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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes liquid hydrogen" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Gaseous and Liquid Hydrogen Storage  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Today's state of the art for hydrogen storage includes 5,000- and 10,000-psi compressed gas tanks and cryogenic liquid hydrogen tanks for on-board hydrogen storage.

2

Liquid Hydrogen Delivery - Strategic Directions for Hydrogen...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Liquid Hydrogen Delivery - Strategic Directions for Hydrogen Delivery Workshop Liquid Hydrogen Delivery - Strategic Directions for Hydrogen Delivery Workshop Targets, barriers and...

3

Safetygram #9- Liquid Hydrogen  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Hydrogen is colorless as a liquid. Its vapors are colorless, odorless, tasteless, and highly flammable.

4

Bio-Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed Reforming Targets (Presentation)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Distributed Reforming Targets Arlene F. Anderson Technology Development Manager, U.S. DOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program Bio-Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed Reforming Working Group and Hydrogen Production Technical Team Review November 6, 2007 Bio-Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed Reforming Working Group (BILIWG) The Bio-Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed Reforming Working Group (BILIWG), launched in October 2006, provides a forum for effective communication and collaboration among participants in DOE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies Program (HFCIT) cost-shared research directed at distributed bio-liquid reforming. The Working Group includes

5

Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material, such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

6

Cryocompressed Hydrogen Storage and Liquid Delivery  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Cryocompressed Hydrogen Storage & Liquid Delivery Jacob Leachman, Ph.D. Assistant Professor DOE H 2 Transmission & Delivery Workshop 2262014 H Y P E R H drogen roperties for...

7

Energetics of Hydrogen Bond Network Rearrangements in Liquid...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Energetics of Hydrogen Bond Network Rearrangements in Liquid Water Energetics of Hydrogen Bond Network Rearrangements in Liquid Water Print Wednesday, 25 May 2005 00:00 The unique...

8

Technical Assessment of Organic Liquid Carrier Hydrogen Storage...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Technical Assessment of Organic Liquid Carrier Hydrogen Storage Systems for Automotive Applications Technical Assessment of Organic Liquid Carrier Hydrogen Storage Systems for...

9

Hydrogen from Bio-Derived Liquids (Presentation)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

From Bio-Derived Liquids From Bio-Derived Liquids Hydrogen From Bio Hydrogen From Bio - - Derived Liquids Derived Liquids Dave King, Yong Wang, PNNL BILIWIG Meeting Laurel, Maryland November 6, 2007 Innovation / Overview Innovation / Overview Innovation / Overview Project comprises two components z Ethanol steam reforming z Aqueous phase reforming (APR) Importance to small scale hydrogen production for distributed reforming for hydrogen production ‹ Ethanol is rapidly becoming an infrastructure fuel and is a logical feedstock ‹ APR provides vehicle for facile reforming of a variety of bio-derived feedstocks available in the biorefinery that are not conducive to conventional vapor phase reforming Distinctive technology approach/innovation z We are investigating single step ethanol reforming with emphasis on lower

10

Liquid Hydrogen in Protonic Chabazite  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

1,5,6 Today, the prototype hydrogen vehicles use space-demanding tanks with compressed gas. ... aerogela ... hydrogen (LH2) storage in terms of vol., vehicle range, dormancy, energy required for fuel processing, and cost. ...

Adriano Zecchina; Silvia Bordiga; Jenny G. Vitillo; Gabriele Ricchiardi; Carlo Lamberti; Giuseppe Spoto; Morten Bjrgen; Karl Petter Lillerud

2005-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

11

Air Liquide Hydrogen Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydrogen Energy Hydrogen Energy Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Air Liquide Hydrogen Energy Name Air Liquide Hydrogen Energy Address 6, Rue Cognacq-Jay Place Paris, France Zip 75321 Sector Hydrogen Year founded 2009 Website http://www.airliquide-hydrogen Coordinates 48.8617579°, 2.3047757° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":48.8617579,"lon":2.3047757,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

12

Compressed/Liquid Hydrogen Tanks  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Currently, DOE's physical hydrogen storage R&D focuses on the development of high-pressure (10,000 psi) composite tanks, cryo-compressed tanks, conformable tanks, and other advanced concepts...

13

Short residence time coal liquefaction process including catalytic hydrogenation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Normally solid dissolved coal product and a distillate liquid product are produced by continuously passing a feed slurry comprising raw feed coal and a recycle solvent oil and/or slurry together with hydrogen to a preheating-reaction zone (26, alone, or 26 together with 42), the hydrogen pressure in the preheating-reaction zone being at least 1500 psig (105 kg/cm.sup.2), reacting the slurry in the preheating-reaction zone (26, or 26 with 42) at a temperature in the range of between about 455.degree. and about 500.degree. C. to dissolve the coal to form normally liquid coal and normally solid dissolved coal. A total slurry residence time is maintained in the reaction zone ranging from a finite value from about 0 to about 0.2 hour, and reaction effluent is continuously and directly contacted with a quenching fluid (40, 68) to substantially immediately reduce the temperature of the reaction effluent to below 425.degree. C. to substantially inhibit polymerization so that the yield of insoluble organic matter comprises less than 9 weight percent of said feed coal on a moisture-free basis. The reaction is performed under conditions of temperature, hydrogen pressure and residence time such that the quantity of distillate liquid boiling within the range C.sub.5 -454.degree. C. is an amount at least equal to that obtainable by performing the process under the same condition except for a longer total slurry residence time, e.g., 0.3 hour. Solvent boiling range liquid is separated from the reaction effluent (83) and recycled as process solvent (16). The amount of solvent boiling range liquid is sufficient to provide at least 80 weight percent of that required to maintain the process in overall solvent balance.

Anderson, Raymond P. (Overland Park, KS); Schmalzer, David K. (Englewood, CO); Wright, Charles H. (Overland Park, KS)

1982-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

14

Short residence time coal liquefaction process including catalytic hydrogenation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Normally solid dissolved coal product and a distillate liquid product are produced by continuously passing a feed slurry comprising raw feed coal and a recycle solvent oil and/or slurry together with hydrogen to a preheating-reaction zone, the hydrogen pressure in the preheating-reaction zone being at least 1,500 psig (105 kg/cm[sup 2]), reacting the slurry in the preheating-reaction zone at a temperature in the range of between about 455 and about 500 C to dissolve the coal to form normally liquid coal and normally solid dissolved coal. A total slurry residence time is maintained in the reaction zone ranging from a finite value from about 0 to about 0.2 hour, and reaction effluent is continuously and directly contacted with a quenching fluid to substantially immediately reduce the temperature of the reaction effluent to below 425 C to substantially inhibit polymerization so that the yield of insoluble organic matter comprises less than 9 weight percent of said feed coal on a moisture-free basis. The reaction is performed under conditions of temperature, hydrogen pressure and residence time such that the quantity of distillate liquid boiling within the range C[sub 5]-454 C is an amount at least equal to that obtainable by performing the process under the same condition except for a longer total slurry residence time, e.g., 0.3 hour. Solvent boiling range liquid is separated from the reaction effluent and recycled as process solvent. The amount of solvent boiling range liquid is sufficient to provide at least 80 weight percent of that required to maintain the process in overall solvent balance. 6 figs.

Anderson, R.P.; Schmalzer, D.K.; Wright, C.H.

1982-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

15

Bio-Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed Reforming Working Group Kick-Off Meeting  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy held a kick-off meeting for the Bio-Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed Reforming Working Group (BILIWG) on October 24, 2006, in Baltimore, Maryland. The Working Group is addressing technical challenges to distributed reforming of biomass-derived, renewable liquid fuels to hydrogen, including the reforming, water-gas shift, and hydrogen recovery and purification steps. The meeting provided the opportunity for researchers to share their experiences in converting bio-derived liquids to hydrogen with each other and with members of the DOE Hydrogen Production Technical Team.

16

Bio-Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed Reforming Targets  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation by Arlene Anderson at the October 24, 2006 Bio-Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed Reforming Working Group Kick-Off Meeting.

17

Bio-Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed Reforming Targets (Presentation)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presented at the 2007 Bio-Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed Reforming Working Group held November 6, 2007 in Laurel, Maryland.

18

Electrokinetic Hydrogen Generation from Liquid Water Microjets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electrochemical hydrogen production methods are quiteonly causative hydrogen production method. Although the massa method for the production of molecular hydrogen from

Duffin, Andrew M.; Saykally, Richard J.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Electrokinetic Hydrogen Generation from Liquid Water Microjets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

currents and hydrogen production rates are shown to followmolecules. The hydrogen production efficiency is currentlycurrently available hydrogen production routes that can be

Duffin, Andrew M.; Saykally, Richard J.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Design, fabrication and testing of a liquid hydrogen fuel tank for a long duration aircraft  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Liquid hydrogen has distinct advantages as an aircraft fuel. These include a specific heat of combustion 2.8 times greater than gasoline or jet fuel and zero carbon emissions. It can be utilized by fuel cells turbine engines and internal combustion engines. The high heat of combustion is particularly important in the design of long endurance aircraft with liquid hydrogen enabling cruise endurance of several days. However the mass advantage of the liquid hydrogen fuel will result in a mass advantage for the fuel system only if the liquid hydrogen tank and insulation mass is a small fraction of the hydrogen mass. The challenge is producing a tank that meets the mass requirement while insulating the cryogenic liquid hydrogen well enough to prevent excessive heat leak and boil off. In this paper we report on the design fabrication and testing of a liquid hydrogen fuel tank for a prototype high altitude long endurance (HALE) demonstration aircraft. Design options on tank geometry tank wall material and insulation systems are discussed. The final design is an aluminum sphere insulated with spray on foam insulation (SOFI). Several steps and organizations were involved in the tank fabrication and test. The tank was cold shocked helium leak checked and proof pressure tested. The overall thermal performance was verified with a boil off test using liquid hydrogen.

Gary L. Mills; Brian Buchholtz; Al Olsen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes liquid hydrogen" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Liquid composition having ammonia borane and decomposing to form hydrogen and liquid reaction product  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Liquid compositions of ammonia borane and a suitably chosen amine borane material were prepared and subjected to conditions suitable for their thermal decomposition in a closed system that resulted in hydrogen and a liquid reaction product.

Davis, Benjamin L; Rekken, Brian D

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Energetics of Hydrogen Bond Network Rearrangements in Liquid Water  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Energetics of Hydrogen Bond Network Rearrangements in Liquid Water Print Energetics of Hydrogen Bond Network Rearrangements in Liquid Water Print The unique chemical and physical properties of liquid water are thought to result from the highly directional hydrogen bonding (H-bonding) network structure and its associated dynamics. However, despite intense experimental and theoretical scrutiny, a complete description of this structure has been elusive. Recently, with the help of their novel liquid microjet apparatus, a University of California, Berkeley, group derived a new energy criterion for H-bonds based on experimental data. With this new criterion based on analysis of the temperature dependence of the x-ray absorption spectra of normal and supercooled liquid water, they concluded that the traditional structural model of water is valid.

23

Energetics of Hydrogen Bond Network Rearrangements in Liquid Water  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Energetics of Hydrogen Bond Network Rearrangements in Liquid Water Print Energetics of Hydrogen Bond Network Rearrangements in Liquid Water Print The unique chemical and physical properties of liquid water are thought to result from the highly directional hydrogen bonding (H-bonding) network structure and its associated dynamics. However, despite intense experimental and theoretical scrutiny, a complete description of this structure has been elusive. Recently, with the help of their novel liquid microjet apparatus, a University of California, Berkeley, group derived a new energy criterion for H-bonds based on experimental data. With this new criterion based on analysis of the temperature dependence of the x-ray absorption spectra of normal and supercooled liquid water, they concluded that the traditional structural model of water is valid.

24

Energetics of Hydrogen Bond Network Rearrangements in Liquid Water  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Energetics of Hydrogen Bond Network Rearrangements in Liquid Water Print Energetics of Hydrogen Bond Network Rearrangements in Liquid Water Print The unique chemical and physical properties of liquid water are thought to result from the highly directional hydrogen bonding (H-bonding) network structure and its associated dynamics. However, despite intense experimental and theoretical scrutiny, a complete description of this structure has been elusive. Recently, with the help of their novel liquid microjet apparatus, a University of California, Berkeley, group derived a new energy criterion for H-bonds based on experimental data. With this new criterion based on analysis of the temperature dependence of the x-ray absorption spectra of normal and supercooled liquid water, they concluded that the traditional structural model of water is valid.

25

SBIR/STTR Release 2 Topics Announced-Includes Hydrogen and Fuel...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Release 2 Topics Announced-Includes Hydrogen and Fuel Cells SBIRSTTR Release 2 Topics Announced-Includes Hydrogen and Fuel Cells October 31, 2014 - 12:05pm Addthis The 2015 Small...

26

Large-Scale Liquid Hydrogen Handling Equipment  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation by Jerry Gillette of Argonne National Laboratory at the Joint Meeting on Hydrogen Delivery Modeling and Analysis, May 8-9, 2007

27

Liquid Hydrogen Delivery - Strategic Directions for Hydrogen Delivery Workshop  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Hydrogen Delivery Strategic Directions for Hydrogen Delivery Workshop May 7-8, 2003 Crystal City, Virginia Main Themes/Caveats Will be challenging (if not impossible) to meet the 2010 cost target with today's technology Without significant growth in product demand, progress will likely be slow even with incremental technology Group a little light on technical expertise, but feel captured main ideas required Less "weeding" of ideas, but more divergent thinking Targets/Objectives 2003 Status: $1.11/kg May be a bit lower than actual costs Baseline needs to be revisited 2005 Target: $1.01/kg Technically (10% improvement) could be met, but unlikely demand drivers will be present to encourage meeting target Likely no plant will be built in 2005

28

FINAL REPORT: Room Temperature Hydrogen Storage in Nano-Confined Liquids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

DOE continues to seek solid-state hydrogen storage materials with hydrogen densities of ?6 wt% and ?50 g/L that can deliver hydrogen and be recharged at room temperature and moderate pressures enabling widespread use in transportation applications. Meanwhile, development including vehicle engineering and delivery infrastructure continues for compressed-gas hydrogen storage systems. Although compressed gas storage avoids the materials-based issues associated with solid-state storage, achieving acceptable volumetric densities has been a persistent challenge. This project examined the possibility of developing storage materials that would be compatible with compressed gas storage technology based on enhanced hydrogen solubility in nano-confined liquid solvents. These materials would store hydrogen in molecular form eliminating many limitations of current solid-state materials while increasing the volumetric capacity of compressed hydrogen storage vessels. Experimental methods were developed to study hydrogen solubility in nano-confined liquids. These methods included 1) fabrication of composites comprised of volatile liquid solvents for hydrogen confined within the nano-sized pore volume of nanoporous scaffolds and 2) measuring the hydrogen uptake capacity of these composites without altering the composite composition. The hydrogen storage capacities of these nano-confined solvent/scaffold composites were compared with bulk solvents and with empty scaffolds. The solvents and scaffolds were varied to optimize the enhancement in hydrogen solubility that accompanies confinement of the solvent. In addition, computational simulations were performed to study the molecular-scale structure of liquid solvent when confined within an atomically realistic nano-sized pore of a model scaffold. Confined solvent was compared with similar simulations of bulk solvent. The results from the simulations were used to formulate a mechanism for the enhanced solubility and to guide the experiments. Overall, the combined experimental measurements and simulations indicate that hydrogen storage based on enhanced solubility in nano-confined liquids is unlikely to meet the storage densities required for practical use. Only low gravimetric capacities of < 0.5 wt% were achieved. More importantly, solvent filled scaffolds had lower volumetric capacities than corresponding empty scaffolds. Nevertheless, several of the composites measured did show significant (>~ 5x) enhanced hydrogen solubility relative to bulk solvent solubility, when the hydrogen capacity was attributed only to dissolution in the confined solvent. However, when the hydrogen capacity was compared to an empty scaffold that is known to store hydrogen by surface adsorption on the scaffold walls, including the solvent always reduced the hydrogen capacity. For the best composites, this reduction relative to an empty scaffold was ~30%; for the worst it was ~90%. The highest capacities were obtained with the largest solvent molecules and with scaffolds containing 3- dimensionally confined pore geometries. The simulations suggested that the capacity of the composites originated from hydrogen adsorption on the scaffold pore walls at sites not occupied by solvent molecules. Although liquid solvent filled the pores, not all of the adsorption sites on the pore walls were occupied due to restricted motion of the solvent molecules within the confined pore space.

VAJO, JOHN

2014-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

29

FLUIDIZABLE CATALYSTS FOR PRODUCING HYDROGEN BY STEAM REFORMING BIOMASS PYROLYSIS LIQUIDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FLUIDIZABLE CATALYSTS FOR PRODUCING HYDROGEN BY STEAM REFORMING BIOMASS PYROLYSIS LIQUIDS Kimberly established that biomass pyrolysis oil could be steam-reformed to generate hydrogen using non pyrolysis oil could be almost stoichiometrically converted to hydrogen. However, process performance

30

Hydrogen Storage Basics | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

storing hydrogen include: Physical storage of compressed hydrogen gas in high pressure tanks (up to 700 bar) Physical storage of cryogenic liquid hydrogen (cooled to -253C, at...

31

Experimental Study of a New PVC Foam Insulation System for Liquid-Hydrogen-Liquid-Oxygen Space Vehicles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper discusses the development of a rigid external foam insulation for liquid-hydrogen-liquid-oxygen space vehicles...1...], dealing with the use of Klegecell G 300,* a PVC closed-cell foam. This foam does ...

F. J. Muller

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

System for exchange of hydrogen between liquid and solid phases  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The reversible reaction M + x/2 H/sub 2/ reversible MH/sub x/, wherein M is a reversible metal hydride former that forms a hydride MH/sub x/ in the presence of H/sub 2/, generally used to store and recall H/sub 2/, is found to proceed under an inert liquid, thereby reducing contamination, providing better temperature control, providing in situ mobility of the reactants, and increasing flexibility in process design. Thus, a slurry of particles of a metal hydride former with an inert solvent is subjected to a temperature and pressure controlled atmosphere containing H/sub 2/, to store hydrogen and to release previously stored hydrogen. The direction of the flow of the H/sub 2/ through the liquid is dependent upon the H/sub 2/ pressure in the gas phase at a given temperature. When the actual H/sub 2/ pressure is above the equilibrium absorption pressure of the respective hydride the reaction proceeds to the right, i.e., the metal hydride is formed and hydrogen is stored in the solid particle. When the actual pressure in the gas phase is below the equilibrium dissociation pressure of the respective hydride the reaction proceeds to the left, the metal hydride is decomposed and hydrogen is released into the gas phase.

Reilly, J.J.; Grohse, E.W.; Johnson, J.R.; Winsche, W.E.

1985-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

33

System for exchange of hydrogen between liquid and solid phases  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The reversible reaction M+x/2 H.sub.2 .rarw..fwdarw.MH.sub.x, wherein M is a reversible metal hydride former that forms a hydride MH.sub.x in the presence of H.sub.2, generally used to store and recall H.sub.2, is found to proceed under an inert liquid, thereby reducing contamination, providing better temperature control, providing in situ mobility of the reactants, and increasing flexibility in process design. Thus, a slurry of particles of a metal hydride former with an inert solvent is subjected to a temperature and pressure controlled atmosphere containing H.sub.2, to store hydrogen and to release previously stored hydrogen. The direction of the flow of the H.sub.2 through the liquid is dependent upon the H.sub.2 pressure in the gas phase at a given temperature. When the actual H.sub.2 pressure is above the equilibrium absorption pressure of the respective hydride the reaction proceeds to the right, i.e., the metal hydride is formed and hydrogen is stored in the solid particles. When the actual pressure in the gas phase is below the equilibrium dissociation pressure of the respective hydride the reaction proceeds to the left, the metal hydride is decomposed and hydrogen is released into the gas phase.

Reilly, James J. (Bellport, NY); Grohse, Edward W. (Port Jefferson Station, NY); Johnson, John R. (Calverton, NY); Winsche, deceased, Warren E. (late of Bellport, NY)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

AMO Issues Request for Information on Clean Energy Manufacturing Topics, Including Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Applications  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The AMO seeks information on mid-Technology Readiness Level R&D needs, market challenges, supply chain challenges, and shared facility needs addressing clean energy manufacturing topics, including the fuel cell and hydrogen sectors.

35

Hydrogen and helium entrapment in flowing liquid metal plasma-facing surfaces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrogen and helium entrapment in flowing liquid metal plasma-facing surfaces Ahmed Hassanein the PFC surface (helium and hydrogen isotopes) while accommodating high heat loads. To study this problem. Hydrogen isotope (DT) particles are likely be trapped in the liquid metal surface (e.g., lithium) due

Harilal, S. S.

36

MOLECULAR PHYSICS, 1999, VOL. 97, NO. 7, 897 905 Dynamics and hydrogen bonding in liquid ethanol  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MOLECULAR PHYSICS, 1999, VOL. 97, NO. 7, 897± 905 Dynamics and hydrogen bonding in liquid ethanol L of liquid ethanol at three temperatures have been carried out. The hydrogen bonding states of ethanol measurements of the frequency-dependent dielectric permittivity of liquid ethanol. 1. Introduction A detailed

Saiz, Leonor

37

Technical Assessment of Organic Liquid Carrier Hydrogen Storage Systems for Automotive Applications  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

In 2007-2009, the DOE Hydrogen Program conducted a technical assessment of organic liquid carrier based hydrogen storage systems for automotive applications, consistent with the Programs Multiyear Re

38

Technical Assessment of Organic Liquid Carrier Hydrogen Storage Systems for Automotive Applications  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Technical report describing the US Department of Energy's (DOE) assessment of the performance and cost of organic liquid based hydrogen storage systems for automotive applications.

39

The influence of transition metal ions on the catalytic performance of Ru particles during the liquid phase hydrogenation of benzene to cyclohexene  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The influence of some transition metal ions including Fe2+, Ni2+, Cr3+, Mn2+, Zn2+, Cd2+...on the catalytic performance of Ru particles during the liquid phase partial hydrogenation of benzene to cyclohexene was ...

Yixin Qu; Chengxuan Fang; Chengyang Qian

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Nuclear Quantum Effects and Nonlocal Exchange-Correlation Functionals Applied to Liquid Hydrogen at High Pressure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Using first-principles molecular dynamics, we study the influence of nuclear quantum effects (NQEs) and nonlocal exchange-correlation density functionals (DFs) near molecular dissociation in liquid hydrogen. NQEs strongly influence intramolecular properties, such as bond stability, and are thus an essential part of the dissociation process. Moreover, by including DFs that account for either the self-interaction error or dispersion interactions, we find a much better description of molecular dissociation and metallization than previous studies based on classical protons and/or local or semilocal DFs. We obtain excellent agreement with experimentally measured optical properties along Hugoniot curves for precompressed states, and while we still find a first-order liquid-liquid transition at low temperatures, transition pressures are increased by more than 100GPa.

Miguel A. Morales, Jeffrey M. McMahon, Carlo Pierleoni, and David M. Ceperley

2013-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes liquid hydrogen" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

High pressure/high temperature vapor liquid equilibrium study of light gases in hydrogen-coal liquid model compound systems using perturbation chromatography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Perturbation chromatography or gas-liquid partition chromatography (GLPC) provides a powerful tool for making physicochemical measurements. In this investigation GLPC was applied to study the vapor-liquid equilibrium behavior of light gases in nonvolatile coal liquid model compound solvents at high temperatures and high pressures. Improvements made in existing GLPC techniques include: the use of a high pressure tandem proportioning pump to give precise control of the carrier gas flow rate and low pressure drops; a high pressure ionization chamber to detect the injection of very dilute radioactive sample gases; and the use of a microcomputer to provide instantaneous integration and very precise retention times of the chromatographic peaks. Infinite dilution K-values for methane, ethane, propane, n-butane, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen sulfide in hydrogen-dibenzofuran systems were obtained at 100 and 125 C and up to 800 psia. Infinite dilution K-values for the same light gases in hydrogen-9-methylanthracene systems were obtained at 100, 125, 150, 175, and 200 C and up to 3000 psia. Henry's constants were determined for the light gases in 9-methylanthracene. Second cross virial coefficients and vapor phase infinite dilution fugacity coefficients were calculated for methane, ethane, propane, and n-butane in hydrogen. These results were combined with the experimental K-value measurements to obtain Henry's constants in hydrogen-9-methylanthracene mixtures of fixed liquid compositions. Infinite dilution heats of solution of the solute gases in the mixtures were calculated.

Kragas, T.K.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

ARTICLE IN PRESS Modeling hydrogen sulfide emissions across the gas liquid interface  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

production methods in the US have led to the emergence of large- scale commeARTICLE IN PRESS Modeling hydrogen sulfide emissions across the gas­ liquid interface-film theory Hydrogen sulfide Process-based model Lagoon flux Mass transfer a b s t r a c t Hydrogen sulfide (H

Aneja, Viney P.

43

First-order liquid-liquid phase transition in dense hydrogen  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We use ab initio molecular-dynamics simulations to study the nonmetal-to-metal transition in dense liquid hydrogen. By calculating the equation of state of hydrogen at high pressures up to several megabars and temperatures above the melting line up to 1500 K we confirm the first-order nature of this transition at these temperatures. We characterize both phases based on equation of state data, the electrical conductivity, and the pair-correlation functions, which are all derived self-consistently from these simulations. We locate the respective transition line in the phase diagram and give an estimate for its critical point. We compare with available experimental data and other theoretical predictions.

Winfried Lorenzen, Bastian Holst, and Ronald Redmer

2010-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

44

Agenda for the Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed Reforming Working Group (BILIWG) Hydrogen Production Technical Team Research Review  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

& Hydrogen Production Technical Team Research Review Agenda for Tuesday, November 6, 2007 Location: BCS Incorporated, 8929 Stephens Road, Laurel, MD. 20723 410-997-7778 8:30 - 9:00 Continental Breakfast 9:00 DOE Targets, Tools and Technology o Bio-Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed Reforming Targets DOE, Arlene Anderson o H2A Overview, NREL, Darlene Steward o Bio-Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed Reforming Cost Analysis DTI, Brian James 10:00 Research Review o Low-Cost Hydrogen Distributed Production Systems, H2Gen, Sandy Thomas o Integrated Short Contact Time Hydrogen Generator, GE Global Research, Wei Wei o Distributed Bio-Oil Reforming, NREL, Darlene Steward o High Pressure Steam Ethanol Reforming, ANL, Romesh Kumar

45

Effect of Convection in Helium-Charged, Partial-Foam Insulations for Liquid Hydrogen Propellant Tanks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Liquid hydrogen, because of its low density and extremely low boiling point, requires very effective insulation during its storage and use as a fuel for space booster applications. For space booster. insulatio...

B. N. Taylor; F. E. Mack

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Bio-Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed Reforming Working Group Background Paper  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Paper by Arlene Anderson and Tracy Carole presented at the Bio-Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed Reforming Working Group, with a focus on key drivers, purpose, and scope.

47

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Bio-Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Group Meeting - November 2007 Group Meeting - November 2007 The Bio-Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed Reforming Working Group participated in a Hydrogen Production Technical Team Research Review on November 6, 2007. The meeting provided the opportunity for researchers to share their experiences in converting bio-derived liquids to hydrogen with members of the Department of Energy Hydrogen Production Technical Team. The following meeting documents are available as Adobe Acrobat PDFs. Download Adobe Reader. Proceedings Agenda, discussion points, and participant list (PDF 146 KB) Action items and meeting highlights (PDF 104 KB) 2007 Annual Merit Review Report excerpts on bio-derived liquids to hydrogen distributed reforming research (PDF 3.9 MB) Presentations DOE Targets, Tools, and Technology

48

Microfluidic Hydrogen Fuel Cell with a Liquid Electrolyte  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report the design and characterization of a microfluidic hydrogen fuel cell with a flowing sulfuric acid solution instead of a Nafion membrane as the electrolyte. We studied the effect of cell resistance, hydrogen and oxygen flow rates, and electrolyte ...

Ranga S. Jayashree; Michael Mitchell; Dilip Natarajan; Larry J. Markoski; Paul J. A. Kenis

2007-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

49

Solar thermal upper stage technology demonstrator liquid hydrogen storage and feed system test program  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Solar Thermal Upper Stage Technology Demonstrator (STUSTD) Liquid Hydrogen Storage and Feed System (LHSFS) Test Program is described. The test program consists of two principal phases. First an engineering characterization phase includes tests performed to demonstrate and understand the expected tank performance. This includes fill and drain; baseline heat leak; active Thermodynamic Vent System (TVS); and flow tests. After the LHSFS performance is understood and performance characteristics are determined a 30 day mission simulation test will be conducted. This test will simulate a 30 day transfer mission from low earth orbit (LEO) to geosynchronous equatorial orbit (GEO). Mission performance predictions based on the results of the engineering characterization tests will be used to correlate the results of the 30 day mission simulation.

E. C. Cady

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Technical Assessment of Organic Liquid Carrier Hydrogen Storage Systems for Automotive Applications  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Technical Assessment of Organic Liquid Carrier Hydrogen Storage Systems for Technical Assessment of Organic Liquid Carrier Hydrogen Storage Systems for Automotive Applications R. K. Ahluwalia, T. Q. Hua, and J-K Peng Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 M. Kromer, S. Lasher, K. McKenney, K. Law, and J. Sinha TIAX LLC, Lexington, MA 02421 June 21, 2011 Executive Summary In 2007-2009, the DOE Hydrogen Program conducted a technical assessment of organic liquid carrier based hydrogen storage systems for automotive applications, consistent with the Program's Multiyear Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan. This joint performance (ANL) and cost analysis (TIAX) report summarizes the results of this assessment. These results should be considered only in conjunction with the assumptions used in selecting, evaluating, and

51

Technical Assessment of Organic Liquid Carrier Hydrogen Storage...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

cell system by controlling the hydrogen utilization in such a manner that the thermal energy needed for the dehydrogenation reaction is provided by burning the remaining...

52

Toward new solid and liquid phase systems for the containment, transport and delivery of hydrogen  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

new solid and liquid phase systems new solid and liquid phase systems for the containment, transport and delivery of hydrogen By Guido P. Pez Hydrogen Energy Infrastructure for Fuel Cell Vehicle Transportation Scenario A: Distributed H 2 from a Large Scale Plant (150-230 tonne/day) Large Scale H 2 Plant (300-800 psi H 2 ) H 2 Buffer Storage Tube Trailer Liquid H 2 Truck H 2 Pipeline Multi-vehicle filling stations Feedstock: N. gas, Coal, Biomass Pet. Coke, Resids. Future: Carbon sequestration Storage: Underground well? Output: Depends on the vehicle's H 2 storage technology Currently H 2 up to >6000 psi for 5000 psi tanks Scenario B: Hydrogen by a small scale reforming of pipeline natural gas and compression Natural Gas Pipeline Reformer Liquid H 2 Backup Compressor H 2 (>6000 psig) H 2 Production: 100-400 kg/day; 4-5Kg H

53

Development of a Practical Hydrogen Storage System Based on Liquid Organic Hydrogen Carriers and a Homogeneous Catalyst - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5 5 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Craig Jensen 1 (Primary Contact), Daniel Brayton 1 , and Scott Jorgensen 2 1 Hawaii Hydrogen Carriers, LLC 531 Cooke Street Honolulu, HI 96813 Phone: (808) 339-1333 Email: hhcllc@hotmail.com 2 General Motors Technical Center DOE Managers HQ: Ned Stetson Phone: (202) 586-9995 Email: Ned.Stetson@ee.doe.gov GO: Katie Randolph Phone: (720) 356-1759 Email: Katie.Randolph@go.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-EE0005020 Project Start Date: July 1, 2011 Project End Date: June 30, 2013 *Congressionally directed project Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives The objective of this project is to optimize a hydrogen storage media based on a liquid organic carrier (LOC) for hydrogen and design a commercially viable hydrogen

54

Catalytic two-stage coal hydrogenation process using extinction recycle of heavy liquid fraction  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is described for catalytic two-stage hydrogenation and liquefaction of coal with selective extinction recycle of all heavy liquid fractions boiling above a distillation cut point of about 600--750 F to produce increased yields of low-boiling hydrocarbon liquid and gas products. In the process, the particulate coal feed is slurried with a process-derived liquid solvent normally boiling above about 650 F and fed into a first stage catalytic reaction zone operated at conditions which promote controlled rate liquefaction of the coal, while simultaneously hydrogenating the hydrocarbon recycle oils. The first stage reactor is maintained at 710--800 F temperature, 1,000--4,000 psig hydrogen partial pressure, and 10-90 lb/hr per ft[sup 3] catalyst space velocity. Partially hydrogenated material withdrawn from the first stage reaction zone is passed directly to the second stage catalytic reaction zone maintained at 760--860 F temperature for further hydrogenation and hydroconversion reactions. A 600--750 F[sup +] fraction containing 0--20 W % unreacted coal and ash solids is recycled to the coal slurrying step. If desired, the cut point lower boiling fraction can be further catalytically hydrotreated. By this process, the coal feed is successively catalytically hydrogenated and hydroconverted at selected conditions, to provide significantly increased yields of desirable low-boiling hydrocarbon liquid products and minimal production of hydrocarbon gases, and no net production of undesirable heavy oils and residuum materials. 2 figs.

MacArthur, J.B.; Comolli, A.G.; McLean, J.B.

1989-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

55

Hydrogenation with monolith reactor under conditions of immiscible liquid phases  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to an improved for the hydrogenation of an immiscible mixture of an organic reactant in water. The immiscible mixture can result from the generation of water by the hydrogenation reaction itself or, by the addition of, water to the reactant prior to contact with the catalyst. The improvement resides in effecting the hydrogenation reaction in a monolith catalytic reactor from 100 to 800 cpi, at a superficial velocity of from 0.1 to 2 m/second in the absence of a cosolvent for the immiscible mixture. In a preferred embodiment, the hydrogenation is carried out using a monolith support which has a polymer network/carbon coating onto which a transition metal is deposited.

Nordquist, Andrew Francis (Whitehall, PA); Wilhelm, Frederick Carl (Zionsville, PA); Waller, Francis Joseph (Allentown, PA); Machado, Reinaldo Mario (Allentown, PA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

High Hydrogen, Low Methane Syngas from Low-Rank Coals for Coal-to-Liquids  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

High Hydrogen, Low Methane Syngas from Low-Rank Coals for Coal-to-Liquids Production High Hydrogen, Low Methane Syngas from Low-Rank Coals for Coal-to-Liquids Production Southern Research Institute (SRI) Project Number: FE0012054 Project Description The focus of the project will be to develop, test, and optimize steam-reforming catalysts for converting tars, C2+ hydrocarbons, NH3, and CH4 in high-temperature and sulfur environments, increasing the ratio of hydrogen in syngas, as part of a modified, advanced gasification platform for the conversion of low-rank coals to syngas for coal-to-liquid and integrated gasification combined cycle applications. Project Details Program Background and Project Benefits Project Scope and Technology Readiness Level Accomplishments Contacts, Duration, and Cost Project Images Abstract Performer website: Southern Research Institute

57

A high liquid yield process for retorting various organic materials including oil shale  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention is a continuous retorting process for various high molecular weight organic materials, including oil shale, that yields an enhanced output of liquid product. The organic material, mineral matter, and an acidic catalyst, that appreciably adsorbs alkenes on surface sites at prescribed temperatures, are mixed and introduced into a pyrolyzer. A circulating stream of olefin enriched pyrolysis gas is continuously swept through the organic material and catalyst, whereupon, as the result of pyrolysis, the enhanced liquid product output is provided. Mixed spent organic material, mineral matter, and cool catalyst are continuously withdrawn from the pyrolyzer. Combustion of the spent organic material and mineral matter serves to reheat the catalyst. Olefin depleted pyrolysis gas, from the pyrolyzer, is enriched in olefins and recycled into the pyrolyzer. The reheated acidic catalyst is separated from the mineral matter and again mixed with fresh organic material, to maintain the continuously cyclic process. 2 figs.

Coburn, T.T.

1988-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

58

High liquid yield process for retorting various organic materials including oil shale  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention is a continuous retorting process for various high molecular weight organic materials, including oil shale, that yields an enhanced output of liquid product. The organic material, mineral matter, and an acidic catalyst, that appreciably adsorbs alkenes on surface sites at prescribed temperatures, are mixed and introduced into a pyrolyzer. A circulating stream of olefin enriched pyrolysis gas is continuously swept through the organic material and catalyst, whereupon, as the result of pyrolysis, the enhanced liquid product output is provided. Mixed spent organic material, mineral matter, and cool catalyst are continuously withdrawn from the pyrolyzer. Combustion of the spent organic material and mineral matter serves to reheat the catalyst. Olefin depleted pyrolysis gas, from the pyrolyzer, is enriched in olefins and recycled into the pyrolyzer. The reheated acidic catalyst is separated from the mineral matter and again mixed with fresh organic material, to maintain the continuously cyclic process.

Coburn, Thomas T. (Livermore, CA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Unexpectedly high pressure for molecular dissociation in liquid hydrogen by a reliable electronic simulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The study of the high pressure phase diagram of hydrogen has continued with renewed effort for about one century as it remains a fundamental challenge for experimental and theoretical techniques. Here we employ an efficient molecular dynamics based on the quantum Monte Carlo method, which can describe accurately the electronic correlation and treat a large number of hydrogen atoms, allowing a realistic and reliable prediction of thermodynamic roperties. We find that the molecular liquid phase is unexpectedly stable and the transition towards a fully atomic liquid phase occurs at much higher pressure than previously believed. The old standing problem of low temperature atomization is, therefore, still far from experimental reach.

Mazzola, Guglielmo; Sorella, Sandro

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Modeling of Plasma-Assisted Conversion of Liquid Ethanol into Hydrogen Enriched Syngas in the Nonequilibrium Electric Discharge Plasma-Liquid System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this work we report recent results of our experimental and theoretical studies related to plasma conversion of liquid ethanol into hydrogen-enriched syngas in the plasma-liquid system with the electric discharge in a gas channel with liquid wall using available diagnostics and numerical modeling.

Levko, Dmitry; Naumov, Vadim; Chernyak, Valery; Yukhymenko, Vitaly; Prysiazhnevych, Irina; Olszewski, Sergey

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes liquid hydrogen" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Hydrogen Highways  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

adequate on-board hydrogen storage is essential, and remainsjustify their costs. Hydrogen storage remains an importantto 10,000 psi, liquid hydrogen storage, and other solid and

Lipman, Timothy

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Dynamical Model of Rocket Propellant Loading with Liquid Hydrogen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

f = dimensionless resistance coefficient H = height of external tank, m h = specific enthalpy, J S = cross-sectional area of vent valve area or leak hole, m2 T = temperature, K u = specific internal energy, J=kg V = volume, m3 v = velocity of liquid/vapor in pipes or valves, m=s _W = power on or by control

Muratov, Cyrill

63

Microfluidic Hydrogen Fuel Cell with a Liquid Electrolyte Ranga S. Jayashree, Michael Mitchell, Dilip Natarajan, Larry J. Markoski, and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Letters Microfluidic Hydrogen Fuel Cell with a Liquid Electrolyte Ranga S. Jayashree, Michael and characterization of a microfluidic hydrogen fuel cell with a flowing sulfuric acid solution instead of a Nafion membrane as the electrolyte. We studied the effect of cell resistance, hydrogen and oxygen flow rates

Kenis, Paul J. A.

64

Bio-Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed Reforming Working Group (BILIWG) Kick-Off Meeting Proceedings Hilton Garden Inn-BWI,Baltimore, MD October 24, 2006  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Proceedings from the October 24, 2006 Bio-Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed Reforming Working Group Kick-Off Meeting.

65

Ultrafast conversions between hydrogen bonded structures in liquid water observed by femtosecond x-ray spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the first femtosecond soft x-ray spectroscopy in liquids, enabling the observation of changes in hydrogen bond structures in water via core-hole excitation. The oxygen K-edge of vibrationally excited water is probed with femtosecond soft x-ray pulses, exploiting the relation between different water structures and distinct x-ray spectral features. After excitation of the intramolecular OH stretching vibration, characteristic x-ray absorption changes monitor the conversion of strongly hydrogen-bonded water structures to more disordered structures with weaker hydrogen-bonding described by a single subpicosecond time constant. The latter describes the thermalization time of vibrational excitations and defines the characteristic maximum rate with which nonequilibrium populations of more strongly hydrogen-bonded water structures convert to less-bonded ones. On short time scales, the relaxation of vibrational excitations leads to a transient high-pressure state and a transient absorption spectrum different from that of statically heated water.

