK (United States); Thomas, C.P. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

453

Exploiting heavy oil reserves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

North Sea investment potential Exploiting heavy oil reserves Beneath the waves in 3D Aberdeen the potential of heavy oil 8/9 Taking the legal lessons learned in the north Sea to a global audience 10 potential Exploiting heavy oil reserves Aberdeen: A community of science AT WORK FOR THE ENERGY SECTOR ISSUE

Levi, Ran

454

Meals included in Conference Registrations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Meals included in Conference Registrations Meals included as part of the cost of a conference the most reasonable rates are obtained. Deluxe hotels and motels should be avoided. GSA rates have been for Georgia high cost areas. 75% of these amounts would be $21 for non- high cost areas and $27 for high cost

Arnold, Jonathan

455

Canadian operators boost heavy oil production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent technological advances in slurry pipelining, horizontal wells, and thermal recovery techniques have made recovery of Canadian heavy oil resources more economical. In addition, reduced government royalties have made investment in these difficult reservoirs more attractive. As a result, activity has increased in heavy-oil fields in Alberta and Saskatchewan. This paper review the various oil sand recovery projects under development in the area and the current government policies which are helping to develop them. The paper also provides brief descriptions of the equipment and technologies that have allowed a reduced cost in the development. Items discussed include surface mining techniques, horizontal drilling, reservoir engineering techniques, separation processes, and thermal recovery.

Perdue, J.M.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Fuel oil and kerosene sales 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This publication contains the 1995 survey results of the ``Annual Fuel Oil and Kerosene Sales Report`` (Form EIA-821). This is the seventh year that the survey data have appeared in a separate publication. Except for the kerosene and on-highway diesel information, data presented in Tables 1 through 12 (Sales of Fuel Oil and Kerosene) present results of the EIA-821 survey. Tables 13 through 24 (Adjusted Sales of Fuel Oil and Kerosene) include volumes that are based on the EIA-821 survey but have been adjusted to equal the product supplied volumes published in the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). 24 tabs.

NONE

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Diesel fuel oils, 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Properties of diesel fuels produced during 1980 were submitted for study and compilation under a cooperative agreement between the Department of Energy, Bartlesville Energy Technology Center, Bartlesville, Oklahoma and the American Petroleum Institute. Tests of 192 samples of diesel fuel oils from 95 refineries throughout the country were made by 28 petroleum groups according to type of diesel fuel. Each group of analyses is subdivided into five tabulations according to five general regions of the country where the fuels are marketed. The regions, containing a total of 16 districts, are shown on a map in the report. Data from 13 laboratory tests on each individual diesel fuel sample are listed and arranged by geographic marketing districts in decreasing order of sales volumes. Charts are included showing trends of averages of certain properties for the four types of diesel fuels for the years 1960-1980. Summaries of the results of the 1980 survey, compared with similar data for 1979, are shown.

Shelton, E.M.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Heating oils, 1983  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Properties of 195 heating oils marketed in the United States were submitted for study and compilation under agreement between the Bartlesville Energy Technology Center (BETC) and the American Petroleum Institute (API). The fuels were manufactured by 25 petroleum refining companies in 83 domestic refineries. The data are tabulated according to six grades of fuel and subdivided into five geographic regions in which the fuels are marketed. The six grades of fuels are defined by the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) Specification D396. The five regions containing a total of 16 marketing districts are shown on a map in the report. Trend charts are included showing average properties of the six grades of fuel for the past several years. Summaries of the results of the tests by grade and by region for 1983 are compared with data for 1982. 7 figures, 12 tables.

Shelton, E.M.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Manufacture of refrigeration oils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lubricating oils suitable for use in refrigeration equipment in admixture with fluorinated hydrocarbon refrigerants are produced by solvent extraction of naphthenic lubricating oil base stocks, cooling the resulting extract mixture, optionally with the addition of a solvent modifier, to form a secondary raffinate and a secondary extract, and recovering a dewaxed oil fraction of lowered pour point from the secondary raffinate as a refrigeration oil product. The process of the invention obviates the need for a separate dewaxing operation, such as dewaxing with urea, as conventionally employed for the production of refrigeration oils.

Chesluk, R.P.; Platte, H.J.; Sequeira, A.J.

