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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes cooling capacity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Property:Cooling Capacity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Capacity Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Pages using the property "Cooling Capacity" Showing 2 pages using this property. D Distributed Generation...

2

Property:Number of Plants included in Capacity Estimate | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of Plants included in Capacity Estimate Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Number of Plants included in Capacity Estimate Property Type Number Retrieved from "http:...

3

Air conditioning system with supplemental ice storing and cooling capacity  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present air conditioning system with ice storing and cooling capacity can generate and store ice in its pipe assembly or in an ice storage tank particularly equipped for the system, depending on the type of the air conditioning system. The system is characterized in particular in that ice can be produced and stored in the air conditioning system whereby the time of supplying cooled air can be effectively extended with the merit that the operation cycle of the on and off of the compressor can be prolonged, extending the operation lifespan of the compressor in one aspect. In another aspect, ice production and storage in great amount can be performed in an off-peak period of the electrical power consumption and the stored ice can be utilized in the peak period of the power consumption so as to provide supplemental cooling capacity for the compressor of the air conditioning system whereby the shift of peak and off-peak power consumption can be effected with ease. The present air conditioning system can lower the installation expense for an ice-storing air conditioning system and can also be applied to an old conventional air conditioning system.

Weng, Kuo-Lianq (Taichung, TW); Weng, Kuo-Liang (Taichung, TW)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Prototype solar heating and cooling systems, including potable hot water. Quarterly report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The progress made in the development, delivery and support of two prototype solar heating and cooling systems including potable hot water is reported. The system consists of the following subsystems: collector, auxiliary heating, potable hot water, storage, control, transport, and government-furnished site data acquisition. Included is a comparison of the proposed Solaron-Heat Pump and Solaron-Desiccant Heating and Cooling Systems, Installation Drawings, data on the Akron House at Akron, Ohio, and other program activities from July 1, 1977 through November 9, 1977.

Not Available

1977-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Prototype solar heating and cooling systems including potable hot water. Quarterly reports  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The activities conducted by Solaron Corporation from November 1977 through September 1978 are summarized and the progress made in the development, delivery and support of two prototype solar heating and cooling systems including potable hot water is covered. The system consists of the following subsystems: solar collector, auxiliary heating, potable hot water, storage, control, transport, and government-furnished site data acquisition.

Williamson, R.

1978-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Prototype solar heating and cooling systems including potable hot water. Quarterly reports, November 1976--June 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report covers the progress made in the development, delivery and support of two prototype solar heating and cooling systems including potable hot water. The system consists of the following subsystems: collector, auxiliary heating, potable hot water, storage, control, transport, and government-furnished site data acquisition.

Not Available

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Advances in Energy Efficiency, Capital Cost, and Installation Schedules for Large Capacity Cooling Applications Using a Packaged Chiller Plant Approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cooling equipment, whether used to meet air-conditioning or process cooling loads, represents a large consumer of energy. Even more to the point, cooling loads and the associated cooling equipment energy consumption tend to be at maximum levels during periods of high ambient air temperatures. It is precisely at those times that the general demand for energy is at its peak and therefore the price or value of energy is also at its highest level. Cooling loads often drive the peak electric power demand of energy users and thus affect not only the level of consumption of high cost energy, but also affect the peak power demand. Together, the energy and demand costs equate to very high unit costs for operating cooling equipment. Accordingly, it is of interest to minimize cooling energy use and costs by maximizing the energy efficiency of cooling equipment installations. A relatively new approach has been developed and is being increasingly used to maximize chiller plant efficiency. The approach involves the use of a standardized, pre-engineered, shop-fabricated approach to entire chiller plant installations. Compared to the traditional, piece-meal approach to chiller plants that utilize individual component specification, procurement and installation, the "packaged" or modular chiller plant approach often delivers substantially improved energy efficiencies. Also, the packaged plant approach achieves further benefits for large cooling system owners and operators. These additional benefits include: 1) dramatic reductions in unit capital costs of installed chiller plant capacity on a dollar per ton basis, 2) marked improvements in total procurement and installation schedules, 3) significantly smaller space requirements, and 4) enhanced control over total system quality and performance. The capacities and performance characteristics of available chiller plant modules are described, including both electric and non-electric chiller technologies. Examples are presented to illustrate the typical sizes and locations of actual installations as well as the growth and extent of the use of this technology to-date. Case studies document the energy efficiency improvements, cost reductions in both operating and capital costs, and improvements in schedule and space utilization, of the packaged chiller plant approach relative to the traditional chiller plant approach.

Pierson, T. L.; Andrepont, J. S.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Gravo-thermodynamics of the Intracluster Medium: negative heat capacity and dilation of cooling time scales  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The time scale for cooling of the gravitationally bound gaseous intracluster medium (ICM) is not determined by radiative processes alone. If the ICM is in quasi-hydrostatic equilibrium in the fixed gravitational field of the dark matter halo then energy losses incurred by the gravitational potential energy of the gas should also be taken into account. This "gravitational heating" has been known for a while using explicit solutions to the equations of motion. Here, we re-visit this effect by applying the virial theorem to gas in quasi-hydrostatic equilibrium in an external gravitational field, neglecting the gravity of the gas. For a standard NFW form of halo profiles and for a finite gas density, the response of the gas temperature to changes in the total energy is significantly delayed. The effective cooling time could be prolonged by more than an order of magnitude inside the scale radius ($\\rs$) of the halo. Gas lying at a distance twice the scale radius, has negative heat capacity so that the temperature increases as a result of energy losses. Although external heating (e.g. by AGN activity) is still required to explain the lack of cool ICM near the center, the analysis here may circumvent the need for heating in farther out regions where the effective cooling time could be prolonged to become larger than the cluster age and also explains the increase of temperature with radius in these regions.

Adi Nusser

2008-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

9

Experimental Analysis of Variable Capacity Heat Pump Systems equipped with a liquid-cooled frequency inverter.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Using an inverter-driven compressor in variable capacity heat pump systems has a main drawback, which is the extra loss in the inverter. The present… (more)

Ebraheem, Thair

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Sensible and Latent Cooling Load Control Using Centrally-Ducted, Variable-Capacity Space Conditioning Systems in Low Sensible Load Environments  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sensible and Latent Cooling Load Control Using Centrally-Ducted, Variable-Capacity Space Conditioning Systems in Low Sensible Load Environments James Cummings BA-PIRC; Florida Solar Energy Center Presented at BA Summer Meeting, July 26, 2012 The gist of my message * Fixed capacity AC systems generally provide good RH control in typical residences. * In low-load homes, they may be less effective in achieving good RH control. * On the other hand, variable capacity AC systems have several characteristics which can provide improved RH control in homes. - Both Nordyne and Carrier have variable capacity units, varying from about 40% to 100% of nominal full capacity. - What is variable capacity? -- condenser fan, compressor speed, and AHU fan speed. The gist, continued

11

Gas turbine cooling system  

SciTech Connect

A gas turbine engine (10) having a closed-loop cooling circuit (39) for transferring heat from the hot turbine section (16) to the compressed air (24) produced by the compressor section (12). The closed-loop cooling system (39) includes a heat exchanger (40) disposed in the flow path of the compressed air (24) between the outlet of the compressor section (12) and the inlet of the combustor (14). A cooling fluid (50) may be driven by a pump (52) located outside of the engine casing (53) or a pump (54) mounted on the rotor shaft (17). The cooling circuit (39) may include an orifice (60) for causing the cooling fluid (50) to change from a liquid state to a gaseous state, thereby increasing the heat transfer capacity of the cooling circuit (39).

Bancalari, Eduardo E. (Orlando, FL)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Evaluation of an Absorption Heat Pump to Mitigate Plant Capacity Reduction Due to Ambient Temperature Rise for an Air-Cooled Ammonia and Water Cycle: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Air-cooled geothermal plants suffer substantial decreases in generating capacity at increased ambient temperatures. As the ambient temperature rises by 50 F above a design value of 50 F, at low brine-resource temperatures, the decrease in generating capacity can be more than 50%. This decrease is caused primarily by increased condenser pressure. Using mixed-working fluids has recently drawn considerable attention for use in power cycles. Such cycles are more readily amenable to use of absorption ''heat pumps.'' For a system that uses ammonia and water as the mixed-working fluid, this paper evaluates using an absorption heat pump to reduce condenser backpressure. At high ambient temperatures, part of the turbine exhaust vapor is absorbed into a circulating mixed stream in an absorber in series with the main condenser. This steam is pumped up to a higher pressure and heated to strip the excess vapor, which is recondensed using an additional air-cooled condenser. The operating conditions are chosen to reconstitute this condensate back to the same concentration as drawn from the original system. We analyzed two power plants of nominal 1-megawatt capacity. The design resource temperatures were 250 F and 300 F. Ambient temperature was allowed to rise from a design value of 50 F to 100 F. The analyses indicate that using an absorption heat pump is feasible. For the 300 F resource, an increased brine flow of 30% resulted in a net power increase of 21%. For the 250 F resource, the increase was smaller. However, these results are highly plant- and equipment-specific because evaluations must be carried out at off-design conditions for the condenser. Such studies should be carried out for specific power plants that suffer most from increased ambient temperatures.

Bharathan, D.; Nix, G.

2001-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

13

Cooling of Neutron Stars. Hadronic Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the cooling of isolated neutron stars. The main cooling regulators are introduced: EoS, thermal transport, heat capacity, neutrino and photon emissivity, superfluid nucleon gaps. Neutrino emissivity includes main processes. A strong impact of medium effects on the cooling rates is demonstrated. With taking into account of medium effects in reaction rates and in nucleon superfluid gaps modern experimental data can be well explained.

D. Blaschke; H. Grigorian; D. N. Voskresensky

2004-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

14

Proceedings: Cooling Tower and Advanced Cooling Systems Conference  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cooling towers and associated systems performance strongly affects availability and heat rate in fossil and nuclear power plants. Papers presented at EPRI's 1994 Cooling Tower and Advanced Cooling Systems Conference discuss research results, industry experience, and case histories of cooling tower problems and solutions. Specific topics include cooling tower upgrades and retrofits, cooling tower performance, cooling tower fouling, and dry and hybrid cooling systems.

1995-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

15

Comparative report: performance of active-solar space-cooling systems, 1981 cooling season  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report provides a detailed analysis of solar absorption cooling and solar Rankine cooling processes as represented by the National Solar Data Network (NSDN) systems. There is comprehensive data on four absorption chiller cooling systems and one Rankine cooling system. Three of these systems, including the Rankine system, demonstrated that solar cooling can be operated efficiently and provide energy savings. Good designs and operating procedures are discussed. Problems which reduce savings are identified. There is also a comparison of solar cooling by absorption, Rankine, and photovoltaic processes. Parameters and performance indices presented include overall system delivered loads, solar fraction of the load, coefficient of performance, energy collected and stored, and various subsystem efficiencies. The comparison of these factors has allowed evaluation of the relative performance of various systems. Analyses performed for which comparative data are provided include: energy savings and operating costs in terms of Btu; energy savings in terms of dollars; overall solar cooling efficiency and coefficient of performance; hourly building cooling loads; actual and long-term weather conditions; collector performance; collector area to tons of chiller cooling capacity; chiller performance; normalized building cooling loads per cooling degree-day and building area; and cooling solar fractions, design and measured.

Wetzel, P.; Pakkala, P.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Cooling Systems | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

technologies used in homes and buildings include ventilation, evaporative cooling, air conditioning, absorption cooling, and radiant cooling. Learn more about how these...

17

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: CHP Capacity Optimizer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Related Links CHP Capacity Optimizer CHP Capacity Optimizer logo Selecting the proper installed capacity for cooling, heating, and power (CHP) equipment is critical to the...

18

Evaluation of cooling performance of thermally activated building system with evaporative cooling source for typical United States climates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

have higher cooling capacity because the thermal resistancethe thermal comfort requirement unless the cooling capacitysurface cooling system and TABS systems THERMAL COMFORT

Feng, Jingjuan; Bauman, Fred

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

FAQs about Storage Capacity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

about Storage Capacity about Storage Capacity How do I determine if my tanks are in operation or idle or non-reportable? Refer to the following flowchart. Should idle capacity be included with working capacity? No, only report working capacity of tanks and caverns in operation, but not for idle tanks and caverns. Should working capacity match net available shell in operation/total net available shell capacity? Working capacity should be less than net available shell capacity because working capacity excludes contingency space and tank bottoms. What is the difference between net available shell capacity in operation and total net available shell capacity? Net available shell capacity in operation excludes capacity of idle tanks and caverns. What do you mean by transshipment tanks?

20

FOCUS COOLING  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

www.datacenterdynamics.com www.datacenterdynamics.com FOCUS COOLING Issue 28, March/April 2013 LBNL'S NOVEL APPROACH TO COOLING Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and APC by Schneider Electric test a unique double-exchanger cooling system LBNL program manager Henry Coles says can cut energy use by half A s part of a demonstration sponsored by the California Energy Commission in support of the Silicon Valley Leadership Group's data center summit, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) collaborated with APC by Schneider Electric to demonstrate a novel prototype data center cooling device. The device was installed at an LBNL data center in Berkeley, California. It included two air-to-water heat exchangers. Unlike common single-heat-exchanger configurations, one of these was supplied with

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes cooling capacity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Evolution of cool-roof standards in the United States  

SciTech Connect

Roofs that have high solar reflectance and high thermal emittance stay cool in the sun. A roof with lower thermal emittance but exceptionally high solar reflectance can also stay cool in the sun. Substituting a cool roof for a noncool roof decreases cooling-electricity use, cooling-power demand, and cooling-equipment capacity requirements, while slightly increasing heating-energy consumption. Cool roofs can also lower citywide ambient air temperature in summer, slowing ozone formation and increasing human comfort. Provisions for cool roofs in energy-efficiency standards can promote the building- and climate-appropriate use of cool roofing technologies. Cool-roof requirements are designed to reduce building energy use, while energy-neutral cool-roof credits permit the use of less energy-efficient components (e.g., larger windows) in a building that has energy-saving cool roofs. Both types of measures can reduce the life-cycle cost of a building (initial cost plus lifetime energy cost). Since 1999, several widely used building energy-efficiency standards, including ASHRAE 90.1, ASHRAE 90.2, the International Energy Conservation Code, and California's Title 24 have adopted cool-roof credits or requirements. This paper reviews the technical development of cool-roof provisions in the ASHRAE 90.1, ASHRAE 90.2, and California Title 24 standards, and discusses the treatment of cool roofs in other standards and energy-efficiency programs. The techniques used to develop the ASHRAE and Title 24 cool-roof provisions can be used as models to address cool roofs in building energy-efficiency standards worldwide.

Akbari, Hashem; Akbari, Hashem; Levinson, Ronnen

2008-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

22

Evaluation of the Heating & Cooling Energy Demand of a Case Residential Building by Comparing The National Calculation Methodology of Turkey and EnergyPlus through Thermal Capacity Calculations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In all around the world, because of the rapid population growth and exhausting energy sources over time, energy efficiency and energy conservation gradually come into prominence. Hence, in 2002, a directive (EPBD) which obligates reducing energy usage and energy performance in buildings was published by European Union. In this scope, Turkey has developed a National Building Energy Performance Calculation Methodology, BepTr, which is based on simple hourly method in ISO EN 13790 Umbrella Document to determine the energy performance of buildings. The aim of the paper is to display the energy demand differences resultant from only the envelope’s thermal capacity between simplified method which is projected in ISO EN 13790 Umbrella Document and EnergyPlus which is based on full dynamic simulation method.

Atamaca, Merve; Kalaycioglu, Ece; Yilmaz, Zerrin

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Space cooling demands from office plug loads  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Undersizing space cooling systems for office buildings can result in uncomfortable and angry tenants on peak cooling days. However, oversizing wastes money because more capacity is installed than is needed, and oversized systems have a lower energy efficiency which makes operating costs higher than necessary. Oversizing can adversely affect comfort as well, because oversized systems may provide poor humidity control and large temperature variations. Correct system sizing requires estimating building heat loads accurately. This paper discusses the heat load generated by the plug load, which includes any electrical equipment that is plugged into outlets.

Komor, P.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Dynamic performance testing of prototype 3 ton air-cooled carrier absorption chiller  

SciTech Connect

The performance of a prototype 3 ton cooling capacity air-cooled lithium bromide/water absorption chiller was tested using an absorption chiller test facility which was modified to expand its testing capabilities to include air-cooled chillers in addition to water-cooled chillers. Temperatures of the three externally supplied fluid loops: hot water, chilled water, and cooling air, were varied in order to determine the effects this would have on the two principal measures of chiller performance: cooling capacity and thermal coefficient of performance (COP). A number of interrelated factors were identified as contributing to less than expected performance. For comparison, experimental correlations of other investigators for this and other similar absorption chillers are presented. These have been plotted as both contour and three-dimensional performance maps in order to more clearly show the functional dependence of the chiller performance on the fluid loop temperatures.

Borst, R.R.; Wood, B.D.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Energy Basics: Absorption Cooling  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

cooling. Other potential heat sources include propane, solar-heated water, or geothermal-heated water. Although mainly used in industrial or commercial settings, absorption...

26

High energy bursts from a solid state laser operated in the heat capacity limited regime  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

High energy bursts are produced from a solid state laser operated in a heat capacity limited regime. Instead of cooling the laser, the active medium is thermally well isolated. As a result, the active medium will heat up until it reaches some maximum acceptable temperature. The waste heat is stored in the active medium itself. Therefore, the amount of energy the laser can put out during operation is proportional to its mass, the heat capacity of the active medium, and the temperature difference over which it is being operated. The high energy burst capacity of a heat capacity operated solid state laser, together with the absence of a heavy, power consuming steady state cooling system for the active medium, will make a variety of applications possible. Alternately, cooling takes place during a separate sequence when the laser is not operating. Industrial applications include new material working processes.

Albrecht, Georg (Livermore, CA); George, E. Victor (Livermore, CA); Krupke, William F. (Pleasanton, CA); Sooy, Walter (Pleasanton, CA); Sutton, Steven B. (Manteca, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

High energy bursts from a solid state laser operated in the heat capacity limited regime  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

High energy bursts are produced from a solid state laser operated in a heat capacity limited regime. Instead of cooling the laser, the active medium is thermally well isolated. As a result, the active medium will heat up until it reaches some maximum acceptable temperature. The waste heat is stored in the active medium itself. Therefore, the amount of energy the laser can put out during operation is proportional to its mass, the heat capacity of the active medium, and the temperature difference over which it is being operated. The high energy burst capacity of a heat capacity operated solid state laser, together with the absence of a heavy, power consuming steady state cooling system for the active medium, will make a variety of applications possible. Alternately, cooling takes place during a separate sequence when the laser is not operating. Industrial applications include new material working processes. 5 figs.

Albrecht, G.; George, E.V.; Krupke, W.F.; Sooy, W.; Sutton, S.B.

1996-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

28

Cool Magnetic Molecules  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cool Magnetic Molecules Cool Magnetic Molecules Cool Magnetic Molecules Print Wednesday, 25 May 2011 00:00 Certain materials are known to heat up or cool down when they are exposed to a changing magnetic field. This is known as the magnetocaloric effect. All magnetic materials exhibit this effect, but in most cases, it is too small to be technologically useful. Recently, however, the search for special molecules with a surprisingly large capacity to keep cool has heated up, driven by environmental and cost considerations as well as by recent improvements in our ability to design, assemble, and probe the structure and chemistry of small molecules. An international collaboration of researchers from Spain, Scotland, and the U.S. has utilized ALS Beamline 11.3.1 (small-molecule crystallography) to characterize the design of such "molecular coolers." The work targets the synthesis of molecular cluster compounds containing many unpaired electrons ("nanomagnets") for applications involving enhanced magnetic refrigeration at very low temperatures.

29

Advanced Cooling Options for Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Alternative power plant cooling systems exist that offer significant opportunity for reducing the amount of water used in power plant cooling. These systems include direct dry cooling using air-cooled condensers, indirect dry cooling using air-cooled heat exchangers paired with water-cooled surface condensers, and a variety of hybrid systems incorporating both dry and wet cooling elements. The water savings afforded by the use of these systems, however, comes at a price in the form of more expensive ...

2013-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

30

Stochastic Cooling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Stochastic Cooling was invented by Simon van der Meer and was demonstrated at the CERN ISR and ICE (Initial Cooling Experiment). Operational systems were developed at Fermilab and CERN. A complete theory of cooling of unbunched beams was developed, and was applied at CERN and Fermilab. Several new and existing rings employ coasting beam cooling. Bunched beam cooling was demonstrated in ICE and has been observed in several rings designed for coasting beam cooling. High energy bunched beams have proven more difficult. Signal suppression was achieved in the Tevatron, though operational cooling was not pursued at Fermilab. Longitudinal cooling was achieved in the RHIC collider. More recently a vertical cooling system in RHIC cooled both transverse dimensions via betatron coupling.

Blaskiewicz, M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Cool Magnetic Molecules  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cool Magnetic Molecules Print Cool Magnetic Molecules Print Certain materials are known to heat up or cool down when they are exposed to a changing magnetic field. This is known as the magnetocaloric effect. All magnetic materials exhibit this effect, but in most cases, it is too small to be technologically useful. Recently, however, the search for special molecules with a surprisingly large capacity to keep cool has heated up, driven by environmental and cost considerations as well as by recent improvements in our ability to design, assemble, and probe the structure and chemistry of small molecules. An international collaboration of researchers from Spain, Scotland, and the U.S. has utilized ALS Beamline 11.3.1 (small-molecule crystallography) to characterize the design of such "molecular coolers." The work targets the synthesis of molecular cluster compounds containing many unpaired electrons ("nanomagnets") for applications involving enhanced magnetic refrigeration at very low temperatures.

32

Cool Magnetic Molecules  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cool Magnetic Molecules Print Cool Magnetic Molecules Print Certain materials are known to heat up or cool down when they are exposed to a changing magnetic field. This is known as the magnetocaloric effect. All magnetic materials exhibit this effect, but in most cases, it is too small to be technologically useful. Recently, however, the search for special molecules with a surprisingly large capacity to keep cool has heated up, driven by environmental and cost considerations as well as by recent improvements in our ability to design, assemble, and probe the structure and chemistry of small molecules. An international collaboration of researchers from Spain, Scotland, and the U.S. has utilized ALS Beamline 11.3.1 (small-molecule crystallography) to characterize the design of such "molecular coolers." The work targets the synthesis of molecular cluster compounds containing many unpaired electrons ("nanomagnets") for applications involving enhanced magnetic refrigeration at very low temperatures.

33

Cool Magnetic Molecules  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cool Magnetic Molecules Print Cool Magnetic Molecules Print Certain materials are known to heat up or cool down when they are exposed to a changing magnetic field. This is known as the magnetocaloric effect. All magnetic materials exhibit this effect, but in most cases, it is too small to be technologically useful. Recently, however, the search for special molecules with a surprisingly large capacity to keep cool has heated up, driven by environmental and cost considerations as well as by recent improvements in our ability to design, assemble, and probe the structure and chemistry of small molecules. An international collaboration of researchers from Spain, Scotland, and the U.S. has utilized ALS Beamline 11.3.1 (small-molecule crystallography) to characterize the design of such "molecular coolers." The work targets the synthesis of molecular cluster compounds containing many unpaired electrons ("nanomagnets") for applications involving enhanced magnetic refrigeration at very low temperatures.

34

Cool Magnetic Molecules  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cool Magnetic Molecules Print Cool Magnetic Molecules Print Certain materials are known to heat up or cool down when they are exposed to a changing magnetic field. This is known as the magnetocaloric effect. All magnetic materials exhibit this effect, but in most cases, it is too small to be technologically useful. Recently, however, the search for special molecules with a surprisingly large capacity to keep cool has heated up, driven by environmental and cost considerations as well as by recent improvements in our ability to design, assemble, and probe the structure and chemistry of small molecules. An international collaboration of researchers from Spain, Scotland, and the U.S. has utilized ALS Beamline 11.3.1 (small-molecule crystallography) to characterize the design of such "molecular coolers." The work targets the synthesis of molecular cluster compounds containing many unpaired electrons ("nanomagnets") for applications involving enhanced magnetic refrigeration at very low temperatures.

35

Cool Magnetic Molecules  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cool Magnetic Molecules Print Cool Magnetic Molecules Print Certain materials are known to heat up or cool down when they are exposed to a changing magnetic field. This is known as the magnetocaloric effect. All magnetic materials exhibit this effect, but in most cases, it is too small to be technologically useful. Recently, however, the search for special molecules with a surprisingly large capacity to keep cool has heated up, driven by environmental and cost considerations as well as by recent improvements in our ability to design, assemble, and probe the structure and chemistry of small molecules. An international collaboration of researchers from Spain, Scotland, and the U.S. has utilized ALS Beamline 11.3.1 (small-molecule crystallography) to characterize the design of such "molecular coolers." The work targets the synthesis of molecular cluster compounds containing many unpaired electrons ("nanomagnets") for applications involving enhanced magnetic refrigeration at very low temperatures.

36

Hydronic rooftop cooling systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A roof top cooling unit has an evaporative cooling section that includes at least one evaporative module that pre-cools ventilation air and water; a condenser; a water reservoir and pump that captures and re-circulates water within the evaporative modules; a fan that exhausts air from the building and the evaporative modules and systems that refill and drain the water reservoir. The cooling unit also has a refrigerant section that includes a compressor, an expansion device, evaporator and condenser heat exchangers, and connecting refrigerant piping. Supply air components include a blower, an air filter, a cooling and/or heating coil to condition air for supply to the building, and optional dampers that, in designs that supply less than 100% outdoor air to the building, control the mixture of return and ventilation air.

Bourne, Richard C. (Davis, CA); Lee, Brian Eric (Monterey, CA); Berman, Mark J. (Davis, CA)

2008-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

37

Vehicle Cooling Systems - Energy Innovation Portal  

Hydrogen and Fuel Cell; Hydropower, Wave and ... The cabin cooling system includes at least one fan to draw the hot air into the cooling duct at a ...

38

Refinery Capacity Report 2007  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Data series include fuel, electricity, and steam purchased for consumption at the refinery; refinery receipts of crude oil by method of transportation; current and projected capacities for atmospheric crude oil distillation, downstream charge, production, and storage capacities. Respondents are operators of all operating and idle petroleum refineries (including new refineries under construction) and refineries shut down during the previous year, located in the 50 States, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, Guam, and other U.S. possessions.

Information Center

2007-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

39

Refinery Capacity Report 2009  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Data series include fuel, electricity, and steam purchased for consumption at the refinery; refinery receipts of crude oil by method of transportation; current and projected capacities for atmospheric crude oil distillation, downstream charge, production, and storage capacities. Respondents are operators of all operating and idle petroleum refineries (including new refineries under construction) and refineries shut down during the previous year, located in the 50 States, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, Guam, and other U.S. possessions.

Information Center

2009-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

40

Refinery Capacity Report 2008  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Data series include fuel, electricity, and steam purchased for consumption at the refinery; refinery receipts of crude oil by method of transportation; current and projected capacities for atmospheric crude oil distillation, downstream charge, production, and storage capacities. Respondents are operators of all operating and idle petroleum refineries (including new refineries under construction) and refineries shut down during the previous year, located in the 50 States, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, Guam, and other U.S. possessions.

Information Center

2008-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes cooling capacity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

GENERATING CAPACITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evidence from the U.S. and some other countries indicates that organized wholesale markets for electrical energy and operating reserves do not provide adequate incentives to stimulate the proper quantity or mix of generating capacity consistent with mandatory reliability criteria. A large part of the problem can be associated with the failure of wholesale spot market prices for energy and operating reserves to rise to high enough levels during periods when generating capacity is fully utilized. Reforms to wholesale energy markets, the introduction of well-design forward capacity markets, and symmetrical treatment of demand response and generating capacity resources to respond to market and institutional imperfections are discussed. This policy reform program is compatible with improving the efficiency of spot wholesale electricity markets, the continued evolution of competitive retail markets, and restores incentives for efficient investment in generating capacity consistent with operating reliability criteria applied by system operators. It also responds to investment disincentives that have been associated with volatility in wholesale energy prices, limited hedging opportunities and to concerns about regulatory opportunism. 1

Paul L. Joskow; Paul L. Joskow; Paul L. Joskow

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Steam-Electric Power-Plant-Cooling Handbook  

SciTech Connect

The Steam-Electric Power Plant Cooling Handbook provides summary data on steam-electric power plant capacity, generation and number of plants for each cooling means, by Electric Regions, Water Resource Regions and National Electric Reliability Council Areas. Water consumption by once-through cooling, cooling ponds and wet evaporative towers is discussed and a methodology for computation of water consumption is provided for a typical steam-electric plant which uses a wet evaporative tower or cooling pond for cooling.

Sonnichsen, J.C.; Carlson, H.A.; Charles, P.D.; Jacobson, L.D.; Tadlock, L.A.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Turbine blade cooling  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A turbine rotor blade comprises a shank portion, a tip portion and an airfoil. The airfoil has a pressure side wall and a suction side wall that are interconnected by a plurality of partition sidewalls, defining an internal cooling passageway within the airfoil. The internal cooling passageway includes at least one radial outflow passageway to direct a cooling medium flow from the shank portion towards the tip portion and at least one radial inflow passageway to direct a cooling medium flow from the tip portion towards the shank portion. A number of mixing ribs are disposed on the partition sidewalls within the radial outflow passageways so as to enhance the thermal mixing of the cooling medium flow, thereby producing improved heat transfer over a broad range of the Buoyancy number.

Staub, Fred Wolf (Schenectady, NY); Willett, Fred Thomas (Niskayuna, NY)

1999-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

44

Turbine blade cooling  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A turbine rotor blade comprises a shank portion, a tip portion and an airfoil. The airfoil has a pressure side wall and a suction side wall that are interconnected by a plurality of partition sidewalls, defining an internal cooling passageway within the airfoil. The internal cooling passageway includes at least one radial outflow passageway to direct a cooling medium flow from the shank portion towards the tip portion and at least one radial inflow passageway to direct a cooling medium flow from the tip portion towards the shank portion. A number of mixing ribs are disposed on the partition sidewalls within the radial outflow passageways so as to enhance the thermal mixing of the cooling medium flow, thereby producing improved heat transfer over a broad range of the Buoyancy number.

Staub, Fred Wolf (Schenectady, NY); Willett, Fred Thomas (Niskayuna, NY)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Turbine blade cooling  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A turbine rotor blade comprises a shank portion, a tip portion and an airfoil. The airfoil has a pressure side wall and a suction side wall that are interconnected by a plurality of partition sidewalls, defining an internal cooling passageway within the airfoil. The internal cooling passageway includes at least one radial outflow passageway to direct a cooling medium flow from the shank portion towards the tip portion and at least one radial inflow passageway to direct a cooling medium flow from the tip portion towards the shank portion. A number of mixing ribs are disposed on the partition sidewalls within the radial outflow passageways so as to enhance the thermal mixing of the cooling medium flow, thereby producing improved heat transfer over a broad range of the Buoyancy number. 13 figs.

Staub, F.W.; Willett, F.T.

1999-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

46

Economic Evaluation of Alternative Cooling Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water use and conservation at electric power plants are becoming increasingly important siting issues. At most plants, the requirement for condensing exhaust steam from the steam turbine, generically known as power plant cooling, is the major use of water. Alternative cooling systems exist, including once-through cooling, wet-recirculating cooling, dry cooling, and hybrid (or wet/dry cooling), some of which offer significant opportunity for water conservation. These water savings normally, but perhaps no...

2012-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

47

Water-lithium bromide double-effect absorption cooling analysis  

SciTech Connect

A numerical model was developed for the transient simulation of the double-effect, water-lithium bromide absorption cooling machine, and the use of the model to determine the effect of the various design and input variables on the absorption unit performance. The performance parameters considered were coefficient of performance and cooling capacity. The sensitivity analysis was performed by selecting a nominal condition and determining performance sensitivity for each variable with others held constant. The variables considered in the study include source hot water, cooling water, and chilled water temperatures; source hot water, cooling water, and chilled water flow rates; solution circulation rate; heat exchanger areas; pressure drop between evaporator and absorber; solution pump characteristics; and refrigerant flow control methods. The performance sensitivity study indicated in particular that the distribution of heat exchanger area among the various (seven) heat exchange components is a very-important design consideration. Moreover, it indicated that the method of flow control of the first effect refrigerant vapor through the second effect is a critical design feature when absorption units operate over a significant range of cooling capacity. The model was used to predict the performance of the Trane absorption unit with fairly good accuracy.

Vliet, G.C.; Lawson, M.B.; Lithgow, R.A.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Comparative performance of two types of evacuated tubular solar collectors in a residential heating and cooling system. Final report, October 1 1977-September 30 1978 (including 1974-1977 operating results comparisons)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two types of evacuated tubular solar collectors have been operated in space heating, cooling, and domestic hot water heating systems in Colorado State University Solar House I. An experimental collector from Corning Glass works supplied heat to the system from January 1977 through February 1978, and an experimental collector from the Phillips Research Laboratory, Aachen, which is currently in use, has been operating since August 1978. A flat absorber plate inside a single-walled glass tube is used in the Corning design, whereas heat is conducted through a single glass wall to an external heat exchanger plate in the Philips collector. The respective aperture areas are 50.0 m/sup 2/ and 44.7 m/sup 2/. Since system designs and conditions of operation were not identical, efficiencies and energy deliveries of the two evacuated tubular collectors should not be compared without recognition of these factors. But in comparison with conventional flat plate collectors, both types show substantially reduced heat losses and improved efficiency.

Loef, G.O.G.; Duff, W.S.

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

WATER COOLED RETORT COVER  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A retort cover is designed for use in the production of magnesium metal by the condensation of vaporized metal on a collecting surface. The cover includes a condensing surface, insulating means adjacent to the condensing surface, ind a water-cooled means for the insulating means. The irrangement of insulation and the cooling means permits the magnesium to be condensed at a high temperature and in massive nonpyrophoric form. (AEC)

Ash, W.J.; Pozzi, J.F.

1962-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Cooled railplug  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The railplug is a plasma ignitor capable of injecting a high energy plasma jet into a combustion chamber of an internal combustion engine or continuous combustion system. An improved railplug is provided which has dual coaxial chambers (either internal or external to the center electrode) that provide for forced convective cooling of the electrodes using the normal pressure changes occurring in an internal combustion engine. This convective cooling reduces the temperature of the hot spot associated with the plasma initiation point, particularly in coaxial railplug configurations, and extends the useful life of the railplug. The convective cooling technique may also be employed in a railplug having parallel dual rails using dual, coaxial chambers.

Weldon, William F. (Austin, TX)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Rapid Cooling Using Ice Slurries for Industrial and Medical ...  

Because of the high energy content of ice slurry, its cooling capacity is many times greater than that of single-phase fluids. ... Wind Energy; Partners (27)

52

Cooling arrangement for a tapered turbine blade  

SciTech Connect

A cooling arrangement (11) for a highly tapered gas turbine blade (10). The cooling arrangement (11) includes a pair of parallel triple-pass serpentine cooling circuits (80,82) formed in an inner radial portion (50) of the blade, and a respective pair of single radial channel cooling circuits (84,86) formed in an outer radial portion (52) of the blade (10), with each single radial channel receiving the cooling fluid discharged from a respective one of the triple-pass serpentine cooling circuit. The cooling arrangement advantageously provides a higher degree of cooling to the most highly stressed radially inner portion of the blade, while providing a lower degree of cooling to the less highly stressed radially outer portion of the blade. The cooling arrangement can be implemented with known casting techniques, thereby facilitating its use on highly tapered, highly twisted Row 4 industrial gas turbine blades that could not be cooled with prior art cooling arrangements.

Liang, George (Palm City, FL)

2010-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

53

Ventilative cooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis evaluates the performance of daytime and nighttime passive ventilation cooling strategies for Beijing, Shanghai and Tokyo. A new simulation method for cross-ventilated wind driven airflow is presented . This ...

Graça, Guilherme Carrilho da, 1972-

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Refinery Capacity Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Refinery Capacity Report Refinery Capacity Report With Data as of January 1, 2013 | Release Date: June 21, 2013 | Next Release Date: June 20, 2014 Previous Issues Year: 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 1999 1997 1995 1994 Go Data series include fuel, electricity, and steam purchased for consumption at the refinery; refinery receipts of crude oil by method of transportation; and current and projected atmospheric crude oil distillation, downstream charge, and production capacities. Respondents are operators of all operating and idle petroleum refineries (including new refineries under construction) and refineries shut down during the previous year, located in the 50 States, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, Guam, and other U.S. possessions.

55

Dehumidification and cooling loads from ventilation air  

SciTech Connect

The importance of controlling humidity in buildings is cause for concern, in part, because of indoor air quality problems associated with excess moisture in air-conditioning systems. But more universally, the need for ventilation air has forced HVAC equipment (originally optimized for high efficiency in removing sensible heat loads) to remove high moisture loads. To assist cooling equipment and meet the challenge of larger ventilation loads, several technologies have succeeded in commercial buildings. Newer technologies such as subcool/reheat and heat pipe reheat show promise. These increase latent capacity of cooling-based systems by reducing their sensible capacity. Also, desiccant wheels have traditionally provided deeper-drying capacity by using thermal energy in place of electrical power to remove the latent load. Regardless of what mix of technologies is best for a particular application, there is a need for a more effective way of thinking about the cooling loads created by ventilation air. It is clear from the literature that all-too-frequently, HVAC systems do not perform well unless the ventilation air loads have been effectively addressed at the original design stage. This article proposes an engineering shorthand, an annual load index for ventilation air. This index will aid in the complex process of improving the ability of HVAC systems to deal efficiently with the amount of fresh air the industry has deemed useful for maintaining comfort in buildings. Examination of typical behavior of weather shows that latent loads usually exceed sensible loads in ventilation air by at least 3:1 and often as much as 8:1. A designer can use the engineering shorthand indexes presented to quickly assess the importance of this fact for a given system design. To size those components after they are selected, the designer can refer to Chapter 24 of the 1997 ASHRAE Handbook--Fundamentals, which includes separate values for peak moisture and peak temperature.