Wen, Haidan; Huse, Nils; Schoenlein, Robert W.; Lindenberg, Aaron M.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Hydrogen Fluoride Capture by Imidazolium Acetate Ionic Liquid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Extraction of hydrofluoric acid (HF) from oils is a drastically important problem in petroleum industry, since HF causes quick corrosion of pipe lines and brings severe health problems to humanity. Some ionic liquids (ILs) constitute promising scavenger agents thanks to strong binding to polar compounds and tunability. PM7-MD simulations and hybrid density functional theory are employed here to consider HF capture ability of ILs. Discussing the effects and impacts of the cation and the anion separately and together, I will evaluate performance of imidazolium acetate and outline systematic search guidelines for efficient adsorption and extraction of HF.

Chaban, Vitaly

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

SBIR/STTR Phase I Release 1 Award Winners Announced, Includes Four Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Projects  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The US Department of Energy (DOE) recently announced the FY 2014 Small Business Innovation Research and Small Business Technology Transfer (SBIR/STTR) Phase I Release 1 award winners, including four hydrogen and fuel cell projects in Arizona, Massachusetts, and South Carolina.

68

SBIR/STTR Phase II Release 1 Award Winners Announced, Includes Two Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Projects  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The US Department of Energy (DOE) recently announced the FY 2014 Small Business Innovation Research and Small Business Technology Transfer (SBIR/STTR) Phase II Release 1 award winners, including two hydrogen and fuel cell projects in Colorado and New Jersey.

69

Observation of crystallization slowdown in supercooled para-hydrogen and ortho-deuterium quantum liquid mixtures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report a quantitative experimental study of the crystallization kinetics of supercooled quantum liquid mixtures of para-hydrogen (pH$_2$) and ortho-deuterium (oD$_2$) by high spatial resolution Raman spectroscopy of liquid microjets. We show that in a wide range of compositions the crystallization rate of the isotopic mixtures is significantly reduced with respect to that of the pure substances. To clarify this behavior we have performed path-integral simulations of the non-equilibrium pH$_2$-oD$_2$ liquid mixtures, revealing that differences in quantum delocalization between the two isotopic species translate into different effective particle sizes. Our results provide first experimental evidence for crystallization slowdown of quantum origin, offering a benchmark for theoretical studies of quantum behavior in supercooled liquids.

Matthias Khnel; Jos M. Fernndez; Filippo Tramonto; Guzmn Tejeda; Elena Moreno; Anton Kalinin; Marco Nava; Davide E. Galli; Salvador Montero; Robert E. Grisenti

2014-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

70

Hybrid approach for including electronic and nuclear quantum effects in molecular dynamics simulations of hydrogen transfer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hybrid approach for including electronic and nuclear quantum effects in molecular dynamics January 2001 A hybrid approach for simulating proton and hydride transfer reactions in enzymes coefficient and to investigate the real-time dynamics of reactive trajectories. This hybrid approach includes

Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

71

Hydrogen Storage - Current Technology | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Current on-board hydrogen storage approaches involve compressed hydrogen gas tanks, liquid hydrogen tanks, cryogenic compressed hydrogen, metal hydrides,...

72

Hydrogen Delivery  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mark Paster Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technology Program Hydrogen Production and Delivery Team Hydrogen Delivery Goal Hydrogen Delivery Goal Liquid H 2 & Chem. Carriers Gaseous Pipeline Truck Hydrides Liquid H 2 - Truck - Rail Other Carriers Onsite reforming Develop Develop hydrogen fuel hydrogen fuel delivery delivery technologies that technologies that enable the introduction and enable the introduction and long long - - term viability of term viability of hydrogen as an energy hydrogen as an energy carrier for transportation carrier for transportation and stationary power. and stationary power. Delivery Options * End Game - Pipelines - Other as needed * Breakthrough Hydrogen Carriers * Truck: HP Gas & Liquid Hydrogen

73

Hydrogen Related Analytical Studies Office of Fossil Energy and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

coal with co-production of electric power · Centralized production of liquid fuel hydrogen carriers to ASPEN. Simulations included production of power, liquids, syngas and hydrogen from coal. · In the mid current baseline · Centralized production of hydrogen from coal · Centralized production of hydrogen from

74

SBIR/STTR Release 2 Topics AnnouncedIncludes Hydrogen and Fuel Cells  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The 2015 Small Business Innovation Research and Small Business Technology Transfer (SBIR/STTR) Phase I Release 2 topics include fuel cell-battery electric hybrid trucks and in-line quality control devices for polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells.

75

Catalytic pressurization of liquid hydrogen fuel tanks for unmanned aerial vehicles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

As the use and applications of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) expand the need for a lighter weight fuel allowing for longer duration flights has become the primary limiting factor in the advancement of these vehicles. To extend the operational envelope of UAV onboard condensed hydrogen storage for missions exceeding one week is necessary. Currently large spherical liquid hydrogen tanks that are pressurized with external helium tanks or electronic heating elements are utilized for this purpose. However the mass size and power consumption of the fuel storage tank and fuel pressurization system significantly limit the flight envelope of UAV. In an effort to alleviate these issues this paper investigates the technological feasibility of orthohydrogen-parahydrogen catalysis as a method of fuel pressurization. Typical pressurization requirements for takeoff cruise and landing are reviewed. Calculations of the catalyst system mass and response time are presented.

Jacob Leachman; Melissa Jean Street; Teira Graham

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

REFORMING OF LIQUID HYDROCARBONS IN A NOVEL HYDROGEN-SELECTIVE MEMBRANE-BASED FUEL PROCESSOR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We propose to develop an inorganic metal-metal composite membrane to study reforming of liquid hydrocarbons and methanol by equilibrium shift in membrane-reactor configuration, viewed as fuel processor. Based on our current understanding and experience in the Pd-ceramic composite membrane, we propose to further develop this membrane to a Pd and Pd-Ag alloy membrane on microporous stainless steel support to provide structural reliability from distortion due to thermal cycling. Because of the metal-metal composite structure, we believe that the associated end-seal problem in the Pd-ceramic composite membrane in tubular configuration would not be an issue at all. We plan to test this membrane as membrane-reactor-separator for reforming liquid hydrocarbons and methanol for simultaneous production and separation of high-purity hydrogen for PEM fuel cell applications. To improve the robustness of the membrane film and deep penetration into the pores, we have used osmotic pressure field in the electroless plating process. Using this novel method, we deposited thin Pd-film on the inside of microporous stainless steel tube and the deposited film appears to robust and defect free. Work is in progress to evaluate the hydrogen perm-selectivity of the Pd-stainless steel membrane.

Shamsuddin Ilias

2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

77

Design of a reconfigurable liquid hydrogen fuel tank for use in the Genii unmanned aerial vehicle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Long endurance flight on the order of days is a leading flight performance characteristic for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs). Liquid hydrogen (LH2) is well suited to providing multi-day flight times with a specific energy 2.8 times that of conventional kerosene based fuels. However no such system of LH2 storage delivery and use is currently available for commercial UAVs. In this paper we develop a light weight LH2 dewar for integration and testing in the proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell powered student designed and constructed Genii UAV. The fuel tank design is general for scaling to suit various UAV platforms. A cylindrical vacuum-jacketed design with removable end caps was chosen to incorporate various fuel level gauging pressurizing and slosh mitigation systems. Heat and mechanical loadings were modeled to compare with experimental results. Mass performance of the fuel tank is characterized by the fraction of liquid hydrogen to full tank mass and the insulation performance was characterized by effective thermal conductivity and boil-off rate.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Chemoselective Hydrogenation of Biomass-Derived 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural into the Liquid Biofuel 2,5-Dimethylfuran  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Chemoselective Hydrogenation of Biomass-Derived 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural into the Liquid Biofuel 2,5-Dimethylfuran ... In recent years, 2,5-dimethylfuran (DMF), which is produced by the selective hydrogenation of biomass-derived 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) and is considered as a new-fashioned liquid biofuel for transportation, has received much more attention from many researchers in the world. ... Among the various desired compounds via the oriented transformation,(15-19) 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) is considered as a versatile platform compound (Scheme 1) and a crucial intermediate for connecting biomass resource and fossil industry,(20-24) and this is because that it can be further transformed into a series of high-quality fuels such as ethyl levulinate (EL),(25-27) 5-ethoxymethylfurfural (EMF),(28-30) 2,5-dimethylfuran (DMF),(31-33) and C9C15 alkanes(34-36) and high-value chemicals such as levulinic acid (LA),(37-39) 2,5-dihydroxymethylfuran (DHMF),(40-42) 2,5-diformylfuran (DFF),(43-45) and 2,5-furandicarboxylic acid (FDCA). ...

Lei Hu; Lu Lin; Shijie Liu

2014-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

79

Design of a reconfigurable liquid hydrogen fuel tank for use in the Genii unmanned aerial vehicle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Long endurance flight, on the order of days, is a leading flight performance characteristic for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs). Liquid hydrogen (LH2) is well suited to providing multi-day flight times with a specific energy 2.8 times that of conventional kerosene based fuels. However, no such system of LH2 storage, delivery, and use is currently available for commercial UAVs. In this paper, we develop a light weight LH2 dewar for integration and testing in the proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell powered, student designed and constructed, Genii UAV. The fuel tank design is general for scaling to suit various UAV platforms. A cylindrical vacuum-jacketed design with removable end caps was chosen to incorporate various fuel level gauging, pressurizing, and slosh mitigation systems. Heat and mechanical loadings were modeled to compare with experimental results. Mass performance of the fuel tank is characterized by the fraction of liquid hydrogen to full tank mass, and the insulation performance was characterized by effective thermal conductivity and boil-off rate.

Adam, Patrick; Leachman, Jacob [HYdrogen Properties for Energy Research (HYPER) Laboratory, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164-2920 (United States)

2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

80

Hazards Induced by Breach of Liquid Rocket Fuel Tanks: Conditions and Risks of Cryogenic Liquid Hydrogen-Oxygen Mixture Explosions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We analyze the data of purposeful rupture experiments with LOx and LH2 tanks, the Hydrogen-Oxygen Vertical Impact (HOVI) tests that were performed to clarify the ignition mechanisms, the explosive power of cryogenic H2/Ox mixtures under different conditions, and to elucidate the puzzling source of the initial formation of flames near the intertank section during the Challenger disaster. We carry out a physics-based analysis of general explosions scenarios for cryogenic gaseous H2/Ox mixtures and determine their realizability conditions, using the well-established simplified models from the detonation and deflagration theory. We study the features of aerosol H2/Ox mixture combustion and show, in particular, that aerosols intensify the deflagration flames and can induce detonation for any ignition mechanism. We propose a cavitation-induced mechanism of self-ignition of cryogenic H2/Ox mixtures that may be realized when gaseous H2 and Ox flows are mixed with a liquid Ox turbulent stream, as occurred in all HOVI ...

Osipov, Viatcheslav; Hafiychuk, Halyna; Ponizovskaya-Devine, Ekaterina; Smelyanskiy, Vadim; Mathias, Donovan; Lawrence, Scott; Werkheiser, Mary

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes liquid hydrogen" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Challenges and design solutions of the liquid hydrogen circuit at the European Spallation Source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The European Spallation Source (ESS), Lund, Sweden will be a 5MW long-pulse neutron spallation research facility and will enable new opportunities for researchers in the fields of life sciences, energy, environmental technology, cultural heritage and fundamental physics. Neutrons are produced by accelerating a high-energy proton beam into a rotating helium-cooled tungsten target. These neutrons pass through moderators to reduce their energy to an appropriate range (< 5 meV for cold neutrons); two of which will use liquid hydrogen at 17 K as the moderating and cooling medium. There are several technical challenges to overcome in the design of a robust system that will operate under such conditions, not least the 20 kW of deposited heat. These challenges and the associated design solutions will be detailed in this paper.

Gallimore, S.; Nilsson, P.; Sabbagh, P.; Takibayev, A.; Weisend II, J. G. [European Spallation Source ESS AB, SE-22100 Lund (Sweden); Beler, Y. [Forschungzentrum Jlich, Jlich (Germany); Klaus, M. [Technische Universitt Dresden, Dresden (Germany)

2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

82

Hydrogen  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hydrogen energy is a clean or inexhaustible energy like renewable energy and nuclear energy. Todays energy supply has a considerable impact on the environment. Hydrogen energy is a promising alternative solut...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

The effect of a micro bubble dispersed gas phase on hydrogen isotope transport in liquid metals under nuclear irradiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The present work intend to be a first step towards the understanding and quantification of the hydrogen isotope complex phenomena in liquid metals for nuclear technology. Liquid metals under nuclear irradiation in,e.g., breeding blankets of a nuclear fusion reactor would generate tritium which is to be extracted and recirculated as fuel. At the same time that tritium is bred, helium is also generated and may precipitate in the form of nano bubbles. Other liquid metal systems of a nuclear reactor involve hydrogen isotope absorption processes, e.g., tritium extraction system. Hence, hydrogen isotope absorption into gas bubbles modelling and control may have a capital importance regarding design, operation and safety. Here general models for hydrogen isotopes transport in liquid metal and absorption into gas phase, that do not depend on the mass transfer limiting regime, are exposed and implemented in OpenFOAMR CFD tool for 0D to 3D simulations. Results for a 0D case show the impact of a He dispersed phase of na...

Fradera, Jorge

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Comparing air quality impacts of hydrogen and gasoline  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

pathway, with hydrogen production at refueling stations (with centralized hydrogen production and gaseous hydrogenwith centralized hydrogen production and liquid hydrogen (

Sperling, Dan; Wang, Guihua; Ogden, Joan M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Lined sampling vessel including a filter to separate solids from liquids on exit  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A filtering apparatus has an open canister with an inlet port. A canister lid is provided which includes an outlet port for the passage of fluids from the canister. Liners are also provided which are shaped to fit the interiors of the canister and the lid, with at least the canister liner preferably being flexible. The sample to be filtered is positioned inside the canister liner, with the lid and lid liner being put in place thereafter. A filter element is located between the sample and the outlet port. Seals are formed between the canister liner and lid liner, and around the outlet port to prevent fluid leakage. A pressure differential is created between the canister and the canister liner so that the fluid in the sample is ejected from the outlet port and the canister liner collapses around the retained solids.

Shurtliff, Rodney M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Klingler, Kerry M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Turner, Terry D. (Ammon, ID)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

"Kohn-Shamification" of the classical density-functional theory of inhomogeneous polar molecular liquids with application to liquid hydrogen chloride  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Gordian knot of density-functional theories for classical molecular liquids remains finding an accurate free-energy functional in terms of the densities of the atomic sites of the molecules. Following Kohn and Sham, we show how to solve this problem by considering noninteracting molecules in a set of effective potentials. This shift in perspective leads to an accurate and computationally tractable description in terms of simple three-dimensional functions. We also treat both the linear- and saturation- dielectric responses of polar systems, presenting liquid hydrogen chloride as a case study.

Johannes Lischner; T. A. Arias

2008-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

87

Production of hydrogen, liquid fuels, and chemicals from catalytic processing of bio-oils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Disclosed herein is a method of generating hydrogen from a bio-oil, comprising hydrogenating a water-soluble fraction of the bio-oil with hydrogen in the presence of a hydrogenation catalyst, and reforming the water-soluble fraction by aqueous-phase reforming in the presence of a reforming catalyst, wherein hydrogen is generated by the reforming, and the amount of hydrogen generated is greater than that consumed by the hydrogenating. The method can further comprise hydrocracking or hydrotreating a lignin fraction of the bio-oil with hydrogen in the presence of a hydrocracking catalyst wherein the lignin fraction of bio-oil is obtained as a water-insoluble fraction from aqueous extraction of bio-oil. The hydrogen used in the hydrogenating and in the hydrocracking or hydrotreating can be generated by reforming the water-soluble fraction of bio-oil.

Huber, George W; Vispute, Tushar P; Routray, Kamalakanta

2014-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

88

Hydrogen bonding in asphaltenes and coal liquids. Quarterly report, November 1, 1982-January 31, 1983  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Aging of upgraded coal-derived liquids obtained from catalytic hydroprocessing of H-coal and SRC-II syncrudes has been studied. Fuel degradation, in the presence of added specific heteroatomic compounds, is monitored in the early stages by laser light scattering of developing particles at ambient temperature. The following additives have been included: 2,5-dimethypyrrole (DMP), 2,6-dimethylquioline (DMQ), phenol, 2,6-di-tert-butyl phenol (DTBP), pyridine, thiophenol, n-butyl sulfide, n-butyl disulfide, thiophene, tetrahydrothiophene, 1-hexene, copper wire, iron wire. Very pronounced enhancement of light scattering intensity has been observed for coal liquids containing the following additives: (1) Phenol, pyridine, Cu; (2) DTBP, pyridine, Cu; (3) Phenol, DMQ, Cu; (4) DMP, thiophenol. Phenolic oxidative coupling is a very important mechanism for the aging of coal liquids, and pyridine- or DMQ- complexed Cu is effective catalyst for oxidative coupling. DTBP is a hindered phenol, and therefore oxidative coupling is not as extensive as for the parent phenol. As a result, light scattering for system (2) is not as extensive as system (1). DMP by itself is deleterious to fuel stability, and the effect is enhanced by the presence of thiophenol. Thiophenes, sulfides, and hexene are much less deleterious. Iron is a poor catalyst for oxidative coupling, and therefore light scatteirng in the presence of iron is minimal. 7 figures, 1 table.

Li, N.C.; Yaggi, N.F.; Loeffler, M.C.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

SBIR/STTR FY15 Release 1 Awards AnnouncedIncludes Fuel Cell Catalyst and Hydrogen Contamination Detection R&D  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy has announced the 2015 Small Business Innovation Research and Small Business Technology Transfer (SBIR/STTR) Phase I Release 1 Awards, including projects focusing on non-platinum catalysts for fuel cells and detection of contaminants in hydrogen.

90

Conversion of Hydrogen Sulfide in Coal Gases to Liquid Elemental Sulfur with Monolithic Catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Removal of hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) from coal gasifier gas and sulfur recovery are key steps in the development of Department of Energy's (DOE's) advanced power plants that produce electric power and clean transportation fuels with coal and natural gas. These plants will require highly clean coal gas with H{sub 2}S below 1 ppmv and negligible amounts of trace contaminants such as hydrogen chloride, ammonia, alkali, heavy metals, and particulate. The conventional method of sulfur removal and recovery employing amine, Claus, and tail-gas treatment is very expensive. A second generation approach developed under DOE's sponsorship employs hot-gas desulfurization (HGD) using regenerable metal oxide sorbents followed by Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP). However, this process sequence does not remove trace contaminants and is targeted primarily towards the development of advanced integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants that produce electricity (not both electricity and transportation fuels). There is an immediate as well as long-term need for the development of cleanup processes that produce highly clean coal gas for next generation power plants. To this end, a novel process is now under development at several research organizations in which the H{sub 2}S in coal gas is directly oxidized to elemental sulfur over a selective catalyst. Such a process is ideally suited for coal gas from commercial gasifiers with a quench system to remove essentially all the trace contaminants except H{sub 2}S In the Single-Step Sulfur Recovery Process (SSRP), the direct oxidation of H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur in the presence of SO{sub 2} is ideally suited for coal gas from commercial gasifiers with a quench system to remove essentially all the trace contaminants except H{sub 2}S. This direct oxidation process has the potential to produce a super clean coal gas more economically than both conventional amine-based processes and HGD/DSRP. The H{sub 2} and CO components of syngas appear to behave as inert with respect to sulfur formed at the SSRP conditions. One problem in the SSRP process that needs to be eliminated or minimized is COS formation that may occur due to reaction of CO with sulfur formed from the Claus reaction. The objectives of this research are to formulate monolithic catalysts for removal of H{sub 2}S from coal gases and minimum formation of COS with monolithic catalyst supports, {gamma}-alumina wash or carbon coats, and catalytic metals, to develop a catalytic regeneration method for a deactivated monolithic catalyst, to measure kinetics of both direct oxidation of H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur with SO{sub 2} as an oxidizer and formation of COS in the presence of a simulated coal gas mixture containing H{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, and moisture, using a monolithic catalyst reactor, and to develop kinetic rate equations and model the direct oxidation process to assist in the design of large-scale plants. This heterogeneous catalytic reaction has gaseous reactants such as H{sub 2}S and SO{sub 2}. However, this heterogeneous catalytic reaction has heterogeneous products such as liquid elemental sulfur and steam. Experiments on conversion of hydrogen sulfide into elemental sulfur and formation of COS were carried out for the space time range of 130-156 seconds at 120-140 C to formulate catalysts suitable for the removal of H{sub 2}S and COS from coal gases, evaluate removal capabilities of hydrogen sulfide and COS from coal gases with formulated catalysts, and develop an economic regeneration method of deactivated catalysts. Simulated coal gas mixtures consist of 3,300-3,800-ppmv hydrogen sulfide, 1,600-1,900 ppmv sulfur dioxide, 18-21 v% hydrogen, 29-34 v% CO, 8-10 v% CO{sub 2}, 5-18 vol % moisture, and nitrogen as remainder. Volumetric feed rates of a simulated coal gas mixture to the reactor are 114-132 SCCM. The temperature of the reactor is controlled in an oven at 120-140 C. The pressure of the reactor is maintained at 116-129 psia. The molar ratio of H{sub 2}S to SO{sub 2} in the monolithic catalyst reactor is

K. C. Kwon

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

91

Conversion of Hydrogen Sulfide in Coal Gases to Liquid Elemental Sulfur with Monolithic Catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Removal of hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) from coal gasifier gas and sulfur recovery are key steps in the development of Department of Energy's (DOE's) advanced power plants that produce electric power and clean transportation fuels with coal and natural gas. These plants will require highly clean coal gas with H{sub 2}S below 1 ppmv and negligible amounts of trace contaminants such as hydrogen chloride, ammonia, alkali, heavy metals, and particulate. The conventional method of sulfur removal and recovery employing amine, Claus, and tail-gas treatment is very expensive. A second generation approach developed under DOE's sponsorship employs hot-gas desulfurization (HGD) using regenerable metal oxide sorbents followed by Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP). However, this process sequence does not remove trace contaminants and is targeted primarily towards the development of advanced integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants that produce electricity (not both electricity and transportation fuels). There is an immediate as well as long-term need for the development of cleanup processes that produce highly clean coal gas for next generation power plants. To this end, a novel process is now under development at several research organizations in which the H{sub 2}S in coal gas is directly oxidized to elemental sulfur over a selective catalyst. Such a process is ideally suited for coal gas from commercial gasifiers with a quench system to remove essentially all the trace contaminants except H{sub 2}S In the Single-Step Sulfur Recovery Process (SSRP), the direct oxidation of H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur in the presence of SO{sub 2} is ideally suited for coal gas from commercial gasifiers with a quench system to remove essentially all the trace contaminants except H{sub 2}S. This direct oxidation process has the potential to produce a super clean coal gas more economically than both conventional amine-based processes and HGD/DSRP. The H{sub 2} and CO components of syngas appear to behave as inert with respect to sulfur formed at the SSRP conditions. One problem in the SSRP process that needs to be eliminated or minimized is COS formation that may occur due to reaction of CO with sulfur formed from the Claus reaction. The objectives of this research are to formulate monolithic catalysts for removal of H{sub 2}S from coal gases and minimum formation of COS with monolithic catalyst supports, {gamma}-alumina wash coat, and catalytic metals, to develop a regeneration method for a deactivated monolithic catalyst, to measure kinetics of both direct oxidation of H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur with SO{sub 2} as an oxidizer and formation of COS in the presence of a simulated coal gas mixture containing H{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, and moisture, using a monolithic catalyst reactor. The task of developing kinetic rate equations and modeling the direct oxidation process to assist in the design of large-scale plants will be abandoned since formulation of catalysts suitable for the removal of H{sub 2}S and COS is being in progress. This heterogeneous catalytic reaction has gaseous reactants such as H{sub 2}S and SO{sub 2}. However, this heterogeneous catalytic reaction has heterogeneous products such as liquid elemental sulfur and steam. Experiments on conversion of hydrogen sulfide into elemental sulfur and formation of COS were carried out for the space time range of 46-570 seconds under reaction conditions to formulate catalysts suitable for the removal of H{sub 2}S and COS from coal gases and evaluate their capabilities in reducing hydrogen sulfide and COS in coal gases. Simulated coal gas mixtures consist of 3,200-4,000-ppmv hydrogen sulfide, 1,600-20,000-ppmv sulfur dioxide, 18-27 v% hydrogen, 29-41 v% CO, 8-12 v% CO{sub 2}, 0-10 vol % moisture, and nitrogen as remainder. Volumetric feed rates of simulated coal gas mixtures to the reactor are 30 - 180 cm{sup 3}/min at 1 atm and 25 C (SCCM). The temperature of the reactor is controlled in an oven at 120-155 C. The pressure of the reactor is maintained at 40-210 psia. The molar ratio

K.C. Kwon

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

92

Conversion of Hydrogen Sulfide in Coal Gases to Liquid Elemental Sulfur with Monolithic Catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Removal of hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) from coal gasifier gas and sulfur recovery are key steps in the development of Department of Energy's (DOE's) advanced power plants that produce electric power and clean transportation fuels with coal and natural gas. These plants will require highly clean coal gas with H{sub 2}S below 1 ppmv and negligible amounts of trace contaminants such as hydrogen chloride, ammonia, alkali, heavy metals, and particulate. The conventional method of sulfur removal and recovery employing amine, Claus, and tail-gas treatment is very expensive. A second generation approach developed under DOE's sponsorship employs hot-gas desulfurization (HGD) using regenerable metal oxide sorbents followed by Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP). However, this process sequence does not remove trace contaminants and is targeted primarily towards the development of advanced integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants that produce electricity (not both electricity and transportation fuels). There is an immediate as well as long-term need for the development of cleanup processes that produce highly clean coal gas for next generation power plants. To this end, a novel process is now under development at several research organizations in which the H{sub 2} in coal gas is directly oxidized to elemental sulfur over a selective catalyst. Such a process is ideally suited for coal gas from commercial gasifiers with a quench system to remove essentially all the trace contaminants except H{sub 2}S In the Single-Step Sulfur Recovery Process (SSRP), the direct oxidation of H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur in the presence of SO{sub 2} is ideally suited for coal gas from commercial gasifiers with a quench system to remove essentially all the trace contaminants except H{sub 2}S. This direct oxidation process has the potential to produce a super clean coal gas more economically than both conventional amine-based processes and HGD/DSRP. The H{sub 2} and CO components of syngas appear to behave as inert with respect to sulfur formed at the SSRP conditions. One problem in the SSRP process that needs to be eliminated or minimized is COS formation that may occur due to reaction of CO with sulfur formed from the Claus reaction. The objectives of this research are to formulate monolithic catalysts for removal of H{sub 2}S from coal gases and minimum formation of COS with monolithic catalyst supports, {gamma}-alumina wash or carbon coats, and catalytic metals, to develop a catalytic regeneration method for a deactivated monolithic catalyst, to measure kinetics of both direct oxidation of H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur with SO{sub 2} as an oxidizer and formation of COS in the presence of a simulated coal gas mixture containing H{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, and moisture, using a monolithic catalyst reactor, and to develop kinetic rate equations and model the direct oxidation process to assist in the design of large-scale plants. This heterogeneous catalytic reaction has gaseous reactants such as H{sub 2}S and SO{sub 2}. However, this heterogeneous catalytic reaction has heterogeneous products such as liquid elemental sulfur and steam. To achieve the above-mentioned objectives using a monolithic catalyst reactor, experiments on conversion of hydrogen sulfide into elemental sulfur and formation of COS were carried out for the space time range of 40-560 seconds at 120-150 C to evaluate effects of reaction temperatures, total pressure, space time, and catalyst regeneration on conversion of hydrogen sulfide into elemental sulfur and formation of COS. Simulated coal gas mixtures consist of 3,600-4,000-ppmv hydrogen sulfide, 1,800-2,000 ppmv sulfur dioxide, 23-27 v% hydrogen, 36-41 v% CO, 10-12 v% CO{sub 2}, 0-10 vol % moisture, and nitrogen as remainder. Volumetric feed rates of a simulated coal gas mixture to the reactor are 30-180 SCCM. The temperature of the reactor is controlled in an oven at 120-150 C. The pressure of the reactor is maintained at 40-210 psia. The molar ratio of H{sub 2}S to SO{sub 2} in the monolithic catalyst reactor is mai

K. C. Kwon

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

93

Hydrogen Liquefaction  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Liquid Hydrogen is 0.2% Ortho, 99.8% Para 3 Liquid Supply North America 250+ TPD Capacity Diverse Feedstocks Chlor-Alkali SMR Petro-chem Market...

94

Liquid Hydrogen Production and Delivery from a Dedicated Wind Power Plant  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This May 2012 study assesses the costs and potential for remote renewable energy to be transported via hydrogen to a demand center for transportation use.

95

High P/T phase and volumetric behavior of coal liquid constituents. (Quarterly technical progress report), January 1-April 1, 1984. [6 gases in hydrogen-dibenzofuran and in hydrogen-g-methylanthracene  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A sophisticated perturbation chromatography technique has been used to study the vapor-liquid equilibrium behavior of six light gases in two hydrogen-coal liquid model compounds systems. Infinite-dilution K values are reported for methane, ethane, propane, n-butane, carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide in: (1) hydrogen-dibenzofuran system at 373.2 and 398.2/sup 0/K and up to 6 MPa; and (2) hydrogen-g-methylanthracene systems at 373.2, 398.2, 423.2, 448.2 and 473.2/sup 0/K and up to 21 M Pa. Henry's constants were determined for the light gases in 9-methylanthracene. Second cross virial coefficients and vapor-phase infinite-dilution fugacity coefficients were calculated for the hydrocarbon gases in hydrogen. The results were combined with the experimental K-value measurements to obtain Henry's constants in hydrogen-9-methylanthracene mixtures of fixed liquid composition. The constants thus obtained show a significant dependence of hydrogen solubility. 1 reference.

Kobayshi, R.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Determining the Lowest-Cost Hydrogen Delivery Mode  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

liquefaction and liquid hydrogen storage tanks are needed.low cost of liquid hydrogen storage is offset by the highrefueling pressure. Hydrogen storage requirements vary among

Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Determining the lowest-cost hydrogen delivery mode  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

liquefaction and liquid hydrogen storage tanks are needed.low cost of liquid hydrogen storage is offset by the highrefueling pressure. Hydrogen storage requirements vary among

Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Hydrogen Cryomagnetics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

% cryogenics (inc. MRI) 29% pressurisation and purging 11%controlled atmospheres (inc. breathing) 6% 4 Figure 5. Simplified price-cost, supply-demand relationship that is central to the helium market model developed during the Helium Resources... of hydrogen large amounts of hydrogen must be available for liquefaction. This poses problems for the production of liquid hydrogen via intermittent wind energy and via microwave plasma reactors that are not scalable as a result of low hydrogen production...

Glowacki, B. A.; Hanely, E.; Nuttall, W. J.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Hydrogen sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A hydrogen sensor for detecting/quantitating hydrogen and hydrogen isotopes includes a sampling line and a microplasma generator that excites hydrogen from a gas sample and produces light emission from excited hydrogen. A power supply provides power to the microplasma generator, and a spectrometer generates an emission spectrum from the light emission. A programmable computer is adapted for determining whether or not the gas sample includes hydrogen, and for quantitating the amount of hydrogen and/or hydrogen isotopes are present in the gas sample.

Duan, Yixiang (Los Alamos, NM); Jia, Quanxi (Los Alamos, NM); Cao, Wenqing (Katy, TX)

2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

100

Metallization of fluid hydrogen  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...P. Tunstall Metallization of fluid hydrogen W. J. Nellis 1 A. A. Louis 2 N...The electrical resistivity of liquid hydrogen has been measured at the high dynamic...which structural changes are paramount. hydrogen|metallization of hydrogen|liquid...

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes liquid hydrogen" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Reforming of Liquid Hydrocarbons in a Novel Hydrogen-Selective Membrane-Based Fuel Processor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this work, asymmetric dense Pd/porous stainless steel composite membranes were fabricated by depositing palladium on the outer surface of the tubular support. The electroless plating method combined with an osmotic pressure field was used to deposit the palladium film. Surface morphology and microstructure of the composite membranes were characterized by SEM and EDX. The SEM and EDX analyses revealed strong adhesion of the plated pure palladium film on the substrate and dense coalescence of the Pd film. Membranes were further characterized by conducting permeability experiments with pure hydrogen, nitrogen, and helium gases at temperatures from 325 to 450 C and transmembrane pressure differences from 5 to 45 psi. The permeation results showed that the fabricated membranes have both high hydrogen permeability and selectivity. For example, the hydrogen permeability for a composite membrane with a 20 {micro}m Pd film was 3.02 x 10{sup -5} moles/m{sup 2}.s.Pa{sup 0.765} at 450 C. Hydrogen/nitrogen selectivity for this composite membrane was 1000 at 450 C with a transmembrane pressure difference of 14.7 psi. Steam reforming of methane is one of the most important chemical processes in hydrogen and syngas production. To investigate the usefulness of palladium-based composite membranes in membrane-reactor configuration for simultaneous production and separation of hydrogen, steam reforming of methane by equilibrium shift was studied. The steam reforming of methane using a packed-bed inert membrane tubular reactor (PBIMTR) was simulated. A two-dimensional pseudo-homogeneous reactor model with parallel flow configuration was developed for steam reforming of methane. The shell volume was taken as the feed and sweep gas was fed to the inside of the membrane tube. Radial diffusion was taken into account for concentration gradient in the radial direction due to hydrogen permeation through the membrane. With appropriate reaction rate expressions, a set of partial differential equations was derived using the continuity equation for the reaction system and then solved by finite difference method with appropriate boundary and initial conditions. An iterative scheme was used to obtain a converged solution. Membrane reactor performance was compared to that in a traditional non-membrane packed-bed reactor (PBR). Their performances were also compared with thermodynamic equilibrium values achievable in a conventional non-membrane reactor. Numerical results of the models show that the methane conversions in the PBIMTR are always higher than that in the PBR, as well as thermodynamic equilibrium conversions. For instance, at a reaction pressure of 6 atm, a temperature of 650 C, a space velocity of 900/16.0 SCCM/gm{sub cat}, a steam to methane molar feed ratio of 3.0, a sweep ratio of 0.15, the conversion in the membrane reactor is about 86.5%, while the conversion in the non-membrane reactor is about 50.8%. The corresponding equilibrium conversion is about 56.4%. The effects on the degree of conversion and hydrogen yield were analyzed for different parameters such as temperature, reactor pressure, feed and sweep flow rate, feed molar ratio, and space time. From the analysis of the model results, it is obvious that the membrane reactor operation can be optimized for conversion or yield through the choice of proper operating and design parameters. Comparisons with available literature data for both membrane and non-membrane reactors showed a good agreement.

Shamsuddin Ilias

2006-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

102

Methods of using ionic liquids having a fluoride anion as solvents  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method in one embodiment includes contacting a strongly hydrogen bonded organic material with an ionic liquid having a fluoride anion for solubilizing the strongly hydrogen bonded organic material; and maintaining the ionic liquid at a temperature of about 90.degree. C. or less during the contacting. A method in another embodiment includes contacting a strongly hydrogen bonded organic material with an ionic liquid having an acetate or formate anion for solubilizing the strongly hydrogen bonded organic material; and maintaining the ionic liquid at a temperature of less than about 90.degree. C. during the contacting.

Pagoria, Philip (Livermore, CA); Maiti, Amitesh (San Ramon, CA); Gash, Alexander (Brentwood, CA); Han, Thomas Yong (Pleasanton, CA); Orme, Christine (Oakland, CA); Fried, Laurence (Livermore, CA)

2011-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

103

Numerical simulation of CO2 leakage from a geologic disposal reservoir including transitions from super- to sub-critical conditions, and boiling of liquid of CO2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The critical point of CO{sub 2} is at temperature and pressure conditions of T{sub crit} = 31.04 C, P{sub crit} = 73.82 bar. At lower (subcritical) temperatures and/or pressures, CO{sub 2} can exist in two different phase states, a liquid and a gaseous state, as well as in two-phase mixtures of these states. Disposal of CO{sub 2} into brine formations would be made at supercritical pressures. However, CO{sub 2} escaping from the storage reservoir may migrate upwards towards regions with lower temperatures and pressures, where CO{sub 2} would be in subcritical conditions. An assessment of the fate of leaking CO{sub 2} requires a capability to model not only supercritical but also subcritical CO{sub 2}, as well as phase changes between liquid and gaseous CO{sub 2} in sub-critical conditions. We have developed a methodology for numerically simulating the behavior of water-CO{sub 2} mixtures in permeable media under conditions that may include liquid, gaseous, and supercritical CO{sub 2}. This has been applied to simulations of leakage from a deep storage reservoir in which a rising CO{sub 2} plume undergoes transitions from supercritical to subcritical conditions. We find strong cooling effects when liquid CO{sub 2} rises to elevations where it begins to boil and evolve a gaseous CO{sub 2} phase. A three-phase zone forms (aqueous - liquid - gas), which over time becomes several hundred meters thick as decreasing temperatures permit liquid CO{sub 2} to advance to shallower elevations. Fluid mobilities are reduced in the three-phase region from phase interference effects. This impedes CO{sub 2} upflow, causes the plume to spread out laterally, and gives rise to dispersed CO{sub 2} discharge at the land surface. Our simulation suggests that temperatures along a CO{sub 2} leakage path may decline to levels low enough so that solid water ice and CO{sub 2} hydrate phases may be formed.

Pruess, Karsten

2003-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

104

Optimizing the Design of Biomass Hydrogen Supply Chains Using Real-World Spatial Distributions: A Case Study Using California Rice Straw  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

gas trucks needs hydrogen storage, hydrogen compressors forcapacity. Liquid hydrogen storage consists of 5 days of thethis reason the liquid hydrogen storage at the station is

Parker, Nathan C

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Optimizing the Design of Biomass Hydrogen Supply ChainsUsing Real-World Spatial Distributions: A Case Study Using California Rice Straw  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

gas trucks needs hydrogen storage, hydrogen compressors forcapacity. Liquid hydrogen storage consists of 5 days of thethis reason the liquid hydrogen storage at the station is

Parker, Nathan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Integrated modeling of CO2 storage and leakage scenarios including transitions between super- and sub-critical conditions, and phase change between liquid and gaseous CO2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Storage of CO{sub 2} in saline aquifers is intended to be at supercritical pressure and temperature conditions, but CO{sub 2} leaking from a geologic storage reservoir and migrating toward the land surface (through faults, fractures, or improperly abandoned wells) would reach subcritical conditions at depths shallower than 500-750 m. At these and shallower depths, subcritical CO{sub 2} can form two-phase mixtures of liquid and gaseous CO{sub 2}, with significant latent heat effects during boiling and condensation. Additional strongly non-isothermal effects can arise from decompression of gas-like subcritical CO{sub 2}, the so-called Joule-Thomson effect. Integrated modeling of CO{sub 2} storage and leakage requires the ability to model non-isothermal flows of brine and CO{sub 2} at conditions that range from supercritical to subcritical, including three-phase flow of aqueous phase, and both liquid and gaseous CO{sub 2}. In this paper, we describe and demonstrate comprehensive simulation capabilities that can cope with all possible phase conditions in brine-CO{sub 2} systems. Our model formulation includes: (1) an accurate description of thermophysical properties of aqueous and CO{sub 2}-rich phases as functions of temperature, pressure, salinity and CO{sub 2} content, including the mutual dissolution of CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O; (2) transitions between super- and subcritical conditions, including phase change between liquid and gaseous CO{sub 2}; (3) one-, two-, and three-phase flow of brine-CO{sub 2} mixtures, including heat flow; (4) non-isothermal effects associated with phase change, mutual dissolution of CO{sub 2} and water, and (de-) compression effects; and (5) the effects of dissolved NaCl, and the possibility of precipitating solid halite, with associated porosity and permeability change. Applications to specific leakage scenarios demonstrate that the peculiar thermophysical properties of CO{sub 2} provide a potential for positive as well as negative feedbacks on leakage rates, with a combination of self-enhancing and self-limiting effects. Lower viscosity and density of CO{sub 2} as compared to aqueous fluids provides a potential for self-enhancing effects during leakage, while strong cooling effects from liquid CO{sub 2} boiling into gas, and from expansion of gas rising towards the land surface, act to self-limit discharges. Strong interference between fluid phases under three-phase conditions (aqueous - liquid CO{sub 2} - gaseous CO{sub 2}) also tends to reduce CO{sub 2} fluxes. Feedback on different space and time scales can induce non-monotonic behavior of CO{sub 2} flow rates.