1981-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

460

A Review and Perspective of Recent Bio-Oil Hydrotreating Research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The pathway for catalytic hydrodeoxygenation of biomass derived fast pyrolysis oil represents a compelling route for production of liquid transportation fuels. There has been continued progress and advancements in both the public and private research areas towards driving this technology to completion. Published research and patent literature have demonstrated that continued development of HDO as a part of a processes for production liquid transportation using biomass is being advanced for both fuel blend stocks and for refinery intermediates for co-processing. Much of the research has still focused on “quality” metrics around single or groups of unit operations generating partially treated bio-oil streams without assessing upstream and downstream implications. However, there is an encouraging amount of research that is now being targeted and assessed with attempts to understand the impact on the final fuel product, regardless of the route. Much of the most important research is moving towards continuous, industrially relevant processes where data can be generated to adequately inform process and economic modeling. As the technology for producing liquid transportation fuels from pyrolysis/HDO/coprocessing is driving towards commercialization, further research should be prioritized on the basis of impact to a techno-economic analyses.

Zacher, Alan H.; Olarte, Mariefel V.; Santosa, Daniel M.; Elliott, Douglas C.; Jones, Susanne B.

2014-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes pyrolysis oils" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Hydrogen Production From Crude Bio-oil and Biomass Char by Electrochemical Catalytic Reforming  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We reports an efficient approach for production of hydrogen from crude bio-oil and biomass char in the dual fixed-bed system by using the electrochemical catalytic reforming method. The maximal absolute hydrogen yield reached 110.9 g H2/kg dry biomass. The product gas was a mixed gas containing 72%H2, 26%CO2, 1.9%CO, and a trace amount of CH4. It was observed that adding biomass char (a by-product of pyrolysis of biomass) could remarkably increase the absolute H2 yield (about 20%-50%). The higher reforming temperature could enhance the steam reforming reaction of organic compounds in crude bio-oil and the reaction of CO and H2O. In addition, the CuZn-Al2O3 catalyst in the water-gas shift bed could also increase the absolute H2 yield via shifting CO to CO2.

Xing-long Li; Shen Ning; Li-xia Yuan; Quan-xin Li

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Comparative analysis of pinewood, peanut shell, and bamboo biomass derived biochars produced via hydrothermal conversion and pyrolysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Biochars were produced from pinewood, peanut shell, and bamboo biomass through hydrothermal conversion (HTC) at 300 °C and comparatively by slow pyrolysis over a temperature range of 300, 400, and 500 °C. These biochars were characterized by FT-IR, cation exchange capacity (CEC) assay, methylene blue adsorption, as well as proximate and elemental analysis. The experimental results demonstrated higher retained oxygen content in biochars produced at lower pyrolysis temperatures and through HTC, which also correlated to the higher CEC of respective biochars. Furthermore, all types of biochar studied herein were capable of adsorption of methylene blue from solution and the adsorption did not appear to strongly correlate with CEC, indicating that the methylene blue adsorption appears to be dependent more upon the non-electrostatic molecular interactions such as the likely dispersive ?–? interactions between the graphene-like sheets of the biochar with the aromatic ring structure of the dye, than the electrostatic CEC. A direct comparison of hydrothermal and pyrolysis converted biochars reveals that biochars produced through HTC have much higher CEC than the biochars produced by slow pyrolysis. Analysis by FT-IR reveals a higher retention of oxygen functional groups in HTC biochars; additionally, there is an apparent trend of increasing aromaticity of the pyrolysis biochars when produced at higher temperatures. The CEC value of the HTC biochar appears correlated with its oxygen functional group content as indicated by the FT-IR measurements and its O:C ratio.

Matthew D. Huff; Sandeep Kumar; James W. Lee

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Used oil recycling: Closing the loop  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper provides an overview of the recycling and re-refining of used oil. Recommended best management practices to encourage the safe management, collection, recovery and purchasing of this resource are identified. Management practices address handling, separating, and specifications. Other topics outlined include collection methods, market research, state studies and programs, environmental and economic factors of recycling, re-refining, and oil filters. References, studies, regulations, and other sources of information are noted in the bibliography.

Arner, R. [Northern Virginia Planning District Commission, Annandale, VA (United States)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Abstract 3691: Fish oil increases immune cell infiltration of tumors and reduces the incidence of mammary carcinogenesis in Her2neu mice.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...pattern on fatty acid composition of edible oil in Bangladesh: From preclinical studies...essential commodities, including edible oils, because of insufficient local production...million, and its improving economy. Edible oil is an energy-dense food nutrient providing...