Harriman, L.G. III [Mason-Grant, Portsmouth, NH (United States); Plager, D. [Quantitative Decision Support, Portsmouth, NH (United States); Kosar, D. [Gas Research Inst., Chicago, IL (United States)

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

METHOD OF FABRICATING ELECTRODES INCLUDING HIGH-CAPACITY ...  

An electrode (110) is provided that may be used in an electrochemical device (100) such as an energy storage/discharge device, e.g., a lithium-ion battery, or an ...

57

Laser Cooling and Cold Atomic Matter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laser Cooling and Cold Atomic Matter: to advance the understanding and applications of cold atomic matter, including ...

2012-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

58

Electric Capacity | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Capacity Capacity Dataset Summary Description The New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development publishes an annual Energy Outlook, which presents projections of New Zealand's future energy supply, demand, prices and greenhouse gas emissions. The principle aim of these projections is to inform the national energy debate. Included here are the model results for electricity and generation capacity. The spreadsheet provides an interactive tool for selecting which model results to view, and which scenarios to evaluate; full model results for each scenario are also included. Source New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development Date Released Unknown Date Updated December 15th, 2010 (3 years ago) Keywords Electric Capacity Electricity Generation New Zealand projections

59

Entangling capacity with local ancilla  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the entangling capacity of a dynamical operation with access to local ancilla. A comparison is made between the entangling capacity with and without the assistance of prior entanglement. An analytic solution is found for the log-negativity entangling capacity of two-qubit gates, which equals the entanglement of the Choi matrix isomorphic to the unitary operator. Surprisingly, the availability of prior entanglement does not affect this result; a property we call resource independence of the entangling capacity. We prove several useful upper-bounds on the entangling capacity that hold for general qudit dynamical operations, and for a whole family of entanglement measures including log-negativity and log-robustness. The log-robustness entangling capacity is shown to be resource independent for general dynamics. We provide numerical results supporting a conjecture that the log-negativity entangling capacity is resource independence for all two-qudit unitaries.

Campbell, Earl T

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Cooling System Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cooling System Basics Cooling System Basics Cooling System Basics August 16, 2013 - 1:08pm Addthis Cooling technologies used in homes and buildings include ventilation, evaporative cooling, air conditioning, absorption cooling, and radiant cooling. Learn more about how these technologies work. Ventilation Ventilation allows air to move into and out of homes and buildings either by natural or mechanical means. Evaporative Cooling In dry climates, evaporative cooling or "swamp cooling" provides an experience like air conditioning, but with much lower energy use. An evaporative cooler uses the outside air's heat to evaporate water inside the cooler. The heat is drawn out of the air and the cooled air is blown into the space by the cooler's fan. Air Conditioning Air conditioners, which employ the same operating principles and basic

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes cooling capacity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Cooling System Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cooling System Basics Cooling System Basics Cooling System Basics August 16, 2013 - 1:08pm Addthis Cooling technologies used in homes and buildings include ventilation, evaporative cooling, air conditioning, absorption cooling, and radiant cooling. Learn more about how these technologies work. Ventilation Ventilation allows air to move into and out of homes and buildings either by natural or mechanical means. Evaporative Cooling In dry climates, evaporative cooling or "swamp cooling" provides an experience like air conditioning, but with much lower energy use. An evaporative cooler uses the outside air's heat to evaporate water inside the cooler. The heat is drawn out of the air and the cooled air is blown into the space by the cooler's fan. Air Conditioning Air conditioners, which employ the same operating principles and basic

62

Definition: Water Cooling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Cooling Water Cooling Water cooling is commonly defined as a method of using water as a heat conduction to remove heat from an object, machine, or other substance by passing cold water over or through it. In energy generation, water cooling is typically used to cool steam back into water so it can be used again in the generation process.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Water cooling is a method of heat removal from components and industrial equipment. As opposed to air cooling, water is used as the heat conductor. Water cooling is commonly used for cooling automobile internal combustion engines and large industrial facilities such as steam electric power plants, hydroelectric generators, petroleum refineries and chemical plants. Other uses include cooling the barrels of machine guns, cooling of

63

Cooled railplug  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The railplug is a plasma ignitor capable of injecting a high energy plasma jet into a combustion chamber of an internal combustion engine or continuous combustion system. An improved railplug is provided which has dual coaxial chambers (either internal or external to the center electrode) that provide for forced convective cooling of the electrodes using the normal pressure changes occurring in an internal combustion engine. This convective cooling reduces the temperature of the hot spot associated with the plasma initiation point, particularly in coaxial railplug configurations, and extends the useful life of the railplug. The convective cooling technique may also be employed in a railplug having parallel dual rails using dual, coaxial chambers. 10 figs.

Weldon, W.F.

1996-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

64

Indirect passive cooling system for liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a passive cooling system. It is for liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors having a pool of liquid metal coolant with the heat generating fissionable fuel core substantially immersed in the pool of liquid metal coolant. The passive cooling system including a combination of spaced apart side-by-side partitions in generally concentric arrangement and providing for intermediate fluid circulation and heat transfer therebetween.

Hunsbedt, A.; Boardman, C.E.

1990-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

65

Capacity Markets for Electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ternative Approaches for Power Capacity Markets”, Papers andand Steven Stoft, “Installed Capacity and Price Caps: Oil onElectricity Markets Have a Capacity requirement? If So, How

Creti, Anna; Fabra, Natalia

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

2. Gas Productive Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

2. Gas Productive Capacity Gas Capacity to Meet Lower 48 States Requirements The United States has sufficient dry gas productive capacity at the wellhead to meet ...

67

Cooling tower waste reduction  

SciTech Connect

At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), the two main cooling tower systems (central and northwest) were upgraded during the summer of 1997 to reduce the generation of hazardous waste. In 1996, these two tower systems generated approximately 135,400 lbs (61,400 kg) of hazardous sludge, which is more than 90 percent of the hazardous waste for the site annually. At both, wet decks (cascade reservoirs) were covered to block sunlight. Covering the cascade reservoirs reduced the amount of chemical conditioners (e.g. algaecide and biocide), required and in turn the amount of waste generated was reduced. Additionally, at the northwest cooling tower system, a sand filtration system was installed to allow cyclical filtering and backflushing, and new pumps, piping, and spray nozzles were installed to increase agitation. the appurtenance upgrade increased the efficiency of the cooling towers. The sand filtration system at the northwest cooling tower system enables operators to continuously maintain the cooling tower water quality without taking the towers out of service. Operational costs (including waste handling and disposal) and maintenance activities are compared for the cooling towers before and after upgrades. Additionally, the effectiveness of the sand filter system in conjunction with the wet deck covers (northwest cooling tower system), versus the cascade reservoir covers alone (south cooling tower south) is discussed. the overall expected return on investment is calculated to be in excess of 250 percent. this upgrade has been incorporated into the 1998 DOE complex-wide water conservation project being led by Sandia National Laboratory/Albuquerque.

Coleman, S.J.; Celeste, J.; Chine, R.; Scott, C.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Passive containment cooling system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A passive containment cooling system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and a gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel and is vented to the drywell. An isolation pool is disposed above the GDCS pool and includes an isolation condenser therein. The condenser has an inlet line disposed in flow communication with the drywell for receiving the non-condensable gas along with any steam released therein following a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). The condenser also has an outlet line disposed in flow communication with the drywell for returning to the drywell both liquid condensate produced upon cooling of the steam and the non-condensable gas for reducing pressure within the containment vessel following the LOCA.

Billig, Paul F. (San Jose, CA); Cooke, Franklin E. (San Jose, CA); Fitch, James R. (San Jose, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Passive containment cooling system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A passive containment cooling system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and a gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel and is vented to the drywell. An isolation pool is disposed above the GDCS pool and includes an isolation condenser therein. The condenser has an inlet line disposed in flow communication with the drywell for receiving the non-condensable gas along with any steam released therein following a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). The condenser also has an outlet line disposed in flow communication with the drywell for returning to the drywell both liquid condensate produced upon cooling of the steam and the non-condensable gas for reducing pressure within the containment vessel following the LOCA. 1 figure.

Billig, P.F.; Cooke, F.E.; Fitch, J.R.

1994-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

70

Oriented spray-assisted cooling tower  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Apparatus useful for heat exchange by evaporative cooling when employed in conjunction with a conventional cooling tower. The arrangement includes a header pipe which is used to divert a portion of the water in the cooling tower supply conduit up stream of the cooling tower to a multiplicity of vertical pipes and spray nozzles which are evenly spaced external to the cooling tower so as to produce a uniform spray pattern oriented toward the central axis of the cooling tower and thereby induce an air flow into the cooling tower which is greater than otherwise achieved. By spraying the water to be cooled towards the cooling tower in a region external to the cooling tower in a manner such that the spray falls just short of the cooling tower basin, the spray does not interfere with the operation of the cooling tower, proper, and the-maximum increase in air velocity is achieved just above the cooling tower basin where it is most effective. The sprayed water lands on a concrete or asphalt apron which extends from the header pipe to the cooling tower basin and is gently sloped towards the cooling tower basin such that the sprayed water drains into the basin. By diverting a portion of the water to be cooled to a multiplicity of sprays external to the cooling tower, thermal performance is improved. 4 figs.

Bowman, C.F.

1995-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

71

Closed circuit steam cooled turbine shroud and method for steam cooling turbine shroud  

SciTech Connect

A turbine shroud cooling cavity is partitioned to define a plurality of cooling chambers for sequentially receiving cooling steam and impingement cooling of the radially inner wall of the shoud. An impingement baffle is provided in each cooling chamber for receiving the cooling media from a cooling media inlet in the case of the first chamber or from the immediately upstream chamber in the case of the second through fourth chambers and includes a plurality of impingement holes for effecting the impingement cooling of the shroud inner wall.

Burdgick, Steven Sebastian (Schenectady, NY); Sexton, Brendan Francis (Simpsonville, SC); Kellock, Iain Robertson (Simpsonville, SC)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Passive cooling safety system for liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor having a passive cooling system for removing residual heat resulting from fuel decay during reactor shutdown. The passive cooling system comprises a plurality of partitions surrounding the reactor vessel in spaced apart relation forming intermediate areas for circulating heat transferring fluid which remove and carry away heat from the reactor vessel. The passive cooling system includes a closed primary fluid circuit through the partitions surrounding the reactor vessel and a partially adjoining secondary open fluid circuit for carrying transferred heat out into the atmosphere.

Hunsbedt, Anstein (Los Gatos, CA); Boardman, Charles E. (Saratoga, CA); Hui, Marvin M. (Sunnyvale, CA); Berglund, Robert C. (Saratoga, CA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Indirect passive cooling system for liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor having a passive cooling system for removing residual heat resulting from fuel decay during reactor shutdown. The passive cooling system comprises a plurality of partitions surrounding the reactor vessel in spaced apart relation forming intermediate areas for circulating heat transferring fluid which remove and carry away heat from the reactor vessel. The passive cooling system includes a closed primary fluid circuit through the partitions surrounding the reactor vessel and a partially adjoining secondary open fluid circuit for carrying transferred heat out into the atmosphere.

Hunsbedt, Anstein (Los Gatos, CA); Boardman, Charles E. (Saratoga, CA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

SIMULATING THE COOLING FLOW OF COOL-CORE CLUSTERS  

SciTech Connect

We carry out high-resolution adaptive mesh refinement simulations of a cool core cluster, resolving the flow from Mpc scales down to pc scales. We do not (yet) include any active galactic nucleus (AGN) heating, focusing instead on cooling in order to understand how gas reaches the supermassive black hole at the center of the cluster. We find that, as the gas cools, the cluster develops a very flat temperature profile, undergoing a cooling catastrophe only in the central 10-100 pc of the cluster. Outside of this region, the flow is smooth, with no local cooling instabilities, and naturally produces very little low-temperature gas (below a few keV), in agreement with observations. The gas cooling in the center of the cluster rapidly forms a thin accretion disk. The amount of cold gas produced at the very center grows rapidly until a reasonable estimate of the resulting AGN heating rate (assuming even a moderate accretion efficiency) would overwhelm cooling. We argue that this naturally produces a thermostat which links the cooling of gas out to 100 kpc with the cold gas accretion in the central 100 pc, potentially closing the loop between cooling and heating. Isotropic heat conduction does not affect the result significantly, but we show that including the potential well of the brightest cluster galaxy is necessary to obtain the correct result. Also, we found that the outcome is sensitive to resolution, requiring very high mass resolution to correctly reproduce the small transition radius.

Li Yuan; Bryan, Greg L. [Department of Astronomy, Pupin Physics Laboratories, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States)

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Multi-pass cooling for turbine airfoils  

SciTech Connect

An airfoil for a turbine vane of a gas turbine engine. The airfoil includes an outer wall having pressure and suction sides, and a radially extending cooling cavity located between the pressure and suction sides. A plurality of partitions extend radially through the cooling cavity to define a plurality of interconnected cooling channels located at successive chordal locations through the cooling cavity. The cooling channels define a serpentine flow path extending in the chordal direction. Further, the cooling channels include a plurality of interconnected chambers and the chambers define a serpentine path extending in the radial direction within the serpentine path extending in the chordal direction.

Liang, George (Palm City, FL)

2011-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

76

A bottom-up engineering estimate of the aggregate heating and cooling loads of the entire U.S. building stock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

furnaces, chillers, and cooling towers, including the energyheating, chiller and cooling towers. Gas Plant Factors in

Huang, Yu Joe; Brodrick, Jim

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Performance analysis of hybrid liquid desiccant solar cooling system.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis investigates the coefficient of performance (COP) of a hybrid liquid desiccant solar cooling system. This hybrid cooling system includes three sections: 1) conventional… (more)

Zhou, Zhipeng (Joe Zoe)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Hybrid Wet/Dry Cooling for Power Plants (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation includes an overview of cooling options, an analysis of evaporative enhancement of air-cooled geothermal power plants, field measurements at a geothermal plant, a preliminary analysis of trough plant, and improvements to air-cooled condensers.

Kutscher, C.; Buys, A.; Gladden, C.

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

"Hot" for Warm Water Cooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

liquid cooling, dry cooler, cooling tower 1. INTRODUCTIONsolutions for cooling. Substituting cooling towers,hybrid cooling towers, or dry coolers that provide warmer

Coles, Henry

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

REACTOR COOLING  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor with provisions for selectively cooling the fuel elements is described. The reactor has a plurality of tubes extending throughout. Cylindrical fuel elements are disposed within the tubes and the coolant flows through the tubes and around the fuel elements. The fuel elements within the central portion of the reactor are provided with roughened surfaces of material. The fuel elements in the end portions of the tubes within the reactor are provlded with low conduction jackets and the fuel elements in the region between the central portion and the end portions are provided with smooth surfaces of high heat conduction material.

Quackenbush, C.F.

1959-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes cooling capacity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

electricity generating capacity | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

generating capacity generating capacity Dataset Summary Description The New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development publishes energy data including many datasets related to electricity. Included here are three electricity generating capacity datasets: annual operational electricity generation capacity by plant type (1975 - 2009); estimated generating capacity by fuel type for North Island, South Island and New Zealand (2009); and information on generating plants (plant type, name, owner, commissioned date, and capacity), as of December 2009. Source New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development Date Released Unknown Date Updated July 03rd, 2009 (5 years ago) Keywords biomass coal Electric Capacity electricity generating capacity geothermal Hydro Natural Gas wind Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon Operational Electricity Generation Capacity by Plant Type (xls, 42.5 KiB)

82

THERMAL STUDY OF THE DIII-D MACHINE HEAT REMOVAL CAPACITY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

OAK-B135 With each plasma shot, the DIII-D tokamak dissipates 0.5 to 1.0 GJ of energy. Plasma shots may occur as frequently as every ten minutes, and the energy is removed in the form of heat by a cooling water system. to remove heat from the machine, cooling water circulates through each major heat source. These sources include the power supplies, motor/generator, rf current drives, neutral beam power supplies, magnetic field coils, and vacuum vessel. The cooling water system consists of isolated primary and secondary cooling loops separated by intermediate heat exchangers. As future DIII-D plans include operation during summer months and longer pulse duration, the cooling system's overall heat removal capability and performance efficiency must be assessed. Temperature and flow data from around the DIII-D facility are collected by a programmable logic controller (PLC); the data are used to analyze the heat generating sources, the heat transfer rate to intermediate heat exchangers, and the ultimate heat rejection to the environment via the cooling towers. A comparison of the original DIII-D machine design versus the actual performance determines the margin of heat removal capacity. projections of the heat removal rate for various longer plasma shots are made. Improvements in design and/or operational procedure will be necessary to attain the desired pulse duration.

YIP,H; ADERSON,P.M; HOLTROP,K.L; HARRISON,S

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

"Hot" for Warm Water Cooling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Liquid cooling is key to reducing energy consumption for this generation of supercomputers and remains on the roadmap for the foreseeable future. This is because the heat capacity of liquids is orders of magnitude larger than that of air and once heat has been transferred to a liquid, it can be removed from the datacenter efficiently. The transition from air to liquid cooling is an inflection point providing an opportunity to work collectively to set guidelines for facilitating the energy efficiency of liquid-cooled High Performance Computing (HPC) facilities and systems. The vision is to use non-compressor-based cooling, to facilitate heat re-use, and thereby build solutions that are more energy-efficient, less carbon intensive and more cost effective than their air-cooled predecessors. The Energy Efficient HPC Working Group is developing guidelines for warmer liquid-cooling temperatures in order to standardize facility and HPC equipment, and provide more opportunity for reuse of waste heat. This report describes the development of those guidelines.

IBM Corporation; Energy Efficient HPC Working Group; Hewlett Packard Corporation; SGI; Cray Inc.; Intel Corporation; U.S. Army Engineer Research Development Center; Coles, Henry; Ellsworth, Michael; Martinez, David J.; Bailey, Anna-Maria; Banisadr, Farhad; Bates, Natalie; Coghlan, Susan; Cowley, David E.; Dube, Nicholas; Fields, Parks; Greenberg, Steve; Iyengar, Madhusudan; Kulesza, Peter R.; Loncaric, Josip; McCann, Tim; Pautsch, Greg; Patterson, Michael K.; Rivera, Richard G.; Rottman, Greg K.; Sartor, Dale; Tschudi, William; Vinson, Wade; Wescott, Ralph

2011-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

84

Absorption Cooling | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

it is also referred to as gas-fired cooling. Other potential heat sources include propane, solar-heated water, or geothermal-heated water. Although mainly used in industrial...

85

Guam Refinery Thermal Cracking/Other (including Gas Oil ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Guam Refinery Thermal Cracking/Other (including Gas Oil) Downstream Charge Capacity as of January 1 (Barrels per Stream Day)

86

Empirical Modeling of a Rolling-Piston Compressor Heat Pump for Predictive Control in Low-Lift Cooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Inverter-driven variable-capacity air conditioners, heat pumps, and chillers can provide energy-efficient cooling, particularly at part-load capacity. Varying the capacity of vapor compression systems enables operation at ...

Gayeski, Nicholas

87

Comparison of Productive Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Appendix B Comparison of Productive Capacity Comparisons of base case productive capacities for this and all previous studies were made (Figure B1).

88

Tables - Refinery Capacity Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Tables: 1: Number and Capacity of Operable Petroleum Refineries by PAD District and State as of January 1, 2009: PDF: 2: Production Capacity of Operable ...

89

Non-intrusive cooling system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A readily replaceable heat exchange cooling jacket for applying fluid to a system conduit pipe. The cooling jacket comprises at least two members, separable into upper and lower portions. A chamber is formed between the conduit pipe and cooling jacket once the members are positioned about the pipe. The upper portion includes a fluid spray means positioned above the pipe and the bottom portion includes a fluid removal means. The heat exchange cooling jacket is adaptable with a drain tank, a heat exchanger, a pump and other standard equipment to provide a system for removing heat from a pipe. A method to remove heat from a pipe, includes the steps of enclosing a portion of the pipe with a jacket to form a chamber between an outside surface of the pipe and the cooling jacket; spraying cooling fluid at low pressure from an upper portion of the cooling jacket, allowing the fluid to flow downwardly by gravity along the surface of the pipe toward a bottom portion of the chamber; and removing the fluid at the bottom portion of the chamber.

Morrison, Edward F. (Burnt Hills, NY); Bergman, John W. (Barrington, NH)

2001-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

90

Cooling circuit for a gas turbine bucket and tip shroud  

SciTech Connect

An open cooling circuit for a gas turbine bucket wherein the bucket has an airfoil portion, and a tip shroud, the cooling circuit including a plurality of radial cooling holes extending through the airfoil portion and communicating with an enlarged internal area within the tip shroud before exiting the tip shroud such that a cooling medium used to cool the airfoil portion is subsequently used to cool the tip shroud.

Willett, Fred Thomas (25 Long Creek Dr., Burnt Hills, NY 12027); Itzel, Gary Michael (12 Cider Mill Dr., Clifton Park, NY 12065); Stathopoulos, Dimitrios (11 Wyngate Rd., Glenmont, NY 12077); Plemmons, Larry Wayne (late of Hamilton, OH); Plemmons, Helen M. (2900 Long Ridge Trails, Hamilton, OH 45014); Lewis, Doyle C. (444 River Way, Greer, SC 29651)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Cold side thermal energy storage system for improved operation of air cooled power plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Air cooled power plants experience significant performance fluctuations as plant cooling capacity reduces due to higher daytime temperature than nighttime temperature. The purpose of this thesis is to simulate the detailed ...

Williams, Daniel David

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Water-lithium bromide double-effect absorption cooling analysis. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This investigation involved the development of a numerical model for the transient simulation of the double-effect, water-lithium bromide absorption cooling machine, and the use of the model to determine the effect of the various design and input variables on the absorption unit performance. The performance parameters considered were coefficient of performance and cooling capacity. The sensitivity analysis was performed by selecting a nominal condition and determining performance sensitivity for each variable with others held constant. The variables considered in the study include source hot water, cooling water, and chilled water temperatures; source hot water, cooling water, and chilled water flow rates; solution circulation rate; heat exchanger areas; pressure drop between evaporator and absorber; solution pump characteristics; and refrigerant flow control methods. The performance sensitivity study indicated in particular that the distribution of heat exchanger area among the various (seven) heat exchange components is a very important design consideration. Moreover, it indicated that the method of flow control of the first effect refrigerant vapor through the second effect is a critical design feature when absorption units operate over a significant range of cooling capacity. The model was used to predict the performance of the Trane absorption unit with fairly good accuracy. The dynamic model should be valuable as a design tool for developing new absorption machines or modifying current machines to make them optimal based on current and future energy costs.

Vliet, G.C.; Lawson, M.B.; Lithgow, R.A.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Absorption Cooling Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cooling Basics Cooling Basics Absorption Cooling Basics August 16, 2013 - 2:26pm Addthis Absorption coolers use heat rather than electricity as their energy source. Because natural gas is the most common heat source for absorption cooling, it is also referred to as gas-fired cooling. Other potential heat sources include propane, solar-heated water, or geothermal-heated water. Although mainly used in industrial or commercial settings, absorption coolers are commercially available for large residential homes. How Absorption Cooling Works An absorption cooling cycle relies on three basic principles: When a liquid is heated it boils (vaporizes) and when a gas is cooled it condenses Lowering the pressure above a liquid reduces its boiling point Heat flows from warmer to cooler surfaces.

94

Working and Net Available Shell Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Containing storage capacity data for crude oil, petroleum products, and selected biofuels. The report includes tables detailing working and net available shell ...

95

Matching equipment size to the cooling load  

SciTech Connect

This article presents a heat extraction rate analysis method, using ASHRAE algorithms that enables HVAC system designers to optimally size cooling equipment. The final stage of the cooling load calculation process determines the heat extraction rate required to achieve design conditions. Put another way, this stage determines the equipment capacity required to match the cooling load profile, and it does so in a manner that predicts the resulting space temperature profile, and it does so in a manner that predicts the resulting space temperature profile. It is a stage in the design process that, in practice, may not be given the attention it deserves.

Bloom, B. (Harvey Toub Engineering, Atlanta, GA (United States))

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

RADIATIVE AND PASSIVE COOLING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at the 3rd Annual Solar Heating and Cooling R&D Contractors'been supported by the Solar Heating and Cooling Research andof Energy. 3rd Annual Solar Heating and Cooling R&D

Martin, M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Floating dry cooling: a competitive alternative to evaporative cooling in a binary cycle geothermal power plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The application of the floating cooling concept to non-evaporative and evaporative atmospheric heat rejection systems was studied as a method of improving the performance of geothermal powerplants operating upon medium temperature hydrothermal resources. The LBL thermodynamic process computer code GEOTHM is used in the case study of a 50 MWe isobutane binary cycle power plant at Heber, California. It is shown that operating a fixed capacity plant in the floating cooling mode can generate significantly more electrical energy at a higher thermodynamic efficiency and reduced but bar cost for approximately the same capital investment. Floating cooling is shown to benefit a plant which is dry cooled to an even greater extent than the same plant operating with an evaporative heat rejection system. Results of the Heber case study indicate that a dry floating cooling geothermal binary cycle plant can produce energy at a bus bar cost which is competitive with the cost of energy associated with evaporatively cooled systems.

Pines, H.S.; Green, M.A.; Pope, W.L.; Doyle, P.A.

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Energy Basics: Evaporative Cooling  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

absorbent material. Evaporative cooling uses evaporated water to naturally and energy-efficiently cool. How Evaporative Coolers Work There are two types of evaporative...

99

Network Routing Capacity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We define the routing capacity of a network to be the supremum of all possible fractional message throughputs achievable by routing. We prove that the routing capacity of every network is achievable and rational, we present an algorithm for its computation, and we prove that every non-negative rational number is the routing capacity of some network. We also determine the routing capacity for various example networks. Finally, we discuss the extension of routing capacity to fractional coding solutions and show that the coding capacity of a network is independent of the alphabet used.

Jillian Cannons; Randall Dougherty; Christopher Freiling; Kenneth Zeger

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Alternate Cooling Methods for Industrial Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cooling in industrial facilities has traditionally been performed by mechanical vapor compression units. While it remains the standard, recent concerns with the rising cost of electricity and environmental legislation restricting or outlawing CFC refrigerants has caused many plants to evaluate existing cooling methods. This paper presents case studies on alternate cooling methods used for space conditioning at several different industrial facilities. Methods discussed include direct and indirect evaporative, desiccant, and absorption cooling. Cooling effectiveness, operating cost and investment are also presented. Data for this evaluation was collected from clients served by Georgia Tech's Industrial Energy Extension Service, a state-sponsored energy conservation assistance program.

Brown, M.; Moore, D.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes cooling capacity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

'Radio Wave Cooling' Offers New Twist on Laser Cooling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

'Radio Wave Cooling' Offers New Twist on Laser Cooling. From NIST Tech Beat: September 13, 2007. ...

2013-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

102

Cooling for Parabolic Trough Power Plants: Overview (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation discusses water requirements for power generation and includes an analysis of wet/dry cooling.

Not Available

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Testing of a solar powered cooling system using cross-cooled desiccant dehumidifiers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A solar powered desiccant cooling system using two fixed bed silica gel dehumidifiers has been designed, built and is being tested. The dehumidifiers, 0.6 x 0.6 x 0.6 m each, are constructed of 80 channels lined with 64 m/sup 2/ of 1.5 mm thick silica gel sheets. The bed is cooled by air flowing in an equal number of perpendicular channels. Both sets of channels are two mm wide, the dehumidifiers undergo adsorption, preheating, desorption and precooling in a cyclic fashion. The cooling capacity of the experimental system is one ton at ARI design conditions. The system has a high cooling capacity, high COP, low parasitic power consumption and requires low regeneration temperatures.

Monnier, J.B.; Worek, W.M.; Lavan, Z.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Performance of a cross-cooled desiccant dehumidifier prototype  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The cross-cooled dehumidifier prototype was constructed in the form of a cube with a side dimension of 0.6 m. The cross-cooling was achieved by passing air through rectangular channels perpendicular to process channels which are lined with desiccant sheets consisting of 9..mu..m Syloid 63/sup TM/ silica gel held in a Teflon web. The process for the manufacture of the silica gel sheets was developed at the Illinois Institute of Technology. The dehumidifier prototype was installed in a test system that simulated the performance of a cross-cooled desiccant cooling system and monitored the performance of the prototype. The dehumidifier prototype was operated over a wide range of operating conditions which would be typically encountered in the field installation of such a system. Variables measured were the moisture cycled, cooling capacity, total cooling capacity and coefficient of performance.

Worek, W.M.; Lavan, Z.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Desiccant contamination in desiccant cooling systems  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the results of a desiccant contamination experiment and the impact of the obtained silica gel degradation data on the performance of a desiccant cooling system. A test apparatus was used to thermally cycle several desiccant samples and expose them to ambient'' humid air or contaminated'' humid air. The source of contamination was cigarette smoke. The exposed desiccant samples were removed after 0.5, 1, 2, or 4 months of exposure and their moisture capacities were measured. The silica get samples thermally cycled with ambient air showed a 5% to 30% to 70% of their moisture capacity. Using the obtained degradation data in a system, the impact of desiccant degradation on the performance of a desiccant cooling cycle was estimated. Depending on the degree of desiccant degradation, the decrease in thermal coefficient of performance (COP) and cooling capacity of the system was 10% to 35%. It was found that the COP and the cooling capacity of a system after desiccant degradation can be improved by increasing the rotational speed of the dehumidifier. This indicates that a simple engineering solution may exist to alleviate some type of degradations. 9 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

Pesaran, A.A.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

OCCUPATIONAL COOLING TOWERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HEALTH SCIENCES LIBRARY COOLING TOWERS EMPLOYEE HEALTH B C D F E CHILDREN'S ELEVATORS MEDICAL SCHOOL

Crews, Stephen

107

Transphase cool storage test report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Ice Storage Test Facility (ISTF) is designed to test commercial cool storage systems. Transphase, Inc. provided a prototype of a new storage tank design equipped with coils designed for use with a secondary fluid system and filled with a eutectic designed to freeze at 41{degree}F. The Transphase cool storage system was tested over a wide range of operating conditions. Measured system performance during charging showed the ability to freeze the tank with relatively constant brine temperatures over most of the charging cycle. During discharge cycles, the storage tank outlet temperature was governed mainly by the brine flow rate and the tank`s remaining charge. The discharge capacity was dependent upon both the selected discharge rate and maximum allowable tank outlet temperature. This prototype unit experienced several operational problems, not unexpected for the first full-size execution of a new design. Such prototype testing was one of EPRI`s primary goals in founding the ISTF.

Stovall, T.K.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Fans for Cooling | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fans for Cooling Fans for Cooling Fans for Cooling May 30, 2012 - 7:46pm Addthis Ceiling fans circulate air in a room to help keep occupants cool. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/jimkruger Ceiling fans circulate air in a room to help keep occupants cool. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/jimkruger What does this mean for me? You may be able to keep your home cool with energy-efficient and well-placed fans. Fans are less expensive to operate than air conditioners. Circulating fans include ceiling fans, table fans, floor fans, and fans mounted to poles or walls. These fans create a wind chill effect that will make you more comfortable in your home, even if it's also cooled by natural ventilation or air conditioning. Ceiling Fans Ceiling fans are considered the most effective of these types of fans,

109

Cavity cooling of a single atom  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

All conventional methods to laser-cool atoms rely on repeated cycles of optical pumping and spontaneous emission of a photon by the atom. Spontaneous emission in a random direction is the dissipative mechanism required to remove entropy from the atom. However, alternative cooling methods have been proposed for a single atom strongly coupled to a high-finesse cavity; the role of spontaneous emission is replaced by the escape of a photon from the cavity. Application of such cooling schemes would improve the performance of atom cavity systems for quantum information processing. Furthermore, as cavity cooling does not rely on spontaneous emission, it can be applied to systems that cannot be laser-cooled by conventional methods; these include molecules (which do not have a closed transition) and collective excitations of Bose condensates, which are destroyed by randomly directed recoil kicks. Here we demonstrate cavity cooling of single rubidium atoms stored in an intracavity dipole trap. The cooling mechanism res...

Maunz, P; Schuster, I; Syassen, N; Pinkse, P W H; Rempe, G

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

ION-BY-ION COOLING EFFICIENCIES  

SciTech Connect

We present ion-by-ion cooling efficiencies for low-density gas. We use Cloudy (version 10.00) to estimate the cooling efficiencies for each ion of the first 30 elements (H-Zn) individually. We present results for gas temperatures between 10{sup 4} and 10{sup 8} K, assuming low densities and optically thin conditions. When nonequilibrium ionization plays a significant role the ionization states deviate from those that obtain in collisional ionization equilibrium (CIE), and the local cooling efficiency at any given temperature depends on specific nonequilibrium ion fractions. The results presented here allow for an efficient estimate of the total cooling efficiency for any ionic composition. We also list the elemental cooling efficiencies assuming CIE conditions. These can be used to construct CIE cooling efficiencies for non-solar abundance ratios or to estimate the cooling due to elements not included in any nonequilibrium computation. All the computational results are listed in convenient online tables.

Gnat, Orly [Theoretical Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, MC 350-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States) and Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, 91904 Jerusalem (Israel); Ferland, Gary J., E-mail: orlyg@tapir.caltech.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States)

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Study on Water-Cooled Solar Semiconductor Air Conditioner  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water-cooled solar semiconductor air conditioner was designed. Relevant calculation was made to determine the room's cooling load, which export the solar panels and battery capacity, followed by selection of CNC matcher. Development work also involves ... Keywords: solar energy, peltier effect, semiconductor air conditioner

Dong Zhi-Ming; Chang Ji-Bin; Xiang Li-Juan; Zhou Xue-Bin

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Cooling apparatus and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device and method provide for cooling of a system having an energy source, one or more devices that actively consume energy, and one or more devices that generate heat. The device may include one or more thermoelectric coolers ("TECs") in conductive engagement with at least one of the heat-generating devices, and an energy diverter for diverting at least a portion of the energy from the energy source that is not consumed by the active energy-consuming devices to the TECs.

Mayes, James C. (Sugar Land, TX)

2009-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

113

ORISE: Capacity Building  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capacity Building Capacity Building Because public health agencies must maintain the resources to respond to public health challenges, critical situations and emergencies, the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) helps government agencies and organizations develop a solid infrastructure through capacity building. Capacity building refers to activities that improve an organization's ability to achieve its mission or a person's ability do his or her job more effectively. For organizations, capacity building may relate to almost any aspect of its work-from leadership and administration to program development and implementation. Strengthening an organizational infrastructure can help agencies and community-based organizations more quickly identify targeted audiences for

114

Turbine inter-disk cavity cooling air compressor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A combustion turbine may have a cooling circuit for directing a cooling medium through the combustion turbine to cool various components of the combustion turbine. This cooling circuit may include a compressor, a combustor shell and a component of the combustion turbine to be cooled. This component may be a rotating blade of the combustion turbine. A pressure changing mechanism is disposed in the combustion turbine between the component to be cooled and the combustor shell. The cooling medium preferably flows from the compressor to the combustor shell, through a cooler, the component to the cooled and the pressure changing mechanism. After flowing through the pressure changing mechanism, the cooling medium is returned to the combustor shell. The pressure changing mechanism preferably changes the pressure of the cooling medium from a pressure at which it is exhausted from the component to be cooled to approximately that of the combustor shell.

Little, David Allen (Oviedo, FL)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Hybrid Cooling Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water consumption by power plants has become an increasingly contentious siting issue. In nearly all fossil-fired and nuclear plants, water for plant cooling is by far the greatest water requirement. Therefore, the use of water-conserving cooling systems such as dry or hybrid cooling is receiving increasing attention. This technology overview from the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) provides a brief introduction to hybrid cooling systems. As defined in the report, the term "hybrid cooling" refer...

2011-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

116

Cooling Plant Optimization Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Central cooling plants or district cooling systems account for 22 percent of energy costs for cooling commercial buildings. Improving the efficiency of central cooling plants will significantly impact peak demand and energy usage for both building owners and utilities. This guide identifies opportunities for optimizing a central cooling plant and provides a simplified optimization procedure. The guide focuses on plant optimization from the standpoint of minimizing energy costs and maximizing efficiencies...

1998-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

117

Modeling Capacity Reservation Contract  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we model a scenario where a chip designer (buyer) buys capacity from chip manufacturers (suppliers) in the presence of demand uncertainty faced by the buyer. We assume that the buyer knows the probability distribution of his demand. The supplier offers the buyer to reserve capacity in advance at a price that is lower than the historical average of the spot price. The supplier’s price (if the buyer reserves capacity in advance) is function of her capacity, demand for her capacity, unit production cost, the average spot market price and the amount of capacity reserved by the buyer. Based on these parameters we derive the price the suppliers will charge. We formulate the problem from the buyer’s perspective. The buyer’s decisions are how much capacity to reserve and from how many suppliers. The optimal solution is obtained numerically. Our model addresses the following issues that are not covered in the current literature on capacity reservation models. In the existing literature the supplier’s price is an exogenous parameter. We model the supplier’s price from relevant parameters mentioned above. This makes our model richer. For example, if the expected capacity utilization for the supplier is likely to be low then the supplier will charge a lower price for capacity reservation. In reality, the buyer sources from multiple suppliers. Most mathematical models on capacity reservation, we are aware of, assumes a single buyer and a single supplier. We generalize this to a single buyer and multiple suppliers.

Jishnu Hazra; B. Mahadevan; Sudhi Seshadri

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Optimal entangling capacity of dynamical processes  

SciTech Connect

We investigate the entangling capacity of dynamical operations when provided with local ancilla. A comparison is made between the entangling capacity with and without the assistance of prior entanglement. An analytic solution is found for the log-negativity entangling capacity of two-qubit gates, which equals the entanglement of the Choi matrix isomorphic to the unitary operator. Surprisingly, the availability of prior entanglement does not affect this result, a property we call resource independence of the entangling capacity. We prove several useful upper bounds on the entangling capacity that hold for general qudit dynamical operations and for a whole family of entanglement monotones including log negativity and log robustness. The log-robustness entangling capacity is shown to be resource independent for general dynamics. We provide numerical results supporting a conjecture that the log-negativity entangling capacity is resource independent for all two-qudit unitary operators.