Pruess, K.

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

107

Hydrogenation apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Hydrogenation reaction apparatus is described comprising a housing having walls which define a reaction zone and conduits for introducing streams of hydrogen and oxygen into the reaction zone, the oxygen being introduced into a central portion of the hydrogen stream to maintain a boundary layer of hydrogen along the walls of the reaction zone. A portion of the hydrogen and all of the oxygen react to produce a heated gas stream having a temperature within the range of from 1,100 to 1,900 C, while the boundary layer of hydrogen maintains the wall temperature at a substantially lower temperature. The heated gas stream is introduced into a hydrogenation reaction zone and provides the source of heat and hydrogen for a hydrogenation reaction. There also is provided means for quenching the products of the hydrogenation reaction. The present invention is particularly suitable for the hydrogenation of low-value solid carbonaceous materials to provide high yields of more valuable liquid and gaseous products. 2 figs.

Friedman, J.; Oberg, C. L.; Russell, L. H.

1981-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

108

FCT Hydrogen Storage: Hydrogen Storage R&D Activities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Storage R&D Activities Hydrogen Storage R&D Activities to someone by E-mail Share FCT Hydrogen Storage: Hydrogen Storage R&D Activities on Facebook Tweet about FCT Hydrogen Storage: Hydrogen Storage R&D Activities on Twitter Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Storage: Hydrogen Storage R&D Activities on Google Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Storage: Hydrogen Storage R&D Activities on Delicious Rank FCT Hydrogen Storage: Hydrogen Storage R&D Activities on Digg Find More places to share FCT Hydrogen Storage: Hydrogen Storage R&D Activities on AddThis.com... Home Basics Current Technology DOE R&D Activities National Hydrogen Storage Compressed/Liquid Hydrogen Tanks Testing and Analysis Quick Links Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Delivery Fuel Cells Technology Validation Manufacturing Codes & Standards

109

Why Hydrogen? Hydrogen from Diverse Domestic Resources  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Overview of the U.S. DOE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program, including technical targets and research and development needs for hydrogen storage and delivery.

110

Hydrogen & Fuel Cells - Hydrogen - Hydrogen Quality  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Quality Issues for Fuel Cell Vehicles Hydrogen Quality Issues for Fuel Cell Vehicles Introduction Developing and implementing fuel quality specifications for hydrogen are prerequisites to the widespread deployment of hydrogen-fueled fuel cell vehicles. Several organizations are addressing this fuel quality issue, including the International Standards Organization (ISO), the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE), the California Fuel Cell Partnership (CaFCP), and the New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization (NEDO)/Japan Automobile Research Institute (JARI). All of their activities, however, have focused on the deleterious effects of specific contaminants on the automotive fuel cell or on-board hydrogen storage systems. While it is possible for the energy industry to provide extremely pure hydrogen, such hydrogen could entail excessive costs. The objective of our task is to develop a process whereby the hydrogen quality requirements may be determined based on life-cycle costs of the complete hydrogen fuel cell vehicle "system." To accomplish this objective, the influence of different contaminants and their concentrations in fuel hydrogen on the life-cycle costs of hydrogen production, purification, use in fuel cells, and hydrogen analysis and quality verification are being assessed.

111

E-Print Network 3.0 - air liquide adds Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

All Sizes (Cylinders to Liquid to Pipelines) Operations... ;4 Merchant Hydrogen Plants Praxair Liquid Hydrogen Plant Praxair Tube Trailer Hydrogen Plant ... Source: DOE Office of...

112

Hydrogen and Hydrogen-Storage Materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Currently, neutron applications in the field of hydrogen and hydrogen-storage materials represent a large and promising research ... relevant topics from this subject area, including hydrogen bulk properties (con...

Milva Celli; Daniele Colognesi; Marco Zoppi

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Final Report for the DOE Chemical Hydrogen Storage Center of...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

of interest for further development into viable storage systems. High pressure hydrogen tanks, systems that store hydrogen in a cryocompressed state, or liquid hydrogen storage...

114

Air Liquide - Biogas & Fuel Cells  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Liquide - Biogas & Fuel Cells Hydrogen Energy Biogas Upgrading Technology 12 June 2012 Charlie.Anderson@airliquide.com 2 Air Liquide, world leader in gases for industry,...

115

Direct Experimental Evidence for a Negative Heat Capacity in the Liquid-to-Gas Phase Transition in Hydrogen Cluster Ions: Backbending of the Caloric Curve  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

By selecting specific decay reactions in high-energy collisions (60??keV/amu) of hydrogen cluster ions with a helium target (utilizing event-by-event data of a recently developed multicoincidence experiment) and by deriving corresponding temperatures for these microcanonical cluster ensembles (analyzing respective fragment distributions), we are able to construct caloric curves for H3+(H2)m cluster ions (6?m?14). All individual curves and the mean of these curves show a backbending in the plateau region, thus constituting direct evidence for a negative microcanonical heat capacity in the liquid-to-gas transition of these finite systems.

F. Gobet; B. Farizon; M. Farizon; M. J. Gaillard; J. P. Buchet; M. Carr; P. Scheier; T. D. Mrk

2002-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

116

A GIS-based Assessment of Coal-based Hydrogen Infrastructure Deployment in the State of Ohio  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

gaseous and liquid hydrogen storage tech- nologies are giveninclude compressors, hydrogen storage and dispensing. In thein the analysis. Hydrogen production and storage Hydrogen

Johnson, Nils; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, J

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Magnetic liquefier for hydrogen  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document summarizes work done at the Astronautics Technology Center of the Astronautics Corporation of America (ACA) in Phase 1 of a four phase program leading to the development of a magnetic liquefier for hydrogen. The project involves the design, fabrication, installation, and operation of a hydrogen liquefier providing significantly reduced capital and operating costs, compared to present liquefiers. To achieve this goal, magnetic refrigeration, a recently developed, highly efficient refrigeration technology, will be used for the liquefaction process. Phase 1 project tasks included liquefier conceptual design and analysis, preliminary design of promising configurations, design selection, and detailed design of the selected design. Fabrication drawings and vendor specifications for the selected design were completed during detailed design. The design of a subscale, demonstration magnetic hydrogen liquefier represents a significant advance in liquefaction technology. The cost reductions that can be realized in hydrogen liquefaction in both the subscale and, more importantly, in the full-scale device are expected to have considerable impact on the use of liquid hydrogen in transportation, chemical, and electronic industries. The benefits to the nation from this technological advance will continue to have importance well into the 21st century.

NONE

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

118

The potential utilization of nuclear hydrogen for synthetic fuels production at a coaltoliquid facility / Steven Chiuta.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The production of synthetic fuels (synfuels) in coaltoliquids (CTL) facilities has contributed to global warming due to the huge CO2 emissions of the process. This (more)

Chiuta, Steven

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Recirculating cryogenic hydrogen maser  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report on the design and initial testing of a new type of hydrogen maser, operated at dilution refrigerator temperatures, in which H atoms circulate back and forth between a microwave-pumped state selector and the maser cavity. Other novel design features include liquid-4He-coated walls, He-cooled electronics, and the use of microscopic magnetic particles to relax the two lowest hyperfine levels in the state selector. Stabilities at least as good as that of a Rb clock and a high-stability quartz oscillator are observed for measuring times between 1 and 300 s.

M. D. Hrlimann; W. N. Hardy; A. J. Berlinsky; R. W. Cline

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Hydrogen: The ultimate fuel and energy carrier  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hydrogen: The ultimate fuel and energy carrier ... Some of the questions include: 1)Why choose hydrogen as a fuel, 2) How is hydrogen produced, 3)Why is this combustion nonpolluting, 4) How is hydrogen stored? ... Hydrogen ...

Gustav P. Dinga

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes liquid hydrogen" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Negative void reactivity in a large liquid-metal fast breeder reactor with hydrogenous moderator (ZrH[sub 1. 7]) layers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Placing a thin hydrogenous moderator (ZrH[sub 1.7]) layer between the seed and the blanket is very effective in reducing the sodium void reactivity of a liquid-metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR). The void reactivity reduction is attributed to the decrease in neutron production and increase in neutron absorption in the blanket at voiding due to the slowing down of fast neutrons in the layer. This dominates the whole core neutron balance. The fixed hydrogenous layer concept is much more effective than the conventional uniform introduction of such moderator in a core. Furthermore, it does not seriously deteriorate the breeding capability. For realizing the negative sodium void reactivity in a large-sized core, the seeds should be divided by blankets with the layers. The conceptual design of a nonflat LMFBR core is presented for demonstrating the effectiveness of the layer. Negative void reactivity is realized in a radially heterogeneous core of 1,000-MW(electric) class output. The active core is 2.9 m high. It is much taller than the conventional LMFBR core, which is [approximately]1 m high. A wide pitch-to-fuel diameter ratio was chosen so as not to increase the pressure drop in the core. The compound system doubling time is 12.5 yr.

Oka, Yoshiaki; Jevremovic, T.; Koshizuka, Seiichi (Univ. of Tokyo, Ibaraki (Japan). Nuclear Engineering Research Lab.)

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

A Near-Term Economic Analysis of Hydrogen Fueling Stations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Production 2. Hydrogen Storage 3. Hydrogen Compression vi 4.Table 2-13: Liquid Hydrogen Storage System Costs fromTable 2-1 4: Gaseou s Hydrogen Storage System Costs from

Weinert, Jonathan X.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

A Near-term Economic Analysis of Hydrogen Fueling Stations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Production 2. Hydrogen Storage 3. Hydrogen Compression vi 4.Table 2-13: Liquid Hydrogen Storage System Costs fromTable 2-1 4: Gaseou s Hydrogen Storage System Costs from

Weinert, Jonathan X.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

DEVELOPMENT OF A NATURAL GAS TO HYDROGEN FUEL STATION William E. Liss  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DEVELOPMENT OF A NATURAL GAS TO HYDROGEN FUEL STATION William E. Liss P: 847-768-0753; E: william hurdles facing on-board liquid fuel reforming. This program leverages efforts to develop natural gas for compressed natural gas vehicles. The integrated natural gas-to-hydrogen system includes a high efficiency

125

Uranium hexafluoride liquid thermal expansion, elusive eutectic with hydrogen fluoride, and very first production using chlorine trifluoride  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three unusual incidents and case histories involving uranium hexafluoride in the enrichment facilities of the USA in the late 1940`s and early 1950`s are presented. The history of the measurements of the thermal expansion of liquids containing fluorine atoms within the molecule is reviewed with special emphasis upon uranium hexafluoride. A comparison is made between fluorinated esters, fluorocarbons, and uranium hexafluoride. The quantitative relationship between the thermal expansion coefficient, a, of liquids and the critical temperature, T{sub c} is presented. Uranium hexafluoride has an a that is very high in a temperature range that is used by laboratory and production workers - much higher than any other liquid measured. This physical property of UF{sub 6} has resulted in accidents involving filling the UF{sub 6} containers too full and then heating with a resulting rupture of the container. Such an incident at a uranium gaseous diffusion plant is presented. Production workers seldom {open_quotes}see{close_quotes} uranium hexafluoride. The movement of UF{sub 6} from one container to another is usually trailed by weight, not sight. Even laboratory scientists seldom {open_quotes}see{close_quotes} solid or liquid UF{sub 6} and this can be a problem at times. This inability to {open_quotes}see{close_quotes} the UF{sub 6}-HF mixtures in the 61.2{degrees}C to 101{degrees}C temperature range caused a delay in the understanding of the phase diagram of UF{sub 6}-HF which has a liquid - liquid immiscible region that made the eutectic composition somewhat elusive. Transparent fluorothene tubes solved the problem both for the UF{sub 6}-HF phase diagram as well as the UF{sub 6}-HF-CIF{sub 3} phase diagram with a miscibility gap starting at 53{degrees}C. The historical background leading to the first use of CIF{sub 3} to produce UF{sub 6} in both the laboratory and plant at K-25 is presented.

Rutledge, G.P. [Central Environmental, Inc., Anchorage, AK (United States)

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

126

hydrogen | netl.doe.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

totals), hydrogen production or co-production from syngas generated by liquid or solid gasification is commercially practiced as well, with ten plants in operation worldwide1 as...

127

Hydrogen & Fuel Cells - Hydrogen - Distributed Ethanol Reforming  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hydrogen from Bio-Derived Liquids Hydrogen from Bio-Derived Liquids Bio-derived liquid fuels can be produced from renewable agricultural products, such as wood chips. Background Bio-derived renewable fuels are attractive for their high energy density and ease of transport. One scenario for a sustainable hydrogen economy considers that these bio-derived liquid fuels will be produced at plants close to the biomass resource, and then transported to distributed hydrogen production centers (e.g., hydrogen refueling stations), where the fuels will be reformed via the steam reforming process, similar to the current centralized production of hydrogen by the steam reforming of natural gas. Hydrogen produced by reforming these fuels must first be purified and compressed to appropriate storage and dispensing pressures. Compressing

128

Strategic Directions for Hydrogen Delivery Workshop Proceedings  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

including water or oil pipelines for hydrogen transport Assess viability of natural gas safety systems when hydrogen is introduced Conduct field demonstra- tion of hydrogen...

129

FCT Hydrogen Storage: Current Technology  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Current Technology to someone Current Technology to someone by E-mail Share FCT Hydrogen Storage: Current Technology on Facebook Tweet about FCT Hydrogen Storage: Current Technology on Twitter Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Storage: Current Technology on Google Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Storage: Current Technology on Delicious Rank FCT Hydrogen Storage: Current Technology on Digg Find More places to share FCT Hydrogen Storage: Current Technology on AddThis.com... Home Basics Current Technology Gaseous and Liquid Hydrogen Storage Materials-Based Hydrogen Storage Hydrogen Storage Challenges Status of Hydrogen Storage Technologies DOE R&D Activities Quick Links Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Delivery Fuel Cells Technology Validation Manufacturing Codes & Standards Education Systems Analysis Contacts Current Technology

130

Determining the Lowest-Cost Hydrogen Delivery Mode  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

liquid hydrogen pumps cost less than compressors. Further,hydrogen flow rate, though there are slight economies of scale associated with compressor cost.

Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Numerical Simulations of Bubble Dynamics and Heat Transfer in Pool Boiling--Including the Effects of Conjugate Conduction, Level of Gravity, and Noncondensable Gas Dissolved in the Liquid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Microgravity Fluid Physics and Heat Transfer, 62-71. 47.that included the heat transfer between the fluid and solidflux, only one fluidwatershowed significant heat transfer

Aktinol, Eduardo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Hydrogen Delivery- Current Technology  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Hydrogen is transported from the point of production to the point of use via pipeline, over the road in cryogenic liquid trucks or gaseous tube trailers, or by rail or barge. Read on to learn more about current hydrogen delivery and storage technologies.

133

Overview of interstate hydrogen pipeline systems.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of hydrogen in the energy sector of the United States is projected to increase significantly in the future. Current uses are predominantly in the petroleum refining sector, with hydrogen also being used in the manufacture of chemicals and other specialized products. Growth in hydrogen consumption is likely to appear in the refining sector, where greater quantities of hydrogen will be required as the quality of the raw crude decreases, and in the mining and processing of tar sands and other energy resources that are not currently used at a significant level. Furthermore, the use of hydrogen as a transportation fuel has been proposed both by automobile manufacturers and the federal government. Assuming that the use of hydrogen will significantly increase in the future, there would be a corresponding need to transport this material. A variety of production technologies are available for making hydrogen, and there are equally varied raw materials. Potential raw materials include natural gas, coal, nuclear fuel, and renewables such as solar, wind, or wave energy. As these raw materials are not uniformly distributed throughout the United States, it would be necessary to transport either the raw materials or the hydrogen long distances to the appropriate markets. While hydrogen may be transported in a number of possible forms, pipelines currently appear to be the most economical means of moving it in large quantities over great distances. One means of controlling hydrogen pipeline costs is to use common rights-of-way (ROWs) whenever feasible. For that reason, information on hydrogen pipelines is the focus of this document. Many of the features of hydrogen pipelines are similar to those of natural gas pipelines. Furthermore, as hydrogen pipeline networks expand, many of the same construction and operating features of natural gas networks would be replicated. As a result, the description of hydrogen pipelines will be very similar to that of natural gas pipelines. The following discussion will focus on the similarities and differences between the two pipeline networks. Hydrogen production is currently concentrated in refining centers along the Gulf Coast and in the Farm Belt. These locations have ready access to natural gas, which is used in the steam methane reduction process to make bulk hydrogen in this country. Production centers could possibly change to lie along coastlines, rivers, lakes, or rail lines, should nuclear power or coal become a significant energy source for hydrogen production processes. Should electrolysis become a dominant process for hydrogen production, water availability would be an additional factor in the location of production facilities. Once produced, hydrogen must be transported to markets. A key obstacle to making hydrogen fuel widely available is the scale of expansion needed to serve additional markets. Developing a hydrogen transmission and distribution infrastructure would be one of the challenges to be faced if the United States is to move toward a hydrogen economy. Initial uses of hydrogen are likely to involve a variety of transmission and distribution methods. Smaller users would probably use truck transport, with the hydrogen being in either the liquid or gaseous form. Larger users, however, would likely consider using pipelines. This option would require specially constructed pipelines and the associated infrastructure. Pipeline transmission of hydrogen dates back to late 1930s. These pipelines have generally operated at less than 1,000 pounds per square inch (psi), with a good safety record. Estimates of the existing hydrogen transmission system in the United States range from about 450 to 800 miles. Estimates for Europe range from about 700 to 1,100 miles (Mohipour et al. 2004; Amos 1998). These seemingly large ranges result from using differing criteria in determining pipeline distances. For example, some analysts consider only pipelines above a certain diameter as transmission lines. Others count only those pipelines that transport hydrogen from a producer to a customer (e.g., t

Gillette, J .L.; Kolpa, R. L

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Exploring Hydrogen Generation from Biomass-Derived Sugar and Sugar Alcohols to Reduce Costs  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

New aqueous phase reforming process uses liquid feedstocks to produce energy from hydrogen with reduced costs.

135

Liguid and Solid Carriers Group- Strategic Directions for Hydrogen Delivery Workshop  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Targets, barriers and research and development priorities for solid and liquid hydrogen storage and delivery materials.

136

California Hydrogen Infrastructure Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. has completed a comprehensive, multiyear project to demonstrate a hydrogen infrastructure in California. The specific primary objective of the project was to demonstrate a model of a ???¢????????real-world???¢??????? retail hydrogen infrastructure and acquire sufficient data within the project to assess the feasibility of achieving the nation???¢????????s hydrogen infrastructure goals. The project helped to advance hydrogen station technology, including the vehicle-to-station fueling interface, through consumer experiences and feedback. By encompassing a variety of fuel cell vehicles, customer profiles and fueling experiences, this project was able to obtain a complete portrait of real market needs. The project also opened its stations to other qualified vehicle providers at the appropriate time to promote widespread use and gain even broader public understanding of a hydrogen infrastructure. The project engaged major energy companies to provide a fueling experience similar to traditional gasoline station sites to foster public acceptance of hydrogen. Work over the course of the project was focused in multiple areas. With respect to the equipment needed, technical design specifications (including both safety and operational considerations) were written, reviewed, and finalized. After finalizing individual equipment designs, complete station designs were started including process flow diagrams and systems safety reviews. Material quotes were obtained, and in some cases, depending on the project status and the lead time, equipment was placed on order and fabrication began. Consideration was given for expected vehicle usage and station capacity, standard features needed, and the ability to upgrade the station at a later date. In parallel with work on the equipment, discussions were started with various vehicle manufacturers to identify vehicle demand (short- and long-term needs). Discussions included identifying potential areas most suited for hydrogen fueling stations with a focus on safe, convenient, fast-fills. These potential areas were then compared to and overlaid with suitable sites from various energy companies and other potential station operators. Work continues to match vehicle needs with suitable fueling station locations. Once a specific site was identified, the necessary agreements could be completed with the station operator and expected station users. Detailed work could then begin on the site drawings, permits, safety procedures and training needs. Permanent stations were successfully installed in Irvine (delivered liquid hydrogen), Torrance (delivered pipeline hydrogen) and Fountain Valley (renewable hydrogen from anaerobic digester gas). Mobile fueling stations were also deployed to meet short-term fueling needs in Long Beach and Placerville. Once these stations were brought online, infrastructure data was collected and reported to DOE using Air Products???¢???????? Enterprise Remote Access Monitoring system. Feedback from station operators was incorporated to improve the station user???¢????????s fueling experience.

Edward C. Heydorn

2013-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

137

Foreseeing the Market for Hydrogen Fuel-Cell Vehicles: Stakeholders' Perspectives and Models of New Technology Diffusion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

include on-board hydrogen storage and fuel cell durability.drive Hydrogen production Hydrogen storage Hydrogen fuelingnecessary are on-board hydrogen storage and fuel cells. The

Collantes, Gustavo O

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

FORESEEING THE MARKET FOR HYDROGEN FUEL-CELL VEHICLES: STAKEHOLDERS PERSPECTIVES AND MODELS OF NEW TECHNOLOGY DIFFUSION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

include on-board hydrogen storage and fuel cell durability.drive Hydrogen production Hydrogen storage Hydrogen fuelingnecessary are on-board hydrogen storage and fuel cells. The

Collantes, Gustavo

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Using Ionic Liquids to Make Titanium Dioxide Nanotubes - Energy...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Solar Photovoltaic Solar Photovoltaic Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Energy Storage Energy Storage Find More Like This Return to Search Using Ionic Liquids to Make...

140

Determining the lowest-cost hydrogen delivery mode  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

liquid hydrogen pumps cost less than compressors. Further,hydrogen ?ow rate, though there are slight economies of scale associated with compressor cost.hydrogen storage tanks are needed. Costs for central plant compressors

Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes liquid hydrogen" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

ECO2M: A TOUGH2 Fluid Property Module for Mixtures of Water, NaCl, and CO2, Including Super- and Sub-Critical Conditions, and Phase Change Between Liquid and Gaseous CO2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ECO2M is a fluid property module for the TOUGH2 simulator (Version 2.0) that was designed for applications to geologic storage of CO{sub 2} in saline aquifers. It includes a comprehensive description of the thermodynamics and thermophysical properties of H{sub 2}O - NaCl - CO{sub 2} mixtures, that reproduces fluid properties largely within experimental error for temperature, pressure and salinity conditions in the range of 10 C {le} T {le} 110 C, P {le} 600 bar, and salinity from zero up to full halite saturation. The fluid property correlations used in ECO2M are identical to the earlier ECO2N fluid property package, but whereas ECO2N could represent only a single CO{sub 2}-rich phase, ECO2M can describe all possible phase conditions for brine-CO{sub 2} mixtures, including transitions between super- and sub-critical conditions, and phase change between liquid and gaseous CO{sub 2}. This allows for seamless modeling of CO{sub 2} storage and leakage. Flow processes can be modeled isothermally or non-isothermally, and phase conditions represented may include a single (aqueous or CO{sub 2}-rich) phase, as well as two-and three-phase mixtures of aqueous, liquid CO{sub 2} and gaseous CO{sub 2} phases. Fluid phases may appear or disappear in the course of a simulation, and solid salt may precipitate or dissolve. TOUGH2/ECO2M is upwardly compatible with ECO2N and accepts ECO2N-style inputs. This report gives technical specifications of ECO2M and includes instructions for preparing input data. Code applications are illustrated by means of several sample problems, including problems that had been previously solved with TOUGH2/ECO2N.

Pruess, K.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Hydrogen & Fuel Cells - Hydrogen - Hydrogen Storage  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Storage Systems Modeling and Analysis Hydrogen Storage Systems Modeling and Analysis Several different approaches are being pursued to develop on-board hydrogen storage systems for light-duty vehicle applications. The different approaches have different characteristics, such as: the thermal energy and temperature of charge and discharge kinetics of the physical and chemical process steps involved requirements for the materials and energy interfaces between the storage system and the fuel supply system on one hand, and the fuel user on the other Other storage system design and operating parameters influence the projected system costs as well. Argonne researchers are developing thermodynamic, kinetic, and engineering models of the various hydrogen storage systems to understand the characteristics of storage systems based on these approaches and to evaluate their potential to meet the DOE targets for on-board applications. The DOE targets for 2015 include a system gravimetric capacity of 1.8 kWh/kg (5.5 wt%) and a system volumetric capacity of 1.3 kWh/L (40 g/L). We then use these models to identify significant component and performance issues, and evaluate alternative system configurations and design and operating parameters.

143

Hydrogenation of carbonaceous materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for reacting pulverized coal with heated hydrogen-rich gas to form hydrocarbon liquids suitable for conversion to fuels wherein the reaction involves injection of pulverized coal entrained in a minimum amount of gas and mixing the entrained coal at ambient temperature with a separate source of heated hydrogen. In accordance with the present invention, the hydrogen is heated by reacting a small portion of the hydrogen-rich gas with oxygen in a first reaction zone to form a gas stream having a temperature in excess of about 1000.degree. C. and comprising a major amount of hydrogen and a minor amount of water vapor. The coal particles then are reacted with the hydrogen in a second reaction zone downstream of the first reaction zone. The products of reaction may be rapidly quenched as they exit the second reaction zone and are subsequently collected.

Friedman, Joseph (Encino, CA); Oberg, Carl L. (Canoga Park, CA); Russell, Larry H. (Agoura, CA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Renewable Liquid Fuels Reforming  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Program anticipates that distributed reforming of biomass-derived liquid fuels could be commercial during the transition to hydrogen and used in the mid- and long-term time frames.

145

Questions and Issues on Hydrogen Pipelines: Pipeline Transmission of Hydrogen  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Issues on Hydrogen Issues on Hydrogen Pipelines Pipeline Transmission of Hydrogen Doe Hydrogen Pipeline Working Group Meeting August 31, 2005 Pipeline Transmission of Hydrogen --- 2 Copyright: Air Liquide Pipeline Inventory Breakdown by gases 0 500 1000 1500 2000 2500 3000 3500 KM N2 2956 km O2 3447 km H2 1736 km CO/Syngas 61 km TOTAL 8200 km Pipeline Inventory 2004 Asie Pacific America Europe Pipeline Transmission of Hydrogen --- 3 Copyright: Pipeline Transmission of Hydrogen --- 4 Copyright: 3. Special structures River Crossings (culvert): 6 (Rhein, Ruhr, Rhein-Herne-Kanal) River crossing (on bridge): 1 (Rhein-Herne-Kanal) Motorway Crossings: 26 Overground Pipelines: approx 21 km Pipeline Transmission of Hydrogen --- 5 Copyright: 5. Mining areas Pipeline Transmission of Hydrogen --- 6 Copyright: France & Netherlands

146

Catalyst for hydrotreating carbonaceous liquids  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A catalyst for denitrogenating and desulfurating carbonaceous liquid such as solvent refined coal includes catalytic metal oxides impregnated within a porous base of mostly alumina with relatively large pore diameters, surface area and pore volume. The base material includes pore volumes of 0.7-0.85 ml/g, surface areas of 200-350 m.sup.2 /g and pore diameters of 85-200 Angstroms. The catalytic metals impregnated into these base materials include the oxides of Group VI metals, molybdenum and tungsten, and the oxides of Group VIII metals, nickel and cobalt, in various combinations. These catalysts and bases in combination have effectively promoted the removal of chemically combined sulfur and nitrogen within a continuous flowing mixture of carbonaceous liquid and hydrogen gas.

Berg, Lloyd (Bozeman, MT); McCandless, Frank P. (Bozeman, MT); Ramer, Ronald J. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

FCT Hydrogen Delivery: Current Technology  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Current Technology to someone Current Technology to someone by E-mail Share FCT Hydrogen Delivery: Current Technology on Facebook Tweet about FCT Hydrogen Delivery: Current Technology on Twitter Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Delivery: Current Technology on Google Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Delivery: Current Technology on Delicious Rank FCT Hydrogen Delivery: Current Technology on Digg Find More places to share FCT Hydrogen Delivery: Current Technology on AddThis.com... Home Basics Current Technology R&D Activities Quick Links Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Storage Fuel Cells Technology Validation Manufacturing Codes & Standards Education Systems Analysis Contacts Current Technology Today, hydrogen is transported from the point of production to the point of use via pipeline, over the road in cryogenic liquid trucks or gaseous tube

148

Liquid Hydrogen Absorber for MICE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

part of the MICE experiment is muon energy absorber.an absorbing material, muons lose energy due to ionization

Ishimoto, S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Liquid Hydrogen Absorber for MICE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from a cryocooler with cooling power 1.5 W at 4.2 K. ThePT415 cryocooler with cooling power 1.5W at 4.2K. In415D cryocooler with cooling power 1.5 W at 4.2K was used.

Ishimoto, S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Fueling up with Hydrogen: New Approaches to Hydrogen Storage (433rd Brookhaven Lecture)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydrogen, the most abundant element in the universe, burns excellently and cleanly, with only pure water as a byproduct. NASA has used hydrogen as fuel for years in the space program. So, why not use hydrogen to fuel cars? The bottleneck of developing hydrogen-fueled vehicles has been identified: the greatest problem is storage. The conventional storage method, compressed hydrogen gas, requires a large tank volume, and the possibility of a tank rupture poses a significant safety risk. Another method, low temperature liquid storage, is expensive and impractical for most automotive applications. An alternative is to store the hydrogen in the solid state. In his talk, Jason Graetz will describe the new approaches to hydrogen storage being studied by his group at BNL. These include using kinetically stabilized hydrides, bialkali alanates and reversible metal-organic hydrides. The researchers are also using novel synthesis approaches, state-of-the-art characterization and first principles modeling, all providing a better fundamental understanding of these interesting and useful new materials.

Graetz, Jason (Energy Sciences and Technology Dept) [Energy Sciences and Technology Dept

2008-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

151

Process to upgrade coal liquids by extraction prior to hydrodenitrogenation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Oxygen compounds are removed, e.g., by extraction, from a coal liquid prior to its hydrogenation. As a result, compared to hydrogenation of such a non-treated coal liquid, the rate of nitrogen removal is increased.

Schneider, Abraham (Overbrook Hills, PA); Hollstein, Elmer J. (Wilmington, DE); Janoski, Edward J. (Havertown, PA); Scheibel, Edward G. (Media, PA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Design progress of cryogenic hydrogen system for China Spallation Neutron Source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS) is a large proton accelerator research facility with 100 kW beam power. Construction started in October 2011 and is expected to last 6.5 years. The cryogenic hydrogen circulation is cooled by a helium refrigerator with cooling capacity of 2200 W at 20 K and provides supercritical hydrogen to neutron moderating system. Important progresses of CSNS cryogenic system were concluded as follows. Firstly, process design of cryogenic system has been completed including helium refrigerator, hydrogen loop, gas distribution, and safety interlock. Secondly, an accumulator prototype was designed to mitigate pressure fluctuation caused by dynamic heat load from neutron moderation. Performance test of the accumulator has been carried out at room and liquid nitrogen temperature. Results show the accumulator with welding bellows regulates hydrogen pressure well. Parameters of key equipment have been identified. The contract for the helium refrigerator has been signed. Mechanical design of the hydrogen cold box has been completed, and the hydrogen pump, ortho-para hydrogen convertor, helium-hydrogen heat exchanger, hydrogen heater, and cryogenic valves are in procurement. Finally, Hydrogen safety interlock has been finished as well, including the logic of gas distribution, vacuum, hydrogen leakage and ventilation. Generally, design and construction of CSNS cryogenic system is conducted as expected.

Wang, G. P.; Zhang, Y.; Xiao, J.; He, C. C.; Ding, M. Y.; Wang, Y. Q.; Li, N.; He, K. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, P.R. (China)

2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

153

Water's Hydrogen Bond Strength  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water is necessary both for the evolution of life and its continuance. It possesses particular properties that cannot be found in other materials and that are required for life-giving processes. These properties are brought about by the hydrogen bonded environment particularly evident in liquid water. Each liquid water molecule is involved in about four hydrogen bonds with strengths considerably less than covalent bonds but considerably greater than the natural thermal energy. These hydrogen bonds are roughly tetrahedrally arranged such that when strongly formed the local clustering expands, decreasing the density. Such low density structuring naturally occurs at low and supercooled temperatures and gives rise to many physical and chemical properties that evidence the particular uniqueness of liquid water. If aqueous hydrogen bonds were actually somewhat stronger then water would behave similar to a glass, whereas if they were weaker then water would be a gas and only exist as a liquid at sub-zero temperatures. The overall conclusion of this investigation is that water's hydrogen bond strength is poised centrally within a narrow window of its suitability for life.

Martin Chaplin

2007-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

154

BP and Hydrogen Pipelines  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

BP and Hydrogen Pipelines BP and Hydrogen Pipelines DOE Hydrogen Pipeline Working Group Workshop August 30-31, 2005 Gary P. Yoho, P.E. i l i * Green corporate philosophy and senior management commitment * Reduced greenhouse gas emissions nine years ahead of target * Alternatives to oil are a big part of BP' including natural gas, LNG, solar and hydrogen * Hydrogen Bus Project won Australia' prestigious environmental award * UK partnership opened the first hydrogen demonstration refueling station * Two hydrogen pipelines in Houston area BP Env ronmenta Comm tment s portfolio, s most BP' * li l " li i i * i l pl i i * Li l li l * " i i l i 2 i i ll i i l pl ifi i * 8" ly idl i i l s Hydrogen Pipelines Two nes, on y a brand new 12 ne s act ve Connect Houston area chem ca ant w th a ref nery nes come off a p

155

FCEVs and Hydrogen in California  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Board South Coast AQMD US EPA US DOE US DOT TECHNOLOGY AFCC AC Transit Air Liquide Air Products Ballard Power Systems CDFA CEERT EIN Hydrogenics ITS - UC Davis Linde NFCRC -...

156

Hydrogen Storage Technologies Hydrogen Delivery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrogen Storage Technologies Roadmap Hydrogen Delivery Technical Team Roadmap June 2013 #12;This.................................................................................. 13 6. Hydrogen Storage). The Hydrogen Delivery Technical Team is one of 12 U.S. DRIVE technical teams ("tech teams") whose mission

157

Hydrogen Storage- Overview  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

- - Overview George Thomas, Hydrogen Consultant to SNL * and Jay Keller, Hydrogen Program Manager Sandia National Laboratories H 2 Delivery and Infrastructure Workshop May 7-8, 2003 * Most of this presentation has been extracted from George Thomas' invited BES Hydrogen Workshop presentation (May 13-14, 2003) Sandia National Laboratories 4/14/03 2 Sandia National Laboratories From George Thomas, BES workshop 5/13/03 H 2 storage is a critical enabling technology for H 2 use as an energy carrier The low volumetric density of gaseous fuels requires a storage method which compacts the fuel. Hence, hydrogen storage systems are inherently more complex than liquid fuels. Storage technologies are needed in all aspects of hydrogen utilization. production distribution utilization

158

Hydrogen Data Book from the Hydrogen Analysis Resource Center  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The Hydrogen Data Book contains a wide range of factual information on hydrogen and fuel cells (e.g., hydrogen properties, hydrogen production and delivery data, and information on fuel cells and fuel cell vehicles), and it also provides other data that might be useful in analyses of hydrogen infrastructure in the United States (e.g., demographic data and data on energy supply and/or infrastructure). Its made available from the Hydrogen Analysis Resource Center along with a wealth of related information. The related information includes guidelines for DOE Hydrogen Program Analysis, various calculator tools, a hydrogen glossary, related websites, and analysis tools relevant to hydrogen and fuel cells. [From http://hydrogen.pnl.gov/cocoon/morf/hydrogen

159

E-Print Network 3.0 - alternative hydrogen energy Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

technically challenging barriers to the widespread use of hydrogen as a form of energy... energy content by volume (liquid hydrogen is about four times less than gasoline). This...

160

Optimization of compression and storage requirements at hydrogen refueling stations.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The transition to hydrogen-powered vehicles requires detailed technical and economic analyses of all aspects of hydrogen infrastructure, including refueling stations. The cost of such stations is a major contributor to the delivered cost of hydrogen. Hydrogen refueling stations require not only dispensers to transfer fuel onto a vehicle, but also an array of such ancillary equipment as a cascade charging system, storage vessels, compressors and/or pumps/evaporators. This paper provides detailed information on design requirements for gaseous and liquid hydrogen refueling stations and their associated capital and operating costs, which in turn impact hydrogen selling price at various levels of hydrogen demand. It summarizes an engineering economics approach which captures the effect of variations in station size, seasonal, daily and hourly demand, and alternative dispensing rates and pressures on station cost. Tradeoffs in the capacity of refueling station compressors, storage vessels, and the cascade charging system result in many possible configurations for the station. Total costs can be minimized by optimizing that configuration. Using a methodology to iterate among the costs of compression, storage and cascade charging, it was found that the optimum hourly capacity of the compressor is approximately twice the station's average hourly demand, and the optimum capacity of the cascade charging system is approximately 15% of the station's average daily demand. Further, for an hourly demand profile typical of today's gasoline stations, onsite hydrogen storage equivalent to at least 1/3 of the station's average daily demand is needed to accommodate peak demand.

Elgowainy, A.; Mintz, M.; Kelly, B.; Hooks, M.; Paster, M. (Energy Systems); (Nexant, Inc.); (TIAX LLC)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes liquid hydrogen" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

High Pressure Hydrogen Materials Compatibility of Piezoelectric...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Abstract: Hydrogen is being considered as a next-generation clean burning fuel. However, hydrogen has well known materials issues, including blistering and embrittlement in...

162

Composition of liquids from coals of different rank  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Eight coal liquids prepared from six coals of widely differing rank were compared with respect to their suitability as potential feedstocks for production of refined fuels. The compositions of the liquids were determined by methods adapted from those developed for characterization of petroleum crudes. The coal liquids were prepared and upgraded by hydrogenation in a batch autoclave. The reaction conditions employed were selected to minimize hydrocarbon ring-opening reactions and, at the same time, to produce most of the hydrocarbon liquids potentially available from the coals. The degree of hydrogenation of the raw coal liquids was varied as required to decrease the nitrogen content to about the same level and to provide a predominantly hydrocarbon liquid for analysis. Distilled fractions of the upgraded coal liquids boiling up to 540/sup 0/C were characterized by a combination of separation and analytical techniques including adsorption chromatography; gel permeation chromatography; separations of acids, bases, and asphaltenes; and high- and low-resolution mass spectrometry. In general, the results show that liquids of comparable suitability as feedstocks for production of refined fuels can be produced from coals of different rank.

Sturm, G.P. Jr.; Thomson, J.S.; Woodward, P.W.; Vogh, J.W.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Autothermal hydrogen storage and delivery systems  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Processes are provided for the storage and release of hydrogen by means of dehydrogenation of hydrogen carrier compositions where at least part of the heat of dehydrogenation is provided by a hydrogen-reversible selective oxidation of the carrier. Autothermal generation of hydrogen is achieved wherein sufficient heat is provided to sustain the at least partial endothermic dehydrogenation of the carrier at reaction temperature. The at least partially dehydrogenated and at least partially selectively oxidized liquid carrier is regenerated in a catalytic hydrogenation process where apart from an incidental employment of process heat, gaseous hydrogen is the primary source of reversibly contained hydrogen and the necessary reaction energy.

Pez, Guido Peter (Allentown, PA); Cooper, Alan Charles (Macungie, PA); Scott, Aaron Raymond (Allentown, PA)

2011-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

164

Hydrogens Potential  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Estimates of future demand for non-fossil produced hydrogen and of its potential are oriented toward ... to the environment as the present fossil energy economy [10.4, 10.9].

J. Nitsch; C. Voigt

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Muon capture in hydrogen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Theoretical difficulties in reconciling the measured rates for ordinary and radiative muon capture are discussed, based on heavy-baryon chiral perturbation theory. We also examine ambiguity in our analysis due to the formation of p$\\mu$p molecules in the liquid hydrogen target.