William J. Turbitt; Shawntawnee D. Collins; Haifang Xu; Sharlene Washington; Cesar Aliaga; Karam El-Bayoumy; Andrea Manni; Connie J. Rogers

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

465

Carcinogenicity Studies of Estonian Oil Shale Soots  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

determine the carcinogenicity of Estonian oil shale soot as well as the soot from oil shale fuel oil. All

A. Vosamae

466

Apparatus for oil shale retorting  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A cascading bed retorting process and apparatus in which cold raw crushed shale enters at the middle of a retort column into a mixer stage where it is rapidly mixed with hot recycled shale and thereby heated to pyrolysis temperature. The heated mixture then passes through a pyrolyzer stage where it resides for a sufficient time for complete pyrolysis to occur. The spent shale from the pyrolyzer is recirculated through a burner stage where the residual char is burned to heat the shale which then enters the mixer stage.

Lewis, Arthur E. (Los Altos, CA); Braun, Robert L. (Livermore, CA); Mallon, Richard G. (Livermore, CA); Walton, Otis R. (Livermore, CA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Interstate Oil and Gas Conservation Compact (Maryland) | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Interstate Oil and Gas Conservation Compact (Maryland) Interstate Oil and Gas Conservation Compact (Maryland) Interstate Oil and Gas Conservation Compact (Maryland) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Maryland Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission This legislation authorizes the State to join the Interstate Compact for the Conservation of Oil and Gas. The Compact is an agreement that has been entered into by 30 oil- and gas-producing states, as well as eight associate states and 10 international affiliates (including seven Canadian provinces). Members participate in the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact

468

Geotechnical properties of oil-contaminated Kuwaiti sand  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Large quantities of oil-contaminated sands resulted from exploded oil wells, burning oil fires, the destruction of oil storage tanks, and the formation of oil lakes in Kuwait at the end of the Gulf War. An extensive laboratory testing program was carried out to determine the geotechnical characteristics of this material. Testing included basic properties, compaction and permeability tests, and triaxial and consolidation tests on clean and contaminated sand at the same relative density. Contaminated specimens were prepared by mixing the sand with oil in the amount of 6% by weight or less to match field conditions. The influence of the type of oil, and relative density was also investigated by direct shear tests. The results indicated a small reduction in strength and permeability and an increase in compressibility due to contamination. The preferred method of disposal of this material is to use it as a stabilizing material for other projects such as road construction.

Al-Sanad, H.A.; Eid, W.K.; Ismael, N.F. [Kuwait Univ., Safat (Kuwait). Dept. of Civil Engineering] [Kuwait Univ., Safat (Kuwait). Dept. of Civil Engineering

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Crude Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Market Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Market Outlook Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Market Outlook 8/13/01 Click here to start Table of Contents Crude Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Market Outlook Short-Term World Oil Price Forecast Price Movements Related to Supply/Demand Balance OPEC Production Likely To Remain Low U.S. Reflects World Market Crude Oil Outlook Conclusions Distillate Prices Increase With Crude Oil Distillate Stocks on the East Coast Were Very Low Entering Last Winter Distillate Demand Strong Last Winter More Supply Possible This Fall than Forecast Distillate Fuel Oil Imports Could Be Available - For A Price Distillate Supply/Demand Balance Reflected in Spreads Distillate Stocks Expected to Remain Low Winter Crude Oil and Distillate Price Outlook Heating Oil Outlook Conclusion Propane Prices Follow Crude Oil

470

A Feasibility Study for Recycling Used Automotive Oil Filters In A Blast Furnace  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This feasibility study has indicated that of the approximately 120,000 tons of steel available to be recycled from used oil filters (UOF's), a maximum blast furnace charge of 2% of the burden may be anticipated for short term use of a few months. The oil contained in the most readily processed UOF's being properly hot drained and crushed is approximately 12% to 14% by weight. This oil will be pyrolized at a rate of 98% resulting in additional fuel gas of 68% and a condensable hydrocarbon fraction of 30%, with the remaining 2% resulting as carbon being added into the burden. Based upon the writer's collected information and assessment, there appears to be no operational problems relating to the recycling of UOF's to the blast furnace. One steel plant in the US has been routinely charging UOF's at about 100 tons to 200 tons per month for many years. Extensive analysis and calculations appear to indicate no toxic consideration as a result of the pyrolysis of the small contained oil ( in the 'prepared' UOFs) within the blast furnace. However, a hydrocarbon condensate in the ''gasoline'' fraction will condense in the blast furnace scrubber water and may require additional processing the water treatment system to remove benzene and toluene from the condensate. Used oil filters represent an additional source of high quality iron units that may be effectively added to the charge of a blast furnace for beneficial value to the operator and to the removal of this resource from landfills.