Campbell, Earl T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

119

Optimal Entangling Capacity of Dynamical Processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the entangling capacity of dynamical operations when provided with local ancilla. A comparison is made between the entangling capacity with and without the assistance of prior entanglement. An analytic solution is found for the log-negativity entangling capacity of two-qubit gates, which equals the entanglement of the Choi matrix isomorphic to the unitary operator. Surprisingly, the availability of prior entanglement does not affect this result; a property we call resource independence of the entangling capacity. We prove several useful upper-bounds on the entangling capacity that hold for general qudit dynamical operations, and for a whole family of entanglement monotones including log-negativity and log-robustness. The log-robustness entangling capacity is shown to be resource independent for general dynamics. We provide numerical results supporting a conjecture that the log-negativity entangling capacity is resource independence for all two-qudit unitaries.

Earl T. Campbell

2010-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

120

Energy Efficient Electronics Cooling Project  

SciTech Connect

Parker Precision Cooling Business Unit was awarded a Department of Energy grant (DE-EE0000412) to support the DOE-ITP goal of reducing industrial energy intensity and GHG emissions. The project proposed by Precision Cooling was to accelerate the development of a cooling technology for high heat generating electronics components. These components are specifically related to power electronics found in power drives focused on the inverter, converter and transformer modules. The proposed cooling system was expected to simultaneously remove heat from all three of the major modules listed above, while remaining dielectric under all operating conditions. Development of the cooling system to meet specific customer's requirements and constraints not only required a robust system design, but also new components to support long system functionality. Components requiring further development and testing during this project included pumps, fluid couplings, cold plates and condensers. All four of these major categories of components are required in every Precision Cooling system. Not only was design a key area of focus, but the process for manufacturing these components had to be determined and proven through the system development.

Steve O'Shaughnessey; Tim Louvar; Mike Trumbower; Jessica Hunnicutt; Neil Myers

2012-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes cooling capacity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Cooling circuit for steam and air-cooled turbine nozzle stage  

SciTech Connect

The turbine vane segment includes inner and outer walls with a vane extending therebetween. The vane includes leading and trailing edge cavities and intermediate cavities. An impingement plate is spaced from the outer wall to impingement-cool the outer wall. Post-impingement cooling air flows through holes in the outer wall to form a thin air-cooling film along the outer wall. Cooling air is supplied an insert sleeve with openings in the leading edge cavity for impingement-cooling the leading edge. Holes through the leading edge afford thin-film cooling about the leading edge. Cooling air is provided the trailing edge cavity and passes through holes in the side walls of the vane for thin-film cooling of the trailing edge. Steam flows through a pair of intermediate cavities for impingement-cooling of the side walls. Post-impingement steam flows to the inner wall for impingement-cooling of the inner wall and returns the post-impingement cooling steam through inserts in other intermediate cavities for impingement-cooling the side walls of the vane.

Itzel, Gary Michael (Clifton Park, NY); Yu, Yufeng (Guilderland, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Inclusion of cool roofs in nonresidential Title 24 prescriptive requirements  

SciTech Connect

Roofs that have high solar reflectance (high ability to reflect sunlight) and high thermal emittance (high ability to radiate heat) tend to stay cool in the sun. The same is true of low-emittance roofs with exceptionally high solar reflectance. Substituting a cool roof for a noncool roof tends to decrease cooling electricity use, cooling power demand, and cooling-equipment capacity requirements, while slightly increasing heating energy consumption. Cool roofs can also lower the ambient air temperature in summer, slowing ozone formation and increasing human comfort. DOE-2.1E building energy simulations indicate that use of a cool roofing material on a prototypical California nonresidential building with a low-sloped roof yields average annual cooling energy savings of approximately 300 kWh/1000 ft2 [3.2 kWh/m2], average annual natural gas deficits of 4.9 therm/1000 ft2 [5.6 MJ/m2], average source energy savings of 2.6 MBTU/1000 ft2 [30 MJ/m2], and average peak power demand savings of 0. 19 kW/1000 ft2 [2.1 W/m2]. The 15-year net present value (NPV) of energy savings averages $450/1000 ft2 [$4.90/m2] with time dependent valuation (TDV), and $370/1000 ft2 [$4.00/m2] without TDV. When cost savings from downsizing cooling equipment are included, the average total savings (15-year NPV + equipment savings) rises to $550/1000 ft2 [$5.90/m2] with TDV, and to $470/1000 ft2 [$5.00/m2] without TDV. Total savings range from 0.18 to 0.77 $/ft2 [1.90 to 8.30 $/m2] with TDV, and from 0.16 to 0.66 $/ft2 [1.70 to 7.10 $/m2] without TDV, across California's 16 climate zones. The typical cost premium for a cool roof is 0.00 to 0.20 $/ft2 [0.00 to 2.20 $/m2]. Cool roofs with premiums up to $0.20/ft2 [$2.20/m2] are expected to be cost effective in climate zones 2 through 16; those with premiums not exceeding $0.18/ft2 [$1.90/m2] are expected to be also cost effective in climate zone 1. Hence, this study recommends that the year-2005 California building energy efficiency code (Title 24, Pa rt 6 of the California Code of Regulations) for nonresidential buildings with low-sloped roofs include a cool-roof prescriptive requirement in all California climate zones. Buildings with roofs that do not meet prescriptive requirements may comply with the code via an ''overall-envelope'' approach (non-metal roofs only), or via a performance approach (all roof types).

Levinson, Ronnen; Akbari, Hashem; Konopacki, Steve; Bretz, Sarah

2002-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

123

Liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor plant system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor having a passive cooling system for removing residual heat resulting for fuel decay during reactor shutdown, or heat produced during a mishap. The reactor system is enhanced with sealing means for excluding external air from contact with the liquid metal coolant leaking from the reactor vessel during an accident. The invention also includes a silo structure which resists attack by leaking liquid metal coolant, and an added unique cooling means.

Hunsbedt, Anstein (Los Gatos, CA); Boardman, Charles E. (Saratoga, CA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Emergency core cooling system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactor provided with an emergency core cooling system includes a reactor vessel which contains a reactor core comprising an array of fuel assemblies and a plurality of blanket assemblies. The reactor core is immersed in a pool of liquid metal coolant. The reactor also includes a primary coolant system comprising a pump and conduits for circulating liquid metal coolant to the reactor core and through the fuel and blanket assemblies of the core. A converging-diverging venturi nozzle with an intermediate throat section is provided in between the assemblies and the pump. The intermediate throat section of the nozzle is provided with at least one opening which is in fluid communication with the pool of liquid sodium. In normal operation, coolant flows from the pump through the nozzle to the assemblies with very little fluid flowing through the opening in the throat. However, when the pump is not running, residual heat in the core causes fluid from the pool to flow through the opening in the throat of the nozzle and outwardly through the nozzle to the assemblies, thus providing a means of removing decay heat.

Schenewerk, William E. (Sherman Oaks, CA); Glasgow, Lyle E. (Westlake Village, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

production capacity | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

production capacity production capacity Dataset Summary Description No description given. Source Oak Ridge National Laboratory Date Released November 30th, 2009 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords biodiesel ethanol location production capacity transportation Data application/zip icon Biorefineries.zip (zip, 7 MiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote Usefulness of the dataset Average vote Your vote Ease of access Average vote Your vote Overall rating Average vote Your vote Comments Login or register to post comments If you rate this dataset, your published comment will include your rating.

126

Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Summary)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Salt Caverns Storage Capacity Aquifers Storage Capacity Depleted Fields Storage Capacity Total Working Gas Capacity Working Gas Capacity of Salt Caverns Working Gas Capacity of...

127

Increasing State Capacity Through Clans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

their role in increasing state capacity With the decline ofhere focus on state capacity and the associated discussionselements of state capacity during the transition from one

Doyle, Jr, Thomas Martin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Capacity Markets for Electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Designing Markets for Electricity. Wiley IEEE Press. [25]in the England and Wales Electricity Market”, Power WorkingFelder (1996), “Should Electricity Markets Have a Capacity

Creti, Anna; Fabra, Natalia

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

ORISE: Capacity Building  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capacity Building Because public health agencies must maintain the resources to respond to public health challenges, critical situations and emergencies, the Oak Ridge Institute...

130

DOE Science Showcase - Cool roofs, cool research, at DOE | OSTI...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Accelerator returns cool roof documents from 6 DOE Databases Executive Order on Sustainability Secretary Chu Announces Steps to Implement One Cool Roof Cool Roofs Lead to Cooler...

131

U.S. Refinery Thermal Cracking, Other (including Gas Oil ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Refinery Thermal Cracking, Other (including Gas Oil) Downstream Charge Capacity as of January 1 (Barrels per Stream Day)

132

Cryogenics for the MuCool Test Area (MTA)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

MuCool Test Area (MTA) is a complex of buildings at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, which are dedicated to operate components of a cooling cell to be used for Muon Collider and Neutrino Factory R&D. The long-term goal of this facility is to test ionization cooling principles by operating a 25-liter liquid hydrogen (LH{sub 2}) absorber embedded in a 5 Tesla superconducting solenoid magnet. The MTA solenoid magnet will be used with RF cavities exposed to a high intensity beam. Cryogens used at the MTA include LHe, LN{sub 2} and LH{sub 2}. The latter dictates stringent system design for hazardous locations. The cryogenic plant is a modified Tevatron refrigerator based on the Claude cycle. The implementation of an in-house refrigerator system and two 300 kilowatt screw compressors is under development. The helium refrigeration capacity is 500 W at 14 K. In addition the MTA solenoid magnet will be batch-filled with LHe every 2 days using the same cryo-plant. This paper reviews cryogenic systems used to support the Muon Collider and Neutrino Factory R&D programs and emphasizes the feasibility of handling cryogenic equipment at MTA in a safe manner.

Darve, Christine; Norris, Barry; Pei, Liu-Jin; /Fermilab

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Space Heating and Cooling  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A wide variety of technologies are available for heating and cooling homes and other buildings. In addition, many heating and cooling systems have certain supporting equipment in common, such as...

134

Cooling System Functions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...size Flow restrictions Heat exchanger size and design All of these factors must be considered. Every component in the cooling

135

Performance analysis of heat transfer processes from wet and dry surfaces : cooling towers and heat exchangers.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The objective of this work is to study the thermal and hydraulic performance of evaporatively cooled heat exchangers, including closed wet cooling towers, and dry… (more)

Hasan, Ala Ali

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Performance Analysis of Heat Transfer Processes from Wet and Dry Surfaces: Cooling Towers and Heat Exchangers.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The objective of this work is to study the thermal and hydraulic performance of evaporatively cooled heat exchangers, including closed wet cooling towers, and dry… (more)

Hasan, Ala Ali

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Capacity on Finsler Spaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Here, the concept of electric capacity on Finsler spaces is introduced and the fundamental conformal invariant property is proved, i.e. the capacity of a compact set on a connected non-compact Finsler manifold is conformal invariant. This work enables mathematicians and theoretical physicists to become more familiar with the global Finsler geometry and one of its new applications.

Bidabad, B

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Liquid heat capacity lasers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The heat capacity laser concept is extended to systems in which the heat capacity lasing media is a liquid. The laser active liquid is circulated from a reservoir (where the bulk of the media and hence waste heat resides) through a channel so configured for both optical pumping of the media for gain and for light amplification from the resulting gain.

Comaskey, Brian J. (Walnut Creek, CA); Scheibner, Karl F. (Tracy, CA); Ault, Earl R. (Livermore, CA)

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Microsoft PowerPoint - Cool Roofs_090804  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

for: for: Quarterly Facilities and Infrastructure Meeting Presented by: The Office of Engineering and Construction Management Content Excerpted From Presentation of: Bob Schmidt - NNSA Kansas City Plant Cool Roofs - An Overview August 4, 2009 2 *The terms "white roof" and "cool roof" are often mistakenly used interchangeably. A white roof is not necessarily a cool roof and a cool roof is not necessarily white. *"Cool Roofs" come in many style as defined by industry standard and can include: Metal Single ply Modified bitumen Acrylic coated White Roof vs. Cool Roof 3 Solar reflectance alone can significantly influence surface temperature, with the white stripe on the brick wall about 5 to 10° F (3-5° C) cooler than the surrounding, darker

140

Cooling load estimation methods  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Ongoing research on quantifying the cooling loads in residential buildings, particularly buildings with passive solar heating systems, is described. Correlations are described that permit auxiliary cooling estimates from monthly average insolation and weather data. The objective of the research is to develop a simple analysis method, useful early in design, to estimate the annual cooling energy required of a given building.

McFarland, R.D.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes cooling capacity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Cooling Water System Optimization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

During summer months, many manufacturing plants have to cut back in rates because the cooling water system is not providing sufficient cooling to support higher production rates. There are many low/no-cost techniques available to improve tower performance. To understand the importance of the optimization techniques, cooling tower theory will be discussed first.

Aegerter, R.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Stochastic cooling in RHIC  

SciTech Connect

After the success of longitudinal stochastic cooling of bunched heavy ion beam in RHIC, transverse stochastic cooling in the vertical plane of Yellow ring was installed and is being commissioned with proton beam. This report presents the status of the effort and gives an estimate, based on simulation, of the RHIC luminosity with stochastic cooling in all planes.

Brennan,J.M.; Blaskiewicz, M. M.; Severino, F.

2009-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

143

Natural Cooling Retrofit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Substantial numbers of existing plants and buildings are found to depend solely upon Mechanical Cooling even though Natural Cooling techniques could be employed utilizing ambient air. Most of these facilities were constructed without Natural Cooling capability due to 'first cost' budget constraints when the cost and availability of energy were of little concern.

Fenster, L. C.; Grantier, A. J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Quantum noise in photothermal cooling  

SciTech Connect

We study the problem of cooling a mechanical oscillator using the photothermal (bolometric) force. Contrary to previous attempts to model this system, we take into account the noise effects due to the granular nature of photon absorption. We achieve this by developing a Langevin formalism for the motion of the cantilever, valid in the bad-cavity limit, which includes both photon absorption shot noise and the noise due to radiation pressure. This allows us to tackle the cooling problem down to the noise-dominated regime and to find reasonable estimates for the lowest achievable phonon occupation in the cantilever.

De Liberato, Simone [Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Lambert, Neill [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, Wako-shi, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Nori, Franco [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, Wako-shi, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Physics Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

145

Quantum Capacities of Channels with small Environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the quantum capacity of noisy quantum channels which can be represented by coupling a system to an effectively small environment. A capacity formula is derived for all cases where both system and environment are two-dimensional--including all extremal qubit channels. Similarly, for channels acting on higher dimensional systems we show that the capacity can be determined if the channel arises from a sufficiently small coupling to a qubit environment. Extensions to instances of channels with larger environment are provided and it is shown that bounds on the capacity with unconstrained environment can be obtained from decompositions into channels with small environment.

Michael M. Wolf; David Perez-Garcia

2006-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

146

capacity | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

capacity capacity Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 9, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts. The data is broken down into power only, combined heat and power, cumulative planned additions, cumulative unplanned conditions, and cumulative retirements and total electric power sector capacity . Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO capacity consumption EIA Electricity generating Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Electricity Generating Capacity- Reference Case (xls, 130.1 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment

147

Battery capacity indicator  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a battery capacity indicator for providing a continuous indication of battery capacity for a battery powered device. It comprises means for periodically effecting a first and a second positive discharge rate of the battery; voltage measurement means, for measuring the battery terminal voltage at the first and second positive discharge rates during the operation of the device, and for generating a differential battery voltage value in response thereto; memory means for storing a set of predetermined differential battery voltage values and a set of predetermined battery capacity values, each of the set of predetermined differential battery voltage values defining one of the set of predetermined battery capacity values; comparison means, coupled to the memory means and to the voltage measurement means, for comparing the measured differential battery voltage values with the set of predetermined differential battery voltage values, and for selecting the predetermined battery capacity value corresponding thereto.

Kunznicki, W.J.

1991-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

148

Turbine stator vane segment having internal cooling circuits  

SciTech Connect

A turbine stator vane includes outer and inner walls each having outer and inner chambers and a vane extending between the outer and inner walls. The vane includes first, second, third, fourth and fifth cavities for flowing a cooling medium. The cooling medium enters the outer chamber of the outer wall, flows through an impingement plate for impingement cooling of the outer band wall defining in part the hot gas path and through openings in the first, second and fourth cavities for flow radially inwardly, cooling the vane. The spent cooling medium flows into the inner wall and inner chamber for flow through an impingement plate radially outwardly to cool the inner wall. The spent cooling medium flows through the third cavity for egress from the turbine vane segment from the outer wall. The first, second or third cavities contain inserts having impingement openings for impingement cooling of the vane walls. The fifth cavity provides air cooling for the trailing edge.

Jones, Raymond Joseph (Oxford, MA); Burns, James Lee (Schenectady, NY); Bojappa, Parvangada Ganapathy (Simpsonville, SC); Jones, Schotsch Margaret (Greer, SC)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Working and Net Available Shell Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working and Net Available Shell Storage Capacity Working and Net Available Shell Storage Capacity With Data for September 2013 | Release Date: November 27, 2013 | Next Release Date: May 29, 2013 Previous Issues Year: September 2013 March 2013 September 2012 March 2012 September 2011 March 2011 September 2010 Go Containing storage capacity data for crude oil, petroleum products, and selected biofuels. The report includes tables detailing working and net available shell storage capacity by type of facility, product, and Petroleum Administration for Defense District (PAD District). Net available shell storage capacity is broken down further to show the percent for exclusive use by facility operators and the percent leased to others. Crude oil storage capacity data are also provided for Cushing, Oklahoma, an

150

Channel capacities via $p$-summing norms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we show how \\emph{the metric theory of tensor products} developed by Grothendieck perfectly fits in the study of channel capacities, a central topic in \\emph{Shannon's information theory}. Furthermore, in the last years Shannon's theory has been generalized to the quantum setting to let the \\emph{quantum information theory} step in. In this paper we consider the classical capacity of quantum channels with restricted assisted entanglement. In particular these capacities include the classical capacity and the unlimited entanglement-assisted classical capacity of a quantum channel. To deal with the quantum case we will use the noncommutative version of $p$-summing maps. More precisely, we prove that the (product state) classical capacity of a quantum channel with restricted assisted entanglement can be expressed as the derivative of a completely $p$-summing norm.

Marius Junge; Carlos palazuelos

2013-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

151

A Successful Cool Storage Rate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Houston Lighting & Power (HL&P) initiated design and development of its commercial cool storage program as part of an integrated resource planning process with a targeted 225 MW of demand reduction through DSM. Houston's extensive commercial air conditioning load, which is highly coincident with HL&P's system peak, provided a large market for cool storage technologies. Initial market research made it very clear that a special cool storage rate was required to successfully market the technology. Development of the rate required an integrated, multidepartment effort and extensive use of DSManager, an integrated resource planning model. An experimental version of the rate was initially implemented as part of the initial phase of the cool storage program. A permanent rate, incorporating lessons learned from the experimental rate, was then developed for the long term implementation of the program. The permanent rate went through a lengthy regulatory approval process which included intervention by a local natural gas distribution company. The end result is a very successful cool storage program with 52 projects and 31 megawatts of demand reduction in the first three and one-half years of program implementation.

Ahrens, A. C.; Sobey, T. M.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Cooling water distribution system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A passive containment cooling system for a nuclear reactor containment vessel. Disclosed is a cooling water distribution system for introducing cooling water by gravity uniformly over the outer surface of a steel containment vessel using an interconnected series of radial guide elements, a plurality of circumferential collector elements and collector boxes to collect and feed the cooling water into distribution channels extending along the curved surface of the steel containment vessel. The cooling water is uniformly distributed over the curved surface by a plurality of weirs in the distribution channels.

Orr, Richard (Pittsburgh, PA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

OpenEI - Electric Capacity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

New Zealand Energy New Zealand Energy Outlook (2010): Electricity and Generation Capacity http://en.openei.org/datasets/node/357 The New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development publishes an annual Energy Outlook, which presents projections of New Zealand's future energy supply, demand, prices and greenhouse gas emissions. The principle aim of these projections is to inform the national energy debate. Included here are the model results for electricity and generation capacity. The spreadsheet provides an interactive tool for selecting which model results to view, and which scenarios to evaluate; full model results for each scenario are also included.

License

154

New Zealand Energy Data: Electricity Generating Capacity by Fuel...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of Economic Development publishes energy data including many datasets related to electricity. Included here are three electricity generating capacity datasets: annual...

155

Cooling air recycling for gas turbine transition duct end frame and related method  

SciTech Connect

A method of cooling a transition duct end frame in a gas turbine includes the steps of a) directing cooling air into the end frame from a region external of the transition duct and the impingement cooling sleeve; and b) redirecting the cooling air from the end frame into the annulus between the transition duct and the impingement cooling sleeve.

Cromer, Robert Harold (Johnstown, NY); Bechtel, William Theodore (Scotia, NY); Sutcu, Maz (Niskayuna, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

SOLERAS solar cooling project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In view of the increasing demand for cooling in both the United States and Saudi Arabia, solar cooling systems are being considered as serious alternatives to the energy intensive conventional systems, especially when confronted with rising fossil fuel costs. Saudi Arabia and the hot, southern regions of the United States, having abundant sunshine and high cooling demand, are obvious candidates for solar active cooling systems and passive cooling design. Solar active cooling has yet to be shown to be either technologically mature or economically feasible, but efforts have been, and are presently being made within the United States National Solar Cooling Program to develop reliable systems which can compete economically with conventional cooling systems. Currently, the program is funding research and development projects in the areas of absorption, Rankine, dessicant, and advanced technologies. Saudi Arabia has a long and successful tradition of building cooling using passive architectural designs. Combining these past achievements with a program of research and development in both active and passive solar cooling should permit an early economical introduction of entirely solar cooled buildings to Saudi Arabia and the southern United States.

Corcoleotes, G.; Williamson, J.S.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

GAS COOLED NUCLEAR REACTORS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas-cooled nuclear reactor consisting of a graphite reacting core and reflector structure supported in a containing vessel is described. A gas sealing means is included for sealing between the walls of the graphite structure and containing vessel to prevent the gas coolant by-passing the reacting core. The reacting core is a multi-sided right prismatic structure having a pair of parallel slots around its periphery. The containing vessel is cylindrical and has a rib on its internal surface which supports two continuous ring shaped flexible web members with their radially innermost ends in sealing engagement within the radially outermost portion of the slots. The core structure is supported on ball bearings. This design permits thermal expansion of the core stracture and vessel while maintainirg a peripheral seal between the tvo elements.

Long, E.; Rodwell, W.

1958-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

158

CoolEarth formerly Cool Earth Solar | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CoolEarth formerly Cool Earth Solar CoolEarth formerly Cool Earth Solar Jump to: navigation, search Name CoolEarth (formerly Cool Earth Solar) Place Livermore, California Zip 94550 Product CoolEarth is a concentrated PV developer using inflatable concentrators to focus light onto triple-junction cells. References CoolEarth (formerly Cool Earth Solar)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. CoolEarth (formerly Cool Earth Solar) is a company located in Livermore, California . References ↑ "CoolEarth (formerly Cool Earth Solar)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=CoolEarth_formerly_Cool_Earth_Solar&oldid=343892" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations

159

Inclusion of cool roofs in nonresidential Title 24 prescriptiverequirements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Roofs that have high solar reflectance (high ability toreflect sunlight) and high thermal emittance (high ability to radiateheat) tend to stay cool in the sun. The same is true of low-emittanceroofs with exceptionally high solar reflectance. Substituting a cool rooffor a non-cool roof tends to decrease cooling electricity use, coolingpower demand, and cooling-equipment capacity requirements, while slightlyincreasing heating energy consumption. Cool roofs can also lower citywideambient air temperature in summer, slowing ozone formation and increasinghuman comfort.DOE-2.1E building energy simulations indicate that use of acool roofing material on a prototypical California nonresidential (NR)building with a low-sloped roof yields average annual cooling energysavings of approximately 3.2 kW h/m2 (300 kW h/1000 ft2), average annualnatural gas deficits of 5.6 MJ/m2 (4.9 therm/1000 ft2), average annualsource energy savings of 30 MJ/m2 (2.6 MBTU/1000 ft2), and average peakpower demand savings of 2.1 W/m2 (0.19 kW/1000 ft2). The 15-year netpresent value (NPV) of energy savings averages $4.90/m2 ($450/1000 ft2)with time-dependent valuation (TDV), and $4.00/m2 ($370/1000 ft2) withoutTDV. When cost savings from downsizing cooling equipment are included,the average total savings (15-year NPV+equipment savings) rises to$5.90/m2 ($550/1000 ft2) with TDV, and to $5.00/m2 ($470/1000 ft2)without TDV.Total savings range from 1.90 to 8.30 $/m2 (0.18 0.77 $/ft2)with TDV, and from 1.70 to 7.10 $/m2 (0.16 0.66 $/ft2) without TDV,across California's 16 climate zones. The typical cost premium for a coolroof is 0.00 2.20 $/m2 (0.00 0.20 $/ft2). Cool roofs with premiums up to$2.20/m2 ($0.20/ft2) are expected to be cost effective in climate zones 216; those with premiums not exceeding $1.90/m2 ($0.18/ft2) are expectedto be also cost effective in climate zone 1. Hence, this study recommendsthat the year-2005 California building energy efficiency code (Title 24,Part 6 of the California Code of Regulations) for NR buildings withlow-sloped roofs include a cool-roof prescriptive requirement in allCalifornia climate zones. Buildings with roofs that do not meetprescriptive requirements may comply with the code via an"overall-envelope" approach (non-metal roofs only), or via a performanceapproach (all roof types).

Levinson, Ronnen; Akbari, Hashem; Konopacki, Steve; Bretz, Sarah

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Lateral Capacity Exchange and Its Impact on Capacity Investment Decisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the problem of capacity exchange between two …rms in anticipation of the mismatch between demand and capacity and its impact on …rm’s capacity investment decisions. For given capacity investment levels of the two …rms, we demonstrate how capacity price may be determined and how much capacity should be exchanged when either manufacturer acts as a Stackelberg leader in the capacity exchange game. By benchmarking against the centralized system, we show that a side payment may be used to coordinate the capacity exchange decisions. We then study the …rms’capacity investment decisions using a biform game framework in which capacity investment decisions are made individually and exchange decisions are made as in a centralized system. We demonstrate the existence and uniqueness of the Nash equilibrium capacity investment levels and study the impact of …rms’share of the capacity exchange surplus on their capacity investment levels.

Amiya K. Chakravartyz; Jun Zhangy

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes cooling capacity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Capacity Markets for Electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Global Agenda, August 15. [6] FERC, Docket No. EL01-63-003,at http://www.pjm.com. [7] FERC, Docket No. ER01-1440-capacity of the others” (FERC, 2001). Therefore, if an LSE

Creti, Anna; Fabra, Natalia

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

IEP - Water-Energy Interface: Advanced Cooling Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cooling Technology Cooling Technology This component of the program is focused on research to develop technologies that improve performance and reduce costs associated with wet cooling, dry cooling, and hybrid cooling technologies. In addition, the research area covers innovative methods to control bio-fouling of cooling water intake structures as well as advances in intake structure systems. Read More! It is technically possible to cool power plants with minimal water use. However, at this time such cooling methods are not as economically feasible as traditional cooling systems. Additional research and development is necessary to develop cooling systems that use as little water as possible, but at a reasonable cost. Water intake structures are also an area of concern, especially considering the Clean Water Act 316(b) regulation which requires that the location, design, construction, and capacity of cooling water intake structures reflect the best technology available for minimizing adverse environmental impact. With plant intake structures, the particular concern is impingement and entrainment of aquatic organisms.

163

Cavity cooling of a single atom  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

All conventional methods to laser-cool atoms rely on repeated cycles of optical pumping and spontaneous emission of a photon by the atom. Spontaneous emission in a random direction is the dissipative mechanism required to remove entropy from the atom. However, alternative cooling methods have been proposed for a single atom strongly coupled to a high-finesse cavity; the role of spontaneous emission is replaced by the escape of a photon from the cavity. Application of such cooling schemes would improve the performance of atom cavity systems for quantum information processing. Furthermore, as cavity cooling does not rely on spontaneous emission, it can be applied to systems that cannot be laser-cooled by conventional methods; these include molecules (which do not have a closed transition) and collective excitations of Bose condensates, which are destroyed by randomly directed recoil kicks. Here we demonstrate cavity cooling of single rubidium atoms stored in an intracavity dipole trap. The cooling mechanism results in extended storage times and improved localization of atoms. We estimate that the observed cooling rate is at least five times larger than that produced by free-space cooling methods, for comparable excitation of the atom.

P. Maunz; T. Puppe; I. Schuster; N. Syassen; P. W. H. Pinkse; G. Rempe

2004-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

164

Forward capacity market CONEfusion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In ISO New England and PJM it was assumed that sponsors of new capacity projects would offer them into the newly established forward centralized capacity markets at prices based on their levelized net cost of new entry, or ''Net CONE.'' But the FCCMs have not operated in the way their proponents had expected. To clear up the CONEfusion, FCCM designs should be reconsidered to adapt them to the changing circumstances and to be grounded in realistic expectations of market conduct. (author)

Wilson, James F.

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

165

Engineering and cost analysis of a dry cooling system augmented with a thermal storage pond  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An engineering and cost study of the capacitive thermal storage pond added to a state-of-the-art dry cooling system is described. The purpose of the study was to assess the potential for reducing the cost of all-dry cooling for thermal electric power plants using a dry cooling system that includes a thermal storage pond. Using the modified BNW-I computer code, the effect of varying significant design parameters was investigated. The parametric study included studying the effects of varying turbine type, pond size, replacement energy costing, capacity penalty methodology, pond location with respect to the dry cooling tower, design temperature, and site location (meteorology). Incremental power production costs for dry cooling (i.e., the portion of the cost of bus-bar electricity from the plant which is attributable to the cost of building and operating the heat rejection system) with a thermal storage pond system were determined for meteorologies of both Wyodak, Wyoming and Phoenix, Arizona. For Wyodak the incremental cost of dry cooling with a thermal storage pond was 2.81 mills/kWh as compared to 2.55 mills/kWh for a system without a thermal storage pond. For Phoenix the incremental cost of dry cooling with a thermal storage pond was 3.66 mills/kWh as compared to 4.31 mills/kWh for a system without a thermal storage pond. If the use of a modified conventional turbine with the dry-cooled system is stipulated in order to stay with proven technology for large turbines, then results of this study show that in extremely hot climates the thermal storage pond can reduce the cost of dry cooling. If no cost penalty is assigned to high back pressure turbines and it can be used, then the thermal storage pond has no advantage in hot climates. However, collateral use of the pond for makeup or emergency cooling water storage may decreae the cost. (LCL)

Drost, M.K.; Allemann, R.T.

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Stochastic cooling in RHIC  

SciTech Connect

The full 6-dimensional [x,x'; y,y'; z,z'] stochastic cooling system for RHIC was completed and operational for the FY12 Uranium-Uranium collider run. Cooling enhances the integrated luminosity of the Uranium collisions by a factor of 5, primarily by reducing the transverse emittances but also by cooling in the longitudinal plane to preserve the bunch length. The components have been deployed incrementally over the past several runs, beginning with longitudinal cooling, then cooling in the vertical planes but multiplexed between the Yellow and Blue rings, next cooling both rings simultaneously in vertical (the horizontal plane was cooled by betatron coupling), and now simultaneous horizontal cooling has been commissioned. The system operated between 5 and 9 GHz and with 3 x 10{sup 8} Uranium ions per bunch and produces a cooling half-time of approximately 20 minutes. The ultimate emittance is determined by the balance between cooling and emittance growth from Intra-Beam Scattering. Specific details of the apparatus and mathematical techniques for calculating its performance have been published elsewhere. Here we report on: the method of operation, results with beam, and comparison of results to simulations.

Brennan J. M.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Mernick, K.

2012-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

167

Design and Operating Guidelines Manual for Cooling-Water Treatment - Treatment of Recirculated Cooling Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This preliminary manual was developed to provide a systematic procedure for evaluating candidate strategies for the treatment of recirculated cooling water. It presents (1) a means of selecting optimal treatment methods and facilities on the basis of technical and economic considerations, and (2) guidelines for proper cooling-water system operation. Descriptions of, and user's manuals for, the cooling-system process and chemical equilibrium computer simulation models are included.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Parametric Study of Turbine Blade Internal Cooling and Film Cooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas turbine engines are extensively used in the aviation and power generation industries. They are used as topping cycles in combined cycle power plants, or as stand alone power generation units. Gains in thermodynamic efficiency can be realized by increasing the turbine inlet temperatures. Since modern turbine inlet temperatures exceed the melting point of the constituent superalloys, it is necessary to provide an aggressive cooling system. Relatively cool air, ducted from the compressor of the engine is used to remove heat from the hot turbine blade. This air flows through passages in the hollow blade (internal cooling), and is also ejected onto the surface of the blade to form an insulating film (film cooling). Modern land-based gas turbine engines use high Reynolds number internal flow to cool their internal passages. The first part of this study focuses on experiments pertaining to passages with Reynolds numbers of up to 400,000. Common turbulator designs (45degree parallel sharp-edged and round-edged) ribs are studied. Older correlations are found to require corrections in order to be valid in the high Reynolds number parameter space. The effect of rotation on heat transfer in a typical three-pass serpentine channel is studied using a computational model with near-wall refinement. Results from this computational study indicate that the hub experiences abnormally high heat transfer under rotation. An experimental study is conducted at Buoyancy numbers similar to an actual engine on a wedge shaped model trailing edge, roughened with pin-fins and equipped with slot ejection. Results show an asymmetery between the leading and trailing surfaces due to rotation - a difference which is subdued due to the provision of pin-fins. Film cooling effectiveness is measured by the PSP mass transfer analogy technique in two different configurations: a flat plate and a typical high pressure turbine blade. Parameters studied include a step immediately upstream of a row of holes; the Strouhal number (quantifying rotor-stator interaction) and coolant to mainstream density ratio. Results show a deterioration in film cooling effectiveness with on increasing the Strouhal number. Using a coolant with a higher density results in higher film cooling effectiveness.

Rallabandi, Akhilesh P.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Alternatives to compressor cooling in California climates  

SciTech Connect

This review and discussion has been prepared for the California Institute for Energy Efficiency (CIEE) to examine research on alternatives to compressor cooling. The report focuses on strategies for eliminating compressors in California's transition climates -- moderately warm areas located between the cool coastal regions and the hot central regions. Many of these strategies could also help reduce compressor use in hotter climates. Compressor-driven cooling of residences in California's transition climate regions is an undesirable load for California's electric utilities because load factor is poor and usage is typically high during periods of system peak demand. We review a number of alternatives to compressors, including low-energy strategies: evaporative cooling, natural and induced ventilation, reflective coatings, shading with vegetation and improved glazing, thermal storage, and radiative cooling. Also included are two energy-intensive strategies: absorption cooling and desiccant cooling. Our literature survey leads us to conclude that many of these strategies, used either singly or in combination, are technically and economically feasible alternatives to compressor-driven cooling. 78 refs., 8 figs.

Feustel, H. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)); de Almeida, A. (Coimbra Univ. (Portugal). Dept. of Electrical Engineering); Blumstein, C. (California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Universitywide Energy Research Group)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Thermal Storage with Conventional Cooling Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The newly opened Pennsylvania Convention Center in Philadelphia, PA; Exxon's Computer Facility at Florham Park, NJ; The Center Square Building in Philadelphia, are success stories for demand shifting through thermal storage. These buildings employ a simple thermal energy storage system that already exists in almost every structure - concrete. Thermal storage calculations simulate sub-cooling of a building's structure during unoccupied times. During occupied times, the sub-cooled concrete reduces peak cooling demand, thereby lowering demand and saving money. In addition, significant savings are possible in the first cost of chilled water equipment, and the smaller chillers run at peak capacity and efficiency during a greater portion of their run time. The building, controlled by an Energy Management and Control System (EMCS), "learns" from past experience how to run the building efficiently. The result is an optimized balance between energy cost and comfort.

Kieninger, R. T.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

SIMULATION OF A SOLAR ABSORPTION COOLING SYSTEM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes the dynamic modeling of a solar absorption cooling plant that will be built for both research and demonstration purposes by the end of 2007. The synchronizing of cooling loads with solar radiation intensity is an important advantage when utilizing solar energy in air conditioning in buildings. The first part of this work deals with the dynamic modeling of an evacuated tube collector. A field of these collectors feed a single-effect absorption chiller of 35 kW nominal cooling capacity. The simulation model has been done in a modular way under TRNSYS16. In a second part, simulation and optimization of the system has been investigated in order to determine the effect of several parameters (collector area, tank volume...) on chiller performance.

J. P. Praene; D. Morau; F. Lucas; F. Garde; H. Boyer; J. P. Praene

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Passive containment cooling system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A containment cooling system utilizes a naturally induced air flow and a gravity flow of water over the containment shell which encloses a reactor core to cool reactor core decay heat in two stages. When core decay heat is greatest, the water and air flow combine to provide adequate evaporative cooling as heat from within the containment is transferred to the water flowing over the same. The water is heated by heat transfer and then evaporated and removed by the air flow. After an initial period of about three to four days when core decay heat is greatest, air flow alone is sufficient to cool the containment.

Conway, Lawrence E. (Robinson Township, Allegheny County, PA); Stewart, William A. (Penn Hills Township, Allegheny County, PA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Power electronics cooling apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A semiconductor cooling arrangement wherein a semiconductor is affixed to a thermally and electrically conducting carrier such as by brazing. The coefficient of thermal expansion of the semiconductor and carrier are closely matched to one another so that during operation they will not be overstressed mechanically due to thermal cycling. Electrical connection is made to the semiconductor and carrier, and a porous metal heat exchanger is thermally connected to the carrier. The heat exchanger is positioned within an electrically insulating cooling assembly having cooling oil flowing therethrough. The arrangement is particularly well adapted for the cooling of high power switching elements in a power bridge.

Sanger, Philip Albert (Monroeville, PA); Lindberg, Frank A. (Baltimore, MD); Garcen, Walter (Glen Burnie, MD)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Energy Basics: Cooling Systems  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

or "swamp cooling" provides an experience like air conditioning, but with much lower energy use. An evaporative cooler uses the outside air's heat to evaporate water inside the...