S. Ando; F. Myhrer; K. Kubodera

2001-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

166

Hydrogen Use and Safety  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

USE AND SAFETY USE AND SAFETY The lightest and most common element in the universe, hydrogen has been safely used for decades in industrial applications. Currently, over 9 million tons of hydrogen are produced in the U.S. each year and 3.2 trillion cubic feet are used to make many common products. They include glass, margarine, soap, vitamins, peanut butter, toothpaste and almost all metal products. Hydrogen has been used as a fuel since the 1950s by the National Aeronautics & Space Administration (NASA) in the U.S. space program. Hydrogen - A Safe, Clean Fuel for Vehicles Hydrogen has another use - one that can help our nation reduce its consumption of fossil fuels. Hydrogen can be used to power fuel cell vehicles. When combined with oxygen in a fuel cell, hydrogen generates electricity used

167

FUEL CELL TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Hydrogen is an energy carrier, not an  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with a renewable-source ink on paper containing at least 50% wastepaper, including 10% post consumer waste. EERE gas with carbon sequestration are preferred. Gasification Gasification is a process in which coal hydrogen through biomass gasification releases near-zero net greenhouse gases. Renewable Liquid Reforming

168

Metal salt catalysts for enhancing hydrogen spillover  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A composition for hydrogen storage includes a receptor, a hydrogen dissociating metal doped on the receptor, and a metal salt doped on the receptor. The hydrogen dissociating metal is configured to spill over hydrogen to the receptor, and the metal salt is configured to increase a rate of the spill over of the hydrogen to the receptor.

Yang, Ralph T; Wang, Yuhe

2013-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

169

Nuclear Hydrogen  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Error Error Nuclear Hydrogen - RCC cannot be displayed due to a timeout error. We recommend: * Refresh Nuclear Hydrogen - RCC * Increasing your portlet timeout setting. *...

170

WASTE/BY-PRODUCT HYDROGEN DOE/DOD Workshop  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; 6 Waste/Byproduct HydrogenWaste/By product Hydrogen Waste H2 sources include: Waste biomass: biogas Waste/Byproduct Hydrogen Waste/By product Hydrogen Fuel FlexibilityFuel Flexibility Biogas: generated

171

Hydrogen from Coal | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Liquids » Hydrogen Liquids » Hydrogen from Coal Hydrogen from Coal Technicians make adjustments to equipment in the hydrogen membrane testing unit at FE's National Energy Technology Laboratory. NETL researchers in the Office of Research and Development are testing different types of materials that might be used to separate hydrogen from other gases. Photo courtesy of NETL. Technicians make adjustments to equipment in the hydrogen membrane testing unit at FE's National Energy Technology Laboratory. NETL researchers in the Office of Research and Development are testing different types of materials that might be used to separate hydrogen from other gases. Photo courtesy of NETL. Hydrogen from coal research supports goals of increasing energy security, reducing environmental impact of energy use, promoting economic

172

Dehydrogenation of liquid fuel in microchannel catalytic reactor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is an improved process for the storage and delivery of hydrogen by the reversible hydrogenation/dehydrogenation of an organic compound wherein the organic compound is initially in its hydrogenated state. The improvement in the route to generating hydrogen is in the dehydrogenation step and recovery of the dehydrogenated organic compound resides in the following steps: introducing a hydrogenated organic compound to a microchannel reactor incorporating a dehydrogenation catalyst; effecting dehydrogenation of said hydrogenated organic compound under conditions whereby said hydrogenated organic compound is present as a liquid phase; generating a reaction product comprised of a liquid phase dehydrogenated organic compound and gaseous hydrogen; separating the liquid phase dehydrogenated organic compound from gaseous hydrogen; and, recovering the hydrogen and liquid phase dehydrogenated organic compound.

Toseland, Bernard Allen (Coopersburg, PA); Pez, Guido Peter (Allentown, PA); Puri, Pushpinder Singh (Emmaus, PA)

2010-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

173

Thick film hydrogen sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A thick film hydrogen sensor element includes an essentially inert, electrically-insulating substrate having deposited thereon a thick film metallization forming at least two resistors. The metallization is a sintered composition of Pd and a sinterable binder such as glass frit. An essentially inert, electrically insulating, hydrogen impermeable passivation layer covers at least one of the resistors. 8 figs.

Hoffheins, B.S.; Lauf, R.J.

1995-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

174

NREL Wind to Hydrogen Project: Renewable Hydrogen Production for Energy Storage & Transportation (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Presentation about NREL's Wind to Hydrogen Project and producing renewable hydrogen for both energy storage and transporation, including the challenges, sustainable pathways, and analysis results.

Ramsden, T.; Harrison, K.; Steward, D.

2009-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

175

Ultrafine hydrogen storage powders  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of making hydrogen storage powder resistant to fracture in service involves forming a melt having the appropriate composition for the hydrogen storage material, such, for example, LaNi.sub.5 and other AB.sub.5 type materials and AB.sub.5+x materials, where x is from about -2.5 to about +2.5, including x=0, and the melt is gas atomized under conditions of melt temperature and atomizing gas pressure to form generally spherical powder particles. The hydrogen storage powder exhibits improved chemcial homogeneity as a result of rapid solidfication from the melt and small particle size that is more resistant to microcracking during hydrogen absorption/desorption cycling. A hydrogen storage component, such as an electrode for a battery or electrochemical fuel cell, made from the gas atomized hydrogen storage material is resistant to hydrogen degradation upon hydrogen absorption/desorption that occurs for example, during charging/discharging of a battery. Such hydrogen storage components can be made by consolidating and optionally sintering the gas atomized hydrogen storage powder or alternately by shaping the gas atomized powder and a suitable binder to a desired configuration in a mold or die.

Anderson, Iver E. (Ames, IA); Ellis, Timothy W. (Doylestown, PA); Pecharsky, Vitalij K. (Ames, IA); Ting, Jason (Ames, IA); Terpstra, Robert (Ames, IA); Bowman, Robert C. (La Mesa, CA); Witham, Charles K. (Pasadena, CA); Fultz, Brent T. (Pasadena, CA); Bugga, Ratnakumar V. (Arcadia, CA)

2000-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

176

President's Hydrogen Fuel Initiative  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Fuel Initiative Hydrogen Fuel Initiative Workshop on Manufacturing R&D for the Hydrogen Economy Washington, DC July 13, 2005 JoAnn Milliken DOE Hydrogen Program Planning U.S. Energy Dependence is Driven By Transportation * The U.S. imports 55% of its oil; expected to grow to 68% by 2025 under the status quo. * Transportation accounts for 2/3 of the 20 million barrels of oil our nation uses each day. * Gasoline hybrid electric vehicles will help in the near -mid term; a replacement for petroleum is needed for the long-term. 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 22 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 Million barrels per day Marine Rail Actual Projection Cars Air Light Trucks Heavy Vehicles U.S. Production Off-Road Projection Hydrogen Provides a Solution Producing hydrogen from domestic resources, including renewable, nuclear, and coal

177

A Fracture Criterion for the Notch Strength of High Strength Steels in the Presence of Hydrogen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that the presence of lattice hydrogen increases the susceptibility to hydrogen embrittlement whereas trapped. Keywords: Hydrogen embrittlement, Hydrogen trapping, Weakest link statistics. 1. Introduction Steels, when failure. Consequently, the adverse effects of hydrogen embrittlement must be included in engineer- ing

Fleck, Norman A.

178

Rydberg states of triatomic hydrogen  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Watson Rydberg states of triatomic hydrogen C. H. Greene 1 J. A. Stephens 2 1...Rydberg electron dynamics in triatomic hydrogen, at a level that includes the full rotational...deuterium. Rydberg states of triatomic hydrogen B y C. H. Greene1 and J. A. Stephens2...

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Sustainable Hydrogen Production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Today, hydrogen is mainly produced from natural gas via steam methane reforming, and although this process can sustain an initial...operating, or maintenance costs are included in the calculation. HHV, higher heating value. System efficiencies of commercial electrolyzers...

John A. Turner

2004-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

180

Hydrogen Compatible Materials Workshop  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Summary of the Hydrogen Compatible Materials Workshop held November, 3, 2010, at Sandia National Laboratories in Livermore, California. Summary includes the workshop agenda, an overview of the morning presentations, a discussion of the afternoon meeting, and a list of participants.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes liquid hydrogen" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Use of once-through treat gas to remove the heat of reaction in solvent hydrogenation processes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In a coal liquefaction process wherein feed coal is contacted with molecular hydrogen and a hydrogen-donor solvent in a liquefaction zone to form coal liquids and vapors and coal liquids in the solvent boiling range are thereafter hydrogenated to produce recycle solvent and liquid products, the improvement which comprises separating the effluent from the liquefaction zone into a hot vapor stream and a liquid stream; cooling the entire hot vapor stream sufficiently to condense vaporized liquid hydrocarbons; separating condensed liquid hydrocarbons from the cooled vapor; fractionating the liquid stream to produce coal liquids in the solvent boiling range; dividing the cooled vapor into at least two streams; passing the cooling vapors from one of the streams, the coal liquids in the solvent boiling range, and makeup hydrogen to a solvent hydrogenation zone, catalytically hydrogenating the coal liquids in the solvent boiling range and quenching the hydrogenation zone with cooled vapors from the other cooled vapor stream.

Nizamoff, Alan J. (Convent Station, NJ)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Distributed Hydrogen Fueling Station Based on GEGR SCPO Technology (Presentation)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presented at the 2007 Bio-Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed Reforming Working Group held November 6, 2007 in Laurel, Maryland.

183

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program: 2012 Annual Progress Report - Hydrogen  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Production Printable Version 2012 Annual Progress Report II. Hydrogen Production This section of the 2012 Annual Progress Report for the DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program focuses on hydrogen production. Hydrogen Production Sub-Program Overview, Sara Dillich, U.S. Department of Energy A. Distributed Bio-Derived Liquid Production Biomass-Derived Liquids Distributed (Aqueous Phase) Reforming, David King, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Distributed Bio-Oil Reforming, Stefan Czernik, National Renewable Energy Laboratory Back to Top B. Biomass Gasification One Step Biomass Gas Reforming-Shift Separation Membrane Reactor, Mike Roberts, Gas Technology Institute Back to Top C. Separations Development of Hydrogen Selective Membranes/Modules as Reactors/Separators for Distributed Hydrogen Production, Paul Liu, Media

184

DOE Hydrogen Transition Analysis Workshop  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy sponsored a Hydrogen Transition Analysis Workshop in Washington, DC, on January 26, 2006. Attendees included automobile and energy company representatives, industrial...

185

Hydrogen Analysis  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation on Hydrogen Analysis to the DOE Systems Analysis Workshop held in Washington, D.C. July 28-29, 2004 to discuss and define role of systems analysis in DOE Hydrogen Program.

186

Hydrogen Storage  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

On-board hydrogen storage for transportation applications continues to be one of the most technically challenging barriers to the widespread commercialization of hydrogen-fueled vehicles. The EERE...

187

Hydrogen Safety  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This 2-page fact sheet, intended for a non-technical audience, explains the basic properties of hydrogen and provides an overview of issues related to the safe use of hydrogen as an energy carrier.

188

U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen Storage Cost Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is to conduct cost analyses and estimate costs for on- and off-board hydrogen storage technologies under development by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) on a consistent, independent basis. This can help guide DOE and stakeholders toward the most-promising research, development and commercialization pathways for hydrogen-fueled vehicles. A specific focus of the project is to estimate hydrogen storage system cost in high-volume production scenarios relative to the DOE target that was in place when this cost analysis was initiated. This report and its results reflect work conducted by TIAX between 2004 and 2012, including recent refinements and updates. The report provides a system-level evaluation of costs and performance for four broad categories of on-board hydrogen storage: (1) reversible on-board metal hydrides (e.g., magnesium hydride, sodium alanate); (2) regenerable off-board chemical hydrogen storage materials(e.g., hydrolysis of sodium borohydride, ammonia borane); (3) high surface area sorbents (e.g., carbon-based materials); and 4) advanced physical storage (e.g., 700-bar compressed, cryo-compressed and liquid hydrogen). Additionally, the off-board efficiency and processing costs of several hydrogen storage systems were evaluated and reported, including: (1) liquid carrier, (2) sodium borohydride, (3) ammonia borane, and (4) magnesium hydride. TIAX applied a â??bottom-upâ? costing methodology customized to analyze and quantify the processes used in the manufacture of hydrogen storage systems. This methodology, used in conjunction with DFMA?® software and other tools, developed costs for all major tank components, balance-of-tank, tank assembly, and system assembly. Based on this methodology, the figure below shows the projected on-board high-volume factory costs of the various analyzed hydrogen storage systems, as designed. Reductions in the key cost drivers may bring hydrogen storage system costs closer to this DOE target. In general, tank costs are the largest component of system cost, responsible for at least 30 percent of total system cost, in all but two of the 12 systems. Purchased BOP cost also drives system cost, accounting for 10 to 50 percent of total system cost across the various storage systems. Potential improvements in these cost drivers for all storage systems may come from new manufacturing processes and higher production volumes for BOP components. In addition, advances in the production of storage media may help drive down overall costs for the sodium alanate, SBH, LCH2, MOF, and AX-21 systems.

Law, Karen; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey; Han, Vickie; Chan, Michael; Chiang, Helena; Leonard, Jon

2013-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

189

An Assessment of the Near-Term Costs of Hydrogen Refueling Stations and Station Components  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Reciprocating Hydrogen Compressor Costs: (Industry)of Diaphragm Hydrogen Compressor Costs (Industry) Capacity (kWh/kg includes compressor) Capital Costs Hydrogen Equipment

Lipman, T E; Weinert, Jonathan X.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program: 2011 Annual Progress Report - Hydrogen  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Production Printable Version 2011 Annual Progress Report II. Hydrogen Production This section of the 2011 Progress Report for the DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program focuses on hydrogen production. Each technical report is available as an individual Adobe Acrobat PDF. Hydrogen Production Sub-Program Overview, Sara Dillich, DOE A. Distributed Bio-Derived Liquid Production Biomass-Derived Liquids Distributed (Aqueous Phase) Reforming, David King, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Distributed Bio-Oil Reforming, Stefan Czernik, National Renewable Energy Laboratory Distributed Reforming of Renewable Liquids Using Oxygen Transport Membranes (OTMs), Balu Balachandran, Argonne National Laboratory Back to Top B. Biomass Gasification A Novel Slurry-Based Biomass Reforming Process, Sean Emerson, United

191

Dynamic simulation of nuclear hydrogen production systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nuclear hydrogen production processes have been proposed as a solution to rising CO 2 emissions and low fuel yields in the production of liquid transportation fuels. In these processes, the heat of a nuclear reactor is ...

Ramrez Muoz, Patricio D. (Patricio Dario)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Chemical Hydrogen Storage | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

a new type of liquid-phase material has been developed. This material, developed by Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., has shown 5-7 wt.% gravimetric hydrogen storage capacity...

193

Condensed hydrogen for thermonuclear fusion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) power, in either pure fusion or fission-fusion hybrid reactors, is a possible solution for future world's energy demands. Formation of uniform layers of a condensed hydrogen fuel in ICF targets has been a long standing materials physics challenge. Here, we review the progress in this field. After a brief discussion of the major ICF target designs and the basic properties of condensed hydrogens, we review both liquid and solid layering methods, physical mechanisms causing layer nonuniformity, growth of hydrogen single crystals, attempts to prepare amorphous and nanostructured hydrogens, and mechanical deformation behavior. Emphasis is given to current challenges defining future research areas in the field of condensed hydrogens for fusion energy applications.

Kucheyev, S. O.; Hamza, A. V. [Nanoscale Synthesis and Characterization Laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

194

Hydrogen recovery process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A treatment process for a hydrogen-containing off-gas stream from a refinery, petrochemical plant or the like. The process includes three separation steps: condensation, membrane separation and hydrocarbon fraction separation. The membrane separation step is characterized in that it is carried out under conditions at which the membrane exhibits a selectivity in favor of methane over hydrogen of at least about 2.5.

Baker, Richard W. (Palo Alto, CA); Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Union City, CA); He, Zhenjie (Fremont, CA); Pinnau, Ingo (Palo Alto, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Fuel Cell Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan - Section 3.2 Hydrogen Delivery  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Technical Plan - Delivery Technical Plan - Delivery Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan Page 3.2 - 1 3.2 Hydrogen Delivery Delivery is an essential component of any future hydrogen infrastructure. It encompasses those processes needed to transport hydrogen from a central or semi-central production facility to the final point of use and those required to load the energy carrier directly onto a given fuel cell system. Successful commercialization of hydrogen-fueled fuel cell systems, including those used in vehicles, back-up power sources, and distributed power generators, will likely depend on a hydrogen delivery infrastructure that provides the same level of safety, convenience, and functionality as existing liquid and gaseous fossil

196

Hydrogen from Post-Consumer Residues  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. #12;Approach Technology being developed for producing hydrogen from biomass: Pyrolysis or partial pyrolysis gases and vapors. Catalytic steam reforming of biomass-derived liquid streams (trap grease of the Project This work is one of three tasks in the Biomass to Hydrogen project. Goal: develop and demonstrate

197

Improvements to Hydrogen Delivery Scenario Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

­ Improved liquefier, pipeline, compressors, storage, labor, indirect capital, and O&M cost estimatesImprovements to Hydrogen Delivery Scenario Analysis Model (HDSAM) and Results May 8, 2007 Amgad and storage are at or adjacent to Liquid Hydrogen (LH) TruckH2 Production 100 or 1500 kg/d Compressed H2 (CH

198

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program: 2009 Annual Progress Report - Hydrogen  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Production Printable Version 2009 Annual Progress Report II. Hydrogen Production This section of the 2009 Progress Report for the DOE Hydrogen Program focuses on hydrogen production. Each technical report is available as an individual Adobe Acrobat PDF. Download Adobe Reader. Hydrogen Production Sub-Program Overview, Richard Farmer, U.S. Department of Energy (PDF 76 KB) A. Distributed Production from Bio-Derived Liquids Low-Cost Hydrogen Distributed Production System Development (PDF 246 KB), Frank Lomax, H2Gen Innovations, Inc. Distributed Hydrogen Production from Biomass Reforming (PDF 485 KB), Yong Wang, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Hydrogen Generation from Biomass-Derived Carbohydrates via the Aqueous-Phase Reforming (APR) Process (PDF 234 KB), Greg Keenan, Virent

199

Hydrogen Pipeline Working Group Workshop: Code for Hydrogen Pipelines  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Code for Hydrogen Code for Hydrogen Pipelines Hydrogen Pipeline Working Group Workshop Augusta, Georgia August 31, 2005 Louis Hayden, PE Chair ASME B31.12 3 Presentation Outline * Approval for new code development * Charge from BPTCS to B31 Standards Committee for Hydrogen Piping/Pipeline code development * B31.12 Status & Structure * Hydrogen Pipeline issues * Research Needs * Where Do We Go From Here? 4 Code for Hydrogen Piping and Pipelines * B31 Hydrogen Section Committee to develop a new code for H 2 piping and pipelines - Include requirements specific to H 2 service for power, process, transportation, distribution, commercial, and residential applications - Balance reference and incorporation of applicable sections of B31.1, B31.3 and B31.8 - Have separate parts for industrial, commercial/residential

200

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program: Permitting Hydrogen Facilities Home  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Fueling Stations Telecommunication Fuel Cell Use Hazard and Risk Analysis U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen Fueling Stations Telecommunication Fuel Cell Use Hazard and Risk Analysis U.S. Department of Energy The objective of this U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen Permitting Web site is to help local permitting officials deal with proposed hydrogen fueling stations, fuel cell installations for telecommunications backup power, and other hydrogen projects. Resources for local permitting officials who are looking to address project proposals include current citations for hydrogen fueling stations and a listing of setback requirements on the Alternative Fuels & Advanced Vehicle Data Center Web site. In addition, this overview of telecommunications fuel cell use and an animation that demonstrates telecommunications site layout using hydrogen fuel cells for backup power should provide helpful

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes liquid hydrogen" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

11 Annual Progress Report 11 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program I. Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 II. Hydrogen Production . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 II.0 Hydrogen Production Sub-Program Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 II.A Distributed BDL Production . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 II.A.1 Pacific Northwest National Laboratory: Biomass-Derived Liquids Distributed (Aqueous Phase) Reforming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25

202

Novel Compression and Fueling Apparatus to Meet Hydrogen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

compressor concept involving compression of hydrogen with a "liquid piston" with little temperature rise that are available commercially Cost increases, but cost per kg of delivered hydrogen decreases slightly 700 barg delivers 71% more hydrogen for a similar sized vehicle tank #12;8 Novel Compressor Targets: ­ Prototype

203

MIS-based sensors with hydrogen selectivity  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention provides hydrogen selective metal-insulator-semiconductor sensors which include a layer of hydrogen selective material. The hydrogen selective material can be polyimide layer having a thickness between 200 and 800 nm. Suitable polyimide materials include reaction products of benzophenone tetracarboxylic dianhydride 4,4-oxydianiline m-phenylene diamine and other structurally similar materials.

Li; ,Dongmei (Boulder, CO); Medlin, J. William (Boulder, CO); McDaniel, Anthony H. (Livermore, CA); Bastasz, Robert J. (Livermore, CA)

2008-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

204

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Plan (September 2011)  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

The Department of Energy Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Plan outlines the strategy, activities, and plans of the DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, which includes hydrogen and fuel cell activities

205

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

FY 2012 Annual Progress Report FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program I. Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-1 II. Hydrogen Production . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .II-1 II.0 Hydrogen Production Sub-Program Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .II-3 II.A Distributed Biomass-Derived Liquids Production . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . II-11 II.A.1 Pacific Northwest National Laboratory: Biomass-Derived Liquids Distributed (Aqueous Phase) Reforming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

206

Strategic Initiatives for Hydrogen Delivery Workshop  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energys Hydrogen Pipeline Working Group Workshop included more than 45 researchers and industry experts. The workshop provided an overview of hydrogen pipeline projects.

207

Basic Research for the Hydrogen Fuel Initiative  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Basic Research for the Hydrogen Fuel Initiative Basic Research for the Hydrogen Fuel Initiative Institution Project Title Category A: Novel Hydrogen Storage Materials Massachusetts Institute of Technology Theory and Modeling of Materials for Hydrogen Storage Washington University In Situ NMR Studies of Hydrogen Storage Systems University of Pennsylvania Chemical Hydrogen Storage in Ionic Liquid Media Colorado School of Mines Molecular Hydrogen Storage in Novel Binary Clathrate Hydrates at Near-Ambient Temperatures and Pressures Georgia Institute of Technology First-Principles Studies of Phase Stability and Reaction Dynamics in Complex Metal Hydrides Louisiana Tech University Understanding the Local Atomic-Level Effect of Dopants In Complex Metal Hydrides Using Synchrotron X-ray Absorption

208

17 - Hydrogen as a fuel in transportation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract: Hydrogen has attracted fresh attention in recent decades as an alternative renewable and sustainable transportation fuel. Hydrogen can fuel conventional or hybridized power trains, through highly efficient and low emission hydrogen-fueled internal combustion engines (H2ICE) and proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC). High capacity and cost-effective onboard vehicle hydrogen storage remains a major challenge, along with the affordability of building out a distributed hydrogen production, distribution, and fueling infrastructure. Current practice is to store hydrogen onboard vehicles as a compressed gas, cryogenic liquid, or in chemical form for conversion on demand. Recent hydrogen demonstrations and field trials have advanced the technology, lowered costs, and improved public perception.

J.R. Anstrom

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program: 2004 Annual Progress Report - Hydrogen  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Storage Hydrogen Storage Printable Version 2004 Annual Progress Report III. Hydrogen Storage Each individual technical report is available as an individual Adobe Acrobat PDF for easier use. Download Adobe Reader. Hydrogen Storage Sub-Program Review, JoAnn Milliken, DOE (PDF 227 KB) A. Compressed/Liquid H2 Tanks Low-Cost, High-Efficiency, High-Pressure Hydrogen Storage, Jui Ko, Quantum (PDF 373 KB) Optimum Utilization of Available Space in a Vehicle through Conformable Hydrogen Tanks, Salvador Aceves, LLNL (PDF 614 KB) Next Generation Physical Hydrogen Storage, Andrew Weisberg, LLNL (PDF 1 MB) Back to Top B. Chemical Hydrides Low-Cost, Off-Board Regeneration of Sodium Borohydride, Ying Wu, Millennium Cell (PDF 420 KB) Hydrogen Storage: Radiolysis for Borate Regeneration, Bruce Wilding,

210

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program: 2008 Annual Progress Report - Hydrogen  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Production Printable Version 2008 Annual Progress Report II. Hydrogen Production This section of the 2008 Progress Report for the DOE Hydrogen Program focuses on hydrogen production. Each technical report is available as an individual Adobe Acrobat PDF. Download Adobe Reader. Hydrogen Production Sub-Program Overview, Richard Farmer, U.S. Department of Energy (PDF 319 KB) A. Distributed Production from Bio-Derived Liquids Low-Cost Hydrogen Distributed Production System Development, Frank Lomax, H2Gen Innovations, Inc. (PDF 298 KB) Distributed Hydrogen Production from Biomass Reforming, David King, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PDF 372 KB) Analysis of Ethanol Reforming System Configurations, Brian James, Directed Technologies, Inc. (PDF 515 KB)

211

Device for hydrogen separation and method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A device for hydrogen separation has a porous support and hydrogen separation material on the support. The support is prepared by heat treatment of metal microparticles, preferably of iron-based or nickel-based alloys that also include aluminum and/or yttrium. The hydrogen separation material is then deposited on the support. Preferred hydrogen separation materials include metals such as palladium, alloys, platinum, refractory metals, and alloys.

Paglieri, Stephen N. (White Rock, NM); Anderson, Iver E. (Ames, IA); Terpstra, Robert L. (Ames, IA)

2009-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

212

8 - Photocatalytic production of hydrogen  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract: The photocatalytic production of hydrogen represents a fascinating way to convert and store solar energy as chemical energy, in the form of renewable hydrogen, the ideal fuel for the future. Hydrogen can be produced either by direct water splitting or by photo-reforming of organics in either liquid or gas phase. Both methods are reviewed in this chapter. Starting with a brief historical background, the most recent achievements in the field of photocatalytic hydrogen production are discussed, concerning both the development of innovative materials able to exploit a larger portion of the solar spectrum compared to traditional photocatalytic materials, and the different set-ups and devices which have been developed and tested.

G.L. Chiarello; E. Selli

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Hydrogen Analysis Projects by Performing  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Performing Organization Performing Organization Below are hydrogen analyses and analytical models grouped by performing organization. A B D E F G I L M N O P R S T U W A Aalborg University Wind Power Integration Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. Ceramic Membrane Reactors for Converting Natural Gas to Hydrogen Hydrogen Energy Station Validation Anhui University of Technology Well-to-Wheels Analysis of Hydrogen Fuel-Cell Vehicle Pathways in Shanghai Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) Advanced Vehicle Introduction Decisions (AVID) Model AirCRED Model All Modular Industry Growth Assessment (AMIGA) Model Biofuels in Light-Duty Vehicles Consumer Adoption and Infrastructure Development Including Combined Hydrogen, Heat, and Power Cost Implications of Hydrogen Quality Requirements

214

Hydrogen Fuel Pilot Plant and Hydrogen ICE Vehicle Testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) teamed with Electric Transportation Applications (ETA) and Arizona Public Service (APS) to develop the APS Alternative Fuel (Hydrogen) Pilot Plant that produces and compresses hydrogen on site through an electrolysis process by operating a PEM fuel cell in reverse; natural gas is also compressed onsite. The Pilot Plant dispenses 100% hydrogen, 15 to 50% blends of hydrogen and compressed natural gas (H/CNG), and 100% CNG via a credit card billing system at pressures up to 5,000 psi. Thirty internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles (including Daimler Chrysler, Ford and General Motors vehicles) are operating on 100% hydrogen and 15 to 50% H/CNG blends. Since the Pilot Plant started operating in June 2002, they hydrogen and H/CNG ICE vehicels have accumulated 250,000 test miles.

J. Francfort (INEEL)

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Hydrogen Storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hydrogen is an important energy carrier, and when used as a fuel, can be considered as an alternate to the major fossil fuels, coal, crude oil, and natural gas, and their derivatives. It has the potential to b...

Prof. Dr. Robert A. Huggins

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Hydrogen energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...use of hydrogen as an energy carrier will depend significantly...its utilization and conversion to electricity/heat...becomes an alternative energy carrier. However, various...effectively with conventional energy conversion technologies. The...

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Hydrogen Production  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This 2-page fact sheet provides a brief introduction to hydrogen production technologies. Intended for a non-technical audience, it explains how different resources and processes can be used to produ

218

Catalyzed borohydrides for hydrogen storage  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A hydrogen storage material and process is provided in which alkali borohydride materials are created which contain effective amounts of catalyst(s) which include transition metal oxides, halides, and chlorides of titanium, zirconium, tin, and combinations of the various catalysts. When the catalysts are added to an alkali borodydride such as a lithium borohydride, the initial hydrogen release point of the resulting mixture is substantially lowered. Additionally, the hydrogen storage material may be rehydrided with weight percent values of hydrogen at least about 9 percent.

Au, Ming (Augusta, GA)

2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

219

Hydrogen-Selective Membrane  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A hydrogen-selective membrane comprises a tubular porous ceramic support having a palladium metal layer deposited on an inside surface of the ceramic support. The thickness of the palladium layer is greater than about 10 .mu.m but typically less than about 20 .mu.m. The hydrogen permeation rate of the membrane is greater than about 1.0 moles/m.sup.2.s at a temperature of greater than about 500.degree. C. and a transmembrane pressure difference of about 1,500 kPa. Moreover, the hydrogen-to-nitrogen selectivity is greater than about 600 at a temperature of greater than about 500.degree. C. and a transmembrane pressure of about 700 kPa. Hydrogen can be separated from a mixture of gases using the membrane. The method may include the step of heating the mixture of gases to a temperature of greater than about 400.degree. C. and less than about 1000.degree. C. before the step of flowing the mixture of gases past the membrane. The mixture of gases may include ammonia. The ammonia typically is decomposed to provide nitrogen and hydrogen using a catalyst such as nickel. The catalyst may be placed inside the tubular ceramic support. The mixture of gases may be supplied by an industrial process such as the mixture of exhaust gases from the IGCC process.

Collins, John P. (Boulder, CO); Way, J. Douglas (Boulder, CO)

1995-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

220

Hydrogen-selective membrane  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A hydrogen-selective membrane comprises a tubular porous ceramic support having a palladium metal layer deposited on an inside surface of the ceramic support. The thickness of the palladium layer is greater than about 10 {micro}m but typically less than about 20 {micro}m. The hydrogen permeation rate of the membrane is greater than about 1.0 moles/m{sup 2} s at a temperature of greater than about 500 C and a transmembrane pressure difference of about 1,500 kPa. Moreover, the hydrogen-to-nitrogen selectivity is greater than about 600 at a temperature of greater than about 500 C and a transmembrane pressure of about 700 kPa. Hydrogen can be separated from a mixture of gases using the membrane. The method may include the step of heating the mixture of gases to a temperature of greater than about 400 C and less than about 1000 C before the step of flowing the mixture of gases past the membrane. The mixture of gases may include ammonia. The ammonia typically is decomposed to provide nitrogen and hydrogen using a catalyst such as nickel. The catalyst may be placed inside the tubular ceramic support. The mixture of gases may be supplied by an industrial process such as the mixture of exhaust gases from the IGCC process. 9 figs.

Collins, J.P.; Way, J.D.

1997-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes liquid hydrogen" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Hydrogen-selective membrane  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A hydrogen-selective membrane comprises a tubular porous ceramic support having a palladium metal layer deposited on an inside surface of the ceramic support. The thickness of the palladium layer is greater than about 10 {micro}m but typically less than about 20 {micro}m. The hydrogen permeation rate of the membrane is greater than about 1.0 moles/m{sup 2}s at a temperature of greater than about 500 C and a transmembrane pressure difference of about 1,500 kPa. Moreover, the hydrogen-to-nitrogen selectivity is greater than about 600 at a temperature of greater than about 500 C and a transmembrane pressure of about 700 kPa. Hydrogen can be separated from a mixture of gases using the membrane. The method may include the step of heating the mixture of gases to a temperature of greater than about 400 C and less than about 1000 C before the step of flowing the mixture of gases past the membrane. The mixture of gases may include ammonia. The ammonia typically is decomposed to provide nitrogen and hydrogen using a catalyst such as nickel. The catalyst may be placed inside the tubular ceramic support. The mixture of gases may be supplied by an industrial process such as the mixture of exhaust gases from the IGCC process. 9 figs.

Collins, J.P.; Way, J.D.

1995-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

222

Liquid Wall Chambers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The key feature of liquid wall chambers is the use of a renewable liquid layer to protect chamber structures from target emissions. Two primary options have been proposed and studied: wetted wall chambers and thick liquid wall (TLW) chambers. With wetted wall designs, a thin layer of liquid shields the structural first wall from short ranged target emissions (x-rays, ions and debris) but not neutrons. Various schemes have been proposed to establish and renew the liquid layer between shots including flow-guiding porous fabrics (e.g., Osiris, HIBALL), porous rigid structures (Prometheus) and thin film flows (KOYO). The thin liquid layer can be the tritium breeding material (e.g., flibe, PbLi, or Li) or another liquid metal such as Pb. TLWs use liquid jets injected by stationary or oscillating nozzles to form a neutronically thick layer (typically with an effective thickness of {approx}50 cm) of liquid between the target and first structural wall. In addition to absorbing short ranged emissions, the thick liquid layer degrades the neutron flux and energy reaching the first wall, typically by {approx}10 x x, so that steel walls can survive for the life of the plant ({approx}30-60 yrs). The thick liquid serves as the primary coolant and tritium breeding material (most recent designs use flibe, but the earliest concepts used Li). In essence, the TLW places the fusion blanket inside the first wall instead of behind the first wall.

Meier, W R

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

223

Table of Contents; DOE Hydrogen Program FY 2008 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

8 Annual Progress Report 8 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen Program Table of Contents I. Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 II. Hydrogen Production . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17 II.0 Hydrogen Production Sub-Program Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19 II.A Distributed Production from Bio-Derived Liquids . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23 II.A.1 H 2 Gen Innovations, Inc: Low-Cost Hydrogen Distributed Production System Development. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23

224

Projected Cost, Energy Use, and Emissions of Hydrogen Technologies for Fuel Cell Vehicles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Each combination of technologies necessary to produce, deliver, and distribute hydrogen for transportation use has a corresponding levelized cost, energy requirement, and greenhouse gas emission profile depending upon the technologies' efficiencies and costs. Understanding the technical status, potential, and tradeoffs is necessary to properly allocate research and development (R&D) funding. In this paper, levelized delivered hydrogen costs, pathway energy use, and well-to-wheels (WTW) energy use and emissions are reported for multiple hydrogen production, delivery, and distribution pathways. Technologies analyzed include both central and distributed reforming of natural gas and electrolysis of water, and central hydrogen production from biomass and coal. Delivery options analyzed include trucks carrying liquid hydrogen and pipelines carrying gaseous hydrogen. Projected costs, energy use, and emissions for current technologies (technology that has been developed to at least the bench-scale, extrapolated to commercial-scale) are reported. Results compare favorably with those for gasoline, diesel, and E85 used in current internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles, gasoline hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), and flexible fuel vehicles. Sensitivities of pathway cost, pathway energy use, WTW energy use, and WTW emissions to important primary parameters were examined as an aid in understanding the benefits of various options. Sensitivity studies on production process energy efficiency, total production process capital investment, feed stock cost, production facility operating capacity, electricity grid mix, hydrogen vehicle market penetration, distance from the hydrogen production facility to city gate, and other parameters are reported. The Hydrogen Macro-System Model (MSM) was used for this analysis. The MSM estimates the cost, energy use, and emissions trade offs of various hydrogen production, delivery, and distribution pathways under consideration. The MSM links the H2A Production Model, the Hydrogen Delivery Scenario Analysis Model (HDSAM), and the Greenhouse Gas, Regulated Emission, and Energy for Transportation (GREET) Model. The MSM utilizes the capabilities of each component model and ensures the use of consistent parameters between the models to enable analysis of full hydrogen production, delivery, and distribution pathways. To better understand spatial aspects of hydrogen pathways, the MSM is linked to the Hydrogen Demand and Resource Analysis Tool (HyDRA). The MSM is available to the public and enables users to analyze the pathways and complete sensitivity analyses.

Ruth, M. F.; Diakov, V.; Laffen, M. J.; Timbario, T. A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Effective hydrogen storage in single-wall carbon nanotubes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The hydrogen-storage behavior of single-wall carbon nanotubes was studied using molecular dynamics simulations and ab initio electronic calculations. Hydrogen atoms with kinetic energy of 1625 eV were observed to penetrate into and be trapped inside the tube. Consecutively injected H atoms form hydrogen molecules, and gradually condense to become liquid hydrogen in the tube. The density of injected hydrogen in the tube and the pressure on the wall of the nanotube induced by the stored hydrogen molecules were evaluated at room temperature.

Yuchen Ma; Yueyuan Xia; Mingwen Zhao; Ruijin Wang; Liangmo Mei

2001-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

226

Hydrogen Technology Research at SRNL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is a U.S. Department of Energy research and development laboratory located at the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina. SRNL has over 50 years of experience in developing and applying hydrogen technology, both through its national defense activities as well as through its recent activities with the DOE Hydrogen Programs. The hydrogen technical staff at SRNL comprises over 90 scientists, engineers and technologists. SRNL has ongoing R&D initiatives in a variety of hydrogen storage areas, including metal hydrides, complex hydrides, chemical hydrides and carbon nanotubes. SRNL has over 25 years of experience in metal hydrides and solid-state hydrogen storage research, development and demonstration. As part of its defense mission at SRS, SRNL developed, designed, demonstrated and provides ongoing technical support for the largest hydrogen processing facility in the world based on the integrated use of metal hydrides for hydrogen storage, separation, and compression. The SRNL has been active in teaming with academic and industrial partners to advance hydrogen technology. A primary focus of SRNL's R&D has been hydrogen storage using metal and complex hydrides. SRNL and its Hydrogen Technology Research Laboratory have been very successful in leveraging their defense infrastructure, capabilities and investments to help solve this country's energy problems. SRNL has participated in projects to convert public transit and utility vehicles for operation using hydrogen fuel. Two major projects include the H2Fuel Bus and an Industrial Fuel Cell Vehicle (IFCV) also known as the GATOR{trademark}. Both of these projects were funded by DOE and cost shared by industry. These are discussed further in Section 3.0, Demonstration Projects. In addition to metal hydrides technology, the SRNL Hydrogen group has done extensive R&D in other hydrogen technologies, including membrane filters for H2 separation, doped carbon nanotubes, storage vessel design and optimization, chemical hydrides, hydrogen compressors and hydrogen production using nuclear energy. Several of these are discussed further in Section 2, SRNL Hydrogen Research and Development.

Danko, E.

2011-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

227

Precision liquid level sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A precision liquid level sensor utilizes a balanced R. F. bridge, each arm including an air dielectric line. Changes in liquid level along one air dielectric line imbalance the bridge and create a voltage which is directly measurable across the bridge.

Field, Michael E. (Albuquerque, NM); Sullivan, William H. (Albuquerque, NM)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Thin film hydrogen sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A thin film hydrogen sensor includes a substantially flat ceramic substrate with first and second planar sides and a first substrate end opposite a second substrate end; a thin film temperature responsive resistor on the first planar side of the substrate proximate to the first substrate end; a thin film hydrogen responsive metal resistor on the first planar side of the substrate proximate to the fist substrate end and proximate to the temperature responsive resistor; and a heater on the second planar side of the substrate proximate to the first end. 5 figs.

Cheng, Y.T.; Poli, A.A.; Meltser, M.A.

1999-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

229

Thin film hydrogen sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A thin film hydrogen sensor, includes: a substantially flat ceramic substrate with first and second planar sides and a first substrate end opposite a second substrate end; a thin film temperature responsive resistor on the first planar side of the substrate proximate to the first substrate end; a thin film hydrogen responsive metal resistor on the first planar side of the substrate proximate to the fist substrate end and proximate to the temperature responsive resistor; and a heater on the second planar side of the substrate proximate to the first end.