Ralph M. Smailer; Gregory L. Dressel; Jennifer Hsu Hill

2002-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

471

Fabrication of hydrophobic, electrically conductive and flame-resistant carbon aerogels by pyrolysis of regenerated cellulose aerogels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this paper, we reported miscellaneous carbon aerogels prepared by pyrolysis of regenerated cellulose aerogels that were fabricated by dissolution in a mild NaOH/PEG solution, freeze ? thaw treatment, regeneration, and freeze drying. The as-prepared carbon aerogels were subsequently characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), nitrogen adsorption measurements, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, and water contact angle (WCA) tests. The results showed that the carbon aerogels with pore diameters of 1 ? 60 nm maintained interconnected three-dimensional (3D) network after the pyrolysis, and showed type ? IV adsorption isotherm. The pyrolysis process leaded to the decomposition of oxygen-containing functional groups, the destruction of cellulose crystalline structure, and the formation of highly disordered amorphous graphite. Moreover, the carbon aerogels also had strong hydrophobicity, electrical conductivity and flame retardance, which held great potential in the fields of waterproof, electronic devices and fireproofing.

Caichao Wan; Yun Lu; Yue Jiao; Chunde Jin; Qingfeng Sun; Jian Li

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Crude Oil Analysis Database  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The composition and physical properties of crude oil vary widely from one reservoir to another within an oil field, as well as from one field or region to another. Although all oils consist of hydrocarbons and their derivatives, the proportions of various types of compounds differ greatly. This makes some oils more suitable than others for specific refining processes and uses. To take advantage of this diversity, one needs access to information in a large database of crude oil analyses. The Crude Oil Analysis Database (COADB) currently satisfies this need by offering 9,056 crude oil analyses. Of these, 8,500 are United States domestic oils. The database contains results of analysis of the general properties and chemical composition, as well as the field, formation, and geographic location of the crude oil sample. [Taken from the Introduction to COAMDATA_DESC.pdf, part of the zipped software and database file at http://www.netl.doe.gov/technologies/oil-gas/Software/database.html] Save the zipped file to your PC. When opened, it will contain PDF documents and a large Excel spreadsheet. It will also contain the database in Microsoft Access 2002.

Shay, Johanna Y.

473

Electromagnetic Heating Methods for Heavy Oil Reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The most widely used method of thermal oil recovery is by injecting steam into the reservoir. A well-designed steam injection project is very efficient in recovering oil, however its applicability is limited in many situations. Simulation studies and field experience has shown that for low injectivity reservoirs, small thickness of the oil-bearing zone, and reservoir heterogeneity limits the performance of steam injection. This paper discusses alternative methods of transferring heat to heavy oil reservoirs, based on electromagnetic energy. They present a detailed analysis of low frequency electric resistive (ohmic) heating and higher frequency electromagnetic heating (radio and microwave frequency). They show the applicability of electromagnetic heating in two example reservoirs. The first reservoir model has thin sand zones separated by impermeable shale layers, and very viscous oil. They model preheating the reservoir with low frequency current using two horizontal electrodes, before injecting steam. The second reservoir model has very low permeability and moderately viscous oil. In this case they use a high frequency microwave antenna located near the producing well as the heat source. Simulation results presented in this paper show that in some cases, electromagnetic heating may be a good alternative to steam injection or maybe used in combination with steam to improve heavy oil production. They identify the parameters which are critical in electromagnetic heating. They also discuss past field applications of electromagnetic heating including technical challenges and limitations.

Sahni, A.; Kumar, M.; Knapp, R.B.