175

Process Cooling Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cooling towers have been on the scene for more than 50 years. It is because they have proven to be an economic choice for waste heat dissipation. But it seems, for some reason, that after installation very little attention is paid to the cooling-tower and its effect on plant operating efficiency and production. This paper will describe the value of working with a cooling tower specialist to establish the physical and thermal potential of an existing cooling tower. It also demonstrates that a repair and thermal upgrade project to improve efficiency will have a better than average return on investment.

McCann, C. J.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Capacity degradation of field-tested silica gel samples  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Researchers at the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) have begun preliminary studies to quantify the effect of contamination of silica gel used in dehumidification processes of desiccant cooling systems. Sorption capacity degradation of field tested samples was measured, and the source of degradation was quantified using surface analysis experimental methods.

Penney, T.R.; Pesaran, A.A.; Thomas, T.M.

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

The state of the art in hadron beam cooling  

SciTech Connect

Cooling of hadron beams (including heavy-ions) is a powerful technique by which accelerator facilities around the world achieve the necessary beam brightness for their physics research. In this paper, we will give an overview of the latest developments in hadron beam cooling, for which high energy electron cooling at Fermilab's Recycler ring and bunched beam stochastic cooling at Brookhaven National Laboratory's RHIC facility represent two recent major accomplishments. Novel ideas in the field will also be introduced.

Prost, L.R.; Derwent, P.; /Fermilab

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Floating power optimization studies for the cooling system of a geothermal power plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The floating power concept was studied for a geothermal power plant as a method of increasing the plant efficiency and decreasing the cost of geothermal power. The stored cooling concept was studied as a method of reducing the power fluctuations of the floating power concept. The studies include parametric and optimization studies for a variety of different types of cooling systems including wet and dry cooling towers, direct and indirect cooling systems, forced and natural draft cooling towers, and cooling ponds. The studies use an indirect forced draft wet cooling tower cooling system as a base case design for comparison purposes.

Shaffer, C.J.

1977-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Cavity cooling of a single atom  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

All conventional methods to laser-cool atoms rely on repeated cycles of optical pumping and spontaneous emission of a photon by the atom. Spontaneous emission in a random direction is the dissipative mechanism required to remove entropy from the atom. However, alternative cooling methods have been proposed1, 2 for a single atom strongly coupled to a high-finesse cavity; the role of spontaneous emission is replaced by the escape of a photon from the cavity. Application of such cooling schemes would improve the performance of atom cavity systems for quantum information processing3, 4. Furthermore, as cavity cooling does not rely on spontaneous emission, it can be applied to systems that cannot be laser-cooled by conventional methods; these include molecules2 (which do not have a closed transition) and collective excitations of

P. Maunz; I. Schuster; N. Syassen; P. W. H. Pinkse; G. Rempe

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Cooling system for a nuclear reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cooling system for a gas-cooled nuclear reactor is disclosed which includes at least one primary cooling loop adapted to pass coolant gas from the reactor core and an associated steam generator through a duct system having a main circulator therein, and at least one auxiliary cooling loop having communication with the reactor core and adapted to selectively pass coolant gas through an auxiliary heat exchanger and circulator. The main and auxiliary circulators are installed in a common vertical cavity in the reactor vessel, and a common return duct communicates with the reactor core and intersects the common cavity at a junction at which is located a flow diverter valve operative to effect coolant flow through either the primary or auxiliary cooling loops.

Amtmann, Hans H. (Rancho Santa Fe, CA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes cooling capacity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Reducing home heating and cooling costs  

SciTech Connect

This report is in response to a request from the House Committee on Energy and Commerce that the Energy Information Administration (EIA) undertake a neutral, unbiased analysis of the cost, safety, and health and environmental effects of the three major heating fuels: heating oil, natural gas, and electricity. The Committee also asked EIA to examine the role of conservation in the choice of heating and cooling fuel. To accommodate a wide audience, EIA decided to respond to the Committee`s request in the context of a report on reducing home heating and cooling costs. Accordingly, this report discusses ways to weatherize the home, compares the features of the three major heating and cooling fuels, and comments on the types of heating and cooling systems on the market. The report also includes a worksheet and supporting tables that will help in the selection of a heating and/or cooling system.

Not Available

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Refinery Capacity Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Refinery Capacity Report Refinery Capacity Report June 2013 With Data as of January 1, 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other Federal agencies. Table 1. Number and Capacity of Operable Petroleum Refineries by PAD District and State as of January 1, 2013

183

Dual capacity reciprocating compressor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A multi-cylinder compressor particularly useful in connection with northern climate heat pumps and in which different capacities are available in accordance with reversing motor rotation is provided with an eccentric cam on a crank pin under a fraction of the connecting rods, and arranged for rotation upon the crank pin between opposite positions 180[degree] apart so that with cam rotation on the crank pin such that the crank throw is at its normal maximum value all pistons pump at full capacity, and with rotation of the crank shaft in the opposite direction the cam moves to a circumferential position on the crank pin such that the overall crank throw is zero. Pistons whose connecting rods ride on a crank pin without a cam pump their normal rate with either crank rotational direction. Thus a small clearance volume is provided for any piston that moves when in either capacity mode of operation. 6 figs.

Wolfe, R.W.

1984-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

184

Dual capacity reciprocating compressor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A multi-cylinder compressor 10 particularly useful in connection with northern climate heat pumps and in which different capacities are available in accordance with reversing motor 16 rotation is provided with an eccentric cam 38 on a crank pin 34 under a fraction of the connecting rods, and arranged for rotation upon the crank pin between opposite positions 180.degree. apart so that with cam rotation on the crank pin such that the crank throw is at its normal maximum value all pistons pump at full capacity, and with rotation of the crank shaft in the opposite direction the cam moves to a circumferential position on the crank pin such that the overall crank throw is zero. Pistons 24 whose connecting rods 30 ride on a crank pin 36 without a cam pump their normal rate with either crank rotational direction. Thus a small clearance volume is provided for any piston that moves when in either capacity mode of operation.

Wolfe, Robert W. (Wilkinsburg, PA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Acoustic cooling engine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An acoustic cooling engine with improved thermal performance and reduced internal losses comprises a compressible fluid contained in a resonant pressure vessel. The fluid has a substantial thermal expansion coefficient and is capable of supporting an acoustic standing wave. A thermodynamic element has first and second ends and is located in the resonant pressure vessel in thermal communication with the fluid. The thermal response of the thermodynamic element to the acoustic standing wave pumps heat from the second end to the first end. The thermodynamic element permits substantial flow of the fluid through the thermodynamic element. An acoustic driver cyclically drives the fluid with an acoustic standing wave. The driver is at a location of maximum acoustic impedance in the resonant pressure vessel and proximate the first end of the thermodynamic element. A hot heat exchanger is adjacent to and in thermal communication with the first end of the thermodynamic element. The hot heat exchanger conducts heat from the first end to portions of the resonant pressure vessel proximate the hot heat exchanger. The hot heat exchanger permits substantial flow of the fluid through the hot heat exchanger. The resonant pressure vessel can include a housing less than one quarter wavelength in length coupled to a reservoir. The housing can include a reduced diameter portion communicating with the reservoir. The frequency of the acoustic driver can be continuously controlled so as to maintain resonance.

Hofler, Thomas J. (Los Alamos, NM); Wheatley, John C. (Los Alamos, NM); Swift, Gregory W. (Santa Fe, NM); Migliori, Albert (Santa Fe, NM)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Cooling circuit for and method of cooling a gas turbine bucket  

SciTech Connect

A closed internal cooling circuit for a gas turbine bucket includes axial supply and return passages in the dovetail of the bucket. A first radial outward supply passage provides cooling medium to and along a passageway adjacent the leading edge and then through serpentine arranged passageways within the airfoil to a chamber adjacent the airfoil tip. A second radial passage crosses over the radial return passage for supplying cooling medium to and along a pair of passageways along the trailing edge of the airfoil section. The last passageway of the serpentine passageways and the pair of passageways communicate one with the other in the chamber for returning spent cooling medium radially inwardly along divided return passageways to the return passage. In this manner, both the leading and trailing edges are cooled using the highest pressure, lowest temperature cooling medium.

Jacala, Ariel C. P. (Simpsonville, SC)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Gas hydrate cool storage system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention presented relates to the development of a process utilizing a gas hydrate as a cool storage medium for alleviating electric load demands during peak usage periods. Several objectives of the invention are mentioned concerning the formation of the gas hydrate as storage material in a thermal energy storage system within a heat pump cycle system. The gas hydrate was formed using a refrigerant in water and an example with R-12 refrigerant is included. (BCS)

Ternes, M.P.; Kedl, R.J.

1984-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

188

Liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors with passive cooling system  

SciTech Connect

A liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor having a passive cooling system for removing residual heat resulting from fuel decay during reactor shutdown. The passive cooling system comprises a plurality of cooling medium flow circuits which cooperate to remove and carry heat away from the fuel core upon loss of the normal cooling flow circuit to areas external thereto.

Hunsbedt, Anstein (Los Gatos, CA); Fanning, Alan W. (San Jose, CA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Operating Experience and Economic Assessment of Commercial and Industrial Cool Storage Systems - TVA Case Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal storage systems offer utilities a means to change the energy use patterns of both residential and commercial and industrial (C&I) customers by moving water-heating and space-conditioning loads from peak to offpeak periods. Benefits from investments in these systems include reduced capital investment in new generating capacity, reduced operating costs, and reduced risk associated with load growth projections and future environmental legislation. This paper presents the results of a study undertaken to evaluate the performance of and quantify the potential economic benefits of C&I cool storage systems. The paper is organized into three major sections. Section one discusses the empirical data gathered from TVA's C&I Cool Storage Demonstration conducted during the summer of 1984. Section two discusses TVA's methodology For quantifying the potential economic benefits of these systems. Finally, the results are summarized with regard to future program activities.

Sieber, R. E.; Dahmus, A. B.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Cool Storage Technology Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is a fact that avoiding load growth is cheaper than constructing new power plants. Cool storage technologies offer one method for strategically stemming the impact of future peak demand growth. This guide provides a comprehensive resource for understanding and evaluating cool storage technologies.

2000-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

191

Measure Guideline: Ventilation Cooling  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this measure guideline on ventilation cooling is to provide information on a cost-effective solution for reducing cooling system energy and demand in homes located in hot-dry and cold-dry climates. This guideline provides a prescriptive approach that outlines qualification criteria, selection considerations, and design and installation procedures.

Springer, D.; Dakin, B.; German, A.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Cooling Tower Technology Conference  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cooling towers and associated systems cause significant loss of availability and heat rate degradation in both nuclear and fossil-fired power plants. Twenty-one papers presented at a 2003 conference in Charleston, South Carolina discussed industrial experience and provided case histories of cooling tower problems and solutions.

2003-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

193

Cooling of superconducting devices by liquid storage and refrigeration unit  

SciTech Connect

A system is disclosed for cooling superconducting devices. The system includes a cryogen cooling system configured to be coupled to the superconducting device and to supply cryogen to the device. The system also includes a cryogen storage system configured to supply cryogen to the device. The system further includes flow control valving configured to selectively isolate the cryogen cooling system from the device, thereby directing a flow of cryogen to the device from the cryogen storage system.

Laskaris, Evangelos Trifon; Urbahn, John Arthur; Steinbach, Albert Eugene

2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

194

Solar Desiccant Cooling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Solar Desiccant Cooling Solar Desiccant Cooling Speaker(s): Paul Bourdoukan Date: December 6, 2007 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Ashok Gadgil The development of HVAC systems is a real challenge regarding its environmental impact. An innovative technique operating only by means of water and solar energy, is desiccant cooling. The principle is evaporative cooling with the introduction of a dehumidification unit, the desiccant wheel to control the humidity levels. The regeneration of the desiccant wheel requires a preheated airstream. A solar installation is a very interesting option for providing the preheated airstream. In France, at the University of La Rochelle, and at the National Institute of Solar Energy (INES), the investigation of the solar desiccant cooling technique has been

195

Water cooled steam jet  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A water cooled steam jet for transferring fluid and preventing vapor lock, or vaporization of the fluid being transferred, has a venturi nozzle and a cooling jacket. The venturi nozzle produces a high velocity flow which creates a vacuum to draw fluid from a source of fluid. The venturi nozzle has a converging section connected to a source of steam, a diffuser section attached to an outlet and a throat portion disposed therebetween. The cooling jacket surrounds the venturi nozzle and a suction tube through which the fluid is being drawn into the venturi nozzle. Coolant flows through the cooling jacket. The cooling jacket dissipates heat generated by the venturi nozzle to prevent vapor lock.

Wagner, Jr., Edward P. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Cool Roof Colored Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cool Roof Colored Materials Cool Roof Colored Materials Speaker(s): Hashem Akbari Date: May 29, 2003 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Raising roof reflectivity from an existing 10-20% to about 60% can reduce cooling-energy use in buildings in excess of 20%. Cool roofs also result in a lower ambient temperature that further decreases the need for air conditioning and retards smog formation. Reflective roofing products currently available in the market are typically used for low-sloped roofs. For the residential buildings with steep-sloped roofs, non-white (colored) cool roofing products are generally not available and most consumers prefer colors other than white. In this collaborative project LBNL and ORNL are working with the roofing industry to develop and produce reflective, colored roofing products and make yhrm a market reality within three to

197

Hydronic Radiant Cooling Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 Hydronic Radiant Cooling Systems Cooling nonresidential buildings in the U.S. contributes significantly to electrical power consumption and peak power demand. Part of the electrical energy used to cool buildings is drawn by fans transporting cool air through the ducts. The typical thermal cooling peak load component for California office buildings can be divided as follows: 31% for lighting, 13% for people, 14% for air transport, and 6% for equipment (in the graph below, these account for 62.5% of the electrical peak load, labeled "chiller"). Approximately 37% of the electrical peak power is required for air transport, and the remainder is necessary to operate the compressor. DOE-2 simulations for different California climates using the California

198

Home Cooling | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cooling Cooling Home Cooling Ventilation Systems for Cooling Learn how to avoid heat buildup and keep your home cool with ventilation. Read more Cooling with a Whole House Fan A whole-house fan, in combination with other cooling systems, can meet all or most of your home cooling needs year round. Read more Although your first thought for cooling may be air conditioning, there are many alternatives that provide cooling with less energy use. You might also consider fans, evaporative coolers, or heat pumps as your primary means of cooling. In addition, a combination of proper insulation, energy-efficient windows and doors, daylighting, shading, and ventilation will usually keep homes cool with a low amount of energy use in all but the hottest climates. Although ventilation is not an effective cooling strategy in hot, humid

199

Optimizing the performance of desiccant beds for solar-regenerated cooling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Detailed computer simulations as well as a simplified psychrometric analysis are used to determine the increase in cooling system performance that can be realized through the use of nonhomogeneous or staged desiccant beds. A staged bed of four hypothetical desiccants is shown to give a 10% higher cooling capacity than a silica gel bed of the same thickness. Alternatively, the same cooling capacity is produced by a staged bed 37% thinner than the silica gel bed. These effects could be employed to reduce the parasitic power requirements of desiccant cooling systems.

Barlow, R.; Collier, K.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Tomorrow`s energy today for cities and counties - keep it cool with thermal energy storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cool thermal energy storage (TES) is described as a means for electric utilities to provide electricity from off-peak times, particularly in the summer when air-conditioning accounts for 50% or more of electricity consumption. Cool TES uses off-peak power to provide cooling capacity by extracting heat from a storage medium such as ice or other phase change material. A refrigeration system may may be utilized at night to provide a reservoir of cold material. During the day, the reservoir is tapped to provide cooling capacity. The advantages of TES are discussed.

NONE

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes cooling capacity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Strategic Capacity Analysis and Database (SCAAD) Code, Version 3.0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

SCAAD Version 3.0 software enables electric utility engineers to make more informed decisions for selecting the most appropriate technique for increasing their combustion turbines' capacity. SCAAD provides performance enhancement benefits and budgetary costs for evaporative cooling with media, evaporative cooling with foggers, cool water coil, chilling and thermal energy storage, water injection, steam injection, water fog injection (overspray and wet compression), supercharging, high-flow Inlet Guide Va...

2001-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

202

Cooling load differences between radiant and air systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

M. Filippi, B.W. Olesen, Solar radiation and cooling loaddependant upon solar radiation, ASHRAE Transactions, (2006)heat gains also included solar radiation through windows. G3

Feng, Jingjuan Dove; Schiavon, Stefano; Bauman, Fred

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Passive cooling system for a vehicle - Energy Innovation Portal  

The passive cooling system includes one or more heat pipes (112) having an evaporator section ... Building Energy Efficiency; ... Solar Thermal; Startup America;

204

Measured Effects of Retrofits - A Refrigerant Oil Additive and a Condenser Spray Device - On the Cooling Performance of a Heat Pump  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A 15-year old, 3-ton single package air-to-air heat pump was tested in laboratory environmental chambers simulating indoor and outdoor conditions. After documenting initial performance, the unit was retrofitted with a prototype condenser water-spray device and retested. Results at standard AM cooling rating conditions (95°F outdoor dry bulb and 80167 OF indoor dry bulb/wet bulb temperatures) showed the capacity increased by about 7%, and the electric power demand dropped by about 8%, resulting in a steady-state EER increase of 17%. Suction and discharge pressures were reduced by 7 and 37 psi, respectively. A refrigerant oil additive formulated to enhance refrigerant-side heat transfer was added at a dose of one ounce per ton of rated capacity. and the unit was tested for several days at the same 95°F outdoor conditions and showed essentially no increase in capacity, and a slight 3% increase in steady-state EER. Adding more additive lowered the EER slightly. Suction and discharge pressures were essentially unchanged. Our short-term testing showed that the condenser-spray device was effective in increasing the cooling capacity and lowering the electrical demand on an old and relatively inefficient heat pump, but the refrigerant additive had little effect on the cooling performance of our unit Sprayer issues to be resolved include the effect of a sprayer on a new, high-efficiency air conditioner/heat pump, reliable long-term operation, and economics.

Levins, W. P.; Sand, J. R.; Baxter, V. D.; Linkous, R. S.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Technical Assessment Guide -- Generation Capacity Addition Topics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses the challenges facing the power industry with regard to capacity addition. These challenges include technological and regulatory risks, life cycle management, and material and labor escalation forecast. The report also examines the market trends for CT and CTCC, as this technology has become a reliable technology for capacity addition, and provides the cost data for various switchyard configurations. These topics have been addressed in past TAG reports and the content in this ...

2013-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

206

EPRI Increased Transmission Capacity Workshop Proceedings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the proceedings of EPRI's Increased Overhead Transmission Capacity Workshop. The workshop was held on September 20, 2011 at the offices of the American Transmission Company in Waukesha, Wisconsin. Participants included members of the EPRI Increased Overhead Transmission Capacity Task Force. The workshop was a joint effort of two EPRI research projects: (1) Increased Power Flow Guidebook and Ratings for Overhead Lines, and (2) Impact of High Temperature Operation on Conductor Systems...

2011-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

207

Wet cooling towers: rule-of-thumb design and simulation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A survey of wet cooling tower literature was performed to develop a simplified method of cooling tower design and simulation for use in power plant cycle optimization. The theory of heat exchange in wet cooling towers is briefly summarized. The Merkel equation (the fundamental equation of heat transfer in wet cooling towers) is presented and discussed. The cooling tower fill constant (Ka) is defined and values derived. A rule-of-thumb method for the optimized design of cooling towers is presented. The rule-of-thumb design method provides information useful in power plant cycle optimization, including tower dimensions, water consumption rate, exit air temperature, power requirements and construction cost. In addition, a method for simulation of cooling tower performance at various operating conditions is presented. This information is also useful in power plant cycle evaluation. Using the information presented, it will be possible to incorporate wet cooling tower design and simulation into a procedure to evaluate and optimize power plant cycles.

Leeper, S.A.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Experimental Study of the Floor Radiant Cooling System Combined with Displacement Ventilation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As a comfortable and energy-efficient air conditioning system, the application of floor radiant heating system is used increasingly greatly in the north of China. As a result, the feasibility of floor radiant cooling has gained more attention. To examine the thermodynamic performance of the floor radiant cooling system, we measured the operational conditions including the minimum floor surface temperature, the cooling capacity, and the indoor temperature field distribution under different outdoor temperatures in Beijing. Because the ground temperature changes with the mean temperature of the supplied and returned water and room temperature, the mean temperature of the supplied and retuned water was obtained. Finally, we analyzed the phenomenon of dewing and developed measures for preventing it. The dry air layer near the floor formed by a displacement ventilation system can effectively prevent dews on the surface of the floor in the wet and hot days in summer. In addition, for the sake of the displacement ventilation system, the heat transfer effect between floor and space is enhanced. Our analysis pointed out that floor radiant cooling system combined with displacement ventilation ensures good comfort and energy efficiency.

Ren, Y.; Li, D.; Zhang, Y.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Quantum Zero-error Capacity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We define here a new kind of quantum channel capacity by extending the concept of zero-error capacity for a noisy quantum channel. The necessary requirement for which a quantum channel has zero-error capacity greater than zero is given. Finally, we point out some directions on how to calculate the zero-error capacity of such channels.

Rex A. C. Medeiros; Francisco M. De Assis

2006-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

210

Scaling and Optimization of Magnetic Refrigeration for Commercial Building HVAC Systems Greater than 175 kW in Capacity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heating, ventilation, air-conditioning and refrigeration (HVACR) account for approximately one- third of building energy consumption. Magnetic refrigeration presents an opportunity for significant energy savings and emissions reduction for serving the building heating, cooling, and refrigeration loads. In this paper, we have examined the magnet and MCE material requirements for scaling magnetic refrigeration systems for commercial building cooling applications. Scaling relationships governing the resources required for magnetic refrigeration systems have been developed. As system refrigeration capacity increases, the use of superconducting magnet systems becomes more applicable, and a comparison is presented of system requirements for permanent and superconducting (SC) magnetization systems. Included in this analysis is an investigation of the ability of superconducting magnet based systems to overcome the parasitic power penalty of the cryocooler used to keep SC windings at cryogenic temperatures. Scaling relationships were used to develop the initial specification for a SC magnet-based active magnetic regeneration (AMR) system. An optimized superconducting magnet was designed to support this system. In this analysis, we show that the SC magnet system consisting of two 0.38 m3 regenerators is capable of producing 285 kW of cooling power with a T of 28 K. A system COP of 4.02 including cryocooler and fan losses which illustrates that an SC magnet-based system can operate with efficiency comparable to traditional systems and deliver large cooling powers of 285.4 kW (81.2 Tons).

Abdelaziz, Omar [ORNL; West, David L [ORNL; Mallow, Anne M [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Evaporative Cooling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Evaporative Cooling Evaporative Cooling (Redirected from Hybrid Cooling) Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Evaporative Cooling: An evaporative cooler is a device that cools air through the evaporation of water. Evaporative cooling works by employing water's large enthalpy of vaporization. The temperature of dry air can be dropped significantly through the phase transition of liquid water to water vapor (evaporation), which can cool air using much less energy than refrigeration. Evaporative cooling requires a water source, and must continually consume water to operate. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Evaporative Cooling Evaporative Cooling Tower Diagram of Evaporative Cooling Tower Evaporative cooling technologies take advantage of both air and water to extract heat from a power plant. By utilizing both water and air one can

212

Vortex-augmented cooling tower - windmill combination  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cooling tower for cooling large quantities of effluent water from a production facility by utilizing natural wind forces includes the use of a series of helically directed air inlet passages extending outwardly from the base of the tower to introduce air from any direction in a swirling vortical pattern while the force of the draft created in the tower makes it possible to place conventional power generating windmills in the air passage to provide power as a by-product.

McAllister, J.E. Jr.

1982-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

213

Gas turbine bucket with impingement cooled platform  

SciTech Connect

In a turbine bucket having an airfoil portion and a root portion, with a substantially planar platform at an interface between the airfoil portion and root portion, a platform cooling arrangement including at least one bore in the root portion and at least one impingement cooling tube seated in the bore, the tube extending beyond the bore with an outlet in close proximity to a targeted area on an underside of the platform.

Jones, Raphael Durand (Guilderland, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Update: Cooling tower and spray pond technology  

SciTech Connect

The 9th Cooling Tower and Spray Pond Symposium, under the auspices of the International Association for Hydraulic Research, took place at the von Karman Institute for Fluid Dynamics, Belgium, in September 1994. Technical topics discussed included cooling system design, performance, operation, environmental effects, modeling and components. Symposium proceedings will not be published. However, information of primary interest to staffs of power plants in the United States is summarized in this article.

Bartz, J.A.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

What's so cool about Curiosity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What's so cool about Curiosity? What's so cool about Curiosity? Curiosity, the Mars Science Laboratory, is the largest and most complicated device we have ever landed on a planet other than Earth. ï‚· About the size of a small SUV -- ten feet long (not including the arm), nine feet wide and seven feet tall ï‚· 900 kilograms (2,000 pounds) (Spirit and Opportunity, earlier research vehicles sent to Mars were 384 pounds) ï‚· Uses aerobraking, parachute, retro rockets and skycrane concepts to land gently (Spirit and Opportunity used aerobraking, parachutes and airbags that bounced them to the surface) Curiosity carries three instruments from Los Alamos National Laboratory. ï‚· The Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator supplies electricity and heat to the rover

216

Capacity Value of Solar Power  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Evaluating the capacity value of renewable energy sources can pose significant challenges due to their variable and uncertain nature. In this paper the capacity value of solar power is investigated. Solar capacity value metrics and their associated calculation methodologies are reviewed and several solar capacity studies are summarized. The differences between wind and solar power are examined, the economic importance of solar capacity value is discussed and other assessments and recommendations are presented.

Duignan, Roisin; Dent, Chris; Mills, Andrew; Samaan, Nader A.; Milligan, Michael; Keane, Andrew; O'Malley, Mark

2012-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

217

Load Capacity of Bodies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For the stress analysis in a plastic body $\\Omega$, we prove that there exists a maximal positive number $C$, the \\emph{load capacity ratio,} such that the body will not collapse under any external traction field $t$ bounded by $Y_{0}C$, where $Y_0$ is the elastic limit. The load capacity ratio depends only on the geometry of the body and is given by $$ \\frac{1}{C}=\\sup_{w\\in LD(\\Omega)_D} \\frac{\\int_{\\partial\\Omega}|w|dA} {\\int_{\\Omega}|\\epsilon(w)|dV}=\\left\\|\\gamma_D\\right\\|. $$ Here, $LD(\\Omega)_D$ is the space of isochoric vector fields $w$ for which the corresponding stretchings $\\epsilon(w)$ are assumed to be integrable and $\\gamma_D$ is the trace mapping assigning the boundary value $\\gamma_D(w)$ to any $w\\in LD(\\Omega)_D$.

Reuven Segev

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Tips: Passive Solar Heating and Cooling | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Passive Solar Heating and Cooling Passive Solar Heating and Cooling Tips: Passive Solar Heating and Cooling April 24, 2012 - 4:18pm Addthis Tips: Passive Solar Heating and Cooling Using passive solar design to heat and cool your home can be both environmentally friendly and cost effective. In many cases, your heating costs can be reduced to less than half the cost of heating a typical home. Passive solar design can also help lower your cooling costs. Passive solar cooling techniques include carefully designed overhangs and using reflective coatings on windows, exterior walls, and roofs. Newer techniques include placing large, insulated windows on south-facing walls and putting thermal mass, such as a concrete slab floor or a heat-absorbing wall, close to the windows. A passive solar house requires careful design and siting, which vary by

219

Tips: Passive Solar Heating and Cooling | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tips: Passive Solar Heating and Cooling Tips: Passive Solar Heating and Cooling Tips: Passive Solar Heating and Cooling April 24, 2012 - 4:18pm Addthis Tips: Passive Solar Heating and Cooling Using passive solar design to heat and cool your home can be both environmentally friendly and cost effective. In many cases, your heating costs can be reduced to less than half the cost of heating a typical home. Passive solar design can also help lower your cooling costs. Passive solar cooling techniques include carefully designed overhangs and using reflective coatings on windows, exterior walls, and roofs. Newer techniques include placing large, insulated windows on south-facing walls and putting thermal mass, such as a concrete slab floor or a heat-absorbing wall, close to the windows. A passive solar house requires careful design and siting, which vary by

220

Overview: Home Cooling Systems | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

than earlier models. Dehumidifying heat pipes can help an air conditioner remove humidity and more efficiently cool the air. Radiant Cooling Radiant cooling cools a floor or...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes cooling capacity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Refinery Capacity Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 Idle Operating Total Stream Day Barrels per Idle Operating Total Calendar Day Barrels per Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Capacity Idle Operating Total Operable Refineries Number of State and PAD District a b b 14 10 4 1,617,500 1,205,000 412,500 1,708,500 1,273,500 435,000 ............................................................................................................................................... PAD District I 1 0 1 182,200 0 182,200 190,200 0 190,200 ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ Delaware......................................

222

Table 2. Production Capacity of Operable Petroleum Refineries by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Includes hydrogen production capacity of hydrogen plants on refinery grounds. MMcfd = Million cubic feet per day. a ... (EIA), Form EIA-820, "Annual Refinery Report."

223

Working and Net Available Shell Storage Capacity as of March...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

includes tables detailing working and net available shell storage capacity by type of facility, product, and Petroleum Administration for Defense District (PAD District). Net...

224

Working and Net Available Shell Storage Capacity as of ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

It includes three tables detailing working and net available shell storage capacity by facility type, product, and PAD District as of September 30, 2010.

225

Figure 77. Electricity generation capacity additions by fuel type ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sheet3 Sheet2 Sheet1 Figure 77. Electricity generation capacity additions by fuel type, including combined heat and power, 2012-2040 (gigawatts) Coal

226

Heat pump system with selective space cooling  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reversible heat pump provides multiple heating and cooling modes and includes a compressor, an evaporator and heat exchanger all interconnected and charged with refrigerant fluid. The heat exchanger includes tanks connected in series to the water supply and a condenser feed line with heat transfer sections connected in counterflow relationship. The heat pump has an accumulator and suction line for the refrigerant fluid upstream of the compressor. Sub-cool transfer tubes associated with the accumulator/suction line reclaim a portion of the heat from the heat exchanger. A reversing valve switches between heating/cooling modes. A first bypass is operative to direct the refrigerant fluid around the sub-cool transfer tubes in the space cooling only mode and during which an expansion valve is utilized upstream of the evaporator/indoor coil. A second bypass is provided around the expansion valve. A programmable microprocessor activates the first bypass in the cooling only mode and deactivates the second bypass, and vice-versa in the multiple heating modes for said heat exchanger. In the heating modes, the evaporator may include an auxiliary outdoor coil for direct supplemental heat dissipation into ambient air. In the multiple heating modes, the condensed refrigerant fluid is regulated by a flow control valve. 4 figs.

Pendergrass, J.C.

1997-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

227

Heat pump system with selective space cooling  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reversible heat pump provides multiple heating and cooling modes and includes a compressor, an evaporator and heat exchanger all interconnected and charged with refrigerant fluid. The heat exchanger includes tanks connected in series to the water supply and a condenser feed line with heat transfer sections connected in counterflow relationship. The heat pump has an accumulator and suction line for the refrigerant fluid upstream of the compressor. Sub-cool transfer tubes associated with the accumulator/suction line reclaim a portion of the heat from the heat exchanger. A reversing valve switches between heating/cooling modes. A first bypass is operative to direct the refrigerant fluid around the sub-cool transfer tubes in the space cooling only mode and during which an expansion valve is utilized upstream of the evaporator/indoor coil. A second bypass is provided around the expansion valve. A programmable microprocessor activates the first bypass in the cooling only mode and deactivates the second bypass, and vice-versa in the multiple heating modes for said heat exchanger. In the heating modes, the evaporator may include an auxiliary outdoor coil for direct supplemental heat dissipation into ambient air. In the multiple heating modes, the condensed refrigerant fluid is regulated by a flow control valve.

Pendergrass, Joseph C. (Gainesville, GA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

LBNL's Novel Approach to Cooling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

systems department, chilled water, cooling water tower, double exchanger cooling, dual heat exchanger, high tech and industrial systems group, inrow, lawrence berkeley national...

229

Cool Roofs and Heat Islands  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(510) 486-7494 Links Heat Island Group The Cool Colors Project Batteries and Fuel Cells Buildings Energy Efficiency Applications Commercial Buildings Cool Roofs and...

230

Total Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity Working Gas Capacity of Salt Caverns Working Gas Capacity of Aquifers Working Gas Capacity of Depleted Fields Total Number of Existing Fields Number of Existing Salt...

231

Optimization of Cooling Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A cooling water system can be optimized by operation at the highest possible cycles of concentration without risking sealing and fouling on heat exchanger surfaces. The way to optimize will be shown, with a number of examples of new systems.

Matson, J.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

RADIATIVE AND PASSIVE COOLING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Passive Cooling Marlo Martin and Paul Berdahl SeptemberNTIS. 3. P. Berdahl and M. Martin, "The Resource for Radia-1978) p. 684. 4. M. Martin and P. Berdahl, "Description of a

Martin, M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Stimulated radiative laser cooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Building a refrigerator based on the conversion of heat into optical energy is an ongoing engineering challenge. Under well-defined conditions, spontaneous anti-Stokes fluorescence of a dopant material in a host matrix is capable of lowering the host temperature. The fluorescence is conveying away a part of the thermal energy stored in the vibrational oscillations of the host lattice. In particular, applying this principle to the cooling of (solid-state) lasers opens up many potential device applications, especially in the domain of high-power lasers. In this paper, an alternative optical cooling scheme is outlined, leading to radiative cooling of solid-state lasers. It is based on converting the thermal energy stored in the host, into optical energy by means of a stimulated nonlinear process, rather than a spontaneous process. This should lead to better cooling efficiencies and a higher potential of applying the principle for device applications.

Muys, Peter

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Sisyphus Cooling of Lithium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Laser cooling to sub-Doppler temperatures by optical molasses is thought to be inhibited in atoms with unresolved, near-degenerate hyperfine structure in the excited state. We demonstrate that such cooling is possible in one to three dimensions, not only near the standard D2 line for laser cooling, but over a range extending to the D1 line. Via a combination of Sisyphus cooling followed by adiabatic expansion, we reach temperatures as low as 40 \\mu K, which corresponds to atomic velocities a factor of 2.6 above the limit imposed by a single photon recoil. Our method requires modest laser power at a frequency within reach of standard frequency locking methods. It is largely insensitive to laser power, polarization and detuning, magnetic fields, and initial hyperfine populations. Our results suggest that optical molasses should be possible with all alkali species.

Paul Hamilton; Geena Kim; Trinity Joshi; Biswaroop Mukherjee; Daniel Tiarks; Holger Müller

2013-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

235

Status of cool roof standards in the United States  

SciTech Connect

Since 1999, several widely used building energy efficiency standards, including ASHRAE 90.1, ASHRAE 90.2, the International Energy Conservation Code, and California's Title 24 have adopted cool roof credits or requirements. We review the technical development of cool roof provisions in the ASHRAE 90.1, ASHRAE 90.2, and California Title 24 standards, and discuss the treatment of cool roofs in other standards and energy-efficiency programs. The techniques used to develop the ASHRAE and Title 24 cool roof provisions can be used as models to address cool roofs in building energy standards worldwide.

Akbari, Hashem; Levinson, Ronnen

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Potential Refrigerants for Power Electronics Cooling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the past, automotive refrigerants have conventionally been used solely for the purpose of air conditioning. However, with the development of hybrid-electric vehicles and the incorporation of power electronics (PEs) into the automobile, automotive refrigerants are taking on a new role. Unfortunately, PEs have lifetimes and functionalities that are highly dependent on temperature and as a result thermal control plays an important role in the performance of PEs. Typically, PEs are placed in the engine compartment where the internal combustion engine (ICE) already produces substantial heat. Along with the ICE heat, the additional thermal energy produced by PEs themselves forces designers to use different cooling methods to prevent overheating. Generally, heat sinks and separate cooling loops are used to maintain the temperature. Disturbingly, the thermal control system can consume one third of the total volume and may weigh more than the PEs [1]. Hence, other avenues have been sought to cool PEs, including submerging PEs in automobile refrigerants to take advantage of two-phase cooling. The objective of this report is to explore the different automotive refrigerants presently available that could be used for PE cooling. Evaluation of the refrigerants will be done by comparing environmental effects and some thermo-physical properties important to two-phase cooling, specifically measuring the dielectric strengths of potential candidates. Results of this report will be used to assess the different candidates with good potential for future use in PE cooling.

Starke, M.R.

2005-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

237

Refrigerant directly cooled capacitors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a direct contact refrigerant cooling system using a refrigerant floating loop having a refrigerant and refrigeration devices. The cooling system has at least one hermetic container disposed in the refrigerant floating loop. The hermetic container has at least one electronic component selected from the group consisting of capacitors, power electronic switches and gating signal module. The refrigerant is in direct contact with the electronic component.

Hsu, John S. (Oak Ridge, TN); Seiber, Larry E. (Oak Ridge, TN); Marlino, Laura D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Ayers, Curtis W. (Kingston, TN)

2007-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

238

Laser cooling of solids  

SciTech Connect

We present an overview of solid-state optical refrigeration also known as laser cooling in solids by fluorescence upconversion. The idea of cooling a solid-state optical material by simply shining a laser beam onto it may sound counter intuitive but is rapidly becoming a promising technology for future cryocooler. We chart the evolution of this science in rare-earth doped solids and semiconductors.