Cheng, Yang-Tse (Rochester Hills, MI); Poli, Andrea A. (Livonia, MI); Meltser, Mark Alexander (Pittsford, NY)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Molecular hydrogen in Lyman alpha emitters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......undamped by neutral hydrogen. The main features...calculated including dust production due to SNe II, assuming...to which the neutral hydrogen fraction of at z (5...2011a). 3MOLECULAR HYDROGEN PHYSICS H2 can be formed in galaxies by two main methods: the first, and rather......

Livia Vallini; Pratika Dayal; Andrea Ferrara

2012-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

231

Hydrogen program overview  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper consists of viewgraphs which summarize the following: Hydrogen program structure; Goals for hydrogen production research; Goals for hydrogen storage and utilization research; Technology validation; DOE technology validation activities supporting hydrogen pathways; Near-term opportunities for hydrogen; Market for hydrogen; and List of solicitation awards. It is concluded that a full transition toward a hydrogen economy can begin in the next decade.

Gronich, S. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Utility Technologies

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

232

Active Hydrogen  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Dry hydrogen can be activated in an electric discharge if the pressure and voltage are carefully regulated. Active hydrogen reduces metallic sulphides whose heat of formation is 22 000 cal. or less. The active gas is decomposed by 3 cm of well packed glass wool. A quantitative method is given for the determination of active hydrogen. Less of the active gas is formed in a tube coated with stearic acid or phosphoric acid than when no coating is employed. The decay reaction was found to follow the expression for a unimolecular reaction. The rate of decay appears to be independent of the wall surface. The period of half?life at room temperature and 40 mm pressure is 0.2 sec. approximately. The energy of formation of active hydrogen is approximately 18 000 cal. The energy of activation for the decay of the active constituent is approximately 17 800 cal. The properties of active hydrogen are considered in relation to the properties predicted for H3.

A. C. Grubb; A. B. Van Cleave

1935-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Support of a pathway to a hydrogen future  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper consists of viewgraphs which outline the content of the presentation. Subjects addressed include: hydrogen research program vision; electricity industry restructuring -- opportunities and challenges for hydrogen; transportation sector -- opportunities for hydrogen; near-term and mid-term opportunities for hydrogen; and hydrogen production technologies from water. It is concluded that the global climate change challenge is the potential driver for the development of hydrogen systems.

Hoffman, A.R. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Utility Technologies

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

234

Low-Cost Hydrogen-from-Ethanol: A Distributed Production System (Presentation)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presented at the 2007 Bio-Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed Reforming Working Group held November 6, 2007 in Laurel, Maryland.

235

Hydrogen Generation from Biomass-Derived Carbohydrates via Aqueous-Phase Reforming  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation by Virent Energy Systems, Inc. at the October 24, 2006 Bio-Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed Reforming Working Group Kick-Off Meeting.

236

Hydrogen Storage Options: Technologies and Comparisons for Light-Duty Vehicle Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

10 kpsi) in carbon fiber-composite tanks, liquid hydrogen incarbon fiber is the highest cost material component of high pressure compressed gas tanks.

Burke, Andy; Gardiner, Monterey

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

BILIWG Meeting: DOE Hydrogen Quality Working Group Update and Recent Progress (Presentation)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presented at the 2007 Bio-Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed Reforming Working Group held November 6, 2007 in Laurel, Maryland.

238

Hydrogen Analysis  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

A A H2A: Hydrogen Analysis Margaret K. Mann DOE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies Program Systems Analysis Workshop July 28-29, 2004 Washington, D.C. H2A Charter * H2A mission: Improve the transparency and consistency of approach to analysis, improve the understanding of the differences among analyses, and seek better validation from industry. * H2A was supported by the HFCIT Program H2A History * First H2A meeting February 2003 * Primary goal: bring consistency & transparency to hydrogen analysis * Current effort is not designed to pick winners - R&D portfolio analysis - Tool for providing R&D direction * Current stage: production & delivery analysis - consistent cost methodology & critical cost analyses * Possible subsequent stages: transition analysis, end-point

239

Hydrogen Technologies Group  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hydrogen Technologies Group at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory advances the Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center's mission by researching a variety of hydrogen technologies.

Not Available

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Hydrogen | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sector List of Hydrogen Incentives Hydrogen Energy Data Book Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleHydrogen&oldid271963...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes liquid hydrogen" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

The Hype About Hydrogen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

economy based on the hydrogen fuel cell, but this cannot beus to look toward hydrogen. Fuel cell basics, simplifiedthe path to fuel cell commercialization. Hydrogen production

Mirza, Umar Karim

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Synthesis of hydrogen-carbon clathrate material and hydrogen evolution therefrom at moderate temperatures and pressures  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for making a hydrogenated carbon material is provided which includes forming a mixture of a carbon source, particularly a carbonaceous material, and a hydrogen source. The mixture is reacted under reaction conditions such that hydrogen is generated and/or released from the hydrogen source, an amorphous diamond-like carbon is formed, and at least a portion of the generated and/or released hydrogen associates with the amorphous diamond-like carbon, thereby forming a hydrogenated carbon material. A hydrogenated carbon material including a hydrogen carbon clathrate is characterized by evolution of molecular hydrogen at room temperature at atmospheric pressure in particular embodiments of methods and compositions according to the present invention.

Lueking, Angela (State College, PA); Narayanan, Deepa (Redmond, WA)

2011-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

243

Water reactive hydrogen fuel cell power system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A water reactive hydrogen fueled power system includes devices and methods to combine reactant fuel materials and aqueous solutions to generate hydrogen. The generated hydrogen is converted in a fuel cell to provide electricity. The water reactive hydrogen fueled power system includes a fuel cell, a water feed tray, and a fuel cartridge to generate power for portable power electronics. The removable fuel cartridge is encompassed by the water feed tray and fuel cell. The water feed tray is refillable with water by a user. The water is then transferred from the water feed tray into the fuel cartridge to generate hydrogen for the fuel cell which then produces power for the user.

Wallace, Andrew P; Melack, John M; Lefenfeld, Michael

2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

244

Water reactive hydrogen fuel cell power system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A water reactive hydrogen fueled power system includes devices and methods to combine reactant fuel materials and aqueous solutions to generate hydrogen. The generated hydrogen is converted in a fuel cell to provide electricity. The water reactive hydrogen fueled power system includes a fuel cell, a water feed tray, and a fuel cartridge to generate power for portable power electronics. The removable fuel cartridge is encompassed by the water feed tray and fuel cell. The water feed tray is refillable with water by a user. The water is then transferred from the water feed tray into a fuel cartridge to generate hydrogen for the fuel cell which then produces power for the user.

Wallace, Andrew P; Melack, John M; Lefenfeld, Michael

2014-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

245

Chemical Hydride Slurry for Hydrogen Production and Storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this project was to investigate and evaluate the attractiveness of using a magnesium chemical hydride slurry as a hydrogen storage, delivery, and production medium for automobiles. To fully evaluate the potential for magnesium hydride slurry to act as a carrier of hydrogen, potential slurry compositions, potential hydrogen release techniques, and the processes (and their costs) that will be used to recycle the byproducts back to a high hydrogen content slurry were evaluated. A 75% MgH2 slurry was demonstrated, which was just short of the 76% goal. This slurry is pumpable and storable for months at a time at room temperature and pressure conditions and it has the consistency of paint. Two techniques were demonstrated for reacting the slurry with water to release hydrogen. The first technique was a continuous mixing process that was tested for several hours at a time and demonstrated operation without external heat addition. Further work will be required to reduce this design to a reliable, robust system. The second technique was a semi-continuous process. It was demonstrated on a 2 kWh scale. This system operated continuously and reliably for hours at a time, including starts and stops. This process could be readily reduced to practice for commercial applications. The processes and costs associated with recycling the byproducts of the water/slurry reaction were also evaluated. This included recovering and recycling the oils of the slurry, reforming the magnesium hydroxide and magnesium oxide byproduct to magnesium metal, hydriding the magnesium metal with hydrogen to form magnesium hydride, and preparing the slurry. We found that the SOM process, under development by Boston University, offers the lowest cost alternative for producing and recycling the slurry. Using the H2A framework, a total cost of production, delivery, and distribution of $4.50/kg of hydrogen delivered or $4.50/gge was determined. Experiments performed at Boston University have demonstrated the technical viability of the process and have provided data for the cost analyses that have been performed. We also concluded that a carbothermic process could also produce magnesium at acceptable costs. The use of slurry as a medium to carry chemical hydrides has been shown during this project to offer significant advantages for storing, delivering, and distributing hydrogen: Magnesium hydride slurry is stable for months and pumpable. The oils of the slurry minimize the contact of oxygen and moisture in the air with the metal hydride in the slurry. Thus reactive chemicals, such as lithium hydride, can be handled safely in the air when encased in the oils of the slurry. Though magnesium hydride offers an additional safety feature of not reacting readily with water at room temperatures, it does react readily with water at temperatures above the boiling point of water. Thus when hydrogen is needed, the slurry and water are heated until the reaction begins, then the reaction energy provides heat for more slurry and water to be heated. The reaction system can be relatively small and light and the slurry can be stored in conventional liquid fuel tanks. When transported and stored, the conventional liquid fuel infrastructure can be used. The particular metal hydride of interest in this project, magnesium hydride, forms benign byproducts, magnesium hydroxide (Milk of Magnesia) and magnesium oxide. We have estimated that a magnesium hydride slurry system (including the mixer device and tanks) could meet the DOE 2010 energy density goals. ? During the investigation of hydriding techniques, we learned that magnesium hydride in a slurry can also be cycled in a rechargeable fashion. Thus, magnesium hydride slurry can act either as a chemical hydride storage medium or as a rechargeable hydride storage system. Hydrogen can be stored and delivered and then stored again thus significantly reducing the cost of storing and delivering hydrogen. Further evaluation and development of this concept will be performed as follow-on work under a

McClaine, Andrew W.

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

246

Liquid Fuels Market Module  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquid Fuels Market Module Liquid Fuels Market Module This page inTenTionally lefT blank 145 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Liquid Fuels Market Module The NEMS Liquid Fuels Market Module (LFMM) projects petroleum product prices and sources of supply for meeting petroleum product demand. The sources of supply include crude oil (both domestic and imported), petroleum product imports, unfinished oil imports, other refinery inputs (including alcohols, ethers, esters, corn, biomass, and coal), natural gas plant liquids production, and refinery processing gain. In addition, the LFMM projects capacity expansion and fuel consumption at domestic refineries. The LFMM contains a linear programming (LP) representation of U.S. petroleum refining

247

Hydrogen Systems Analysis | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Clean Coal » Coal to Liquids » Hydrogen Clean Coal » Coal to Liquids » Hydrogen Systems Analysis Hydrogen Systems Analysis Energy analyses provide valuable information, input, and guidance into the decision-making process on important issues such as national energy security and environmental policies, research and development programs and plans, technology options, and potential technical, economic, market, and social barriers to technology deployment. The Hydrogen and Clean Coal Fuels Program, working with the NETL Office of Systems, Analyses, and Planning, supports systems, techno-economic, and benefits analysis activities to provide guidance and input for its research and development program portfolio, assess the progress made by Program-funded research, and measure the energy security, economic and

248

Strategic Directions for Hydrogen Delivery Workshop  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy sponsored a Hydrogen Delivery Workshop in Washington, DC, May 7-8, 2003. Attendees included researchers, government officials, and industry members.

249

Pump apparatus including deconsolidator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A pump apparatus includes a particulate pump that defines a passage that extends from an inlet to an outlet. A duct is in flow communication with the outlet. The duct includes a deconsolidator configured to fragment particle agglomerates received from the passage.

Sonwane, Chandrashekhar; Saunders, Timothy; Fitzsimmons, Mark Andrew

2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

250

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Economic Analysis of Hydrogen Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Economic Analysis of Hydrogen Energy Station Concepts Economic Analysis of Hydrogen Energy Station Concepts Project Summary Full Title: Economic Analysis of Hydrogen Energy Station Concepts: Are 'H2E-Stations' a Key Link to a Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle Infrastructure? Project ID: 244 Principal Investigator: Timothy Lipman Brief Description: This project expands on a previously conducted, preliminary H2E-Station analysis in a number of important directions. Purpose This analysis, based on an integrated Excel/MATLAB/Simulink fuel cell system cost and performance model called CETEEM, includes the following: several energy station designs based on different sizes of fuel cell systems and hydrogen storage and delivery systems for service station and office building settings; characterization of a typical year of operation

251

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Hydrogen Fueling Station Economics Model  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fueling Station Economics Model Fueling Station Economics Model Project Summary Full Title: Hydrogen Fueling Station Economics Model Project ID: 193 Principal Investigator: Bill Liss Brief Description: The Gas Technology Institute developed a hydrogen fueling station economics model as part of their project to develop a natural gas to hydrogen fuel station. Keywords: Compressed gas; vehicle; refueling station; cost; natural gas Purpose Calculate hydrogen fueling station costs, including capital, operating, and maintenance costs. Performer Principal Investigator: Bill Liss Organization: Gas Technology Institute Address: 1700 South Mount Prospect Road Des Plains, IL 60018-1804 Telephone: 847-768-0530 Email: william.liss@gastechnology.org Project Description Type of Project: Model Category: Hydrogen Fuel Pathways

252

Hydrogen Delivery Infrastructure Option Analysis  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Delivery Infrastructure Hydrogen Delivery Infrastructure Option Analysis Option Analysis DOE and FreedomCAR & Fuel Partnership Hydrogen Delivery and On-Board Storage Analysis Workshop January 25, 2005 Washington DC This presentation does not contain any proprietary or confidential information Tan-Ping Chen Nexant Jim Campbell Bhadra Grover Air Liquide Stefan Unnasch TIAX Glyn Hazelden GTI Graham Moore Chevron Matt Ringer NREL Ray Hobbs Pinnacle West 2 Presentation Outline Project Background Knowledge Collected and Preliminary Results for Each Delivery Option Summary of Observations Next Step Project Background Project Background 4 Delivery Options Option 1* GH delivery by new pipelines Option 2 Converting NG/oil pipelines for GH delivery Option 3 Blending GH into NG pipelines Option 4* GH tube trailers

253

Polymer formulations for gettering hydrogen  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A novel method for preparing a hydrogenation composition comprising organic polymer molecules having carbon--carbon double bonds, for removing hydrogen from the atmosphere within enclosed spaces and particularly from atmospheres within enclosed spaces that contain air, water vapor, oxygen, carbon dioxide or ammonia. The organic polymers molecules containing carbon--carbon double bonds throughout their structures, preferably polybutadiene, polyisoprene and derivatives thereof, intimately mixed with an insoluble noble metal catalyst composition. High molecular weight polymers may be added to the organic polymer/catalyst mixture in order to improve their high temperature performance. The hydrogenation composition is prepared by dispersing the polymers in a suitable solvent, forming thereby a solution suspension, flash-freezing droplets of the solution in a liquid cryogen, freeze-drying the frozen droplets to remove frozen solvent incorporated in the droplets, and recovering the dried powder thus formed.

Shepodd, Timothy J. (330 Thrasher Ave., Livermore, CA 94550); Even, Jr., William R. (4254 Drake Way, Livermore, CA 94550)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Hydrogen Energy System and Hydrogen Production Methods  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hydrogen is being considered as a synthetic fuel ... . This paper contains an overview of the hydrogen production methods, those being commercially available today as well...

F. Barbir; T. N. Veziro?lu

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Hydrogen Production from Thermocatalytic Hydrogen Sulfide Decomposition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Experimental data on hydrogen production from hydrogen sulfide decomposition over various solid catalysts at ... The possibilities given by surface modification by vacuum methods (electron beam evaporation and ma...

O. K. Alexeeva

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Development of a National Center for Hydrogen Technology: A Summary Report of Activities Completed at the National Center for Hydrogen Technology - Year 6  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) located in Grand Forks, North Dakota, has operated the National Center for Hydrogen Technology? (NCHT?) since 2005 under a Cooperative Agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The EERC has a long history of hydrogen generation and utilization from fossil fuels, and under the NCHT Program, the EERC has accelerated its research on hydrogen generation and utilization topics. Since the NCHT?s inception, the EERC has received more than $65 million in funding for hydrogen-related projects ($24 million for projects in the NCHT, which includes federal and corporate partner development funds) involving more than 85 partners (27 with the NCHT). The NCHT Program?s nine activities span a broad range of technologies that align well with the Advanced Fuels Program goals and, specifically, those described in the Hydrogen from Coal Program research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) plan that refers to realistic testing of technologies at adequate scale, process intensification, and contaminant control. A number of projects have been completed that range from technical feasibility of several hydrogen generation and utilization technologies to public and technical education and outreach tools. Projects under the NCHT have produced hydrogen from natural gas, coal, liquid hydrocarbons, and biomass. The hydrogen or syngas generated by these processes has also been purified in many of these instances or burned directly for power generation. Also, several activities are still undergoing research, development, demonstration, and commercialization at the NCHT. This report provides a summary overview of the projects completed in Year 6 of the NCHT. Individual activity reports are referenced as a source of detailed information on each activity.

Holmes, Michael

2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

257

DEVELOPMENT OF A NATIONAL CENTER FOR HYDROGEN TECHNOLOGY: A SUMMARY REPORT OF ACTIVITIES COMPLETED AT THE NATIONAL CENTER FOR HYDROGEN TECHNOLOGY FROM 2005 TO 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) located in Grand Forks, North Dakota, has operated the National Center for Hydrogen Technology® (NCHT®) since 2005 under a Cooperative Agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy??s (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The EERC has a long history of hydrogen generation and utilization from fossil fuels, and under the NCHT Program, the EERC has accelerated its research of hydrogen generation and utilization topics. Since the NCHT??s inception, the EERC has received more than $65 million in funding of hydrogen-related projects ($20 million for the NCHT project which includes federal and corporate development partner funds) involving more than 85 partners (27 with the NCHT). The NCHT project??s 19 activities span a broad range of technologies that align well with the Advanced Fuels Program goals and, specifically, those described in the Hydrogen from Coal Program research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) plan. A number of projects have been completed which range from technical feasibility of several hydrogen generation and utilization technologies to public and technical education and outreach tools. Projects under the NCHT have produced hydrogen from natural gas, coal, liquid hydrocarbons, and biomass. The hydrogen or syngas generated by these processes has also been purified to transportation-grade quality in many of these instances or burned directly for power generation. Also, several activities are still undergoing research, development, demonstration, and commercialization at the NCHT. This report provides a summary overview of the projects completed in the first 5 years of the NCHT. Individual activity reports are referenced as a source of detailed information on each activity.

Michael Holmes

2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

258

Experiment Hazard Class 11 - Hydrogen  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1 - Hydrogen 1 - Hydrogen Applicability This hazard classification applies to all experiments and processes involving the use of gaseous hydrogen. This class includes work performed in the Experiment Hall Beamline Stations and any preparatory/setup/testing work performed in the LOM laboratories. Other hazard controls such as fire protection and life safety regulations may apply to experiments of this hazard class. A summary of controls for hydrogen use is available in the hydrogen summary document. Experiment Category Experiments involving previously reviewed hazard controls qualify for categorized as medium risk. Experiments involving new equipment or modified hazard control schemes are categorized as high risk. Experiment Hazard Control Verification Statements Engineered Controls - Applicable controls for storage and use of

259

Hydrogen Storage Materials Database Demonstration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

| Fuel Cell Technologies Program Source: US DOE 4/25/2011 eere.energy.gov | Fuel Cell Technologies Program Source: US DOE 4/25/2011 eere.energy.gov Hydrogen Storage Materials Database Demonstration FUEL CELL TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Ned Stetson Storage Tech Team Lead Fuel Cell Technologies Program U.S. Department of Energy 12/13/2011 Hydrogen Storage Materials Database Marni Lenahan December 13, 2011 Database Background * The Hydrogen Storage Materials Database was built to retain information from DOE Hydrogen Storage funded research and make these data more accessible. * Data includes properties of hydrogen storage materials investigated such as synthesis conditions, sorption and release conditions, capacities, thermodynamics, etc. http://hydrogenmaterialssearch.govtools.us Current Status * Data continues to be collected from DOE funded research.

260

Hydrogen Analysis Group  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

NREL factsheet that describes the general activites of the Hydrogen Analysis Group within NREL's Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center.

Not Available

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes liquid hydrogen" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

The Hype About Hydrogen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

another promising solution for hydrogen storage. However,storage and delivery, and there are safety issues as well with hydrogen

Mirza, Umar Karim

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Hydrogen Technology Validation  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This fact sheet provides a basic introduction to the DOE Hydrogen National Hydrogen Learning Demonstration for non-technical audiences.

263

Method of measuring a liquid pool volume  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of measuring a molten metal liquid pool volume and in particular molten titanium liquid pools, including the steps of (a) generating an ultrasonic wave at the surface of the molten metal liquid pool, (b) shining a light on the surface of a molten metal liquid pool, (c) detecting a change in the frequency of light, (d) detecting an ultrasonic wave echo at the surface of the molten metal liquid pool, and (e) computing the volume of the molten metal liquid.

Garcia, Gabe V. (Las Cruces, NM); Carlson, Nancy M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Donaldson, Alan D. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Kinetics of the Reaction of the Heaviest Hydrogen Atom with H2, the 4He? + H2 -> 4He?? + H Reaction: Experiments, Accurate Quantal Calculations, and Variational Transition State Theory, including Kinetic Isotope Effects for a Factor of 36.1 in Isotopic Mass  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The neutral muonic helium atom {sup 4}He{mu}, in which one of the electrons of He is replaced by a negative muon, may be effectively regarded as the heaviest isotope of the hydrogen atom, with a mass of 4.115 amu. We report details of the first muon spin rotation ({mu}SR) measurements of the chemical reaction rate constant of {sup 4}He{mu} with molecular hydrogen, {sup 4}He{mu} + H{sub 2} {yields} {sup 4}He{mu}H + H, at temperatures of 295.5, 405, and 500 K, as well as a {mu}SR measurement of the hyperfine coupling constant of muonic He at high pressures. The experimental rate constants, k{sub He{mu}}, are compared with the predictions of accurate quantum mechanical (QM) dynamics calculations carried out on a well converged Born-Huang (BH) potential energy surface, based on complete configuration interaction calculations and including a Born-Oppenheimer diagonal correction. At the two highest measured temperatures the agreement between the quantum theory and experiment is good to excellent, well within experimental uncertainties that include an estimate of possible systematic error, but at 295.5 K the quantum calculations for k{sub He{mu}} are below the experimental value by 2.1 times the experimental uncertainty estimates. Possible reasons for this discrepancy are discussed. Variational transition state theory calculations with multidimensional tunneling have also been carried out for k{sub He{mu}} on the BH surface, and they agree with the accurate QM rate constants to within 30% over a wider temperature range of 200-1000 K. Comparisons between theory and experiment are also presented for the rate constants for both the D + H{sub 2} and Mu + H{sub 2} reactions in a novel study of kinetic isotope effects for the H + H{sub 2} reactions over a factor of 36.1 in isotopic mass of the atomic reactant.

Fleming, Donald G.; Arseneau, Donald J.; Sukhorukov, Oleksandr; Brewer, Jess H.; Mielke, Steven L.; Truhlar, Donald G.; Schatz, George C.; Garrett, Bruce C.; Peterson, Kirk A.

2011-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

265

Ammonia as an Alternative Energy Storage Medium for Hydrogen Fuel Cells: Scientific and Technical Review for Near-Term Stationary Power Demonstration Projects, Final Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

here. The interest in hydrogen and fuel cell technologies atof new and improved hydrogen and fuel cell technologies.policy drivers for hydrogen and fuel cells include the

Lipman, Tim; Shah, Nihar

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Techno-Economic Analysis of Traditional Hydrogen Transmission...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Golden, CO February 25, 2014 2 Traditional hydrogen transmission and distribution (T&D) options Gaseous Form Liquid Form 3 Cost contribution of components in pipeline T&D...

267

Hydrogen Gas Production from Nuclear Power Plant in Relation to Hydrogen Fuel Cell Technologies Nowadays  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recently world has been confused by issues of energy resourcing including fossil fuel use global warming and sustainable energy generation. Hydrogen may become the choice for future fuel of combustion engine. Hydrogen is an environmentally clean source of energy to end?users particularly in transportation applications because without release of pollutants at the point of end use. Hydrogen may be produced from water using the process of electrolysis. One of the GEN?IV reactors nuclear projects (HTGRs HTR VHTR) is also can produce hydrogen from the process. In the present study hydrogen gas production from nuclear power plant is reviewed in relation to commercialization of hydrogen fuel cell technologies nowadays.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Hydrogen storage and integrated fuel cell assembly  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Hydrogen is stored in materials that absorb and desorb hydrogen with temperature dependent rates. A housing is provided that allows for the storage of one or more types of hydrogen-storage materials in close thermal proximity to a fuel cell stack. This arrangement, which includes alternating fuel cell stack and hydrogen-storage units, allows for close thermal matching of the hydrogen storage material and the fuel cell stack. Also, the present invention allows for tailoring of the hydrogen delivery by mixing different materials in one unit. Thermal insulation alternatively allows for a highly efficient unit. Individual power modules including one fuel cell stack surrounded by a pair of hydrogen-storage units allows for distribution of power throughout a vehicle or other electric power consuming devices.

Gross, Karl J. (Fremont, CA)

2010-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

269

Environmental information volume: Liquid Phase Methanol (LPMEOH{trademark}) project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this project is to demonstrate the commercial viability of the Liquid Phase Methanol Process using coal-derived synthesis gas, a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide. This report describes the proposed actions, alternative to the proposed action, the existing environment at the coal gasification plant at Kingsport, Tennessee, environmental impacts, regulatory requirements, offsite fuel testing, and DME addition to methanol production. Appendices include the air permit application, solid waste permits, water permit, existing air permits, agency correspondence, and Eastman and Air Products literature.

NONE

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Borazine-boron nitride hybrid hydrogen storage system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A hybrid hydrogen storage composition includes a first phase and a second phase adsorbed on the first phase, the first phase including BN for storing hydrogen by physisorption and the second phase including a borazane-borazine system for storing hydrogen in combined form as a hydride.

Narula, Chaitanya K. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Simonson, J. Michael (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Maya, Leon (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Paine, Robert T. (Albuquerque, NM) [Albuquerque, NM

2008-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

271

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program: 2004 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

4 4 Printable Version 2004 Annual Progress Report The 2004 Progress Report for the DOE Hydrogen Program summarizes the hydrogen and fuel cell R&D and analysis activities and accomplishments for FY 2004. Published in November 2004, the full document is very large; each technical report is available as an individual Adobe Acrobat PDF. Download Adobe Reader. Front Cover (PDF 203 KB) Table of Contents (PDF 432 KB) I. Introduction (PDF 350 KB) II. Hydrogen Production and Delivery Distributed Production Technologies Separations Biomass Gasification/Pyrolysis Photobiological Production Photoelectrochemical Production Electrolysis High-Temperature Thermochemical Processes Hydrogen Delivery Analysis III. Hydrogen Storage Compressed/Liquid H2 Tanks Chemical Hydrides Metal Hydrides

272

Hydrogen Delivery Technologies and Systems - Pipeline Transmission...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Hydrogen Delivery Technologies and Systems - Pipeline Transmission of Hydrogen Hydrogen Delivery Technologies and Systems - Pipeline Transmission of Hydrogen Hydrogen Delivery...

273

Hydrogen dynamics and light-induced structural changes in hydrogenated amorphous silicon T. A. Abtew* and D. A. Drabold  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrogen dynamics and light-induced structural changes in hydrogenated amorphous silicon T. A first-principles methods to study the network dynamics of hydrogenated amorphous silicon, including the motion of hydrogen. In addition to studies of atomic dynamics in the electronic ground state, we also

Drabold, David

274

Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Advanced Nuclear Research Advanced Nuclear Research Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology FY 2003 Programmatic Overview Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology Henderson/2003 Hydrogen Initiative.ppt 2 Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative Program Goal * Demonstrate the economic commercial-scale production of hydrogen using nuclear energy by 2015 Need for Nuclear Hydrogen * Hydrogen offers significant promise for reduced environmental impact of energy use, specifically in the transportation sector * The use of domestic energy sources to produce hydrogen reduces U.S. dependence on foreign oil and enhances national security * Existing hydrogen production methods are either inefficient or produce

275

Behavioral Response to Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles and Refueling: Results of California Drive Clinics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hydrogen vehicles in public transportation, including taxis. This study exploring fuel cell powered passenger cars

Martin, Elliot W; Shaheen, Susan A; Lipman, T E; Lidicker, Jeffrey

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

15 - Hydrogen storage in nanoporous materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract: This chapter covers hydrogen storage in nanoporous materials, which is one of the options currently being considered for automotive or mobile applications. It first introduces the principles behind hydrogen adsorption by these materials and the methods used to characterise their hydrogen storage properties. It then provides an overview of the different material types that are available including porous carbons, zeolites, metal-organic frameworks and microporous organic polymers and their most important hydrogen storage properties. The chapter concludes with a discussion of the use of nanoporous materials in practical hydrogen storage units, the most important considerations for this purpose, and a discussion of future trends in the area.

D.P. Broom; D. Book

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program: 2010 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

0 0 Printable Version 2010 Annual Progress Report The 2010 Progress Report for the DOE Hydrogen Program summarizes the hydrogen and fuel cell R&D activities and accomplishments for FY 2010. Published in February 2011, the full document is very large; each technical report is available as an individual Adobe Acrobat PDF. Front Cover Table of Contents I. Introduction, Sunita Satyapal, U.S. Department of Energy II. Hydrogen Production Distributed Bio-Derived Liquid Production Biomass Gasification Separations Hydrogen from Coal Electrolysis Hi-Temp Thermochemical Photoelectrochemical Biological Production Cross-Cutting/Production III. Hydrogen Delivery IV. Hydrogen Storage Metal Hydride Center of Excellence Chemical Hydrogen Storage Center of Excellence Hydrogen Sorption Center of Excellence

278

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program: 2011 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1 1 Printable Version 2011 Annual Progress Report The 2011 Progress Report for the DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program summarizes the hydrogen and fuel cell R&D activities and accomplishments for FY 2011. Published in November 2011, the full document is very large; each technical report is available as an individual Adobe Acrobat PDF. Front Cover and Title Page Table of Contents I. Introduction, Sunita Satyapal, U.S. Department of Energy II. Hydrogen Production Distributed Bio-Derived Liquid Production Biomass Gasification Separations Hydrogen from Coal Electrolysis Hi-Temp Thermochemical Photoelectrochemical Biological Production Analysis Production Basic Energy Sciences III. Hydrogen Delivery IV. Hydrogen Storage Metal Hydride Chemical Hydrogen Storage Hydrogen Sorption

279

Resistive hydrogen sensing element  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Systems and methods are described for providing a hydrogen sensing element with a more robust exposed metallization by application of a discontinuous or porous overlay to hold the metallization firmly on the substrate. An apparatus includes: a substantially inert, electrically-insulating substrate; a first Pd containing metallization deposited upon the substrate and completely covered by a substantially hydrogen-impermeable layer so as to form a reference resistor on the substrate; a second Pd containing metallization deposited upon the substrate and at least a partially accessible to a gas to be tested, so as to form a hydrogen-sensing resistor; a protective structure disposed upon at least a portion of the second Pd containing metallization and at least a portion of the substrate to improve the attachment of the second Pd containing metallization to the substrate while allowing the gas to contact said the second Pd containing metallization; and a resistance bridge circuit coupled to both the first and second Pd containing metallizations. The circuit determines the difference in electrical resistance between the first and second Pd containing metallizations. The hydrogen concentration in the gas may be determined. The systems and methods provide advantages because adhesion is improved without adversely effecting measurement speed or sensitivity.

Lauf, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Coal hydrogenation and deashing in ebullated bed catalytic reactor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved process for hydrogenation of coal containing ash with agglomeration and removal of ash from an ebullated bed catalytic reactor to produce deashed hydrocarbon liquid and gas products. In the process, a flowable coal-oil slurry is reacted with hydrogen in an ebullated catalyst bed reaction zone at elevated temperature and pressure conditions. The upward velocity and viscosity of the reactor liquid are controlled so that a substantial portion of the ash released from the coal is agglomerated to form larger particles in the upper portion of the reactor above the catalyst bed, from which the agglomerated ash is separately withdrawn along with adhering reaction zone liquid. The resulting hydrogenated hydrocarbon effluent material product is phase separated to remove vapor fractions, after which any ash remaining in the liquid fraction can be removed to produce substantially ash-free coal-derived liquid products.

Huibers, Derk T. A. (Pennington, NJ); Johanson, Edwin S. (Princeton, NJ)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes liquid hydrogen" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Distributed Reforming of Renewable Liquids via Water Splitting using Oxygen Transport Membrane (OTM) (Presentation)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presented at the 2007 Bio-Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed Reforming Working Group held November 6, 2007 in Laurel, Maryland.

282

BILIWG Meeting: High Pressure Steam Reforming of Bio-Derived Liquids (Presentation)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presented at the 2007 Bio-Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed Reforming Working Group held November 6, 2007 in Laurel, Maryland.

283

Air Liquide - Biogas & Fuel Cells  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Liquide - Biogas & Fuel Cells Liquide - Biogas & Fuel Cells ■ Hydrogen Energy ■ Biogas Upgrading Technology 12 June 2012 Charlie.Anderson@airliquide.com 2 Air Liquide, world leader in gases for industry, health and the environment Renewable H 2 to Fuel Cell, Integrated Concept Purified Biogas 3 Air Liquide, world leader in gases for industry, health and the environment Renewable H 2 to Fuel Cell, Non-Integrated Concept Landfill WWTP digester Biogas membrane Pipeline quality methane CH4 Pipeline Hydrogen Production To Fuel Cell Vehicles Stationary Fuel Cells With H2 purification Stationary Fuel Cells Direct Conversion Directed Biomethane 4 Air Liquide, world leader in gases for industry, health and the environment Biogas Sources in the US ■ Landfill gas dominates (~4,000 Nm3/h typical)

284

Hydrogen Pipeline Working Group Workshop: Code for Hydrogen Pipelines...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Pipeline Working Group Workshop: Code for Hydrogen Pipelines Hydrogen Pipeline Working Group Workshop: Code for Hydrogen Pipelines Code for Hydrogen Piping and Pipelines. B31...

285

Bulk Hydrogen Storage - Strategic Directions for Hydrogen Delivery...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Bulk Hydrogen Storage - Strategic Directions for Hydrogen Delivery Workshop Bulk Hydrogen Storage - Strategic Directions for Hydrogen Delivery Workshop Targets, barriers and...

286

Hydrogen Bonded Arrays: The Power of Multiple Hydrogen Bonds...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Bonded Arrays: The Power of Multiple Hydrogen Bonds. Hydrogen Bonded Arrays: The Power of Multiple Hydrogen Bonds. Abstract: Hydrogen bond interactions in small covalent model...

287

Efficient production of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural through the dehydration of sugars with caprolactam hydrogen sulfate ([CPL]HSO4) ionic liquid catalyst in a water/proprylene glycol monomethyl ether mixed solvent  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Efficient production of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) through the dehydration of sugars...4) ionic liquid or using metal halide as the co-catalyst in a new water/proprylene glycol monomethyl ether solvent system....

Pingzhen Huang; Aijuan Gu; Jinxing Wang

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Liquid-level detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Aliquid level sensor is described which has a pair of upright conductors spaced by an insulator defining a first high resistance path between the conductors. An electrically conductive path is interposed between the upright conductors at a discrete location at which liquid level is to be measured. It includes a liquid accessible gap of a dimension such that the electrical resistance across the conductor when the gap is filled with the liquid is detectably less than when the gap is emptied. The conductor might also be physically altered by temperature changes to serve also as an indicator of elevated temperature.

Not Available

1981-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

289

Conduction of Electricity by Dielectric Liquids at High Field Strengths  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The conductivity of highly purified heptane has been measured between optical flats at field strengths up to 600,000 volts per cm at temperatures ranging from - 190C to 20C. Electrode separations down to 0.005 cm were used in order to minimize the effect of space charge and ionic recombination. It is concluded that electronic or collision processes are unlikely as the source of high field conductivity in heptane and probably most other liquid dielectrics as well. It is suggested that the highly nonconducting dielectric liquids should be included as extreme cases in the general class of weak electrolytes. The presence of appreciable conductivity under high electric fields is ascribed to the lowering of the energy of the hydrogen bond by the applied field.

H. J. Plumley

1941-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

290

Hydrogen from Coal  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Coal Coal Edward Schmetz Office of Sequestration, Hydrogen and Clean Coal Fuels U.S. Department of Energy DOE Workshop on Hydrogen Separations and Purification Technologies September 8, 2004 Presentation Outline ƒ Hydrogen Initiatives ƒ Hydrogen from Coal Central Production Goal ƒ Why Coal ƒ Why Hydrogen Separation Membranes ƒ Coal-based Synthesis Gas Characteristics ƒ Technical Barriers ƒ Targets ƒ Future Plans 2 3 Hydrogen from Coal Program Hydrogen from Coal Program FutureGen FutureGen Hydrogen Fuel Initiative Hydrogen Fuel Initiative Gasification Fuel Cells Turbines Gasification Fuel Cells Turbines Carbon Capture & Sequestration Carbon Capture & Sequestration The Hydrogen from Coal Program Supports the Hydrogen Fuel Initiative and FutureGen * The Hydrogen Fuel Initiative is a $1.2 billion RD&D program to develop hydrogen

291

Hydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Technologies ProgramHydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Technologies Program Hydrogen Codes &  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Technologies ProgramHydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure)DescriptionMilestone #12;Hydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Technologies ProgramHydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Technologies Program Hydrogen Codes & Standards #12;Hydrogen Codes & Standards: Goal & Objectives Goal

292

Hydrogen Storage Materials: Properties and Possibilities  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...diffuse rapidly into the niobium. For bs hydroLaNi5 and FeTi as well, the role...storage. The most attractive source of low-cost hydrogen, coal gasification, produces...but substantial extra energy and capital costs are incurred by going through the liquid...

R. L. Cohen; J. H. Wernick

1981-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

293

Hydrogen Storage in Ammonia and Aminoborane Complexes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrogen Storage in Ammonia and Aminoborane Complexes Ali Raissi Florida Solar Energy Center;Advantages of Ammonia Costs about $150 per short ton or less than $6.25 per million BTU of H2 contained and utilization Stores 30% more energy by liquid volume than LH2 Easily reformed using 16% of the energy

294

HYDROGEN REGIONAL INFRASTRUCTURE PROGRAM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to serve as "go-to" organization to catalyze PA Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Economy development #12;FundingHYDROGEN REGIONAL INFRASTRUCTURE PROGRAM IN PENNSYLVANIA HYDROGEN REGIONAL INFRASTRUCTURE PROGRAM IN PENNSYLVANIA Melissa Klingenberg, PhDMelissa Klingenberg, PhD #12;Hydrogen ProgramHydrogen Program Air Products

295

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Production  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Production Production Photo of hydrogen researcher. Hydrogen can be produced using diverse, domestic resources including fossil fuels, such as natural gas and coal (with carbon sequestration); nuclear; biomass; and other renewable energy technologies, such as wind, solar, geothermal, and hydro-electric power. The overall challenge to hydrogen production is cost reduction. For cost-competitive transportation, a key driver for energy independence, hydrogen must be comparable to conventional fuels and technologies on a per-mile basis in order to succeed in the commercial marketplace. Learn more about DOE's hydrogen cost goal and the analysis used in projecting the future cost of hydrogen. The U.S. Department of Energy supports the research and development of a wide range of technologies to produce hydrogen economically and in environmentally friendly ways.

296

Detonation in Liquid Explosives  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... Laboratory, on the initiative of Dr. A. H. Davis, into the process of detonation in explosives, the programme including a photographic study of the ... in explosives, the programme including a photographic study of the detonation Waves in transparent liquid explosivesthe sensitivity of some of which can be varied by ...