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Biodiesel production using waste frying oil  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research highlights: {yields} Waste sunflower frying oil is successfully converted to biodiesel using lipase as catalyst. {yields} Various process parameters that affects the conversion of transesterification reaction such as temperature, enzyme concentration, methanol: oil ratio and solvent are optimized. {yields} Inhibitory effect of methanol on lipase is reduced by adding methanol in three stages. {yields} Polar solvents like n-hexane and n-heptane increases the conversion of tranesterification reaction. - Abstract: Waste sunflower frying oil is used in biodiesel production by transesterification using an enzyme as a catalyst in a batch reactor. Various microbial lipases have been used in transesterification reaction to select an optimum lipase. The effects of various parameters such as temperature, methanol:oil ratio, enzyme concentration and solvent on the conversion of methyl ester have been studied. The Pseudomonas fluorescens enzyme yielded the highest conversion. Using the P. fluorescens enzyme, the optimum conditions included a temperature of 45 deg. C, an enzyme concentration of 5% and a methanol:oil molar ratio 3:1. To avoid an inhibitory effect, the addition of methanol was performed in three stages. The conversion obtained after 24 h of reaction increased from 55.8% to 63.84% because of the stage-wise addition of methanol. The addition of a non-polar solvent result in a higher conversion compared to polar solvents. Transesterification of waste sunflower frying oil under the optimum conditions and single-stage methanol addition was compared to the refined sunflower oil.

Charpe, Trupti W. [Chemical Engineering Department, Institute of Chemical Technology, Matunga, Mumbai 400 019 (India); Rathod, Virendra K., E-mail: vk.rathod@ictmumbai.edu.in [Chemical Engineering Department, Institute of Chemical Technology, Matunga, Mumbai 400 019 (India)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

475

Sponsorship includes: Agriculture in the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sponsorship includes: · Agriculture in the Classroom · Douglas County Farm Bureau · Gifford Farm · University of Nebraska Agricultural Research and Development Center · University of Nebraska- Lincoln Awareness Coalition is to help youth, primarily from urban communities, become aware of agriculture

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

476

Attenuated Total Reflection Infrared (ATR-IR) Spectroscopy of a Water-in-Oil Emulsion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Water-in-oil (w/o) emulsions are of great interest in many areas including food technology and the oil and gas industry. However, the molecular mechanisms that lead to a stable...

Kiefer, Johannes; Frank, Kerstin; Schuchmann, Heike P

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Design Case Summary: Production of Gasoline and Diesel from Biomass via Fast Pyrolysis, Hydrotreating, and Hydrocracking  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Biomass Program develops design cases to understand the current state of conversiontechnologies and to determine where improvements need to take place in the future. The bestavailable bench and pilot-scale conversion data are integrated with detailed process flow andengineering models to identify technical barriers where research and development could leadto significant cost improvements and to calculate production costs. Past design cases focusedon finding pathways toward cost-competitive production of ethanol. This design case is thefirst to establish detailed cost targets for the production of diesel and gasoline blendstock frombiomass via a fast pyrolysis process.

478

Transparent and conducting ZnO films grown by spray pyrolysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

ZnO films were prepared using the simple, flexible and cost-effective spray pyrolysis technique at different substrate temperatures and precursor molarity values. The films' structural, optical and electrical properties were investigated by x-ray diffraction, UV–VIS transmittance spectroscopy, profilometry and voltage–current–temperature (VIT) measurements. The films prepared at substrate temperatures above 400 °C appear better crystallized with (0?0?2) preferred orientation and exhibit higher visible transmittance (65–80%), higher electrical n-type semiconductor conductivity (10–50 (? cm)?1), lower activation energy (

Lazhar Hadjeris; Labidi Herissi; M Badreddine Assouar; Thomas Easwarakhanthan; Jamal Bougdira; Nadhir Attaf; M Salah Aida

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Bio-oil Analysis Using Negative Electrospray Ionization: Comparative Study of High-Resolution Mass Spectrometers and Phenolic versus Sugaric Components  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have previously demonstrated that a petroleomic analysis could be performed for bio-oils and revealed the complex nature of bio-oils for the nonvolatile phenolic compounds (Smith, E.; Lee, Y. J. Energy Fuels 2010, 24, 5190?5198). As a subsequent study, we have adapted electrospray ionization in negative-ion mode to characterize a wide variety of bio-oil compounds. A comparative study of three common high-resolution mass spectrometers was performed to validate the methodology and to investigate the differences in mass discrimination and resolution. The mass spectrum is dominated by low mass compounds with m/z of 100–250, with some compounds being analyzable by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC–MS). We could characterize over 800 chemical compositions, with only about 40 of them being previously known in GC–MS. This unveiled a much more complex nature of bio-oils than typically shown by GC–MS. The pyrolysis products of cellulose and hemicellulose, particularly polyhydroxy cyclic hydrocarbons (or what we call “sugaric” compounds), such as levoglucosan, could be effectively characterized with this approach. Phenolic compounds from lignin pyrolysis could be clearly distinguished in a contour map of double bond equivalent (DBE) versus the number of carbons from these sugaric compounds.