Epstein, Richard I [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sheik-bahae, Mansoor [UNM

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Optimization of a solar cooling system with interior energy storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper focuses on the optimization of the performance of a solar absorption cooling system composed by four units with interior energy storage. A full dynamic simulation model that includes the solar collector field, the absorption heat pump system and the building load calculation has been developed. It has been applied to optimize the coupling of a system based on this new technology of solar powered absorption heat pump, to a bioclimatic building recently constructed in the Plataforma Solar de Almeria (PSA) in Spain. The absorption heat pump system considered is composed by four heat pumps that store energy in the form of crystallized salts so that no external storage capacity is required. Each heat pump is composed of two separate barrels that can charge (store energy from the solar field) and discharge (deliver heat or cold to the building) independently. Different configurations of the four units have been analysed taking into account the storage possibilities of the system and its capacity to respond to the building loads. It has been shown how strong the influence of the control strategies in the overall performance is, and the importance of using hourly simulations models when looking for highly efficient buildings. (author)

Sanjuan, C.; Soutullo, S.; Heras, M.R. [Department of Energy, Energy Efficiency in Buildings Unit, CIEMAT, Madrid E-28040 (Spain)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

240

Photovoltaics effective capacity: Interim final report 2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The authors provide solid evidence, based on more than 8 million data points, that regional photovoltaic (PV) effective capacity is largely unrelated to the region`s solar resource. They confirm, however, that effective capacity is strongly related to load-shape characteristics. The load-shape effective-capacity relationship appears to be valid for end-use loads as small as 100 kW, except possibly in the case of electrically heated buildings. This relationship was used as a tool to produce a US map of PV`s effective capacity. The regions of highest effective capacities include (1) the central US from the northern Great Plains to the metropolitan areas of Chicago and Detroit, down to the lower Mississippi Valley, (2) California and western Arizona, and (3) the northeast metropolitan corridor. The features of this map are considerably different from the traditional solar resource maps. They tend to reflect the socio-economic and climatic factors that indirectly drive PV`s effective capacity: e.g., commercial air-conditioning, little use of electric heat, and strong summer heat waves. The map provides a new and significant insight to a comprehensive valuation of the PV resource. The authors assembled preliminary evidence showing that end-use load type may be related to PV`s effective capacity. Highest effective capacities were found for (nonelectrically heated) office buildings, followed by hospitals. Lowest capacities were found for airports and residences. Many more data points are needed, however, to ascertain and characterize these preliminary findings.

Perez, R.; Seals, R. [State Univ. of New York, Albany, NY (United States). Atmospheric Sciences Research Center

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes cooling capacity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Feasibility of a hybrid cooling system in a thermal power plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The feasibility of introducing a hybrid cooling system in a thermal power plant is investigated with an aim to reduce water use with a minimum impact on plant performance. A number of cooling systems have been modelled including existing evaporative ... Keywords: cooling, hybrid cooling, power station, sustainable water consumption

C. R. Williams; M. G. Rasul

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Cooling system for superconducting magnet  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cooling system is configured to control the flow of a refrigerant by controlling the rate at which the refrigerant is heated, thereby providing an efficient and reliable approach to cooling a load (e.g., magnets, rotors). The cooling system includes a conduit circuit connected to the load and within which a refrigerant circulates; a heat exchanger, connected within the conduit circuit and disposed remotely from the load; a first and a second reservoir, each connected within the conduit, each holding at least a portion of the refrigerant; a heater configured to independently heat the first and second reservoirs. In a first mode, the heater heats the first reservoir, thereby causing the refrigerant to flow from the first reservoir through the load and heat exchanger, via the conduit circuit and into the second reservoir. In a second mode, the heater heats the second reservoir to cause the refrigerant to flow from the second reservoir through the load and heat exchanger via the conduit circuit and into the first reservoir. 3 figs.

Gamble, B.B.; Sidi-Yekhlef, A.

1998-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

243

Cooling system for superconducting magnet  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cooling system is configured to control the flow of a refrigerant by controlling the rate at which the refrigerant is heated, thereby providing an efficient and reliable approach to cooling a load (e.g., magnets, rotors). The cooling system includes a conduit circuit connected to the load and within which a refrigerant circulates; a heat exchanger, connected within the conduit circuit and disposed remotely from the load; a first and a second reservoir, each connected within the conduit, each holding at least a portion of the refrigerant; a heater configured to independently heat the first and second reservoirs. In a first mode, the heater heats the first reservoir, thereby causing the refrigerant to flow from the first reservoir through the load and heat exchanger, via the conduit circuit and into the second reservoir. In a second mode, the heater heats the second reservoir to cause the refrigerant to flow from the second reservoir through the load and heat exchanger via the conduit circuit and into the first reservoir.

Gamble, Bruce B. (Wellesley, MA); Sidi-Yekhlef, Ahmed (Framingham, MA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Capacities associated with scalar signed Riesz kernels, and analytic capacity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The real and imaginari parts of the Cauchy kernel in the plane are scalar Riesz kernels of homogeneity -1. One can associate with each of them a natural notion of capacity related to bounded potentials. The main result of the paper asserts that these capacities are comparable to classical analytic capacity, thus stressing the real variables nature of analytic capacity. Higher dimensional versions of this result are also considered.

Mateu, Joan; Verdera, Joan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

cooling degree days | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

cooling degree days cooling degree days Dataset Summary Description The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Services (NESDIS), in conjunction with the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) publish monthly and annual climate data by state for the U.S., including, cooling degree days (total number of days per month and per year). The average values for each state are weighted by population, using 2000 Census data. The base temperature for this dataset is 65 degrees F. Source NOAA Date Released Unknown Date Updated June 24th, 2005 (9 years ago) Keywords climate cooling degree days NOAA Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon hcs_51_avg_cdd.xls (xls, 215.6 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review

246

Gas-cooled nuclear reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas-cooled nuclear reactor includes a central core located in the lower portion of a prestressed concrete reactor vessel. Primary coolant gas flows upward through the core and into four overlying heat-exchangers wherein stream is generated. During normal operation, the return flow of coolant is between the core and the vessel sidewall to a pair of motor-driven circulators located at about the bottom of the concrete pressure vessel. The circulators repressurize the gas coolant and return it back to the core through passageways in the underlying core structure. If during emergency conditions the primary circulators are no longer functioning, the decay heat is effectively removed from the core by means of natural convection circulation. The hot gas rising through the core exits the top of the shroud of the heat-exchangers and flows radially outward to the sidewall of the concrete pressure vessel. A metal liner covers the entire inside concrete surfaces of the concrete pressure vessel, and cooling tubes are welded to the exterior or concrete side of the metal liner. The gas coolant is in direct contact with the interior surface of the metal liner and transfers its heat through the metal liner to the liquid coolant flowing through the cooling tubes. The cooler gas is more dense and creates a downward convection flow in the region between the core and the sidewall until it reaches the bottom of the concrete pressure vessel when it flows radially inward and up into the core for another pass. Water is forced to flow through the cooling tubes to absorb heat from the core at a sufficient rate to remove enough of the decay heat created in the core to prevent overheating of the core or the vessel.

Peinado, Charles O. (La Jolla, CA); Koutz, Stanley L. (San Diego, CA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Solar absorption cooling plant in Seville  

SciTech Connect

A solar/gas cooling plant at the Engineering School of Seville (Spain) was tested during the period 2008-2009. The system is composed of a double-effect LiBr + water absorption chiller of 174 kW nominal cooling capacity, powered by: (1) a pressurized hot water flow delivered by mean of a 352 m{sup 2} solar field of a linear concentrating Fresnel collector and (2) a direct-fired natural gas burner. The objective of the project is to indentify design improvements for future plants and to serve as a guideline. We focused our attention on the solar collector size and dirtiness, climatology, piping heat losses, operation control and coupling between solar collector and chiller. The daily average Fresnel collector efficiency was 0.35 with a maximum of 0.4. The absorption chiller operated with a daily average coefficient of performance of 1.1-1.25, where the solar energy represented the 75% of generator's total heat input, and the solar cooling ratio (quotient between useful cooling and insolation incident on the solar field) was 0.44. (author)

Bermejo, Pablo; Pino, Francisco Javier; Rosa, Felipe [Departamento de Ingenieria Energetica, Universidad de Sevilla, Camino de los Descubrimiento s/n, 41092 Sevilla (Spain)

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

248

Comparative report: performance of active solar space cooling systems, 1982 cooling season  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report provides a detailed analysis of solar absorption cooling and solar Rankine cooling processes as represented by the National Solar Data Network (NSDN) systems. Five solar cooling systems were monitored in 1982; four of these have absorption chillers and one has a Rankine engine. Of the four absorption chillers, two are directly solar fired and two are boiler fired using solar energy as the preheat to the boiler. The composite data for the five sites covers the period from September 1981 through December 1982. There are 36 site months of data covered in the report. These are all commercial systems with buildings ranging in size from 5000 to 84,000 square feet. There are three evacuated-tube, one flat-plate, and one linear concentrating collector systems. Analyses performed for which comparative data is provided include: Energy savings and operating costs in terms of Btu; Overall solar cooling efficiency and coefficient of performance; Hourly building cooling loads; Actual and long-term weather conditions; Collector performance; Chiller performance; Normalized building cooling loads per cooling degree-day and building area; and Cooling solar fractions, design and measured. Conclusions and lessons learned from the comparative analysis are presented.

Logee, T.; Kendall, P.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Multipath Channels of Unbounded Capacity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The capacity of discrete-time, noncoherent, multipath fading channels is considered. It is shown that if the variances of the path gains decay faster than exponentially, then capacity is unbounded in the transmit power.

Koch, Tobias

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Thermal Performance of Phase-Change Wallboard for Residential Cooling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 6 Thermal Performance of Phase-Change Wallboard for Residential Cooling Cooling residential buildings in milder climates contributes significantly to peak demand mainly because of poor load factors. Peak cooling load determines the size of equipment and the cooling source. Several measures reduce cooling-system size and allow the use of lower-energy cooling sources; they include incorporating exterior walls or other elements that effectively shelter interiors from outside heat and cold, and providing thermal mass, to cool interior spaces during the day by absorbing heat and warm them at night as the mass discharges its heat. Thermal mass features may be used for storage only or serve as structural elements. Concrete, steel, adobe, stone, and brick all satisfy requirements

251

Best Management Practice: Single-Pass Cooling Equipment | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Single-Pass Cooling Equipment Single-Pass Cooling Equipment Best Management Practice: Single-Pass Cooling Equipment October 8, 2013 - 9:37am Addthis Single-pass or once-through cooling systems provide an opportunity for significant water savings. In these systems, water is circulated once through a piece of equipment and is then disposed down the drain. Types of equipment that typically use single-pass cooling include CAT scanners, degreasers, hydraulic equipment, condensers, air compressors, welding machines, vacuum pumps, ice machines, x-ray equipment, and air conditioners. To remove the same heat load, single-pass systems use 40 times more water than a cooling tower operated at five cycles of concentration. To maximize water savings, single-pass cooling equipment should be either modified to

252

Gas-cooled reactors  

SciTech Connect

Experience to date with operation of high-temperature gas-cooled reactors has been quite favorable. Despite problems in completion of construction and startup, three high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) units have operated well. The Windscale Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactor (AGR) in the United Kingdom has had an excellent operating history, and initial operation of commercial AGRs shows them to be satisfactory. The latter reactors provide direct experience in scale-up from the Windscale experiment to fullscale commercial units. The Colorado Fort St. Vrain 330-MWe prototype helium-cooled HTGR is now in the approach-to-power phase while the 300-MWe Pebble Bed THTR prototype in the Federal Republic of Germany is scheduled for completion of construction by late 1978. THTR will be the first nuclear power plant which uses a dry cooling tower. Fuel reprocessing and refabrication have been developed in the laboratory and are now entering a pilot-plant scale development. Several commercial HTGR power station orders were placed in the U.S. prior to 1975 with similar plans for stations in the FRG. However, the combined effects of inflation, reduced electric power demand, regulatory uncertainties, and pricing problems led to cancellation of the 12 reactors which were in various stages of planning, design, and licensing.

Schulten, R.; Trauger, D.B.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Cooling Towers, The Debottleneckers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Power generating plants and petro-chemical works are always expanding. An on-going problem is to identify and de-bottle neck restricting conditions of growth. The cooling tower is a highly visible piece of equipment. Most industrial crossflow units are large structures, Illustration 1. Big budget money and engineering time goes into gleaming stainless steel equipment and exotic process apparatus, the poor cooling tower is the ignored orphan of the system. Knowledgeable Engineers, however, are now looking into the function of the cooling tower, which is to produce colder water- and question the quality of water discharged from that simple appearing box. These cross-flow structures are quite large, ranging up to 60 feet tall with as many as 6 or more cells in a row. With cells up to 42 feet long so immense in aspect, with fans rotating, operators assume, just by appearances, that all is well, and usually pay no attention to the quality of cold water returning from the cooling tower. The boxes look sturdy, but the function of the cooling tower is repeated ignored production of water as cold as possible.

Burger, R.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Air Cooling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cooling Cooling Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Air Cooling: Air cooling is commonly defined as rejecting heat from an object by flowing air over the surface of the object, through means of convection. Air cooling requires that the air must be cooler than the object or surface from which it is expected to remove heat. This is due to the second law of thermodynamics, which states that heat will only move spontaneously from a hot reservoir (the heat sink) to a cold reservoir (the air). Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Air Cooling Air Cooling Diagram of Air Cooled Condenser designed by GEA Heat Exchangers Ltd. (http://www.gea-btt.com.cn/opencms/opencms/bttc/en/Products/Air_Cooled_Condenser.html) Air cooling is limited on ambient temperatures and typically require a

255

Water Cooling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cooling: Cooling: Water cooling is commonly defined as a method of using water as a heat conduction to remove heat from an object, machine, or other substance by passing cold water over or through it. In energy generation, water cooling is typically used to cool steam back into water so it can be used again in the generation process. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Water Cooling Typical water cooled condenser used for condensing steam Water or liquid cooling is the most efficient cooling method and requires the smallest footprint when cold water is readily available. When used in power generation the steam/vapor that exits the turbine is condensed back into water and reused by means of a heat exchanger. Water cooling requires a water resource that is cold enough to bring steam, typically

256

Evaporative Cooling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Evaporative Cooling: Evaporative Cooling: An evaporative cooler is a device that cools air through the evaporation of water. Evaporative cooling works by employing water's large enthalpy of vaporization. The temperature of dry air can be dropped significantly through the phase transition of liquid water to water vapor (evaporation), which can cool air using much less energy than refrigeration. Evaporative cooling requires a water source, and must continually consume water to operate. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Evaporative Cooling Evaporative Cooling Tower Diagram of Evaporative Cooling Tower Evaporative cooling technologies take advantage of both air and water to extract heat from a power plant. By utilizing both water and air one can reduce the amount of water required for a power plant as well as reduce the

257

Optimal sequencing of a cooling tower with multiple cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper evaluates the energy savings potential of multi-cell cooling tower optimal sequencing control methods. Annual tower fan energy usage is calculated for a counter-flow tower with multiple variable-speed fans. Effectiveness-NTU tower model is employed to predict the cooling tower performance at various conditions. Natural convection when the fan is off is accounted by using an assumed airflow rate. The energy savings at five cities representing different typical climates are studied using typical meteorological year data. The results show that, if the tower capacity can be increased by 50% and 100% by running extra tower cells, the annual total fan power usage can be reduced by 44% and 61%, respectively. A cumulative saving percent curve is generated to help estimate the annual total savings percent when extra cooling tower capacity is available during only part of a year.

Zhang, Z.; Liu, J.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Efficient cooling: Making it happen  

SciTech Connect

This article presents a series of solutions that can help everyone to some basic questions about air conditioning: what`s the best way to size a residential air conditioner? to what extent do air conditioners tend to be oversized? how can energy research and programs help promote optimal sizing of cooling systems? Topics covered include the following: defining the debate over sizing of air conditioners; methods for sizing; evaluating simple {open_quotes}rules of thumb{close_quotes}; working with HVAC contractors; creating consumer demand for proper sizing. 1 fig. 1 tab.

Sherman, C.; Hildebrandt, E. [Sacramento Municipal Utility District, CA (United States)

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

IAEA Planning and Economic Studies Section (PESS) Capacity Building | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

IAEA Planning and Economic Studies Section (PESS) Capacity Building IAEA Planning and Economic Studies Section (PESS) Capacity Building Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: IAEA Planning and Economic Studies Section (PESS) Capacity Building Agency/Company /Organization: International Atomic Energy Agency Sector: Energy Focus Area: Non-renewable Energy, Energy Efficiency, Renewable Energy Topics: Pathways analysis Resource Type: Software/modeling tools, Training materials References: IAEA PESS capacity building[1] Logo: IAEA Planning and Economic Studies Section (PESS) Capacity Building "PESS offers assistance to Member States, particularly from developing regions, to improve their energy system analysis & planning capabilities. Assistance can include: transferring modern planning methods, tools and databanks

260

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Pipeline Capacity and Utilization  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pipeline Utilization & Capacity Pipeline Utilization & Capacity About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 2007/2008 with selected updates Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity & Utilization Overview | Utilization Rates | Integration of Storage | Varying Rates of Utilization | Measures of Utilization Overview of Pipeline Utilization Natural gas pipeline companies prefer to operate their systems as close to full capacity as possible to maximize their revenues. However, the average utilization rate (flow relative to design capacity) of a natural gas pipeline system seldom reaches 100%. Factors that contribute to outages include: Scheduled or unscheduled maintenance Temporary decreases in market demand Weather-related limitations to operations

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes cooling capacity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Heat capacities of elastic solids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The work function is embedded in the equation describing the relationship between the constant volume and constant pressure heat capacities. The modification of the work function results that the relationship between these quantities must be changed accordingly. Using the newly derived work functions of elastic solids the description of the heat capacities and the relationship between the heat capacities are given for solid phase.

Garai, J

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Symmetrical Symplectic Capacity with Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we first introduce the concept of symmetrical symplectic capacity for symmetrical symplectic manifolds, and by using this symmetrical symplectic capacity theory we prove that there exists at least one symmetric closed characteristic (brake orbit and $S$-invariant brake orbit are two examples) on prescribed symmetric energy surface which has a compact neighborhood with finite symmetrical symplectic capacity.

Liu, Chungen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

cooling | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

cooling cooling Dataset Summary Description The following data-set is for a benchmark residential home for all TMY3 locations across all utilities in the US. The data is indexed by utility service provider which is described by its "unique" EIA ID ( Source National Renewable Energy Laboratory Date Released April 05th, 2012 (2 years ago) Date Updated April 06th, 2012 (2 years ago) Keywords AC apartment CFL coffeemaker Computer cooling cost demand Dishwasher Dryer Furnace gas HVAC Incandescent Laptop load Microwave model NREL Residential television tmy3 URDB Data text/csv icon Residential Cost Data for Common Household Items (csv, 14.5 MiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL)

264

Natural gas productive capacity for the lower 48 states 1984 through 1996, February 1996  

SciTech Connect

This is the fourth wellhead productive capacity report. The three previous ones were published in 1991, 1993, and 1994. This report should be of particular interest to those in Congress, Federal and State agencies, industry, and the academic community, who are concerned with the future availability of natural gas. The EIA Dallas Field Office has prepared five earlier reports regarding natural gas productive capacity. These reports, Gas Deliverability and Flow Capacity of Surveillance Fields, reported deliverability and capacity data for selected gas fields in major gas producing areas. The data in the reports were based on gas-well back-pressure tests and estimates of gas-in-place for each field or reservoir. These reports use proven well testing theory, most of which has been employed by industry since 1936 when the Bureau of Mines first published Monograph 7. Demand for natural gas in the United States is met by a combination of natural gas production, underground gas storage, imported gas, and supplemental gaseous fuels. Natural gas production requirements in the lower 48 States have been increasing during the last few years while drilling has remained at low levels. This has raised some concern about the adequacy of future gas supplies, especially in periods of peak heating or cooling demand. The purpose of this report is to address these concerns by presenting a 3-year projection of the total productive capacity of natural gas at the wellhead for the lower 48 States. Alaska is excluded because Alaskan gas does not enter the lower-48 States pipeline system. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) generates this 3-year projection based on historical gas-well drilling and production data from State, Federal, and private sources. In addition to conventional gas-well gas, coalbed gas and oil-well gas are also included.

NONE

1996-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

265

Noise from cooling towers of power parks  

SciTech Connect

A study is presented of the noise pollution problem for large power parks proposed for the future. Such parks might have an area of about 75 sq. miles, and a generating capacity up to 48000 MW. A comparative analysis has been done for natural and mechanical-draft wet towers as the major sources of acoustic power. Noise radiation from single isolated towers as well as from a dispersed array of towers has been considered for both types of cooling systems. Major noise attenuation effects considered are due to the atmospheric absorption and A- weighting. Conditions of 60F and 70 percent relative humidity in a still atmosphere have been assumed. (auth)

Zakaria, J.; Moore, F.K.

1975-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

266

Table 11.6 Installed Nameplate Capacity of Fossil-Fuel Steam-Electric Generators With Environmental Equipment, 1985-2010 (Megawatts)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Installed Nameplate Capacity of Fossil-Fuel Steam-Electric Generators With Environmental Equipment," Installed Nameplate Capacity of Fossil-Fuel Steam-Electric Generators With Environmental Equipment," " 1985-2010 (Megawatts)" "Year","Coal",,,,"Petroleum and Natural Gas",,,,"Total 1" ,,,"Flue Gas","Total 2",,,"Flue Gas","Total 2",,,"Flue Gas","Total 2" ,"Particulate","Cooling","Desulfurization",,"Particulate","Cooling","Desulfurization",,"Particulate","Cooling","Desulfurization" ,"Collectors","Towers","(Scrubbers)",,"Collectors","Towers","(Scrubbers)",,"Collectors","Towers","(Scrubbers)"

267

Evaluation of cooling performance of thermally activated building system with evaporative cooling source for typical United States climates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cooling (TABS) with a cooling tower providing chilled waterevaporative cooling (cooling tower) for radiant ceiling slabradiant cooling with a cooling tower providing chilled water

Feng, Jingjuan; Bauman, Fred

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Survey of absorption cooling technology in solar applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A comprehensive survey of the current state of the absorption cooling technology has been conducted. This survey discusses the basic and applied absorption cooling/heating technology, analyses the current state of the art including the discussion of limitations and possible solutions, identifies areas where promising developments are indicated, lists the current products and activities of the absorption industry, and presents the current RD and D efforts of the U.S. government. The main subjects covered in the survey are as follows: Principles of absorption cooling technology (NH/sub 3/-H/sub 2/O cycle and H/sub 2/O-LiBr Cycle), Adaptation of absorption cooling technology for solar cooling applications, Thermal performance of absorption cooling units, Comparison of NH/sub 3/-H/sub 2/O absorption with H/sub 2/O-LiBr absorption, Commercially available solar absorption units, General trends of the absorption cooling industry toward solar application, Absorption cooling system performance in actual installations, Limitations of absorption cooling technology, Solar-powered absorption heat pumps, and U.S. ERDA activities relating to solar absorption cooling. The treatment of the subjects is intended to be basic and comprehensive in order that the general readers may understand the current aspects of absorption technology in solar cooling applications. 36 references.

Auh, P C

1977-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

An Assessment of Railway Capacity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we review the main concepts and methods to perform capacity analyses, and we present an automated tool that is able to perform several capacity analyses. Capacity is extremely dependent on infrastructure, traffic, and operating parameters. Therefore, an in-depth study of the main factors that influence railway capacity is performed on several Spanish railway infrastructures. The results show how the capacity varies according to factors such as train speed, commercial stops, train heterogeneity, distance between railway signals, and timetable robustness.

M. Abril; F. Barber; A L. Ingolotti; A M. A. Salido; P. Tormos; B A. Lova

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

CFD Simulation and Analysis of the Combined Evaporative Cooling and Radiant Ceiling Air-conditioning System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Due to such disadvantages as large air duct and high energy consumption of the current all- outdoor air evaporative cooling systems used in the dry region of Northwest China, as well as the superiority of the ceiling cooling system in improving thermal comfort and saving energy, a combined system is presented in this paper. It combines an evaporative cooling system with ceiling cooling, in which the evaporative cooling system handles the entire latent load and one part of the sensible loads, and the ceiling cooling system deals with the other part of sensible loads in the air-conditioned zone, so that the condensation on radiant panels and the insufficiency of cooling capacity can be avoided. The cooling water at 18? used in the cooling coils of ceiling cooling system can be ground water, tap water or the cooled water from cooling towers in the summer. This new air-conditioning system and existing all- outdoor air evaporative cooling system are applied to a project in the city of Lanzhou. Energy consumption analysis of the building is carried out using the energy consumption code. Velocity and temperature distribution in the air-conditioned zone is computed using CFD. According to the results, the energy consumption and indoor human thermal comfort of both systems are then compared. It is concluded that the new system occupies less building space, reduces energy consumption, improves indoor human thermal comfort and saves initial investment.

Xiang, H.; Yinming, L.; Junmei, W.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Turbomachine rotor with improved cooling  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas turbine rotor has an essentially closed loop cooling air scheme in which cooling air drawn from the compressor discharge air that is supplied to the combustion chamber is further compressed, cooled, and then directed to the aft end of the turbine rotor. Downstream seal rings attached to the downstream face of each rotor disc direct the cooling air over the downstream disc face, thereby cooling it, and then to cooling air passages formed in the rotating blades. Upstream seal rings attached to the upstream face of each disc direct the heated cooling air away from the blade root while keeping the disc thermally isolated from the heated cooling air. From each upstream seal ring, the heated cooling air flows through passages in the upstream discs and is then combined and returned to the combustion chamber from which it was drawn. 5 figs.

Hultgren, K.G.; McLaurin, L.D.; Bertsch, O.L.; Lowe, P.E.

1998-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

272

Turbomachine rotor with improved cooling  

SciTech Connect

A gas turbine rotor has an essentially closed loop cooling air scheme in which cooling air drawn from the compressor discharge air that is supplied to the combustion chamber is further compressed, cooled, and then directed to the aft end of the turbine rotor. Downstream seal rings attached to the downstream face of each rotor disc direct the cooling air over the downstream disc face, thereby cooling it, and then to cooling air passages formed in the rotating blades. Upstream seal rings attached to the upstream face of each disc direct the heated cooling air away from the blade root while keeping the disc thermally isolated from the heated cooling air. From each upstream seal ring, the heated cooling air flows through passages in the upstream discs and is then combined and returned to the combustion chamber from which it was drawn.

Hultgren, Kent Goran (Winter Park, FL); McLaurin, Leroy Dixon (Winter Springs, FL); Bertsch, Oran Leroy (Titusville, FL); Lowe, Perry Eugene (Oviedo, FL)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Emerging Technologies for Efficient Data Centers: Uninterruptible Power Supply Eco Mode, Liquid Cooling, and Evaporative Cooling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes research in emerging technologies that improve data center energy efficiency, including evaporative cooling, liquid cooling, and high-efficiency eco mode operation of the uninterruptible power supply. The report describes the efficiency gains of these technologies and their impact on total data center energy use. It also identifies market barriers for each technology and potential next steps to promote adoption of these efficient technologies.

2013-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

274

Inlet Air Chillers for Gas Turbine Capacity Enhancement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides information and analysis to help power generation engineers assess the cost-effectiveness of using inlet air chillers to increase the net output capacity of combustion turbine and combined cycle generating units. It also provides an analysis of integrating the storage of chilled water or ice with the inlet air cooling system as a means of energy storage. This report provides new and updated information and analysis, building on information from previous Electric Power Research ...

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Five solar cooling projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The jointly funded $100 million five-year international agreement (SOLERAS) between Saudi Arabia and the United States was undertaken to promote the development of solar energy technologies of interest to both nations. Five engineering field tests of active solar cooling systems funded under the SOLERAS agreement for installation and operation in the U.S. southwest are described.

Davis, R.E.; Williamson, J.S.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Passive Cooling System for a Vehicle  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A passive cooling system for a vehicle (114) transfers heat from an overheated internal component, for example, an instrument panel (100), to an external portion (116) of the vehicle (114), for example, a side body panel (126). The passive cooling system includes one or more heat pipes (112) having an evaporator section (118) embedded in the overheated internal component and a condenser section (120) at the external portion (116) of the vehicle (114). The evaporator (118) and condenser (120) sections are in fluid communication. The passive cooling system may also include a thermally conductive film (140) for thermally connecting the evaporator sections (118) of the heat pipes (112) to each other and to the instrument panel (100).

Hendricks, T. J.; Thoensen, T.

2005-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

277

Internal cooling in a semiconductor laser diode  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract—A thermal model of a diode laser structure is developed which includes a bipolar thermoelectric term not included in previous models. It is shown that heterostructure band offsets can be chosen so that there are thermoelectric cooling sources near the active region; this method of cooling is internal to the device itself, as opposed to temperature stabilization schemes which employ an external cooler. A novel laser structure is proposed that is capable of internal cooling in the Ga1 In As Sb1 –GaSb material system with = 2 64 m. Index Terms—Electrothermal effects, lasers, laser thermal factors, photothermal effects, semiconductor lasers, thermionic emission, thermionic energy conversion, thermoelectric devices, thermoelectric energy conversion, thermoelectricity. Fig. 1. Band structure and thermoelectric heat source distribution for (a) and (b) conventional SCH, and (c) and (d) ICICLE.

K. P. Pipe; R. J. Ram; A. Shakouri

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Helical Muon Beam Cooling Channel Engineering Design  

SciTech Connect

The Helical Cooling Channel (HCC), a novel technique for six-dimensional (6D) ionization cooling of muon beams, has shown considerable promise based on analytic and simulation studies. However, the implementation of this revolutionary method of muon cooling requires new techniques for the integration of hydrogen-pressurized, high-power RF cavities into the low-temperature superconducting magnets of the HCC. We present the progress toward a conceptual design for the integration of 805 MHz RF cavities into a 10 T Nb{sub 3}Sn based HCC test section. We include discussions on the pressure and thermal barriers needed within the cryostat to maintain operation of the magnet at 4.2 K while operating the RF and energy absorber at a higher temperature. Additionally, we include progress on the Nb{sub 3}Sn helical solenoid design.

Kashikhin, V.S.; Lopes, M.L.; Romanov, G.V.; Tartaglia, M.A.; Yonehara, K.; Yu, M.; Zlobin, A.V.; /Fermilab; Flanagan, G.; Johnson, R.P.; Kazakevich, G.M.; Marhauser, F.; /MUONS Inc., Batavia

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Heat pipe cooling for scramjet engines. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Liquid metal heat pipe cooling systems have been investigated for the combustor liner and engine inlet leading edges of scramjet engines for a missile application. The combustor liner is cooled by a lithium-TZM molybdenum annular heat pipe, which incorporates a separate lithium reservoir. Heat is initially absorbed by the sensible thermal capacity of the heat pipe and liner, and subsequently by the vaporization and discharge of lithium to the atmosphere. The combustor liner temperature is maintained at 3400 F or less during steady-state cruise. The engine inlet leading edge is fabricated as a sodium-superalloy heat pipe. Cooling is accomplished by radiation of heat from the aft surface of the leading edge to the atmosphere. The leading edge temperature is limited to 1700 F or less. It is concluded that heat pipe cooling is a viable method for limiting scramjet combustor liner and engine inlet temperatures to levels at which structural integrity is greatly enhanced.

Silverstein, C.C.

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

EIA - Electricity Generating Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

imports and exports. Renewable & Alternative Fuels Includes hydropower, solar, wind, geothermal, biomass and ethanol. Nuclear & Uranium Uranium fuel, nuclear reactors, generation,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes cooling capacity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Cooling Towers- Energy Conservation Strategies Understanding Cooling Towers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cooling towers are energy conservation devices that Management, more often than not, historically overlooks in the survey of strategies for plant operating efficiencies. The utilization of the colder water off the cooling tower is the money maker!

Smith, M.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Program on Technology Innovation: Tradeoffs Between Once-Through Cooling and Closed-Cycle Cooling for Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has been investigating a number of energy-related water topics that include the implications of retrofitting existing once-through generating stations with closed-cycle cooling, the cost and benefits of closed-cycle cooling, the impacts of impingement and entrainment, alternative fish protection technologies, water use in the electric power generation sector, and advanced power plant cooling technologies.

2012-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

283

Heat capacity and compactness of denatured proteins  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of the striking results of protein thermodynamics is that the heat capacity change upon denaturation is large and positive. This change is generally ascribed to the exposure of non-polar groups to water on denaturation, in analogy to the large heat capacity change for the transfer of small non-polar molecules from hydrocarbons to water. Calculations of the heat capacity based on the exposed surface area of the completely unfolded denatured state give good agreement with experimental data. This result is difficult to reconcile with evidence that the heat denatured state in the absence of denaturants is reasonably compact. In this work, sample conformations for the denatured state of truncated CI2 are obtained by use of an effective energy function for proteins in solution. The energy function gives denatured conformations that are compact with radii of gyration that are slightly larger than that of the native state. The model is used to estimate the heat capacity, as well as that of the native state, at 300 and 350 K via finite enthalpy differences. The calculations show that the heat capacity of denaturation can have large positive contributions from non-covalent intraprotein interactions because these interactions change more with temperature in non-native conformations than in the native state. Including this contribution, which has been neglected in empirical surface area models, leads to heat capacities of unfolding for compact denatured states that are consistent with the experimental heat capacity data. Estimates of the stability curve of CI2 made with the effective energy function support the present model. # 1999 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

Themis Lazaridis; Martin Karplus

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

DOE mixed waste treatment capacity analysis  

SciTech Connect

This initial DOE-wide analysis compares the reported national capacity for treatment of mixed wastes with the calculated need for treatment capacity based on both a full treatment of mixed low-level and transuranic wastes to the Land Disposal Restrictions and on treatment of transuranic wastes to the WIPP waste acceptance criteria. The status of treatment capacity is reported based on a fifty-element matrix of radiation-handling requirements and functional treatment technology categories. The report defines the classifications for the assessment, describes the models used for the calculations, provides results from the analysis, and includes appendices of the waste treatment facilities data and the waste stream data used in the analysis.

Ross, W.A.; Wehrman, R.R.; Young, J.R.; Shaver, S.R.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Heat capacity at the glass transition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A fundamental problem of glass transition is to explain the jump of heat capacity at the glass transition temperature $T_g$ without asserting the existence of a distinct solid glass phase. This problem is also common to other disordered systems, including spin glasses. We propose that if $T_g$ is defined as the temperature at which the liquid stops relaxing at the experimental time scale, the jump of heat capacity at $T_g$ follows as a necessary consequence due to the change of system's elastic, vibrational and thermal properties. In this picture, we discuss time-dependent effects of glass transition, and identify three distinct regimes of relaxation. Our approach explains widely observed logarithmic increase of $T_g$ with the quench rate and the correlation of heat capacity jump with liquid fragility.

Kostya Trachenko; Vadim Brazhkin

2010-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

286

Decentralized capacity management and internal pricing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Press. Goex, R. (2002). Capacity planning and pricing undermanufacturing on innovation, capacity and pro?tability.Mieghem, V. J. (2003). Capacity management, investment and

Dutta, Sunil; Reichelstein, Stefan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Capacity consideration of wireless ad hoc networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Capacity ProblemCurrent Research on Capacity of Wireless Ad HocChapter 3 Upper Bound on the Capacity of Wireless Ad Hoc

Tan, Yusong

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Are there capacity limitations in symmetry perception?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1980). The demonstration of capacity limitation. Cognitive1972). Visual processing capacity and attentional control.J. (1996). Goodness of CAPACITY LIMIT OF SYMMETRY PERCEPTION

Huang, L Q; Pashler, Harold; Junge, J A

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

The Ergodic Capacity of Interference Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A. Jafar, “The ergodic capacity of interference networks,”Gupta and P. R. Kumar, “The capacity of wireless networks,”cooperation achieves optimal capacity scaling in ad hoc

Jafar, Syed A

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Mapping Individual Variations in Learning Capacity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in working memory capacity. Integrative Physiological andVariations in Learning Capacity Eduardo Mercado IIIdifferences in learning capacity are evident in humans and

Mercado III, Eduardo

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Definition: Capacity Emergency | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Emergency Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Capacity Emergency A capacity emergency exists when a Balancing Authority Area's operating capacity, plus firm purchases from...

292

Optimizing the Low Temperature Cooling Energy Supply: Experimental Performance of an Absorption Chiller, a Compression Refrigeration Machine and Direct Cooling - a Comparison  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A strategy to optimize the low temperature cooling energy supply of a newly build office building is discussed against the background of a changing energy system. It is focused on, what production way - Direct Cooling, the Compression Refrigeration Machine or the Absorption Chiller provided with heat from Combined Heat and Power Plants - has the lowest primary energy consumption at what load level. For low levels this is direct cooling. If demand exceeds the capacity of direct cooling, the absorption chiller is the option to choose. However, in future the compression refrigeration machine is more efficient at providing high load levels than the Absorption Chiller. The operation analysis shows that flow rates are often held constant and the re-cooling temperatures are often above the ambient temperature. By the integration of automatic flow rate control and lowering the re-cooling temperature of the chillers, electricity consumption of pumps can be reduced and energy efficiency enhanced.

Uhrhan, S.; Gerber, A.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Dynamic Model of Facial Cooling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent modifications to windchill forecasting have motivated the development of a rate-of-tissue-cooling model for the purpose of predicting facial cooling times. The model assumes a hollow cylindrical geometry with a fixed internal boundary ...

Peter Tikuisis; Randall J. Osczevski

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Solar heating and cooling demonstration project summaries  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Brief descriptive overviews are presented of the design and operating characteristics of all commercial and Federal residential solar heating and cooling systems and of the structures themselves. Also included are available pictures of the buildings and simplified solar system diagrams. A list of non-Federal residential installations is provided.

Not Available

1978-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION STAFF COOLING WATER MANAGEMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

maintenance includes having effective drift eliminators, periodically cleaning the system if appropriate, minimization of process leads into the cooling system that provide nutrients for bacteria, maintenance management plan shall describe how the system will be returned to normal microbial control following an upset

296

Covered Product Category: Cool Roof Products  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

FEMP provides acquisition guidance across a variety of product categories, including cool roof products, which are an ENERGY STAR®-qualified product category. Federal laws and executive orders mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law.

297

Adaptive capacity and its assessment  

SciTech Connect

This paper reviews the concept of adaptive capacity and various approaches to assessing it, particularly with respect to climate variability and change. I find that adaptive capacity is a relatively under-researched topic within the sustainability science and global change communities, particularly since it is uniquely positioned to improve linkages between vulnerability and resilience research. I identify opportunities for advancing the measurement and characterization of adaptive capacity by combining insights from both vulnerability and resilience frameworks, and I suggest several assessment approaches for possible future development that draw from both frameworks and focus on analyzing the governance, institutions, and management that have helped foster adaptive capacity in light of recent climatic events.