D. CRONEY

1948-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

297

Kinetic study of hydrogen sulfide absorption in aqueous chlorine solution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). This technique involves H2S mass transfer in an aqueous phase using a gas-liquid contactor. Since H2S is poorly. This scrubbing liquid is just drained when the salt accumulation due to H2S oxidation into sulfate anions becomes Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is currently removed from gaseous effluents by chemical scrubbing using water

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

298

Reversible hydrogen storage materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In accordance with the present disclosure, a process for synthesis of a complex hydride material for hydrogen storage is provided. The process includes mixing a borohydride with at least one additive agent and at least one catalyst and heating the mixture at a temperature of less than about 600.degree. C. and a pressure of H.sub.2 gas to form a complex hydride material. The complex hydride material comprises MAl.sub.xB.sub.yH.sub.z, wherein M is an alkali metal or group IIA metal, Al is the element aluminum, x is any number from 0 to 1, B is the element boron, y is a number from 0 to 13, and z is a number from 4 to 57 with the additive agent and catalyst still being present. The complex hydride material is capable of cyclic dehydrogenation and rehydrogenation and has a hydrogen capacity of at least about 4 weight percent.

Ritter, James A. (Lexington, SC); Wang, Tao (Columbia, SC); Ebner, Armin D. (Lexington, SC); Holland, Charles E. (Cayce, SC)

2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

299

Robust Polymer Composite Membranes for Hydrogen Separation  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

applications, including the following: * Electricity generation via gas turbines or fuel cells * As a feedstock to produce a range of high-value liquid or gaseous fuels and...

300

Commercialization of Coal-to-Liquids Technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report provides an overview of the current status of coal-to-liquids (CTL) commercialization efforts, including an analysis of efforts to develop and implement large-scale, commercial coal-to-liquids projects to create transportation fuels. Topics covered include: an overview of the history of coal usage and the current market for coal; a detailed description of what coal-to-liquids technology is; the history of coal-to-liquids development and commercial application; an analysis of the key business factors that are driving the increased interest in coal-to-liquids; an analysis of the issues and challenges that are hindering the commercialization of coal-to-liquids technology; a review of available coal-to-liquids technology; a discussion of the economic drivers of coal-to-liquids project success; profiles of key coal-to-liquids developers; and profiles of key coal-to-liquids projects under development.

NONE

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes liquid hydrogen" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Solar hydrogen for urban trucks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Clean Air Now (CAN) Solar Hydrogen Project, located at Xerox Corp., El Segundo, California, includes solar photovoltaic powered hydrogen generation, compression, storage and end use. Three modified Ford Ranger trucks use the hydrogen fuel. The stand-alone electrolyzer and hydrogen dispensing system are solely powered by a photovoltaic array. A variable frequency DC-AC converter steps up the voltage to drive the 15 horsepower compressor motor. On site storage is available for up to 14,000 standard cubic feet (SCF) of solar hydrogen, and up to 80,000 SCF of commercial hydrogen. The project is 3 miles from Los Angeles International airport. The engine conversions are bored to 2.9 liter displacement and are supercharged. Performance is similar to that of the Ranger gasoline powered truck. Fuel is stored in carbon composite tanks (just behind the driver`s cab) at pressures up to 3600 psi. Truck range is 144 miles, given 3600 psi of hydrogen. The engine operates in lean burn mode, with nil CO and HC emissions. NO{sub x} emissions vary with load and rpm in the range from 10 to 100 ppm, yielding total emissions at a small fraction of the ULEV standard. Two trucks have been converted for the Xerox fleet, and one for the City of West Hollywood. A public outreach program, done in conjunction with the local public schools and the Department of Energy, introduces the local public to the advantages of hydrogen fuel technologies. The Clean Air Now program demonstrates that hydrogen powered fleet development is an appropriate, safe, and effective strategy for improvement of urban air quality, energy security and avoidance of global warming impact. Continued technology development and cost reduction promises to make such implementation market competitive.

Provenzano, J.: Scott, P.B.; Zweig, R. [Clean Air Now, Northridge, CA (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

302

Hydrogen Storage Testing and Analysis R&D | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

DOE R&D Activities Hydrogen Storage Testing and Analysis R&D Hydrogen Storage Testing and Analysis R&D DOE's hydrogen storage R&D activities include testing, analysis, and...

303

An Assessment of the Near-Term Costs of Hydrogen Refueling Stations and Station Components  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3-7: Booster Compressor Costs 3.5 Hydrogen PurificationkWh/kg includes compressor) Capital Costs Hydrogen EquipmentHydrogen Equipment Purifier Storage System Compressor Dispenser Additional Equipment Installation Costs

Weinert, Jonathan X.; Lipman, Timothy

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

FCT Hydrogen Production: Basics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Basics to someone by E-mail Basics to someone by E-mail Share FCT Hydrogen Production: Basics on Facebook Tweet about FCT Hydrogen Production: Basics on Twitter Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Production: Basics on Google Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Production: Basics on Delicious Rank FCT Hydrogen Production: Basics on Digg Find More places to share FCT Hydrogen Production: Basics on AddThis.com... Home Basics Central Versus Distributed Production Current Technology R&D Activities Quick Links Hydrogen Delivery Hydrogen Storage Fuel Cells Technology Validation Manufacturing Codes & Standards Education Systems Analysis Contacts Basics Photo of hydrogen production in photobioreactor Hydrogen, chemical symbol "H", is the simplest element on earth. An atom of hydrogen has only one proton and one electron. Hydrogen gas is a diatomic

305

The Transition to Hydrogen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

above, not all hydrogen production methods are equal inrealize hydrogens bene- ?ts fully, production methods thathydrogen vary depending on which primary source produces it and which production method

Ogden, Joan M

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

The Hydrogen Economy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The hydrogen economy is a vision for a future in which hydrogen replaces fossil fuels. There are a variety ... of methods for generating, storing and delivering hydrogen since no single method has yet proven supe...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Hydrogen storage methods  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hydrogen exhibits the highest heating value per mass of all chemical fuels. Furthermore, hydrogen is regenerative and environmentally friendly. There are two reasons why hydrogen is not the major fuel of todays ...

Andreas Zttel

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles UCD-ITS-RR-92-14 September byet al. , 1988,1989 HYDROGEN FUEL-CELL VEHICLES: TECHNICALIn the FCEV, the hydrogen fuel cell could supply the "net"

Delucchi, Mark

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the hydrogen refueling station. Compressor cost: inputcost) Compressor power requirement: input data 288.80 Initial temperature of hydrogen (Compressor cost per unit of output ($/hp/million standard ft [SCF] of hydrogen/

Delucchi, Mark

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

EMSL - liquids  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

liquids en Iodine Solubility in Low-Activity Waste Borosilicate Glass at 1000 C. http:www.emsl.pnl.govemslwebpublicationsiodine-solubility-low-activity-waste-borosilicate...

311

Coal to Liquids | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Liquids Liquids Coal to Liquids Major General Allen Tackett of the National Guard's 130th Airlift Wing dispenses the first fill-up of hydrogen fuel from the Yeager facility. Located in Charleston, WV, the Yeager facility was constructed and operated with support from the Office of Fossil Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory. Major General Allen Tackett of the National Guard's 130th Airlift Wing dispenses the first fill-up of hydrogen fuel from the Yeager facility. Located in Charleston, WV, the Yeager facility was constructed and operated with support from the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory. The Hydrogen and Clean Coal Fuels Program supports DOE's strategic goals of increasing energy security, reducing environmental impact of energy use,

312

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program: 2009 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

9 9 Printable Version 2009 Annual Progress Report The 2009 Progress Report for the DOE Hydrogen Program summarizes the hydrogen and fuel cell R&D activities and accomplishments for FY 2009. Published in November 2009, the full document is very large; each technical report is available as an individual Adobe Acrobat PDF. Download Adobe Reader. Front Cover (PDF 1.2 MB) Table of Contents (PDF 318 KB) I. Introduction, Sunita Satyapal, U.S. Department of Energy (PDF 1.5 MB) II. Hydrogen Production Distributed Production from Bio-Derived Liquids Biomass Gasification Separations Hydrogen from Coal Electrolysis Hi-Temp Thermochemical Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative Photoelectrochemical Biological Cross-Cutting/Production III. Hydrogen Delivery IV. Hydrogen Storage Metal Hydride Center of Excellence

313

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program: 2008 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

8 8 Printable Version 2008 Annual Progress Report The 2008 Progress Report for the DOE Hydrogen Program summarizes the hydrogen and fuel cell R&D activities and accomplishments for FY 2008. Published in November 2008, the full document is very large; each technical report is available as an individual Adobe Acrobat PDF. Download Adobe Reader. Front Cover (PDF 1.2 MB) Table of Contents (PDF 180 KB) I. Introduction, JoAnn Milliken, U.S. Department of Energy (PDF 980 KB) II. Hydrogen Production Distributed Production from Bio-Derived Liquids Electrolysis Separations Biomass Gasification Photoelectrochemical Biological Production Hydrogen From Coal Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative Hi-Temp Thermochemical Cross-Cutting Basic Energy Sciences III. Hydrogen Delivery IV. Hydrogen Storage

314

A novel concept for high conversion of coal to liquids. Final report, 1 September 1988--31 August 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A batch microreactor was designed and fabricated as a means of investigating maximum yields of liquids obtainable in very short reaction times of the order of a few seconds, and the maximum ratios of liquids/hydrocarbon (HC) gases obtainable under those conditions. A Wyodak sub-bituminous coal, crushed and sieved to {minus}200 mesh particle size, was used in the experiments, with a temperature of 500{degrees}C and a pressure of 1500 psi. The fine coal particles were fed dry to the reactor and heated to reaction temperature in times of one to two seconds. At a time of 3 seconds at reaction temperature, in a single pass a liquid yield of 60% by weight of the coal was obtained, accompanied by a ratio of liquids/(HC) gases of 30/1. When the unreacted solids were recycled to the reactor, and the results combined with those of the first pass, a liquid yield of 82% by weight of the coal was achieved, accompanied by a ratio of liquids/HC gases of 30/1. This ratio represents only about 3 wt percent HC gases, much lower that is produced in current advanced technologies, and represents a large saving in hydrogen consumption. A simulated distillation technique was applied to the liquids. The liquid product contained 86% by weight (of the liquids) total distillables (boiling point below 538{degrees}C), including 70% by weight of low-boiling fractions in the gasoline, kerosene and gas oil range (boiling point up to 325{degrees}C). The liquid product exhibited a H/C ratio of 1.5, which is considerably higher than observed in current advanced technologies for the primary liquids. Several catalysts were investigated. Iron catalysts, specifically ferric chloride hexahydrate and ferric sulfate pentahydrate, each produced these high conversions and high ratios of liquids/HC gases.

Wiser, W.H.; Shabtai, J.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Hydrogen Permeation Barrier Coatings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gaseous hydrogen, H2, has many physical properties that allow it to move rapidly into and through materials, which causes problems in keeping hydrogen from materials that are sensitive to hydrogen-induced degradation. Hydrogen molecules are the smallest diatomic molecules, with a molecular radius of about 37 x 10-12 m and the hydrogen atom is smaller still. Since it is small and light it is easily transported within materials by diffusion processes. The process of hydrogen entering and transporting through a materials is generally known as permeation and this section reviews the development of hydrogen permeation barriers and barrier coatings for the upcoming hydrogen economy.

Henager, Charles H.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Technology: Hydrogen and hydrates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... . 22492258 (2004). US Department of Energy Hydrogen Posture Plan http://www.eere.energy.gov/hydrogenandfuelcells/pdfs/hydrogen_posture_plan.pdf Kuhs, W. F. , Genov, ...

Ferdi Schth

2005-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

317

Hydrogen Pipeline Working Group  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Hydrogen Pipeline Working Group of research and industry experts focuses on issues related to the cost, safety, and reliability of hydrogen pipelines. Participants represent organizations...

318

Hydrogen and fuel taxation.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The competitiveness of hydrogen depends on how it is integrated in the energy tax system in Europe. This paper addresses the competitiveness of hydrogen and (more)

Hansen, Anders Chr.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

CAN HYDROGEN WIN?: EXPLORING SCENARIOS FOR HYDROGEN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

such as biofuel plug-in hybrids, but did well when biofuels were removed or priced excessively. Hydrogen fuel cells failed unless costs were assumed to descend independent of demand. However, hydrogen vehicles were; Hydrogen as fuel -- Economic aspects; Technological innovations -- Environmental aspects; Climatic changes

320

Terminal Operations for Tube Trailer and Liquid Tanker Filling...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

and Liquid Tanker Filling: Status, Challenges and R&D Needs 1 Linde covers the entire hydrogen value chain LH 2 storage SupplyStorage CompressionTransfer Dispenser Onsite SMR...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes liquid hydrogen" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

CATALYTIC CONVERSION OF SOLVENT REFINED COAL TO LIQUID PRODUCTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I. Solvent Refined Coal II. Catalysts III. Purpose andSondreal, E.A. , "Viscosity of Coal Liquids - The Effect ofAnthraxylon - Kinetics of Coal Hydrogenation," Ind. and Eng.

Tanner, K.I.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Hydrogen Pipeline Discussion  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

praxair.com praxair.com Copyright © 2003, Praxair Technology, Inc. All rights reserved. Hydrogen Pipeline Discussion BY Robert Zawierucha, Kang Xu and Gary Koeppel PRAXAIR TECHNOLOGY CENTER TONAWANDA, NEW YORK DOE Hydrogen Pipeline Workshop Augusta, GA August 2005 2 Introduction Regulatory and technical groups that impact hydrogen and hydrogen systems ASME, DOE, DOT etc, Compressed Gas Association activities ASTM TG G1.06.08 Hydrogen pipelines and CGA-5.6 Selected experience and guidance Summary and recommendations 3 CGA Publications Pertinent to Hydrogen G-5: Hydrogen G-5.3: Commodity Specification for Hydrogen G-5.4: Standard for Hydrogen Piping at Consumer Locations G-5.5: Hydrogen Vent Systems G-5.6: Hydrogen Pipeline Systems (IGC Doc 121/04/E) G-5.7: Carbon Monoxide and Syngas

323

Hydrogen | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

<-- Back to Hydrogen Gateway <-- Back to Hydrogen Gateway Technical Reference for Hydrogen Compatibility of Materials KIA FCEV SUNRISE MG 7955 6 7.jpg Guidance on materials selection for hydrogen service is needed to support the deployment of hydrogen as a fuel as well as the development of codes and standards for stationary hydrogen use, hydrogen vehicles, refueling stations, and hydrogen transportation. Materials property measurement is needed on deformation, fracture and fatigue of metals in environments relevant to this hydrogen economy infrastructure. The identification of hydrogen-affected material properties such as strength, fracture resistance and fatigue resistance are high priorities to ensure the safe design of load-bearing structures. To support the needs of the hydrogen community, Sandia National

324

Gas-liquid separator and method of operation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for gas-liquid separation in electrolysis processes is provided. The system includes a first compartment having a liquid carrier including a first gas therein and a second compartment having the liquid carrier including a second gas therein. The system also includes a gas-liquid separator fluidically coupled to the first and second compartments for separating the liquid carrier from the first and second gases.

Soloveichik, Grigorii Lev (Latham, NY); Whitt, David Brandon (Albany, NY)

2009-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

325

Chemical Hydrides for Hydrogen Storage in Fuel Cell Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Due to its high hydrogen storage capacity (up to 19.6% by weight for the release of 2.5 molar equivalents of hydrogen gas) and its stability under typical ambient conditions, ammonia borane (AB) is a promising material for chemical hydrogen storage for fuel cell applications in transportation sector. Several systems models for chemical hydride materials such as solid AB, liquid AB and alane were developed and evaluated at PNNL to determine an optimal configuration that would meet the 2010 and future DOE targets for hydrogen storage. This paper presents an overview of those systems models and discusses the simulation results for various transient drive cycle scenarios.

Devarakonda, Maruthi N.; Brooks, Kriston P.; Ronnebro, Ewa; Rassat, Scot D.; Holladay, Jamelyn D.

2012-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

326

Hydrogen Energy Technology Geoff Dutton  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) Pyrolysis Water electrolysis Reversible fuel cell Hydrogen Hydrogen-fuelled internal combustion engines Hydrogen-fuelled turbines Fuel cells Hydrogen systems Overall expensive. Intermediate paths, employing hydrogen derived from fossil fuel sources, are already used

Watson, Andrew

327

Hydrogen Delivery Options and Issues  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Options and Issues Options and Issues Mark Paster DOE August, 2006 Scope * From the end point of central or distributed production (300 psi H2) to and including the dispenser at a refueling station or stationary power site - GH2 Pipelines and Trucks, LH2 Trucks, Carriers <$1.00/kg of Hydrogen by 2017 Hydrogen Delivery H2 Delivery Current Status * Technology - GH2 Tube Trailers: ~340 kg, ~2600 psi - LH2 Trucks: ~3900 kg - Pipelines: up to 1500 psi (~630 miles in the U.S.) - Refueling Site Operations (compression, storage dispensing): Demonstration projects * Cost (Does NOT include refueling Site Operations) - Trucks: $4-$12/kg - Pipeline: <$2/kg H2A Analysis * Consistent, comparable, transparent approach to hydrogen production and delivery cost analysis * Excel spreadsheet tools with common economic

328

DOE Permitting Hydrogen Facilities: Hydrogen Fueling Stations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Stations Stations Public-use hydrogen fueling stations are very much like gasoline ones. In fact, sometimes, hydrogen and gasoline cars can be fueled at the same station. These stations offer self-service pumps, convenience stores, and other services in high-traffic locations. Photo of a Shell fueling station showing the site convenience store and hydrogen and gasoline fuel pumps. This fueling station in Washington, D.C., provides drivers with both hydrogen and gasoline fuels Many future hydrogen fueling stations will be expansions of existing fueling stations. These facilities will offer hydrogen pumps in addition to gasoline or natural gas pumps. Other hydrogen fueling stations will be "standalone" operations. These stations will be designed and constructed to

329

Spatial development of hydrogen economy in a low-carbon UK energy system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hydrogen technologies and infrastructures might play a significant role in meeting ambitious climate and energy policy goals of the UK Government. Nonetheless, studies on hydrogen are either limited in scope in that they do not take into account the relationships with the wider energy system drivers and constraints or do not consider how a hydrogen network might develop geographically. This paper presents a framework where a spatially explicit hydrogen module is embedded in the UK MARKAL Energy System model to explore energy system trade-offs for the production, delivery and use of hydrogen at the sub-national level. A set of illustrative scenarios highlight the competitiveness of hydrogen related infrastructures and technologies as well as imported liquid hydrogen against a stringent emissions reduction target; the effect of emissions reduction trajectory on the development of hydrogen network; the intense resource competition between low carbon hydrogen production and electricity generation, and the importance of economies of scale in hydrogen supply and distribution.

Nazmiye Balta-Ozkan; Elizabeth Baldwin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Hydrogen & Fuel Cells | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Hydrogen & Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Meet Brian Larsen, a materials scientist who is helping lower fuel cell costs by developing the next generation of fuel cell catalysts. Meet Brian Larsen, a materials scientist who is helping lower fuel cell costs by developing the next generation of fuel cell catalysts. Fuel cells produce electricity from a number of domestic fuels, including hydrogen and renewables, and can provide power for virtually any application -- from cars and buses to commercial buildings. This technology, which is similar to a battery, has the potential to revolutionize the way we power the nation while reducing carbon pollution and oil consumption.

331

Membrane separation advances in FE hydrogen program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since its inception in Fiscal Year 2003 the US Office of Fossil Energy (FE) Hydrogen from Coal Program has sponsored more than 60 projects and made advances in the science of separating out pure hydrogen from syngas produced through coal gasification. The Program is focusing on advanced hydrogen separation technologies, which include membranes, and combining the WGS reaction and hydrogen separation in a single operation known as process intensification. The article explains the technologies and describes some key FE membrane projects. More details are available from http://www.fossil.energy.gov. 1 fig.

NONE

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

332

Hydrogen & Our Energy Future  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Program Hydrogen Program www.hydrogen.energy.gov Hydrogen & Our Energy Future  | HydrOgEn & Our EnErgy FuturE U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen Program www.hydrogen.energy.gov u.S. department of Energy |  www.hydrogen.energy.gov Hydrogen & Our Energy Future Contents Introduction ................................................... p.1 Hydrogen - An Overview ................................... p.3 Production ..................................................... p.5 Delivery ....................................................... p.15 Storage ........................................................ p.19 Application and Use ........................................ p.25 Safety, Codes and Standards ............................... p.33

333

Hydrogen Compatibility of Materials  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation slides from the Energy Department webinar, Hydrogen Compatibility of Materials, held August 13, 2013.

334

Hydrogen Delivery Liquefaction & Compression  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrogen Delivery Liquefaction & Compression Raymond Drnevich Praxair - Tonawanda, NY Strategic Initiatives for Hydrogen Delivery Workshop - May 7, 2003 #12;2 Agenda Introduction to Praxair Hydrogen Liquefaction Hydrogen Compression #12;3 Praxair at a Glance The largest industrial gas company in North

335

UNDERSTANDING OF CATALYST DEACTIVATION CAUSED BY SULFUR POISONING AND CARBON DEPOSITION IN STEAM REFORMING OF LIQUID HYDROCARBON FUELS.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The present work was conducted to develop a better understanding on the catalyst deactivation in steam reforming of sulfur-containing liquid hydrocarbon fuels for hydrogen production. (more)

Xie, Chao

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Composition for absorbing hydrogen  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A hydrogen absorbing composition is described. The composition comprises a porous glass matrix, made by a sol-gel process, having a hydrogen-absorbing material dispersed throughout the matrix. A sol, made from tetraethyl orthosilicate, is mixed with a hydrogen-absorbing material and solidified to form a porous glass matrix with the hydrogen-absorbing material dispersed uniformly throughout the matrix. The glass matrix has pores large enough to allow gases having hydrogen to pass through the matrix, yet small enough to hold the particles dispersed within the matrix so that the hydrogen-absorbing particles are not released during repeated hydrogen absorption/desorption cycles.

Heung, L.K.; Wicks, G.G.; Enz, G.L.

1995-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

337

Liquid fossil fuel technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress reports are presented under the following headings: (1) extraction (technology assessment, oil research, gas research); (2) liquid processing (characterization, thermodynamics, processing technology); (3) utilization (energy conservation); and (4) project integration and technology transfer. BETC publications are also listed. Some of the highlights for this period are: the Bartlesville Energy Technology Center was converted into NIPER, the National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research on October 1, 1983; modelling of enthalpies, heat capacities and volumes of aqueous surfactant solutions began using a mass action model; a series of experiments were run on upgrading by hydrogenation SRC-II coal liquid at different degrees of severity and the products have been analyzed; heavy crude oil extracts were separated into fraction with high performance liquid chromatography by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and the mass spectra and electron spin resonance were determin ed; and particulates from exhaust gases of diesel engines using fire fuel types are being collected and will be analyzed by chemical methods and results will be compared with those obtained by biological assay. (ATT)

Not Available

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Gaseous Hydrogen Delivery Breakout - Strategic Directions for...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Gaseous Hydrogen Delivery Breakout - Strategic Directions for Hydrogen Delivery Workshop Gaseous Hydrogen Delivery Breakout - Strategic Directions for Hydrogen Delivery Workshop...

339

METAL HYDRIDE HYDROGEN COMPRESSORS: A REVIEW  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Metal hydride (MH) thermal sorption compression is an efficient and reliable method allowing a conversion of energy from heat into a compressed hydrogen gas. The most important component of such a thermal engine the metal hydride material itself should possess several material features in order to achieve an efficient performance in the hydrogen compression. Apart from the hydrogen storage characteristics important for every solid H storage material (e.g. gravimetric and volumetric efficiency of H storage, hydrogen sorption kinetics and effective thermal conductivity), the thermodynamics of the metal-hydrogen systems is of primary importance resulting in a temperature dependence of the absorption/desorption pressures). Several specific features should be optimized to govern the performance of the MH-compressors including synchronisation of the pressure plateaus for multi-stage compressors, reduction of slope of the isotherms and hysteresis, increase of cycling stability and life time, together with challenges in system design associated with volume expansion of the metal matrix during the hydrogenation. The present review summarises numerous papers and patent literature dealing with MH hydrogen compression technology. The review considers (a) fundamental aspects of materials development with a focus on structure and phase equilibria in the metal-hydrogen systems suitable for the hydrogen compression; and (b) applied aspects, including their consideration from the applied thermodynamic viewpoint, system design features and performances of the metal hydride compressors and major applications.

Bowman Jr, Robert C [ORNL] [ORNL; Yartys, Dr. Volodymyr A. [Institute for Energy Technology (IFE)] [Institute for Energy Technology (IFE); Lototskyy, Dr. Michael V [University of the Western Cape, South Africa] [University of the Western Cape, South Africa; Pollet, Dr. B.G. [University of the Western Cape, South Africa

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Strong liquid-crystalline polymeric compositions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Strong liquid-crystalline polymeric (LCP) compositions of matter are described. LCP backbones are combined with liquid crystalline (LC) side chains in a manner which maximizes molecular ordering through interdigitation of the side chains, thereby yielding materials which are predicted to have superior mechanical properties over existing LCPs. The theoretical design of LCPs having such characteristics includes consideration of the spacing distance between side chains along the backbone, the need for rigid sections in the backbone and in the side chains, the degree of polymerization, the length of the side chains, the regularity of the spacing of the side chains along the backbone, the interdigitation of side chains in sub-molecular strips, the packing of the side chains on one or two sides of the backbone to which they are attached, the symmetry of the side chains, the points of attachment of the side chains to the backbone, the flexibility and size of the chemical group connecting each side chain to the backbone, the effect of semiflexible sections in the backbone and the side chains, and the choice of types of dipolar and/or hydrogen bonding forces in the backbones and the side chains for easy alignment. 27 figures.

Dowell, F.

1993-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes liquid hydrogen" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Method for synthesis of titanium dioxide nanotubes using ionic liquids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The invention is directed to a method for producing titanium dioxide nanotubes, the method comprising anodizing titanium metal in contact with an electrolytic medium containing an ionic liquid. The invention is also directed to the resulting titanium dioxide nanotubes, as well as devices incorporating the nanotubes, such as photovoltaic devices, hydrogen generation devices, and hydrogen detection devices.

Qu, Jun; Luo, Huimin; Dai, Sheng

2013-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

342

Report on the evening discussion: Hydrogen storage in carbon materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hydrogen may be the most important energy carrier of the future as soon as the problem of hydrogen storage is solved. Storing of hydrogen under high pressure or as liquid costs much energy. Furthermore a high pressure or liquid hydrogen tank in a fuel cell driven vehicle would be much larger and heavier compared to a typical gasoline tank. In metal hydride tanks the stored hydrogen density is higher but the tank would be much too heavy (for a comparison see Fig. 1). Since the first promising results of Heben et al. in 1997 on hydrogen storage in single walled carbon nanotubes and the spectacularly large storage capacities in carbon nanofibers from the Baker and Rodriguez group in 1998 considerable research activity has been started all over the world to investigate hydrogen storage in carbon materials. Especially car industry is very interested and is waiting for a material with a reversible hydrogen storage capacity above 6.5 wt%. In this report the evening discussion on Hydrogen storage in carbon materials is summarized.

Andrea Quintel

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Hydrogen storage: The major technological barrier to the development of hydrogen fuel cell cars  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, we review the current technology for the storage of hydrogen on board a fuel cell-propelled vehicle. Having outlined the technical specifications necessary to match the performance of hydrocarbon. fue1, we first outline the inherent difficulties with gas pressure and liquid hydrogen storage. We then outline the history of transition metal hydride storage, leading to the development of metal hydride batteries. A viable system, however, must involve lighter elements and be vacuum-tight. The first new system to get serious consideration is titanium-activated sodium alanate, followed by the lithium amide and borohydride systems that potentially overcome several of the disadvantages of alanates. Borohydrides can alternatively produce hydrogen by reaction with water in the presence of a catalyst but the product would have to be recycled via a chemical plant. Finally various possible ways of making magnesium hydride decompose and reform more readily are discussed. The alternative to lighter hydrides is the development of physisorption of molecular hydrogen on high surface area materials such as carbons, metal oxide frameworks, zeolites. Here the problem is that the surface binding energy is too low to work at anything above liquid nitrogen temperature. Recent investigations of the interaction mechanism are discussed which show that systems with stronger interactions will inevitably require a surface interaction that increases the molecular hydrogenhydrogen distance.

D.K. Ross

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Hydrogen Modeling Projects  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Modeling Projects Modeling Projects Below are models grouped by topic. These models are used to analyze hydrogen technology, infrastructure, and other areas related to the development and use of hydrogen. Cross-Cutting Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER_CAM) Hydrogen Deployment System (HyDS) Model and Analysis Hydrogen Technology Assessment and Selection Model (HyTASM) Renewable Energy Power System Modular Simulator (RPM-Sim) Stranded Biogas Decision Tool for Fuel Cell Co-Production Energy Infrastructure All Modular Industry Growth Assessment (AMIGA) Model Building Energy Optimization (BEopt) Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER_CAM) Hydrogen Deployment System (HyDS) Model and Analysis Hydrogen Technology Assessment and Selection Model (HyTASM)

345

Solar pumping installation for pumping liquid and solar collector construction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A solar pumping system, comprises, a pumping housing which defines a pump chamber therein which is adapted to be positioned in the ground below ground water level. Displacer means in the form of, for example, a bladder, arranged within the pump chamber, is capable of displacing liquid out of the pump chamber in response to a pressurized medium acting thereon to expel the water out of the chamber and up to a level above the ground for use. A suction valve connected into the chamber permits the ground water to flow into the chamber and a discharge valve connected out of the chamber permits the outflow of the ground water during the action of the displacer means. The construction includes a solar collector having at least one hydride conduit which is adapted to be exposed to the sun for solar heating to act on the hydride to cause hydrogen to be formed, the pressure of which acts against the displacer means to displace the ground liquid out of the pump chamber. When the solar collector is shielded and the hydride is permitted to cool or is cooled rapidly by the circulation of water thereover, the pressure of the generated hydrogen decreases, permitting ground water to enter into the pumping chamber once again through the suction valves.

Seidel, A.; Wolf, D.

1984-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

346

Suggested Talking Points for Hydrogen Road Tour  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Hydrogen can be part of a balanced energy portfolio. Hydrogen can be part of a balanced energy portfolio. * Energy is one of the greatest challenges we face as a nation. We rely too heavily on imported oil, particularly for transportation, and we must have cost-competitive, clean, low-carbon options for our power generation and transportation sectors. * Hydrogen is one part of a balanced, strategic portfolio of energy alternatives that includes solar, wind, hydropower, and geothermal energy, as well as biofuels, plug-in hybrid vehicles and advanced technologies to increase fuel economies of today's vehicles. * Hydrogen can be produced from abundant and diverse domestic resources including fossil, nuclear, and renewable energy. This diversity of supply means we do not need to rely on any single source for our energy needs. Hydrogen can be used in a fuel cell or an

347

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program: Hydrogen Analysis Resource Center  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Delivery Hydrogen Storage Hydrogen Manufacturing Fuel Cells Applications/Technology Validation Safety Codes and Standards Education Basic Research Systems Analysis Analysis Repository H2A Analysis Hydrogen Analysis Resource Center Scenario Analysis Well-to-Wheels Analysis Systems Integration U.S. Department of Energy Search help Home > Systems Analysis > Hydrogen Analysis Resource Center Printable Version Hydrogen Analysis Resource Center The Hydrogen Analysis Resource Center provides consistent and transparent data that can serve as the basis for hydrogen-related calculations, modeling, and other analytical activities. This new site features the Hydrogen Data Book with data pertinent to hydrogen infrastructure analysis; links to external databases related to

348

Hydrogen Permeability and Integrity of Hydrogen Delivery Pipelines...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

of hydrogen permeation behavior and its impact on hydrogen embrittlement of pipeline steels under high gaseous pressures relevant to hydrogen gas transmission pipeline...

349

Bulk Hydrogen Storage - Strategic Directions for Hydrogen Delivery...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Bulk Hydrogen Storage Strategic Directions for Hydrogen Delivery Workshop May 7-8, 2003 Crystal City, Virginia Breakout Session - Bulk Hydrogen Storage Main ThemesCaveats Bulk...

350

Hydrogen Supply: Cost Estimate for Hydrogen Pathways-Scoping...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Supply: Cost Estimate for Hydrogen Pathways-Scoping Analysis. January 22, 2002-July 22, 2002 Hydrogen Supply: Cost Estimate for Hydrogen Pathways-Scoping Analysis. January 22,...

351

NREL: Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Research - Hydrogen Storage  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

L. Simpson. (2010) Contact: Thomas Gennett 303-384-6628 Printable Version Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Research Home Projects Fuel Cells Hydrogen Production & Delivery Hydrogen Storage...

352

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 5037: Hydrogen Storage...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

5037: Hydrogen Storage Materials - 2004 vs. 2006 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 5037: Hydrogen Storage Materials - 2004 vs. 2006 This program record from the Department...

353

Hydrogen Delivery Technologies and Systems- Pipeline Transmission of Hydrogen  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Hydrogen Delivery Technologies and Systems - Pipeline Transmission of Hydrogen. Design and operations standards and materials for hydrogen and natural gas pipelines.

354

Stable catalyst layers for hydrogen permeable composite membranes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides a hydrogen separation membrane based on nanoporous, composite metal carbide or metal sulfide coated membranes capable of high flux and permselectivity for hydrogen without platinum group metals. The present invention is capable of being operated over a broad temperature range, including at elevated temperatures, while maintaining hydrogen selectivity.

Way, J. Douglas; Wolden, Colin A

2014-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

355

NREL Develops Test Facility and Test Protocols for Hydrogen Sensor Performance (Fact Sheet), Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Highlights (HFCTH)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

8 * November 2010 8 * November 2010 The NREL hydrogen safety sensor test facility (Robert Burgess/NREL) PIX 18240 NREL Develops Test Facility and Test Protocols for Hydrogen Sensor Performance Team: Safety Codes & Standards Group, Hydrogen Technologies & Systems Center Accomplishment: The NREL Hydrogen Sensor Test Facility was recently commissioned for the quantitative assessment of hydrogen safety sensors (first reported in April 2010). Testing of sensors has started and is ongoing. Test Apparatus: The Test Facility was designed to test hydrogen sensors under precisely controlled conditions. The apparatus can simultaneously test multiple sensors and can handle all common electronic interfaces, including voltage, current, resistance,

356

Confinement of hydrogen at high pressure in carbon nanotubes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high pressure hydrogen confinement apparatus according to one embodiment includes carbon nanotubes capped at one or both ends thereof with a hydrogen-permeable membrane to enable the high pressure confinement of hydrogen and release of the hydrogen therethrough. A hydrogen confinement apparatus according to another embodiment includes an array of multi-walled carbon nanotubes each having first and second ends, the second ends being capped with palladium (Pd) to enable the high pressure confinement of hydrogen and release of the hydrogen therethrough as a function of palladium temperature, wherein the array of carbon nanotubes is capable of storing hydrogen gas at a pressure of at least 1 GPa for greater than 24 hours. Additional apparatuses and methods are also presented.

Lassila, David H. (Aptos, CA); Bonner, Brian P. (Livermore, CA)

2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

357

Systems and methods for generation of hydrogen peroxide vapor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system according to one embodiment includes a moisture trap for drying air; at least one of a first container and a second container; and a mechanism for at least one of: bubbling dried air from the moisture trap through a hydrogen peroxide solution in the first container for producing a hydrogen peroxide vapor, and passing dried air from the moisture trap into a headspace above a hydrogen peroxide solution in the second container for producing a hydrogen peroxide vapor. A method according one embodiment includes at least one of bubbling dried air through a hydrogen peroxide solution in a container for producing a first hydrogen peroxide vapor, and passing dried air from the moisture trap into a headspace above the hydrogen peroxide solution in a container for producing a second hydrogen peroxide vapor. Additional systems and methods are also presented.

Love, Adam H; Eckels, Joel Del; Vu, Alexander K; Alcaraz, Armando; Reynolds, John G

2014-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

358

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Strategic Directions for Hydrogen Delivery  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Strategic Directions for Hydrogen Delivery Workshop Strategic Directions for Hydrogen Delivery Workshop The U.S. Department of Energy sponsored a Hydrogen Delivery Workshop in Washington, DC, May 7-8, 2003. Attendees included researchers, government officials, and industry members. A key element of the overall hydrogen energy infrastructure is the delivery system that moves the hydrogen from its point of production to an end-use device. The DOE's Fuel Cell Technologies Office will initiate, in fiscal year 2004, a research program targeted specifically at addressing hydrogen transportation and delivery. This special workshop was held to outline the future technology and research needs for developing cost-effective, reliable, and safe hydrogen delivery systems. The proceedings of the Hydrogen Delivery Workshop, which include the presentations and the recommendations of the four breakout groups, are available as Adobe Acrobat PDFs. Download Adobe Reader.

359

138 Industrial Productivity Spinoff 2009 Gauging Systems Monitor Cryogenic Liquids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

138 Industrial Productivity Spinoff 2009 Gauging Systems Monitor Cryogenic Liquids originating propellants like liquid hydrogen and oxygen at cryogenic temperatures (below -243 °F) is crucial for space) tanks. The Agency has used these cryogenic fluids for vehicle propellants, reactants, and life support

360

LNG liquid-liquid immiscibility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Although natural gas species rarely exhibit liquid-liquid immiscibility in binary systems, the presence of additional components can extend the domain of immiscibility in those few binary systems where it already exists or produce immiscibility in binary systems where it had not existed. If the solute has the proper molecular relation to the solvent mixture background, liquid-liquid-vapor (LLV) behavior will occur; such phenomena greatly complicate the design of LNG processing equipment. To aid LNG engineers, researchers mapped the thermodynamic behavior of four ternary LLV systems and examined the effects of the second solvents - ethane, propane, n-butane, and CO/sub 2/ - on the binary methane + n-octane system.

Luks, K.D.; Kohn, J.P.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes liquid hydrogen" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Why Hydrogen? Hydrogen from Diverse Domestic Resources  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

produce hydrogen in a centralized coal based operation for .79kg at the plant gate with carbon sequestration. Develop advanced OTM, HTM, technology, advanced reforming and shift...

362

Resource Assessment for Hydrogen Production: Hydrogen Production...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Administration ERR Estimated Recoverable Reserves FCEV fuel cell electric vehicle GHG greenhouse gas GW gigawatt GWh gigawatt-hour GWdt gigawatt-days thermal H2A Hydrogen...

363

Muon Capture in Gaseous Hydrogen  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An experiment to measure the muon nuclear capture rate in ultrapure gaseous hydrogen (8 atm, 293K) has been performed using a special target in which a system of gas proportional counters, working with the pure hydrogen of the target itself, were operating. Neutrons from the capture reactions were detected using a scintillation-counter technique, and the ?-ray background was eliminated by pulse-shape discrimination. The working conditions ensured that the captures were taking place in ?p atomic systems in a singlet total-spin state. The experimental result is ?expt=65157 sec-1, which has to be compared with the theoretical rate ?s,theor=62626 sec-1. From the experimental capture rate, and within the framework of the currently accepted theory, we have obtained for the induced pseudoscalar coupling constant gp=(-7.33.7)gV. The results of the present experiment are analyzed, together with results obtained from stopping negative muons in liquid hydrogen.

A. Alberigi Quaranta; A. Bertin; G. Matone; F. Palmonari; G. Torelli; P. Dalpiaz; A. Placci; E. Zavattini

1969-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

364

NFPA's Hydrogen Technologies Code Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article discusses the development of National Fire Protection Association 2 (NFPA), a comprehensive hydrogen safety code. It analyses the contents of this document with particular attention focused on new requirements for setting hydrogen storage systems. These new requirements use computational fluid dynamic modeling and risk assessment procedures to develop requirements that are based on both technical analyses and defined risk criteria. The intent is to develop requirements based on procedures that can be replicated based on the information provided in the code document. This code will require documentation of the modeling inputs and risk criteria and analyses in the supporting information. This article also includes a description of the codes and standards that address hydrogen technologies in general.

Rivkin, C. H.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Method of measuring a liquid pool volume  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of measuring a molten metal liquid pool volume and in particular molten titanium liquid pools is disclosed, including the steps of (a) generating an ultrasonic wave at the surface of the molten metal liquid pool, (b) shining a light on the surface of a molten metal liquid pool, (c) detecting a change in the frequency of light, (d) detecting an ultrasonic wave echo at the surface of the molten metal liquid pool, and (e) computing the volume of the molten metal liquid. 3 figures.