Smith, Erica A.; Park, Soojin; Klein, Adam T.; Lee, Young Jin

2012-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

480

Aging effects on oil-contaminated Kuwaiti sand  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Large quantities of oil-contaminated sands resulted from the destruction of oil wells and the formation of oil lakes in Kuwait at the end of the Gulf Wa/r. A laboratory testing program was carried out to determine the geotechnical properties of this material and the effect of aging on their properties. Tests included direct shear, triaxial, and consolidation tests on clean and contaminated sand at the same relative density. The influence of aging was examined by testing uncontaminated sand after aging for one, three, and six months in natural environmental conditions. The results indicated increased strength and stiffness due to aging and a reduction of the oil content due to evaporation of volatile compounds. The factors that influence the depth of oil penetration in compacted sand columns were also examined including the type of oil, relative density, and the amount of fines.

Al-Sanad, H.A.; Ismael, N.F. [Kuwait Univ., Safat (Kuwait). Dept. of Civil Engineering

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes pyrolysis oils" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Hydrous pyrolysis/oxidation process for in situ destruction of chlorinated hydrocarbon and fuel hydrocarbon contaminants in water and soil  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In situ hydrous pyrolysis/oxidation process is useful for in situ degradation of hydrocarbon water and soil contaminants. Fuel hydrocarbons, chlorinated hydrocarbons, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, petroleum distillates and other organic contaminants present in the soil and water are degraded by the process involving hydrous pyrolysis/oxidation into non-toxic products of the degradation. The process uses heat which is distributed through soils and water, optionally combined with oxygen and/or hydrocarbon degradation catalysts, and is particularly useful for remediation of solvent, fuel or other industrially contaminated sites.

Knauss, Kevin G. (Livermore, CA); Copenhaver, Sally C. (Livermore, CA); Aines, Roger D. (Livermore, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

World Oil: Market or Mayhem?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The world oil market is regarded by many as a puzzle. Why are oil prices so volatile? What is OPEC and what does OPEC do? Where are oil prices headed in the long run? Is “peak oil” a genuine concern? Why did oil prices ...

Smith, James L.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

A Numerical Study on Gaseous Reactions in Silane Pyrolysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A simple gaseous reaction model involving 11 elementary reactions for 10 chemical species is proposed for silane and disilane pyrolyses at 550–750 K; its appropriateness is examined by a calculation based on an one-dimensional nonsteady condition which includes gaseous reactions, diffusional transport and radical adsorptions. The calculated results show that the model can successfully explain the experimental behavior of a gas composition concerning the time lag of hydrogen molecule production as well as the temperature and pressure dependences of the saturated higher silane concentrations. The reaction model is applied to a SiH4–H2–N2 system; it predicts that dilution with hydrogen or the premixing of c.a. 4% of disilane is useful for obtaining a spatially uniform deposition rate in a flow-type CVD reactor.

Akimasa Yuuki; Yasuji Matsui; Kunihide Tachibana

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Vegetable oil fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this article, the future role of renewable agricultural resources in providing fuel is discussed. it was only during this century that U.S. farmers began to use petroleum as a fuel for tractors as opposed to forage crop as fuel for work animals. Now farmers may again turn to crops as fuel for agricultural production - the possible use of sunflower oil, soybean oil and rapeseed oil as substitutes for diesel fuel is discussed.

Bartholomew, D.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Fuel oil and kerosene sales 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This publication contains the 1993 survey results of the ``Annual Fuel Oil and Kerosene, Sales Report`` (Form EIA-821). This is the fifth year that the survey data have appeared in a separate publication. Prior to the 1989 report, the statistics appeared in the Petroleum Marketing Annual (PMA) for reference year 1988 and the Petroleum Marketing Monthly (PMM) for reference years 1984 through 1987. The 1993 edition marks the 10th annual presentation of the results of the ongoing ``Annual Fuel Oi