Engle, Nathan L.

2011-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

298

Gas turbine bucket cooling circuit and related process  

SciTech Connect

A turbine bucket includes an airfoil portion having leading and trailing edges; at least one radially extending cooling passage within the airfoil portion, the airfoil portion joined to a platform at a radially inner end of the airfoil portion; a dovetail mounting portion enclosing a cooling medium supply passage; and, a crossover passage in fluid communication with the cooling medium supply passage and with at least one radially extending cooling passage, the crossover passage having a portion extending along and substantially parallel to an underside surface of the platform.

Lewis, Doyle C. (Greer, SC); Barb, Kevin Joseph (Halfmoon, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

HEPTAFLUOROPROPANE WITH WATER SPRAY COOLING ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

HEPTAFLUOROPROPANE WITH WATER SPRAY COOLING SYSTEM AS A TOTAL ... and evaluation studies on active and passive fire protection ...

2011-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

300

AIR COOLED NEUTRONIC REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor of the air-cooled, graphite moderated type is described. The active core consists of a cubicle mass of graphite, approximately 25 feet in each dimension, having horizontal channels of square cross section extending between two of the opposite faces, a plurality of cylindrical uranium slugs disposed in end to end abutting relationship within said channels providing a space in the channels through which air may be circulated, and a cadmium control rod extending within a channel provided in the moderator. Suitable shielding is provlded around the core, as are also provided a fuel element loading and discharge means, and a means to circulate air through the coolant channels through the fuel charels to cool the reactor.

Fermi, E.; Szilard, L.

1958-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes cooling capacity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Temperature and cooling management in computing systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

72 5.1.2 Memory thermal and cooling model . . . . . . . . 75Energy, Thermal and Cooling Management . . . . . . . .Conclusion . . Chapter 4 Thermal and Cooling Management in

Ayoub, Raid

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Guide to Minimizing Compress-based Cooling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

cooling (direct or indirect), or various liquid cooled solutions. In addition to weather data, the Green Grid organization has developed a free cooling map tool to aid in...

303

Thermal performance of phase change wallboard for residential cooling application  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cooling of residential California buildings contributes significantly to electrical consumption and peak power demand mainly due to very poor load factors in milder climates. Thermal mass can be utilized to reduce the peak-power demand, downsize the cooling systems, and/or switch to low-energy cooling sources. Large thermal storage devices have been used in the past to overcome the shortcomings of alternative cooling sources, or to avoid high demand charges. The manufacturing of phase change material (PCM) implemented in gypsum board, plaster or other wall-covering material, would permit the thermal storage to become part of the building structure. PCMs have two important advantages as storage media: they can offer an order-of-magnitude increase in thermal storage capacity, and their discharge is almost isothermal. This allows the storage of high amounts of energy without significantly changing the temperature of the room envelope. As heat storage takes place inside the building, where the loads occur, rather than externally, additional transport energy is not required. RADCOOL, a thermal building simulation program based on the finite difference approach, was used to numerically evaluate the latent storage performance of treated wallboard. Extended storage capacity obtained by using double PCM-wallboard is able to keep the room temperatures close to the upper comfort limits without using mechanical cooling. Simulation results for a living room with high internal loads and weather data for Sunnyvale, California, show significant reduction of room air temperature when heat can be stored in PCM-treated wallboards.

Feustel, H.E.; Stetiu, C.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Application of Building Precooling to Reduce Peak Cooling Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A building cooling control strategy was developed and tested for a 1.4 million square foot (130,000 square meter) office building located in Hoffman Estates, IL. The goal of the control strategy was to utilize building thermal mass to limit the peak cooling load for continued building operation in the event of the loss of one of the four central chiller units. The algorithm was first developed and evaluated through simulation and then evaluated through tests on two identical buildings. The east building utilized the existing building control strategy while the west building used the precooling strategy developed for this project. Consistent with simulation predictions, the precooling control strategy successfully limited the peak load to 75 % of the cooling capacity for the west building, while the east building operated at 100 % of capacity. Precooling of the building mass provided an economical alternative to the purchase of an additional chiller unit. The estimated cost of installing an additional chiller was approximately $500,000. Computer models developed for this project also showed that precooling based upon cooling cost minimization could result in savings of approximately $25,000 per month during the peak cooling season. The building model was validated with experimental results and could be used in the development of a cost minimization strategy.

Kevin R. Keeney; James E. Braun, Ph.D.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Conduction cooled tube supports  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In boilers, process tubes are suspended by means of support studs that are in thermal contact with and attached to the metal roof casing of the boiler and the upper bend portions of the process tubes. The support studs are sufficiently short that when the boiler is in use, the support studs are cooled by conduction of heat to the process tubes and the roof casing thereby maintaining the temperature of the stud so that it does not exceed 1400.degree. F.

Worley, Arthur C. (Mt. Tabor, NJ); Becht, IV, Charles (Morristown, NJ)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Cooling your home naturally  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet describes some alternatives to air conditioning which are common sense suggestions and low-cost retrofit options to cool a house. It first describes how to reflect heat away from roofs, walls, and windows. Blocking heat by using insulation or shading are described. The publication then discusses removing built-up heat, reducing heat-generating sources, and saving energy by selecting energy efficient retrofit appliances. A resource list is provided for further information.

NONE

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

SCINTILLATION DETECTOR COOLING SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect

A well logging apparatus for irradiating earth formations with neutrons and recording the gamma rays emitted therefrom is designed which hss a scintillation decay time of less than 3 x 10/sup -8/ sec and hence may be used with more intense neutron sources. The scintillation crystal is an unactivated NaI crystal maintained at liquid N/sub 2/ temperature. The apparatus with the cooling system is described in detail. (D.L.C.)

George, W.D.; Jones, S.B.; Yule, H.P.

1962-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

308

Special Property Assessment for Renewable Heating and Cooling Systems |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Special Property Assessment for Renewable Heating and Cooling Special Property Assessment for Renewable Heating and Cooling Systems Special Property Assessment for Renewable Heating and Cooling Systems < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Solar Heating Program Info State Maryland Program Type Property Tax Incentive Rebate Amount Eligible property is assessed at no more than the value of a conventional system Provider Department of Assessments and Taxation Title 8 of Maryland's property tax code includes a state-wide special assessment for solar and geothermal heating and cooling systems. Under this provision, such systems are to be assessed at not more than the value of a conventional system for property tax purposes if no conventional system

309

Open Cooling Water Chemistry Guideline  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

State-of-the-art chemistry programs help to ensure the continued operation of open cooling water systems while mitigating corrosion and fouling mechanisms. This document, Open Cooling Water Chemistry Guideline, prepared by a committee of industry experts, reflects field and laboratory data on corrosion and fouling issues of open cooling systems.BackgroundService Water System Chemical Addition Guideline (Electric Power Research Institute ...

2012-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

310

Proceedings: Cooling Tower Technology Conference  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cooling towers and associated systems performance strongly affect availability and heat rate in fossil and nuclear power plants. Twenty-two papers presented at the 1997 Cooling Tower Technology Conference discuss research results, industry experience, and case histories of cooling tower problems and solutions.

1997-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

311

Conduction cooling: multicrate fastbus hardware  

SciTech Connect

Described is a new and novel approach for cooling nuclear instrumentation modules via heat conduction. The simplicity of liquid cooled crates and ease of thermal management with conduction cooled modules are described. While this system was developed primarily for the higher power levels expected with Fastbus electronics, it has many general applications.

Makowiecki, D.; Sims, W.; Larsen, R.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Liquid metal reactor air cooling baffle  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A baffle is provided between a relatively hot containment vessel and a relatively cold silo for enhancing air cooling performance. The baffle includes a perforate inner wall positionable outside the containment vessel to define an inner flow riser therebetween, and an imperforate outer wall positionable outside the inner wall to define an outer flow riser therebetween. Apertures in the inner wall allow thermal radiation to pass laterally therethrough to the outer wall, with cooling air flowing upwardly through the inner and outer risers for removing heat.

Hunsbedt, Anstein (Los Gatos, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Minimal Cooling of Neutron Stars: A New Paradigm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new classification of neutron star cooling scenarios, involving either ``minimal'' cooling or ``enhanced'' cooling is proposed. The minimal cooling scenario replaces and extends the so-called standard cooling scenario to include neutrino emission from the Cooper pair breaking and formation process. This emission dominates that due to the modified Urca process for temperatures close to the critical temperature for superfluid pairing. Minimal cooling is distinguished from enhanced cooling by the absence of neutrino emission from any direct Urca process, due either to nucleons or to exotica. Within the minimal cooling scenario, theoretical cooling models can be considered to be a four parameter family involving the equation of state of dense matter, superfluid properties of dense matter, the composition of the neutron star envelope, and the mass of the neutron star. Consequences of minimal cooling are explored through extensive variations of these parameters. Results are compared with the inferred properties of thermally-emitting neutron stars in order to ascertain if enhanced cooling occurs in any of them. All stars for which thermal emissions have been clearly detected are at least marginally consistent with the lack of enhanced cooling. The two pulsars PSR 0833-45 (Vela) and PSR 1706-44 would require enhanced cooling in case their ages and/or temperatures are on the lower side of their estimated values whereas the four stars PSR 0656+14, PSR 1055-52, Geminga, and RX J0720.4-3125 may require some source of internal heating in case their age and/or luminosity are on the upper side of their estimated values. The new upper limits on the thermal luminosity of PSR J0205+6449 and RX J0007.0+7302 are indicative of the occurrence of some enhanced neutrino emission beyond the minimal scenario.

Dany Page; James M. Lattimer; Madappa Prakash; Andrew W. Steiner

2004-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

314

Thermal and hydraulic analyses of TFTR cooling water system and magnetic field coils  

SciTech Connect

The TFTR toroidal field coils, ohmic heating, hybrid and equilibrium field coils are cooled by water from the machine area cooling water system. The system has the following major equipment and capacities: flow rate of 3600 gpm; ballast tank volume of 5500 gal; pumps of 70.4 m head; chiller refrigeration rating of 3300 tons and connecting pipe of 45.7 cm I.D. The performance of the closed loop system was analyzed and found to be adequate for the thermal loads. The field coils were analyzed with detailed thermal and hydraulic models, including a simulation of the complete water cooling loop. Under the nominal operating mode of one second of toroidal field flat top time and 300 seconds of pulse cycle time, the maximum temperature for the TF coils is 53/sup 0/C; for the OH coils 46/sup 0/C and for the EF coils 39/sup 0/C, which are well below the coil design limit of 120/sup 0/C. The maximum TF coil coolant temperature is 33/sup 0/C which is below the coolant design limit of 100/sup 0/C. The overall pressure loss of the system is below 6.89 x 10/sup 5/ Pa (100 psi). With the given chiller refrigeration capacity, the TF coils can be operated to yield up to 4 seconds of flat top time. The TF coils can be operated on a steady state basis at up to 20% of the pulsed duty design current rating of 7.32 kA/coil (36.6 kA/conductor).

Lee, A.Y.

1975-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Cooling system for a gas turbine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A plurality of arcuate circumferentially spaced supply and return manifold segments are arranged on the rim of a rotor for respectively receiving and distributing cooling steam through exit ports for distribution to first and second-stage buckets and receiving spent cooling steam from the first and second-stage buckets through inlet ports for transmission to axially extending return passages. Each of the supply and return manifold segments has a retention system for precluding substantial axial, radial and circumferential displacement relative to the rotor. The segments also include guide vanes for minimizing pressure losses in the supply and return of the cooling steam. The segments lie substantially equal distances from the centerline of the rotor and crossover tubes extend through each of the segments for communicating steam between the axially adjacent buckets of the first and second stages, respectively.

Wilson, Ian David (Mauldin, SC); Salamah, Samir Armando (Niskayuna, NY); Bylina, Noel Jacob (Niskayuna, NY)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Guide to efficient unitary cooling equipment  

SciTech Connect

The universe of unitary cooling equipment is a large one; these systems are used in nearly forty percent of the residential and commercial buildings in the United States. Unitary cooling equipment is made up of off-the-shelf units: factory-assembled single or split systems, including air-source heat pumps and air conditioners. The efficiency of this class of cooling equipment has increased steadily in recent years, driven primarily by government standards. Although most of the units have efficiencies near the minimum federal standards, a significant number of models beat the standards by 10 to 30 percent. However, the larger the system, the narrower the range of efficiencies available and the fewer models available in the most efficient categories. For the buyer and the utility, this report reveals where to get efficiency information on current products, and a recommended purchasing process. It also examines the ratings, standards, and programs that can expand the number of high-efficiency models available.

Gregerson, J.; George, K.L.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Battery Capacity Measurement And Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we look at different battery capacity models that have been introduced in the literatures. These models describe the battery capacity utilization based on how the battery is discharged by the circuits that consume power. In an attempt to validate these models, we characterize a commercially available lithium coin cell battery through careful measurements of the current and the voltage output of the battery under different load profile applied by a micro sensor node. In the result, we show how the capacity of the battery is affected by the different load profile and provide analysis on whether the conventional battery models are applicable in the real world. One of the most significant finding of our work will show that DC/DC converter plays a significant role in determining the battery capacity, and that the true capacity of the battery may only be found by careful measurements.

Using Lithium Coin; Sung Park; Andreas Savvides; Mani B. Srivastava

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Measuring wind plant capacity value  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Electric utility planners and wind energy researchers pose a common question: What is the capacity value of a wind plant? Tentative answers, which can be phrased in a variety of ways, are based on widely varying definitions and methods of calculation. From the utility`s point of view, a resource that has no capacity value also has a reduced economic value. Utility planners must be able to quantify the capacity value of a wind plant so that investment in conventional generating capacity can be potentially offset by the capacity value of the wind plant. Utility operations personnel must schedule its conventional resources to ensure adequate generation to meet load. Given a choice between two resources, one that can be counted on and the other that can`t, the utility will avoid the risky resource. This choice will be reflected in the price that the utility will pay for the capacity: higher capacity credits result in higher payments. This issue is therefore also important to the other side of the power purchase transaction -- the wind plant developer. Both the utility and the developer must accurately assess the capacity value of wind. This article summarizes and evaluates some common methods of evaluating capacity credit. During the new era of utility deregulation in the United States, it is clear that many changes will occur in both utility planning and operations. However, it is my judgement that the evaluation of capacity credit for wind plants will continue to play an important part in renewable energy development in the future.

Milligan, M.R.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Evaluation of geothermal cooling systems for Arizona  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Arizona consumes nearly 50 percent more electricity during the peak summer season of May through part of October, due to the high cooling load met by electrical-driven air conditioning units. This study evaluates two geothermal-driven cooling systems that consume less electricity, namely, absorption cooling and heat pumps. Adsorption cooling requires a geothermal resource above 105{sup 0}C (220{sup 0}F) in order to operate at a reasonable efficiency and capacity. Geothermal resources at these temperatures or above are believed existing in the Phoenix and Tucson areas, but at such depths that geothermal-driven absorption systems have high capital investments. Such capital investments are uneconomical when paid out over only five months of operation each year, but become economical when cascaded with other geothermal uses. There may be other regions of the state, where geothermal resources exist at 105{sup 0}C (220{sup 0}F) or higher at much less depth, such as the Casa Grande/Coolidge or Hyder areas, which might be attractive locations for future plants of the high-technology industries. Geothermal assisted heat pumps have been shown in this study to be economical for nearly all areas of Arizona. They are more economical and reliable than air-to-air heat pumps. Such systems in Arizona depend upon a low-temperature geothermal resource in the narrow range of 15.5 to 26.6{sup 0}C (60 to 80{sup 0}F), and are widely available in Arizona. The state has over 3000 known (existing) thermal wells, out of a total of about 30,000 irrigation wells.

White, D.H.; Goldstone, L.A.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Reactor core isolation cooling system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reactor core isolation cooling system includes a reactor pressure vessel containing a reactor core, a drywell vessel, a containment vessel, and an isolation pool containing an isolation condenser. A turbine is operatively joined to the pressure vessel outlet steamline and powers a pump operatively joined to the pressure vessel feedwater line. In operation, steam from the pressure vessel powers the turbine which in turn powers the pump to pump makeup water from a pool to the feedwater line into the pressure vessel for maintaining water level over the reactor core. Steam discharged from the turbine is channeled to the isolation condenser and is condensed therein. The resulting heat is discharged into the isolation pool and vented to the atmosphere outside the containment vessel for removing heat therefrom. 1 figure.

Cooke, F.E.

1992-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes cooling capacity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Reactor core isolation cooling system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reactor core isolation cooling system includes a reactor pressure vessel containing a reactor core, a drywell vessel, a containment vessel, and an isolation pool containing an isolation condenser. A turbine is operatively joined to the pressure vessel outlet steamline and powers a pump operatively joined to the pressure vessel feedwater line. In operation, steam from the pressure vessel powers the turbine which in turn powers the pump to pump makeup water from a pool to the feedwater line into the pressure vessel for maintaining water level over the reactor core. Steam discharged from the turbine is channeled to the isolation condenser and is condensed therein. The resulting heat is discharged into the isolation pool and vented to the atmosphere outside the containment vessel for removing heat therefrom.

Cooke, Franklin E. (San Jose, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Passive cooling system for top entry liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a passive cooling system for liquid metal cooled, top entry loop nuclear fission reactors. It comprises: a liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor plant; a passive cooling system; and a secondary passive cooling system.

Boardman, C.E.; Hunsbedt, A.; Hui, M.M.

1992-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

323

Worldwide Energy Efficiency Action through Capacity Building and Training  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Worldwide Energy Efficiency Action through Capacity Building and Training Worldwide Energy Efficiency Action through Capacity Building and Training (WEACT) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Worldwide Energy Efficiency Action through Capacity Building and Training (WEACT) Name Worldwide Energy Efficiency Action through Capacity Building and Training (WEACT) Agency/Company /Organization National Renewable Energy Laboratory, The International Partnership for Energy Efficiency Cooperation Sector Energy Focus Area Energy Efficiency Topics Background analysis Resource Type Training materials Website http://www.nrel.gov/ce/ipeec/w Country Mexico, India UN Region Northern America References Worldwide Energy Efficiency Action through Capacity Building and Training (WEACT)[1] Abstract Included are training materials for the Worldwide Energy Efficiency Action through Capacity Building & Training (WEACT) Workshop in Mexico City, 28-30 September 2010.

324

Evaluation of ammonia as a working fluid for a wet/dry-cooled binary geothermal plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The concepts considered in this study involve various arrangments of the binary geothermal power cycle with advanced dry cooling schemes. Brief descriptions of the binary cycle and advanced cooling schemes are included. Also included are descriptions of the base case concept and the ammonia working fluid concept. Performance and cost estimates were developed for a wet-cooled isobutane cycle plant, wet/dry cooled isobutane cycle plant, wet-cooled ammonia cycle plant, and a wet/dry cooled ammonia cycle plant. The performance and cost estimates were calculated using the GEOCOST computer code developed at PNL. Inputs for GEOCOST were calculated based on the Heber sites. The characteristics of the wet/dry cooling system were determined using the BNWGEO computer code developed at PNL. Results of the cooling system analysis are presented, followed by results of the geothermal plant analysis. Conclusions and comments also are included.

Drost, M.K.; Huber, H.D.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Compact Solid State Cooling Systems: Compact MEMS Electrocaloric Module  

SciTech Connect

BEETIT Project: UCLA is developing a novel solid-state cooling technology to translate a recent scientific discovery of the so-called giant electrocaloric effect into commercially viable compact cooling systems. Traditional air conditioners use noisy, vapor compression systems that include a polluting liquid refrigerant to circulate within the air conditioner, absorb heat, and pump the heat out into the environment. Electrocaloric materials achieve the same result by heating up when placed within an electric field and cooling down when removed—effectively pumping heat out from a cooler to warmer environment. This electrocaloric-based solid state cooling system is quiet and does not use liquid refrigerants. The innovation includes developing nano-structured materials and reliable interfaces for heat exchange. With these innovations and advances in micro/nano-scale manufacturing technologies pioneered by semiconductor companies, UCLA is aiming to extend the performance/reliability of the cooling module.

None

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Introduction of a Cooling Fan Efficiency Index  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with four cooling fans of different designs available on thedesign, installation, and use, the performance of cooling fans

Schiavon, Stefano; Melikov, Arsen

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Cooling thermal storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article gives some overall guidelines for successful operation of cooling thermal storage installations. Electric utilities use rates and other incentives to encourage thermal storage, which not only reduces their system peaks but also transfers a portion of their load from expensive daytime inefficient peaking plants to less expensive nighttime base load high efficiency coal and nuclear plants. There are hundreds of thermal storage installations around the country. Some of these are very successful; others have failed to achieve all of their predicted benefits because application considerations were not properly addressed.

Gatley, D.P.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Superconducting magnet cooling system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device is provided for cooling a conductor to the superconducting state. The conductor is positioned within an inner conduit through which is flowing a supercooled liquid coolant in physical contact with the conductor. The inner conduit is positioned within an outer conduit so that an annular open space is formed therebetween. Through the annular space is flowing coolant in the boiling liquid state. Heat generated by the conductor is transferred by convection within the supercooled liquid coolant to the inner wall of the inner conduit and then is removed by the boiling liquid coolant, making the heat removal from the conductor relatively independent of conductor length.

Vander Arend, Peter C. (Center Valley, PA); Fowler, William B. (St. Charles, IL)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Cooled, temperature controlled electrometer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cooled, temperature controlled electrometer for the measurement of small currents. The device employs a thermal transfer system to remove heat from the electrometer circuit and its environment and dissipate it to the external environment by means of a heat sink. The operation of the thermal transfer system is governed by a temperature regulation circuit which activates the thermal transfer system when the temperature of the electrometer circuit and its environment exceeds a level previously inputted to the external variable temperature control circuit. The variable temperature control circuit functions as subpart of the temperature control circuit. To provide temperature stability and uniformity, the electrometer circuit is enclosed by an insulated housing.

Morgan, John P. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. . Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity by State, December 31, 1996 (Capacity in Billion Cubic Feet) Table State Interstate Companies Intrastate Companies Independent Companies Total Number of Active Fields Capacity Number of Active Fields Capacity Number of Active Fields Capacity Number of Active Fields Capacity Percent of U.S. Capacity Alabama................. 0 0 1 3 0 0 1 3 0.04 Arkansas ................ 0 0 3 32 0 0 3 32 0.40 California................ 0 0 10 470 0 0 10 470 5.89 Colorado ................ 4 66 5 34 0 0 9 100 1.25 Illinois ..................... 6 259 24 639 0 0 30 898 11.26 Indiana ................... 6 16 22 97 0 0 28 113 1.42 Iowa ....................... 4 270 0 0 0 0 4 270 3.39 Kansas ................... 16 279 2 6 0 0 18 285 3.57 Kentucky ................ 6 167 18 49 0 0 24 216 2.71 Louisiana................ 8 530 4 25 0 0 12 555 6.95 Maryland ................ 1 62

331

Evaporative Roof Cooling - A Simple Solution to Cut Cooling Costs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since the "Energy Crisis" Evaporative Roof Cooling Systems have gained increased acceptance as a cost effective method to reduce the high cost of air conditioning. Documented case histories in retrofit installations show direct energy savings and paybacks from twelve to thirty months. The main operating cost of an Evaporative Roof Cooling System is water. One thousand gallons of water, completely evaporated, will produce over 700 tons of cooling capability. Water usage seldom averages over 100 gallons per 1000 ft^2 of roof area per day or 10 oz. of water per 100 ft^2 every six minutes. Roof Cooling Systems, when planned in new construction, return 1-1/2 times the investment the first year in equipment savings and operating costs. Roof sprays are a low cost cooling solution for warehouses, distribution centers and light manufacturing or assembly areas with light internal loads. See text "Flywheel Cooling."

Abernethy, D.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

COMMUNITY CAPACITY BUILDING THROUGH TECHNOLOGY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

COMMUNITY CAPACITY BUILDING THROUGH TECHNOLOGY COMMUNITY CAPACITY BUILDING THROUGH TECHNOLOGY Empowering Communities in the Age of E-Government Prepared by Melinda Downing, Environmental Justice Program Manager, U.S. Department of Energy MAR 06 MARCH 2006 Since 1999, the Department of Energy has worked with the National Urban Internet and others to create community capacity through technology.  Empowering Communities in the Age of E-Government Table of Contents Message from the Environmental Justice Program Manager . . . . . . . . 3 Introduction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Partnerships. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Process Chart: From Agency to Community. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Case Studies. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8

333

Spray Cooling Enhancement of Air-Cooled Condensers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dry cooling of power plants may be an attractive alternative to wet cooling, particularly where water conservation and environmental protection pose critical siting issues. However, dry cooling technology may be unable to maintain design plant output during the hottest periods of the year, which are often periods of peak system demand. This study—cosponsored by EPRI, the California Energy Commission, and Crockett Cogeneration Co.—evaluated the use of a low-pressure spray enhancement system to...

2003-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

334

Special Property Assessment for Renewable Heating & Cooling Systems  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Title 8 of Maryland’s property tax code includes a state-wide special assessment for solar and geothermal heating and cooling systems. Under this provision, such systems are to be assessed at not...

335

Status of cool roof standards in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cool roofs save energy. ASHRAE Transactions 104(1B):783-788.2000. Updates on revision to ASHRAE Standard 90.2: includingSSP90.1 for Reflective Roofs. ASHRAE Transactions, 104(1B),

Akbari, Hashem; Levinson, Ronnen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Water-Cooled Ice Machines, Purchasing Specifications for Energy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ice Makers. b) Measured in accordance with ARI Standard 810-2003. Does not include condenser water use. Buying Energy-Efficient Water-Cooled Ice Machines Several types of...

337

X-ray Absorption Due to Cold Gas in Cluster Cooling Cores  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have calculated the emergent X-ray properties for models of cluster cooling flows including the effects of accumulated cooled material. The opacity of this cooled gas can reduce the overall X-ray luminosity of the cooling flow, and values of Mdot based on these luminosities can underestimate the true value by factors of ~2. We find that accumulated cooled material can produce emergent surface brightness profiles much like those observed even for nearly homogeneous gas distributions. Consequently, much more of the gas may be cooling below X-ray emitting temperatures in the central regions of cooling flows (r cooling flows may have been underestimated. We show that distributed absorption in cooling flows produces a number of observable effects in the spectrum which may allow it to be differentiated from absorption due to gas in our Galaxy. Th...

Wise, M W; Wise, Michael W.; Sarazin, Craig L.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

High field solenoids for muon cooling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The proposed cooling system for the muon collider will consist of a 200 meter long line of alternating field straight solenoids interspersed with bent solenoids. The muons are cooled in all directions using a 400 mm long section liquid hydrogen at high field. The muons are accelerated in the forward direction by about 900 mm long, 805 MHz RF cavities in a gradient field that goes from 6 T to -6 T in about 300 mm. The high field section in the channel starts out at an induction of about 2 T in the hydrogen. As the muons proceed down the cooling channel, the induction in the liquid hydrogen section increases to inductions as high as 30 T. The diameter of the liquid hydrogen section starts at 750 mm when the induction is 2 T. As the induction in the cooling section goes up, the diameter of the liquid hydrogen section decreases. When the high field induction is 30 T, the diameter of the liquid hydrogen section is about 80 mm. When the high field solenoid induction is below 8.5 T or 9T, niobium titanium coils are proposed for generating .the magnetic field. Above 8.5 T or 9 T to about 20 T, graded niobium tin and niobium titanium coils would be used at temperatures down to 1.8 K. Above 20 T, a graded bybrid magnet system is proposed, where the high field magnet section (above 20 T) is either a conventional water cooled coil section or a water cooled Bitter type coil. Two types of superconducting coils have been studied. They include; epoxy impregnated intrinsically stable coils, and cable in conduit conductor (CICC) coils with helium in the conduit.

Green, M.A.; Eyssa, Y.; Kenny, S.; Miller, J.R.; Prestemon, S.

1999-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

339

High Capacity Immobilized Amine Sorbents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capacity Immobilized Amine Sorbents Capacity Immobilized Amine Sorbents Opportunity The Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory is seeking licensing partners interested in implementing United States Patent Number 7,288,136 entitled "High Capacity Immobilized Amine Sorbents." Disclosed in this patent is the invention of a method that facilitates the production of low-cost carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) sorbents for use in large-scale gas-solid processes. This method treats an amine to increase the number of secondary amine groups and impregnates the amine in a porous solid support. As a result of this improvement, the method increases CO 2 capture capacity and decreases the cost of using an amine-enriched solid sorbent in CO 2 capture systems. Overview The U.S. Department of Energy has placed a high priority on the separation

340

generation capacity | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

generation capacity generation capacity Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords AEO Electricity electricity market module region generation capacity Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Electricity Generation Capacity by Electricity Market Module Region and Source- Reference Case (xls, 10.6 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008-2035 License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL) Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes cooling capacity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Building Regulatory Capacity for Change  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regulatory Capacity for Change PRESENTED BY Sarah Spencer-Workman, LEED AP July 27, 2011 "How to identify and review laws relevant to buildings and find places and opportunities...

342

Capacity Markets and Market Stability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The good news is that market stability can be achieved through a combination of longer-term contracts, auctions for far enough in the future to permit new entry, a capacity management system, and a demand curve. The bad news is that if and when stable capacity markets are designed, the markets may seem to be relatively close to where we started - with integrated resource planning. Market ideologues will find this anathema. (author)

Stauffer, Hoff

2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

343

Keeping Cool, Saving Water and Money | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Keeping Cool, Saving Water and Money Keeping Cool, Saving Water and Money Keeping Cool, Saving Water and Money July 2, 2010 - 2:25pm Addthis The Orlando Science Center has installed a new energy efficient HVAC unit. | Photo courtesy of Orlando Science Center The Orlando Science Center has installed a new energy efficient HVAC unit. | Photo courtesy of Orlando Science Center In the summer of 2009, the Orlando Science Center (OSC) was full of hot air, literally. The museum's heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) system - which had been an operational challenge for several years - was running at 30 percent capacity. That meant the building's interior temperature was often at a toasty 80 degrees, subjecting patrons to miserable conditions. "To keep visitors happy, the museum had to reduce admission prices and

344

Keeping Cool, Saving Water and Money | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cool, Saving Water and Money Cool, Saving Water and Money Keeping Cool, Saving Water and Money July 2, 2010 - 2:25pm Addthis The Orlando Science Center has installed a new energy efficient HVAC unit. | Photo courtesy of Orlando Science Center The Orlando Science Center has installed a new energy efficient HVAC unit. | Photo courtesy of Orlando Science Center In the summer of 2009, the Orlando Science Center (OSC) was full of hot air, literally. The museum's heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) system - which had been an operational challenge for several years - was running at 30 percent capacity. That meant the building's interior temperature was often at a toasty 80 degrees, subjecting patrons to miserable conditions. "To keep visitors happy, the museum had to reduce admission prices and

345

Potential of Evaporative Cooling Systems for Buildings in India  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evaporative cooling potential for building in various climatic zones in India is investigated. Maintainable indoor conditions are obtained from the load - capacity analysis for the prevailing ambient conditions. For the assumed activity level, clothing and air velocity, the predicted mean vote (PMV), predicted percentage dissatisfied (PPD), and cumulative dissatisfaction levels for each month are estimated. Time - air condition contours of ambient, supply air and indoor air are plotted on a psychrometric chart for different cities in India like Ahmadabad, Jodhpur, Nagpur and New Delhi representing different climatic conditions of India. While satisfactorily comfort can be achieved at cool and dry weather conditions by evaporative cooling system throughout the year, some discomfort prevailed for few months around July at hot and dry/humid weather conditions. The results are also quantified in terms of PMV, PPD and their cumulative factors; PMV-hour and PPD-hour.

Maiya, M. P.; Vijay, S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Hybrid Cooling for Geothermal Power Plants: Final ARRA Project Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Many binary-cycle geothermal plants use air as the heat rejection medium. Usually this is accomplished by using an air-cooled condenser (ACC) system to condense the vapor of the working fluid in the cycle. Many air-cooled plants suffer a loss of production capacity of up to 50% during times of high ambient temperatures. Use of limited amounts of water to supplement the performance of ACCs is investigated. Deluge cooling is found to be one of the least-cost options. Limiting the use of water in such an application to less than one thousand operating hours per year can boost plant output during critical high-demand periods while minimizing water use in binary-cycle geothermal power plants.

Bharathan, D.

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Beam cooling: Principles and achievements  

SciTech Connect

After a discussion of Liouville's theorem, and its implications for beam cooling, a brief description is given of each of the various methods of beam cooling: stochastic, electron, radiation, laser, ionization, etc. For each, we present the type of particle for which it is appropriate, its range of applicability, and the currently achieved degree of cooling. For each method we also discuss the present applications and, also, possible future developments and further applications.

Mohl, Dieter; Sessler, Andrew M.

2003-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

348

Variable area fuel cell cooling  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel cell arrangement having cooling fluid flow passages which vary in surface area from the inlet to the outlet of the passages. A smaller surface area is provided at the passage inlet, which increases toward the passage outlet, so as to provide more uniform cooling of the entire fuel cell. The cooling passages can also be spaced from one another in an uneven fashion.

Kothmann, Richard E. (Churchill Borough, PA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Capacity Value of Wind Power  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Power systems are planned such that they have adequate generation capacity to meet the load, according to a defined reliability target. The increase in the penetration of wind generation in recent years has led to a number of challenges for the planning and operation of power systems. A key metric for system adequacy is the capacity value of generation. The capacity value of a generator is the contribution that a given generator makes to overall system adequacy. The variable and stochastic nature of wind sets it apart from conventional energy sources. As a result, the modeling of wind generation in the same manner as conventional generation for capacity value calculations is inappropriate. In this paper a preferred method for calculation of the capacity value of wind is described and a discussion of the pertinent issues surrounding it is given. Approximate methods for the calculation are also described with their limitations highlighted. The outcome of recent wind capacity value analyses in Europe and North America are highlighted with a description of open research questions also given.

Keane, Andrew; Milligan, Michael; Dent, Chris; Hasche, Bernhard; DAnnunzio, Claudine; Dragoon, Ken; Holttinen, Hannele; Samaan, Nader A.; Soder, Lennart; O'Malley, Mark J.

2011-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

350

InterTechnology Corporation technology summary, solar heating and cooling. National Solar Demonstration Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A summary of systems technology for solar-thermal heating and cooling of buildings is given. Solar collectors, control systems for solar heating and cooling, selective surfaces, thermal energy storage, solar-assisted heat pumps, and solar-powered cooling systems are discussed in detail. Also, an ITC specification for a solar control system is included. (WHK)

None

1976-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Desiccant degradation in desiccant cooling systems: An experimental study  

SciTech Connect

The authors conducted experiments to quantify the effects of thermal cycling and exposure to contamination on solid desiccant materials that may be used in desiccant cooling systems. The source of contamination was cigarette smoke, which is considered one of the worst pollutants in building cooling applications. The authors exposed five different solid desiccants to ``ambient`` and ``contaminated`` humid air: silica gel, activated alumina, activated carbon, molecular sieves, and lithium chloride. They obtained the moisture capacity of samples as a function of exposure time. Compared to virgin desiccant samples, the capacity loss caused by thermal cycling with humid ambient air was 10 percent to 30 percent for all desiccants. The capacity loss because of combined effect of thermal cycling with ``smoke-filled`` humid air was between 30 percent to 70 percent. The higher losses occurred after four months of experiment time, which is equivalent to four to eight years of field operation. Using a system model and smoke degradation data on silica gel, the authors predicted that, for low-temperature regeneration, the loss in performance of a ventilation-cycle desiccant cooling system would be between 10 percent to 35 percent, in about eight years, with higher value under worst conditions.

Pesaran, A.A. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Impact of desiccant degradation on desiccant cooling system performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The performance of open-cycle desiccant cooling systems depends on several factors, some of which can change beyond manufacturers' specifications. For example, the desiccant sorption process may degrade with time on exposure to airborne contaminants and thermal cycling. Desiccant degradation can reduce the performance of a dehumidifier and thus the performance of desiccant cooling systems. Using computer simulations and recent experimental data on silica gel, the impact of degradation was evaluated. Hypothetical degradations of desiccants with Type 1 moderate isotherms were also simulated. Depending on the degree and type of desiccant degradation, the decrease in thermal coefficient of performance (COP) and cooling capacity of the system was 10% to 35%. The 35% loss in system performance occurs when desiccant degradation is considered worst case. The simulations showed that the COP, and to a lesser degree the cooling capacity of these degraded systems, could be improved by increasing the rotational speed of the dehumidifier. It is shown that easy engineering solutions might be available for some types of degradations. 9 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

Pesaran, A.A.; Penney, T.R.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Muon Cooling R&D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

International efforts are under way to design and test a muon ionization cooling channel. The present R&D program is described, and future plans outlined.

Steve Geer

2001-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

354

"Hot" for Warm Water Cooling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Published 112011 Conference Location Seattle, WA Call Number LBNL-5128E Abstract Liquid cooling is key to reducing energy consumption for this generation of supercomputers and...

355

Influence of Cooling on Distortion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 11   Factors that influence the cooling intensity of liquid quenchants...the vapor pressure is, the more difficult the

356

Laser Cooling of Trapped Ions.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... period, so it can be assumed to give an in- stantaneous impulse to the ... In sympathetic laser cooling, two different ion species are loaded into a trap. ...

2002-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

357

Theory of Semiconductor Laser Cooling .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Recently laser cooling of semiconductors has received renewed attention, with the hope that a semiconductor cooler might be able to achieve cryogenic temperatures. In order… (more)

Rupper, Greg

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Thermally activated miniaturized cooling system.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A comprehensive study of a miniaturized thermally activated cooling system was conducted. This study represents the first work to conceptualize, design, fabricate and successfully test… (more)

Determan, Matthew Delos

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Direct cooled power electronics substrate  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The disclosure describes directly cooling a three-dimensional, direct metallization (DM) layer in a power electronics device. To enable sufficient cooling, coolant flow channels are formed within the ceramic substrate. The direct metallization layer (typically copper) may be bonded to the ceramic substrate, and semiconductor chips (such as IGBT and diodes) may be soldered or sintered onto the direct metallization layer to form a power electronics module. Multiple modules may be attached to cooling headers that provide in-flow and out-flow of coolant through the channels in the ceramic substrate. The modules and cooling header assembly are preferably sized to fit inside the core of a toroidal shaped capacitor.