Garcia, G.V.; Carlson, N.M.; Donaldson, A.D.

1991-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

366

Hydrogen storage gets new hope  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hydrogen storage gets new hope Hydrogen storage gets new hope A new method for "recycling" hydrogen-containing fuel materials could open the door to economically viable...

367

The Bumpy Road to Hydrogen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

will trump hydrogen and fuel cell vehicles. Advocates ofbenefits sooner than hydrogen and fuel cells ever could.emissions from a hydrogen fuel cell vehicle will be about

Sperling, Dan; Ogden, Joan M

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Hydrogen Production from Nuclear Energy via High Temperature Electrolysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents the technical case for high-temperature nuclear hydrogen production. A general thermodynamic analysis of hydrogen production based on high-temperature thermal water splitting processes is presented. Specific details of hydrogen production based on high-temperature electrolysis are also provided, including results of recent experiments performed at the Idaho National Laboratory. Based on these results, high-temperature electrolysis appears to be a promising technology for efficient large-scale hydrogen production.

James E. O'Brien; Carl M. Stoots; J. Stephen Herring; Grant L. Hawkes

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

The response of a point source in a liquid layer overlying a liquid half space  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The response to a harmonic point source in a liquid layer overlying a liquid half space is computed as a function of frequency. Included are the contributions form all normal modes that occur, and the branch-line integral ...

Greenfield, Roy

1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Options for CO2-lean hydrogen export from Norway to Germany  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Norway is a nation with an abundant supply of energy, both from fossil and renewable resources. Due to limited domestic demand, Norway is today exporting large amounts of petroleum products. For the future, various options for export of CO2-lean energy exist, both from Northern and Southern Norway, and both from fossil sources (including carbon capture and storage), and renewable energies (particularly wind power). Transport vectors are hydrogen pipelines, liquid hydrogen ships and HVDC cables, and a plausible customer is central Europe due to its proximity, high population density and lack of domestic energy resources. Within the framework of the NorWays project, various options to deliver energy for hydrogen-based transportation from Norway to Germany were studied. Eight CO2-lean well-to-wheel energy export chains were evaluated with respect to efficiency, GHG emissions and other environmental impacts, costs and utilisation of Norwegian R&D experience. In the chosen scenarios, energy export via hydrogen pipelines and ships appeared energetically and economically interesting against existing approaches as NG and electricity export. Furthermore, increased utilisation of Norwegian R&D experience and higher value creation is anticipated by the export of a higher refined product.

Christoph Stiller; Ann Mari Svensson; Steffen Mller-Holst; Ulrich Bnger; Kari Aamodt Espegren; ystein Bindesbll Holm; Asgeir Tomasgrd

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

FCT Hydrogen Production: Hydrogen Production R&D Activities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Production R&D Hydrogen Production R&D Activities to someone by E-mail Share FCT Hydrogen Production: Hydrogen Production R&D Activities on Facebook Tweet about FCT Hydrogen Production: Hydrogen Production R&D Activities on Twitter Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Production: Hydrogen Production R&D Activities on Google Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Production: Hydrogen Production R&D Activities on Delicious Rank FCT Hydrogen Production: Hydrogen Production R&D Activities on Digg Find More places to share FCT Hydrogen Production: Hydrogen Production R&D Activities on AddThis.com... Home Basics Current Technology R&D Activities Quick Links Hydrogen Delivery Hydrogen Storage Fuel Cells Technology Validation Manufacturing Codes & Standards Education Systems Analysis Contacts

372

Projecting full build-out environmental impacts and roll-out strategies associated with viable hydrogen fueling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2 August 2011 Available online 15 September 2011 Keywords: Hydrogen Infrastructure Fuel cell gasoline internal combustion engine vehicles to hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs) is likely include hydrogen in fuel cell pow- e

Dabdub, Donald

373

Global Assessment of Hydrogen Technologies - Executive Summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project was a collaborative effort involving researchers from the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), drawing on the experience and expertise of both research organizations. The goal of this study was to assess selected hydrogen technologies for potential application to transportation and power generation. Specifically, this study evaluated scenarios for deploying hydrogen technologies and infrastructure in the Southeast. One study objective was to identify the most promising near-term and long-term hydrogen vehicle technologies based on performance, efficiency, and emissions profiles and compare them to traditional vehicle technologies. Hydrogen vehicle propulsion may take many forms, ranging from hydrogen or hythane fueled internal combustion engines (ICEs) to fuel cells and fuel cell hybrid systems. This study attempted to developed performance and emissions profiles for each type (assuming a light duty truck platform) so that effective deployment strategies can be developed. A second study objective was to perform similar cost, efficiency, and emissions analysis related to hydrogen infrastructure deployment in the Southeast. There will be many alternative approaches for the deployment of hydrogen fueling infrastructure, ranging from distributed hydrogen production to centralized production, with a similar range of delivery options. This study attempted to assess the costs and potential emissions associated with each scenario. A third objective was to assess the feasibility of using hydrogen fuel cell technologies for stationary power generation and to identify the advantages and limits of different technologies. Specific attention was given to evaluating different fuel cell membrane types. A final objective was to promote the use and deployment of hydrogen technologies in the Southeast. This effort was to include establishing partnerships with industry as well promoting educational and outreach efforts to public service providers. To accomplish these goals and objectives a work plan was developed comprising 6 primary tasks: Task 1 - Technology Evaluation of Hydrogen Light-Duty Vehicles The PSAT powertrain simulation software was used to evaluate candidate hydrogen-fueled vehicle technologies for near-term and long-term deployment in the Southeastern U.S. Task 2 - Comparison of Performance and Emissions from Near-Term Hydrogen Fueled Light Duty Vehicles - An investigation was conducted into the emissions and efficiency of light-duty internal combustion engines fueled with hydrogen and compressed natural gas (CNG) blends. The different fuel blends used in this investigation were 0%, 15%, 30%, 50%, 80%, 95%, and ~100% hydrogen, the remainder being compressed natural gas. Task 3 - Economic and Energy Analysis of Hydrogen Production and Delivery Options - Expertise in engineering cost estimation, hydrogen production and delivery analysis, and transportation infrastructure systems was used to develop regional estimates of resource requirements and costs for the infrastructure needed to deliver hydrogen fuels to advanced-technology vehicles. Task 4 Emissions Analysis for Hydrogen Production and Delivery Options - The hydrogen production and delivery scenarios developed in Task 3 were expanded to include analysis of energy and greenhouse gas emissions associated with each specific case studies. Task 5 Use of Fuel Cell Technology in Power Generation - The purpose of this task was to assess the performance of different fuel cell types (specifically low-temperature and high temperature membranes) for use in stationary power generation. Task 6 Establishment of a Southeastern Hydrogen Consortium - The goal of this task was to establish a Southeastern Hydrogen Technology Consortium (SHTC) whose purpose would be to promote the deployment of hydrogen technologies and infrastructure in the Southeast.

Fouad, Fouad H.; Peters, Robert W.; Sisiopiku, Virginia P.; Sullivan, Andrew J.

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Catalyzed Hydrogen Spillover for Hydrogen Storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Catalyzed Hydrogen Spillover for Hydrogen Storage ... Storing sufficient H on-board a wide range of vehicle platforms, while meeting all consumer requirements (driving range, cost, safety, performance, etc.), without compromising passenger or cargo space, is a tremendous tech. ... The authors show that for the 1st time significant amts. of H can be stored in MOF-5 and IRMOF-8 at ambient temp. ...

Ralph T. Yang; Yuhe Wang

2009-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

375

Hydrogen Permeability and Integrity of Hydrogen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· To develop suitable welding technology for H2 pipeline construction and repair · To develop technical basisHydrogen Permeability and Integrity of Hydrogen Delivery Pipelines Z. Feng*, L.M. Anovitz*, J pressure permeation test · Edison Welding Institute - Pipeline materials · Lincoln Electric Company

376

Sonoelectrochemical (20 khz) production of hydrogen from aqueous solutions.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??There are various methods of producing Hydrogen. These include electrolysis, which this work is based upon, and steam reforming; currently the most commercially viable method. (more)

Symes, Daniel

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Design of an underground compressed hydrogen gas storage.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Hydrogen has received significant attention throughout the past decade as the United States focuses on diversifying its energy portfolio to include sources of energy beyond (more)

Powell, Tobin Micah

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Hydrogen peroxide sensing with microstructured optical fibres : fuel, wine & babies.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The capacity to measure the concentration of hydrogen peroxide in solution is critical for many disparate application areas, including wine quality sensing, aviation fuel monitoring (more)

Schartner, Erik Peter

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Hazardous Liquid Pipelines and Storage Facilities (Iowa)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This statute regulates the permitting, construction, monitoring, and operation of pipelines transporting hazardous liquids, including petroleum products and coal slurries. The definition used in...

380

Hydrogen Pathway Cost Distributions Jim Uihlein  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Influence · Approach · Implementation · Results · Discussion Process · Summary #12;3 Hydrogen R&D Cost Goal $) EIA Annual Energy Outlook, 2005 Ratio of FCV fuel economy to evolved gasoline ICE 2.40 NRC H2 Economy Liquid Distribution $0.28 $1.06 $2.54 $3.88 Central Wind Electrolysis Pipeline Distribution $0.01 $6

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes liquid hydrogen" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Gaseous Hydrogen Delivery Breakout- Strategic Directions for Hydrogen Delivery Workshop  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Targets, barriers and research and development priorities for gaseous delivery of hydrogen through hydrogen and natural gas pipelines.

382

Hydrogen Production- Current Technology  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The development of clean, sustainable, and cost-competitive hydrogen production processesis key to a viable future clean energy economy. Hydrogen production technologies fall into three general...

383

A Hydrogen Economy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The history of the hydrogen economy may be broken down into three parts ... is the history of the founding of the Hydrogen Energy Society which took place in Miami,...

J. OM. Bockris

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Solar Hydrogen Production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The common methods of hydrogen production impose many concerns regarding the decline in...2...emission, and ecological impacts. Subsequently, all the downstream industries that consume hydrogen involve the aforem...

Ibrahim Dincer; Anand S. Joshi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Hydrogen Fuel Quality (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Jim Ohi of NREL's presentation on Hydrogen Fuel Quality at the 2007 DOE Hydrogen Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation on May 15-18, 2007 in Arlington, Virginia.

Ohi, J.

2007-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

386

Microfluidic devices and methods including porous polymer monoliths  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Microfluidic devices and methods including porous polymer monoliths are described. Polymerization techniques may be used to generate porous polymer monoliths having pores defined by a liquid component of a fluid mixture. The fluid mixture may contain iniferters and the resulting porous polymer monolith may include surfaces terminated with iniferter species. Capture molecules may then be grafted to the monolith pores.

Hatch, Anson V; Sommer, Gregory J; Singh, Anup K; Wang, Ying-Chih; Abhyankar, Vinay V

2014-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

387

Webinar: Hydrogen Refueling Protocols  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Video recording and text version of the webinar titled, Hydrogen Refueling Protocols, originally presented on February 22, 2013.

388

The Hydrogen Economy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Before describing the characteristics of an economy in which hydrogen is the medium of energy, let us...

J. OM. Bockris; Z. Nagy

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Hydrogen Technologies Safety Guide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this guide is to provide basic background information on hydrogen technologies. It is intended to provide project developers, code officials, and other interested parties the background information to be able to put hydrogen safety in context. For example, code officials reviewing permit applications for hydrogen projects will get an understanding of the industrial history of hydrogen, basic safety concerns, and safety requirements.

Rivkin, C.; Burgess, R.; Buttner, W.

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

National Hydrogen Energy Roadmap  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This roadmap provides a blueprint for the coordinated, long-term, public and private efforts required for hydrogen energy development.

391

Hydrogenation of Magnesium Nickel Boride for Reversible Hydrogen Storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hydrogenation of Magnesium Nickel Boride for Reversible Hydrogen Storage ... Use of hydrogen for transportation applications requires materials that not only store hydrogen at high density but that can operate reversibly at temperatures and pressures below approximately 100 C and 10 bar, respectively. ... This composition is based on assuming the following complete hydrogenation reaction:which stores 2.6 wt % hydrogen. ...

Wen Li; John J. Vajo; Robert W. Cumberland; Ping Liu; Son-Jong Hwang; Chul Kim; Robert C. Bowman, Jr.

2009-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

392

Gaseous Hydrogen Delivery Breakout  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

or reduce the likelihood of hydrogen embrittlement Test existing high strength steel alloys for use in largeGaseous Hydrogen Delivery Breakout Strategic Directions for Hydrogen Delivery Workshop May 7 compression. Safety, integrity, reliability: Metal embrittlement, no H2 odorant, low ignition energy

393

SBIR/STTR FY15 Release 1 Awards Announced-Includes Fuel Cell...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

FY15 Release 1 Awards Announced-Includes Fuel Cell Catalyst and Hydrogen Contamination Detection R&D SBIRSTTR FY15 Release 1 Awards Announced-Includes Fuel Cell Catalyst and...

394

Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Overview  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen + Fuel Cells 2011 International Conference and Exhibition Vancouver, Canada May 17, 2011 Enable widespread commercialization of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies: * Early markets such as stationary power, lift trucks, and portable power * Mid-term markets such as residential CHP systems, auxiliary power units, fleets and buses * Long-term markets including mainstream transportation applications/light duty vehicles Updated Program Plan 2011 Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Key Goals 2 from renewables or low carbon resources Source: U.S. DOE, May 2011 Fuel Cell Market Overview 0 25 50 75 100 2008 2009 2010 USA Japan South Korea Germany Other (MW) Megawatts Shipped, Key Countries: 2008-2010 Fuel cell market continues to grow

395

Hydrogen Delivery Liquefaction and Compression  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Hydrogen Delivery Liquefaction and Compression - Overview of commercial hydrogen liquefaction and compression and opportunities to improve efficiencies and reduce cost.

396

New Materials for Hydrogen Pipelines  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Barriers to Hydrogen Delivery: Existing steel pipelines are subject to hydrogen embrittlement and are inadequate for widespread H2 distribution.

397

Electrochemical Hydrogen Compressor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Electrochemical Hydrogen Compressor EHC was evaluated against DOE applications for compressing hydrogen at automobile filling stations, in future hydrogen pipelines and as a commercial replacement for conventional diaphragm hydrogen compressors. It was also evaluated as a modular replacement for the compressors used in petrochemical refineries. If the EHC can be made inexpensive, reliable and long lived then it can satisfy all these applications save pipelines where the requirements for platinum catalyst exceeds the annual world production. The research performed did not completely investigate Molybdenum as a hydrogen anode or cathode, it did show that photoetched 316 stainless steel is inadequate for an EHC. It also showed that: molybdenum bipolar plates, photochemical etching processes, and Gortex Teflon seals are too costly for a commercial EHC. The use of carbon paper in combination with a perforated thin metal electrode demonstrated adequate anode support strength, but is suspect in promoting galvanic corrosion. The nature of the corrosion mechanisms are not well understood, but locally high potentials within the unit cell package are probably involved. The program produced a design with an extraordinary high cell pitch, and a very low part count. This is one of the promising aspects of the redesigned EHC. The development and successful demonstration of the hydraulic cathode is also important. The problem of corrosion resistant metal bipolar plates is vital to the development of an inexpensive, commercial PEM fuel cell. Our research suggests that there is more to the corrosion process in fuel cells and electrochemical compressors than simple, steady state, galvanic stability. It is an important area for scientific investigation. The experiments and analysis conducted lead to several recommended future research directions. First, we need a better understanding of the corrosion mechanisms involved. The diagnosis of experimental cells with titration to determine the loss of membrane active sites is recommended. We suspect that the corrosion includes more than simple galvanic mechanisms. The mechanisms involved in this phenomenon are poorly understood. Shunt currents at hydraulic cathode ports were problematic, but are not difficult to cure. In addition to corrosion there is evidence of high component resistivity. This may be due to the deposition of organic compounds, which may be produced electrochemically on the surface of the metal support screens that contact carbon gas diffusion layers (GDLs) or catalyst supports. An investigation of possible electro-organic sythesis mechanisms with emphasis on oxalates formation is warranted. The contaminated cell parts can be placed in an oxidizing atmosphere at high temperature and the weight loss can be observed. This would reveal the existence of organic compounds. Investigation into the effects of conductivity enhancers such as carbon microlayers on supporting carbon paper is also needed. Corrosion solutions should be investigated such as surface passivation of 316 SS parts using nitric acid. Ultra thin silane/siloxane polymer coatings should be tried. These may be especially useful in conjunction with metal felt replacement of carbon paper. A simple cure for the very high, localized corrosion of the anode might be to diffusion bond the metal electrode support screen to bipolar plate. This will insure uniform resistance perpendicular to the plane of the cell and eliminate some of the dependence of the resistance on high stack compression. Alternative materials should be explored. Alternatives to carbon in the cell may be helpful in any context. In particular, alternatives to carbon paper GDLs such as metal felts and alternatives to carbon supports for Pt such as TiC and TiB2 might also be worthwhile and would be helpful to fuel cells as well. Some alternative to the metals we used in the cell, Mo and 316 SS, are potentially useful. These include Al/Mg/Si alloys. Corrosion resistant materials such as Nb and Mo might prove useful as cladding materials that can be hot stamp

David P. Bloomfield; Brian S. MacKenzie

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Impact of Hydrogen Production on U.S. Energy Markets  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Production on Impact of Hydrogen Production on Hydrogen Production on Impact of Hydrogen Production on U.S. Energy Markets U.S. Energy Markets Presented to: Presented to: DOE Hydrogen Transition DOE Hydrogen Transition Analysis Workshop Analysis Workshop Washington DC Washington DC January 26, 2006 January 26, 2006 Prepared by: Prepared by: E. Harry Vidas, Energy and Environmental Analysis, Inc. E. Harry Vidas, Energy and Environmental Analysis, Inc. Paul Friley, Brookhaven National Laboratory Paul Friley, Brookhaven National Laboratory AZ CA Project Scope Project Scope * Focus will be on competition between hydrogen production and distribution technologies with respect to hydrogen fuel demand, technology cost, regional mix, and impact on feedstock prices. * Evaluate impacts on U.S. energy markets including price

399

Hydrogen Analysis (H2A) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydrogen Analysis (H2A) Hydrogen Analysis (H2A) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Hydrogen Analysis (H2A) Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Economic Development Topics: Policies/deployment programs Website: www.nrel.gov/hydrogen/energy_analysis.html#h2a OpenEI Keyword(s): EERE tool Language: English References: H2A Analysis[1] Perform economic analysis of forecourt (distributed) and central hydrogen production systems using various energy resources, including renewables, coal, natural gas, and biomass; calculate the delivered cost of hydrogen for a particular delivery component. H2A, which stands for Hydrogen Analysis, was initiated to better leverage the combined talents and capabilities of analysts working on hydrogen

400

Hydrogen separation process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for separating a hydrogen-rich product stream from a feed stream comprising hydrogen and at least one carbon-containing gas, comprising feeding the feed stream, at an inlet pressure greater than atmospheric pressure and a temperature greater than 200.degree. C., to a hydrogen separation membrane system comprising a membrane that is selectively permeable to hydrogen, and producing a hydrogen-rich permeate product stream on the permeate side of the membrane and a carbon dioxide-rich product raffinate stream on the raffinate side of the membrane. A method for separating a hydrogen-rich product stream from a feed stream comprising hydrogen and at least one carbon-containing gas, comprising feeding the feed stream, at an inlet pressure greater than atmospheric pressure and a temperature greater than 200.degree. C., to an integrated water gas shift/hydrogen separation membrane system wherein the hydrogen separation membrane system comprises a membrane that is selectively permeable to hydrogen, and producing a hydrogen-rich permeate product stream on the permeate side of the membrane and a carbon dioxide-rich product raffinate stream on the raffinate side of the membrane. A method for pretreating a membrane, comprising: heating the membrane to a desired operating temperature and desired feed pressure in a flow of inert gas for a sufficient time to cause the membrane to mechanically deform; decreasing the feed pressure to approximately ambient pressure; and optionally, flowing an oxidizing agent across the membrane before, during, or after deformation of the membrane. A method of supporting a hydrogen separation membrane system comprising selecting a hydrogen separation membrane system comprising one or more catalyst outer layers deposited on a hydrogen transport membrane layer and sealing the hydrogen separation membrane system to a porous support.

Mundschau, Michael (Longmont, CO); Xie, Xiaobing (Foster City, CA); Evenson, IV, Carl (Lafayette, CO); Grimmer, Paul (Longmont, CO); Wright, Harold (Longmont, CO)

2011-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes liquid hydrogen" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Anti-Hydrogen Jonny Martinez  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Anti-Hydrogen Jonny Martinez University of California, Berkeley #12;OUTLINE WHAT IS ANTI-HYDROGEN? HISTORY IMPORTANCE THEORY HOW TO MAKE ANTI-HYDROGEN OTHER ANTI-MATTER EXPERIMENTS CONCLUSION #12;WHAT IS ANTI-HYDROGEN? Anti-hydrogen is composed of a Positron(anti-electron) and anti-Proton. Anti-Hydrogen

Budker, Dmitry

402

Hydrogen production from the reaction of solvated electrons with benzene in water-ammonia mixtures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Product analysis data for the reaction of the ammoniated electron with benzene-water mixtures in liquid ammonia show that the dominant product is evolved hydrogen and not 1,4-cyclohexadiene.

Dewald, R.R.; Jones, S.R.; Schwartz, B.S.

1980-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

403

Collective Hydrogen Bond Reorganization in Water Studied with Temperature-Dependent Ultrafast Infrared Spectroscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We use temperature-dependent ultrafast infrared spectroscopy of dilute HOD in H2O to study the picosecond reorganization of the hydrogen bond network of liquid water. Temperature-dependent two-dimensional infrared (2D IR), ...

Nicodemus, Rebecca A.

404

ITP Steel: Hydrogen and Nitrogen Control in Ladle and Casting Operations  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

In recent years there has been an increasing demand to reduce and control the amount of dissolved gases in steel. Hydrogen and nitrogen are two of the most important gases which when dissolved in liquid steel affect its properties significantly

405

Atomistic Models of Long-Term Hydrogen Diffusion in Metals M. P. Ariza1,a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-storage-related applications including, but not limited to, hydrogen embrittlement, grain boundary diffusion, and various and the kinetics of hydrogen atoms. One example is hydrogen embrittlement, that is, the material becomes brittleAtomistic Models of Long-Term Hydrogen Diffusion in Metals M. P. Ariza1,a , K. G. Wang,2,b , and M

Ortiz, Michael

406

Development of Advanced Small Hydrogen Engines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The main objective of the project is to develop advanced, low cost conversions of small (< 25 hp) gasoline internal combustion engines (ICEs) to run on hydrogen fuel while maintaining the same performance and durability. This final technical report summarizes the results of i) the details of the conversion of several small gasoline ICEs to run on hydrogen, ii) the durability test of a converted hydrogen engine and iii) the demonstration of a prototype bundled canister solid hydrogen storage system. Peak power of the hydrogen engine achieves 60% of the power output of the gasoline counterpart. The efforts to boost the engine power with various options including installing the over-sized turbocharger, retrofit of custom-made pistons with high compression ratio, an advanced ignition system, and various types of fuel injection systems are not realized. A converted Honda GC160 engine with ACS system to run with hydrogen fuel is successful. Total accumulative runtime is 785 hours. A prototype bundled canister solid hydrogen storage system having nominal capacity of 1.2 kg is designed, constructed and demonstrated. It is capable of supporting a wide range of output load of a hydrogen generator.

Krishna Sapru; Zhaosheng Tan; Ben Chao

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

407

Hydrogen peroxide safety issues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A literature survey was conducted to review the safety issues involved in handling hydrogen peroxide solutions. Most of the information found in the literature is not directly applicable to conditions at the Rocky Flats Plant, but one report describes experimental work conducted previously at Rocky Flats to determine decomposition reaction-rate constants for hydrogen peroxide solutions. Data from this report were used to calculate decomposition half-life times for hydrogen peroxide in solutions containing several decomposition catalysts. The information developed from this survey indicates that hydrogen peroxide will undergo both homogeneous and heterogeneous decomposition. The rate of decomposition is affected by temperature and the presence of catalytic agents. Decomposition of hydrogen peroxide is catalyzed by alkalies, strong acids, platinum group and transition metals, and dissolved salts of transition metals. Depending upon conditions, the consequence of a hydrogen peroxide decomposition can range from slow evolution of oxygen gas to a vapor, phase detonation of hydrogen peroxide vapors.

Conner, W.V.

1993-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

408

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Hydrogen Production by  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Production by Photovoltaic-powered Electrolysis Production by Photovoltaic-powered Electrolysis Project Summary Full Title: Production of Hydrogen by Photovoltaic-powered Electrolysis Project ID: 91 Principal Investigator: D.L. Block Keywords: Hydrogen production; electrolysis; photovoltaic (PV) Purpose To evaluate hydrogen production from photovoltaic (PV)-powered electrolysis. Performer Principal Investigator: D.L. Block Organization: Florida Solar Energy Center Address: 1679 Clearlake Road Cocoa, FL 32922 Telephone: 321-638-1001 Email: block@fsec.ucf.edu Sponsor(s) Name: Michael Ashworth Organization: Florida Energy Office Name: Neil Rossmeissl Organization: DOE/Advanced Utilities Concepts Division Name: H.T. Everett Organization: NASA/Kennedy Space Center Project Description Type of Project: Analysis Category: Hydrogen Fuel Pathways

409

Hydrogen Material Compatibility for Hydrogen ICE | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C. pm04smith.pdf More Documents & Publications Hydrogen Materials Compatibility for the H-ICE...

410

Advanced Hydrogen Turbine Development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Siemens has developed a roadmap to achieve the DOE goals for efficiency, cost reduction, and emissions through innovative approaches and novel technologies which build upon worldwide IGCC operational experience, platform technology, and extensive experience in G-class operating conditions. In Phase 1, the technologies and concepts necessary to achieve the program goals were identified for the gas turbine components and supporting technology areas and testing plans were developed to mitigate identified risks. Multiple studies were conducted to evaluate the impact in plant performance of different gas turbine and plant technologies. 2015 gas turbine technologies showed a significant improvement in IGCC plant efficiency, however, a severe performance penalty was calculated for high carbon capture cases. Thermodynamic calculations showed that the DOE 2010 and 2015 efficiency targets can be met with a two step approach. A risk management process was instituted in Phase 1 to identify risk and develop mitigation plans. For the risks identified, testing and development programs are in place and the risks will be revisited periodically to determine if changes to the plan are necessary. A compressor performance prediction has shown that the design of the compressor for the engine can be achieved with additional stages added to the rear of the compressor. Tip clearance effects were studied as well as a range of flow and pressure ratios to evaluate the impacts to both performance and stability. Considerable data was obtained on the four candidate combustion systems: diffusion, catalytic, premix, and distributed combustion. Based on the results of Phase 1, the premixed combustion system and the distributed combustion system were chosen as having the most potential and will be the focus of Phase 2 of the program. Significant progress was also made in obtaining combustion kinetics data for high hydrogen fuels. The Phase 1 turbine studies indicate initial feasibility of the advanced hydrogen turbine that meets the aggressive targets set forth for the advanced hydrogen turbine, including increased rotor inlet temperature (RIT), lower total cooling and leakage air (TCLA) flow, higher pressure ratio, and higher mass flow through the turbine compared to the baseline. Maintaining efficiency with high mass flow Syngas combustion is achieved using a large high AN2 blade 4, which has been identified as a significant advancement beyond the current state-of-the-art. Preliminary results showed feasibility of a rotor system capable of increased power output and operating conditions above the baseline. In addition, several concepts were developed for casing components to address higher operating conditions. Rare earth modified bond coat for the purpose of reducing oxidation and TBC spallation demonstrated an increase in TBC spallation life of almost 40%. The results from Phase 1 identified two TBC compositions which satisfy the thermal conductivity requirements and have demonstrated phase stability up to temperatures of 1850 C. The potential to join alloys using a bonding process has been demonstrated and initial HVOF spray deposition trials were promising. The qualitative ranking of alloys and coatings in environmental conditions was also performed using isothermal tests where significant variations in alloy degradation were observed as a function of gas composition. Initial basic system configuration schematics and working system descriptions have been produced to define key boundary data and support estimation of costs. Review of existing materials in use for hydrogen transportation show benefits or tradeoffs for materials that could be used in this type of applications. Hydrogen safety will become a larger risk than when using natural gas fuel as the work done to date in other areas has shown direct implications for this type of use. Studies were conducted which showed reduced CO{sub 2} and NOx emissions with increased plant efficiency. An approach to maximize plant output is needed in order to address the DOE turbine goal for 20-30% reduction o

Joesph Fadok

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program: 2007 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

7 7 Printable Version 2007 Annual Progress Report The 2007 Progress Report for the DOE Hydrogen Program summarizes the hydrogen and fuel cell R&D activities and accomplishments for FY 2007. Published in November 2007, the full document is very large; each technical report is available as an individual Adobe Acrobat PDF. Download Adobe Reader. Front Cover (PDF 711 KB) Table of Contents (PDF 236 KB) I. Introduction, JoAnn Milliken, U.S. Department of Energy (PDF 821 KB) II. Hydrogen Production Distributed Production from Natural Gas Distributed Production from Bio-Derived Liquids Electrolysis Separations Central Biomass Gasification Solar Hi-Temp Thermochemical Water Splitting Photoelectrochemical Biological Production Hydrogen from Coal Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative

412

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Emissions Analysis of Electricity Storage  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Emissions Analysis of Electricity Storage with Hydrogen Emissions Analysis of Electricity Storage with Hydrogen Project Summary Full Title: Emissions Analysis of Electricity Storage with Hydrogen Project ID: 269 Principal Investigator: Amgad Elgowainy Brief Description: Argonne National Laboratory examined the potential fuel cycle energy and emissions benefits of integrating hydrogen storage with renewable power generation. ANL also examined the fuel cycle energy use and emissions associated with alternative energy storage systems, including pumped hydro storage (PHS), compressed air energy storage (CAES), and vanadium-redox batteries (VRB). Keywords: Hydrogen; Emissions; Greenhouse gases (GHG); Energy storage; Life cycle analysis Performer Principal Investigator: Amgad Elgowainy Organization: Argonne National Laboratory (ANL)

413

Recovery of hydrogen iodide  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of extraction of HI from an aqueous solution of HI and I.sub.2. HBr is added to create a two-phase liquid mixture wherein a dry phase consists essentially of HBr, I and HI and is in equilibrium with a wet phase having a far greater HBr:HI ratio. Using a countercurrent extractor, two solutions can be obtained: a dry HBr--HI--I.sub.2 solution and a wet essentially HBr solution. The dry and wet phases are easily separable, and HI is recovered from the dry phase, after first separating I.sub.2, as by distillation. Alternatively, the HI-HBr liquid mixture is treated to catalytically decompose the HI. HBr is recovered from the wet phase by suitable treatment, including high-pressure distillation, to produce an H.sub.2 O--HBr azeotrope that is not more than 25 mole percent HBr. The azeotrope may be returned for use in an earlier step in the overall process which results in the production of the aqueous solution of HI and I.sub.2 without major detriment because of the presence of HBr.

Norman, John H. (La Jolla, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Where does Hydrogen Fit in a Sustainable Energy Economy?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Where does hydrogen fit into a global sustainable energy strategy for the 21st century, as we face the enormous challenges of irreversible climate change and uncertain oil supply? This fundamental question is addressed by sketching a sustainable energy strategy that is based predominantly on renewable energy inputs and energy efficiency, with hydrogen playing a crucial and substantial role. But this role is not an exclusive one as in the original concept of the hydrogen economy proposed in the early 1970s. A hierarchy of spatially-distributed hydrogen production, storage and distribution centres relying on local renewable energy sources and feedstocks would be created to avoid the need for an expensive long-distance hydrogen pipeline system. There would thus be complementary use of electricity and hydrogen as energy vectors. Importantly, bulk hydrogen storage would provide the strategic energy reserve to guarantee national and global energy security in a world relying increasingly on renewable energy; and longer-term seasonal storage on electricity grids relying mainly on renewables. In the transport sector, a horses for courses approach is proposed in which hydrogen fuel cell vehicles would be used in road and rail vehicles requiring a range comparable to today's petrol and diesel vehicles, and in coastal and international shipping, while liquid hydrogen would probably have to be used in air transport. Plug-in battery electric vehicles would be reserved for shorter-trips. Energy-economic-environmental modelling is recommended as the next step to quantify the net benefits of the overall strategy outlined.

John Andrews; Bahman Shabani

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Physical Chemistry of Ionic Liquids  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ionic liquids are experiencing explosive growth in many areas of research Ionic liquids are experiencing explosive growth in many areas of research and practical applications. They present a wide range of complex physical and chemical behaviors, including ambient vapor pressures ranging from UHV to weakly volatile, a substantial variety of distinct condensed phases, including multiple crystal isomorphs, glasses, amorphous plastic and liquid crystal phases, deep supercooling, and interesting dynamical and transport phenomena. Experiments and simulations have shown that their intrinsic self-organization at the nanoscale is responsible for several of these properties. The symposium will assemble an international array of speakers to discuss ionic liquids in the context of their heterogeneous environments, solvation, dynamics and transport, interfacial properties,

416

Hydrogen and Nitrogen Control in Ladle and Casting Operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In recent years there has been an increasing demand to reduce and control the amount of dissolved gases in steel. Hydrogen and nitrogen are two of the most important gases which when dissolved in liquid steel affect its properties significantly. Several steelmaking additions have been investigated in this research for their effect on the hydrogen and nitrogen content of steels. It has been established that calcium hydroxide (hydrated lime) acts as a source of hydrogen. Carburizers, such as metallurgical coke, were found to result in no hydrogen pickup when added to liquid steel. Addition of petroleum coke, on the other hand, increased the hydrogen content of liquid steel. Ferroalloy such as medium carbon ferromanganese when added to the liquid iron was found to increase its nitrogen content, the increase being proportional to the amount of ferroalloy added. Similarly, addition of pitch coke, which had a significant nitrogen impurity, increased the nitrogen content of liquid iron. A mathematical model was developed to quantify the absorption of nitrogen and hydrogen from the air bubbles entrained during tapping of liquid steel. During the bottom stirring of liquid metal in a ladle, the inert gas escaping from the top displaces the slag layer and often forms an open eye. The absorption of atmospheric nitrogen through the spout eye was estimated for different slag thickness and gas flow rate. The ultimate goal of this research was to develop a comprehensive set of equations which could predict the nitrogen and hydrogen pickup from their various sources. Estimates of hydrogen and nitrogen pickup during the steel transfer operations such as tapping and ladle stirring and the predicted pickup from steelmaking additions were integrated into empirical equations. The comprehensive model is designed to predict the gas pickup under varying operating conditions such as the metal oxygen and sulfur content, the total tapping or stirring time, the stirring gas flow rate and the slag thickness. The model predictions are based on mathematical and empirical evidence which are derived from thermodynamic and kinetic fundamental principles.

Richard J. Fruehan; Siddhartha Misra

2005-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

417

Chapter 4 - Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this chapter, hydrogen and fuel cell systems are introduced. Hydrogen is closely related to fuel cells because fuel cells are very efficient devices for power generation which when supplied with hydrogen generate non-polluting effluents, mainly water or steam. A hydrogen economy is necessary in the context of continuous growth of population and per-capita energy consumption. In this context, renewable energy solutionsespecially solarbecome more important and their harvesting requires hydrogen as energy carrier. Therefore the role of hydrogen and fuel cell systems in power generation becomes very important. As detailed in the chapter, these systems are useful for converting the fluctuating and intermittent energy of renewable sources and providing power on demand. Hydrogen and fuel cell systems can work either as grid-connected or as independent power generators. Connection to the grid allows for better load leveling and major savings as well as for reduction of pollution associated with power generation. Hydrogen can also be used to power residences and to cogenerate heat or other commodities. In addition, hydrogen and fuel cell technologies are much required for the transportation sector, where they can contribute to pollution and cost reduction and increased efficiency. Hydrogen production methods are reviewed in this chapter with a focus on electrolysis and thermochemical cycles. These systems appear to be leading technologies for the future. Other revised hydrogen production methods are gasification and reforming, which are very relevant for biomass conversion into hydrogen. Photochemical and photo-biochemical hydrogen production methods are also discussed. All types of fuel cells are introduced; these include alkaline, proton-exchange-membrane, phosphoric acid, molten carbonate, solid oxide, direct methanol, and direct ammonia fuel cells. Construction and specific application for power generation are presented for each type. The modeling and optimization aspects of fuel cells and their systems are explained. Several power generation systems with fuel cells are discussed, in which each type of fuel cells has specific system requirements. The overall system must include various types of separators, pumps, and compressors depending on the case. In aqueous systems water must be recycled, e.g., in the case of proton-exchange membrane fuel cells water must be actually fed in excess so that the membrane is wetted. Also for a direct methanol fuel cell water must be recovered and recycled. In molten carbonate fuel cell systems carbon dioxide must be recovered and recycled. In solid oxide fuel cell systems, the fuel must be supplied in excess and is not completely consumed; therefore it is important to couple these systems with gas turbines.

Ibrahim Dincer; Calin Zamfirescu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Solar-hydrogen energy system for Pakistan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A solar-hydrogen energy system has been proposed for Pakistan as the best replacement for the present fossil fuel based energy system. It has been suggested to produce hydrogen via photovoltaic-electrolysis, utilizing the available non-agricultural sunny terrain in Baluchistan region. There will be a desalination plant for sea water desalination. The area under the photovoltaic panels with the availability of water would provide suitable environment for growing some cash crops. This would change the cast useless desert land into green productive farms. In order to show the quantitative benefits of the proposed system, future trends of important energy and economical parameters have been studied with and without hydrogen introduction. The following parameters have been included: population, energy demand (fossil + hydrogen), energy production (fossil + hydrogen), gross national product, fossil energy imports, world energy prices, air pollution, quality of life, environmental savings due to hydrogen introduction, savings due to the higher utilization efficiency of hydrogen, by-product credit, agricultural income, income from hydrogen sale, photovoltaic cell area, total land area, water desalination plant capacity, capital investment, operating and maintenance cost, and total income from the system. The results indicate that adopting the solar-hydrogen energy system would eliminate the import dependency of fossil fuels, increase gross product per capita, reduce pollution, improve quality of life and establish a permanent and clean energy system. The total annual expenditure on the proposed system is less than the total income from the proposed system. The availability of water, the cash crop production, electricity and hydrogen would result in rapid development of Baluchistan, the largest province of Pakistan.

Lutfi, N.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Critical point anomalies include expansion shock waves  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

From first-principle fluid dynamics, complemented by a rigorous state equation accounting for critical anomalies, we discovered that expansion shock waves may occur in the vicinity of the liquid-vapor critical point in the two-phase region. Due to universality of near-critical thermodynamics, the result is valid for any common pure fluid in which molecular interactions are only short-range, namely, for so-called 3-dimensional Ising-like systems, and under the assumption of thermodynamic equilibrium. In addition to rarefaction shock waves, diverse non-classical effects are admissible, including composite compressive shock-fan-shock waves, due to the change of sign of the fundamental derivative of gasdynamics.

Nannan, N. R., E-mail: ryan.nannan@uvs.edu [Mechanical Engineering Discipline, Anton de Kom University of Suriname, Leysweg 86, PO Box 9212, Paramaribo, Suriname and Process and Energy Department, Delft University of Technology, Leeghwaterstraat 44, 2628 CA Delft (Netherlands); Guardone, A., E-mail: alberto.guardone@polimi.it [Department of Aerospace Science and Technology, Politecnico di Milano, Via La Masa 34, 20156 Milano (Italy); Colonna, P., E-mail: p.colonna@tudelft.nl [Propulsion and Power, Delft University of Technology, Kluyverweg 1, 2629 HS Delft (Netherlands)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

420

Hydrogen Generation Via Fuel Reforming  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Reforming is the conversion of a hydrocarbon based fuel to a gas mixture that contains hydrogen. The H2 that is produced by reforming can then be used to produce electricity via fuel cells. The realization of H2?based power generation via reforming is facilitated by the existence of the liquid fuel and natural gas distribution infrastructures. Coupling these same infrastructures with more portable reforming technology facilitates the realization of fuel cell powered vehicles. The reformer is the first component in a fuel processor. Contaminants in the H2?enriched product stream such as carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) can significantly degrade the performance of current polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). Removal of such contaminants requires extensive processing of the H2?rich product stream prior to utilization by the fuel cell to generate electricity. The remaining components of the fuel processor remove the contaminants in the H2 product stream. For transportation applications the entire fuel processing system must be as small and lightweight as possible to achieve desirable performance requirements. Current efforts at Argonne National Laboratory are focused on catalyst development and reactor engineering of the autothermal processing train for transportation applications.