Wiles, Randy H. (Powell, TN), Wereszczak, Andrew A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Ayers, Curtis W. (Kingston, TN); Lowe, Kirk T. (Knoxville, TN)

2010-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

360

Solar heating and cooling system for an office building at Reedy Creek Utilities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This final report describes in detail the solar energy system installed in a new two-story office building at the Reedy Creek Utilities Company, which provides utility service to Walt Disney World at Lake Buena Vista, Florida. The solar components were partly funded by the Department of Energy under Contract EX-76-C-01-2401, and the technical management was by NASA/George C. Marshall Space Flight Center. The solar energy system application is 100 percent heating, 80 percent cooling, and 100 percent hot water. The collector is a modular cylindrical concentrator type with an area of 3.840 square feet. The storage medium is water with a capacity of 10,000 gallons hot and 10,000 gallons chilled. Design, construction, operation, cost, maintenance, and performance are described in depth. Detailed drawings are included.

Not Available

1978-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes cooling capacity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(Barrels per Calendar Day) (Barrels per Calendar Day) Data Series: Total Number of Operable Refineries Number of Operating Refineries Number of Idle Refineries Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operating Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Idle Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity (B/SD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operating Capacity (B/SD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Idle Capacity (B/SD) Vacuum Distillation Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Total Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Delayed Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD Thermal Cracking Fluid Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Visbreaking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Other/Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Cracking Fresh Feed Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Cracking Recycle Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Residual Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Low Pressure Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming High Pressure Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating/Desulfurization Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Naphtha/Reformer Feed Charge Cap (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Gasoline Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Heavy Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Kerosene/Jet Fuel Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Diesel Fuel Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Other Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Residual/Other Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Residual Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Other Oils Charge Capacity (B/SD) Fuels Solvent Deasphalting Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Total Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Catalytic Cracking Fresh Feed Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Period:

362

Film cooling for a closed loop cooled airfoil  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Turbine stator vane segments have radially inner and outer walls with vanes extending therebetween. The inner and outer walls are compartmentalized and have impingement plates. Steam flowing into the outer wall plenum passes through the impingement plate for impingement cooling of the outer wall upper surface. The spent impingement steam flows into cavities of the vane having inserts for impingement cooling the walls of the vane. The steam passes into the inner wall and through the impingement plate for impingement cooling of the inner wall surface and for return through return cavities having inserts for impingement cooling of the vane surfaces. At least one film cooling hole is defined through a wall of at least one of the cavities for flow communication between an interior of the cavity and an exterior of the vane. The film cooling hole(s) are defined adjacent a potential low LCF life region, so that cooling medium that bleeds out through the film cooling hole(s) reduces a thermal gradient in a vicinity thereof, thereby the increase the LCF life of that region.

Burdgick, Steven Sebastian (Schenectady, NY); Yu, Yufeng Phillip (Simpsonville, SC); Itzel, Gary Michael (Simpsonville, SC)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Maryvale Terrace: geothermal residential district space heating and cooling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A preliminary study of the technical and economic feasibility of installing a geothermal district heating and cooling system is analyzed for the Maryvale Terrace residential subdevelopment in Phoenix, Arizona, consisting of 557 residential houses. The design heating load was estimated to be 16.77 million Btu/h and the design cooling load was estimated to be 14.65 million Btu/h. Average annual energy use for the development was estimated to be 5870 million Btu/y and 14,650 million Btu/y for heating and cooling, respectively. Competing fuels are natural gas for heating and electricity for cooling. A geothermal resource is assumed to exist beneath the site at a depth of 6000 feet. Five production wells producing 1000 gpm each of 220/sup 0/F geothermal fluid are required. Total estimated cost for installing the system is $5,079,300. First year system operations cost (including debt service) is $974,361. The average annual geothermal heating and cooling cost per home is estimated to be $1750 as compared to a conventional system annual cost of $1145. Further, the cost of geothermal heating and cooling is estimated to be $47.50 per million Btu when debt service is included and $6.14 per million Btu when only operating costs are included. Operating (or fuel) costs for conventional heating and cooling are estimated to be $15.55 per million Btu.

White, D.H.; Goldstone, L.A.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

The Thermodynamic and Cost Benefits of Floating Cooling Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Historically, a fixed cooling concept is used in the design of evaporative heat rejection systems for process and power plants. In the fixed cooling mode, a plant is designed for maximum output at the design summer wet bulb temperature. The application of a floating cooling concept to evaporative heat rejection systems can have significant impact on improving plant performance. The floating cooling concept refers to the optimization of yearly plant output and energy consumption by taking advantage of seasonal wet bulb temperature fluctuations. The maximum plant output occurs at the average winter wet bulb temperature. Floating cooling is especially suited to base load power plants located in regions with large daily and seasonal wet bulb temperature variations. An example for a geothermal power plant is included in this paper.

Svoboda, K. J.; Klooster, H. J.; Johnnie, D. H., Jr.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Turbine engine component with cooling passages  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A component for use in a turbine engine including a first member and a second member associated with the first member. The second member includes a plurality of connecting elements extending therefrom. The connecting elements include securing portions at ends thereof that are received in corresponding cavities formed in the first member to attach the second member to the first member. The connecting elements are constructed to space apart a first surface of the second member from a first surface of the first member such that at least one cooling passage is formed between adjacent connecting elements and the first surface of the second member and the first surface of the first member.

Arrell, Douglas J. (Oviedo, FL); James, Allister W. (Orlando, FL)

2012-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

366

COOLING AND HEATING FUNCTIONS OF PHOTOIONIZED GAS  

SciTech Connect

Cooling and heating functions of cosmic gas are crucial ingredients for any study of gas dynamics and thermodynamics in the interstellar and intergalactic media. As such, they have been studied extensively in the past under the assumption of collisional ionization equilibrium. However, for a wide range of applications, the local radiation field introduces a non-negligible, often dominant, modification to the cooling and heating functions. In the most general case, these modifications cannot be described in simple terms and would require a detailed calculation with a large set of chemical species using a radiative transfer code (the well-known code Cloudy, for example). We show, however, that for a sufficiently general variation in the spectral shape and intensity of the incident radiation field, the cooling and heating functions can be approximated as depending only on several photoionization rates, which can be thought of as representative samples of the overall radiation field. This dependence is easy to tabulate and implement in cosmological or galactic-scale simulations, thus economically accounting for an important but rarely included factor in the evolution of cosmic gas. We also show a few examples where the radiation environment has a large effect, the most spectacular of which is a quasar that suppresses gas cooling in its host halo without any mechanical or non-radiative thermal feedback.

Gnedin, Nickolay Y. [Particle Astrophysics Center, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Hollon, Nicholas, E-mail: gnedin@fnal.gov [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

367

Advanced Open-Cycle Desiccant Cooling System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The concept of staged regeneration as means of improving the desiccant cooling system performance is the subject of investigation in this study. In the staged regeneration, the regeneration section of desiccant dehumidifier is divided into two parts and only the latter fraction is subjected to the desorption air stream which has been heated to the desired regeneration temperature. In the present work, the mathematical model describing the heat and mass transfer processes that occur during sorption of moisture in the desiccnnt dehumidifier includes both the gas-side (film) and solid-side resistances for heat and mass transports. The moisture diffusion in the desiccant material is expressed by gas-phase diffusion and surface diffusion. Effects of several parameters on the performance of desiccant cooling system with staged regeneration are investigated and the results of present model are compared with those of the lumped-resistance model. Results of this study show that coefficient of perfomnnce of the desiccant cooling system can be substantially improved by using the staged regeneration concept. There is an optimum stage fraction and optimum cycle time for given system parmeters and operating conditions. The results also indicate that the cooling system performance is higher than that predicted by the lumped-resistance model.

Ko, Y. J.; Charoensupaya, D.; Lavan, Z.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

User's Guide to Cooling Systems Data Base  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A bibliographical computerized data base related to cooling system impacts on aquatic environments were compiled by the Information Center Complex at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Atomic Industrial Forum, Inc. (AIF). The data base covers four major subject areas: thermal effects, chemical effects, impingement, and entrainment. The ORNL portion of the project covers published literature, including government and university reports, conference proceedings, and trade journals. The AIF portion...

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Management of Non-Cooling Water Releases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report assesses the efficacy and cost of water management practices that can be used by power companies to address non-cooling water and stormwater release issues with respect to siting, design, and operation of facilities, including generating stations, substations, and rights-of-way in urban and rural settings. The report will be of value to environmental and generation managers within power companies, as well as regulators, water resource managers, and environmentalists.

2008-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

370

Passively cooled direct drive wind turbine  

SciTech Connect

A wind turbine is provided that passively cools an electrical generator. The wind turbine includes a plurality of fins arranged peripherally around a generator house. Each of the fins being oriented at an angle greater than zero degrees to allow parallel flow of air over the fin. The fin is further tapered to allow a constant portion of the fin to extend beyond the air stream boundary layer. Turbulence initiators on the nose cone further enhance heat transfer at the fins.

Costin, Daniel P. (Chelsea, VT)

2008-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

371

Enhanced heat transfer surface for cast-in-bump-covered cooling surfaces and methods of enhancing heat transfer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An annular turbine shroud separates a hot gas path from a cooling plenum containing a cooling medium. Bumps are cast in the surface on the cooling side of the shroud. A surface coating overlies the cooling side surface of the shroud, including the bumps, and contains cooling enhancement material. The surface area ratio of the cooling side of the shroud with the bumps and coating is in excess of a surface area ratio of the cooling side surface with bumps without the coating to afford increased heat transfer across the element relative to the heat transfer across the element without the coating.

Chiu, Rong-Shi Paul (Glenmont, NY); Hasz, Wayne Charles (Pownal, VT); Johnson, Robert Alan (Simpsonville, SC); Lee, Ching-Pang (Cincinnati, OH); Abuaf, Nesim (Lincoln City, OR)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Temperature initiated passive cooling system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A passive cooling system for cooling an enclosure only when the enclosure temperature exceeds a maximum standby temperature comprises a passive heat transfer loop containing heat transfer fluid having a particular thermodynamic critical point temperature just above the maximum standby temperature. An upper portion of the heat transfer loop is insulated to prevent two phase operation below the maximum standby temperature.

Forsberg, Charles W. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Temperature initiated passive cooling system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A passive cooling system for cooling an enclosure only when the enclosure temperature exceeds a maximum standby temperature comprises a passive heat transfer loop containing heat transfer fluid having a particular thermodynamic critical point temperature just above the maximum standby temperature. An upper portion of the heat transfer loop is insulated to prevent two phase operation below the maximum standby temperature. 1 fig.

Forsberg, C.W.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Transient analysis and energy optimization of solar heating and cooling systems in various configurations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, a transient simulation model of solar-assisted heating and cooling systems (SHC) is presented. A detailed case study is also discussed, in which three different configurations are considered. In all cases, the SHC system is based on the coupling of evacuated solar collectors with a single-stage LiBr-H{sub 2}O absorption chiller, and a gas-fired boiler is also included for auxiliary heating, only during the winter season. In the first configuration, the cooling capacity of the absorption chiller and the solar collector area are designed on the basis of the maximum cooling load, and an electric chiller is used as the auxiliary cooling system. The second layout is similar to the first one, but, in this case, the absorption chiller and the solar collector area are sized in order to balance only a fraction of the maximum cooling load. Finally, in the third configuration, there is no electric chiller, and the auxiliary gas-fired boiler is also used in summer to feed the absorption chiller, in case of scarce solar irradiation. The simulation model was developed using the TRNSYS software, and included the analysis of the dynamic behaviour of the building in which the SHC systems were supposed to be installed. The building was simulated using a single-lumped capacitance model. An economic model was also developed, in order to assess the operating and capital costs of the systems under analysis. Furthermore, a mixed heuristic-deterministic optimization algorithm was implemented, in order to determine the set of the synthesis/design variables that maximize the energy efficiency of each configuration under analysis. The results of the case study were analyzed on monthly and weekly basis, paying special attention to the energy and monetary flows of the standard and optimized configurations. The results are encouraging as for the potential of energy saving. On the contrary, the SHC systems appear still far from the economic profitability: however, this is notoriously true for the great majority of renewable energy systems. (author)

Calise, F.; Dentice d'Accadia, M.; Palombo, A. [DETEC - University of Naples Federico II, P.le Tecchio 80, 80125 Naples (Italy)

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

375

Cryostat including heater to heat a target  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cryostat is provided which comprises a vacuum vessel; a target disposed within the vacuum vessel; a heat sink disposed within the vacuum vesssel for absorbing heat from the detector; a cooling mechanism for cooling the heat sink; a cryoabsorption mechanism for cryoabsorbing residual gas within the vacuum vessel; and a heater for maintaining the target above a temperature at which the residual gas is cryoabsorbed in the course of cryoabsorption of the residual gas by the cryoabsorption mechanism.

Pehl, Richard H. (Berkeley, CA); Madden, Norman W. (Livermore, CA); Malone, Donald F. (Oakland, CA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Cryostat including heater to heat a target  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cryostat is provided which comprises a vacuum vessel; a target disposed within the vacuum vessel; a heat sink disposed within the vacuum vessel for absorbing heat from the detector; a cooling mechanism for cooling the heat sink; a cryoabsorption mechanism for cryoabsorbing residual gas within the vacuum vessel; and a heater for maintaining the target above a temperature at which the residual gas is cryoabsorbed in the course of cryoabsorption of the residual gas by the cryoabsorption mechanism. 2 figs.

Pehl, R.H.; Madden, N.W.; Malone, D.F.

1990-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

377

Optimal Capacity Adjustments for Supply Chain Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Decisions on capacity are often treated separately from those of production and inventory. In most situations, capacity issues are longer-term, so capacity-related decisions are considered strategic and thus not part of ...

Budiman, Benny

378

Cool Roofs | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cool Roofs Cool Roofs Cool Roofs July 26, 2013 - 10:36am Addthis White painted roofs have been popular since ancient times in places like Greece. Similar technology can be easy to adapt to modern homes and other buildings. | Credit: ©iStockphoto/PhotoTalk White painted roofs have been popular since ancient times in places like Greece. Similar technology can be easy to adapt to modern homes and other buildings. | Credit: ©iStockphoto/PhotoTalk If you live in a hot climate, a cool roof can: Save you money on air conditioning Make your home more comfortable in hot weather How does it work? By making your roof more reflective, you reduce heat gain into your home. Check out these resources for more information. A cool roof is one that has been designed to reflect more sunlight and

379

Laser cooling to quantum degeneracy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) in a gas of strontium atoms, using laser cooling as the only cooling mechanism. The condensate is formed within a sample that is continuously Doppler cooled to below 1\\muK on a narrow-linewidth transition. The critical phase-space density for BEC is reached in a central region of the sample, in which atoms are rendered transparent for laser cooling photons. The density in this region is enhanced by an additional dipole trap potential. Thermal equilibrium between the gas in this central region and the surrounding laser cooled part of the cloud is established by elastic collisions. Condensates of up to 10^5 atoms can be repeatedly formed on a timescale of 100ms, with prospects for the generation of a continuous atom laser.

Stellmer, Simon; Grimm, Rudolf; Schreck, Florian

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Keeping cool in the job  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Describes cooling garments used at nuclear plants to keep workers cooler for longer periods of time, safeguard health, boost efficiency, and elevate morale. Examines 2 cooling concepts tested by EPRI in laboratory and field conditions: using circulating liquids for cooling (represented by 2 commercially available personal cooling systems); and using frozen water for cooling (represented by 2 prototype garments recently developed by EPRI). Explains that pipes and pressure vessels inside nuclear power plants give off significant amounts of waste heat, with temperatures reaching up to 55C (131F)-not very comfortable for maintenance workers who are swathed in radiation protection gear and doing repair work. Finds that the frozen-water concept may considerably extend working time in the power plant. Concludes that the right research can overcome heat, humidity, and close quarters which conspire to make maintenance work in power plants a tough task.

Lihach, N.; O'Brien, J.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes cooling capacity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Wind turbine generators having wind assisted cooling systems and cooling methods  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A wind generator includes: a nacelle; a hub carried by the nacelle and including at least a pair of wind turbine blades; and an electricity producing generator including a stator and a rotor carried by the nacelle. The rotor is connected to the hub and rotatable in response to wind acting on the blades to rotate the rotor relative to the stator to generate electricity. A cooling system is carried by the nacelle and includes at least one ambient air inlet port opening through a surface of the nacelle downstream of the hub and blades, and a duct for flowing air from the inlet port in a generally upstream direction toward the hub and in cooling relation to the stator.

Bagepalli, Bharat (Niskayuna, NY); Barnes, Gary R. (Delanson, NY); Gadre, Aniruddha D. (Rexford, NY); Jansen, Patrick L. (Scotia, NY); Bouchard, Jr., Charles G. (Schenectady, NY); Jarczynski, Emil D. (Scotia, NY); Garg, Jivtesh (Cambridge, MA)

2008-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

382

installed capacity | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

installed capacity installed capacity Dataset Summary Description Estimates for each of the 50 states and the entire United States show Source Wind Powering America Date Released February 04th, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated April 13th, 2011 (3 years ago) Keywords annual generation installed capacity usa wind Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon Wind potential data (xls, 102.4 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment Work of the U.S. Federal Government. Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote Usefulness of the dataset Average vote Your vote Ease of access Average vote Your vote Overall rating Average vote Your vote Comments

383

Building Regulatory Capacity for Change  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regulatory Capacity for Regulatory Capacity for Change PRESENTED BY Sarah Spencer-Workman, LEED AP July 27, 2011 "How to identify and review laws relevant to buildings and find places and opportunities that can accept changes that would support building energy objectives" Presentation Highlights Rulemaking Community and Stakeholder Identification To Support Code Changes Engagement: Building Capacity for Change Pay It Forward RULEMAKING : Plan Development and Research of Laws Relevant to Buildings How is it conducted? 'Landscape' Review Key words or phrases to look for Identify "home rule" jurisdictions Update and review cycle built in 'Landscape' Review:

384

Appendix F Cultural Resources, Including  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Appendix F Appendix F Cultural Resources, Including Section 106 Consultation STATE OF CALIFORNIA - THE RESOURCES AGENCY EDMUND G. BROWN, JR., Governor OFFICE OF HISTORIC PRESERVATION DEPARTMENT OF PARKS AND RECREATION 1725 23 rd Street, Suite 100 SACRAMENTO, CA 95816-7100 (916) 445-7000 Fax: (916) 445-7053 calshpo@parks.ca.gov www.ohp.parks.ca.gov June 14, 2011 Reply in Reference To: DOE110407A Angela Colamaria Loan Programs Office Environmental Compliance Division Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave SW, LP-10 Washington, DC 20585 Re: Topaz Solar Farm, San Luis Obispo County, California Dear Ms. Colamaria: Thank you for seeking my consultation regarding the above noted undertaking. Pursuant to 36 CFR Part 800 (as amended 8-05-04) regulations implementing Section

385

Film cooling air pocket in a closed loop cooled airfoil  

SciTech Connect

Turbine stator vane segments have radially inner and outer walls with vanes extending between them. The inner and outer walls are compartmentalized and have impingement plates. Steam flowing into the outer wall plenum passes through the impingement plate for impingement cooling of the outer wall upper surface. The spent impingement steam flows into cavities of the vane having inserts for impingement cooling the walls of the vane. The steam passes into the inner wall and through the impingement plate for impingement cooling of the inner wall surface and for return through return cavities having inserts for impingement cooling of the vane surfaces. To provide for air film cooing of select portions of the airfoil outer surface, at least one air pocket is defined on a wall of at least one of the cavities. Each air pocket is substantially closed with respect to the cooling medium in the cavity and cooling air pumped to the air pocket flows through outlet apertures in the wall of the airfoil to cool the same.

Yu, Yufeng Phillip (Simpsonville, SC); Itzel, Gary Michael (Simpsonville, SC); Osgood, Sarah Jane (East Thetford, VT); Bagepalli, Radhakrishna (Schenectady, NY); Webbon, Waylon Willard (Greenville, SC); Burdgick, Steven Sebastian (Schenectady, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

District cooling: Phase 2, Direct freeze ice slurry system testing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of this research are to: extend the range of pressure drop data for ice-water slurry flows, and design and build a prototypical ice slurry distribution system which demonstrates ice slurry handling at an end user's heat exchanger, without sending ice slurry directly through the heat exchanger. The results of Phase 1 work demonstrated a 40% reduction in pump power required to move an ice-water slurry versus the same mass flow of water only. In addition to lower pressure drop, pumping ice slurries is advantageous because of the large latent and sensible heat cooling capacity stored in the ice compared to only sensible heat in chilled water. For example, an ice-water slurry with a 20% ice fraction (by mass) has a mass flow rate that is 70% less than the mass flow rate required for a chilled water system cooling and equivalent load. The greatly reduced mass flow combined with the friction reducing effects of ice-water slurries results in a total savings of 83% in pumping power. Therefore, a substantial savings potential exists for capital costs and system operating costs in ice-water slurry district cooling systems. One potential disadvantage of an ice-slurry district cooling system is the introduction of ice into equipment not so designed, such as air handlers at end user locations. A prototypic ice slurry distribution loop will demonstrate a cooling network which will provide ice slurry to an end user but sends ice free water into the actual heat transfer.

Winters, P.J.

1991-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

387

Performance of a hotel chilled water plant with cool storage  

SciTech Connect

A comprehensive monitoring suite was installed at a large convention hotel located in San Francisco, CA. The instrumentation was used for a research project to evaluate the effectiveness of electricity price based controls that automate response to real time pricing and to characterize the operation and performance of the hotel's chilled water plant that included a newly installed ice cool storage system. The hotel operates under real-time electricity rates. To date, over four years of data have been collected. Data included electricity use for all chillers, secondary coolant, chilled water, condenser pumps, and the cooling tower fans. Thermal flow data were also collected for the storage system, ice chiller, direct cooling chillers, and chilled water load loops. This paper (1) describes the chilled water plant, (2) defines the performance measurement objectives for the project, (3) discusses operational experience with the plant, focusing on the cool storage system, (4) analyzes chilled water plant and cool storage system operation by examining the charge/discharge heat flow data, and (5) evaluates how well the plant as a whole and the cool storage system specifically met cooling loads of the facility, and how this affected their use.

Gillespie, K.L.; Blanc, S.L.; Parker, S.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Worldwide Energy Efficiency Action through Capacity Building...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Worldwide Energy Efficiency Action through Capacity Building and Training (WEACT) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Worldwide Energy Efficiency Action through Capacity Building and...

389

Working and Net Available Shell Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

and tank farms. Excludes storage capacity of refineries, fuel ethanol plants, and pipelines. 2 Percent exclusive use is that portion of capacity in operation that is for the...

390

High Capacity Hydrogen Storage Nanocomposite - Energy ...  

Energy Storage Advanced Materials High Capacity Hydrogen Storage Nanocomposite Processes to add metal hydrideds to nanocarbon structures to yield high capacity ...

391

Economic Dispatch of Electric Generation Capacity | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Economic Dispatch of Electric Generation Capacity Economic Dispatch of Electric Generation Capacity A report to congress and the states pursuant to sections 1234 and 1832 of the...

392

California Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) California Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

393

Resource Adequacy Capacity - Power Marketing - Sierra Nevada...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Resource Adequacy Capacity Resource Adequacy Capacity Resource Adequacy Plan - Current Local Resource Adequacy Plan (Word - 175K) - Notice of Proposed Final Resource Adequacy Plan...

394

Washington Natural Gas Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Washington Natural Gas Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

395

Missouri Natural Gas Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Missouri Natural Gas Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

396

Mississippi Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Mississippi Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

397

Minnesota Natural Gas Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Minnesota Natural Gas Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

398

Pennsylvania Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Pennsylvania Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

399

Washington Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Washington Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

400

EIA Crude Oil Distillation Capacity (Table 36)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

(Important Note on Sources of Crude Oil Distillation Capacity Estimates) Table 3.6 World Crude Oil Distillation Capacity, January 1, 1970 - January 1, 2009

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes cooling capacity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

New Cool Roof Coatings and Affordable Cool Color Asphalt  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

New Cool Roof Coatings and New Cool Roof Coatings and Affordable Cool Color Asphalt Shingles Meng-Dawn Cheng Oak Ridge National Laboratory chengmd@ornl.gov; 865-241-5918 April 4, 2013 PM: Andre Desjarlais PI: Meng-Dawn Cheng, Ph.D. David Graham, Ph.D. Sue Carroll Steve Allman Dawn Klingeman Susan Pfiffner, Ph.D. (FY12) Karen Cheng (FY12) Partner: Joe Rokowski (Dow) Roof Testing Facility at ORNL Building Technologies Research and Integration Center 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov * Building accounted for 41% of the US energy consumption in 2010 greater than either transportation (28%) or industry (31%).

402

New Cool Roof Coatings and Affordable Cool Color Asphalt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Cool Roof Coatings and New Cool Roof Coatings and Affordable Cool Color Asphalt Shingles Meng-Dawn Cheng Oak Ridge National Laboratory chengmd@ornl.gov; 865-241-5918 April 4, 2013 PM: Andre Desjarlais PI: Meng-Dawn Cheng, Ph.D. David Graham, Ph.D. Sue Carroll Steve Allman Dawn Klingeman Susan Pfiffner, Ph.D. (FY12) Karen Cheng (FY12) Partner: Joe Rokowski (Dow) Roof Testing Facility at ORNL Building Technologies Research and Integration Center 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov * Building accounted for 41% of the US energy consumption in 2010 greater than either transportation (28%) or industry (31%).

403

cooling degree-days - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Alternative Fuels. Includes hydropower, solar, wind, geothermal, biomass and ethanol. ... Cooling degree-days. There are no record(s) that match your search criteria.

404

THE STIRLING ENGINE: THERMODYNAMICS AND APPLICATIONS IN COMBINED COOLING, HEATING, AND POWER SYSTEMS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The goal of this study is to assess the potential of the Stirling engine in alternative energy applications including combined cooling, heating, and power… (more)

Harrod, James C

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Effects of Cooling Rate on Microstructure in En-Ac43000 Gravity ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chillers of different dimensions and materials, including water cooled ones, were placed at one side of the casting in order to obtain mono-dimensional heat flux ...

406

Quantum capacity under adversarial quantum noise: arbitrarily varying quantum channels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate entanglement transmission over an unknown channel in the presence of a third party (called the adversary), which is enabled to choose the channel from a given set of memoryless but non-stationary channels without informing the legitimate sender and receiver about the particular choice that he made. This channel model is called arbitrarily varying quantum channel (AVQC). We derive a quantum version of Ahlswede's dichotomy for classical arbitrarily varying channels. This includes a regularized formula for the common randomness-assisted capacity for entanglement transmission of an AVQC. Quite surprisingly and in contrast to the classical analog of the problem involving the maximal and average error probability, we find that the capacity for entanglement transmission of an AVQC always equals its strong subspace transmission capacity. These results are accompanied by different notions of symmetrizability (zero-capacity conditions) as well as by conditions for an AVQC to have a capacity described by a single-letter formula. In he final part of the paper the capacity of the erasure-AVQC is computed and some light shed on the connection between AVQCs and zero-error capacities. Additionally, we show by entirely elementary and operational arguments motivated by the theory of AVQCs that the quantum, classical, and entanglement-assisted zero-error capacities of quantum channels are generically zero and are discontinuous at every positivity point.

Rudolf Ahlswede; Igor Bjelakovic; Holger Boche; Janis Noetzel

2010-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

407

Countries Gasoline Prices Including Taxes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Countries (U.S. dollars per gallon, including taxes) Countries (U.S. dollars per gallon, including taxes) Date Belgium France Germany Italy Netherlands UK US 01/13/14 7.83 7.76 7.90 8.91 8.76 8.11 3.68 01/06/14 8.00 7.78 7.94 8.92 8.74 8.09 3.69 12/30/13 NA NA NA NA NA NA 3.68 12/23/13 NA NA NA NA NA NA 3.63 12/16/13 7.86 7.79 8.05 9.00 8.78 8.08 3.61 12/9/13 7.95 7.81 8.14 8.99 8.80 8.12 3.63 12/2/13 7.91 7.68 8.07 8.85 8.68 8.08 3.64 11/25/13 7.69 7.61 8.07 8.77 8.63 7.97 3.65 11/18/13 7.99 7.54 8.00 8.70 8.57 7.92 3.57 11/11/13 7.63 7.44 7.79 8.63 8.46 7.85 3.55 11/4/13 7.70 7.51 7.98 8.70 8.59 7.86 3.61 10/28/13 8.02 7.74 8.08 8.96 8.79 8.04 3.64 10/21/13 7.91 7.71 8.11 8.94 8.80 8.05 3.70 10/14/13 7.88 7.62 8.05 8.87 8.74 7.97 3.69

408

Technical Evaluation of Side Stream Filtration for Cooling Towers  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cooling Towers (photo from Pacific Cooling Towers (photo from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory) * Scaling: Scaling is the precipitation of dissolved mineral components that have become saturated in solution, which can lower efficiency of the system. * Fouling: Fouling occurs when suspended particles or biologic growth forms an insulating film on heat transfer surfaces. Common foulants include organic matter, process oils, and silt, which can also lower system performance. * Microbiological Activity: Microbiological activity refers to microorganisms that live and grow in the cooling system that can contribute

409

Technical Evaluation of Side Stream Filtration for Cooling Towers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cooling Towers (photo from Pacific Cooling Towers (photo from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory) * Scaling: Scaling is the precipitation of dissolved mineral components that have become saturated in solution, which can lower efficiency of the system. * Fouling: Fouling occurs when suspended particles or biologic growth forms an insulating film on heat transfer surfaces. Common foulants include organic matter, process oils, and silt, which can also lower system performance. * Microbiological Activity: Microbiological activity refers to microorganisms that live and grow in the cooling system that can contribute

410

Preliminary design package for prototype solar heating and cooling systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A summary is presented of the preliminary analysis and design activity on solar heating and cooling systems. The analysis was made without site specific data other than weather; therefore, the results indicate performance expected under these special conditions. Major items in this report include a market analysis, design approaches, trade studies and other special data required to evaluate the preliminary analysis and design. The program calls for the development and delivery of eight prototype solar heating and cooling systems for installation and operational test. Two heating and six heating and cooling units will be delivered for Single Family Residences (SFR), Multiple-Family Residences (MFR), and commerical applications.

Not Available

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

A Free Cooling Based Chilled Water System at Kingston  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In efforts to reduce operating costs, the IBM site at Kingston, New York incorporated the energy saving concept of 'free cooling' (direct cooling of chilled water with condenser water) with the expansion of the site chilled water system. Free cooling was employed to satisfy the winter chilled water load of approximately 3000 tons resulting in electrical savings of up to 70% in the winter with wet bulb temperatures below 38 oF. Other energy efficient features included variable speed pumping, high efficiency motors and chillers with reduced entering condenser water limits. This paper will describe the various possible operating modes and their associated savings using computer simulation techniques.

Jansen, P. R.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Coherent electron cooling proof of principle instrumentation design  

SciTech Connect

The goal of the Coherent Electron Cooling Proof-of-Principle (CeC PoP) experiment being designed at RHIC is to demonstrate longitudinal (energy spread) cooling before the expected CD-2 for eRHIC. The scope of the experiment is to longitudinally cool a single bunch of 40 GeV/u gold ions in RHIC. This paper will describe the instrumentation systems proposed to meet the diagnostics challenges. These include measurements of beam intensity, emittance, energy spread, bunch length, position, orbit stability, and transverse and temporal alignment of electron and ion beams.

Gassner D. M.; Litvinenko, V.; Michnoff, R.; Miller, T.; Minty, M.; Pinayev, I.

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

413

Predictive pre-cooling control for low lift radiant cooling using building thermal mass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Low lift cooling systems (LLCS) hold the potential for significant energy savings relative to conventional cooling systems. An LLCS is a cooling system which leverages existing HVAC technologies to provide low energy cooling ...

Gayeski, Nicholas (Nicholas Thomas)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Commercial Cooling Par Engineering: Proposed Penalty (2013-CE-5312) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Proposed Penalty (2013-CE-5312) Proposed Penalty (2013-CE-5312) Commercial Cooling Par Engineering: Proposed Penalty (2013-CE-5312) January 31, 2013 DOE alleged in a Notice of Proposed Civil Penalty that Commercial Cooling Par Engineering failed to certify walk-in cooler or freezer components as compliant with the energy conservation standards. DOE regulations require a manufacturer (which includes importers) to submit reports certifying that its products have been tested and meet the applicable energy conservation standards. This civil penalty notice advises the company of the potential penalties and DOE's administrative process, including the company's right to a hearing. Commercial Cooling Par Engineering: Proposed Penalty (2013-CE-5312) More Documents & Publications Commercial Cooling Par Engineering: Order (2013-CE-5312)

415

Design Considerations for Economically Competitive Sodium Cooled Fast Reactors  

SciTech Connect

The technological viability of sodium cooled fast reactors (SFR) has been established by various experimental and prototype (demonstration) reactors such as EBR-II, FFTF, Phénix, JOYO, BN-600 etc. However, the economic competitiveness of SFR has not been proven yet. The perceived high cost premium of SFRs over LWRs has been the primary impediment to the commercial expansion of SFR technologies. In this paper, cost reduction options are discussed for advanced SFR designs. These include a hybrid loop-pool design to optimize the primary system, multiple reheat and intercooling helium Brayton cycle for the power conversion system and the potential for suppression of intermediate heat transport system. The design options for the fully passive decay heat removal systems are also thoroughly examined. These include direct reactor auxiliary cooling system (DRACS), reactor vessel auxiliary cooling system (RVACS) and the newly proposed pool reactor auxiliary cooling system (PRACS) in the context of the hybrid loop-pool design.

Hongbin Zhang; Haihua Zhao

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Stochastic cooling in muon colliders  

SciTech Connect

Analysis of muon production techniques for high energy colliders indicates the need for rapid and effective beam cooling in order that one achieve luminosities > 10{sup 30} cm{sup {minus}2}s{sup {minus}1} as required for high energy physics experiments. This paper considers stochastic cooling to increase the phase space density of the muons in the collider. Even at muon energies greater than 100 GeV, the number of muons per bunch must be limited to {approximately}10{sup 3} for the cooling rate to be less than the muon lifetime. With such a small number of muons per bunch, the final beam emittance implied by the luminosity requirement is well below the thermodynamic limit for beam electronics at practical temperatures. Rapid bunch stacking after the cooling process can raise the number of muons per bunch to a level consistent with both the luminosity goals and with practical temperatures for the stochastic cooling electronics. A major advantage of our stochastic cooling/stacking scheme over scenarios that employ only ionization cooling is that the power on the production target can be reduced below 1 MW.

Barletta, W.A.; Sessler, A.M.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

SOLERAS - Saudi University Solar Cooling Laboratories Project: University of Petroleum and Minerals. Solar cooling system. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides details of the proposed solar cooling laboratory, including descriptions of the building and design conditions; the collector/storage subsystem; the Rankine cycle engine subsystem; instrumentation and data acquisition; and an implementation plan. Appendices of relevant data including computer programs for building load and engine system calculations and descriptions of equipment are included.

Not Available

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Power production, generating capacity data for 1972--1977  

SciTech Connect

Statistics on trends in electric power production, generating capacity, and consumption of fossil fuels over the past six-year period are reported. Included are monthly production by fuel, fuel consumption and stocks for the past six years, installed capacity, and net generation by type of prime mover and class of ownership. Most data are by State for the past year. A narrative section discusses the highlights and trends supported by the tables. This document continues the annual series on power production and generating capacity previously published by the Federal Power Commission. This publication was discontinued with this issue. 8 tables.

1978-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Experimental Study on the Performance of IIST Passive Core Cooling System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to conduct the experiments at the Institute of Nuclear Energy Research (INER) Integral System Test (IIST) facility for evaluation of the performance of the passive core cooling system (PCCS) during the cold-leg small break loss-of-coolant accidents (SBLOCAs). Five experiments were performed with (1) three different break sizes, 2%, 0.5%, and 0.2% (approximately corresponding to 1 1/4'', 2'', and 4'' breaks for Maanshan nuclear power plant), and (2) 0.2% and 0.5% without actuation of the first-stage and third-stage automatic depressurization valve (ADS-1 and ADS-3) to initiate PCCS for assessing its capacity in accident management. The detailed descriptions of general system response and the interactions of core makeup tanks (CMTs), accumulators (ACCs), automatic depressurization system (ADS), passive residual heat Removal (PRHR), and in-containment refueling water storage tank (IRWST) on the core heat removal are included. The results show: (1) core long term cooling can be maintained for all cases following the PCCS procedures, (2) the core can be covered for the cases of the 0.2% and 0.5% breaks without actuation of ADS-1 and ADS-3. (authors)

Chin-Jang Chang; Chien-Hsiung Lee [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research P.O. Box 3-3, Longtan, 32500, Taiwan (China); Wen-Tan Hong [Gengood Engineering Corporation, No. 36, Lane 362, Ming-Sheng W. Road, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Wang, Lance L.C. [Taiwan Power Company, 62, Yeh-Hai St, Kung-Liao, Taipei County, 238, Taiwan (China)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

CONTROL SYSTEM FOR SOLAR HEATING and COOLING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

l U CONTROL SYSTEM FOR SOLAR HEATING AND COOLING* M.Wahlig,be capable of operating solar heating and cooling systemsand now transferred to ERDA, on solar heating and cooling of

Dols, C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes cooling capacity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Evaluation of the cooling fan efficiency index.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

between the cooling effect (measured with a thermal manikin)output is the body cooling effect [5]. Thermal manikins withThermal manikins can be used to measure the fan cooling

Schiavon, Stefano; Melikov, Arsen

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Introduction of a Cooling Fan Efficiency Index  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the cooling effect measured with the thermal manikin andThe mea- sured cooling effect with the thermal manikin isby a thermal manikin to quantify the cooling effects of air

Schiavon, Stefano; Melikov, Arsen

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

MUCOOL: Ionization Cooling R&D  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laboratory MUCOOL Muon Ionization Cooling R&D Welcome to the muon ionization cooling experimental R&D page. The MuCool collaboration has been formed to pursue the development of a...

424

Development of a Very Dense Liquid Cooled Compute Platform  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project was to design and develop a prototype very energy efficient high density compute platform with 100% pumped refrigerant liquid cooling using commodity components and high volume manufacturing techniques. Testing at SLAC has indicated that we achieved a DCIE of 0.93 against our original goal of 0.85. This number includes both cooling and power supply and was achieved employing some of the highest wattage processors available.

Hughes, Phillip N.; Lipp, Robert J.

2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

425

Interaction of lighting, heating, and cooling systems in buildings  

SciTech Connect

The interaction of building lighting and HVAC systems, and the effects on cooling load and lighting system performance, are being evaluated using a full-scale test facility at the National Institute of Standards and Technology. The results from a number of test configurations are described, including lighting system efficiency and cooling load due to lighting. The effect of lighting and HVAC system design and operation on performance is evaluated. Design considerations are discussed.

Treado, S.J.; Bean, J.W.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Vortex-augmented cooling tower-windmill combination  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cooling tower for cooling large quantities of effluent water from a production facility by utilizing natural wind forces includes the use of a series of helically directed air inlet passages extending outwardly from the base of the tower to introduce air from any direction in a swirling vortical pattern while the force of the draft created in the tower makes it possible to place conventional power generating windmills in the air passages to provide power as a by-product.

McAllister, Jr., John E. (Aiken, SC)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Thermal and flow design of helium-cooled reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This book continues the American Nuclear Society's series of monographs on nuclear science and technology. Chapters of the book include information on the first-generation gas-cooled reactors; HTGR reactor developments; reactor core heat transfer; mechanical problems related to the primary coolant circuit; HTGR design bases; core thermal design; gas turbines; process heat HTGR reactors; GCFR reactor thermal hydraulics; and gas cooling of fusion reactors.

Melese, G.; Katz, R.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Combined cooling and purification system for nuclear reactor spent fuel pit, refueling cavity, and refueling water storage tank  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The spent fuel pit of a pressured water reactor (PWR) nuclear power plant has sufficient coolant capacity that a safety rated cooling system is not required. A non-safety rated combined cooling and purification system with redundant branches selectively provides simultaneously cooling and purification for the spent fuel pit, the refueling cavity, and the refueling water storage tank, and transfers coolant from the refueling water storage tank to the refueling cavity without it passing through the reactor core. Skimmers on the suction piping of the combined cooling and purification system eliminate the need for separate skimmer circuits with dedicated pumps.

Corletti, Michael M. (New Kensington, PA); Lau, Louis K. (Monroeville, PA); Schulz, Terry L. (Murrysville Boro, PA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Combined cooling and purification system for nuclear reactor spent fuel pit, refueling cavity, and refueling water storage tank  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The spent fuel pit of a pressured water reactor (PWR) nuclear power plant has sufficient coolant capacity that a safety rated cooling system is not required. A non-safety rated combined cooling and purification system with redundant branches selectively provides simultaneously cooling and purification for the spent fuel pit, the refueling cavity, and the refueling water storage tank, and transfers coolant from the refueling water storage tank to the refueling cavity without it passing through the reactor core. Skimmers on the suction piping of the combined cooling and purification system eliminate the need for separate skimmer circuits with dedicated pumps. 1 figures.

Corletti, M.M.; Lau, L.K.; Schulz, T.L.

1993-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

430

IEP - Water-Energy Interface: Cooling Water Intake Structures  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The types of cooling water systems to be evaluated are: Wet Cooling Tower - The condenser is cooled with water recirculated to a mechanical draft cooling tower. Because there...

431

Thermally Activated Cooling: A Regional Approach for Estimating Building Adoption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Distributed Generation, Absorption Cooling, Space Cooling,use heat to drive an absorption cooling cycle, and the heatlargest drivers for absorption cooling technology adoption

Edwards, Jennifer L.; Marnay, Chris

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Cool roofs could save money, save planet  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cool roofs could save money, save planet Title Cool roofs could save money, save planet Publication Type Broadcast Year of Publication 2009 Authors Akbari, Hashem, and Arthur H....

433

Temperature and cooling management in computing systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

78 5.2 Combined Energy, Thermal and CoolingOne reason for thermal and energy variations betweenWe propose a combined energy, thermal and cooling management

Ayoub, Raid

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Entangling and disentangling capacities of nonlocal maps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Entangling and disentangling capacities are the key manifestation of the nonlocal content of a quantum operation. A lot of effort has been put recently into investigating (dis)entangling capacities of unitary operations, but very little is known about capacities of non-unitary operations. Here we investigate (dis)entangling capacities of unital CPTP maps acting on two qubits.

Berry Groisman

2007-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

435

Louisiana Refinery Catalytic Reforming Downstream Charge Capacity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Louisiana Refinery Catalytic Reforming Downstream Charge Capacity as of January 1 (Barrels per Stream Day)

436

Oklahoma Refinery Vacuum Distillation Downstream Charge Capacity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Oklahoma Refinery Vacuum Distillation Downstream Charge Capacity as of January 1 (Barrels per Stream Day)

437

Georgia Refinery Marketable Petroleum Coke Production Capacity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Georgia Refinery Marketable Petroleum Coke Production Capacity as of January 1 (Barrels per Stream Day)

438

Cooling Technologies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technologies Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Power Plant Cooling Technologies Cooling Technologies Cooling tower at Steamboat Springs geothermal power plant in Steamboat Springs, NV. Power generation facilities that rely on thermal sources as their energy inputs such as Coal, Natural Gas, Geothermal, Concentrates Solar Power, and Nuclear require cooling technologies to reject the heat that is created. The second law of thermodynamics states: "No process can convert heat absorbed from a reservoir at one temperature directly into work without also rejecting heat to a cooler reservoir. That is, no heat engine is 100% efficient"[1] In the context of power generation from thermal energy, this means that any heat that is created must be rejected. Heat is most commonly rejected in

439

Multi-Photon Laser Cooling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... used traditional cooling beams at 852 nm in the x-y plane, but replaced the usual two beams along z with lasers at 795 nm. This laser only couples ...

2011-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

440

Success Stories: Cool Color Roofs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

instead of absorbing, solar heat. So the question for scientists interested in increasing energy efficiency is, can one make a roof that is both cool and dark? Hashem Akbari, Paul...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes cooling capacity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Convective Cooling of Lightning Channels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report experimental data which trace the time development of electric discharge channels in air and which demonstrate the turbulent cooling of such channels. These data provide qualitative confirmation of the model proposed and used by Hill, ...

J. M. Picone; J. P. Boris; J. R. Greig; M. Raleigh; R. F. Fernsler

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Energy Savers: Cool Summer Tips  

SciTech Connect

A tri-fold brochure addressing energy-saving tips for homeowners ranging from low- or no-cost suggestions to higher cost suggestions for longer-term savings. Cooling, windows, weatherizing, and landscaping are addressed.

Miller, M.

2001-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

443

Cooling Systems | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

heat is drawn out of the air and the cooled air is blown into the space by the cooler's fan. Air Conditioning Air conditioners, which employ the same operating principles and...

444

Advance in MEIC cooling studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cooling of ion beams is essential for achieving a high luminosity for MEIC at Jefferson Lab. In this paper, we present the design concept of the electron cooling system for MEIC. In the design, two facilities are required for supporting a multi-staged cooling scheme; one is a 2 MeV DC cooler in the ion pre-booster; the other is a high electron energy (up to 55 MeV) ERL-circulator cooler in the collider ring. The simulation studies of beam dynamics in an ERL-circulator cooler are summarized and followed by a report on technology development for this cooler. We also discuss two proposed experiments for demonstrating high energy cooling with a bunched electron beam and the ERL-circulator cooler.

Zhang, Yuhong [JLAB, Newport News, VA (United States); Derbenev, Ya. [JLAB, Newport News, VA (United States); Douglas, D. [JLAB, Newport News, VA (United States); Hutton, A. [JLAB, Newport News, VA (United States); Kimber, A. [JLAB, Newport News, VA (United States); Li, R. [JLAB, Newport News, VA (United States); Nissen, E. [JLAB, Newport News, VA (United States); Tennant, [JLAB, Newport News, VA (United States); Zhang, H. [JLAB, Newport News, VA (United States)

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Improving efficiency of high-concentrator photovoltaics by cooling with  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improving efficiency of high-concentrator photovoltaics by cooling with Improving efficiency of high-concentrator photovoltaics by cooling with two-phase forced convection Title Improving efficiency of high-concentrator photovoltaics by cooling with two-phase forced convection Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2010 Authors Ho, Tony, Samuel S. Mao, and Ralph Greif Journal International Journal of Energy Research Volume 34 Start Page 1257 Issue 14 Pagination 1257-1271 Date Published 11/2010 Keywords high-concentrator photovoltaic efficiency, two-phase flow cooling applications Abstract The potential of increasing high-concentrator photovoltaic cell efficiency by cooling with two-phase flow is analyzed. The governing energy equations were used to predict cell temperature distributions and cell efficiencies for a photovoltaic cell under 100 suns' concentration. Several design conditions were taken into consideration in the analysis, including cooling channel height, working fluid type (between water and R134a), working fluid inlet temperature, pressure, and mass flow rate. It was observed that the dominant parameter for increasing cell efficiency was the working fluid saturation temperature, which itself is affected by a number of the aforementioned design parameters. The results show R134a at low inlet pressures to be highly effective in this two-phase cooling design.

446

Cooling Towers, Energy Conservation Machines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cooling towers, in all too many industrial plants, are often the neglected units of the process chain which are hidden bonanzas for energy conservation and dollar savings. By lowering the entire systems temperature by the use of colder water returning from the cooling tower, greater chemical product volume can be condensed and less energy is required to run compressors. This paper will discuss two case histories and the rapid cost-effective savings thereby accruing through retrofit.

Burger, R.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Quantum limit of photothermal cooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the problem of cooling a mechanical oscillator using the photothermal (bolometric) force. Contrary to previous attempts to model this system, we take into account the noise effects due to the granular nature of photon absorption. This allows us to tackle the cooling problem down to the noise dominated regime and to find reasonable estimates for the lowest achievable phonon occupation in the cantilever.

De Liberato, Simone; Nori, Franco

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Oil cooled, hermetic refrigerant compressor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hermetic refrigerant compressor having an electric motor and compressor assembly in a hermetic shell is cooled by oil which is first cooled in an external cooler and is then delivered through the shell to the top of the motor rotor where most of it is flung radially outwardly within the confined space provided by the cap which channels the flow of most of the oil around the top of the stator and then out to a multiplicity of holes to flow down to the sump and provide further cooling of the motor and compressor. Part of the oil descends internally of the motor to the annular chamber to provide oil cooling of the lower part of the motor, with this oil exiting through vent hole also to the sump. Suction gas with entrained oil and liquid refrigerant therein is delivered to an oil separator from which the suction gas passes by a confined path in pipe to the suction plenum and the separated oil drops from the separator to the sump. By providing the oil cooling of the parts, the suction gas is not used for cooling purposes and accordingly increase in superheat is substantially avoided in the passage of the suction gas through the shell to the suction plenum. 3 figs.

English, W.A.; Young, R.R.

1985-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

449

Oil cooled, hermetic refrigerant compressor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hermetic refrigerant compressor having an electric motor and compressor assembly in a hermetic shell is cooled by oil which is first cooled in an external cooler 18 and is then delivered through the shell to the top of the motor rotor 24 where most of it is flung radially outwardly within the confined space provided by the cap 50 which channels the flow of most of the oil around the top of the stator 26 and then out to a multiplicity of holes 52 to flow down to the sump and provide further cooling of the motor and compressor. Part of the oil descends internally of the motor to the annular chamber 58 to provide oil cooling of the lower part of the motor, with this oil exiting through vent hole 62 also to the sump. Suction gas with entrained oil and liquid refrigerant therein is delivered to an oil separator 68 from which the suction gas passes by a confined path in pipe 66 to the suction plenum 64 and the separated oil drops from the separator to the sump. By providing the oil cooling of the parts, the suction gas is not used for cooling purposes and accordingly increase in superheat is substantially avoided in the passage of the suction gas through the shell to the suction plenum 64.

English, William A. (Murrysville, PA); Young, Robert R. (Murrysville, PA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

High capacity immobilized amine sorbents  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is provided for making low-cost CO.sub.2 sorbents that can be used in large-scale gas-solid processes. The improved method entails treating an amine to increase the number of secondary amine groups and impregnating the amine in a porous solid support. The method increases the CO.sub.2 capture capacity and decreases the cost of utilizing an amine-enriched solid sorbent in CO.sub.2 capture systems.

Gray, McMahan L. (Pittsburgh, PA); Champagne, Kenneth J. (Fredericktown, PA); Soong, Yee (Monroeville, PA); Filburn, Thomas (Granby, CT)

2007-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

451

Building Energy Software Tools Directory : CHP Capacity Optimizer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CHP Capacity Optimizer Back to Tool CHP Capacity Optimizer data entry screen CHP Capacity Optimizer results screen CHP Capacity Optimizer restult map...

452

Cooling the dark energy camera instrument  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

DECam, camera for the Dark Energy Survey (DES), is undergoing general design and component testing. For an overview see DePoy, et al in these proceedings. For a description of the imager, see Cease, et al in these proceedings. The CCD instrument will be mounted at the prime focus of the CTIO Blanco 4m telescope. The instrument temperature will be 173K with a heat load of 113W. In similar applications, cooling CCD instruments at the prime focus has been accomplished by three general methods. Liquid nitrogen reservoirs have been constructed to operate in any orientation, pulse tube cryocoolers have been used when tilt angles are limited and Joule-Thompson or Stirling cryocoolers have been used with smaller heat loads. Gifford-MacMahon cooling has been used at the Cassegrain but not at the prime focus. For DES, the combined requirements of high heat load, temperature stability, low vibration, operation in any orientation, liquid nitrogen cost and limited space available led to the design of a pumped, closed loop, circulating nitrogen system. At zenith the instrument will be twelve meters above the pump/cryocooler station. This cooling system expected to have a 10,000 hour maintenance interval. This paper will describe the engineering basis including the thermal model, unbalanced forces, cooldown time, the single and two-phase flow model.

Schmitt, R.L.; Cease, H.; /Fermilab; DePoy, D.; /Ohio State U.; Diehl, H.T.; Estrada, J.; Flaugher, B.; /Fermilab; Kuhlmann, S.; /Ohio State U.; Onal, Birce; Stefanik, A.; /Fermilab

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Cedarville School District Retrofit of Heating and Cooling Systems with  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

School District Retrofit of Heating and Cooling Systems with School District Retrofit of Heating and Cooling Systems with Geothermal Heat Pumps and Ground Source Water Loops Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Cedarville School District Retrofit of Heating and Cooling Systems with Geothermal Heat Pumps and Ground Source Water Loops Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act - Geothermal Technologies Program: Ground Source Heat Pumps Project Type / Topic 2 Topic Area 1: Technology Demonstration Projects Project Description - Improve the indoor air quality and lower the cost of cooling and heating the buildings that make up the campus of Cedarville High School, Middle School and Elementary School. - Provide jobs, and reduce requirements of funds for the capital budget of the School District, and thus give relief to taxpayers in this rural region during a period of economic recession. - The new Heat Pumps will be targeted to perform at very high efficiency with EER (energy efficiency ratios) of 22+/-. System capacity is planned at 610 tons. - Remove unusable antiquated existing equipment and systems from the campus heating and cooling system, but utilize ductwork, piping, etc. where feasible. The campus is served by antiquated air conditioning units combined with natural gas, and with very poor EER estimated at 6+/-. - Monitor for 3 years the performance of the new systems compared to benchmarks from the existing system, and provide data to the public to promote adoption of Geothermal technology. - The Geothermal installation contractor is able to provide financing for a significant portion of project funding with payments that fall within the energy savings resulting from the new high efficiency heating and cooling systems.

454

Microfluidically Cryo-Cooled Planar Coils for Magnetic Resonance Imaging  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is typically required for higher resolution and faster speed in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Planar microcoils as receiver probes in MRI systems offer the potential to be configured into array elements for fast imaging as well as to enable the imaging of extremely small objects. Microcoils, however, are thermal noise dominant and suffer limited SNR. Cryo-cooling for the microcoils can reduce the thermal noise, however conventional cryostats are not optimum for the microcoils because they typically use a thick vacuum gap to keep samples to be imaged to near room temperature during cryo-cooling. This vacuum gap is typically larger than the most sensitive region of the microcoils that defines the imaging depth, which is approximately the same as the diameters of the microcoils. Here microfluidic technology is utilized to locally cryo-cool the microcoils and minimize the thermal isolation gap so that the imaging surface is within the imaging depth of the microcoils. The first system consists of a planar microcoil with microfluidically cryo-cooling channels, a thin N2 gap and an imaging. The microcoil was locally cryo-cooled while maintaining the sample above 8°C. MR images using a 4.7 Tesla MRI system shows an average SNR enhancement of 1.47 fold. Second, the system has been further developed into a cryo-cooled microcoil system with inductive coupling to cryo-cool both the microcoil and the on-chip microfabricated resonating capacitor to further improve the Q improvement. Here inductive coupling was used to eliminate the physical connection between the microcoil and the tuning network so that a single cryocooling microfluidic channel could enclose both the microcoil and the capacitor with minimum loss in cooling capacity. Q improvement was 2.6 fold compared to a conventional microcoil with high-Q varactors and transmission line connection. Microfluidically tunable capacitors with the 653% tunability and Q of 1.3 fold higher compared to a conventional varactor have been developed and demonstrated as matching/tuning networks as a proof of concept. These developed microfluidically cryo-cooling system and tunable capacitors for improving SNR will potentially allow MR microcoils to have high-resolution images over small samples.

Koo, Chiwan

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

MANX, a 6-D Muon Beam Cooling Experiment for RAL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

MANX is a six-dimensional muon ionization cooling demonstration experiment based on the concept of a helical cooling channel in which a beam of muons loses energy in a continuous helium or hydrogen absorber while passing through a special superconducting magnet called a helical solenoid. The goals of the experiment include tests of the theory of the helical cooling channel and the helical solenoid implementation of it, verification of the simulation programs, and a demonstration of effective six-dimensional cooling of a muon beam. We report the status of the experiment and in particular, the proposal to have MANX follow MICE at the Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory (RAL) as an extension of the MICE experimental program. We describe the economies of such an approach which allow the MICE beam line and much of the MICE apparatus and expertise to be reused.

Yonehara, K.; Kashikhin, V.; Lamm, M.; Zlobin, A.; /Fermilab; Abrams, R.; Ankenbrandt, C.; Cummings, M.A.C.; Johnson, R.P.; Kahn, S.; /Muons Inc., Batavia; Maloney, J.; /Northern Illinois U.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Ballast users plug life span, cooling savings into paybacks  

SciTech Connect

Energy-efficient ballasts are saving fluorescent lamp users energy expenses by reducing cooling as well as lighting costs and by extending bulb life. Retrofit calculations should include the cost of installing new ballasts with union labor. Three users describe their installations and their use of either simple payback or simple payback including replacement savings. (DCK)

Duffy, J.

1983-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

457

Evaluating the role of uncertainty in electric utility capacity planning  

SciTech Connect

This final report on Evaluating the Role of Uncertainty in Electric Utility Capacity Planning is divided into separate sections addressing demand, supply and the simultaneous consideration of both and describes several mathematical characterizations of the effects of uncertainty on the capacity expansion decision. The basic objective is to develop more robust models which can appropriately include the fundamental uncertainties associated with capacity expansion planning in the electric utility industry. Much of what has been developed in this project has been incorporated into a long-term, computer model for capacity expansion planning. A review is provided of certain deterministic capacity expansion methodologies. The effect of load curve uncertainty on capacity planning is considered and the use of a certain expected load curve to account for uncertainty in demand is proposed. How uncertainty influences the allocation of capital costs among the various load curve realizations is also discussed. The supply side uncertainties of fuel prices and random availability of generating units are considered. In certain cases it is shown that the use of the expected fuel costs will furnish a solution which minimizes the total expected costs. The effect of derating units to account for their random availability is also characterized. A stochastic linear program formulated to examine the simultaneous consideration of fuel cost and demand uncertainties is analyzed. This volume includes the report text one appendix with information on linear programming-based analysis of marginal cost pricing in the electric utility industry.

Soyster, A.L.

1981-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

458

A Heat Capacity Estimator for Fourier Path Integral Simulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Previous heat capacity estimators useful in path integral simulations have variances that grow with the number of path variables included. In the present work a new specific heat estimator for Fourier path integral Monte Carlo simulations is derived using methods similar to those used in developing virial energy estimators. The resulting heat capacity estimator has a variance that is roughly independent of the number of Fourier coe#cients (k max ) included, and the asymptotic convergence rate is shown to be proportional to 1/k 2 max when partial averaging is included. Quantum Monte Carlo simulations are presented to test the estimator using two one-dimensional models and for Lennard-Jones representations of Ne 13 . For finite kmax , using numerical methods, the calculated heat capacity is found to diverge at low temperatures for the potential functions studied in this work. Extrapolation methods enable useful results to be determined over a wide temperature range. Typeset using REVT...

J. P. Neirotti; David L. Freeman; J. D. Doll

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

FILES- COOLING TOWER PLUME MODELING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ladies and Gentlemen:? In the referenced letter, Progress Energy Carolinas, Inc. (PEC) noted that the input and output' files for the modeling analysis for cooling tower plumes would be provided under a separate cover. due to the requirements for native file submittal (see NRC RAI # 5.3.3.1-1 and PGN RAI # H-295). The purpose of this letter is to submit these calculation native files. The supplemental information contained in the files on the attached CD is provided to support the NRC's review of the Shearon Harris Nuclear Power Plant Units 2 and 3 (HAR) Environmental Report (ER), but does not comply with the requirements for electronic submission in the NRC Guidance Document. The NRC staff requested the files be submitted in their native formats, required for utilization in the software employed to support the ER development. As discussed with the NRC's environmental project manager responsible for review of the HAR ER, the data provided on the attached CD are of a nature that is not easily convertible to PDF output files. Furthermore, PEC understands that converting the information to PDF output files; would not serve the underlying purpose of the submittal; i.e., to provide the raw, unprocessed data to enable reviewers to evaluate software used in the HAR application. Enclosure 1 provides a list of folders with the requested data files that are included on the attached CD (Attachment 5.3.3.1-1 SACTI Native Files). If you have any further questions, or need additional information, please contact Bob Kitchen at

Garry D. Mi Er

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Stochastic Optimization Approach to Water Management in Cooling-Constrained Power Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

constraints and weather conditions on generation capacity. In a pulverized coal power plant study we have source of freshwater withdrawals in the United States [10]. In base-load power plants (i.e., coal of evaporation. A 500 MW coal-fired power plant that employs once-through cooling can use more than 10 million

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes cooling capacity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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461

SOLERAS program. Engineering field test of a solar cooling system. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A solar-powered air conditioning system was designed, constructed, and installed at a Phoenix, Arizona site whose climatic conditions approximate those of Saudi Arabia. The nominal 18 ton capacity Rankine cycle chiller system with hot and cold storage and conventional fan/coil delivery units was operated for two cooling seasons and met its design objectives.

Not Available

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Dry Cooling: Perspectives on Future Needs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The total number of dry-cooled power plants in the United States has increased significantly in recent years. This is because nonutility generators are using dry-cooling systems to meet environmental protection and water conservation requirements. A survey shows that utility planners expect that dry cooling could become an important cooling-system option for new utility plants.

1991-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

463

Simulations of sizing and comfort improvements for residential forced-air heating and cooling systems  

SciTech Connect

In many parts of North America residential HVAC systems are installed outside conditioned space. This leads to significant energy losses and poor occupant comfort due to conduction and air leakage losses from the air distribution ducts. In addition, cooling equipment performance is sensitive to air flow and refrigerant charge that have been found to be far from manufacturers specifications in most systems. The simulation techniques discussed in this report were developed in an effort to provide guidance on the savings potentials and comfort gains that can be achieved by improving ducts (sealing air leaks) and equipment (correct air-flow and refrigerant charge). The simulations include the complex air flow and thermal interactions between duct systems, their surroundings and the conditioned space. They also include cooling equipment response to air flow and refrigerant charge effects. Another key aspect of the simulations is that they are dynamic to account for cyclic losses from the HVAC system and the effect of cycle length on energy and comfort performance. To field test the effect of changes to residential HVAC systems requires extensive measurements to be made for several months for each condition tested. This level of testing is often impractical due to cost and time limitations. Therefore the Energy Performance of Buildings Group at LBNL developed a computer simulation tool that models residential HVAC system performance. This simulation tool has been used to answer questions about equipment downsizing, duct improvements, control strategies and climate variation so that recommendations can be made for changes in residential construction and HVAC installation techniques that would save energy, reduce peak demand and result in more comfortable homes. Although this study focuses on California climates, the simulation tool could easily be applied to other climates. This report summarizes the simulation tool and discusses the significant developments that allow the use of this tool to perform detailed residential HVAC system simulations. The simulations have been verified by comparison to measured results in several houses over a wide range of weather conditions and HVAC system performance. After the verification was completed, more than 350 cooling and 450 heating simulations were performed. These simulations covered a range of HVAC system performance parameters and California climate conditions (that range from hot dry deserts to cold mountain regions). The results of the simulations were used to show the large increases in HVAC system performance that can be attained by improving the HVAC duct distribution systems and by better sizing of residential HVAC equipment. The simulations demonstrated that improved systems can deliver improved heating or cooling to the conditioned space, maintain equal or better comfort while reducing peak demand and the installed equipment capacity (and therefore capital costs).

Walker, I.S.; Degenetais, G.; Siegel, J.A.

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Surface and bulk modified high capacity layered oxide cathodes with low irreversible capacity loss  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention includes compositions, surface and bulk modifications, and methods of making of (1-x)Li[Li.sub.1/3Mn.sub.2/3]O.sub.2.xLi[Mn.sub.0.5-yNi.sub.0.5-yCo.sub.2- y]O.sub.2 cathode materials having an O3 crystal structure with a x value between 0 and 1 and y value between 0 and 0.5, reducing the irreversible capacity loss in the first cycle by surface modification with oxides and bulk modification with cationic and anionic substitutions, and increasing the reversible capacity to close to the theoretical value of insertion/extraction of one lithium per transition metal ion (250-300 mAh/g).

Manthiram, Arumugam (Austin, TX); Wu, Yan (Austin, TX)

2010-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

465

Desiccant degradation in desiccant cooling systems: A system study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors predict the impact of desiccant degradation on the performance of an open-cycle desiccant cooling system in ventilation mode using the degradation data on silica gel obtained from a previous study. The degradation data were based on thermal cycling desiccant samples and exposing them to ambient or contaminated air. Depending on the degree of desiccant degradation, the decrease in the thermal coefficient of performance (COP) and the cooling capacity of the system for low-temperature regeneration was 10 percent to 35 percent. The 35 percent loss occurred based on the worst-case desiccant degradation scenario. Under more realistic conditions the loss in system performance is expected to be lower.

Pesaran, A.A. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

X-ray Absorption Due to Cold Gas in Cluster Cooling Cores  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have calculated the emergent X-ray properties for models of cluster cooling flows including the effects of accumulated cooled material. The opacity of this cooled gas can reduce the overall X-ray luminosity of the cooling flow, and values of Mdot based on these luminosities can underestimate the true value by factors of ~2. We find that accumulated cooled material can produce emergent surface brightness profiles much like those observed even for nearly homogeneous gas distributions. Consequently, much more of the gas may be cooling below X-ray emitting temperatures in the central regions of cooling flows (r cooling flows may have been underestimated. We show that distributed absorption in cooling flows produces a number of observable effects in the spectrum which may allow it to be differentiated from absorption due to gas in our Galaxy. These include a characteristic suppression of the continuum below ~2 keV, absorption features such as a redshifted O K-edge, and diminished intensity of resonance emission lines. Spectra including the effects of intrinsic absorption are not well fit by foreground absorbing models. Attempting to fit such models to the spatially resolved spectra can lead to underestimates of the true absorbing column by factors of 3-20. Fits to integrated spectra of the entire cooling flow region can either underestimate or overestimate the mass of the absorbing gas depending on the specifics of the model. We discuss the potential detection of these effects with AXAF, XMM, and Astro-E.

Michael W. Wise; Craig L. Sarazin

1999-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

467

Bartholomew Heating and Cooling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Heating and Cooling Heating and Cooling Jump to: navigation, search Name Bartholomew Heating and Cooling Place Linwood, NJ Website http://bartholomewheatingandco References Bartholomew Heating and Cooling[1] Information About Partnership with NREL Partnership with NREL Yes Partnership Type Test & Evaluation Partner Partnering Center within NREL Electricity Resources & Building Systems Integration LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! Bartholomew Heating and Cooling is a company located in Linwood, NJ. References ↑ "Bartholomew Heating and Cooling" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Bartholomew_Heating_and_Cooling&oldid=381585" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations

468

Working and Net Available Shell Storage Capacity as of March 31, 2011  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Working and Net Available Shell Storage Capacity Working and Net Available Shell Storage Capacity Working and Net Available Shell Storage Capacity Archives With Data for March 2011 | Release Date: May 31, 2011 Working and Net Available Shell Storage Capacity is the U.S. Energy Information Administration's (EIA) report containing storage capacity data for crude oil, petroleum products, and selected biofuels. The report includes tables detailing working and net available shell storage capacity by type of facility, product, and Petroleum Administration for Defense District (PAD District). Net available shell storage capacity is broken down further to show the percent for exclusive use by facility operators and the percent leased to others. Crude oil storage capacity data are also provided for Cushing, Oklahoma, an important crude oil market center. Data

469

Personal cooling apparatus and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A portable lightweight cooling apparatus for cooling a human body is disclosed, having a channeled sheet which absorbs sweat and/or evaporative liquid, a layer of highly conductive fibers adjacent the channeled sheet; and, an air-moving device for moving air through the channeled sheet, wherein the layer of fibers redistributes heat uniformly across the object being cooled, while the air moving within the channeled sheet evaporates sweat and/or other evaporative liquid, absorbs evaporated moisture and the uniformly distributed heat generated by the human body, and discharges them into the environment. Also disclosed is a method for removing heat generated by the human body, comprising the steps of providing a garment to be placed in thermal communication with the body; placing a layer of highly conductive fibers within the garment adjacent the body for uniformly distributing the heat generated by the body; attaching an air-moving device in communication with the garment for forcing air into the garment; removably positioning an exchangeable heat sink in communication with the air-moving device for cooling the air prior to the air entering the garment; and, equipping the garment with a channeled sheet in communication with the air-moving device so that air can be directed into the channeled sheet and adjacent the layer of fibers to expell heat and moisture from the body by the air being directed out of the channeled sheet and into the environment. The cooling system may be configured to operate in both sealed and unsealed garments.

Siman-Tov, Moshe (Knoxville, TN); Crabtree, Jerry Allen (Knoxville, TN)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Cooling Towers, Energy Conservation Strategies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cooling towers, because of their seeming simplicity, are usually orphans of the facilities operation. We are all aware that cooling towers are the step-children of the chemical process plant, electric power generating station, and refrigeration system. While our engineers are pretty well convinced of the importance of their sophisticated equipment, and rightly so, they take the cooling towers and the cold water returning from them for granted. Design Conditions are specified for the particular requirements before a cooling tower is purchased. After it is put on the line and the cold water temperature or volume becomes inadequate, they look to solutions other than the obvious. While all cooling towers are purchased to function at 100% of capability in accordance with the required Design Conditions, in actual on stream employment, the level of operation many times is lower, downwards to as much as 50% due to a variety of reasons: (1) The present service needed is now greater than the original requirements which the tower was purchased for; (2) 'Slippage' due to usage and perhaps deficient maintenance has reduced the performance of the tower over years of operation; (3) The installation could have been originally undersized due to the low bidder syndrome; and (4) New plant expansion needs colder temperatures off the tower.

Burger, R.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Oxygen Absorption in Cooling Flows  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The inhomogeneous cooling flow scenario predicts the existence of large quantities of gas in massive elliptical galaxies, groups, and clusters that have cooled and dropped out of the flow. Using spatially resolved, deprojected X-ray spectra from the ROSAT PSPC we have detected strong absorption over energies ~0.4-0.8 keV intrinsic to the central ~1 arcmin of the galaxy, NGC 1399, the group, NGC 5044, and the cluster, A1795. These systems have amongst the largest nearby cooling flows in their respective classes and low Galactic columns. Since no excess absorption is indicated for energies below ~0.4 keV the most reasonable model for the absorber is warm, collisionally ionized gas with T=10^{5-6} K where ionized states of oxygen provide most of the absorption. Attributing the absorption only to ionized gas reconciles the large columns of cold H and He inferred from Einstein and ASCA with the lack of such columns inferred from ROSAT, and also is consistent with the negligible atomic and molecular H inferred from HI, and CO observations of cooling flows. The prediction of warm ionized gas as the product of mass drop-out in these and other cooling flows can be verified by Chandra, XMM, and ASTRO-E.

David A. Buote

2000-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

472

The Effect of Technological Improvement on Capacity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We formulate a model of capacity expansion that is relevant to a service provider for whom the cost of capacity shortages would be considerable but difficult to quantify exactly. Due to demand uncertainty and a lead time for adding capacity, not all shortages are avoidable. In addition, technological innovations will reduce the cost of adding capacity but may not be completely predictable. Analytical expressions for the infinite horizon expansion cost and shortages are optimized numerically. Sensitivity analyses allow us to determine the impact of technological change on the optimal timing and sizes of capacity expansions to account for economies of scale, the time value of money and penalties for insufficient capacity.

Expansion For Uncertain; Dohyun Pak; Nattapol Pornsalnuwat; Sarah M. Ryan

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Performance Assessment of a Desiccant Cooling System in a CHP Application with an IC Engine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Performance of a desiccant cooling system was evaluated in the context of combined heat and power (CHP). The baseline system incorporated a desiccant dehumidifier, a heat exchanger, an indirect evaporative cooler, and a direct evaporative cooler. The desiccant unit was regenerated through heat recovery from a gas-fired reciprocating internal combustion engine. The system offered sufficient sensible and latent cooling capacities for a wide range of climatic conditions, while allowing influx of outside air in excess of what is typically required for commercial buildings. Energy and water efficiencies of the desiccant cooling system were also evaluated and compared with those of a conventional system. The results of parametric assessments revealed the importance of using a heat exchanger for concurrent desiccant post cooling and regeneration air preheating. These functions resulted in enhancement of both the cooling performance and the thermal efficiency, which are essential for fuel utilization improvement. Two approaches for mixing of the return air and outside air were examined, and their impact on the system cooling performance and thermal efficiency was demonstrated. The scope of the parametric analyses also encompassed the impact of improving the indirect evaporative cooling effectiveness on the overall cooling system performance.

Jalalzadeh-Azar, A. A.; Slayzak, S.; Judkoff, R.; Schaffhauser, T.; DeBlasio, R.

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Integrated Modeling of Building Energy Requirements Incorporating Solar Assisted Cooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

heat recovery and absorption cooling are selected in allself- generated and absorption cooling displaces a further

Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris; Wang, Juan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Impact of Solar Control PVB Glass on Vehicle Interior Temperatures, Air-Conditioning Capacity, Fuel Consumption, and Vehicle Range  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the study was to assess the impact of Saflex1 S-series Solar Control PVB (polyvinyl butyral) configurations on conventional vehicle fuel economy and electric vehicle (EV) range. The approach included outdoor vehicle thermal soak testing, RadTherm cool-down analysis, and vehicle simulations. Thermal soak tests were conducted at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Vehicle Testing and Integration Facility in Golden, Colorado. The test results quantified interior temperature reductions and were used to generate initial conditions for the RadTherm cool-down analysis. The RadTherm model determined the potential reduction in air-conditioning (A/C) capacity, which was used to calculate the A/C load for the vehicle simulations. The vehicle simulation tool identified the potential reduction in fuel consumption or improvement in EV range between a baseline and modified configurations for the city and highway drive cycles. The thermal analysis determined a potential 4.0% reduction in A/C power for the Saflex Solar PVB solar control configuration. The reduction in A/C power improved the vehicle range of EVs and fuel economy of conventional vehicles and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles.

Rugh, J.; Chaney, L.; Venson, T.; Ramroth, L.; Rose, M.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Proprties of the Carrol system and a machine design for solar-powered, air-cooled, absorption space cooling. Phase I and Phase II. Final report, September 1977-March 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The name Carrol has been selected as a convenient short-hand designation for a prime candidate chemical system comprising ethylene glycol-lithium bromide as an absorbent mixture with water as a refrigerant. The instrumentation, methods of handling data and numerical results from a systematic determination of Carrol property data required to design an air cooled absorption machine based on this chemical system are described. These data include saturation temperature, relative enthalpy, density, specific heat capacity, thermal conductivity, viscosity and absorber film heat transfer coefficient as functions of solution temperature and Carrol concentration over applicable ranges. For each of the major components of the absorption chiller, i.e., generator, chiller, absorber, condenser, heat exchanger, purge and controls, the report contains an assembly drawing and the principal operating characteristics of that component.

Biermann, W.J.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Comparative Study Between Air-Cooled and Water-Cooled Condensers of the Air-Conditioning Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The weather in Kuwait is very dry where the dry-bulb temperature exceeds the wet-bulb temperature more than 20oC in most of the summer months. Thus, the air-conditioning (A/C) system with the water-cooled (WC) condensers is expected to perform more efficiently than with the air-cooled (AC) condensers. This fact was behind the idea of a field study conducted in one of the major hospital in Kuwait during a summer season to investigate the performance of WC and AC systems in terms of peak power and energy consumptions. The cooling capacities for WC and AC systems were 373 and 278 tons-of- refrigeration, respectively. It was found that for the same cooling production, the peak power demand and the daily energy consumption of the WC system were 45 and 32% less than that of the AC system, respectively. The maximum reduction in the power demand coincided with the peak power demand period of the utilities i.e. between 14:00 and 17:00 hr, thereby offering a maximum advantage of peak power saving.

Maheshwari, G. P.; Mulla Ali, A. A.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z