John F. Krebs

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes liquid hydrogen" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Hydrogen Codes and Standards  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Codes and Standards Codes and Standards James Ohi National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Blvd. Golden, CO 80401 Background The development and promulgation of codes and standards are essential if hydrogen is to become a significant energy carrier and fuel because codes and standards are critical to establishing a market-receptive environment for commercializing hydrogen-based products and systems. The Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies Program of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), with the help of the National Hydrogen Association (NHA) and other key stakeholders, are coordinating a collaborative national effort by government and industry to prepare, review, and promulgate hydrogen codes and standards needed to expedite hydrogen infrastructure development. The

422

Hydrogen Based Bacteria  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Based Bacteria Hydrogen Based Bacteria Name: Ellen Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: i was in my Biology class and a very respectable someone mentioned something about the discovery of a hydrogen based bacteria. my teacher wasnt aware of this study, and assigned me to find out about it. so i thought i would Email you and see if you people knew anything about it. Awaiting your repsonse Replies: I'm not quite sure what you mean by hydrogen based bacteria but I will take a stab that you mean bacteria that use hydrogen for energy. Some bacteria are chemolithotrophs which mean that they are autrophs but don't use the sun as their energy source; they get their energy from chemical sources. There are bacteria that use hydrogen as their energy source. They are diverse as a group and are all facultative. The overall chemical reaction looks like this:

423

Hydrogen permeability and Integrity of hydrogen transfer pipelines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Natural Gas Pipelines Hydrogen embrittlement What is the relevance to hydrogen pipelines? ORNL researchHydrogen permeability and Integrity of hydrogen transfer pipelines Team: Sudarsanam Suresh Babu, Z Pressure Permeation Testing) Hydrogen Pipeline R&D, Project Review Meeting Oak Ridge National Laboratory

424

Hydrogen Delivery Technologies and Pipeline Transmission of Hydrogen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Issues for H2 Service Materials of Construction Hydrogen Embrittlement Presence of atomic hydrogen susceptible to Hydrogen Embrittlement. #12;Pipeline Transmission of Hydrogen --- 7 Copyright: H2 Induced, characteristic of hydrogen embrittlement. Photo Courtesy of NASA/Kennedy Space Center Materials Lab #12;Pipeline

425

BP and Hydrogen Pipelines DOE Hydrogen Pipeline Working Group Workshop  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BP and Hydrogen Pipelines DOE Hydrogen Pipeline Working Group Workshop August 30-31, 2005 Gary P · UK partnership opened the first hydrogen demonstration refueling station · Two hydrogen pipelines l · " i i l i 2 i i ll i i l pl ifi i · 8" ly idl i i l s Hydrogen Pipelines Two nes, on y a brand

426

Hydrogen Storage -Overview George Thomas, Hydrogen Consultant to SNL*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrogen Storage - Overview George Thomas, Hydrogen Consultant to SNL* and Jay Keller, Hydrogen volumetric density of gaseous fuels requires a storage method which compacts the fuel. Hence, hydrogen and cost-effective hydrogen storage? #12;4/14/03 3 Sandia National Laboratories From George Thomas, BES

427

Meals included in Conference Registrations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Meals included in Conference Registrations Meals included as part of the cost of a conference the most reasonable rates are obtained. Deluxe hotels and motels should be avoided. GSA rates have been for Georgia high cost areas. 75% of these amounts would be $21 for non- high cost areas and $27 for high cost

Arnold, Jonathan

428

Hydrogen powered bus  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Take a ride on a new type of bus, fueled by hydrogen. These hydrogen taxis are part of a Department of Energy-funded deployment of hydrogen powered vehicles and fueling infrastructure at nine federal facilities across the country to demonstrate this market-ready advanced technology. Produced and leased by Ford Motor Company , they consist of one 12- passenger bus and one nine-passenger bus. More information at: http://go.usa.gov/Tgr

None

2013-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

429

Liquid electrode  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A dropping electrolyte electrode is described for use in electrochemical analysis of non-polar sample solutions, such as benzene or cyclohexane. The liquid electrode, preferably an aqueous salt solution immiscible in the sample solution, is introduced into the solution in dropwise fashion from a capillary. The electrolyte is introduced at a known rate, thus, the droplets each have the same volume and surface area. The electrode is used in making standard electrochemical measurements in order to determine properties of non-polar sample solutions. 2 figures.

Ekechukwu, A.A.

1994-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

430

Hydrogen Compatibility of Materials  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Compatibility of Materials Compatibility of Materials August 13, 2013 DOE EERE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Webinar Chris San Marchi Sandia National Laboratories Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000 SAND2013-6278P 2 Webinar Objectives * Provide context for hydrogen embrittlement and hydrogen compatibility of materials - Distinguish embrittlement, compatibility and suitability - Examples of hydrogen embrittlement * Historical perspective - Previous work on hydrogen compatibility - Motivation of "Materials Guide" * Identify the landscape of materials compatibility documents

431

Hydrogen Generation by Electrolysis  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Better Engineered Solutions. Better Engineered Solutions. What Listening Generates. Better Engineered Solutions. What Listening Generates. Hydrogen Generation by Electrolysis September 2004 Steve Cohen Hydrogen Generation by Electrolysis September 2004 Steve Cohen NREL H 2 Electrolysis - Utility Integration Workshop NREL H 2 Electrolysis - Utility Integration Workshop 2 Hydrogen Generation by Electrolysis Hydrogen Generation by Electrolysis  Intro to Teledyne Energy Systems  H 2 Generator Basics & Major Subsystems  H 2 Generating & Storage System Overview  Electrolysis System Efficiency & Economics  Focus for Attaining DOE H 2 Production Cost Goals 3 Teledyne Energy Systems Locations - ISO 9001 Teledyne Energy Systems Locations - ISO 9001 Hunt Valley, Maryland  State-of-the-art thermoelectric,

432

Hydrogen permeation resistant barrier  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A hydrogen permeation resistant barrier is formed by diffusing aluminum into an iron or nickel alloy and forming an intermetallic aluminide layer.

McGuire, Joseph C. (Richland, WA); Brehm, William F. (Richland, WA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Hydrogen Generator Appliance  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

lAbOrAtOry NG Workshop summary report - appeNDIX J slide presentation: hydrogen Generator appliance Gus Block, Nuvera Fuel Cells...

434

Module 2: Hydrogen Use  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This course covers the processes by which hydrogen is extracted, how it is stored and transported, and the inherent advantages and disadvantages of each method

435

Hydrogen | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

electric cooperatives* to offer net metering to customers who generate electricity using solar energy, wind energy, hydropower, hydrogen, biomass, landfill gas, geothermal energy,...

436

Hydrogen Production & Delivery  

Energy Savers [EERE]

* Address key materials needs for P&D: Membranes, Catalysts, PEC Devices, Reactors, and Tanks Hydrogen from Coal * Complete laboratory-scale development of separation and...

437

Renewable Hydrogen (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Presentation about the United State's dependence on oil, how energy solutions are challenging, and why hydrogen should be considered as a long-term alternative for transportation fuel.

Remick, R. J.

2009-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

438

Hydrogen Production & Delivery  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

"2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation H2 and Fuel Cells Plenary "

439

Hydrogen Release Behavior  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C.

440

Hydrogen permeation resistant barrier  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A hydrogen permeation resistant barrier is formed by diffusing aluminum into an iron or nickel alloy and forming an intermetallic aluminide layer.

McGuire, J.C.; Brehm, W.F.

1980-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes liquid hydrogen" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

President's Hydrogen Fuel Initiative  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Hydrogen Infrastructure and Fuel Cell Technologies put on an Accelerated Schedule. President Bush commits a total $1.7 billion over first 5 years

442

Hydrogen Safety Knowledge Tools  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With hydrogen gaining acceptance as an energy carrier for fuel cell vehicles and stationary fuel cell applications, a new community of hydrogen users is emerging and continues to grow. With this growth has come the need to spread the word about safe practices for handling, storing, and using hydrogen. Like all energy forms, hydrogen can be used safely through proper procedures and engineering techniques. However, hydrogen involves a degree of risk that must be respected, and the importance of avoiding complacency or haste in the safe conduct and performance of projects involving hydrogen cannot be overstated. To encourage and promote the safe use of hydrogen, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has developed and continues to enhance two software tools in support of the U.S. Department of Energy's Fuel Cell Technologies Program: the Hydrogen Safety Best Practices online manual (www.H2BestPractices.org) and the Hydrogen Incident Reporting and Lessons Learned database (www.H2Incidents.org).

Fassbender, Linda L.

2011-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

443

Hydrogen ion microlithography  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed is a hydrogen ion microlithography process for use in microelectronic fabrication and semiconductor device processing. The process comprises the steps of providing a single layer of either an amorphous silicon or hydrogenated amorphous silicon material. A pattern is recorded in a selected layer of amorphous silicon or hydrogenated amorphous silicon materials by preferentially implanting hydrogen ions therein so as to permit the selected layer to serve as a mask-resist wafer suitable for subsequent development and device fabrication. The layer is developed to provide a surface pattern therein adaptable for subsequent use in microelectronic fabrication and semiconductor device processing. 6 figs.

Tsuo, Y.S.; Deb, S.K.

1990-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

444

Detroit Commuter Hydrogen Project  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C.

445

Hydrogen Fuel Cells  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

The fuel cell an energy conversion device that can efficiently capture and use the power of hydrogen is the key to making it happen.

446

Department of Energy - Hydrogen  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Goes to.... Lighting Up Operations with Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technology http:energy.goveerearticlesand-oscar-sustainable-mobile-lighting-goes-lighting-operations-hydro...

447

Thin film hydrogen sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A hydrogen sensor element comprises an essentially inert, electrically-insulating substrate having a thin-film metallization deposited thereon which forms at least two resistors on the substrate. The metallization comprises a layer of Pd or a Pd alloy for sensing hydrogen and an underlying intermediate metal layer for providing enhanced adhesion of the metallization to the substrate. An essentially inert, electrically insulating, hydrogen impermeable passivation layer covers at least one of the resistors, and at least one of the resistors is left uncovered. The difference in electrical resistances of the covered resistor and the uncovered resistor is related to hydrogen concentration in a gas to which the sensor element is exposed.

Lauf, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Hoffheins, Barbara S. (Knoxville, TN); Fleming, Pamela H. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Hydrogen Hydrogen Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen on AddThis.com... More in this section... Hydrogen Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Laws & Incentives Hydrogen Hydrogen is a potentially emissions-free alternative fuel that can be produced from diverse domestic energy sources. Research is under way to make hydrogen vehicles practical for widespread use.

449

FCT Hydrogen Production: Current Technology  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Current Technology to Current Technology to someone by E-mail Share FCT Hydrogen Production: Current Technology on Facebook Tweet about FCT Hydrogen Production: Current Technology on Twitter Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Production: Current Technology on Google Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Production: Current Technology on Delicious Rank FCT Hydrogen Production: Current Technology on Digg Find More places to share FCT Hydrogen Production: Current Technology on AddThis.com... Home Basics Current Technology Thermal Processes Electrolytic Processes Photolytic Processes R&D Activities Quick Links Hydrogen Delivery Hydrogen Storage Fuel Cells Technology Validation Manufacturing Codes & Standards Education Systems Analysis Contacts Current Technology The development of clean, sustainable, and cost-competitive hydrogen

450

Hydrogen Threshold Cost Calculation | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Hydrogen Threshold Cost Calculation Hydrogen Threshold Cost Calculation DOE Hydrogen Program Record number11007, Hydrogen Threshold Cost Calculation, documents the methodology and...

451

Hydrogen Refueling Station Costs in Shanghai  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

high-pressure stationary hydrogen storage tanks. The storagehigh-pressure gaseous hydrogen storage containers, and atrailer Compressed hydrogen storage High-pressure hydrogen

Weinert, Jonathan X.; Shaojun, Liu; Ogden, Joan M; Jianxin, Ma

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Hydrogen Delivery - Basics | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Delivery Hydrogen Delivery - Basics Hydrogen Delivery - Basics Photo of light-duty vehicle at hydrogen refueling station. Infrastructure is required to move hydrogen from the...

453

NREL: Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Research - Basics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Basics Photo of vehicle filling up at renewable hydrogen fueling station. NREL's hydrogen fueling station dispenses hydrogen produced via renewable...

454

Combination moisture and hydrogen getter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A combination moisture and hydrogen getter comprises (a) a moisture getter comprising a readily oxidizable metal; and (b) a hydrogen getter comprising (1) a solid acetylenic compound and (2) a hydrogenation catalyst. A method of scavenging moisture from a closed container uses the combination moisture and hydrogen getter to irreversibly chemically reduce the moisture and chemically bind the resultant hydrogen.

Harrah, L.A.; Mead, K.E.; Smith, H.M.

1983-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

455

Electrochemical hydrogen Storage Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As the global need for energy increases, scientists and engineers have found a possible solution by using hydrogen to power our world. Although hydrogen can be combusted as a fuel, it is considered an energy carrier for use in fuel cells wherein it is consumed (oxidized) without the production of greenhouse gases and produces electrical energy with high efficiency. Chemical storage of hydrogen involves release of hydrogen in a controlled manner from materials in which the hydrogen is covalently bound. Sodium borohydride and aminoborane are two materials given consideration as chemical hydrogen storage materials by the US Department of Energy. A very significant barrier to adoption of these materials as hydrogen carriers is their regeneration from 'spent fuel,' i.e., the material remaining after discharge of hydrogen. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) formed a Center of Excellence for Chemical Hydrogen Storage, and this work stems from that project. The DOE has identified boron hydrides as being the main compounds of interest as hydrogen storage materials. The various boron hydrides are then oxidized to release their hydrogen, thereby forming a 'spent fuel' in the form of a lower boron hydride or even a boron oxide. The ultimate goal of this project is to take the oxidized boron hydrides as the spent fuel and hydrogenate them back to their original form so they can be used again as a fuel. Thus this research is essentially a boron hydride recycling project. In this report, research directed at regeneration of sodium borohydride and aminoborane is described. For sodium borohydride, electrochemical reduction of boric acid and sodium metaborate (representing spent fuel) in alkaline, aqueous solution has been investigated. Similarly to literature reports (primarily patents), a variety of cathode materials were tried in these experiments. Additionally, approaches directed at overcoming electrostatic repulsion of borate anion from the cathode, not described in the previous literature for electrochemical reduction of spent fuels, have been attempted. A quantitative analytical method for measuring the concentration of sodium borohydride in alkaline aqueous solution has been developed as part of this work and is described herein. Finally, findings from stability tests for sodium borohydride in aqueous solutions of several different compositions are reported. For aminoborane, other research institutes have developed regeneration schemes involving tributyltin hydride. In this report, electrochemical reduction experiments attempting to regenerate tributyltin hydride from tributyltin chloride (a representative by-product of the regeneration scheme) are described. These experiments were performed in the non-aqueous solvents acetonitrile and 1,2-dimethoxyethane. A non-aqueous reference electrode for electrolysis experiments in acetonitrile was developed and is described. One class of boron hydrides, called polyhedral boranes, became of interest to the DOE due to their ability to contain a sufficient amount of hydrogen to meet program goals and because of their physical and chemical safety attributes. Unfortunately, the research performed here has shown that polyhedral boranes do not react in such a way as to allow enough hydrogen to be released, nor do they appear to undergo hydrogenation from the spent fuel form back to the original hydride. After the polyhedral boranes were investigated, the project goals remained the same but the hydrogen storage material was switched by the DOE to ammonia borane. Ammonia borane was found to undergo an irreversible hydrogen release process, so a direct hydrogenation was not able to occur. To achieve the hydrogenation of the spent ammonia borane fuel, an indirect hydrogenation reaction is possible by using compounds called organotin hydrides. In this process, the organotin hydrides will hydrogenate the spent ammonia borane fuel at the cost of their own oxidation, which forms organotin halides. To enable a closed-loop cycle, our task was then to be able to hydrogenate the organotin halides back to th

Dr. Digby Macdonald

2010-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

456

Florida Hydrogen Initiative  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Florida Hydrogen Initiative (FHI) was a research, development and demonstration hydrogen and fuel cell program. The FHI program objectives were to develop Florida?s hydrogen and fuel cell infrastructure and to assist DOE in its hydrogen and fuel cell activities The FHI program funded 12 RD&D projects as follows: Hydrogen Refueling Infrastructure and Rental Car Strategies -- L. Lines, Rollins College This project analyzes strategies for Florida's early stage adaptation of hydrogen-powered public transportation. In particular, the report investigates urban and statewide network of refueling stations and the feasibility of establishing a hydrogen rental-car fleet based in Orlando. Methanol Fuel Cell Vehicle Charging Station at Florida Atlantic University ? M. Fuchs, EnerFuel, Inc. The project objectives were to design, and demonstrate a 10 kWnet proton exchange membrane fuel cell stationary power plant operating on methanol, to achieve an electrical energy efficiency of 32% and to demonstrate transient response time of less than 3 milliseconds. Assessment of Public Understanding of the Hydrogen Economy Through Science Center Exhibits, J. Newman, Orlando Science Center The project objective was to design and build an interactive Science Center exhibit called: ?H2Now: the Great Hydrogen Xchange?. On-site Reformation of Diesel Fuel for Hydrogen Fueling Station Applications ? A. Raissi, Florida Solar Energy Center This project developed an on-demand forecourt hydrogen production technology by catalytically converting high-sulfur hydrocarbon fuels to an essentially sulfur-free gas. The removal of sulfur from reformate is critical since most catalysts used for the steam reformation have limited sulfur tolerance. Chemochromic Hydrogen Leak Detectors for Safety Monitoring ? N. Mohajeri and N. Muradov, Florida Solar Energy Center This project developed and demonstrated a cost-effective and highly selective chemochromic (visual) hydrogen leak detector for safety monitoring at any facility engaged in transport, handling and use of hydrogen. Development of High Efficiency Low Cost Electrocatalysts for Hydrogen Production and PEM Fuel Cell Applications ? M. Rodgers, Florida Solar Energy Center The objective of this project was to decrease platinum usage in fuel cells by conducting experiments to improve catalyst activity while lowering platinum loading through pulse electrodeposition. Optimum values of several variables during electrodeposition were selected to achieve the highest electrode performance, which was related to catalyst morphology. Understanding Mechanical and Chemical Durability of Fuel Cell Membrane Electrode Assemblies ? D. Slattery, Florida Solar Energy Center The objective of this project was to increase the knowledge base of the degradation mechanisms for membranes used in proton exchange membrane fuel cells. The results show the addition of ceria (cerium oxide) has given durability improvements by reducing fluoride emissions by an order of magnitude during an accelerated durability test. Production of Low-Cost Hydrogen from Biowaste (HyBrTec?) ? R. Parker, SRT Group, Inc., Miami, FL This project developed a hydrogen bromide (HyBrTec?) process which produces hydrogen bromide from wet-cellulosic waste and co-produces carbon dioxide. Eelectrolysis dissociates hydrogen bromide producing recyclable bromine and hydrogen. A demonstration reactor and electrolysis vessel was designed, built and operated. Development of a Low-Cost and High-Efficiency 500 W Portable PEMFC System ? J. Zheng, Florida State University, H. Chen, Bing Energy, Inc. The objectives of this project were to develop a new catalyst structures comprised of highly conductive buckypaper and Pt catalyst nanoparticles coated on its surface and to demonstrate fuel cell efficiency improvement and durability and cell cost reductions in the buckypaper based electrodes. Development of an Interdisciplinary Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technology Academic Program ? J. Politano, Florida Institute of Technology, Melbourne, FL This project developed a hydrogen and fuel cel

Block, David L

2013-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

457

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program: Hydrogen Production  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Delivery Hydrogen Storage Hydrogen Manufacturing Fuel Cells Applications/Technology Validation Safety Codes and Standards Education Basic Research Systems Analysis Systems Integration U.S. Department of Energy Search help Home > Hydrogen Production Printable Version Hydrogen Production Hydrogen can be produced from diverse domestic feedstocks using a variety of process technologies. Hydrogen-containing compounds such as fossil fuels, biomass or even water can be a source of hydrogen. Thermochemical processes can be used to produce hydrogen from biomass and from fossil fuels such as coal, natural gas and petroleum. Power generated from sunlight, wind and nuclear sources can be used to produce hydrogen electrolytically. Sunlight alone can also drive photolytic production of

458

Ovonic Hydrogen Systems LLC formerly Texaco Ovonic Hydrogen Systems LLC |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydrogen Systems LLC formerly Texaco Ovonic Hydrogen Systems LLC Hydrogen Systems LLC formerly Texaco Ovonic Hydrogen Systems LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Ovonic Hydrogen Systems LLC (formerly Texaco Ovonic Hydrogen Systems LLC) Place Rochester Hills, Michigan Zip 48309 Sector Hydro, Hydrogen, Vehicles Product It commercializes hydrogen storage technology based on metal-hydrides for portable and stationary power systems as well as fuel-cell vehicles. References Ovonic Hydrogen Systems LLC (formerly Texaco Ovonic Hydrogen Systems LLC)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Ovonic Hydrogen Systems LLC (formerly Texaco Ovonic Hydrogen Systems LLC) is a company located in Rochester Hills, Michigan . References

459

Hydrogen Permeability and Integrity of Hydrogen Delivery Pipelines  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Project Objectives: To gain basic understanding of hydrogen permeation behavior and its impact on hydrogen embrittlement of pipeline steels under high gaseous pressures relevant to hydrogen gas transmission pipeline

460

Rotor for processing liquids using movable capillary tubes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A rotor assembly for processing liquids, especially whole blood samples, is disclosed. The assembly includes apparatus for separating non-liquid components of whole blood samples from liquid components, apparatus for diluting the separated liquid component with a diluent and apparatus for transferring the diluted sample to an external apparatus for analysis. The rotor assembly employs several movable capillary tubes to handle the sample and diluents. A method for using the rotor assembly to process liquids is also described. 5 figs.

Johnson, W.F.; Burtis, C.A.; Walker, W.A.

1987-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes liquid hydrogen" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Improvements to Hydrogen Delivery Scenario Analysis Model (HDSAM) and Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to Hydrogen to Hydrogen Delivery Scenario Analysis Model (HDSAM) and Results May 8, 2007 Amgad Elgowainy Argonne National Laboratory Comparison of Delivery Pathways- V1.0 vs. V2.0 2 1 3 i delivery by a Loading, the plant Version 1.0 character zed components for 3 pathways with single mode. conditioning and storage are at or adjacent to Liquid Hydrogen (LH) Truck H2 Production 100 or 1500 kg/d Compressed H2 (CH) Truck H2 Production 3 or 7 kpsi 100 or 1500 kg/d H2 Production Gaseous H2 Pipeline 100 or 1500 kg/d HDSAM V1.0 Estimates Delivery Cost for 3 Pathways 4 H2 H2 1 2 3 H2 Distribution and Ci I. Liquid H2 Distribution: HDSAM V2.0 Simulates Nine Pathways Production Production LH Terminal LH Terminal Production LH Terminal Transmission Transmission Distribution

462

Guidance Document Cryogenic Liquids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Guidance Document Cryogenic Liquids [This is a brief and general summary. Read the full MSDS for more details before handling.] Introduction: All cryogenic liquids are gases at normal temperature liquefies them. Cryogenic liquids are kept in the liquid state at very low temperatures. Cryogenic liquids

463

Microchannel Reactor System for Catalytic Hydrogenation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We successfully demonstrated a novel process intensification concept enabled by the development of microchannel reactors, for energy efficient catalytic hydrogenation reactions at moderate temperature, and pressure, and low solvent levels. We designed, fabricated, evaluated, and optimized a laboratory-scale microchannel reactor system for hydrogenation of onitroanisole and a proprietary BMS molecule. In the second phase of the program, as a prelude to full-scale commercialization, we designed and developed a fully-automated skid-mounted multichannel microreactor pilot plant system for multiphase reactions. The system is capable of processing 1 10 kg/h of liquid substrate, and an industrially relevant immiscible liquid-liquid was successfully demonstrated on the system. Our microreactor-based pilot plant is one-of-akind. We anticipate that this process intensification concept, if successfully demonstrated, will provide a paradigm-changing basis for replacing existing energy inefficient, cost ineffective, environmentally detrimental slurry semi-batch reactor-based manufacturing practiced in the pharmaceutical and fine chemicals industries.

Adeniyi Lawal; Woo Lee; Ron Besser; Donald Kientzler; Luke Achenie

2010-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

464

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Transition to Hydrogen Transportation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Transition to Hydrogen Transportation Fuel Transition to Hydrogen Transportation Fuel Project Summary Full Title: A Smooth Transition to Hydrogen Transportation Fuel Project ID: 87 Principal Investigator: Gene Berry Brief Description: This project contrasts the options of decentralized production using the existing energy distribution network, and centralized production of hydrogen with a large-scale infrastructure. Keywords: Infrastructure; costs; hydrogen production Purpose The case for hydrogen-powered transportation requires an assessment of present and prospective methods for producing, storing, and delivering hydrogen. This project examines one potential pathway: on-site production of hydrogen to fuel light-duty vehicles. Performer Principal Investigator: Gene Berry Organization: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)

465

Plasma post-hydrogenation of hydrogenated amorphous silicon and germanium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Incorporation and kinetics of hydrogen during plasma post-hydrogenation and thermal treatment are discussed for a-Si:H and a-Ge:H films. For material of low hydrogen content, the hydrogen surface concentration reached by plasma treatment equals the hydrogen concentration obtained by deposition at the same temperature and under similar plasma conditions. Enhancements of the hydrogen diffusion coefficient and of hydrogen solubility observed for plasma treatment at temperatures {le}400 C and {le}300 C for a-Si:H and a-Ge:H, respectively, are attributed to a plasma induced rise of the surface hydrogen chemical potential.

Beyer, W.; Zastrow, U. [Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany). Inst. fuer Schicht- und Ionentechnik

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

466

Hydrogen Pipeline Working Group Workshop: Code for Hydrogen Pipelines  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Code for Hydrogen Piping and Pipelines. B31 Hydrogen Section Committee to develop a new code for H2 piping and pipelines.

467

NREL: Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Research - Hydrogen System Component...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

other hydrogen system components. Reliable components are needed to ensure the success of hydrogen fueling stations and support the commercial deployment of fuel cell electric...

468

NREL: Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Research - Hydrogen Production...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5 Cost adjusted to 2007 dollars, accurate to two significant figures. Printable Version Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Research Home Projects Fuel Cells Hydrogen Production & Delivery...

469

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 5037: Hydrogen Storage...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record Record : 5037 Date: May 22, 2006 Title: Hydrogen Storage Materials - 2004 vs 2006 Originator: Sunita Satyapal Approved by: JoAnn Milliken...

470

NREL: Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Research - Hydrogen Production and Delivery  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Production and Delivery Hydrogen Production and Delivery Most of the hydrogen in the United States is produced by steam reforming of natural gas. For the near term, this production method will continue to dominate. Researchers at NREL are developing advanced processes to produce hydrogen economically from sustainable resources. NREL's hydrogen production and delivery R&D efforts, which are led by Huyen Dinh, focus on the following topics: Biological Water Splitting Fermentation Conversion of Biomass and Wastes Photoelectrochemical Water Splitting Solar Thermal Water Splitting Renewable Electrolysis Hydrogen Dispenser Hose Reliability Hydrogen Production and Delivery Pathway Analysis. Biological Water Splitting Certain photosynthetic microbes use light energy to produce hydrogen from

471

The Hydrogen Backlash  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...from outside: the infrastructure they need to...existing electricity grid or natural gas...massive new hydrogen infrastructure to deliver the...development of hybrid cars, critics...out on page 974 , hybrid electric vehicles...separate hydrogen infrastructure. Near-term help...

Robert F. Service

2004-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

472

The Hydrogen Backlash  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...paces, 200 fuel cells under...Switching from fossil fuels to hydrogen...reduce urban air pollution, lower dependence...cleaner air, lower greenhouse...cost of the fuel drops to $1.50...hydrogen from fossil fuels, DOE...none of these solutions is up to...

Robert F. Service

2004-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

473

Hydrogen, Fuel Infrastructure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

results of using hydrogen power, of course, will be energy independence for this nation... think about between hydrogen and oxygen generates energy, which can be used to power a car producing only water to taking these cars from laboratory to showroom so that the first car driven by a child born today could

474

Renewable Resources for Hydrogen (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation provides an overview of renewable resources for hydrogen. It was presented at the National Hydrogen Association Hydrogen Conference & Expo in Long Beach, CA, May 3-6, 2010.

Jalalzadeh-Azar, A. A.

2010-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

475

The Bumpy Road to Hydrogen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the cost of hydrogen production, distribution, and use.accelerate R&D of zero-emission hydrogen production methods.Renewable hydrogen production is a key area for focused

Sperling, Dan; Ogden, Joan M

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Hydrogen in semiconductors and insulators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

type can be applied to hydrogen storage materials. Keywords:can be applied to hydrogen storage materials. Manuscript O-of the formalism to hydrogen storage materials. A partial

Van de Walle, Chris G.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Thin Film Hydrogen Storage System  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the last one decade the use of hydrogen as an energy carrier has attracted world ... on the technology involved for the production, storage and use of hydrogen. In this paper we discuss storage aspect of hydrogen

I. P. Jain; Y. K. Vijay

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Hydrogen Delivery | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

truck at hydrogen production facility. A viable hydrogen infrastructure requires that hydrogen be able to be delivered from where it's produced to the point of end-use, such as...

479

Hydrogen from Coal Edward Schmetz  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Turbines Carbon Capture & Sequestration Carbon Capture & Sequestration The Hydrogen from Coal Program Cells, Turbines, and Carbon Capture & Sequestration #12;Production Goal for Hydrogen from Coal Central Separation System PSA Membrane Membrane Carbon Sequestration Yes (87%) Yes (100%) Yes (100%) Hydrogen

480

Hydrogen Delivery: An Option to Ease the Transition  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Delivery: Delivery: An Option to Ease the Transition Presentation at: The DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Coordination Meeting Washington, D.C. June 3, 2003 John C. Winslow, Product Manager, Coal Fuels & Hydrogen National Energy Technology Laboratory Descriptor - include initials, /org#/date Hydrogen Delivery Today * Hydrogen infrastructure exists only for small merchant hydrogen markets in the chemical and refining industries * Current natural gas infrastructure consists of: - Pipelines - intermediate product storage - import terminals - rail, barge, and truck delivery U.S. Pipeline Mileage 0.7 2000 279 0 1000 2000 3000 Oil Nat Gas Hydrogen thousand miles Source: APCI, EIA, NEP Descriptor - include initials, /org#/date Comparison of Alternative Delivery Pathways Central H 2 production (coal)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes liquid hydrogen" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Renewable Hydrogen Production Using Sugars and Sugar Alcohols (Presentation)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Working Group Meeting Working Group Meeting 11/06/2007 Renewable Hydrogen Production Using Renewable Hydrogen Production Using Sugars and Sugar Alcohols Sugars and Sugar Alcohols * * Problem: Problem: Need Need to develop renewable to develop renewable hydrogen production technologies using hydrogen production technologies using diverse diverse feedstocks feedstocks 10 15 20 CH 4 : C 6 H 14 ln(P) * * Description: Description: The BioForming The BioForming TM TM process uses process uses aqueous phase reforming to cost effectively aqueous phase reforming to cost effectively produce hydrogen from a range of feedstocks, produce hydrogen from a range of feedstocks, including glycerol and sugars. The key including glycerol and sugars. The key breakthrough is a proprietary catalyst that breakthrough is a proprietary catalyst that

482

Electrochemical Hydrogen Compression (EHC)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Electrochemical Hydrogen Compression (EHC) Pinakin Patel and Ludwig Lipp Presentation at DOE Hydrogen Compression, Storage and Dispensing Workshop at ANL Argonne, IL March 20, 2013 2 * Experience with all fuel cells - MCFC, SOFC, PEM, PAFC, etc. * Excellent progress in commercialization of MCFC technology (>300 MW installed + backlog, >50 MW per year production rate, 11 MW single site unit in Korea, >1.5 billion kWh produced) * Unique internal reforming technology for high efficiency fuel cells FCE Overview $- $2,000 $4,000 $6,000 $8,000 $10,000 2003 2007 2011 mid-term Product cost per kW 3 H 2 Peak and Back- up Power Fuel Cell Cars DFC ® Power Plant (Electricity + Hydrogen) Solid State Hydrogen Separator (EHS) Solid State Hydrogen

483

NREL: Learning - Hydrogen Storage  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Storage Hydrogen Storage On the one hand, hydrogen's great asset as a renewable energy carrier is that it is storable and transportable. On the other hand, its very low natural density requires storage volumes that are impractical for vehicles and many other uses. Current practice is to compress the gas in pressurized tanks, but this still provides only limited driving range for vehicles and is bulkier than desirable for other uses as well. Liquefying the hydrogen more than doubles the fuel density, but uses up substantial amounts of energy to lower the temperature sufficiently (-253°C at atmospheric pressure), requires expensive insulated tanks to maintain that temperature, and still falls short of desired driving range. One possible way to store hydrogen at higher density is in the spaces within the crystalline

484

Hydrogen Threshold Cost Calculation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Program Record (Offices of Fuel Cell Technologies) Program Record (Offices of Fuel Cell Technologies) Record #: 11007 Date: March 25, 2011 Title: Hydrogen Threshold Cost Calculation Originator: Mark Ruth & Fred Joseck Approved by: Sunita Satyapal Date: March 24, 2011 Description: The hydrogen threshold cost is defined as the hydrogen cost in the range of $2.00-$4.00/gge (2007$) which represents the cost at which hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs) are projected to become competitive on a cost per mile basis with the competing vehicles [gasoline in hybrid-electric vehicles (HEVs)] in 2020. This record documents the methodology and assumptions used to calculate that threshold cost. Principles: The cost threshold analysis is a "top-down" analysis of the cost at which hydrogen would be

485

Hydrogen Fuel Quality  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For the past 6 years, open discussions and/or meetings have been held and are still on-going with OEM, Hydrogen Suppliers, other test facilities from the North America Team and International collaborators regarding experimental results, fuel clean-up cost, modeling, and analytical techniques to help determine levels of constituents for the development of an international standard for hydrogen fuel quality (ISO TC197 WG-12). Significant progress has been made. The process for the fuel standard is entering final stages as a result of the technical accomplishments. The objectives are to: (1) Determine the allowable levels of hydrogen fuel contaminants in support of the development of science-based international standards for hydrogen fuel quality (ISO TC197 WG-12); and (2) Validate the ASTM test method for determining low levels of non-hydrogen constituents.

Rockward, Tommy [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

486

Hydrogen Purity Standard  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Compressed Gas Association Compressed Gas Association Roger A. Smith Technical Director April 26, 2004 Hydrogen Purity Standard Compressed Gas Association 2 Compressed Gas Association ‹ 150 Members „ Industrial Gas Companies „ Equipment Manufacturers „ Other Gas Industry Associations „ Other SDOs ‹ Manufacturers, Fillers, Distributors, and Transporters of Industrial and Medical Gases Compressed Gas Association 3 Hydrogen Activities ‹ Committees „ Hydrogen Fuel Technology „ Bulk Distribution Equipment „ Hazardous Materials Codes „ Gas Specifications „ Cylinders, Valves & PRD's ‹ International „ Europe (EIGA) „ Japan (JIGA) „ Asia (AIGA) „ United Nations Compressed Gas Association 4 Hydrogen Purity Standard ‹ Draft hydrogen purity standard for stationary fuel cells and ICE's in 10 months

487

Air Liquide Group | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Group Group Jump to: navigation, search Name Air Liquide Group Place Paris, France Zip 75321 Sector Hydro, Hydrogen Product Paris-based manufacturer of industrial and medical gases. The company is working on hydrogen production and gas-to-liquid technology. Coordinates 48.85693°, 2.3412° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":48.85693,"lon":2.3412,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

488

Computational studies of hydrogen storage materials and the development of related methods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Computational methods, including density functional theory and the cluster expansion formalism, are used to study materials for hydrogen storage. The storage of molecular hydrogen in the metal-organic framework with formula ...

Mueller, Timothy Keith

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Analysis of Hydrogen and Competing Technologies for Utility-Scale Energy Storage (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Presentation about the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's analysis of hydrogen energy storage scenarios, including analysis framework, levelized cost comparison of hydrogen and competing technologies, analysis results, and conclusions drawn from the analysis.

Steward, D.

2010-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

490

Progress on first-principles-based materials design for hydrogen storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...perspective, renewable energy harvesting technologies...based on natural energy flows, including...wind power, geothermal energy, and tidal energy...hydrogen storage research traces a long history...objective is the development of a stored hydrogen...

Noejung Park; Keunsu Choi; Jeongwoon Hwang; Dong Wook Kim; Dong Ok Kim; Jisoon Ihm

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Sponsorship includes: Agriculture in the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sponsorship includes: · Agriculture in the Classroom · Douglas County Farm Bureau · Gifford Farm · University of Nebraska Agricultural Research and Development Center · University of Nebraska- Lincoln Awareness Coalition is to help youth, primarily from urban communities, become aware of agriculture

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

492

Executive Summaries for the Hydrogen Storage Materials Center of Excellence - Chemical Hydrogen Storage CoE, Hydrogen Sorption CoE, and Metal Hydride CoE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Executive Summaries Executive Summaries for the Hydrogen Storage Materials Centers of Excellence Chemical Hydrogen Storage CoE, Hydrogen Sorption CoE, and Metal Hydride CoE Period of Performance: 2005-2010 Fuel Cell Technologies Program Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy U. S. Department of Energy April 2012 2 3 Primary Authors: Chemical Hydrogen Storage (CHSCoE): Kevin Ott, Los Alamos National Laboratory Hydrogen Sorption (HSCoE): Lin Simpson, National Renewable Energy Laboratory Metal Hydride (MHCoE): Lennie Klebanoff, Sandia National Laboratory Contributors include members of the three Materials Centers of Excellence and the Department of Energy Hydrogen Storage Team in the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's Fuel Cell Technologies Program.

493

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program: 2007 Annual Merit Review Proceedings  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2007 Annual Merit Review Proceedings 2007 Annual Merit Review Proceedings Printable Version 2007 Annual Merit Review Proceedings Logo for the 2007 DOE Hydrogen Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation, May 15-18, Washington, D.C. Principal investigators presented the status and results of their hydrogen and fuel cell projects at the DOE Hydrogen Program's Annual Merit Review on May 15-18, 2007 in Washington, D.C. Links to their presentations and posters are provided below. Plenary Session Presentations Hydrogen Production and Delivery Presentations Distributed Production Biological Production Separations Electrolysis Photoelectrochemical Production Hi-Temp Thermochemical Hydrogen Delivery Hydrogen from Coal Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative Posters Central Biomass Biological Production Compressed/Liquid Tanks

494

A liquid film motor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is well known that electro-hydrodynamical effects in freely suspended liquid films can force liquids to flow. Here, we report a purely electrically driven rotation in water and some other liquid suspended film...

A. Amjadi; R. Shirsavar; N. Hamedani Radja

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

Tokamak with liquid metal toroidal field coil  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Tokamak apparatus includes a pressure vessel for defining a reservoir and confining liquid therein. A toroidal liner disposed within the pressure vessel defines a toroidal space within the liner. Liquid metal fills the reservoir outside said liner. Electric current is passed through the liquid metal over a conductive path linking the toroidal space to produce a toroidal magnetic field within the toroidal space about the major axis thereof. Toroidal plasma is developed within the toroidal space about the major axis thereof.

Ohkawa, Tihiro (La Jolla, CA); Schaffer, Michael J. (San Diego, CA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor plant system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor having a passive cooling system for removing residual heat resulting for fuel decay during reactor shutdown, or heat produced during a mishap. The reactor system is enhanced with sealing means for excluding external air from contact with the liquid metal coolant leaking from the reactor vessel during an accident. The invention also includes a silo structure which resists attack by leaking liquid metal coolant, and an added unique cooling means.